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Sample records for activities section iii

  1. 7. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDING NO. 10, PRODUCER GAS & EXHAUSTER BLDG., PLANT A.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant A, Parts I, II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Producer Gas Plant, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  2. 36. Photocopied August 1978. SECTION III, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM SPRUCE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Photocopied August 1978. SECTION III, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM SPRUCE STREET, JUNE 13, 1902, WITH TIMBER LINING ALMOST COMPLETED. (245) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  3. SARA title III, section 313 - looking ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, P.W.; Currie, R.M.; Churchill, R.J.

    1988-11-01

    On July 1, 1988, thousands of plants throughout the United States were required to submit R Forms presenting estimates of releases to the atmosphere, waste-water, and solid waste during 1987 of toxic chemicals listed under Section 313 of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. Because this is an annual reporting requirement, the paper will present recommendations, based upon Dames and Moore's experience in developing toxic chemical releases for a wide variety of facilities, to improve the accuracy of these release estimates for future submissions. These recommendations will be centered on ways in which each plant can assure, organize, and collect appropriate data with which to make the toxic chemical release estimates. In addition, the paper will recommend and provide supporting rationale for each plant's assessing the impact on air quality of the atmospheric releases reported on the R Forms. While this is not required, it is information which is invaluable in communicating to the public the impact of these releases and in responding to inquiries from the press and environmental groups. In undertaking this assessment, a step-by-step procedure beginning with low coast screening dispersion modeling analyses will be presented.

  4. 20. Photocopied August 1978. CANAL SECTION III, LOOKING SOUTH, AUGUST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopied August 1978. CANAL SECTION III, LOOKING SOUTH, AUGUST OR SEPTEMBER 1900, FOLLOWING A MAJOR BANK SLIDE. SLIDES LIKE THIS ONE WERE FAIRLY FREQUENT FOLLOWING RAIN STORMS BEFORE THE CANAL WALLS WERE TIMBER LINED IN THE EARTH SECTIONS. (64) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  5. DSM-5 section III personality traits and section II personality disorders in a Flemish community sample.

    PubMed

    Bastiaens, Tim; Smits, Dirk; De Hert, Marc; Vanwalleghem, Dominique; Claes, Laurence

    2016-04-30

    The Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5; Krueger et al., 2012) is a dimensional self-report questionnaire designed to measure personality pathology according to the criterion B of the DSM-5 Section III personality model. In the current issue of DSM, this dimensional Section III personality model co-exists with the Section II categorical personality model derived from DSM-IV-TR. Therefore, investigation of the inter-relatedness of both models across populations and languages is warranted. In this study, we first examined the factor structure and reliability of the PID-5 in a Flemish community sample (N=509) by means of exploratory structural equation modeling and alpha coefficients. Next, we investigated the predictive ability of section III personality traits in relation to section II personality disorders through correlations and stepwise regression analyses. Results revealed a five factor solution for the PID-5, with adequate reliability of the facet scales. The variance in Section II personality disorders could be predicted by their theoretically comprising Section III personality traits, but additional Section III personality traits augmented this prediction. Based on current results, we discuss the Section II personality disorder conceptualization and the Section III personality disorder operationalization.

  6. 43. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDINGS H-1 TO H-10 INCL., GRINDING, MANUFACTURING AREA, PLANT 'B'.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant B, Parts II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of the District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  7. 38. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDINGS G-1 TO G-10 INCL., PURIFICATION, MANUFACTURING AREA, PLAN 'B'.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant B, Parts II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  8. 16. Dry Dock No. 4. Longitudinal Section. Subdivision Nos. III ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Dry Dock No. 4. Longitudinal Section. Subdivision Nos. III and IV (Frederic R. Harris, Inc., January 10, 1941). In Files of Cushman & Wakefield, Building no. 501, Philadelphia Naval Business Center. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Dry Dock No. 4, Broad Street south of Government Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. Section III, Division 5 - Development And Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Dana K.; Jetter, Robert I; Nestell, James E.; Burchell, Timothy D; Sham, Sam

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development.

  10. Assessing Inter-Model Continuity Between the Section II and Section III Conceptualizations of Borderline Personality Disorder in DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Evans, Chloe M; Simms, Leonard J

    2017-03-02

    DSM-5 includes 2 competing models of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in Sections II and III. Empirical comparisons between these models are required to understand and improve intermodel continuity. We compared Section III BPD traits to Section II BPD criteria assessed via semistructured interviews in 455 current/recent psychiatric patients using correlation and regression analyses, and also evaluated the incremental predictive power of other Section III traits. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that self-harm would incrementally predict BPD Criterion 5 over the Section III traits. Results supported Section III BPD traits as an adequate representation of traditional BPD symptomatology, although modifications that would increase intermodel continuity were identified. Finally, we found support for the incremental validity of suspiciousness, anhedonia, perceptual dysregulation, and self-harm, suggesting possible gaps in the Section III PD trait definitions. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Section III, Division 5 - Development and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. Morton; R I Jetter; James E Nestell; T. D. Burchell; T L Sham

    2012-07-01

    This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development. Portions of this paper were based on Chapter 17 of the Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Fourth Edition, © ASME, 2012, Reference.

  12. Literature of War and Peace. Section III: Why War?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bettendorf, Joline; And Others

    This 13-day curriculum unit is designed for use in English and language arts classrooms, grades 7-12 and junior college. While it is the third section in a series of five on the literature of war and peace, it can be used with or without the other four sections. Each section of the series focuses on a different genre of the literature of war and…

  13. Activities: Sectioning a Regular Tetrahedron.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maletsky, Evan M., Ed.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Worksheets are provided for use by students in grades 8 and above when sectioning a tetrahedron. Lesson objectives include the discovery of generalizations regarding the cross-sections of a tetrahedron. (MK)

  14. Accurate universal parameterization of absorption cross sections III - light systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1999-09-01

    Our prior nuclear absorption cross sections model [R.K. Tripathi, F.A. Cucinotta, J.W. Wilson, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 117 (1996) 347; R.K. Tripathi, J.W. Wilson, F.A. Cucinotta, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 129 (1997) 11] is extended for light systems ( A ⩽ 4) where either both projectile and target are light particles or one is light particle and the other is medium or heavy nucleus. The agreement with experiment is excellent for these cases as well. Present work in combination with our original model provides a comprehensive picture of absorption cross sections for light, medium and heavy systems. As a result the extended model can reliably be used in all studies where there is a need for absorption cross sections.

  15. Incremental Validity of the DSM-5 Section III Personality Disorder Traits With Respect to Psychosocial Impairment.

    PubMed

    Simms, Leonard J; Calabrese, William R

    2016-02-01

    Traditional personality disorders (PDs) are associated with significant psychosocial impairment. DSM-5 Section III includes an alternative hybrid personality disorder (PD) classification approach, with both type and trait elements, but relatively little is known about the impairments associated with Section III traits. Our objective was to study the incremental validity of Section III traits--compared to normal-range traits, traditional PD criterion counts, and common psychiatric symptomatology--in predicting psychosocial impairment. To that end, 628 current/recent psychiatric patients completed measures of PD traits, normal-range traits, traditional PD criteria, psychiatric symptomatology, and psychosocial impairments. Hierarchical regressions revealed that Section III PD traits incrementally predicted psychosocial impairment over normal-range personality traits, PD criterion counts, and common psychiatric symptomatology. In contrast, the incremental effects for normal-range traits, PD symptom counts, and common psychiatric symptomatology were substantially smaller than for PD traits. These findings have implications for PD classification and the impairment literature more generally.

  16. Section III: Examining American Values: Value Choices Since Revolutionary Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The statements of Erik Erikson and Urie Bronfenbrenner on American values are followed by a values clarification exercise and an activity based on biographical sketches of five Americans who lived before and after the American Revolution. (KM)

  17. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  18. Status of ASME Section III Task Group on Graphite Support Core Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Robert L. Bratton; Tim D. Burchell

    2005-08-01

    This report outlines the roadmap that the ASME Project Team on Graphite Core Supports is pursuing to establish design codes for unirradiated and irradiated graphite core components during its first year of operation. It discusses the deficiencies in the proposed Section III, Division 2, Subsection CE graphite design code and the different approaches the Project Team has taken to address those deficiencies.

  19. Modulation of active Cr(III) complexes by bath preparation to adjust Cr(III) electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Ming-yong; Zhang, Yi

    2013-09-01

    The preparation process of the Cr(III) bath was studied based on a perspective of accelerating the formation of active Cr(III) complexes. The results of ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and electrodeposition showed that active Cr(III) complexes in the bath prepared at room temperature in several days were rare for depositing chromium. The increase of heating temperature, time, and pH value during the bath preparation promoted the formation of active Cr(III) complexes. The chromium deposition rate increased with the concentration of active Cr(III) complexes increasing. Increasing the heating temperature from 60 to 96°C, the chromium deposition rate increased from 0.40 to 0.71 μm/min. When the concentration of active Cr(III) complexes increased, the grain size of Cr coatings increased, and the carbon content of the coating decreased. It is deduced that Cr(H2O)4(OH)L2+ (L is an organic ligand, and its valence is omitted) is a primary active Cr(III) complex.

  20. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Biologically Active Lanthanide (III) Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostova, I.; Trendafilova, N.; Georgieva, I.; Rastogi, V. K.; Kiefer, W.

    2008-11-01

    The complexation ability and the binding mode of the ligand coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (HCCA) to La(III), Ce(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III) and Dy(III) lanthanide ions (Ln(III)) are elucidated at experimental and theoretical level. The complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, DTA and TGA data as well as 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques as well as DFT quantum chemical calculations were used for characterization of the binding mode and the structures of lanthanide(III) complexes of HCCA. The metal—ligand binding mode is predicted through molecular modeling and energy estimation of different Ln—CCA structures using B3LYP/6-31G(d) method combined with a large quasi-relativistic effective core potential for lanthanide ion. The energies obtained predict bidentate coordination of CCA- to Ln(III) ions through the carbonylic oxygen and the carboxylic oxygen. Detailed vibrational analysis of HCCA, CCA- and Ln(III) complexes based on both calculated and experimental frequencies confirms the suggested metal—ligand binding mode. The natural bonding analysis predicts strongly ionic character of the Ln(III)-CCA bonding in the- complexes studied. With the relatively resistant tumor cell line K-562 we obtained very interesting in-vitro results which are in accordance with our previously published data concerning the activity of lanthanide(III) complexes with other coumarin derivatives.

  1. Examining the DSM-5 Section III Criteria for Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder in a Community Sample.

    PubMed

    Liggett, Jacqueline; Sellbom, Martin; Carmichael, Kieran L C

    2017-03-06

    The current study examined the extent to which the trait-based operationalization of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) in Section III of the DSM-5 describes the same construct as the one described in Section II. A community sample of 313 adults completed a series of personality inventories indexing the DSM-5 Sections II and III diagnostic criteria for OCPD, in addition to a measure of functional impairment modelled after the criteria in Section III. Results indicated that latent constructs representing Section II and Section III OCPD overlapped substantially (r = .75, p < .001). Hierarchical latent regression models revealed that at least three of the four DSM-5 Section III facets (Rigid Perfectionism, Perseveration, and Intimacy Avoidance) uniquely accounted for a large proportion of variance (53%) in a latent Section II OCPD variable. Further, Anxiousness and (low) Impulsivity, as well as self and interpersonal impairment, augmented the prediction of latent OCPD scores.

  2. [Plasma antithrombin III activity in patients with pulmonary thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Vertun, B; Filipecki, S; Szczepański, M; Wawrzyńska, L; Rózycka, J

    A decreased plasma antithrombin III activity has been noted in 12 out of 20 patients. In 2 patients it was most probably congenital defect, whereas in the remaining 10 patients--acquired. The observed disorders in the activity of antithrombin III with particular reference to anticoagulant therapy have been discussed.

  3. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from electrodeposition of organic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Appliers of organic coatings via electrodeposition (EDP) may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist appliers of organic coatings in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  4. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from electroplating operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Facilities engaged in electroplating operations may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those who perform electroplating operations in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  5. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from formulation of aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    Formulators of aqueous solutions may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist formulators of aqueous solutions, emulsions, and slurries in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  6. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from textile dyeing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    Facilities engaged in textile dyeing may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist textile dyers in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  7. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from semiconductor manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Manufacturers of semiconductors may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist semiconductor manufacturers in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  8. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from paper and paperboard production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    Facilities engaged in paper and paperboard production may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those engaged in paper and paperboard production in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  9. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from spray application of organic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Spray applicators of organic coatings may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist appliers of organic coatings in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  10. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from monofilament fiber manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Manufacturers of monofilament fibers may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist monofilament fiber manufacturers in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  11. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from printing operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Printers may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist printers in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  12. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from wood preserving operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    Facilities engaged in wood preserving operations may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist facilities engaged in wood preserving operations in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  13. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from leather tanning and finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    Facilities engaged in leather tanning and finishing may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those in the leather tanning and finishing industry in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  14. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from rubber production and compounding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    Facilities engaged in rubber production and compounding may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those who produce rubber in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  15. [Quantitative polarization microscopy demonstration of collagen type I and type III in histologic paraffin sections].

    PubMed

    Ogbuihi, S; Müller, Z; Zink, P

    1988-01-01

    The industrial dye Solophenyl Red 3 BL (Ciba-Geigy) dissolved in a saturated aquaeous solution of picric acid has proved suitable for differentiating between collagen types I and III in histological sections. When examined under polarization microscopy, type I fibers are radiant orange while type III fibers are green. Using 5 micron paraffin sections, an optimal staining procedure was determined: sections were first stained with Resorcin Fuchsin for elastic fibers and with Celestin Blue/Mayer's Hematoxylin for nuclear structures. The staining was then completed with 0.1 g Solophenyl Red/100 ml saturated aqueous solution of picric acid for 60 min at a pH value of 1.25. It was shown that the dye stained collagen selectively. With the aid of a photomultiplier, the spectral distribution of a series of lung sections adequately stained according to the optimized procedure was carried out using a monochromator and an interference filter, respectively. Both methods yielded identical peaks at 590 nm for the orange colored light of collagen type I and 490 nm for the green light of collagen type III. Application of appropriate filters permitted the intensity of the orange and green light at 590 nm and 490 nm to be measured. Long postmortem intervals did not affect the measured values. Quantitative inferences on the ratio of collagen I to collagen III could then be deduced from the ratio of the intensity of orange to green light. This index I/III is often applied in the diagnosis of discrete fibrotic changes in various organs.

  16. Protein-water dynamics in antifreeze protein III activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao; Bäumer, Alexander; Meister, Konrad; Bischak, Connor G.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-03-01

    We combine Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism for the antifreeze activity of one class of antifreeze protein, antifreeze protein type III (AFP-III) with a focus on the collective water hydrogen bond dynamics near the protein. After summarizing our previous work on AFPs, we present a new investigation of the effects of cosolutes on protein antifreeze activity by adding sodium citrate to the protein solution of AFP-III. Our results reveal that for AFP-III, unlike some other AFPs, the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate does not affect the hydrogen bond dynamics at the protein surface significantly, as indicated by concentration dependent THz measurements. The present data, in combination with our previous THz measurements and molecular simulations, confirm that while long-range solvent perturbation is a necessary condition for the antifreeze activity of AFP-III, the local binding affinity determines the size of the hysteresis.

  17. Impulsivity-related traits and their relation to DSM-5 section II and III personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Few, Lauren R; Lynam, Donald R; Miller, Joshua D

    2015-07-01

    Difficulties with impulse control are considered a core feature of personality disorders (PDs) as assessed by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th edition [DSM-5]; American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Despite this, there has been relatively little examination of the manner in which DSM-5 PDs are characterized by multidimensional models of impulsivity that parse this broad umbrella construct into smaller, more unidimensional constructs. Using the UPPS model and measure of impulsivity (Whiteside & Lynam, 2001), the relations between 4 impulsivity-related traits and interview-rated scores on both DSM-5 Section II and III PDs and PD traits were examined in a community sample of individuals currently receiving psychological or psychiatric care (N = 106). As expected, the UPPS traits manifested correlations with the new Section III trait model that were generally consistent with the assertion that this new DSM-5 trait model reflects a pathological variant of the Five-Factor Model (FFM; e.g., UPPS traits associated with FFM conscientiousness were most strongly related to DSM-5 disinhibition traits). Overall, the UPPS traits accounted best for variance in DSM-5 Section II and III Cluster B PDs, consistent with these PDs being characterized, in part, by emotionally and cognitively based forms of impulsivity.

  18. 24 CFR 8.29 - Homeownership programs (sections 235(i) and 235(j), Turnkey III and Indian housing mutual self...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Homeownership programs (sections 235(i) and 235(j), Turnkey III and Indian housing mutual self-help programs). 8.29 Section 8.29...), Turnkey III and Indian housing mutual self-help programs). Any housing units newly constructed...

  19. 24 CFR 8.29 - Homeownership programs (sections 235(i) and 235(j), Turnkey III and Indian housing mutual self...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Homeownership programs (sections 235(i) and 235(j), Turnkey III and Indian housing mutual self-help programs). 8.29 Section 8.29...), Turnkey III and Indian housing mutual self-help programs). Any housing units newly constructed...

  20. 24 CFR 8.29 - Homeownership programs (sections 235(i) and 235(j), Turnkey III and Indian housing mutual self...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Homeownership programs (sections 235(i) and 235(j), Turnkey III and Indian housing mutual self-help programs). 8.29 Section 8.29...), Turnkey III and Indian housing mutual self-help programs). Any housing units newly constructed...

  1. 24 CFR 8.29 - Homeownership programs (sections 235(i) and 235(j), Turnkey III and Indian housing mutual self...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Homeownership programs (sections 235(i) and 235(j), Turnkey III and Indian housing mutual self-help programs). 8.29 Section 8.29...), Turnkey III and Indian housing mutual self-help programs). Any housing units newly constructed...

  2. 77 FR 72430 - Salem Investment Partners III, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Salem Investment Partners III, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Salem Investment Partners III,...

  3. 24 CFR 8.29 - Homeownership programs (sections 235(i) and 235(j), Turnkey III and Indian housing mutual self...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Homeownership programs (sections 235(i) and 235(j), Turnkey III and Indian housing mutual self-help programs). 8.29 Section 8.29... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Program Accessibility § 8.29 Homeownership programs (sections 235(i) and...

  4. Diverse intracellular pathogens activate type III interferon expression from peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Odendall, Charlotte; Dixit, Evelyn; Stavru, Fabrizia; Bierne, Helene; Franz, Kate M; Durbin, Ann Fiegen; Boulant, Steeve; Gehrke, Lee; Cossart, Pascale; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    Type I interferon responses are considered the primary means by which viral infections are controlled in mammals. Despite this view, several pathogens activate antiviral responses in the absence of type I interferons. The mechanisms controlling type I interferon-independent responses are undefined. We found that RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) induce type III interferon expression in a variety of human cell types, and identified factors that differentially regulate expression of type I and type III interferons. We identified peroxisomes as a primary site of initiation of type III interferon expression, and revealed that the process of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation upregulates peroxisome biogenesis and promotes robust type III interferon responses in human cells. These findings highlight the importance of different intracellular organelles in specific innate immune responses.

  5. ESCRT-III on endosomes: new functions, new activation pathway.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Philip

    2016-01-15

    The multivesicular body (MVB) pathway sorts ubiquitinated membrane cargo to intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) within the endosome, en route to the lysosomal lumen. The pathway involves the sequential action of conserved protein complexes [endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs)], culminating in the activation by ESCRT-II of ESCRT-III, a membrane-sculpting complex. Although this linear pathway of ESCRT activation is widely accepted, a study by Luzio and colleagues in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal suggests that there is greater complexity in ESCRT-III activation, at least for some MVB cargoes. They show that ubiquitin-dependent sorting of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I to the MVB requires the central ESCRT-III complex but does not involve either ESCRT-II or functional links between ESCRT-II and ESCRT-III. Instead, they propose that MHC class I utilizes histidine-domain protein tyrosine phosphatase (HD-PTP), a non-canonical ESCRT interactor, to promote ESCRT-III activation.

  6. Comparing the utility of DSM-5 Section II and III antisocial personality disorder diagnostic approaches for capturing psychopathic traits.

    PubMed

    Few, Lauren R; Lynam, Donald R; Maples, Jessica L; MacKillop, James; Miller, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    The current study compares the 2 diagnostic approaches (Section II vs. Section III) included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-5 (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) for diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) in terms of their relations with psychopathic traits and externalizing behaviors (EBs). The Section III approach to ASPD, which is more explicitly trait-based than the Section II approach, also includes a psychopathy specifier (PS) that was created with the goal of making the diagnosis of ASPD more congruent with psychopathy. In a community sample of individuals currently receiving mental health treatment (N = 106), ratings of the 2 DSM-5 diagnostic approaches were compared in relation to measures of psychopathy, as well as indices of EBs. Both DSM-5 ASPD approaches were significantly related to the psychopathy scores, although the Section III approach accounted for almost twice the amount of variance when compared with the Section II approach. Relatively little of this predictive advantage, however, was due to the PS, as these traits manifested little evidence of incremental validity in relation to existing psychopathy measures and EBs, with the exception of a measure of fearless dominance. Overall, the DSM-5 Section III diagnostic approach for ASPD is more convergent with the construct of psychopathy, from which ASPD was originally derived. These improvements, however, are due primarily to the new trait-based focus in the Section III ASPD diagnosis rather than the assessment of personality dysfunction or the inclusion of additional "psychopathy-specific" traits.

  7. Construct Validity of the DSM-5 Section III Maladaptive Trait Domains in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Debast, Inge; Rossi, Gina; van Alphen, S P J

    2017-01-10

    The DSM-5 Section III model of personality disorders remains largely unexplored in older adults. More specifically, there is a need for further research on the generalizability of the five trait domains in old age. The development of a short operationalization to screen for maladaptive trait domains, the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 Brief Form (PID-5-BF), can stimulate the use of the alternative DSM-5 model in older adults by addressing the need for short instruments. The primary goal of this study was to examine the construct validity of the PID-5-BF by comparing its structural model and nomological network with the original PID-5 in terms of relations with domains of personality functioning and a gero-specific personality disorder indicator. A five-factor model was supported, but the domain Disinhibition was not replicated in the original PID-5, and some PID-5-BF items showed weak loadings. Nevertheless, the nomological network was similar and showed meaningful relations, supporting the use of the Brief PID-5 in older clinical samples.

  8. 14 CFR Section 11 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating... ACCOUNTS AND REPORTS FOR LARGE CERTIFICATED AIR CARRIERS Profit and Loss Classification Section 11 Functional Classification—Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers 5100Flying Operations....

  9. Examining the associations between DSM-5 section III antisocial personality disorder traits and psychopathy in community and university samples.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jaime L; Sellbom, Martin; Wygant, Dustin B; Salekin, Randall T; Krueger, Robert F

    2014-10-01

    The current investigation examined the associations between personality traits representing DSM-5 Section III Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD), its psychopathy specifier, and contemporary models of psychopathic personality disorder. We used two samples consisting of university students (n = 463) and community-dwelling participants (n = 148) recruited for subclinical psychopathic proclivities. Both samples were administered the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (Krueger et al., 2012), Triarchic Psychopathy Measure (Patrick, 2010), and versions of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; Lilienfeld & Widows, 2005). University students also completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Disorders-Personality Questionnaire (First, Gibbon, Spitzer, Williams, & Benjamin, 1997). Across both samples, the Section III ASPD traits were moderately strongly correlated with psychopathy measures, except the fearless-dominance/boldness domain. However, as would be expected, traits representing the Section III psychopathy specifier accounted for a substantial amount of variance within this domain. Furthermore, additional DSM-5 Section III personality traits augmented the characterization of psychopathy from the PPI and Triarchic perspectives.

  10. Monolithic active pixel matrix with binary counters (MAMBO III) ASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, Farah; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Shenai, Alpana; Yarema, Raymond; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Monolithic Active Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) is a counting ASIC designed for detecting and measuring low energy X-rays from 6-12keV. Each pixel contains analogue functionality implemented with a charge preamplifier, CR-RC{sup 2} shaper and a baseline restorer. It also contains a window comparator which can be trimmed by 4 bit DACs to remove systematic offsets. The hits are registered by a 12 bit ripple counter which is reconfigured as a shift register to serially output the data from the entire ASIC. Each pixel can be tested individually. Two diverse approaches have been used to prevent coupling between the detector and electronics in MAMBO III and MAMBO IV. MAMBO III is a 3D ASIC, the bottom ASIC consists of diodes which are connected to the top ASIC using {mu}-bump bonds. The detector is decoupled from the electronics by physically separating them on two tiers and using several metal layers as a shield. MAMBO IV is a monolithic structure which uses a nested well approach to isolate the detector from the electronics. The ASICs are being fabricated using the SOI 0.2 {micro}m OKI process, MAMBO III is 3D bonded at T-Micro and MAMBO IV nested well structure was developed in collaboration between OKI and Fermilab.

  11. Instructional Activities Series. Elementary and Secondary Sections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council for Geographic Education.

    Twenty teacher-developed elementary and secondary instructional activities on geography-related topics are available in a single activity, loose-leaf format as an on-going series. Simulations, role playing, mapping, group discussion, experiential learning, and field excursions are some of the instructional approaches. Materials include case…

  12. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from roller, knife, and gravure coating operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    Facilities performing coating operations may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those using roller, knife, and gravure coating equipment in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  13. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from presswood and laminated wood products manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    Facilities engaged in the manufacture of presswood and laminated wood products may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those who manufacture presswood and laminated wood products in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  14. Where are the Sunday babies? III. Caesarean sections, decreased weekend births, and midwife involvement in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerchl, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    A previous study has shown a marked and continuing decline in weekend births in Germany between 1988 and 2003 (Lerchl, Naturwissenschaften 92:592-594, 2005). The present study was performed to investigate the possible influence of caesarean sections (CS) on weekend birth number and on the involvement of midwives in births for all 16 German states for the year 2003. In total, data from 706,721 births were sorted according to weekday of births and state, respectively, and the weekend births avoidance rates were calculated. Weekend births were consistently less frequent than births during the week, with an average of -15.3% for all states and due to fewer births on Saturdays (-13.6%) and Sundays (-16.7%). Between the states, weekend births avoidance rates ranged from -11.6% (Bremen) to -24.2% (Saarland). The proportion of CS was 25.5% for all states, ranging from 19.2% (Sachsen and Sachsen-Anhalt) to 30.5% (Saarland). CS and weekend births avoidance rates were significantly correlated, consistent with the hypothesis that primary (planned) CS are regularly scheduled on weekdays. The number of births per midwife (BPM) was calculated according to the number of active members in the states’ professional midwives’ organizations. The mean number of BPM was 59.5, ranging from 45.2 (Bremen) to 82.4 (Sachsen-Anhalt). CS and BPM were significantly correlated, consistent with the hypothesis that higher CS ratios are associated with lower midwife involvement in births. It is concluded that the decline in weekend births and lower involvement of midwives are caused, at least in part, by an increased number of caesarean sections.

  15. 78 FR 41785 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Implementation of Title I/II Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Implementation of Title I/II Program... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Implementation of Title I/II Program... Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 6,573. Abstract: The Implementation of Title I/II...

  16. A Conceptual Exploration of Participation. Section III: Utilitarian Perspectives and Conclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Ruth; Whybrow, Katherine; Scharber, Cassandra

    2012-01-01

    This is the third section of an article (each published in subsequent regular issues of EPAT) that explores the concept of participation. Section I: Introduction and Early Perspectives grounds our exploration of participation and explores definitions and early perspectives of participation we have identified as "historically original" and…

  17. Synthesis and spectroscopic studies of biologically active compounds derived from oxalyldihydrazide and benzil, and their Cr(III), Fe(III) and Mn(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Singh, D P; Kumar, Ramesh; Singh, Jitender

    2009-04-01

    A new series of complexes have been synthesized by template condensation of oxalyldihydrazide and benzil in methanolic medium in the presence of trivalent chromium, manganese and iron salts forming complexes of the type [M(C(32)H(24)N(8)O(4))X]X(2) where M = Cr(III), Mn(III), Fe(III) and X = Cl(-1), NO(3)(-1), CH(3)COO(-1). The complexes have been characterized with the help of elemental analyses, conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, electronic, NMR, infrared and far infrared spectral studies. On the basis of these studies, a five coordinate square pyramidal geometry has been proposed for all these complexes. The biological activities of the metal complexes have been tested in vitro against a number of pathogenic bacteria to assess their inhibiting potential. Some of these complexes have been found to exhibit remarkable antibacterial activities.

  18. Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

    2007-11-30

    The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

  19. Section on Cataloguing: Report of the Activities, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Maria

    This paper reports on the activities of the IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions) Section on Cataloging for 2000-2001. The first part discusses the interest in cataloging and its harmonization at the international level that is shared by libraries throughout the world, including the section's work on development…

  20. Section on Cataloguing: Report of the Activities, 1998/1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Maria

    This paper reports on the activities of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) Section on Cataloguing for 1998-99. The first part of the report introduces the aims of the Section. Membership, the standing committee, and officers are detailed in the second part. The third part provides information on the…

  1. Comments on the somatic effects section of the BEIR III report

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, H.H.

    1980-12-01

    The recent report of the BEIR Committee of the National Academy of Sciences presents a wide range of risk estimates for radiogenic cancer. The values that can be considered to be most plausible on the basis of radiobiological and epidemiological evidence are given little emphasis and they are presented as lower bounds of the probable risk. The upper bound is said to be provided by estimates based on the so-called linear hypothesis. The preferred analysis in BEIR III requires an arbitrary choice of a critical parameter. This results in estimates that differ little from those given in BEIR I and that may be too high by an order of magnitude. It also refuses to speculate on any health effects of background radiation. It thus does not support the validity of those concepts of radiation protection that are based on linearity.

  2. Accurate universal parameterization of absorption cross sections III--light systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    Our prior nuclear absorption cross sections model [R.K. Tripathi, F.A. Cucinotta, J.W. Wilson, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 117 (1996) 347; R.K. Tripathi, J.W. Wilson, F.A. Cucinotta, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 129 (1997) 11] is extended for light systems (A < or = 4) where either both projectile and target are light particles or one is light particle and the other is medium or heavy nucleus. The agreement with experiment is excellent for these cases as well. Present work in combination with our original model provides a comprehensive picture of absorption cross sections for light, medium and heavy systems. As a result the extended model can reliably be used in all studies where there is a need for absorption cross sections.

  3. Functional Activation of the Flagellar Type III Secretion Export Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Andrew M.; Calvo, Rebecca A.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Flagella are assembled sequentially from the inside-out with morphogenetic checkpoints that enforce the temporal order of subunit addition. Here we show that flagellar basal bodies fail to proceed to hook assembly at high frequency in the absence of the monotopic protein SwrB of Bacillus subtilis. Genetic suppressor analysis indicates that SwrB activates the flagellar type III secretion export apparatus by the membrane protein FliP. Furthermore, mutants defective in the flagellar C-ring phenocopy the absence of SwrB for reduced hook frequency and C-ring defects may be bypassed either by SwrB overexpression or by a gain-of-function allele in the polymerization domain of FliG. We conclude that SwrB enhances the probability that the flagellar basal body adopts a conformation proficient for secretion to ensure that rod and hook subunits are not secreted in the absence of a suitable platform on which to polymerize. PMID:26244495

  4. A Guide for Planning Drafting and Design Technology Programs. Section III, Data Collection and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1971

    This document, the second of three related reports, constitutes the data collection and analysis section of the study designed to provide information for preparing a planning guide for drafting and design technology programs. The curriculum survey instrument mailed to 26 schools, contained questions regarding: (1) length of semesters, (2)…

  5. Tunable luminescence and enhanced photocatalytic activity for Eu(III) doped Bi2WO6 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gu, Haidong; Yu, Lei; Wang, Juan; Ni, Min; Liu, Tingting; Chen, Feng

    2017-04-15

    A series of Eu(III) doped Bi2WO6 nanoparticles were synthesized by a hydrothermal process. The obtained Bi2WO6:Eu(III) nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, SEM, luminescence spectrophotometer and DRS. The XRD and TEM results indicate that the Eu(III) doping concentration has no influence on the phase and morphology. However, the Eu(III) doping can tune the luminescence and enhance the photocatalytic activity of Bi2WO6. With the increases of Eu(3+) doping concentrations, the emission intensity of WO6(6-) group decreases nut the photocatalytic activity increases. The tunable luminescence of Bi2WO6:Eu(III) nanoparticles results from the energy transfer from WO6(6-) group to Eu(III) ion. The enhanced performance can be ascribed to efficient separation of electron and hole pairs after doping Eu(III) into the Bi2WO6 lattice.

  6. Tunable luminescence and enhanced photocatalytic activity for Eu(III) doped Bi2WO6 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Haidong; Yu, Lei; Wang, Juan; Ni, Min; Liu, Tingting; Chen, Feng

    2017-04-01

    A series of Eu(III) doped Bi2WO6 nanoparticles were synthesized by a hydrothermal process. The obtained Bi2WO6:Eu(III) nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, SEM, luminescence spectrophotometer and DRS. The XRD and TEM results indicate that the Eu(III) doping concentration has no influence on the phase and morphology. However, the Eu(III) doping can tune the luminescence and enhance the photocatalytic activity of Bi2WO6. With the increases of Eu3 + doping concentrations, the emission intensity of WO66 - group decreases nut the photocatalytic activity increases. The tunable luminescence of Bi2WO6:Eu(III) nanoparticles results from the energy transfer from WO66 - group to Eu(III) ion. The enhanced performance can be ascribed to efficient separation of electron and hole pairs after doping Eu(III) into the Bi2WO6 lattice.

  7. Stratigraphic sections of the Phosphoria formation in Idaho, 1947-48, Part III

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Malley, F.W.; Davidson, D.F.; Hoppin, R.A.; Sheldon, R.P.

    1951-01-01

    .The U.S. Geological Survey has measured and sampled the Phosphoria formation at many localities in Idaho and other western states. These data will not be fully synthesized and analyzed for several years but segments of the data, accompanied by little or no interpretation, are published as preliminary reports as they are assembled. This report, which contains abstracts of many of the sections in southeastern Idaho (fig. 1), is one of this series and is the third report of data gathered in Idaho during 1947 and 1948. The field and laboratory procedures adopted in these investigations are described rather fully in a companion report (McKelvey and others, 1953). Many people have taken part in this investigation, which was organized and supervised by V. E. McKelvey. D. A. Bostwick, R. M. Campbell, R. A. Gulbrandsen, R. A. Harris, R. L. Parker, R. A. Smart, J. E. Smedley, R. H. Thurston, and R. G. Waring participated in the description of strata and collection of samples referred to in this report. D. B. Dimick, Jack George, W. S. Hunziker, J. E. Jones, H. A. Larsen, and T. K. Rigby assisted in the preparation of trenches and collection, crushing, and splitting of samples in the field. The laboratory preparation of samples for chemical analysis was done in Denver, Colo., under the direction of W. P. Huleatt.

  8. Absolute stereochemistry of fungal beauveriolide III and ACAT inhibitory activity of four stereoisomers.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Taichi; Namatame, Ichiji; Nagai, Kenichiro; Sekiguchi, Takafumi; Doi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Takashi; Akasaka, Kazuaki; Rudel, Lawrence L; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Omura, Satoshi

    2006-09-29

    Fungal beauveriolide III (BeauIII, 1b), a cyclodepsipeptide inhibiting acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) and showing antiatherogenic activity in mouse models, consists of L-Phe, L-Ala, D-allo-Ile, and 3-hydroxy-4-methyloctanoic acid (HMA) moieties, but the stereochemistry of the HMA part has not until now been fully defined. To determine it, four HMA stereoisomers were synthesized and labeled with (S)-(+)-2-(anthracene-2,3-dicarboximido)-1-propyl trifluoromethane sulfonate (AP-OTf), a chiral fluorescent reagent. The derivatives were separated by HPLC and compared with the natural HMA derivative, which was thereby identified as (3S,4S)HMA in BeauIII. Furthermore, the four beauveriolide III isomers ((3S,4S)BeauIII (23a), (3R,4R)BeauIII (23b), (3R,4S)BeauIII (23c), and (3S,4R)BeauIII (23d)) were synthesized, and it was shown that all the spectral data for 23a were identical with those for natural 1b. Isomers 23a and 23d showed potent inhibitory activity of lipid droplet accumulation in macrophages, while the other two isomers caused weak inhibition. Thus, the 3S configuration of BeauIII is important for this activity. Furthermore, 23a and 23d showed rather specific inhibition against the ACAT1 isozyme.

  9. Extracellular assembly and activation principles of oncogenic class III receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Kenneth; Savvides, Savvas N

    2012-11-01

    Intracellular signalling cascades initiated by class III receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK-IIIs) and their cytokine ligands contribute to haematopoiesis and mesenchymal tissue development. They are also implicated in a wide range of inflammatory disorders and cancers. Recent snapshots of RTK-III ectodomains in complex with cognate cytokines have revealed timely insights into the structural determinants of RTK-III activation, evolution and pathology. Importantly, candidate 'driver' and 'passenger' mutations that have been identified in RTK-IIIs can now be collectively mapped for the first time to structural scaffolds of the corresponding RTK-III ectodomains. Such insights will generate a renewed interest in dissecting the mechanistic effects of such mutations and their therapeutic relevance.

  10. Galleria mellonella apolipophorin III - an apolipoprotein with anti-Legionella pneumophila activity.

    PubMed

    Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Palusińska-Szysz, Marta; Gruszecki, Wiesław I; Mak, Paweł; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2014-10-01

    The greater wax moth Galleria mellonella has been exploited worldwide as an alternative model host for studying pathogenicity and virulence factors of different pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, a causative agent of a severe form of pneumonia called Legionnaires' disease. An important role in the insect immune response against invading pathogens is played by apolipophorin III (apoLp-III), a lipid- and pathogen associated molecular pattern-binding protein able to inhibit growth of some Gram-negative bacteria, including Legionella dumoffii. In the present study, anti-L. pneumophila activity of G. mellonella apoLp-III and the effects of the interaction of this protein with L. pneumophila cells are demonstrated. Alterations in the bacteria cell surface occurring upon apoLp-III treatment, revealed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, are also documented. ApoLp-III interactions with purified L. pneumophila LPS, an essential virulence factor of the bacteria, were analysed using electrophoresis and immunoblotting with anti-apoLp-III antibodies. Moreover, FTIR spectroscopy was used to gain detailed information on the type of conformational changes in L. pneumophila LPS and G. mellonella apoLp-III induced by their mutual interactions. The results indicate that apoLp-III binding to components of bacterial cell envelope, including LPS, may be responsible for anti-L. pneumophila activity of G. mellonella apoLp-III.

  11. Activation Cross Sections Improvements needed for IFE Power Reactors Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, A; Cabellos, O; Sanz, J; FalQuina, R; Latkowski, J; Reyes, S

    2003-10-02

    Uncertainties in the prediction of the neutron induced long-lived activity in the natural elements from H to Bi due to activation cross section uncertainties are estimated assuming as neutron environment those of the HYLIFE-II and Sombrero vessel structures. The latest available activation cross section data are employed. The random variables used in the uncertainty analysis have been the concentration limits (CL's) corresponding to hands-on recycling, remote recycling and shallow land burial, quantities typically considered in ranking elements under waste management considerations. The CL standard value (CL{sub nom}), i.e. without uncertainties, is compared with the 95th percentile CL value (CL95). The results of the analysis are very helpful in assessing the quality of the current activation data for IFE applications, providing a rational basis for programmatic priority assignments for new cross sections measurements or evaluations. The HYLIFE-II results shown that a significant error is estimated in predicting the activation of several elements. The estimated errors in the Sombrero case are much less important.

  12. Cr(III), Fe(III) and Co(III) complexes of tetradentate (ONNO) Schiff base ligands: Synthesis, characterization, properties and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskioğlu, Eren; Gündüzalp, Ayla Balaban; Çete, Servet; Hamurcu, Fatma; Erk, Birgül

    2008-08-01

    A series of metal complexes were synthesized from equimolar amounts of Schiff bases: 1,4-bis[3-(2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldimine)propyl]piperazine (bappnaf) and 1,8-bis[3-(2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldimine)- p-menthane (damnaf) with metal chlorides. All of synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, spectral (UV-vis, IR, 1H- 13C NMR, LC-MS) and thermal (TGA-DTA) methods, magnetic and conductance measurements. Schiff base complexes supposed in tetragonal geometry have the general formula [M(bappnaf or damnaf)]Cl· nH 2O, where M = Cr(III), Co(III) and n = 2, 3. But also Fe(III) complexes have octahedral geometry by the coordination of two water molecules and the formula is [Fe(bappnaf or damnaf)(H 2O) 2]Cl. The changes in the selected vibration bands in FT-IR indicate that Schiff bases behave as (ONNO) tetradentate ligands and coordinate to metal ions from two phenolic oxygen atoms and two azomethine nitrogen atoms. Conductance measurements suggest 1:1 electrolytic nature of the metal complexes. The synthesized compounds except bappnaf ligand have the antimicrobial activity against the bacteria: Escherichia coli (ATCC 11230), Yersinia enterocolitica (ATCC 1501), Bacillus magaterium (RSKK 5117), Bacillus subtilis (RSKK 244), Bacillus cereus (RSKK 863) and the fungi: Candida albicans (ATCC 10239). These results have been considerably interest in piperazine derivatives due to their significant applications in antimicrobial studies.

  13. Loneliness Predicts Reduced Physical Activity: Cross-Sectional & Longitudinal Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hawkley, Louise C.; Thisted, Ronald A.; Cacioppo, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine cross-sectional and prospective associations between loneliness and physical activity, and to evaluate the roles of social control and emotion regulation as mediators of these associations. Design A population-based sample of 229 White, Black, and Hispanic men and women, age 50 to 68 years at study onset, were tested annually for each of 3 years. Main Outcome Measures Physical activity probability, and changes in physical activity probability over a 3-year period. Results Replicating and extending prior cross-sectional research, loneliness was associated with a significantly reduced odds of physical activity (OR = 0.65 per SD of loneliness) net of sociodemographic variables (age, gender, ethnicity, education, income), psychosocial variables (depressive symptoms, perceived stress, hostility, social support), and self-rated health. This association was mediated by hedonic emotion regulation, but not by social control as indexed by measures of social network size, marital status, contact with close ties, group membership, or religious group affiliation. Longitudinal analyses revealed that loneliness predicted diminished odds of physical activity in the next two years (OR = 0.61), and greater likelihood of transitioning from physical activity to inactivity (OR = 1.58). Conclusion Loneliness among middle and older age adults is an independent risk factor for physical inactivity and increases the likelihood that physical activity will be discontinued over time. PMID:19450042

  14. SELENIUM TREATMENT/REMOVAL ALTERNATIVES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM ACTIVITY III, PROJECT 20

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the final report for EPA's Mine WAste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 20--Selenium Treatment/Removal Alternatives Demonstration project. Selenium contamination originates from many sources including mining operations, mineral processing, abandoned...

  15. Hunting the human DPP III active conformation: combined thermodynamic and QM/MM calculations.

    PubMed

    Tomić, Antonija; Tomić, Sanja

    2014-11-07

    Multiple choices of the protein active conformations in flexible metalloenzymes complicate study of their catalytic mechanism. We used three different conformations of human dipeptidyl-peptidase III (DPP III) to investigate the influence of the protein environment on ligand binding and the Zn(2+) coordination. MD simulations followed by calculations of binding free energy components accomplished for a series of DPP III substrates, both synthetic and natural, revealed that binding of the β-strand shaped substrate to the five-stranded β-core of the compact DPP III form (in antiparallel fashion) is the preferred binding mode, in agreement with the experimentally determined structure of the DPP III inactive mutant-tynorphin complex (Bezerra et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2012, 109, 6525). Previously it was proposed that the catalytic mechanism of DPP III is similar to that of thermolysin, which assumes exchange of five and four coordinated Zn(2+), and activation of Zn-bound water by a nearby Glu. Our QM/MM calculations, performed for a total of 18 protein structures with different zinc ion environments, revealed that the 5-coordinated metal ion is more favourable than the 6-coordinated one in only the most compact DPP III form. Besides, in this structure E451 is H-bonded to the metal ion coordinating water. Also, our study revealed two constraints for the broad substrate specificity of DPP III. One is the possibility of the substrate adopting the β-strand shape and the other is its charged N-terminus. Altogether, we assume that the human DPP III active conformation would be the most compact form, similar to the "closed X-ray" DPP III structure.

  16. GBM heterogeneity as a function of variable epidermal growth factor receptor variant III activity

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Olle R.; McKinney, Andrew; Engler, Jane R.; Koshkakaryan, Gayane; Gong, Henry; Robinson, Aaron E.; Ewald, Andrew J.; Huillard, Emmanuelle; James, C. David; Molinaro, Annette M.; Shieh, Joseph T.; Phillips, Joanna J.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) due to a deletion of exons 2-7 of EGFR (EGFRvIII) is a common alteration in glioblastoma (GBM). While this alteration can drive gliomagenesis, tumors harboring EGFRvIII are heterogeneous. To investigate the role for EGFRvIII activation in tumor phenotype we used a neural progenitor cell-based murine model of GBM driven by EGFR signaling and generated tumor progenitor cells with high and low EGFRvIII activation, pEGFRHi and pEGFRLo. In vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro studies suggested a direct association between EGFRvIII activity and increased tumor cell proliferation, decreased tumor cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, and altered progenitor cell phenotype. Time-lapse confocal imaging of tumor cells in brain slice cultures demonstrated blood vessel co-option by tumor cells and highlighted differences in invasive pattern. Inhibition of EGFR signaling in pEGFRHi promoted cell differentiation and increased cell-matrix adhesion. Conversely, increased EGFRvIII activation in pEGFRLo reduced cell-matrix adhesion. Our study using a murine model for GBM driven by a single genetic driver, suggests differences in EGFR activation contribute to tumor heterogeneity and aggressiveness. PMID:27738329

  17. Potent anticancer activity of photo-activated oxo-bridged diiron(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Chanu, S Binita; Banerjee, Samya; Roy, Mithun

    2017-01-05

    Cancer-specific anticancer drugs are still an elusive goal. Using light as the temporal control to generate cytotoxic species from photo-activated prodrug in the presence or absence of molecular oxygen has shown potential application targeted chemotherapy as in photodynamic therapy (PDT). In the present work we explored the chemistry of several photo-active (μ-oxo)diiron(III) complexes of the following formulation [{Fe(μ-O) (L-his)(B)}2](ClO4)2 (1a-1c), [Fe2(μ-O)(H2O)2B4](ClO4)4 (2b, 2c) and [Fe2(μ-O)(μ-O2CMe)B4](ClO4)3 (3b, 3c), L-his = l-histidine, B is 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq) complexes for tumor-specific anticancer activity. Facile redox chemistry and photochemical aspects of the complexes prompted us to investigate the cytotoxic as well as the photo-activated cytotoxic properties of the complexes to the cancer cells. In the present investigation we explored the cancer-specific condition of excess concentration of H2O2 for our approach to targeted chemotherapy. Cytotoxic effect of the complexes to the cancer cells was found to be significantly higher than in normal cells indicating tumor-specific anticancer activity of the complexes. Cytotoxic effect was even more pronounced when the cancer cells treated with the complexes were exposed to the visible light (400-700 nm). There was >12 fold increase in cytotoxicity of the photoactivated complexes in cancer cells (MCF-7) in comparison to the normal cells (MCF-10a). We have defined a factor viz. cancer cell specificity factor (f) describing the targeted photochemotherapeutic effect of the complexes at their specific concentration. The factor (f) > 1 indicated the cancer cell specificity of the complexes, while f > 2.5 for the complexes under the visible light exposure suggested photodynamic effect. DCFDA assay indicated the presence of excess of ROS in the treated HeLa cells. ROS concentration was found to increase even more on visible

  18. ZnCl2-activated biochar from biogas residue facilitates aqueous As(III) removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dong; Tan, Fen; Zhang, Chuanpan; Jiang, Xiuli; Chen, Zheng; Li, Heng; Zheng, Yanmei; Li, Qingbiao; Wang, Yuanpeng

    2016-07-01

    Biochars prepared from biogas residue using different chemical activators were investigated for their As(III) adsorption properties. The results indicated that the original biochars did not exhibit significant As(III) adsorption. However, ZnCl2-activated biochar, which possessed the largest specific surface area, 516.67 cm2/g, and exhibited a perfectly porous texture, showed excellent performance in a 500 μgL-1 solution of As(III). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were utilized to identify the mechanism of As(III) adsorption by ZnCl2-activated biochar. Adsorption was found to occur mainly through ligand exchange of the hydroxyl in Zn-OH to form Zn-O-As(III), as well as through porous adsorption. As a low-cost adsorbent, the adsorption process was well fitted using a pseudo-second-order model, with an R2 > 0.993. The adsorption process was fast, requiring nearly 90 min to reach adsorption equilibrium. Batch adsorption experimental results indicated that ZnCl2-activated biochar has a maximum adsorption capacity of 27.67 mg/g at pH 7.0, and the adsorption process followed the Freundlich isotherm model well, with an R2 > 0.994. In addition, the current work demonstrated the efficiency of using ZnCl2-activated biochar adsorbent to treat As(III)-contaminated water.

  19. Antitumoral activity of trisubstituted dihydrobenzo(a)carbazoles. Part III.

    PubMed

    Segall, A; Pizzorno, M T

    2000-10-01

    Two recently synthesized, trisubstituted dihydrobenzo(a)carbazoles were investigated regarding their anti-HIV and antitumoral activity. The compounds showed some activity against melanoma, renal cancer and breast cancer cell lines.

  20. Staining histological lung sections with Sudan Black B or Sudan III for automated identification of alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jan Philipp; Pedersen, Lars; Mühlfeld, Christian; Ochs, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cells produce, store and secrete pulmonary surfactant and serve as progenitor cells for the alveolar epithelium. They are thus an interesting target in wide fields of pulmonary research. Stereological methods allow their quantification based on measurements on histological sections. A proper AE2 cell quantification, however, requires a method of tissue processing that results in little tissue shrinkage during processing. It was recently shown that a primary fixation with a mixture of glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde, postfixation with osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate and embedding in glycol methacrylate fulfills this requirement. However, a proper quantification, furthermore, requires a secure identification of the cells under the microscope. Classical approaches using routine stainings, high magnifications and systematic uniform random sampling can result in a tedious counting procedure. In this article we show that Sudan Black B and Sudan III staining in combination with the previously described "low shrinkage method" of tissue processing result in good staining of lamellar bodies of AE2 cells (their storing organelles of surfactant) and thus provide a good signal of AE2 cells, which allows their easy and secure identification even at rather low magnifications. We further show that this signal enables automated detection of AE2 cells by image analysis, which should make this method a suitable staining method for the recently developed and more efficient proportionator sampling.

  1. An Iridium(III) Complex Inhibits JMJD2 Activities and Acts as a Potential Epigenetic Modulator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Juan; Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; He, Bingyong; Kwong, Daniel W J; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2015-08-27

    A novel iridium(III) complex was synthesized and evaluated for its ability to target JMJD2 enzymatic activity. The iridium(III) complex 1 can inhibit JMJD2 activity and was selective for JMJD2 activity over JARID, JMJD3, and HDAC activities. Moreover, 1 suppressed the trimethylation of the p21 promoter on H3K9me3 and interrupted the JMJD2D-H3K9me3 interactions in human cells, suggesting that it could act as an epigenetic modulator. To our knowledge, 1 represents the first metal-based JMJD2 inhibitor reported in the literature.

  2. Induction of polyclonal B cell activation and differentiation by the AIDS retrovirus (HTLV-III/LAV)

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, S.E.; Schnittman, S.M.; Lane, H.C.; Folks, T.; Koenig, S.; Fauci, A.S.

    1986-03-05

    The immune systems of individuals infected with HTLV-III/LAV are characterized by a profound defect in cellular immunity together with paradoxical polyclonal B cell activation. The present study examined the direct effects of HTLV-III/LAV on B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood B cells from healthy donors were incubated with a variety of HTLV-III/LAV isolates for 1 h and /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation was measured at multiple time points. Responses ranged from 9000-28,000 cpm and peaked on day 4. This B cell activation was not enhanced by the addition of interleukin-2 to culture, was not synergistic with Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I, was not modulated by the addition of T lymphocytes to culture, and was not associated with B cell transformation. Supernatant Ig could first be detected in virus-activated cultures at day 4, plateaued by day 8, and yielded a mean of 12,500 ng IgG+IgM/ml/50,000 B cells. Thus, HTLV-III/LAV is a potent T cell independent B cell mitogen capable of inducing B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation comparable in magnitude to that of the most potent B cell activators. This biological property of HTLV-III/LAV may help explain the profound polyclonal B cell activation observed in patients with AIDS and may provide investigators with another probe for investigating the mechanisms of B cell activation.

  3. Improvement of thermostability and activity of Trichoderma reesei endo-xylanase Xyn III on insoluble substrates.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Kaneko, Satoshi; Yaoi, Katsuro

    2016-09-01

    Trichoderma reesei Xyn III, an endo-β-1,4-xylanase belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 10 (GH10), is vital for the saccharification of xylans in plant biomass. However, its enzymatic thermostability and hydrolytic activity on insoluble substrates are low. To overcome these difficulties, the thermostability of Xyn III was improved using random mutagenesis and directed evolution, and its hydrolytic activity on insoluble substrates was improved by creating a chimeric protein. In the screening of thermostable Xyn III mutants from a random mutagenesis library, we identified two amino acid residues, Gln286 and Asn340, which are important for the thermostability of Xyn III. The Xyn III Gln286Ala/Asn340Tyr mutant showed xylanase activity even after heat treatment at 60 °C for 30 min or 50 °C for 96 h, indicating a dramatic enhancement in thermostability. In addition, we found that the addition of a xylan-binding domain (XBD) to the C-terminal of Xyn III improved its hydrolytic activity on insoluble xylan.

  4. Interaction of antithrombin III with bovine aortic segments. Role of heparin in binding and enhanced anticoagulant activity

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, D.; Nawroth, P.; Marcum, J.; Handley, D.; Kisiel, W.; Rosenberg, R.; Stern, K.

    1985-01-01

    Bovine antithrombin III (AT III) interaction with the luminal surface of bovine aortic segments with a continuous layer of endothelium was examined. Incubation of /sup 125/I-AT III with vessel segments, previously washed free of endogenous AT III, demonstrated specific, time-dependent binding to the protease inhibitor to the endothelium. Half-maximal binding was observed at an added AT III concentration of 14 nM. Binding of /sup 125/I-AT III to the vessel wall was reversible (50% dissociated in 4 min), and addition of either heparin or Factor Xa accelerated displacement of /sup 125/I-AT III from the vessel segment. Dissociation of /sup 125/I-AT III from the vessel segment in the presence of factor Xa coincided with the formation of a Factor Xa-/sup 125/I-AT III complex. Inactivation of Factor IXa and Factor Xa by AT III was facilitated in the presence of vessel segments. Pretreatment of vessel segments with highly purified Flavobacterium heparinase precluded the vessel-dependent augmentation of AT III anticoagulant activity as well as specific binding of /sup 125/I-AT III to the vessel endothelium. In contrast, pretreatment of the vessel segments with chrondroitinases (ABC or AC) had no detectable effect on /sup 125/I-AT III binding or on AT III anticoagulant activity. AT III binding to vessel segments was competitively inhibited by increasing concentration of platelet factor 4. Binding of the protease inhibitor to vessel segments was inhibited by chemical modification of AT III lysyl or tryptophan residues. These AT III derivatives retained progressive inhibitory activity. These data suggest that heparin-like molecules are present on the aortic vessel wall and mediate binding of AT III to the vessel surface, as well as enhancing the anticoagulant activity of AT III at these sites.

  5. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules.

  6. Effects of Al(III) and Nano-Al13 Species on Malate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al13 can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al13 concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al13 on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules. PMID:22163924

  7. 78 FR 4189 - Harbert Mezzanine Partners III SBIC, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Harbert Mezzanine Partners III... Mezzanine Partners III SBIC I, L.P. proposes to Finance a small business in which its Associate Harbert... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL...

  8. Acceptor impurity activation in III-nitride light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Römer, Friedhard Witzigmann, Bernd

    2015-01-12

    In this work, the role of the acceptor doping and the acceptor activation and its impact on the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of a Gallium Nitride (GaN) based multi-quantum well light emitting diode is studied by microscopic simulation. Acceptor impurities in GaN are subject to a high activation energy which depends on the presence of proximate dopant atoms and the electric field. A combined model for the dopant ionization and activation barrier reduction has been developed and implemented in a semiconductor carrier transport simulator. By model calculations, we demonstrate the impact of the acceptor activation mechanisms on the decay of the IQE at high current densities, which is known as the efficiency droop. A major contributor to the droop is the electron leakage which is largely affected by the acceptor doping.

  9. Examination of the Section III DSM-5 diagnostic system for personality disorders in an outpatient clinical sample

    PubMed Central

    Few, Lauren R.; Miller, Joshua D.; Rothbaum, Alex; Meller, Suzanne; Maples, Jessica; Terry, Douglas P.; Collins, Brittany; MacKillop, James

    2014-01-01

    The DSM-5 includes a novel approach to the diagnosis of personality disorders (PDs) in Section III, in order to stimulate further research with the possibility that this proposal will be included more formally in future DSM iterations. The current study provides the first test of this proposal in a clinical sample by simultaneously examining its two primary components: a system for rating personality impairment and a newly developed dimensional model of pathological personality traits. Participants were community adults currently receiving outpatient mental health treatment who completed a semi-structured interview for DSM-IV PDs and were then rated in terms of personality impairment and pathological traits. Data on the pathological traits were also collected via self-reports using the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). Both sets of trait scores were compared to self-report measures of general personality traits, internalizing symptoms, and externalizing behaviors. Inter-rater reliabilities for the clinicians’ ratings of impairment and the pathological traits were fair. The impairment ratings manifested substantial correlations with symptoms of depression and anxiety, DSM-5 PDs, and DSM-5 pathological traits. The clinician and self-reported personality trait scores demonstrated good convergence with one another, both accounted for substantial variance in DSM-IV PD constructs, and both manifested expected relations with the external criteria. The traits but not the impairment ratings demonstrated incremental validity in the prediction of the DSM-IV PDs. Overall, the current results support the general validity of several of the components of this new PD diagnostic system and point to areas that may require further modification. PMID:24364607

  10. On Shape Normalization for Non-Uniformly Active Catalyst Pellets. III.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    ON SHAPE NORMALIZATION FOR NON-UNIFORMLY ACTIVE CATALYST PELLET--ETC(U) OCT Al M4 MORBIDELLI . A VARMA DAA629 RI C 001 UNCLASSIFIED MRC-TSR-2289 NL 7...RESEARCH CENTRR ON SHAPE NORMALIZATION FOR NON-UNIFORMLY ACTIVE CATALYST PELLETS - III M. Morbidelli and A. Varma Technical Summary Report #2289 October...lies with N4RC, and not with the authors of this report. ON SHAPE NORMALIZATION FOR NON-UNIFORMLY ACTIVE CATALYST PELLETS - III M. Morbidelli and A

  11. Stability of the DSM-5 Section III pathological personality traits and their longitudinal associations with psychosocial functioning in personality disordered individuals.

    PubMed

    Wright, Aidan G C; Calabrese, William R; Rudick, Monica M; Yam, Wern How; Zelazny, Kerry; Williams, Trevor F; Rotterman, Jane H; Simms, Leonard J

    2015-02-01

    This study was conducted to establish (a) the stability of the DSM-5 Section III personality disorder (PD) traits, (b) whether these traits predict future psychosocial functioning, and (c) whether changes in traits track with changes in psychosocial functioning across time. Ninety-three outpatients (61% female) diagnosed with at least 1 PD completed patient-report measures at 2 time-points (M time between assessments = 1.44 years), including the Personality Inventory for the DSM-5 and several measures of psychosocial functioning. Effect sizes of rank-order and mean-level change were calculated. In addition, Time 1 traits were used to predict functioning measures at Time 2. Finally, latent change score models were estimated for DSM-5 Section III traits and functioning measures, and correlations among latent change scores were calculated to establish the relationship between change in traits and functional outcomes. Findings demonstrated that the DSM-5 Section III traits were highly stable in terms of normative (i.e., mean-level) change and rank-order stability over the course of the study. Furthermore, traits prospectively predicted psychosocial functioning. However, at the individual level traits and functioning were not entirely static over the study, and change in individuals' functioning tracked with changes in trait levels. These findings demonstrate that the DSM-5 Section III traits are highly stable consistent with the definition of PD, prospectively predictive of psychosocial functioning, and are dynamically associated with functioning over time. This study provides important evidence in support of the DSM-5 Section III PD model.

  12. Stability of the DSM-5 Section III Pathological Personality Traits and their Longitudinal Associations with Psychosocial Functioning in Personality Disordered Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Aidan G.C.; Calabrese, William R.; Rudick, Monica M.; Yam, Wern How; Zelazny, Kerry; Williams, Trevor F.; Rotterman, Jane H.; Simms, Leonard J.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to establish (a) the stability of the DSM-5 Section III personality disorder (PD) traits, (b) whether these traits predict future psychosocial functioning, and (c) whether changes in traits track with changes in psychosocial functioning across time. Ninety-three outpatients (61% Female) diagnosed with at least one PD completed patient-report measures at two time-points (M time between assessments = 1.44 years), including the Personality Inventory for the DSM-5 and several measures of psychosocial functioning. Effect sizes of rank-order and mean-level change were calculated. In addition, Time 1 traits were used to predict functioning measures at Time 2. Finally, latent change score models were estimated for DSM-5 Section III traits and functioning measures, and correlations among latent change scores were calculated to establish the relationship between change in traits and functional outcomes. Findings demonstrated that the DSM-5 Section III traits were highly stable in terms of normative (i.e., mean-level) change and rank-order stability over the course of the study. Furthermore, traits prospectively predicted psychosocial functioning. However, at the individual level traits and functioning were not entirely static over the study, and change in individuals’ functioning tracked with changes in trait levels. These findings demonstrate that the DSM-5 Section III traits are highly stable consistent with the definition of PD, prospectively predictive of psychosocial functioning, and dynamically associated with functioning over time. This study provides important evidence in support of the DSM-5 Section III PD model. PMID:25384070

  13. Project ACE Activity Sets. Book III: Grades 8 through 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eden City Schools, NC.

    Eleven activity sets for students in grades 8 through 12 are designed to supplement courses in citizenship and U.S. history and government. "The Civil War That Could Have Been" creates a hypothetical situation which requires the participant to analyze the causes of the Civil War. In "History on TV -- Enemy or Ally of the Social Studies Program,"…

  14. Fighting Fenton Chemistry: A Highly Active Iron(III) Tetracarbene Complex in Epoxidation Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kück, Jens W; Anneser, Markus R; Hofmann, Benjamin; Pöthig, Alexander; Cokoja, Mirza; Kühn, Fritz E

    2015-12-07

    Organometallic Fe complexes with exceptionally high activities in homogeneous epoxidation catalysis are reported. The compounds display Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxidation states and bear a tetracarbene ligand. The more active catalyst exhibits activities up to 183 000 turnovers per hour at room temperature and turnover numbers of up to 4300 at -30 °C. For the Fe(III) complex, a decreased Fenton-type reactivity is observed compared with Fe(II) catalysts reported previously as indicated by a substantially lower H2 O2 decomposition and higher (initial) turnover frequencies. The dependence of the catalyst performance on the catalyst loading, substrate, water addition, and the oxidant is investigated. Under all applied conditions, the advantageous nature of the use of the Fe(III) complex is evident.

  15. Active calibration target for bistatic radar cross-section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienaar, M.; Odendaal, J. W.; Joubert, J.; Cilliers, J. E.; Smit, J. C.

    2016-05-01

    Either passive calibration targets are expensive and complex to manufacture or their bistatic radar cross section (RCS) levels are significantly lower than the monostatic RCS levels of targets such as spheres, dihedral, and trihedral corner reflectors. In this paper the performance of an active calibration target with relative high bistatic RCS values is illustrated as a reference target for bistatic RCS measurements. The reference target is simple to manufacture, operates over a wide frequency range, and can be configured to calibrate all four polarizations (VV, HH, HV, and VH). Bistatic RCS measurements of canonical targets, performed in a controlled environment, are calibrated with the reference target and the results are compared to simulated results using FEKO.

  16. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of sectioned hair strands for arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, V.P.

    1996-12-31

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) is a valuable and proven method for the quantitative analysis of sectioned human head hair specimens for arsenic - and, if arsenic is found to be present at high concentrations, the approximate times when it was ingested. Reactor-flux thermal-neutron activation of the hair samples produces 26.3-h {sup 76}As, which is then detected by germanium gamma-ray spectrometry, measuring the 559.1-keV gamma-ray peak of {sup 76}As. Even normal levels of arsenic in hair, in the range of <1 ppm up to a few parts per million of arsenic can be measured - and the far higher levels associated with large internal doses of arsenic, levels approaching or exceeding 100 ppm arsenic, are readily and accurately measurable. However, all phases of forensic investigations of possible chronic (or in some cases, acute) arsenic poisoning are important, i.e., not just the analysis phase. All of these phases are discussed in this paper, based on the author`s experience and the experience of others, in criminal cases. Cases of chronic arsenic poisoning often reveal a series of two to four doses, perhaps a few months apart, with increasing doses.

  17. Helioseismology of pre-emerging active regions. III. Statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.; Braun, D. C.; Birch, A. C.

    2014-05-01

    The subsurface properties of active regions (ARs) prior to their appearance at the solar surface may shed light on the process of AR formation. Helioseismic holography has been applied to samples taken from two populations of regions on the Sun (pre-emergence and without emergence), each sample having over 100 members, that were selected to minimize systematic bias, as described in Paper I. Paper II showed that there are statistically significant signatures in the average helioseismic properties that precede the formation of an AR. This paper describes a more detailed analysis of the samples of pre-emergence regions and regions without emergence based on discriminant analysis. The property that is best able to distinguish the populations is found to be the surface magnetic field, even a day before the emergence time. However, after accounting for the correlations between the surface field and the quantities derived from helioseismology, there is still evidence of a helioseismic precursor to AR emergence that is present for at least a day prior to emergence, although the analysis presented cannot definitively determine the subsurface properties prior to emergence due to the small sample sizes.

  18. Connective tissue-activating peptide III (CTAP-III): cloning the synthetic gene and characterization of the protein expressed in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.H.; Castor, C.W.; Walz, D.A.

    1986-05-01

    CTAP-III, an ..cap alpha..-granule protein secreted by human platelets, is known to stimulate mitogenesis, extracellular matrix synthesis, and plasminogen activator synthesis in human fibroblast cultures. From its primary sequence, a synthetic gene was constructed to code for a methionine-free derivative (Leu substituted for Met-21), then cloned and expressed in E. coli using a new expression vector containing regulatory elements of the colicin E1 operon. Partially purified recombinant CTAP-III showed a line of identity with CTAP-III by immunodiffusion against rabbit antibody to platelet-derived CTAP-III. Immunodetection of the reduced protein after SDS-PAGE electrophoresis showed a molecular weight (mobility) in agreement with the natural form. Biologic activity of rCTAP-III eluted from an antiCTAP-III immunoaffinity column was measured in human synovial cell bioassay systems. rCTAP-III stimulated synovial cell synthesis of /sup 14/C-hyaluronic acid approximately 13-fold; significant (P < 0.001) mitogenesis was also observed. These studies indicate that a sufficient quantity of bioactive peptide can be obtained for a more comprehensive study of its biologic properties.

  19. Oral contraceptives, antithrombin- III activity, and postoperative deep-vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Sagar, S; Stamatakis, J D; Thomas, D P; Kakkar, V V

    1976-03-06

    Deep-vein thrombosis (D.V.T.) was detected by the fibrinogen-uptake test in six out of a total of thirty-one young women undergoing emergency abdominal surgery who gave a history of recent oral contraceptive intake. In contrast, no D.V.T. developed in nineteen similar patients who were not on oral contraceptives (P less than 0-01). Plasma-antithrombin-III activity was significantly lower preoperatively in patients taking oral contraceptives; postoperative D.V.T. subsequently developed in three out of five patients with preoperative antithrombin-III activity below 50%. In seventy-eight dental patients undergoing molar extraction, antithrombin-III activity was measured before, during, and after operation. Activity fell in all patients during operation, but the fall was significantly greater in women taking oral contraceptives (P less than 0-01). The intra-operative fall in antithrombin-III activity was prevented by a small preoperative dose of subcutaneous heparin.

  20. Effectiveness of phosphate removal during anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by dosing iron(III).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiang; Wang, Jue; Chen, Bing; Wang, Yu; Liu, Jiaqi; Liu, Lubo

    2017-05-15

    Phosphate-Fe(II) precipitation induced by Fe(III) reduction during the anaerobic digestion of excess activated sludge was investigated for the removal of phosphorus and its possible recovery. The experiments were conducted with three Fe(III) sources at 35 °C and 55 °C. The results show that ferrihydrite-Fe(III) was effectively reduced during the anaerobic sludge digestion by 63% and 96% under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions, respectively. Whereas FeCl3-Fe(III) was only mesophilically reducible and the reduction of hematite-Fe(III) was unnoticeable at either temperature. Efficient precipitation of vivianite was not observed although high saturation index values, e.g., >14 (activity reduction not considered), had been reached. This reveals the complexity of vivianite precipitation in anaerobic digestion systems; for example, Fe(II) complexation and organic interference could not be ignored. With ferrihydrite amendments at a Fe/TP of 1.5, methane production from sludge digestion was reduced by 35.1% at 35 °C, and was unaffected when the digestion temperature went up to 55 °C. But, acidic FeCl3 severely inhibited the methane production and consequently the sludge biomass degradation.

  1. Structural basis for activation, assembly and membrane binding of ESCRT-III Snf7 filaments.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaogeng; Henne, W Mike; Borbat, Peter P; Buchkovich, Nicholas J; Freed, Jack H; Mao, Yuxin; Fromme, J Christopher; Emr, Scott D

    2015-12-15

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) constitute hetero-oligomeric machines that catalyze multiple topologically similar membrane-remodeling processes. Although ESCRT-III subunits polymerize into spirals, how individual ESCRT-III subunits are activated and assembled together into a membrane-deforming filament remains unknown. Here, we determine X-ray crystal structures of the most abundant ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 in its active conformation. Using pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy (PDS), we show that Snf7 activation requires a prominent conformational rearrangement to expose protein-membrane and protein-protein interfaces. This promotes the assembly of Snf7 arrays with ~30 Å periodicity into a membrane-sculpting filament. Using a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches, both in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that mutations on these protein interfaces halt Snf7 assembly and block ESCRT function. The architecture of the activated and membrane-bound Snf7 polymer provides crucial insights into the spatially unique ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling.

  2. Studies on chemistry, spectroscopy and antioxidant activities of chromium(III)-hydrazide complexes.

    PubMed

    Shamshad, Bushra; Jamal, Rifat A; Ashiq, Uzma; Mahrooof-Tahir, Mohammad; Shaikh, Zara; Sultan, Sadaf; Khan, Khalid M

    2015-01-01

    Acid hydrazides are vital chemical entities due to their biological activities. Upon complexation with certain metal ions, their biological activities are known to be positively enhanced. The present work describes the synthesis of Cr(III)-hydrazide complexes, and their structural, spectroscopic and antioxidant properties to reveal their chemistry and biochemistry. Physical (magnetic moment, conductivity measurements), analytical (C, H, N and Cr analysis) and spectral (EI-Mass, FTIR) techniques are used for the characterization of synthesized compounds. All Cr(III)-hydrazide complexes exhibit octahedral geometry with general formula [Cr(L)2(H2O)2]Cl3. In these complexes, the hydrazide ligands are coordinated via carbonyl oxygen and terminal amino nitrogen in a bidentate fashion. All Cr(III)-hydrazide complexes were screened for in vitro diphenyldipicryl hydrazine (DPPH), superoxide dismutase and nitric oxide radical scavenging activities. Majority of the Cr(III)-hydrazide complexes were found to be more potent scavengers than their uncoordinated hydrazide ligands. This study demonstrates an interesting structure-activity relationship (SAR) which is presented here.

  3. Structural basis for activation, assembly and membrane binding of ESCRT-III Snf7 filaments

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shaogeng; Henne, W Mike; Borbat, Peter P; Buchkovich, Nicholas J; Freed, Jack H; Mao, Yuxin; Fromme, J Christopher; Emr, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) constitute hetero-oligomeric machines that catalyze multiple topologically similar membrane-remodeling processes. Although ESCRT-III subunits polymerize into spirals, how individual ESCRT-III subunits are activated and assembled together into a membrane-deforming filament remains unknown. Here, we determine X-ray crystal structures of the most abundant ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 in its active conformation. Using pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy (PDS), we show that Snf7 activation requires a prominent conformational rearrangement to expose protein-membrane and protein-protein interfaces. This promotes the assembly of Snf7 arrays with ~30 Å periodicity into a membrane-sculpting filament. Using a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches, both in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that mutations on these protein interfaces halt Snf7 assembly and block ESCRT function. The architecture of the activated and membrane-bound Snf7 polymer provides crucial insights into the spatially unique ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12548.001 PMID:26670543

  4. Short-term and long-term treatment outcomes with Class III activator

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyo-kyung; Chong, Hyun-Jeong; An, Ki-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate short-term and long-term skeletodental outcomes of Class III activator treatment. Methods A Class III activator treatment group (AG) comprised of 22 patients (9 boys, 13 girls) was compared with a Class III control group (CG) comprised of 17 patients (6 boys, 11 girls). The total treatment period was divided into three stages; the initial stage (T1), the post-activator treatment or post-mandibular growth peak stage (T2), and the long-term follow-up stage (T3). Cephalometric changes were evaluated statistically via the Mann-Whitney U-test and the Friedman test. Results The AG exhibited significant increases in the SNA angle, ANB angle, Wits appraisal, A point-N perpendicular, Convexity of A point, and proclination of the maxillary incisors, from T1 to T2. In the long-term follow-up (T1-T3), the AG exhibited significantly greater increases in the ANB angle, Wits appraisal, and Convexity of A point than the CG. Conclusions Favorable skeletal outcomes induced during the Class III activator treatment period were generally maintained until the long-term follow-up period of the post-mandibular growth peak stage. PMID:26445717

  5. Selectively lighting up two-photon photodynamic activity in mitochondria with AIE-active iridium(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangping; Jin, Chengzhi; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Xingguo; Chen, Yu; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2017-02-07

    Herein a series of mitochondria-targeted AIE (aggregation-induced emission)-active Ir(iii) complexes were designed to selectively exert one-/two-photon photodynamic activities in mitochondria to address the issues which current PDT are confronted with (i.e., shallow penetration depth of routinely used irradiation; systematic toxicity associated with effective drug concentration; concentration-quenched photodynamic activity at the target, etc.).

  6. Identification of an iridium(III) complex with anti-bacterial and anti-cancer activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lihua; Liu, Li-juan; Chao, Wei-chieh; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Lu, Jin-Jian; Li, Ruei-nian; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2015-09-29

    Group 9 transition metal complexes have been widely explored as therapeutic agents due to their unique geometry, their propensity to undergo ligand exchanges with biomolecules and their diverse steric and electronic properties. These metal complexes can offer distinct modes of action in living organisms compared to carbon-based molecules. In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial and anti-proliferative abilities of a series of cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes. The iridium(III) complex 1 inhibited the growth of S. aureus with MIC and MBC values of 3.60 and 7.19 μM, respectively, indicating its potent bactericidal activity. Moreover, complex 1 also exhibited cytotoxicity against a number of cancer cell lines, with particular potency against ovarian, cervical and melanoma cells. This cyclometallated iridium(III) complex is the first example of a substitutionally-inert, Group 9 organometallic compound utilized as a direct and selective inhibitor of S. aureus.

  7. Identification of an iridium(III) complex with anti-bacterial and anti-cancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lihua; Liu, Li-Juan; Chao, Wei-chieh; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Lu, Jin-Jian; Li, Ruei-nian; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Group 9 transition metal complexes have been widely explored as therapeutic agents due to their unique geometry, their propensity to undergo ligand exchanges with biomolecules and their diverse steric and electronic properties. These metal complexes can offer distinct modes of action in living organisms compared to carbon-based molecules. In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial and anti-proliferative abilities of a series of cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes. The iridium(III) complex 1 inhibited the growth of S. aureus with MIC and MBC values of 3.60 and 7.19 μM, respectively, indicating its potent bactericidal activity. Moreover, complex 1 also exhibited cytotoxicity against a number of cancer cell lines, with particular potency against ovarian, cervical and melanoma cells. This cyclometallated iridium(III) complex is the first example of a substitutionally-inert, Group 9 organometallic compound utilized as a direct and selective inhibitor of S. aureus. PMID:26416333

  8. Title III List of Lists: Consolidated list of chemicals subject to the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act, as amended. Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This consolidated chemical list includes chemicals subject to reporting requirements under Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), also known as the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and chemicals listed under Section 112(r) of Title III of the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990. This consolidated list has been prepared to help firms handling chemicals determine whether they need to submit reports under sections 302, 304, or 314 or SARA Title III (EPCRA) and, for a specific chemical, what reports may need to be submitted. It also will also help firms determine whether they will be subject to accident prevention regulations under CAA section 112(r).

  9. Ferrous-activated persulfate oxidation of arsenic(III) and diuron in aquatic system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Zheng, Wei; Ji, Yuefei; Zhang, Jinfeng; Zeng, Chao; Zhang, Ya; Wang, Qi; Yang, Xi

    2013-12-15

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) can be an effective technology for the remediation of soil and groundwater polluted by organic and inorganic contaminants. This study investigated the oxidation of arsenic(III) (As(III)) and diuron using ferrous activated persulfate-based ISCO. The results indicated that Fe(II)/persulfate oxidation could be an effective method to oxidize As(III) and diuron. Effects of pH, S2O8(2-) and Fe(II) amounts on the destruction of As(III) and diuron were examined in batch experiments. Acidic conditions favored the removal of As(III) and diuron. Four chelating agents, citric acid (CA), Na2S2O3, diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid disodium (EDTA-Na2) were used in attempt to maintain the quantity of ferrous ion in solution. In our experiments, CA and Na2S2O3 were found to be more effective than DTPA and EDTA-Na2. Our results also revealed a widely practical prospect of inorganic chelating agent Na2S2O3. Hydroxyl and sulfate radical were determined to play key roles in the oxidation process by using ethanol and tertiary butanol as molecular probes. Oxidation of As(III) yielded As(V) via the electron-transfer reaction. In the oxidation process of diuron, a stepwise nucleophilic substitution of chlorine by hydroxyl and a stepwise oxidation process of the methyl on the dimethylurea group by hydroxyl and sulfate radical were proposed.

  10. 20 CFR 641.610 - How are section 502(e) activities administered?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How are section 502(e) activities... Projects Under Section 502(e) of the OAA § 641.610 How are section 502(e) activities administered? (a) The... training activities should emphasize different work modes, such as job sharing, flex-time,...

  11. Low molecular weight heparin restores antithrombin III activity from hyperglycemia induced alterations.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Marchi, E; Palazzni, E; Quatraro, A; Giugliano, D

    1990-01-01

    Alteration of antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, glycemia level dependent, exists in diabetes mellitus. In this study the ability of a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) (Fluxum, Alfa-Wassermann S.p.A., Bologna, Italy), as well as unfractioned héparin, to preserve ATIII activity from glucose-induced alterations, both in vitro and in vivo, is reported. The subcutaneous and intravenous LMWH and heparin administration increases basal depressed ATIII activity in diabetic patients. Heparin shows an equivalent effect on both anti-IIa and anti-Xa activity of ATIII, while LMWH is more effective in preserving the anti-Xa activity. Similarity, heparin preserves ATIII activity from hyperglycemia-induced alterations, during hyperglycemic clamp, and LMWH infusion is able to preserve a significant amount of anti-Xa activity from glucose-induced alterations. Since diabetic patients show a high incidence of thrombotic accidents, LMWH appears to be a promising innovation for the prevention of diabetic thrombophylia.

  12. Cytotoxic activity of new neodymium (III) complexes of bis-coumarins.

    PubMed

    Kostova, Irena; Manolov, Ilia; Momekov, Georgi

    2004-09-01

    Complexes of neodymium (III) with bis-coumarins: 3,3'-benzylidene-bis(4-hydroxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one); bis(4-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl)-piridin-2-yl-methane; bis(4-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl)-piridin-4-yl-methane; bis(4-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl)-(1H-pyrazol-3-yl)-methane were synthesized by reaction of neodymium (III) salt and the ligands, in amounts equal to metal:ligand molar ratio of 1:2. The complexes were prepared by adding an aqueous solution of neodymium (III) salt to an aqueous solution of the ligand subsequently raising the pH of the mixture gradually to ca. 5.0 by adding dilute solution of sodium hydroxide. The neodymium (III) complexes with bis-coumarins were characterized by different physicochemical methods-elemental analysis, IR-, (1)H- and (13)C-NMR-spectroscopies and mass-spectral data. The spectral data of neodymium (III) complexes were interpreted on the basis of comparison with the spectra of the free ligands. This analysis showed that in the Nd (III) complexes the ligands coordinated to the metal ion through both deprotonated hydroxyl groups. On the basis of the nu(C=O) red shift observed, participation of the carbonyl groups in the coordination to the metal ion was also suggested. Cytotoxic screening by MTT assay was carried out. The complexes were tested on HL-60, HL-60/Dox and SKW-3 cell lines. The overall results from the preliminary screening program revealed that all of the new Nd (III) complexes reach 50% inhibition of the malignant cells proliferation and thus could be considered as biologically active. On the basis of the IC(50) values obtained compounds Nd(L(1))(OH).H(2)O and Nd(L(3))(OH).2H(2)O were found to exert superior activity in comparison to the remaining complexes.

  13. Iron(III)-induced activation of chloride and bromide from modeled salt pans.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, Julian; Bleicher, Sergej; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2015-05-14

    The photochemistry of halides in sea spray aerosol, on salt pans, and on other salty surfaces leads to a formation of reactive halogen species. We investigated the photochemical formation of atomic chlorine (Cl) and bromine (Br) in the gas phase in the presence of laboratory-modeled salt pans consisting of sodium chloride doped with iron(III) chloride hexahydrate (0.5 and 2 wt %). The samples were spread on a Teflon sheet and exposed to simulated sunlight in a Teflon smog chamber in purified, humidified air in the presence of a test mixture of hydrocarbons at the ppb level to determine Cl, Br, and OH formation by the radical clock method. Driven by the photolytic reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), the production rates of the Fe(III)-doped NaCl salt samples (up to10(7) atoms cm(-3) s(-1)) exceeded the release of Cl above a pure NaCl sample by more than an order of magnitude in an initially O3-free environment at low NOX. In bromide-doped samples (0.5 wt % NaBr), a part of the Cl release was replaced by Br when Fe(III) was present. Additions of sodium sulfate, sodium oxalate, oxalic acid, and catechol to NaCl/FeCl3 samples were found to restrain the activation of chloride.

  14. Angiotensin III stimulates ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinases and astrocyte growth in cultured rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Michelle A; Tran, Hsieu; Nguyen, Chinh

    2011-10-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) III is a biologically active metabolite of Ang II with similar effects and receptor binding properties as Ang II. Most Ang III studies delineate physiological effects of the peptide but, the intracellular pathways leading to the actions are unknown and are a focus of these studies. We investigated in cultured brainstem and cerebellum rat astrocytes whether Ang III stimulates ERK1/2 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases and astrocyte growth. Ang III significantly stimulated ERK1/2 MAP kinases in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The maximal stimulation occurred with 100 nM Ang III (2.8±0.3 and 2.3±0.1-fold over basal, in brainstem and cerebellum astrocytes, respectively). This stimulation occurred as early as 1 min, and was sustained for at least 15 min. Moreover, inhibition of the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway by 10 μM PD98059 attenuated Ang III-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Ang III induction of ERK1/2 occurred via stimulation of the Ang AT(1) receptor since pretreatment with 10 μM Losartan, a selective AT(1) receptor blocker, prevented Ang III-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The selective AT(2) Ang receptor blocker PD123319 was ineffective. Comparable to Ang II, Ang III also stimulated astrocyte growth in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect that occurred via activation of the AT(1) receptor as well. These findings suggest that Ang III has similar effects as Ang II in astrocytes since it rapidly stimulates the phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinases and induces astrocyte proliferation through activation of the AT(1) receptor. These studies are important in establishing signaling pathways for Ang III and provide validation of the central role of Ang III.

  15. Evaluation depth of the curve of Spee in class I, class II, and class III malocclusion: A cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Dinakarsamy, V.; Santhosh, S.

    2015-01-01

    Occlusal plane is an essential consideration when multiple long-span posterior restorations are designed. When restorations are added to an existing tooth arrangement characterized by rotated, tipped, or extruded teeth, excursive interferences may be incorporated, resulting in detrimental squeal. The curve of Spee, which exists in the ideal natural dentition, allows harmony to exist between the anterior tooth and condylar guidance. This curve exists in the sagittal plane and is the best viewed from a lateral aspect. It permits total posterior disclusion on mandibular protrusion, given proper anterior tooth guidance. It is unclear that whether the curve of Spee is a description of the occlusal surface of each arch separately or in maximal intercuspation. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in the depth of curve of Spee between the class I, class II, class III and to investigate the relationship of depth of curve of Spee with over jet, over-bite. PMID:26015764

  16. IFLA General Conference 1991. Division of Regional Activities: Section of Africa; Section of Asia and Oceania; Section of Latin America and the Carribean. Booklet 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The six papers in this collection were presented at three sections of the Division of Regional Activities: (1) "A la recherche d'Approches adaptees aux Besoins en Documentation des Africains (In Search of an Approach Adapted to the Information Needs of Africans)" (Touria Temsamani Haji, Morocco); (2) "People's Libraries: An African…

  17. Leukocyte adhesion deficiency-III is caused by mutations in KINDLIN3 affecting integrin activation

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Lena; Howarth, Kimberley; McDowall, Alison; Patzak, Irene; Evans, Rachel; Ussar, Siegfried; Moser, Markus; Metin, Ayse; Fried, Mike; Tomlinson, Ian; Hogg, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Integrins are the major adhesion receptors of leukocytes and platelets. β1 and β2 integrin function on leukocytes is crucial for a successful immune response and the platelet integrin αIIbβ3 initiates the process of blood clotting through binding fibrinogen1-3. Integrins on circulating cells bind poorly to their ligands but become active after ‘inside-out’ signaling through other membrane receptors4,5. Subjects with leukocyte adhesion deficiency-1 (LAD-I) do not express β2 integrins because of mutations in the gene specifying the β2 subunit, and they suffer recurrent bacterial infections6,7. Mutations affecting αIIbβ3 integrin cause the bleeding disorder termed Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia3. Subjects with LAD-III show symptoms of both LAD-I and Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia. Their hematopoietically-derived cells express β1, β2 and β3 integrins, but defective inside-out signaling causes immune deficiency and bleeding problems8. The LAD-III lesion has been attributed to a C→A mutation in the gene encoding calcium and diacylglycerol guanine nucleotide exchange factor (CALDAGGEF1; official symbol RASGRP2) specifying the CALDAG-GEF1 protein9, but we show that this change is not responsible for the LAD-III disorder. Instead, we identify mutations in the KINDLIN3 (official symbol FERMT3) gene specifying the KINDLIN-3 protein as the cause of LAD-III in Maltese and Turkish subjects. Two independent mutations result in decreased KINDLIN3 messenger RNA levels and loss of protein expression. Notably, transfection of the subjects’ lymphocytes with KINDLIN3 complementary DNA but not CALDAGGEF1 cDNA reverses the LAD-III defect, restoring integrin-mediated adhesion and migration. PMID:19234463

  18. The OPTX Project. IV. How Reliable is [O III] as a Measure of AGN Activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouille, L.; Barger, A. J.

    2010-10-01

    We compare optical and hard X-ray identifications of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using a uniformly selected (above a flux limit of f 2-8 keV = 3.5 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1) and highly optically spectroscopically complete (>80% for f 2-8 keV > 10-14 erg cm-2 s-1 and >60% below) 2-8 keV sample observed in three Chandra fields (CLANS, CLASXS, and the CDF-N). We find that empirical emission-line ratio diagnostic diagrams misidentify 50% of the X-ray-selected AGNs that can be put on these diagrams as star formers. We confirm that there is a large (two orders of magnitude) dispersion in the ratio of the [O III]λ5007 (hereafter [O III]) to hard X-ray luminosities for the non-broad-line AGNs, even after applying reddening corrections to the [O III] luminosities. We find that the dispersion is similar for the broad-line AGNs, where there is not expected to be much X-ray absorption from an obscuring torus around the AGN nor much obscuration from the galaxy along the line of sight if the AGN is aligned with the galaxy. We postulate that the X-ray-selected AGNs that are misidentified by the diagnostic diagrams have low [O III] luminosities due to the complexity of the structure of the narrow-line region, which causes many ionizing photons from the AGN not to be absorbed. This would mean that the [O III] luminosity can only be used to predict the X-ray luminosity to within a factor of ~3 (1σ). Despite selection effects, we show that the shapes and normalizations of the [O III] and transformed hard X-ray luminosity functions show reasonable agreement, suggesting that the [O III] samples are not finding substantially more AGNs at low redshifts than hard X-ray samples. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The observatory was made possible by the generous financial

  19. Absolute elastic differential electron scattering cross sections in the intermediate energy region. III - SF6 and UF6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Trajmar, S.; Chutjian, A.; Williams, W.

    1976-01-01

    A recently developed technique has been used to measure the ratios of elastic differential electron scattering cross sections (DCS) for SF6 and UF6 to those of He at electron impact energies of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 75 eV and at scattering angles of 20 to 135 deg. In order to obtain the absolute values of DCS from these ratios, He DCS of McConkey and Preston have been employed in the 20 to 90 deg range. At angles in the 90 to 135 deg range the recently determined cross sections of Srivastava and Trajmar have been utilized. From these DCS, elastic integral and momentum transfer cross sections have been obtained.

  20. 20 CFR 641.630 - What private sector training activities are allowable under section 502(e)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What private sector training activities are... activities are allowable under section 502(e)? Allowable activities authorized under section 502(e) include... job development; or (9) Combinations of the above-listed activities. (b) Working with employers...

  1. Detailed correlation of type III radio bursts with H alpha activity. I - Active region of 22 May 1970.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Pasachoff, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Comparison of observations of type III impulsive radio bursts made at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory with high-spatial-resolution cinematographic observations taken at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. Use of the log-periodic radio interferometer makes it possible to localize the radio emission uniquely. This study concentrates on the particularly active region close to the limb on May 22, 1970. Sixteen of the 17 groups were associated with some H alpha activity, 11 of them with the start of such activity.

  2. Comparison of the electronic and vibrational optical activity of a europium(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Hudecová, Jana; You, Xiao-Zeng; Urbanová, Marie; Bouř, Petr

    2015-04-07

    The geometry and the electronic structure of chiral lanthanide(III) complexes are traditionally probed by electronic methods, such as circularly polarised luminescence (CPL) and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectroscopy. The vibrational phenomena are much weaker. In the present study, however, significant enhancements of vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectral intensities were observed during the formation of a chiral bipyridine-Eu(III) complex. The ten-fold enhancement of the vibrational absorption and VCD intensities was explained by a charge-transfer process and the dominant effect of the nitrate ion on the spectra. A much larger enhancement of the ROA and Raman intensities and a hundred-fold increase of the circular intensity difference (CID) ratio were explained by the resonance of the λ = 532 nm laser light with the (7)F0 → (5)D0 transitions. This phenomenon is combined with a chirality transfer, and mixing of the Raman and luminescence effects involving low-energy (7)F states of europium. The results thus indicate that the vibrational optical activity (VOA) may be a very sensitive tool for chirality detection and probing of the electronic structure of Eu(III) and other coordination compounds.

  3. DNA interaction of europium(III) complex containing 2,2'-bipyridine and its antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Jahani, Shohreh; Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of native fish salmon DNA (FS-DNA) with [Eu(bpy)3Cl2(H2O)]Cl, where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, is studied at physiological pH in Tris-HCl buffer by spectroscopic methods, viscometric techniques as well as circular dichroism (CD). These experiments reveal that Eu(III) complex has interaction with FS-DNA. Moreover, binding constant and binding site size have been determined. The value of Kb has been defined 2.46 ± .02 × 10(5) M(-1). The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by Van't Hoff equation, the results show that the interaction of the complex with FS-DNA is an entropically driven phenomenon. CD spectroscopy followed by viscosity as well as fluorescence and UV--Vis measurements indicate that the complex interacts with FS-DNA via groove binding mode. Also, the synthesized Eu(III) complex has been screened for antimicrobial activities.

  4. 78 FR 77110 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; GEPA Section 427 Guidance for All...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; GEPA Section 427 Guidance for All Grant... of Collection: GEPA Section 427 Guidance for All Grant Applications. OMB Control Number:...

  5. Applications of immunocolloids in light microscopy. III. Demonstration of antigenic and lectin-binding sites in semithin resin sections.

    PubMed

    Lucocq, J M; Roth, J

    1984-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that antigens or lectin-binding sites can be localized in sections from paraffin-embedded tissues with protein A or lectins bound to colloidal gold or colloidal silver (Roth J: J Histochem Cytochem 30:691, 1982 and 31:547, 1983). In the present study the protein A-gold technique and lectin-gold complexes have been applied to semithin sections (0.5-1.5 micron) of Epon- or low temperature Lowicryl K4M-embedded rat pancreas, kidney and submandibular gland. The results show that an increase in resolution and, therefore, in amount of information can be obtained. The optimal mode of imaging was determined on sections without counterstaining. Bright-field illumination gives the maximum information about the staining signal, while phase-contrast and Nomarski differential interference contrast give predominantly structural and, to a lesser extent, staining information. Polarization epi- and transillumination microscopy is inferior in all aspects. The application of a battery of lectin-gold complexes to rat submandibular gland revealed a specific staining pattern for each lectin in acinar and excretory duct cells.

  6. Deflocculation of Activated Sludge by the Dissimilatory Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium Shewanella alga BrY

    PubMed Central

    Caccavo, F.; Frolund, B.; Van Ommen, Kloeke F.; Nielsen, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of microbial Fe(III) reduction on the deflocculation of autoclaved activated sludge was investigated. Fe(III) flocculated activated sludge better than Fe(II). Decreasing concentrations of Fe(III) caused an increase in sludge bulk water turbidity, while bulk water turbidity remained relatively constant over a range of Fe(II) concentrations. Cells of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella alga BrY coupled the oxidation of H(inf2) to the reduction of Fe(III) bound in sludge flocs. Cell adhesion to the Fe(III)-sludge flocs was a prerequisite for Fe(III) reduction. The reduction of Fe(III) in sludge flocs by strain BrY caused an increase in bulk water turbidity, suggesting that the sludge was deflocculated. The results of this study support previous research suggesting that microbial Fe(III) respiration may have an impact on the floc structure and colloidal chemistry of activated sludge. PMID:16535299

  7. Mononuclear Ru(III) Schiff base complexes: Synthesis, spectral, redox, catalytic and biological activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priya, N. Padma; Arunachalam, S.; Manimaran, A.; Muthupriya, D.; Jayabalakrishnan, C.

    2009-04-01

    An octahedral ruthenium(III) Schiff base complexes of the type [RuX(EPh 3)(L)] (where, X = Cl/Br; E = As/P; L = dianion of the Schiff bases derived from acetoacetanilide with o-phenylenediamine and salicylaldehyde/ o-hydroxyacetophenone/ o-vanillin/2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde) have been synthesized from the reactions of equimolar reactions of [RuX 3(EPh 3) 3] and Schiff bases in benzene. The new Ru(III) Schiff base complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR, electronic, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra, EPR spectral studies, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electrochemical studies. The new complexes were found to be effective catalysts for aryl-aryl coupling and the oxidation of alcohols into their corresponding carbonyl compounds, respectively, using molecular oxygen atmosphere at ambient temperature. Further, the new Ru(III) Schiff base complexes were screened for their antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio cholera, Salomonella typhi and Staphylococcus aureaus.

  8. Arsenic (III) adsorption on iron acetate coated activated alumina: thermodynamic, kinetics and equilibrium approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption potential of iron acetate coated activated alumina (IACAA) for removal of arsenic [As (III)] as arsenite by batch sorption technique is described. IACAA was characterized by XRD, FTIR, EDAX and SEM instruments. Percentage adsorption on IACAA was determined as a function of pH, contact time and adsorbent dose. The study revealed that the removal of As (III) was best achieved at pH =7.4. The initial As (III) concentration (0.45 mg/L) came down to less than 0.01 mg/L at contact time 90 min with adsorbent dose of 1 g/100 mL. The sorption was reasonably explained with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 and E a were calculated in order to understand the nature of sorption process. The sorption process was found to be controlled by pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. PMID:24359995

  9. Class III peroxidases are activated in proanthocyanidin-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Liguo; Xu, Weifeng; Li, Wenrao; Ye, Nenghui; Liu, Rui; Shi, Lu; Bin Rahman, A. N. M. Rubaiyath; Fan, Mingshou; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims It has previously been shown that proanthocyanidins (PAs) in the seed coat of Arabidopsis thaliana have the ability to scavenge superoxide radicals (O2−). However, the physiological processess in PA-deficit seeds are not clear. It is hypothesized that there exist alternative ways in PA-deficient seeds to cope with oxidative stress. Methods The content of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and its relevance to the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidases was investigated in both wild-type and PA-deficit mutant seeds. A biochemical staining approach was used to detect tissue localizations of peroxidase activities in PA-deficit mutant seeds. Key Results PA-deficient mutants possess significantly lower levels of H2O2 than the wild-type, despite their higher accumulation of superoxide radicals. Screening of the key antioxidant enzymes revealed that peroxidase activity was significantly over-activated in mutant seeds. This high peroxidase activity was mainly confined to the seed coat zone. Interestingly, neither ascorbate peroxidase nor glutathione peroxidase, just the guaiacol peroxidases (class III peroxidases), was specifically activated in the seed coat. However, no significant difference in peroxidase activity was observed in embryos of either mutants or the wild-type, although gene expressions of several candidate peroxidases were down-regulated in the embryos of PA-deficient seeds. Conclusions The results suggest that enhanced class III peroxidase activity in the seed coat of PA-deficient mutants is an adaptive strategy for seed development and survival. PMID:23448691

  10. Light-Activated Protein Inhibition through Photoinduced Electron Transfer of a Ruthenium(II)–Cobalt(III) Bimetallic Complex

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Weinberg, David J.; Peterson, Mark D.; Weiss, Emily A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a mechanism of light activation that initiates protein inhibitory action of a biologically inert Co(III) Schiff base (Co(III)-sb) complex. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs from a Ru(II) bipyridal complex to a covalently attached Co(III) complex and is gated by conformational changes that occur in tens of nanoseconds. Reduction of the Co(III)-sb by PET initiates displacement of the inert axial imidazole ligands, promoting coordination to active site histidines of α-thrombin. Upon exposure to 455 nm light, the rate of ligand exchange with 4-methylimidazole, a histidine mimic, increases by approximately 5-fold, as observed by NMR spectroscopy. Similarly, the rate of α-thrombin inhibition increases over 5-fold upon irradiation. These results convey a strategy for light activation of inorganic therapeutic agents through PET utilizing redox-active metal centers. PMID:25671465

  11. Light-activated protein inhibition through photoinduced electron transfer of a ruthenium(II)–cobalt(III) bimetallic complex

    DOE PAGES

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Weinberg, David J.; Peterson, Mark D.; ...

    2015-02-11

    In this paper, we describe a mechanism of light activation that initiates protein inhibitory action of a biologically inert Co(III) Schiff base (Co(III)-sb) complex. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs from a Ru(II) bipyridal complex to a covalently attached Co(III) complex and is gated by conformational changes that occur in tens of nanoseconds. Reduction of the Co(III)-sb by PET initiates displacement of the inert axial imidazole ligands, promoting coordination to active site histidines of α-thrombin. Upon exposure to 455 nm light, the rate of ligand exchange with 4-methylimidazole, a histidine mimic, increases by approximately 5-fold, as observed by NMR spectroscopy. Similarly,more » the rate of α-thrombin inhibition increases over 5-fold upon irradiation. Finally, these results convey a strategy for light activation of inorganic therapeutic agents through PET utilizing redox-active metal centers.« less

  12. Light-activated protein inhibition through photoinduced electron transfer of a ruthenium(II)–cobalt(III) bimetallic complex

    SciTech Connect

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Weinberg, David J.; Peterson, Mark D.; Weiss, Emily A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-02-11

    In this paper, we describe a mechanism of light activation that initiates protein inhibitory action of a biologically inert Co(III) Schiff base (Co(III)-sb) complex. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs from a Ru(II) bipyridal complex to a covalently attached Co(III) complex and is gated by conformational changes that occur in tens of nanoseconds. Reduction of the Co(III)-sb by PET initiates displacement of the inert axial imidazole ligands, promoting coordination to active site histidines of α-thrombin. Upon exposure to 455 nm light, the rate of ligand exchange with 4-methylimidazole, a histidine mimic, increases by approximately 5-fold, as observed by NMR spectroscopy. Similarly, the rate of α-thrombin inhibition increases over 5-fold upon irradiation. Finally, these results convey a strategy for light activation of inorganic therapeutic agents through PET utilizing redox-active metal centers.

  13. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

  14. Synthesis of catalytically active form III ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in archaea.

    PubMed

    Finn, Michael W; Tabita, F Robert

    2003-05-01

    Ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) catalyzes the biological reduction and assimilation of carbon dioxide gas to organic carbon; it is the key enzyme responsible for the bulk of organic matter found on earth. Until recently it was believed that there are only two forms of RubisCO, form I and form II. However, the recent completion of several genome-sequencing projects uncovered open reading frames resembling RubisCO in the third domain of life, the archaea. Previous work and homology comparisons suggest that these enzymes represent a third form of RubisCO, form III. While earlier work indicated that two structurally distinct recombinant archaeal RubisCO proteins catalyzed bona fide RubisCO reactions, it was not established that the rbcL genes of anaerobic archaea can be transcribed and translated to an active enzyme in the native organisms. In this report, it is shown not only that Methanococcus jannaschii, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, Methanosarcina acetivorans, and Methanosarcina barkeri possess open reading frames with the residues required for catalysis but also that the RubisCO protein from these archaea accumulates in an active form under normal growth conditions. In addition, the form III RubisCO gene (rbcL) from M. acetivorans was shown to complement RubisCO deletion strains of Rhodobacter capsulatus and Rhodobacter sphaeroides under both photoheterotrophic and photoautotrophic growth conditions. These studies thus indicate for the first time that archaeal form III RubisCO functions in a physiologically significant fashion to fix CO(2). Furthermore, recombinant M. jannaschii, M. acetivorans, and A. fulgidus RubisCO possess unique properties with respect to quaternary structure, temperature optima, and activity in the presence of molecular oxygen compared to the previously described Thermococcus kodakaraensis and halophile proteins.

  15. Enzymatic activity and proteomic profile of class III peroxidases during sugarcane stem development.

    PubMed

    Cesarino, Igor; Araújo, Pedro; Sampaio Mayer, Juliana Lischka; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2012-06-01

    Class III peroxidases are present as large multigene families in all land plants. This large number of genes together with the diversity of processes catalyzed by peroxidases suggests possible functional specialization of each isoform. However, assigning a precise role for each individual peroxidase gene has continued to be a major bottleneck. Here we investigated the enzyme activity and translational profile of class III peroxidases during stem development of sugarcane as a first step in the estimation of physiological functions of individual isoenzymes. Internodes at three different developmental stages (young, developing and mature) were divided into pith (inner tissue) and rind (outer tissue) fractions. The rind of mature internodes presented the highest enzymatic activity and thus could be considered the ideal tissue for the discovery of peroxidase gene function. In addition, activity staining of 2DE gels revealed different isoperoxidase profiles and protein expression regulation among different tissue fractions. In-gel tryptic digestion of excised spots followed by peptide sequencing by LC-MS/MS positively matched uncharacterized peroxidases in the sugarcane database SUCEST. Multiple spots matching the same peroxidase gene were found, which reflects the generation of more than one isoform from a particular gene by post-translational modifications. The identified sugarcane peroxidases appear to be monocot-specific sequences with no clear ortholog in dicot model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

  16. 14 CFR Section 11 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... operations. b. This subfunction shall not include expenses related to financial accounting, purchasing or... contribute to more than a single operating function such as general financial accounting activities... accounting year. Allocations of maintenance burden to capital projects, and service sales to others shall...

  17. Two tridentate Schiff base ligands and their mononuclear cobalt (III) complexes: Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial and antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Elif; Celen, Selma; Azaz, Dilek; Kara, Hulya

    2012-08-01

    Two Schiff base ligands (HL1, HL2) and their Co(III) complexes, [Co(HL1)(L1)] (1) and [Co(HL2)(L2)] (2) [where HL1=2-((E)-(2-hydroxyethylimino)methyl)-4-chlorophenol and HL2=2-((E)-(2-hydroxyethylimino)methyl)-4-bromophenol] were synthesized and characterized using spectroscopic methods. The crystal structures of 1 and 2 have been re-determined by single crystal diffraction at 100K. The ligands and their Co(III) complexes were screened for antibacterial and antifungal activities by the disc diffusion, microdilution broth and single spore culture techniques. The antimicrobial activity of the Co(III) complexes and the free ligands exhibit antimicrobial properties and the Co(III) complexes show enhanced inhibitory activity compared with their parent ligand.

  18. High chemiluminescence activity of an Fe(III)-TAML activator in aqueous-organic media and its use in the determination of organic peroxides.

    PubMed

    Demiyanova, Alexandra S; Sakharov, Ivan Yu

    2015-05-07

    High activity of Fe(III)-TAML, peroxidase mimic, upon the catalytic oxidation of luminol in aqueous-organic media (ethanol, isopropanol and acetonitrile) was determined. Using Fe(III)-TAML the sensitive chemiluminescence assays for the determination of benzoyl peroxide and tert-butyl hydroperoxide in the presence of organic solvents were performed.

  19. Nanocrystalline brookite with enhanced stability and photocatalytic activity: influence of lanthanum(III) doping.

    PubMed

    Perego, Céline; Wang, Yu-Heng; Durupthy, Olivier; Cassaignon, Sophie; Revel, Renaud; Jolivet, Jean-Pierre

    2012-02-01

    Metastable TiO(2) polymorphs are more promising materials than rutile for specific applications such as photocatalysis or catalysis support. This was clearly demonstrated for the anatase phase but still under consideration for brookite, which is difficult to obtain as pure phase. Moreover, the surface doping of anatase with lanthanum ions is known to both increase the thermal stability of the metastable phase and improve its photocatalytic activity. In this study, TiO(2) nanoparticles of almost only the brookite structure were prepared by a simple sol-gel procedure in aqueous solution. The nanoparticles were then doped with lanthanum(III) ions. The thermal stability of the nanoparticles was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and kinetic models were successfully applied to quantify phases evolutions. The presence of surface-sorbed lanthanum(III) ions increased the phase stability of at least 200 °C and this temperature shift was attributed to the selective phase stabilization of metastable TiO(2) polymorphs. Moreover, the combination of the surface doping ions and the thermal treatment induces the vanishing of the secondary anatase phase, and the photocatalytic tests on the doped brookite nanoparticles demonstrated that the doping increased photocatalytic activity and that the extent depended on the duration of the sintering treatment.

  20. Increased alpha 2-macroglobulin in diabetes: a hyperglycemia related phenomenon associated with reduced antithrombin III activity.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Stante, A; Dello Russo, P; Torella, R

    1989-01-01

    Increased alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) activity and concentration, and decreased antithrombin III (ATIII) plasma concentration are reported in diabetic subjects. In diabetes an inverse correlation between ATIII activity and blood glucose, HbA1, alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration, and a direct correlation between both alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration with blood glucose and HbA1 are found. Moreover, a direct correlation between alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration fails. In both diabetic and normal subjects induced hyperglycemia increases alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration reduces ATIII activity, while ATIII concentration is not affected. These data which show that hyperglycemia may increase alpha 2M molecule levels while altering only the biological function of ATIII, provide evidence that hyperglycemia may decrease, directly, the biological function of some proteins and may condition the levels of some risk factors for the development of diabetic complications such as alpha 2M.

  1. 1997 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Heather McBride

    1997-07-01

    The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (EPCIL4), Title III, Section 313 [also known as the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA)], as modified by Executive Order 12856, requires all federal facilities to submit an annual Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report every July for the preceding calendar year. Owners and operators of manufacturing, processing, or production facilities are required to report their toxic chemical releases to all environmental mediums (air, water, soil, etc.). At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), nitric acid was the only toxic chemical used in 1997 that met the reportable threshold limit of 10,000 lb. Form R is the only documentation required by the Environmental Protection Agency, and it is included in the appendix of this report. This report, as requested by DOE, is provided for documentation purposes. In addition, a detailed description of the evaluation and reporting process for chemicals and processes at LANL has been included.

  2. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC); they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT) mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease. PMID:27518095

  3. Purification, enzymatic properties, and active site environment of a novel manganese(III)-containing acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Y; Kawabe, H; Tanaka, H; Fujimoto, S; Ohara, A

    1981-10-25

    A new manganese-containing acid phosphatase has been isolated and crystallized from sweet potato tubers. The pure enzyme contains one atom of manganese per Mr = 110,000 polypeptide and shows phosphatase activity toward various phosphate substrates. The pH optimum of the enzyme was 5.8 and the enzyme activity was inhibited by Cu2+, Zn2+, Hg2+, AsO43-, and MoO42-. This stable metalloenzyme is red-violet in color with an intense absorption band at 515 nm (epsilon - 2460). Our electronic, circular dichroism, and electron spin resonance findings strongly indicate that the Mn-valence state of the native enzyme is trivalent. When the Mn-enzyme is excited by the 5145 A line of Ar+ laser, prominent Raman lines at 1230, 1298, 1508, and 1620 cm-1 were detected. This Raman spectrum can probably be interpreted in terms of internal vibration of a coordinated tyrosine phenolate anion. The tryptophan-modified enzyme showed a positive Raman band at 370 cm-1, which is preferentially assigned to a Mn(III)-S streching mode. The modification of the Mn-enzyme by N-bromosuccinimide led to a large decrease in the fluorescence intensity of 335 nm which was dominated by its tryptophan residues within a considerable hydrophobic environment. The acid phosphatase activity was significantly decreased by the tryptophan modification. With respect to the active site donor sets, the Mn(III)-containing acid phosphatase is distinctly different from the Zn(II)-containing alkaline phosphatase. Of interest is also the appreciable similarity of some enzymatic and spectroscopic properties between the present enzyme and uteroferrin.

  4. Title III list of lists: Consolidated list of chemicals subject to the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act, as amended. Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The consolidated chemical list includes chemicals subject to reporting requirements under Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), also known as the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), and chemicals listed under section 112(r) of Title III the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990. This consolidated list has been prepared to help firms handling chemicals determine whether they need to submit reports under sections 302, 304, or 313 of SARA Title III (EPCRA) and, for a specific chemical, what reports may need to be submitted. Separate lists are also provided of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste streams and unlisted hazardous wastes, and of radionuclides reportable under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). These lists should be used as reference tool, not as a definitive source of compliance information. The chemicals on the consolidated list are ordered by Chemical Abstract Service (CAS) registry number. Categories of chemicals, which do not have CAS registry numbers, but which are cited under CERCLA, EPCRA section 313, and the CAA, are placed at the end of the list. More than one chemical name may be listed for one CAS number, because the same chemical may appear on different lists under different names.

  5. Title III list of lists: Consolidated list of chemicals subject to the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act, as ammended. Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This consolidated list has been prepared to help firms handling chemicals determine whether they need to submit reports under sections 302, 304, or 313 of SARA Title III (EPCRA) and, for a specific chemical, what reports may need to be submitted. It will also help firms determine whether they will be subject to accident prevention regulations under CAA section 112(r). Separate lists are also provided of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste streams and unlisted hazardous wastes, and of radionuclides reportable under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). These lists should be used as a reference tool, not as a definitive source of compliance information.

  6. Photosynthetic activity and protein overexpression found in Cr(III)-tolerant cells of the green algae Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M; Bartolomé, C M; Sánchez-Fortún, S

    2014-08-01

    Chromium is an important constituent in effluents obtained from chromium plating industries. Due to the highly toxic nature of Cr(VI), attention has been shifted to less hazardous Cr(III) electroplating processes. This study evaluated aquatic toxicity of Cr(III)-containing laboratory samples representative of effluents from chromium electroplating industries, on the photosynthetic activity exhibited by both Cr(III)-sensitive (Dc1M(wt)) and tolerant (Dc1M(Cr(III)R30)) Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides strains. Additionally, selected de novo-determined peptide sequences, obtained from Dc1M(Cr(III)R30), have been analyzed to evidence the possible Cr(III) toxic mechanism involved in the resistance of these cells to high Cr(III) levels in aquatic environments. Dc1M(Cr(III)R30) strain exhibited a gross photosynthetic balance of about five times lower than that exhibited by Dc1M(wt) strain, demonstrating that Dc1M(Cr(III)R30) has a photosynthetic yield significantly lower than Dc1M(wt). SDS-PAGE of Dc1M(Cr(III)R30) samples showed the presence of at least two protein bands (23.05 and 153.46 KDa, respectively) absent in wild-type strain samples. Although it has achieved a low coincidence between the lower molecular weight band and a GTPase identified from genome of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, none of de novo peptide sequences obtained showed a significant MS-BLAST score, so that further studies will be required.

  7. LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. III. CO-EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLE GROWTH AND STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY?

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Hernan-Caballero, Antonio; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang Yiping; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-03-10

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78 Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} using [Ne III] 15.56 {mu}m and optical [O III] {lambda}5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear {approx}1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 {mu}m PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy.

  8. Dietary intake, physical activity, body mass index, and childhood asthma in the Third National Health And Nutrition Survey (NHANES III).

    PubMed

    Romieu, Isabelle; Mannino, David M; Redd, Stephen C; McGeehin, Michael A

    2004-07-01

    Childhood asthma may be affected by dietary changes and increased body mass related to a sedentary lifestyle, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. To test this hypothesis, we used data from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES III) from 1988-1994, including 7,904 children. We analyzed cross-sectional information on body mass index (BMI = weight/height2), physical activity (hr/day viewing television), dietary intake (24-hr recall), and vitamin C intake (60 mg/day). The probability of self-reported asthma or wheezing relating to risk factors was calculated by logistic regression. After controlling for dietary intake, physical activity, and sociodemographic variables, asthma risk was three times higher for children aged 6-16 years in the highest percentiles of BMI (>95th percentile) when compared to children in percentiles 25-49 (OR = 3.44; 95% CI, 1.49-7.96). No increase was observed in children aged 2-5 years. Low vitamin C intake was marginally related to self-reported current wheezing in children aged 6-16 years. Our results show that increased BMI may influence asthma prevalence in children, but further investigation is needed.

  9. ESCRT-III activation by parallel action of ESCRT-I/II and ESCRT-0/Bro1 during MVB biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shaogeng; Buchkovich, Nicholas J; Henne, W Mike; Banjade, Sudeep; Kim, Yun Jung; Emr, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) pathway facilitates multiple fundamental membrane remodeling events. Previously, we determined X-ray crystal structures of ESCRT-III subunit Snf7, the yeast CHMP4 ortholog, in its active and polymeric state (Tang et al., 2015). However, how ESCRT-III activation is coordinated by the upstream ESCRT components at endosomes remains unclear. Here, we provide a molecular explanation for the functional divergence of structurally similar ESCRT-III subunits. We characterize novel mutations in ESCRT-III Snf7 that trigger activation, and identify a novel role of Bro1, the yeast ALIX ortholog, in Snf7 assembly. We show that upstream ESCRTs regulate Snf7 activation at both its N-terminal core domain and the C-terminus α6 helix through two parallel ubiquitin-dependent pathways: the ESCRT-I-ESCRT-II-Vps20 pathway and the ESCRT-0-Bro1 pathway. We therefore provide an enhanced understanding for the activation of the spatially unique ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15507.001 PMID:27074665

  10. ESCRT-III activation by parallel action of ESCRT-I/II and ESCRT-0/Bro1 during MVB biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaogeng; Buchkovich, Nicholas J; Henne, W Mike; Banjade, Sudeep; Kim, Yun Jung; Emr, Scott D

    2016-04-13

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) pathway facilitates multiple fundamental membrane remodeling events. Previously, we determined X-ray crystal structures of ESCRT-III subunit Snf7, the yeast CHMP4 ortholog, in its active and polymeric state (Tang et al., 2015). However, how ESCRT-III activation is coordinated by the upstream ESCRT components at endosomes remains unclear. Here, we provide a molecular explanation for the functional divergence of structurally similar ESCRT-III subunits. We characterize novel mutations in ESCRT-III Snf7 that trigger activation, and identify a novel role of Bro1, the yeast ALIX ortholog, in Snf7 assembly. We show that upstream ESCRTs regulate Snf7 activation at both its N-terminal core domain and the C-terminus α6 helix through two parallel ubiquitin-dependent pathways: the ESCRT-I-ESCRT-II-Vps20 pathway and the ESCRT-0-Bro1 pathway. We therefore provide an enhanced understanding for the activation of the spatially unique ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling.

  11. Concomitant Carboxylate and Oxalate Formation From the Activation of CO2 by a Thorium(III) Complex

    PubMed Central

    Formanuik, Alasdair; Ortu, Fabrizio; Inman, Christopher J.; Kerridge, Andrew; Castro, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Improving our comprehension of diverse CO2 activation pathways is of vital importance for the widespread future utilization of this abundant greenhouse gas. CO2 activation by uranium(III) complexes is now relatively well understood, with oxo/carbonate formation predominating as CO2 is readily reduced to CO, but isolated thorium(III) CO2 activation is unprecedented. We show that the thorium(III) complex, [Th(Cp′′)3] (1, Cp′′={C5H3(SiMe3)2‐1,3}), reacts with CO2 to give the mixed oxalate‐carboxylate thorium(IV) complex [{Th(Cp′′)2[κ2‐O2C{C5H3‐3,3′‐(SiMe3)2}]}2(μ‐κ2:κ2‐C2O4)] (3). The concomitant formation of oxalate and carboxylate is unique for CO2 activation, as in previous examples either reduction or insertion is favored to yield a single product. Therefore, thorium(III) CO2 activation can differ from better understood uranium(III) chemistry. PMID:27714966

  12. Synthesis, Characterization, DNA Interaction, and Antitumor Activities of La (III) Complex with Schiff Base Ligand Derived from Kaempferol and Diethylenetriamine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Huang, Yu; Zhang, Jin-Sheng; Yang, Xin-Bin

    2014-01-01

    A novel La (III) complex, [LaL(H2O)3]NO3·3H2O, with Schiff base ligand L derived from kaempferol and diethylenetriamine, has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-visible, 1H NMR, thermogravimetric analysis, and molar conductance measurements. The fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism spectra, and viscosity measurements and gel electrophoresis experiments indicated that the ligand L and La (III) complex could bind to CT-DNA presumably via intercalative mode and the La (III) complex showed a stronger ability to bind and cleave DNA than the ligand L alone. The binding constants (Kb) were evaluated from fluorescence data and the values ranged from 0.454 to 0.659 × 105 L mol−1 and 1.71 to 17.3 × 105 L mol−1 for the ligand L and La (III) complex, respectively, in the temperature range of 298–310 K. It was also found that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of EB-DNA by ligand L and La (III) complex was a static quenching process. In comparison to free ligand L, La (III) complex exhibited enhanced cytotoxic activities against tested tumor cell lines HL-60 and HepG-2, which may correlate with the enhanced DNA binding and cleaving abilities of the La (III) complex. PMID:25371657

  13. Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Kinch, Lisa N; Salomon, Dor; Tomchick, Diana R; Grishin, Nick V; Orth, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered that Vibrio parahaemolyticus VtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure of VtrA/VtrC with bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15718.001 PMID:27377244

  14. Chromatin-dependent regulation of RNA polymerases II and III activity throughout the transcription cycle.

    PubMed

    Jordán-Pla, Antonio; Gupta, Ishaan; de Miguel-Jiménez, Lola; Steinmetz, Lars M; Chávez, Sebastián; Pelechano, Vicent; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2015-01-01

    The particular behaviour of eukaryotic RNA polymerases along different gene regions and amongst distinct gene functional groups is not totally understood. To cast light onto the alternative active or backtracking states of RNA polymerase II, we have quantitatively mapped active RNA polymerases at a high resolution following a new biotin-based genomic run-on (BioGRO) technique. Compared with conventional profiling with chromatin immunoprecipitation, the analysis of the BioGRO profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that RNA polymerase II has unique activity profiles at both gene ends, which are highly dependent on positioned nucleosomes. This is the first demonstration of the in vivo influence of positioned nucleosomes on transcription elongation. The particular features at the 5' end and around the polyadenylation site indicate that this polymerase undergoes extensive specific-activity regulation in the initial and final transcription elongation phases. The genes encoding for ribosomal proteins show distinctive features at both ends. BioGRO also provides the first nascentome analysis for RNA polymerase III, which indicates that transcription of tRNA genes is poorly regulated at the individual copy level. The present study provides a novel perspective of the transcription cycle that incorporates inactivation/reactivation as an important aspect of RNA polymerase dynamics.

  15. Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Kinch, Lisa N.; Salomon, Dor; Tomchick, Diana R.; Grishin, Nick V.; Orth, Kim

    2016-07-05

    Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered thatVibrio parahaemolyticusVtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure of VtrA/VtrC with bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment.

  16. Myosin III-mediated cross-linking and stimulation of actin bundling activity of Espin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyang; Li, Jianchao; Raval, Manmeet H; Yao, Ningning; Deng, Xiaoying; Lu, Qing; Nie, Si; Feng, Wei; Wan, Jun; Yengo, Christopher M; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-01-19

    Class III myosins (Myo3) and actin-bundling protein Espin play critical roles in regulating the development and maintenance of stereocilia in vertebrate hair cells, and their defects cause hereditary hearing impairments. Myo3 interacts with Espin1 through its tail homology I motif (THDI), however it is not clear how Myo3 specifically acts through Espin1 to regulate the actin bundle assembly and stabilization. Here we discover that Myo3 THDI contains a pair of repeat sequences capable of independently and strongly binding to the ankyrin repeats of Espin1, revealing an unexpected Myo3-mediated cross-linking mechanism of Espin1. The structures of Myo3 in complex with Espin1 not only elucidate the mechanism of the binding, but also reveal a Myo3-induced release of Espin1 auto-inhibition mechanism. We also provide evidence that Myo3-mediated cross-linking can further promote actin fiber bundling activity of Espin1.

  17. Control of type III secretion activity and substrate specificity by the cytoplasmic regulator PcrG

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pei-Chung; Zmina, Stephanie Elizabeth; Stopford, Charles Morgan; Toska, Jonida; Rietsch, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria use syringe-like type III secretion systems (T3SS) to inject effector proteins directly into targeted host cells. Effector secretion is triggered by host cell contact, and before contact is prevented by a set of conserved regulators. How these regulators interface with the T3SS apparatus to control secretion is unclear. We present evidence that the proton motive force (pmf) drives T3SS secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and that the cytoplasmic regulator PcrG interacts with distinct components of the T3SS apparatus to control two important aspects of effector secretion: (i) It coassembles with a second regulator (Pcr1) on the inner membrane T3SS component PcrD to prevent effectors from accessing the T3SS, and (ii) In conjunction with PscO, it controls protein secretion activity by modulating the ability of T3SS to convert pmf. PMID:24778208

  18. Carbonic anhydrase III regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}2

    SciTech Connect

    Mitterberger, Maria C.; Kim, Geumsoo; Rostek, Ursula; Levine, Rodney L.; Zwerschke, Werner

    2012-05-01

    Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII) is an isoenzyme of the CA family. Because of its low specific anhydrase activity, physiological functions in addition to hydrating CO{sub 2} have been proposed. CAIII expression is highly induced in adipogenesis and CAIII is the most abundant protein in adipose tissues. The function of CAIII in both preadipocytes and adipocytes is however unknown. In the present study we demonstrate that adipogenesis is greatly increased in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from CAIII knockout (KO) mice, as demonstrated by a greater than 10-fold increase in the induction of fatty acid-binding protein-4 (FABP4) and increased triglyceride formation in CAIII{sup -/-} MEFs compared with CAIII{sup +/+} cells. To address the underlying mechanism, we investigated the expression of the two adipogenic key regulators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-{alpha}. We found a considerable (approximately 1000-fold) increase in the PPAR{gamma}2 expression in the CAIII{sup -/-} MEFs. Furthermore, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous CAIII in NIH 3T3-L1 preadipocytes resulted in a significant increase in the induction of PPAR{gamma}2 and FABP4. When both CAIII and PPAR{gamma}2 were knocked down, FABP4 was not induced. We conclude that down-regulation of CAIII in preadipocytes enhances adipogenesis and that CAIII is a regulator of adipogenic differentiation which acts at the level of PPAR{gamma}2 gene expression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discover a novel function of Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that CAIII is a regulator of adipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that CAIII acts at the level of PPAR{gamma}2 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our data contribute to a better understanding of the role of CAIII in fat tissue.

  19. Characterization and Properties of Activated Carbon Prepared from Tamarind Seeds by KOH Activation for Fe(III) Adsorption from Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Mopoung, Sumrit; Moonsri, Phansiri; Palas, Wanwimon; Khumpai, Sataporn

    2015-01-01

    This research studies the characterization of activated carbon from tamarind seed with KOH activation. The effects of 0.5 : 1-1.5 : 1 KOH : tamarind seed charcoal ratios and 500-700°C activation temperatures were studied. FTIR, SEM-EDS, XRD, and BET were used to characterize tamarind seed and the activated carbon prepared from them. Proximate analysis, percent yield, iodine number, methylene blue number, and preliminary test of Fe(III) adsorption were also studied. Fe(III) adsorption was carried out by 30 mL column with 5-20 ppm Fe(III) initial concentrations. The percent yield of activated carbon prepared from tamarind seed with KOH activation decreased with increasing activation temperature and impregnation ratios, which were in the range from 54.09 to 82.03 wt%. The surface functional groups of activated carbon are O-H, C=O, C-O, -CO3, C-H, and Si-H. The XRD result showed high crystallinity coming from a potassium compound in the activated carbon. The main elements found in the activated carbon by EDS are C, O, Si, and K. The results of iodine and methylene blue adsorption indicate that the pore size of the activated carbon is mostly in the range of mesopore and macropore. The average BET pore size and BET surface area of activated carbon are 67.9764 Å and 2.7167 m(2)/g, respectively. Finally, the tamarind seed based activated carbon produced with 500°C activation temperature and 1.0 : 1 KOH : tamarind seed charcoal ratio was used for Fe(III) adsorption test. It was shown that Fe(III) was adsorbed in alkaline conditions and adsorption increased with increasing Fe(III) initial concentration from 5 to 20 ppm with capacity adsorption of 0.0069-0.019 mg/g.

  20. In vivo anti-radiation activities of the Ulva pertusa polysaccharides and polysaccharide-iron(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinming; Cheng, Cuilin; Zhao, Haitian; Jing, Jing; Gong, Ning; Lu, Weihong

    2013-09-01

    Polysaccharides with different molecular weights were extracted from Ulva pertusa and fractionated by ultrafiltration. Iron(III) complex of the low molecular-weight U. pertusa polysaccharides were synthesized. Atomic absorption spectrum showed that the iron content of iron(III)-polysaccharide complex was 27.4%. The comparison between U. pertusa polysaccharides and their iron(III) complex showed that iron chelating altered the structural characteristics of the polysaccharides. The bioactivity analysis showed that polysaccharide with low molecular weight was more effective than polysaccharide with high molecular weight in protecting mice from radiation induced damages on bone marrow cells and immune system. Results also proved that the anti-radiation and anti-oxidative activity of iron(III) complex of low molecular-weight polysaccharides were not less than that of low molecular-weight polysaccharides.

  1. Utilizing avidity to improve antifreeze protein activity: a type III antifreeze protein trimer exhibits increased thermal hysteresis activity.

    PubMed

    Can, Özge; Holland, Nolan B

    2013-12-03

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice growth inhibitors that allow the survival of several species living at temperatures colder than the freezing point of their bodily fluids. AFP activity is commonly defined in terms of thermal hysteresis, which is the difference observed for the solution freezing and melting temperatures. Increasing the thermal hysteresis activity of these proteins, particularly at low concentrations, is of great interest because of their wide range of potential applications. In this study, we have designed and expressed one-, two-, and three-domain antifreeze proteins to improve thermal hysteresis activity through increased binding avidity. The three-domain type III AFP yielded significantly greater activity than the one- and two-domain proteins, reaching a thermal hysteresis of >1.6 °C at a concentration of <1 mM. To elucidate the basis of this increase, the data were fit to a multidomain protein adsorption model based on the classical Langmuir isotherm. Fits of the data to the modified isotherms yield values for the equilibrium binding constants for the adsorption of AFP to ice and indicate that protein surface coverage is proportional to thermal hysteresis activity.

  2. Apelin-13 impedes foam cell formation by activating Class III PI3K/Beclin-1-mediated autophagic pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Feng; Lv, Yun-Cheng; Zhang, Min; Xie, Wei; Tan, Yu-Lin; Gong, Duo; Cheng, Hai-Peng; Liu, Dan; Li, Liang; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Xi-Long; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2015-10-30

    Apelin-13, an adipokine, promotes cholesterol efflux in macrophages with antiatherosclerotic effect. Autophagy, an evolutionarily ancient response to cellular stress, has been involved in atherosclerosis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether apelin-13 regulates macrophage foam cell cholesterol metabolism through autophagy, and also explore the underlying mechanisms. Here, we revealed that apelin-13 decreased lipid accumulation in THP-1 derived macrophages through markedly enhancing cholesterol efflux. Our study further demonstrated that apelin-13 induced autophagy via activation of Class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and Beclin-1. Inhibition of Class III PI3K and Beclin-1 suppressed the stimulatory effects of apelin-13 on autophagy activity. The present study concluded that apelin-13 reduces lipid accumulation of foam cells by activating autophagy via Class III PI3K/Beclin-1 pathway. Therefore, our results provide brand new insight about apelin-13 inhibiting foam cell formation and highlight autophagy as a promising therapeutic target in atherosclerosis.

  3. Synthesis, structures and urease inhibitory activity of cobalt(III) complexes with Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Jing, Changling; Wang, Cunfang; Yan, Kai; Zhao, Kedong; Sheng, Guihua; Qu, Dan; Niu, Fang; Zhu, Hailiang; You, Zhonglu

    2016-01-15

    A series of new cobalt(III) complexes were prepared. They are [CoL(1)(py)3]·NO3 (1), [CoL(2)(bipy)(N3)]·CH3OH (2), [CoL(3)(HL(3))(N3)]·NO3 (3), and [CoL(4)(MeOH)(N3)] (4), where L(1), L(2), L(3) and L(4) are the deprotonated form of N'-(2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzylidene)-3-methylbenzohydrazide, N'-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-3-hydroxylbenzohydrazide, 2-[(2-dimethylaminoethylimino)methyl]-4-methylphenol, and N,N'-bis(5-methylsalicylidene)-o-phenylenediamine, respectively, py is pyridine, and bipy is 2,2'-bipyridine. The complexes were characterized by infrared and UV-Vis spectra, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The Co atoms in the complexes are in octahedral coordination. Complexes 1 and 4 show effective urease inhibitory activities, with IC50 values of 4.27 and 0.35 μmol L(-1), respectively. Complex 2 has medium activity against urease, with IC50 value of 68.7 μmol L(-1). While complex 3 has no activity against urease. Molecular docking study of the complexes with Helicobacter pylori urease was performed.

  4. Group III alcohol dehydrogenase from Pectobacterium atrosepticum: insights into enzymatic activity and organization of the metal ion-containing region.

    PubMed

    Elleuche, Skander; Fodor, Krisztian; von der Heyde, Amélie; Klippel, Barbara; Wilmanns, Matthias; Antranikian, Garabed

    2014-05-01

    NAD(P)(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) are widely distributed in all phyla. These proteins can be assigned to three nonhomologous groups of isozymes, with group III being highly diverse with regards to catalytic activity and primary structure. Members of group III ADHs share a conserved stretch of amino acid residues important for cofactor binding and metal ion coordination, while sequence identities for complete proteins are highly diverse (<20 to >90 %). A putative group III ADH PaYqhD has been identified in BLAST analysis from the plant pathogenic enterobacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum. The PaYqhD gene was expressed in the heterologous host Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein was purified in a two-step purification procedure to homogeneity indicating an obligate dimerization of monomers. Four conserved amino acid residues involved in metal ion coordination were substituted with alanine, and their importance for catalytic activity was confirmed by circular dichroism spectrum determination, in vitro, and growth experiments. PaYqhD exhibits optimal activity at 40 °C with short carbon chain aldehyde compounds and NADPH as cofactor indicating the enzyme to be an aldehyde reductase. No oxidative activities towards alcoholic compounds were detectable. EDTA completely inhibited catalytic activity and was fully restored by the addition of Co(2+). Activity measurements together with sequence alignments and structure analysis confirmed that PaYqhD belongs to the butanol dehydrogenase-like enzymes within group III of ADHs.

  5. Visible light photocatalytic activity induced by Rh(III) modification on the surface of BiOCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinli; Wu, Xin; Huang, Caijin; Fan, Wenjie; Qiu, Xiaoqing

    2016-11-01

    Using impregnation technique, a small amount of Rh(III) clusters has been grafted on the BiOCl microflowers. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy coupled with high energy distribution X-ray, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activities are investigated by the decomposition of gaseous acetaldehyde under irradiation of visible light. The bare BiOCl microflowers exhibit the limited visible light photocatalytic activity because of its wide band gap. After surface modification of Rh(III) clusters, the Rh(III)-BiOCl samples show an enhanced photocatalytic activity for the decomposition gaseous acetaldehyde under visible light irradiation. It is found that the Rh(III) clusters play an important role for the visible light absorption, probably through the electron transfer between Rh(III) clusters and the BiOCl, as well as the redox reaction centers for the multi-electron reduction of O2.

  6. Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III Overexpression By Gene Therapy Exerts Antitumoral Activity In Mouse Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    González, Raúl; De la Rosa, Ángel J; Romero-Brufau, Santiago; Barrera-Pulido, Lydia; Gallardo-Chamizo, Francisco; Pereira, Sheila; Marín, Luís M; Álamo, José M; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ángeles; Padillo, Francisco J; Muntané, Jordi

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma develops in cirrhotic liver. The nitric oxide (NO) synthase type III (NOS-3) overexpression induces cell death in hepatoma cells. The study developed gene therapy designed to specifically overexpress NOS-3 in cultured hepatoma cells, and in tumors derived from orthotopically implanted tumor cells in fibrotic livers. Liver fibrosis was induced by CCl4 administration in mice. Hepa 1-6 cells were used for in vitro and in vivo experiments. The first generation adenovirus was designed to overexpress NOS-3 (or GFP) and luciferase cDNA under the regulation of murine alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and Rous Sarcoma Virus (RSV) promoters, respectively. Both adenoviruses were administered through the tail vein two weeks after orthotopic tumor cell implantation. AFP-NOS-3/RSV-Luciferase increased oxidative-related DNA damage, p53, CD95/CD95L expression and caspase-8 activity in cultured Hepa 1-6 cells. The increased expression of CD95/CD95L and caspase-8 activity was abolished by l-NAME or p53 siRNA. The tail vein infusion of AFP-NOS- 3/RSV-Luciferase adenovirus increased cell death markers, and reduced cell proliferation of established tumors in fibrotic livers. The increase of oxidative/nitrosative stress induced by NOS-3 overexpression induced DNA damage, p53, CD95/CD95L expression and cell death in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The effectiveness of the gene therapy has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Remarkable in vitro bactericidal activity of bismuth(III) sulfonates against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Philip C; Busse, Madleen; Deacon, Glen B; Ferrero, Richard L; Junk, Peter C; MacLellan, Jonathan G; Vom, Amelia

    2012-10-14

    Four new tris-substituted bismuth(III) sulfonates of general formula [Bi(O(3)SR)(3)] (R = phenyl 1, p-tolyl 2, 2,4,6-mesityl 3 and S-(+)-10-camphoryl 4) have been synthesised and characterised. Their synthesis by solvent-free (SF) and solvent-mediated (SM) methods has been explored and their activity against Helicobacter pylori has been investigated. The compounds 1-4 display a remarkable in vitro activity against three laboratory strains of H. pylori (B128, 26,695 and 251) with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values as low as 0.049 μg mL(-1) for the strains B128 and 26,695, and 0.781 μg mL(-1) for the clinical isolate 251. This places most MIC values in the nano-molar region and demonstrates the strong influence of the sulfonate group on the bactericidal properties. The novel solid state structure [Bi(8)(O(3)SMes)(20)(SO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(6)]·(C(7)H(8))(7)5·(C(7)H(8))(7), derived from the SM reaction under reflux conditions, is presented and the incorporation of the two inorganic sulfate anions in the centre of the wheel-like bismuth sulfonate cluster explained.

  8. Associations between DSM-5 section III personality traits and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scales in a psychiatric patient sample.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jaime L; Sellbom, Martin; Ayearst, Lindsay; Quilty, Lena C; Chmielewski, Michael; Bagby, R Michael

    2015-09-01

    Our aim in the current study was to evaluate the convergence between Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5) Section III dimensional personality traits, as operationalized via the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5), and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scale scores in a psychiatric patient sample. We used a sample of 346 (171 men, 175 women) patients who were recruited through a university-affiliated psychiatric facility in Toronto, Canada. We estimated zero-order correlations between the PID-5 and MMPI-2-RF substantive scale scores, as well as a series of exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) analyses to examine how these scales converged in multivariate latent space. Results generally showed empirical convergence between the scales of these two measures that were thematically meaningful and in accordance with conceptual expectations. Correlation analyses showed significant associations between conceptually expected scales, and the highest associations tended to be between scales that were theoretically related. ESEM analyses generated evidence for distinct internalizing, externalizing, and psychoticism factors across all analyses. These findings indicate convergence between these two measures and help further elucidate the associations between dysfunctional personality traits and general psychopathology.

  9. Synthesis of activated carbon-based amino phosphonic acid chelating resin and its adsorption properties for Ce(III) removal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Yan, Chunjie; Wang, Yixia; Tang, Conghai; Zhou, Sen; Zhao, Yuan; Ma, Rui; Duan, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the adsorption of Ce(III) onto chelating resin based on activated carbon (CRAC). The CRAC adsorbent was prepared from activated carbon (AC) followed by oxidation, silane coupling, ammoniation and phosphorylation, and characterized by Fourier transform-infrared spectrometry, nitrogen adsorption measurements and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of solution pH, adsorbent dosage and contact time were studied by batch technique. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were used to describe the adsorption behaviour of Ce(III) by CRAC, and the results showed that the adsorption behaviour well fitted the Langmuir model. The maximum uptake capacity (qmax) calculated by using the Langmuir equation for cerium ions was found to be 94.34 mg/g. A comparison of the kinetic models and the overall experimental data was best fitted with the type 1 pseudo second-order kinetic model. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°) showed that the adsorption for Ce(III) was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic at 25-45 °C. The CRAC showed an excellent adsorptive selectivity towards Ce(III). Moreover, more than 82% of Ce(III) adsorbed onto CRAC could be desorbed with HCl and could be used several times.

  10. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION OF MICE WITH THE POLYSACCHARIDES OF PNEUMOCOCCI TYPES I, II AND III

    PubMed Central

    Zozaya, José; Clark, Janet

    1933-01-01

    1. Pneumococcus polysaccharides Types I, II and III adsorbed on collodion particles, and Types I and III adsorbed on carbon (norit) are antigenic in mice. 2. Unadsorbed pneumococcus polysaccharide of Type I is antigenic in mice in proper dilution. One preparation of Type II polysaccharide was not antigenic, while another one immunized against Types I and II. Type III polysaccharide was only slightly antigenic against Type III but immunized against Type I. 3. The antigenicity of pneumococcus polysaccharide in optimal dosage is tentatively explained by an adsorption phenomenon taking place in the body in instances in which the polysaccharides had not been adsorbed before injection. 4. The aggressin-like action of large doses of pneumococcus polysaccharides Types I, II and III is further established. PMID:19870119

  11. Transcriptional activation of Xenopus class III genes in chromatin isolated from sperm and somatic nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Wolffe, A P

    1989-01-01

    Xenopus sperm chromatin lacks class III transcription complexes and somatic histone H1. Inactive class III genes in sperm chromatin are easily programmed with transcription complexes de novo and transcribed in Xenopus oocyte nuclear extract. In contrast, repressed class III genes in somatic chromatin are not transcribed in the oocyte nuclear extract. Class III genes that are initially inactive or repressed in both types of chromatin can be efficiently transcribed in a cell free preparation of Xenopus eggs. Chromatin mediated repression of class III genes in somatic nuclei is reversible in Xenopus egg extract, but not in the oocyte nuclear extract. Any inhibition of transcription attributed to chromatin assembly onto a gene, will therefore depend on the extract in which transcription is assayed. Images PMID:2915929

  12. 2002 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stockton

    2003-11-01

    For reporting year 2002, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds and mercury as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2002 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical usage and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2002 as well as provide background information about the data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999 EPA promulgated a final rule on Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable under EPCRA Section 313. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  13. III. The importance of physical activity and aerobic fitness for cognitive control and memory in children.

    PubMed

    Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Hillman, Charles H; Cohen, Neal J; Kramer, Arthur F

    2014-12-01

    In this chapter, we review literature that examines the association among physical activity, aerobic fitness, cognition, and the brain in elementary school children (ages 7-10 years). Specifically, physical activity and higher levels of aerobic fitness in children have been found to benefit brain structure, brain function, cognition, and school achievement. For example, higher fit children have larger brain volumes in the basal ganglia and hippocampus, which relate to superior performance on tasks of cognitive control and memory, respectively, when compared to their lower fit peers. Higher fit children also show superior brain function during tasks of cognitive control, better scores on tests of academic achievement, and higher performance on a real-world street crossing task, compared to lower fit and less active children. The cross-sectional findings are strengthened by a few randomized, controlled trials, which demonstrate that children randomly assigned to a physical activity intervention group show greater brain and cognitive benefits compared to a control group. Because these findings suggest that the developing brain is plastic and sensitive to lifestyle factors, we also discuss typical structural and functional brain maturation in children to provide context in which to interpret the effects of physical activity and aerobic fitness on the developing brain. This research is important because children are becoming increasingly sedentary, physically inactive, and unfit. An important goal of this review is to emphasize the importance of physical activity and aerobic fitness for the cognitive and brain health of today's youth.

  14. Simultaneous demonstration of bone alkaline and acid phosphatase activities in plastic-embedded sections and differential inhibition of the activities.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Sanghvi, R; Burnell, J M; Howard, G A

    1987-01-01

    Bone alkaline (AlP) and acid phosphatase (AcP) activities were simultaneously demonstrated in tissue sections obtained from mice, rats, and humans. The method involved tissue fixation in ethanol, embedding in glycol methacrylate (GMA), and demonstration of AlP and AcP activities employing a simultaneous coupling azo dye technique using substituted naphthol phosphate as a substrate. AlP activity was demonstrated first followed by AcP activity. Both enzyme activities were demonstrated in tissue sections from bones fixed and/or stored in acetone or 70% ethanol for up to 14 days or stored in GMA for 2 months. AlP activity in tissue sections from bones fixed in 10% formalin, 2% glutaraldehyde, or formal-calcium, however, was markedly inhibited after 3-7 days and was no longer detectable after 14 days of fixation. Moreover, AlP activity was diminished in tissue sections from bones fixed in 70% ethanol or 10% formalin and subsequently demineralized in 10% EDTA (pH 7) for 2 days, and the activity was completely abolished in tissue sections from bones subsequently demineralized in 5% formic acid: 20% sodium citrate (1:1, pH 4.2) for 2 days. Methyl methacrylate (MMA) embedding at concentrations above 66% completely inhibited AlP activity. AcP activity, however, was only partially inhibited by formalin, glutaraldehyde, or formal-calcium after 7 or 14 days of fixation or by MMA embedding and was unaffected by the demineralizing agent formic acid-citrate for 2 days. While AcP activity was preserved in bones fixed in formalin and subsequently demineralized in EDTA, the activity was completely abolished when EDTA demineralization was carried out on bones previously fixed in 70% ethanol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. 2004 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stockton

    2006-01-15

    Section 313 of Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. For reporting year 2004, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds, nitric acid, and nitrate compounds as required under the EPCRA Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2004 above the reportable thresholds. This document provides a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2004, as well as background information about data included on the Form R reports.

  16. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  17. Template synthesis, spectroscopic studies, antimicrobial, nematicidal and pesticidal activities of chromium(III) macrocyclic complexes.

    PubMed

    Masih, Iffat; Fahmi, Nighat; Rajkumar

    2013-02-01

    A new series of Cr(III) macrocyclic complexes have been synthesized by template condensation of ligands 2-[4-chloro-2-(2-oxo-1,2-diphenyl-ethylideneamino)-phenylimino]-1,2-diphenyl-ethanone (ML(1)) and 2-[4-fluro-2-(2-oxo-1,2-diphenyl-ethylideneamino)-phenylimino]-1,2-diphenyl-ethanone (ML(2)) respectively, with appropriate diamines i.e. 1,2-phenylenediamine, 4- chloro 1,2-phenylenediamine and 4-fluro- 1,2-phenylenediamine in the presence of CrCl(3).6H(2)O. The ligands and their complexes have been characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, molecular weight determinations, conductance and magnetic susceptibility measurements and spectral studies including IR, ESR, electronic spectra and X-ray powder diffraction studies. On the basis of these studies, a six-coordinated octahedral geometry has been proposed for all these complexes. The newly synthesized ligands and their complexes have been screened for their antimicrobial, nematicidal and pesticidal activities. The results are indeed positive.

  18. Myosin III-mediated cross-linking and stimulation of actin bundling activity of Espin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiyang; Li, Jianchao; Raval, Manmeet H; Yao, Ningning; Deng, Xiaoying; Lu, Qing; Nie, Si; Feng, Wei; Wan, Jun; Yengo, Christopher M; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-01-01

    Class III myosins (Myo3) and actin-bundling protein Espin play critical roles in regulating the development and maintenance of stereocilia in vertebrate hair cells, and their defects cause hereditary hearing impairments. Myo3 interacts with Espin1 through its tail homology I motif (THDI), however it is not clear how Myo3 specifically acts through Espin1 to regulate the actin bundle assembly and stabilization. Here we discover that Myo3 THDI contains a pair of repeat sequences capable of independently and strongly binding to the ankyrin repeats of Espin1, revealing an unexpected Myo3-mediated cross-linking mechanism of Espin1. The structures of Myo3 in complex with Espin1 not only elucidate the mechanism of the binding, but also reveal a Myo3-induced release of Espin1 auto-inhibition mechanism. We also provide evidence that Myo3-mediated cross-linking can further promote actin fiber bundling activity of Espin1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12856.001 PMID:26785147

  19. Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed Enantiotopic C-H Activation Enables Access to P-Chiral Cyclic Phosphinamides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Cramer, Nicolai

    2017-01-02

    Compounds with stereogenic phosphorus atoms are frequently used as ligands for transition-metal as well as organocatalysts. A direct catalytic enantioselective method for the synthesis of P-chiral compounds from easily accessible diaryl phosphinamides is presented. The use of rhodium(III) complexes equipped with a suitable atropochiral cyclopentadienyl ligand is shown to enable an enantiodetermining C-H activation step. Upon trapping with alkynes, a broad variety of cyclic phosphinamides with a stereogenic phosphorus(V) atom are formed in high yields and enantioselectivities. Moreover, these can be reduced enantiospecifically to P-chiral phosphorus(III) compounds.

  20. Regulation of yeast ESCRT-III membrane scission activity by the Doa4 ubiquitin hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Natalie; West, Matt; Odorizzi, Greg

    2017-03-01

    ESCRT-III executes membrane scission during the budding of intralumenal vesicles (ILVs) at endosomes. The scission mechanism is unknown but appears to be linked to the cycle of assembly and disassembly of ESCRT-III complexes at membranes. Regulating this cycle is therefore expected to be important for determining the timing of ESCRT-III-mediated membrane scission. We show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ESCRT-III complexes are stabilized and ILV membrane scission is delayed by Doa4, which is the ubiquitin hydrolase that deubiquitinates transmembrane proteins sorted as cargoes into ILVs. These results suggest a mechanism to delay ILV budding while cargoes undergo deubiquitination. We further show that deubiquitination of ILV cargoes is inhibited via Doa4 binding to Vps20, which is the subunit of ESCRT-III that initiates assembly of the complex. Current models suggest that ESCRT-III complexes surround ubiquitinated cargoes to trap them at the site of ILV budding while the cargoes undergo deubiquitination. Thus our results also propose a mechanism to prevent the onset of ILV cargo deubiquitination at the initiation of ESCRT-III complex assembly.

  1. TATA-box DNA binding activity and subunit composition for RNA polymerase III transcription factor IIIB from Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    McBryant, S J; Meier, E; Leresche, A; Sharp, S J; Wolf, V J; Gottesfeld, J M

    1996-01-01

    The RNA polymerase III transcription initiation factor TFIIIB contains the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP) and polymerase III-specific TBP-associated factors (TAFs). Previous studies have shown that DNA oligonucleotides containing the consensus TATA-box sequence inhibit polymerase III transcription, implying that the DNA binding domain of TBP is exposed in TFIIIB. We have investigated the TATA-box DNA binding activity of Xenopus TFIIIB, using transcription inhibition assays and a gel mobility shift assay. Gel shift competition assays with mutant and nonspecific DNAs demonstrate the specificity of the TFIIIB-TATA box DNA complex. The apparent dissociation constant for this protein-DNA interaction is approximately 0.4 nM, similar to the affinity of yeast TBP for the same sequence. TFIIIB transcriptional activity and TATA-box binding activity cofractionate during a series of four ion-exchange chromatographic steps, and reconstituted transcription reactions demonstrate that the TATA-box DNA-protein complex contains TFIIIB TAF activity. Polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 75 and 92 kDa are associated with TBP in this complex. These polypeptides were renatured after elution from sodium dodecyl sulfate-gels and tested individually and in combination for TFIIIB TAF activity. Recombinant TBP along with protein fractions containing the 75- and 92-kDa polypeptides were sufficient to reconstitute TFIIIB transcriptional activity and DNA binding activity, suggesting that Xenopus TFIIIB is composed of TBP along with these polypeptides. PMID:8756620

  2. 2006 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2007-12-12

    For reporting year 2006, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2006 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2006, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  3. 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01

    For reporting year 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2008 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2008, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  4. Influence of chirality using Mn(III) salen complexes on DNA binding and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Khan, Noor-Ul H; Pandya, Nirali; Kumar, Manoj; Bera, Prasanta Kumar; Kureshy, Rukhsana I; Abdi, Sayed H R; Bajaj, Hari C

    2010-10-07

    Chiral Mn(iii) salen complexes S-1, R-1, S-2, R-2, S-3 and R-3 derived from the respective chiral salen ligands, viz., (1S,2S)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-chloromethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine S-1'/(1R,2R)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-chloromethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine R-1'/(1S,2S)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-N,N'N'triethylaminomethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine dichloride S-2'/(1R,2R)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-N,N'N'triethylaminomethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine dichloride R-2'/(1S,2S)-N,N'-bis-[3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine S-3' and (1R,2R)-N,N'-bis-[3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine R-3', were synthesized. Characterization of the complexes was done by microanalysis, IR, LC-MS, UV-vis. and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Binding of these complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was studied by absorption spectroscopy, competitive binding study, viscosity measurements, circular dichroism measurements, thermal denaturation study and observation of their different antioxidant activities. Among all the complexes used, the best result in terms of binding constant (intercalative) (130.4 x 10(4)) was achieved with the complex S-1 by spectroscopic titration. The complex S-1 showed strong antioxidant activity as well.

  5. Fluorescence studies, DNA binding properties and antimicrobial activity of a dysprosium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Moodi, Asieh; Niroomand, Sona

    2013-10-05

    Luminescence and binding properties of dysprosium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), [Dy(phen)2(OH2)3Cl]Cl2⋅H2O with DNA has been studied by electronic absorption, emission spectroscopy and viscosity measurement. The thermodynamic studies suggest that the interaction process to be endothermic and entropically driven, which indicates that the dysprosium(III) complex might interact with DNA by a non intercalation binding mode. Additionally, the competitive fluorescence study with ethidium bromide and also the effect of iodide ion and salt concentration on fluorescence of the complex-DNA system is investigated. Experimental results indicate that the Dy(III) complex strongly binds to DNA, presumably via groove binding mode. Furthermore, the complex shows a potent antibacterial activity and DNA cleavage ability.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of chromium(III) Schiff base complexes: antimicrobial activity and its electrocatalytic sensing ability of catechol.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Praveen; Suresh, R; Giribabu, K; Manigandan, R; Munusamy, S; Muthamizh, S; Narayanan, V

    2015-03-15

    A series of acyclic Schiff base chromium(III) complexes were synthesized with the aid of microwave irradiation method. The complexes were characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, spectral analysis such as UV-Visible, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry. Electrochemical analysis of the complexes indicates the presence of chromium ion in +3 oxidation state. Cr (III) ion is stabilized by the tetradentate Schiff base ligand through its nitrogen and phenolic oxygen. From the spectral studies it is understood that the synthesized chromium(III) complexes exhibits octahedral geometry. Antimicrobial activity of chromium complexes was investigated towards the Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. In the present work, an attempt was made to fabricate a new kind of modified electrode based on chromium Schiff base complexes for the detection of catechol at nanomolar level.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of chromium(III) Schiff base complexes: Antimicrobial activity and its electrocatalytic sensing ability of catechol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen Kumar, S.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Manigandan, R.; Munusamy, S.; Muthamizh, S.; Narayanan, V.

    2015-03-01

    A series of acyclic Schiff base chromium(III) complexes were synthesized with the aid of microwave irradiation method. The complexes were characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, spectral analysis such as UV-Visible, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry. Electrochemical analysis of the complexes indicates the presence of chromium ion in +3 oxidation state. Cr (III) ion is stabilized by the tetradentate Schiff base ligand through its nitrogen and phenolic oxygen. From the spectral studies it is understood that the synthesized chromium(III) complexes exhibits octahedral geometry. Antimicrobial activity of chromium complexes was investigated towards the Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. In the present work, an attempt was made to fabricate a new kind of modified electrode based on chromium Schiff base complexes for the detection of catechol at nanomolar level.

  8. Consolidated list of chemicals subject to reporting under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act: SARA (Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986) Section 302 Extremely Hazardous Substances, CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) Hazardous Substances and SARA Section 313 Toxic Chemicals (Title III. List of Lists) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, H.

    1990-01-01

    The data file is the disk-based version of the Office of Toxic Substances' consolidated list of chemicals subject to reporting under Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) and SARA Section 302 Extremely Hazardous Substances, as well as CERCLA Hazardous Substances. Title III is also known as the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act. The disks are designed to generate either a printout or a dBase III file from any IBM or IBM compatible system.

  9. Polymer-cobalt(III) complexes: structural analysis of metal chelates on DNA interaction and comparative cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Nehru, Selvan; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam; Arun, Renganathan; Premkumar, Kumpati

    2014-01-01

    A new series of pendant-type polymer-cobalt(III) complexes, [Co(LL)2(BPEI)Cl](2+), (where BPEI = branched polyethyleneimine, LL = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c](6,7,8,9-tetrahydro)phenazine (dpqc), dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq) and imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline (ip)) each with three different degrees of coordination have been synthesized and characterized. Studies to know the mode and strength of interaction between these polymer-metal complexes and calf thymus DNA have been performed by UV-Visible absorption and emission techniques. Among these series, each polymer metal complex having higher binding strength with DNA has been selected to test against human cancer/normal cell lines. On the basis of these spectral studies, it is proposed that our polymer-metal complexes bind with DNA mainly through intercalation along with some electrostatic binding. The order of binding strength for the complexes with ligand, dpqc > dpq > ip. The analysis of the results suggests that polymer-cobalt(III) complexes with higher degree of coordination effectively binds with DNA due to the presence of large number of positively charged cobalt(III) chelates in the polymer chain which cooperatively act to increase the overall binding strength. These polymer-cobalt(III) complexes with hydrophobic ligands around the cobalt(III) metal centre favour the base stacking interactions via intercalation. All the complexes show very good anticancer activities and increasing of binding strength results in higher inhibition value. The polymer-cobalt(III) complex with dpqc ligand possess two fold increased anticancer activity when compared to complexes with other ligands against MCF-7 cells. Besides, the complexes were insensitive towards the growth of normal cells (HEK-293) at the IC50 concentration.

  10. MICROSCOPIC DETERMINATION OF BONE PHOSPHORUS BY QUANTITATIVE AUTORADIOGRAPHY OF NEUTRON-ACTIVATED SECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Jacques; Haumont, Stanislas; Roels, Joseph

    1965-01-01

    Longitudinal sections of human cortical bone were submitted to thermal neutrons. γ-ray spectra were recorded repeatedly during 15 days following irradiation. They showed that Na24 is predominant as early as 3 hours after activation and that all the γ-emitters have decayed on the 15th day. When the γ-rays have disappeared, β-rays are still produced by the sections. It was proved by the absorption curve in aluminium that all these β-rays are issued from the P32 induced in the sections by activation of P31. Therefore autoradiograms registered 15 days after activation reveal the distribution of P32 in the sections. γ-ray spectra and β-ray absorption curves of neutron activated sections of ivory demonstrated a mineral composition similar to that of bone. Autoradiograms of ivory sections activated for various times were used to establish the relation between the optical density of the autoradiograms and the radioactivity in P32. When the bone autoradiograms are compared with the ivory standards of known radioactivity, the optical densities of single osteons (Haversian systems), can be related to their phosphorus contents. Autoradiograms and microradiograms of the same sections were examined side by side. The least calcified osteons, that contain 80 per cent of the calcium of the fully calcified osteons, also contain about 80 per cent of the phosphorus of the fully mineralized osteons. It is concluded that the Ca:P ratio remains constant while mineralization of bone tissue is being completed. PMID:14286295

  11. Structural basis for the endoribonuclease activity of the type III-A CRISPR-associated protein Csm6

    PubMed Central

    Niewoehner, Ole; Jinek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotic CRISPR–Cas systems provide an RNA-guided mechanism for genome defense against mobile genetic elements such as viruses and plasmids. In type III-A CRISPR–Cas systems, the RNA-guided multisubunit Csm effector complex targets both single-stranded RNAs and double-stranded DNAs. In addition to the Csm complex, efficient anti-plasmid immunity mediated by type III-A systems also requires the CRISPR-associated protein Csm6. Here we report the crystal structure of Csm6 from Thermus thermophilus and show that the protein is a ssRNA-specific endoribonuclease. The structure reveals a dimeric architecture generated by interactions involving the N-terminal CARF and C-terminal HEPN domains. HEPN domain dimerization leads to the formation of a composite ribonuclease active site. Consistently, mutations of invariant active site residues impair catalytic activity in vitro. We further show that the ribonuclease activity of Csm6 is conserved across orthologs, suggesting that it plays an important functional role in CRISPR–Cas systems. The dimer interface of the CARF domains features a conserved electropositive pocket that may function as a ligand-binding site for allosteric control of ribonuclease activity. Altogether, our work suggests that Csm6 proteins provide an auxiliary RNA-targeting interference mechanism in type III-A CRISPR–Cas systems that operates in conjunction with the RNA- and DNA-targeting endonuclease activities of the Csm effector complex. PMID:26763118

  12. Structural basis for the endoribonuclease activity of the type III-A CRISPR-associated protein Csm6.

    PubMed

    Niewoehner, Ole; Jinek, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas systems provide an RNA-guided mechanism for genome defense against mobile genetic elements such as viruses and plasmids. In type III-A CRISPR-Cas systems, the RNA-guided multisubunit Csm effector complex targets both single-stranded RNAs and double-stranded DNAs. In addition to the Csm complex, efficient anti-plasmid immunity mediated by type III-A systems also requires the CRISPR-associated protein Csm6. Here we report the crystal structure of Csm6 from Thermus thermophilus and show that the protein is a ssRNA-specific endoribonuclease. The structure reveals a dimeric architecture generated by interactions involving the N-terminal CARF and C-terminal HEPN domains. HEPN domain dimerization leads to the formation of a composite ribonuclease active site. Consistently, mutations of invariant active site residues impair catalytic activity in vitro. We further show that the ribonuclease activity of Csm6 is conserved across orthologs, suggesting that it plays an important functional role in CRISPR-Cas systems. The dimer interface of the CARF domains features a conserved electropositive pocket that may function as a ligand-binding site for allosteric control of ribonuclease activity. Altogether, our work suggests that Csm6 proteins provide an auxiliary RNA-targeting interference mechanism in type III-A CRISPR-Cas systems that operates in conjunction with the RNA- and DNA-targeting endonuclease activities of the Csm effector complex.

  13. Measurements of the neutron activation cross sections for Bi and Co at 386 MeV.

    PubMed

    Yashima, H; Sekimoto, S; Ninomiya, K; Kasamatsu, Y; Shima, T; Takahashi, N; Shinohara, A; Matsumura, H; Satoh, D; Iwamoto, Y; Hagiwara, M; Nishiizumi, K; Caffee, M W; Shibata, S

    2014-10-01

    Neutron activation cross sections for Bi and Co at 386 MeV were measured by activation method. A quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam was produced using the (7)Li(p,n) reaction. The energy spectrum of these neutrons has a high-energy peak (386 MeV) and a low-energy tail. Two neutron beams, 0° and 25° from the proton beam axis, were used for sample irradiation, enabling a correction for the contribution of the low-energy neutrons. The neutron-induced activation cross sections were estimated by subtracting the reaction rates of irradiated samples for 25° irradiation from those of 0° irradiation. The measured cross sections were compared with the findings of other studies, evaluated in relation to nuclear data files and the calculated data by Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System code.

  14. The fenton activity of iron(III) in the presence of deferiprone.

    PubMed

    Devanur, Lakshmi D; Neubert, Hendrik; Hider, Robert C

    2008-04-01

    Hydroxyl radical production from a range of clinically relevant iron chelators in the presence of hydrogen peroxide was measured using the deoxyribose oxidation assay. Hydroxyl radical production from an iron complex is dependent on whether the ligand is able to completely surround the iron, thereby preventing access of reductants to the coordinated iron cation. The partially coordinated [(deferiprone)(2)Fe(III)](+) complex is able to generate hydroxyl radicals in the presence of oxidants, whereas the fully coordinated [(deferiprone)(3)Fe(III)](0) complex is not. Hydroxyl radical production from iron(III)deferiprone complexes is dependent on the molar ratio of iron to deferiprone, which, in turn, affects the speciation of the complex. Mass spectrometry data have confirmed the presence of the [(deferiprone)(2)Fe(III)](+) complex in aqueous solution. Hydroxyl radical production from the [(deferiprone)(2)Fe(III)](+) complex is maximal in the presence of equimolar ascorbate and hydrogen peroxide and is abolished in the absence of hydrogen peroxide. Under biological conditions, any [(deferiprone)(2)Fe(III)](+) complex formed intracellularly will be rapidly reduced by ascorbate. The resulting unstable iron(II) complex will dissociate to hexa-aquo iron(II), a major component of the endogenous intracellular labile iron pool.

  15. Receptor dimerization is not a factor in the signalling activity of a transforming variant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII).

    PubMed Central

    Chu, C T; Everiss, K D; Wikstrand, C J; Batra, S K; Kung, H J; Bigner, D D

    1997-01-01

    The type-III deletion variant of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) is frequently found in glioblastomas and other malignant human tumours. Although EGFRvIII confers ligand-independent oncogenic transformation of cell lines, the mechanism by which it promotes aberrant cellular proliferation is unknown. Using cell lines expressing comparable numbers of either wild-type receptor (EGFRwt) or EGFRvIII, we compared several parameters of receptor activation: dimerization, tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of intracellular signalling proteins. Like activated EGFRwt, EGFRvIII was phosphorylated and bound constitutively to the Shc adapter protein. Indeed, EGFRvIII-associated Shc had a higher phosphotyrosine content than Shc associated with stimulated EGFRwt. EGFRwt dimerized in response to either EGF or transforming growth factor alpha. Higher cross-linker concentrations and incubation at higher temperatures (37 degrees C) allowed detection of EGFRwt dimers even in the absence of exogenous ligand. In contrast, EGFRvIII failed to dimerize under any conditions studied. Moreover, neither mitogen-activated protein kinase nor phospholipase Cgamma were phosphorylated in EGFRvIII-expressing cells. We conclude that the deletion of 267 amino acids from the 621-amino-acid N-terminal domain of EGFR does not result simply in a constitutively activated receptor, but alters the spectrum of signalling cascades utilized. Furthermore the ligand-independent transforming activity of EGFRvIII is independent of receptor dimerization. PMID:9210410

  16. Biochemical investigation of yttrium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline: DNA binding and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Moodi, Asieh; Niroomand, Sona

    2013-03-05

    Characterization of the interaction between yttrium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline as ligand, [Y(phen)2Cl(OH2)3]Cl2⋅H2O, and DNA has been carried out by UV absorption, fluorescence spectra and viscosity measurements in order to investigate binding mode. The experimental results indicate that the yttrium(III) complex binds to DNA and absorption is decreasing in charge transfer band with the increase in amount of DNA. The binding constant (Kb) at different temperatures as well as thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°), were calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and Vant' Hoff equation. The results of interaction mechanism studies, suggested that groove binding plays a major role in the binding of the complex and DNA. The activity of yttrium(III) complex against some bacteria was tested and antimicrobial screening tests shown growth inhibitory activity in the presence of yttrium(III) complex.

  17. Characterization and Properties of Activated Carbon Prepared from Tamarind Seeds by KOH Activation for Fe(III) Adsorption from Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Mopoung, Sumrit; Moonsri, Phansiri; Palas, Wanwimon; Khumpai, Sataporn

    2015-01-01

    This research studies the characterization of activated carbon from tamarind seed with KOH activation. The effects of 0.5 : 1–1.5 : 1 KOH : tamarind seed charcoal ratios and 500–700°C activation temperatures were studied. FTIR, SEM-EDS, XRD, and BET were used to characterize tamarind seed and the activated carbon prepared from them. Proximate analysis, percent yield, iodine number, methylene blue number, and preliminary test of Fe(III) adsorption were also studied. Fe(III) adsorption was carried out by 30 mL column with 5–20 ppm Fe(III) initial concentrations. The percent yield of activated carbon prepared from tamarind seed with KOH activation decreased with increasing activation temperature and impregnation ratios, which were in the range from 54.09 to 82.03 wt%. The surface functional groups of activated carbon are O–H, C=O, C–O, –CO3, C–H, and Si–H. The XRD result showed high crystallinity coming from a potassium compound in the activated carbon. The main elements found in the activated carbon by EDS are C, O, Si, and K. The results of iodine and methylene blue adsorption indicate that the pore size of the activated carbon is mostly in the range of mesopore and macropore. The average BET pore size and BET surface area of activated carbon are 67.9764 Å and 2.7167 m2/g, respectively. Finally, the tamarind seed based activated carbon produced with 500°C activation temperature and 1.0 : 1 KOH : tamarind seed charcoal ratio was used for Fe(III) adsorption test. It was shown that Fe(III) was adsorbed in alkaline conditions and adsorption increased with increasing Fe(III) initial concentration from 5 to 20 ppm with capacity adsorption of 0.0069–0.019 mg/g. PMID:26689357

  18. Cytotoxic activity of new cerium (III) complexes of bis-coumarins.

    PubMed

    Kostova, Irena; Manolov, Ilia; Momekov, Georgi; Tzanova, Tzvetomira; Konstantinov, Spiro; Karaivanova, Margarita

    2005-12-01

    Complexes of cerium (III) with bis-coumarins: 3,3'-benzylidene-bis(4-hydroxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one) and bis(4-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl)-(1H-pyrazol-3-yl)-methane were synthesized by reaction of cerium (III) salt and the ligands, in amounts equal to metal/ligand molar ratio of 1:2. The complexes were prepared by adding an aqueous solution of cerium (III) salt to an aqueous solution of the ligand subsequently raising the pH of the mixture gradually to ca. 5.0 by adding dilute solution of sodium hydroxide. The cerium (III) complexes with bis-coumarins were characterized by different physicochemical methods--elemental analysis, IR-, 1H- and 13C-NMR-spectroscopies and mass-spectral data. The spectral data of cerium (III) complexes were interpreted on the basis of comparison with the spectra of the free ligands. This analysis showed that in the Ce (III) complexes the ligands coordinated to the metal ion through both deprotonated hydroxyl groups. On the basis of the nu(C=O) red shift observed, participation of the carbonyl groups in the coordination to the metal ion was also suggested. Cytotoxic screening by MTT assay was carried out. In the present study we performed comparative evaluation of the cytotoxic effects of the two newly synthesized cerium complexes against the acute myeloid leukemia derived HL-60 and the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)-derived BV-173. In addition the cytotoxic effects of Ce (III) complex with 3,3'-benzylidene-bis(4-hydroxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one) were evaluated on the CML-derived K-562 and LAMA-84 cells, characterized by relative low responsiveness to chemotherapy. The DNA isolated from the cytosolic fraction of BV-173 cells after 24 h treatment with the same complex (at 100 and 200 microM) demonstrated a laddering phenomenon that is indicative for apoptotic cell death.

  19. Does habitual physical activity prevent insomnia? A cross-sectional and longitudinal study of elderly Japanese.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Sachiko; Yorifuji, Takashi; Sugiyama, Masumi; Ohta, Toshiki; Ishikawa-Takata, Kazuko; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    Few epidemiological studies have examined the potential protective effects of physical activity on insomnia. The authors thus evaluated the association between physical activity and insomnia in a large population-based study in Shizuoka, Japan. Individual data were obtained from participants in an ongoing cohort study. A total of 14,001 older residents who completed questionnaires were followed for 3 yr. Of these, 10,211 and 3,697 participants were eligible for the cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, respectively. The authors obtained information about the frequency of physical activity and insomnia. Then, the adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals between physical activity and insomnia were estimated. Habitual physical activity was related to lower prevalence of insomnia. Frequent physical activity also reduced the incidence of insomnia, especially difficulty maintaining sleep. For elderly people with sufficient mobility and no preexisting disease, high-frequency physical activity (e.g., 5 or more days/wk) may help reduce insomnia.

  20. Determination of (n,γ) Cross Sections of 241Am by Cold Neutron Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genreith, C.; Rossbach, M.; Révay, Zs.; Kudejova, P.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate cross section data of actinides are crucial for criticality calculations of GEN IV reactors and transmutation but also for analytical purposes such as nuclear waste characterization, decommissioning of nuclear installations and safeguard applications. Tabulated data are inconsistent and sometimes associated with large uncertainties. Neutron activation with external cold neutron beams from high flux reactors offers a chance for determination of accurate capture cross sections scalable to the whole 1/√{E}-region even for isotopes with low-lying resonances like 241Am. Preparation of 241Am samples for irradiation at the PGAA station of the FRM II in Garching has been optimized together with PTB in Braunschweig. Two samples were irradiated together with gold flux monitors to extract the thermal neutron capture cross section after appropriate corrections for attenuation of neutrons and photons in the sample. For one sample, the thermal ground state neutron capture cross section was measured as 663.0 ± 28.8 b. The thermal neutron capture cross section was calculated to 725.4 ± 34.4 b. For the other sample, a ground state neutron capture cross section of 649.9 ± 28.2 b was measured and a thermal neutron capture cross section of 711.1 ± 33.9 b was derived.

  1. The experimental isomeric cross-section ratio in the nuclear activation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vänskä, R.; Rieppo, R.

    1981-02-01

    First, the experimental isomeric cross-section ratio is discussed considering a single metastable state induced. The experimental ratio is given in a straightforward and exact formula, which is generally applicable to any incident particle activation and to any isomeric pair of an exclusive, fractional or non-existing isomeric transition decay. Second, the derived experimental isomeric yield ration is adapted for the present work where neutron induced reactions are considered and gamma-ray spectrometry is utilized in the determination of the 14-15 MeV neutron activation cross-sections and isomeric cross-section ratios for the germanium reactions, 74Ge(n, α) 71m,gZn and 76Ge(n, 2n) 75m,gGe, leading to single metastable and ground states in the product.

  2. 47 CFR 1.1805 - Federal Communications Commission Section 504 Programs and Activities Accessibility Handbook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Federal Communications Commission Section 504... COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Enforcement of Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability In Programs or Activities Conducted By the Federal...

  3. [NiIII(OMe)]-mediated reductive activation of CO2 affording a Ni(κ1-OCO) complex

    DOE PAGES

    Chiou, Tzung -Wen; Tseng, Yen -Ming; Lu, Tsai -Te; ...

    2016-02-24

    Here, carbon dioxide is expected to be employed as an inexpensive and potential feedstock of C1 sources for the mass production of valuable chemicals and fuel. Versatile chemical transformations of CO2, i.e. insertion of CO2 producing bicarbonate/acetate/formate, cleavage of CO2 yielding μ-CO/μ-oxo transition-metal complexes, and electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 affording CO/HCOOH/CH3OH/CH4/C2H4/oxalate were well documented. Herein, we report a novel pathway for the reductive activation of CO2 by the [NiIII(OMe)(P(C6H3-3-SiMe3-2-S)3)]– complex, yielding the [NiIII(κ1-OCO˙–)(P(C6H3-3-SiMe3-2-S)3)]– complex. The formation of this unusual NiIII(κ1-OCO˙–) complex was characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, EPR, IR, SQUID, Ni/S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and Ni valence-to-core X-ray emissionmore » spectroscopy. The inertness of the analogous complexes [NiIII(SPh)], [NiII(CO)], and [NiII(N2H4)] toward CO2, in contrast, demonstrates that the ionic [NiIII(OMe)] core attracts the binding of weak σ-donor CO2 and triggers the subsequent reduction of CO2 by the nucleophilic [OMe]– in the immediate vicinity. This metal–ligand cooperative activation of CO2 may open a novel pathway promoting the subsequent incorporation of CO2 in the buildup of functionalized products.« less

  4. Hyperglycemia-conditioned increase in alpha-2-macroglobulin in healthy normal subjects: a phenomenon correlated with deficient antithrombin III activity.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Quatraro, A; Dello Russo, P; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Giugliano, D

    1989-01-01

    Induced hyperglycemia in normal subjects increases alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) activity and alpha 2M concentration and reduces antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, while it does not affect ATIII plasma concentration. Hyperglycemia-determined variations in ATIII activity and alpha 2M molecules are correlated in an inverse and parallel fashion. A compensatory role for the increase in alpha 2M in the regulation of the coagulation system may be hypothesized. Moreover, these data provide evidence that hyperglycemia may decrease, directly, the biological function of some proteins and may influence the levels of some risk factors for the development of complications in diabetes.

  5. Mechanistic Insight into the Rh(III)-Catalyzed C-H Activation of 2-Acetyl-1-Arythydrazines in Water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weirong; Liu, Tao; Huang, Caiyun; Zhang, Jing; Man, Xiaoping

    2017-03-02

    A mechanistic study of the Cp*Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H functionalization of 2-acetyl-1-arythydrazines with diazo compounds in water was carried out by using density functional theory calculations. The results reveal that the acetyl-bonded N-H deprotonation is prior to the phenyl C-H activation. The mechanisms from protonation by acetic acid disagree with the proposal by the Wang group. Different from the Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H activation reported by experimental literature, the rate-determining step of the whole catalytic cycle with an overall barrier of 31.7 kcal mol(-1) (IV → TS12-P') is the protonation process of hydroxy O rather than the C-H bond cleavage step. The present theoretical study rationalizes the experimental observation at the molecular level.

  6. A thermochromic europium(iii) room temperature ionic liquid with thermally activated anion-cation interactions.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Bernardo; Outis, Mani; Cruz, Hugo; Leal, João Paulo; Laia, César A T; Pereira, Cláudia C L

    2017-01-10

    We report the first example of an observable and reversible case of thermochromism due to the interaction of an alkylphosphonium (P6,6,6,14)(+) with a β-diketonate (1,1,1,2,2,3,3-heptafluoro-7,7-dimethyloctane-4,6-dionate-fod) of an europium(iii) tetrakis-β-diketonate room temperature ionic liquid. This thermochromism is characterized by the conversion of a light yellow viscous liquid, at room temperature, to a reddish substance close to 80 °C. The reversibility of this optical effect was highlighted by the thermal stability of the Eu(iii) complex.

  7. Cooperative activation of the T-type CaV3.2 channel: interaction between Domains II and III.

    PubMed

    Demers-Giroux, Pierre-Olivier; Bourdin, Benoîte; Sauvé, Rémy; Parent, Lucie

    2013-10-11

    T-type CaV3 channels are important mediators of Ca(2+) entry near the resting membrane potential. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for channel activation. Homology models based upon the high-resolution structure of bacterial NaV channels predict interaction between the S4-S5 helix of Domain II (IIS4-S5) and the distal S6 pore region of Domain II (IIS6) and Domain III (IIIS6). Functional intra- and inter-domain interactions were investigated with a double mutant cycle analysis. Activation gating and channel kinetics were measured for 47 single mutants and 20 pairs of mutants. Significant coupling energies (ΔΔG(interact) ≥ 1.5 kcal mol(-1)) were measured for 4 specific pairs of mutants introduced between IIS4-S5 and IIS6 and between IIS4-S5 and IIIS6. In agreement with the computer based models, Thr-911 in IIS4-S5 was functionally coupled with Ile-1013 in IIS6 during channel activation. The interaction energy was, however, found to be stronger between Val-907 in IIS4-S5 and Ile-1013 in IIS6. In addition Val-907 was significantly coupled with Asn-1548 in IIIS6 but not with Asn-1853 in IVS6. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the S4-S5 and S6 helices from adjacent domains are energetically coupled during the activation of a low voltage-gated T-type CaV3 channel.

  8. Photochemical and DFT studies on DNA-binding ability and antibacterial activity of lanthanum(III)-phenanthroline complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niroomand, Sona; Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Jahani, Shohreh; Moodi, Asieh

    2017-02-01

    The binding of the lanthanum(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), [La(phen)3Cl3·OH2], to DNA is investigated by absorption and emission methods. This complex shows absorption decreasing in a charge transfer band, and fluorescence decrement when it binds to DNA. Electronic absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis), fluorescence spectra, iodide quenching experiments, salt effect and viscosity measurements, ethidium bromide (EB) competition test, circular dichroism (CD) spectra as well as variable temperature experiments indicate that the La(III) complex binds to fish salmon (FS) DNA, presumably via groove binding mode. The binding constants (Kb) of the La(III) complex with DNA is (2.55 ± 0.02) × 106 M-1. Furthermore, the binding site size, n, the Stern-Volmer constant KSV and thermodynamic parameters; enthalpy change (ΔH0) and entropy change (ΔS0) and Gibb's free energy (ΔG0), are calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and the Van't Hoff equation. The La(III) complex has been screened for its antibacterial activities by the disc diffusion method. Also, in order to supplement the experimental findings, DFT computation and NBO analysis are carried out.

  9. Structure and membrane remodeling activity of ESCRT-III helical polymers

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, John; Clippinger, Amy K.; Talledge, Nathaniel; Skowyra, Michael L.; Saunders, Marissa G.; Naismith, Teresa V.; Colf, Leremy A.; Afonine, Pavel; Arthur, Christopher; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Hanson, Phyllis I.; Frost, Adam

    2015-12-18

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) proteins mediate fundamental membrane remodeling events that require stabilizing negative membrane curvature. These include endosomal intralumenal vesicle formation, HIV budding, nuclear envelope closure, and cytokinetic abscission. ESCRT-III subunits perform key roles in these processes by changing conformation and polymerizing into membrane-remodeling filaments. Here, we report the 4 angstrom resolution cryogenic electron microscopy reconstruction of a one-start, double-stranded helical copolymer composed of two different human ESCRT-III subunits, charged multivesicular body protein 1B (CHMP1B) and increased sodium tolerance 1 (IST1). The inner strand comprises “open” CHMP1B subunits that interlock in an elaborate domain-swapped architecture and is encircled by an outer strand of “closed” IST1 subunits. Unlike other ESCRT-III proteins, CHMP1B and IST1 polymers form external coats on positively curved membranes in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, our analysis suggests how common ESCRT-III filament architectures could stabilize different degrees and directions of membrane curvature.

  10. Structure and membrane remodeling activity of ESCRT-III helical polymers.

    PubMed

    McCullough, John; Clippinger, Amy K; Talledge, Nathaniel; Skowyra, Michael L; Saunders, Marissa G; Naismith, Teresa V; Colf, Leremy A; Afonine, Pavel; Arthur, Christopher; Sundquist, Wesley I; Hanson, Phyllis I; Frost, Adam

    2015-12-18

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) proteins mediate fundamental membrane remodeling events that require stabilizing negative membrane curvature. These include endosomal intralumenal vesicle formation, HIV budding, nuclear envelope closure, and cytokinetic abscission. ESCRT-III subunits perform key roles in these processes by changing conformation and polymerizing into membrane-remodeling filaments. Here, we report the 4 angstrom resolution cryogenic electron microscopy reconstruction of a one-start, double-stranded helical copolymer composed of two different human ESCRT-III subunits, charged multivesicular body protein 1B (CHMP1B) and increased sodium tolerance 1 (IST1). The inner strand comprises "open" CHMP1B subunits that interlock in an elaborate domain-swapped architecture and is encircled by an outer strand of "closed" IST1 subunits. Unlike other ESCRT-III proteins, CHMP1B and IST1 polymers form external coats on positively curved membranes in vitro and in vivo. Our analysis suggests how common ESCRT-III filament architectures could stabilize different degrees and directions of membrane curvature.

  11. Structure and membrane remodeling activity of ESCRT-III helical polymers

    DOE PAGES

    McCullough, John; Clippinger, Amy K.; Talledge, Nathaniel; ...

    2015-12-18

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) proteins mediate fundamental membrane remodeling events that require stabilizing negative membrane curvature. These include endosomal intralumenal vesicle formation, HIV budding, nuclear envelope closure, and cytokinetic abscission. ESCRT-III subunits perform key roles in these processes by changing conformation and polymerizing into membrane-remodeling filaments. Here, we report the 4 angstrom resolution cryogenic electron microscopy reconstruction of a one-start, double-stranded helical copolymer composed of two different human ESCRT-III subunits, charged multivesicular body protein 1B (CHMP1B) and increased sodium tolerance 1 (IST1). The inner strand comprises “open” CHMP1B subunits that interlock in an elaborate domain-swapped architecturemore » and is encircled by an outer strand of “closed” IST1 subunits. Unlike other ESCRT-III proteins, CHMP1B and IST1 polymers form external coats on positively curved membranes in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, our analysis suggests how common ESCRT-III filament architectures could stabilize different degrees and directions of membrane curvature.« less

  12. 26 CFR 1.863-9 - Source of income derived from communications activity under section 863(a), (d), and (e).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Source of income derived from communications activity under section 863(a), (d), and (e). 1.863-9 Section 1.863-9 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... communications activity under section 863(a), (d), and (e). (a) In general. Income of a United States or...

  13. 20 CFR 641.640 - How do the private sector training activities authorized under section 502(e) differ from other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... required to have a community service project component. However, 502(e) participants must also be co... private sector. (c) The Department is authorized to pay all of the costs of section 502(e) activities (i.e... authorized under section 502(e) differ from other SCSEP activities? 641.640 Section 641.640...

  14. Tartrazine modified activated carbon for the removal of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cr(III).

    PubMed

    Monser, Lotfi; Adhoum, Nafaâ

    2009-01-15

    A two in one attempt for the removal of tartrazine and metal ions on activated carbon has been developed. The method was based on the modification of activated carbon with tartrazine then its application for the removal of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cr(III) ions at different pH values. Tartrazine adsorption data were modelled using both Langmuir and Freundlich classical adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacities qm were 121.3, 67 and 56.7mgg(-1) at initial pH values of 1.0, 6.0 and 10, respectively. The adsorption of tartrazine onto activated carbon followed second-order kinetic model. The equilibrium time was found to be 240min at pH 1.0 and 120min at pH 10 for 500mgL(-1) tartrazine concentration. A maximum removal of 85% was obtained after 1h of contact time. The presence of tartrazine as modifier enhances attractive electrostatic interactions between metal ions and carbon surface. The adsorption capacity for Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cr(III) ions has been improved with respect to non-modified carbon reaching a maximum of 140%. The adsorption capacity was found to be a pH dependent for both modified and non-modified carbon with a greater adsorption at higher pH values except for Cr(III). The enhancement percent of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cr(III) at different pH values was varied from 28% to 140% with respect to non-modified carbon. The amount of metal ions adsorbed using static regime was 11-40% higher than that with dynamic mode. The difference between adsorption capacities could be attributed to the applied flow rate.

  15. Studies of neutron cross-sections important for spallation experiments using the activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrzalová, J.; Chudoba, P.; Krása, A.; Majerle, M.; Suchopár, M.; Svoboda, O.; Wagner, V.

    2014-09-01

    A series of experiments devoted to studies of neutron cross-sections by activation method was carried out. The cross-sections of various threshold reactions were studied by means of different quasi-monoenergetic neutron sources with energies from 14 MeV up to 100 MeV. Threshold reactions in various materials are among other used to measure fast neutron fields produced during accelerator driven system studies. For this reason our measurements of neutron cross-sections are crucial. At present, neither experimental nor evaluated data above 30 MeV are available for neutron threshold reactions in Au, I and In published in this proceedings. We studied materials in the form of thin foils and compared our data with the calculations preformed using the deterministic code TALYS 1.4.

  16. Comparative activities of the triterpene saponin maesabalide III and liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome) against Leishmania donovani in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Maes, Louis; Germonprez, Nils; Quirijnen, Ludo; Van Puyvelde, Luc; Cos, Paul; Vanden Berghe, Dirk

    2004-06-01

    Maesabalide III (MB-III), an oleane triterpene saponin isolated from the Vietnamese plant Maesa balansae, is a new antileishmanial lead compound whose activity against Leishmania donovani (MHOM/ET/67/L82) in groups of five golden hamsters was evaluated after administration of a single subcutaneous dose on either day 1 (prophylactic treatment) or day 28 (curative treatment) after infection. Liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome), administered intravenously at 5 mg/kg of body weight, was used as the reference drug. Amastigote burdens in liver, spleen, and bone marrow were determined either 7 days (early effects) or 56 days (late effects) after treatment. Prophylactic administration of MB-III at 0.2 mg/kg reduced liver amastigote burdens by 99.8 and 83% within 7 and 56 days after treatment, respectively. In the latter group, however, all animals became ill and some died. Both MB-III at 0.8 mg/kg and liposomal amphotericin B were 100% effective against liver stages, but clearance from the spleen and bone marrow was not achieved. Curative administration of MB-III at 0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg was not protective, as no survivors were left at the termination of the experiment on day 84. Despite the high level of reduction of the liver amastigote burden after treatment with MB-III at 0.8 mg/kg (94.2%) or liposomal amphotericin B (99.4%), clinical protection could not be obtained in either group, with two deaths occurring and the residual liver burdens persisting. It is concluded that administration of a single dose of MB-III at 0.8 mg/kg has efficacy potential comparable to that of a single dose of liposomal amphotericin B at 5 mg/kg and is therefore considered a promising new antileishmanial lead compound. However, multiple-dose pharmacological, toxicological, and pharmacokinetic studies are still needed before it can become a valid drug candidate for development.

  17. Synthesis of Succinimide-Containing Chromones, Naphthoquinones, and Xanthones under Rh(III) Catalysis: Evaluation of Anticancer Activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, Saegun; De, Umasankar; Mishra, Neeraj Kumar; Park, Jihye; Sharma, Satyasheel; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Han, Sangil; Kim, Hyung Sik; Kim, In Su

    2016-12-16

    The weakly coordinating ketone group directed C-H functionalizations of chromones, 1,4-naphthoquinones, and xanthones with various maleimides under rhodium(III) catalysis are described. These protocols efficiently provide a range of succinimide-containing chromones, naphthoquinones, and xanthones with excellent site selectivity and functional group compatibility. All synthetic compounds were screened for in vitro anticancer activity against human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (MCF-7). In particular, compounds 7aa and 7ca with a naphthoquinone scaffold were found to be highly cytotoxic, with an activity competitive with anticancer agent doxorubicin.

  18. Activity and regulation by growth factors of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III (elongation factor 2-kinase) in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parmer, T G; Ward, M D; Yurkow, E J; Vyas, V H; Kearney, T J; Hait, W N

    1999-01-01

    Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III (CaM kinase III, elongation factor-2 kinase) is a unique member of the Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase family. Activation of CaM kinase III leads to the selective phosphorylation of elongation factor 2 (eEF-2) and transient inhibition of protein synthesis. Recent cloning and sequencing of CaM kinase III revealed that this enzyme represents a new superfamily of protein kinases. The activity of CaM kinase III is selectively activated in proliferating cells; inhibition of the kinase blocked cells in G0/G1-S and decreased viability. To determine the significance of CaM kinase III in breast cancer, we measured the activity of the kinase in human breast cancer cell lines as well as in fresh surgical specimens. The specific activity of CaM kinase III in human breast cancer cell lines was equal to or greater than that seen in a variety of cell lines with similar rates of proliferation. The specific activity of CaM kinase III was markedly increased in human breast tumour specimens compared with that of normal adjacent breast tissue. The activity of this enzyme was regulated by breast cancer mitogens. In serum-deprived MDA-MB-231 cells, the combination of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulated cell proliferation and activated CaM kinase III to activities observed in the presence of 10% serum. Inhibition of enzyme activity blocked cell proliferation induced by growth factors. In MCF-7 cells separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, CaM kinase III was increased in S-phase over that of other phases of the cell cycle. In summary, the activity of Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase III is controlled by breast cancer mitogens and appears to be constitutively activated in human breast cancer. These results suggest that CaM kinase III may contribute an important link between growth factor/receptor interactions, protein synthesis and the induction of cellular proliferation in human breast

  19. Activation cross sections of longer-lived radionuclides produced in germanium by alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, S.; Takács, M. P.; Ditrói, F.; Aikawa, M.; Haba, H.; Komori, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The cross sections of alpha particles induced nuclear reactions on natural germanium were investigated by using the standard stacked foil target technique, the activation method and high resolution gamma spectrometry. Targets with thickness of about 1 μm were prepared from natural Ge by vacuum evaporation onto 25 μm thick polyimide (Kapton) backing foils. Stacks were composed of Kapton-Ge-Ge-Kapton sandwich target foils and additional titanium monitor foils with nominal thickness of 11 μm to monitor the beam parameters using the natTi(α,x)51Cr reaction. The irradiations were done with Eα = 20.7 and Eα = 51.25 MeV, Iα = 50 nA alpha particle beams for about 1 h. Direct or cumulative activation cross sections were determined for production of the 72,73,75Se, 71,72,74,76,78As, and 69Ge radionuclides. The obtained experimental cross sections were compared to the results of theoretical calculations taken from the TENDL data library based on the TALYS computer code. A comparison was made with available experimental data measured earlier. Thick target yields were deduced from the experimental cross sections and compared with the data published before.

  20. Cross-section studies of relativistic deuteron reactions on copper by activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchopár, M.; Wagner, V.; Svoboda, O.; Vrzalová, J.; Chudoba, P.; Kugler, A.; Adam, J.; Závorka, L.; Baldin, A.; Furman, W.; Kadykov, M.; Khushvaktov, J.; Solnyshkin, A.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V.; Tyutyunnikov, S.

    2015-02-01

    The cross-sections of relativistic deuteron reactions on natural copper were studied in detail by means of activation method. The copper foils were irradiated during experiments with the model spallation targets in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. The irradiation of activation samples was performed by beams in the energy range from 1 to 8 GeV. Residual nuclides were measured by the gamma spectrometry. While the EXFOR database contains sets of data for relativistic proton reactions, data for deuteron reactions in this energy range are almost missing. Lack of such experimental cross-section values prevents the use of copper foils from beam integral monitoring. For this reason our experiments focused on their measurement and completely new data were obtained in the energy region where no experimental data have been available so far. The copper monitors with their low sensitivity to fast neutrons will contribute to improvement of the beam integral determination during accelerator-driven system studies.

  1. SERS Activity of Silver Nanoparticles Functionalized with A Desferrioxamine B Derived Ligand for FE(III) Binding and Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinetto, P.; Taglietti, A.; Pasotti, L.; Pallavicini, P.; Dacarro, G.; Giulotto, E.; Grandi, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    We report the SERS activity of colloidal silver nanoparticles functionalized with a ligand, derived from the siderophore desferrioxamine B (desferal, DFO), an iron chelator widely used in biological and medical applications. The ligand was equipped with a sulfur-containing moiety to ensure optimal binding with silver surfaces. By means of Raman and SERS effects we monitored the route of material preparation from the modified DFO-S molecule to the colloidal aggregates. The results indicate that the functionalization of the chelating agent does not affect its binding ability towards Fe(III). The resulting functionalized silver nanoparticles are a promising SERS tag for operation in biological environments. The Fe-O stretching signature, arising when DFO-S grafted to silver nanoparticles binds Fe(III), could provide a tool for cation sensing in solution.

  2. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and antibacterial activity of antimony(III) bis(dialkyldithiocarbamato)alkyldithiocarbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, H. P. S.; Bakshi, Abhilasha; Bhatiya, Sumit

    2011-10-01

    Some mixed sulfur donor ligand complexes of antimony(III) of the general formula [(R 2NCS 2)] 2SbS 2COR' where R = CH 3, C 2H 5 and R' = Me, Et, Pr n, Pr i, Bu n and Bu i have been synthesized by the reaction of antimony(III) bis(dialkyldithiocarbamate) chloride with potassium organodithiocarbonate in an equimolar ratio by stirring at room temperature in benzene/CS 2 mixture. These complexes have been characterized by physicochemical [elemental analysis, melting points and molecular weight determinations] and spectral [UV, IR, Far-IR, NMR ( 1H and 13C), FAB + mass and powder X-ray diffraction] studies. Free ligands and synthesized complexes have also been screened against different bacterial strains and results obtained made it desirable to delineate a comparison between free ligands, standard drug used and synthesized complexes.

  3. Cross-sectional imaging of functional activation in the rat somatosensory cortex with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, A. D.; Chen, Y.; Ruvinskaya, L.; Devor, A.; Boas, D. A.; Fujimoto, J. G.

    2005-08-01

    Simultaneous optical coherence tomography (OCT) and video microscopy were performed on the rat somatosensory cortex through a thinned skull during forepaw stimulation. Fractional change measurements in OCT images reveal a functional signal timecourse similar to well understood hemodynamic signal timecourses measured with video microscopy. The precise etiology of the observed OCT functional signal is still under investigation, but these results suggest that OCT can provide high-resolution cross-sectional images of functional neuro-vascular activation.

  4. Synthesis of the Tolerance-Inducing Oligosaccharide Lacto-N-Fucopentaose III Bearing an Activated Linker

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junfeng; Zou, Lu; Lowary, Todd L

    2013-01-01

    A concise synthetic route to an immunomodulatory pentasaccharide, lacto-N-fucopentaose III (1) and its corresponding human serum albumin conjugate, is described. Key transformations of the strategy include two highly regio- and stereoselective glycosylations for the construction of disaccharide 10 and pentasaccharide 12, a Birch reduction for deprotection of benzyl ethers, and a UV-promoted radical addition of a thiol to an alkene for modification of the aglycone. PMID:24551556

  5. Amber light-emitting diode comprising a group III-nitride nanowire active region

    DOEpatents

    Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Koleske, Daniel

    2014-07-22

    A temperature stable (color and efficiency) III-nitride based amber (585 nm) light-emitting diode is based on a novel hybrid nanowire-planar structure. The arrays of GaN nanowires enable radial InGaN/GaN quantum well LED structures with high indium content and high material quality. The high efficiency and temperature stable direct yellow and red phosphor-free emitters enable high efficiency white LEDs based on the RGYB color-mixing approach.

  6. An Overview of SAGE III Validation Activities during the SOLVE-2/VINTERSOL Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepte, C.

    2003-12-01

    A major goal of the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) II and the Validation of International Satellites and Study of Ozone Loss (VINTERSOL) field experiments is to support validation studies for a new generation of satellite experiments that had been recently placed in orbit. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III instrument was launched in December 2001 on board a Russian Meteor 3M satellite to provide information on the behavior of ozone, aerosols, water vapor and other trace species at high and mid latitudes in the upper troposphere and stratosphere. The instrument supports an advanced design from its predecessor with added spectral coverage and resolution and greater dynamic range that allows for observations during solar and lunar occultations as well as measurements of scattered light along the limb. During the SOLVE-2/VINTERSOL campaigns, a comprehensive set of correlative measurements was obtained from a network of ground-based instruments and the launch small balloon payloads from high latitude sites, the launch of several large balloon payloads and multiple rockets from Esrange, Sweden and flights of the NASA DC-8, the DLR Falcon, and the M55 Geophysica aircraft based from Kiruna, Sweden. These measurements provide an opportunity to assess biases between instrument techniques and to help interpret satellite observations in a variety of meteorological settings. This presentation will highlight comparison findings for the SAGE III satellite experiment from the array of observations collected during the SOLVE-2/VINTERSOL campaigns.

  7. Bipartite recognition of target RNAs activates DNA cleavage by the Type III-B CRISPR–Cas system

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Joshua R.; Sheppard, Nolan F.; Ramia, Nancy; Deighan, Trace; Li, Hong; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas systems eliminate nucleic acid invaders in bacteria and archaea. The effector complex of the Type III-B Cmr system cleaves invader RNAs recognized by the CRISPR RNA (crRNA ) of the complex. Here we show that invader RNAs also activate the Cmr complex to cleave DNA. As has been observed for other Type III systems, Cmr eliminates plasmid invaders in Pyrococcus furiosus by a mechanism that depends on transcription of the crRNA target sequence within the plasmid. Notably, we found that the target RNA per se induces DNA cleavage by the Cmr complex in vitro. DNA cleavage activity does not depend on cleavage of the target RNA but notably does require the presence of a short sequence adjacent to the target sequence within the activating target RNA (rPAM [RNA protospacer-adjacent motif]). The activated complex does not require a target sequence (or a PAM) in the DNA substrate. Plasmid elimination by the P. furiosus Cmr system also does not require the Csx1 (CRISPR-associated Rossman fold [CARF] superfamily) protein. Plasmid silencing depends on the HD nuclease and Palm domains of the Cmr2 (Cas10 superfamily) protein. The results establish the Cmr complex as a novel DNA nuclease activated by invader RNAs containing a crRNA target sequence and a rPAM. PMID:26848045

  8. Activity patterns in the Sahara Desert: an interpretation based on cross-sectional geometric properties.

    PubMed

    Nikita, Efthymia; Siew, Yun Ysi; Stock, Jay; Mattingly, David; Lahr, Marta Mirazón

    2011-11-01

    The Garamantian civilization flourished in modern Fezzan, Libya, between 900 BC and 500 AD, during which the aridification of the Sahara was well established. Study of the archaeological remains suggests a population successful at coping with a harsh environment of high and fluctuating temperatures and reduced water and food resources. This study explores the activity patterns of the Garamantes by means of cross-sectional geometric properties. Long bone diaphyseal shape and rigidity are compared between the Garamantes and populations from Egypt and Sudan, namely from the sites of Kerma, el-Badari, and Jebel Moya, to determine whether the Garamantian daily activities were more strenuous than those of other North African populations. Moreover, sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry are assessed at an intra- and inter-population level. The inter-population comparisons showed the Garamantes not to be more robust than the comparative populations, suggesting that the daily Garamantian activities necessary for survival in the Sahara Desert did not generally impose greater loads than those of other North African populations. Sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry in almost all geometric properties of the long limbs were comparatively low among the Garamantes. Only the lower limbs were significantly stronger among males than females, possibly due to higher levels of mobility associated with herding. The lack of systematic bilateral asymmetry in cross-sectional geometric properties may relate to the involvement of the population in bilaterally intensive activities or the lack of regular repetition of unilateral activities.

  9. Physical activity in patients with axial spondyloarthritis: a cross-sectional study of 203 patients.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Stéphanie; Molto, Anna; Dadoun, Sabrina; Rein, Christopher; Hudry, Christophe; Kreis, Sarah; Fautrel, Bruno; Pertuiset, Edouard; Gossec, Laure

    2016-12-01

    Physical activity is recommended in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) but may be insufficiently performed. The objective of this study was to assess physical activity in axial spondyloarthritis and to explore its explanatory factors. This was a cross-sectional study of patients with definite axSpA. The level of physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Long form, IPAQ-L), type of aerobic exercise and the Exercise Benefits and Barriers Score were collected. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to explain levels of exercise at least as recommended by the World Health Organization. In all, 203 patients were included: mean age 46.0 ± 11.6 years, 108 (53.2 %) males, mean Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Activity Index (0-100) 37.8 ± 19.9; 137 (68.8 %) were treated with TNF-inhibitors. In all, 111 patients (54.7 %) were exercising at least as recommended; 96 (47.2 %) were in the 'high physical activity' category. Aerobic exercise >30 min was performed at least once a week by 61 (30.0 %) patients; the most frequent activities were energetic walking (31.0 %) and swimming (21.2 %). Main perceived benefits of exercising were improving physical fitness and functioning of the cardiovascular system, and the main barrier was physical exertion. Patients with paid employment had lower levels of physical activity whereas other demographic variables, disease activity/severity or TNF-inhibitor treatment were not predictive. One half of these patients performed enough physical activity according to the recommendations, similarly to the French population. Levels of physical activity did not appear to be explained by disease-related variables. Physical activity should be encouraged in axSpA.

  10. Activation of Type I and III Interferon Response by Mitochondrial and Peroxisomal MAVS and Inhibition by Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Silke; Reuter, Antje; Eberle, Florian; Einhorn, Evelyne; Binder, Marco; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Sensing viruses by pattern recognition receptors (PRR) triggers the innate immune system of the host cell and activates immune signaling cascades such as the RIG-I/IRF3 pathway. Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, also known as IPS-1, Cardif, and VISA) is the crucial adaptor protein of this pathway localized on mitochondria, peroxisomes and mitochondria-associated membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. Activation of MAVS leads to the production of type I and type III interferons (IFN) as well as IFN stimulated genes (ISGs). To refine the role of MAVS subcellular localization for the induction of type I and III IFN responses in hepatocytes and its counteraction by the hepatitis C virus (HCV), we generated various functional and genetic knock-out cell systems that were reconstituted to express mitochondrial (mito) or peroxisomal (pex) MAVS, exclusively. Upon infection with diverse RNA viruses we found that cells exclusively expressing pexMAVS mounted sustained expression of type I and III IFNs to levels comparable to cells exclusively expressing mitoMAVS. To determine whether viral counteraction of MAVS is affected by its subcellular localization we employed infection of cells with HCV, a major causative agent of chronic liver disease with a high propensity to establish persistence. This virus efficiently cleaves MAVS via a viral protease residing in its nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) and this strategy is thought to contribute to the high persistence of this virus. We found that both mito- and pexMAVS were efficiently cleaved by NS3 and this cleavage was required to suppress activation of the IFN response. Taken together, our findings indicate comparable activation of the IFN response by pex- and mitoMAVS in hepatocytes and efficient counteraction of both MAVS species by the HCV NS3 protease. PMID:26588843

  11. Computational Mechanistic Study of Redox-Neutral Rh(III)-Catalyzed C-H Activation Reactions of Arylnitrones with Alkynes: Role of Noncovalent Interactions in Controlling Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yang-Yang; Liu, Jian-Biao; Tian, Ying-Ying; Sun, Chuan-Zhi; Huang, Fang; Chen, De-Zhan

    2016-11-23

    The mechanism of redox-neutral Rh(III)-catalyzed coupling reactions of arylnitrones with alkynes was investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The free energy profiles associated with the catalytic cycle, involving C(sp(2))-H activation, insertion of alkyne, transfer of O atom, cyclization and protodemetalation, are presented and analyzed. An overwhelming preference for alkyne insertion into Rh-C over Rh-O is observed among all pathways, and the most favorable route is determined. The pivalate-assisted C-H activation step is turnover-limiting, and the cyclization step determines the diastereoselectivity of the reaction, with the stereoselectivity arising mainly from the difference of noncovalent interactions in key transition states. The detailed mechanism of O atom transfer, Rh(III)-Rh(I)-Rh(III) versus Rh(III)-Rh(V)-Rh(III) cycle, is discussed.

  12. Passive and active soil gas sampling at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, M.D.; Goering, T.J.; Peace, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessing and remediating the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The Mixed Waste Landfill is a 2.6 acre, inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. In 1993 and 1994, an extensive passive and active soil gas sampling program was undertaken to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at the landfill. Passive soil gas surveys identified levels of PCE, TCE, 1,1, 1-TCA, toluene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, dichloroethyne, and acetone above background. Verification by active soil gas sampling confirmed concentrations of PCE, TCE, 1,1,1-TCA, and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane at depths of 10 and 30 feet below ground surface. In addition, dichlorodifluoroethane and trichlorofluoromethane were detected during active soil gas sampling. All of the volatile organic compounds detected during the active soil gas survey were present in the low ppb range.

  13. [Various aspects of cognitive activities of schizophrenics. III. Maladjustment assimilation/accommodation and generalization of reasoning].

    PubMed

    Blein, G; Azorin, J M; Vollrath, J L; Andréoli, A; Tissot, R

    1987-05-01

    Paranoid schizophrenics are unable to balance affirmation and negation. Using the terms of Jean Piaget, they therefore only partially achieve the "équilibrations majorantes" of level II and never those of level III. In their thinking, they have access to the "généralisations inductives" (often excessive ones), but rarely to the "généralisations constructives complétives". They do not have access to the "généralisations synthétisantes" or to the feeling that logic is necessary. They oscillate between the positivist need to measure or verify and absolute beliefs issued from magical thinking.

  14. Symptomatic and neuroprotective effects following activation of nigral group III metabotropic glutamate receptors in rodent models of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Austin, PJ; Betts, MJ; Broadstock, M; O'Neill, MJ; Mitchell, SN; Duty, S

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Increased glutamatergic innervation of the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) and pars compacta (SNpc) may contribute to the motor deficits and neurodegeneration, respectively, in Parkinson's disease (PD). This study aimed to establish whether activation of pre-synaptic group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors reduced glutamate release in the SN, and provided symptomatic or neuroprotective relief in animal models of PD. Experimental approach: Broad-spectrum group III mGlu receptor agonists, O-phospho-l-serine (l-SOP) and l-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (l-AP4), were assessed for their ability to inhibit KCl-evoked [3H]-d-aspartate release in rat nigral prisms or inhibit KCl-evoked endogenous glutamate release in the SNpr in vivo using microdialysis. Reversal of akinesia in reserpine-treated rats was assessed following intranigral injection of l-SOP and l-AP4. Finally, the neuroprotective effect of 7 days' supra-nigral treatment with l-AP4 was examined in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. Key results: l-SOP and l-AP4 inhibited [3H]-d-aspartate release by 33 and 44% respectively. These effects were blocked by the selective group III mGlu antagonist (RS)-α-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (CPPG). l-SOP also reduced glutamate release in the SNpr in vivo by 48%. Injection of l-SOP and l-AP4 into the SNpr reversed reserpine-induced akinesia. Following administration above the SNpc, l-AP4 provided neurochemical, histological and functional protection against 6-OHDA lesion of the nigrostriatal tract. Pretreatment with CPPG inhibited these effects. Conclusions and implications: These findings highlight group III mGlu receptors in the SN as potential targets for providing both symptomatic and neuroprotective relief in PD, and indicate that inhibition of glutamate release in the SN may underlie these effects. PMID:20649576

  15. Testing of an activation cross sections library according to integral data

    SciTech Connect

    Grudzevich, O.T.; Zelenetskii, A.V.; Pashchenko, A.B.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of computer programs in predicting the required activity, heat release, and other characteristics of a thermonuclear reactor. Experimental data from a joint US DOE/JAERI experiment were compared to computational results obtained by using activation cross sections from the ADL-3 libraries, decay data from the UKDECAY2 library, and the FISPACT program. Overall, activity agreed well irrespective of the value and half-lives of the radioactive nuclei. Of 150 cases studied, approximately 10 showed significant discrepancies. Analysis of the discrepancies requires additional information such as the uncertainty of the neutron spectrum, particularly in the low-energy range. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Construct Validity of the Chinese Version of the Activities of Daily Living Rating Scale III in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, En-Chi; Lee, Yen; Lai, Kuan-Yu; Kuo, Chian-Jue; Lee, Shu-Chun; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background The Chinese version of the Activities of Daily Living Rating Scale III (ADLRS-III), which has 10 domains, is commonly used for assessing activities of daily living (ADL) in patients with schizophrenia. However, construct validity (i.e., unidimensionality) for each domain of the ADLRS-III is unknown, limiting the explanations of the test results. Purpose This main purpose of this study was to examine unidimensionality of each domain in the ADLRS-III. We also examined internal consistency and ceiling/floor effects in patients with schizophrenia. Methods From occupational therapy records, we obtained 304 self-report data of the ADLRS-III. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to examine the 10 one-factor structures. If a domain showed an insufficient model fit, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was performed to investigate the factor structure and choose one factor representing the original construct. Internal consistency was examined using Cronbach’s alpha (α). Ceiling and floor effects were determined by the percentage of patients with the maximum and minimum scores in each domain, respectively. Results CFA analyses showed that 4 domains (i.e., leisure, picture recognition, literacy ability, communication tools use) had sufficient model fits. These 4 domains had acceptable internal consistency (α = 0.79-0.87) and no ceiling/floor effects, except the leisure domain which had a ceiling effect. The other 6 domains showed insufficient model fits. The EFA results showed that these 6 domains were two-factor structures. Conclusion The results supported unidimensional constructs of the leisure, picture recognition, literacy ability, and communication tool uses domains. The sum scores of these 4 domains can be used to represent their respective domain-specific functions. Regarding the 6 domains with insufficient model fits, we have explained the two factors of each domain and chosen one factor to represent its original construct. Future users may

  17. Oxidative Stress and Antimicrobial Activity of Chromium(III) and Ruthenium(II) Complexes on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Páez, Paulina L.; Bazán, Claudia M.; Bongiovanni, María E.; Toneatto, Judith; Albesa, Inés; Becerra, María C.; Argüello, Gerardo A.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistance has resulted in the need for new approaches to be developed to combat previously easily treatable infections. The main aim of this work was to establish the potential of the synthetic α-diimine chromium(III) and ruthenium(II) complexes (where the α-diimine ligands are bpy = 2,2-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, and dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]-phenazine) like [Cr(phen)3]3+, [Cr(phen)2(dppz)]3+, [Ru(phen)3]2+, and [Ru(bpy)3]2+ as antibacterial agents by generating oxidative stress. The [Cr(phen)3]3+ and [Cr(phen)2(dppz)]3+ complexes showed activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging from 0.125 μg/mL to 1 μg/mL, while [Ru(phen)3]2+ and [Ru(bpy)3]2+ do not exhibit antimicrobial activity against the two bacterial genera studied at the concentration range used. When ciprofloxacin was combined with [Cr(phen)3]3+ for the inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, an important synergistic effect was observed, FIC 0.066 for S. aureus and FIC 0.064 for E. coli. The work described here shows that chromium(III) complexes are bactericidal for S. aureus and E. coli. Our results indicate that α-diimine chromium(III) complexes may be interesting to open new paths for metallodrug chemotherapy against different bacterial genera since some of these complexes have been found to exhibit remarkable antibacterial activities. PMID:24093107

  18. Pore-forming Activity of the Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System Protein EspD*

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Caballero-Franco, Celia; Bakker, Dannika; Totten, Stephanie; Jardim, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli is a causative agent of gastrointestinal and diarrheal diseases. Pathogenesis associated with enterohemorrhagic E. coli involves direct delivery of virulence factors from the bacteria into epithelial cell cytosol via a syringe-like organelle known as the type III secretion system. The type III secretion system protein EspD is a critical factor required for formation of a translocation pore on the host cell membrane. Here, we show that recombinant EspD spontaneously integrates into large unilamellar vesicle (LUV) lipid bilayers; however, pore formation required incorporation of anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine and an acidic pH. Leakage assays performed with fluorescent dextrans confirmed that EspD formed a structure with an inner diameter of ∼2.5 nm. Protease mapping indicated that the two transmembrane helical hairpin of EspD penetrated the lipid layer positioning the N- and C-terminal domains on the extralumenal surface of LUVs. Finally, a combination of glutaraldehyde cross-linking and rate zonal centrifugation suggested that EspD in LUV membranes forms an ∼280–320-kDa oligomeric structure consisting of ∼6–7 subunits. PMID:26324713

  19. Proton and gallium(III) binding properties of a biologically active salicylidene acylhydrazide.

    PubMed

    Hakobyan, Shoghik; Boily, Jean-François; Ramstedt, Madeleine

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation causes a range of problems in our society, especially in health care. Salicylidene acylhydrazides (hydrazones) are promising antivirulence drugs targeting secretion systems used during bacterial infection of host cells. When mixed with the gallium ion they become especially potent as bacterial and biofilm growth-suppressing agents, although the mechanisms through which this occurs are not fully understood. At the base of this uncertainty lies the nature of hydrazone-metal interactions. This study addresses this issue by resolving the equilibrium speciation of hydrazone-gallium aqueous solutions. The protonation constants of the target 2-oxo-2-[N-(2,4,6-trihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazino]-acetamide (ME0163) hydrazone species and of its 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzaldehyde and oxamic acid hydrazide building blocks were determined by UV-visible spectrophotometry to achieve this goal. These studies show that the hydrazone is an excessively strong complexing agent for gallium and that its antivirulence properties are predominantly ascribed to monomeric 1:1Ga-ME0163 complexes of various Ga hydrolysis and ME0163 protonation states. The chelation of Ga(III) to the hydrazone also increased the stability of the compounds against acid-induced hydrolysis, making this group of compounds very interesting for biological applications where the Fe-antagonist action of both Ga(III) and the hydrazone can be combined for enhanced biological effect.

  20. Objectively measured sedentary time and physical activity in women with fibromyalgia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Jonatan R; Segura-Jiménez, Víctor; Ortega, Francisco B; Álvarez-Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Camiletti-Moirón, Daniel; Aparicio, Virginia A; Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Femia, Pedro; Munguía-Izquierdo, Diego; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To characterise levels of objectively measured sedentary time and physical activity in women with fibromyalgia. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Local Association of Fibromyalgia (Granada, Spain). Participants The study comprised 94 women with diagnosed fibromyalgia who did not have other severe somatic or psychiatric disorders, or other diseases that prevent physical loading, able to ambulate and to communicate and capable and willing to provide informed consent. Primary outcome measures Sedentary time and physical activity were measured by accelerometry and expressed as time spent in sedentary behaviours, average physical activity intensity (counts/minute) and amount of time (minutes/day) spent in moderate intensity and in moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA). Results The proportion of women meeting the physical activity recommendations of 30 min/day of MVPA on 5 or more days a week was 60.6%. Women spent, on average, 71% of their waking time (approximately 10 h/day) in sedentary behaviours. Both sedentary behaviour and physical activity levels were similar across age groups, waist circumference and percentage body fat categories, years since clinical diagnosis, marital status, educational level and occupational status, regardless of the severity of the disease (all p>0.1). Time spent on moderate-intensity physical activity and MVPA was, however, lower in those with greater body mass index (BMI) (−6.6 min and −7 min, respectively, per BMI category increase, <25, 25–30, >30 kg/m2; p values for trend were 0.056 and 0.051, respectively). Women spent, on average, 10 min less on MVPA (p<0.001) and 22 min less on sedentary behaviours during weekends compared with weekdays (p=0.051). Conclusions These data provide an objective measure of the amount of time spent on sedentary activities and on physical activity in women with fibromyalgia. PMID:23794573

  1. Investigation of activation cross-section data of proton induced nuclear reactions on rhenium.

    PubMed

    Ditrói, F; Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Yamazaki, H; Baba, M; Mohammadi, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2013-07-01

    In the frame of systematic investigations of activation cross-section data for different applications the excitation functions of (nat)Re(p,x)(185)Os, (183m)Os, (183g)Os, (182)Os, (181m)Os, (186g)Re, (184m)Re, (184g)Re, (183)Re, (182m)Re, (182g)Re and (181g)Re reactions were measured up to 70MeV. The data for the (nat)Re(p,x) (183m)Os, (183g)Os, (182)Os, (181g)Os,(186g)Re, (184m)Re,(182m)Re, (182g)Re, and (181)Re reactions are reported for the first time. The activation method, the stacked foil irradiation technique and γ-spectroscopy for activity detection were used. The experimental data were compared with predictions of three theoretical codes. From the measured cross-section thick target integral yields were also calculated and presented.

  2. Catalytic activity of ruthenium(III) on the oxidation of an anticholinergic drug-atropine sulfate monohydrate by copper(III) periodate complex in aqueous alkaline medium - decarboxylation and free radical mechanism.

    PubMed

    Byadagi, Kirthi S; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T; Chimatadar, Shivamurti A

    2013-01-01

    Atropine sulfate monohydrate (ASM) is an anticholinergic drug, having a wide spectrum of activity. Hence, the kinetics of oxidation of ASM by diperiodatocuperate (DPC) in the presence of micro (10-6) amounts of Ru(III) catalyst has been investigated spectrophotometrically in aqueous alkaline medium at I = 0.50 mol dm-3. The reaction between DPC and ASM exhibits 1:2 stoichiometry (ASM:DPC) i. e., one mole of ASM require two moles of DPC to give products. The main oxidation products were confirmed by spectral studies. The reaction is first order with respect to [DPC] and [Ru(III)], while the order with respect to [ASM] and [OH-] was less than unity. The rates decreased with increase in periodate concentration. The reaction rates revealed that Ru(III) catalyzed reaction was about seven-fold faster than the uncatalyzed reaction. The catalytic constant (KC) was also determined at different temperatures. A plausible mechanism is proposed. The activation parameters with respect to slow step of the mechanism were calculated and the thermodynamic quantities were also determined. Kinetic experiments suggest that [Cu(H2IO6)(H2O)2] is the reactive Cu(III) species and [Ru(H2O)5OH]2+ is the reactive Ru(III) species.

  3. Energy and Safety: Science Activities for Elementary Students, Level III (Grades (5-6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westcott, Dale; And Others

    Thirteen activities are presented that focus on a common phenomenon of a child's world: energy. These activities relate energy, how it occurs, how it is used, and how to use it safely. Each activity includes the purpose, introduction, background, procedure, materials, estimated time for the activity, typical results, safety notes, and more ideas.…

  4. Mitochondrial Complex I Activity is Conditioned by Supercomplex I-III2-IV Assembly in Brain Cells: Relevance for Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Fabuel, Irene; Resch-Beusher, Monica; Carabias-Carrasco, Monica; Almeida, Angeles; Bolaños, Juan P

    2017-02-14

    The assembly of complex I (CI) with complexes III (CIII) and IV (CIV) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) to configure I-III- or I-III-IV-containing supercomplexes (SCs) regulates mitochondrial energy efficiency and reactive oxygen species (mROS) production. However, whether the occurrence of SCs impacts on CI specific activity remains unknown to our knowledge. To investigate this issue, here we determined CI activity in primary neurons and astrocytes, cultured under identical antioxidants-free medium, from two mouse strains (C57Bl/6 and CBA) and Wistar rat, i.e. three rodent species with or without the ability to assemble CIV into SCs. We found that CI activity was 6- or 1.8-fold higher in astrocytes than in neurons, respectively, from rat or CBA mouse, which can form I-III2-IV SC; however, CI activity was similar in the cells from C57Bl/6 mouse, which does not form I-III2-IV SC. Interestingly, CII-III activity, which was comparable in neurons and astrocytes from mice, was about 50% lower in astrocytes when compared with neurons from rat, a difference that was abolished by antioxidants- or serum-containing media. CIV and citrate synthase activities were similar under all conditions studied. Interestingly, in rat astrocytes, CI abundance in I-III2-IV SC was negligible when compared with its abundance in I-III-containing SCs. Thus, CIV-containing SCs formation may determine CI specific activity in astrocytes, which is important to understand the mechanism for CI deficiency observed in Parkinson's disease.

  5. Physical Activity Level of Urban Pregnant Women in Tianjin, China: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Dong, Shengwen; Zuo, Jianhua; Hu, Xiangqin; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the physical activity level and factors influencing physical activity among pregnant urban Chinese women. Methods This prospective cross-sectional study enrolled 1056 pregnant women (18–44 years of age) in Tianjin, China. Their socio-demographic characteristics were recorded, and the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to assess their physical activity during pregnancy. The data were analyzed by multinomial logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. Results Median total energy expenditure of pregnant women in each of the three trimesters ranged from 18.50 to 21.90 metabolic equivalents of task (METs) h/day. They expended 1.76–1.85 MET h/day on moderate and vigorous activities and 0.11 MET h/day on exercise. Only 117 of the women (11.1%) met the international guideline for physical activity in pregnancy (≥150 min moderate intensity exercise per week). The most frequent reason given for not being more physically active was the fear of miscarriage. Higher education level (OR: 4.11, 95% CI: 1.59–10.62), habitual exercise before pregnancy (OR: 2.14, 95% CI: 1.39–3.28), and husbands who exercised regularly (OR: 2.21, 95% CI: 1.33–3.67) significantly increased the odds of meeting the guideline (p<0.001). A low pre gravid body mass index (OR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.20–0.87) significantly decreased the odds (p<0.001). Conclusions Few urban Chinese pregnant women met the recommended physical activity guideline. They also expended little energy exercising. Future interventions should be based on the clinic environment and targeting family members as well as the subjects. All pregnant women should be targeted, not just those in high-risk groups. PMID:25286237

  6. Prevalence of factors related to active reproductive health behavior: a cross-sectional study Indonesian adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Rumiko; Tsuda, Akiko; Tabuchi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Complex and diverse factors are related to reproductive health (RH) behavior among adolescents according to the social and cultural context of each countries. This study examined the prevalence of active RH and factors related to active RH behavior among Indonesian adolescents. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1,040 of students who were selected through a multi-stage random sampling technique. A self-administered questionnaire was developed, including the World Health Organization Illustrative Questionnaire for Interview-Surveys with Young People, pubertal development scale, and sexual activity scale, modified in accordance to the Indonesian context. The data were analyzed using descriptive and comparative statistics, as well as logistic regression analyses. RESULTS The prevalence of active RH behavior were more higher in boys (56.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 50.6% to 62.6%) than in girls (43.7%; 95% CI, 37.6% to 49.8%). Negative attitudes towards RH were a factor related to active RH behavior in both boys and girls. Smoking and kind relationship envisioned before marriage (pacaran [courtship] and nikah siri [non-registered marriage]) were factors related to active RH behavior in boys; whereas the absence of access to information on substance abuse was an additional factor in girls. Moreover, an interaction was found between access to information on development and smoking (boys) and attitudes on RH (girls) as independent variables associated with active RH behavior. CONCLUSIONS Sex education for adolescents in Indonesia, particularly in the context of a health promotion program, should be developed based on prevalent social, cultural, and religious values to prevent active RH behavior. Such programs should focus on the kind of relationship envisioned before marriage and smoking for boys and access to information on subtance abuse for girls. PMID:27866406

  7. 2009 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Environmental Stewardship Group

    2010-11-01

    For reporting year 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2009 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2009, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports.

  8. Cross-Section Measurements via the Activation Technique at the Cologne Clover Counting Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Felix; Mayer, Jan; Netterdon, Lars; Scholz, Philipp; Zilges, Andreas

    The activation technique is a widely used method for the determination of cross-section values for charged-particle induced reactions at astrophysically relevant energies. Since network calculations of nucleosynthesis processes often depend on reaction rates calculated in the scope of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model, these cross-sections can be used to improve the nuclear-physics input-parameters like optical-model potentials (OMP), γ-ray strength functions, and nuclear level densities. In order to extend the available experimental database, the 108Cd(α, n)111Sn reaction cross section was investigated at ten energies between 10.2 and 13.5 MeV. As this reaction at these energies is almost only sensitive on the α-decay width, the results were compared to statistical model calculations using different models for the α-OMP. The irradiation as well as the consecutive γ-ray counting were performed at the Institute for Nuclear Physics of the University of Cologne using the 10 MV FN-Tandem accelerator and the Cologne Clover Counting Setup. This setup consists of two clover- type high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in a close face-to-face geometry to cover a solid angle of almost 4π.

  9. The efficacy of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) vs antithrombin III (at III) vs heparin, in the healing process of partial-thickness burns: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Kritikos, O.; Tsagarakis, M.; Tsoutsos, D.; Kittas, C.; Gorgoulis, V.; Papalois, A.; Giannopoulos, A.; Kakiopoulos, G.; Papadopoulos, O.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This is an experimental study regarding the positive effect of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) in the healing process of partial-thickness burns, in comparison to antithrombin III and heparin. On a porcine model we induced superficial partial-thickness and deep partial-thickness burns and performed intravenous administration of the elements of study during the first 48 h. The progress of the condition of the injured tissues was evaluated by histopathological examination at specific time intervals. The results showed an improved healing response of the specimens treated with rhAPC compared to those treated with antithrombin III, heparin, and placebo. PMID:23233823

  10. Mechanism for adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR56-mediated RhoA activation induced by collagen III stimulation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rong; Jeong, Sung-Jin; Yang, Annie; Wen, Miaoyun; Saslowsky, David E; Lencer, Wayne I; Araç, Demet; Piao, Xianhua

    2014-01-01

    GPR56 is a member of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Despite the importance of GPR56 in brain development, where mutations cause a devastating human brain malformation called bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria (BFPP), the signaling mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. Like many other adhesion GPCRs, GPR56 is cleaved via a GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain into N- and C-terminal fragments (GPR56N and GPR56C); however, the biological significance of this cleavage is elusive. Taking advantage of the recent identification of a GPR56 ligand and the presence of BFPP-associated mutations, we investigated the molecular mechanism of GPR56 signaling. We demonstrate that ligand binding releases GPR56N from the membrane-bound GPR56C and triggers the association of GPR56C with lipid rafts and RhoA activation. Furthermore, one of the BFPP-associated mutations, L640R, does not affect collagen III-induced lipid raft association of GPR56. Instead, it specifically abolishes collagen III-mediated RhoA activation. Together, these findings reveal a novel signaling mechanism that may apply to other members of the adhesion GPCR family.

  11. Synthesis, molecular structure, theoretical calculation, DNA/protein interaction and cytotoxic activity of manganese(III) complex with 8-hydroxyquinoline.

    PubMed

    Thamilarasan, V; Sengottuvelan, N; Sudha, A; Srinivasan, P; Siva, A

    2015-01-01

    Manganese(III) complex (1) [Mn(8-hq)3] (where 8-hq=8-hydroxyquinoline) has been synthesized and characterized by elemental, spectral (UV-vis, FT-IR) and thermal analysis. The structure of complex (1) has been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies and the configuration around manganese(III) ion was elongated octahedral coordination geometry. Density functional theory calculations were performed for ligand and its complex. Binding studies of ligand and complex 1 with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated by absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopy and viscosity measurements. Absorption spectral studies revealed that ligand and complex 1 binds to DNA groove and its intrinsic binding strength has been found to be 2.57×10(4) and 2.91×10(4)M(-1). A molecular docking study confirm that the complex 1 is a minor groove binder and was stabilized through hydrogen bonding interactions. Complex 1 exhibits a good binding propensity to bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein. The in vitro cytotoxicity study of complex 1 on breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) indicate that it has the potential to act as effective anticancer drug, with IC50 values of 3.25μM. The ligand and its complex have been screened for antimicrobial activities and the complex showed better antimicrobial activity than the free ligand.

  12. Active Control of Low-Speed Fan Tonal Noise Using Actuators Mounted in Stator Vanes: Part III Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Remington, Paul J.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2003-01-01

    A test program to demonstrate simplification of Active Noise Control (ANC) systems relative to standard techniques was performed on the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan from May through September 2001. The target mode was the m = 2 circumferential mode generated by the rotor-stator interaction at 2BPF. Seven radials (combined inlet and exhaust) were present at this condition. Several different error-sensing strategies were implemented. Integration of the error-sensors with passive treatment was investigated. These were: (i) an in-duct linear axial array, (ii) an induct steering array, (iii) a pylon-mounted array, and (iv) a near-field boom array. The effect of incorporating passive treatment was investigated as well as reducing the actuator count. These simplified systems were compared to a fully ANC specified system. Modal data acquired using the Rotating Rake are presented for a range of corrected fan rpm. Simplified control has been demonstrated to be possible but requires a well-known and dominant mode signature. The documented results here in are part III of a three-part series of reports with the same base title. Part I and II document the control system and error-sensing design and implementation.

  13. Activation of Manganese Oxidants with Bisulfite for Enhanced Oxidation of Organic Contaminants: The Involvement of Mn(III).

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Guan, Xiaohong; Fang, Jingyun; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2015-10-20

    MnO4(-) was activated by HSO3(-), resulting in a process that oxidizes organic contaminants at extraordinarily high rates. The permanganate/bisulfite (PM/BS) process oxidized phenol, ciprofloxacin, and methyl blue at pHini 5.0 with rates (kobs ≈ 60-150 s(-1)) that were 5-6 orders of magnitude faster than those measured for permanganate alone, and ∼5 to 7 orders of magnitude faster than conventional advanced oxidation processes for water treatment. Oxidation of phenol was fastest at pH 4.0, but still effective at pH 7.0, and only slightly slower when performed in tap water. A smaller, but still considerable (∼3 orders of magnitude) increase in oxidation rates of methyl blue was observed with MnO2 activated by HSO3(-) (MO/BS). The above results, time-resolved spectroscopy of manganese species under various conditions, stoichiometric analysis of pH changes, and the effect of pyrophosphate on UV absorbance spectra suggest that the reactive intermediate(s) responsible for the extremely rapid oxidation of organic contaminants in the PM/BS process involve manganese(III) species with minimal stabilization by complexation. The PM/BS process may lead to a new category of advanced oxidation technologies based on contaminant oxidation by reactive manganese(III) species, rather than hydroxyl and sulfate radicals.

  14. Sonochemical synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial activity and textile dyeing behavior of nano-sized cobalt(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Bala, Ritu; Behal, Jagriti; Kaur, Varinder; Jain, Subheet Kumar; Rani, Riveka; Manhas, Rajesh Kumari; Prakash, Vinit

    2017-03-01

    Using ultrasonic irradiations, nano-sized cobalt(III) coordination complexes, [Co(NH3)6]Cl3·2H2O (A), [Co(en)3]Cl3·3H2O (B) (en-ethylenediamine) and [Co(dien)2]Cl3·3.5H2O (C) (dien-diethylenetriamine) were synthesized. These complexes were characterized by spectroscopic studies like IR, UV/Visible and NMR. Morphology of these complexes was determined by SEM and particle size with the help of TEM & Zeta-sizer. The comparative thermal stability along with phase difference between nano structures and their respective bulk complexes has been studied by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) study respectively. The dyeing behavior of nano-sized Co(III) complexes and their respective bulks has also been studied (using both exhaust and pad dyeing methods) on cotton and wool fabrics and results shown rationalized dyeing behavior. All these complexes were further tested for antimicrobial activity (against B. subtilis, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, F. oxysporum and A. alternate) and it was observed that nano sized complexes enhanced the activity further.

  15. The role of hyperglycaemia-induced alterations of antithrombin III and factor X activation in the thrombin hyperactivity of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Quatraro, A; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Dello Russo, P; Lefebvre, P; Giugliano, D

    1990-05-01

    Factor X concentration and factor X activation, antithrombin III anti-Xa activity and plasma concentration, and fibrinopeptide A were measured in 20 diabetic patients and 20 normal subjects. Although factor X activation (81.3 +/- 2.2 vs 97.3 +/- 2.1%, p less than 0.01; mean +/- SE) and antithrombin III activity (76.5 +/- 2.2 vs 96.3 +/- 1.8%, p less than 0.01) were reduced in the diabetic patients, fibrinopeptide A concentration was increased (3.7 +/- 0.4 vs 1.7 +/- 0.2 ng ml-1, p less than 0.01). The ratio of factor X activation to antithrombin III anti-factor Xa activity was increased in the diabetic patients (1.10 +/- 0.01 vs 1.01 +/- 0.02, p less than 0.01). Induced hyperglycaemia was able to mimic all these abnormalities, without changing factor X or antithrombin III concentration. The results suggest that in vivo hyperglycaemia produces a decrease of factor X activation, but at the same time increases fibrinopeptide A formation due to a greater decrease of antithrombin III anti-Xa activity.

  16. Clinical and molecular cross-sectional study of a cohort of adult type III spinal muscular atrophy patients: clues from a biomarker study

    PubMed Central

    Tiziano, Francesco D; Lomastro, Rosa; Di Pietro, Lorena; Barbara Pasanisi, Maria; Fiori, Stefania; Angelozzi, Carla; Abiusi, Emanuela; Angelini, Corrado; Sorarù, Gianni; Gaiani, Alessandra; Mongini, Tiziana; Vercelli, Liliana; Vasco, Gessica; Vita, Giuseppe; Luca Vita, Gian; Messina, Sonia; Politano, Luisa; Passamano, Luigia; Di Gregorio, Grazia; Montomoli, Cristina; Orsi, Chiara; Campanella, Angela; Mantegazza, Renato; Morandi, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations of the SMN1 gene. Based on severity, three forms of SMA are recognized (types I–III). All patients usually have 2–4 copies of a highly homologous gene (SMN2), which produces insufficient levels of functional survival motor neuron (SMN) protein due to the alternative splicing of exon 7. The availability of potential candidates to the treatment of SMA has raised a number of issues, including the availability of biomarkers. This study was aimed at evaluating whether the quantification of SMN2 products in peripheral blood is a suitable biomarker for SMA. Forty-five adult type III patients were evaluated by Manual Muscle Testing, North Star Ambulatory Assessment scale, 6-min walk test, myometry, forced vital capacity, and dual X-ray absorptiometry. Molecular assessments included SMN2 copy number, levels of full-length SMN2 (SMN2-fl) transcripts and those lacking exon 7 and SMN protein. Clinical outcome measures strongly correlated to each other. Lean body mass correlated inversely with years from diagnosis and with several aspects of motor performance. SMN2 copy number and SMN protein levels were not associated with motor performance or transcript levels. SMN2-fl levels correlated with motor performance in ambulant patients. Our results indicate that SMN2-fl levels correlate with motor performance only in patients preserving higher levels of motor function, whereas motor performance was strongly influenced by disease duration and lean body mass. If not taken into account, the confounding effect of disease duration may impair the identification of potential SMA biomarkers. PMID:23073312

  17. Time-dependent quantum mechanical calculations on H+O2 for total angular momentum J>0. III. Total cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfield, Evelyn M.; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.

    2000-12-01

    The H+O2→OH+O reaction has been studied with a time-dependent wave packet method for total angular momentum J=15, 20, 25, 35. This work is a continuation of previous studies for J⩽10. The calculations were performed combining a real wave packet method with the Coriolis coupled method on parallel computers. We find that for most energies there is a monotonic decrease of reaction probability with increasing J. Nevertheless, due to the 2J+1 degeneracy, higher angular momentum states contribute significantly to the total reaction cross section. A smoothing/interpolation/extrapolation scheme is employed to compute total reaction cross sections. These cross sections are compared with quasiclassical results on the same potential energy surface, and the most recent experimental cross sections. Comparisons with quasiclassical results show the significance of zero-point energy constraints. The quantum mechanical theoretical cross sections are smaller than the experimental ones everywhere, suggesting that a more accurate potential energy surface is required. There is also some possibility that nonadiabatic effects play a role in this reaction.

  18. Identification of a recombinant inulin fructotransferase (difructose dianhydride III forming) from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 with high specific activity and remarkable thermostability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Yu, Shuhuai; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng

    2015-04-08

    Difructose dianhydride III (DFA III) is a functional carbohydrate produced from inulin by inulin fructotransferase (IFTase, EC 4.2.2.18). In this work, an IFTase gene from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 was cloned and expressed in Escherachia coli. The recombinant enzyme was purified by metal affinity chromatography. It showed significant inulin hydrolysis activity, and the produced main product from inulin was determined as DFA III by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The molecular mass of the purified protein was calculated to be 43 and 125 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration, respectively, suggesting the native enzyme might be a homotrimer. The recombinant enzyme showed maximal activity as 2391 units/mg at pH 6.5 and 55 °C. It displayed the highest thermostability among previously reported IFTases (DFA III forming) and was stable up to 80 °C for 4 h of incubation. The smallest substrate was determined as nystose. The conversion ratio of inulin to DFA III reached 81% when 100 g/L inulin was catalyzed by 80 nM recombinant enzyme for 20 min at pH 6.5 and 55 °C. All of these data indicated that the IFTase (DFA III forming) from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 had great potential for industrial DFA III production.

  19. Assessing braze quality in the actively cooled Tore Supra Phase III outboard pump limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.E.; Lutz, T.L.; Miller, J.D.; McGrath, R.; Dale, G.

    1994-12-31

    The quality of brazing of pyrolytic graphite armor brazed to copper tubes in Tore Supra`s Phase III Outboard Pump Limiter was assessed through pre-service qualification testing of individual copper/tile assemblies. The evaluation used non-destructive, hot water transient heating tests performed in the high-temperature, high-pressure flow loop at Sandia`s Plasma Materials Test Facility. Surface temperatures of tiles were monitored with an infrared camera as water at 120{degrees}C at about 2.07 MPa (300 psi) passed through a tube assembly initially at 30{degrees}C. For tiles with braze voids or cracks, the surface temperatures tagged behind those of adjacent well-bonded tiles. Temperature tags were correlated with flaw sizes observed during repairs based upon a detailed 2-D heat transfer analyses. {open_quotes}Bad{close_quotes} tiles, i.e., temperature tags of 10-20{degrees}C depending upon tile`s size, were easy to detect and, when removed, revealed braze voids of roughly 50% of the joint area. Eleven of the 14 tubes were rebrazed after bad tiles were detected and removed. Three tubes were rebrazed twice.

  20. TORC1-dependent sumoylation of Rpc82 promotes RNA polymerase III assembly and activity

    PubMed Central

    Chymkowitch, Pierre; Nguéa P, Aurélie; Aanes, Håvard; Robertson, Joseph; Klungland, Arne; Enserink, Jorrit M.

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining cellular homeostasis under changing nutrient conditions is essential for the growth and development of all organisms. The mechanisms that maintain homeostasis upon loss of nutrient supply are not well understood. By mapping the SUMO proteome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we discovered a specific set of differentially sumoylated proteins mainly involved in transcription. RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) components, including Rpc53, Rpc82, and Ret1, are particularly prominent nutrient-dependent SUMO targets. Nitrogen starvation, as well as direct inhibition of the master nutrient response regulator target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1), results in rapid desumoylation of these proteins, which is reflected by loss of SUMO at tRNA genes. TORC1-dependent sumoylation of Rpc82 in particular is required for robust tRNA transcription. Mechanistically, sumoylation of Rpc82 is important for assembly of the RNAPIII holoenzyme and recruitment of Rpc82 to tRNA genes. In conclusion, our data show that TORC1-dependent sumoylation of Rpc82 bolsters the transcriptional capacity of RNAPIII under optimal growth conditions. PMID:28096404

  1. Substrate-Activated Conformational Switch on Chaperones Encodes aTargeting Signal in Type III Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Ai, Xuanjun; Portaliou, Athina G.; Minetti, Conceicao A.S.A.; Remeta, David P.; Economou, Anastassios; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Targeting of type III secretion proteins at the injectisome is an important process in bacterial virulence. Nevertheless, how the injectisome specifically recognizes TTS substrates among all bacterial proteins is unknown. A TTS peripheral membrane ATPase protein located at the base of the injectisome has been implicated in the targeting process. We have investigated the targeting of the EspA filament protein and its cognate chaperone CesAB to the EscN ATPase of the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). We show that EscN selectively engages the EspA-loaded CesAB, but not the unliganded CesAB. Structure analysis revealed that the targeting signal is encoded in a disorder-order structural transition in CesAB that is elicited only upon binding of its physiological substrate, EspA. Abrogation of the interaction between the CesAB–EspA complex and EscN resulted in severe secretion and infection defects. We further show that the targeting and secretion signals are distinct and the two processes are likely regulated by different mechanisms. PMID:23523349

  2. Synthesis, characterization, antioxidant activity and DNA-binding studies of three rare earth (III) complexes with 1-(4-aminoantipyrine)-3-tosylurea ligand.

    PubMed

    Xi, Pin-xian; Xu, Zhi-hong; Liu, Xiao-hui; Chen, Feng-juan; Zeng, Zheng-zhi; Zhang, Xiao-wen; Liu, Ying

    2009-01-01

    1-(4-aminoantipyrine)-3-tosylurea (H2L) and its three lanthanide (III) complexes, M(H2L)3 3NO3 [where M=Nd(III), Sm(III) and Eu(III)], have been synthesized and characterized. In addition, the DNA-binding properties of the three complexes have been investigated by UV-vis (ultraviolet and visible) absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and viscosity measurements. Results suggest that the three complexes bind to DNA via a groove binding mode. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity (superoxide and hydroxyl radical) of the metal complexes was determined by using spectrophotometer methods in vitro. These complexes were found to possess potent antioxidant activity and be better than standard antioxidants like vitamin C and mannitol.

  3. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between parenting style and adolescent girls’ physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the influences on physical activity is crucial, particularly among important target groups such as adolescent girls. This study describes cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between parenting style and girls’ participation in organized sport, walking/cycling trips and objectively assessed moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Methods Data were collected from adolescent girls (n=222) and their parents in 2004 and again in 2006. Parents self-reported their demographic characteristics and parenting style. Girls self-reported their organized sport participation and weekly walking/cycling trips, while MVPA was assessed using accelerometers. Linear regression and interaction analyses were performed. Interactions between socio-demographic factors and parenting style with organized sport, walking/cycling trips and MVPA are presented. Results There were cross-sectional associations between authoritative (B=−0.45, p=0.042) and indulgent (B=−0.56, p=0.002) parenting and the number of walking/cycling trips, and authoritarian (B=0.27, p=0.033) parenting and frequency of organized sport. Significant interactions included those between: family status, authoritative parenting and daily (p=0.048) and week day (p=0.013) MVPA; education, indulgent parenting and MVPA on weekend days (p=0.006); and, employment, authoritarian parenting and duration and frequency of organized sport (p=0.004), highlighting the complexity of these relationships. Longitudinal analyses revealed significant decreases in organized sport and MVPA, significant increases in walking/cycling trips and no significant associations between parenting and physical activity. Conclusion Parenting styles appear to influence walking and cycling trips among adolescent girls, though not physical activity within other domains. Socio-demographic characteristics interact with the relationships between parenting and physical activity. While these findings can inform the

  4. Learning Activity Packets for Grinding Machines. Unit III--Cylindrical Grinding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) is one of three that accompany the curriculum guide on grinding machines. It outlines the study activities and performance tasks for the third unit of this curriculum guide. Its purpose is to aid the student in attaining a working knowledge of this area of training and in achieving a skilled or moderately…

  5. Learning Activity Packets for Milling Machines. Unit III--Vertical Milling Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) outlines the study activities and performance tasks covered in a related curriculum guide on milling machines. The course of study in this LAP is intended to help students learn to set up and operate a vertical mill. Tasks addressed in the LAP include mounting and removing cutters and cutter holders for vertical…

  6. Project EFFECT. Energy for the Future: Education, Conservation, Training. Curriculum Guide for the Training of Energy Extension Agents. A Working Paper, Section III: Energy Audit Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Univ., South Bend. Center for Energy Conservation.

    This third of four sections in a curriculum guide for training energy extension agents contains general introductory materials, an overview of the total curriculum, and four modules: Energy Cost Calculations, Energy Use Survey: Procedure and Techniques, Field Observations (Practicum), and Energy Use Surveys (Practicum). The curriculum is designed…

  7. Manual of Documentation Practices Applicable to Defence-Aerospace Scientific and Technical Information. Volume III: Sections 7--Information Retrieval; 8--Dissemination Practices; 9--Microform Systems and Reprography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuler, S. C., Ed.

    The third of four volumes in a series describing the basic documentation practices involved in the initial setting up and subsequent operation of an information-library organization to provide defense-aerospace scientific and technical information services, this manual consists of three sections. "Information Retrieval," by Tom Norton,…

  8. Practice of Physical Activity among Future Doctors: A Cross Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Chythra R; Darshan, BB; Das, Nairita; Rajan, Vinaya; Bhogun, Meemansha; Gupta, Aditya

    2012-01-01

    Background: Non communicable diseases (NCD) will account for 73% of deaths and 60% of the global disease burden by 2020. Physical activity plays a major role in the prevention of these non-communicable diseases. The stress involved in meeting responsibilities of becoming a physician may adversely affect the exercise habits of students. So, the current study aimed to study the practice of physical activity among undergraduate medical students. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted among 240 undergraduate medical students. Quota sampling method was used to identify 60 students from each of the four even semesters. A pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the data. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16 was used for data entry and analysis and results are expressed as percentages and proportions. Results: In our study, 55% were 20 to 22 years old. Over half of the students were utilizing the sports facilities provided by the university in the campus. Majority of students 165 (69%) had normal body mass index (BMI), (51) 21% were overweight, while 7 (3%) were obese. Of the 62% who were currently exercising, the practice of physical activity was more among boys as compared to girls (62% v/s 38%). Lack of time 46 (60.5%), laziness (61.8%), and exhaustion from academic activities (42%) were identified as important hindering factors among medical students who did not exercise. Conclusion: A longitudinal study to follow-up student behavior throughout their academic life is needed to identify the factors promoting the practice of physical activity among students. PMID:22708033

  9. Physical Activity Patterns and Factors Related to Exercise during Pregnancy: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Simony Lira; Surita, Fernanda Garanhani; Godoy, Ana Carolina; Kasawara, Karina Tamy; Morais, Sirlei Siani

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the physical activity levels of pregnant women and to examine the characteristics associated with the practice of exercise and the activities of daily living during pregnancy. Methods For this cross-sectional study, 1,279 women were recruited within 72 hours postpartum. They were interviewed about their socio-demographic data and obstetric history and were administered self-report questionnaires about exercise and daily physical activities during pregnancy. Data on the current pregnancy, labor, delivery, and newborn outcomes were collected from participants’ medical records. To analyze factors related to the practice of exercise, we used the student t-test, X², and odds ratio (OR), with a corresponding 95% confident interval (CI), followed by a multiple logistic regression. The significance level was 5%. Results Compared to the pre-pregnancy period, the prevalence of physical activity among participants was lower throughout pregnancy (20.1%) (p = 0.01). Half of the women interrupted practicing physical exercise due to pregnancy. The lowest prevalence of exercise was observed in the first (13.6%) and third trimesters (13.4%). Less than half of women received exercise guidance during prenatal care meetings (47.4%). Walking was the most commonly reported exercise, followed by water aerobics. Factors positively associated with exercise practice were higher educational level (OR= 1.82; CI 95% 1.28–2.60), primiparity (OR=1.49; CI 95% 1.07–2.07), exercising before pregnancy (OR= 6.45; CI 95% 4.64–8.96), and exercise guidance during prenatal care (OR=2.54; CI 95% 1.80–3.57). Mildly intense exercise and domestic activities were most frequently reported among pregnant women. There were no differences in maternal and perinatal outcomes between active and sedentary pregnant women. Conclusion The findings indicate that promoting physical activity remains a priority in public health policy, and women of childbearing age, especially those planning a

  10. Mechanism of catalase activity in aqueous solutions of dimanganese(III,IV) ethylenediamine-N,N prime -diacetate

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, J.D.; Maskos, Z. )

    1990-03-07

    Manganous ions, ligated by ethylenediamine-N,N{prime}-diacetate (edda = L) decompose hydrogen peroxide with a rate law {minus}d(H{sub 2}O{sub 2})/dt = k{sub 17}(Mn(edda))(H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) where k{sub 17} = 5.4 M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} at pH 7. The reduction of peroxide to water is initiated by the reaction of Mn{sup II}L with a dinuclear Mn{sup III,IV}L{sub 2}. A subsequent fast reaction between the transient product of this reaction and hydrogen peroxide or tert-butyl hydroperoxide effectively oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn(IV) in a concerted step without formation of the hydroxyl radical. The green mixed-valence complex, which is probably a bis({mu}-oxo)-bridged structure, is stable in neutral aqueous solution and exhibits a 16-line ESR signal in frozen solution. The basis of catalase activity is the autocatalytic formation of this complex when hydrogen peroxide is reduced by manganese(II). The catalase cycle is independent of the formation of oxy radicals. Mononuclear Mn{sup III}edda and Mn{sup II}edda react with superoxide radicals, but the decomposition of peroxide is virtually independent of these reactions. In unbuffered solutions, with a moderate excess of hydrogen peroxide, an oscillation in the concentration of the dinuclear complex is detected. 28 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Gallium(III), cobalt(III) and copper(II) protoporphyrin IX exhibit antimicrobial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis by reducing planktonic and biofilm growth and invasion of host epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Olczak, Teresa; Maszczak-Seneczko, Dorota; Smalley, John W; Olczak, Mariusz

    2012-08-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis acquires heme for growth, and initiation and progression of periodontal diseases. One of its heme acquisition systems consists of the HmuR and HmuY proteins. This study analyzed the antimicrobial activity of non-iron metalloporphyrins against P. gingivalis during planktonic growth, biofilm formation, epithelial cell adhesion and invasion, and employed hmuY, hmuR and hmuY-hmuR mutants to assess the involvement of HmuY and HmuR proteins in the acquisition of metalloporphyrins. Iron(III) mesoporphyrin IX (mesoheme) and iron(III) deuteroporphyrin IX (deuteroheme) supported planktonic growth of P. gingivalis cells, biofilm accumulation, as well as survival, adhesion and invasion of HeLa cells in a way analogous to protoheme. In contrast, cobalt(III), gallium(III) and copper(II) protoporphyrin IX exhibited antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis, and thus represent potentially useful antibacterial compounds with which to target P. gingivalis. P. gingivalis hmuY, hmuR and hmuY-hmuR mutants showed decreased growth and infection of epithelial cells in the presence of all metalloporphyrins examined. In conclusion, the HmuY protein may not be directly involved in transport of free metalloporphyrins into the bacterial cell, but it may also play a protective role against metalloporphyrin toxicity by binding an excess of these compounds.

  12. Activation Cross-Sections for 14.2 MeV Neutrons on Molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa Rao, C. V.; Lakshmana Das, N.; Thirumala Rao, B. V.; Rama Rao, J.

    1981-12-01

    Using the activation method, the cross-section for the following reactions on molybdenum were measured employing the mixed powder technique and Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectroscopy: 94Mo(n, 2n)93mMo, 3.5 ± 0.5 mbarn; 92Mo(n, 2n)91mMo, 19 ± 3 mbarn; 92Mo(n, 2n)91m+gMo, 226 ± 11 mbarn; 100Mo(n, p)100m2Nb, 9 ± 1 mbarn; 98Mo(n, p)98Nb, 10 ± 1 mbarn; 97Mo(n, p)97mNb, 5 ± 1 mbarn; 96Mo(n, p)96Nb, 12 ± 2 mbarn; 92Mo(n, α)89mZr, 2.1 ± 0.5 mbarn; and 92Mo(n, α)89m+gZr 24 ± 6 mbarn; the neutron energy was 14.2 ± 0.2 MeV. The experimental cross-sections were compared with the predictions of evaporation model and of different versions of pre-equilibrium model. The master equation approach appears to give satisfactory results.

  13. The Decovalex III Project: A Summary of Activities and LessonsLearned

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Jing, Lanru; Stephansson, Ove; Kautsky, Fritz

    2005-03-21

    Initiated in 1992, the DECOVALEX project is an international collaboration for advancing the understanding and modeling of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in geologic systems. The project has made important scientific achievements through three stages and is progressing in its fourth stage. It has played a key role in the development of mathematical modeling and in situ testing of coupled THM processes in fractured rock and buffer/backfill materials, a subject of importance for performance assessment of radioactive waste geologic repositories. This paper summarizes studies under the most recent stage of the project, DECOVALEX III (2000-2003). These studies include those of two major field experiments: (a) the FEBEX experiment at Grimsel, Switzerland, investigating coupled THM processes in a crystalline rock-bentonite system, and (b) the Drift Scale Test (DST) experiment at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, investigating coupled THM processes in unsaturated tuff. These are two of the largest multiyear heater tests undertaken to date for the study of coupled THM processes in geological systems. In addition, three so-called benchmark tests are also studied to evaluate the impact of coupled THM processes under different scenarios and geometries. Within the DECOVALEX project, multiple research teams participated in each of the studies, using different approaches and computer codes. Comparisons of results have provided insight into coupled THM processes, which in turn has stimulated further development of our modeling capabilities. Lessons learned from these studies are discussed. The scientific advances and enhanced insight gained through this kind of international cooperation illustrate the effectiveness of the DECOVALEX project.

  14. Alpha capture reaction cross section measurements on Sb isotopes by activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkulu, Z.; Özkan, N.; Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Fülöp, Zs; Güray, R. T.; Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z.; Somorjai, E.; Török, Zs; Yalçin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Alpha induced reactions on natural and enriched antimony targets were investigated via the activation technique in the energy range from 9.74 MeV to 15.48 MeV, close to the upper end of the Gamow window at a temperature of 3 GK relevant to the γ-process. The experiments were carried out at the Institute for Nuclear Research, the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA Atomki). 121Sb(α,γ)125I, 121Sb(α,n)124I and 123Sb(α,n)126I reactions were measured using a HPGe detector. In this work, the 121Sb(α,n)124 cross section results and the comparison with the theoretical predictions (obtained with standard settings of the statistical model codes NON-SMOKER and TALYS) were presented.

  15. Activation cross sections for reactions induced by 14 MeV neutrons on natural tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Junhua; Tuo Fei; Kong Xiangzhong

    2009-05-15

    Cross sections for (n,2n), (n,p), (n,n{sup '}{alpha}), (n,t), (n,d{sup '}), and (n,{alpha}) reactions have been measured on tantalum isotopes at the neutron energies of 13.5 to 14.7 MeV using the activation technique. Data are reported for the following reactions: {sup 181}Ta(n,2n){sup 180}Ta{sup g}, {sup 181}Ta(n,p){sup 181}Hf, {sup 181}Ta(n,n{sup '}{alpha}){sup 177}Lu{sup m}, {sup 181}Ta(n,t){sup 179}Hf{sup m2}, {sup 181}Ta(n,d{sup '}){sup 180}Hf{sup m}, and {sup 181}Ta(n,{alpha}){sup 178}Lu{sup m}. The neutron fluences were determined using the monitor reaction {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na. Results were discussed and compared with the previous works.

  16. Tl(I) and Tl(III) activate both mitochondrial and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hanzel, Cecilia Eliana; Verstraeten, Sandra Viviana

    2009-04-01

    Thallium (Tl) is a highly toxic metal though yet its mechanisms are poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells exposure to thallous (Tl(I)) or thallic (Tl(III)) cations leads to mitochondrial damage and reduced cell viability. In the present work we comparatively characterized the possible pathways involved in Tl(I)- and Tl(III)- (10-100 {mu}M) mediated decrease in PC12 cells viability. We observed that these cations do not cause cell necrosis but significantly increased the number of cells with apoptotic features. Both cations lead to Bax oligomerization and caused apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), endonuclease G (Endo G), and cytochrome c release from mitochondria, but they did not activate caspase dependent DNAse (CAD). Tl(I)- and Tl(III)-dependent caspases 9 and 3 activation followed similar kinetics, with maximal effects at 18 h of incubation. In addition, Tl(I) promoted phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure. Tl(III) induced 2- and 18-fold increase in Fas content and caspase 8 activity, respectively. Together, experimental results show that Tl(I) and Tl(III) induce PC12 cells apoptosis, although differential pathways are involved. While Tl(I)-mediated cell apoptosis was mainly associated with mitochondrial damage, Tl(III) showed a mixed effect triggering both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying Tl-induced loss of cell viability in PC12 cells.

  17. Cross-Sectional Investigation of HEMS Activities in Europe: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Gava, Paolo; Truhlář, Anatolij; Sandberg, Mårten; Group, The Euphorea

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To gather information on helicopter emergency medical services (HEMSs) activities across Europe. Methods. Cross-sectional data-collection on daily (15 November 2013) activities of a sample of European HEMSs. A web-based questionnaire with both open and closed questions was used, developed by experts of the European Prehospital Research Alliance (EUPHOREA). Results. We invited 143 bases from 11 countries; 85 (60%) reported base characteristics only and 73 (51%) sample-day data too. The variety of base characteristics was enormous; that is, the target population ranged from 94.000 to 4.500.000. Of 158 requested primary missions, 62 (0.82 per base) resulted in landing. Cardiac aetiology (36%) and trauma (36%) prevailed, mostly of life-threatening severity (43%, 0.64 per mission). Had HEMS been not dispatched, patients would have been attended by another physician in 67% of cases, by paramedics in 24%, and by nurses in 9%. On-board physicians estimated to have caused a major decrease of death risk in 47% of missions, possible decrease in 22%, minor benefit in 17%, no benefit in 11%, and damage in 3%. Earlier treatment and faster transport to hospital were the main reasons for benefit. The most frequent therapeutic procedure was drug administration (78% of missions); endotracheal intubation occurred in 25% of missions and was an option hardly offered by ground crews. Conclusions. The study proved feasible, establishing an embryonic network of European HEMS. The participation rate was low and limits the generalizability of the results. Fortunately, because of its cross-sectional characteristics and the handy availability of the web platform, the study is easily repeatable with an enhanced network. PMID:25538947

  18. Fibronectin type III5 repeat contains a novel cell adhesion sequence, KLDAPT, which binds activated alpha4beta1 and alpha4beta7 integrins.

    PubMed

    Moyano, J V; Carnemolla, B; Domínguez-Jiménez, C; García-Gila, M; Albar, J P; Sánchez-Aparicio, P; Leprini, A; Querzé, G; Zardi, L; Garcia-Pardo, A

    1997-10-03

    The region of fibronectin encompassing type III repeats 4-6 contains a low affinity heparin binding domain, but its physiological significance is not clear. We have studied whether this domain is able to interact with cells as already shown for other heparin binding domains of fibronectin. A computer search based on homologies with known active sites in fibronectin revealed the sequence KLDAPT located in FN-III5. A synthetic peptide containing this sequence induced lymphoid cell adhesion upon treatment with the activating anti-beta1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) TS2/16 or with Mn2+, indicating that KLDAPT was binding to an integrin. A recombinant fragment containing repeat III5 (FN-III5) also mediated adhesion of TS2/16/Mn2+-treated cells while the FN-III6 fragment did not. Soluble KLDAPT peptide inhibited cell adhesion to FN-III5 as well as to a 38-kDa fibronectin fragment and VCAM-1, two previously known ligands for alpha4beta1 integrin. KLDAPT also competed with the binding of soluble alkaline phosphatase-coupled VCAM-Ig to Mn2+-treated alpha4beta1. Furthermore, mAbs anti-alpha4 and anti-alpha4beta7, but not mAbs to other integrins, inhibited cell adhesion to FN-III5 and KLDAPT. These results therefore establish a cell adhesive function for the FN-III5 repeat and show that KLDAPT is a novel fibronectin ligand for activated alpha4 integrins.

  19. Inspection methods for physical protection Task III review of other agencies' physical security activities for research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    In Task I of this project, the current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) position-on physical security practices and procedures at research reactors were reviewed. In the second task, a sampling of the physical security plans was presented and the three actual reactor sites described in the security plans were visited. The purpose of Task III is to review other agencies' physical security activities for research reactors. During this phase, the actions, procedures and policies of two domestic and two foreign agencies other than the NRC that relate to the research reactor community were examined. The agencies examined were: International Atomic Energy Agency; Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board; Department of Energy; and American Nuclear Insurers.

  20. Adaptive organic nanoparticles of a teflon-coated iron (III) porphyrin catalytically activate dioxygen for cyclohexene oxidation.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Amit; Singh, Sunaina; Samson, Jacopo; Drain, Charles Michael

    2012-07-26

    Self-organized organic nanoparticles (ONP) are adaptive to the environmental reaction conditions. ONP of fluorous alkyl iron(III) porphyrin catalytically oxidize cyclohexene to the allylic oxidation products. In contrast, the solvated metalloporphyrin yields both allylic oxidation and epoxidation products. The ONP system facilitates a greener reaction because about 89% reaction medium is water, molecular oxygen is used in place of synthetic oxidants, and the ambient reaction conditions used require less energy. The enhanced catalytic activity of these ONP is unexpected because the metalloporphyrins in the nanoaggregates are in the close proximity and the TON should diminish by self-oxidative degradation. The fluorous alkyl chain stabilizes the ONP toward self-oxidative degradation.

  1. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process, Part III-A: Calculation Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Alfred W.

    This is the second in a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. This document deals exclusively with the calculation procedures, including simplified mixing formulas, aeration tank…

  2. Ergosteroids III. Syntheses and biological activity of seco-steroids related to dehydroepiandrosterone.

    PubMed

    Reich, I L; Lardy, H; Wei, Y; Marwah, P; Kneer, N; Powell, D R; Reich, H J

    1998-10-01

    The unusual activity of some D-ring-seco estrogens led us to prepare several seco steroids related to dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and to test for their ability to mimic thyroid hormone and 7-oxo-DHEA (1) as inducers of thermogenic enzymes in rats' livers. Only one, 3 beta-acetoxy-17a-oxa-androst-5-ene-7,17-dione (17), was capable of inducing both mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme. The closely related 3 beta-hydroxy-17a-oxa-androsta-5,15-diene-7,17-diones (both 14 alpha and 14 beta, 14 and 15) induce the formation of malic enzyme but not of glycerophosphate dehydrogenase. The 3 beta-propionyl ester of the above 14 alpha steroid was not active, presumably because it was not deacylated in vivo. The 16,17 dicarboxylic acid (9) produced by opening the D-ring also induced the formation of malic enzyme but not of glycerophosphate dehydrogenase. 3 beta-Acetoxyandrost-5-ene-7,16,17-trione, an intermediate in the synthesis of D-ring seco compounds enhanced the formation of both enzymes. Twelve other D-ring seco compounds were not active. Seco androstanes oxygenated at position 7 and with expanded A or B rings were not active.

  3. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  4. Validity of approximate methods in molecular scattering. III - Effective potential and coupled states approximations for differential and gas kinetic cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monchick, L.; Green, S.

    1977-01-01

    Two dimensionality-reducing approximations, the j sub z-conserving coupled states (sometimes called the centrifugal decoupling) method and the effective potential method, were applied to collision calculations of He with CO and with HCl. The coupled states method was found to be sensitive to the interpretation of the centrifugal angular momentum quantum number in the body-fixed frame, but the choice leading to the original McGuire-Kouri expression for the scattering amplitude - and to the simplest formulas - proved to be quite successful in reproducing differential and gas kinetic cross sections. The computationally cheaper effective potential method was much less accurate.

  5. Study of activation cross-sections of deuteron induced reactions on rhodium up to 40 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.; Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2011-09-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of the activation cross-sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions, excitation functions of the 103Rh(d,x) 100,101,103Pd, 100g,101m,101g,102m,102gRh and 103gRu reactions were determined up to 40 MeV. Cross-sections were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. Excitation functions of the contributing reactions were calculated using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS codes. From the measured cross-section data integral production yields were calculated and compared with experimental integral yield data reported in the literature. From the measured cross-sections and previous data, activation curves were deduced to support thin layer activation (TLA) on rhodium and Rh containing alloys.

  6. Synthesis, characterization, antioxidant activity and DNA-binding studies of two rare earth(III) complexes with naringenin-2-hydroxy benzoyl hydrazone ligand.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Rong; Yang, Zheng-Yin; Wang, Bao-Dui; Qin, Dong-Dong

    2008-08-01

    Two novel rare earth complexes, Y(III) complex (1) and Eu(III) complex (2), with naringenin-2-hydroxy benzoyl hydrazone ligand were synthesized and characterized. The interaction of the two metal complexes and the free ligand with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) was investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity measurement. All the experimental evidences indicate that these three compounds can strongly bind to CT DNA via an intercalation mechanism. The intrinsic binding constants of the Y(III) complex (1), Eu(III) complex (2) and the free ligand with CT DNA were 2.1 x 10(4), 8.5 x 10(4) and 1.6 x 10(4) M(-1), respectively. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of the metal complexes was determined by hydroxyl radical scavenging method in vitro.

  7. Human T cell activation. III. Induction of an early activation antigen, EA 1 by TPA, mitogens and antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Jung, L.K.L.; FU, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    With human T cells activated for 12 hours by 12-o-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as immunogen, an IgG/sub 2a/ monoclonal antibody, mAb Ea 1, has been generated to a 60KD phosphorylated protein with 32KD and 28KD subunits. The antigen, Ea 1, is readily detected on 60% of isolated thymocytes by indirect immunofluorescence. A low level of Ea 1 expression is detectable on 2-6% of blood lymphocytes. Isolated T cells have been induced to express Ea 1 by TPA, mitogens and anitgens. TPA activated T cells express Ea 1 as early as 1 hour after activation. By 4 hours, greater than 95% of the T cells stain with mAb Ea 1. About 50% of the PHA or Con A activated T cells express Ea 1 with a similar kinetics. Ea 1 expression proceeds that of IL-2 receptor in these activation processes. T cells activated by soluble antigens (tetanus toxoid and PPD) and alloantigens in MLR also express Ea 1 after a long incubation. About 20% of the T cells stain for Ea 1 at day 6. Ea 1 expression is not limited to activated T cells. B cells activated by TPA or anti-IgM Ab plus B cell growth factor express Ea 1. The kinetics of Ea 1 expression is slower and the staining is less intense. Repeated attempts to detect Ea 1 on resting and activated monocytes and granulocytes have not been successful. Ea 1 expression is due to de novo synthesis for its induction is blocked by cycloheximide and actinomycin D. Ea 1 is the earliest activation antigen detectable to-date.

  8. Neutron physics of the Re/Os clock. III. Resonance analyses and stellar (n,gamma) cross sections of {sup 186,187,188}Os

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Abbondanno, U.; Belloni, F.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Kaeppeler, F.; Audouin, L.; Dillmann, I.; Heil, M.; Plag, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wisshak, K.; Mengoni, A.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Aerts, G.; Andriamonje, S.; Berthoumieux, E.; Dridi, W.

    2010-07-15

    Neutron resonance analyses have been performed for the capture cross sections of {sup 186}Os, {sup 187}Os, and {sup 188}Os measured at the n{sub T}OF facility at cern. Resonance parameters have been extracted up to 5, 3, and 8 keV, respectively, using the sammy code for a full R-matrix fit of the capture yields. From these results average resonance parameters were derived by a statistical analysis to provide a comprehensive experimental basis for modeling of the stellar neutron capture rates of these isotopes in terms of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Consistent calculations for the capture and inelastic reaction channels are crucial for the evaluation of stellar enhancement factors to correct the Maxwellian averaged cross sections obtained from experimental data for the effect of thermally populated excited states. These factors have been calculated for the full temperature range of current scenarios of s-process nucleosynthesis using the combined information of the experimental data in the region of resolved resonances and in the continuum. The consequences of this analysis for the s-process component of the {sup 187}Os abundance and the related impact on the evaluation of the time duration of galactic nucleosynthesis via the Re/Os cosmochronometer are discussed.

  9. Neutron physics of the Re/Os clock. III. Resonance analyses and stellar (n,γ) cross sections of Os186,187,188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Mosconi, M.; Mengoni, A.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Käppeler, F.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Bisterzo, S.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Furman, W.; Gallino, R.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Karamanis, D.; Karadimos, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; Oshima, M.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2010-07-01

    Neutron resonance analyses have been performed for the capture cross sections of Os186, Os187, and Os188 measured at the n_TOF facility at cern. Resonance parameters have been extracted up to 5, 3, and 8 keV, respectively, using the sammy code for a full R-matrix fit of the capture yields. From these results average resonance parameters were derived by a statistical analysis to provide a comprehensive experimental basis for modeling of the stellar neutron capture rates of these isotopes in terms of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Consistent calculations for the capture and inelastic reaction channels are crucial for the evaluation of stellar enhancement factors to correct the Maxwellian averaged cross sections obtained from experimental data for the effect of thermally populated excited states. These factors have been calculated for the full temperature range of current scenarios of s-process nucleosynthesis using the combined information of the experimental data in the region of resolved resonances and in the continuum. The consequences of this analysis for the s-process component of the Os187 abundance and the related impact on the evaluation of the time duration of galactic nucleosynthesis via the Re/Os cosmochronometer are discussed.

  10. [Research on Chinese medicine pairs (III)--Their bio-active components].

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Xia; Tang, Yu-Ping; Liu, Li; Liu, Pei; Su, Shu-Lan; Qian, Da-Wei; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2013-12-01

    The total effect of Chinese medicine pair (CMP) was not the simply addition of two single herbs, but the interaction of their different components. Therefore, the research on the bio-active components of CMP is the basis of CMP compatibility study, and has important significance for revealing the compatibility effect and action mechanism, and creating traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) new drugs. This paper summed up the latest research progress of CMP on the basis of the bio-active components variation regularity of CMP from chemical solutions and content changes in vitro and the actions of CMP on bodies in vivo, in order to further drive the modern basic and applied research of CMP, and to reveal the scientific essence of CMP compatibility.

  11. Utility of the modified ATP III defined metabolic syndrome and severe obesity as predictors of insulin resistance in overweight children and adolescents: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Dhuper, Sarita; Cohen, Hillel W; Daniel, Josephine; Gumidyala, Padmasree; Agarwalla, Vipin; St Victor, Rosemarie; Dhuper, Sunil

    2007-01-01

    Background The rising prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) has received increased attention since both place individuals at risk for Type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance (IR) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity and MetS in both children and adults and is a known independent cardiovascular risk factor. However measures of IR are not routinely performed in children while MetS or severe obesity when present, are considered as clinical markers for IR. Objective The study was undertaken to assess the utility of ATPIII defined metabolic syndrome (MetS) and severe obesity as predictors of insulin resistance (IR) in a group of 576 overweight children and adolescents attending a pediatric obesity clinic in Brooklyn. Methods Inclusion criteria were children ages 3–19, and body mass index > 95th percentile for age. MetS was defined using ATP III criteria, modified for age. IR was defined as upper tertile of homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) within 3 age groups (3–8, n = 122; 9–11, n = 164; 12–19, n = 290). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values and odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated within age groups for predicting IR using MetS and severe obesity respectively. Results MetS was present in 45%, 48% and 42% of the respective age groups and significantly predicted IR only in the oldest group (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.2, 3.4; p = .006). Sensitivities were <55%; specificities <63% and positive predictive values ≤ 42% in all groups. Severe obesity was significantly associated with IR in both the 9–11 (p = .002) and 12–18 (p = .01) groups but positive predictive values were nonetheless ≤ 51% for all groups. Conclusion The expression of IR in overweight children and adolescents is heterogeneous and MetS or severe obesity may not be sufficiently sensitive and specific indicators of insulin resistance. In addition to screening for MetS in overweight children markers for

  12. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Flammulina velutipes polysacchrides and polysacchride-iron(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ya-Ru; Cheng, Shu-Jie; Qi, Guo-Hong; Yang, Zhi-Ping; Yin, Shi-Yu; Chen, Gui-Tang

    2017-04-01

    FVP is polysacchrides obtained from Flammulina velutipes. A polysacchride named FVP2 was isolated from FVP by DEAE cellulose-52 chromatography and Sephadex G-100 size-exclusion chromatography. FVP-Fe and FVP2-Fe were synthesized by neutralization of FeCl3 carbohydrate solution. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of FVP, FVP2, FVP-Fe, FVP2-Fe were investigated and their antioxidant effects on hydroxyl, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), superoxide anion, 2,2'-azobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radicals, reducing power, inhibition of malondialdehyde (MDA) were assessed in vitro. The results suggested that FVP-Fe and FVP2-Fe significantly suppressed the growth of bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis, and have relatively strong antioxidant activity to scavenge superoxide anion radical. In addition, FVP exhibited strong antioxidant activity to eliminate hydroxyl, DPPH, ABTS radicals, had high reducing power and inhibited the MDA production of health mice liver homogenate induced by auto-oxidation and Fe(2+)-H2O2 system.

  13. Genetic Dissection of the Signaling Cascade that Controls Activation of the Shigella Type III Secretion System from the Needle Tip

    PubMed Central

    Murillo, I.; Martinez-Argudo, I.; Blocker, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use type III secretion systems (T3SSs) for virulence. The Shigella T3SS consists of a hollow needle, made of MxiH and protruding from the bacterial surface, anchored in both bacterial membranes by multimeric protein rings. Atop the needle lies the tip complex (TC), formed by IpaD and IpaB. Upon physical contact with eukaryotic host cells, T3S is initiated leading to formation of a pore in the eukaryotic cell membrane, which is made of IpaB and IpaC. Through the needle and pore channels, further bacterial proteins are translocated inside the host cell to meditate its invasion. IpaD and the needle are implicated in transduction of the host cell-sensing signal to the T3S apparatus. Furthermore, the sensing-competent TC seems formed of 4 IpaDs topped by 1 IpaB. However, nothing further is known about the activation process. To investigate IpaB’s role during T3SS activation, we isolated secretion-deregulated IpaB mutants using random mutagenesis and a genetic screen. We found ipaB point mutations in leading to defects in secretion activation, which sometimes diminished pore insertion and host cell invasion. We also demonstrated IpaB communicates intramolecularly and intermolecularly with IpaD and MxiH within the TC because mutations affecting these interactions impair signal transduction. PMID:27277624

  14. Control of active nitrogen species used for PA-MBE growth of group III nitrides on Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohachi, Tadashi; Yamabe, Nobuhiko; Yamamoto, Yuka; Wada, Motoi; Ariyada, Osamu

    2011-03-01

    A new spiral parallel mesh electrode (PME) is presented to control active nitrogen species in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxial (PA-MBE) growth of group III nitrides and their alloys. Direct flux of active nitrogen from radio frequency inductive coupled plasma (rf-ICP) discharge was able to be measured using a mesh electrode for filtering charge particles and electron emission due to the self-ionization of nitrogen atoms on a negatively biased electrode. In situ measurement of direct nitrogen atom fluxes using the spiral PME during PA-MBE growth of GaN and AlN on Si substrates is investigated. A linear rf power dependence of direct flux of active species on atoms such as nitrogen (N+N*), where N and N* were ground and excited atoms, respectively, from a rf-ICP was confirmed by the spiral PME. An indirect flux of nitrogen adsorbed (ADS) atoms (N+N*) during discharge was also monitored by the spiral PME and received influence of the wall surface of the growth chamber. ADS nitrogen atoms are able to be used for nitridation of Si surface to grow a double buffer layer (DBL) AlN/β-Si3N4/Si.

  15. Case study of the propagation of a small flaw under PWR loading conditions and comparison with the ASME code design life. Comparison of ASME Code Sections III and XI

    SciTech Connect

    Yahr, G.T.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Richardson, A.K.; Server, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    A cooperative study was performed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate the degree of conservatism and consistency in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III fatigue evaluation procedure and Section XI flaw acceptance standards. A single, realistic, sample problem was analyzed to determine the significance of certain points of criticism made of an earlier parametric study by staff members of the Division of Engineering Standards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The problem was based on a semielliptical flaw located on the inside surface of the hot-leg piping at the reactor vessel safe-end weld for the Zion 1 pressurized-water reactor (PWR). Two main criteria were used in selecting the problem; first, it should be a straight pipe to minimize the computational expense; second, it should exhibit as high a cumulative usage factor as possible. Although the problem selected has one of the highest cumulative usage factors of any straight pipe in the primary system of PWRs, it is still very low. The Code Section III fatigue usage factor was only 0.00046, assuming it was in the as-welded condition, and fatigue crack-growth analyses predicted negligible crack growth during the 40-year design life. When the analyses were extended past the design life, the usage factor was less than 1.0 when the flaw had propagated to failure. The current study shows that the criticism of the earlier report should not detract from the conclusion that if a component experiences a high level of cyclic stress corresponding to a fatigue usage factor near 1.0, very small cracks can propagate to unacceptable sizes.

  16. Class III PI3K-mediated prolonged activation of autophagy plays a critical role in the transition of cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng; Zhang, Yangyang; Li, Chuanfu; Li, Yuehua; Jiang, Surong; Zhang, Xiaojin; Ding, Zhengnian; Tu, Fei; Wu, Jun; Gao, Xiang; Li, Liu

    2015-07-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy often leads to heart failure. Activation of autophagy has been shown in pathological hypertrophic hearts. Autophagy is regulated positively by Class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). However, it is unknown whether Class III PI3K plays a role in the transition of cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure. To address this question, we employed a previously established cardiac hypertrophy model in heat shock protein 27 transgenic mice which shares common features with several types of human cardiomyopathy. Age-matched wild-type mice served as control. Firstly, a prolonged activation of autophagy, as reflected by autophagosome accumulation, increased LC3 conversion and decreased p62 protein levels, was detected in hypertrophic hearts from adaptive stage to maladaptive stage. Moreover, morphological abnormalities in myofilaments and mitochondria were presented in the areas accumulated with autophagosomes. Secondly, activation of Class III PI3K Vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34), as demonstrated by upregulation of Vps34 expression, increased interaction of Vps34 with Beclin-1, and deceased Bcl-2 expression, was demonstrated in hypertrophic hearts from adaptive stage to maladaptive stage. Finally, administration with Wortmaninn, a widely used autophagy inhibitor by suppressing Class III PI3K activity, significantly decreased autophagy activity, improved morphologies of intracellular apartments, and most importantly, prevented progressive cardiac dysfunction in hypertrophic hearts. Collectively, we demonstrated that Class III PI3K plays a central role in the transition of cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure via a prolonged activation of autophagy in current study. Class III PI3K may serve as a potential target for the treatment and management of maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy.

  17. Respiratory health associated with exposure to automobile exhaust. III. Results of a cross-sectional study in 1987, and repeated pulmonary function tests from 1987 to 1990.

    PubMed

    Nakai, S; Nitta, H; Maeda, K

    1999-01-01

    We conducted an epidemiological study to investigate the association between exposure to automobile exhaust and respiratory health. We selected 3 zones from two geographically different areas in Tokyo on the basis of expected exposure levels: (1) within 20 m from the side of major roads with heavy traffic, (2) between 20 and 150 m from the side of the same road, and (3) a residential district of suburban Tokyo. The subjects of the study were female adults aged 30-59 y. A cross-sectional study of respiratory symptoms and repeated pulmonary function testing were also performed in each zone. The results suggested that exposure to automobile exhaust may be associated with respiratory symptoms. Nevertheless, repeated pulmonary function testing did not reveal any consistent differences. Investigators should conduct additional follow-up studies to investigate the decline of pulmonary functions with age.

  18. Spectroscopic, structure and antimicrobial activity of new Y(III) and Zr(IV) ciprofloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeek, Sadeek A.; El-Shwiniy, Walaa H.; Zordok, Wael A.; El-Didamony, Akram M.

    2011-02-01

    The preparation and characterization of the new solid complexes [Y(CIP) 2(H 2O) 2]Cl 3·10H 2O and [ZrO(CIP) 2Cl]Cl·15H 2O formed in the reaction of ciprofloxacin (CIP) with YCl 3 and ZrOCl 2·8H 2O in ethanol and methanol, respectively, at room temperature were reported. The isolated complexes have been characterized with elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, conductance measurements, UV-vis and 1H NMR spectroscopic methods and thermal analyses. The results support the formation of the complexes and indicate that ciprofloxacin reacts as a bidentate ligand bound to the metal ion through the pyridone oxygen and one carboxylato oxygen. The activation energies, E*; entropies, Δ S*; enthalpies, Δ H*; Gibbs free energies, Δ G*, of the thermal decomposition reactions have been derived from thermogravimetric (TGA) and differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves, using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzeger methods. The proposed structure of the two complexes was detected by using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/CEP-31G level of theory. The ligand as well as their metal complexes was also evaluated for their antibacterial activity against several bacterial species, such as Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus), Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa) and antifungal screening was studied against two species ( Penicillium ( P. rotatum) and Trichoderma ( T. sp.)). This study showed that the metal complexes are more antibacterial as compared to free ligand and no antifungal activity observed for ligand and their complexes.

  19. Exploring Career Clusters. Section III: Career Exploration and Planning. Unit I: Exploring Career Clusters of the Coordinated Career Education Curriculum Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eads, Jerry

    This document is a teaching unit of the Coordinated Career Education Curriculum Guide, available separately in ERIC--see note. It provides learning activities for 15 career clusters to be explored by special needs students. The career clusters covered in the unit include agribusiness and natural resources, business and office, communication and…

  20. Anticancer Activity of Small Molecule and Nanoparticulate Arsenic(III) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Swindell, Elden P.; Hankins, Patrick L.; Chen, Haimei; Miodragović, Ðenana U.; O'Halloran, Thomas V.

    2014-01-01

    Starting in ancient China and Greece, arsenic-containing compounds have been used in the treatment of disease for over 3000 years. They were used for a variety of diseases in the 20th century, including parasitic and sexually transmitted illnesses. A resurgence of interest in the therapeutic application of arsenicals has been driven by the discovery that low doses of a 1% aqueous solution of arsenic trioxide (i.e. arsenous acid) leads to complete remission of certain types of leukemia. Since FDA approval of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in 2000, it has become a front line therapy in this indication. There are currently over 100 active clinical trials involving inorganic arsenic or organoarsenic compounds registered with the FDA for the treatment of cancers. New generations of inorganic and organometallic arsenic compounds with enhanced activity or targeted cytotoxicity are being developed to overcome some of the shortcomings of arsenic therapeutics, namely short plasma half-lives and narrow therapeutic window. PMID:24147771

  1. Half-sandwich rhodium(III) transfer hydrogenation catalysts: Reduction of NAD(+) and pyruvate, and antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Soldevila-Barreda, Joan J; Habtemariam, Abraha; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Sadler, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Organometallic complexes have the potential to behave as catalytic drugs. We investigate here Rh(III) complexes of general formula [(Cp(x))Rh(N,N')(Cl)], where N,N' is ethylenediamine (en), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or N-(2-aminoethyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzenesulfonamide (TfEn), and Cp(x) is pentamethylcyclopentadienyl (Cp*), 1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetramethylcyclopentadienyl (Cp(xPh)) or 1-biphenyl-2,3,4,5-tetramethyl cyclopentadienyl (Cp(xPhPh)). These complexes can reduce NAD(+) to NADH using formate as a hydride source under biologically-relevant conditions. The catalytic activity decreased in the order of N,N-chelated ligand bpy > phen > en with Cp* as the η(5)-donor. The en complexes (1-3) became more active with extension to the Cp(X) ring, whereas the activity of the phen (7-9) and bpy (4-6) compounds decreased. [Cp*Rh(bpy)Cl](+) (4) showed the highest catalytic activity, with a TOF of 37.4±2h(-1). Fast hydrolysis of the chlorido complexes 1-10 was observed by (1)H NMR (<10min at 310K). The pKa* values for the aqua adducts were determined to be ca. 8-10. Complexes 1-9 also catalysed the reduction of pyruvate to lactate using formate as the hydride donor. The efficiency of the transfer hydrogenation reactions was highly dependent on the nature of the chelating ligand and the Cp(x) ring. Competition reactions between NAD(+) and pyruvate for reduction by formate catalysed by 4 showed a preference for reduction of NAD(+). The antiproliferative activity of complex 3 towards A2780 human ovarian cancer cells increased by up to 50% when administered in combination with non-toxic doses of formate, suggesting that transfer hydrogenation can induce reductive stress in cancer cells.

  2. Electron-transfer reactions of cobalt(III) complexes. 1. The kinetic investigation of the reduction of various surfactant cobalt(III) complexes by iron(II) in surface active ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Senthil Murugan, Krishnan; Thangamuniyandi, Pilavadi; Sakthinathan, Subramanian

    2015-05-15

    The kinetics of outer sphere electron transfer reaction of surfactant cobalt(III) complex ions, cis-[Co(en)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (1), cis-[Co(dp)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (2), cis-[Co(trien)(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (3), cis-[Co(bpy)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (4) and cis-[Co(phen)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (5) (en: ethylenediamine, dp: diaminopropane, trien : triethylenetetramine, bpy: 2,2'-bipyridyl, phen: 1,10-phenanthroline and C12H25NH2 : dodecylamine) have been interrogated by Fe(2+) ion in ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazoliumbromide) medium at different temperatures (298, 303, 308, 313, 318 and 323K) by the spectrophotometry method under pseudo first order conditions using an excess of the reductant. Experimentally the reactions were found to be of second order and the electron transfer as outer sphere. The second order rate constant for the electron transfer reaction in ionic liquids was found to increase with increase in the concentration of all these surfactant cobalt(III) complexes. Among these complexes (from en to phen ligand), complex containing the phenanthroline ligand rate is higher compared to other complexes. By assuming the outer sphere mechanism, the results have been explained based on the presence of aggregated structures containing cobalt(III) complexes at the surface of ionic liquids formed by the surfactant cobalt(III) complexes in the reaction medium. The activation parameters (enthalpy of activation ΔH(‡) and entropy of activation ΔS(‡)) of the reaction have been calculated which substantiate the kinetics of the reaction.

  3. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) over-production and autocrine cell activation are key factors in monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)]-induced malignant transformation of urothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Lourdes, C; Wu, T; Camarillo, J M; Gandolfi, A J

    2012-01-01

    The association between chronic human exposure to arsenicals and bladder cancer development is well recognized; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been fully determined. We propose that inflammatory responses can play a pathogenic role in arsenic-related bladder carcinogenesis. In previous studies, it was demonstrated that chronic exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsenous acid [MMA(III)] leads to malignant transformation of an immortalized model of urothelial cells (UROtsa), with only 3 mo of exposure necessary to trigger the transformation-related changes. In the three-month window of exposure, the cells over-expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8), consistent with the sustained activation of NFKβ and AP1/c-jun, ERK2, and STAT3. IL-8 was over-expressed within hours after exposure to MMA(III), and sustained over-expression was observed during chronic exposure. In this study, we profiled IL-8 expression in UROtsa cells exposed to 50 nM MMA(III) for 1 to 5 mo. IL-8 expression was increased mainly in cells after 3 mo MMA(III) exposure, and its production was also found increased in tumors derived from these cells after heterotransplantation in SCID mice. UROtsa cells do express both receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, suggesting that autocrine cell activation could be important in cell transformation. Supporting this observation and consistent with IL-8 over-expression, CXCR1 internalization was significantly increased after three months of exposure to MMA(III). The expression of MMP-9, cyclin D1, bcl-2, and VGEF was significantly increased in cells exposed to MMA(III) for 3 mo, but these mitogen-activated kinases were significantly decreased after IL-8 gene silencing, together with a decrease in cell proliferation rate and in anchorage-independent colony formation. These results suggest a relevant role of IL-8 in MMA(III)-induced UROtsa cell transformation.

  4. Distinct catalytic activity and in vivo roles of the ExoIII and EndoIV AP endonucleases from Sulfolobus islandicus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhou; Huang, Qihong; Ni, Jinfeng; Shen, Yulong

    2016-09-01

    AP endonuclease cleaves the phosphodiester bond 5'- to the AP (apurinic or apyrimidinic) sites and is one of the major enzymes involved in base excision repair. So far, the properties of several archaeal AP endonuclease homologues have been characterized in vitro, but little is known about their functions in vivo. Herein, we report on the biochemical and genetic analysis of two AP endonucleases, SisExoIII and SisEndoIV, from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A. Both SisExoIII and SisEndoIV exhibit AP endonuclease activity, but neither of them has 3'-5' exonuclease activity. SisExoIII and SisEndoIV have similar K M values on the substrate containing an AP site, but the latter cleaves the AP substrate at a dramatically higher catalytic rate than the former. Unlike other AP endonucleases identified in archaea, SisExoIII and SisEndoIV do not exhibit any cleavage activity on DNA having oxidative damage (8-oxo-dG) or uracil. Genetic analysis revealed that neither gene is essential for cell viability, and the growth of ∆SiRe_2666 (endoIV), ∆SiRe_0100 (exoIII), and ∆SiRe_0100∆SiRe_2666 is not affected under normal growth conditions. However, ∆SiRe_2666 exhibits higher sensitivity to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) than ∆SiRe_0100. Over-expression of SiRe_0100 can partially complement the sensitivity of ∆SiRe_2666 to MMS, suggesting a backup role of SisExoIII in AP site processing in vivo. Intriguingly, over-expression of SisEndoIV renders the strain more sensitive to MMS than the control. Taken together, we conclude that SisEndoIV, but not SisExoIII, is the main AP endonuclease that participates directly in base excision repair in S. islandicus.

  5. The Effect of the Electronic Nature of Spectator Ligands in the C-H Bond Activation of Ethylene by Cr(III) Silicates: An ab initio Study.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Zarur, Francisco; Comas-Vives, Aleix

    2015-01-01

    The Phillips catalyst, chromium oxides supported on silica, is one of the most widely used catalysts for the industrial production of polyethylene (PE). We recently synthesized a well-defined mononuclear Cr(III) silicate as active site model of the Phillips catalyst. The catalytic activity of this well-defined catalyst was similar to the industrial Phillips catalyst. We proposed that C-H bond activation of ethylene over a Cr-O bond initiates polymerization in this Cr(III) catalyst. Our results also showed that the presence of a second ethylene olefin in the coordination sphere of Cr decreases the intrinsic energy barrier of the C-H activation of ethylene. In order to understand the effect of this additional ligand in the C-H activation of ethylene by the Cr(III) catalyst, we evaluated the energetics of this step with different spectator ligands (C2H4, C2F4, N2 and CO) coordinated to the Cr center. The Charge Decomposition Analysis (CDA) of the bonding interactions between the Cr(III) catalyst and the ligands showed that the intrinsic energy barrier for the C-H activation of ethylene decreases with the increasing electron-donor properties of the spectator ligand.

  6. Bis(acridine-9-carboxylate)-nitro-europium(III) dihydrate complex a new apoptotic agent through Flk-1 down regulation, caspase-3 activation and oligonucleosomes DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Azab, Hassan A; Hussein, Belal H M; El-Azab, Mona F; Gomaa, Mohamed; El-Falouji, Abdullah I

    2013-01-01

    New bis(acridine-9-carboxylate)-nitro-europium(III) dihydrate complex was synthesized and characterized. In vivo anti-angiogenic activities of bis(acridine-9-carboxylate)-nitro-europium(III) dihydrate complex against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells are described. The newly synthesized complex resulted in inhibition of proliferation of EAC cells and ascites formation. The anti-tumor effect was found to be through anti-angiogenic activity as evident by the reduction of microvessel density in EAC solid tumors. The anti-angiogenic effect is mediated through down-regulation of VEGF receptor type-2 (Flk-1). The complex was also found to significantly increase the level of caspase-3 in laboratory animals compared to the acridine ligand and to the control group. This was also consistent with the DNA fragmentation detected by capillary electrophoresis that proved the apoptotic effect of the new complex. Our complex exhibited anti-angiogenic and apoptotic activity in vivo, a thing that makes it a potential effective chemotherapeutic agent. The interaction of calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) with bis(acridine-9-carboxylate)-nitro-europium(III) dihydrate complex has been investigated using fluorescence technique. A competitive experiment of the europium(III)-acridine complex with ethidium bromide (EB) to bind DNA revealed that interaction between the europium(III)-acridine and DNA was via intercalation. The interaction of the synthesized complex with tyrosine kinases was also studied using molecular docking simulation to further substantiate its mode of action.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and anticancer activities of two lanthanide(III) complexes with a nicotinohydrazone ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhou-Qin; Mao, Xian-Jie; Jia, Lei; Xu, Jun; Zhu, Tao-Feng; Cai, Hong-Xin; Bie, Hong-Yan; Chen, Ru-Hua; Ma, Tie-liang

    2015-12-01

    Two isostructural acylhydrazone based complexes, namely [Ce(penh)2(H2O)4](NO3)3·4H2O (1) and [Sm(penh)2(NO3)2](NO3)·C2H5OH (2) (penh = 2-acetylpyridine nicotinohydrazone), have been obtained and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The ten-coordinated lanthanide metal ion in each complex is surrounded by two independent tridentate neutral acylhydrazones with two ON2 donor sets. The other four coordination oxygen atoms are from four water molecules and two bidentate nitrate anions for complexes 1 and 2, respectively, thus giving distorted bicapped square antiprism geometry. Both complexes have excellent antitumor activity towards human pancreatic cancer (PATU8988), human colorectal cancer (lovo) and human gastric cancer(SGC7901) cell line. Furthermore, the cell apoptosis of complex 1 is detected by AnnexinV/PI flow cytometry.

  8. Effects of heavy metals on the expression of a zinc-inducible metallothionein-III gene and antioxidant enzyme activities in Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Cong, Ming; Wu, Huifeng; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Jianmin; Wang, Xuan; Lv, Jiasen; Hou, Lin

    2012-10-01

    Sequestration by metallothioneins and antioxidant defense are two kinds of important defense mechanisms employed by mollusks to minimize adverse effects caused by heavy metal contaminants in marine environment. In the present study, a novel metallothionein gene, CgMT-III, was cloned from Crassostrea gigas, consisting of eighteen conserved cysteine residues and encoding a MT III-like protein with two tandem β domains. The expression level of CgMT-III transcript induced by zinc was much higher than that induced by cadmium exposure. It suggested that CgMT-III was perhaps mainly involved in homeostatic control of zinc metabolism, which was distinct from previously identified MTs in C. gigas. Among the tested antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), SOD and GPx showed varying up-regulations in a tissue-specific manner, while CAT activities were inhibited in both gill and hepatopancreas from C. gigas exposed to heavy metals. It can be inferred that CgMT-III was mainly involved in zinc homeostasis, and CgMT-III gene together with CAT enzyme could be potential biomarkers to indicate heavy metal, especially zinc pollution in marine organisms.

  9. Synthesis and in vitro antitumor activity of novel iridium(III) complexes with enantiopure C2-symmetrical vicinal diamine ligands.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Chang, Jun; Song, Jiao; Qian, Meng-Ting; Yu, Jian-Ming; Sun, Xun

    2013-08-15

    Four novel iridium(III) complexes with enantiopure C2-symmetrical vicinal diamine ligands were designed, synthesized, and characterized by FT-IR, NMR, and MS. The cytotoxicities of all of the complexes against the human solid tumor cell lines A2780, A549, KB, and MDA-MB-231 were evaluated. Both R,R-configured complexes (R,R)-5a and (R,R)-5b exhibited more potent or similar activity compared with oxaliplatin, whereas their corresponding (S,S)-isomers (S,S)-5a and (S,S)-5b were found to be mostly inactive. As indicated by the activation of caspase-3, the cleavage of PARP, and the upregulation of p53, the preliminary mechanism studies revealed that the mode of cell death initiated by (R,R)-5a in A2780 cells was predominantly p53-mediated apoptosis. In addition, the structure of (R,R)-5a was unambiguously confirmed through single crystal X-ray structure determination.

  10. Synthesis and Assessment of Antibacterial Activities of Ruthenium(III) Mixed Ligand Complexes Containing 1,10-Phenanthroline and Guanide

    PubMed Central

    Hailemariam, Tizazu

    2016-01-01

    In this work, two complexes of ruthenium(III) ([Ru(phen)2Cl2]Cl·2H2O and [Ru(phen)2(G)Cl]2Cl·H2O) were synthesized from 1,10-phenanthroline alone as well as from both 1,10-phenanthroline and guanide. The synthesis was checked using halide test, conductance measurement, and spectroscopic (ICP-OES, FTIR, and UV/Vis) analysis. Their in vitro antibacterial activities were also investigated on two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and two Gram-negative (Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae)) bacteria. These complexes showed wide-range better activities than the commercially available controls (Chloramphenicol and Ciprofloxacin) against even the most drug resistant K. pneumoniae. [Ru(phen)2(G)Cl]2Cl·H2O inhibited S. aureus, MRSA, E. coli, and K. pneumoniae by 17.5%, 27.4%, 16%, and 52%, respectively, better than Chloramphenicol. It also inhibited these pathogens by 5.9%, 5.1%, 2.3%, and 17.2%, respectively, better than Ciprofloxacin. Similarly, [Ru(Phen)2(Cl)2]Cl·2H2O inhibited these pathogens by 11%, 8.7%, 0.1%, and 31.2%, respectively, better than Chloramphenicol. Therefore, after in vivo cytotoxicity investigations, these compounds can be considered as potential antibiotic drugs. PMID:27833473

  11. The age-mass relation for chromospherically active binaries. III. Lithium depletion in giant components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrado y Navascues, D.; de Castro, E.; Fernandez-Figueroa, M. J.; Cornide, M.; Garcia Lopez, R. J.

    1998-09-01

    We present a study of the lithium abundances of a sample of evolved components of Chromospherically Active Binary Systems. We show that a significant part of them have lithium excesses, independently of their mass and evolutionary stage. Therefore, it can be concluded that Li abundance does not depend on age for giant components of CABS. These overabundances appear to be closely related to the stellar rotation, and we interpret them as a consequence of the transfer of angular momentum from the orbit to the rotation as the stars evolve in and off the Main Sequence, in a similar way as it happens in the dwarf components of the same systems and in the Tidally Locked Binaries belonging to the Hyades and M67. Based on observations collected with the 2.2\\,m telescope of the German-Spanish Observatorio de Calar Alto (Almeria, Spain), and with the 2.56\\,m Nordic Optical Telescope in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrof\\'\\i sica de Canarias (La Palma, Spain)

  12. Synthesis, characterization, antioxidative and antitumor activities of solid quercetin rare earth(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Wang, L F; Wang, J Y; Tang, N

    2001-01-01

    Eight rare earth metal(II) complexes with quercetin ML3 x 6H2O [L=quercetin (3-OH group deprotonated); M = La, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Tm and Y] have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, complexometric titration, thermal analysis, conductivity, IR, UV, 1HNMR and fluorescence spectra techniques as well as cyclic voltammetry. The quercetin:metal stoichiometry and the equilibrium stability constant for metal binding to quercetin have been determined. The antioxidative and antitumor activities of quercetin x 2H2O and the complexes were tested by both the MTT and SRB methods. The results show that the suppression ratio of the complexes against the tested tumour cells are superior to quercetin x 2H2O. The property of LaL3 x 6H2O reacting with calf thymus DNA was studied by fluorescence methods. The La-complex binding to DNA has been determined by fluorescence titration in 0.05 M Tris-HCl, 0.5 M NaCl buffer (pH 7.0). The results indicate that the interaction of the complex with DNA is very evident.

  13. A series of binuclear lanthanide(III) complexes: Crystallography, antimicrobial activity and thermochemistry properties studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Ren, Ning; Xu, Su-Ling; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Da-Hai

    2015-02-01

    A series of novel lanthanide complexes with the general formula [Ln(3,4-DClBA)3phen]2 (Ln = Ho(1), Nd(2), Sm(3), Dy(4), Eu(5), Tb(6), Yb(7) and Er(8), 3,4-DClBA = 3,4-dichlorobenzoate, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) were prepared at room temperature and characterized. The crystal structures of complexes 1-8 have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. These complexes are isomorphous and lanthanide ions are all eight-coordinated to oxygen atoms and nitrogen atoms with distorted square-antiprism geometry. The thermal decomposition mechanism and TG-FTIR spectra of gaseous products of thermal decomposition processes for complexes 1-8 were acquired through TG/DSC-FTIR system. The heat capacities of complexes 1-8 were measured using DSC technology and fitted to a polynomial equation by the least-squares method. Complexes 3-6 display characteristic lanthanide emission bands in the visible region. Meanwhile, these complexes exhibit in good antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureu.

  14. Simultaneous precipitation of orthophosphate in activated sludge systems with Al(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    This dissertation examines the simultaneous precipitation of soluble orthophosphate (SOP) when alum is dosed to an activated sludge aeration basin. The results of batch and continuous flow experimental studies were used to develop a model of this process. This research identified three regions of chemical phosphorus removal, in each of which a different SOP removal mechanism appeared to apply: Region 1 extends to SOP residual concentrations as low as 1.0 mg P/1. In this region the stoichiometric precipitation of Al{sub 0.91}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (OH){sub 1.73(s)} is the predominate phosphate removal mechanism. Region 2 includes SOP residual concentrations in the range 0.1-1.0 mg P/1. Phosphate removal in this region is described on the basis of the adsorption of SOP on to aluminum hydroxide solid surfaces. Region 3 includes SOP residual concentrations as low as 0.02 mg P/1. The minimum SOP phosphate concentration that can be reached in this region is controlled by the presence of both aluminum-hydroxyphosphate and aluminum hydroxide solids.

  15. The Importance of Physical Fitness versus Physical Activity for Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Deborah Rohm; Steinhardt, Mary A.

    1993-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined relationships among physical fitness, physical activity, and risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) in male police officers. Data from screenings and physical fitness assessments indicated physical activity must be sufficient to influence fitness before obtaining statistically significant risk-reducing…

  16. Polyguluronate sulfate, polymannuronate sulfate, and their oligosaccharides have antithrombin III- and heparin cofactor II-independent anticoagulant activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xuan; Lan, Ying; Zeng, Pengjiao; Guo, Zhihua; Hao, Cui; Zhang, Lijuan

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading causes of death. However, the complications can be treated with heparin and heparinoids, such as heparin pentasaccharide Fondaparinux, dermatan sulfate, and PSS made from alginate extracted from brown seaweeds by chemical sulfation. Alginate is composed of a linear backbone of polymannuronate (PM), polyguluronate (PG), and alternate residues of mannuronic acid and guluronic acid. It is unknown if heparin and sulfated PG (PGS)/PM (PMS) have the same or different anticoagulant molecular targets. In the current study, the anticoagulant activities of PGS, PMS, and their oligosaccharides were directly compared to that of heparin, Fondaparinux, and dermatan sulfate by the activated partial thrombinplastin time (aPTT) assay using normal, antithrombin III (ATIII)-deficient, heparin co-factor II (HCII)-deficient, and ATIII- and HCII-double deficient human plasmas. Our results showed that PGS, PMS, and their oligosaccharides had better anticoagulant activity than that of Fondaparinux in all four human plasmas tested. As expected, heparin was the best anticoagulant in normal plasma. Moreover, PGS, PGS6, PGS12, PGS25, PMS6, PMS12, and PMS25 were better anticoagulants than dermatan sulfate in HCII-deficient plasma. Most strikingly, PGS, PGS12, PGS25, PMS6, PMS12, and PMS25 were better anticoagulants than that of heparin in ATIII- and HCII-double deficient human plasma. The results revealed for the first time that sulfated alginate had ATIII- and HCII-independent anticoagulant activities. Therefore, developing PGS and PMS-based anticoagulants might require to discover their major molecular targets and to develop target-specific anticoagulant assays.

  17. Synthesis, antioxidant activities of the nickel(II), iron(III) and oxovanadium(IV) complexes with N2O2 chelating thiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Bal-Demirci, Tülay; Sahin, Musa; Ozyürek, Mustafa; Kondakçı, Esin; Ulküseven, Bahri

    2014-05-21

    The nickel(II), iron(III) and oxovanadium(IV) complexes of the N2O2 chelating thiosemicarbazones were synthesized using 4-hydroxysalicyladehyde-S-methylthiosemicarbazone and R1-substitute-salicylaldehyde (R1: 4-OH, H) in the presence of Ni(II), Fe(III), VO(IV) ions by the template reaction. The structures of the thiosemicarbazone complexes were characterized by FT-IR, (1)H NMR, elemental, ESI-MS and APCI-MS analysis. The synthesized compounds were screened for their antioxidant capacity by using the cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) method. Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) of iron(III) complex, 1c, was measured to be higher than that of the other complexes. Other parameters of antioxidant activity (scavenging effects on •OH, O2(•-) and H2O2) of these compounds were also determined. All the compounds have shown encouraging ROS scavenging activities.

  18. Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) new complexes of 5-aminosalicylic acid: Spectroscopic, thermal characterization and biological activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Madiha H.; Mohamed, Gehad G.

    2013-04-01

    The complexing behavior of mesalazine (5-aminosalicylic acid; 5-ASA) towards the transition metal ions namely, Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) have been examined by elemental analyses, magnetic measurements, electronic, IR and 1H NMR. Thermal properties and decomposition kinetics of all complexes are investigated. The interpretation, mathematical analyses and evaluation of kinetic parameters of all thermal decomposition stages have been evaluated using Coats-Redfern equation. The free ligand and its metal complexes have been tested in vitro against Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans fungi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Bacillis subtilies and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in order to assess their antimicrobial potential. The results indicate that the metal complexes are also found to have more antimicrobial activity than the parent 5-ASA drug.

  19. C-H activation by a mononuclear manganese(III) hydroxide complex: synthesis and characterization of a manganese-lipoxygenase mimic?

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Christian R; Cole, Adam P; Stack, T Daniel P

    2005-07-13

    Lipoxygenases are mononuclear non-heme metalloenzymes that regio- and stereospecifically convert 1,4-pentadiene subunit-containing fatty acids into alkyl peroxides. The rate-determining step is generally accepted to be hydrogen atom abstraction from the pentadiene subunit of the substrate by an active metal(III)-hydroxide species to give a metal(II)-water species and an organic radical. All known plant and animal lipoxygenases contain iron as the active metal; recently, however, manganese was found to be the active metal in a fungal lipoxygenase. Reported here are the synthesis and characterization of a mononuclear Mn(III) complex, [Mn(III)(PY5)(OH)](CF(3)SO(3))(2) (PY5 = 2,6-bis(bis(2-pyridyl)methoxymethane)pyridine), that reacts with hydrocarbon substrates in a manner most consistent with hydrogen atom abstraction and provides chemical precedence for the proposed reaction mechanism. The neutral penta-pyridyl ligation of PY5 endows a strong Lewis acidic character to the metal center allowing the Mn(III) compound to perform this oxidation chemistry. Thermodynamic analysis of [Mn(III)(PY5)(OH)](2+) and the reduced product, [Mn(II)(PY5)(H(2)O)](2+), estimates the strength of the O-H bond in the metal-bound water in the Mn(II) complex to be 82 (+/-2) kcal mol(-)(1), slightly less than that of the O-H bond in the related reduced iron complex, [Fe(II)(PY5)(MeOH)](2+). [Mn(III)(PY5)(OH)](2+) reacts with hydrocarbon substrates at rates comparable to those of the analogous [Fe(III)(PY5)(OMe)](2+) at 323 K. The crystal structure of [Mn(III)(PY5)(OH)](2+) displays Jahn-Teller distortions that are absent in [Mn(II)(PY5)(H(2)O)](2+), notably a compression along the Mn(III)-OH axis. Consequently, a large internal structural reorganization is anticipated for hydrogen atom transfer, which may be correlated to the lessened dependence of the rate of substrate oxidation on the substrate bond dissociation energy as compared to other metal complexes. The results presented here suggest

  20. Sunlight-driven photo-transformation of bisphenol A by Fe(III) in aqueous solution: Photochemical activity and mechanistic aspects.

    PubMed

    Pan, Meilan; Ding, Jie; Duan, Lin; Gao, Guandao

    2017-01-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant elements in aquatic environments, and plays important roles in the fate and transport of environmental contaminants. Previous studies on the photochemical properties of Fe(III) species have largely focused on complexes formed between Fe(III) and environmental ligands such as natural organic matter (NOM) under UV irradiation, whereas the potentially important roles of hydrolysis species of Fe(III) in Fe(III)-mediated photo-transformation of environmental contaminants under solar light are not fully understood. In this study, the solar light-driven photochemical activities of hydrolysis species of Fe(III) were further explored, using a system containing only 0.5 mM Fe2(SO4)3 and bisphenol A. The important role of colloidal [Fe(OH)3]m, formed from the hydrolysis of Fe(3+), as a core photochemical species of Fe(III) was proposed and verified. Interestingly, O2(-), rather than OH, was identified (via electron spin resonance) as the key active radical responsible for the degradation of bisphenol A. We propose that unlike Fe(OH)(2+), which under UV irradiation can yield OH (Fe(OH)(2+) + hv → Fe(2+) + OH), colloidal [Fe(OH)3]m produces O2(-) even in sunlight ([Fe(OH)3]m + 2O2 + hv → Fe(II) + 2O2(-) + H2O). The fact that Fe(III) can produce strong radicals in sunlight may have important environmental implications.

  1. 75 FR 9434 - Civil Rights Division, Disability Rights Section; Agency Information Collection Activities Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... Act of 1990/Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Discrimination Complaint Form. The... Disabilities Act/Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Discrimination Complaint Form. (3) The agency... asked to respond, as well as a brief abstract: Primary: Individuals alleging discrimination by...

  2. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) over-production and autocrine cell activation are key factors in monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)]-induced malignant transformation of urothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero-Lourdes, C.; Wu, T.; Camarillo, J.M.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    The association between chronic human exposure to arsenicals and bladder cancer development is well recognized; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been fully determined. We propose that inflammatory responses can play a pathogenic role in arsenic-related bladder carcinogenesis. In previous studies, it was demonstrated that chronic exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsenous acid [MMA(III)] leads to malignant transformation of an immortalized model of urothelial cells (UROtsa), with only 3 mo of exposure necessary to trigger the transformation-related changes. In the three-month window of exposure, the cells over-expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8), consistent with the sustained activation of NFKβ and AP1/c-jun, ERK2, and STAT3. IL-8 was over-expressed within hours after exposure to MMA(III), and sustained over-expression was observed during chronic exposure. In this study, we profiled IL-8 expression in UROtsa cells exposed to 50 nM MMA(III) for 1 to 5 mo. IL-8 expression was increased mainly in cells after 3 mo MMA(III) exposure, and its production was also found increased in tumors derived from these cells after heterotransplantation in SCID mice. UROtsa cells do express both receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, suggesting that autocrine cell activation could be important in cell transformation. Supporting this observation and consistent with IL-8 over-expression, CXCR1 internalization was significantly increased after three months of exposure to MMA(III). The expression of MMP-9, cyclin D1, bcl-2, and VGEF was significantly increased in cells exposed to MMA(III) for 3 mo, but these mitogen-activated kinases were significantly decreased after IL-8 gene silencing, together with a decrease in cell proliferation rate and in anchorage-independent colony formation. These results suggest a relevant role of IL-8 in MMA(III)-induced UROtsa cell transformation. -- Highlights: ► IL-8 is over-expressed in human MMA(III)-exposed urothelial

  3. The ERECTA, CLAVATA and class III HD-ZIP Pathways Display Synergistic Interactions in Regulating Floral Meristem Activities

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Udi; Asis, Lior; Eshed Williams, Leor

    2015-01-01

    In angiosperms, the production of flowers marks the beginning of the reproductive phase. At the emergence of flower primordia on the flanks of the inflorescence meristem, the WUSCHEL (WUS) gene, which encodes a homeodomain transcription factor starts to be expressed and establishes de novo stem cell population, founder of the floral meristem (FM). Similarly to the shoot apical meristem a precise spatial and temporal expression pattern of WUS is required and maintained through strict regulation by multiple regulatory inputs to maintain stem cell homeostasis. However, following the formation of a genetically determined fixed number of floral organs, this homeostasis is shifted towards organogenesis and the FM is terminated. In here we performed a genetic study to test how a reduction in ERECTA, CLAVATA and class III HD-ZIP pathways affects floral meristem activity and flower development. We revealed strong synergistic phenotypes of extra flower number, supernumerary whorls, total loss of determinacy and extreme enlargement of the meristem as compared to any double mutant combination indicating that the three pathways, CLV3, ER and HD-ZIPIII distinctively regulate meristem activity and that they act in parallel. Our findings yield several new insights into stem cell-driven development. We demonstrate the crucial requirement for coupling floral meristem termination with carpel formation to ensure successful reproduction in plants. We also show how regulation of meristem size and alternation in spatial structure of the meristem serve as a mechanism to determine flower organogenesis. We propose that the loss of FM determinacy due to the reduction in CLV3, ER and HD-ZIPIII activity is genetically separable from the AGAMOUS core mechanism of meristem termination. PMID:25946150

  4. Heterolytic Activation of C-H Bonds on Cr(III)-O Surface Sites Is a Key Step in Catalytic Polymerization of Ethylene and Dehydrogenation of Propane.

    PubMed

    Conley, Matthew P; Delley, Murielle F; Núñez-Zarur, Francisco; Comas-Vives, Aleix; Copéret, Christophe

    2015-06-01

    We describe the reactivity of well-defined chromium silicates toward ethylene and propane. The initial motivation for this study was to obtain a molecular understanding of the Phillips polymerization catalyst. The Phillips catalyst contains reduced chromium sites on silica and catalyzes the polymerization of ethylene without activators or a preformed Cr-C bond. Cr(II) sites are commonly proposed active sites in this catalyst. We synthesized and characterized well-defined chromium(II) silicates and found that these materials, slightly contaminated with a minor amount of Cr(III) sites, have poor polymerization activity and few active sites. In contrast, chromium(III) silicates have 1 order of magnitude higher activity. The chromium(III) silicates initiate polymerization by the activation of a C-H bond of ethylene. Density functional theory analysis of this process showed that the C-H bond activation step is heterolytic and corresponds to a σ-bond metathesis type process. The same well-defined chromium(III) silicate catalyzes the dehydrogenation of propane at elevated temperatures with activities similar to those of a related industrial chromium-based catalyst. This reaction also involves a key heterolytic C-H bond activation step similar to that described for ethylene but with a significantly higher energy barrier. The higher energy barrier is consistent with the higher pKa of the C-H bond in propane compared to the C-H bond in ethylene. In both cases, the rate-determining step is the heterolytic C-H bond activation.

  5. 26 CFR 1.904-4T - Separate application of section 904 with respect to certain categories of income (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... paragraph (c) of this section), or any active rents and royalties (as defined in paragraph (b)(2)(iii) of... does not satisfy, but P does satisfy, the active trade or business requirements of section 954(c)(2)(A... active trade or business requirements of section 954(c)(2)(A) and, in addition, the royalty income...

  6. Humeral cross-sectional morphology from 18th century Quebec prisoners of war: Limits to activity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Elizabeth

    2005-03-01

    This study uses measures of cross-sectional robusticity and asymmetry (based on humeral areal and inertial cross-sectional components) to test a prediction from bone remodeling theory that a physically active 18th century Quebec prisoner of war sample (N = 25) should have more robust and asymmetrical humeri than a nonphysically active 20th century New Mexico suburbanite sample (N = 27). Narrative accounts document that prisoners of war engaged in labor-intensive activities, and these activities were confirmed by observations of osteoarthritis and other pathologies. The suburbanite sample, for the most part, did not engage in such activities. The prisoners had higher levels of pathology than the suburbanites (e.g., 80% vs. 22% osteoarthritis; F = 17.95, P < 0.01). For robusticity, the populations did not differ significantly in total area, cortical area, moment areas of inertia about the mediolateral plane, or polar moment area of inertia. The Quebec prison sample did have significantly higher values for moment areas of inertia about the anteroposterior plane. For asymmetry, the populations did not differ in any values (total area, cortical area, moment areas of inertia about the mediolateral plane, moment areas of inertia about the anteroposterior plane, or polar moment of inertia). Thus, examinations of cross-sectional robusticity and asymmetry failed to conclusively confirm the hypothesis that intensive labor leads to changes in humeral morphology. Possible explanations for the lack of differences are discussed, such as poor diet impeding bone remodeling. Nevertheless, the one significant finding suggests that cross-sectional shape is more useful in reconstructing activity patterns than amount of bone in a cross section. Results from this study join those from other recent investigations to suggest that additional controls are required before cross-sectional differences may be confidently attributed to activity patterns.

  7. Contrasting Anticancer Activity of Half-Sandwich Iridium(III) Complexes Bearing Functionally Diverse 2-Phenylpyridine Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and antiproliferative activity of 15 iridium(III) half-sandwich complexes of the type [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-(R′-phenyl)-R-pyridine)Cl] bearing either an electron-donating (−OH, −CH2OH, −CH3) or electron-withdrawing (−F, −CHO, −NO2) group at various positions on the 2-phenylpyridine (2-PhPy) chelating ligand giving rise to six sets of structural isomers. The X-ray crystal structures of [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-(2′-fluorophenyl)pyridine)Cl] (1) and [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-(4′-fluorophenyl)pyridine)Cl] (2) exhibit the expected “piano-stool” configuration. DFT calculations showed that substituents caused only localized effects on the electrostatic potential surface of the chelating 2-PhPy ligand of the complexes. Hydrolysis of all complexes is rapid, but readily reversed by addition of NaCl. The complexes show preferential binding to 9-ethylguanine over 9-methyladenine and are active catalysts for the oxidation of NADH to NAD+. Antiproliferative activity experiments in A2780 ovarian, MCF-7 breast, A549 lung, and HCT116 colon cancer cell lines showed IC50 values ranging from 1 to 89 μM, with the most potent complex, [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-(2′-methylphenyl)pyridine)Cl] (13) (A2780 IC50 = 1.18 μM), being 10× more active than the parent, [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-phenylpyridine)Cl], and 2× more active than [(η5-CpxPh)Ir(2-phenylpyridine)Cl]. Intriguingly, contrasting biological activities are observed between structural isomers despite exhibiting similar chemical reactivity. For pairs of structural isomers both the nature and position of the functional group can affect the hydrophobicity of the complex. An increase in hydrophobicity resulted in enhanced cellular-iridium accumulation in A2780 ovarian cells, which generally gave rise to an increase in potency. The structural isomers [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-(4′-fluorophenyl)pyridine)Cl] (2) and [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-phenyl-5-fluoropyridine)Cl] (4) preferentially localized in the cytosol > membrane and particulate

  8. Toxicity of arsenic (III) and (V) on plant growth, element uptake, and total amylolytic activity of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina).

    PubMed

    Mokgalaka-Matlala, Ntebogeng S; Flores-Tavizón, Edith; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2008-01-01

    The effects of arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] on the growth of roots, stems, and leaves and the uptake of arsenic (As), micro- and macronutrients, and total amylolytic activity were investigated to elucidate the phytotoxicity of As to the mesquite plant (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina). The plant growth was evaluated by measuring the root and shoot length, and the element uptake was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The root and leaf elongation decreased significantly with increasing As(III) and As(V) concentrations; whereas, stem elongation remained unchanged. The As uptake increased with increasing As(III) or As(V) concentrations in the medium. Plants treated with 50 mg/L As(III) accumulated up to 920 mg/kg dry weight (d wt) in roots and 522 mg/kg d wt in leaves, while plants exposed to 50 mg/L As(V) accumulated 1980 and 210 mg/kg d wt in roots and leaves, respectively. Increasing the As(V) concentration up to 20 mg/L resulted in a decrease in the total amylolytic activity. On the contrary, total amylolytic activity in As(III)-treated plants increased with increasing As concentration up to 20 mg/L. The macro- and micronutrient concentrations changed in As-treated plants. In shoots, Mo and K were reduced but Ca was increased, while in roots Fe and Ca were increased but K was reduced. These changes reduced the size of the plants, mainly in the As(III)-treated plants; however, there were no visible sign of As toxicity.

  9. Detailed spectroscopic, thermodynamic, and kinetic studies on the protolytic equilibria of Fe(III)cydta and the activation of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Brausam, Ariane; Maigut, Joachim; Meier, Roland; Szilágyi, Petra A; Buschmann, Hans-Jürgen; Massa, Werner; Homonnay, Zoltán; van Eldik, Rudi

    2009-08-17

    .1 cm(3) mol(-1). A detailed kinetic study of the effect of the buffer, temperature, and pressure on the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with [Fe(III)(cydta)(H(2)O)](-) was performed using stopped-flow techniques. The reaction was found to consist of two steps and resulted in the formation of a purple Fe(III) side-on-bound peroxo complex [Fe(III)(cydta)(eta(2)-O(2))](3-). The peroxo complex and its degradation products were characterized using Mossbauer spectroscopy. Formation of the purple peroxo complex is only observable above a pH of 9.5. Both reaction steps are affected by specific and general acid catalysis. Two different buffer systems were used to clarify the role of general acid catalysis in these reactions. Mechanistic descriptions and a comparison between the edta and cydta systems are presented. The first reaction step reveals an element of reversibility, which is evident over the whole studied pH range. The positive volume of activation for the forward reaction and the positive entropy of activation for the backward reaction suggest a dissociative interchange mechanism for the reversible end-on binding of hydrogen peroxide to [Fe(III)(cydta)(H(2)O)](-). Deprotonation of the end-on-bound hydroperoxo complex leads to the formation of a seven-coordinate side-on-bound peroxo complex [Fe(III)(cydta)(eta(2)-O(2))](3-), where one carboxylate arm is detached. [Fe(III)(cydta)(eta(2)-O(2))](3-) can be reached by two different pathways, of which one is catalyzed by a base and the other by deprotonated hydrogen peroxide. For both pathways, a small negative volume and entropy of activation was observed, suggesting an associative interchange mechanism for the ring-closure step to the side-on-bound peroxo complex. For the second reaction step, no element of reversibility was found.

  10. Functional Analysis of Plant Defense Suppression and Activation by the Xanthomonas Core Type III Effector XopX.

    PubMed

    Stork, William; Kim, Jung-Gun; Mudgett, Mary Beth

    2015-02-01

    Many phytopathogenic type III secretion effector proteins (T3Es) have been shown to target and suppress plant immune signaling but perturbation of the plant immune system by T3Es can also elicit a plant response. XopX is a "core" Xanthomonas T3E that contributes to growth and symptom development during Xanthomonas euvesicatoria infection of tomato but its functional role is undefined. We tested the effect of XopX on several aspects of plant immune signaling. XopX promoted ethylene production and plant cell death (PCD) during X. euvesicatoria infection of susceptible tomato and in transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana, which is consistent with its requirement for the development of X. euvesicatoria-induced disease symptoms. Additionally, although XopX suppressed flagellin-induced reactive oxygen species, it promoted the accumulation of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) gene transcripts. Surprisingly, XopX coexpression with other PCD elicitors resulted in delayed PCD, suggesting antagonism between XopX-dependent PCD and other PCD pathways. However, we found no evidence that XopX contributed to the suppression of effector-triggered immunity during X. euvesicatoria-tomato interactions, suggesting that XopX's primary virulence role is to modulate PTI. These results highlight the dual role of a core Xanthomonas T3E in simultaneously suppressing and activating plant defense responses.

  11. Equilibrium unfolding studies of the rat liver methionine adenosyltransferase III, a dimeric enzyme with intersubunit active sites.

    PubMed Central

    Gasset, María; Alfonso, Carlos; Neira, José L; Rivas, Germán; Pajares, María A

    2002-01-01

    The reversible unfolding of rat liver methionine adenosyltransferase dimer by urea under equilibrium conditions has been monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, CD, size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and enzyme activity measurements. The results obtained indicate that unfolding takes place through a three-state mechanism, involving an inactive monomeric intermediate. This intermediate has a 70% native secondary structure, binds less 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulphonic acid than the native dimer and has a sedimentation coefficient of 4.24+/-0.15. The variations of free energy in the absence of denaturant [DeltaG(H(2)O)] and its coefficients of urea dependence (m), calculated by the linear extrapolation model, were 36.15+/-2.3 kJ.mol(-1) and 19.87+/-0.71 kJ.mol(-1).M(-1) for the dissociation of the native dimer and 14.77+/-1.63 kJ.mol(-1) and 5.23+/-0.21 kJ.mol(-1).M(-1) for the unfolding of the monomeric intermediate respectively. Thus the global free energy change in the absence of denaturant and the m coefficient were calculated to be 65.69 kJ.mol(-1) and 30.33 kJ.mol(-1).M(-1) respectively. Analysis of the calculated thermodynamical parameters indicate the instability of the dimer in the presence of denaturant, and that the major exposure to the solvent is due to dimer dissociation. Finally, a minimum-folding mechanism for methionine adenosyltransferase III is established. PMID:11772402

  12. Pre-clinical pharmacokinetics and anti-chlamydial activity of salicylidene acylhydrazide inhibitors of bacterial type III secretion.

    PubMed

    Ur-Rehman, Tofeeq; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Chu, Hencelyn; Blomgren, Anders; Dahlgren, Markus K; Zetterström, Caroline E; Peterson, Ellena M; Elofsson, Mikael; Gylfe, Asa

    2012-08-01

    Salicylidene acylhydrazides belong to a class of compounds shown to inhibit bacterial type III secretion (T3S) in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. This class of compounds also inhibits growth and replication of Chlamydiae, strict intracellular bacteria that possess a T3S system. In this study a library of 58 salicylidene acylhydrazides was screened to identify inhibitors of Chlamydia growth. Compounds inhibiting growth of both Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydophila pneumoniae were tested for cell toxicity and seven compounds were selected for preliminary pharmacokinetic analysis in mice using cassette dosing. Two compounds, ME0177 and ME0192, were further investigated by individual pharmacokinetic analysis. Compound ME0177 had a relatively high peak plasma concentration (C(max)) and area under curve and therefore may be considered for systemic treatment of Chlamydia infections. The other compound, ME0192, had poor pharmacokinetic properties but the highest anti-chlamydial activity in vitro and therefore was tested for topical treatment in a mouse vaginal infection model. ME0192 administered vaginally significantly reduced the infectious burden of C. trachomatis and the number of infected mice.

  13. Synthesis, structure, spectroscopic properties, and antiproliferative activity in vitro of novel osmium(III) complexes with azole heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Iryna N; Krokhin, Artem A; John, Roland O; Roller, Alexander; Arion, Vladimir B; Jakupec, Michael A; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2008-08-18

    Reactions of (H 2azole) 2[OsCl 6], where Hazole = pyrazole, Hpz, ( 1), indazole, Hind, ( 2), imidazole, Him, ( 3) and benzimidazole, Hbzim, ( 4) with the corresponding azole heterocycle in 1:4 molar ratio in boiling isoamyl alcohol or hexanol-1 afforded novel water-soluble osmium(III) complexes of the type trans-[OsCl 2(Hazole) 4]Cl, where Hazole = Hpz ( 5a), Hind ( 6a), Him ( 7a), and Hbzim ( 9a) in 50-70% ( 5a, 7a, 9a) and 5% ( 6a) yields. The synthesis of 7a was accompanied by a concurrent reaction which led to minor formation (<4%) of cis-[OsCl 2(Him) 4]Cl ( 8). The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, ESI mass spectrometry, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray crystallography. 5a, 7a, and 9a were found to possess remarkable antiproliferative activity in vitro against A549 (non-small cell lung carcinoma), CH1 (ovarian carcinoma), and SW480 (colon carcinoma) cells, which was compared with that of related ruthenium compounds trans-[RuCl 2(Hazole) 4]Cl, where Hazole = Hpz (5b), Hind (6b), Him (7b), and Hbzim (9b).

  14. Suppression of the barley uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene by a Ds activation tagging element generates developmental photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ayliffe, Michael A; Agostino, Anthony; Clarke, Bryan C; Furbank, Robert; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Pryor, Anthony J

    2009-03-01

    Chlorophyll production involves the synthesis of photoreactive intermediates that, when in excess, are toxic due to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A novel, activation-tagged barley (Hordeum vulgare) mutant is described that results from antisense suppression of a uroporphyrinogen III synthase (Uros) gene, the product of which catalyzes the sixth step in the synthesis of chlorophyll and heme. In homozygous mutant plants, uroporphyrin(ogen) I accumulates by spontaneous cyclization of hydroxyl methylbilane, the substrate of Uros. Accumulation of this tetrapyrrole intermediate results in photosensitive cell death due to the production of ROS. The efficiency of Uros gene suppression is developmentally regulated, being most effective in mature seedling leaves compared with newly emergent leaves. Reduced transcript accumulation of a number of nuclear-encoded photosynthesis genes occurs in the mutant, even under 3% light conditions, consistent with a retrograde plastid-nuclear signaling mechanism arising from Uros gene suppression. A similar set of nuclear genes was repressed in wild-type barley following treatment with a singlet oxygen-generating herbicide, but not by a superoxide generating herbicide, suggesting that the retrograde signaling apparent in the mutant is specific to singlet oxygen.

  15. The type III effector EspF coordinates membrane trafficking by the spatiotemporal activation of two eukaryotic signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Alto, Neal M.; Weflen, Andrew W.; Rardin, Matthew J.; Yarar, Defne; Lazar, Cheri S.; Tonikian, Raffi; Koller, Antonius; Taylor, Susan S.; Boone, Charles; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Schmid, Sandra L.; Hecht, Gail A.; Dixon, Jack E.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial toxins and effector proteins hijack eukaryotic enzymes that are spatially localized and display rapid signaling kinetics. However, the molecular mechanisms by which virulence factors engage highly dynamic substrates in the host cell environment are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) type III effector protein EspF nucleates a multiprotein signaling complex composed of eukaryotic sorting nexin 9 (SNX9) and neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP). We demonstrate that a specific and high affinity association between EspF and SNX9 induces membrane remodeling in host cells. These membrane-remodeling events are directly coupled to N-WASP/Arp2/3–mediated actin nucleation. In addition to providing a biochemical mechanism of EspF function, we find that EspF dynamically localizes to membrane-trafficking organelles in a spatiotemporal pattern that correlates with SNX9 and N-WASP activity in living cells. Thus, our findings suggest that the EspF-dependent assembly of SNX9 and N-WASP represents a novel form of signaling mimicry used to promote EPEC pathogenesis and gastrointestinal disease. PMID:17893247

  16. The morphology of flare phenomena, magnetic fields, and electric currents in active regions. III - NOAA active region 6233 (1990 August)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De La Beaujardiere, J.-F.; Canfield, Richard C.; Leka, K. D.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the spatial relationship between vertical electric currents and flare phenomena in NOAA Active Region 6233, which was observed 1990, August 28-31 at Mees Solar Observatory. The two flares studied are the 1N/M1.8 flare on August 28, 22:30 UT and the 1N/M1.6 flare on August 29, 20:35 UT. Using Stokes polarimetry we make magnetograms of the region and compute the vertical current density. Using H-alpha imaging spectroscopy we identify sites of intense nonthermal electron precipitation or of high coronal pressure. The precipitation in these flares is barely strong enough to be detectable. We find that both precipitation and high pressure tend to occur near vertical currents, but that neither phenomenon is cospatial with current maxima. In contrast with the conclusion of other authors, we argue that these observations do not support a current-interruption model for flares, unless the relevant currents are primarily horizontal. The magnetic morphology and temporal evolution of these flares suggest that an erupting filament model may be relevant, but this model does not explicitly predict the relationship between precipitation, high pressure, and vertical currents.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, cytotoxic and antitubercular activities of new gold(I) and gold(III) complexes containing ligands derived from carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Joana Darc Souza; Damasceno, Jaqueline Lopes; Paula, Marcela Cristina Ferreira; de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Azevedo, Gustavo Chevitarese; Matos, Renato Camargo; Lourenço, Maria Cristina S; Tavares, Denise Crispim; Silva, Heveline; Fontes, Ana Paula Soares; de Almeida, Mauro Vieira

    2015-10-01

    Novel gold(I) and gold(III) complexes containing derivatives of D-galactose, D-ribose and D-glucono-1,5-lactone as ligands were synthesized and characterized by IR, (1)H, and (13)C NMR, high resolution mass spectra and cyclic voltammetry. The compounds were evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxicity against three types of tumor cells: cervical carcinoma (HeLa) breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and glioblastoma (MO59J) and one non-tumor cell line: human lung fibroblasts (GM07492A). Their antitubercular activity was evaluated as well expressed as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90) in μg/mL. In general, the gold(I) complexes were more active than gold(III) complexes, for example, the gold(I) complex (1) was about 8.8 times and 7.6 times more cytotoxic than gold(III) complex (8) in MO59J and MCF-7 cells, respectively. Ribose and alkyl phosphine derivative complexes were more active than galactose and aryl phosphine complexes. The presence of a thiazolidine ring did not improve the cytotoxicity. The study of the cytotoxic activity revealed effective antitumor activities for the gold(I) complexes, being more active than cisplatin in all the tested tumor cell lines. Gold(I) compounds (1), (2), (3), (4) and (6) exhibited relevant antitubercular activity even when compared with first line drugs such as rifampicin.

  18. Positional effects of hydroxy groups on catalytic activity of proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Iridium(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Suna, Yuki; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Wang, Wan-Hui; Kambayashi, Hide; Manaka, Yuichi; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2014-11-12

    Proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Ir(III) complexes possessing a bipyridine ligand with two hydroxy groups at the 3,3'-, 4,4'-, 5,5'- or 6,6'-positions (3DHBP, 4DHBP, 5DHBP, or 6DHBP) were systematically investigated. UV-vis titration data provided average pK a values of the hydroxy groups on the ligands. Both hydroxy groups were found to deprotonate in the pH 4.6–5.6 range for the 4–6DHBP complexes. One of the hydroxy groups of the 3DHBP complex exhibited the low pKa value of < 0.4 because the deprotonation is facilitated by the strong intramolecular hydrogen bond formed between the generated oxyanion and the remaining hydroxy group, which in turn leads to an elevated pKa value of ~13.6 for the second deprotonation step. The crystal structures of the 4– and 6DHBP complexes obtained from basic aqueous solutions revealed their deprotonated forms. The intramolecular hydrogen bond in the 3DHBP complex was also observed in the crystal structures. The catalytic activities of these complexes in aqueous phase reactions, at appropriate pH, for hydrogenation of carbon dioxide (pH 8.5), dehydrogenation of formic acid (pH 1.8), transfer hydrogenation reactions using formic acid/formate as a hydrogen source (pH 7.2 and 2.6) were investigated to compare the positional effects of the hydroxy groups. The 4– and 6DHBP complexes exhibited remarkably enhanced catalytic activities under basic conditions because of the resonance effect of the strong electrondonating oxyanions, whereas the 5DHBP complex exhibited negligible activity despite the presence of electron-donating groups. The 3DHBP complex exhibited relatively high catalytic activity at low pH owing to the one strong electron-donating oxyanion group stabilized by the intramolecular hydrogen bond. DFT calculations were employed to study the mechanism of CO₂ hydrogenation by the 4DHBP and 6DHBP complexes, and comparison of the activation free energies of the H₂ heterolysis and CO

  19. Positional effects of hydroxy groups on catalytic activity of proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Iridium(III) complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Suna, Yuki; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; ...

    2014-11-12

    Proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Ir(III) complexes possessing a bipyridine ligand with two hydroxy groups at the 3,3'-, 4,4'-, 5,5'- or 6,6'-positions (3DHBP, 4DHBP, 5DHBP, or 6DHBP) were systematically investigated. UV-vis titration data provided average pK a values of the hydroxy groups on the ligands. Both hydroxy groups were found to deprotonate in the pH 4.6–5.6 range for the 4–6DHBP complexes. One of the hydroxy groups of the 3DHBP complex exhibited the low pKa value of < 0.4 because the deprotonation is facilitated by the strong intramolecular hydrogen bond formed between the generated oxyanion and the remaining hydroxy group, which in turn leadsmore » to an elevated pKa value of ~13.6 for the second deprotonation step. The crystal structures of the 4– and 6DHBP complexes obtained from basic aqueous solutions revealed their deprotonated forms. The intramolecular hydrogen bond in the 3DHBP complex was also observed in the crystal structures. The catalytic activities of these complexes in aqueous phase reactions, at appropriate pH, for hydrogenation of carbon dioxide (pH 8.5), dehydrogenation of formic acid (pH 1.8), transfer hydrogenation reactions using formic acid/formate as a hydrogen source (pH 7.2 and 2.6) were investigated to compare the positional effects of the hydroxy groups. The 4– and 6DHBP complexes exhibited remarkably enhanced catalytic activities under basic conditions because of the resonance effect of the strong electrondonating oxyanions, whereas the 5DHBP complex exhibited negligible activity despite the presence of electron-donating groups. The 3DHBP complex exhibited relatively high catalytic activity at low pH owing to the one strong electron-donating oxyanion group stabilized by the intramolecular hydrogen bond. DFT calculations were employed to study the mechanism of CO₂ hydrogenation by the 4DHBP and 6DHBP complexes, and comparison of the activation free energies of the H₂ heterolysis and CO₂ insertion steps

  20. Rh(III)-Catalyzed Cyclopropanation Initiated by C–H Activation: Ligand Development Enables a Diastereoselective [2 + 1] Annulation of N-Enoxyphthalimides and Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    N-Enoxyphthalimides undergo a Rh(III)-catalyzed C–H activation initiated cyclopropanation of electron deficient alkenes. The reaction is proposed to proceed via a directed activation of the olefinic C–H bond followed by two migratory insertions, first across the electron-deficient alkene and then by cyclization back onto the enol moiety. A newly designed isopropylcyclopentadienyl ligand drastically improves yield and diastereoselectivity. PMID:25093811

  1. The VPS-20 subunit of the endosomal sorting complex ESCRT-III exhibits an open conformation in the absence of upstream activation.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Amber L; Hanna, Michael; Quinney, Kyle; Wang, Lei; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R; Audhya, Anjon

    2015-03-15

    Members of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery function in membrane remodelling processes during multivesicular endosome (MVE) biogenesis, cytokinesis, retroviral budding and plasma membrane repair. During luminal vesicle formation at endosomes, the ESCRT-II complex and the ESCRT-III subunit vacuolar protein sorting (VPS)-20 play a specific role in regulating assembly of ESCRT-III filaments, which promote vesicle scission. Previous work suggests that Vps20 isoforms, like other ESCRT-III subunits, exhibits an auto-inhibited closed conformation in solution and its activation depends on an association with ESCRT-II specifically at membranes [1]. However, we show in the present study that Caenorhabditis elegans ESCRT-II and VPS-20 interact directly in solution, both in cytosolic cell extracts and in using recombinant proteins in vitro. Moreover, we demonstrate that purified VPS-20 exhibits an open extended conformation, irrespective of ESCRT-II binding, in contrast with the closed auto-inhibited architecture of another ESCRT-III subunit, VPS-24. Our data argue that individual ESCRT-III subunits adopt distinct conformations, which are tailored for their specific functions during ESCRT-mediated membrane reorganization events.

  2. UV and visible activation of Cr(III)-doped TiO2 catalyst prepared by a microwave-assisted sol-gel method during MCPA degradation.

    PubMed

    Mendiola-Alvarez, S Y; Guzmán-Mar, J L; Turnes-Palomino, G; Maya-Alejandro, F; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Hinojosa-Reyes, L

    2016-11-10

    Photocatalytic degradation of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in aqueous solution using Cr(III)-doped TiO2 under UV and visible light was investigated. The semiconductor material was synthesized by a microwave-assisted sol-gel method with Cr(III) doping contents of 0.02, 0.04, and 0.06 wt%. The catalyst was characterized using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen physisorption, UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The photocatalytic activity for the photodegradation of MCPA was followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis. The intermediates formed during degradation were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Chloride ion evolution was measured by ion chromatography. Characterization results showed that Cr(III)-doped TiO2 materials possessed a small crystalline size, high surface area, and mesoporous structure. UV-Vis DRS showed enhanced absorption in the visible region as a function of the Cr(III) concentration. The Cr(III)-doped TiO2 catalyst with 0.04 wt% of Cr(III) was more active than bare TiO2 for the degradation of MCPA under both UV and visible light. The intermediates identified during MCPA degradation were 4-chloro-2-methylphenol (CMP), 2-(4-hydroxy-2-methylphenoxy) acetic acid (HMPA), and 2-hydroxybuta-1,3-diene-1,4-diyl-bis (oxy)dimethanol (HBDM); the formation of these intermediates depended on the radiation source.

  3. Effects of mutations in the Exo III motif of the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase gene on enzyme activities, viral replication, and replication fidelity.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Y T; Liu, B Y; Coen, D M; Hwang, C B

    1997-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase catalytic subunit, which has intrinsic polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease activities, contains sequence motifs that are homologous to those important for 3'-5' exonuclease activity in other polymerases. The role of one such motif, Exo III, was examined in this study. Mutated polymerases containing either a single tyrosine-to-histidine change at residue 577 or this change plus an aspartic acid-to-alanine at residue 581 in the Exo III motif exhibited defective or undetectable exonuclease activity, respectively, yet retained substantial polymerase activity. Despite the defects in exonuclease activity, the mutant polymerases were able to support viral replication in transient complementation assays, albeit inefficiently. Viruses replicated via the action of these mutant polymerases exhibited substantially increased frequencies of mutants resistant to ganciclovir. Furthermore, when the Exo III mutations were incorporated into the viral genome, the resulting mutant viruses displayed only modestly defect in replication in Vero cells and exhibited substantially increased mutation frequencies. The results suggest that herpes simplex virus can replicate despite severely impaired exonuclease activity and that the 3'-5' exonuclease contributes substantially to the fidelity of viral DNA replication. PMID:9311864

  4. Mono- and dinuclear manganese(III) complexes showing efficient catechol oxidase activity: syntheses, characterization and spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Banu, Kazi Sabnam; Chattopadhyay, Tanmay; Banerjee, Arpita; Mukherjee, Madhuparna; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Patra, Goutam Kumar; Zangrando, Ennio; Das, Debasis

    2009-10-28

    Four side-off compartmental ligands L1-L4 [L1 = N,N'-ethylenebis(3-formyl-5-methyl-salicylaldimine), L2 = N,N'-1-methylethylenebis(3-formyl-5-methylsalicylaldimine), L3 = N,N'-1,1-dimethylethylenebis(3-formyl-5-methylsalicylaldimine) and L4= N,N'-cyclohexenebis(3-formyl-5-methylsalicylaldimine)] having two binding sites, N2O2 and O4, have been chosen to synthesize mononuclear and dinuclear manganese(III) complexes with the aim to study their catecholase activity using 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (3,5-DTBC) as substrate in the presence of molecular oxygen. In all cases only mononuclear manganese complexes (1-4) were obtained, with manganese coordination taking place at the N2O2 binding site only, irrespective of the amount of manganese salt used. All these complexes have been characterized by routine physico-chemical techniques. Complex MnL2Cl.4H2O (2) has further been structurally characterized by X-ray single crystal structure analysis. Four dinuclear manganese complexes, 5-8, were obtained after condensing the two pending formyl groups on each ligand (L1-L4) with aniline followed by reaction with MnCl2 to put the second Mn atom onto another N2O2 site. The catalytic activity of all complexes 1-8 has been investigated following the oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (3,5-DTBC) to 3,5-di-tert-butylbenzoquinone (3,5-DTBQ) with molecular oxygen in two different solvents, methanol and acetonitrile. The study reveals that the catalytic activity is influenced by the solvent and to a significant extent by the backbone of the diamine and the behavior seems to be related mainly to steric rather than electronic factors. Experimental data suggest that a correlation, the lower the E(1/2) value the higher the catalytic activity, can be drawn between E(1/2) and Vmax of the complexes in a particular solvent. The EPR measurements suggest that the catalytic property of the complexes is related to the metal center(s) participation rather than to a radical mechanism.

  5. Kynurenine Aminotransferase III and Glutamine Transaminase L Are Identical Enzymes that have Cysteine S-Conjugate β-Lyase Activity and Can Transaminate l-Selenomethionine*

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, John T.; Krasnikov, Boris F.; Alcutt, Steven; Jones, Melanie E.; Dorai, Thambi; Villar, Maria T.; Artigues, Antonio; Li, Jianyong; Cooper, Arthur J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Three of the four kynurenine aminotransferases (KAT I, II, and IV) that synthesize kynurenic acid, a neuromodulator, are identical to glutamine transaminase K (GTK), α-aminoadipate aminotransferase, and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, respectively. GTK/KAT I and aspartate aminotransferase/KAT IV possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. The gene for the former enzyme, GTK/KAT I, is listed in mammalian genome data banks as CCBL1 (cysteine conjugate beta-lyase 1). Also listed, despite the fact that no β-lyase activity has been assigned to the encoded protein in the genome data bank, is a CCBL2 (synonym KAT III). We show that human KAT III/CCBL2 possesses cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity, as does mouse KAT II. Thus, depending on the nature of the substrate, all four KATs possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. These present studies show that KAT III and glutamine transaminase L are identical enzymes. This report also shows that KAT I, II, and III differ in their ability to transaminate methyl-l-selenocysteine (MSC) and l-selenomethionine (SM) to β-methylselenopyruvate (MSP) and α-ketomethylselenobutyrate, respectively. Previous studies have identified these seleno-α-keto acids as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors. Methylselenol (CH3SeH), also purported to have chemopreventive properties, is the γ-elimination product of SM and the β-elimination product of MSC catalyzed by cystathionine γ-lyase (γ-cystathionase). KAT I, II, and III, in part, can catalyze β-elimination reactions with MSC generating CH3SeH. Thus, the anticancer efficacy of MSC and SM will depend, in part, on the endogenous expression of various KAT enzymes and cystathionine γ-lyase present in target tissue coupled with the ability of cells to synthesize in situ either CH3SeH and/or seleno-keto acid metabolites. PMID:25231977

  6. Energy and Man's Environment Activity Guide: An Interdisciplinary Teacher's Guide to Energy and Environmental Activities, Section Three - Conversion of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John, Ed.

    This publication presents the activities pertaining to the third goal of this activity guide series. The activities in this publication focus on understanding conservation processes, efficiencies, socioeconomic costs, and personal decision-making. These materials are appropriate for middle school and junior high school students. These activities,…

  7. Self-face recognition shares brain regions active during proprioceptive illusion in the right inferior fronto-parietal superior longitudinal fasciculus III network.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomoyo; Saito, Daisuke N; Ban, Midori; Shimada, Koji; Okamoto, Yuko; Kosaka, Hirotaka; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Asada, Minoru; Naito, Eiichi

    2017-04-21

    Proprioception is somatic sensation that allows us to sense and recognize position, posture, and their changes in our body parts. It pertains directly to oneself and may contribute to bodily awareness. Likewise, one's face is a symbol of oneself, so that visual self-face recognition directly contributes to the awareness of self as distinct from others. Recently, we showed that right-hemispheric dominant activity in the inferior fronto-parietal cortices, which are connected by the inferior branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF III), is associated with proprioceptive illusion (awareness), in concert with sensorimotor activity. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that visual self-face recognition shares brain regions active during proprioceptive illusion in the right inferior fronto-parietal SLF III network. We scanned brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging while twenty-two right-handed healthy adults performed two tasks. One was a proprioceptive illusion task, where blindfolded participants experienced a proprioceptive illusion of right hand movement. The other was a visual self-face recognition task, where the participants judged whether an observed face was their own. We examined whether the self-face recognition and the proprioceptive illusion commonly activated the inferior fronto-parietal cortices connected by the SLF III in a right-hemispheric dominant manner. Despite the difference in sensory modality and in the body parts involved in the two tasks, both tasks activated the right inferior fronto-parietal cortices, which are likely connected by the SLF III, in a right-side dominant manner. Here we discuss possible roles for right inferior fronto-parietal activity in bodily awareness and self-awareness.

  8. 76 FR 4657 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; TSCA Section 402...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... Training and Certification, Accreditation and Standards for Lead-Based Paint Activities and Renovation, Repair, and Painting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In... Training and Certification, Accreditation and Standards for Lead-Based Paint Activities and...

  9. Physical Activity and Its Correlates among Adults in Malaysia: A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Cai Lian, Tam; Bonn, Gregory; Si Han, Yeoh; Chin Choo, Yap; Chee Piau, Wong

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and rates of non-communicable diseases linked to physical inactivity have increased dramatically in Malaysia over the past 20 years. Malaysia has also been identified as one of the least physically active countries in the world with over 60% of adults being essentially sedentary. This study examines the relationship of socio-demographic factors to physical activity among 770 adults from 3 Malaysian states. Physical activity levels were significantly related to ethnicity, gender, age, occupation and educational level. Controlling for inter-relationships among these variables; age, gender, Chinese ethnicity and education level were found to have unique effects on total physical activity, as well as moderate and vigorous exercise. As would be expected, younger people were more physically active, engaging more in both moderate and vigorous types of exercise and males were generally more active than females. Contrary to findings from many developed countries, however, more educated Malaysians were less likely to engage in all types of physical activity. Ethnic Chinese participants, and to a lesser degree Indians also consistently reported lower levels of activity. Possible intervention strategies are discussed that specifically target ethnic and cultural norms related to physical activity. Future research programs exploring barriers to participation and perceptions of physical activity, as well as programs to encourage active life styles among youths are also suggested. PMID:27332883

  10. Activation energy and capture cross section of majority carrier traps in Zn doped InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, George; Williams, Wendell

    1993-01-01

    Schottky barrier diodes were fabricated on Zn doped InP Wafers. The diodes were radiation damaged with 2 MeV protons to a dose of 2 x 10(exp 12)cm(sup -2). The damage was analyzed by DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) using the double correlation technique. Capture cross sections were measured directly. Two major defects were observed in the DLTS spectra. The first defect, was H4 at Ev + 0.29 eV, with capture cross section 1.1 x 10(exp -17)cm(sup 2). The second defect, was H5 at Ev + 0.53 eV. Its capture cross section varied with temperature as described by the relationship sigma = sigma(sub 0) exp(delta(E)/kT) where sigma(sub 0) = 1.3 x 10(exp -19)cm(sup 2) and delta(E) = .08 eV. This relationship yields a sigma of 5.9 x 10(exp -21)cm(sup 2) at room temperature. The surprisingly small capture cross section of H5 and its temperature dependence are discussed in terms of the multiphonon emission process for carrier capture at the defect. The advantages of the improved experimental techniques used are also discussed.

  11. 75 FR 27815 - Civil Rights Division; Disability Rights Section: Agency Information Collection Activities Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Discrimination Complaint Form. The Department of Justice, Civil Rights... Americans with Disabilities Act/Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Discrimination Complaint Form... discrimination by public entities based on disability. Under title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act,...

  12. Three-dimensional reconstruction of active muscle cell segment volume from two-dimensional optical sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, David S.; Griffiths, P. J.; Cecchi, G.; Taylor, Stuart R.

    1999-06-01

    An ultramicroscope coupled to a square-aspect-ratio sensor was used to image the dynamic geometry of live muscle cells. Skeletal muscle cells, dissected from frogs, were suspended in the optical axis and illuminated from one side by a focused slit of white light. The sensor detected light scattered at 90 degrees to the incident beam. Serial cross-sections were acquired as a motorized stage moved the cell through the slit of light. The axial force at right angles to the cross- sections was recorded simultaneously. Cross-sections were aligned by a least-squares fit of their centroids to a straight line, to correct for misalignments between the axes of the microscope, the stage, and the sensor. Three- dimensional volumes were reconstructed from each series and viewed from all directions to locate regions that remained at matching axial positions. The angle of the principal axis and the cross-sectional area were calculated and associated with force recorded concurrently. The cells adjusted their profile and volume to remain stable against turning as contractile force rose and fell, as predicted by the law of conservation of angular momentum.

  13. Mixed ligand complexes of cobalt(III) and iron(III) containing N2O2-chelating Schiff base: Synthesis, characterisation, antimicrobial activity, antioxidant and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Harun A. R.; Paul, Pradip C.; Mondal, Paritosh; Bhattacharjee, Chira R.

    2015-11-01

    Six mixed ligand complexes, namely, [Co(acac)L1] (1), [Fe(acac)L1] (2), [Co(acac)L2] (3), [Fe(acac)L2] (4), [Co(acac)L3] (5), and [Fe(acac)L3] (6) (H2L1 = NN/-bis(salicylidene)-trans 1,2 diaminocyclohexane, H2L2 = NN/-bis(salicylidene)-1,2 phenylenediamine, H2L3 = NN/-bis(salicylidene)-4-methyl-1,2-phenylenediamine) were synthesised and characterized using elemental analysis, IR spectra, UV-Vis spectra, mass spectra, magnetic susceptibility measurements, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis. The molar conductance measurement confirmed the non-electrolytic nature of the complexes in DMF solution. Antioxidant activity of the complexes was studied using the 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging method. Biological studies of the complexes have been carried out in vitro for antimicrobial activity against some selected gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. DFT calculations were performed using GAUSSIAN 09 program to ascertain the stable electronic structure, HOMO-LUMO energy gap, chemical hardness and dipole moment of the complexes.

  14. The β2 clamp in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA polymerase III αβ2ε replicase promotes polymerization and reduces exonuclease activity

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shoujin; Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Hongtai; Fleming, Joy; Yang, Weiqiang; Wang, Shihua; Wei, Wenjing; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Guofeng; Deng, Jiaoyu; Hou, Jian; Zhou, Ying; Lin, Shiqiang; Zhang, Xian-En; Bi, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase III (DNA pol III) is a multi-subunit replication machine responsible for the accurate and rapid replication of bacterial genomes, however, how it functions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires further investigation. We have reconstituted the leading-strand replication process of the Mtb DNA pol III holoenzyme in vitro, and investigated the physical and functional relationships between its key components. We verify the presence of an αβ2ε polymerase-clamp-exonuclease replicase complex by biochemical methods and protein-protein interaction assays in vitro and in vivo and confirm that, in addition to the polymerase activity of its α subunit, Mtb DNA pol III has two potential proofreading subunits; the α and ε subunits. During DNA replication, the presence of the β2 clamp strongly promotes the polymerization of the αβ2ε replicase and reduces its exonuclease activity. Our work provides a foundation for further research on the mechanism by which the replication machinery switches between replication and proofreading and provides an experimental platform for the selection of antimicrobials targeting DNA replication in Mtb. PMID:26822057

  15. Patterns and correlates of physical activity: a cross-sectional study in urban Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Jurj, Adriana L; Wen, Wanqing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Matthews, Charles E; Yang, Gong; Li, Hong-Lan; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2007-01-01

    Background Inactivity is a modifiable risk factor for many diseases. Rapid economic development in China has been associated with changes in lifestyle, including physical activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the patterns and correlates of physical activity in middle-aged and elderly women from urban Shanghai. Methods Study population consisted of 74,942 Chinese women, 40–70 years of age, participating in the baseline survey of the Shanghai Women's Health Study (1997–2000), an ongoing population-based cohort study. A validated, interviewer-administered physical activity questionnaire was used to collect information about several physical activity domains (exercise/sports, walking and cycling for transportation, housework). Correlations between physical activity domains were evaluated by Spearman rank-correlation coefficients. Associations between physical activity and socio-demographic and lifestyle factors were evaluated by odds ratios derived from logistic regression. Results While more than a third of study participants engaged in regular exercise, this form of activity contributed only about 10% to daily non-occupational energy expenditure. About two-thirds of women met current recommendations for lifestyle activity. Age was positively associated with participation in exercise/sports and housework. Dietary energy intake was positively associated with all physical activity domains. High socioeconomic status, unemployment (including retirement), history of chronic disease, small household, non-smoking status, alcohol and tea consumption, and ginseng intake were all positively associated with exercise participation. High socioeconomic status and small household were inversely associated with non-exercise activities. Conclusion This study demonstrates that physical activity domains other than sports and exercise are important contributors to total energy expenditure in women. Correlates of physical activity are domain-specific. These findings

  16. Hepatitis B virus X protein induces RNA polymerase III-dependent gene transcription and increases cellular TATA-binding protein by activating the Ras signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, H D; Trivedi, A; Johnson, D L

    1997-12-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the hepatitis B virus protein, X, activates all three classes of RNA polymerase III (pol III)-dependent promoters by increasing the cellular level of TATA-binding protein (TBP) (H.-D. Wang et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 15:6720-6728, 1995), a limiting transcription component (A. Trivedi et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 16:6909-6916, 1996). We have investigated whether these X-mediated events are dependent on the activation of the Ras/Raf-1 signaling pathway. Transient expression of a dominant-negative mutant Ras gene (Ras-ala15) in a Drosophila S-2 stable cell line expressing X (X-S2), or incubation of the cells with a Ras farnesylation inhibitor, specifically blocked both the X-dependent activation of a cotransfected tRNA gene and the increase in cellular TBP levels. Transient expression of a constitutively activated form of Ras (Ras-val12) in control S2 cells produced both an increase in tRNA gene transcription and an increase in cellular TBP levels. These events are not cell type specific since X-mediated gene induction was also shown to be dependent on Ras activation in a stable rat 1A cell line expressing X. Furthermore, increases in RNA pol III-dependent gene activity and TBP levels could be restored in X-S2 cells expressing Ras-ala15 by coexpressing a constitutively activated form of Raf-1. These events are serum dependent, and when the cells are serum deprived, the X-mediated effects are augmented. Together, these results demonstrate that the X-mediated induction of RNA pol III-dependent genes and increase in TBP are both dependent on the activation of the Ras/Raf-1 signaling cascade. In addition, these studies define two new and important consequences mediated by the activation of the Ras signal transduction pathway: an increase in the central transcription factor, TBP, and the induction of RNA pol III-dependent gene activity.

  17. Tanshinone I Activates the Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Response and Protects Against As(III)-Induced Lung Inflammation In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shasha; Zheng, Yi; Lau, Alexandria; Jaramillo, Melba C.; Chau, Binh T.; Lantz, R. Clark; Wong, Pak K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway regulates the cellular antioxidant response and activation of Nrf2 has recently been shown to limit tissue damage from exposure to environmental toxicants, including As(III). In an attempt to identify improved molecular agents for systemic protection against environmental insults, we have focused on the identification of novel medicinal plant-derived Nrf2 activators. Results: Tanshinones [tanshinone I (T-I), tanshinone IIA, dihydrotanshinone, cryptotanshinone], phenanthrenequinone-based redox therapeutics derived from the medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza, have been tested as experimental therapeutics for Nrf2-dependent cytoprotection. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay overexpressing wild-type or mutant Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1), we demonstrate that T-I is a potent Keap1-C151-dependent Nrf2 activator that stabilizes Nrf2 by hindering its ubiquitination. In human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to As(III), T-I displays pronounced cytoprotective activity with upregulation of Nrf2-orchestrated gene expression. In Nrf2 wild-type mice, systemic administration of T-I attenuates As(III) induced inflammatory lung damage, a protective effect not observed in Nrf2 knockout mice. Innovation: Tanshinones have been identified as a novel class of Nrf2-inducers for antioxidant tissue protection in an in vivo As(III) inhalation model, that is relevant to low doses of environmental exposure. Conclusion: T-I represents a prototype Nrf2-activator that displays cytoprotective activity upon systemic administration targeting lung damage originating from environmental insults. T-I based Nrf2-directed systemic intervention may provide therapeutic benefit in protecting other organs against environmental insults. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1647–1661. PMID:23394605

  18. BIOPLUME III

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BIOPLUME III is a two-dimensional finite difference model for simulating the natural attenuation of organic contaminants in groundwater due to the processes of advection, dispersion, sorption, and biodegradation.

  19. Understanding the sequential activation of Type III and Type VI Secretion Systems in Salmonella typhimurium using Boolean modeling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Three pathogenicity islands, viz. SPI-1 (Salmonella pathogenicity island 1), SPI-2 (Salmonella pathogenicity island 2) and T6SS (Type VI Secretion System), present in the genome of Salmonella typhimurium have been implicated in the virulence of the pathogen. While the regulation of SPI-1 and SPI-2 (both encoding components of the Type III Secretion System - T3SS) are well understood, T6SS regulation is comparatively less studied. Interestingly, inter-connections among the regulatory elements of these three virulence determinants have also been suggested to be essential for successful infection. However, till date, an integrated view of gene regulation involving the regulators of these three secretion systems and their cross-talk is not available. Results In the current study, relevant regulatory information available from literature have been integrated into a single Boolean network, which portrays the dynamics of T3SS (SPI-1 and SPI-2) and T6SS mediated virulence. Some additional regulatory interactions involving a two-component system response regulator YfhA have also been predicted and included in the Boolean network. These predictions are aimed at deciphering the effects of osmolarity on T6SS regulation, an aspect that has been suggested in earlier studies, but the mechanism of which was hitherto unknown. Simulation of the regulatory network was able to recreate in silico the experimentally observed sequential activation of SPI-1, SPI-2 and T6SS. Conclusions The present study integrates relevant gene regulatory data (from literature and our prediction) into a single network, representing the cross-communication between T3SS (SPI-1 and SPI-2) and T6SS. This holistic view of regulatory interactions is expected to improve the current understanding of pathogenesis of S. typhimurium. PMID:24079299

  20. Sex hormone-binding globulin and antithrombin III activity in women with oral ultra-low-dose estradiol.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Sumika; Yasui, Toshiyuki; Kasai, Kana; Keyama, Kaoru; Yoshida, Kanako; Kato, Takeshi; Uemura, Hirokazu; Kuwahara, Akira; Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Irahara, Minoru

    2017-03-20

    Oral oestrogen increases the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and increases production of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in a dose-dependent manner. SHBG has been suggested to be involved in venous thromboembolism. We examined the effects of oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol on circulating levels of SHBG and coagulation parameters, and we compared the effects to those of transdermal oestradiol. Twenty women received oral oestradiol (500 μg) every day (oral ultra-low-dose group) and 20 women received a transdermal patch (50 μg) as a transdermal group. In addition, the women received dydrogesterone continuously (5 mg) except for women who underwent hysterectomy. Circulating SHBG, antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, d-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complex and plasmin-α2 plasmin inhibitor complex were measured before and 3 months after the start of treatment. SHBG was significantly increased at 3 months in the oral ultra-low-dose group, but not in the transdermal group. However, percent changes in SHBG were not significantly different between the two groups. In both groups, ATIII was significantly decreased at 3 months. In conclusion, even ultra-low-dose oestradiol orally increases circulating SHBG level. However, the magnitude of change in SHBG caused by oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol is small and is comparable to that caused by transdermal oestradiol. Impact statement Oral oestrogen replacement therapy increases production of SHBG which may be related to increase in VTE risk. However, the effect of oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol on SHBG has not been clarified. Even ultra-low-dose oestradiol orally increases circulating SHBG levels, but the magnitude of change in SHBG caused by oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol is small and is comparable to that caused by transdermal oestradiol. VTE risk in women receiving oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol may be comparable to that in women receiving transdermal oestradiol.

  1. Discovery of γ-Ray Emission from the Radio-intermediate Quasar III Zw 2: Violent Jet Activity with Intraday γ-Ray Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Neng-Hui; Xin, Yu-Liang; Fan, Xu-Liang; Weng, Shan-Shan; Li, Shao-Kun; Chen, Liang; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    III Zw 2 is the prototype of radio-intermediate quasars. Although there is the evidence of possessing strong jet, significant γ-ray emission has not been reported before. In this work, we carry out a detailed analysis of the latest Fermi-LAT Pass 8 data. No significant γ-ray signal has been detected in the time-averaged 7-year Fermi-LAT data of III Zw 2; however, we have identified two distinct γ-ray flares with isotropic luminosities of ˜1045 erg s-1. Multiwavelength data analysis (also including the optical photometric observations from Yunnan Observatories) are presented and the main finding is simultaneous optical and γ-ray flares of III Zw 2 appearing in 2009 November. Violent γ-ray variability with a doubling timescale of 2.5 hr was detected in another γ-ray flare in May 2010, for which the 3-hr γ-ray peak flux is ˜250 times of the average flux in 7 years. Rather similar behaviors are observed in blazars and the blazar model can reasonably reproduce the spectral energy distribution of III Zw 2 in a wide energy range, strongly suggesting that its central engine resembles that of blazars. In view of its core, which shares radio similarities with young radio sources, together with weak extended radio lobe emission, we suggest that III Zw 2 harbors a recurrent activity core and thus serves as a valuable target for investigating the fueling and triggering of the activity in radio-loud active galactic nuclei.

  2. Energy and Man's Environment Activity Guide: An Interdisciplinary Teacher's Guide to Energy and Environmental Activities, Section One - Sources of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John, Ed.

    This publication presents the activities pertaining to the first goal of this activity guide series. The activities in this publication focus primarily on the availability of resources, forms of energy, natural laws, and socioeconomic considerations. These materials are appropriate for middle school and junior high school students. These…

  3. Energy and Man's Environment Activity Guide: An Interdisciplinary Teacher's Guide to Energy and Environmental Activities, Section Four - Impacts of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John, Ed.

    This publication presents the activities pertaining to the fourth goal of this activity guide series. The activities in this publication focus on the socioeconomic effects of energy uses and crises and the understandings needed to assess those effects. These materials are appropriate for middle school and junior high school students. These…

  4. Synthesis, structure, DNA/protein binding, and cytotoxic activity of a rhodium(III) complex with 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazolyl)pyridine.

    PubMed

    Esteghamat-Panah, Roya; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Farrokhpour, Hossein; Simpson, Jim; Abdolmaleki, Amir; Abyar, Fatemeh

    2017-02-15

    A new mononuclear rhodium(III) complex, [Rh(bzimpy)Cl3] (bzimpy = 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazolyl)pyridine), was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The molecular structure of the complex was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The interaction of the complex with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) was investigated by UV spectroscopy, emission titration, and viscosity measurement in order to evaluate the possible DNA-binding mode and to calculate the corresponding DNA-binding constant. The results reveal that the Rh(III) complex interacts with DNA through groove binding mode with a binding affinity on the order of 10(4). In addition, the binding of the Rh(III) complex to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was monitored by UV-Vis and fluorescence emission spectroscopy at different temperatures. The mechanism of the complex interaction was found to be static quenching. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG) obtained from the fluorescence spectroscopy data show that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds play a major role in the binding of the Rh(III) complex to BSA. For the comparison of the DNA- and BSA-binding affinities of the free bzimpy ligand with its Rh(III) complex, the absorbance titration and fluorescence quenching experiments of the free bzimpy ligand with DNA and BSA were carried out. Competitive experiments using eosin Y and ibuprofen as site markers indicated that the complex was mainly located in the hydrophobic cavity of site I of the protein. These experimental results were confirmed by the results of molecular docking. Finally, the in vitro cytotoxicity properties of the Rh(III) complex against the MCF-7, K562, and HT-29 cell lines were evaluated and compared with those of the free ligand (bzimpy). It was found that the complexation process improved the anticancer activity significantly.

  5. Evaluation of Hylife-II and Sombrero using 175- and 566- group neutron transport and activation cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D; Latkowski, J; Sanz, J

    1999-06-18

    Recent modifications to the TART Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code enable calculation of 566-group neutron spectra. This expanded group structure represents a significant improvement over the 50- and 175-group structures that have been previously available. To support use of this new capability, neutron activation cross section libraries have been created in the 175- and 566-group structures starting from the FENDL/A-2.0 pointwise data. Neutron spectra have been calculated for the first walls of the HYLIFE-II and SOMBRERO inertial fusion energy power plant designs and have been used in subsequent neutron activation calculations. The results obtained using the two different group structures are compared to each other as well as to those obtained using a 175-group version of the EAF3.1 activation cross section library.

  6. Structure of solvation water around the active and inactive regions of a type III antifreeze protein and its mutants of lowered activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowska, Joanna; Kuffel, Anna; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Water molecules from the solvation shell of the ice-binding surface are considered important for the antifreeze proteins to perform their function properly. Herein, we discuss the problem whether the extent of changes of the mean properties of solvation water can be connected with the antifreeze activity of the protein. To this aim, the structure of solvation water of a type III antifreeze protein from Macrozoarces americanus (eel pout) is investigated. A wild type of the protein is used, along with its three mutants, with antifreeze activities equal to 54% or 10% of the activity of the native form. The solvation water of the ice-binding surface and the rest of the protein are analyzed separately. To characterize the structure of solvation shell, parameters describing radial and angular characteristics of the mutual arrangement of the molecules were employed. They take into account short-distance (first hydration shell) or long-distance (two solvation shells) effects. The obtained results and the comparison with the results obtained previously for a hyperactive antifreeze protein from Choristoneura fumiferana lead to the conclusion that the structure and amino acid composition of the active region of the protein evolved to achieve two goals. The first one is the modification of the properties of the solvation water. The second one is the geometrical adjustment of the protein surface to the specific crystallographic plane of ice. Both of these goals have to be achieved simultaneously in order for the protein to perform its function properly. However, they seem to be independent from one another in a sense that very small antifreeze activity does not imply that properties of water become different from the ones observed for the wild type. The proteins with significantly lower activity still modify the mean properties of solvation water in a right direction, in spite of the fact that the accuracy of the geometrical match with the ice lattice is lost because of the

  7. Auto Mechanics I. Learning Activity Packets (LAPs). Section D--Suspension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains six learning activity packets (LAPs) that outline the study activities for the "suspension" instructional area for an Auto Mechanics I course. The six LAPs cover the following topics: wheel bearings, tires and wheels, wheel balancing, suspension system, steering system, and wheel alignment. Each LAP contains a…

  8. Auto Mechanics I. Learning Activity Packets (LAPs). Section C--Engine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains five learning activity packets (LAPs) that outline the study activities for the "engine" instructional area for an Auto Mechanics I course. The five LAPs cover the following topics: basic engine principles, cooling system, engine lubrication system, exhaust system, and fuel system. Each LAP contains a cover sheet…

  9. Learning Activity Packets for Auto Mechanics II. Section A--Engine Rebuilding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Eight learning activity packets (LAPs) are provided for the instructional area of engine rebuilding in the auto mechanics II program. They accompany an instructor's guide available separately. The LAPs outline the study activities and performance tasks for these eight units: (1) engine condition evaluation; (2) engine removal; (3) engine…

  10. Mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of an actively stabilized beam-column with circular cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffner, Maximilian; Enss, Georg C.; Platz, Roland

    2014-04-01

    Buckling of axially loaded beam-columns represents a critical design constraint for light-weight structures. Besides passive solutions to increase the critical buckling load, active buckling control provides a possibility to stabilize slender elements in structures. So far, buckling control by active forces or bending moments has been mostly investigated for beam-columns with rectangular cross-section and with a preferred direction of buckling. The proposed approach investigates active buckling control of a beam-column with circular solid cross-section which is fixed at its base and pinned at its upper end. Three controlled active lateral forces are applied near the fixed base with angles of 120° to each other to stabilize the beam-column and allow higher critical axial loads. The beam-column is subject to supercritical static axial loads and lateral disturbance forces with varying directions and offsets. Two independent modal state space systems are derived for the bending planes in the lateral y- and z-directions of the circular cross-section. These are used to design two linear-quadratic regulators (LQR) that determine the necessary control forces which are transformed into the directions of the active lateral forces. The system behavior is simulated with a finite element model using one-dimensional beam elements with six degrees of freedom at each node. With the implemented control, it is possible to actively stabilize a beam-column with circular cross-section in arbitrary buckling direction for axial loads significantly above the critical axial buckling load.

  11. Water-soluble oxoglaucine-Y(III), Dy(III) complexes: in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities by triggering DNA damage, leading to S phase arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jian-Hua; Chen, Zhen-Feng; Qin, Jiao-Lan; Liu, Yan-Cheng; Li, Zhu-Quan; Khan, Taj-Malook; Wang, Meng; Jiang, Yan-Hua; Shen, Wen-Ying; Liang, Hong

    2015-07-07

    Complexes of yttrium(III) and dysprosium(III) with the traditional Chinese medicine active ingredient oxoglaucine (OG), namely [Y(OG)2(NO3)3]·CH3OH (1) and [Dy(OG)2(NO3)3]·H2O (2), were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, ESI-MS, (1)H and (13)C NMR as well as single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In vitro the complexes exhibited higher anticancer activity than the free ligand OG against the tested cancer cell lines. Among the tested cell lines, HepG2 is the most sensitive to the complexes. Complex 2 can trigger DNA damage in HepG2 cells, resulting in cell cycle arrest in the S phase and leading to cell apoptosis. The S phase cell-cycle arrest is caused via the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated)-Chk2-Cdc25A pathway. Chk2 is phosphorylated and activated in an ATM-dependent manner. It, in turn, phosphorylates Cdc25A phosphatise on serine124, causing the inactivation of Cdc25A in ubiquitin-mediated proteolytic degradation. The cyclin-Cdk complexes of the S phase could also be inhibited by limited supply of cyclins A and E. This irreversible cell cycle arrest process ultimately induces mitochondria-involved apoptotic cell death via the activation of Bcl-2 protein. Complex e2 ffectively inhibited tumour growth in the BEL-7402 xenograft mouse model and exhibited higher safety in vivo than cisplatin.

  12. Dog ownership during pregnancy, maternal activity, and obesity: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Westgarth, Carri; Liu, Jihong; Heron, Jon; Ness, Andrew R; Bundred, Peter; Gaskell, Rosalind M; German, Alexander J; McCune, Sandra; Dawson, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) is an observational study of 14,273 UK pregnant singleton mothers in 1990/1991. We examined outcomes of self report of strenuous activity (hours per week) at 18 and 32 weeks of gestation, hours spent in leisure-time physical activities and types, and pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI); overweight status was defined as pre-pregnancy BMI≥25 and obesity BMI≥30. Pet ownership and activity data were reported for 11,466 mothers. Twenty-five percent of mothers owned at least one dog. There was a positive relationship between participation in activity at least once a week and dog ownership (at 18 weeks, Odds ratio 1.27, 95% confidence interval 1.11-1.44, P<0.001). Dog owners were 50% more likely to achieve the recommended 3 hours activity per week, equivalent to 30 minutes per day, most days of the week (1.53, 1.35-1.72, P<0.001). Dog owners were also more likely to participate in brisk walking activity than those who did not have a dog (compared to no brisk walking 2-6 hrs per week 1.43, 1.23 to 1.67, P<0.001; 7+ hrs per week 1.80, 1.43 to 2.27, P<0.001). However, no association was found with any other types of activities and there was no association between dog ownership and weight status. During the time period studied, pregnant women who had dogs were more active, through walking, than those who did not own dogs. As walking is a low-risk exercise, participation of pregnant women in dog walking activities may be a useful context to investigate as part of a broader strategy to improve activity levels in pregnant women.

  13. Pea formaldehyde-active class III alcohol dehydrogenase: common derivation of the plant and animal forms but not of the corresponding ethanol-active forms (classes I and P).

    PubMed Central

    Shafqat, J; El-Ahmad, M; Danielsson, O; Martínez, M C; Persson, B; Parés, X; Jornvall, H

    1996-01-01

    A plant class III alcohol dehydrogenase (or glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase) has been characterized. The enzyme is a typical class III member with enzymatic parameters and substrate specificity closely related to those of already established animal forms. Km values with the pea enzyme are 6.5 microM for NAD+, 2 microM for S-hydroxymethylglutathione, and 840 microM for octanol versus 9, 4, and 1200 microM, respectively, with the human enzyme. Structurally, the pea/human class III enzymes are closely related, exhibiting a residue identity of 69% and with only 3 of 23 residues differing among those often considered in substrate and coenzyme binding. In contrast, the corresponding ethanol-active enzymes, the long-known human liver and pea alcohol dehydrogenases, differ more (47% residue identities) and are also in functionally important active site segments, with 12 of the 23 positions exchanged, including no less than 7 at the usually much conserved coenzyme-binding segment. These differences affect functionally important residues that are often class-distinguishing, such as those at positions 48, 51, and 115, where the plant ethanol-active forms resemble class III (Thr, Tyr, and Arg, respectively) rather than the animal ethanol-active class I forms (typically Ser, His, and Asp, respectively). Calculations of phylogenetic trees support the conclusions from functional residues in subgrouping plant ethanol-active dehydrogenases and the animal ethanol-active enzymes (class I) as separate descendants from the class III line. It appears that the classical plant alcohol dehydrogenases (now called class P) have a duplicatory origin separate from that of the animal class I enzymes and therefore a paralogous relationship with functional convergence of their alcohol substrate specificity. Combined, the results establish the conserved nature of class III also in plants, and contribute to the molecular and functional understanding of alcohol dehydrogenases by

  14. Multifunctionality in bimetallic Ln(III)[W(V)(CN)8]3- (Ln = Gd, Nd) coordination helices: optical activity, luminescence, and magnetic coupling.

    PubMed

    Chorazy, Szymon; Nakabayashi, Koji; Arczynski, Mirosław; Pełka, Robert; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi; Sieklucka, Barbara

    2014-06-02

    Two chiral luminescent derivatives of pyridine bis(oxazoline) (Pybox), (SS/RR)-iPr-Pybox (2,6-bis[4-isopropyl-2-oxazolin-2-yl]pyridine) and (SRSR/RSRS)-Ind-Pybox (2,6-bis[8H-indeno[1,2-d]oxazolin-2-yl]pyridine), have been combined with lanthanide ions (Gd(3+), Nd(3+)) and octacyanotungstate(V) metalloligand to afford a remarkable series of eight bimetallic CN(-)-bridged coordination chains: {[Ln(III)(SS/RR-iPr-Pybox)(dmf)4]3[W(V)(CN)8]3}n ⋅dmf⋅4 H2O (Ln = Gd, 1-SS and 1-RR; Ln = Nd, 2-SS and 2-RR) and {[Ln(III)(SRSR/RSRS-Ind-Pybox)(dmf)4][W(V)(CN)8]}n⋅5 MeCN⋅4 MeOH (Ln = Gd, 3-SRSR and 3-RSRS; Ln = Nd, 4-SRSR and 4-RSRS). These materials display enantiopure structural helicity, which results in strong optical activity in the range 200-450 nm, as confirmed by natural circular dichroism (NCD) spectra and the corresponding UV/Vis absorption spectra. Under irradiation with UV light, the Gd(III)-W(V) chains show dominant ligand-based red phosphorescence, with λmax ≈660 nm for 1-(SS/RR) and 680 nm for 3-(SRSR/RSRS). The Nd(III)-W(V) chains, 2-(SS/RR) and 4-(SRSR/RSRS), exhibit near-infrared luminescence with sharp lines at 986, 1066, and 1340 nm derived from intra-f (4)F3/2 → (4)I9/2,11/2,13/2 transitions of the Nd(III) centers. This emission is realized through efficient ligand-to-metal energy transfer from the Pybox derivative to the lanthanide ion. Due to the presence of paramagnetic lanthanide(III) and [W(V)(CN)8](3-) moieties connected by cyanide bridges, 1-(SS/RR) and 3-(SRSR/RSRS) are ferrimagnetic spin chains originating from antiferromagnetic coupling between Gd(III) (SGd = 7/2) and W(V) (SW = 1/2) centers with J1-(SS) = -0.96(1) cm(-1), J1-(RR) =-0.95(1) cm(-1), J3-(SRSR) = -0.91(1) cm(-1), and J3-(RSRS) =-0.94(1) cm(-1). 2-(SS/RR) and 4-(SRSR/RSRS) display ferromagnetic coupling within their Nd(III)-NC-W(V) linkages.

  15. Imaging of sialidase activity in rat brain sections by a highly sensitive fluorescent histochemical method.

    PubMed

    Minami, Akira; Shimizu, Hirotaka; Meguro, Yuko; Shibata, Naoki; Kanazawa, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Sialidase (EC 3.2.1.18) removes sialic acid from sialoglycoconjugates. Since sialidase extracellularly applied to the rat hippocampus influences many neural functions, including synaptic plasticity and innervations of glutamatergic neurons, endogenous sialidase activities on the extracellular membrane surface could also affect neural functions. However, the distribution of sialidase activity in the brain remains unknown. To visualize extracellular sialidase activity on the membrane surface in the rat brain, acute brain slices were incubated with 5-bromo-4-chloroindol-3-yl-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid (X-Neu5Ac) and Fast Red Violet LB (FRV LB) at pH 7.3. After 1h, myelin-abundant regions showed intense fluorescence in the rat brain. Although the hippocampus showed weak fluorescence in the brain, mossy fiber terminals in the hippocampus showed relatively intense fluorescence. These fluorescence intensities were attenuated with a sialidase-specific inhibitor, 2,3-dehydro-2-deoxy-N-acetylneuraminic acid (DANA, 1mM). Additionally, the fluorescence intensities caused by X-Neu5Ac and FRV LB were correlated with the sialidase activity measured with 4-methylumbelliferyl-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid (4MU-Neu5Ac), a classical substrate for quantitative measurement of sialidase activity, in each brain region. Therefore, staining with X-Neu5Ac and FRV LB is specific for sialidase and useful for quantitative analysis of sialidase activities. The results suggest that white matter of the rat brain has intense sialidase activity.

  16. A "turn-on" and label-free fluorescent assay for the rapid detection of exonuclease III activity based on Tb(3+)-induced G-quadruplex conjugates.

    PubMed

    Yang, WeiJuan; Ruan, YaJuan; Wu, WeiHua; Chen, PingPing; Xu, LiangJun; Fu, FengFu

    2014-07-01

    A "turn-on" and label-free fluorescent assay for the specific, rapid, and sensitive detection of 3' → 5' exonuclease III activity is reported in this study. The assay is based on the Tb(3+)-promoted G-quadruplex, which lead to the enhancement of Tb(3+) fluorescence due to the energy transfer from guanines. The proposed assay is highly simple, rapid, and cost-effective, and does not require sophisticated experimental techniques such as gel-based equipment or radioactive labels. It can be used for the rapid detection of exonuclease III activity with a detection limit of 0.8 U and a RSD (n = 6) <5 %. Notably, no dye was covalently conjugated to the DNA strands, which offers the advantages of low-cost and being interference-free.

  17. Iridium-mediated C-S bond activation and transformation: organoiridium(III) thioether, thiolato, sulfinato and thiyl radical compounds. Synthesis, mechanistic, spectral, electrochemical and theoretical aspects.

    PubMed

    Das, Ujjwal; Ghorui, Tapas; Adhikari, Basab; Roy, Sima; Pramanik, Shuvam; Pramanik, Kausikisankar

    2015-05-14

    An attractive methodology, single-electron transfer (SET) reductive cleavage of the C-S bond mediated by a metal in the presence of the external stimuli PPh3, has been applied to the kinetically inert IrCl3 in order to synthesize the thiolato complex [Ir(III)(L(S))Cl(PPh3)2] 3 from precursor thioether complexes [Ir(III)(L(SR))Cl2(PPh3)] (R = alkyl) 2. The aforesaid cleavage process in association with (arene)C-H activation furnishes a new class of organosulfur compounds of iridium(III). The thiolato chelate 3 displays a reversible oxidative wave at 0.75 V vs. Ag/AgCl signifying its remarkable nucleophilic character. The high electron density on the thiolato-S vis-à-vis superior nucleophilicity can be envisaged through the formation of a number of S-centered derivatives. This observation has been corroborated with the nature of HOMO in 3, which assumes 49% of S(3p). Notably, the facile oxidative nature of 3 makes it an apposite precursor for metal-stabilized thiyl radical species. Indeed, iridium(III)-stabilized 3˙(+) can be generated by chemical/electrochemical means. The axial EPR spectra with g ∼ 2.0 along with theoretical analysis of SOMO (S(3p) 24% + Ph(π) 43% + d(yz) 15%) and spin density (ρ(S) = +0.543, ρ(Ph) = +0.315, ρ(Ir) = +0.151) of one-electron oxidized 3˙(+) validate the iridium-stabilized thiyl radical description. This observation suggests that the CNS coordination mode in thiophenolato complex 3 is redox-active. Complex 3 is very prone to S-centered oxidation under normal aerobic conditions to yield metallosulfoxide [Ir(III)(L(SO2))Cl(PPh3)2] 4. The enhanced nucleophilicity of thiolato-S can also be manifested via the smooth S-C bond making process with alkyl halides (R'X, R' = Me and allyl; X = Br, I) and subsequent formation of thioether complexes of type [Ir(III)(L(SR'))ClX(PPh3)] 5. The organosulfur compounds of iridium(III) exhibit rich spectral properties including luminescence and the origin of these transitions is scrutinized with

  18. Recreational Physical Activity and Premenstrual Syndrome in Young Adult Women: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ronnenberg, Alayne G.; Zagarins, Sofija E.; Houghton, Serena C.; Takashima-Uebelhoer, Biki B.; Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction It is estimated that up to 75% of premenopausal women experience at least one premenstrual symptom and 8–20% meet clinical criteria for premenstrual syndrome. Premenstrual syndrome substantially reduces quality of life for many women of reproductive age, with pharmaceutical treatments having limited efficacy and substantial side effects. Physical activity has been recommended as a method of reducing menstrual symptom severity. However, this recommendation is based on relatively little evidence, and the relationship between physical activity, premenstrual symptoms, and premenstrual syndrome remains unclear. Methods We evaluated the relationship between physical activity and premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual symptoms among 414 women aged 18–31. Usual premenstrual symptom experience was assessed with a modified version of the Calendar of Premenstrual Experiences. Total, physical, and affective premenstrual symptom scores were calculated for all participants. Eighty women met criteria for moderate-to-severe premenstrual syndrome, while 89 met control criteria. Physical activity, along with dietary and lifestyle factors, was assessed by self-report. Results Physical activity was not significantly associated with total, affective, or physical premenstrual symptom score. Compared to the women with the lowest activity, women in tertiles 2 and 3 of activity, classified as metabolic equivalent task hours, had prevalence odds ratios for premenstrual syndrome of 1.5 (95% CI: 0.6–3.7) and 0.9 (95% CI: 0.4–2.4), respectively (p-value for trend = 0.85). Conclusions We found no association between physical activity and either premenstrual symptom scores or the prevalence of premenstrual syndrome. PMID:28081191

  19. Built Environment and Active Transport to School (BEATS) Study: protocol for a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mandic, Sandra; Williams, John; Moore, Antoni; Hopkins, Debbie; Flaherty, Charlotte; Wilson, Gordon; García Bengoechea, Enrique; Spence, John C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Active transport to school (ATS) is a convenient way to increase physical activity and undertake an environmentally sustainable travel practice. The Built Environment and Active Transport to School (BEATS) Study examines ATS in adolescents in Dunedin, New Zealand, using ecological models for active transport that account for individual, social, environmental and policy factors. The study objectives are to: (1) understand the reasons behind adolescents and their parents' choice of transport mode to school; (2) examine the interaction between the transport choices, built environment, physical activity and weight status in adolescents; and (3) identify policies that promote or hinder ATS in adolescents. Methods and analysis The study will use a mixed-method approach incorporating both quantitative (surveys, anthropometry, accelerometers, Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis, mapping) and qualitative methods (focus groups, interviews) to gather data from students, parents, teachers and school principals. The core data will include accelerometer-measured physical activity, anthropometry, GIS measures of the built environment and the use of maps indicating route to school (students)/work (parents) and perceived safe/unsafe areas along the route. To provide comprehensive data for understanding how to change the infrastructure to support ATS, the study will also examine complementary variables such as individual, family and social factors, including student and parental perceptions of walking and cycling to school, parental perceptions of different modes of transport to school, perceptions of the neighbourhood environment, route to school (students)/work (parents), perceptions of driving, use of information communication technology, reasons for choosing a particular school and student and parental physical activity habits, screen time and weight status. The study has achieved a 100% school recruitment rate (12 secondary schools). Ethics and

  20. Hermes III endpoint energy calculation from photonuclear activation of 197Au and 58Ni foils

    SciTech Connect

    Parzyck, Christopher Thomas

    2014-09-01

    A new process has been developed to characterize the endpoint energy of HERMES III on a shot-to-shot basis using standard dosimetry tools from the Sandia Radiation Measurements Laboratory. Photonuclear activation readings from nickel and gold foils are used in conjunction with calcium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters to derive estimated electron endpoint energies for a series of HERMES shots. The results are reasonably consistent with the expected endpoint voltages on those shots.

  1. An unexpected cobalt(III) complex containing a Schiff base ligand: Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic behavior, electrochemical property and SOD-like activity.

    PubMed

    Chai, Lan-Qin; Huang, Jiao-Jiao; Zhang, Hong-Song; Zhang, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jian-Yu; Li, Yao-Xin

    2014-10-15

    An unexpected mononuclear Co(III) complex, [Co(L2)2·(CH3COO)]·CH3OH (HL2=1-(2-{[(E)-3,5-dichloro-2-hydroxybenzylidene]amino}phenyl)ethanone oxime), has been synthesized via complexation of Co(II) acetate tetrahydrate with HL1 originally. The plausible reaction mechanism for the formation of quinazoline-type ligand was proposed. HL1 and its corresponding Co(III) complex were characterized by IR, as well as by elemental analysis and UV-vis spectroscopy. The crystal structure of the complex has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Each complex links two other molecules into an infinite 1-D chain via intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions. Moreover, the electrochemical properties of the cobalt(III) complex were studied by cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS). In addition, superoxide dismutase-like activities of HL1 and Co(III) complex were also investigated.

  2. A Single RNaseIII Domain Protein from Entamoeba histolytica Has dsRNA Cleavage Activity and Can Help Mediate RNAi Gene Silencing in a Heterologous System.

    PubMed

    Pompey, Justine M; Foda, Bardees; Singh, Upinder

    2015-01-01

    Dicer enzymes process double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small RNAs that target gene silencing through the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Dicer enzymes are complex, multi-domain RNaseIII proteins, however structural minimalism of this protein has recently emerged in parasitic and fungal systems. The most minimal Dicer, Saccharomyces castellii Dicer1, has a single RNaseIII domain and two double stranded RNA binding domains. In the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica 27nt small RNAs are abundant and mediate silencing, yet no canonical Dicer enzyme has been identified. Although EhRNaseIII does not exhibit robust dsRNA cleavage in vitro, it can process dsRNA in the RNAi-negative background of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in conjunction with S. castellii Argonaute1 can partially reconstitute the RNAi pathway. Thus, although EhRNaseIII lacks the domain architecture of canonical or minimal Dicer enzymes, it has dsRNA processing activity that contributes to gene silencing via RNAi. Our data advance the understanding of small RNA biogenesis in Entamoeba as well as broaden the spectrum of non-canonical Dicer enzymes that contribute to the RNAi pathway.

  3. A Single RNaseIII Domain Protein from Entamoeba histolytica Has dsRNA Cleavage Activity and Can Help Mediate RNAi Gene Silencing in a Heterologous System

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Upinder

    2015-01-01

    Dicer enzymes process double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small RNAs that target gene silencing through the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Dicer enzymes are complex, multi-domain RNaseIII proteins, however structural minimalism of this protein has recently emerged in parasitic and fungal systems. The most minimal Dicer, Saccharomyces castellii Dicer1, has a single RNaseIII domain and two double stranded RNA binding domains. In the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica 27nt small RNAs are abundant and mediate silencing, yet no canonical Dicer enzyme has been identified. Although EhRNaseIII does not exhibit robust dsRNA cleavage in vitro, it can process dsRNA in the RNAi-negative background of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in conjunction with S. castellii Argonaute1 can partially reconstitute the RNAi pathway. Thus, although EhRNaseIII lacks the domain architecture of canonical or minimal Dicer enzymes, it has dsRNA processing activity that contributes to gene silencing via RNAi. Our data advance the understanding of small RNA biogenesis in Entamoeba as well as broaden the spectrum of non-canonical Dicer enzymes that contribute to the RNAi pathway. PMID:26230096

  4. Experimental determination of water activity for binary aqueous cerium(III) ionic solutions: application to an assessment of the predictive capability of the binding mean spherical approximation model.

    PubMed

    Ruas, Alexandre; Simonin, Jean-Pierre; Turq, Pierre; Moisy, Philippe

    2005-12-08

    This work is aimed at a description of the thermodynamic properties of actinide salt solutions at high concentration. The predictive capability of the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA) theory to describe the thermodynamic properties of electrolytes is assessed in the case of aqueous solutions of lanthanide(III) nitrate and chloride salts. Osmotic coefficients of cerium(III) nitrate and chloride were calculated from other lanthanide(III) salts properties. In parallel, concentrated binary solutions of cerium nitrate were prepared in order to measure experimentally its water activity and density as a function of concentration, at 25 degrees C. Water activities of several binary solutions of cerium chloride were also measured to check existing data on this salt. Then, the properties of cerium chloride and cerium nitrate solutions were compared within the BIMSA model. Osmotic coefficient values for promethium nitrate and promethium chloride given by this theory are proposed. Finally, water activity measurements were made to examine the fact that the ternary system Ce(NO3)3/HNO3/H2O and the quaternary system Ce(NO3)3/HNO3/N2H5NO3/H2O may be regarded as "simple solutions" (in the sense of Zdanovskii and Mikulin).

  5. Reactions of the class II peroxidases, lignin peroxidase and Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase, with hydrogen peroxide. Catalase-like activity, compound III formation, and enzyme inactivation.

    PubMed

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Hernández-Ruiz, Josefa; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Brisset, Nigel C; Smith, Andrew T; Arnao, Marino B; Acosta, Manuel

    2002-07-26

    The reactions of the fungal enzymes Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP) and Phanerochaete chrysosporium lignin peroxidase (LiP) with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) have been studied. Both enzymes exhibited catalase activity with hyperbolic H(2)O(2) concentration dependence (K(m) approximately 8-10 mm, k(cat) approximately 1-3 s(-1)). The catalase and peroxidase activities of LiP were inhibited within 10 min and those of ARP in 1 h. The inactivation constants were calculated using two independent methods; LiP, k(i) approximately 19 x 10(-3) s(-1); ARP, k(i) approximately 1.6 x 10(-3) s(-1). Compound III (oxyperoxidase) was detected as the majority species after the addition of H(2)O(2) to LiP or ARP, and its formation was accompanied by loss of enzyme activity. A reaction scheme is presented which rationalizes the turnover and inactivation of LiP and ARP with H(2)O(2). A similar model is applicable to horseradish peroxidase. The scheme links catalase and compound III forming catalytic pathways and inactivation at the level of the [compound I.H(2)O(2)] complex. Inactivation does not occur from compound III. All peroxidases studied to date are sensitive to inactivation by H(2)O(2), and it is suggested that the model will be generally applicable to peroxidases of the plant, fungal, and prokaryotic superfamily.

  6. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) As of FY 2015 President’s Budget...00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Responsible Office References Program Name Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) DoD Component Air Force

  7. [Investigation of biologically active compounds at the Department of Organic Chemistry of University of Debrecen 1992-2009. Part III].

    PubMed

    Antus, Sándor

    2010-01-01

    The author briefly reviews the beginning of the carbohydrate chemistry in Hungary with special regard to the results achieved at the Department of Organic Chemistry of University of Debrecen and summarizes the most important synthetic and pharmaceutical results obtained in this field between 1992-2009, part III.

  8. Structure-activity relationships for analogues of the phenazine-based dual topoisomerase I/II inhibitor XR11576.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouming; Miller, Warren; Milton, John; Vicker, Nigel; Stewart, Alistair; Charlton, Peter; Mistry, Prakash; Hardick, David; Denny, William A

    2002-02-11

    As part of a programme to identify further analogues of the dual topo I/II inhibitor XR11576, we describe here the syntheses and SAR studies of various 'minimal' and 3,4-benzofused phenazine chromophores of the phenazine template of XR11576.

  9. Binding analysis of ytterbium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline with DNA and its antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Moodi, Asieh; Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Niroomand, Sona

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the biological preference of [Yb(phen)₂(OH₂)Cl₃](H₂O)₂ (phen is 1,10-phenanthroline) for DNA, interaction of Yb(III) complex with DNA in Tris-HCl buffer is studied by various biophysical and spectroscopic techniques which reveal that the complex binds to DNA. The results of fluorescence titration reveal that [Yb(phen)₂(OH₂)Cl₃](H₂O)₂ has strongly quenched in the presence of DNA. The binding site number n, apparent binding constant K b, and the Stern-Volmer quenching constant K SV are determined. ΔH⁰, ΔS⁰, and ΔG⁰ are obtained based on the quenching constants and thermodynamic theory (ΔH⁰ > 0, ΔS⁰ > 0, and ΔG⁰ < 0). The experimental results show that the Yb(III) complex binds to DNA by non-intercalative mode. Groove binding is the preferred mode of interaction for [Yb(phen)₂(OH₂)Cl₃](H₂O)₂ to DNA. The DNA cleavage results show that in the absence of any reducing agent, Yb(III) complex can cleave DNA. The antimicrobial screening tests are also recorded and give good results in the presence of Yb(III) complex.

  10. Are “armchair socialists” still sitting? Cross sectional study of political affiliation and physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Joanne; Milton, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the validity of the concept of left wing “armchair socialists” and whether they sit more and move less than their right wing and centrist counterparts. Design Secondary analysis of Eurobarometer data from 32 European countries. Setting The study emanated from the authors’ sit-stand desks (rather than from their armchairs). Participants Total of 29 193 European adults, of whom 1985 were left wing, 1902 right wing, 17 657 political centrists, and 7649 politically uncommitted. Main outcome measures Self-reported political affiliation, physical activity, and total daily sitting time. Methods Linear models were used to examine the relation between physical activity, sitting time, and reported political affiliation. Results The findings refute the existence of an “armchair socialist”; people at the extremes of both ends of the political spectrum were more physically active, with the right wing reporting 62.2 more weekly minutes of physical activity (95% confidence interval 23.9 to 100.5), and the left wing 57.8 more minutes (20.6 to 95.1) than those in the political centre. People with right wing political affiliations reported 12.8 minutes less time sitting a day (3.8 to 21.9) than the centrists. It is those sitting in the middle (politically) that are moving less, and possibly sitting more, both on the fence and elsewhere, making them a defined at-risk group. Conclusions There is little evidence to support the notion of armchair socialists, as they are more active than the mainstream in the political centre. Encouraging centrists to adopt stronger political views may be an innovative approach to increasing their physical activity, potentially benefiting population health. PMID:25500112

  11. Adolescents' leisure activities, parental monitoring and cigarette smoking - a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adolescent participation in leisure activities is developmentally beneficial, but certain activities may increase health compromising behaviours, such as tobacco smoking. A limited range of leisure activities has been studied, with little research on out-of-school settings where parental supervision is a potential protective factor. Tobacco smoking is an important, potentially modifiable health determinant, so understanding associations between adolescent leisure activities, parental monitoring, demographic factors and daily smoking may inform preventive strategies. These associations are reported for a New Zealand adolescent sample. Methods Randomly selected schools (n = 145) participated in the 2006 Youth In-depth Survey, a national, biennial study of Year 10 students (predominantly 14-15 years). School classes were randomly selected and students completed a self-report questionnaire in class time. Adjustment for clustering at the school level was included in all analyses. Since parental monitoring and demographic variables potentially confound relations between adolescent leisure activities and smoking, variables were screened before multivariable modelling. Given prior indications of demographic differences, gender and ethnic specific regression models were built. Results and Discussion Overall, 8.5% of the 3,161 students were daily smokers, including more females (10.5%) than males (6.5%). In gender and ethnic specific multivariate analysis of associations with daily smoking (adjusted for age, school socioeconomic decile rating, leisure activities and ethnicity or gender, respectively), parental monitoring exhibited a consistently protective, dose response effect, although less strongly among Māori. Attending a place of worship and going to the movies were protective for non-Māori, as was watching sports, whereas playing team sport was protective for all, except males. Attending a skate park was a risk factor for females and Māori which

  12. Measurement of the {sup 241}Am(n,2n) reaction cross section using the activation method

    SciTech Connect

    Perdikakis, G.; Papadopoulos, C.T.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Galanopoulos, S.; Patronis, N.; Lagoyannis, A.; Spyrou, A.; Zarkadas, Ch.; Kalyva, G.; Kossionides, S.; Karamanis, D.

    2006-06-15

    In the context of the n{sub T}OF Collaboration, the measurement of the cross section of the reaction {sup 241}Am(n,2n){sup 240}Am, has been performed, for the first time at neutron energies from 8.8 to 11.4 MeV, by the activation method, relative to the {sup 27}Al(n,a){sup 24}Na reaction reference cross section. The monoenergetic neutron beam was produced at the 5.5 MV TANDEM accelerator of NCSR ''Demokritos,'' by means of the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction, using a deuterium filled gas cell. The radioactive target consisted of a 37 GBq {sup 241}Am source enclosed in a Pb container. After the end of the irradiation, the activity induced by the neutron beam at the target and reference, was measured off-line by a 56% relative efficiency, HPGe detector.

  13. Parent-child interactions and objectively measured child physical activity: a cross-sectional study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parents influence their children's behaviors directly through specific parenting practices and indirectly through their parenting style. Some practices such as logistical and emotional support have been shown to be positively associated with child physical activity (PA) levels, while for others (e.g...

  14. Machine Shop I. Learning Activity Packets (LAPs). Section B--Basic and Related Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains eight learning activity packets (LAPs) for the "basic and related technology" instructional area of a Machine Shop I course. The eight LAPs cover the following topics: basic mathematics, blueprints, rules, micrometer measuring tools, Vernier measuring tools, dial indicators, gaging and inspection tools, and…

  15. Synthesis, physicochemical characterization, DFT calculation and biological activities of Fe(III) and Co(II)-omeprazole complexes. Potential application in the Helicobacter pylori eradication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Marcos G.; Vega Hissi, Esteban G.; Rizzi, Alberto C.; Brondino, Carlos D.; Salinas Ibañez, Ángel G.; Vega, Alba E.; Silva, Humberto J.; Mercader, Roberto; Narda, Griselda E.

    2014-03-01

    The reaction between the antiulcer agent omeprazole (OMZ) with Fe(III) and Co(II) ions was studied, observing a high ability to form metal complexes. The isolated microcrystalline solid complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), magnetic measurements, thermal study, FTIR, UV-Visible, Mössbauer, electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and DFT calculations. The metal-ligand ratio for both complexes was 1:2 determined by elemental and thermal analysis. FTIR spectroscopy showed that OMZ acts as a neutral bidentate ligand through the pyridinic nitrogen of the benzimidazole ring and the oxygen atom of the sulfoxide group, forming a five-membered ring chelate. Electronic, Mössbauer, and EPR spectra together with magnetic measurements indicate a distorted octahedral geometry around the metal ions, where the coordination sphere is completed by two water molecules. SEM and XRPD were used to characterize the morphology and the crystal nature of the complexes. The most favorable conformation for the Fe(III)-OMZ and Co(II)-OMZ complexes was obtained by DFT calculations by using B3LYP/6-31G(d)&LanL2DZ//B3LYP/3-21G(d)&LanL2DZ basis set. Studies of solubility along with the antibacterial activity against Helicobacter pylori for OMZ and its Co(II) and Fe(III) complexes are also reported. Free OMZ and both metal complexes showed antibacterial activity against H. pylori. Co(II)-OMZ presented a minimal inhibitory concentration ˜32 times lower than that of OMZ and ˜65 lower than Fe(III)-OMZ, revealing its promising potential use for the treatment of gastric pathologies associated with the Gram negative bacteria. The morphological changes observed in the cell membrane of the bacteria after the incubation with the metal-complexes were also analyzed by SEM microscopy. The antimicrobial activity of the complexes was proved by the viability test.

  16. Synergistic Effect of Dual Electron-Cocatalysts for Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity: rGO as Electron-Transfer Mediator and Fe(III) as Oxygen-Reduction Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huogen; Tian, Jing; Chen, Feng; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xuefei

    2015-01-01

    For a high-performance cocatalyst-modified photocatalyst, an effective interfacial separation of photogenerated electron from its corresponding holes and its following reduction reaction at the active sites are highly required. However, it is difficult for a single-component cocatalyst to simultaneously realize the crucial functions. In this study, an effective interfacial transfer of photogenerated electrons and its following rapid oxygen-reduction can be easily realized in a dual electron-cocatalyst modified Fe(III)/rGO-TiO2 photocatalyst, where the rGO nanosheets function as an electron-transfer mediator for the effective transfer of photogenerated electrons from the TiO2 surface while the Fe(III) cocatalyst serves as an electron-reduction active site to promote the following interfacial oxygen reduction. In this case, the rGO nanosheets were firstly loaded on the TiO2 nanoparticle surface by a hydrothermal method and then the Fe(III) cocatalyst was further modified on the rGO nanosheets by an impregnation method to prepare the Fe(III)/rGO-TiO2 photocatalyst. It was found that the dual electron-cocatalyst modified Fe(III)/rGO-TiO2 photocatalyst showed an obviously higher photocatalytic performance than the naked TiO2 and single-cocatalyst modified photocatalysts (such as Fe(III)/TiO2 and rGO-TiO2) owing to the synergistic effect of rGO and Fe(III) bi-cocatalysts. The present work can provide some new insights for the smart design of high-efficiency photocatalytic materials. PMID:26272870

  17. Bidirectional cross-sectional and prospective associations between physical activity and body composition in adolescence: Birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hallal, Pedro C.; Reichert, Felipe F.; Ekelund, Ulf; Dumith, Samuel C.; Menezes, Ana M.; Victora, Cesar G.; Wells, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cross-sectional and prospective associations between physical activity and body composition in adolescence. This is a prospective study, including 4,103 adolescents belonging to the Pelotas (Brazil) 1993 birth cohort, who were followed up at the mean ages of 11.3 and 14.7 years. Subsample analyses included 511 individuals with accelerometry and deuterium dilution data at 13.3 years. Sum of skinfolds at age 11.3 years was highly correlated with skinfolds at age 14.7 years (rho = 0.74, P < 0.001). More than 85% of participants remained in the same quintile or changed by not more than one quintile during the 3.4 year period. Tracking of physical activity was considerably lower, although still significant; the correlation was 0.24 (P < 0.001) and 61.4% of the adolescents moved one or less quintiles. In fully-adjusted models, no significant cross-sectional or longitudinal associations were found between physical activity and body composition, neither in boys nor in girls. These null results were confirmed in the 511 individuals with accelerometry and deuterium data. We provide evidence of tracking of physical activity and particularly body composition during adolescence. Our results do not support the hypothesis that physical activity and fatness are strongly related in adolescents. PMID:22141438

  18. Antibacterial activity of peptides derived from the C-terminal region of a hemolytic lectin, CEL-III, from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Suenaga, Tomoko; Eto, Seiichiro; Niidome, Takuro; Aoyagi, Haruhiko

    2004-01-01

    Several synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal domain sequence of a hemolytic lectin, CEL-III, were examined as to their action on bacteria and artificial lipid membranes. Peptide P332 (KGVIFAKASVSVKVTASLSK-NH(2)), corresponding to the sequence from residue 332, exhibited strong antibacterial activity toward Gram-positive bacteria. Replacement of each Lys in P332 by Ala markedly decreased the activity. However, when all Lys were replaced by Arg, the antibacterial activity increased, indicating the importance of positively charged residues at these positions. Replacement of Val by Leu also led to higher antibacterial activity, especially toward Gram-negative bacteria. The antibacterial activity of these peptides was correlated with their membrane-permeabilizing activity toward the bacterial inner membrane and artificial lipid vesicles, indicating that the antibacterial action is due to perturbation of bacterial cell membranes, leading to enhancement of their permeability. These results also suggest that the hydrophobic region of CEL-III, from which P332 and its analogs were derived, may play some role in the interaction with target cell membranes to trigger hemolysis.

  19. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  20. Paraoxonase Activity and Lipid Profile in Paediatric Nephrotic Syndrome: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anuradha B.; Patil, Vidya S.; Ingleshwar, Deepti G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dyslipidaemia of Nephrotic Syndrome (NS) is known to be linked to oxidative reactions and atherosclerosis. Paraoxonase (PON1) has been implicated in the prevention of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) lipid peroxidation and also degrades biologically active oxidised lipids in lipoprotein. Aim The present study was taken up to assess PON1 levels in paediatric nephrotic syndrome and also to see if any correlation exists between lipid parameters and PON1. Materials and Methods This study consists of Group 1 with 40 cases of NS in the age group of 2-14 years and Group 2 with 40 age and sex matched healthy controls. Lipid profile and paraoxonase activity was measured in serum samples of both the groups. Results Statistical analysis by student’s t-test showed that the mean levels of Total Cholesterol, Trigylycerides, LDL, and VLDL were significantly increased in Group 1 when compared to Group 2 (p <0.001). The mean levels of HDL were similar in both groups. The levels of PON1 were significantly lowered in Group 1 when compared to Group 2. Correlation studies showed no significant correlation between lipid profile and PON1. Conclusion Cases have atherosclerotic dyslipidaemia and significantly decreased PON1 activity. Decreased PON1 may lead to increased oxidation of LDL accelerating the process of atherosclerosis. PMID:27134858

  1. Synthesis of Isocoumarins from Cyclic 2-Diazo-1,3-diketones and Benzoic Acids via Rh(III)-Catalyzed C-H Activation and Esterification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; He, Xinwei; Zhang, Lanlan; Han, Guang; Zuo, Youpeng; Shang, Yongjia

    2017-02-17

    A mild and efficient Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H activation/esterification reaction for the synthesis of isocoumarins has been developed. This procedure uses readily available benzoic acids and cyclic diazo-1,3-diketones as starting materials and involves domino intermolecular C-H activation in combination with intramolecular esterification to give the corresponding isocoumarins in moderate to excellent yields. This process provides a facile approach for the construction of isocoumarins containing various functional groups that does not require any additives.

  2. Mechanistic insights on iodine(III) promoted metal-free dual C-H activation involved in the formation of a spirocyclic bis-oxindole.

    PubMed

    Sreenithya, A; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2014-12-05

    The mechanism of a metal-free, phenyliodine(III) bis(trifluoroacetate) promoted, dual aryl C-H activation of an anilide to a spirocyclic bis-oxindole is examined using density functional theory (M06-2X). The most preferred pathway proceeds through the involvement of a novel iodonium ion intermediate and a pivotal trifluoroacetate counterion. The two sequential aryl C-H activations, assisted by trifluoroacetate as well as the superior leaving group ability of PhI, facilitate the formation of spirocyclic bis-oxindole.

  3. Comparison of the Antiproliferative Activity of Two Antitumour Ruthenium(III) Complexes With Their Apotransferrin and Transferrin-Bound Forms in a Human Colon Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Keppler, B. K.; Hartmann, M.; Messori, L.; Berger, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    Two ruthenium(III) complexes, namely trans-indazolium[tetrachlorobis(indazole)- ruthenate(III)], HInd[RuInd2Cl4] and trans-imidazolium[tetrachlorobis(imidazole)- ruthenate(III)], HIm[RuIm2Cl4] exhibit high anticancer activity in an autochthonous colorectal carcinoma model in rats. Recently, it has been shown that both complexes bind specifically to human serum apotransferrin and the resulting adducts have been studied through spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques with the ultimate goal of preparing adducts with good selectivity for cancer cells due to the fact that tumour cells express high amounts of transferrin receptors on their cell surface. In order to investigate whether the cellular uptake of the complexes was mediated by apotransferrin or transferrin, we compared the antiproliferative efficacy of HInd[RuInd2Cl4] and HIm[RuIm2Cl4] with its apotransferrin- and transferrin-bound form in the human colon cancer cell line SW707 using the microculture tetrazolium test (MTT). Our results show that especially the transferrin-bound forms exhibit high antiproliferative activity, which exceeds that of the free complex, indicating that this protein can act as a carrier of the ruthenium complexes into the tumor cell. PMID:18472789

  4. YopN and TyeA Hydrophobic Contacts Required for Regulating Ysc-Yop Type III Secretion Activity by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Ayad A. A.; Gurung, Jyoti M.; Costa, Tiago R. D.; Ruuth, Kristina; Zavialov, Anton V.; Forsberg, Åke; Francis, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia bacteria target Yop effector toxins to the interior of host immune cells by the Ysc-Yop type III secretion system. A YopN-TyeA heterodimer is central to controlling Ysc-Yop targeting activity. A + 1 frameshift event in the 3-prime end of yopN can also produce a singular secreted YopN-TyeA polypeptide that retains some regulatory function even though the C-terminal coding sequence of this YopN differs greatly from wild type. Thus, this YopN C-terminal segment was analyzed for its role in type III secretion control. Bacteria producing YopN truncated after residue 278, or with altered sequence between residues 279 and 287, had lost type III secretion control and function. In contrast, YopN variants with manipulated sequence beyond residue 287 maintained full control and function. Scrutiny of the YopN-TyeA complex structure revealed that residue W279 functioned as a likely hydrophobic contact site with TyeA. Indeed, a YopNW279G mutant lost all ability to bind TyeA. The TyeA residue F8 was also critical for reciprocal YopN binding. Thus, we conclude that specific hydrophobic contacts between opposing YopN and TyeA termini establishes a complex needed for regulating Ysc-Yop activity. PMID:27446813

  5. Structural, EPR, and Mössbauer characterization of (μ-alkoxo)(μ-carboxylato)diiron(II,III) model complexes for the active sites of mixed-valent diiron enzymes.

    PubMed

    Li, Feifei; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Dong, Yanhong; Kauffmann, Karl; Bominaar, Emile L; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence

    2012-03-05

    To obtain structural and spectroscopic models for the diiron(II,III) centers in the active sites of diiron enzymes, the (μ-alkoxo)(μ-carboxylato)diiron(II,III) complexes [Fe(II)Fe(III)(N-Et-HPTB)(O(2)CPh)(NCCH(3))(2)](ClO(4))(3) (1) and [Fe(II)Fe(III)(N-Et-HPTB)(O(2)CPh)(Cl)(HOCH(3))](ClO(4))(2) (2) (N-Et-HPTB = N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-(1-ethyl-benzimidazolylmethyl))-2-hydroxy-1,3-diaminopropane) have been prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography, UV-visible absorption, EPR, and Mössbauer spectroscopies. Fe1-Fe2 separations are 3.60 and 3.63 Å, and Fe1-O1-Fe2 bond angles are 128.0° and 129.4° for 1 and 2, respectively. Mössbauer and EPR studies of 1 show that the Fe(III) (S(A) = 5/2) and Fe(II) (S(B) = 2) sites are antiferromagnetically coupled to yield a ground state with S = 1/2 (g= 1.75, 1.88, 1.96); Mössbauer analysis of solid 1 yields J = 22.5 ± 2 cm(-1) for the exchange coupling constant (H = JS(A)·S(B) convention). In addition to the S = 1/2 ground-state spectrum of 1, the EPR signal for the S = 3/2 excited state of the spin ladder can also be observed, the first time such a signal has been detected for an antiferromagnetically coupled diiron(II,III) complex. The anisotropy of the (57)Fe magnetic hyperfine interactions at the Fe(III) site is larger than normally observed in mononuclear complexes and arises from admixing S > 1/2 excited states into the S = 1/2 ground state by zero-field splittings at the two Fe sites. Analysis of the "D/J" mixing has allowed us to extract the zero-field splitting parameters, local g values, and magnetic hyperfine structural parameters for the individual Fe sites. The methodology developed and followed in this analysis is presented in detail. The spin Hamiltonian parameters of 1 are related to the molecular structure with the help of DFT calculations. Contrary to what was assumed in previous studies, our analysis demonstrates that the deviations of the g values from the free electron value (g = 2) for the

  6. 21 CFR 1308.13 - Schedule III.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Schedule III. 1308.13 Section 1308.13 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Schedules § 1308.13 Schedule III. (a) Schedule III shall consist of the drugs and other substances,...

  7. 21 CFR 1308.13 - Schedule III.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Schedule III. 1308.13 Section 1308.13 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Schedules § 1308.13 Schedule III. (a) Schedule III shall consist of the drugs and other substances,...

  8. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin

    2014-10-02

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  9. Social participation and independence in activities of daily living: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Encarnación; Lázaro, Angelina; Sánchez-Sánchez, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Background It is today widely accepted that participation in social activities contributes towards successful ageing whilst, at the same time, maintaining independence in the activities of daily living (ADLs) is the sine qua non for achieving that end. This study looks at people aged 65 and over living in an urban area in Spain who retain the ability to attend Social Centres providing recreational facilities. The aim of this paper is to quantify independence and identify the risk factors involved in its deterioration. Methods The sample size was calculated using the equation for proportions in finite populations based on a random proportional sample type, absolute error (e) = 0.05, α = 0.05, β = 0.1, p = q = 0.5. Two-stage sampling was used. In the first place, the population was stratified by residence and a Social Centre was randomly chosen for each district. In the second stage, individuals were selected in a simple random sample without replacement in proportion to the number of members at each social centre. A multivariate logistical regression analysis takes functional ADL capacity as the dependent variable. The choice of predictive variables was made using a bivariate correlation matrix. Among the estimators obtained, Nagelkerke's R2 coefficient, and the Odds ratio (CI 95%) were considered. Sensitivity and 1-specificity were adopted to present the results in graphic form. Results Out of this sample, 63.7% were fully capable of carrying out ADLs, while the main factors contributing to deterioration, identified on the basis of a logistic regression model, are in order of importance, poor physical health, poor mental health, age (above 75 years) and gender (female). The model employed has a predictive value of 88% and 92% (depending on the age range considered) with regard to the independence in ADLs. Conclusion A review of the few Spanish works using similar methodology shows that the percentage of non-institutionalised persons who are independent enough to

  10. Ligand Design for Rh(III)-Catalyzed C–H Activation: An Unsymmetrical Cyclopentadienyl Enables a Regioselective Synthesis of Dihydroisoquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Hyster, Todd K.; Dalton, Derek M.

    2014-01-01

    We report the regioselective synthesis of dihydroisoquinolones from aliphatic alkenes and O-pivaloyl benzhydroxamic acids mediated by a Rh(III) precatalyst bearing sterically bulky substituents. While the prototypical Cp* ligand provides product with low selectivity, sterically bulky Cpt affords product with excellent regioselectivity for a range of benzhydroxamic acids and alkenes. Crystallographic evidence offers insight as to the source of the increased regioselectivity. PMID:25489470

  11. Cobalt(III) complexes as potential anticancer agents: Physicochemical, structural, cytotoxic activity and DNA/protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Thamilarasan, V; Sengottuvelan, N; Sudha, A; Srinivasan, P; Chakkaravarthi, G

    2016-09-01

    Cobalt(III) complexes (1-3) such as [Co(acac)(bpy)(N3)2·H2O] 1, [Co(acac)(en)(N3)2] 2, and [Co(acac)(2-pic)(N3)2] 3 (where, acac=acetylacetone, bpy=2.2'-bipyridine, en=ethylenediamine, 2-pic=2-picolylamine and NaN3=sodium azide) were synthesized and characterized. The structure of complexes (1-3) has been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies and the configuration around cobalt(III) ion was distorted octahedral coordination geometry. Density functional theory calculations were performed to examine the molecular geometry and frontier molecular orbital properties of complexes (1-3). DNA binding properties of the cobalt(III) complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated by UV-visible absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism spectroscopy and viscosity measurements. The docking studies showed the preferred orientation of sterically acceptable Co(III) complexes (1, 2) inside the DNA through the mode of intercalation, whereas complex 3 exhibited minor groove binding modes. The intrinsic binding constants Kb of complexes (1-3) with CT-DNA were in the following order 1>3>2. Complexes (1-3) exhibit a good binding propensity to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated that the complexes (1-3) promote the cleavage of the pBR322 DNA in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and cleavage process was found to proceed by singlet oxygen cleavage mechanism. Further, the in vitro cytotoxicity studies of complexes (1-3) were tested on human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7).

  12. Expedient Access to 2,3-Dihydropyridines from Unsaturated Oximes by Rh(III)-Catalyzed C-H Activation.

    PubMed

    Romanov-Michailidis, Fedor; Sedillo, Kassandra F; Neely, Jamie M; Rovis, Tomislav

    2015-07-22

    α,β-Unsaturated oxime pivalates are proposed to undergo reversible C(sp(2))-H insertion with cationic Rh(III) complexes to furnish five-membered metallacycles. In the presence of 1,1-disubstituted olefins, these species participate in irreversible migratory insertion to give, after reductive elimination, 2,3-dihydropyridine products in good yields. Catalytic hydrogenation can then be used to convert these molecules into piperidines, which are important structural components of numerous pharmaceuticals.

  13. Abundance, Distribution, and Activity of Fe(II)-Oxidizing and Fe(III)-Reducing Microorganisms in Hypersaline Sediments of Lake Kasin, Southern Russia

    PubMed Central

    Emmerich, Maren; Bhansali, Ankita; Lösekann-Behrens, Tina; Schröder, Christian; Kappler, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The extreme osmotic conditions prevailing in hypersaline environments result in decreasing metabolic diversity with increasing salinity. Various microbial metabolisms have been shown to occur even at high salinity, including photosynthesis as well as sulfate and nitrate reduction. However, information about anaerobic microbial iron metabolism in hypersaline environments is scarce. We studied the phylogenetic diversity, distribution, and metabolic activity of iron(II)-oxidizing and iron(III)-reducing Bacteria and Archaea in pH-neutral, iron-rich salt lake sediments (Lake Kasin, southern Russia; salinity, 348.6 g liter−1) using a combination of culture-dependent and -independent techniques. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries for Bacteria and Archaea revealed a microbial community composition typical for hypersaline sediments. Most-probable-number counts confirmed the presence of 4.26 × 102 to 8.32 × 103 iron(II)-oxidizing Bacteria and 4.16 × 102 to 2.13 × 103 iron(III)-reducing microorganisms per gram dry sediment. Microbial iron(III) reduction was detected in the presence of 5 M NaCl, extending the natural habitat boundaries for this important microbial process. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that 16S rRNA gene copy numbers of total Bacteria, total Archaea, and species dominating the iron(III)-reducing enrichment cultures (relatives of Halobaculum gomorrense, Desulfosporosinus lacus, and members of the Bacilli) were highest in an iron oxide-rich sediment layer. Combined with the presented geochemical and mineralogical data, our findings suggest the presence of an active microbial iron cycle at salt concentrations close to the solubility limit of NaCl. PMID:22504804

  14. Tungsten disulfide nanosheet and exonuclease III co-assisted amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescence polarization detection of DNA glycosylase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjin; Ma, Yefei; Kong, Rongmei; Zhang, Liangliang; Yang, Wen; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-08-05

    Herein, we introduced a tungsten disulfide (WS2) nanosheet and exonuclease III (Exo III) co-assisted signal amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescent polarization (FP) assay of DNA glycosylase activity. Two DNA glycosylases, uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) and human 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), were tested. A hairpin-structured probe (HP) which contained damaged bases in the stem was used as the substrate. The removal of damaged bases from substrate by DNA glycosylase would lower the melting temperature of HP. The HP was then opened and hybridized with a FAM dye-labeled single strand DNA (DP), generating a duplex with a recessed 3'-terminal of DP. This design facilitated the Exo III-assisted amplification by repeating the hybridization and digestion of DP, liberating numerous FAM fluorophores which could not be adsorbed on WS2 nanosheet. Thus, the final system exhibited a small FP signal. However, in the absence of DNA glycosylases, no hybridization between DP and HP was occurred, hampering the hydrolysis of DP by Exo III. The intact DP was then adsorbed on the surface of WS2 nanosheet that greatly amplified the mass of the labeled-FAM fluorophore, resulting in a large FP value. With the co-assisted amplification strategy, the sensitivity was substantially improved. In addition, this method was applied to detect UDG activity in cell extracts. The study of the inhibition of UDG was also performed. Furthermore, this method is simple in design, easy in implementation, and selective, which holds potential applications in the DNA glycosylase related mechanism research and molecular diagnostics.

  15. New bipyridine gold(III) dithiocarbamate-containing complexes exerted a potent anticancer activity against cisplatin-resistant cancer cells independent of p53 status

    PubMed Central

    Altaf, Muhammad; Monim-ul-Mehboob, Muhammad; Kawde, Abdel-Nasser; Corona, Giuseppe; Larcher, Roberto; Ogasawara, Marcia; Casagrande, Naike; Celegato, Marta; Borghese, Cinzia; Siddik, Zahid H.; Aldinucci, Donatella; Isab, Anvarhusein A.

    2017-01-01

    We synthesized, characterized and tested in a panel of cancer cell lines, nine new bipyridine gold(III) dithiocarbamate-containing complexes. In vitro studies demonstrated that compounds 1, 2, 4, 5, 7 and 8 were the most cytotoxic in prostate, breast, ovarian cancer cell lines and in Hodgkin lymphoma cells with IC50 values lower than the reference drug cisplatin. The most active compound 1 was more active than cisplatin in ovarian (A2780cis and 2780CP-16) and breast cancer cisplatin-resistant cells. Compound 1 determined an alteration of the cellular redox homeostasis leading to increased ROS levels, a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome-c release from the mitochondria and activation of caspases 9 and 3. The ROS scavenger NAC suppressed ROS generation and rescued cells from damage. Compound 1 resulted more active in tumor cells than in normal human Mesenchymal stromal cells. Gold compounds were active independent of p53 status: exerted cytotoxic effects on a panel of non-small cell lung cancer cell lines with different p53 status and in the ovarian A2780 model where the p53 was knocked out. In conclusion, these promising results strongly indicate the need for further preclinical evaluation to test the clinical potential of these new gold(III) complexes. PMID:27888799

  16. Prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional survey of general medical outpatient clinics using National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Omech, Bernard; Tshikuka, Jose-Gaby; Mwita, Julius C; Tsima, Billy; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Amone-P’Olak, Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    Background Low- and middle-income countries, including Botswana, are facing rising prevalence of obesity and obesity-related cardiometabolic complications. Very little information is known about clustering of cardiovascular risk factors in the outpatient setting during routine visits. We aimed to assess the prevalence and identify the determinants of metabolic syndrome among the general outpatients’ attendances in Botswana. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from August to October 2014 involving outpatients aged ≥20 years without diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. A precoded questionnaire was used to collect data on participants’ sociodemographics, risk factors, and anthropometric indices. Fasting blood samples were drawn and analyzed for glucose and lipid profile. Metabolic syndrome was assessed using National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results In total, 291 participants were analyzed, of whom 216 (74.2%) were females. The mean age of the total population was 50.1 (±11) years. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 27.1% (n=79), with no significant difference between the sexes (female =29.6%, males =20%, P=0.11). A triad of central obesity, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and elevated blood pressure constituted the largest proportion (38 [13.1%]) of cases of metabolic syndrome, followed by a combination of low high-density lipoprotein, elevated triglycerides, central obesity, and elevated blood pressure, with 17 (5.8%) cases. Independent determinants of metabolic syndrome were antihypertensive use and increased waist circumference. Conclusion Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in the general medical outpatients clinics. Proactive approaches are needed to screen and manage cases targeting its most important predictors. PMID:27616893

  17. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectroscopy to Resolve the in Vivo Chemistry of the Redox-Active Indazolium trans-[Tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (KP1019)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Indazolium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (1, KP1019) and its analogue sodium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (2, KP1339) are promising redox-active anticancer drug candidates that were investigated with X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The analysis was based on the concept of the coordination charge and ruthenium model compounds representing possible coordinations and oxidation states in vivo. 1 was investigated in citrate saline buffer (pH 3.5) and in carbonate buffer (pH 7.4) at 37 °C for different time intervals. Interaction studies on 1 with glutathione in saline buffer and apo-transferrin in carbonate buffer were undertaken, and the coordination of 1 and 2 in tumor tissues was studied too. The most likely coordinations and oxidation states of the compound under the above mentioned conditions were assigned. Microprobe X-ray fluorescence of tumor thin sections showed the strong penetration of ruthenium into the tumor tissue, with the highest concentrations near blood vessels and in the edge regions of the tissue samples. PMID:23282017

  18. X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy to resolve the in vivo chemistry of the redox-active indazolium trans-[Tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (KP1019).

    PubMed

    Hummer, Alfred A; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Filipits, Martin; Batchelor, David; Büchel, Gabriel E; Jakupec, Michael A; Keppler, Bernhard K; Rompel, Annette

    2013-02-14

    Indazolium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (1, KP1019) and its analogue sodium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (2, KP1339) are promising redox-active anticancer drug candidates that were investigated with X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The analysis was based on the concept of the coordination charge and ruthenium model compounds representing possible coordinations and oxidation states in vivo. 1 was investigated in citrate saline buffer (pH 3.5) and in carbonate buffer (pH 7.4) at 37 °C for different time intervals. Interaction studies on 1 with glutathione in saline buffer and apo-transferrin in carbonate buffer were undertaken, and the coordination of 1 and 2 in tumor tissues was studied too. The most likely coordinations and oxidation states of the compound under the above mentioned conditions were assigned. Microprobe X-ray fluorescence of tumor thin sections showed the strong penetration of ruthenium into the tumor tissue, with the highest concentrations near blood vessels and in the edge regions of the tissue samples.

  19. The Zeplin-Iii Veto Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scovell, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    An active veto detector to complement the ZEPLIN-III two phase Xenon, direct dark matter device is described. The design consists of 52 plastic scintillator segments, individually read out by high efficiency photomultipliers, coupled to a Gd loaded passive polypropylene shield. Experimental work was performed to determine the plastic scintillator characteristics which were used to inform a complete end-to-end Monte Carlo simulation of the expected performance of the new instrument, both operating alone and as an active veto detector for ZEPLIN-III. The veto device will be capable of tagging over 65% of expected coincident nuclear recoil events in the energy range of interest in ZEPLIN-III, and over 14% for gamma ray rejection (gamma and neutron rate is predicted by simulation), while contributing no significant additional background. In addition it will also provide valuable diagnostic capabilities. The inclusion of the veto to ZEPLIN-III will aid to significantly improve the sensitivity to spin independent WIMP-nucleon cross sections 10-9 pb.

  20. 63Cu(n ,γ ) cross section measured via 25 keV activation and time of flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, M.; Beinrucker, C.; Couture, A.; Fiebiger, S.; Fonseca, M.; Göbel, K.; Heftrich, M.; Heftrich, T.; Jandel, M.; Käppeler, F.; Krása, A.; Lederer, C.; Lee, H. Y.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Reifarth, R.; Schmidt, S.; Sonnabend, K.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    In the nuclear mass range A ≈60 to 90 of the solar abundance distribution the weak s -process component is the dominant contributor. In this scenario, which is related to massive stars, the overall neutron exposure is not sufficient for the s process to reach mass flow equilibrium. Hence, abundances and isotopic ratios are very sensitive to the neutron capture cross sections of single isotopes, and nucleosynthesis models need accurate experimental data. In this work we report on a new measurement of the 63Cu(n ,γ ) cross section for which the existing experimental data show large discrepancies. The 63Cu(n ,γ ) cross section at kBT =25 keV was determined via activation with a quasistellar neutron spectrum at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Geel, and the energy dependence was determined with the time-of-flight technique and the calorimetric 4 π BaF2 detector array DANCE at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. We provide new cross section data for the whole astrophysically relevant energy range.

  1. School travel and children’s physical activity: a cross-sectional study examining the influence of distance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Walking to school is associated with higher levels of physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between school travel mode and physical activity using a sampling frame that purposefully locates schools in varying neighbourhoods. Methods Cross-sectional survey of 785 children (10.57 ± 0.7 years) in Toronto, Canada. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry and travel mode was self-reported by parents. Linear regression models accounting for school clustering effects examined the associations between mode choice, BMI, and physical activity and were estimated adjusting for age, types of neighbourhoods and travel distance to school. Results Significant associations between walking to school and moderate activity during weekdays were found. Interactions between walking to school and travel distance to school were found only in boys with significant associations between walking to school and higher physical activity levels in those living within 1000–1600 meters from school. Boys walking to school and living in this range accumulated 7.6 more minutes of daily MVPA than boys who were driven. Conclusions Walking to school can make a modest but significant contribution to overall physical activity. This contribution was modified by travel distance and not school neighbourhood socioeconomic status or the built environment. PMID:24330459

  2. Activation cross sections of deuteron induced reactions on silver in the 33-50MeV energy range.

    PubMed

    Ditrói, F; Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2017-02-01

    Excitation functions were measured for the (nat)Ag(d,x)(105,104)Cd, (110)(m,108m,106m,105g,104g)Ag and (101)Pd, (105,101m)Rh reactions over the energy range 33-50MeV by using the stacked foil activation technique and subsequent high-resolution gamma-spectrometry. We present the first experimental cross section data above 40MeV for all of these reactions and the first experimental cross section data for (nat)Ag(d,x)(108m,104g)Ag and (105,103)Rh. The experimental data are compared with results of the model calculations performed with the ALICE-D, EMPIRE-D theoretical nuclear reaction model codes and with the TALYS code results as available in the TENDL-2014 and -2015 on-line libraries.

  3. Activation cross sections of deuteron induced reactions on niobium in the 30-50 MeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    Activation cross-sections of deuterons induced reactions on Nb targets were determined with the aim of different applications and comparison with theoretical models. We present the experimental excitation functions of 93Nb(d,x)93m,90Mo, 92m,91m,90Nb, 89,88Zr and 88,87m,87gY in the energy range of 30-50 MeV. The results were compared with earlier measurements and with the cross-sections calculated by means of the theoretical model codes ALICE-D, EMPIRE-D and TALYS (on-line TENDL-2014 and TENDL-2015 libraries). Possible applications of the radioisotopes are discussed in detail.

  4. Thermodynamics, Kinetics, and Activation energy Studies of the sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) to a Mn3O4 nanomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Yvette; Remes, Abril; Reyna, Alejandra; Martinez, Denise; Villarreal, Jahaziel; Ramos, Hilda; Trevino, Samantha; Tamez, C.; Martinez, A.; Eubanks, T.; Parsons, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a manganese oxide, Mn3O4 was used to remove chromium(III) and chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions. The Mn3O4 nanomaterial was synthesized through a precipitation method, and was characterized using XRD, which confirmed the material had a crystal structure similar to hausmannite. In addition, using Scherrer’s equation it was determined that the nanomaterial had an average grain size of 19.5 ± 1.10 nm. A study of the effects of pH on the binding of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) showed that the optimum binding pH was 4 and 3 respectively. Batch isotherm studies were performed to determine the binding capacity of chromium(III), which was determined to be 18.7 mg/g, 41.7 mg/g, and 54.4 mg/g respectively for 4°C, 21°C, and 45°C. Chromium(VI) on the other hand had lower binding capacities of 2.5 mg/g, 4.3 mg/g, and 5.8 mg/g for 4°C, 21°C, 45°C, respectively. Thermodynamic studies performed indicated the sorption process was for the most part controlled by physisorption. The ΔG for the sorption of chromium(III) and Chromium(VI) ranged from −0.9 to −13 kJ/mol, indicating a spontaneous reaction was occurring. The enthalpy indicated a endothermic reaction was occurring during the binding and show ΔH values of 70.6 and 19.1 kJ.mol for chromium(III) and Chromium(VI), respectively. In addition, ΔS for the reaction had positive values of 267 and 73 J/mol for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) which indicate a spontaneous reaction. In addition, the sorption process was found to follow pseudo second order kinetic and the activation energy studies indicated the binding process occurred through chemisorption. PMID:25097453

  5. 26 CFR 1.42-4 - Application of not-for-profit rules of section 183 to low-income housing credit activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Application of not-for-profit rules of section 183 to low-income housing credit activities. 1.42-4 Section 1.42-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE...) of this section are effective with respect to buildings placed in service after December 31, 1986....

  6. Bismuth(III) complexes derived from α-amino acids: the impact of hydrolysis and oxido-cluster formation on their activity against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Busse, Madleen; Border, Emily; Junk, Peter C; Ferrero, Richard L; Andrews, Philip C

    2014-12-28

    Eight bismuth(III) complexes derived from a variety of α-amino acids covering a range of physico-chemical properties (L-phenylalanine (Phe), L-proline (Pro), L-methionine (Met), L-cysteine (Cys), D,L-serine (Ser), L-tyrosine (Tyr), l-aspartic acid (Asp) and L-glutamic acid (Glu)) have been synthesised, characterised, and evaluated for their activity against Helicobacter pylori. The optimal synthetic procedure utilises [Bi(O(t)Bu)3], giving the complexes [BiL3] (L = Phe 1, Pro 2, Met 3, Ser 5, Tyr 6) and [Bi2L3] (L = Cys 4, Asp 7, Glu 8) cleanly and in good yield. However, the synthesis is sensitive to both temperature and moisture. The solubility and stability of the bismuth(III) complexes was investigated using ESI-MS. Almost all compounds (except for [Bi(Phe)3] and [Bi(Pro)3]) were found to be partially or completely soluble in aqueous solution giving a pH 2.5-5.0, indicating the presence of free α-amino acid and hydrolysis of the bismuth(III) complexes to polynuclear bismuth oxido-clusters. The results of the bactericidal studies against Helicobacter pylori demonstrate that this hydrolysis process impacts significantly on the observed Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MICs) which are increased substantially, often by many orders of magnitude, when the complexes are initially prepared in water rather than DMSO.

  7. Type 2 Active Galactic Nuclei with Double-Peaked [O III] Lines: Narrow-Line Region Kinematics or Merging Supermassive Black Hole Pairs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A.; Greene, Jenny E.

    2010-01-01

    We present a sample of 167 type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with double-peaked [O III] λλ4959,5007 narrow emission lines, selected from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The double-peaked profiles can be well modeled by two velocity components, blueshifted and redshifted from the systemic velocity. Half of these objects have a more prominent redshifted component. In cases where the Hβ emission line is strong, it also shows two velocity components whose line-of-sight (LOS) velocity offsets are consistent with those of [O III]. The relative LOS velocity offset between the two components is typically a few hundred km s-1, larger by a factor of ~1.5 than the line full width at half maximum of each component. The offset correlates with the host stellar velocity dispersion σ*. The host galaxies of this sample show systematically larger σ*, stellar masses, and concentrations, and older luminosity-weighted mean stellar ages than a regular type 2 AGN sample matched in redshift, [O III] λ5007 equivalent width, and luminosity; they show no significant difference in radio properties. These double-peaked features could be due to narrow-line region kinematics, or binary black holes. The statistical properties do not show strong preference for or against either scenario, and spatially resolved optical imaging, spectroscopy, radio or X-ray follow-up are needed to draw firm conclusions.

  8. Rhodium(III)-triphenylphosphine complex with NNS donor thioether containing Schiff base ligand: Synthesis, spectra, electrochemistry and catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Sujan; Sarkar, Deblina; Kundu, Subhankar; Roy, Puspendu; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    New rhodium(III)-triphenylphosphine complex, [Rh(PPh3)(L)Cl2](PF6) (1) with thioether containing NNS donor ligand (L) (L = 2-(methylthio)-N-((pyridine-2-yl)methylene)benzenamine) has been synthesized and characterized. The pseudo octahedral geometry of the complex has been confirmed by single crystal X-ray analysis. The electronic structure, redox properties, absorption and emission properties of the complexes have been interpreted by DFT and TDDFT calculations. The complex effectively catalyzed the transfer hydrogenation reaction of ketones in 2-propanol and oxidation of alcohols in presence of NMO.

  9. Evidence of active tectonics on a Roman aqueduct system (II-III century A.D.) near Rome, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Fabrizio; Montone, Paola; Pirro, Mario; Boschi, Enzo

    2004-04-01

    In this paper we describe evidence of strong tectonic deformation affecting two aqueducts of Roman age (II-III century A.D.). The channels are located approximately 20 km northeast of Rome along the ancient Via Tiburtina. Brittle and ductile deformation affects these two structures, including extensional joint systems, NE-oriented faults, and horizontal distortion. This deformation is consistent with right-lateral movement on major N-striking faults, and represents the first evidence that tectonic deformation took place in historical times in the vicinity of Rome, with local strike-slip movement superimposed on a regional extensional fault system.

  10. Student research activities in the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division, Summer 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Chester, R.O.; Roberts, D.A.

    1981-08-01

    Reports summarizing activities of students assigned to the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division for the summer 1980 are presented. Unless indicated otherwise, each report was written by the student whose work is being described. For each student, the student's supervisor, the name of the program under which the student was brought to ORNL, the academic level of the student, and the name of the ORNL project to which the student was assigned are tabulated. The reports are presented in alphabetical order of the students' last names.

  11. [NiIII(OMe)]-mediated reductive activation of CO2 affording a Ni(κ1-OCO) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, Tzung -Wen; Tseng, Yen -Ming; Lu, Tsai -Te; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenes; Ho, Wei -Chieh; Kuo, Ting -Shen; Jang, Ling -Yun; Lee, Jyh -Fu; Liaw, Wen -Feng

    2016-02-24

    Here, carbon dioxide is expected to be employed as an inexpensive and potential feedstock of C1 sources for the mass production of valuable chemicals and fuel. Versatile chemical transformations of CO2, i.e. insertion of CO2 producing bicarbonate/acetate/formate, cleavage of CO2 yielding μ-CO/μ-oxo transition-metal complexes, and electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 affording CO/HCOOH/CH3OH/CH4/C2H4/oxalate were well documented. Herein, we report a novel pathway for the reductive activation of CO2 by the [NiIII(OMe)(P(C6H3-3-SiMe3-2-S)3)] complex, yielding the [NiIII1-OCO˙)(P(C6H3-3-SiMe3-2-S)3)] complex. The formation of this unusual NiIII1-OCO˙–) complex was characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, EPR, IR, SQUID, Ni/S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and Ni valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy. The inertness of the analogous complexes [NiIII(SPh)], [NiII(CO)], and [NiII(N2H4)] toward CO2, in contrast, demonstrates that the ionic [NiIII(OMe)] core attracts the binding of weak σ-donor CO2 and triggers the subsequent reduction of CO2 by the nucleophilic [OMe] in the immediate vicinity. This metal–ligand cooperative activation of CO2 may open a novel pathway promoting the subsequent incorporation of CO2 in the buildup of functionalized products.

  12. Dimerization, redox properties and antioxidant activity of two manganese(III) complexes of difluoro- and dichloro-substituted Schiff-base ligands.

    PubMed

    Palopoli, Claudia; Gómez, Guillermo; Foi, Ana; Doctorovich, Fabio; Mallet-Ladeira, Sonia; Hureau, Christelle; Signorella, Sandra

    2017-02-01

    Two mononuclear Mn(III) complexes [Mn(3,5-F2salpn)(H2O)2][B(C6H5)4]·2H2O (1·2H2O) and [Mn(3,5-Cl2salpn)(OAc)(H2O)]·H2O (2·H2O), where H2salpn=1,3-bis(salicylidenamino)propane, have been prepared and characterized. The crystal structure of 1·H2O shows that this complex forms μ-aqua dimers with a short Mn⋯Mn distance of 4.93Å. Under anaerobic conditions, the two complexes are stable in solution and possess trans-diaxial symmetry with the tetradentate Schiff base ligand symmetrically arranged in the equatorial plane. When left in air, these complexes slowly dimerize to yield high-valent [Mn(IV)2(3,5-X2-salpn)2(μ-O)2] in which each X2-salpn ligand wraps the two Mn ions. This process is favored in basic medium where the deprotonation of the bound water molecule is concomitant with air oxidation. The two complexes catalyze the dismutation of superoxide (superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity) and peroxide (catalase (CAT) activity) in basic medium. The phenyl-ring substituents play an important role on the CAT reaction but have little effect on SOD activity. Kinetics and spectroscopic results indicate that 1 and 2 catalyze H2O2 disproportionation through a cycle involving Mn(III)2 and Mn(IV)2 dimers, unlike related complexes with a more rigid and smaller chelate ring, which employ Mn(III)/Mn(V)O monomers.

  13. 26 CFR 1.42-4 - Application of not-for-profit rules of section 183 to low-income housing credit activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 183 to low-income housing credit activities. 1.42-4 Section 1.42-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Credits Against Tax § 1.42-4 Application of not-for-profit rules of section 183 to low-income housing credit activities. (a) Inapplicability...

  14. Rh(III)-Catalyzed Carbocyclization of 3-(Indolin-1-yl)-3-oxopropanenitriles with Alkynes and Alkenes through C-H Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Wang, Yanwei; Li, Bin; Wang, Baiquan

    2016-10-07

    Rh(III)-catalyzed carbocyclization reactions of 3-(indolin-1-yl)-3-oxopropanenitriles with alkynes and alkenes have been developed to form 1,7-fused indolines through C-H activation. These reactions have a broad range of substrates and high yields. Unsymmetrical aryl-alkyl substituted alkynes proceeded smoothly with high regioselectivity. Electron-rich alkynes could undergo further oxidative coupling reaction to form polycyclic compounds. For alkenes, 1,2-dihydro-4H-pyrrolo[3,2,1-ij]quinolin-4-ones were formed via C(sp(2))-H bond alkenylation and C(sp(2))-H, C(sp(3))-H oxidative coupling reactions.

  15. Light coupling between vertical III-As nanowires and planar Si photonic waveguides for the monolithic integration of active optoelectronic devices on a Si platform.

    PubMed

    Giuntoni, Ivano; Geelhaar, Lutz; Bruns, Jürgen; Riechert, Henning

    2016-08-08

    We present a new concept for the optical interfacing between vertical III-As nanowires and planar Si waveguides. The nanowires are arranged in a two-dimensional array which forms a grating structure on top of the waveguide. This grating enables light coupling in both directions between the components made from the two different material classes. Numerical simulations show that this concept permits a light extraction efficiency from the waveguide larger than 45% and a light insertion efficiency larger than 35%. This new approach would allow the monolithic integration of nanowire-based active optoelectronics devices, like photodetectors and light sources, on the Si photonics platform.

  16. Measurement of activation cross-sections for high-energy neutron-induced reactions of Bi and Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Naik, Haladhara; Shahid, Muhammad; Lee, Manwoo

    2015-08-01

    The cross-sections for 209Bi(n, 4n)206Bi, 209Bi(n, 5n)205Bi, natPb(n, xn)204mPb, natPb(n, xn)203Pb, natPb(n, xn)202mPb,natPb(n, xn)201Pb, natPb(n, xn)200Pb, natPb(n, αxn)203Hg and natPb(n, p xn)202Tl reactions were determined at the Korean Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Korea in the neutron energy range of 15.2 to 37.2 MeV. The above cross-sections were obtained by using the activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique. The quasi-monoenergetic neutron used for the above reactions are based on the 9Be(p, n) reaction. Simulations of the spectral flux from the Be target were done using the MCNPX program. The cross-sections were estimated with the TALYS 1.6 code using the default parameter. The data from the present work and literature were compared with the data from the EAF-2010 and the TENDL-2013 libraries, and calculated values of TALYS 1.6 code. It shows that appropriate level density model, the γ-ray strength function, and the spin cut-off parameter are needed to obtain a good agreement between experimental data and theoretical values from TALYS 1.6 code.

  17. Transcriptional activation of RNA polymerase III-dependent genes by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 tax protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gottesfeld, J M; Johnson, D L; Nyborg, J K

    1996-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus-encoded tax protein is a potent activator of many viral and cellular genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. We find that both chromatin and cell extracts derived from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-infected human T lymphocytes support higher levels of 5S rRNA and tRNA gene transcription than chromatin or extracts from uninfected T lymphocytes. The viral protein Tax was likely responsible for this higher level of class II gene transcription, as purified Tax was found to stimulate both genes when added to the uninfected cell extract or in reconstituted systems. Both limiting-component transcription assays and DNA binding assays identified the class III gene transcription factor TFIIIB as the principle target of Tax activity. Surprisingly, we find that Tax increases the effective concentration of active TFIIIB molecules. These data suggest that Tax stimulates RNA polymerase III-dependent gene expression by accelerating the rate and/or extent of transcription initiation complex assembly. PMID:8657153

  18. New record and enzyme activity of four species in Penicillium section Citrina from marine environments in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Myung Soo; Eom, Ji Eun; Fong, Jonathan J; Lim, Young Woon

    2015-04-01

    Several strains of Penicillium section Citrina were isolated during a survey of fungi from marine environments along the southern coast of Korea. Based on multigene phylogenetic analyses (β-tubulin and calmodulin) and morphological characteristics, the 11 strains were identified as P. citrinum, P. hetheringtonii, P. paxilli, P. sumatrense, P. terrigenum, and P. westlingii. To understand the ecological role of these species, we tested all strains for extracellular enzyme activity; six strains representing four species showed β-glucosidase activity. Four of the identified species - P. hetheringtonii, P. paxilli, P. terrigenum, and P. westlingii - are new records for Korea. For these new species records, we describe morphological characteristics of the strains and compare results to published data of type strains.

  19. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. By using high resolution gamma spectrometry cross-section data for the production of 51,48Cr, 48V, 48,47,46,44m,44g,43Sc and 43,42K were determined. Comparisons with the earlier published data are presented and results predicted by different theoretical codes (EMPIRE and TALYS) are included. Thick target yields were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves and compared with the earlier experimental yield data. Depth distribution curves to be used for thin layer activation (TLA) are also presented.

  20. Enhanced activity of galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase and ascorbate-glutathione cycle in mitochondria from complex III deficient Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zsigmond, Laura; Tomasskovics, Bálint; Deák, Veronika; Rigó, Gábor; Szabados, László; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Szarka, András

    2011-08-01

    The mitochondrial antioxidant homeostasis was investigated in Arabidopsis ppr40-1 mutant, which presents a block of electron flow at complex III. The activity of the ascorbate biosynthetic enzyme, L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.2.3) (GLDH) was elevated in mitochondria isolated from mutant plants. In addition increased activities of the enzymes of Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle and elevated glutathione (GSH) level were observed in the mutant mitochondria. Lower ascorbate and ascorbate plus dehydroascorbate contents were detected at both cellular and mitochondrial level. Moreover, the more oxidized mitochondrial redox status of ascorbate in the ppr40-1 mutant indicated that neither the enhanced activity of GLDH nor Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle could compensate for the enhanced ascorbate consumption in the absence of a functional respiratory chain.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, electro chemistry, catalytic and biological activities of ruthenium(III) complexes with bidentate N, O/S donor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, K. P.; Parameswari, K.; Chinnusamy, V.; Prabhakaran, R.; Natarajan, K.

    2006-11-01

    New hexa-coordinated ruthenium(III) complexes of the type [RuX 2(EPh 3) 2(L)] (E = P or As; X = Cl or Br; L = monobasic bidentate Schiff base derived from the condensation of benzhydrazide with furfuraldehyde, 2-acetylfuran and 2-acetylthiophene) have been synthesized from the equimolar amounts of [RuX 3(EPh 3) 3] or [RuBr 3(PPh 3) 2(MeOH)] and Schiff bases in benzene. The new complexes have been characterized by analytical, spectral (IR, electronic and EPR), magnetic moment, and cyclic voltammetry. An octahedral structure has been tentatively proposed. All the complexes have exhibited catalytic activity for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol, cyclohexanol and cinnamylalcohol in the presence of N-methylmorpholine- N-oxide as co-oxidant. All the new complexes were found to be active against the bacteria such as E. coli, Pseudomonas, Salmonella typhi and Staphylococcus aureus. The activity was compared with standard Streptomycin.

  2. Associations between physical activity and self-rated wellbeing in European adults: A population-based, cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Marques, Adilson; Peralta, Miguel; Martins, João; Catunda, Ricardo; Matos, Margarida Gaspar de; Saboga Nunes, Luís

    2016-10-01

    Although self-rated wellbeing is an indicator of health status, it has been receiving little attention; its relationship with physical activity among adults remains inconclusive. The purpose of this study was to analyse the relationship between physical activity and several dimensions of self-rated wellbeing in European adults. This cross-sectional study was based on data from the European Social Survey round 6, 2012, comprising 40,600 European adults (18,418 men, 22,186 women) from 27 countries, with mean age 42.1±13.3. Meeting physical activity guidelines was assessed using World Health Organization criteria. Six dimensions of the self-rated wellbeing were assessed (evaluative wellbeing, emotional wellbeing, functioning, vitality, community wellbeing, supportive wellbeing). Men and women who attained physical activity recommended levels had better evaluative wellbeing (men, p=0.009; women, p<0.001), emotional wellbeing (men, p<0.001; women, p<0.001), functioning (men, p<0.001; women, p<0.001), vitality (men, p<0.001; women, p<0.001), supportive relationships (men, p<0.001; women, p<0.001), and wellbeing total score (men, p<0.001; women, p<0.001). Physical activity frequency was linearly associated with self-rated wellbeing in the 6 dimensions as well as the wellbeing total score (p<0.001). Attaining recommended physical activity levels is related to better self-rated wellbeing, and more frequent physical activity is linearly associated with better self-rated wellbeing in its 6 dimensions.

  3. Mothers impose physical activity restrictions on their asthmatic children and adolescents: an analytical cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical activities are important for children and adolescents, especially asthmatics. A significant proportion is considered less active than their non-asthmatic peers and mother’s beliefs about asthma are thought to be a determinant factor. The research objectives were to investigate whether mothers try to impose limitations on the physical activity (PA) of their asthmatic children/adolescents; identify associated factors; and explore if this attitude has any impact on children’s PA levels. Methods In this cross sectional investigation, we studied 115 asthmatics aged between 9 and 19 years and their mothers. Asthma severity, PA level and exercise induced bronchospasm (EIB) were evaluated. Mothers were questioned on their beliefs about physical activity in non-asthmatic and asthmatic children, if they imposed restrictions on their children’s physical activity, on EIB perception and personal levels of anxiety and depression. Results Ninety six percent of the mothers answered that PA are important for children and adolescents. Despite this, 37% of them admitted imposing restrictions to their children’s PA. This attitude was associated with mother’s negative opinions about asthmatics doing PA, perception of children’s dyspnea after running on a treadmill, mother’s anxiety level and children’s asthma severity. The mother’s restrictive attitudes were not associated with children’s lower PA levels. Conclusion A high proportion of the mothers said that they restrained their asthmatic children from engaging in physical activity. This fact should be recognized by health professionals and discussed with parents and caregivers as these negative beliefs may lead to conflicts and prejudiced attitudes that could discourage children’s involvement in physical activities and sports. PMID:24673939

  4. Multiple-source multiple-harmonic active vibration control of variable section cylindrical structures: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxin; Chen, Xuefeng; Gao, Jiawei; Zhang, Xingwu

    2016-12-01

    Air vehicles, space vehicles and underwater vehicles, the cabins of which can be viewed as variable section cylindrical structures, have multiple rotational vibration sources (e.g., engines, propellers, compressors and motors), making the spectrum of noise multiple-harmonic. The suppression of such noise has been a focus of interests in the field of active vibration control (AVC). In this paper, a multiple-source multiple-harmonic (MSMH) active vibration suppression algorithm with feed-forward structure is proposed based on reference amplitude rectification and conjugate gradient method (CGM). An AVC simulation scheme called finite element model in-loop simulation (FEMILS) is also proposed for rapid algorithm verification. Numerical studies of AVC are conducted on a variable section cylindrical structure based on the proposed MSMH algorithm and FEMILS scheme. It can be seen from the numerical studies that: (1) the proposed MSMH algorithm can individually suppress each component of the multiple-harmonic noise with an unified and improved convergence rate; (2) the FEMILS scheme is convenient and straightforward for multiple-source simulations with an acceptable loop time. Moreover, the simulations have similar procedure to real-life control and can be easily extended to physical model platform.

  5. EMG activity of selected rotator cuff musculature during grade III distraction and posterior glide glenohumeral mobilization: results of a pilot trial comparing painful and non-painful shoulders

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Brian T.; Holst, Brian; Infante, John; Poenitzsch, James; Ortiz, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate rotator cuff activity that may be present during grade III distraction and posterior glide mobilization of the glenohumeral (GH) joint, as well as to examine any differences in response between painful and non-painful shoulders utilizing these techniques. Methods EMG data were collected using Delsys EMGworks® software and Trigno® mini-wireless electrodes for the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and upper trapezius musculature during grade III GH distraction and posterior glide mobilization. A total of 20 shoulders (10 painful, 10 non-painful) were recruited from a sample of convenience. Submaximal voluntary dynamic contraction against gravity was used as reference for each of the three selected muscles. Participants underwent two trials of each mobilization, and the mean results for each group were assessed using descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation) and effect size. Results Both the painful and non-painful groups exhibited considerable levels of rotator cuff activity during each test parameter, with the painful group consistently generating higher supraspinatus and infraspinatus RMS and peak force activity. Analysis of the peak combined rotator cuff activity during distraction (d = 0.58) and posterior glides (d = 0.64) suggests moderate-to-high practical significance of the results. Discussion GH distraction and posterior glide mobilizations have traditionally been thought of as passive treatment procedures. The results of this pilot study indicate that the supraspinatus and infraspinatus are significantly active during these techniques. Findings suggest that during these techniques, the total infra/supraspinatus EMG activity approaches the level produced while raising the arm against gravity. Level of evidence: 2b PMID:27252577

  6. Experimental Studies of Electron Impact Phenomena: (i) Absolute Elastic Differential Cross Section Measurements of Carbon-Monoxide Nitrogen Molecule, and Carbon-Dioxide Using a Refined Relative Flow Technique, (ii) Differential Cross Section Measurements for Excitation of Electronic Levels of Carbon-Monoxide by Electron Impact, (iii) Absolute Total Scattering Cross Section Measurements for Electron Impact on Krypton, Oxygen Molecule, and Carbon-Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanik, Isik

    1988-12-01

    Absolute elastic differential scattering cross sections (DCS) for electron impact on CO, N_2 , and CO_2 in the energy range 20-100 eV and angular range 20^circ -120^circ were measured. A crossed beam scattering geometry was employed and the results were obtained using a relative flow technique in which the DCS of CO and CO_2 were compared directly to the DCS of helium at each angle and energy and the DCS of N_2 was compared directly to the DCS of CO. The results of the elastic DCS of neon are also presented as a check on the experimental procedure. Differential cross section measurements for excitation of the electronic features (a^3Pi , a^'^3Sigma ^+, d^3Delta, and A^1Pi) of CO by electron impact have been carried out by JPL group (Peter Zetner and Sandor Trajmar). These data have been analyzed and differential cross sections were obtained for the impact energies 12.5 eV and 15.0 eV by using a computer unfolding program that employes flux corrected Franck-Condon factors and calibration scheme developed jointly with the JPL group. Details of the routine for extracting the DCS are presented. Absolute total scattering cross section measurements were carried out for electron impact on Kr, O_2 , and CO. The results were obtained using a linear attenuation technique in the 5-300 eV incident energy range. The present results have an assigned error of 3% and generally found to be in good agreement with other experimental data.

  7. Thermal and optical properties of Tb(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III)/Eu(III) co-complexed silicone fluorinated acrylate copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yinfeng; Xie, Hongde; Cai, Haijun; Cai, Peiqing; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2015-07-01

    Tb(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III)/Eu(III) activated silicone fluorinated acrylate (SFA) have been successfully synthesized using the method of semi-continuous emulsion polymerization. The copolymers are characterized by flourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermal gravity analysis (TGA), photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and emission (PL) spectroscopy. The copolymer containing Tb(III) and Eu(III) ions display green and red luminescent colors under UV light excitation, respectively. The TGA curves show the thermal decomposition temperatures of the copolymers are up to about 300 °C. The PL spectra show a strong green emission at 546 nm (5D4 → 7F5) of Tb(III) complexed copolymers, and show a prominent red emission at 615 nm (5D0 → 7F2) of Eu(III) complexed copolymers. Different concentrations of Eu(III) and Tb(III) ions are introduced into the copolymer and the energy transfer from Tb(III) to Eu(III) ions in the copolymer was found. Thus, based on the results it can be suggested that SFA:Eu(III), SFA:Tb(III) and SFA:Tb(III)/Eu(III) can be used potentially as luminescent materials.

  8. Characterization by temperature-programmed reduction and by temperature-programmed oxidation (TPR-TPO) of chromium (III) oxide-based catalysts: Correlation with the catalytic activity for hydrofluoroalkane synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brunet, S.; Requieme, B.; Matouba, E.; Barrault, J.; Blanchard, M.

    1995-03-01

    The catalytic activity of chromium (III) oxide for the fluorination of CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}Cl (HCFC 133a) is proportional to the number of reversibly oxidized sites. The proportionality coefficient depends on the atmosphere employed during the pretreatment of the catalyst. The temperature-programmed reduction and temperature-programmed oxidation experiments constitute a simple technique that allows the number of reversibly oxidized chromium atoms to be measured. The method of preparation of the chromium hydroxide has little effect on the catalytic properties of chromium (III) oxide. The activation atmosphere and the temperature are essential parameters in the formation of chromium (III) oxide from hydroxide. Indeed, the most active chromium (III) oxide for the fluorination of CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}Cl is obtained by thermal treatment of hydroxide at 380{degrees}C under nitrogen. 20 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Type III secretion system expression in oxygen-limited Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures is stimulated by isocitrate lyase activity

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jade C. S.; Rzhepishevska, Olena; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Welch, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen and a common cause of chronic infections in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Oxygen limitation was recently reported to regulate the expression of a major virulence determinant in P. aeruginosa, the type III secretion system (T3SS). Here, we show that expression of the T3SS in oxygen-limited growth conditions is strongly dependent on the glyoxylate shunt enzyme, isocitrate lyase (ICL; encoded by aceA), which was previously shown to be highly expressed in CF isolates. ICL-dependent regulation of the T3SS did not alter the expression level of the master transcriptional regulator, ExsA, but did affect expression of the T3 structural proteins, effectors and regulators (ExsC, ExsD and ExsE). An aceA mutant displayed enhanced biofilm formation during anaerobic growth, which suggested that AceA-dependent modulation of type III secretion might impinge upon the RetS/LadS signalling pathways. Indeed, our data suggest that RetS is able to mediate some of its effects through AceA, as expression of aceA in trans partially restored T3SS expression in a retS mutant. Our findings indicate that AceA is a key player in the metabolic regulation of T3SS expression during oxygen-limited growth of P. aeruginosa. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that the T3SS can be regulated by factors that do not affect ExsA expression levels. PMID:23363478

  10. CO2/ethylene oxide copolymerization and ligand variation for a highly active salen-cobalt(III) complex tethering 4 quaternary ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong Yeob; Lee, Jung Jae; Varghese, Jobi Kodiyan; Na, Sung Jae; Sujith, S; Go, Min Jeong; Lee, Junseong; Ok, Myung-Ahn; Lee, Bun Yeoul

    2013-07-07

    A cobalt(III) complex (1) of a salcy-type ligand tethering 4 quaternary ammonium salts, which is thought to act as a highly active catalyst for CO2/propylene oxide (PO) copolymerization, also shows high activity (TOF, 25,900 h(-1); TON, 518,000; 2.72 kg polymer per g cat) and selectivity (>98%) for CO2/ethylene oxide (EO) copolymerization that results in high-molecular-weight polymers (M(n), 200,000-300,000) that have strictly alternating repeating units. The related cobalt(III) complexes 11-14 were prepared through variations of the ligand framework of 1 by replacing the trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane unit with 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine, trans-1,2-diaminocyclopentane, or 1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diamine or by replacing the aldimine bond with ketimine. These ligand frameworks are thought to favour the formation of the cis-β configuration in complexation, and the formation of the cis-β configuration in 11-14 was confirmed through NMR studies or X-ray crystallographic studies of model complexes not bearing the quaternary ammonium salts. Complexes 11, 13, and 14, which adopt the cis-β configuration even in DMSO did not show any activity for CO2/PO copolymerization. Complex 12, which was constructed with trans-1,2-diaminocyclopentane and fluctuated in DMSO between the coordination and de-coordination of the acetate ligand as observed for 1, showed fairly high activity (TOF, 12,400 h(-1)). This fluctuating behaviour may play a role in polymerization. However, complex 12 did not compete with 1 in terms of activity, selectivity, and the catalyst cost.

  11. The random-coil 'C' fragment of the dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop can activate or inhibit native skeletal ryanodine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Haarmann, Claudia S; Green, Daniel; Casarotto, Marco G; Laver, Derek R; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2003-01-01

    The actions of peptide C, corresponding to (724)Glu-Pro(760) of the II-III loop of the skeletal dihydropyridine receptor, on ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels incorporated into lipid bilayers with the native sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane show that the peptide is a high-affinity activator of native skeletal RyRs at cytoplasmic concentrations of 100 nM-10 microM. In addition, we found that peptide C inhibits RyRs in a voltage-independent manner when added for longer times or at higher concentrations (up to 150 microM). Peptide C had a random-coil structure indicating that it briefly assumes a variety of structures, some of which might activate and others which might inhibit RyRs. The results suggest that RyR activation and inhibition by peptide C arise from independent stochastic processes. A rate constant of 7.5 x 10(5) s(-1).M(-1) was obtained for activation and a lower estimate for the rate constant for inhibition of 5.9 x 10(3) s(-1).M(-1). The combined actions of peptide C and peptide A (II-III loop sequence (671)Thr-Leu(690)) showed that peptide C prevented activation but not blockage of RyRs by peptide A. We suggest that the effects of peptide C indicate functional interactions between a part of the dihydropyridine receptor and the RyR. These interactions could reflect either dynamic changes that occur during excitation-contraction coupling or interactions between the proteins at rest. PMID:12620094

  12. Retooling Manganese(III) Porphyrin-Based Peroxynitrite Decomposition Catalysts for Selectivity and Oral Activity: A Potential New Strategy for Treating Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Rausaria, Smita; Ghaffari, Mahsa M.E.; Kamadulski, Andrew; Rodgers, Kenny; Bryant, Leesa; Chen, Zhoumou; Doyle, Tim; Shaw, Michael J.; Salvemini, Daniela; Neumann, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Redox-active metalloporphyrins represent the most well characterized class of catalysts capable of attenuating oxidative stress in vivo through the direct interception and decomposition of superoxide and peroxynitrite. While many interesting pharmacological probes have emerged from these studies, few catalysts have been developed with pharmaceutical properties in mind. Herein we describe our efforts to identify new Mn(III)-porphyrin systems with enhanced membrane solubilizing properties. To this end seven new Mn(III)-tetracyclohexenylporphyin (TCHP) analogues 7, 10, 12, 15, 16a–c have been prepared in which the beta-fused cyclohexenyl rings provide a means to shield the charged metal center from the membrane during passive transport. Compounds 7, 15, and 16a–c have been shown to be orally active and potent analgesics in a model of carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia. In addition oral administration of compound 7 (10–100 mg/kg, n = 5) has been shown to dose dependently reverse mechano-allodynia in the CCI model of chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:22082008

  13. Aquasoluble iron(III)-arylhydrazone-β-diketone complexes: structure and catalytic activity for the peroxidative oxidation of C5-C8 cycloalkanes.

    PubMed

    Kopylovich, Maximilian N; Mac Leod, Tatiana C O; Haukka, Matti; Amanullayeva, Gunel I; Mahmudov, Kamran T; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2012-10-01

    The aquasoluble Fe(III) complexes [Fe(H(2)O)(3)(L(1))]∙4H(2)O (3) and [Fe(H(2)O)(3)(L(2))]∙3H(2)O (4), bearing the basic forms of 5-chloro-3-(2-(4,4-dimethyl-2,6-dioxocyclohexylidene)hydrazinyl)-2-hydroxy-benzenesulfonic acid (H(3)L(1), 1) and 3-(2-(2,4-dioxopentan-3-ylidene)hydrazinyl)-2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzenesulfonic acid (H(3)L(2), 2), were synthesized and fully characterized including by X-ray crystal structural analysis. In the channels of the water-soluble 3D networks of 3 and 4, the uncoordinated water molecules are held by oxygen atoms of the carbonyl and sulfonyl groups, and by the water ligands. The Fe(III) coordination environment resembles that in the active sites of some mononuclear non-heme iron-containing enzymes. The complexes show a high catalytic activity for the peroxidative oxidation (with aqueous H(2)O(2)) of C(5)-C(8) cycloalkanes to the corresponding alcohols and ketones under mild conditions. The effects of various factors, such as amounts of oxidant, catalyst and HNO(3) additive, were investigated allowing to reach overall yields of ca. 25% and turnover numbers (TONs) up to 290. The catalytic reactions proceed via both oxygen- and carbon-radicals as shown by radical trap experiments.

  14. Retooling manganese(III) porphyrin-based peroxynitrite decomposition catalysts for selectivity and oral activity: a potential new strategy for treating chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Rausaria, Smita; Ghaffari, Mahsa M E; Kamadulski, Andrew; Rodgers, Kenny; Bryant, Leesa; Chen, Zhoumou; Doyle, Tim; Shaw, Michael J; Salvemini, Daniela; Neumann, William L

    2011-12-22

    Redox-active metalloporphyrins represent the most well-characterized class of catalysts capable of attenuating oxidative stress in vivo through the direct interception and decomposition of superoxide and peroxynitrite. While many interesting pharmacological probes have emerged from these studies, few catalysts have been developed with pharmaceutical properties in mind. Herein, we describe our efforts to identify new Mn(III)-porphyrin systems with enhanced membrane solubilizing properties. To this end, seven new Mn(III)-tetracyclohexenylporphyin (TCHP) analogues, 7, 10, 12, 15, and 16a-c, have been prepared in which the beta-fused cyclohexenyl rings provide a means to shield the charged metal center from the membrane during passive transport. Compounds 7, 15, and 16a-c have been shown to be orally active and potent analgesics in a model of carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia. In addition, oral administration of compound 7 (10-100 mg/kg, n=5) has been shown to dose dependently reverse mechano-allodynia in the CCI model of chronic neuropathic pain.

  15. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy activity of (5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-(4-carboxyphenycarbonoimidoyl)phenyl)porphyrinato) chloro gallium(III).

    PubMed

    Managa, Muthumuni; Amuhaya, Edith K; Nyokong, Tebello

    2015-12-05

    (5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(4-(4-carboxyphenycarbonoimidoyl)phenyl)porphyrinato) chloro gallium(III) (complex 1) was conjugated to platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) (represented as 1-PtNPs). The resulting conjugate showed 18 nm red shift in the Soret band when compared to 1 alone. Complex 1 and 1-PtNPs showed promising photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans in solution where the log reductions obtained were 4.92, 3.76, and 3.95, respectively for 1-PtNPs. The singlet oxygen quantum yields obtained were higher at 0.56 for 1-PtNPs in DMF while that of 1 was 0.52 in the same solvent. This resulted in improved PACT activity for 1-PtNPs compared to 1 alone.

  16. Active voltage contrast imaging of cross-sectional surface of multilayer ceramic capacitor using helium ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, C.; Ishida, N.; Masuda, H.; Nagano, S.; Kitahara, M.; Ogata, Y.; Fujita, D.

    2016-08-01

    We studied active voltage contrast (AVC) imaging using helium ion microscopy (HIM). We observed secondary electron (SE) images of the cross-sectional surface of multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) with and without a voltage applied to the internal electrodes. When no voltage was applied, we obtained an image reflecting the material contrast between the Ni internal electrode region and the BaTiO3 dielectric region of the cross-sectional surface of the MLCC. When a voltage was applied, the electrical potential difference between the grounded and the positively biased internal electrodes affected the contrast (voltage contrast). Moreover, attenuation of the SE intensity from the grounded to the positively biased internal electrodes was observed in the dielectric region. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements of the contact potential difference (CPD) were performed on the same sample. By using the AVC image from the HIM observation and the CPD image from the KPFM measurement, we could quantitatively evaluate the electrical potential. We think that the results of this study will lead to an expansion in the number of applications of HIM.

  17. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  18. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  19. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  20. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  1. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  2. Extension of activation cross section data of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on rhodium up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.

    2015-11-01

    In the frame of the systematical study of light ion induced nuclear reactions activation cross sections for deuteron induced reactions on monoisotopic 103Rh were extended to 50 MeV incident energy. Excitation functions were measured in the 49.8-36.6 MeV energy range for the 103Rh(d,xn)100,101Pd, 103Rh(d,pxn)99m,99g,100,101m,101g,102m,102gRh and 103Rh(d,x)97,103Ru reactions by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and off-line high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. The experimental results are compared to our previous results and to the theoretical predictions in the TENDL-2014 library (TALYS 1.6 code).

  3. Titanium spallation cross sections between 30 and 584 MeV and Ar-39 activities on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinburnn, F.; Fireman, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    The production cross sections of Ar39 for Ti spallation at 45-, 319-, 433-, and 584-MeV proton energies were measured to be 0.37 + or - 0.09, 12.4 + or - 3.7, 9.1 + or - 2.7, and 17.8 + or - 6.2 mb, respectively. Normalized Ar39 production rates and activities are also derived for protons above 40 MeV and for three differential proton spectra of the type approximately E(- alpha). It is concluded that, even for samples of high-Ti content, Ti spallation by solar protons below 200-MeV energy does not contribute significantly to their Ar39 radioactivity.

  4. Synthesis and self-assembly of spin-labile and redox-active manganese(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Claudio; Cotting, Tatiana; Martinho, Paulo N; Sereda, Olha; Neels, Antonia; Morgan, Grace G; Albrecht, Martin

    2011-03-07

    New amphiphilic and spin-labile Mn(III) complexes based on dianionic N(4)O(2)-hexadentate sal(2)trien or sal(2)bapen ligands, which contain OC(6)H(13), OC(12)H(25), or OC(18)H(37) alkoxy substituents at different positions of the salicylidene unit were prepared (H(2)sal(2)trien = N,N'''-bis(salicylidene)-1,4,7,10-tetraazadecane, H(2)sal(2)bapen = N,N'''-bis(salicylidene)-1,5,8,12-tetraazadodecane). According to electrochemical measurements, these complexes undergo two (quasi)reversible redox processes. Temperature-dependent magnetic measurements revealed a high-spin configuration for all sal(2)trien complexes (S = 2) and gradual spin crossover for sal(2)bapen complexes from high to low spin (S = 1). The chain length strongly influences the spin crossover, as C(18)-functionalization stabilizes the low spin state at much higher temperatures than shorter alkyl chains. Moreover, long alkyl chains allow for spontaneous self-assembly of the molecules, which was investigated in single crystals and in Langmuir-films at the air-water interface. Long alkyl chains (C(12) or C(18)) as well as a mutual syn-orientation of these molecular recognition sites were required for the Langmuir monolayers to be stable.

  5. Visible-light induced photocatalytic activity of electrospun-TiO2 in arsenic(III) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gong; Sun, Meng; Liu, Yang; Lang, Xiufeng; Liu, Limin; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui; Li, Jinghong

    2015-01-14

    In practical implementation of TiO2 semiconductors, utilization of their outstanding properties is mainly hindered by poor material quality and high operational costs. In this contribution, the electrospinning method was employed to fabricate N-doped mixed-crystalline TiO2 with exposed high-energy facets. The Ti oxide transformation process was thoroughly studied. During the mixed crystal structure formation process, the high-energy facets could be preserved due to the lower calcination temperature and the protective role of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in the electrospinning process. In addition, after calcination, the N doping, generated by the decomposition of PVP, extended the absorption spectrum of TiO2 to the visible region. These TiO2 fibers exhibited superior photooxidation of arsenite (III) to arsenate (V)in both the UV and visible light regions, mainly attributed to the exposure of high-energy facets, robust separation of photoexcited charge carriers between the anatase/rutile phases, and narrow band gap induced by the in situ N doping. Combining both robustness and scalability, the TiO2 fibers produced via this electrospinning process have the potential for a broad range of applications.

  6. Hydrothermal synthesis, structure, heterogeneous catalytic activity and photoluminescent properties of a novel homoleptic Sm(III)-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ay, Burak; Yildiz, Emel; Felts, Ashley C.; Abboud, Khalil A.

    2016-12-01

    A novel metal-organic framework, (H2pip)n[Sm2(pydc)4(H2O)2]n (1) (H2pydc=2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, H2pip=piperazine) has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and characterized by the elemental analysis, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometer, fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). The structure of 1 was determined to be three-dimensional, linked along Sm-O-Sm chains. The asymmetric unit consisted of one singly anionic fragment consisting of Sm(III) coordinated to two H2pydc ligands and one water, and one half of a protonated H2pip, which sits on an inversion center. 1 exhibited luminescence emission bands at 534 nm at room temperature when excited at 440 nm. Its thermal behavior and catalytic performance were investigated and the selectivity was measured as 100% for the oxidation of thymol to thymoquinone.

  7. Physical activity and self-reported health status among adolescents: a cross-sectional population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Galán, I; Boix, R; Medrano, M J; Ramos, P; Rivera, F; Pastor-Barriuso, R; Moreno, C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about the dose–response relationship between physical activity and health benefits among young people. Our objective was to analyse the association between the frequency of undertaking moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and the self-reported health status of the adolescent population. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting All regions of Spain. Participants Students aged 11–18 years participating in the Spanish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey 2006. A total of 375 schools and 21 188 students were selected. Main outcomes The frequency of undertaking MVPA was measured by a questionnaire, with the following four health indicators: self-rated health, health complaints, satisfaction with life and health-related quality of life. Linear and logistic regression models were used to analyse the association, adjusting for potential confounding variables and the modelling of the dose–response relationship. Results As the frequency of MVPA increased, the association with health benefits was stronger. A linear trend (p<0.05) was found for self-rated health and health complaints in males and females and for satisfaction with life among females; for health-related quality of life this relationship was quadratic for both sexes (p<0.05). For self-reported health and health complaints, the effect was found to be of greater magnitude in males than in females and, in all scales, the benefits were observed from the lowest frequencies of MVPA, especially in males. Conclusions A protective effect of MVPA was found in both sexes for the four health indicators studied, and this activity had a gradient effect. Among males, health benefits were detected from very low levels of physical activity and the magnitude of the relationship was greater than that for females. PMID:23676798

  8. Intraclass correlation and design effect in BMI, physical activity and diet: a cross-sectional study of 56 countries

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Mohd; Reidpath, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Measuring the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and design effect (DE) may help to modify the public health interventions for body mass index (BMI), physical activity and diet according to geographic targeting of interventions in different countries. The purpose of this study was to quantify the level of clustering and DE in BMI, physical activity and diet in 56 low-income, middle-income and high-income countries. Design Cross-sectional study design. Setting Multicountry national survey data. Methods The World Health Survey (WHS), 2003, data were used to examine clustering in BMI, physical activity in metabolic equivalent of task (MET) and diet in fruits and vegetables intake (FVI) from low-income, middle-income and high-income countries. Multistage sampling in the WHS used geographical clusters as primary sampling units (PSU). These PSUs were used as a clustering or grouping variable in this analysis. Multilevel intercept only regression models were used to calculate the ICC and DE for each country. Results The median ICC (0.039) and median DE (1.82) for BMI were low; however, FVI had a higher median ICC (0.189) and median DE (4.16). For MET, the median ICC was 0.141 and median DE was 4.59. In some countries, however, the ICC and DE for BMI were large. For instance, South Africa had the highest ICC (0.39) and DE (11.9) for BMI, whereas Uruguay had the highest ICC (0.434) for MET and Ethiopia had the highest ICC (0.471) for FVI. Conclusions This study shows that across a wide range of countries, there was low area level clustering for BMI, whereas MET and FVI showed high area level clustering. These results suggested that the country level clustering effect should be considered in developing preventive approaches for BMI, as well as improving physical activity and healthy diets for each country. PMID:26743697

  9. Learning about Animals. Superific Science Book III. A Good Apple Science Activity Book for Grades 5-8+.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Lorraine

    Designed to arouse interest in students about animals, this document was developed to provide teachers with a variety of information and teaching activities. The booklet is intended to enable students to become knowledgeable about science concepts relating to animals without the use of expensive equipment. The teaching activities deal with: (1)…

  10. A Dibasic Amino Acid Pair Conserved in the Activation Loop Directs Plasma Membrane Localization and Is Necessary for Activity of Plant Type I/II Phosphatidylinositol Phosphate Kinase1[W

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Koji; Saavedra, Laura; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Uji, Toshiki; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Sommarin, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK) is an enzyme involved in the regulation of cellular levels of phosphoinositides involved in various physiological processes, such as cytoskeletal organization, ion channel activation, and vesicle trafficking. In animals, research has focused on the modes of activation and function of PIPKs, providing an understanding of the importance of plasma membrane localization. However, it still remains unclear how this issue is regulated in plant PIPKs. Here, we demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal catalytic domain, which contains the activation loop, is sufficient for plasma membrane localization of PpPIPK1, a type I/II B PIPK from the moss Physcomitrella patens. The importance of the carboxyl-terminal catalytic domain for plasma membrane localization was confirmed with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AtPIP5K1. Our findings, in which substitution of a conserved dibasic amino acid pair in the activation loop of PpPIPK1 completely prevented plasma membrane targeting and abolished enzymatic activity, demonstrate its critical role in these processes. Placing our results in the context of studies of eukaryotic PIPKs led us to conclude that the function of the dibasic amino acid pair in the activation loop in type I/II PIPKs is plant specific. PMID:20427464

  11. Characterization of noncovalent complexes of antimalarial agents of the artemisinin-type and FE(III)-heme by electrospray mass spectrometry and collisional activation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pashynska, Vlada A; Van den Heuvel, Hilde; Claeys, Magda; Kosevich, Marina V

    2004-08-01

    In this study, we demonstrate, using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/CID/MS), that stable noncovalent complexes can be formed between Fe(III)-heme and antimalarial agents, i.e., quinine, artemisinin, and the artemisinin derivatives, dihydroartemisinin, alpha- and beta-artemether, and beta-arteether. Differences in the binding behavior of the examined drugs with Fe(III)-heme and the stability of the drug-heme complexes are demonstrated. The results show that all tested antimalarial agents form a drug-heme complex with a 1:1 stoichiometry but that quinine also results in a second complex with the heme dimer. ESI-MS performed on mixtures of pairs of various antimalarial agents with heme indicate that quinine binds preferentially to Fe(III)-heme, while ESI-MS/CID/MS shows that the quinine-heme complex is nearly two times more stable than the complexes formed between heme and artemisinin or its derivatives. Moreover, it is found that dihydroartemisinin, the active metabolite of the artemisinin-type drugs in vivo, results in a Na(+)-containing heme-drug complex, which is as stable as the heme-quinine complex. The efficiency of drug-heme binding of artemisinin derivatives is generally lower and the decomposition under CID higher compared with quinine, but these parameters are within the same order of magnitude. These results suggest that the efficiency of antimalarial agents of the artemisinin-type to form noncovalent complexes with Fe(III)-heme is comparable with that of the traditional antimalarial agent, quinine. Our study illustrates that electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry are suitable tools to probe noncovalent interactions between heme and antimalarial agents. The results obtained provide insights into the underlying molecular modes of action of the traditional antimalarial agent quinine and of the antimalarials of

  12. Enhanced anti-diabetic activity of a combination of chromium(III) malate complex and propolis and its acute oral toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang-Yang; Li, Fang; Zhao, Ting; Mao, Guang-Hua; Li, Jing; Qu, Hong-Yuan; Ren, Yue-Na; Yang, Liu-Qing

    2012-07-01

    In order to obtain the additional benefit of anti-diabetic activity and protective effects of liver injury for diabetes, the anti-diabetic effect and acute oral toxicity of a combination of chromium(III) malate complex (Cr(2)(LMA)(3)) and propolis were assessed. The anti-diabetic activity of the combination of the Cr(2)LMA(3) and propolis was compared with Cr(2)(LMA)(3) and propolis alone in alloxan-induced diabetic mice by daily oral gavage for a period of 2 weeks. Acute oral toxicity of the combination of the Cr(2)LMA(3) and propolis was tested using ICR mice at the dose of 1.0-5.0 g/kg body mass by a single oral gavage and observed for a period of 2 weeks. The results of the anti-diabetic activity of the combination from the aspects of blood glucose level, liver glycogen level, and the activities of aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase indicated that the increased anti-diabetic activity and the protective efficacy of liver injury for diabetes were observed. In acute toxicity study, LD(50) (median lethal dose) value for the combination was greater than 5.0 g/kg body mass. The combination of Cr(2)LMA(3) and propolis might represent the nutritional supplement with potential therapeutic value to control blood glucose and exhibit protective efficacy of liver injury for diabetes and non-toxicity in acute toxicity.

  13. Activation in Context: Differential Conclusions Drawn from Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Analyses of Adolescents' Cognitive Control-Related Neural Activity.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Ethan M; Qu, Yang; Telzer, Eva H

    2017-01-01

    Although immature cognitive control, subserved by late-developing prefrontal regions, has been proposed to underlie increased risk taking during adolescence, it remains unclear what patterns of PFC activation represent mature brain states: more or less activation? One challenge to drawing cogent conclusions from extant work stems from its reliance on single-time point neuroimaging and cross-sectional comparisons, which are ill-suited for assessing the complex changes that characterize adolescence. This necessitates longitudinal fMRI work to track within-subject changes in PFC function and links to risk-taking behavior, which can serve as an external marker for maturation of neural systems involved in cognitive control. In the current study, 20 healthy adolescents (13 males) completed a go/nogo task during two fMRI scans, once at age 14 years and again at age 15 years. We found that the association between cognitive control-related VLPFC activation and risk-taking behavior reversed when examining wave 1 (W1) versus longitudinal change (W2 > W1) and wave 2 (W2) in neural activation, such that increased VLPFC activation at W1 was associated with lower risk taking, whereas longitudinal increases in cognitive control-related VLPFC activation as well as heightened VLPFC activation at W2 were associated with greater risk taking. Several steps were taken to disentangle potential alternative accounts that might explain these disparate results across time. Findings highlight the necessity of considering brain-behavior relationships in the context of ongoing developmental changes and suggests that using neuroimaging data at a single time point to predict behavioral changes can introduce interpretation errors when failing to account for changes in neural trajectories.

  14. Activation in Context: Differential Conclusions Drawn from Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Analyses of Adolescents’ Cognitive Control-Related Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Ethan M.; Qu, Yang; Telzer, Eva H.

    2017-01-01

    Although immature cognitive control, subserved by late-developing prefrontal regions, has been proposed to underlie increased risk taking during adolescence, it remains unclear what patterns of PFC activation represent mature brain states: more or less activation? One challenge to drawing cogent conclusions from extant work stems from its reliance on single-time point neuroimaging and cross-sectional comparisons, which are ill-suited for assessing the complex changes that characterize adolescence. This necessitates longitudinal fMRI work to track within-subject changes in PFC function and links to risk-taking behavior, which can serve as an external marker for maturation of neural systems involved in cognitive control. In the current study, 20 healthy adolescents (13 males) completed a go/nogo task during two fMRI scans, once at age 14 years and again at age 15 years. We found that the association between cognitive control-related VLPFC activation and risk-taking behavior reversed when examining wave 1 (W1) versus longitudinal change (W2 > W1) and wave 2 (W2) in neural activation, such that increased VLPFC activation at W1 was associated with lower risk taking, whereas longitudinal increases in cognitive control-related VLPFC activation as well as heightened VLPFC activation at W2 were associated with greater risk taking. Several steps were taken to disentangle potential alternative accounts that might explain these disparate results across time. Findings highlight the necessity of considering brain-behavior relationships in the context of ongoing developmental changes and suggests that using neuroimaging data at a single time point to predict behavioral changes can introduce interpretation errors when failing to account for changes in neural trajectories. PMID:28392763

  15. Residents of highly walkable neighbourhoods in Canadian urban areas do substantially more physical activity: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thielman, Justin; Manson, Heather; Chiu, Maria; Copes, Ray; Rosella, Laura C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research has shown that neighbourhood walkability is associated with small differences in physical activity; however, the health impacts of these small differences have been questioned. We examined the size of the association of walkability with accelerometer-measured physical activity in a large, national-level Canadian population, and compared results to physical activity levels recommended in international guidelines. Our primary objective was to investigate the direction and size of the differences in physical activity that were related to walkability, and whether these differences depended on age. Methods: Participants were included from among respondents to the 2007-2011 Canadian Health Measures Surveys who lived in urban areas and were aged 6-79 years. The Canadian Health Measures Surveys are ongoing cross-sectional surveys of a Canada-wide population. Respondents were divided into quintiles based on Street Smart Walk Score® values of their census dissemination areas. For all respondents and age subgroups, we used covariate-adjusted generalized linear models to estimate differences between quintiles in accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time. Results: We included 7180 respondents. Differences in participant MVPA between highest and lowest Street Smart Walk Score quintiles were 3.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] -3.2 to 9.6) minutes/day for ages 6-11 years, 11.4 (95% CI 5.3 to 17.4) minutes/day for ages 12-17 years, 9.9 (95% CI 2.4 to 17.4) minutes/day for ages 18-29 years, 14.9 (95% CI 10.2 to 19.6) minutes/day for ages 30-44 years, 11.5 (95% CI 6.7 to 16.3) minutes/day for ages 45-64 years and 6.9 (95% CI 3.1 to 10.8) minutes/day for ages 65-79 years. There were no significant differences in sedentary time in any age group. Interpretation: In all groups except the youngest, participants in the most walkable areas did significantly more MVPA than those in the least walkable areas. For several age

  16. In Situ Measurement of Fe(III) Reduction Activity of Geobacter pelophilus by Simultaneous in Situ RT-PCR and XPS Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-16

    Geobacter pelophilus is capable of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reduction on solid phase Fe(III)-oxides by means of surface attachment and direct electron...expression, and mineral transformation by this organism. The gene fer A ( Geobacter sulfurreducens outer membrane Fe(III) reductase cytochrome c) was

  17. Identification of novel macrolides with antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and type I and III IFN-augmenting activity in airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Porter, James D.; Watson, Jennifer; Roberts, Lee R.; Gill, Simren K.; Groves, Helen; Dhariwal, Jaideep; Almond, Mark H.; Wong, Ernie; Walton, Ross P.; Jones, Lyn H.; Tregoning, John; Kilty, Iain; Johnston, Sebastian L.; Edwards, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Exacerbations of asthma and COPD are triggered by rhinoviruses. Uncontrolled inflammatory pathways, pathogenic bacterial burden and impaired antiviral immunity are thought to be important factors in disease severity and duration. Macrolides including azithromycin are often used to treat the above diseases, but exhibit variable levels of efficacy. Inhaled corticosteroids are also readily used in treatment, but may lack specificity. Ideally, new treatment alternatives should suppress unwanted inflammation, but spare beneficial antiviral immunity. Methods In the present study, we screened 225 novel macrolides and tested them for enhanced antiviral activity against rhinovirus, as well as anti-inflammatory activity and activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Primary bronchial epithelial cells were grown from 10 asthmatic individuals and the effects of macrolides on rhinovirus replication were also examined. Another 30 structurally similar macrolides were also examined. Results The oleandomycin derivative Mac5, compared with azithromycin, showed superior induction (up to 5-fold, EC50 = 5–11 μM) of rhinovirus-induced type I IFNβ, type III IFNλ1 and type III IFNλ2/3 mRNA and the IFN-stimulated genes viperin and MxA, yet had no effect on IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA. Mac5 also suppressed rhinovirus replication at 48 h, proving antiviral activity. Mac5 showed antibacterial activity against Gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae; however, it did not have any antibacterial properties compared with azithromycin when used against Gram-negative Escherichia coli (as a model organism) and also the respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. Further non-toxic Mac5 derivatives were identified with various anti-inflammatory, antiviral and antibacterial activities. Conclusions The data support the idea that macrolides have antiviral properties through a mechanism that is yet to be ascertained. We also provide

  18. Rh(III)-catalyzed synthesis of sultones through C-H activation directed by a sulfonic acid group.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zisong; Wang, Mei; Li, Xingwei

    2014-09-04

    A new rhodium-catalyzed synthesis of sultones via the oxidative coupling of sulfonic acids with internal alkynes is described. The reaction proceeds via aryl C-H activation assisted by a sulfonic acid group.

  19. Neighbourhoods for Active Kids: study protocol for a cross-sectional examination of neighbourhood features and children's physical activity, active travel, independent mobility and body size

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Melody; McPhee, Julia; Carroll, Penelope; Ikeda, Erika; Mavoa, Suzanne; Mackay, Lisa; Kearns, Robin A; Kyttä, Marketta; Asiasiga, Lanuola; Garrett, Nicholas; Lin, Judy; Mackett, Roger; Zinn, Caryn; Moewaka Barnes, Helen; Egli, Victoria; Prendergast, Kate; Witten, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction New Zealand children's physical activity, including independent mobility and active travel, has declined markedly over recent decades. The Neighbourhoods for Active Kids (NfAK) study examines how neighbourhood built environments are associated with the independent mobility, active travel, physical activity and neighbourhood experiences of children aged 9–12 years in primary and intermediate schools across Auckland, New Zealand's largest city. Methods and analysis Child-specific indices of walkability, destination accessibility and traffic exposure will be constructed to measure the built environment in 8 neighbourhoods in Auckland. Interactive online-mapping software will be used to measure children's independent mobility and transport mode to destinations and to derive measures of neighbourhood use and perceptions. Physical activity will be measured using 7-day accelerometry. Height, weight and waist circumference will be objectively measured. Parent telephone interviews will collect sociodemographic information and parent neighbourhood perceptions. Interviews with school representative will capture supports and barriers for healthy activity and nutrition behaviours at the school level. Multilevel modelling approaches will be used to understand how differing built environment variables are associated with activity, neighbourhood experiences and health outcomes. Discussion We anticipate that children who reside in neighbourhoods considered highly walkable will be more physically active, accumulate more independent mobility and active travel, and be more likely to have a healthy body size. This research is timely as cities throughout New Zealand develop and implement plans to improve the liveability of intensifying urban neighbourhoods. Results will be disseminated to participants, local government agencies and through conventional academic avenues. PMID:27531740

  20. Activity of antifungal organobismuth(III) compounds derived from alkyl aryl ketones against S. cerevisiae: comparison with a heterocyclic bismuth scaffold consisting of a diphenyl sulfone.

    PubMed

    Murafuji, Toshihiro; Tomura, Mai; Ishiguro, Katsuya; Miyakawa, Isamu

    2014-07-29

    A series of hypervalent organobismuth(III) compounds derived from alkyl aryl ketones [XBi(5-R'C6H3-2-COR)(Ar)] was synthesized to investigate the effect of the compounds' structural features on their antifungal activity against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to bismuth heterocycles [XBi(5-RC6H3-2-SO2C6H4-1'-)] derived from diphenyl sulfones, a systematic quantitative structure-activity relationship study was possible. The activity depended on the Ar group and increased for heavier X atoms, whereas lengthening the alkyl chain (R) or introducing a substituent (R') reduced the activity. IBi(C6H4-2-COCH3)(4-FC6H4) was the most active. Its activity was superior to that of the related acyclic analogues ClBi[C6H4-2-CH2N(CH3)2](Ar) and ClBi(C6H4-2-SO2 tert-Bu)(Ar) and also comparable to that of heterocyclic ClBi(C6H4-2-SO2C6H4-1'-), which was the most active compound in our previous studies. Density function theory calculations suggested that hypervalent bismuthanes undergo nucleophilic addition with a biomolecule at the bismuth atom to give an intermediate ate complex. For higher antifungal activity, adjusting the lipophilicity-hydrophilicity balance, modeling the three-dimensional molecular structure around the bismuth atom, and stabilizing the ate complex appear to be more important than tuning the Lewis acidity at the bismuth atom.

  1. Interest and preferences for using advanced physical activity tracking devices: results of a national cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Alley, Stephanie; Schoeppe, Stephanie; Guertler, Diana; Jennings, Cally; Vandelanotte, Corneel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pedometers are an effective self-monitoring tool to increase users' physical activity. However, a range of advanced trackers that measure physical activity 24 hours per day have emerged (eg, Fitbit). The current study aims to determine people's current use, interest and preferences for advanced trackers. Design and participants A cross-sectional national telephone survey was conducted in Australia with 1349 respondents. Outcome measures Regression analyses were used to determine whether tracker interest and use, and use of advanced trackers over pedometers is a function of demographics. Preferences for tracker features and reasons for not wanting to wear a tracker are also presented. Results Over one-third of participants (35%) had used a tracker, and 16% are interested in using one. Multinomial regression (n=1257) revealed that the use of trackers was lower in males (OR=0.48, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.65), non-working participants (OR=0.43, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.61), participants with lower education (OR=0.52, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.72) and inactive participants (OR=0.52, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.70). Interest in using a tracker was higher in younger participants (OR=1.73, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.58). The most frequently used tracker was a pedometer (59%). Logistic regression (n=445) revealed that use of advanced trackers compared with pedometers was higher in males (OR=1.67, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.79) and younger participants (OR=2.96, 95% CI 1.71 to 5.13), and lower in inactive participants (OR=0.35, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.63). Over half of current or interested tracker users (53%) prefer to wear it on their wrist, 31% considered counting steps the most important function and 30% regarded accuracy as the most important characteristic. The main reasons for not wanting to use a tracker were, ‘I don't think it would help me’ (39%), and ‘I don't want to increase my activity’ (47%). Conclusions Activity trackers are a promising tool to engage people in self-monitoring a physical activity

  2. Fundamental movement skills and physical activity among children living in low-income communities: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although previous studies have demonstrated that children with high levels of fundamental movement skill competency are more active throughout the day, little is known regarding children’s fundamental movement skill competency and their physical activity during key time periods of the school day (i.e., lunchtime, recess and after-school). The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between fundamental movement skill competency and objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) throughout the school day among children attending primary schools in low-income communities. Methods Eight primary schools from low-income communities and 460 children (8.5 ± 0.6 years, 54% girls) were involved in the study. Children’s fundamental movement skill competency (TGMD-2; 6 locomotor and 6 object-control skills), objectively measured physical activity (ActiGraph GT3X and GT3X + accelerometers), height, weight and demographics were assessed. Multilevel linear mixed models were used to assess the cross-sectional associations between fundamental movement skills and MVPA. Results After adjusting for age, sex, BMI and socio-economic status, locomotor skill competency was positively associated with total (P = 0.002, r = 0.15) and after-school (P = 0.014, r = 0.13) MVPA. Object-control skill competency was positively associated with total (P < 0.001, r = 0.20), lunchtime (P = 0.03, r = 0.10), recess (P = 0.006, r = 0.11) and after-school (P = 0.022, r = 0.13) MVPA. Conclusions Object-control skill competency appears to be a better predictor of children’s MVPA during school-based physical activity opportunities than locomotor skill competency. Improving fundamental movement skill competency, particularly object-control skills, may contribute to increased levels of children’s MVPA throughout the day. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry No: ACTRN

  3. The CRISPR/Cas9 system targeting EGFR exon 17 abrogates NF-κB activation via epigenetic modulation of UBXN1 in EGFRwt/vIII glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Yang, Chao; Wang, Qi-Xue; Li, Yan-Sheng; Fang, Chuan; Tan, Yan-Li; Wei, Jian-Wei; Wang, Yun-Fei; Li, Xin; Zhou, Jun-Hu; Zhou, Bing-Cong; Yi, Kai-Kai; Zhang, Kai-Liang; Li, Jie; Kang, Chun-Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Worldwide, glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal and frequent intracranial tumor. Despite decades of study, the overall survival of GBM patients remains unchanged. epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification and gene mutation are thought to be negatively correlated with prognosis. In this study, we used proteomics to determine that UBXN1 is a negative downstream regulator of the EGFR mutation vIII (EGFRvIII). Via bioinformatics analysis, we found that UBXN1 is a factor that can improve glioma patients' overall survival time. We also determined that the down-regulation of UBXN1 is mediated by the upregulation of H3K27me3 in the presence of EGFRvIII. Because NF-κB can be negatively regulated by UBXN1, we believe that EGFRwt/vIII activates NF-κB by suppressing UBXN1 expression. Importantly, we used the latest genomic editing tool, CRISPR/Cas9, to knockout EGFRwt/vIII on exon 17 and further proved that UBXN1 is negatively regulated by EGFRwt/vIII. Furthermore, knockout of EGFR/EGFRvIII could benefit GBM in vitro and in vivo, indicating that CRISPR/Cas9 is a promising therapeutic strategy for both EGFR amplification and EGFR mutation-bearing patients.

  4. Cross-sectional and prospective associations between moderate to vigorous physical activity and sedentary time with adiposity in children

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Adilson; Minderico, Cláudia; Martins, Sandra; Palmeira, António; Ekelund, Ulf; Sardinha, Luís B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (SED) have both been suggested as potential risk factors for adiposity in children. However, there is paucity of data examining the temporal associations between these variables. Objective This study aimed to analyze the cross-sectional and prospective associations between PA, SED and body composition in children. Methods 510 children (age at baseline 10.1±0.8, age at follow up 11.8±0.9) from 6 Portuguese schools from the Oeiras Municipality participated in this study. PA and SED were measured by accelerometry and trunk fat mass (TFM) and body fat mass (BFM) were measured by Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Fat mass index (FMI) was calculated as BFM divided by height squared. Several regression models adjusted for age, sex, maturity status, follow-up duration, baseline levels of the outcome variable, and SED or MVPA were performed. Results Moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) (min/d) was cross-sectionally inversely associated with adiposity indexes (FMI, TFM, BFM). Adiposity indexes were inversely associated with time in MVPA. In prospective analyses, MVPA was associated with a lower levels of FMI (β=−0.37, 95% CI: −0.49 to −0.26, p<0.001), TFM (β=−0.20, 95% CI: −0.29 to −0.10, p<0.001), and BFM (β=−0.37, 95% CI: −0.49 to −0.26, p<0.001). When the model was adjusted for age, sex, maturity status and for baseline levels of the outcome variables MVPA remained a significant predictor of lower adiposity indexes (FMI: β=−0.09, 95% CI: −0.16 to −0.01, p<0.05; TFM: β=−0.08, 95% CI: −0.15 to −0.01, p<0.05; BFM: β=−0.07, 95% CI: −0.15 to 0.00, p<0.05). Adiposity was not associated with MVPA when modeled as the exposure in prospective analyses. SED was not related with adiposity indexes, except for the relationship with FMI. Conclusions In cross-sectional and prospective analyses, MVPA is associated with lower adiposity independent of covariates and SED. Results suggest that

  5. Biologically active components from mycobacterial cell walls. III. Production of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Meyer, T J; Azuma, I; Ribi, E E

    1975-02-01

    The efficacy of various fractions of mycobacterial cell walls in producing experimental ahlergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) has been evaluated. BCG (Bacillus-Calmette-Buérin) cell walls were effective in producing EAE in all animals at dose levels as low as 40 mug. Study of subfractions of these cell walls revealed the following: (1) wax D was active, but required larger doses than BCG cell walls; (2) the chloroform-methanol-soluble (CMS) portion of wax D and P3 (a mycolic acid-trehalose ester contained therein) were inactive; (3) the chloroform-methanol-insoluble (CMI) portion of wax D was active; (4) exhaustively delipidated cell wass skeletons of BCG, Nocardia asteroides, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Corynebacterium diphtheriae and M. kansaii were active; (5) two water-soluble adjuvants prepared from mycobacteria were active. These results suggest that the mycobacterial structure responsible for EAE adjuvanticity is present in the organic solvent-insoluble cell wall skeleton framework. The activity of wax D may be due to the presence of cell-wall skeleton constituents which are found in varying quanity in most wax D preparations. Wax D components soluble in a solution of chloroform:methanol (diluted 2:1 v/v) do not produce EAE.

  6. Moderators of intervention dose effects on diet quality and physical activity changes in a church-based, multicomponent, lifestyle study: Delta Body and Soul III.

    PubMed

    Thomson, J L; Zoellner, J M; Tussing-Humphreys, L M; Goodman, M H

    2016-06-01

    Many community-based lifestyle interventions targeting African Americans have reported positive effects on participants' dietary choices and physical activity habits. However, these effects vary and not all participants will have outcome changes. Moderation analysis can help explain differential effects observed, but are not often reported. Hence, the objective of this secondary analysis was to explore potential moderators of intervention dose effects on diet quality and physical activity outcomes in an effective lifestyle intervention. Delta Body and Soul III, conducted from 2011 to 2012, was a 6-month, church-based, multicomponent, educational intervention designed to improve diet quality and increase physical activity in rural Southern African American adults. Generalized linear mixed models were used to determine associations among indicators of intervention dose received by participants, potential moderators and health outcome changes. Results indicated only three baseline characteristics-employment status, food shopping frequency and individual with primary responsibility for meal preparation-moderated the effects of education session attendance on diet quality changes. No evidence for moderation of exercise class attendance effects on physical activity changes was found. Thus, this culturally targeted, multicomponent lifestyle intervention did induce positive health changes in participants with a range of sociodemographic characteristics and food shopping and eating behaviors.

  7. Improved antiparasitic activity by incorporation of organosilane entities into half-sandwich ruthenium(II) and rhodium(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes.

    PubMed

    Adams, Muneebah; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Land, Kirkwood M; Liu, Nicole; Hopper, Melissa; Hsiao, Allyson; Burgoyne, Andrew R; Stringer, Tameryn; Meyer, Mervin; Wiesner, Lubbe; Chibale, Kelly; Smith, Gregory S

    2015-02-07

    A series of ferrocenyl- and aryl-functionalised organosilane thiosemicarbazone compounds was obtained via a nucleophilic substitution reaction with an amine-terminated organosilane. The thiosemicarbazone (TSC) ligands were further reacted with either a ruthenium dimer [(η(6-i)PrC6H4Me)Ru(μ-Cl)Cl]2 or a rhodium dimer [(Cp*)Rh(μ-Cl)Cl]2 to yield a series of cationic mono- and binuclear complexes. The thiosemicarbazone ligands, as well as their metal complexes, were characterised using NMR and IR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. The molecular structure of the binuclear ruthenium(ii) complex was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The thiosemicarbazones and their complexes were evaluated for their in vitro antiplasmodial activities against the chloroquine-sensitive (NF54) and chloroquine-resistant (Dd2) Plasmodium falciparum strains, displaying activities in the low micromolar range. Selected compounds were screened for potential β-haematin inhibition activity, and it was found that two Rh(iii) complexes exhibited moderate to good inhibition. Furthermore, the compounds were screened for their antitrichomonal activities against the G3 Trichomonas vaginalis strain, revealing a higher percentage of growth inhibition for the ruthenium and rhodium complexes over their corresponding ligand.

  8. A Relation between the Mid-Infrared [Ne v] 14.3 Micrometers and [Ne III] 15.6 Micrometer Lines in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorjian, V.; Cleary, K.; Werner, M. W.; Lawrence, C. R.

    2007-01-01

    We present a strong correlation between the [Ne v] 14.3 mm and [Ne III] 15.6 mm emission lines arising from the narrow-line regions (NLRs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), spanning 4 orders of magnitude in luminosity. The data are compiled primarily from Spitzer Space Telescope observations of nearby Seyfert galaxies (median z p 0.01) and 3C radio sources (median z p 0.52). This correlation is consistent with earlier studies in the optical/UV bands showing that line ratios arising in the NLRs are remarkably constant across AGNs. We also show that the correlation allows only a very narrow range in ionization parameter for simple photoionization models. The observed correlation will place tight constraints on alternative models, which predict constant line ratios over a broader range in ionization parameter.

  9. Heterogeneously integrated III-V-on-silicon 2.3x μm distributed feedback lasers based on a type-II active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruijun; Sprengel, Stephan; Malik, Aditya; Vasiliev, Anton; Boehm, Gerhard; Baets, Roel; Amann, Markus-Christian; Roelkens, Gunther

    2016-11-01

    We report on 2.3x μm wavelength InP-based type-II distributed feedback (DFB) lasers heterogeneously integrated on a silicon photonics integrated circuit. In the devices, a III-V epitaxial layer stack with a "W"-shaped InGaAs/GaAsSb multi-quantum-well active region is adhesively bonded to the first-order silicon DFB gratings. Single mode laser emission coupled to a single mode silicon waveguide with a side mode suppression ratio of 40 dB is obtained. In continuous-wave regime, the 2.32 μm laser operates close to room temperature (above 15 °C) and emits more than 1 mW output power with a threshold current density of 1.8 kA/cm2 at 5 °C. A tunable diode laser absorption measurement of CO is demonstrated using this source.

  10. Human MAF1 targets and represses active RNA polymerase III genes by preventing recruitment rather than inducing long-term transcriptional arrest

    PubMed Central

    Orioli, Andrea; Praz, Viviane; Lhôte, Philippe; Hernandez, Nouria

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) is tightly controlled in response to environmental cues, yet a genomic-scale picture of Pol III regulation and the role played by its repressor MAF1 is lacking. Here, we describe genome-wide studies in human fibroblasts that reveal a dynamic and gene-specific adaptation of Pol III recruitment to extracellular signals in an mTORC1-dependent manner. Repression of Pol III recruitment and transcription are tightly linked to MAF1, which selectively localizes at Pol III loci, even under serum-replete conditions, and increasingly targets transcribing Pol III in response to serum starvation. Combining Pol III binding profiles with EU-labeling and high-throughput sequencing of newly synthesized small RNAs, we show that Pol III occupancy closely reflects ongoing transcription. Our results exclude the long-term, unproductive arrest of Pol III on the DNA as a major regulatory mechanism and identify previously uncharacterized, differential coordination in Pol III binding and transcription under different growth conditions. PMID:26941251

  11. Hemorrhagin VaH4, a covalent heterodimeric P-III metalloproteinase from Vipera ammodytes ammodytes with a potential antitumour activity.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Adrijana; Sajevic, Tamara; Kovačič, Lidija; Pungerčar, Jože; Lang Balija, Maja; Halassy, Beata; Trampuš Bakija, Alenka; Križaj, Igor

    2014-01-01

    In the envenomation caused by a bite of Vipera ammodytes ammodytes, the most venomous snake in Europe, hemorrhage is usually the most severe consequence in man. Identifying and understanding the hemorrhagic components of its venom is therefore particularly important in optimizing medical treatment of patients. We describe a novel high molecular mass hemorrhagin, VaH4. The isolated molecule is a covalent dimer of two homologous subunits, VaH4-A and VaH4-B. Complete structural characterization of A and partial characterization of B revealed that both belong to the P-III class of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs), comprising a metalloproteinase, a disintegrin-like domain and a cysteine-rich domain. However, neither VaH4-A nor VaH4-B possess the Cys174 involved in the inter-subunit disulphide bond of P-III SVMPs. A three-dimensional model of the VaH4 dimer suggests that Cys132 serves this function. This implies that dimers in the P-III class of SVMPs can be formed either between their Cys132 or Cys174 residues. The proteolytic activity and stability of VaH4 depend on Zn²⁺ and Ca²⁺ ions and the presence of glycosaminoglycans, which indicates physiological interaction of VaH4 with the latter element of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The molecular mass of VaH4, determined by MALDI/TOF mass spectrometry, is 110.2 kDa. N-deglycosylation reduced the mass of each monomer by 8.7 kDa. The two possible N-glycosylation sites in VaH4-A are located at completely different positions from those in homodimeric P-IIIc VaH3 from the same venom, however, without any evident functional implications. The hemorrhagic activity of this slightly acidic SVMP is ascribed to its hydrolysis of components of the ECM, particularly fibronectin and nidogen, and of some blood coagulation proteins, in particular the α-chain of fibrinogen. VaH4 is also significant medically as we found it cytotoxic against cancer cells and due to its substantial sequence similarity to ADAM/ADAMTS family of

  12. Expression of Pseudomonas syringae type III effectors in yeast under stress conditions reveals that HopX1 attenuates activation of the high osmolarity glycerol MAP kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Dor; Bosis, Eran; Dar, Daniel; Nachman, Iftach; Sessa, Guido

    2012-11-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) is the causal agent of speck disease in tomato. Pst pathogenicity depends on a type III secretion system that delivers effector proteins into host cells, where they promote disease by manipulating processes to the advantage of the pathogen. Previous studies identified seven Pst effectors that inhibit growth when expressed in yeast under normal growth conditions, suggesting that they interfere with cellular processes conserved in yeast and plants. We hypothesized that effectors also target conserved cellular processes that are required for yeast growth only under stress conditions. We therefore examined phenotypes induced by expression of Pst effectors in yeast grown in the presence of various stressors. Out of 29 effectors tested, five (HopX1, HopG1, HopT1-1, HopH1 and AvrPtoB) displayed growth inhibition phenotypes only in combination with stress conditions. Viability assays revealed that the HopX1 effector caused loss of cell viability under prolonged osmotic stress. Using transcription reporters, we found that HopX1 attenuated the activation of the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, which is responsible for yeast survival under osmotic stress, while other MAPK pathways were mildly affected by HopX1. Interestingly, HopX1-mediated phenotypes in yeast were dependent on the putative transglutaminase catalytic triad of the effector. This study enlarges the pool of phenotypes available for the functional analysis of Pst type III effectors in yeast, and exemplifies how analysis of phenotypes detected in yeast under stress conditions can lead to the identification of eukaryotic cellular processes affected by bacterial effectors.

  13. State Content Standards for English Language Arts. Volume III: Instructional Activities for Effective Teaching, Grades 7-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware State Dept. of Public Instruction, Dover.

    This book of instructional activities for grades seven through eight contains Delaware's State Content Standards for English Language Arts. The standards were developed in 1985 by a committee of teachers representing all grade levels. Used as a basis for curriculum planning in school districts throughout Delaware, the standards were designed to…

  14. Rhodium(III)-catalyzed C-H activation/annulation with vinyl esters as an acetylene equivalent.

    PubMed

    Webb, Nicola J; Marsden, Stephen P; Raw, Steven A

    2014-09-19

    The behavior of electron-rich alkenes in rhodium-catalyzed C-H activation/annulation reactions is investigated. Vinyl acetate emerges as a convenient acetylene equivalent, facilitating the synthesis of sixteen 3,4-unsubstituted isoquinolones, as well as select heteroaryl-fused pyridones. The complementary regiochemical preferences of enol ethers versus enol esters/enamides is discussed.

  15. Dental utilization of active duty/previous active duty US military: a cross-sectional analysis of the 2010 Behavior and Risk Surveillance Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sambamoorthi, Usha; Jurevic, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to understand dental utilization of 1) individuals serving/having served in active duty in the U.S. military as compared with the general public and 2) individuals who are currently serving as compared with individuals who are no longer active duty, but have been in active duty within the previous year. Methods The Behavior and Risk Surveillance Survey, 2010, was used in cross-sectional analyses to determine the comparisons. Chi square and multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied. Results 70.7% of participants who had served/currently serving had a dental visit within the previous 12 months; 69.9% of the general public reported a dental visit (p = 0.0265). 69.8% of participants who had served/currently serving had a dental hygiene visit within the previous 12 months and 68.1% of the general public reported a dental hygiene visit (p <0.0001). The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for participants who had served/currently serving vs. the general public was 1.10 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.05, 1.16; p<0.0001) for dental visits and 1.11 (95%CI 1.05, 1.17; p<0.0001) for dental hygiene visits. Conclusion Participants who are serving or have served were more likely to have any dental visit and dental hygiene visit than the general public; but the results were not substantively important. PMID:26086028

  16. Active index model: a unique approach for regional quantitative morphometry in longitudinal and cross-sectional studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, P. K.; Zhang, H.; Sonka, M.; Christensen, G. E.; Rajapakse, C. S.

    2007-03-01

    Recent advancements in digital medical imaging have opened avenues for quantitative analyses of different volumetric and morphometric indices in response to a disease or a treatment. However, a major challenge in performing such an analysis is the lack of a technology of building a mean anatomic space (MAS) that allows mapping data of a given subject onto MAS. This approach leads to a tool for point-by-point regional analysis and comparison of quantitative indices for data coming from a longitudinal or transverse study. Toward this goal, we develop a new computation technique, called Active Index Model (AIM), which is a unique tool to solve the stated problem. AIM consists of three building blocks - (1) development of MAS for a particular anatomic site, (2) mapping a specific data onto MAS, (3) regional statistical analysis of data from different populations assessing regional response to a disease or treatment progression. The AIM presented here is built at the training phase from two known populations (e.g., normal and diseased) which will be immediately ready for diagnostic purpose in a subject whose clinical status is unknown. AIM will be useful for both cross sectional and longitudinal studies and for early diagnostic. This technique will be a vital tool for understanding regional response of a disease or treatment at various stages of its progression. This method has been applied for analyzing regional trabecular bone structural distribution in rabbit femur via micro-CT imaging and to localize the affected myocardial regions from cardiac MR data.

  17. Modelling the optimal timing in metabolic pathway activation-use of Pontryagin's Maximum Principle and role of the Golden section.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Martin; Li, Pu; Schuster, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    The time course of enzyme concentrations in metabolic pathways can be predicted on the basis of the optimality criterion of minimizing the time period in which an essential product is generated. This criterion is in line with the widely accepted view that high fitness requires high pathway flux. Here, based on Pontryagin's Maximum Principle, a method is developed to solve the corresponding constrained optimal control problem in an almost exclusively analytical way and, thus, to calculate optimal enzyme profiles, when linear, irreversible rate laws are assumed. Three different problem formulations are considered and the corresponding optimization results are derived. Besides the minimization of transition time, we consider an operation time in which 90% of the substrate has been converted into product. In that case, only the enzyme at the lower end of the pathway rather than all enzymes are active in the last phase. In all cases, biphasic or multiphasic time courses are obtained. The biological meaning of the results in terms of a consecutive just-in-time expression of metabolic genes is discussed. For the special case of two-enzyme systems, the role of the Golden section in the solution is outlined.

  18. III-V semiconductor nanoresonators-a new strategy for passive, active, and nonlinear all-dielectric metamaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Sheng; Keeler, Gordon A.; Reno, John L.; ...

    2016-06-10

    We demonstrate 2D and multilayer dielectric metamaterials made from III–V semiconductors using a monolithic fabrication process. The resulting structures could be used to recompress chirped femtosecond optical pulses and in a variety of other optical applications requiring low loss. Moreover, these III–V all-dielectric metamaterials could enable novel active applications such as efficient nonlinear frequency converters, light emitters, detectors, and modulators.

  19. Synthesis, Characterization, and C-H Activation Reactions of Novel Organometallic O-donor Ligated Rh(III) Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tenn, William J.; Conley, Brian L.; Bischof, Steven M.; Periana, Roy A.

    2010-09-17

    The synthesis and characterization of the O-donor ligated, air and water stable organometallic complexes trans- (2), and cis-(hfac-O,O) 2Rh(CH3)(py) (3), trans-(hfac-O,O)2Rh(C6H5)(py) (4), cis-(hfac-O,O)2Rh(C6H5)(py) (5), and cis-(hfac-O,O)2Rh(Mes)(py) (6) (where hfac-O,O = κ 2-O,O-1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetonato) are reported. These compounds are analogues to the O-donor iridium complexes that are active catalysts for the hydroarylation and C–H activation reactions as well as the bis-acetylacetonato rhodium complexes, which we recently reported. The trans-complex 2 undergoes a quantitative trans to cis isomerization in cyclohexane to form 3, which activates C–H bonds in both benzene and mesitylene to form compounds 5 and 6, respectively. All of these compounds are air and water stable and do not lead to decomposition products. Complex 5 promotes hydroarylation of styrene by benzene to generate dihydrostilbene.

  20. Antiviral activity of benzimidazole derivatives. III. Novel anti-CVB-5, anti-RSV and anti-Sb-1 agents.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Michele; Novelli, Federica; Tasso, Bruno; Vazzana, Iana; Sparatore, Anna; Boido, Vito; Sparatore, Fabio; La Colla, Paolo; Sanna, Giuseppina; Giliberti, Gabriele; Busonera, Bernardetta; Farci, Pamela; Ibba, Cristina; Loddo, Roberta

    2014-09-01

    A library of eighty-six assorted benzimidazole derivatives was screened for antiviral activity against a panel of ten RNA and DNA viruses. Fifty-two of them displayed different levels of activity against one or more viruses, among which CVB-5, RSV, BVDV and Sb-1 were the most frequently affected. In particular, fourteen compounds exhibited an EC50 in the range 9-17μM (SI from 6 to >11) versus CVB-5, and seven compounds showed an EC50 in the range 5-15μM (SI from 6.7 to ⩾20) against RSV, thus resulting comparable to or more potent than the respective reference drugs (NM108 and ribavirin). Most of these compounds derive from 2-benzylbenzimidazole, but also other molecular scaffolds [as 1-phenylbenzimidazole (2), 2-trifluoromethylbenzimidazole (69), dihydropyrido[3',2':4,5]imidazo[1,2-a][1,4]benzodiazepin-5-one (3), dibenzo[c,e]benzimidazo[1,2-a]azepine (22), and 2-(tetrahydropyran-2-yl)benzimidazole (81, 82 and 86)] are related to interesting levels of activity against these or other viruses (BVDV, Sb-1). Thus, these scaffolds (some of which, so far unexplored), represent valid starting points to develop more efficient agents against pathologies caused by CVB-5, RSV, BVDV and Sb-1 viruses.