Science.gov

Sample records for activities select resources

  1. Selective mutism - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - selective mutism ... The following organizations are good resources for information on selective mutism : American Speech-Language-Hearing Association -- www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/selectivemutism.htm Selective Mutism and ...

  2. Activated Sludge. Selected Instructional Activities and References. Instructional Resources Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Clinton L.; Walasek, James B.

    This monograph contains a variety of selected materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction. Part I presents a brief discussion of the activated sludge process in wastewater treatment operations. Part II, Instructional Units, contains selected portions of existing programs which may be utilized in…

  3. Selected Resources and Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Directions for Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This chapter provides an annotated bibliography of resources pertaining to international branch campuses (IBCs). This collection of references has been selected to represent the breadth of emerging scholarship on cross-border higher education and is intended to provide further resources on a range of concerns surrounding cross-border higher…

  4. Use of selected toxicology information resources in assessing relationships between chemical structure and biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wassom, J.S.

    1985-09-01

    This paper addresses the subject of the use of the selected toxicology information resources in assessing relationships between chemical structure and specific end points. To assist the researcher in how to access the primary literature of genetic toxicology, teratogenesis, and carcinogenesis, three specific specialized information centers are discussed - Environmental Mutagen Information Center, Environmental Teratology Information Center, and Environmental Carcinogenesis Information Center. Also included are descriptions of information resources that contain evaluated (peer-reviewed) biological research results. The US Environmental Protection Agency Genetic Toxicology Program, the International Agency for Research on Cancer Monographs, and the Toxicology Data Bank are the best sources currently available to obtain peer-reviewed results for compounds tested for genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and other toxicological end points. The value of published information lies in its use. It has become evident that most information cannot be accepted at face value for interpretation and analysis when subjected to stringent quality evaluation criteria. This deficit can be corrected by rigid editorship and the cognizance of authors. Increased interest in alternative methods to in vivo animal testing will be exemplified by use of short-term bioassays and in structure-activity relationship studies. With respect to this latter area, it must be remembered that mechanically (computer generated) derived data cannot substitute, at least at this stage, for data obtained from actual animal testing. The future of structure-activity relationship studies will rest only in their use as a predictive tool.

  5. Use of selected toxicology information resources in assessing relationships between chemical structure and biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Wassom, J S

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the subject of the use of selected toxicology information resources in assessing relationships between chemical structure and specific biological end points. To assist the researcher in how to access the primary literature of genetic toxicology, teratogenesis, and carcinogenesis, three specific specialized information centers are discussed--Environmental Mutagen Information Center, Environmental Teratology Information Center, and Environmental Carcinogenesis Information Center. Also included are descriptions of information resources that contain evaluated (peer-reviewed) biological research results. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Genetic Toxicology Program, the International Agency for Research on Cancer Monographs, and the Toxicology Data Bank are the best sources currently available to obtain peer-reviewed results for compounds tested for genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and other toxicological end points. The value of published information lies in its use. It has become evident that most information cannot be accepted at face value for interpretation and analysis when subjected to stringent quality evaluation criteria. This deficit can be corrected by rigid editorship and the cognizance of authors. Increased interest in alternative methods to in vivo animal testing will be exemplified by use of short-term bioassays and in structure-activity relationship studies. With respect to this latter area, it must be remembered that mechanically (computer generated) derived data cannot substitute, at least at this stage, for data obtained from actual animal testing. The future of structure-activity relationship studies will rest only in their use as a predictive tool. PMID:4065070

  6. Reconciling resource utilization and resource selection functions.

    PubMed

    Hooten, Mevin B; Hanks, Ephraim M; Johnson, Devin S; Alldredge, Mat W

    2013-11-01

    1. Analyses based on utilization distributions (UDs) have been ubiquitous in animal space use studies, largely because they are computationally straightforward and relatively easy to employ. Conventional applications of resource utilization functions (RUFs) suggest that estimates of UDs can be used as response variables in a regression involving spatial covariates of interest. 2. It has been claimed that contemporary implementations of RUFs can yield inference about resource selection, although to our knowledge, an explicit connection has not been described. 3. We explore the relationships between RUFs and resource selection functions from a hueristic and simulation perspective. We investigate several sources of potential bias in the estimation of resource selection coefficients using RUFs (e.g. the spatial covariance modelling that is often used in RUF analyses). 4. Our findings illustrate that RUFs can, in fact, serve as approximations to RSFs and are capable of providing inference about resource selection, but only with some modification and under specific circumstances. 5. Using real telemetry data as an example, we provide guidance on which methods for estimating resource selection may be more appropriate and in which situations. In general, if telemetry data are assumed to arise as a point process, then RSF methods may be preferable to RUFs; however, modified RUFs may provide less biased parameter estimates when the data are subject to location error. PMID:23574332

  7. Reconciling resource utilization and resource selection functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooten, Mevin B.; Hanks, Ephraim M.; Johnson, Devin S.; Alldredge, Mat W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: 1. Analyses based on utilization distributions (UDs) have been ubiquitous in animal space use studies, largely because they are computationally straightforward and relatively easy to employ. Conventional applications of resource utilization functions (RUFs) suggest that estimates of UDs can be used as response variables in a regression involving spatial covariates of interest. 2. It has been claimed that contemporary implementations of RUFs can yield inference about resource selection, although to our knowledge, an explicit connection has not been described. 3. We explore the relationships between RUFs and resource selection functions from a hueristic and simulation perspective. We investigate several sources of potential bias in the estimation of resource selection coefficients using RUFs (e.g. the spatial covariance modelling that is often used in RUF analyses). 4. Our findings illustrate that RUFs can, in fact, serve as approximations to RSFs and are capable of providing inference about resource selection, but only with some modification and under specific circumstances. 5. Using real telemetry data as an example, we provide guidance on which methods for estimating resource selection may be more appropriate and in which situations. In general, if telemetry data are assumed to arise as a point process, then RSF methods may be preferable to RUFs; however, modified RUFs may provide less biased parameter estimates when the data are subject to location error.

  8. Handling Resource Oscillations Through Selective Misinformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Mark; Metzler, Richard; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    When resource consumers select among competing providers based on delayed information, inefficient oscillations in resource utilization can emerge. This paper describes an approach, based on selective stochastic resource request rejection, for dealing with this emergent dysfunction.

  9. Effects on Learners' Performance of Using Selected and Open Network Resources in a Problem-Based Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Ching-Kun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chuang, Chien-Wen; Chang, Chih-Kai

    2012-01-01

    Owing to the popularity of computers and computer networks, fostering the web-based problem-solving ability of students has become an important educational objective in recent years. This study attempted to compare the effects of using selected and open network resources on students' intentions with regard to their information system usage by…

  10. Selected Resources for Encouraging Females in Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiest, Lynda R.

    2001-01-01

    Offers selected resources that educators can use to increase their knowledge of ways to help girls and young women succeed in mathematics, integrate information into classroom instruction, and bring self-help opportunities to their female students' awareness. (KHR)

  11. Gerontology: A Bibliography of Selected Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Patricia R., Comp.; McHorney, Colleen A., Comp.

    This selected bibliography of resources on gerontology, reflecting the holdings of the Western Kentucky University Libraries, is divided into five sections: (1) books and monographs; (2) educational resources center; (3) government documents; (4) microfilms; and (5) periodicals. The table of contents contains an alphabetical listing of all Library…

  12. Sources for Selecting School Library Resource Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friderichsen, Blanche

    A Department of Education publication on an integrated program for Alberta school libraries, this document recommends the use of specific material selection sources designed to aid schools in developing their library collections. Materials are listed in the following sections: (1) Sources for Selecting School Library Resource Materials; (2)…

  13. Electronic Resources: Selection and Bibliographic Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattie, Ling-yuh W., Ed.; Cox, Bonnie Jean, Ed.

    This book is a baseline guide for professionals and library school students on issues that concern the selection and bibliographic control of electronic resources, from both conceptual and pragmatic standpoints. The book includes the following articles: (1) "Foreward" (Lois Mai Chan); (2) "Introduction" (Ling-yuh W. (Miko) Pattie and Bonnie Jean…

  14. Lunar resource evaluation and mine site selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bence, A. Edward

    1992-01-01

    Two scenarios in this evaluation of lunar mineral resources and the selection of possible mining and processing sites are considered. The first scenario assumes that no new surface or near-surface data will be available before site selection (presumably one of the Apollo sites). The second scenario assumes that additional surface geology data will have been obtained by a lunar orbiter mission, an unmanned sample return mission (or missions), and followup manned missions. Regardless of the scenario, once a potentially favorable mine site has been identified, a minimum amount of fundamental data is needed to assess the resources at that site and to evaluate its suitability for mining and downstream processing. Since much of the required data depends on the target mineral(s), information on the resource, its beneficiation, and the refining, smelting, and fabricating processes must be factored into the evaluation. The annual capacity and producing lifetime of the mine and its associated processing plant must be estimated before the resource reserves can be assessed. The available market for the product largely determines the capacity and lifetime of the mine. The Apollo 17 site is described as a possible mining site. The use of new sites is briefly addressed.

  15. Active frequency selective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Walter R.; Hendrickson, Joshua; Cleary, Justin W.; Guo, Junpeng

    2013-05-01

    Split ring resonator arrays are investigated for use as active elements for the realization of voltage controllable frequency selective surfaces. Finite difference time domain simulations suggest the absorptive and reflective properties of such surfaces can be externally controlled through modifications of the split ring resonator gap impedance. In this work, such voltage-controlled resonance tuning is obtained through the addition of an appropriately designed high electron mobility transistor positioned across the split ring resonator gap. It is shown that a 0.5μm gate length high electron mobility transistor allows voltage controllable switching between the two resonant conditions associated with a split ring resonator and that of a closed loop geometry when the surface is illuminated with THz radiation. Partial switching between these two resonant conditions is observed at larger gate lengths. Such active frequency selective surfaces are proposed, for example, for use as modulators in THz detection schemes and as RF filters in radar applications when scaled to operate at GHz frequencies.

  16. Outdoor Education across America: "Weaving the Web." Selected Papers, Activities, and Resources from the 1987 National Outdoor Education Conference (Cortland, New York, October 9-12, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerkes, Rita, Comp.; And Others

    Selected through a refereed process from presentations given by speakers at the "1987 Outdoor Education across America: Weaving the Web" Conference, the content represents philosophy, ideas, program activities, and research of outdoor practitioners and leaders across America. The 25 presentations/workshops are summarized under the broad headings…

  17. Universe At Your Fingertips: An Astronomy Activity and Resource Notebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew, Ed.

    The goal of this resource notebook is to provide activities selected by astronomers and classroom teachers, comprehensive resource lists and bibliographies, background material on astronomical topics, and teaching ideas from experienced astronomy educators. The activities are grouped into several major areas of study in astronomy: lunar phases and…

  18. Youth Physical Activity Resources Use and Activity Measured by Accelerometry

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, Andréa L.; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether utilization of physical activity resources (eg, parks) was associated with daily physical activity measured by accelerometry. Methods 111 adolescents completed a travel diary with concurrent accelerometry. The main exposure was self-reported utilization of a physical activity resource (none/1+ resources). The main outcomes were total minutes spent in daily 1) moderate-vigorous physical activity and 2) vigorous physical activity. Results Utilizing a physical activity resource was significantly associated with total minutes in moderate-vigorous physical activity. African-Americans and males had significantly greater moderate-vigorous physical activity. Conclusions Results from this study support the development and use of physical activity resources. PMID:21204684

  19. Information Resource Selection of Undergraduate Students in Academic Search Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jee Yeon; Paik, Woojin; Joo, Soohyung

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This study aims to investigate the selection of information sources and to identify factors associated with the resource selection of undergraduate students for academic search tasks. Also, user perceptions of some factors, such as credibility, usefulness, accessibility and familiarity, were examined to classify resources by their…

  20. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Ecological Resources (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Jones, A.T.; Smith, C.R.; Kalmijn, A.J.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (COE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed. Regist. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed. Regst. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County, including the southeastern coast, a potential development corridor along the Saddle Road between Hilo and the North Kohala District on the northwestern coast, and on the southeastern coast of Maui. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for future research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  1. 15 CFR 922.21 - Selection of active candidates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Selection of active candidates. 922.21...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE... Selection of active candidates. (a) The Secretary shall, from time to time, select a limited number of...

  2. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Ecological resources

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Jones, A.T.; Smith, C.R.; Kalmijn, A.J.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information that were obtained from review of the (1) scientific literature, (2) government and private sector reports, (3) studies done under DOE interagency agreements with the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and (4) observations made during site visits are being made available for future research in these areas.

  3. An Arts-Based Supplemental Resource's Effect on Teachers' Perceptions of Curriculum Integration, Instructional Materials Development, Learning Activities Selections, and Critical Thinking Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eutsler, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Indiana's declining SAT scores prompted the publisher of a statewide magazine covering the literary, performing, and visual arts to take action and create a program to use the magazine as a supplemental resource for students. It was believed that such a supplemental resource could enhance critical thinking and writing skills and help raise SAT…

  4. Sickle Cell: A Selected Resource Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    This annotated, selective bibliography lists the following types of educational and informational material on both sickle cell disease and trait: (1) professional education materials; (2) fact sheets, pamphlets, and brochures; and (3) audiovisual material. A selected list of references is provided for the following topic areas: (1) genetic…

  5. Selected Internet Resources on Family History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Steven

    2001-01-01

    Provides a list of Internet resources on family history that cover topics such as colonial families, shifting family ideals, families in the Early Republic, families in bondage, westward migration, families during the Great Depression, journals, reference sources, and lesson plans. (CMK)

  6. Resource efficiency potential of selected technologies, products and strategies.

    PubMed

    Rohn, Holger; Pastewski, Nico; Lettenmeier, Michael; Wiesen, Klaus; Bienge, Katrin

    2014-03-01

    Despite rising prices for natural resources during the past 30 years, global consumption of natural resources is still growing. This leads to ecological, economical and social problems. So far, however, limited effort has been made to decrease the natural resource use of goods and services. While resource efficiency is already on the political agenda (EU and national resource strategies), there are still substantial knowledge gaps on the effectiveness of resource efficiency improvement strategies in different fields. In this context and within the project "Material Efficiency and Resource Conservation", the natural resource use of 22 technologies, products and strategies was calculated and their resource efficiency potential analysed. In a preliminary literature- and expert-based identification process, over 250 technologies, strategies, and products, which are regarded as resource efficient, were identified. Out of these, 22 subjects with high resource efficiency potential were selected. They cover a wide range of relevant technologies, products and strategies, such as energy supply and storage, Green IT, transportation, foodstuffs, agricultural engineering, design strategies, lightweight construction, as well as the concept "Using Instead of Owning". To assess the life-cycle-wide resource use of the selected subjects, the material footprint has been applied as a reliable indicator. In addition, sustainability criteria on a qualitative basis were considered. The results presented in this paper show significant resource efficiency potential for many technologies, products and strategies. PMID:24361778

  7. Youth Physical Activity Resource Use and Activity Measured by Accelerometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslow, Andra L.; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether use of physical activity resources (e.g., parks) was associated with daily physical activity measured by accelerometry. Methods: One hundred eleven adolescents completed a travel diary with concurrent accelerometry. The main exposure was self-reported use of a physical activity resource (none /1 resources). The main…

  8. Men and Sexuality: Bibliography of Selected Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc., New York, NY. Education Dept.

    This selective, annotated bibliography covers a range of topics associated with male sexuality, reproductive health, and sexism. The books listed in this document are organized in five categories which are not strictly exclusive, as most of the entries overlap topic areas. Part I, Men in Society, contains 10 entries dealing with masculinity,…

  9. Student-Selected Journals: An Emerging Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Roberta K.; Allen, Ethan J.

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigates the journal selections of 367 graduate students as they worked to fulfill a commonly assigned, criteria-based literature search on educational topics. The criteria called for evidence-based studies, published within the current ten years of course enrollment, within peer-reviewed journals. Student references…

  10. Teen Sexuality Today: Bibliography of Selected Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc., New York, NY.

    This document presents a selected bibliography of recent books and journal articles relating to adolescent sexuality and reproductive health. The compilation of annotated references is divided into sections which focus on the issues of: (1) Sexuality Education; (2) Contraception; (3) Parenthood; (4) Communication with Parents; (5) Reproductive…

  11. Nursing: Tools for the Selection of Library Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Janet W.

    2004-01-01

    The selection of resources for nursing is influenced by the type of nurse client and the institutional setting. Clients include students, professionals and educators. They may use academic and public libraries or resource centers in patient care settings such as hospitals. Nursing collections support four purposes: education, research, clinical…

  12. Comparison of Resource Platform Selection Approaches for Scientific Workflows

    SciTech Connect

    Simmhan, Yogesh; Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2010-03-05

    Cloud computing is increasingly considered as an additional computational resource platform for scientific workflows. The cloud offers opportunity to scale-out applications from desktops and local cluster resources. At the same time, it can eliminate the challenges of restricted software environments and queue delays in shared high performance computing environments. Choosing from these diverse resource platforms for a workflow execution poses a challenge for many scientists. Scientists are often faced with deciding resource platform selection trade-offs with limited information on the actual workflows. While many workflow planning methods have explored task scheduling onto different resources, these methods often require fine-scale characterization of the workflow that is onerous for a scientist. In this position paper, we describe our early exploratory work into using blackbox characteristics to do a cost-benefit analysis across of using cloud platforms. We use only very limited high-level information on the workflow length, width, and data sizes. The length and width are indicative of the workflow duration and parallelism. The data size characterizes the IO requirements. We compare the effectiveness of this approach to other resource selection models using two exemplar scientific workflows scheduled on desktops, local clusters, HPC centers, and clouds. Early results suggest that the blackbox model often makes the same resource selections as a more fine-grained whitebox model. We believe the simplicity of the blackbox model can help inform a scientist on the applicability of cloud computing resources even before porting an existing workflow.

  13. Animal Rights: Selected Resources and Suggestions for Further Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidoff, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    Presents an annotated list of selected resources intended to serve as a guide to the growing amount of material on animal rights. Suggestions to aid in additional research include subject headings used to find books, indexes used to locate periodical articles, sources for locating organizations, and a selected list of animal rights organizations.…

  14. Annotated selected references on natural resources investigations, Collier County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swayze, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    A data base for future natural resources investigations in Collier County, Fla., was initiated by compiling a selected annotated bibliography. This report provides references and annotations for selected reports released between 1950 and 1978. The references are presented by subject material as follows: biologic, ecologic, geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic. (USGS)

  15. Reply to Efford on ‘Integrating resource selection information with spatial capture-recapture’

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, Andy; Chandler, Richard; Sun, Catherine C.; Fuller, Angela K.

    2014-01-01

    3. A key point of Royle et al. (Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 2013, 4) was that active resource selection induces heterogeneity in encounter probability which, if unaccounted for, should bias estimates of population size or density. The models of Royle et al. (Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 2013, 4) and Efford (Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 2014, 000, 000) merely amount to alternative models of resource selection, and hence varying amounts of heterogeneity in encounter probability.

  16. Goal Selection for Embedded Systems with Oversubscribed Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabideau, Gregg; Chien, Steve; McLaren, David

    2010-01-01

    We describe an efficient, online goal selection algorithm and its use for selecting goals at runtime. Our focus is on the re-planning that must be performed in a timely manner on the embedded system where computational resources are limited. In particular, our algorithm generates near optimal solutions to problems with fully specified goal requests that oversubscribe available resources but have no temporal flexibility. By using a fast, incremental algorithm, goal selection can be postponed in a "just-in-time" fashion allowing requests to be changed or added at the last minute. This enables shorter response cycles and greater autonomy for the system under control.

  17. Resource evaluation and site selection for microalgae production systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, E.L.; Folger, A.G.; Hogg, S.E.

    1985-05-01

    Climate, land, and water resource requirements of microalgae production systems (MPS) were examined relative to construction costs, operating costs, and biomass productivity. The objective was the stratification of the southwestern United States into zones of relative suitability for MPS. Maps of climate (insolation, freeze-free period, precipitation, evaporation, thunderstorm days), land (use/cover, ownership, slope), and water (saline groundwater) resource parameters were obtained. These maps were transformed into digital overlays permitting the cell-by-cell compositing of selected resource parameters to form maps representing relative productivity, make-up water, climate suitability, land suitability, water suitability, and overall suitability. The Southwest was selected for this study because of its high levels of insolation, saline water resources, and large areas of relatively low valued land. The stratification maps cannot be used for the selection of specific sites because of their low resolution (12,455-acre cells). They can be used to guide future resource studies and site selection efforts, however, by limiting these efforts to the most suitable regions. Future efforts should concentrate on saline water resources, for which only limited data are currently available. 13 refs., 44 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Activation of nonlocal quantum resources.

    PubMed

    Navascués, Miguel; Vértesi, Tamás

    2011-02-11

    We find two two-qubit bipartite states ρ1, ρ2 such that arbitrarily many copies of one or the other cannot exhibit nonlocal correlations in a two-setting-two-outcome Bell scenario. However, the bipartite state ρ1 ⊗ ρ2 violates the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality [J. F. Clauser, M. A. Horne, A. Shimony, and R. A. Holt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 23, 880 (1969).] by an amount of 2.023. We also identify a CHSH-local state ρ such that ρ⊗2 is CHSH inequality-violating. The tools employed can be easily adapted to find instances of nonlocality activation in arbitrary Bell scenarios. PMID:21405447

  19. Impact assessment of abiotic resources in LCA: quantitative comparison of selected characterization models.

    PubMed

    Rørbech, Jakob T; Vadenbo, Carl; Hellweg, Stefanie; Astrup, Thomas F

    2014-10-01

    Resources have received significant attention in recent years resulting in development of a wide range of resource depletion indicators within life cycle assessment (LCA). Understanding the differences in assessment principles used to derive these indicators and the effects on the impact assessment results is critical for indicator selection and interpretation of the results. Eleven resource depletion methods were evaluated quantitatively with respect to resource coverage, characterization factors (CF), impact contributions from individual resources, and total impact scores. We included 2247 individual market inventory data sets covering a wide range of societal activities (ecoinvent database v3.0). Log-linear regression analysis was carried out for all pairwise combinations of the 11 methods for identification of correlations in CFs (resources) and total impacts (inventory data sets) between methods. Significant differences in resource coverage were observed (9-73 resources) revealing a trade-off between resource coverage and model complexity. High correlation in CFs between methods did not necessarily manifest in high correlation in total impacts. This indicates that also resource coverage may be critical for impact assessment results. Although no consistent correlations between methods applying similar assessment models could be observed, all methods showed relatively high correlation regarding the assessment of energy resources. Finally, we classify the existing methods into three groups, according to method focus and modeling approach, to aid method selection within LCA. PMID:25208267

  20. RoboResource Technology Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keck, Tom, Comp.; Frye, Ellen, Ed.

    Preparing students to be successful in a rapidly changing world means showing them how to use the tools of technology and how to integrate those tools into all areas of learning. This booklet is divided into three sections: Design Activities, Experiments, and Resources. The design activities ask students to collaborate on design projects. In these…

  1. Managing Selection for Electronic Resources: Kent State University Develops a New System to Automate Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Kay

    2012-01-01

    Kent State University has developed a centralized system that manages the communication and work related to the review and selection of commercially available electronic resources. It is an automated system that tracks the review process, provides selectors with price and trial information, and compiles reviewers' feedback about the resource. It…

  2. La Raza: A Selective Bibliography of Library Resources Addenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nupoll, Karin, Comp.

    Books, periodicals, recordings, art works, government documents, and bibliographies, dating mostly from 1960, are included in this 1978 addendum to the 1973 edition of "La Raza: A Selective Bibliography of Library Resources". Similar in format to the earlier volume, the addendum contains 1,616 non-annotated entries organized into 31 Library of…

  3. Human Resource Managers' Perception of Selected Communication Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Donald E.; Manton, Edgar J.; Walker, Janet

    2007-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to determine human resource managers' perceptions of selected communication competencies. The business communication competencies studied were 1. writing and speaking, 2. interpersonal/collaborative competencies and 3. global communication competences. A questionnaire was developed and mailed to human resource…

  4. Current water resources activities in Alabama, fiscal year 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, L.J.; Meadows, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the current (as of 1986) water resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Alabama. The responsibilities and objectives of the Survey; organization of the Alabama District; sources of funding; current projects; hydrologic data program; and a selected bibliography of hydrologic reports are presented. Water resources projects are undertaken usually at the request of and with partial funding from another agency, provided: they are high priority problems and generally identified to fall within the mission of the Water Resources Division and they are consistent with the Program Management Plan developed by the Water Resources Division in Alabama to meet the long range plan for hydrologic data in the State. (USGS)

  5. Integrating resource selection information with spatial capture--recapture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Chandler, Richard B.; Sun, Catherine C.; Fuller, Angela K.

    2013-01-01

    4. Finally, we find that SCR models using standard symmetric and stationary encounter probability models may not fully explain variation in encounter probability due to space usage, and therefore produce biased estimates of density when animal space usage is related to resource selection. Consequently, it is important that space usage be taken into consideration, if possible, in studies focused on estimating density using capture–recapture methods.

  6. STEM Education in the United States: Selected Web Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Eileen G.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this webliography is to provide an overview of STEM education in the U.S. It provides easy access to research and best practices in the field, as well as specific programs, activities, and lesson plans that formal and informal educators can implement. The webliography also includes links to advocacy programs and resources for…

  7. Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project: water-resources activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, Stanley G.; Heiny, Janet S.

    1998-01-01

    Infrastructure, such as roads, buildings, airports, and dams, is built and maintained by use of large quantities of natural resources such as aggregate (sand and gravel), energy, and water. As urban area expand, local sources of these resource are becoming inaccessible (gravel cannot be mined from under a subdivision, for example), or the cost of recovery of the resource becomes prohibitive (oil and gas drilling in urban areas is costly), or the resources may become unfit for some use (pollution of ground water may preclude its use as a water supply). Governmental land-use decision and environmental mandates can further preclude development of natural resources. If infrastructure resources are to remain economically available. current resource information must be available for use in well-reasoned decisions bout future land use. Ground water is an infrastructure resource that is present in shallow aquifers and deeper bedrock aquifers that underlie much of the 2,450-square-mile demonstration area of the Colorado Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project. In 1996, mapping of the area's ground-water resources was undertaken as a U.S. Geological Survey project in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources, and the Colorado Water Conservation Board.

  8. Physical Sciences: Curriculum Resources and Activities for School Librarians and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Amy; Richer, Janet; Weckman, Janet

    This book provides resources to teachers and librarians for creating thematic units on specific topics targeting grades K-8. Each topic includes key concepts, comprehensive teaching resources, teaching resources (nonfiction children's literature), reading selections (fiction children's literature), science activities, creative writing and art…

  9. Earth Sciences: Curriculum Resources and Activities for School Librarians and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Amy; Richer, Janet; Weckman, Janet

    This book provides resources to teachers and librarians for creating thematic units on specific topics targeting grades K-8. Each topic includes key concepts, comprehensive teaching resources, teaching resources (nonfiction children's literature), reading selections (fiction children's literature), science activities, creative writing and art…

  10. Life Sciences: Curriculum Resources and Activities for School Librarians and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Amy; Richer, Janet; Weckman, Janet

    This book provides resources to teachers and librarians for creating thematic units on specific topics targeting grades K-8. Each topic includes key concepts, comprehensive teaching resources, teaching resources (nonfiction children's literature), reading selections (fiction children's literature), science activities, creative writing and art…

  11. A Bayesian random effects discrete-choice model for resource selection: Population-level selection inference

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, D.L.; Johnson, D.; Griffith, B.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling the probability of use of land units characterized by discrete and continuous measures, we present a Bayesian random-effects model to assess resource selection. This model provides simultaneous estimation of both individual- and population-level selection. Deviance information criterion (DIC), a Bayesian alternative to AIC that is sample-size specific, is used for model selection. Aerial radiolocation data from 76 adult female caribou (Rangifer tarandus) and calf pairs during 1 year on an Arctic coastal plain calving ground were used to illustrate models and assess population-level selection of landscape attributes, as well as individual heterogeneity of selection. Landscape attributes included elevation, NDVI (a measure of forage greenness), and land cover-type classification. Results from the first of a 2-stage model-selection procedure indicated that there is substantial heterogeneity among cow-calf pairs with respect to selection of the landscape attributes. In the second stage, selection of models with heterogeneity included indicated that at the population-level, NDVI and land cover class were significant attributes for selection of different landscapes by pairs on the calving ground. Population-level selection coefficients indicate that the pairs generally select landscapes with higher levels of NDVI, but the relationship is quadratic. The highest rate of selection occurs at values of NDVI less than the maximum observed. Results for land cover-class selections coefficients indicate that wet sedge, moist sedge, herbaceous tussock tundra, and shrub tussock tundra are selected at approximately the same rate, while alpine and sparsely vegetated landscapes are selected at a lower rate. Furthermore, the variability in selection by individual caribou for moist sedge and sparsely vegetated landscapes is large relative to the variability in selection of other land cover types. The example analysis illustrates that, while sometimes computationally intense, a

  12. Resource selection for an interdisciplinary field: a methodology.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Beth E; Murray, Jane; Alterman, Ina; Welbourne, Penny

    2002-10-01

    The Health Sciences and Human Services Library of the University of Maryland developed and implemented a methodology to evaluate print and digital resources for social work. Although this methodology was devised for the interdisciplinary field of social work, the authors believe it may lend itself to resource selection in other interdisciplinary fields. The methodology was developed in response to the results of two separate surveys conducted in late 1999, which indicated improvement was needed in the library's graduate-level social work collections. Library liaisons evaluated the print collection by identifying forty-five locally relevant Library of Congress subject headings and then using these subjects or synonymous terms to compare the library's titles to collections of peer institutions, publisher catalogs, and Amazon.com. The collection also was compared to social work association bibliographies, ISI Journal Citation Reports, and major social work citation databases. An approval plan for social work books was set up to assist in identifying newly published titles. The library acquired new print and digital social work resources as a result of the evaluation, thus improving both print and digital collections for its social work constituents. Visibility of digital resources was increased by cataloging individual titles in aggregated electronic journal packages and listing each title on the library Web page. PMID:12398245

  13. Selecting downscaled climate projections for water resource impacts and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Jean-Philippe; Hingray, Benoît

    2015-04-01

    Increasingly large ensembles of global and regional climate projections are being produced and delivered to the climate impact community. However, such an enormous amount of information can hardly been dealt with by some impact models due to computational constraints. Strategies for transparently selecting climate projections are therefore urgently needed for informing small-scale impact and adaptation studies and preventing potential pitfalls in interpreting ensemble results from impact models. This work proposes results from a selection approach implemented for an integrated water resource impact and adaptation study in the Durance river basin (Southern French Alps). A large ensemble of 3000 daily transient gridded climate projections was made available for this study. It was built from different runs of 4 ENSEMBLES Stream2 GCMs, statistically downscaled by 3 probabilistic methods based on the K-nearest neighbours resampling approach (Lafaysse et al., 2014). The selection approach considered here exemplifies one of the multiple possible approaches described in a framework for identifying tailored subsets of climate projections for impact and adaptation studies proposed by Vidal & Hingray (2014). It was chosen based on the specificities of both the study objectives and the characteristics of the projection dataset. This selection approach aims at propagating as far as possible the relative contributions of the four different sources of uncertainties considered, namely GCM structure, large-scale natural variability, structure of the downscaling method, and catchment-scale natural variability. Moreover, it took the form of a hierarchical structure to deal with the specific constraints of several types of impact models (hydrological models, irrigation demand models and reservoir management models). The implemented 3-layer selection approach is therefore mainly based on conditioned Latin Hypercube sampling (Christierson et al., 2012). The choice of conditioning

  14. Multilevel selection in a resource-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Fernando Fagundes; Campos, Paulo R. A.

    2013-07-01

    In the present work we investigate the emergence of cooperation in a multilevel selection model that assumes limiting resources. Following the work by R. J. Requejo and J. Camacho [Phys. Rev. Lett.0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.038701 108, 038701 (2012)], the interaction among individuals is initially ruled by a prisoner's dilemma (PD) game. The payoff matrix may change, influenced by the resource availability, and hence may also evolve to a non-PD game. Furthermore, one assumes that the population is divided into groups, whose local dynamics is driven by the payoff matrix, whereas an intergroup competition results from the nonuniformity of the growth rate of groups. We study the probability that a single cooperator can invade and establish in a population initially dominated by defectors. Cooperation is strongly favored when group sizes are small. We observe the existence of a critical group size beyond which cooperation becomes counterselected. Although the critical size depends on the parameters of the model, it is seen that a saturation value for the critical group size is achieved. The results conform to the thought that the evolutionary history of life repeatedly involved transitions from smaller selective units to larger selective units.

  15. Resource selection by black-footed ferrets in South Dakota and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jachowski, D.S.; Millspaugh, J.J.; Biggins, D.E.; Livieri, T.M.; Matchett, M.R.; Rittenhouse, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    The black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes), once extinct in the wild, remains one of the most critically endangered mammals in North America despite 18 years of reintroduction attempts. Because black-footed ferrets are specialized predators of prairie dogs (Cynomys sp.), a better understanding of how black-footed ferrets select resources might provide insight into how best to identify and manage reintroduction sites. We monitored ferret resource selection at two reintroduction sites with different densities of prairie dog populations-one that contained a high density of prairie dogs (Conata Basin, South Dakota) and one that was lower (UL Bend, Montana). We evaluated support for hypotheses about ferret resource selection as related to the distribution of active burrows used by black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), interactions between ferrets, and habitat edge effects. We found support for all three factors within both populations; however, they affected ferret resource selection differently at each site. Ferrets at Conata Basin tended to select areas with high prairie dog burrow density, closer to the colony edge, and that overlapped other ferret ranges. In contrast, ferrets at UL Bend tended not to select areas of high active prairie dog burrow density, avoided areas close to edge habitat, and females avoided areas occupied by other ferrets. The differences observed between the two sites might be best explained by prairie dog densities, which were higher at Conata Basin (119.3 active burrows per ha) than at UL Bend (44.4 active burrows per ha). Given the positive growth of ferret populations at Conata Basin, management that increases the density of prairie dogs might enhance ferret success within natural areas. To achieve long-term recovery of ferrets in the wild, conservationists should increasingly work across and outside natural area boundaries to increase prairie dog populations.

  16. Antiproliferative activity of synthetic fatty acid amides from renewable resources.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daiane S; Piovesan, Luciana A; D'Oca, Caroline R Montes; Hack, Carolina R Lopes; Treptow, Tamara G M; Rodrigues, Marieli O; Vendramini-Costa, Débora B; Ruiz, Ana Lucia T G; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; D'Oca, Marcelo G Montes

    2015-01-15

    In the work, the in vitro antiproliferative activity of a series of synthetic fatty acid amides were investigated in seven cancer cell lines. The study revealed that most of the compounds showed antiproliferative activity against tested tumor cell lines, mainly on human glioma cells (U251) and human ovarian cancer cells with a multiple drug-resistant phenotype (NCI-ADR/RES). In addition, the fatty methyl benzylamide derived from ricinoleic acid (with the fatty acid obtained from castor oil, a renewable resource) showed a high selectivity with potent growth inhibition and cell death for the glioma cell line-the most aggressive CNS cancer. PMID:25510639

  17. [Independent resource of each hemisphere modulates selective attention].

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Kazuhito; Nishimura, Ritsuko

    2008-06-01

    Based on the load theory and the assumption that each hemisphere has independent resources, we examined the effects of perceptual load in each hemisphere on the compatibility effect. In Experiments 1, and 2ab, two letter-strings were presented to the left and right visual-fields with a distracter, which was presented on the center of the screen. Two conditions were prepared by pairing a letter-string which contained a target with one which did not. Right-handed participants were asked to identify the target in the letter-strings while ignoring the distracter. The results showed that the compatibility effect was larger when the perceptual load of the letter-string which did not contain a target was low. This suggests that the residual resources of the hemisphere where the target was not projected facilitated the processing of the distracter. In Experiment 3, two letter-strings were presented to both hemispheres. The results showed that the compatibility effect was constant, irrespective of the perceptual load of the letter-string. Our findings suggested that selective attention is modulated by the resources of each hemisphere. PMID:18678063

  18. Selection of information resources for education in medical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-González, Maria Dolores; Sanchez-Vanderkast, Egbert

    2005-01-01

    Pharmacology is the foundation science of medical pharmacotherapy. Education in medical pharmacology (EP) requires the use of information resources (IR) to meet the challenge of the continuous introduction of new drugs and new educational, didactic and pedagogical theories to enhance knowledge. Hence criteria for selecting bibliographic material for EP should be clearly outlined and implemented. In this work we present a method to select IR for EP based on systems theory and focusing on the factors determining: (a) the integration of a list of recommended IR for EP; (b) the design of the acquisition list for faculty and students work; (c) the overall organization of the resources available for its optimal use and benefit in the educational process; and (d) a general strategy for assessing the impact of the bibliographic infrastructure. The proposal is based on information from: (i) lists of recommended readings in the academic program of the Pharmacology course given at the School of Medicine of UNAM in the last 30 years; (ii) the extent of discipline development measured by two indexes derived from the contents of Goodman and Gilman's "Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics" (G & G); (iii) the number of texts currently found in the collection of FM-UNAM which are classified in the section of Pharmacology using the Library of Congress Classification System (LCCS); and (iv) the comparison of academic versus standardized classification of pharmacology topics, such as Medical Subject Heading (MESH) and LCCS The importance of this proposal relates to its usefulness for EP and for other medical disciplines. PMID:16416687

  19. 43 CFR 1610.4-8 - Selection of resource management plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Selection of resource management plan..., BUDGETING Resource Management Planning § 1610.4-8 Selection of resource management plan. After publication of the draft resource management plan and draft environmental impact statement, the Field...

  20. 43 CFR 1610.4-8 - Selection of resource management plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Selection of resource management plan..., BUDGETING Resource Management Planning § 1610.4-8 Selection of resource management plan. After publication of the draft resource management plan and draft environmental impact statement, the Field...

  1. Floriculture. Selected Learning Activity Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This series of learning activity packages is based on a catalog of performance objectives, criterion-referenced measures, and performance guides for gardening/groundskeeping developed by the Vocational Education Consortium of States (V-TECS). Learning activity packages are presented in four areas: (1) preparation of soils and planting media, (2)…

  2. Improving Resource Selection and Scheduling Using Predictions. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Warren

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of computational grids has resulted in several new problems in the area of scheduling that can be addressed using predictions. The first problem is selecting where to run an application on the many resources available in a grid. Our approach to help address this problem is to provide predictions of when an application would start to execute if submitted to specific scheduled computer systems. The second problem is gaining simultaneous access to multiple computer systems so that distributed applications can be executed. We help address this problem by investigating how to support advance reservations in local scheduling systems. Our approaches to both of these problems are based on predictions for the execution time of applications on space- shared parallel computers. As a side effect of this work, we also discuss how predictions of application run times can be used to improve scheduling performance.

  3. Elementary school aerospace activities: A resource for teachers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The chronological development of the story of man and flight, with emphasis on space flight, is presented in 10 units designed as a resource for elementary school teachers. Future exploration of space and the utlization of space flight capabilities are included. Each unit contains an outline, a list of suggested activities for correlation, a bibliography, and a list of selected audiovisual materials. A glossary of aerospace terms is included. Topics cover: earth characteristics that affect flight; flight in atmosphere, rockets, technological advances, unmanned Earth satellites, umanned exploration of the solar system, life support systems; astronauts, man in space, and projections for the future.

  4. Resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... palate - resources Colon cancer - resources Cystic fibrosis - resources Depression - resources Diabetes - resources Digestive disease - resources Drug abuse - resources Eating disorders - resources Elder care - resources Epilepsy - resources Family troubles - ...

  5. Infusing and selecting V&V activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    The evolving nature of software development poses a continuing series of challenges for V&V. In response, the V&V community selectively adapts the use of existing V&V activities, and introduces new and improved ones.

  6. Resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diabetes - resources Digestive disease - resources Drug abuse - resources Eating disorders - resources Elder care - resources Epilepsy - resources Family troubles - resources Gastrointestinal disorders - resources Hearing impairment - resources ...

  7. Resource Prospector: Mission Goals, Relevance and Site Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colaprete, A.; Elphic, R. C.; Andrews, D.; Sanders, G.; McGovern, A.; Vaughan, R.; Heldmann, J.; Trimble, J.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades a wealth of new observations of the moon have demonstrated a lunar water system dramatically more complex and rich than was deduced following the Apollo era. Observation from the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer (LPNS) revealed enhancements of hydrogen near the lunar poles. This observation has since been confirmed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) instrument. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission targeted a permanently shadowed, enhanced hydrogen location within the crater Cabeus. The LCROSS impact showed that at least some of the hydrogen enhancement is in the form of water ice and molecular hydrogen (H2). Other volatiles were also observed in the LCROSS impact cloud, including CO2, CO, an H2S. These volatiles, and in particular water, have the potential to be a valuable or enabling resource for future exploration. In large part due to these new findings, the NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) have selected a lunar volatiles prospecting mission for a concept study and potential flight in CY2020. The mission includes a rover-borne payload that (1) can locate surface and near-subsurface volatiles, (2) excavate and analyze samples of the volatile-bearing regolith (up to 1 meter), and (3) demonstrate the form, extractability and usefulness of the materials.

  8. Active Learning with Hands-On Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    The Eisenhower National Clearinghouse for Mathematics and Science Education (ENC) helps teachers by offering a broad assortment of services that enable them to quickly locate educational resources. This document is one in a series of print catalogs designed to give educators information about curriculum resources available for teaching math and…

  9. Some Astronomy 101 Activities Using Internet Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, M. L.

    2000-12-01

    Reputable Internet sites provide a wealth of visual, textual, and numerical data for student activities, as well as some fun simulations. Three activities will be described which have been used in Astronomy 101 classes for non-science students. An exercise in model making and problem solving uses the Astronomy Workshop (janus.astro.umd.edu/astro/impact.html) of the University of Maryland. This site provides a quick simulation of an impact with a planet. One can choose the target, the projectile composition (icy, rocky, or iron), the projectile's diameter, and the projectile's speed. The output provides the energy of impact, the earthquake magnitude, the crater's diameter and depth, and the frequency of such impacts. Students run simulations, pool their data, then collaborate to try to figure out the numerical model behind the simulations. They make predictions, test them, and learn that graphing and physical insight are both important tools. Extrasolar planets are now numerous and fascinating. Students use data from Geoff Marcy's group (www.exoplanets.org) to calculate the masses of the planets using a spreadsheet. They discover that the masses of the stars must depend on spectral type. Correlations among parameters are investigated graphically. As a preparation for writing term papers students review and critique selected sites (csam.montclair.edu/ west/ideasresources.html, west/astrolnk.html), discuss them in small groups, then present the "best" sites to the whole class. Teamwork, evaluation, critical thinking, and public speaking skills are emphasized in this class session. The students find these collaborative activities to be exciting, challenging, and enjoyable as well as increasing their science literacy and problem solving skills.

  10. Ecosystem Matters: Activity and Resource Guide for Environmental Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mary; And Others

    An ecological approach involved making conscious decisions which result in actions that responsibly contribute to the long-term stewardship of natural resources. This activity and resource guide was designed for use by both educators and resource managers to supplement existing courses and programs concerning ecological matters. These…

  11. Water resources activities in Louisiana district, fiscal year 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbert, R.A.; Ellsworth, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    Water resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Louisiana consist of collecting water resources data and conducting interpretive hydrologic investigations and research. The water resources data and the results of the interpretive investigations are published or released by either the USGS or by cooperating agencies. The USGS water resources activities in Louisiana for the 1985 fiscal year (October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985) are described, including data collection and dissemination, water resources appraisals (interpretive studies) and research. (Lantz-PTT)

  12. Resource Evaluation and Site Selection for Microalgae Production in India

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrandt, A.; Jarvis, E.

    2010-09-01

    The study evaluates climate conditions, availability of CO2 and other nutrients, water resources, and land characteristics to identify areas in India suitable for algae production. The purpose is to provide an understanding of the resource potential in India for algae biofuels production and to assist policymakers, investors, and industry developers in their future strategic decisions.

  13. Evaluating Professional Development Resources: Selection and Development Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Renee; Dlott, Mike; Bamford, Heather; McGivern, Jennifer; Cohn, Marisa

    Program and professional development staff in adult education currently employ a variety of strategies to select professional development materials, but generally lack a systematic selection approach. Selections are often based on familiarity rather than quality or how well-suited the materials are to the learning goals of instructors and the…

  14. Student concepts of Natural Selection from a resource-based perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Scott Shawn

    The past two decades have produced a substantial amount of research about the teaching and learning of evolution; however, recent research often lacks a theoretical foundation. Application of a new theoretical framework could help fill the void and improve research about student concepts of evolution. This study seeks to show that a resource-based framework (Hammer et al., 2005) can improve research into student concepts of natural selection. Concepts of natural selection from urban community college students were assessed via qualitative (interviews, written open-response questions, and write/think aloud procedures) and quantitative methods (coded open response analysis, Concept Inventory for Natural Selection (CINS)(Anderson, Fisher, & Norman, 2002). Results showed that students demonstrate four important aspects of resource-based framework: the multi-faceted construction of concepts, context sensitivity/ concept flexibility, at-the-moment activation of resources, and perceptual frames. In open response assessment, evolutionary-gain responses produced significantly different responses than evolutionary-loss questions with: 1) significantly more correct answers for the gain than loss question (Wilcoxon signed rank test, z = -3.68, p=0.0002); 2) more Lamarckian responses to loss than the gain question (Fisher exact, p=0.0039); and significantly different distributions in expanded need vs basic need answers (Fishers exact, p = 0.02). Results from CINS scores showed significant differences in post activity scores between students that held different naive concepts associated with origin of variation, origin of species, differential reproduction, and limited survival suggesting that some naive ideas facilitate learning. Outcomes also suggest that an everyday or self-experience typological perceptual frame is an underlying source of many incorrect ideas about evolution. Interview and write/think aloud assessments propose four process resources applied by students as

  15. Analysis and Selection of Training Resources in Aging. Volume 1, Numbers One and Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinlay, Robert, Ed.; And Others

    This project was designed to aid trainers and educators in the field of aging in the identification of useful current training resources. Project goals include: (1) developing and refining a review format for evaluating training resources in aging; (2) selecting "high demand" training resources for evaluation; (3) training specialists in the field…

  16. Consequences of habitat change and resource selection specialization for population limitation in cavity-nesting birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis and applications. Management should target species that specialize in resource selection on a declining resource. Species with greater resource selection generalization can reduce population impacts of environmental change. Resource generalization can allow a species like the wren to take advantage of habitat refuges, such as those provided by the elk exclosures. Yet, resource generalization cannot offset the negative impacts of broad-scale declines in habitat quality on the landscape, as demonstrated by the general decline of wrens. Ultimately, aspen is an important habitat for biodiversity, and land management programmes that protect and aid recovery of aspen habitats may be critical.

  17. Application of random effects to the study of resource selection by animals.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Cameron S; Hebblewhite, Mark; Nielsen, Scott E; Krawchuk, Meg A; Aldridge, Cameron L; Frair, Jacqueline L; Saher, D Joanne; Stevens, Cameron E; Jerde, Christopher L

    2006-07-01

    1. Resource selection estimated by logistic regression is used increasingly in studies to identify critical resources for animal populations and to predict species occurrence. 2. Most frequently, individual animals are monitored and pooled to estimate population-level effects without regard to group or individual-level variation. Pooling assumes that both observations and their errors are independent, and resource selection is constant given individual variation in resource availability. 3. Although researchers have identified ways to minimize autocorrelation, variation between individuals caused by differences in selection or available resources, including functional responses in resource selection, have not been well addressed. 4. Here we review random-effects models and their application to resource selection modelling to overcome these common limitations. We present a simple case study of an analysis of resource selection by grizzly bears in the foothills of the Canadian Rocky Mountains with and without random effects. 5. Both categorical and continuous variables in the grizzly bear model differed in interpretation, both in statistical significance and coefficient sign, depending on how a random effect was included. We used a simulation approach to clarify the application of random effects under three common situations for telemetry studies: (a) discrepancies in sample sizes among individuals; (b) differences among individuals in selection where availability is constant; and (c) differences in availability with and without a functional response in resource selection. 6. We found that random intercepts accounted for unbalanced sample designs, and models with random intercepts and coefficients improved model fit given the variation in selection among individuals and functional responses in selection. Our empirical example and simulations demonstrate how including random effects in resource selection models can aid interpretation and address difficult assumptions

  18. Identifying polar bear resource selection patterns to inform offshore development in a dynamic and changing Arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Ryan R.; Horne, Jon S.; Rode, Karyn D.; Regehr, Eric V.; Durner, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Although sea ice loss is the primary threat to polar bears (Ursus maritimus), little can be done to mitigate its effects without global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Other factors, however, could exacerbate the impacts of sea ice loss on polar bears, such as exposure to increased industrial activity. The Arctic Ocean has enormous oil and gas potential, and its development is expected to increase in the coming decades. Estimates of polar bear resource selection will inform managers how bears use areas slated for oil development and to help guide conservation planning. We estimated temporally-varying resource selection patterns for non-denning adult female polar bears in the Chukchi Sea population (2008–2012) at two scales (i.e., home range and weekly steps) to identify factors predictive of polar bear use throughout the year, before any offshore development. From the best models at each scale, we estimated scale-integrated resource selection functions to predict polar bear space use across the population's range and determined when bears were most likely to use the region where offshore oil and gas development in the United States is slated to occur. Polar bears exhibited significant intra-annual variation in selection patterns at both scales but the strength and annual patterns of selection differed between scales for most variables. Bears were most likely to use the offshore oil and gas planning area during ice retreat and growth with the highest predicted use occurring in the southern portion of the planning area. The average proportion of predicted high-value habitat in the planning area was >15% of the total high-value habitat for the population during sea ice retreat and growth and reached a high of 50% during November 2010. Our results provide a baseline on which to judge future changes to non-denning adult female polar bear resource selection in the Chukchi Sea and help guide offshore development in the region. Lastly, our study provides a

  19. Job Analysis for Human Resource Management: A Review of Selected Research and Development. Manpower Research Monograph No. 36.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Michael

    The report summarizes the various job analysis techniques that have been developed, discusses their applications to selected human resource management activities, and suggests priorities for further research and developmental work. The introduction defines job analysis and discusses the applications of job analysis data, and the structure of the…

  20. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Socioeconomics

    SciTech Connect

    Saulsbury, J.W.; Sorensen, B.M.; Reed, R.M.; Schexnayder, S.M.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background information on socioeconomic resources collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3--4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The USDOE published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This document provides background information on socioeconomic resources in Hawaii County, with particular emphasis on the Puna District. Information is being made available for use by others in conducting future socioeconomic impact assessments in this area. this report describes existing socioeconomic resources in the areas studied and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. The socioeconomic resources described are primarily those that would be affected by employment and population growth associated with any future large-scale development. These resource categories are population, housing, land use, economic structure, infrastructure and public services, local government revenues and expenditures, and tourism and recreation.

  1. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Socioeconomics (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Saulsbury, J.W.; Sorensen, B.M.; Schexnayder, S.M.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background information on socioeconomic resources collected during the preparation of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed. Regis. 5925638), withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed Regis. 57:5433), of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGPEIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This document provides background information on socioeconomic resources in Hawaii County, with particular emphasis on the Puna District (Fig. 1). Information is being made available for use by others in conducting future socioeconomic impact assessments in this area. This report describes existing socioeconomic resources in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. The socioeconomic resources described are primarily those that would be affected by employment and population growth associated with any future large-scale development. These resource categories are (1) population, (2) housing, (3) land use, (4) economic structure (primarily employment and income), (5) infrastructure and public services (education, ground transportation, police and fire protection, water, wastewater, solid waste disposal, electricity, and emergency planning), (6) local government revenues and expenditures, and (7) tourism and recreation.

  2. Portfolio Assessment: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Betty, Comp.; Kretschmann, Karen Johnson, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography lists and summarizes the key points of 33 resource materials that focus specifically on portfolio assessment. Compiled in Spring 1993 as part of a demonstration project funded by the Wisconsin State Board of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, the bibliography is intended to serve as a tool for use in developing…

  3. Selective Archiving of Web Resources: A Study of Processing Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willer, Mirna; Buzina, Tanja; Holub, Karolina; Zajec, Jasenka; Milinovic, Miroslav; Topolscak, Nebojsa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess costs in the National and University Library of Croatia for processing Croatian web resources and the maintenance and development of the service, and to analyse the present organisation and workflow of their processing, and to propose improvements. Design/methodology/approach: The assessment period…

  4. School Law: A Selected Bibliography to Resources. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, O. Gene, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography includes both general resources in legal research and works specifically addressing school law. A total of 103 items are cited under the following categories: guides to legal research; indexes; dictionaries, encyclopedias, directories, and handbooks; American Digest system; federal statutes, reports, and rules and…

  5. A Selected List of Resources for Development Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swing, Nancy; Smithey, Sandra

    1989-01-01

    Lists materials which have been proven successful in helping students appreciate the extent of the U.S. interconnectedness with developing nations. Provides critiques of resources that have the potential for stimulating consideration of ways in which international development might be aided. Considers books, audiovisual materials, classroom…

  6. El Universo a Sus Pies: Actividades y Recursos para Astronomia (Universe at Your Fingertips: An Astronomy Activity and Resource Notebook).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew, Ed.; Schatz, Dennis, Ed.

    The goal of this resource notebook is to provide activities selected by astronomers and classroom teachers, comprehensive resource lists and bibliographies, background material on astronomical topics, and teaching ideas from experienced astronomy educators. Activities are grouped into several major areas of study in astronomy including lunar…

  7. ReSS: A Resource Selection Service for the Open Science Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Garzoglio, Gabriele; Levshina, Tanya; Mhashilkar, Parag; Timm, Steve; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    The Open Science Grid offers access to hundreds of computing and storage resources via standard Grid interfaces. Before the deployment of an automated resource selection system, users had to submit jobs directly to these resources. They would manually select a resource and specify all relevant attributes in the job description prior to submitting the job. The necessity of a human intervention in resource selection and attribute specification hinders automated job management components from accessing OSG resources and it is inconvenient for the users. The Resource Selection Service (ReSS) project addresses these shortcomings. The system integrates condor technology, for the core match making service, with the gLite CEMon component, for gathering and publishing resource information in the Glue Schema format. Each one of these components communicates over secure protocols via web services interfaces. The system is currently used in production on OSG by the DZero Experiment, the Engagement Virtual Organization, and the Dark Energy. It is also the resource selection service for the Fermilab Campus Grid, FermiGrid. ReSS is considered a lightweight solution to push-based workload management. This paper describes the architecture, performance, and typical usage of the system.

  8. Resources and Biological Activities of Natural Polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Li, An-Na; Li, Sha; Zhang, Yu-Jie; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Chen, Yu-Ming; Li, Hua-Bin

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative stress imposed by reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays an important role in many chronic and degenerative diseases. As an important category of phytochemicals, phenolic compounds universally exist in plants, and have been considered to have high antioxidant ability and free radical scavenging capacity, with the mechanism of inhibiting the enzymes responsible for ROS production and reducing highly oxidized ROS. Therefore, phenolic compounds have attracted increasing attention as potential agents for preventing and treating many oxidative stress-related diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, ageing, diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative diseases. This review summarizes current knowledge of natural polyphenols, including resource, bioactivities, bioavailability and potential toxicity. PMID:25533011

  9. Surfer: An Extensible Pull-Based Framework for Resource Selection and Ranking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolano, Paul Z.

    2004-01-01

    Grid computing aims to connect large numbers of geographically and organizationally distributed resources to increase computational power; resource utilization, and resource accessibility. In order to effectively utilize grids, users need to be connected to the best available resources at any given time. As grids are in constant flux, users cannot be expected to keep up with the configuration and status of the grid, thus they must be provided with automatic resource brokering for selecting and ranking resources meeting constraints and preferences they specify. This paper presents a new OGSI-compliant resource selection and ranking framework called Surfer that has been implemented as part of NASA's Information Power Grid (IPG) project. Surfer is highly extensible and may be integrated into any grid environment by adding information providers knowledgeable about that environment.

  10. Stochastic cycle selection in active flow networks.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Francis G; Forrow, Aden; Fawcett, Joanna B; Dunkel, Jörn

    2016-07-19

    Active biological flow networks pervade nature and span a wide range of scales, from arterial blood vessels and bronchial mucus transport in humans to bacterial flow through porous media or plasmodial shuttle streaming in slime molds. Despite their ubiquity, little is known about the self-organization principles that govern flow statistics in such nonequilibrium networks. Here we connect concepts from lattice field theory, graph theory, and transition rate theory to understand how topology controls dynamics in a generic model for actively driven flow on a network. Our combined theoretical and numerical analysis identifies symmetry-based rules that make it possible to classify and predict the selection statistics of complex flow cycles from the network topology. The conceptual framework developed here is applicable to a broad class of biological and nonbiological far-from-equilibrium networks, including actively controlled information flows, and establishes a correspondence between active flow networks and generalized ice-type models. PMID:27382186

  11. Selective Activation of the Infraspinatus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sung-Min; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Lee, Won-Hwee; Kim, Su-Jung; Park, Kyue-Nam

    2013-01-01

    Context: To improve selective infraspinatus muscle strength and endurance, researchers have recommended selective shoulder external-rotation exercise during rehabilitation or athletic conditioning programs. Although selective strengthening of the infraspinatus muscle is recommended for therapy and training, limited information is available to help clinicians design a selective strengthening program. Objective: To determine the most effective of 4 shoulder external-rotation exercises for selectively stimulating infraspinatus muscle activity while minimizing the use of the middle trapezius and posterior deltoid muscles. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 30 healthy participants (24 men, 6 women; age = 22.6 ± 1.7 years, height = 176.2 ± 4.5 cm, mass = 65.6 ± 7.4 kg) from a university population. Intervention(s): The participants were instructed to perform 4 exercises: (1) prone horizontal abduction with external rotation (PER), (2) side-lying wiper exercise (SWE), (3) side-lying external rotation (SER), and (4) standing external-rotation exercise (STER). Main Outcome Measure(s): Surface electromyography signals were recorded from the infraspinatus, middle trapezius, and posterior deltoid muscles. Differences among the exercise positions were tested using a 1-way repeated-measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni adjustment. Results: The infraspinatus muscle activity was greater in the SWE (55.98% ± 18.79%) than in the PER (46.14% ± 15.65%), SER (43.38% ± 22.26%), and STER (26.11% ± 15.00%) (F3,87 = 19.97, P < .001). Furthermore, the SWE elicited the least amount of activity in the middle trapezius muscle (F3,87 = 20.15, P < .001). Posterior deltoid muscle activity was similar in the SWE and SER but less than that measured in the PER and STER (F3,87 = 25.10, P < .001). Conclusions: The SWE was superior to the PER, SER, and STER in maximizing infraspinatus activity with the least

  12. Groundwater: A Vital Resource. Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Carla, Ed.

    Twenty-three activities dealing with various aspects of groundwater are provided in this manual. The activities are arranged under four headings: (1) the water cycle; (2) water distribution in soils (considering such topics as calculating water table depth and purifying water by filtering); (3) water quality (considering such topics as acid rain,…

  13. ReSS: Resource Selection Service for National and Campus Grid Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhashilkar, Parag; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Levshina, Tanya; Timm, Steve

    2010-04-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) offers access to around hundred Compute elements (CE) and storage elements (SE) via standard Grid interfaces. The Resource Selection Service (ReSS) is a push-based workload management system that is integrated with the OSG information systems and resources. ReSS integrates standard Grid tools such as Condor, as a brokering service and the gLite CEMon, for gathering and publishing resource information in GLUE Schema format. ReSS is used in OSG by Virtual Organizations (VO) such as Dark Energy Survey (DES), DZero and Engagement VO. ReSS is also used as a Resource Selection Service for Campus Grids, such as FermiGrid. VOs use ReSS to automate the resource selection in their workload management system to run jobs over the grid. In the past year, the system has been enhanced to enable publication and selection of storage resources and of any special software or software libraries (like MPI libraries) installed at computing resources. In this paper, we discuss the Resource Selection Service, its typical usage on the two scales of a National Cyber Infrastructure Grid, such as OSG, and of a campus Grid, such as FermiGrid.

  14. ReSS: Resource Selection Service for National and Campus Grid Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Mhashilkar, Parag; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Levshina, Tanya; Timm, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) offers access to around hundred Compute elements (CE) and storage elements (SE) via standard Grid interfaces. The Resource Selection Service (ReSS) is a push-based workload management system that is integrated with the OSG information systems and resources. ReSS integrates standard Grid tools such as Condor, as a brokering service and the gLite CEMon, for gathering and publishing resource information in GLUE Schema format. ReSS is used in OSG by Virtual Organizations (VO) such as Dark Energy Survey (DES), DZero and Engagement VO. ReSS is also used as a Resource Selection Service for Campus Grids, such as FermiGrid. VOs use ReSS to automate the resource selection in their workload management system to run jobs over the grid. In the past year, the system has been enhanced to enable publication and selection of storage resources and of any special software or software libraries (like MPI libraries) installed at computing resources. In this paper, we discuss the Resource Selection Service, its typical usage on the two scales of a National Cyber Infrastructure Grid, such as OSG, and of a campus Grid, such as FermiGrid.

  15. Who Knows? Selected Information Resources on International Social Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feulner, John A., Comp.

    These two annotated listings cite organizations, groups, and programs that provide information on international social affairs. The entries were selected from the data base of the National Referral Center of the Library of Congress. Listings are organized under the following headings: volunteer agencies; food; law; health; population; rural…

  16. Alternative trait combinations and secondary resource partitioning in sexually selected color polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuma; Kawata, Masakado

    2013-07-01

    Resource partitioning within a species, trophic polymorphism is hypothesized to evolve by disruptive selection when intraspecific competition for certain resources is severe. However, in this study, we reported the secondary partitioning of oviposition resources without resource competition in the damselfly Ischnura senegalensis. In this species, females show color polymorphism that has been evolved as counteradaptation against sexual conflict. One of the female morphs is a blue-green (andromorph, male-like morph), whereas the other morph is brown (gynomorph). These female morphs showed alternative preferences for oviposition resources (plant tissues); andromorphs used fresh (greenish) plant tissues, whereas gynomorphs used decaying (brownish) plants tissues, suggesting that they chose oviposition resources on which they are more cryptic. In addition, the two-color morphs had different egg morphologies. Andromorphs have smaller and more elongated eggs, which seemed to adapt to hard substrates compared with those of gynomorphs. The resource partitioning in this species is achieved by morphological and behavioral differences between the color morphs that allow them to effectively exploit different resources. Resource partitioning in this system may be a by-product of phenotypic integration with body color that has been sexually selected, suggesting an overlooked mechanism of the evolution of resource partitioning. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary and ecological consequences of such resource partitioning. PMID:23919150

  17. Alternative trait combinations and secondary resource partitioning in sexually selected color polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yuma; Kawata, Masakado

    2013-01-01

    Resource partitioning within a species, trophic polymorphism is hypothesized to evolve by disruptive selection when intraspecific competition for certain resources is severe. However, in this study, we reported the secondary partitioning of oviposition resources without resource competition in the damselfly Ischnura senegalensis. In this species, females show color polymorphism that has been evolved as counteradaptation against sexual conflict. One of the female morphs is a blue-green (andromorph, male-like morph), whereas the other morph is brown (gynomorph). These female morphs showed alternative preferences for oviposition resources (plant tissues); andromorphs used fresh (greenish) plant tissues, whereas gynomorphs used decaying (brownish) plants tissues, suggesting that they chose oviposition resources on which they are more cryptic. In addition, the two-color morphs had different egg morphologies. Andromorphs have smaller and more elongated eggs, which seemed to adapt to hard substrates compared with those of gynomorphs. The resource partitioning in this species is achieved by morphological and behavioral differences between the color morphs that allow them to effectively exploit different resources. Resource partitioning in this system may be a by-product of phenotypic integration with body color that has been sexually selected, suggesting an overlooked mechanism of the evolution of resource partitioning. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary and ecological consequences of such resource partitioning. PMID:23919150

  18. Higher resources decrease fluctuating selection during host–parasite coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Lopez Pascua, Laura; Hall, Alex R; Best, Alex; Morgan, Andrew D; Boots, Mike; Buckling, Angus

    2014-01-01

    We still know very little about how the environment influences coevolutionary dynamics. Here, we investigated both theoretically and empirically how nutrient availability affects the relative extent of escalation of resistance and infectivity (arms race dynamic; ARD) and fluctuating selection (fluctuating selection dynamic; FSD) in experimentally coevolving populations of bacteria and viruses. By comparing interactions between clones of bacteria and viruses both within- and between-time points, we show that increasing nutrient availability resulted in coevolution shifting from FSD, with fluctuations in average infectivity and resistance ranges over time, to ARD. Our model shows that range fluctuations with lower nutrient availability can be explained both by elevated costs of resistance (a direct effect of nutrient availability), and reduced benefits of resistance when population sizes of hosts and parasites are lower (an indirect effect). Nutrient availability can therefore predictably and generally affect qualitative coevolutionary dynamics by both direct and indirect (mediated through ecological feedbacks) effects on costs of resistance. PMID:25167763

  19. Quantum Computing: Selected Internet Resources for Librarians, Researchers, and the Casually Curious

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirasella, Jill

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an annotated selection of the most important and informative Internet resources for learning about quantum computing, finding quantum computing literature, and tracking quantum computing news. All of the quantum computing resources described in this article are freely available, English-language web sites that fall into one…

  20. Selected Sources, Resources and Services at the New York University Bobst Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Roger A.

    Intended for students and researchers at the Elmer Holmes Bobst Library at New York University, this document is comprised of a group of nine short research guides which present selected library resources on specific research areas or for specific student groups. Included are library resources for journalism students, a research guide on…

  1. Information Resources on Microcomputer Applications for Media Centers. A Selected ERIC Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Pamela, Comp.

    Citations in this annotated bibliography were selected from the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) indexes, Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE), and Resources in Education (RIE). Titles include: (1) "Computer Applications in the Library Media Center: An Introduction to Electronic Spreadsheets" (Keith E. Bernhard); (2)…

  2. Selective Activation of Microglia Facilitates Synaptic Strength

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Anna K.; Gruber-Schoffnegger, Doris; Drdla-Schutting, Ruth; Gerhold, Katharina J.; Malcangio, Marzia

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is thought to be initiated by neurons only, with the prevailing view assigning glial cells mere specify supportive functions for synaptic transmission and plasticity. We now demonstrate that glial cells can control synaptic strength independent of neuronal activity. Here we show that selective activation of microglia in the rat is sufficient to rapidly facilitate synaptic strength between primary afferent C-fibers and lamina I neurons, the first synaptic relay in the nociceptive pathway. Specifically, the activation of the CX3CR1 receptor by fractalkine induces the release of interleukin-1β from microglia, which modulates NMDA signaling in postsynaptic neurons, leading to the release of an eicosanoid messenger, which ultimately enhances presynaptic neurotransmitter release. In contrast to the conventional view, this form of plasticity does not require enhanced neuronal activity to trigger the events leading to synaptic facilitation. Augmentation of synaptic strength in nociceptive pathways represents a cellular model of pain amplification. The present data thus suggest that, under chronic pain states, CX3CR1-mediated activation of microglia drives the facilitation of excitatory synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn, which contributes to pain hypersensitivity in chronic pain states. PMID:25788673

  3. Lifetime reproductive success and density-dependent, multi-variable resource selection

    PubMed Central

    McLoughlin, Philip D; Boyce, Mark S; Coulson, Tim; Clutton-Brock, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Individuals are predicted to maximize lifetime reproductive success (LRS) through selective use of resources; however, a wide range of ecological and social processes may prevent individuals from always using the highest-quality resources available. Resource selection functions (RSFs) estimate the relative amount of time an individual spends using a resource as a function of the proportional availability of that resource. We quantified the association between LRS and coefficients of individual-based RSFs describing lifetime resource selection for 267 female red deer (Cervus elaphus) of the Isle of Rum, Scotland, from 1970 to 2001. LRS was significantly related to first- and second-order effects of selection for Agrostis/Festuca grassland and proximity to the sea coast (quality of forage within Agrostis/Festuca grassland was highest nearest the coast (ratio of short : long grassland)). The benefits of selecting for quality in Agrostis/Festuca grassland, however, traded-off with increases in LRS gained by avoiding conspecific density. LRS was inversely associated with local density, which was highest along the coast, and reproductive benefits of selecting Agrostis/Festuca grassland diminished with increasing density. We discuss the relevance of these results to our understanding of the spatial distribution of red deer abundance, and potential applications of our approach to evolutionary and applied ecology. PMID:16777736

  4. Dynamics of Active Sensing and Perceptual Selection

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Charles E; Wilson, Donald A.; Radman, Thomas; Scharfman, Helen; Lakatos, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Sensory processing is often regarded as a passive process in which a biological sensors like photo- and mechanoreceptors transducer physical energy into a neural code. Recent findings, however, suggest that: 1) most sensory processing is active, and largely determined by motor/attentional sampling routines, 2) due to rhythmicity in the motor routine, as well as to its entrainment of ambient rhythms in sensory regions, sensory inflow tends to be rhythmic, and 3) attentional manipulation of rhythms in sensory pathways is instrumental to perceptual selection. These observations outline the essentials of an Active Sensing paradigm, and argue for increased emphasis on the study of sensory processes as specific to the dynamic motor/attentional context in which inputs are acquired. PMID:20307966

  5. Dynamics of Active Sensing and perceptual selection.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Charles E; Wilson, Donald A; Radman, Thomas; Scharfman, Helen; Lakatos, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Sensory processing is often regarded as a passive process in which biological receptors like photoreceptors and mechanoreceptors transduce physical energy into a neural code. Recent findings, however, suggest that: first, most sensory processing is active, and largely determined by motor/attentional sampling routines; second, owing to rhythmicity in the motor routine, as well as to its entrainment of ambient rhythms in sensory regions, sensory inflow tends to be rhythmic; third, attentional manipulation of rhythms in sensory pathways is instrumental to perceptual selection. These observations outline the essentials of an Active Sensing paradigm, and argue for increased emphasis on the study of sensory processes as specific to the dynamic motor/attentional context in which inputs are acquired. PMID:20307966

  6. 15 CFR 922.21 - Selection of active candidates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Selection of active candidates. 922.21... Selection of active candidates. (a) The Secretary shall, from time to time, select a limited number of sites... standards set forth in section 303 of the Act. (b) Selection of a site as an Active Candidate shall...

  7. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Cultural environment and aesthetic resources

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, L.D.; Petrich, C.H.; Saulsbury, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on the cultural environment and aesthetic resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The cultural environment in the Geothermal Resource Zone (GRZ) and associated study area consists of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious practices and both Native Hawaiian and non-Native Hawaiian cultural resources. This report consists of three sections: (1) a description of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious rights, practices, and values; (2) a description of historic, prehistoric, and traditional Native Hawaiian sites; and (3) a description of other (non-native) sites that could be affected by development in the study area. Within each section, the level of descriptive detail varies according to the information currently available. The description of the cultural environment is most specific in its coverage of the Geothermal Resource Subzones in the Puna District of the island of Hawaii and the study area of South Maui. Ethnographic and archaeological reports by Cultural Advocacy Network Developing Options and International Archaeological Research Institute, Inc., respectively, supplement the descriptions of these two areas with new information collected specifically for this study. Less detailed descriptions of additional study areas on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and the island of Hawaii are based on existing archaeological surveys.

  8. The Development of a Resource for Physically Active School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Vicki R.; O'Connor, Justen P.

    2009-01-01

    This project describes the development of a resource designed to facilitate the exploration of factors influencing physical activity within school settings across multiple levels. Using a socio-ecological framework, the study draws upon factors across three domains that potentially impact physical activity levels within school settings: The…

  9. WATER: Water Activities Teaching Environmental Responsibility: Teacher Resource, Environmental Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Ed, Ed.; And Others

    This activity book was developed as part of an effort to protect water quality of the Stillwater River, Ohio, through a Watershed Protection Project. It is designed to raise teachers' and students' awareness and trigger a sense of stewardship towards the preservation of water resources. The activities are generally appropriate for elementary age…

  10. Dramatic Activities in Language Arts Classrooms: Resource Summary. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Sibel

    This digest reviews some of the related literature about the benefits of classroom drama activities and introduces a variety of resources to help educators incorporate dramatic activities in their language arts classrooms. The digest notes that although several terms have been used to refer to "classroom drama" such as creative dramatics,…

  11. Resource Selection Using Execution and Queue Wait Time Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Smith; Wong, Parkson; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Computational grids provide users with many possible places to execute their applications. We wish to help users select where to run their applications by providing predictions of the execution times of applications on space shared parallel computers and predictions of when scheduling systems for such parallel computers will start applications. Our predictions are based on instance based learning techniques and simulations of scheduling algorithms. We find that our execution time prediction techniques have an average error of 37 percent of the execution times for trace data recorded from SGI Origins at NASA Ames Research Center and that this error is 67 percent lower than the error of user estimates. We also find that the error when predicting how long applications will wait in scheduling queues is 95 percent of mean queue wait times when using our execution time predictions and this is 57 percent lower than if we use user execution time estimates.

  12. Earth resources-regional transfer activity contracts review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensko, J., Jr.; Daniels, J. L.; Downs, S. W., Jr.; Jones, N. L.; Morton, R. R.; Paludan, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    A regional transfer activity contracts review held by the Earth Resources Office was summarized. Contracts in the earth resources field primarily directed toward applications of satellite data and technology in solution of state and regional problems were reviewed. A summary of the progress of each contract was given in order to share experiences of researchers across a seven state region. The region included Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and North Carolina. Research in several earth science disciplines included forestry, limnology, water resources, land use, geology, and mathematical modeling. The use of computers for establishment of information retrieval systems was also emphasized.

  13. Selection of active spaces for multiconfigurational wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Sebastian; Boguslawski, Katharina; Janowski, Tomasz; Reiher, Markus; Pulay, Peter

    2015-06-01

    The efficient and accurate description of the electronic structure of strongly correlated systems is still a largely unsolved problem. The usual procedures start with a multiconfigurational (usually a Complete Active Space, CAS) wavefunction which accounts for static correlation and add dynamical correlation by perturbation theory, configuration interaction, or coupled cluster expansion. This procedure requires the correct selection of the active space. Intuitive methods are unreliable for complex systems. The inexpensive black-box unrestricted natural orbital (UNO) criterion postulates that the Unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) charge natural orbitals with fractional occupancy (e.g., between 0.02 and 1.98) constitute the active space. UNOs generally approximate the CAS orbitals so well that the orbital optimization in CAS Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) may be omitted, resulting in the inexpensive UNO-CAS method. A rigorous testing of the UNO criterion requires comparison with approximate full configuration interaction wavefunctions. This became feasible with the advent of Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) methods which can approximate highly correlated wavefunctions at affordable cost. We have compared active orbital occupancies in UNO-CAS and CASSCF calculations with DMRG in a number of strongly correlated molecules: compounds of electronegative atoms (F2, ozone, and NO2), polyenes, aromatic molecules (naphthalene, azulene, anthracene, and nitrobenzene), radicals (phenoxy and benzyl), diradicals (o-, m-, and p-benzyne), and transition metal compounds (nickel-acetylene and Cr2). The UNO criterion works well in these cases. Other symmetry breaking solutions, with the possible exception of spatial symmetry, do not appear to be essential to generate the correct active space. In the case of multiple UHF solutions, the natural orbitals of the average UHF density should be used. The problems of the UNO criterion and their potential solutions are discussed

  14. Selection of active spaces for multiconfigurational wavefunctions.

    PubMed

    Keller, Sebastian; Boguslawski, Katharina; Janowski, Tomasz; Reiher, Markus; Pulay, Peter

    2015-06-28

    The efficient and accurate description of the electronic structure of strongly correlated systems is still a largely unsolved problem. The usual procedures start with a multiconfigurational (usually a Complete Active Space, CAS) wavefunction which accounts for static correlation and add dynamical correlation by perturbation theory, configuration interaction, or coupled cluster expansion. This procedure requires the correct selection of the active space. Intuitive methods are unreliable for complex systems. The inexpensive black-box unrestricted natural orbital (UNO) criterion postulates that the Unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) charge natural orbitals with fractional occupancy (e.g., between 0.02 and 1.98) constitute the active space. UNOs generally approximate the CAS orbitals so well that the orbital optimization in CAS Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) may be omitted, resulting in the inexpensive UNO-CAS method. A rigorous testing of the UNO criterion requires comparison with approximate full configuration interaction wavefunctions. This became feasible with the advent of Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) methods which can approximate highly correlated wavefunctions at affordable cost. We have compared active orbital occupancies in UNO-CAS and CASSCF calculations with DMRG in a number of strongly correlated molecules: compounds of electronegative atoms (F2, ozone, and NO2), polyenes, aromatic molecules (naphthalene, azulene, anthracene, and nitrobenzene), radicals (phenoxy and benzyl), diradicals (o-, m-, and p-benzyne), and transition metal compounds (nickel-acetylene and Cr2). The UNO criterion works well in these cases. Other symmetry breaking solutions, with the possible exception of spatial symmetry, do not appear to be essential to generate the correct active space. In the case of multiple UHF solutions, the natural orbitals of the average UHF density should be used. The problems of the UNO criterion and their potential solutions are discussed

  15. Selection of active spaces for multiconfigurational wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Sebastian; Boguslawski, Katharina; Reiher, Markus; Janowski, Tomasz; Pulay, Peter

    2015-06-28

    The efficient and accurate description of the electronic structure of strongly correlated systems is still a largely unsolved problem. The usual procedures start with a multiconfigurational (usually a Complete Active Space, CAS) wavefunction which accounts for static correlation and add dynamical correlation by perturbation theory, configuration interaction, or coupled cluster expansion. This procedure requires the correct selection of the active space. Intuitive methods are unreliable for complex systems. The inexpensive black-box unrestricted natural orbital (UNO) criterion postulates that the Unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) charge natural orbitals with fractional occupancy (e.g., between 0.02 and 1.98) constitute the active space. UNOs generally approximate the CAS orbitals so well that the orbital optimization in CAS Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) may be omitted, resulting in the inexpensive UNO-CAS method. A rigorous testing of the UNO criterion requires comparison with approximate full configuration interaction wavefunctions. This became feasible with the advent of Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) methods which can approximate highly correlated wavefunctions at affordable cost. We have compared active orbital occupancies in UNO-CAS and CASSCF calculations with DMRG in a number of strongly correlated molecules: compounds of electronegative atoms (F{sub 2}, ozone, and NO{sub 2}), polyenes, aromatic molecules (naphthalene, azulene, anthracene, and nitrobenzene), radicals (phenoxy and benzyl), diradicals (o-, m-, and p-benzyne), and transition metal compounds (nickel-acetylene and Cr{sub 2}). The UNO criterion works well in these cases. Other symmetry breaking solutions, with the possible exception of spatial symmetry, do not appear to be essential to generate the correct active space. In the case of multiple UHF solutions, the natural orbitals of the average UHF density should be used. The problems of the UNO criterion and their potential solutions

  16. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Dugal, Cherie J; van Beest, Floris M; Vander Wal, Eric; Brook, Ryan K

    2013-01-01

    Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high-risk areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012, in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely selected for sites outside of parks during the hunting season in contrast to adult females and juvenile males. The RSFs showed selection by adult females and juvenile males to be negatively associated with landscape-level forest cover, high road density, and water cover, whereas hunter-kill sites of these cohorts were positively associated with landscape-level forest cover and increasing distance to streams and negatively associated with high road density. Local-level forest was positively associated with collared animal locations and hunter-kill sites; however, selection was stronger for collared juvenile males and hunter-killed adult females. In instances where disease infects a metapopulation and eradication is infeasible, a principle goal of management is to limit the spread of disease among infected animals. We map high-risk areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts but currently underrepresented in the distribution of kill sites. We present a novel application of widely available data to target hunter distribution based on host resource

  17. Coevolution of active vision and feature selection.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Kato, Toshifumi; Marocco, Davide; Sauser, Eric

    2004-03-01

    We show that complex visual tasks, such as position- and size-invariant shape recognition and navigation in the environment, can be tackled with simple architectures generated by a coevolutionary process of active vision and feature selection. Behavioral machines equipped with primitive vision systems and direct pathways between visual and motor neurons are evolved while they freely interact with their environments. We describe the application of this methodology in three sets of experiments, namely, shape discrimination, car driving, and robot navigation. We show that these systems develop sensitivity to a number of oriented, retinotopic, visual-feature-oriented edges, corners, height, and a behavioral repertoire to locate, bring, and keep these features in sensitive regions of the vision system, resembling strategies observed in simple insects. PMID:15052484

  18. Nanostructured electrocatalysts with tunable activity and selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Kühl, Stefanie; Strasser, Peter; Cuenya, Beatriz Roldan

    2016-04-01

    The field of electrocatalysis has undergone tremendous advancement in the past few decades, in part owing to improvements in catalyst design at the nanoscale. These developments have been crucial for the realization of and improvement in alternative energy technologies based on electrochemical reactions such as fuel cells. Through the development of novel synthesis methods, characterization techniques and theoretical methods, rationally designed nanoscale electrocatalysts with tunable activity and selectivity have been achieved. This Review explores how nanostructures can be used to control electrochemical reactivity, focusing on three model reactions: O2 electroreduction, CO2 electroreduction and ethanol electrooxidation. The mechanisms behind nanoscale control of reactivity are discussed, such as the presence of low-coordinated sites or facets, strain, ligand effects and bifunctional effects in multimetallic materials. In particular, studies of how particle size, shape and composition in nanostructures can be used to tune reactivity are highlighted.

  19. Widespread disruptive selection in the wild is associated with intense resource competition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Disruptive selection has been documented in a growing number of natural populations. Yet, its prevalence within individual systems remains unclear. Furthermore, few studies have sought to identify the ecological factors that promote disruptive selection in the wild. To address these issues, we surveyed 15 populations of Mexican spadefoot toad tadpoles, Spea multiplicata, and measured the prevalence of disruptive selection acting on resource-use phenotypes. We also evaluated the relationship between the strength of disruptive selection and the intensity of intraspecific competition—an ecological agent hypothesized to be an important driver of disruptive selection. Results Disruptive selection was the predominant mode of quadratic selection across all populations. However, a directional component of selection favoring an extreme ecomorph—a distinctive carnivore morph—was also common. Disruptive selection was strongest in populations experiencing the most intense intraspecific competition, whereas stabilizing selection was only found in populations experiencing relatively weak intraspecific competition. Conclusions Disruptive selection can be common in natural populations. Intraspecific competition for resources may be a key driver of such selection. PMID:22857143

  20. Analyzing learning during Peer Instruction dialogues: A resource activation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Anna K.; Galloway, Ross K.; Hardy, Judy; Sinclair, Christine M.

    2014-12-01

    Peer Instruction (PI) is an evidence based pedagogy commonly used in undergraduate physics instruction. When asked questions designed to test conceptual understanding, it has been observed that the proportion of students choosing the correct answer increases following peer discussion; however, relatively little is known about what takes place during these discussions or how they are beneficial to the processes of learning physics [M. C. James and S. Willoughby, Am. J. Phys. 79, 123 (2011)]. In this paper a framework for analyzing PI discussions developed through the lens of the "resources model" [D. Hammer, Am. J. Phys. 64, 1316 (1996); D. Hammer et al., Information Age Publishing (2005)] is proposed. A central hypothesis for this framework is that the dialogue with peers plays a crucial role in activating appropriate cognitive resources, enabling the students to see the problem differently, and therefore to answer the questions correctly. This framework is used to gain greater insights into the PI discussions of first year undergraduate physics students at the University of Edinburgh, UK, which were recorded using Livescribe Smartpens. Analysis of the dialogues revealed three different types of resource activation corresponding to increasing cognitive grain size. These were activation of knowledge elements, activation of linkages between knowledge elements, and activation of control structures (epistemic games and epistemological frames). Three case studies are examined to illustrate the role that peer dialogue plays in the activation of these cognitive resources in a PI session. The implications for pedagogical practice are discussed.

  1. Anthropogenic resource subsidies determine space use by Australian arid zone dingoes: an improved resource selection modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Thomas M; Ballard, Guy-Anthony; Dickman, Christopher R; Fleming, Peter J S; Howden, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Dingoes (Canis lupus dingo) were introduced to Australia and became feral at least 4,000 years ago. We hypothesized that dingoes, being of domestic origin, would be adaptable to anthropogenic resource subsidies and that their space use would be affected by the dispersion of those resources. We tested this by analyzing Resource Selection Functions (RSFs) developed from GPS fixes (locations) of dingoes in arid central Australia. Using Generalized Linear Mixed-effect Models (GLMMs), we investigated resource relationships for dingoes that had access to abundant food near mine facilities, and for those that did not. From these models, we predicted the probability of dingo occurrence in relation to anthropogenic resource subsidies and other habitat characteristics over ∼ 18,000 km(2). Very small standard errors and subsequent pervasively high P-values of results will become more important as the size of data sets, such as our GPS tracking logs, increases. Therefore, we also investigated methods to minimize the effects of serial and spatio-temporal correlation among samples and unbalanced study designs. Using GLMMs, we accounted for some of the correlation structure of GPS animal tracking data; however, parameter standard errors remained very small and all predictors were highly significant. Consequently, we developed an alternative approach that allowed us to review effect sizes at different spatial scales and determine which predictors were sufficiently ecologically meaningful to include in final RSF models. We determined that the most important predictor for dingo occurrence around mine sites was distance to the refuse facility. Away from mine sites, close proximity to human-provided watering points was predictive of dingo dispersion as were other landscape factors including palaeochannels, rocky rises and elevated drainage depressions. Our models demonstrate that anthropogenically supplemented food and water can alter dingo-resource relationships. The spatial

  2. Anthropogenic Resource Subsidies Determine Space Use by Australian Arid Zone Dingoes: An Improved Resource Selection Modelling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Thomas M.; Ballard, Guy-Anthony; Dickman, Christopher R.; Fleming, Peter J. S.; Howden, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Dingoes (Canis lupus dingo) were introduced to Australia and became feral at least 4,000 years ago. We hypothesized that dingoes, being of domestic origin, would be adaptable to anthropogenic resource subsidies and that their space use would be affected by the dispersion of those resources. We tested this by analyzing Resource Selection Functions (RSFs) developed from GPS fixes (locations) of dingoes in arid central Australia. Using Generalized Linear Mixed-effect Models (GLMMs), we investigated resource relationships for dingoes that had access to abundant food near mine facilities, and for those that did not. From these models, we predicted the probability of dingo occurrence in relation to anthropogenic resource subsidies and other habitat characteristics over ∼ 18,000 km2. Very small standard errors and subsequent pervasively high P-values of results will become more important as the size of data sets, such as our GPS tracking logs, increases. Therefore, we also investigated methods to minimize the effects of serial and spatio-temporal correlation among samples and unbalanced study designs. Using GLMMs, we accounted for some of the correlation structure of GPS animal tracking data; however, parameter standard errors remained very small and all predictors were highly significant. Consequently, we developed an alternative approach that allowed us to review effect sizes at different spatial scales and determine which predictors were sufficiently ecologically meaningful to include in final RSF models. We determined that the most important predictor for dingo occurrence around mine sites was distance to the refuse facility. Away from mine sites, close proximity to human-provided watering points was predictive of dingo dispersion as were other landscape factors including palaeochannels, rocky rises and elevated drainage depressions. Our models demonstrate that anthropogenically supplemented food and water can alter dingo-resource relationships. The spatial

  3. Current water resources activities in Arkansas, 1984-85

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Louthian, B.L.; Gann, E.E.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes water resources activities conducted by the Arkansas District of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, during fiscal years 1984 and 1985. Activities included surface water, groundwater, water quality, and water-use investigations. Twenty-five projects were funded during 1984 and 1985. For each project, a description of the project objectives, approach, plans and reports is included. Lists are included of reports completed during the period and of reports previously published by, or in conjunction with the Geological Survey. (USGS)

  4. Current water resources activities in Arkansas, 1986-87

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Louthian, B.L.; Gann, E.E.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes water resources activities conducted by the Arkansas District of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division during fiscal years 1986 and 1987. Activities included surface water, groundwater, water quality, and water-use investigations. Eighteen projects were funded during 1986 and 1987. For each project, a description of the project objectives, approach, plans and reports is included. Lists are included of reports completed during the period and of reports previously published by, or in conjunction with, the Geological Survey. (USGS)

  5. Board on Earth Sciences and Resources and its Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffries, Craig M.

    1997-01-01

    The Board will provide oversight of the earth science and resource activities within the National Research Council, provide a review of research and public activities in the solid-earth sciences, and provide analyses and recommendations relevant to the supply, delivery, and associated impacts of and issues related to hydrocarbon, metallic, and non-metallic mineral resources. The Board will monitor the status of the earth sciences, assess the health of the disciplines, and identify research opportunities, and will respond to specific agency requests.

  6. Water resources activities in Kentucky, 1993-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maglothin, L. S., (compiler); Forbes, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is the principal Federal water-resources data collection and investigation agency. Through the Water Resources Division District Office in Kentucky, the USGS investigates the occurrence, distribution, quantity, movement, and chemical and biological quality of surface and ground water in the State. The mission of this program is to collect, interpret, and publish information on water resources. Almost all research and data collection is a cooperative effort in which planning and financial support are shared by State and local agencies and governments. Other activities are funded by other Federal agencies or by direct Congressional appropriation. This report is intended to inform the public and cooperating agencies, vitally interested in the water resources of Kentucky, as to the current status of the Distfict's data collection and investigation program. Included in the report are summaries of water-resources activities in Kentucky conducted by the USGS. Also included is a description of the USGS mission and program, District organization, funding sources and cooperating agencies, and a list of USGS publications relevant to the water resources of the State.

  7. Activities at the Universal Protein Resource (UniProt)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The mission of the Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) (http://www.uniprot.org) is to provide the scientific community with a comprehensive, high-quality and freely accessible resource of protein sequences and functional annotation. It integrates, interprets and standardizes data from literature and numerous resources to achieve the most comprehensive catalog possible of protein information. The central activities are the biocuration of the UniProt Knowledgebase and the dissemination of these data through our Web site and web services. UniProt is produced by the UniProt Consortium, which consists of groups from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) and the Protein Information Resource (PIR). UniProt is updated and distributed every 4 weeks and can be accessed online for searches or downloads. PMID:24253303

  8. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Geological Hazards (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, W.P.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed Regis. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed Regis. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications and open-file reports. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift, and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis). First, overviews of volcanic and earthquake activity, and details of offshore geologic hazards is provided for the Hawaiian Islands. Then, a more detailed discussion of onshore geologic hazards is presented with special emphasis on the southern third of Hawaii and the east rift

  9. Five-Minute Activities: A Resource Book of Short Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ur, Penny; Wright, Andrew

    This book provides about 130 short, easily-prepared activities to supplement the longer teaching procedures that make up the main body of an English course. Suitable for elementary to advanced levels, the activities presented in the book can serve as a quick warm-up for the students, an idea for a brief vocabulary review, a light filler to provide…

  10. Resource Constrained Planning of Multiple Projects with Separable Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Susumu; Morita, Hiroshi; Kanawa, Takuya

    In this study we consider a resource constrained planning problem of multiple projects with separable activities. This problem provides a plan to process the activities considering a resource availability with time window. We propose a solution algorithm based on the branch and bound method to obtain the optimal solution minimizing the completion time of all projects. We develop three methods for improvement of computational efficiency, that is, to obtain initial solution with minimum slack time rule, to estimate lower bound considering both time and resource constraints and to introduce an equivalence relation for bounding operation. The effectiveness of the proposed methods is demonstrated by numerical examples. Especially as the number of planning projects increases, the average computational time and the number of searched nodes are reduced.

  11. Resource Selection Probability Functions for Gopher Tortoise: Providing a Management Tool Applicable Across the Species' Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowal, Virginia A.; Schmolke, Amelie; Kanagaraj, Rajapandian; Bruggeman, Douglas

    2014-03-01

    The gopher tortoise ( Gopherus polyphemus) is protected by conservation policy throughout its range. Efforts to protect the species from further decline demand detailed understanding of its habitat requirements, which have not yet been rigorously defined. Current methods of identifying gopher tortoise habitat typically rely on coarse soil and vegetation classifications, and are prone to over-prediction of suitable habitat. We used a logistic resource selection probability function in an information-theoretic framework to understand the relative importance of various environmental factors to gopher tortoise habitat selection, drawing on nationwide environmental datasets, and an existing tortoise survey of the Ft. Benning military base. We applied the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) as an index of vegetation density, and found that NDVI was strongly negatively associated with active burrow locations. Our results showed that the most parsimonious model included variables from all candidate model types (landscape features, topography, soil, vegetation), and the model groups describing soil or vegetation alone performed poorly. These results demonstrate with a rigorous quantitative approach that although soil and vegetation are important to the gopher tortoise, they are not sufficient to describe suitable habitat. More widely, our results highlight the feasibility of constructing highly accurate habitat suitability models from data that are widely available throughout the species' range. Our study shows that the widespread availability of national environmental datasets describing important components of gopher tortoise habitat, combined with existing tortoise surveys on public lands, can be leveraged to inform knowledge of habitat suitability and target recovery efforts range-wide.

  12. Resource selection probability functions for gopher tortoise: providing a management tool applicable across the species' range.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Virginia A; Schmolke, Amelie; Kanagaraj, Rajapandian; Bruggeman, Douglas

    2014-03-01

    The gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) is protected by conservation policy throughout its range. Efforts to protect the species from further decline demand detailed understanding of its habitat requirements, which have not yet been rigorously defined. Current methods of identifying gopher tortoise habitat typically rely on coarse soil and vegetation classifications, and are prone to over-prediction of suitable habitat. We used a logistic resource selection probability function in an information-theoretic framework to understand the relative importance of various environmental factors to gopher tortoise habitat selection, drawing on nationwide environmental datasets, and an existing tortoise survey of the Ft. Benning military base. We applied the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) as an index of vegetation density, and found that NDVI was strongly negatively associated with active burrow locations. Our results showed that the most parsimonious model included variables from all candidate model types (landscape features, topography, soil, vegetation), and the model groups describing soil or vegetation alone performed poorly. These results demonstrate with a rigorous quantitative approach that although soil and vegetation are important to the gopher tortoise, they are not sufficient to describe suitable habitat. More widely, our results highlight the feasibility of constructing highly accurate habitat suitability models from data that are widely available throughout the species' range. Our study shows that the widespread availability of national environmental datasets describing important components of gopher tortoise habitat, combined with existing tortoise surveys on public lands, can be leveraged to inform knowledge of habitat suitability and target recovery efforts range-wide. PMID:24281920

  13. Teacher's Resource Guide on Acidic Precipitation with Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    The purpose of this teacher's resource guide is to help science teachers incorporate the topic of acidic precipitation into their curricula. A survey of recent junior high school science textbooks found a maximum of one paragraph devoted to the subject; in addition, none of these books had any related laboratory activities. It was on the basis of…

  14. Water Resource Uses and Recreational Activities in Rural Nigeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adekoya, Adebola

    1991-01-01

    This study surveys rural Nigerian residents concerning local water resource uses and tourists' recreational activities with respect to scales of awareness, understanding, and incentive. Results indicate a public willingness to encourage and finance the rural development of water bodies for agricultural purposes exclusive of investment for tourism…

  15. A RESOURCE BOOK OF AEROSPACE ACTIVITIES, K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln Public Schools, NE.

    THIS RESOURCE BOOK OF ACTIVITIES WAS WRITTEN FOR TEACHERS OF GRADES K-6, TO HELP THEM INTEGRATE AEROSPACE SCIENCE WITH THE REGULAR LEARNING EXPERIENCES OF THE CLASSROOM. SUGGESTIONS ARE MADE FOR INTRODUCING AEROSPACE CONCEPTS INTO THE VARIOUS SUBJECT FIELDS SUCH AS LANGUAGE ARTS, MATHEMATICS, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, SOCIAL STUDIES, AND OTHERS. SUBJECT…

  16. Learning for Change in World Society: Reflections, Activities and Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    One World Trust, London (England).

    The resource booklet contains readings and activities for British secondary school world affairs classes. The material lends itself toward incorporation into various curricula, including history, geography, social studies, humanities, environmental studies, language and literature, home economics, math, and science. Subject matter focuses on…

  17. Suggestions, Resources and Activities for Teaching about Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Paul F.

    This teacher resource packet contains a total of 28 modules for teaching about Japan at the elementary and secondary level. Activities on the Japanese family appropriate for grade 1 focus on similarities and differences, family size, family needs, and family roles. Grade 2 lessons look at the school, neighborhood, roles of children in the…

  18. Community Resources for Promoting Youth Nutrition and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kelly R.; McGowan, Melissa K.; Donato, Karen A.; Kollipara, Sobha; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2009-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a national public health crisis. The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), the National Institutes of Health and Kaiser Permanente have developed community tools and resources for children and families to lower their risk for obesity through healthier, active lifestyles. The authors describe innovative practices and…

  19. Board on Earth Sciences and Resources and its activities

    SciTech Connect

    de Souza, Dr. Anthony R.

    2000-02-23

    This 1999 annual report of the activities of the National Research Council's (NRC) Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (BESR) begins with an introduction to the Board. This report (1) lists activities of the Board sustained by Department of Energy support, (2) presents accomplishments of the Board, (3) describes current and proposed studies of the Board, and (4) provides a brief review of the Board's future plans.

  20. Bibliography of selected water-resources publications by the U.S. Geological Survey for North Carolina, 1886-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winner, M.D., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    More than 660 selected publications, written by scientists, engineers, and technicians of the U.S. Geological Survey during the period 1886-1995, compose the bulk of information about North Carolina?s water resources. The bibliography includes interpretive reports on water resources, ground water, surface water, water quality, and public-water supply and water use, as well as data reports on the same subjects. The interpretive reports are organized by geographic areas of the State. These areas include statewide, physiographic province, major river basin, and county. The data reports are listed by water-resource topic, and the introduction to each topic provides historical notes for data-collection and publication activities. Summary tables list Water-Supply Paper numbers for reports containing ground-water, surface-water, and water-quality data by calendar year or water year. A concluding section discusses the availability of U.S. Geological Survey publications.

  1. Constraints on global fire activity vary across a resource gradient.

    PubMed

    Krawchuk, Meg A; Moritz, Max A

    2011-01-01

    We provide an empirical, global test of the varying constraints hypothesis, which predicts systematic heterogeneity in the relative importance of biomass resources to burn and atmospheric conditions suitable to burning (weather/climate) across a spatial gradient of long-term resource availability. Analyses were based on relationships between monthly global wildfire activity, soil moisture, and mid-tropospheric circulation data from 2001 to 2007, synthesized across a gradient of long-term averages in resources (net primary productivity), annual temperature, and terrestrial biome. We demonstrate support for the varying constraints hypothesis, showing that, while key biophysical factors must coincide for wildfires to occur, the relative influence of resources to burn and moisture/weather conditions on fire activity shows predictable spatial patterns. In areas where resources are always available for burning during the fire season, such as subtropical/tropical biomes with mid-high annual long-term net primary productivity, fuel moisture conditions exert their strongest constraint on fire activity. In areas where resources are more limiting or variable, such as deserts, xeric shrublands, or grasslands/savannas, fuel moisture has a diminished constraint on wildfire, and metrics indicating availability of burnable fuels produced during the antecedent wet growing seasons reflect a more pronounced constraint on wildfire. This macro-scaled evidence for spatially varying constraints provides a synthesis with studies performed at local and regional scales, enhances our understanding of fire as a global process, and indicates how sensitivity to future changes in temperature and precipitation may differ across the world. PMID:21560682

  2. Risk assessment activities at NIOSH: Information resources and needs

    SciTech Connect

    Stayner, L.T.; Meinhardt, T.; Hardin, B.

    1990-12-31

    Under the Occupational Safety and Health, and Mine Safety and Health Acts, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is charged with development of recommended occupational safety and health standards, and with conducting research to support the development of these standards. Thus, NIOSH has been actively involved in the analysis of risk associated with occupational exposures, and in the development of research information that is critical for the risk assessment process. NIOSH research programs and other information resources relevant to the risk assessment process are described in this paper. Future needs for information resources are also discussed.

  3. Water-resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Missouri, fiscal year 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kratzer, W.M.; Jenkins, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    Water-resource activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Missouri consist of collecting hydrologic data and making interpretive studies. These projects are funded through joint-funding agreements with State and local agencies, transfer of funds from other Federal agencies, and direct Federal funds. These data and the results of the investigations are published or released by either the U.S. Geological Survey or by cooperating agencies. This report describes the hydrologic data-collection program and local or areal investigations in Missouri for fiscal year 1985 and provides a list of selected water-resources references for Missouri. (USGS)

  4. 38 CFR 40.6 - Selection of programs and activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Selection of programs and... Selection of programs and activities. (a) A State may select any program or activity published in the.... (b) Each State that adopts a process shall notify the Secretary of the VA's programs and...

  5. 18 CFR 1311.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 1311.6 Section 1311.6... § 1311.6 What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? (a)...

  6. Process for selecting NEAMS applications for access to Idaho National Laboratory high performance computing resources

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Pernice

    2010-09-01

    INL has agreed to provide participants in the Nuclear Energy Advanced Mod- eling and Simulation (NEAMS) program with access to its high performance computing (HPC) resources under sponsorship of the Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) program element. This report documents the process used to select applications and the software stack in place at INL.

  7. Selected Resources in the Areas of Adolescent Sexuality and Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glimps, Blanche E.

    This annotated bibliography of resources is suggested for use by school guidance counselors, health educators, teachers, and school nurses who provide supportive counseling and education to teenagers. It includes a general review of some of the problems associated with adolescent pregnancy and childbirth, and presents a list of selected books,…

  8. Selected Resources on Adult Children Living at Home: An Annotated Bibliography for Researchers, Educators, and Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.; Hayes, Kathleen C.

    The resources in this annotated bibliography were selected to help readers better understand what is known about adult children living at home. Data on this subject are scarce. The bibliography is a literature review--a State-of-the-Art report--which is applicable to many professionals and students in the social sciences. It was developed by…

  9. Continuing Education: Reentry and the Mature Woman--Annotated Selected References and Resources. Bibliography Series: 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirksena, Kathy, Comp.; And Others

    This bibliography, second in a series of three to be issued by the Women's Educational Equity Communications Network (WEECN), contains ninety-three selected information resources (articles, papers, separately published bibliographies, and monographs) in the area of continuing education and the reentry woman. These materials, alphabetized according…

  10. Hispanic Women and Education: Annotated Selected References and Resources. Bibliography Series: 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheat, Valerie, Comp.

    The annotated bibliography cites 82 selected references and resources pertaining to Hispanic women. Published between 1969 and 1978, the materials cited include bibliographies, overviews and statistical profiles, curricula and teaching materials, evaluations of material, perspectives on education, and publications on the participation of Hispanic…

  11. Overlap and Unique Titles in Selected Elementary School Media Centers with Implications for Resource Sharing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kugel, Patricia M.

    This descriptive study investigated the numbers of unique and overlap titles in selected elementary schools which may influence resource-sharing decision making. A convenience sample of seven elementary schools in DeKalb County, Georgia, using the Follett Software Company's "Circulation Plus" system was used. Each school printed a shelf list…

  12. A Study to Determine Competencies Needed in Selected Job Titles in Agricultural Resources Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Douglas D.; And Others

    The report is a composite, compilation, and analysis of data collected from selected job titles (soil conservation technician, civil engineering technician, dairy herd improvement supervisor, and lay food inspector) in agricultural resources occupations. The study was conducted to obtain a comprehensive analysis of the occupations and the…

  13. Selected Abstracts from ERIC. Resources in Vocational Education. Volume 14, Number 5, 1981-1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resources in Vocational Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    This issue contains approximately 250 abstracts selected from the ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education related to vocational and technical education research and development from the June through November 1980 Resources in Education. Abstracts, ordered by ED number, may include some or all of the following information:…

  14. Prescribed fire effects on resource selection by cattle in mesic sagebrush steppe. Part 1: Spring grazing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prescribed fire is commonly applied world wide as tool for enhancing habitats and altering resource selection patterns of grazing animals. A scientific basic for this management practice has been established in some rangeland ecosystems (e.g montane grasslands, tall grass prairie, mixed prairie, ...

  15. A Selected Annotated Bibliography on the Analysis of Water Resource Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gysi, Marshall; And Others

    Presented is an annotated bibliography of some selected publications pertaining to the application of systems analysis techniques to water resource problems. The majority of the references included in this bibliography have been published within the last five years. About half of the entries have informative abstracts and keywords following the…

  16. A Selected Annotated Bibliography on the Analysis of Water Resources System, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriss, Carol; And Others

    Presented is an annotated bibliography of some recent selected publications pertaining to the application of systems analysis techniques for defining and evaluating alternative solutions to water resource problems. Both subject and author indices are provided. Keywords are listed at the end of each abstract. The abstracted material emphasizes the…

  17. Habitat manipulation influences northern bobwhite resource selection on a reclaimed surface mine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooke, Jarred M.; Peters, David C.; Unger, Ashley M.; Tanner, Evan P.; Harper, Craig A.; Keyser, Patrick D.; Clark, Joseph D.; Morgan, John J.

    2015-01-01

    More than 600,000 ha of mine land have been reclaimed in the eastern United States, providing large contiguous tracts of early successional vegetation that can be managed for northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus). However, habitat quality on reclaimed mine land can be limited by extensive coverage of non-native invasive species, which are commonly planted during reclamation. We used discrete-choice analysis to investigate bobwhite resource selection throughout the year on Peabody Wildlife Management Area, a 3,330-ha reclaimed surface mine in western Kentucky. We used a treatment-control design to study resource selection at 2 spatial scales to identify important aspects of mine land vegetation and whether resource selection differed between areas with habitat management (i.e., burning, disking, herbicide; treatment) and unmanaged units (control). Our objectives were to estimate bobwhite resource selection on reclaimed mine land and to estimate the influence of habitat management practices on resource selection. We used locations from 283 individuals during the breeding season (1 Apr–30 Sep) and 136 coveys during the non-breeding season (1 Oct–Mar 31) from August 2009 to March 2014. Individuals were located closer to shrub cover than would be expected at random throughout the year. During the breeding season, individuals on treatment units used areas with smaller contagion index values (i.e., greater interspersion) compared with individuals on control units. During the non-breeding season, birds selected areas with greater shrub-open edge density compared with random. At the microhabitat scale, individuals selected areas with increased visual obstruction >1 m aboveground. During the breeding season, birds were closer to disked areas (linear and non-linear) than would be expected at random. Individuals selected non-linear disked areas during winter but did not select linear disked areas (firebreaks) because they were planted to winter wheat each fall and

  18. Activities affecting surface water resources: A general overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    In November 1987, P.E.I. signed a federal/provincial work-sharing arrangement on water resource management focusing on groundwater pollution, surface water degradation and estuarine eutrophication. The surface water program was designed to identify current surface water uses and users within 12 major watersheds across the Island containing 26 individual rivers, as well as problems arising due to practices that degrade the quality of surface water and restricts its value to other user groups. This report presents a general overview of the program, covering the general characteristics of the Island; operations in agriculture, fish and wildlife, forestry, recreation, fisheries, and industry; alterations of natural features of waterways; wetlands; additional watershed activities such as hydrometric stations and subdivision development; and activities affecting surface water resources such as sedimentation sources, pollution point sources and instream obstructions.

  19. Resource Utilization and Site Selection for a Self-Sufficient Martian Outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Donald; Chamitoff, Gregory; James, George

    1998-01-01

    As a planet with striking similarities to Earth, Mars is an important focus for scientific research aimed at understanding the processes of planetary evolution and the formation of our solar system. Fortunately, Mars is also a planet with abundant natural resources, including assessible materials that can be used to support human life and to sustain a self-sufficient martian outpost. Resources required include water, breathable air, food, shelter, energy, and fuel. Through a mission design based on in situ resource development, we can establish a permanent outpost on Mars beginning with the first manned mission. This paper examines the potential for supporting the first manned mission with the objective of achieving self-sufficiency through well-understood resource development and a program of rigorous scientific research aimed at extending that capability. We examine the potential for initially extracting critical resources from the martian environment, and discuss the scientific investigations required to identify additional resources in the atmosphere, on the surface, and within the subsurface. We also discuss our current state of knowledge of Mars, technical considerations of resource utilization, and using unmanned missions' data for selecting an optimal site. The primary goal of achieving self-sufficiency on Mars would accelerate the development of human colonization beyond Earth, while providing a robust and permanent martian base from which humans can explore and conduct long-term research on planetary evolution, the solar system, and life itself.

  20. How Important Are Student-Selected versus Instructor-Selected Literature Resources for Students' Learning and Motivation in Problem-Based Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wijnia, Lisette; Loyens, Sofie M.; Derous, Eva; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2015-01-01

    In problem-based learning students are responsible for their own learning process, which becomes evident when they must act independently, for example, when selecting literature resources for individual study. It is a matter of debate whether it is better to have students select their own literature resources or to present them with a list of…

  1. Resource selection by elk in an agro-forested landscape of northwestern Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Baasch, David M; Fischer, Justin W; Hygnstrom, Scott E; VerCauteren, Kurt C; Tyre, Andrew J; Millspaugh, Joshua J; Merchant, James W; Volesky, Jerry D

    2010-11-01

    In recent years, elk have begun recolonizing areas east of the Rocky Mountains that are largely agro-forested ecosystems composed of privately owned land where management of elk is an increasing concern due to crop and forage depredation and interspecific disease transmission. We used a Geographic Information System, elk use locations (n = 5013), random locations (n = 25,065), discrete-choice models, and information-theoretic methods to test hypotheses about elk resource selection in an agro-forested landscape located in the Pine Ridge region of northwestern Nebraska, USA. Our objectives were to determine landscape characteristics selected by female elk and identify publicly owned land within the Pine Ridge for potential redistribution of elk. We found distance to edge of cover influenced selection of resources by female elk most and that in areas with light hunting pressure, such as ours, this selection was not driven by an avoidance of roads. Female elk selected resources positioned near ponderosa pine cover types during all seasons, exhibited a slight avoidance of roads during spring and fall, selected areas with increased slope during winter and spring, and selected north- and east-facing aspects over flat areas and areas with south-facing slopes during winter months. We used our models to identified a potential elk redistribution area that had a higher proportion of landcover with characteristics selected by elk in our study area than the current herd areas and more landcover that was publicly owned. With appropriate management plans, we believe elk within the Potential Elk Redistribution Area would predominantly occupy publicly owned land, which would help minimize crop and forage damage on privately owned lands. PMID:20872141

  2. Selected Science Activities in Consumer Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagness, Richard L.; Sagness, Rebecca L.

    This publication has been designed for use by teachers wishing to incorporate consumer education activities into their science program. Each activity is classified by grade level most appropriate for use, area of consumer education involved, specific topic, and consumer education concept involved. Activities are designated as suitable for grades…

  3. 77 FR 33774 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request; Education and Human Resources Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request; Education and Human Resources Project... of Collection: Education and Human Resources Project Monitoring Clearance. OMB Approval Number: 3145... States and internationally. The Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR), a unit within...

  4. 18 CFR 1311.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 1311.6 Section 1311.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF...

  5. 18 CFR 1311.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 1311.6 Section 1311.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF...

  6. Bibliography of selected water-resources information for the Arkansas River basin in Colorado through 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuzmiak, John M.; Strickland, Hyla H.

    1994-01-01

    The Arkansas River basin composes most of southeastern Colorado, and the numerous population centers and vast areas of agricultural development are located primarily in the semiarid part of the basin east of the Continental Divide. Because effective management and development of water resources in this semiarid area are essential to the viability of the basin, many hydrologic data- collection programs and investigations have been done. This report contains a bibliography of selected water-resources information about the basin, including regularly published information and special investigations, from Federal, State, and other organizations. To aid the reader, the infor- mation is indexed by author, subject, county, and hydrologic unit (drainage basin).

  7. BReW: Blackbox Resource Selection for e-Science Workflows

    SciTech Connect

    Simmhan, Yogesh; Soroush, Emad; Van Ingen, Catharine; Agarwal, Deb; Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2010-10-04

    Workflows are commonly used to model data intensive scientific analysis. As computational resource needs increase for eScience, emerging platforms like clouds present additional resource choices for scientists and policy makers. We introduce BReW, a tool enables users to make rapid, highlevel platform selection for their workflows using limited workflow knowledge. This helps make informed decisions on whether to port a workflow to a new platform. Our analysis of synthetic and real eScience workflows shows that using just total runtime length, maximum task fanout, and total data used and produced by the workflow, BReW can provide platform predictions comparable to whitebox models with detailed workflow knowledge.

  8. Bayesian model selection applied to artificial neural networks used for water resources modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingston, Greer B.; Maier, Holger R.; Lambert, Martin F.

    2008-04-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have proven to be extremely valuable tools in the field of water resources engineering. However, one of the most difficult tasks in developing an ANN is determining the optimum level of complexity required to model a given problem, as there is no formal systematic model selection method. This paper presents a Bayesian model selection (BMS) method for ANNs that provides an objective approach for comparing models of varying complexity in order to select the most appropriate ANN structure. The approach uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo posterior simulations to estimate the evidence in favor of competing models and, in this study, three known methods for doing this are compared in terms of their suitability for being incorporated into the proposed BMS framework for ANNs. However, it is acknowledged that it can be particularly difficult to accurately estimate the evidence of ANN models. Therefore, the proposed BMS approach for ANNs incorporates a further check of the evidence results by inspecting the marginal posterior distributions of the hidden-to-output layer weights, which unambiguously indicate any redundancies in the hidden layer nodes. The fact that this check is available is one of the greatest advantages of the proposed approach over conventional model selection methods, which do not provide such a test and instead rely on the modeler's subjective choice of selection criterion. The advantages of a total Bayesian approach to ANN development, including training and model selection, are demonstrated on two synthetic and one real world water resources case study.

  9. Selective Activation and Disengagement of Moral Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandura, Albert

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes psychological mechanisms by which moral control is selectively disengaged from inhumane conduct in ordinary and unusual circumstances. Explores the symptoms of moral exclusion as described in the literature. Presents categories that unify theory on moral exclusion and contribute practical classifications for use in empirical studies. (JS)

  10. Nesting success and resource selection of greater sage grouse in South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaczor, Nicholas W.; Jensen, Kent C.; Klaver, Robert W.; Rumble, Mark A.; Herman-Brunson, Katie M.; Swanson, Christopher C.; Sandercock, Brett K., (Edited By); Martin, Kathy; Segelbacher, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    Declines of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in South Dakota are a concern because further population declines may lead to isolation from populations in Wyoming and Montana. Furthermore, little information exists about reproductive ecology and resource selection of sage grouse on the eastern edge of their distribution. We investigated Greater Sage-Grouse nesting success and resource selection in South Dakota during 2006-2007. Radiomarked females were tracked to estimate nesting rates, nest success, and habitat resources selected for nesting. Nest initiation was 98.0%, with a maximum likelihood estimate of nest success of 45.6 ± 5.3%. Females selected nest sites that had greater sagebrush canopy cover and visual obstruction of the nest bowl compared to random sites. Nest survival models indicated that taller grass surrounding nests increased nest survival. Tall grass may supplement the low sagebrush cover in this area in providing suitable nest sites for Greater Sage-Grouse. Land managers on the eastern edge of Greater Sage-Grouse range could focus on increasing sagebrush density while maintaining tall grass by developing range management practices that accomplish this goal. To achieve nest survival rates similar to other populations, predictions from our models suggest 26 cm grass height would result in approximately 50% nest survival. Optimal conditions could be accomplished by adjusting livestock grazing systems and stocking rates.

  11. Temporal variation and scale in movement-based resource selection functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooten, M.B.; Hanks, E.M.; Johnson, D.S.; Alldredge, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    A common population characteristic of interest in animal ecology studies pertains to the selection of resources. That is, given the resources available to animals, what do they ultimately choose to use? A variety of statistical approaches have been employed to examine this question and each has advantages and disadvantages with respect to the form of available data and the properties of estimators given model assumptions. A wealth of high resolution telemetry data are now being collected to study animal population movement and space use and these data present both challenges and opportunities for statistical inference. We summarize traditional methods for resource selection and then describe several extensions to deal with measurement uncertainty and an explicit movement process that exists in studies involving high-resolution telemetry data. Our approach uses a correlated random walk movement model to obtain temporally varying use and availability distributions that are employed in a weighted distribution context to estimate selection coefficients. The temporally varying coefficients are then weighted by their contribution to selection and combined to provide inference at the population level. The result is an intuitive and accessible statistical procedure that uses readily available software and is computationally feasible for large datasets. These methods are demonstrated using data collected as part of a large-scale mountain lion monitoring study in Colorado, USA.

  12. In The Mainstream: Selected Music Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Martha

    1982-01-01

    Discusses classroom management techniques and music activities for handicapped children in mainstreamed and special education classes. Classroom techniques are designed around students' poor reading and concentration abilities, multisensory experiences, and consistent discipline using positive reinforcement. Music activities are used to reinforce…

  13. Cytotoxic activity of selected Nigerian plants.

    PubMed

    Sowemimo, A; van de Venter, M; Baatjies, L; Koekemoer, T

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most prominent human diseases which has stimulated scientific and commercial interest in the discovery of new anticancer agents from natural sources. The current study investigates the cytotoxic activity of ethanolic extracts of sixteen Nigerian plants used locally for the treatment of cancer using the MTT assay on the HeLa cell line. Sapium ellipticum leaves showed activity comparable to the reference compound Cisplatin and greater cytotoxic activity than Combretum paniculatum, Celosia trigyna, Drymaria cordata, Cyathula achyranthoides and Cyathula prostata. Justica extensa, Pupalia lappacea, Hedranthera barteri leaves, Alternanthera sessilis, Ethulia conyzoides leaves, Combretum zenkeri root, Sapium ellipticum stembark and Lannea nigritana stembark showed very low activity while Combretum molle, Adenanthera parvoniana and Lannea acida showed no activity. The results justify the use of Sapium, Combretum, Celosia, Drymaria and Cyathula in traditional treatment of cancer. PMID:20606772

  14. Bibliography on Multicultural Activities in the Classroom: A Listing of Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Mary Lou; Geile, Carole

    This bibliography contains information on multicultural activities in the classroom. It is divided into three sections: a list of 97 book resources, a list of 59 journal articles, and a list of 17 ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) resources. The resources include general multicultural teaching guides and specific topical resources:…

  15. Biological activities of selected basidiomycetes from Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Fatimi, M; Schröder, G; Kreisel, H; Lindequist, U

    2013-03-01

    In a previous paper we demonstrated the results of biological screening of Yemeni basidiomycetes. The present study was aimed to investigate the antimicrobial and the antioxidant activity of further basidiomycetes collected in Yemen. Dichloromethane, methanol and aqueous extracts of the fruiting bodies of 25 species were screened in vitro for their antibacterial activities against three Gram-positive bacteria (Staphyloccocus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus flavus) and two Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa), against six human fungal pathogens (Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Aspergillus fumigatus, Mucor sp., Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes) and against one non human pathogenic fungus (Candida maltosa). The results indicated that 75 extracts exhibited activity against one or more of the bacteria. The methanol extracts of Agaricus cf. bernardii, Agrocybe pediades, Chlorophyllum molybdites, Coriolopsis polyzona, Ganoderma xylonoides, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Trametes lactinea and Trametes cingulata showed activity against all tested bacteria. The highest antibacterial activity was exhibited by methanol extracts from Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides and Trametes cingulata and Agaricus cf. bernardii, Agrocybe pediades, Coriolopsis polyzona, Pycnoporus sanguineus and Trametes lactinea. The methanol extracts of Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides and Pycnoporus sanguineus showed considerable antifungal activities against the tested fungal strains. Strong antioxidative effects employing the DPPH assay were exhibited by methanol extracts from Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides, Hexagonia velutina, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Trametes lactinea and Trametes cingulata. Our previous and presented studies about 48 basidiomycetes collected in Yemen provide evidence that basidiomycetes from the Arabic region so far should attract more attention as potential source for new biologically active

  16. Antibacterial activity of selected Malaysian honey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibacterial activity of honey is mainly dependent on a combination of its peroxide activity and non-peroxide components. This study aims to investigate antibacterial activity of five varieties of Malaysian honey (three monofloral; acacia, gelam and pineapple, and two polyfloral; kelulut and tualang) against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) were performed for semi-quantitative evaluation. Agar well diffusion assay was used to investigate peroxide and non-peroxide activities of honey. Results The results showed that gelam honey possessed lowest MIC value against S. aureus with 5% (w/v) MIC and MBC of 6.25% (w/v). Highest MIC values were shown by pineapple honey against E. coli and P. aeruginosa as well as acacia honey against E. coli with 25% (w/v) MIC and 50% (w/v) MBC values. Agar inhibition assay showed kelulut honey to possess highest total antibacterial activity against S. aureus with 26.49 equivalent phenol concentrations (EPC) and non-peroxide activity of 25.74 EPC. Lowest antibacterial activity was observed in acacia honey against E. coli with total activity of 7.85 EPC and non-peroxide activity of 7.59 EPC. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) between the total antibacterial activities and non-peroxide activities of Malaysian honey. The intraspecific correlation between MIC and EPC of E. coli (r = -0.8559) was high while that between MIC and EPC of P. aeruginosa was observed to be moderate (r = -0.6469). S. aureus recorded a smaller correlation towards the opposite direction (r = 0.5045). In contrast, B.cereus showed a very low intraspecific correlation between MIC and EPC (r = -0.1482). Conclusions Malaysian honey, namely gelam, kelulut and tualang, have high antibacterial potency derived from total and non-peroxide activities, which implies that both peroxide and other

  17. Market study for direct utilization of geothermal resources by selected sectors of economy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    A comprehensive analysis is presented of industrial markets potential for direct use of geothermal energy by a total of six industry sectors: food and kindred products; tobacco manufactures; textile mill products; lumber and wood products (except furniture); chemicals and allied products; and leather and leather products. A brief statement is presented regarding sectors of the economy and major manufacturing processes which can readily utilize direct geothermal energy. Previous studies on plant location determinants are summarized and appropriate empirical data provided on plant locations. Location determinants and potential for direct use of geothermal resources are presented. The data was gathered through interviews with 30 senior executives in the six sectors of economy selected for study. Probable locations of plants in geothermal resource areas and recommendations for geothermal resource marketing are presented. Appendix A presents factors which impact on industry location decisions. Appendix B presents industry executives interviewed during the course of this study. (MHR)

  18. Studying Teacher Selection of Resources in an Ultra-Large Scale Interactive System: Does Metadata Guide the Way?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramovich, Samuel; Schunn, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-large-scale interactive systems on the Internet have begun to change how teachers prepare for instruction, particularly in regards to resource selection. Consequently, it is important to look at how teachers are currently selecting resources beyond content or keyword search. We conducted a two-part observational study of an existing popular…

  19. The Gaia mission a rich resource for outreach activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flaherty, K. S.; Douglas, J.; Prusti, T.

    2008-07-01

    Space science missions, and astronomy missions in particular, capture the public imagination at all levels. ESA's Gaia mission is no exception to this. In addition to its key scientific goal of providing new insight into the origin, formation, and evolution of the Milky Way, Gaia also touches on many other scientific topics of broad appeal, for example, solar system objects, stars (including rare and exotic ones), dark matter, gravitational light bending. The mission naturally provides a rich resource for outreach possibilities whether it be to the general public, or to specific interest groups, such as scientists from other fields or educators. We present some examples of possible outreach activities for Gaia.

  20. Board on Earth Sciences and Resources and its activities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (BESR) coordinates, the National Research Council`s advice to the federal government on solid-earth science issues. The board identifies opportunities for advancing basic research and understanding, reports on applications of earth sciences in such areas as disaster mitigation and resource utilization, and analyzes the scientific underpinnings and credibility of earth science information for resource, environmental and other applications and policy decision. Committees operating under the guidance of the Board conducts studies addressing specific issues within the earth sciences. The current committees are as follows: Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data; Mapping Sciences Committee; Committee on Seismology; Committee on Geodesy; Rediscovering Geography Committee; Committee on Research Programs of the US Bureau of Mines. The following recent reports are briefly described: research programs of the US Bureau of Mines, first assessment 1994; Mount Rainier, active cascade volcano; the national geomagnetic initiative; reservoir class field demonstration program; solid-earth sciences and society; data foundation for the national spatial infrastructure; promoting the national spatial data infrastructure through partnerships; toward a coordinated spatial data infrastructure for the nation; and charting a course into the digital era; guidance to the NOAA`s nautical charting mission.

  1. Editors and author resource centers actively used by attendees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Barbara

    2012-02-01

    At the 2011 Fall Meeting, as in previous years, the Editors Resource Center located on the second floor of Moscone West was buzzing with activity: editors talking with other editors, collaborating with associate editors, speaking with authors, and meeting with students. In addition, several editors took part in "Meet the Editor" informal sessions, a new feature introduced for the 2011 meeting to strengthen the partnership between authors and editors. The map "Where are you from?" (see photo), outside the Editors Resource Center, drew the attention of many attendees who were eager to place their colored dots on the map. The Author Resource Center, located in the AGU Marketplace, became a hub for AGU veteran authors and potential authors alike. Staff were there to answer both editorial and technical questions, especially the most frequent one: What happens after my paper is accepted? The running slideshow that described all aspects of the AGU publications program sparked a myriad of questions, which AGU staff were happy to answer.

  2. Screening antifungal activities of selected medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, E N; Sampietro, A R; Vattuone, M A

    2001-01-01

    Plants synthesise a vast array of secondary metabolites that are gaining importance for their biotechnological applications. The antifungal activity of the ethanolic extracts of ten Argentinean plants used in native medicine is reported. Antifungal assays included radial growth inhibition, disk and well diffusion assays and growth inhibition by broth dilution tests. The chosen test fungi were yeasts, microfungi and wood-rot causing Basidiomycetes. Extracts of Larrea divaricata, Zuccagnia punctata and Larrea cuneifolia displayed remarkable activity in the assays against the majority of the test fungi. In addition to the former plants, Prosopanche americana also inhibited yeast growth. PMID:11137353

  3. It's payback time: Preschoolers selectively request resources from someone they had benefitted.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Expectations that others will reciprocate to the benefits they received from us play a crucial role for the establishment of stable reciprocal exchange within social relationships. In the current study, 3- to 5-year-old preschool children allocated in a first phase more resources to one recipient than to another recipient. Subsequently, they had the possibility to ask one of them for valuable resources. The results of Experiment 1 show that preschool children expect others to reciprocate and strategically ask the ones they benefitted more to share with them. Experiment 2 demonstrates that there was no selective resource request when the recipients were absent during children's resource allocations. Experiment 3 showed that children focused on the absolute amount of resources given to the recipients, but did not monitor their own relative generosity in judging to whom of the recipients they had been nicer. This study provides first evidence that preschool children possess reciprocity expectations and point thus to the strategic nature of early social behavior. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27359157

  4. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  5. Selection, Inclusion, Evaluation and Defense of Transgender-Inclusive Fiction for Young Adults: A Resource Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockefeller, Elsworth I.

    2009-01-01

    An increasingly visible youth transgender population is emerging and the number of transgender-inclusive fiction texts for young adults is growing. Adults serving teens in schools, libraries, and community agencies must begin actively pursuing, utilizing, and incorporating these texts into resource collections. This article provides an overview of…

  6. The Effectiveness of Selected Dissemination Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, David W.; Johnson, Russell H.

    1981-01-01

    The dissemination activities through which college admissions officers heard about Project CHOICE, a three-year project to help colleges improve the information they provided to prospective students, were investigated. The study involved determining how well various dissemination methods (newsletter, journal articles, conference presentations,…

  7. Selected Technology Lab Activities Implementation Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Public Schools, OR.

    These materials supplement state guides for junior high or middle school technology education programs. The materials show instructors how to implement 81 hours of new technology-related activities into existing programs. Introductory materials include a rationale, philosophy, and goals for technology education. Areas of instruction are as…

  8. Integrating resource selection into spatial capture-recapture models for large carnivores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Proffitt, Kelly M.; Goldberg, Joshua; Hebblewite, Mark; Russell, Robin E.; Jimenez, Ben; Robinson, Hugh S.; Pilgrim, Kristine; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife managers need reliable methods to estimate large carnivore densities and population trends; yet large carnivores are elusive, difficult to detect, and occur at low densities making traditional approaches intractable. Recent advances in spatial capture-recapture (SCR) models have provided new approaches for monitoring trends in wildlife abundance and these methods are particularly applicable to large carnivores. We applied SCR models in a Bayesian framework to estimate mountain lion densities in the Bitterroot Mountains of west central Montana. We incorporate an existing resource selection function (RSF) as a density covariate to account for heterogeneity in habitat use across the study area and include data collected from harvested lions. We identify individuals through DNA samples collected by (1) biopsy darting mountain lions detected in systematic surveys of the study area, (2) opportunistically collecting hair and scat samples, and (3) sampling all harvested mountain lions. We included 80 DNA samples collected from 62 individuals in the analysis. Including information on predicted habitat use as a covariate on the distribution of activity centers reduced the median estimated density by 44%, the standard deviation by 7%, and the width of 95% credible intervals by 10% as compared to standard SCR models. Within the two management units of interest, we estimated a median mountain lion density of 4.5 mountain lions/100 km2 (95% CI = 2.9, 7.7) and 5.2 mountain lions/100 km2 (95% CI = 3.4, 9.1). Including harvested individuals (dead recovery) did not create a significant bias in the detection process by introducing individuals that could not be detected after removal. However, the dead recovery component of the model did have a substantial effect on results by increasing sample size. The ability to account for heterogeneity in habitat use provides a useful extension to SCR models, and will enhance the ability of wildlife managers to reliably and

  9. Lunar in situ resource utilization by activated thermites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobosyan, Mkhitar; Martirosyan, Karen

    2011-10-01

    NASA's anticipated returns to the Moon by 2020, subsequent establishment of lunar in situ resource utilization technologies are essential. The surface of Moon is covered with small eroded particles of regolith called lunar dust that adheres electro-statically to everything coming in contact with it, and is of much concern for future lunar base because of its continual mitigation. The next major concern is the protection of equipment and personnel in long term expeditions from harmful UV radiation, which can be made by constructing protective buildings. For construction of permanent structures it is highly desired to have regular shaped sintered regolith with utilization of local materials and with minimum energy consumption. In this study the concept of sintering of lunar regolith with activated thermite reactions is discussed. The thermodynamic calculations as well as the experimental procedure is provided to prove the effectiveness of activated thermites for regolith sintering using local lunar resources with a low (15 wt. %) concentration of aluminum or magnesium. The thermite method is much more energy efficient than the other sintering methods suggested in literature.

  10. Animal genetic resources in Brazil: result of five centuries of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Mariante, A da S; Egito, A A

    2002-01-01

    Brazil has various species of domestic animals, which developed from breeds brought by the Portuguese settlers soon after their discovery. For five centuries, these breeds have been subjected to natural selection in specific environments. Today, they present characteristics adapted to the specific Brazilian environmental conditions. These breeds developed in Brazil are known as "Crioulo," "local," or naturalized. From the beginning of the 20th century, some exotic breeds, selected in temperate regions, have begun to be imported. Although more productive, these breeds do not have adaptive traits, such as resistance to disease and parasites found in breeds considered to be "native." Even so, little by little, they replaced the native breeds, to such an extent that the latter are in danger of extinction. In 1983, to avoid the loss of this important genetic material, the National Research Center for Genetic Resources and Biotechnology (Cenargen) of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa) decided to include conservation of animal genetic resources in its research program Conservation and Utilization of Genetic Resources. Until this time, they were only concerned with conservation of native plants. Conservation has been carried out by various research centers of Embrapa, universities, state research corporations, and private farmers, with a single coordinator at the national level, Cenargen. Specifically, conservation is being carried out by conservation nuclei, which are specific herds in which the animals are being conserved, situated in the habitats where the animals have been subjected to natural selection. This involves storage of semen and embryos from cattle, horses, buffaloes, donkeys, goats, sheep, and pigs. The Brazilian Animal Germplasm Bank is kept at Cenargen, which is responsible for the storage of semen and embryos of various breeds of domestic animals threatened with extinction, where almost 45,000 doses of semen and more than 200

  11. Population-level resource selection by sympatric brown and American black bears in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belant, J.L.; Griffith, B.; Zhang, Y.; Follmann, E.H.; Adams, L.G.

    2010-01-01

    Distribution theory predicts that for two species living in sympatry, the subordinate species would be constrained from using the most suitable resources (e.g., habitat), resulting in its use of less suitable habitat and spatial segregation between species. We used negative binomial generalized linear mixed models with fixed effects to estimate seasonal population-level resource selection at two spatial resolutions for female brown bears (Ursus arctos) and female American black bears (U. americanus) in southcentral Alaska during May-September 2000. Black bears selected areas occupied by brown bears during spring which may be related to spatially restricted (i.e., restricted to low elevations) but dispersed or patchy availability of food. In contrast, black bears avoided areas occupied by brown bears during summer. Brown bears selected areas near salmon streams during summer, presumably to access spawning salmon. Use of areas with high berry production by black bears during summer appeared in response to avoidance of areas containing brown bears. Berries likely provided black bears a less nutritious, but adequate food source. We suggest that during summer, black bears were displaced by brown bears, which supports distribution theory in that black bears appeared to be partially constrained from areas containing salmon, resulting in their use of areas containing less nutritious forage. Spatial segregation of brown and American black bears apparently occurs when high-quality resources are spatially restricted and alternate resources are available to the subordinate species. This and previous work suggest that individual interactions between species can result in seasonal population-level responses. ?? US Government 2009.

  12. Anticancer activity of selected Colocasia gigantia fractions.

    PubMed

    Pornprasertpol, Apichai; Sereemaspun, Amornpun; Sooklert, Kanidta; Satirapipatkul, Chutimon; Sukrong, Suchada

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the anticancer potential of the extract of Colocasia gigantea C. gigantea), a plant member of the Araceae family. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of C. gigantea extract on cervical cancer (Hela) and human white blood cells (WBC) in vitro. The authors then identified the bioactive ingredients that demonstrated cytotoxicity on tested cells and evaluated those bioactive ingredients using the bioassay-guided fractionation method. The results showed that not all parts of C. gigantea promote cytotoxic activity. The dichloromethane leaf fraction showed significant cell proliferation effect on Hela cells, but not on WBCs. Only the n-hexane tuber fraction (Fr. 1T) exhibited significant cytotoxicity on Hela cells (IC50 = 585 μg/ml) and encouraged WBC cell proliferation. From GC-Mass spectrometry, 4,22-Stigmastadiene-3-one, Diazoprogesterone, 9-Octadecenoic acid (Z)-, hexyl ester and Oleic Acid were the components of Fr 1T that demonstrated cytotoxic potential. In conclusion, C. gigantea's Fr 1T shows potential for cervical cancer treatment. PMID:25764620

  13. Selected demonstration and educational products/activities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.J.; Mann, H.C.

    1992-07-01

    The information in this paper was assembled for several informal presentations to a variety of visitor groups during the summer of 1992. A number of staff members at TVA`s National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) found it useful as a quick overview for their use and for their sharing with external colleagues and customers. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive list or explanation of all products and services available from NFERC. However, the authors believe it will give a flavor and tenor of some of the ongoing activities of the Center, especially those activities relating to the retail fertilizer dealer. Programs over the years have focused on key aspects of nutrient efficiency and management. TVA is uniquely positioned to assist the fertilizer industry and US agriculture in protecting the environment from potential adverse environmental impacts of agriculture, especially for fertilizer and the attendant agrichemicals. TVA has the technical base and an ongoing working relationship with the fertilizer industry in technology development and introduction. Dealer education is very important in TVA programs in two aspects: (1) education for the dealer in meeting new environmental stewardship challenges from an operational perspective; and (2) education for the dealer in meeting the site-specific information needs of the farmer.

  14. Effects of Prey Presence and Scale on Bobcat Resource Selection during Winter

    PubMed Central

    Bled, Florent; Summers, Savanna; Martell, Deborah; Petroelje, Tyler R.; Beyer, Dean E.; Belant, Jerrold L.

    2015-01-01

    Factors relevant to resource selection in carnivores may vary across spatial and temporal scales, both in magnitude and rank. Understanding relationships among carnivore occupancy, prey presence, and habitat characteristics, as well as their interactions across multiple scales, is necessary to improve our understanding of resource selection and predict population changes. We used a multi-scale dynamic hierarchical co-occurrence model with camera data to study bobcat and snowshoe hare occupancy in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan during winter 2012–2013. Bobcat presence was influenced at the local scale by snowshoe hare presence, and by road density at the local and larger scale when hare were absent. Hare distribution was related primarily to vegetation cover types, and detectability varied in space and time. Bobcat occupancy dynamics were influenced by different factors depending on the spatial scale considered and the resource availability context. Moreover, considering observed co-occurrence, we suggest that bobcat presence had a greater effect on hare occupancy than hare presence on bobcat occupancy. Our results highlight the importance of studying carnivore distributions in the context of predator-prey relationships and its interactions with environmental covariates at multiple spatial scales. Our approach can be applied to other carnivore species to provide insights beneficial for management and conservation. PMID:26581103

  15. Effects of Prey Presence and Scale on Bobcat Resource Selection during Winter.

    PubMed

    Bled, Florent; Summers, Savanna; Martell, Deborah; Petroelje, Tyler R; Beyer, Dean E; Belant, Jerrold L

    2015-01-01

    Factors relevant to resource selection in carnivores may vary across spatial and temporal scales, both in magnitude and rank. Understanding relationships among carnivore occupancy, prey presence, and habitat characteristics, as well as their interactions across multiple scales, is necessary to improve our understanding of resource selection and predict population changes. We used a multi-scale dynamic hierarchical co-occurrence model with camera data to study bobcat and snowshoe hare occupancy in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan during winter 2012-2013. Bobcat presence was influenced at the local scale by snowshoe hare presence, and by road density at the local and larger scale when hare were absent. Hare distribution was related primarily to vegetation cover types, and detectability varied in space and time. Bobcat occupancy dynamics were influenced by different factors depending on the spatial scale considered and the resource availability context. Moreover, considering observed co-occurrence, we suggest that bobcat presence had a greater effect on hare occupancy than hare presence on bobcat occupancy. Our results highlight the importance of studying carnivore distributions in the context of predator-prey relationships and its interactions with environmental covariates at multiple spatial scales. Our approach can be applied to other carnivore species to provide insights beneficial for management and conservation. PMID:26581103

  16. Water-resources activities in New England, fiscal year 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlando, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has 82 active or complete-except-report projects of hydrologic investigations ongoing within the New England Program Area. Of this total, 23 are data projects. Data projects contain statistics and data on the conditions of surface water, ground water, water quality and (or) water use for the study area. There currently are six data projects in Connecticut, five in Maine, four in Massachusetts, four in Rhode Island, and four in New Hampshire and Vermont. The remaining 59 of these projects are interpretive projects. Interpretive projects include research, aerial appraisal, and other hydrologic studies and include projects as diverse as (1) determining the direction of ground-water flow at a toxic site, (2) predicting the effect of acid rain on water quality of a reservoir, and (3) estimating yields of aquifers on Cape Cod. Of the interpretive projects, 26 are in Massachusetts, 17 in Connecticut, 17 are in New Hampshire and Vermont, 6 are in Maine, and 3 in Rhode Island. The report is compiled from project descriptions for fiscal year 1993. It briefly describes the water-resources activities and projects that were active in each District of the USGS, Water Resources Division, New England Program Area of September 30, 1993. Cooperator or funding source, problem statements, objectives, approaches, progress, and plans for next year are described for each project. The project area is located on a map of the appropriate State(s). The report contains a bibliography, by District and by author, of reports completed since 1977.

  17. Resource Letter ALIP-1: Active-Learning Instruction in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzer, David E.; Thornton, Ronald K.

    2012-06-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on research-based active-learning instruction in physics. These are instructional methods that are based on, assessed by, and validated through research on the teaching and learning of physics. They involve students in their own learning more deeply and more intensely than does traditional instruction, particularly during class time. The instructional methods and supporting body of research reviewed here offer potential for significantly improved learning in comparison to traditional lecture-based methods of college and university physics instruction. We begin with an introduction to the history of active learning in physics in the United States, and then discuss some methods for and outcomes of assessing pedagogical effectiveness. We enumerate and describe common characteristics of successful active-learning instructional strategies in physics. We then discuss a range of methods for introducing active-learning instruction in physics and provide references to those methods for which there is published documentation of student learning gains.

  18. Linking Dynamic Habitat Selection with Wading Bird Foraging Distributions across Resource Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Beerens, James M.; Noonburg, Erik G.; Gawlik, Dale E.

    2015-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDM) link species occurrence with a suite of environmental predictors and provide an estimate of habitat quality when the variable set captures the biological requirements of the species. SDMs are inherently more complex when they include components of a species’ ecology such as conspecific attraction and behavioral flexibility to exploit resources that vary across time and space. Wading birds are highly mobile, demonstrate flexible habitat selection, and respond quickly to changes in habitat quality; thus serving as important indicator species for wetland systems. We developed a spatio-temporal, multi-SDM framework using Great Egret (Ardea alba), White Ibis (Eudocimus albus), and Wood Stork (Mycteria Americana) distributions over a decadal gradient of environmental conditions to predict species-specific abundance across space and locations used on the landscape over time. In models of temporal dynamics, species demonstrated conditional preferences for resources based on resource levels linked to differing temporal scales. Wading bird abundance was highest when prey production from optimal periods of inundation was concentrated in shallow depths. Similar responses were observed in models predicting locations used over time, accounting for spatial autocorrelation. Species clustered in response to differing habitat conditions, indicating that social attraction can co-vary with foraging strategy, water-level changes, and habitat quality. This modeling framework can be applied to evaluate the multi-annual resource pulses occurring in real-time, climate change scenarios, or restorative hydrological regimes by tracking changing seasonal and annual distribution and abundance of high quality foraging patches. PMID:26107386

  19. Linking Dynamic Habitat Selection with Wading Bird Foraging Distributions across Resource Gradients.

    PubMed

    Beerens, James M; Noonburg, Erik G; Gawlik, Dale E

    2015-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDM) link species occurrence with a suite of environmental predictors and provide an estimate of habitat quality when the variable set captures the biological requirements of the species. SDMs are inherently more complex when they include components of a species' ecology such as conspecific attraction and behavioral flexibility to exploit resources that vary across time and space. Wading birds are highly mobile, demonstrate flexible habitat selection, and respond quickly to changes in habitat quality; thus serving as important indicator species for wetland systems. We developed a spatio-temporal, multi-SDM framework using Great Egret (Ardea alba), White Ibis (Eudocimus albus), and Wood Stork (Mycteria Americana) distributions over a decadal gradient of environmental conditions to predict species-specific abundance across space and locations used on the landscape over time. In models of temporal dynamics, species demonstrated conditional preferences for resources based on resource levels linked to differing temporal scales. Wading bird abundance was highest when prey production from optimal periods of inundation was concentrated in shallow depths. Similar responses were observed in models predicting locations used over time, accounting for spatial autocorrelation. Species clustered in response to differing habitat conditions, indicating that social attraction can co-vary with foraging strategy, water-level changes, and habitat quality. This modeling framework can be applied to evaluate the multi-annual resource pulses occurring in real-time, climate change scenarios, or restorative hydrological regimes by tracking changing seasonal and annual distribution and abundance of high quality foraging patches. PMID:26107386

  20. Linking dynamic habitat selection with wading bird foraging distributions across resource gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beerens, James; Noonberg, Erik G.; Gawlik, Dale E.

    2015-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDM) link species occurrence with a suite of environmental predictors and provide an estimate of habitat quality when the variable set captures the biological requirements of the species. SDMs are inherently more complex when they include components of a species' ecology such as conspecific attraction and behavioral flexibility to exploit resources that vary across time and space. Wading birds are highly mobile, demonstrate flexible habitat selection, and respond quickly to changes in habitat quality; thus serving as important indicator species for wetland systems. We developed a spatio-temporal, multi-SDM framework using Great Egret (Ardea alba), White Ibis (Eudocimus albus), and Wood Stork (Mycteria Americana) distributions over a decadal gradient of environmental conditions to predict species-specific abundance across space and locations used on the landscape over time. In models of temporal dynamics, species demonstrated conditional preferences for resources based on resource levels linked to differing temporal scales. Wading bird abundance was highest when prey production from optimal periods of inundation was concentrated in shallow depths. Similar responses were observed in models predicting locations used over time, accounting for spatial autocorrelation. Species clustered in response to differing habitat conditions, indicating that social attraction can co-vary with foraging strategy, water-level changes, and habitat quality. This modeling framework can be applied to evaluate the multi-annual resource pulses occurring in real-time, climate change scenarios, or restorative hydrological regimes by tracking changing seasonal and annual distribution and abundance of high quality foraging patches.

  1. Behavioural cues surpass habitat factors in explaining prebreeding resource selection by a migratory diving duck

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, Shawn T.; Warren, Jeffrey M.; Takekawa, John Y.; De La Cruz, Susan E. W.; Cutting, Kyle A.; Parker, Michael W.; Yee, Julie L.

    2014-01-01

    Prebreeding habitat selection in birds can often be explained in part by habitat characteristics. However, females may also select habitats on the basis of fidelity to areas of previous reproductive success or use by conspecifics. The relative influences of sociobehavioural attributes versus habitat characteristics in habitat selection has been primarily investigated in songbirds, while less is known about how these factors affect habitat selection processes in migratory waterfowl. Animal resource selection models often exhibit much unexplained variation; spatial patterns driven by social and behavioural characteristics may account for some of this. We radiomarked female lesser scaup, Aythya affinis, in the southwestern extent of their breeding range to explore hypotheses regarding relative roles of habitat quality, site fidelity and conspecific density in prebreeding habitat selection. We used linear mixed-effects models to relate intensity of use within female home ranges to habitat features, distance to areas of reproductive success during the previous breeding season and conspecific density. Home range habitats included shallow water (≤118 cm), moderate to high densities of flooded emergent vegetation/open water edge and open water areas with submerged aquatic vegetation. Compared with habitat features, conspecific female density and proximity to successful nesting habitats from the previous breeding season had greater influences on habitat use within home ranges. Fidelity and conspecific attraction are behavioural characteristics in some waterfowl species that may exert a greater influence than habitat features in influencing prebreeding space use and habitat selection within home ranges, particularly where quality habitat is abundant. These processes may be of critical importance to a better understanding of habitat selection in breeding birds.

  2. Environmental cost-effectiveness analysis in intertemporal natural resource policy: evaluation of selective fishing gear.

    PubMed

    Kronbak, Lone Grønbæk; Vestergaard, Niels

    2013-12-15

    In most decision-making involving natural resources, the achievements of a given policy (e.g., improved ecosystem or biodiversity) are rather difficult to measure in monetary units. To address this problem, the current paper develops an environmental cost-effectiveness analysis (ECEA) to include intangible benefits in intertemporal natural resource problems. This approach can assist managers in prioritizing management actions as least cost solutions to achieve quantitative policy targets. The ECEA framework is applied to a selective gear policy case in Danish mixed trawl fisheries in Kattegat and Skagerrak. The empirical analysis demonstrates how a policy with large negative net benefits might be justified if the intangible benefits are included. PMID:24184529

  3. Silica dust exposures during selected construction activities.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Mary Ellen; Seixas, Noah; Majar, Maria; Camp, Janice; Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    This study characterized exposure for dust-producing construction tasks. Eight common construction tasks were evaluated for quartz and respirable dust exposure by collecting 113 personal task period samples for cleanup; demolition with handheld tools; concrete cutting; concrete mixing; tuck-point grinding; surface grinding; sacking and patching concrete; and concrete floor sanding using both time-integrating filter samples and direct-reading respirable dust monitors. The geometric mean quartz concentration was 0.10 mg/m(3) (geometric standard deviation [GSD]=4.88) for all run time samples, with 71% exceeding the threshold limit value. Activities with the highest exposures were surface grinding, tuck-point grinding, and concrete demolition (GM[GSD] of 0.63[4.12], 0.22[1.94], and 0.10[2.60], respectively). Factors recorded each minute were task, tool, work area, respiratory protection and controls used, estimated cross draft, and whether anyone nearby was making dust. Factors important to exposure included tool used, work area configuration, controls employed, cross draft, and in some cases nearby dust. More protective respirators were employed as quartz concentration increased, although respiratory protection was found to be inadequate for 42% of exposures. Controls were employed for only 12% of samples. Exposures were reduced with three controls: box fan for surface grinding and floor sanding, and vacuum/shroud for surface grinding, with reductions of 57, 50, and 71%, respectively. Exposures were higher for sweeping compound, box fan for cleanup, ducted fan dilution, and wetted substrate. Construction masons and laborers are frequently overexposed to silica. The usual protection method, respirators, was not always adequate, and engineering control use was infrequent and often ineffective. PMID:12809537

  4. Assessment of microbiological cleanness of selected medicinal herbs in relations to the level of resource fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Żukiewicz-Sobczak, Wioletta; Sobczak, Paweł; Wróblewska, Paula; Adamczuk, Piotr; Cholewa, Grażyna; Zawiślak, Kazimierz; Mazur, Jacek; Panasiewicz, Marian; Wojciechowska, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Herbs are commonly used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Their vast use is connected with their antibacterial or antioxidising properties, as well as numerous pro-health properties. The aim of the presented research was assessment of the quantitative and qualitative composition of moulds which contaminate samples of dried herbs: Sage (Salvia officinalis L.), Camomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) and Melissa (Mellisa officinalis L.) with different degrees of resource fragmentation. The dried herbs investigated had a characteristic mould content below 1•10(6) CFU/g according to the recommendations of the European Herbal Infusions Association (EHIA). The most contaminated resource turned out to be Camomile, the least--Melissa. The most often isolated moulds were: Aspergillus, Penicillium, Ulocladium, Alternaria. Moreover, it was observed that more fragmented dried herbs were characteristic of lower--by approx. 40-55% microbiological contamination--depending on the type of tested herb, which might be connected with the time of dried herbs' processing, higher aeration, moisture changes or mechanical damaging of fungi's fragments in the case of a resource with higher fragmentation. High contamination of a herbal resource might be harmful for a consumer, and moulds and their metabolites in the form of mitotoxins might constitute a threat for human health. To keep all the sensory features and activity of herbs' active substances, it is extremely important to secure their high microbiological quality. PMID:24364459

  5. Survey of ecological resources at selected US Department of Energy sites

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, C.; Beckert, H.; Abrams, C.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns and manages a wide range of ecological resources. During the next 30 years, DOE Headquarters and Field Offices will make land-use planning decisions and conduct environmental remediation and restoration activities in response to federal and state statutes. This document fulfills, in part, DOE`s need to know what types of ecological resources it currently owns and manages by synthesizing information on the types and locations of ecological resources at 10 DOE sites: Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Plant, Los Alamos National Laboratory, savannah River Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Fernald Environmental Management Project. This report summarizes information on ecosystems, habitats, and federally listed threatened, endangered, and candidate species that could be stressed by contaminants or physical activity during the restoration process, or by the natural or anthropogenic transport of contaminants from presently contaminated areas into presently uncontaminated areas. This report also provides summary information on the ecosystems, habitats, and threatened and endangered species that exist on each of the 10 sites. Each site chapter contains a general description of the site, including information on size, location, history, geology, hydrology, and climate. Descriptions of the major vegetation and animal communities and of aquatic resources are also provided, with discussions of the treatened or endangered plant or animal species present. Site-specific ecological issues are also discussed in each site chapter. 106 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Active Learning Techniques Applied to an Interdisciplinary Mineral Resources Course.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aird, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    An interdisciplinary active learning course was introduced at the University of Puget Sound entitled 'Mineral Resources and the Environment'. Various formative assessment and active learning techniques that have been effective in other courses were adapted and implemented to improve student learning, increase retention and broaden knowledge and understanding of course material. This was an elective course targeted towards upper-level undergraduate geology and environmental majors. The course provided an introduction to the mineral resources industry, discussing geological, environmental, societal and economic aspects, legislation and the processes involved in exploration, extraction, processing, reclamation/remediation and recycling of products. Lectures and associated weekly labs were linked in subject matter; relevant readings from the recent scientific literature were assigned and discussed in the second lecture of the week. Peer-based learning was facilitated through weekly reading assignments with peer-led discussions and through group research projects, in addition to in-class exercises such as debates. Writing and research skills were developed through student groups designing, carrying out and reporting on their own semester-long research projects around the lasting effects of the historical Ruston Smelter on the biology and water systems of Tacoma. The writing of their mini grant proposals and final project reports was carried out in stages to allow for feedback before the deadline. Speakers from industry were invited to share their specialist knowledge as guest lecturers, and students were encouraged to interact with them, with a view to employment opportunities. Formative assessment techniques included jigsaw exercises, gallery walks, placemat surveys, think pair share and take-home point summaries. Summative assessment included discussion leadership, exams, homeworks, group projects, in-class exercises, field trips, and pre-discussion reading exercises

  7. Cornell University remote sensing program. [selected research projects in land and water resource management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, T.; Belcher, D. J.; Mcnair, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    The major activities of the program staff from December 1, 1973 to May 31, 1974 are reported and include: (1) communication and instruction; (2) data and facilities; (3) research completed; (4) research in progress; (5) selected correspondence; (6) grant sponsored travel; and (7) seminars and newsletters. Detailed information and maps are given for the following selected projects: (1) ERTS mapping of waterways in the Tug Hill region of New York State; (2) photo-archeological investigation of Great Gully, New York; and (3) evaluation of selected highway impacts using aerial photography.

  8. Assessing risk to birds from industrial wind energy development via paired resource selection models.

    PubMed

    Miller, Tricia A; Brooks, Robert P; Lanzone, Michael; Brandes, David; Cooper, Jeff; O'Malley, Kieran; Maisonneuve, Charles; Tremblay, Junior; Duerr, Adam; Katzner, Todd

    2014-06-01

    When wildlife habitat overlaps with industrial development animals may be harmed. Because wildlife and people select resources to maximize biological fitness and economic return, respectively, we estimated risk, the probability of eagles encountering and being affected by turbines, by overlaying models of resource selection for each entity. This conceptual framework can be applied across multiple spatial scales to understand and mitigate impacts of industry on wildlife. We estimated risk to Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) from wind energy development in 3 topographically distinct regions of the central Appalachian Mountains of Pennsylvania (United States) based on models of resource selection of wind facilities (n = 43) and of northbound migrating eagles (n = 30). Risk to eagles from wind energy was greatest in the Ridge and Valley region; all 24 eagles that passed through that region used the highest risk landscapes at least once during low altitude flight. In contrast, only half of the birds that entered the Allegheny Plateau region used highest risk landscapes and none did in the Allegheny Mountains. Likewise, in the Allegheny Mountains, the majority of wind turbines (56%) were situated in poor eagle habitat; thus, risk to eagles is lower there than in the Ridge and Valley, where only 1% of turbines are in poor eagle habitat. Risk within individual facilities was extremely variable; on average, facilities had 11% (SD 23; range = 0-100%) of turbines in highest risk landscapes and 26% (SD 30; range = 0-85%) of turbines in the lowest risk landscapes. Our results provide a mechanism for relocating high-risk turbines, and they show the feasibility of this novel and highly adaptable framework for managing risk of harm to wildlife from industrial development. PMID:24405249

  9. Preliminary Mineral Resource Assessment of Selected Mineral Deposit Types in Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludington, Steve; Orris, Greta J.; Bolm, Karen S.; Peters, Stephen G.; the U.S. Geological Survey-Afghanistan Ministry of Mines and Industry Joint Mineral Resource Assessment Team

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Wise decision-making and management of natural resources depend upon credible and reliable scientific information about the occurrence, distribution, quantity and quality of a country's resource base. Economic development decisions by governments require such information to be part of a Mineral Resource Assessment. Such Mineral Assessments are also useful to private citizens and international investors, consultants, and companies prior to entry and investment in a country. Assessments can also be used to help evaluate the economic risks and impact on the natural environment associated with development of resources. In February 2002, at the request of the Department of State and the then U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan (Robert P. Finn), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) prepared a detailed proposal addressing natural resources issues critical to the reconstruction of Afghanistan. The proposal was refined and updated in December 2003 and was presented as a 5-year work plan to USAID-Kabul in February 2004. USAID-Kabul currently funds this plan and this report presents a part of the preliminary results obligated for fiscal year 2006. A final Preliminary Assessment of the Non Fuel Mineral Resource of Afghanistan will be completed and delivered at the end of fiscal year 2007. Afghanistan has abundant metallic and non-metallic resources, but the potential resources have never been systematically assessed using modern methods. Much of the existing mineral information for Afghanistan was gathered during the 1950s and continued in the late 1980s until the departure of the geologic advisors from the Soviet Union. During this period, there were many mineral-related activities centered on systematic geologic mapping of the country, collection of geochemical and rock samples, implementation of airborne geophysical surveys, and exploration focused on the discovery of large mineral deposits. Many reports, maps, charts, and tables were produced at that time. Some of

  10. Development and human resources in the Islamic world: a study of selected countries.

    PubMed

    Duza, M B

    1987-01-01

    "The present paper attempts to provide an analytical profile of development and human resources in [12] selected [Islamic] countries." The countries--Bangladesh, Somalia, Pakistan, Indonesia, Egypt, Turkey, Malaysia, Algeria, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and United Arab Emirates--vary in income levels from low to high and in population size from 1 million to 159 million. Using data from the World Bank and the Population Council, comparisons are made on the basis of mortality and fertility levels, family size, income, urbanization, labor force size and growth, education, nutrition, and health. Governmental policy changes and future directions are discussed. PMID:12315536

  11. Selective classification and quantification model of C&D waste from material resources consumed in residential building construction.

    PubMed

    Mercader-Moyano, Pilar; Ramírez-de-Arellano-Agudo, Antonio

    2013-05-01

    The unfortunate economic situation involving Spain and the European Union is, among other factors, the result of intensive construction activity over recent years. The excessive consumption of natural resources, together with the impact caused by the uncontrolled dumping of untreated C&D waste in illegal landfills have caused environmental pollution and a deterioration of the landscape. The objective of this research was to generate a selective classification and quantification model of C&D waste based on the material resources consumed in the construction of residential buildings, either new or renovated, namely the Conventional Constructive Model (CCM). A practical example carried out on ten residential buildings in Seville, Spain, enabled the identification and quantification of the C&D waste generated in their construction and the origin of the waste, in terms of the building material from which it originated and its impact for every m(2) constructed. This model enables other researchers to establish comparisons between the various improvements proposed for the minimization of the environmental impact produced by building a CCM, new corrective measures to be proposed in future policies that regulate the production and management of C&D waste generated in construction from the design stage to the completion of the construction process, and the establishment of sustainable management for C&D waste and for the selection of materials for the construction on projected or renovated buildings. PMID:23446631

  12. Aging and selective engagement: the moderating impact of motivation on older adults' resource utilization.

    PubMed

    Hess, Thomas M; Germain, Cassandra M; Swaim, Elizabeth L; Osowski, Nicole L

    2009-06-01

    Two studies were conducted to examine age differences in the impact of motivation in a social cognitive task. We tested the hypothesis that aging is associated with an increase in the selective engagement of cognitive resources in support of performance. Different-aged adults read descriptions of 2 people in order to determine which was better suited for a particular job. These descriptions contained behaviors that were either consistent or inconsistent with the job, and participants performed the task under conditions of high versus low accountability. Examination of memory for behavioral information revealed that accountability disproportionately affected older adults' performance, with the locus of this effect being in conscious recollection processes. This supports the aforementioned selective engagement hypothesis by demonstrating that the differential impact of the motivational manipulation was based in deliberative memory processes. PMID:19357075

  13. Space use and resource selection by foraging Indiana bats at the northern edge of their distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jachowski, David S.; Johnson, Joshua B.; Dobony, Christopher A.; Edwards, John W.; Ford, W. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Despite 4 decades of conservation concern, managing endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) populations remains a difficult wildlife resource issue facing natural resource managers in the eastern United States. After small signs of population recovery, the recent emergence of white-nose syndrome has led to concerns of local and/or regional extirpation of the species. Where Indiana bats persist, retaining high-quality foraging areas will be critical to meet physiological needs and ensure successful recruitment and overwinter survival. However, insight into foraging behavior has been lacking in the Northeast of the USA. We radio-tracked 12 Indiana bats over 2 summers at Fort Drum, New York, to evaluate factors influencing Indiana bat resource selection during night-time foraging. We found that foraging space use decreased 2% for every 100 m increase in distance to water and 6% for every 100 m away from the forest edge. This suggests high use of riparian areas in close proximity to forest and is somewhat consistent with the species’ foraging ecology in the Midwest and upper South. Given the importance of providing access to high-quality foraging areas during the summer maternity season, Indiana bat conservation at the northern extent of the species’ range will be linked to retention of forested habitat in close proximity to riparian zones. 

  14. flyDIVaS: A Comparative Genomics Resource for Drosophila Divergence and Selection

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Craig E.; Kulathinal, Rob J.

    2016-01-01

    With arguably the best finished and expertly annotated genome assembly, Drosophila melanogaster is a formidable genetics model to study all aspects of biology. Nearly a decade ago, the 12 Drosophila genomes project expanded D. melanogaster’s breadth as a comparative model through the community-development of an unprecedented genus- and genome-wide comparative resource. However, since its inception, these datasets for evolutionary inference and biological discovery have become increasingly outdated, outmoded, and inaccessible. Here, we provide an updated and upgradable comparative genomics resource of Drosophila divergence and selection, flyDIVaS, based on the latest genomic assemblies, curated FlyBase annotations, and recent OrthoDB orthology calls. flyDIVaS is an online database containing D. melanogaster-centric orthologous gene sets, CDS and protein alignments, divergence statistics (% gaps, dN, dS, dN/dS), and codon-based tests of positive Darwinian selection. Out of 13,920 protein-coding D. melanogaster genes, ∼80% have one aligned ortholog in the closely related species, D. simulans, and ∼50% have 1–1 12-way alignments in the original 12 sequenced species that span over 80 million yr of divergence. Genes and their orthologs can be chosen from four different taxonomic datasets differing in phylogenetic depth and coverage density, and visualized via interactive alignments and phylogenetic trees. Users can also batch download entire comparative datasets. A functional survey finds conserved mitotic and neural genes, highly diverged immune and reproduction-related genes, more conspicuous signals of divergence across tissue-specific genes, and an enrichment of positive selection among highly diverged genes. flyDIVaS will be regularly updated and can be freely accessed at www.flydivas.info. We encourage researchers to regularly use this resource as a tool for biological inference and discovery, and in their classrooms to help train the next generation of

  15. flyDIVaS: A Comparative Genomics Resource for Drosophila Divergence and Selection.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Craig E; Kulathinal, Rob J

    2016-01-01

    With arguably the best finished and expertly annotated genome assembly, Drosophila melanogaster is a formidable genetics model to study all aspects of biology. Nearly a decade ago, the 12 Drosophila genomes project expanded D. melanogaster's breadth as a comparative model through the community-development of an unprecedented genus- and genome-wide comparative resource. However, since its inception, these datasets for evolutionary inference and biological discovery have become increasingly outdated, outmoded, and inaccessible. Here, we provide an updated and upgradable comparative genomics resource of Drosophila divergence and selection, flyDIVaS, based on the latest genomic assemblies, curated FlyBase annotations, and recent OrthoDB orthology calls. flyDIVaS is an online database containing D. melanogaster-centric orthologous gene sets, CDS and protein alignments, divergence statistics (% gaps, dN, dS, dN/dS), and codon-based tests of positive Darwinian selection. Out of 13,920 protein-coding D. melanogaster genes, ∼80% have one aligned ortholog in the closely related species, D. simulans, and ∼50% have 1-1 12-way alignments in the original 12 sequenced species that span over 80 million yr of divergence. Genes and their orthologs can be chosen from four different taxonomic datasets differing in phylogenetic depth and coverage density, and visualized via interactive alignments and phylogenetic trees. Users can also batch download entire comparative datasets. A functional survey finds conserved mitotic and neural genes, highly diverged immune and reproduction-related genes, more conspicuous signals of divergence across tissue-specific genes, and an enrichment of positive selection among highly diverged genes. flyDIVaS will be regularly updated and can be freely accessed at www.flydivas.info We encourage researchers to regularly use this resource as a tool for biological inference and discovery, and in their classrooms to help train the next generation of

  16. Human health risk assessment: selected Internet and world wide web resources.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jacqueline; Hakkinen, P J Bert; Wullenweber, Andrea E

    2002-04-25

    The world wide web (WWW) has become a valuable source of 24 hour-a-day access to information needed by human health risk assessors. Various web sites and other Internet resources provide information needed for human hazard identification, dose-response evaluation, exposure assessment, risk characterization, and risk management. Information on risk communication is also available. Substantial collections of information on multiple aspects of risk assessment are found in sites sponsored by RiskWorld, the (US) EPA's National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA), the (US) National Library of Medicine's TOXNET, the (US) Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS). Also valuable are various web sites providing information on the physical and chemical properties of chemicals, the environmental fate and transport of chemicals, government regulations, and guidance and training for performing risk assessments. Several professional societies and other organizations have web sites addressing risk assessment issues and information, and there are Internet mailing lists for online help and for sharing information and perspectives. We classify selected web sites according to user needs and provide the reader with a collection of selected sites that can serve as entry points to risk assessment-related web resources. PMID:11955689

  17. Activities Selected from the High School Geography Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natoli, Salvatore J., Ed.; And Others

    Out of approximately 50 activities which were, for a variety of reasons, not included in the final version of the High School Geography Project course, Geography in an Urban Age, the HSGP staff selected eight which would be useful in many secondary school classrooms. The activities included here are: 1) Operation Bigger Beef (on themes of cultural…

  18. Resource Selection and Its Implications for Wide-Ranging Mammals of the Brazilian Cerrado

    PubMed Central

    Vynne, Carly; Keim, Jonah L.; Machado, Ricardo B.; Marinho-Filho, Jader; Silveira, Leandro; Groom, Martha J.; Wasser, Samuel K.

    2011-01-01

    Conserving animals beyond protected areas is critical because even the largest reserves may be too small to maintain viable populations for many wide-ranging species. Identification of landscape features that will promote persistence of a diverse array of species is a high priority, particularly, for protected areas that reside in regions of otherwise extensive habitat loss. This is the case for Emas National Park, a small but important protected area located in the Brazilian Cerrado, the world's most biologically diverse savanna. Emas Park is a large-mammal global conservation priority area but is too small to protect wide-ranging mammals for the long-term and conserving these populations will depend on the landscape surrounding the park. We employed novel, noninvasive methods to determine the relative importance of resources found within the park, as well as identify landscape features that promote persistence of wide-ranging mammals outside reserve borders. We used scat detection dogs to survey for five large mammals of conservation concern: giant armadillo (Priodontes maximus), giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), jaguar (Panthera onca), and puma (Puma concolor). We estimated resource selection probability functions for each species from 1,572 scat locations and 434 giant armadillo burrow locations. Results indicate that giant armadillos and jaguars are highly selective of natural habitats, which makes both species sensitive to landscape change from agricultural development. Due to the high amount of such development outside of the Emas Park boundary, the park provides rare resource conditions that are particularly important for these two species. We also reveal that both woodland and forest vegetation remnants enable use of the agricultural landscape as a whole for maned wolves, pumas, and giant anteaters. We identify those features and their landscape compositions that should be prioritized for conservation, arguing

  19. Resource selection and its implications for wide-ranging mammals of the brazilian cerrado.

    PubMed

    Vynne, Carly; Keim, Jonah L; Machado, Ricardo B; Marinho-Filho, Jader; Silveira, Leandro; Groom, Martha J; Wasser, Samuel K

    2011-01-01

    Conserving animals beyond protected areas is critical because even the largest reserves may be too small to maintain viable populations for many wide-ranging species. Identification of landscape features that will promote persistence of a diverse array of species is a high priority, particularly, for protected areas that reside in regions of otherwise extensive habitat loss. This is the case for Emas National Park, a small but important protected area located in the Brazilian Cerrado, the world's most biologically diverse savanna. Emas Park is a large-mammal global conservation priority area but is too small to protect wide-ranging mammals for the long-term and conserving these populations will depend on the landscape surrounding the park. We employed novel, noninvasive methods to determine the relative importance of resources found within the park, as well as identify landscape features that promote persistence of wide-ranging mammals outside reserve borders. We used scat detection dogs to survey for five large mammals of conservation concern: giant armadillo (Priodontes maximus), giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), jaguar (Panthera onca), and puma (Puma concolor). We estimated resource selection probability functions for each species from 1,572 scat locations and 434 giant armadillo burrow locations. Results indicate that giant armadillos and jaguars are highly selective of natural habitats, which makes both species sensitive to landscape change from agricultural development. Due to the high amount of such development outside of the Emas Park boundary, the park provides rare resource conditions that are particularly important for these two species. We also reveal that both woodland and forest vegetation remnants enable use of the agricultural landscape as a whole for maned wolves, pumas, and giant anteaters. We identify those features and their landscape compositions that should be prioritized for conservation, arguing

  20. Direct Activation of Epac by Sulfonylurea is Isoform Selective

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Katie J.; Coltharp, Carla; Amzel, L. Mario; Zhang, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Summary Commonly used as a treatment for Type II diabetes, sulfonylureas (SUs) stimulate insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells by binding to sulfonylurea receptors. Recently, SUs have been shown to also activate exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 2 (Epac2), however little is known about this molecular action. Using biosensor imaging and biochemical analysis, we show that SUs activate Epac2 and the downstream signaling via direct binding to Epac2. We further identify R447 of Epac2 to be critically involved in SU binding. This distinct binding site from cAMP points to a new mode of allosteric activation of Epac2. We also show that SUs selectively activate Epac2 isoform, but not the closely related Epac1, further establishing SUs as a new class of isoform-selective enzyme activators. PMID:21338921

  1. New process for production of fermented black table olives using selected autochthonous microbial resources

    PubMed Central

    Tufariello, Maria; Durante, Miriana; Ramires, Francesca A.; Grieco, Francesco; Tommasi, Luca; Perbellini, Ezio; Falco, Vittorio; Tasioula-Margari, Maria; Logrieco, Antonio F.; Mita, Giovanni; Bleve, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Table olives represent one important fermented product in Europe and, in the world, their demand is constantly increasing. At the present time, no systems are available to control black table olives spontaneous fermentation by the Greek method. During this study, a new protocol for the production of black table olives belonging to two Italian (Cellina di Nardò and Leccino) and two Greek (Kalamàta and Conservolea) cultivars has been developed: for each table olive cultivar, starter-driven fermentations were performed inoculating, firstly, one selected autochthonous yeast starter and, subsequently, one selected autochthonous LAB starter. All starters formulation were able to dominate fermentation process. The olive fermentation was monitored using specific chemical descriptors able to identify a first stage (30 days) mainly characterized by aldehydes; a second period (60 days) mainly characterized by higher alcohols, styrene and terpenes; a third fermentation stage represented by acetate esters, esters and acids. A significant decrease of fermentation time (from 8 to 12 months to a maximum of 3 months) and an significant improvement in organoleptic characteristics of the final product were obtained. This study, for the first time, describes the employment of selected autochthonous microbial resources optimized to mimic the microbial evolution already recorded during spontaneous fermentations. PMID:26441932

  2. New process for production of fermented black table olives using selected autochthonous microbial resources.

    PubMed

    Tufariello, Maria; Durante, Miriana; Ramires, Francesca A; Grieco, Francesco; Tommasi, Luca; Perbellini, Ezio; Falco, Vittorio; Tasioula-Margari, Maria; Logrieco, Antonio F; Mita, Giovanni; Bleve, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Table olives represent one important fermented product in Europe and, in the world, their demand is constantly increasing. At the present time, no systems are available to control black table olives spontaneous fermentation by the Greek method. During this study, a new protocol for the production of black table olives belonging to two Italian (Cellina di Nardò and Leccino) and two Greek (Kalamàta and Conservolea) cultivars has been developed: for each table olive cultivar, starter-driven fermentations were performed inoculating, firstly, one selected autochthonous yeast starter and, subsequently, one selected autochthonous LAB starter. All starters formulation were able to dominate fermentation process. The olive fermentation was monitored using specific chemical descriptors able to identify a first stage (30 days) mainly characterized by aldehydes; a second period (60 days) mainly characterized by higher alcohols, styrene and terpenes; a third fermentation stage represented by acetate esters, esters and acids. A significant decrease of fermentation time (from 8 to 12 months to a maximum of 3 months) and an significant improvement in organoleptic characteristics of the final product were obtained. This study, for the first time, describes the employment of selected autochthonous microbial resources optimized to mimic the microbial evolution already recorded during spontaneous fermentations. PMID:26441932

  3. Whole genome sequencing of elite rice cultivars as a comprehensive information resource for marker assisted selection.

    PubMed

    Duitama, Jorge; Silva, Alexander; Sanabria, Yamid; Cruz, Daniel Felipe; Quintero, Constanza; Ballen, Carolina; Lorieux, Mathias; Scheffler, Brian; Farmer, Andrew; Torres, Edgar; Oard, James; Tohme, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in sequencing technologies and bioinformatics revealed the genomic background of rice, a staple food for the poor people, and provided the basis to develop large genomic variation databases for thousands of cultivars. Proper analysis of this massive resource is expected to give novel insights into the structure, function, and evolution of the rice genome, and to aid the development of rice varieties through marker assisted selection or genomic selection. In this work we present sequencing and bioinformatics analyses of 104 rice varieties belonging to the major subspecies of Oryza sativa. We identified repetitive elements and recurrent copy number variation covering about 200 Mbp of the rice genome. Genotyping of over 18 million polymorphic locations within O. sativa allowed us to reconstruct the individual haplotype patterns shaping the genomic background of elite varieties used by farmers throughout the Americas. Based on a reconstruction of the alleles for the gene GBSSI, we could identify novel genetic markers for selection of varieties with high amylose content. We expect that both the analysis methods and the genomic information described here would be of great use for the rice research community and for other groups carrying on similar sequencing efforts in other crops. PMID:25923345

  4. Whole Genome Sequencing of Elite Rice Cultivars as a Comprehensive Information Resource for Marker Assisted Selection

    PubMed Central

    Duitama, Jorge; Silva, Alexander; Sanabria, Yamid; Cruz, Daniel Felipe; Quintero, Constanza; Ballen, Carolina; Lorieux, Mathias; Scheffler, Brian; Farmer, Andrew; Torres, Edgar; Oard, James; Tohme, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in sequencing technologies and bioinformatics revealed the genomic background of rice, a staple food for the poor people, and provided the basis to develop large genomic variation databases for thousands of cultivars. Proper analysis of this massive resource is expected to give novel insights into the structure, function, and evolution of the rice genome, and to aid the development of rice varieties through marker assisted selection or genomic selection. In this work we present sequencing and bioinformatics analyses of 104 rice varieties belonging to the major subspecies of Oryza sativa. We identified repetitive elements and recurrent copy number variation covering about 200 Mbp of the rice genome. Genotyping of over 18 million polymorphic locations within O. sativa allowed us to reconstruct the individual haplotype patterns shaping the genomic background of elite varieties used by farmers throughout the Americas. Based on a reconstruction of the alleles for the gene GBSSI, we could identify novel genetic markers for selection of varieties with high amylose content. We expect that both the analysis methods and the genomic information described here would be of great use for the rice research community and for other groups carrying on similar sequencing efforts in other crops. PMID:25923345

  5. Resource assurance predicts specialist and generalist bee activity in drought

    PubMed Central

    Minckley, Robert L.; Roulston, T'ai H.; Williams, Neal M.

    2013-01-01

    Many short-lived desert organisms remain in diapause during drought. Theoretically, the cues desert species use to continue diapause through drought should differ depending on the availability of critical resources, but the unpredictability and infrequent occurrence of climate extremes and reduced insect activity during such events make empirical tests of this prediction difficult. An intensive study of a diverse bee–plant community through a drought event found that bee specialists of a drought-sensitive host plant were absent in the drought year in contrast to generalist bees and to specialist bees of a drought-insensitive host plant. Different responses of bee species to drought indicate that the diapause cues used by bee species allow them to reliably predict host availability. Species composition of the bee community in drought shifted towards mostly generalist species. However, we predict that more frequent and extended drought, predicted by climate change models for southwest North America, will result in bee communities that are species-poor and dominated by specialist species, as found today in the most arid desert region of North America. PMID:23536593

  6. Thinking Outside the Box: Rectilinear Shapes Selectively Activate Scene-Selective Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Echavarria, Cesar E.; Tootell, Roger B.H.

    2014-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, an intriguing area was found in human visual cortex. This area (the parahippocampal place area [PPA]) was initially interpreted as responding selectively to images of places. However, subsequent studies reported that PPA also responds strongly to a much wider range of image categories, including inanimate objects, tools, spatial context, landmarks, objectively large objects, indoor scenes, and/or isolated buildings. Here, we hypothesized that PPA responds selectively to a lower-level stimulus property (rectilinear features), which are common to many of the above higher-order categories. Using a novel wavelet image filter, we first demonstrated that rectangular features are common in these diverse stimulus categories. Then we tested whether PPA is selectively activated by rectangular features in six independent fMRI experiments using progressively simplified stimuli, from complex real-world images, through 3D/2D computer-generated shapes, through simple line stimuli. We found that PPA was consistently activated by rectilinear features, compared with curved and nonrectangular features. This rectilinear preference was (1) comparable in amplitude and selectivity, relative to the preference for category (scenes vs faces), (2) independent of known biases for specific orientations and spatial frequency, and (3) not predictable from V1 activity. Two additional scene-responsive areas were sensitive to a subset of rectilinear features. Thus, rectilinear selectivity may serve as a crucial building block for category-selective responses in PPA and functionally related areas. PMID:24828628

  7. Selected administrative, land, and resource data for known geothermal resources areas in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, H.E.; Brook, C.A.; Smith, F.W.

    1980-01-01

    The data are compiled from published and unpublished classification, lease-scale evaluation, and resources assessment documents prepared by the Geological Survey and are current to December 1980. The KGRA's are listed alphabetically for each state.

  8. Resource Allocation for Maximizing Prediction Accuracy and Genetic Gain of Genomic Selection in Plant Breeding: A Simulation Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Aaron J.

    2013-01-01

    Allocating resources between population size and replication affects both genetic gain through phenotypic selection and quantitative trait loci detection power and effect estimation accuracy for marker-assisted selection (MAS). It is well known that because alleles are replicated across individuals in quantitative trait loci mapping and MAS, more resources should be allocated to increasing population size compared with phenotypic selection. Genomic selection is a form of MAS using all marker information simultaneously to predict individual genetic values for complex traits and has widely been found superior to MAS. No studies have explicitly investigated how resource allocation decisions affect success of genomic selection. My objective was to study the effect of resource allocation on response to MAS and genomic selection in a single biparental population of doubled haploid lines by using computer simulation. Simulation results were compared with previously derived formulas for the calculation of prediction accuracy under different levels of heritability and population size. Response of prediction accuracy to resource allocation strategies differed between genomic selection models (ridge regression best linear unbiased prediction [RR-BLUP], BayesCπ) and multiple linear regression using ordinary least-squares estimation (OLS), leading to different optimal resource allocation choices between OLS and RR-BLUP. For OLS, it was always advantageous to maximize population size at the expense of replication, but a high degree of flexibility was observed for RR-BLUP. Prediction accuracy of doubled haploid lines included in the training set was much greater than of those excluded from the training set, so there was little benefit to phenotyping only a subset of the lines genotyped. Finally, observed prediction accuracies in the simulation compared well to calculated prediction accuracies, indicating these theoretical formulas are useful for making resource allocation

  9. Resource allocation for maximizing prediction accuracy and genetic gain of genomic selection in plant breeding: a simulation experiment.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Aaron J

    2013-03-01

    Allocating resources between population size and replication affects both genetic gain through phenotypic selection and quantitative trait loci detection power and effect estimation accuracy for marker-assisted selection (MAS). It is well known that because alleles are replicated across individuals in quantitative trait loci mapping and MAS, more resources should be allocated to increasing population size compared with phenotypic selection. Genomic selection is a form of MAS using all marker information simultaneously to predict individual genetic values for complex traits and has widely been found superior to MAS. No studies have explicitly investigated how resource allocation decisions affect success of genomic selection. My objective was to study the effect of resource allocation on response to MAS and genomic selection in a single biparental population of doubled haploid lines by using computer simulation. Simulation results were compared with previously derived formulas for the calculation of prediction accuracy under different levels of heritability and population size. Response of prediction accuracy to resource allocation strategies differed between genomic selection models (ridge regression best linear unbiased prediction [RR-BLUP], BayesCπ) and multiple linear regression using ordinary least-squares estimation (OLS), leading to different optimal resource allocation choices between OLS and RR-BLUP. For OLS, it was always advantageous to maximize population size at the expense of replication, but a high degree of flexibility was observed for RR-BLUP. Prediction accuracy of doubled haploid lines included in the training set was much greater than of those excluded from the training set, so there was little benefit to phenotyping only a subset of the lines genotyped. Finally, observed prediction accuracies in the simulation compared well to calculated prediction accuracies, indicating these theoretical formulas are useful for making resource allocation

  10. Modeling multi-scale resource selection for bear rub trees in northwestern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan Henderson, Matthew J.; Hebblewhite, Mark; Mitchell, Michael S.; Stetz, Jeffrey B.; Kendall, Katherine C.; Carlson, Ross T.

    2015-01-01

    Both black (Ursus americanus) and grizzly bears (U. arctos) are known to rub on trees and other objects, producing a network of repeatedly used and identifiable rub sites. In 2012, we used a resource selection function to evaluate hypothesized relationships between locations of 887 bear rubs in northwestern Montana, USA, and elevation, slope angle, density of open roads and distance from areas of heightened plant-productivity likely containing forage for bears. Slope and density of open roads were negatively correlated with rub presence. No other covariates were supported as explanatory variables. We also hypothesized that bear rubs would be more strongly associated with closed roads and developed trails than with game trails. The frequencies of bear rubs on 30 paired segments of developed tracks and game trails were not different. Our results suggest bear rubs may be associated with bear travel routes, and support their use as “random” sampling devices for non-invasive spatial capture–recapture population monitoring.

  11. Fertility Limitation and Child Schooling in Ouagadougou: Selective Fertility or Resource Dilution?

    PubMed

    Bougma, Moussa; LeGrand, Thomas K; Kobiané, Jean-François

    2015-06-01

    Using original data collected in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, this study investigates evidence for the competing theories that fertility reductions increase children's education through either the quantity-quality tradeoff (intentionally choosing smaller families to make greater investments in education and other indicators of child quality) or resource dilution (having more children reduces resources available per child, regardless of intentionality of family size). The results provide evidence for both hypotheses: children having four or fewer siblings were significantly more likely to be enrolled in school if their mothers had intentionally stopped childbearing relative to those whose mothers wanted more children but whose childbearing was limited by subfecundity. The difference between intentional and unintentional family limitation was not significant for parities greater than five. In addition, the relationship between number of siblings and their schooling is negative, regardless of the intentionality of family-size limitation, but the strength of this negative relationship is approximately twice as high among children whose mothers intentionally limited fertility (reflecting both selection and dilution effects) than among children whose mothers were subfecund (reflecting the pure dilution effect). PMID:26059989

  12. Effects of resource activities upon repository siting and waste containment with reference to bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, J.; Rowe, J.

    1980-02-01

    The primary consideration for the suitability of a nuclear waste repository site is the overall ability of the repository to safely contain radioactive waste. This report is a discussion of the past, present, and future effects of resource activities on waste containment. Past and present resource activities which provide release pathways (i.e., leaky boreholes, adjacent mines) will receive initial evaluation during the early stages of any repository site study. However, other resource activities which may have subtle effects on containment (e.g., long-term pumping causing increased groundwater gradients, invasion of saline water causing lower retardation) and all potential future resource activities must also be considered during the site evaluation process. Resource activities will affect both the siting and the designing of repositories. Ideally, sites should be located in areas of low resource activity and low potential for future activity, and repository design should seek to eliminate or minimize the adverse effects of any resource activity. Buffer zones should be created to provide areas in which resource activities that might adversely affect containment can be restricted or curtailed. This could mean removing large areas of land from resource development. The impact of these frozen assets should be assessed in terms of their economic value and of their effect upon resource reserves. This step could require a major effort in data acquisition and analysis followed by extensive numerical modeling of regional fluid flow and mass transport. Numerical models should be used to assess the effects of resource activity upon containment and should include the cumulative effects of different resource activities. Analysis by other methods is probably not possible except for relatively simple cases.

  13. The Role of Learned Resourcefulness in Helping Female Undergraduates Deal with Unwanted Sexual Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennett, Deborah J.; Humphreys, Terry P.; Patchell, Meghan

    2009-01-01

    We examined the relationship between learned resourcefulness skills and the manner in which undergraduate heterosexual women handle unwanted sexual advances/activity. Participants consisted of 150 females completing a set of questionnaires assessing general learned resourcefulness, sexual giving-in experience, sexual resourcefulness, sexual…

  14. Advanced Marketing 8130. Instructional Areas. Duties and Tasks. Learning Activities. Referenced Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Dept. of Education, Richmond.

    This resource handbook, which is designed for use by instructors of courses in advanced marketing, consists of a duty/task list with referenced resources, a duty/task list with learning activities, and a list of resources. Included in each list are materials dealing with the following topics: communication in marketing, economics in marketing,…

  15. Neuronal activity biases axon selection for myelination in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Jacob H.; Ravanelli, Andrew M.; Schwindt, Rani; Scott, Ethan K.; Appel, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    An essential feature of vertebrate neural development is ensheathment of axons with myelin, an insulating membrane formed by oligodendrocytes. Not all axons are myelinated, but mechanisms directing myelination of specific axons are unknown. Using zebrafish we show that activity-dependent secretion stabilizes myelin sheath formation on select axons. When VAMP2-dependent exocytosis is silenced in single axons, oligodendrocytes preferentially ensheath neighboring axons. Nascent sheaths formed on silenced axons are shorter in length, but when activity of neighboring axons is also suppressed, inhibition of sheath growth is relieved. Using in vivo time-lapse microscopy, we show that only 25% of oligodendrocyte processes that initiate axon wrapping are stabilized during normal development, and that initiation does not require activity. Instead, oligodendrocyte processes wrapping silenced axons are retracted more frequently. We propose that axon selection for myelination results from excessive and indiscriminate initiation of wrapping followed by refinement that is biased by activity-dependent secretion from axons. PMID:25849987

  16. Using activity-based costing to track resource use in group practices.

    PubMed

    Zeller, T L; Siegel, G; Kaciuba, G; Lau, A H

    1999-09-01

    Research shows that understanding how resources are consumed can help group practices control costs. An American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons study used an activity-based costing (ABC) system to measure how resources are consumed in providing medical services. Teams of accounting professors observed 18 diverse orthopedic surgery practices. The researchers identified 17 resource-consuming business processes performed by nonphysician office staff. They measured resource consumption by assigning costs to each process according to how much time is spent on related work activities. When group practices understand how their resources are being consumed, they can reduce costs and optimize revenues by making adjustments in how administrative and clinical staff work. PMID:11066706

  17. Structural basis for selective activation of ABA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Francis C.; Burgie, E. Sethe; Park, Sang-Youl; Jensen, Davin R.; Weiner, Joshua J.; Bingman, Craig A.; Chang, Chia-En A.; Cutler, Sean R.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2010-11-01

    Changing environmental conditions and lessening fresh water supplies have sparked intense interest in understanding and manipulating abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, which controls adaptive responses to drought and other abiotic stressors. We recently discovered a selective ABA agonist, pyrabactin, and used it to discover its primary target PYR1, the founding member of the PYR/PYL family of soluble ABA receptors. To understand pyrabactin's selectivity, we have taken a combined structural, chemical and genetic approach. We show that subtle differences between receptor binding pockets control ligand orientation between productive and nonproductive modes. Nonproductive binding occurs without gate closure and prevents receptor activation. Observations in solution show that these orientations are in rapid equilibrium that can be shifted by mutations to control maximal agonist activity. Our results provide a robust framework for the design of new agonists and reveal a new mechanism for agonist selectivity.

  18. Leisure-Time Activities in Selected Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tague, Jean Ruth

    This study sought to identify leisure interests and participation patterns of residents over 65 in selected nursing homes in Los Angeles County, California, together with general and professional beliefs of nursing home administrators and authorities on aging as to leisure activities for aged nursing home patients. Interviews were held with 107…

  19. Advanced aerodynamics and active controls. Selected NASA research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic and active control concepts for application to commercial transport aircraft are discussed. Selected topics include in flight direct strike lightning research, triply redundant digital fly by wire control systems, tail configurations, winglets, and the drones for aerodynamic and structural testing (DAST) program.

  20. Bootstrap rank-ordered conditional mutual information (broCMI): A nonlinear input variable selection method for water resources modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilty, John; Adamowski, Jan; Khalil, Bahaa; Rathinasamy, Maheswaran

    2016-03-01

    The input variable selection problem has recently garnered much interest in the time series modeling community, especially within water resources applications, demonstrating that information theoretic (nonlinear)-based input variable selection algorithms such as partial mutual information (PMI) selection (PMIS) provide an improved representation of the modeled process when compared to linear alternatives such as partial correlation input selection (PCIS). PMIS is a popular algorithm for water resources modeling problems considering nonlinear input variable selection; however, this method requires the specification of two nonlinear regression models, each with parametric settings that greatly influence the selected input variables. Other attempts to develop input variable selection methods using conditional mutual information (CMI) (an analog to PMI) have been formulated under different parametric pretenses such as k nearest-neighbor (KNN) statistics or kernel density estimates (KDE). In this paper, we introduce a new input variable selection method based on CMI that uses a nonparametric multivariate continuous probability estimator based on Edgeworth approximations (EA). We improve the EA method by considering the uncertainty in the input variable selection procedure by introducing a bootstrap resampling procedure that uses rank statistics to order the selected input sets; we name our proposed method bootstrap rank-ordered CMI (broCMI). We demonstrate the superior performance of broCMI when compared to CMI-based alternatives (EA, KDE, and KNN), PMIS, and PCIS input variable selection algorithms on a set of seven synthetic test problems and a real-world urban water demand (UWD) forecasting experiment in Ottawa, Canada.

  1. Environmental Resources in Maintenance of Physical Activity 6 Months Following Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Adriana; Fleury, Julie; Belyea, Michael

    2016-08-01

    This study examined differences in weekly time spent in physical activity by level of perceived environmental resources, 6 months following graduation from cardiac rehabilitation. A descriptive, longitudinal design used standardized measures to evaluate perceived environmental resources and physical activity levels. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to examine mean differences in weekly time spent in physical activity by level of perceived environmental resources. Adults 51 to 86 years old (N = 150) diagnosed with coronary heart disease were included. There was a significant change over time in physical activity as measured by minutes per week, F(2, 148) = 7.915, p = .001, where activity increased between baseline and 3 months, and then dropped slightly at 6 months. This change over time differed by the level of perceived neighborhood resources, F(2, 148) = 3.545, p = .032. Home and neighborhood resources may positively influence physical activity maintenance following cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:26826141

  2. Selection of quiescent Escherichia coli with high metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Sonderegger, Marco; Schümperli, Michael; Sauer, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    Sustained metabolic activity in non-growing, quiescent cells can increase the operational life-span of bio-processes and improve process economics by decoupling production from cell growth. Because of the ill-defined molecular nature of this phenotype, we developed selection protocols for the evolution of quiescent Escherichia coli mutants that exhibit high metabolic activity in ammonium starvation-induced stationary phase. The best enrichment procedures were continuously or discontinuously fed ammonium-limited chemostat cultures with a very low dilution rate of 0.03 h(-1). After 40 generations of selection, improved mutants with up to doubled catabolic rates in stationary phase were isolated. The metabolically most active clones were identified by screening for high specific glucose uptake rates during ammonium starvation-induced stationary phase in deep-well microtiter plates. PMID:15721805

  3. 1990 Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey selected tabulations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey (NTACS) provides detailed activity data for a sample of trucks covered in the 1987 Truck Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS) for days selected at random over a 12-month period ending in 1990. The NTACS was conducted by the US Bureau of the Census for the US Department of Transportation (DOT). A Public Use File for the NTACS was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under a reimbursable agreement with the DOT. The content of the Public Use File and the detailed design of the NTACS are described in the ORNL Report [open quotes]Technical Documentation for the 1990 Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey Public Use File[close quotes]. (1992). ORNL Technical Report No. TM-12188, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831. The main purpose of this summary report is to provide selected tables based on the public use file.

  4. Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, John; MacDonald, Ian

    1980-01-01

    Presents a guide to resources on television drama available to teachers for classroom use in television curriculum. Lists American and British television drama videorecordings of both series and individual presentations and offers a bibliography of "one-off" single fiction plays produced for British television. (JMF)

  5. Selected reports of the U.S. Geological Survey on Water Resources in Mississippi, 1990-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moss, Carol P.

    1996-01-01

    Results of water-resources data-collection programs and interpretive hydrologic studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are published in reports and are made available to universities, State and local agencies, other Federal agencies, and the public. The following is a list of selected USGS reports on water resources in Mississippi published since 1990 and categorized according to the major emphasis of the report; these reports are available for inspection at the Mississippi District Office in Pearl, Mississippi.

  6. Preface: Terrestrial Fieldwork to Support in situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) and Robotic Resource Prospecting for Future Activities in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Gerald B.

    2015-05-01

    Finding, extracting, and using resources at the site of robotic and human exploration activities holds the promise of enabling sustainable and affordable exploration of the Moon, Mars, and asteroids, and eventually allow humans to expand their economy and habitation beyond the surface of the Earth. Commonly referred to as in situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), mineral and volatile resources found in space can be converted into oxygen, water, metals, fuels, and manufacturing and construction materials (such as plastics and concrete) for transportation, power, life support, habitation construction, and part/logistics manufacturing applications. For every kilogram of payload landed on the surface of the Moon or Mars, 7.5-11 kg of payload (mostly propellant) needs to be launched into low Earth orbit. Therefore, besides promising long-term self-sufficiency and infrastructure growth, ISRU can provide significant reductions in launch costs and the number of launches required. Key to being able to use space resources is knowing where they are located, how much is there, and how the resources are distributed. While ISRU holds great promise, it has also never been demonstrated in an actual space mission. Therefore, operations and hardware associated with each ISRU prospecting, excavation, transportation, and processing step must be examined, tested, and finally integrated to enable the end goal of using space resources in future human space missions.

  7. 43 CFR 24.4 - Resource management and public activities on Federal lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resource management and public activities on Federal lands. 24.4 Section 24.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE POLICY: STATE-FEDERAL RELATIONSHIPS § 24.4 Resource management and public activities on Federal lands....

  8. Customized cooking method improves total antioxidant activity in selected vegetables.

    PubMed

    Ng, Zhi-Xiang; Chai, Jen-Wai; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2011-03-01

    The present study compares water-soluble phenolic content (WPC) and antioxidant activities in Chinese long bean (Vigna unguiculata), bitter gourd (Momordica charantia), water convolvulus (Ipomoea aquatica) and broccoli (Brassica olearacea) prior to and after subjecting to boiling, microwaving and pressure cooking. The total antioxidant activity was increased in cooked water convolvulus, broccoli and bitter gourd, estimated based on the ferric reducing antioxidant power, the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl radical scavenging activity. Pressure cooking did not cause any significant decline in the antioxidant property. Boiling generally improved the overall antioxidant activity in all the vegetables. Correlation analysis suggests that WPC contributed to significant antioxidant activities in these vegetables. Thus, prudence in selecting an appropriate cooking method for different vegetables may improve or preserve their nutritional value. PMID:21250903

  9. Korean Lunar Lander - Concept Study for Landing-Site Selection for Lunar Resource Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyeong Ja; Wöhler, Christian; Hyeok Ju, Gwang; Lee, Seung-Ryeol; Rodriguez, Alexis P.; Berezhnoy, Alexey A.; van Gasselt, Stephan; Grumpe, Arne; Aymaz, Rabab

    2016-06-01

    As part of the national space promotion plan and presidential national agendas South Korea's institutes and agencies under the auspices of the Ministry of Science, Information and Communication Technology and Future Planning (MSIP) are currently developing a lunar mission package expected to reach Moon in 2020. While the officially approved Korean Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter (KPLO) is aimed at demonstrating technologies and monitoring the lunar environment from orbit, a lander - currently in pre-phase A - is being designed to explore the local geology with a particular focus on the detection and characterization of mineral resources. In addition to scientific and potential resource potentials, the selection of the landing-site will be partly constrained by engineering constraints imposed by payload and spacecraft layout. Given today's accumulated volume and quality of available data returned from the Moon's surface and from orbital observations, an identification of landing sites of potential interest and assessment of potential hazards can be more readily accomplished by generating synoptic snapshots through data integration. In order to achieve such a view on potential landing sites, higher level processing and derivation of data are required, which integrates their spatial context, with detailed topographic and geologic characterizations. We are currently assessing the possibility of using fuzzy c-means clustering algorithms as a way to perform (semi-) automated terrain characterizations of interest. This paper provides information and background on the national lunar lander program, reviews existing approaches - including methods and tools - for landing site analysis and hazard assessment, and discusses concepts to detect and investigate elemental abundances from orbit and the surface. This is achieved by making use of manual, semi-automated as well as fully-automated remote-sensing methods to demonstrate the applicability of analyses. By considering given

  10. Education & Recycling: Educator's Waste Management Resource and Activity Guide 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Conservation. Sacramento. Div. of Recycling.

    This activity guide for grades K-12 reinforces the concepts of recycling, reducing, and reusing through a series of youth-oriented activities. The guide incorporates a video-based activity, multiple session classroom activities, and activities requiring group participation and student conducted research. Constructivist learning theory was…

  11. A theoretical study on cellular antioxidant activity of selected flavonoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Yuzhi; Wang, Zhengwu; Wu, Jinhong; Zhao, Bo

    The antioxidant capacities of the selected flavonoids quercetin, luteolin and taxifolin have been investigated at density functional level of theory with the aim of verifying the cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) values representative of experimental findings. The selected flavonoids were believed to act through the H-atom transfer mechanism. Their potentiality of hydrogen abstraction was evaluated by computing the Osbnd H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) in gas-phase and in dimethylsulfoxide solution. Results indicate that the order of antioxidant efficacies calculated in this work is in agreement with that reported by experimental results of CAA. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations were also performed both in gas-phase and in dimethylsulfoxide to reproduce the electronic UV-vis spectra of the selected flavonoids.

  12. Engaging the Families of ELLs: Ideas, Resources, and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Renee; Abrego, Michelle H.; Sutterby, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Learn how to involve the diverse families of English language learners with the effective, practical approaches in this book. This must-have resource for teachers and school leaders is packed with fresh ideas geared toward building a partnership between school communities and ELL families. The authors begin each chapter with realistic scenarios…

  13. Resource competition induces heterogeneity and can increase cohort survivorship: selection-event duration matters.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Jennifer L; Anderson, James J

    2013-12-01

    Determining when resource competition increases survivorship can reveal processes underlying population dynamics and reinforce the importance of heterogeneity among individuals in conservation. We ran an experiment mimicking the effects of competition in a growing season on survivorship during a selection event (e.g., overwinter starvation, drought). Using a model fish species (Poecilia reticulata), we studied how food availability and competition affect mass in a treatment stage, and subsequently survivorship in a challenge stage of increased temperature and starvation. The post-treatment mean mass was strongly related to the mean time to mortality and mass at mortality at all levels of competition. However, competition increased variance in mass and extended the right tail of the survivorship curve, resulting in a greater number of individuals alive beyond a critical temporal threshold ([Formula: see text]) than without competition. To realize the benefits from previously experienced competition, the duration of the challenge ([Formula: see text]) following the competition must exceed the critical threshold [Formula: see text] (i.e., competition increases survivorship when [Formula: see text]). Furthermore, this benefit was equivalent to increasing food availability by 20 % in a group without competition in our experiment. The relationship of [Formula: see text] to treatment and challenge conditions was modeled by characterizing mortality through mass loss in terms of the stochastic rate of loss of vitality (individual's survival capacity). In essence, when the duration of a selection event exceeds [Formula: see text], competition-induced heterogeneity buffers against mortality through overcompensation processes among individuals of a cohort. Overall, our study demonstrates an approach to quantify how early life stage heterogeneity affects survivorship. PMID:23912261

  14. Resources for Designing, Selecting and Teaching with Visualizations in the Geoscience Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, K. B.; Manduca, C. A.; Ormand, C. J.; McDaris, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    Geoscience is a highly visual field, and effective use of visualizations can enhance student learning, appeal to students’ emotions and help them acquire skills for interpreting visual information. The On the Cutting Edge website, “Teaching Geoscience with Visualizations” presents information of interest to faculty who are teaching with visualizations, as well as those who are designing visualizations. The website contains best practices for effective visualizations, drawn from the educational literature and from experts in the field. For example, a case is made for careful selection of visualizations so that faculty can align the correct visualization with their teaching goals and audience level. Appropriate visualizations will contain the desired geoscience content without adding extraneous information that may distract or confuse students. Features such as labels, arrows and contextual information can help guide students through imagery and help to explain the relevant concepts. Because students learn by constructing their own mental image of processes, it is helpful to select visualizations that reflect the same type of mental picture that students should create. A host of recommended readings and presentations from the On the Cutting Edge visualization workshops can provide further grounding for the educational uses of visualizations. Several different collections of visualizations, datasets with visualizations and visualization tools are available on the website. Examples include animations of tsunamis, El Nino conditions, braided stream formation and mountain uplift. These collections are grouped by topic and range from simple animations to interactive models. A series of example activities that incorporate visualizations into classroom and laboratory activities illustrate various tactics for using these materials in different types of settings. Activities cover topics such as ocean circulation, land use changes, earthquake simulations and the use of

  15. Selected advanced aerodynamic and active control concepts development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A summary is presented of results obtained during analysis, design and test activities on six selected technical tasks directed at exploratory improvement of fuel efficiency for new and derivative transports. The work included investigations into the potential offered by natural laminar flow, improved surface coatings and advanced high lift concepts. Similar investigations covering optimum low-energy flight path control, integrated application of active controls and evaluation of primary flight control systems reliability and maintenance are also summarized. Recommendations are included for future work needed to exploit potential advancements.

  16. Antibacterial Activity of Barringtonia acutangula against Selected Urinary Tract Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, S; Panda, P K; Mishra, S R; Parida, R K; Ellaiah, P; Dash, S K

    2008-09-01

    Barringtonia acutangula (L.) Gaertn belonging to family Barringtoniaceae was investigated to evaluate In vitro antibacterial activity of aqueous, ethanolic, petroleum ether and chloroform extracts against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli the major urinary tract infection causing pathogens were tested by disc diffusion assay method and the minimum inhibitory concentration was evaluated. Ethanol (95%) extract exhibited broader spectrum of inhibition followed by chloroform, petroleum ether and aqueous extracts against the urinary tract pathogens under test. An attempt has been made to compare the activity of extracts with standard antibiotics against selected urinary tract infection causing pathogens. PMID:21394275

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Barringtonia acutangula against Selected Urinary Tract Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, S.; Panda, P. K.; Mishra, S. R.; Parida, R. K.; Ellaiah, P.; Dash, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    Barringtonia acutangula (L.) Gaertn belonging to family Barringtoniaceae was investigated to evaluate In vitro antibacterial activity of aqueous, ethanolic, petroleum ether and chloroform extracts against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli the major urinary tract infection causing pathogens were tested by disc diffusion assay method and the minimum inhibitory concentration was evaluated. Ethanol (95%) extract exhibited broader spectrum of inhibition followed by chloroform, petroleum ether and aqueous extracts against the urinary tract pathogens under test. An attempt has been made to compare the activity of extracts with standard antibiotics against selected urinary tract infection causing pathogens. PMID:21394275

  18. Animal movement constraints improve resource selection inference in the presence of telemetry error.

    PubMed

    Brost, Brian M; Hooten, Mevin B; Hanks, Ephraim M; Small, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    Multiple factors complicate the analysis of animal telemetry location data. Recent advancements address issues such as temporal autocorrelation and telemetry measurement error, but additional challenges remain. Difficulties introduced by complicated error structures or barriers to animal movement can weaken inference. We propose an approach for obtaining resource selection inference from animal location data that accounts for complicated error structures, movement constraints, and temporally autocorrelated observations. We specify a model for telemetry data observed with error conditional on unobserved true locations that reflects prior knowledge about constraints in the animal movement process. The observed telemetry data are modeled using a flexible distribution that accommodates extreme errors and complicated error structures. Although constraints to movement are often viewed as a nuisance, we use constraints to simultaneously estimate and account for telemetry error. We apply the model to simulated data, showing that it outperforms common ad hoc approaches used when confronted with measurement error and movement constraints. We then apply our framework to an Argos satellite telemetry data set on harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) in the Gulf of Alaska, a species that is constrained to move within the marine environment and adjacent coastlines. PMID:26649380

  19. Animal movement constraints improve resource selection inference in the presence of telemetry error

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brost, Brian M.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Hanks, Ephraim M.; Small, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple factors complicate the analysis of animal telemetry location data. Recent advancements address issues such as temporal autocorrelation and telemetry measurement error, but additional challenges remain. Difficulties introduced by complicated error structures or barriers to animal movement can weaken inference. We propose an approach for obtaining resource selection inference from animal location data that accounts for complicated error structures, movement constraints, and temporally autocorrelated observations. We specify a model for telemetry data observed with error conditional on unobserved true locations that reflects prior knowledge about constraints in the animal movement process. The observed telemetry data are modeled using a flexible distribution that accommodates extreme errors and complicated error structures. Although constraints to movement are often viewed as a nuisance, we use constraints to simultaneously estimate and account for telemetry error. We apply the model to simulated data, showing that it outperforms common ad hoc approaches used when confronted with measurement error and movement constraints. We then apply our framework to an Argos satellite telemetry data set on harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) in the Gulf of Alaska, a species that is constrained to move within the marine environment and adjacent coastlines.

  20. Antioxidant activity of various extracts of selected gourd vegetables.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Baljeet S; Yadav, Roshanlal; Yadav, Ritika B; Garg, Munish

    2016-04-01

    Study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidative activity of methanolic (ME), ethanolic (EE) and butanolic extracts (BE) of selected gourd vegetables. The antioxidant activity was investigated using different assays namely ferric thiocyanate test (FTC), thiobarbituric acid test (TBA), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and DPPH free radicals scavenging test. A densitometric HPTLC analysis was performed for the analysis of phenolic acids and flavonoids. Different extracts of the selected gourd vegetables revealed different antioxidant activity. Different extracts of Lagenaria siceraria, Momordica charantia and Luffa cylindrica revealed significantly higher (p < 0.05) concentrations of total phenols, flavonids, tannins and carotenoids content and also the antioxidant activity in comparison to remaining vegetable extracts. Correlation studies indicated that FRAP test best described the antioxidant activity of phenols, flavonoids and carotenoids (r = 0.854, 0.692 and 0.915 respectively). HPTLC profiles revealed the presence of maximum number of phenolic acids and flavonoids in L. siceraria and M. charantia. PMID:27413209

  1. Selecting activated carbon for water and wastewater treatability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Chang, Q.G.; Liu, W.D.; Li, B.J.; Jiang, W.X.; Fu, L.J.; Ying, W.C.

    2007-10-15

    A series of follow-up investigations were performed to produce data for improving the four-indicator carbon selection method that we developed to identify high-potential activated carbons effective for removing specific organic water pollutants. The carbon's pore structure and surface chemistry are dependent on the raw material and the activation process. Coconut carbons have relatively more small pores than large pores; coal and apricot nutshell/walnut shell fruit carbons have the desirable pore structures for removing adsorbates of all sizes. Chemical activation, excessive activation, and/or thermal reactivation enlarge small pores, resulting in reduced phenol number and higher tannic acid number. Activated carbon's phenol, iodine, methylene blue, and tannic acid numbers are convenient indicators of its surface area and pore volume of pore diameters < 10, 10-15, 15-28, and > 28 angstrom, respectively. The phenol number of a carbon is also a good indicator of its surface acidity of oxygen-containing organic functional groups that affect the adsorptive capacity for aromatic and other small polar organics. The tannic acid number is an indicator of carbon's capacity for large, high-molecular-weight natural organic precursors of disinfection by-products in water treatment. The experimental results for removing nitrobenzene, methyl-tert-butyl ether, 4,4-bisphenol, humic acid, and the organic constituents of a biologically treated coking-plant effluent have demonstrated the effectiveness of this capacity-indicator-based method of carbon selection.

  2. Selecting patients with severe sepsis for drotrecogin alfa (activated) therapy.

    PubMed

    Sollet, Jean-Pierre; Garber, Gary E

    2002-12-01

    Selecting patients for drotrecogin alfa (activated) (Xigris; Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN) therapy outside of a clinical trial setting requires knowledge of the rationale that led the Protein C Worldwide Evaluation in Severe Sepsis (PROWESS) investigators to select the various entry criteria for the trial. Enrollment criteria for the study included a known or suspected infection, presence of at least 3 systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, and dysfunction of > or =1 organ or system. The infection criteria used in PROWESS were designed to be straightforward and were based on common clinical and radiological data. Although previous definitions of sepsis required only 2 SIRS criteria, the PROWESS trial investigators required the presence of > or =3 SIRS criteria to improve the sensitivity and specificity of these criteria for the diagnosis of sepsis. Acute organ dysfunction, the diagnostic criterion for severe sepsis, was used to define the study population because it identifies patients at significant risk of death. Characteristics of drotrecogin alfa (activated)-treated patients, including infection, modified SIRS criteria, and organ dysfunction, were similar to those of the placebo group and the general sepsis population. Proper clinical judgment and use of the these inclusion criteria as a guide will help clinicians select and treat sepsis patients with drotrecogin alfa (activated). PMID:12521613

  3. Patient Selection and Activity Planning Guide for Selective Internal Radiotherapy With Yttrium-90 Resin Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Wan-Yee; Kennedy, Andrew S.; Kim, Yun Hwan; Lai, Hee Kit; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Leung, Thomas W.T.; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Salem, Riad; Sangro, Bruno; Shuter, Borys; Wang, Shih-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) resin microspheres can improve the clinical outcomes for selected patients with inoperable liver cancer. This technique involves intra-arterial delivery of {beta}-emitting microspheres into hepatocellular carcinomas or liver metastases while sparing uninvolved structures. Its unique mode of action, including both {sup 90}Y brachytherapy and embolization of neoplastic microvasculature, necessitates activity planning methods specific to SIRT. Methods and Materials: A panel of clinicians experienced in {sup 90}Y resin microsphere SIRT was convened to integrate clinical experience with the published data to propose an activity planning pathway for radioembolization. Results: Accurate planning is essential to minimize potentially fatal sequelae such as radiation-induced liver disease while delivering tumoricidal {sup 90}Y activity. Planning methods have included empiric dosing according to degree of tumor involvement, empiric dosing adjusted for the body surface area, and partition model calculations using Medical Internal Radiation Dose principles. It has been recommended that at least two of these methods be compared when calculating the microsphere activity for each patient. Conclusions: Many factors inform {sup 90}Y resin microsphere SIRT activity planning, including the therapeutic intent, tissue and vasculature imaging, tumor and uninvolved liver characteristics, previous therapies, and localization of the microsphere infusion. The influence of each of these factors has been discussed.

  4. The Green Revolution in Transportation. Resource Recovery. Technology Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    These two learning activities provide context, objectives, list of materials, student activity, and evaluation criteria. The first involves an automotive class in developing a model alternative fueled vehicle, and the second involves the design of a useful recyclable product. (JOW)

  5. Recruitment and Selection Strategies in Optometric Education towards Addressing Human Resource Disparities in Sub-Saharan Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodley, V. R.; Loughman, James; Naidoo, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    The dire need for eye care services and a dearth of human resources (HR) in sub-Saharan Africa motivated the setting up of new optometry programmes. However, to make a meaningful impact, geographical, gender, economic and educational disparities must additionally be addressed. A qualitative study utilizing purposive sampling to select academic…

  6. The Availability and Utilization of School Library Resources in Some Selected Secondary Schools (High School) in Rivers State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owate, C. N.; Iroha, Okpa

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the availability and utilization of school library resources by Secondary School (High School) Students. Eight Selected Secondary Schools in Rivers State, Nigeria were chosen based on their performance in external examinations and geographic locations. In carrying out the research, questionnaires were administered to both…

  7. In vitro antitrypanosomal activity of ethnopharmacologically selected Beninese plants.

    PubMed

    Hoet, Sara; Opperdoes, Frederik; Brun, Reto; Adjakidjé, Victor; Quetin-Leclercq, Joëlle

    2004-03-01

    The in vitro antitrypanosomal activity of methylene chloride, methanol and aqueous extracts of the leaves and twigs of five plant species traditionally used in Benin for the treatment of sleeping sickness were evaluated on Trypanosoma brucei brucei and their selectivity was analysed on Leishmania mexicana mexicana and J774 macrophage-like murine cells. The results showed that the four most active extracts had MIC values < or =19 microg/ml (Hymenocardia acida twig and leaf, Strychnos spinosa leaf, Trichilia emetica leaf methylene chloride extracts). All these extracts had a lower activity on L. m. mexicana and J774 cells. Determination of the IC50 values of the methylene chloride leaf extracts on two strains of trypanosomes (T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense) and two mammalian cell lines (L6 and J774 cells) showed that all extracts possessed some antitrypanosomal activity with IC50's ranging from 1.5 to 39 microg/ml. All were also toxic to the mammalian cells, but usually with higher IC50's. The only exception was the S. spinosa methylene chloride leaf extract which had no toxicity on J774 cells. Although tannins have been identified in most of the species studied, they could not be detected in the most active extracts, just as alkaloids. The presence of flavonoids and quinones may at least in part explain the observed activities of some of the active extracts. PMID:15036465

  8. Perceptual expectation evokes category-selective cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Esterman, Michael; Yantis, Steven

    2010-05-01

    Selective visual attention directed to a location (even in the absence of a stimulus) increases activity in the corresponding regions of visual cortex and enhances the speed and accuracy of target perception. We further explored top-down influences on perceptual representations by manipulating observers' expectations about the category of an upcoming target. Observers viewed a display in which an object (either a face or a house) gradually emerged from a state of phase-scrambled noise; a cue established expectation about the object category. Observers were faster to categorize faces (gender discrimination) or houses (structural discrimination) when the category of the partially scrambled object matched their expectation. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed that this expectation was associated with anticipatory increases in category-specific visual cortical activity, even in the absence of object- or category-specific visual information. Expecting a face evoked increased activity in face-selective cortical regions in the fusiform gyrus and superior temporal sulcus. Conversely, expecting a house increased activity in parahippocampal gyrus. These results suggest that visual anticipation facilitates subsequent perception by recruiting, in advance, the same cortical mechanisms as those involved in perception. PMID:19759124

  9. Selection of active member locations in adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.-S.; Bruno, R.; Salama, M.

    1989-01-01

    The effective use of multiple passive and active members in adaptive structures necessitates that these members be optimally distributed throughout the structure. In truss structures, the problem falls into the class of combinatorial optimization for which the solution becomes exceedingly intractable as the problem size increases. This is overcome by using the simulated annealing algorithm to obtain near optimal locations for passive and/or active members. The maximization of the rate of energy dissipation over a finite time period as the measure of optimality is adopted. The selection of optimal locations for both passive and active members is consistently treated through the use of the energy dissipation rate criterion within the simulated annealing algorithm. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness of the methodology for large truss structures.

  10. Grafting of activated carbon cloths for selective adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gineys, M.; Benoit, R.; Cohaut, N.; Béguin, F.; Delpeux-Ouldriane, S.

    2016-05-01

    Chemical functionalization of an activated carbon cloth with 3-aminophthalic acid and 4-aminobenzoic acid groups by the in situ formation of the corresponding diazonium salt in aqueous acidic solution is reported. The nature and amount of selected functions on an activated carbon surface, in particular the grafted density, were determined by potentiometric titration, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nanotextural properties of the modified carbon were explored by gas adsorption. Functionalized activated carbon cloth was obtained at a discrete grafting level while preserving interesting textural properties and a large porous volume. Finally, the grafting homogeneity of the carbon surface and the nature of the chemical bonding were investigated using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) technique.

  11. Toxicity and mutagenic activity of some selected Nigerian plants.

    PubMed

    Sowemimo, A A; Fakoya, F A; Awopetu, I; Omobuwajo, O R; Adesanya, S A

    2007-09-25

    The toxicity and mutagenic potential of most African plants implicated in the management of cancer have not been investigated. The ethanolic extracts of selected Nigerian plants were subsequently studied using the brine shrimp lethality tests, inhibition of telomerase activity and induction of chromosomal aberrations in vivo in rat lymphocytes. Morinda lucida root bark, Nymphaea lotus whole plant and Garcinia kola root were active in the three test systems. Bryophyllum calycinum whole plant, Annona senegalensis root, Hymenocardia acida stem bark, Erythrophleum suaveolens leaves and Spondiathus preussii stem bark were toxic to brine shrimps and caused chromosomal damage in rat lymphocytes. Ficus exasperata leaves, Chrysophyllum albidum root bark and Hibiscus sabdariffa leaves were non-toxic to all the three test systems. Chenopodium ambrosioides whole plant was non-toxic to brine shrimps and rat lymphocyte chromosomes but showed inhibition in the conventional telomerase assay indicating a possible selectivity for human chromosomes. The result justified the use of the first eight plants and Chenopodium ambrosioides in the management of cancer in south west Nigeria although they appear to be non-selective and their mode of action may be different from plant to plant. All these plants except Chenopodium ambrosioides are also mutagenic and cytotoxic. PMID:17707603

  12. Linking resource selection and mortality modeling for population estimation of mountain lions in Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Hugh S.; Ruth, Toni K.; Gude, Justin A.; Choate, David; DeSimone, Rich; Hebblewhite, Mark; Matchett, Marc R.; Mitchell, Michael S.; Murphy, Kerry; Williams, Jim

    2015-01-01

    To be most effective, the scale of wildlife management practices should match the range of a particular species’ movements. For this reason, combined with our inability to rigorously or regularly census mountain lion populations, several authors have suggested that mountain lions be managed in a source-sink or metapopulation framework. We used a combination of resource selection functions, mortality estimation, and dispersal modeling to estimate cougar population levels in Montana statewide and potential population level effects of planned harvest levels. Between 1980 and 2012, 236 independent mountain lions were collared and monitored for research in Montana. From these data we used 18,695 GPS locations collected during winter from 85 animals to develop a resource selection function (RSF), and 11,726 VHF and GPS locations from 142 animals along with the locations of 6343 mountain lions harvested from 1988–2011 to validate the RSF model. Our RSF model validated well in all portions of the State, although it appeared to perform better in Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) Regions 1, 2, 4 and 6, than in Regions 3, 5, and 7. Our mean RSF based population estimate for the total population (kittens, juveniles, and adults) of mountain lions in Montana in 2005 was 3926, with almost 25% of the entire population in MFWP Region 1. Estimates based on a high and low reference population estimates produce a possible range of 2784 to 5156 mountain lions statewide. Based on a range of possible survival rates we estimated the mountain lion population in Montana to be stable to slightly increasing between 2005 and 2010 with lambda ranging from 0.999 (SD = 0.05) to 1.02 (SD = 0.03). We believe these population growth rates to be a conservative estimate of true population growth. Our model suggests that proposed changes to female harvest quotas for 2013–2015 will result in an annual statewide population decline of 3% and shows that, due to reduced dispersal, changes to

  13. Give me a better break: Choosing workday break activities to maximize resource recovery.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Emily M; Wu, Cindy

    2016-02-01

    Surprisingly little research investigates employee breaks at work, and even less research provides prescriptive suggestions for better workday breaks in terms of when, where, and how break activities are most beneficial. Based on the effort-recovery model and using experience sampling methodology, we examined the characteristics of employee workday breaks with 95 employees across 5 workdays. In addition, we examined resources as a mediator between break characteristics and well-being. Multilevel analysis results indicated that activities that were preferred and earlier in the work shift related to more resource recovery following the break. We also found that resources mediated the influence of preferred break activities and time of break on health symptoms and that resource recovery benefited person-level outcomes of emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, and organizational citizenship behavior. Finally, break length interacted with the number of breaks per day such that longer breaks and frequent short breaks were associated with more resources than infrequent short breaks. PMID:26375961

  14. Election Resources and Activities for Grades K-5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Carolyn C.; Lyon, Anna

    2004-01-01

    In a recent survey, the authors asked 37 elementary teachers to describe websites that they found to be the most helpful in planning to teach about voting, elections in general, and the Presidential election of 2004 in particular. For this article, they selected what were, in their judgment, the most useful websites--flexible enough to use with…

  15. 75 FR 27575 - Agency Information Collection Activities: State Water Resources Research Institute Program Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... notice (74 FR 68860) announcing that we would submit this ICR to OMB for approval and soliciting comments... Geological Survey Agency Information Collection Activities: State Water Resources Research Institute Program... Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as amended (42 U.S.C. 10301 et seq.), authorizes a water...

  16. 78 FR 46597 - Agency Information Collection Activities: State Water Resources Research Institute Program Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ..., we published a Federal Register notice (78 FR 2422) announcing that we would submit this ICR to OMB....S. Geological Survey Agency Information Collection Activities: State Water Resources Research... Water Resources (NIWR) USGS Competitive Grant Program. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act...

  17. 34 CFR 656.3 - What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center? 656.3 Section 656.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND...

  18. 34 CFR 656.3 - What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center? 656.3 Section 656.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND...

  19. 77 FR 74517 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request; Education and Human Resources Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ... the second notice for public comment; the first was published in the Federal Register at 77 FR 33774... FOUNDATION Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request; Education and Human Resources Project...: Education and Human Resources Program Monitoring Clearance. OMB Approval Number: 3145-NEW. Type of...

  20. Application of household production theory to selected natural-resource problems in less-developed countries

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives are threefold: (1) to perform an analytical survey of household production theory as it relates to natural-resource problems in less-developed countries, (2) to develop a household production model of fuelwood decision making, (3) to derive a theoretical framework for travel-cost demand studies of international nature tourism. The model of household fuelwood decision making provides a rich array of implications and predictions for empirical analysis. For example, it is shown that fuelwood and modern fuels may be either substitutes or complements depending on the interaction of the gross-substitution and income-expansion effects. Therefore, empirical analysis should precede adoption of any inter-fuel substitution policies such as subsidizing kerosene. The fuelwood model also provides a framework for analyzing the conditions and factors determining entry and exit by households into the wood-burning subpopulation, a key for designing optimal household energy policies in the Third World. The international nature tourism travel cost model predicts that the demand for nature tourism is an aggregate of the demand for the individual activities undertaken during the trip.

  1. Measuring Reading Activity: An Inventory. Instructional Resource No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, John T.; And Others

    Noting that the amount of reading students do is related to their reading achievement, this booklet presents an instrument designed to measure the amount and breadth of students' reading in and out of school. The first part of the booklet discusses the Reading Activity Inventory (RAI) and how it differs from other reading activity measures, uses…

  2. Antimycobacterial and cytotoxic activity of selected medicinal plant extracts

    PubMed Central

    Nguta, Joseph M.; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Nyarko, Alexander K.; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Addo, Phyllis G.A.; Otchere, Isaac; Kissi-Twum, Abena

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains an ongoing threat to human health. Several medicinal plants are used traditionally to treat tuberculosis in Ghana. The current study was designed to investigate the antimycobacterial activity and cytotoxicity of crude extracts from five selected medicinal plants. Material and methods The microplate alamar blue assay (MABA) was used for antimycobacterial studies while the CellTiter 96® AQueous Assay, which is composed of solutions of a novel tetrazolium compound [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt; MTS] and an electron coupling reagent (phenazine methosulfate) PMS, was used for cytotoxic studies. Correlation coefficients were used to compare the activity of crude extracts against nonpathogenic strains and the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp.tuberculosis. Results Results of the MIC determinations indicated that all the crude extracts were active on all the three tested mycobacterial strains. Minimum inhibitory concentration values as low as 156.3 µg/mL against M. tuberculosis; Strain H37Ra (ATCC® 25,177™) were recorded from the leaves of Solanum torvum Sw. (Solanaceae). Cytotoxicity of the extracts varied, and the leaves from S. torvum had the most promising selectivity index. Activity against M. tuberculosis; Strain H37Ra was the best predictor of activity against pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp.tuberculosis (correlation coefficient=0.8). Conclusion The overall results of the present study provide supportive data on the use of some medicinal plants for tuberculosis treatment. The leaves of Solanum torvum are a potential source of anti-TB natural products and deserve further investigations to develop novel anti-TB agents against sensitive and drug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. PMID:26875647

  3. Selection and preparation of activated carbon for fuel gas storage

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, James A.; Noh, Joong S.; Agarwal, Rajiv K.

    1990-10-02

    Increasing the surface acidity of active carbons can lead to an increase in capacity for hydrogen adsorption. Increasing the surface basicity can facilitate methane adsorption. The treatment of carbons is most effective when the carbon source material is selected to have a low ash content i.e., below about 3%, and where the ash consists predominantly of alkali metals alkali earth, with only minimal amounts of transition metals and silicon. The carbon is washed in water or acid and then oxidized, e.g. in a stream of oxygen and an inert gas at an elevated temperature.

  4. Participation of people with disabilities in selected activities.

    PubMed

    Dowler, J M; Jordan-Simpson, D A

    1990-01-01

    The Health and Activity Limitation Survey (HALS) surveyed disabled Canadians. The survey measured participation in selected cultural and leisure activities, the satisfaction of disabled people with their level of participation, and barriers to participation. Of those surveyed, 98.0% reported doing one or a combination of the following: watching television; listening to radio, records or tapes; reading. Those with speaking and "other" limitations used the telephone less than those with other types of limitations; similarly, those with severe disabilities used the telephone less than those with less-severe disabilities. Participation decreased with age for activities such as doing arts or crafts, gardening, and talking on the telephone. Those aged 65 and over were more likely to be satisfied with their activity than younger people. Overall, 47.4% of those with a severe disability wanted to do more, compared to 34.0% with a moderate disability and 26.2% with a slight disability. The physical inability to do more was the most-often cited barrier to increasing activity: 53.9% of men and 55.7% of women said it was a barrier. PMID:2151649

  5. Antifungal activity of essential oils against selected terverticillate penicillia.

    PubMed

    Felšöciová, Soňa; Kačániová, Miroslava; Horská, Elena; Vukovič, Nenad; Hleba, Lukáš; Petrová, Jana; Rovná, Katarina; Stričík, Michal; Hajduová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen 15 essential oils of selected plant species, viz. Lavandula angustifolia, Carum carvi, Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Mentha piperita, Chamomilla recutita L., Pinus sylvestris, Satureia hortensis L., Origanum vulgare L., Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Thymus vulgaris L., Origanum vulgare L. for antifungal activity against five Penicillium species: Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium expansum and Penicillium griseofulvum. The method used for screening included the disc diffusion method. The study points out the wide spectrum of antifungal activity of essential oils against Penicillium fungi. There were five essential oils of the 15 mentioned above which showed a hopeful antifungal activity: Pimpinella anisum, Chamomilla recutita L., Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare L. The most hopeful antifungal activity and killing effect against all tested penicillia was found to be Origanum vulgare L. and Pimpinella anisum. The lowest level of antifungal activity was demonstrated by the oils Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Rosmarinus officinalis. PMID:25780826

  6. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S

    2013-02-19

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  7. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2010-06-01

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  8. Examining the Relationship Between Flexible Resources and Health Information Channel Selection.

    PubMed

    Manierre, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how variations in flexible resources influence where individuals begin their search for health information. Access to flexible resources such as money, power, and knowledge can alter the accessibility of channels for health information, such as doctors, the Internet, and print media. Using the HINTS 3 sample, whether information channel utilization is predicted by the same factors in two groups with distinct levels of access to flexible resources, as approximated by high and low levels of education, is investigated. Differences in access to flexible resources are hypothesized to produce variations in channel utilization in bivariate analyses, as well as changes in coefficient strength and statistical significance in multivariate models. Multinomial logit models were used to assess how a number of variables influence the probability of using a specific information channel first in either flexible resource group. Results suggest that individuals with higher levels of education, a proxy for flexible resources, are more likely to report seeking information from the Internet first, which is consistent with research on the digital divide. It appears that diminished access to flexible resources is also associated with heightened utilization of offline channels, including doctors. A handful of differences in predictors were found between the low and high flexible resource groups when multivariate models were compared. Future research should take into account the distinctions between different offline channels while also seeking to further understand how social inequality relates to the utilization of different channels and corresponding health outcomes. PMID:25616853

  9. Resource Guide to Literature on Barrier-Free Environments; With Selected Annotations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, Washington, DC.

    The resource guide lists information on 1341 references (1960-1975) on barrier-free environments for elderly and/or handicapped persons. Each citation contains bibliographic information (author, title, ordering information and source), descriptors, and a brief abstract. Resources are arranged according to the following categories (sample subtopics…

  10. The Canadian Environmental Education Catalogue: A Guide to Selected Resources and Materials. Premier Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinrichs, Wally; And Others

    Despite their large numbers, environmental education resources can be difficult to find. The purpose of this catalogue is to broaden the awareness of available resources among educators and curriculum developers and facilitate their accessibility. This first edition of the catalogue contains approximately 1,200 of the more than 4,000 titles that…

  11. Women's Educational Equity: Annotated Selected References and Resources. Bibliography Series: 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirksena, Kathy, Comp.; And Others

    Intended to provide an overview of available resources, the annotated bibliography contains 88 references to major resources on women and education. Most entries were published during the 1970s. The bibliography is designed for school personnel, researchers, parents, citizens, and members of women's organizations who want to know what programs,…

  12. Distribution of selected healthcare resources for influenza pandemic response in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human influenza infection poses a serious public health threat in Cambodia, a country at risk for the emergence and spread of novel influenza viruses with pandemic potential. Prior pandemics demonstrated the adverse impact of influenza on poor communities in developing countries. Investigation of healthcare resource distribution can inform decisions regarding resource mobilization and investment for pandemic mitigation. Methods A health facility survey performed across Cambodia obtained data on availability of healthcare resources important for pandemic influenza response. Focusing on five key resources considered most necessary for treating severe influenza (inpatient beds, doctors, nurses, oseltamivir, and ventilators), resource distributions were analyzed at the Operational District (OD) and Province levels, refining data analysis from earlier studies. Resources were stratified by respondent type (hospital vs. District Health Office [DHO]). A summary index of distribution inequality was calculated using the Gini coefficient. Indices for local spatial autocorrelation were measured at the OD level using geographical information system (GIS) analysis. Finally, a potential link between socioeconomic status and resource distribution was explored by mapping resource densities against poverty rates. Results Gini coefficient calculation revealed variable inequality in distribution of the five key resources at the Province and OD levels. A greater percentage of the population resides in areas of relative under-supply (28.5%) than over-supply (21.3%). Areas with more resources per capita showed significant clustering in central Cambodia while areas with fewer resources clustered in the northern and western provinces. Hospital-based inpatient beds, doctors, and nurses were most heavily concentrated in areas of the country with the lowest poverty rates; however, beds and nurses in Non-Hospital Medical Facilities (NHMF) showed increasing concentrations at higher

  13. A summary of activities of the Earth Resources Laboratory at the Mississippi Test Facility during 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piland, R. O.

    1972-01-01

    First year activities at the NASA Earth Resources Laboratory are reviewed. Covered are: (1) personnel; (2) organization; (3) technical equipment capabilities; (4) University programs; (5) agency relationships; (6) minor projects; (7) technical program; and (8) 1971 reports and products.

  14. 78 FR 23233 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; IEPS International Resource...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; IEPS International Resource Information System (IRIS) AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE), Department of Education (ED). ACTION:...

  15. Peptide fibrils with altered stability, activity, and cell selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F.

    2014-01-01

    Peptides have some unique and superior features compared to proteins. However, the use of peptides as therapeutics is hampered by their low stability and cell selectivity. In this study, a new lytic peptide (CL-1, FLGALFRALSRLL) was constructed. Under the physiological condition, peptide CL-1 self-assembled into dynamically stable aggregates with fibrils-like structures. Aggregated CL-1 demonstrated dramatically altered activity and stability in comparison with single molecule CL-1 and other lytic peptides: when incubated with co-cultured bacteria and tissue cells, CL-1 aggregates killed bacteria selectively but spared co-cultured human cells; CL-1 aggregates kept intact in human serum for more than five hours. Peptide-cell interaction studies performed on lipid monolayers and live human tissue cells revealed that in comparison with monomeric CL-1, aggregated CL-1 had decreased cell affinity and membrane insertion capability on tissue cells. A dynamic process involving aggregate dissociation and rearrangement seemed to be an essential step for membrane bound CL-1 aggregates to realize its cytotoxicity to tissue cells. Our study suggests that peptide aggregation could be as important as the charge and secondary structure of a peptide in affecting peptide-cell interactions. Controlling peptide self-assembly represents a new way to increase the stability and cell selectivity of bioactive peptides for wide biomedical applications. PMID:23713839

  16. Fate of selected pharmaceutically active compounds during simulated riverbank filtration.

    PubMed

    D'Alessio, Matteo; Yoneyama, Bunnie; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature, oxygen, and organic matter on the removal of selected pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) during simulated riverbank filtration (RBF). The behavior of six PhACs (caffeine, carbamazepine, 17-β estradiol [E2], estrone [E1], gemfibrozil, and phenazone) was evaluated by small flow-through column experiments. Results from our study showed that RBF can be used to treat many of the PhACs found in environmental waters. Local conditions at the RBF site, however, can affect the removal of PhACs and should be investigated. Biodegradation and sorption represented the predominant mechanisms involved during the removal of the selected PhACs. All selected PhACs showed limited and slower removal during the winter. Phenazone was highly impacted by the level of oxygen; complete depletion of phenazone below the analytical limit occurred only under aerobic conditions (dissolved oxygen >8 mg L(-1)). Caffeine and E2 were highly impacted by the presence of humic acid in the feed water. Caffeine and E2 were depleted below the detection limit in the presence of humic acid regardless of the temperature and the level of oxygen. E1 was impacted by the different environmental conditions and depletion below the detection limit occurred only during the summer under aerobic conditions. Carbamazepine (10%) and gemfibrozil (<30%) showed limited removal regardless of the different levels of temperature, oxygen and humic acid. PMID:25461064

  17. Fermi Observations of TeV-Selected Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Di Bernardo, G.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Foschini, L.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocian, M. L.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Reyes, L. C.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sellerholm, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-12-01

    We report on observations of TeV-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) made during the first 5.5 months of observations with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). In total, 96 AGNs were selected for study, each being either (1) a source detected at TeV energies (28 sources) or (2) an object that has been studied with TeV instruments and for which an upper limit has been reported (68 objects). The Fermi observations show clear detections of 38 of these TeV-selected objects, of which 21 are joint GeV-TeV sources, and 29 were not in the third EGRET catalog. For each of the 38 Fermi-detected sources, spectra and light curves are presented. Most can be described with a power law of spectral index harder than 2.0, with a spectral break generally required to accommodate the TeV measurements. Based on an extrapolation of the Fermi spectrum, we identify sources, not previously detected at TeV energies, which are promising targets for TeV instruments. Evidence for systematic evolution of the γ-ray spectrum with redshift is presented and discussed in the context of interaction with the extragalactic background light.

  18. Immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activity of selected osthole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zimecki, Michał; Artym, Jolanta; Cisowski, Wojciech; Mazol, Irena; Włodarczyk, Maciej; Gleńsk, Michał

    2009-01-01

    From osthole [7-methoxy-8-(3-methyl-but-2-enyl)-chromen-2-one] (I), obtained by selective extraction of Peucedanum ostruthium (L.) W. Koch roots, ostholic acid (II) was synthetized as a result of its oxidation with chromium trioxide. From ostholic acid, through its chloride, four amides were obtained: the morpholide 1, the p-chloro-benzylamide 2, the piperidine 3 and the N-methyl-piperazide 4. Except for 1, other compounds have not been described before. The amides 1-4 and their precursor osthole (I) were tested for their potential activities in selected immunological assays. The compounds showed moderate inhibitory activity in the humoral immune response to sheep erythrocytes in mice in vitro, and 4 was the most suppressive. The effects of 1 and 3 on concanavalin A- and pokeweed mitogen-induced mouse splenocyte proliferation were inhibitory and those of 4 stimulatory. The compounds were also tested for their activity on tumour necrosis factor a and interleukin 6 production, induced by lipopolysaccharide, in cultures of rat peritoneal cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Compounds 1, 3 and 4 inhibited tumour necrosis factor a (rat cells), whereas compound 2 stimulated the production of both cytokines. Compounds 1, 2 and 3 were also strongly inhibitory on tumour necrosis factor a production in human blood cells (73, 78 and 80% inhibition at 10 microg/ml, respectively). On the other hand, 2 and 4 stimulated the interleukin 6 production (2- to 3-fold stimulation). In addition, 2 and 4 suppressed the carrageenan-induced inflammation in mice (56.5% and 68.3% inhibition, respectively). In summary, the compounds predominantly displayed suppressive and antiinflammatory activities in the investigated models. PMID:19678539

  19. Natural resource management activities at the Savannah River Site. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) reviews the environmental consequences of ongoing natural resource management activities on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Appendix A contains the Natural Resources Management Plant (NRMP). While several SRS organizations have primary responsibilities for different elements of the plan, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Savannah River Forest Station (SRFS) is responsible for most elements. Of the river scenarios defined in 1985, the High-Intensity Management alternative established the upper bound of environmental consequences; it represents a more intense level of resource management than that being performed under current resource management activities. This alternative established compliance mechanisms for several natural resource-related requirements and maximum practical timber harvesting. Similarly, the Low-Intensity Management alternative established the lower bound of environmental consequences and represents a less intense level of resource management than that being performed under current resource management activities. This alternative also established compliance mechanisms, but defined a passively managed natural area. The Proposed Action of this EA describes the current level of multiple-natural resource management. This EA reviews the proposed action, and the high and low intensity alternative scenarios.

  20. Integrating natural resource damage assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-01

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

  1. Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many US Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

  2. Urban school leadership for elementary science instruction: Identifying and activating resources in an undervalued school subject

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillane, James P.; Diamond, John B.; Walker, Lisa J.; Halverson, Rich; Jita, Loyiso

    2001-10-01

    This article explores school leadership for elementary school science teaching in an urban setting. We examine how school leaders bring resources together to enhance science instruction when there appear to be relatively few resources available for it. From our study of 13 Chicago elementary (K-8) schools' efforts to lead instructional change in mathematics, language arts, and science education, we show how resources for leading instruction are unequally distributed across subject areas. We also explore how over time leaders in one school successfully identified and activated resources for leading change in science education. The result has been a steady, although not always certain, development of science as an instructional area in the school. We argue that leading change in science education involves the identification and activation of material resources, the development of teachers' and school leaders' human capital, and the development and use of social capital.

  3. Vibrational spectra and antimicrobial activity of selected bivalent cation benzoates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borawska, M. H.; Koczoń, P.; Piekut, J.; Świsłocka, R.; Lewandowski, W.

    2009-02-01

    Selected bands of FT-IR spectra of Mg(II), Ca(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) benzoates of both solid state and water solution, were assigned to appropriate molecular vibrations. Next evaluation of electronic charge distribution in both carboxylic anion and aromatic ring of studied compounds was performed. Classical plate tests and turbidimetry measurements, monitoring growth of bacteria Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and yeasts Pichia anomala and Saccharomyces cerevisiae during 24 h of incubation, in optimal growth conditions (control) and in medium with addition of studied benzoate (concentration of 0.01% expressed as the concentration of benzoic acid), proved antimicrobial activity of studied compounds against investigated micro-organisms. PLS (partially least square) and PCR (principal component regression) techniques were applied to build a model, correlating spectral data reflecting molecular structure of studied compounds, with degree of influence of those compounds on growth of studied micro-organisms. Statistically significant correlation within cross validation diagnostic of PLS-1 calibration was found, when log 1/T of selected spectral regions of water solution samples were used as input data. The correlation coefficients between predicted with PLS calibration based on created 1, 2 or 3 factor models, and actual values of antimicrobial activity were: 0.70; 0.76, 0.81 for P. anomala, B. subtilis, and E. coli, respectively. Log(PRESS) values of appropriate models were 2.10, 2,39 and 3.23 for P. anomala, B. subtilis, and E. coli, respectively.

  4. Active link selection for efficient semi-supervised community detection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liang; Jin, Di; Wang, Xiao; Cao, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Several semi-supervised community detection algorithms have been proposed recently to improve the performance of traditional topology-based methods. However, most of them focus on how to integrate supervised information with topology information; few of them pay attention to which information is critical for performance improvement. This leads to large amounts of demand for supervised information, which is expensive or difficult to obtain in most fields. For this problem we propose an active link selection framework, that is we actively select the most uncertain and informative links for human labeling for the efficient utilization of the supervised information. We also disconnect the most likely inter-community edges to further improve the efficiency. Our main idea is that, by connecting uncertain nodes to their community hubs and disconnecting the inter-community edges, one can sharpen the block structure of adjacency matrix more efficiently than randomly labeling links as the existing methods did. Experiments on both synthetic and real networks demonstrate that our new approach significantly outperforms the existing methods in terms of the efficiency of using supervised information. It needs ~13% of the supervised information to achieve a performance similar to that of the original semi-supervised approaches. PMID:25761385

  5. Emotion disrupts neural activity during selective attention in psychopathy.

    PubMed

    Sadeh, Naomi; Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Heller, Wendy; Herrington, John D; Engels, Anna S; Warren, Stacie L; Crocker, Laura D; Sutton, Bradley P; Miller, Gregory A

    2013-03-01

    Dimensions of psychopathy are theorized to be associated with distinct cognitive and emotional abnormalities that may represent unique neurobiological risk factors for the disorder. This hypothesis was investigated by examining whether the psychopathic personality dimensions of fearless-dominance and impulsive-antisociality moderated neural activity and behavioral responses associated with selective attention and emotional processing during an emotion-word Stroop task in 49 adults. As predicted, the dimensions evidenced divergent selective-attention deficits and sensitivity to emotional distraction. Fearless-dominance was associated with disrupted attentional control to positive words, and activation in right superior frontal gyrus mediated the relationship between fearless-dominance and errors to positive words. In contrast, impulsive-antisociality evidenced increased behavioral interference to both positive and negative words and correlated positively with recruitment of regions associated with motivational salience (amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, insula), emotion regulation (temporal cortex, superior frontal gyrus) and attentional control (dorsal anterior cingulate cortex). Individuals high on both dimensions had increased recruitment of regions related to attentional control (temporal cortex, rostral anterior cingulate cortex), response preparation (pre-/post-central gyri) and motivational value (orbitofrontal cortex) in response to negative words. These findings provide evidence that the psychopathy dimensions represent dual sets of risk factors characterized by divergent dysfunction in cognitive and affective processes. PMID:22210673

  6. Active link selection for efficient semi-supervised community detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Jin, Di; Wang, Xiao; Cao, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Several semi-supervised community detection algorithms have been proposed recently to improve the performance of traditional topology-based methods. However, most of them focus on how to integrate supervised information with topology information; few of them pay attention to which information is critical for performance improvement. This leads to large amounts of demand for supervised information, which is expensive or difficult to obtain in most fields. For this problem we propose an active link selection framework, that is we actively select the most uncertain and informative links for human labeling for the efficient utilization of the supervised information. We also disconnect the most likely inter-community edges to further improve the efficiency. Our main idea is that, by connecting uncertain nodes to their community hubs and disconnecting the inter-community edges, one can sharpen the block structure of adjacency matrix more efficiently than randomly labeling links as the existing methods did. Experiments on both synthetic and real networks demonstrate that our new approach significantly outperforms the existing methods in terms of the efficiency of using supervised information. It needs ~13% of the supervised information to achieve a performance similar to that of the original semi-supervised approaches. PMID:25761385

  7. Metabolism of a highly selective gelatinase inhibitor generates active metabolite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mijoon; Villegas-Estrada, Adriel; Celenza, Giuseppe; Boggess, Bill; Toth, Marta; Kreitinger, Gloria; Forbes, Christopher; Fridman, Rafael; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2007-11-01

    (4-Phenoxyphenylsulfonyl)methylthiirane (inhibitor 1) is a highly selective inhibitor of gelatinases (matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9), which is showing considerable promise in animal models for cancer and stroke. Despite demonstrated potent, selective, and effective inhibition of gelatinases both in vitro and in vivo, the compound is rapidly metabolized, implying that the likely activity in vivo is due to a metabolite rather than the compound itself. To this end, metabolism of inhibitor 1 was investigated in in vitro systems. Four metabolites were identified by LC/MS-MS and the structures of three of them were further validated by comparison with authentic synthetic samples. One metabolite, 4-(4-thiiranylmethanesulfonylphenoxy)phenol (compound 21), was generated by hydroxylation of the terminal phenyl group of 1. This compound was investigated in kinetics of inhibition of several matrix metalloproteinases. This metabolite was a more potent slow-binding inhibitor of gelatinases (matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9) than the parent compound 1, but it also served as a slow-binding inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-14, the upstream activator of matrix metalloproteinase-2. PMID:17927722

  8. Natural resources management activities and biodiversity maintenance. Progress report, July 1, 1994--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, M.B.

    1995-05-01

    This progress report for the Natural Resources Management Activities and Biodiversity Maintenance for the time period July 1, 1994 - June 30, 1995 was submitted to the DOE by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. The activities devoted to revitilization of wildlife areas and reintroduction of various animal species to wildlife areas (such as Crackerneck Wildlife Management Area) are described. Other information regarding site characterization, land use and resource management in South Carolina is provided. Also, a description of attendence to various meetings and certification seminars is covered.

  9. Highly selective antibacterial activities of silver nanoparticles against Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ju; Rong, Kaifeng; Zhao, Huiping; Li, Fei; Lu, Zhong; Chen, Rong

    2013-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with different sizes (5, 15 and 55 nm) were synthesized via simple method, and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis). The antibacterial activities of the prepared AgNPs against Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli), Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) were evaluated by inhibition zone, inhibition curve, and colony counting methods. The results showed that the AgNPs exhibited obvious bacterium-selective and size-dependent antibacterial activities. The Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus and B. subtilis were more sensitive to AgNPs than Gram-negative bacterium E. coli. Interestingly, AgNPs displayed remarkably antibacterial activities against B. subtilis among Gram-positive bacteria, regardless of whether in separately or cocultured bacteria. It also showed that AgNPs with 5 nm in size presented the highest antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The effects of AgNPs on the membrane leakage of the reducing sugars from three bacteria were also measured by 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid method. The leakage amount of reducing sugars from B. subtilis was the highest among the tested bacteria, indicating that AgNPs could damage the structure of bacteria cell membrane and resulted in the leakage of reducing sugars, leading to the death of bacteria. PMID:24245147

  10. Antimicrobial Activity of Xanthohumol and Its Selected Structural Analogues.

    PubMed

    Stompor, Monika; Żarowska, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of structural analogues of xanthohumol 1, a flavonoid compound found in hops (Humulus lupulus). The agar-diffusion method using filter paper disks was applied. Biological tests performed for selected strains of Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria, fungi (Alternaria sp.), and yeasts (Rhodotorula rubra, Candida albicans) revealed that compounds with at least one hydroxyl group-all of them have it at the C-4 position-demonstrated good activity. Our research showed that the strain S. aureus was more sensitive to chalcones than to the isomers in which the heterocyclic ring C is closed (flavanones). The strain R. rubra was moderately sensitive to only one compound: 4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone 8. Loss of the hydroxyl group in the B-ring of 4'-methoxychalcones or its replacement by a halogen atom (-Cl, -Br), nitro group (-NO₂), ethoxy group (-OCH₂CH₃), or aliphatic substituent (-CH₃, -CH₂CH₃) resulted in the loss of antimicrobial activity towards both R. rubra yeast and S. aureus bacteria. Xanthohumol 1, naringenin 5, and chalconaringenin 7 inhibited growth of S. aureus, whereas 4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone 8 was active towards two strains: S. aureus and R. rubra. PMID:27187329

  11. Fluoride release and antibacterial activity of selected dental materials.

    PubMed

    Marczuk-Kolada, Grazyna; Jakoniuk, Piotr; Mystkowska, Joanna; Łuczaj-Cepowicz, Elzbieta; Waszkiel, Danuta; Dabrowski, Jan Ryszard; Leszczyńska, Katarzyna

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the fluoride ion release and antibacterial activities of the glassionomer cement Fuji IX and the compomer (composite modified polyacid) Dyract AP. Fluoride ion release was measured using direct potentiometry with an Orion fluoride ion selective electrode. The measurement was carried out after 1, 4, 7, 14, 30, and 60 days of storage in phosphate buffer at pH 6.8. The antibacterial activity of the materials was evaluated against the bacteria Streptococcus mutans ATCC 35668, Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 13419, Streptococcus sanguis ATCC 10556, and Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei ATCC 393. The agar diffusion test was applied. The material specimens were assessed twice: after setting and seven days later. Zones of bacterial growth inhibition were measured in millimeters after 24 hours. The results of the study showed that both materials released ion fluoride, with a higher emission of Fuji IX than Dyract AP. The highest level of emission was observed on the seventh day of the study in both materials. After 24 hours of bonding there was inhibition of bacterial growth by Fuji IX, whereas Dyract AP did not show similar activity. On the eighth day after polymerization, Dyract AP was significantly more active towards Streptococcus sanguis and salivarius. PMID:18493226

  12. Plant active components - a resource for antiparasitic agents?

    PubMed

    Anthony, Jean-Paul; Fyfe, Lorna; Smith, Huw

    2005-10-01

    Plant essential oils (and/or active components) can be used as alternatives or adjuncts to current antiparasitic therapies. Garlic oil has broad-spectrum activity against Trypanosoma, Plasmodium, Giardia and Leishmania, and Cochlospermum planchonii and Croton cajucara oils specifically inhibit Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania amazonensis, respectively. Some plant oils have immunomodulatory effects that could modify host-parasite immunobiology, and the lipid solubility of plant oils might offer alternative, transcutaneous delivery routes. The emergence of parasites resistant to current chemotherapies highlights the importance of plant essential oils as novel antiparasitic agents. PMID:16099722

  13. Consumer Education, 5-8: Activities, Resources and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Perry D.; Murray, C. Kenneth

    This publication suggests consumer education learning activities for grades five through eight. It is intended as a guideline for developing local curriculum and for designing instructional strategies. Students are taught to learn to manage, to buy wisely, to save and invest, to protect themselves from unscrupulous practice, and to understand the…

  14. Expanding Adolescent Role Expectations. Information, Activities, Resources for Vocational Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY. Dept. of Community Service Education.

    Developed for vocational educators as a self-study guide or as a basis for inservice workshops, this source book presents information on sex fair education. Each of the six sections contains fact sheets and references, and some contain checklists, guidelines or rating sheets, and highlighted questions and activities which may be used for…

  15. The Impact of Library Resources and Services on the Scholarly Activity of Medical Faculty and Residents.

    PubMed

    Quesenberry, Alexandria C; Oelschlegel, Sandy; Earl, Martha; Leonard, Kelsey; Vaughn, Cynthia J

    2016-01-01

    Librarians at an academic medical center library gathered data to determine if library services and resources impacted scholarly activity. A survey was developed and sent out to faculty and residents asking how they used the library during scholarly activity. Sixty-five faculty members and residents responded to the survey. The majority of respondents involved with scholarly activity use the library's services and resources. PubMed is the most frequently used database. The positive results show the library impacts the scholarly activity of medical faculty and residents. PMID:27391176

  16. Maps showing selected geology and phosphate resources of the Stewart Flat quadrangle, Caribou County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Derkey, Pamela Dunlap; Paul, Ken; Palmer, Pamela; Fakourbayat, Mahasti; Wotruba, Nancy J.; Hovland, R. David

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes information on the thickness, grade, lateral continuity, phosphate resources, and ownership of phosplate-bearing units in the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Phosphoria Formation in the Stewart Flat quadrangle. This report is one of a series of quadrangle reports prepared by the Idaho Bureau of Mines and Geology under U.S. Geological Survey cost sharing contract # 14-08-0001-17925 to calculate phosphate resources in southeastern Idaho (fig. 1).

  17. Scale Dependence of Female Ungulate Reproductive Success in Relation to Nutritional Condition, Resource Selection and Multi-Predator Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Duquette, Jared F; Belant, Jerrold L; Svoboda, Nathan J; Beyer, Dean E; Lederle, Patrick E

    2015-01-01

    Female ungulate reproductive success is dependent on the survival of their young, and affected by maternal resource selection, predator avoidance, and nutritional condition. However, potential hierarchical effects of these factors on reproductive success are largely unknown, especially in multi-predator landscapes. We expanded on previous research of neonatal white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) daily survival within home ranges to assess if resource use, integrated risk of 4 mammalian predators, maternal nutrition, winter severity, hiding cover, or interactions among these variables best explained landscape scale variation in daily or seasonal survival during the post-partum period. We hypothesized that reproductive success would be limited greater by predation risk at coarser spatiotemporal scales, but habitat use at finer scales. An additive model of daily non-ideal resource use and maternal nutrition explained the most (69%) variation in survival; though 65% of this variation was related to maternal nutrition. Strong support of maternal nutrition across spatiotemporal scales did not fully support our hypothesis, but suggested reproductive success was related to dam behaviors directed at increasing nutritional condition. These behaviors were especially important following severe winters, when dams produced smaller fawns with less probability of survival. To increase nutritional condition and decrease wolf (Canis lupus) predation risk, dams appeared to place fawns in isolated deciduous forest patches near roads. However, this resource selection represented non-ideal resources for fawns, which had greater predation risk that led to additive mortalities beyond those related to resources alone. Although the reproductive strategy of dams resulted in greater predation of fawns from alternative predators, it likely improved the life-long reproductive success of dams, as many were late-aged (>10 years old) and could have produced multiple litters of fawns. Our

  18. Scale Dependence of Female Ungulate Reproductive Success in Relation to Nutritional Condition, Resource Selection and Multi-Predator Avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Duquette, Jared F.; Belant, Jerrold L.; Svoboda, Nathan J.; Beyer, Dean E.; Lederle, Patrick E.

    2015-01-01

    Female ungulate reproductive success is dependent on the survival of their young, and affected by maternal resource selection, predator avoidance, and nutritional condition. However, potential hierarchical effects of these factors on reproductive success are largely unknown, especially in multi-predator landscapes. We expanded on previous research of neonatal white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) daily survival within home ranges to assess if resource use, integrated risk of 4 mammalian predators, maternal nutrition, winter severity, hiding cover, or interactions among these variables best explained landscape scale variation in daily or seasonal survival during the post-partum period. We hypothesized that reproductive success would be limited greater by predation risk at coarser spatiotemporal scales, but habitat use at finer scales. An additive model of daily non-ideal resource use and maternal nutrition explained the most (69%) variation in survival; though 65% of this variation was related to maternal nutrition. Strong support of maternal nutrition across spatiotemporal scales did not fully support our hypothesis, but suggested reproductive success was related to dam behaviors directed at increasing nutritional condition. These behaviors were especially important following severe winters, when dams produced smaller fawns with less probability of survival. To increase nutritional condition and decrease wolf (Canis lupus) predation risk, dams appeared to place fawns in isolated deciduous forest patches near roads. However, this resource selection represented non-ideal resources for fawns, which had greater predation risk that led to additive mortalities beyond those related to resources alone. Although the reproductive strategy of dams resulted in greater predation of fawns from alternative predators, it likely improved the life-long reproductive success of dams, as many were late-aged (>10 years old) and could have produced multiple litters of fawns. Our

  19. Sex-specific nutrient use and preferential allocation of resources to a sexually selected trait in Hyalella amphipods.

    PubMed

    Goos, Jared M; Cothran, Rickey D; Jeyasingh, Punidan D

    2016-03-01

    Although sexually dimorphic traits are often well studied, we know little about sex-specific resource use strategies that should underlie such dimorphism. We measured sex-specific responses in acquisition and assimilation of two fundamental resources, carbon (C) and phosphorus (P) in juvenile and mature Hyalella amphipods given low and high supplies of inorganic phosphate, analogous to oligotrophic and eutrophic conditions, respectively. Additionally, we quantified allocation of resources to sexual traits in males. Dual radiotracer ((14)C and (33)P) assays revealed substantial age- and sex-specific differences in acquisition and assimilation. Furthermore, a phenotypic manipulation experiment revealed that amphipods fed low-P food allocated more C to all traits than those fed high-P food. Importantly, we found that amphipods preferentially allocated more C to the development of a sexually selected trait (the posterior gnathopod), compared with a serially homologous trait (the fifth pereopod) not under sexual selection. Substantial differences in how the sexes use fundamental resources, and the impact of altered nutrient supply on such differences, illuminate sexual dimorphism at the lowest level of biological organization. Such information will be important in understanding how sex- and age-specific life history demands influence nutrient processing in a biosphere characterized by rapidly changing alterations to biogeochemical cycles. PMID:26747910

  20. Resource selection by the California condor (Gymnogyps californianus) relative to terrestrial-based habitats and meteorological conditions.

    PubMed

    Rivers, James W; Johnson, J Matthew; Haig, Susan M; Schwarz, Carl J; Glendening, John W; Burnett, L Joseph; George, Daniel; Grantham, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Condors and vultures are distinct from most other terrestrial birds because they use extensive soaring flight for their daily movements. Therefore, assessing resource selection by these avian scavengers requires quantifying the availability of terrestrial-based habitats, as well as meteorological variables that influence atmospheric conditions necessary for soaring. In this study, we undertook the first quantitative assessment of habitat- and meteorological-based resource selection in the endangered California condor (Gymnogyps californianus) within its California range and across the annual cycle. We found that condor use of terrestrial areas did not change markedly within the annual cycle, and that condor use was greatest for habitats where food resources and potential predators could be detected and where terrain was amenable for taking off from the ground in flight (e.g., sparse habitats, coastal areas). Condors originating from different release sites differed in their use of habitat, but this was likely due in part to variation in habitats surrounding release sites. Meteorological conditions were linked to condor use of ecological subregions, with thermal height, thermal velocity, and wind speed having both positive (selection) and negative (avoidance) effects on condor use in different areas. We found little evidence of systematic effects between individual characteristics (i.e., sex, age, breeding status) or components of the species management program (i.e., release site, rearing method) relative to meteorological conditions. Our findings indicate that habitat type and meteorological conditions can interact in complex ways to influence condor resource selection across landscapes, which is noteworthy given the extent of anthropogenic stressors that may impact condor populations (e.g., lead poisoning, wind energy development). Additional studies will be valuable to assess small-scale condor movements in light of these stressors to help minimize their risk to

  1. Resource Selection by the California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus) Relative to Terrestrial-Based Habitats and Meteorological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rivers, James W.; Johnson, J. Matthew; Haig, Susan M.; Schwarz, Carl J.; Glendening, John W.; Burnett, L. Joseph; George, Daniel; Grantham, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Condors and vultures are distinct from most other terrestrial birds because they use extensive soaring flight for their daily movements. Therefore, assessing resource selection by these avian scavengers requires quantifying the availability of terrestrial-based habitats, as well as meteorological variables that influence atmospheric conditions necessary for soaring. In this study, we undertook the first quantitative assessment of habitat- and meteorological-based resource selection in the endangered California condor (Gymnogyps californianus) within its California range and across the annual cycle. We found that condor use of terrestrial areas did not change markedly within the annual cycle, and that condor use was greatest for habitats where food resources and potential predators could be detected and where terrain was amenable for taking off from the ground in flight (e.g., sparse habitats, coastal areas). Condors originating from different release sites differed in their use of habitat, but this was likely due in part to variation in habitats surrounding release sites. Meteorological conditions were linked to condor use of ecological subregions, with thermal height, thermal velocity, and wind speed having both positive (selection) and negative (avoidance) effects on condor use in different areas. We found little evidence of systematic effects between individual characteristics (i.e., sex, age, breeding status) or components of the species management program (i.e., release site, rearing method) relative to meteorological conditions. Our findings indicate that habitat type and meteorological conditions can interact in complex ways to influence condor resource selection across landscapes, which is noteworthy given the extent of anthropogenic stressors that may impact condor populations (e.g., lead poisoning, wind energy development). Additional studies will be valuable to assess small-scale condor movements in light of these stressors to help minimize their risk to

  2. Influence of selected physicochemical parameters on microbiological activity of mucks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Całka, A.; Sokołowska, Z.; Warchulska, P.; Dąbek-Szreniawska, M.

    2009-04-01

    One of the basic factor decided about soil fertility are microorganisms that together with flora, determine trend and character of biochemical processes as well totality of fundamental transformations connected with biogeochemistry and physicochemical properties of soil. Determination of general bacteria number, quantity of selected groups of microorganisms and investigation of respiration intensity let estimate microbiological activity of soil. Intensity of microbiological processes is directly connected with physicochemical soil parameters. In that case, such structural parameters as bulk density, porosity, surface or carbon content play significant role. Microbiological activity also changes within the bounds of mucks with different stage of humification and secondary transformation. Knowledge of relations between structural properties, microorganism activity and degree of transformation and humification can lead to better understanding microbiological processes as well enable to estimate microbiological activity at given physicochemical conditions and at progressing process of soil transformation. The study was carried out on two peaty-moorsh (muck) soils at different state of secondary transformation and humification degree. Soil samples were collected from Polesie Lubelskie (layer depth: 5 - 25 cm). Investigated mucks originated from soils formed from low peatbogs. Soil sample marked as I belonged to muck group weakly secondary transformed. Second sample (II) represented soil group with middle stage of secondary transformation. The main purpose of the research was to examine the relations between some physicochemical and surface properties and their biological activity. Total number and respiration activity of microorganisms were determined. The effectiveness of utilizing the carbon substances from the soil by the bacteria increased simultaneously with the transformation state of the peat-muck soils. Quantity of organic carbon decreased distinctly in the soil

  3. Activity in X-ray-selected late-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takalo, Leo O.; Nousek, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    A spectroscopic study has been conducted of nine X-ray bright late-type stars selected from two Einstein X-ray surveys: the Columbia Astrophysical Laboratory Survey (five stars) and the CFA Medium Sensitivity Survey (MSS; four stars). Spectral classes were determined and radial and V sin(i) velocities were measured for the stars. Four of the Columbia Survey stars were found to be new RS CVn-type binaries. The fifth Columbia survey star was found to be an active G dwarf star without evidence for binarity. None of the four MSS stars were found to be either binaries or optically active stars. Activity in these stars was assessed by measuring the excess emission in H-alpha and the Ca II IRT (8498, 8542) lines in comparison with inactive stars of similar spectral types. A correlation was found between X-ray luminosity and V sin(i) and H-alpha line excess. The measured excess line emission in H-alpha was also correlated with V sin(i) but not with the IRT line excess.

  4. Space Resources for Teachers: Chemistry; Including Suggestions for Classroom Activities and Laboratory Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Richard M.

    This publication is composed of 10 units, each based on an area of space science and technology in which chemistry plays an important role. Each resource unit can be used independently of the others and materials can be selected from within a unit. The materials range in difficulty from the junior high level of understanding to those that will…

  5. Lifecycle Prognostics Architecture for Selected High-Cost Active Components

    SciTech Connect

    N. Lybeck; B. Pham; M. Tawfik; J. B. Coble; R. M. Meyer; P. Ramuhalli; L. J. Bond

    2011-08-01

    There are an extensive body of knowledge and some commercial products available for calculating prognostics, remaining useful life, and damage index parameters. The application of these technologies within the nuclear power community is still in its infancy. Online monitoring and condition-based maintenance is seeing increasing acceptance and deployment, and these activities provide the technological bases for expanding to add predictive/prognostics capabilities. In looking to deploy prognostics there are three key aspects of systems that are presented and discussed: (1) component/system/structure selection, (2) prognostic algorithms, and (3) prognostics architectures. Criteria are presented for component selection: feasibility, failure probability, consequences of failure, and benefits of the prognostics and health management (PHM) system. The basis and methods commonly used for prognostics algorithms are reviewed and summarized. Criteria for evaluating PHM architectures are presented: open, modular architecture; platform independence; graphical user interface for system development and/or results viewing; web enabled tools; scalability; and standards compatibility. Thirteen software products were identified and discussed in the context of being potentially useful for deployment in a PHM program applied to systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These products were evaluated by using information available from company websites, product brochures, fact sheets, scholarly publications, and direct communication with vendors. The thirteen products were classified into four groups of software: (1) research tools, (2) PHM system development tools, (3) deployable architectures, and (4) peripheral tools. Eight software tools fell into the deployable architectures category. Of those eight, only two employ all six modules of a full PHM system. Five systems did not offer prognostic estimates, and one system employed the full health monitoring suite but lacked operations and

  6. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides with High Anticancer Activity and Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Hao; Yu, Hui-Yuan; Chih, Ya-Han; Cheng, Hsi-Tsung; Chou, Yu-Ting; Cheng, Jya-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We describe a strategy to boost anticancer activity and reduce normal cell toxicity of short antimicrobial peptides by adding positive charge amino acids and non-nature bulky amino acid β-naphthylalanine residues to their termini. Among the designed peptides, K4R2-Nal2-S1 displayed better salt resistance and less toxicity to hRBCs and human fibroblast than Nal2-S1 and K6-Nal2-S1. Fluorescence microscopic studies indicated that the FITC-labeled K4R2-Nal2-S1 preferentially binds cancer cells and causes apoptotic cell death. Moreover, a significant inhibition in human lung tumor growth was observed in the xenograft mice treated with K4R2-Nal2-S1. Our strategy provides new opportunities in the development of highly effective and selective antimicrobial and anticancer peptide-based therapeutics. PMID:25970292

  7. Phenolic profile and antioxidant activity in selected seeds and sprouts.

    PubMed

    Pająk, Paulina; Socha, Robert; Gałkowska, Dorota; Rożnowski, Jacek; Fortuna, Teresa

    2014-01-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of germination on the phenolic acids and flavonoids profile, as well as antioxidant activity (AA), in selected edible seeds of mung beans, radish, broccoli and sunflower. Germination increased the total phenolic (TP) and flavonoid (TF) levels, as well as the AA of the seeds, and influenced the profile of free and bound phenolic compounds. Among the samples, mung bean was characterised by lowest levels of TP and TF, as well as AA, evaluated using ABTS, DPPH and FRAP assays. Sunflower and radish sprouts were the most rich in phenolic compounds. Insignificant amounts of free phenolic acids were found in the free phenolic acid fraction; alkaline hydrolysis of the seeds and sprouts extracts provided the majority of the phenolic acids. The amounts of free and bound flavonoids were inconsiderable both for seeds and sprouts. PMID:24054243

  8. Natural products as a resource for biologically active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hanke, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate various sources of biologically active natural products in an effort to identify the active pesticidal compounds involved. The study is divided into several parts. Chapter 1 contains a discussion of several new compounds from plant and animal sources. Chapter 2 introduces a new NMR technique. In section 2.1 a new technique for better utilizing the lanthanide relaxation agent Gd(fod)/sub 3/ is presented which allows the predictable removal of resonances without line broadening. Section 2.2 discusses a variation of this technique for use in an aqueous solvent by applying this technique towards identifying the binding sites of metals of biological interest. Section 2.3 presents an unambiguous /sup 13/C NMR assignment of melibiose. Chapter 3 deals with work relating to the molting hormone of most arthropods, 20-hydroxyecdysone. Section 3.1 discusses the use of two-dimensional NMR (2D NMR) to assign the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of this biologically important compound. Section 3.2 presents a new application for Droplet countercurrent chromatography (DCCC). Chapter 4 presents a basic improvement to the commercial DCCC instrument that is currently being applied to future commercial instruments. Chapter 5 discusses a curious observation of the effects that two previously known compounds, nagilactone C and (-)-epicatechin, have on lettuce and rice and suggest a possible new role for the ubiquitous flavanol (-)-epicatechin in plants.

  9. Individual and Population Level Resource Selection Patterns of Mountain Lions Preying on Mule Deer along an Urban-Wildland Gradient.

    PubMed

    Benson, John F; Sikich, Jeff A; Riley, Seth P D

    2016-01-01

    Understanding population and individual-level behavioral responses of large carnivores to human disturbance is important for conserving top predators in fragmented landscapes. However, previous research has not investigated resource selection at predation sites of mountain lions in highly urbanized areas. We quantified selection of natural and anthropogenic landscape features by mountain lions at sites where they consumed their primary prey, mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), in and adjacent to urban, suburban, and rural areas in greater Los Angeles. We documented intersexual and individual-level variation in the environmental conditions present at mule deer feeding sites relative to their availability across home ranges. Males selected riparian woodlands and areas closer to water more than females, whereas females selected developed areas marginally more than males. Females fed on mule deer closer to developed areas and farther from riparian woodlands than expected based on the availability of these features across their home ranges. We suggest that mortality risk for females and their offspring associated with encounters with males may have influenced the different resource selection patterns between sexes. Males appeared to select mule deer feeding sites mainly in response to natural landscape features, while females may have made kills closer to developed areas in part because these are alternative sites where deer are abundant. Individual mountain lions of both sexes selected developed areas more strongly within home ranges where development occurred less frequently. Thus, areas near development may represent a trade-off for mountain lions such that they may benefit from foraging near development because of abundant prey, but as the landscape becomes highly urbanized these benefits may be outweighed by human disturbance. PMID:27411098

  10. Individual and Population Level Resource Selection Patterns of Mountain Lions Preying on Mule Deer along an Urban-Wildland Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Benson, John F.; Sikich, Jeff A.; Riley, Seth P. D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding population and individual-level behavioral responses of large carnivores to human disturbance is important for conserving top predators in fragmented landscapes. However, previous research has not investigated resource selection at predation sites of mountain lions in highly urbanized areas. We quantified selection of natural and anthropogenic landscape features by mountain lions at sites where they consumed their primary prey, mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), in and adjacent to urban, suburban, and rural areas in greater Los Angeles. We documented intersexual and individual-level variation in the environmental conditions present at mule deer feeding sites relative to their availability across home ranges. Males selected riparian woodlands and areas closer to water more than females, whereas females selected developed areas marginally more than males. Females fed on mule deer closer to developed areas and farther from riparian woodlands than expected based on the availability of these features across their home ranges. We suggest that mortality risk for females and their offspring associated with encounters with males may have influenced the different resource selection patterns between sexes. Males appeared to select mule deer feeding sites mainly in response to natural landscape features, while females may have made kills closer to developed areas in part because these are alternative sites where deer are abundant. Individual mountain lions of both sexes selected developed areas more strongly within home ranges where development occurred less frequently. Thus, areas near development may represent a trade-off for mountain lions such that they may benefit from foraging near development because of abundant prey, but as the landscape becomes highly urbanized these benefits may be outweighed by human disturbance. PMID:27411098

  11. Resources for physical activity in cancer centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Karvinen, Kristina H; Carr, Lucas J; Stevinson, Clare

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity (PA) has many benefits for cancer survivors. However, the available PA resources for survivors at cancer centers throughout the United States are undocumented. The current study surveyed major cancer centers concerning the availability and types (e.g., facilities, programs, counseling, information resources) of PA resources available. Of supportive care services, PA resources were the least commonly reported. Significant correlations were found among availability of PA resources and other supportive care services. Although many cancer centers reported offering PA programming, formal and informal PA guidance and support seem to fall on oncology nurses and other clinicians. Oncology nurses should be reminded that they may be one of the only sources of PA guidance available to survivors at cancer centers. PMID:24305494

  12. Access to environmental resources and physical activity levels of adults in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Geller, KS; Nigg, CR; Ollberding, NJ; Motl, RW; Horwath, C; Dishman, RK

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Examine associations between physical activity (PA) and spatial accessibility to environmental PA resources in Hawaii. Methods Metabolic equivalents (METs) of mild, moderate, and strenuous PA were compared for accessibility to environmental PA resources within a population-based sample of Hawaiian adults (n=381). Multiple linear regression estimated differences in PA levels for residing further from a PA resource or residing in an area with a greater number of resources. Results No associations were found in the total sample. Analyses within subsamples stratified by ethnicity revealed that greater spatial accessibility to a PA resource was positively associated with strenuous PA among Caucasians (p=0.04), but negatively associated with moderate PA among Native Hawaiians (p=0.00). Conclusion The lack of association in the total sample may be a consequence of Hawaii’s unique environment. Results of stratified sample analyses are unique, providing groundwork for future examinations within parallel environments and among similar ethnic groups. PMID:22500037

  13. A summary of water-resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Iowa, fiscal year 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1992-01-01

    Water-resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Iowa consist of collecting hydrologic data and conducting interpretive studies. Hydrologic investigations in Iowa are made through three basic types of projects: (1) hydrologic data-collection programs; (2) local or areal studies; and (3) statewide or regional investigations. These projects are funded through cooperative joint-funding agreements with Federal, State, and local agencies and direct Federal funds. The data and the results of the interpretive studies are published or released by either the U.S. Geological Survey or by cooperating agencies. This report describes: (1) the hydrologic data-collection programs; (2) the local or areal hydrologic investigations; and (3) statewide or regional studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in Iowa during fiscal year 1992 and provides a list of selected water-resources references for Iowa.

  14. A summary of water-resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Iowa; fiscal year 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1990-01-01

    Water resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Iowa consist of collecting hydrologic data and conducting interpretive studies. Hydrologic investigations in Iowa are made through three basic types of projects: (1) hydrologic data-collection programs; (2) local or areal hydrologic studies; and (3) statewide or regional investigations. These projects are funded through cooperative joint-funding agreements with Federal, State, and local agencies and direct Federal funds. The data and the results of the interpretive studies are published or released by either the U.S. Geological Survey or by cooperating agencies. This report describes: (1) the hydrologic data-collection programs; (2) the local or areal hydrologic investigations; and (3) statewide or regional studies conducted by the U.S Geological Survey in Iowa during fiscal year 1990 and provides a list of selected water-resources references for Iowa.

  15. Highly Selective Synthesis of Catalytically Active Monodisperse Rhodium Nanocubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Grass, M.E.; Kuhn, J.N.; Tao, F.; Habas, S.E.; Huang, W.; Yang, P.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-02-21

    Synthesis of monodisperse and shape-controlled colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) is of increasing scientific interest and technological significance. Recently, shape control of Pt, Pd, Ag, Au, and Rh NCs has been obtained by tuning growth kinetics in various solution-phase approaches, including modified polyol methods, seeded growth by polyol reduction, thermolysis of organometallics, and micelle techniques. Control of reduction kinetics of the noble metal precursors and regulation of the relative growth rates of low-index planes (i.e. {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}111{r_brace}) via selective adsorption of selected chemical species are two keys for achieving shape modification of noble metal NCs. One application for noble metal NCs of well-defined shape is in understanding how NC faceting (determines which crystallographic planes are exposed) affects catalytic performance. Rh NCs are used in many catalytic reactions, including hydrogenation, hydroformylation, hydrocarbonylation, and combustion reactions. Shape manipulation of Rh NCs may be important in understanding how faceting on the nanoscale affects catalytic properties, but such control is challenging and there are fewer reports on the shape control of Rh NCs compared to other noble metals. Xia and coworkers obtained Rh multipods exhibiting interesting surface plasmonic properties by a polyol approach. The Somorjai and Tilley groups synthesized crystalline Rh multipods, cubes, horns and cuboctahedra, via polyol seeded growth. Son and colleagues prepared catalytically active monodisperse oleylamine-capped tetrahedral Rh NCs for the hydrogenation of arenes via an organometallic route. More recently, the Somorjai group synthesized sizetunable monodisperse Rh NCs using a one-step polyol technique. In this Communication, we report the highly selective synthesis of catalytically active, monodisperse Rh nanocubes of < 10 nm by a seedless polyol method. In this approach, Br{sup -} ions from trimethyl

  16. ENSEMBLE VARIABILITY OF NEAR-INFRARED-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzuma, S.; Yamaoka, H. E-mail: yamaoka@phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2012-03-01

    We present the properties of the ensemble variability V for nearly 5000 near-infrared active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the catalog of Quasars and Active Galactic Nuclei (13th Edition) and the SDSS-DR7 quasar catalog. From three near-infrared point source catalogs, namely, Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), Deep Near Infrared Survey (DENIS), and UKIDSS/LAS catalogs, we extract 2MASS-DENIS and 2MASS-UKIDSS counterparts for cataloged AGNs by cross-identification between catalogs. We further select variable AGNs based on an optimal criterion for selecting the variable sources. The sample objects are divided into subsets according to whether near-infrared light originates by optical emission or by near-infrared emission in the rest frame; and we examine the correlations of the ensemble variability with the rest-frame wavelength, redshift, luminosity, and rest-frame time lag. In addition, we also examine the correlations of variability amplitude with optical variability, radio intensity, and radio-to-optical flux ratio. The rest-frame optical variability of our samples shows negative correlations with luminosity and positive correlations with rest-frame time lag (i.e., the structure function, SF), and this result is consistent with previous analyses. However, no well-known negative correlation exists between the rest-frame wavelength and optical variability. This inconsistency might be due to a biased sampling of high-redshift AGNs. Near-infrared variability in the rest frame is anticorrelated with the rest-frame wavelength, which is consistent with previous suggestions. However, correlations of near-infrared variability with luminosity and rest-frame time lag are the opposite of these correlations of the optical variability; that is, the near-infrared variability is positively correlated with luminosity but negatively correlated with the rest-frame time lag. Because these trends are qualitatively consistent with the properties of radio-loud quasars reported

  17. A Deterministic Approach to Active Debris Removal Target Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidtke, A.; Lewis, H.; Armellin, R.

    2014-09-01

    Many decisions, with widespread economic, political and legal consequences, are being considered based on space debris simulations that show that Active Debris Removal (ADR) may be necessary as the concerns about the sustainability of spaceflight are increasing. The debris environment predictions are based on low-accuracy ephemerides and propagators. This raises doubts about the accuracy of those prognoses themselves but also the potential ADR target-lists that are produced. Target selection is considered highly important as removal of many objects will increase the overall mission cost. Selecting the most-likely candidates as soon as possible would be desirable as it would enable accurate mission design and allow thorough evaluation of in-orbit validations, which are likely to occur in the near-future, before any large investments are made and implementations realized. One of the primary factors that should be used in ADR target selection is the accumulated collision probability of every object. A conjunction detection algorithm, based on the smart sieve method, has been developed. Another algorithm is then applied to the found conjunctions to compute the maximum and true probabilities of collisions taking place. The entire framework has been verified against the Conjunction Analysis Tools in AGIs Systems Toolkit and relative probability error smaller than 1.5% has been achieved in the final maximum collision probability. Two target-lists are produced based on the ranking of the objects according to the probability they will take part in any collision over the simulated time window. These probabilities are computed using the maximum probability approach, that is time-invariant, and estimates of the true collision probability that were computed with covariance information. The top-priority targets are compared, and the impacts of the data accuracy and its decay are highlighted. General conclusions regarding the importance of Space Surveillance and Tracking for the

  18. Valuation of selected environmental impacts associated with Bonneville Power Administration Resource Program alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Englin, J E; Gygi, K F

    1992-03-01

    This report documents work undertaken by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and its contractors to assist the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) in assessing the potential environmental consequences of new power resources. A major purpose of this effort is to describe and evaluate the techniques available for economic valuation of environmental costs. Another is to provide estimates of the environmental costs associated with specific power resources called for under Bonneville's Resource Programs. Bonneville's efforts to extend valuation techniques to as many impacts as can be reliably assessed represents a substantial advance in the application of state-of-the-art economic techniques to environmental assessments. This economic analysis evaluates effects on human health, wildlife, crops, and visibility impacts associated with air pollution. This report also discusses river recreation (primarily fishing) which may be affected by fluctuations in water levels. 70 refs.

  19. Waterworks Book. An Activity Book about Mississippi's Coastal Resources for Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Kevin M.

    Coastal resources are highlighted in this activity book for primary school children. Special focus is given to Mississippi's coastal areas, but applications to other geographic areas can be made. Wetland concepts and conditions are developed through a variety of games, puzzles, matching exercises and pictorial explanations. Activities addressing…

  20. 34 CFR 656.3 - What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate....3 What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center? A comprehensive... science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields to achieve foreign language...

  1. 34 CFR 656.3 - What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate....3 What activities define a comprehensive or undergraduate National Resource Center? A comprehensive... science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields to achieve foreign language...

  2. Solid Waste Educational Resources and Activities: Let's Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Solid Waste and Emergency Response.

    This contains games, activities, publications, and resources for students and teachers on how to reduce, reuse, recycle, and properly manage waste. It also contains a screen saver featuring runners-up from the Earth Day 2000 art contest. Activities and games include titles such as "Planet Protectors,""Recycle City,""Trash and Climate Change," and…

  3. Super Saver Investigators: An Elementary, Interdisciplinary, Environmental Studies Activity Guidebook about Solid Waste and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, David; And Others

    This is an elementary, interdisciplinary, environmental studies activity guidebook about solid waste and natural resources. "Super Saver Investigators" what solid waste is, where it is generated, how we manage it and could manage it better, and the consequence of mismanagement. It contains many hands-on, skill enhancing activities for elementary…

  4. Young Children's Exploration of Semiotic Resources during Unofficial Computer Activities in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorkvall, Anders; Engblom, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    The article describes and discusses the learning potential of unofficial techno-literacy activities in the classroom with regards to Swedish 7-8-year-olds' exploration of semiotic resources when interacting with computers. In classroom contexts where every child works with his or her own computer, such activities tend to take up a substantial…

  5. Curriculum Resources for Environmental Progress, Vol. 1: Curriculum Outline and Activities Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalamazoo Nature Center, Inc., MI.

    This publication is the first volume of curriculum resources published by the Kalamazoo Nature Center. It contains directions for using the curriculum activities guide and suggests ways of implementing the activities in the classroom. Also included is an outline of the material that could be covered in an environmental education program, with…

  6. Latino Adolescents' Participation in Extracurricular Activities: How Important Are Family Resources and Cultural Orientation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpkins, Sandra D.; O'Donnell, Megan; Delgado, Melissa Y.; Becnel, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Latino adolescents often are less likely to participate in extracurricular activities compared to youth from other ethnic groups. This descriptive study examined the differences in activity participation by family resources and markers of cultural orientation for the four largest Latino ethnic groups in the U.S. Findings were based on secondary…

  7. Geospatial Toolkits and Resource Maps for Selected Countries from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    NREL developed the Geospatial Toolkit (GsT), a map-based software application that integrates resource data and geographic information systems (GIS) for integrated resource assessment. A variety of agencies within countries, along with global datasets, provided country-specific data. Originally developed in 2005, the Geospatial Toolkit was completely redesigned and re-released in November 2010 to provide a more modern, easier-to-use interface with considerably faster analytical querying capabilities. Toolkits are available for 21 countries and each one can be downloaded separately. The source code for the toolkit is also available. [Taken and edited from http://www.nrel.gov/international/geospatial_toolkits.html

  8. Learning Technology Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zugner, Lisa Crooks, Ed.

    This guide to electronic technologies resource organizations offers a broad range of information about selected projects, centers, institutions, clearinghouse activities, courseware, software, unique products and services, consortiums, panels, forums, commissioned reports, and other available resources. Three major sections make up the guide: (1)…

  9. Activated sludge studies of selected contaminants of PFH wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, S.K.; Bustamante, R.B.; Bonner, W.P.

    1991-12-31

    Acetone, propionitrile, pyrrole, and thiocyanate were selected as representative compounds of wastewater expected from pressurized, fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) of Eastern oil shales. The PFH process has been the subject of investigation by the Institute of Gas Technology, under contract with the United States Department of Energy, for the purpose of obtaining higher oil yields from Eastern shales than has been possible using conventional retorting methods. Preliminary batch experiments illustrated that acetone, propionitrile, pyrrole, and thiocyanate are aerobically biodegradable by heterogeneous microbiological cultures. Three continuous flow activated sludge reactors were used to further evaluate the biological treatability of the synthetic waste. The studies revealed that the compounds could be removed at hydraulic residence times of as low as one day. Three one-day experiments demonstrated that biological system`s capability to accept organic shock loadings without a change in effluent quality. A no-recycle reactor illustrated that the flocculent microbiological population had a high resistance to solids washout. Because a supplementary nitrogen source was not included in synthetic waste treated by the no-recycle unit, it was shown that propionitrile, pyrrole, and/or thiocyanate supplied the nitrogen necessary for biological activity.

  10. Activated sludge studies of selected contaminants of PFH wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, S.K. ); Bustamante, R.B.; Bonner, W.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Acetone, propionitrile, pyrrole, and thiocyanate were selected as representative compounds of wastewater expected from pressurized, fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) of Eastern oil shales. The PFH process has been the subject of investigation by the Institute of Gas Technology, under contract with the United States Department of Energy, for the purpose of obtaining higher oil yields from Eastern shales than has been possible using conventional retorting methods. Preliminary batch experiments illustrated that acetone, propionitrile, pyrrole, and thiocyanate are aerobically biodegradable by heterogeneous microbiological cultures. Three continuous flow activated sludge reactors were used to further evaluate the biological treatability of the synthetic waste. The studies revealed that the compounds could be removed at hydraulic residence times of as low as one day. Three one-day experiments demonstrated that biological system's capability to accept organic shock loadings without a change in effluent quality. A no-recycle reactor illustrated that the flocculent microbiological population had a high resistance to solids washout. Because a supplementary nitrogen source was not included in synthetic waste treated by the no-recycle unit, it was shown that propionitrile, pyrrole, and/or thiocyanate supplied the nitrogen necessary for biological activity.

  11. Correlations between surface structure and catalytic activity/selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.W.

    1992-10-01

    Objective is to address the keys to understanding the relation between surface structure and catalytic activity/selectivity. Of concern are questions related to enhanced catalytic properties of mixed-metal catalysts and critical active site requirements for molecular synthesis and rearrangement. The experimental approach utilizes a microcatalytic reactor contiguous to a surface analysis system, an arrangement which allows in vacuo transfer of the catalyst from one chamber to the other. Surface techniques being used include Auger (AES), UV and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (UPS and XPS), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). Our research program builds upon our previous experience relating the results of single crystal kinetic measurements with the results obtained with supported analogs. As well we are exploiting our recent work on the preparation, the characterization, and the determination of the catalytic properties of ultra-thin metal and metal oxide films. The program is proceeding toward the study of the unique catalytic properties of ultrathin metal films; the investigation of the critical ensemble size requirements for principal catalytic reaction types; and the modelling of supported catalysts using ultra-thin planar oxide surfaces.

  12. Return to Flight: Crew Activities Resource Reel 1 of 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The crew of the STS-114 Discovery Mission is seen in various aspects of training for space flight. The crew activities include: 1) STS-114 Return to Flight Crew Photo Session; 2) Tile Repair Training on Precision Air Bearing Floor; 3) SAFER Tile Inspection Training in Virtual Reality Laboratory; 4) Guidance and Navigation Simulator Tile Survey Training; 5) Crew Inspects Orbital Boom and Sensor System (OBSS); 6) Bailout Training-Crew Compartment; 7) Emergency Egress Training-Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT); 8) Water Survival Training-Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL); 9) Ascent Training-Shuttle Motion Simulator; 10) External Tank Photo Training-Full Fuselage Trainer; 11) Rendezvous and Docking Training-Shuttle Engineering Simulator (SES) Dome; 12) Shuttle Robot Arm Training-SES Dome; 13) EVA Training Virtual Reality Lab; 14) EVA Training Neutral Buoyancy Lab; 15) EVA-2 Training-NBL; 16) EVA Tool Training-Partial Gravity Simulator; 17) Cure in Place Ablator Applicator (CIPAA) Training Glove Vacuum Chamber; 16) Crew Visit to Merritt Island Launch Area (MILA); 17) Crew Inspection-Space Shuttle Discovery; and 18) Crew Inspection-External Tank and Orbital Boom and Sensor System (OBSS). The crew are then seen answering questions from the media at the Space Shuttle Landing Facility.

  13. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2011 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Braun Williams; Brenda R. Pace; Hollie K. Gilbert; Christina L. Olson

    2012-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report is intended as a stand-alone document that summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2011. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders, serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work, and meet an agreed upon legal requirement.

  14. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hollie K. Gilbert; Clayton F. Marler; Christina L. Olson; Brenda R. Pace; Julie Braun Williams

    2011-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2010. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders and to serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work.

  15. ENERGY: Selected Resource Materials for Developing Energy Education/Conservation Programs. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wert, Jonathan M.; Worthington, Barry K.

    This annotated bibliography presents resource materials for energy education programs. The materials are listed by the agency from which they are available. The agencies are alphabetized and, for each agency, a mailing address is given. Fifty given agencies are included, many of which have several references listed under them. For each reference,…

  16. Resource Guide to Literature on Barrier-Free Environments with Selected Annotations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, Washington, DC.

    The result of a survey of barrier related literature, research, studies, and legislation completed or in progress, the resource guide lists approximately 1,500 citations regarding barrier free access for disabled persons. Bibliographic information (date, title, author, ordering and price specifications, pagination); descriptors; and a brief…

  17. Evaluation of Availability of Financial Resources and Manpower Development in Selected Monotechnics in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potokri, Onoriode Collins

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates manpower development and availability of financial resources in Nigerian monotechnic education. Monotechnics are single-subject institutions of higher learning that offer specialized programmes. A quantitative research design located within the positivist paradigm was adopted. A sample of 200 students and 80 members of…

  18. Gifted and Talented Children and Youth: A Selected Guide to Resources for Information, Materials and Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, VA. National Clearinghouse for the Gifted and Talented.

    The annotated directory lists approximately 46 national and state resources, and organizations as of June, 1973 which serve gifted and talented children and youth. The listings include region or state covered, name of person or office to contact, name of organization or office, telephone number, and in some cases a short description of function…

  19. Nitrogen fixation. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning nitrogen fixation in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and its impact on future resources. The biochemistry and biophysics of the nitrogen-fixing bacteria, algae, and blue-green algae are discussed. (Contains a minimum of 97 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. A Selected List of Filmstrips on the Conservation of Natural Resources, Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jean Larson; Michaud, Howard H.

    This pamphlet describes 115 conservation filmstrips as to content, sources, suggested grade level(s), curriculum area(s), and notes of interest to the user. The filmstrips are divided into the following areas: (1) general conservation, (2) ecology and resource interrelationships, (3) forest trees and other plants, (4) forest conservation, (5)…

  1. KEY CRITERIA AND SELECTION OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS METHODS APPLIED TO NATURAL RESOURCE MODELS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integrated natural resource models (e.g., APSIM)are typically large and complex, thus, it can be difficult to prioritize parameters that are most promising with respect to system management goals. It is important to evaluate how a model responds to changes in its inputs as part of the process of mo...

  2. Selection and Storage of Perceptual Groups Is Constrained by a Discrete Resource in Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David E.; Vogel, Edward K.; Awh, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Perceptual grouping can lead observers to perceive a multielement scene as a smaller number of hierarchical units. Past work has shown that grouping enables more elements to be stored in visual working memory (WM). Although this may appear to contradict so-called discrete resource models that argue for fixed item limits in WM storage, it is also…

  3. A Selection of Gilded-Age Resources on the World Wide Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Alison

    1999-01-01

    Provides a collection of websites on the Gilded Age that include lesson plans, a chronology, electronic texts, and other resources. Offers a variety of topics such as, but not limited to, African American history, coal mining, political cartoons, architecture, bibliographical information on public figures, and the Spanish-American War. (CMK)

  4. Information Resources on Online Public Access Catalogs. A Selected ERIC Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Information Resources, Syracuse, NY.

    Sixteen articles, books, and reports published between 1978 and 1983 and cited in "Resources in Education" and "Current Index to Journals in Education" are listed in this bibliography on online public access catalogs (OPACs). Emphasis is on the movement toward computer-based alternatives to library card catalogs and user studies. Topics include…

  5. Information Resources on Microcomputers in Libraries: Library Administration. A Selected ERIC Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Information Resources, Syracuse, NY.

    Eleven articles and reports published between 1980 and 1984 and cited in "Resources in Education" and "Current Index to Journals in Education" are listed in this bibliography on microcomputers in libraries. Emphasis is on microcomputers in public and school libraries and topics included are factors that should be considered before purchasing a…

  6. Selected References: The Middle School and Junior High. National Middle School Resource Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Indianapolis.

    This bibliography represents a revision of a previously distributed similar publication printed in the summer of 1974. It includes many items that are a part of the files of the Middle School Resource Center. These documents are starred. Materials in the bibliography are listed under the following categories: (1) books and booklets on the middle…

  7. Genomic resources and their influence on the detection of the signal of positive selection in genome scans.

    PubMed

    Manel, S; Perrier, C; Pratlong, M; Abi-Rached, L; Paganini, J; Pontarotti, P; Aurelle, D

    2016-01-01

    Genome scans represent powerful approaches to investigate the action of natural selection on the genetic variation of natural populations and to better understand local adaptation. This is very useful, for example, in the field of conservation biology and evolutionary biology. Thanks to Next Generation Sequencing, genomic resources are growing exponentially, improving genome scan analyses in non-model species. Thousands of SNPs called using Reduced Representation Sequencing are increasingly used in genome scans. Besides, genome sequences are also becoming increasingly available, allowing better processing of short-read data, offering physical localization of variants, and improving haplotype reconstruction and data imputation. Ultimately, genome sequences are also becoming the raw material for selection inferences. Here, we discuss how the increasing availability of such genomic resources, notably genome sequences, influences the detection of signals of selection. Mainly, increasing data density and having the information of physical linkage data expand genome scans by (i) improving the overall quality of the data, (ii) helping the reconstruction of demographic history for the population studied to decrease false-positive rates and (iii) improving the statistical power of methods to detect the signal of selection. Of particular importance, the availability of a high-quality reference genome can improve the detection of the signal of selection by (i) allowing matching the potential candidate loci to linked coding regions under selection, (ii) rapidly moving the investigation to the gene and function and (iii) ensuring that the highly variable regions of the genomes that include functional genes are also investigated. For all those reasons, using reference genomes in genome scan analyses is highly recommended. PMID:26562485

  8. A National Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing Activities on Drinking Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, C.; Burden, S.; Fleming, M. M.; Knightes, C. D.; Koplos, J.; LeDuc, S. D.; Ring, S.; Stanek, J.; Tuccillo, M. E.; Weaver, J.; Frithsen, J.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently released a draft assessment of the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. As part of the draft assessment, we reviewed, analyzed, and synthesized information from over 950 sources and concluded that there are above and below ground mechanisms by which hydraulic fracturing activities have the potential to impact drinking water resources. These mechanisms include: Water withdrawals in times of, or in areas with, low water availability; Spills of hydraulic fracturing fluids and produced water; Fracturing directly into underground drinking water resources; Below ground migration of liquids and gases; and Inadequate treatment and discharge of wastewater. Of the potential mechanisms identified in this report, we found specific instances where one or more mechanisms led to impacts on drinking water resources, including contamination of drinking water wells. The number of identified cases, however, was small compared to the number of hydraulically fractured wells. This finding could reflect a rarity of effects on drinking water resources, but may also be due to other limiting factors. These factors include: insufficient pre- and post-fracturing data on the quality of drinking water resources; the paucity of long-term systematic studies; the presence of other sources of contamination precluding a definitive link between hydraulic fracturing activities and an impact; and the inaccessibility of some information on hydraulic fracturing activities and potential impacts. Disclaimer: The views expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or polices of the EPA.

  9. Estimating animal resource selection from telemetry data using point process models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Devin S.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Kuhn, Carey E.

    2013-01-01

    To demonstrate the analysis of telemetry data with the point process approach, we analysed a data set of telemetry locations from northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) in the Pribilof Islands, Alaska. Both a space–time and an aggregated space-only model were fitted. At the individual level, the space–time analysis showed little selection relative to the habitat covariates. However, at the study area level, the space-only model showed strong selection relative to the covariates.

  10. Search of antimicrobial activity of selected non-antibiotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kruszewska, Hanna; Zareba, Tomasz; Tyski, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    A variety of pharmaceutical preparations, which are applied in the management of non-infectious diseases, have shown in vitro some antimicrobial activity. These drugs are called "non-antibiotics". The aim of this study was to detect and characterise the antimicrobial activity of non-antibiotic drugs. selected from the preparations analysed during state control performed at the Drug Institute in Poland. Over 160 pharmaceutical preparations were randomly chosen from different groups of drugs. The surveillance study was performed on standard ATCC microbial strains used for drug control: S aureus, E. coil, P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. It was shown that the drugs listed below inhibited growth of at least one of the examined strains:acyclovir (Awirol 5%, cream), alendronate (Alenato 5 mg, tabl.), alverine (Meteospasmyl 20 mg, caps.), butorphanole (Butamidor 10 mg/ml, amp.), clodronate (Sindronat 400 mg, caps), diclofenac (Olfen 75 mg, amp.), emadastine (Emadine 0.05%, eye dr.), etodolac (Febret 200 mg, caps.), fluvastatine (Lescol 40 mg, tabl.), ketamine (Ketamidor 10%, amp.), levocabastine (Histimet 0.5 mg/ml, eye dr.), losartan (Lorista 50 mg, tabl.), matipranolol (Betaman 0.3% eye dr.), mesalazine (Pentasa 1%, susp.), naproxen (Nalgesin 550 mg, tabl.), oxaprosine (Reumax 600 mg, tabl.), oxymethazoline (Nasivin 0.025%, nose dr.), proxymetacaine (Alcaine 0.5%, eye dr.), ribavirin (Rebetol 200 mg, caps.), rutoside with ascorbic acid (Cerutin 20+200 mg, tabl.), sulodexide (Vessel due F, 250 LSU, caps.), tegaserole (Zelmac 50 mg, tabl.), telmisartan (Pritor 20 mg, tabl.), temosolomide (Temodal 100 mg, caps.), ticlopidine (Ticlid 250 mg, tabl.), tolfenamic acid (Migea rapid 200 mg, tabl.), tramadole (Tramundin 100 mg, tabl.), tropicamide (Tropicamidum 1%, eye dr.). Staphylococcus aureus was susceptible to most of the drugs listed above. Ticlopidine showed activity against S. aureus, E. coli and C. albicans (MICs equal to: 0.45; 0.45 and 0.65 mg/ml, respectively

  11. Integrated impacts of future electricity mix scenarios on select southeastern US water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, D.; Meldrum, J.; Flores-Lopez, F.; Davis, Michelle

    2013-09-01

    Recent studies on the relationship between thermoelectric cooling and water resources have been made at coarse geographic resolution and do not adequately evaluate the localized water impacts on specific rivers and water bodies. We present the application of an integrated electricity generation-water resources planning model of the Apalachicola/Chattahoochee/Flint (ACF) and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) rivers based on the regional energy deployment system (ReEDS) and the water evaluation and planning (WEAP) system. A future scenario that includes a growing population and warmer, drier regional climate shows that benefits from a low-carbon, electricity fuel-mix could help maintain river temperatures below once-through coal-plants. These impacts are shown to be localized, as the cumulative impacts of different electric fuel-mix scenarios are muted in this relatively water-rich region, even in a warmer and drier future climate.

  12. Coal resources of selected coal beds and zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie Ruppert; Susan Tewalt; Linda Bragg

    2002-02-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is completing a National Coal Resource Assessment of five coal-producing regions of the United States, including the Appalachian Basin. The USGS, in cooperation with the State geological surveys of Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia, has completed a digital coal resource assessment of five of the top-producing coal beds and coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions -- the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay and Pond Creek coal zones, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. Of the 93 billion short tons of original coal in these units, about 66 billion short tons remain. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Selective and contagious prosocial resource donation in capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees and humans

    PubMed Central

    Claidière, Nicolas; Whiten, Andrew; Mareno, Mary C.; Messer, Emily J. E.; Brosnan, Sarah F.; Hopper, Lydia M.; Lambeth, Susan P.; Schapiro, Steven J.; McGuigan, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Prosocial acts benefitting others are widespread amongst humans. By contrast, chimpanzees have failed to demonstrate such a disposition in several studies, leading some authors to conclude that the forms of prosociality studied evolved in humans since our common ancestry. However, similar prosocial behavior has since been documented in other primates, such as capuchin monkeys. Here, applying the same methodology to humans, chimpanzees, and capuchins, we provide evidence that all three species will display prosocial behavior, but only in certain conditions. Fundamental forms of prosociality were age-dependent in children, conditional on self-beneficial resource distributions even at age seven, and conditional on social or resource configurations in chimpanzees and capuchins. We provide the first evidence that experience of conspecific companions' prosocial behavior facilitates prosocial behavior in children and chimpanzees. Prosocial actions were manifested in all three species following rules of contingency that may reflect strategically adaptive responses. PMID:25559658

  14. Board on Earth Sciences and Resources and Its Activities -- Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony R. de Souza, Ph.D. Director, Board on Earth Sciences and Resources

    2003-09-26

    The Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (BESR) provided oversight of the earth sciences and resources activities with the National Research Council (NRC). The Board reviewed research and public activities in the earth sciences; undertook analyses relevant to the discovery, supply, delivery, waste disposal and associated impacts and issues related to hydrocarbon, metallic, and nonmetallic mineral resources; and monitored the status of the earth sciences, assessed the health of the disciplines, identified research opportunities, and responded to specific agency requests for advice. These tasks were conducted by distinguished volunteers and NRC staff members that are representative of the breadth and depth of the earth sciences and resources disciplines (e.g., ecology, geophysics, geochemistry, geobiology, hydrology, geography, geographic information science, materials science, mineral resources and mining, energy resources, paleontology, visualization, remote sensing, geophysical data and information). Each year the Board held two meetings. Most recently at the May 2003 Board meeting, the main topic of discussion was Coordination of Geospatial Data in the Era of the Department of Homeland Security. Speakers were Steven Cooper, DHS; Barry Napier, FEMA; Bill Shinar, VGIN; Barbara Ryan, USGS; and Hank Garie, DOI. Other topics were Circum-Pacific Council for Energy and Mineral Resources and New Opportunities in the Geology Discipline (Pat Leahy, USGS); Challenges to Understanding Biological Change in a Fluid Landscape (Sue Haseltine, USGS); and GIS and Remote Sensing at the USDA (Rodney Brown, USDA). The Board and the AGI also held a Leadership Forum. At the October 2003 Board meeting in Irvine, California, the Board plans to discuss earth resource issues, develop a white paper on the future directions of the Board, and review two of its standing committees--Committee on Seismology and Geodynamics, and the Committee on Geological and Geotechnical Engineering. The Board

  15. Adaptive Resource Allocation for the PB/MC-CDMA System in Frequency Selective Fading Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyujin; Lee, Kyesan

    We propose Adaptive Resource Allocation for the Partial Block MC-CDMA (ARA-PB/MC-CDMA) system. The ARA-PB/MC-CDMA system aims to improve total throughput performance and frequency efficiency across various channel conditions. It adaptively changes the number of blocks to improve the throughput performance and frequency efficiency according to the Signal to Interference Ratio (SIR). Therefore, the proposed system supports various Quality of Service (QoS) requirements for various SIR values.

  16. Selection of spatial scale for assessing impacts of groundwater-based water supply on freshwater resources.

    PubMed

    Hybel, A-M; Godskesen, B; Rygaard, M

    2015-09-01

    Indicators of the impact on freshwater resources are becoming increasingly important in the evaluation of urban water systems. To reveal the importance of spatial resolution, we investigated how the choice of catchment scale influenced the freshwater impact assessment. Two different indicators were used in this study: the Withdrawal-To-Availability ratio (WTA) and the Water Stress Index (WSI). Results were calculated for three groundwater based Danish urban water supplies (Esbjerg, Aarhus, and Copenhagen). The assessment was carried out at three spatial levels: (1) the groundwater body level, (2) the river basin level, and (3) the regional level. The assessments showed that Copenhagen's water supply had the highest impact on the freshwater resource per cubic meter of water abstracted, with a WSI of 1.75 at Level 1. The WSI values were 1.64 for Aarhus's and 0.81 for Esbjerg's water supply. Spatial resolution was identified as a major factor determining the outcome of the impact assessment. For the three case studies, WTA and WSI were 27%-583% higher at Level 1 than impacts calculated for the regional scale. The results highlight that freshwater impact assessments based on regional data, rather than sub-river basin data, may dramatically underestimate the actual impact on the water resource. Furthermore, this study discusses the strengths and shortcomings of the applied indicator approaches. A sensitivity analysis demonstrates that although WSI has the highest environmental relevance, it also has the highest uncertainty, as it requires estimations of non-measurable environmental water requirements. Hence, the development of a methodology to obtain more site-specific and relevant estimations of environmental water requirements should be prioritized. Finally, the demarcation of the groundwater resource in aquifers remains a challenge for establishing a consistent method for benchmarking freshwater impacts caused by groundwater abstraction. PMID:26093102

  17. Pharmacogenomic knowledge gaps and educational resource needs among physicians in selected specialties

    PubMed Central

    Johansen Taber, Katherine A; Dickinson, Barry D

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of pharmacogenomic testing in the clinical setting has the potential to improve the safety and effectiveness of drug therapy, yet studies have revealed that physicians lack knowledge about the topic of pharmacogenomics, and are not prepared to implement it in the clinical setting. This study further explores the pharmacogenomic knowledge deficit and educational resource needs among physicians. Materials and methods Surveys of primary care physicians, cardiologists, and psychiatrists were conducted. Results Few physicians reported familiarity with the topic of pharmacogenomics, but more reported confidence in their knowledge about the influence of genetics on drug therapy. Only a small minority had undergone formal training in pharmacogenomics, and a majority reported being unsure what type of pharmacogenomic tests were appropriate to order for the clinical situation. Respondents indicated that an ideal pharmacogenomic educational resource should be electronic and include such components as how to interpret pharmacogenomic test results, recommendations for prescribing, population subgroups most likely to be affected, and contact information for laboratories offering pharmacogenomic testing. Conclusion Physicians continue to demonstrate pharmacogenomic knowledge gaps, and are unsure about how to use pharmacogenomic testing in clinical practice. Educational resources that are clinically oriented and easily accessible are preferred by physicians, and may best support appropriate clinical implementation of pharmacogenomics. PMID:25045280

  18. Examination of antimicrobial activity of selected non-antibiotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kruszewska, Hanna; Zareba, Tomasz; Tyski, Stefan

    2004-12-01

    A variety of pharmaceutical preparations, which are applied in the management of non-infectious diseases, have shown in vitro some antimicrobial activity. These drugs are called "non-antibiotics". The aim of this study was to detect and characterize the antimicrobial activity of non-antibiotic drugs, selected from the preparations analysed during state control performed in the National Institute of Public Health in Poland. Over 180 of pharmaceutical preparations were randomly chosen from different groups of drugs. A surveillance study was performed on standard ATCC microbial strains used for drug control: S. aureus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. It was shown that the drugs listed below inhibited growth of at least one of the examined strains: Actonel 5 mg tabl. (risedronate), Aldan 10 mg tabl. (amlodipine), Aleras 10 mg tabl. (cetirisine), Aspicam 15 mg tabl. (meloxicam), Baikadent 6 mg/g gel (flavons of Scutellariae), Debretin 100 mg tabl. (trimebutine), Ferro-Duo 100 mg tabl. (ferrum), Gastrovent 145 mg caps. (bismuth citrate), Ibum 200 mg caps., Upfen 200 mg tabl. (ibuprofen), Lastet 100 mg caps. (etoposide), Legalon 70 mg tabl. (sylimarin), Madopar 125 tabl. (benserazide, levodopa), Moxenil 100 mg tabl. (nimesulide), Neurotin 800 mg tabl. (gabapentin), Propranolol 40 mg tabl. (propranolol), Rexetin 20 mg tabl. (paroxetine), Salipax 20 mg caps. (fluoxetine), Selofen 10 mg caps. (zaleplon) Stenorol 0.6% powder (halofuginone), Stimuloton 50 mg tabl. (sertraline), Superoptim 0.3 mg tabl. (hipericine), Uversan 50 mg tabl. (arbutine from Arctostaphylos uva ursi). S. aureus strain was susceptible to the most of the drugs listed above. The lowest inhibitory concentration was found for sertraline and hipericine (0.16 and 0.075 mg/mL, respectively). PMID:15909927

  19. 1999 resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fort Union Coal Assessment Team

    1999-01-01

    The USGS has assessed resources of selected coal of the Fort Union Formation and equivalent units in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region. The assessment focused on coal in the Powder River, Williston, Hanna-Carbon, and Greater Green River basins most likely to be utilized in the next few decades. In other basins in the region Tertiary coal resources are summarized but not assessed. Disc 1, in PDF files, includes results of the assessment and chapters on coal geology, quantity and quality, and land use and ownership. Disc 2 provides GIS files for land use and ownership maps and geologic maps, and basic GIS data for the assessed basins. ArcView shapefiles, PDF files for cross sections and TIFF files are included along with ArcView Datapublisher software for Windows-based computer systems.

  20. A GIS-assisted approach to wide-area wind resource assessment and site selection for the state of Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, M.C.; Hurley, P.; Simon, R.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the methodology and results of a wide-area wind resource assessment and site selection in Colorado. This was the first phase in a three-part assessment and monitoring program conducted for the State of Colorado Office of Energy Conservation and several collaborating utilities. The objective of this phase was to identify up to 20 candidate sites for evaluation and possible long-term monitoring. This was accomplished using a geographic information system (GIS), which takes into account such factors as topography, existing wind resource data, locations of transmission lines, land cover, and land use. The resulting list of sites recommended for evaluation in Phase 2 of the study includes locations throughout Colorado, but most are in the eastern plains. The GIS wind siting model may be modified and updated in the future as additional information becomes available. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum naphthenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  2. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-06-01

    During coal liquefaction, coal fragments forming a liquid product with reduced heteroatom content. Coal can be considered to be a large network of polynuclear aromatic species connected by heteroatoms and alkyl bridging structures. Predominant heteroatoms contained in coal are sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen. Predominant alkyl bridges are methylene and ethylene structures. The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge structures. The reactions studied include: hydrogenation (HYD), hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrosulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum napththenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS/sub 2/). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  3. Activities of the Water Resources Division in Arizona, 1986-91

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spicer, L. M., (compiler); van de Vanter, E.K.

    1993-01-01

    Water-resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Arizona consist of collecting water- resources data and conducting interpretive hydrologic investigations and research. The water- resources data and the results of the interpretive investigations and research are published or released by the U.S. Geological Survey or by cooperating agencies. The report describes the data-collection activities and water-resources investigations in Arizona for fiscal years 1986-91 (October 1, 1985, to September 30, 1991). The report includes a brief description of the origin of the U.S. Geological Survey, the basic mission of the Water Resources Division, organization of the Arizona District, sources of funding, and a summary of water conditions in Arizona. Information is given for each project and includes the objective, approach, progress and results, and plans for the following year. The report also includes a list of publications prepared by the Arizona District, Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey, that were published from 1984 to 1991.

  4. Neuronal activity is not required for the initial formation and maturation of visual selectivity.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Kenta M; Murakami, Tomonari; Yoshida, Takashi; Tagawa, Yoshiaki; Ohki, Kenichi

    2015-12-01

    Neuronal activity is important for the functional refinement of neuronal circuits in the early visual system. At the level of the cerebral cortex, however, it is still unknown whether the formation of fundamental functions such as orientation selectivity depends on neuronal activity, as it has been difficult to suppress activity throughout development. Using genetic silencing of cortical activity starting before the formation of orientation selectivity, we found that the orientation selectivity of neurons in the mouse visual cortex formed and matured normally despite a strong suppression of both spontaneous and visually evoked activity throughout development. After the orientation selectivity formed, the distribution of the preferred orientations of neurons was reorganized. We found that this process required spontaneous activity, but not visually evoked activity. Thus, the initial formation and maturation of orientation selectivity is largely independent of neuronal activity, and the initial selectivity is subsequently modified depending on neuronal activity. PMID:26523644

  5. EGI-EUDAT integration activity - Pair data and high-throughput computing resources together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scardaci, Diego; Viljoen, Matthew; Vitlacil, Dejan; Fiameni, Giuseppe; Chen, Yin; sipos, Gergely; Ferrari, Tiziana

    2016-04-01

    EGI (www.egi.eu) is a publicly funded e-infrastructure put together to give scientists access to more than 530,000 logical CPUs, 200 PB of disk capacity and 300 PB of tape storage to drive research and innovation in Europe. The infrastructure provides both high throughput computing and cloud compute/storage capabilities. Resources are provided by about 350 resource centres which are distributed across 56 countries in Europe, the Asia-Pacific region, Canada and Latin America. EUDAT (www.eudat.eu) is a collaborative Pan-European infrastructure providing research data services, training and consultancy for researchers, research communities, research infrastructures and data centres. EUDAT's vision is to enable European researchers and practitioners from any research discipline to preserve, find, access, and process data in a trusted environment, as part of a Collaborative Data Infrastructure (CDI) conceived as a network of collaborating, cooperating centres, combining the richness of numerous community-specific data repositories with the permanence and persistence of some of Europe's largest scientific data centres. EGI and EUDAT, in the context of their flagship projects, EGI-Engage and EUDAT2020, started in March 2015 a collaboration to harmonise the two infrastructures, including technical interoperability, authentication, authorisation and identity management, policy and operations. The main objective of this work is to provide end-users with a seamless access to an integrated infrastructure offering both EGI and EUDAT services and, then, pairing data and high-throughput computing resources together. To define the roadmap of this collaboration, EGI and EUDAT selected a set of relevant user communities, already collaborating with both infrastructures, which could bring requirements and help to assign the right priorities to each of them. In this way, from the beginning, this activity has been really driven by the end users. The identified user communities are

  6. Recurrent Selection for Transgene Activity Levels in Maize Results in Proxy Selection for a Native Gene with the Same Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Anastasia L.; Schroder, Megan N.; Scott, M. Paul

    2016-01-01

    High activity levels of a transgene can be very useful, making a transgene easier to evaluate for safety and efficacy. High activity levels can also increase the economic benefit of the production of high value proteins in transgenic plants. The goal of this research is to determine if recurrent selection for activity of a transgene will result in higher activity, and if selection for activity of a transgene controlled by a native promoter will also increase protein levels of the native gene with the same promoter. To accomplish this goal we used transgenic maize containing a construct encoding green fluorescent protein controlled by the promoter for the maize endosperm-specific 27kDa gamma zein seed storage protein. We carried out recurrent selection for fluorescence intensity in two breeding populations. After three generations of selection, both selected populations were significantly more fluorescent and had significantly higher levels of 27kDa gamma zein than the unselected control populations. These higher levels of the 27kDa gamma zein occurred independently of the presence of the transgene. The results show that recurrent selection can be used to increase activity of a transgene and that selection for a transgene controlled by a native promoter can increase protein levels of the native gene with the same promoter via proxy selection. Moreover, the increase in native gene protein level is maintained in the absence of the transgene, demonstrating that proxy selection can be used to produce non-transgenic plants with desired changes in gene expression. PMID:26895451

  7. NASA's SMD Cross-Forum Resources for Supporting Scientist Engagement in Education and Public Outreach Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, S.; Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.; Hsu, B. C.; Sharma, M.; Peticolas, L. M.; Schwerin, T. G.; Shipp, S. S.; Smith, D.

    2012-12-01

    Sharing the excitement of ongoing scientific discoveries is an important aspect of scientific activity for researchers. Directly engaging scientists in education and public outreach (E/PO) activities has the benefit of directly connecting the public to those who engage in scientific activities. A shortage of training in education methods, public speaking, and working with various public audiences increases barriers to engaging scientists in these types in E/PO activities. NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public forums (astrophysics, earth science, heliophysics, and planetary science) support scientists currently involved in E/PO and who are interested in becoming involved in E/PO through a variety of avenues. Over the past three years, the forums have developed a variety of resources to help engage scientists in education and public outreach. We will showcase the following resources developed through the SMD E/PO cross-forum efforts: Professional development resources for writing NASA SMD E/PO proposals (webinars and other online tools), ongoing professional development at scientific conferences to increase scientist engagement in E/PO activities, toolkits for scientists interested in best practices in E/PO (online guides for K-12 education and public outreach), toolkits to inform scientists of science education resources developed within each scientific thematic community, EarthSpace (a community web space where instructors can find and share about teaching space and earth sciences in the undergraduate classroom, including class materials news and funding opportunities, and the latest education research, http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace/), thematic resources for teaching about SMD science topics, and an online database of scientists interested in connecting with education programs. Learn more about the Forum and find resources at http://smdepo.org/.

  8. Annotated bibliography of selected references on ground-water resources and geohydrology of the Louisville area, Kentucky, 1944-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starn, J.J.; Mull, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    Ground water resources in the Louisville area have long been the subject of intense research and investigation. Many investigations have resulted in reports that cover a variety of topics relative to the availability and use of ground water. This bibliography was prepared because of the continued interest in ground water in the Louisville area and the need for a single source of selected references published since 1944. The bibliography is intended to assist interested parties in finding needed information but is not intended to be a complete compilation of all references. The annotated bibliography provides a synopsis of 36 reports and 4 geologic maps.

  9. Preservice elementary teachers' selection and use of simultaneously available multiple resources during attempts to complete unguided inquiry physics tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Joel A.

    The How People Learn (HPL) model for effective learning environments calls for learning environments to be intentionally knowledge-, learner-, assessment-, and community-centered. Requests for special science content courses designed exclusively for future teachers are supported by the HPL model, and are growing in number across the nation's universities. Components of such courses should include inquiry-based laboratory activities performed collaboratively within small groups of students. Desires for a technologically literate society further demand that the use of technology be an integral part of this effective learning environment. This descriptive study describes the actions taken by middle grades preservice elementary teachers in a conceptual physics course who were given physical, computer simulated, and textbook resources to use during their attempts to complete unguided inquiry tasks. Group laboratory reports, "Post Activity Reflections," exam question responses, and videotape of six of the fifteen groups were examined in order to investigate patterns of choice and use, perceptions of the value of each resource, and performance on exam questions directly related to these and other laboratory activities. This study found that these novice physics learners rarely valued the computer simulation unless it was an exact or near exact replica of the physical equipment, which supports the need for appropriate scaffolding during these types of activities. Other findings of interest include the formation of a significant alternative conception during one of the activities. Implications of this study address how characteristics of novice learners in science content settings should inform the design of technology-rich instructional activities.

  10. On the Selection of Models for Runtime Prediction of System Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casolari, Sara; Colajanni, Michele

    Applications and services delivered through large Internet Data Centers are now feasible thanks to network and server improvement, but also to virtualization, dynamic allocation of resources and dynamic migrations. The large number of servers and resources involved in these systems requires autonomic management strategies because no amount of human administrators would be capable of cloning and migrating virtual machines in time, as well as re-distributing or re-mapping the underlying hardware. At the basis of most autonomic management decisions, there is the need of evaluating own global behavior and change it when the evaluation indicates that they are not accomplishing what they were intended to do or some relevant anomalies are occurring. Decisions algorithms have to satisfy different time scales constraints. In this chapter we are interested to short-term contexts where runtime prediction models work on the basis of time series coming from samples of monitored system resources, such as disk, CPU and network utilization. In similar environments, we have to address two main issues. First, original time series are affected by limited predictability because measurements are characterized by noises due to system instability, variable offered load, heavy-tailed distributions, hardware and software interactions. Moreover, there is no existing criteria that can help us to choose a suitable prediction model and related parameters with the purpose of guaranteeing an adequate prediction quality. In this chapter, we evaluate the impact that different choices on prediction models have on different time series, and we suggest how to treat input data and whether it is convenient to choose the parameters of a prediction model in a static or dynamic way. Our conclusions are supported by a large set of analyses on realistic and synthetic data traces.

  11. A review of selected ground penetrating radar applications to mineral resource evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francke, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Since the commercialisation of ground penetrating radar (GPR) in the 1970s, the technology has been relegated to niche applications in the mining industry. Advances in radar technology, such as flexible collinear antennas and the integration of live differential GPS positioning, have spurred GPR's acceptance in recent years as a standard exploration method for a number of deposit types. Provided herein is an overview of commercialised GPR applications for surface mineral resource evaluations, covering examples of alluvial channels, nickel and bauxitic laterites, iron ore deposits, mineral sands, coal and kimberlites.

  12. Selected Resources on Sibling Abuse: An Annotated Bibliography for Researchers, Educators and Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.; Hayes, Kathleen C.

    This publication is part of an ongoing project which produces bibliographies on family topics. This bibliography, begun in July 1993, is a compilation of selected materials on a type of family violence which receives little attention. When all types of mild aggression and extreme violence toward a sibling are considered, it appears that sibling…

  13. Pacific Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) Resource Selection in the Northern Bering Sea

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Chadwick V.; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.; Fischbach, Anthony S.; McDonald, Trent L.; Cooper, Lee W.; Hornsby, Fawn

    2014-01-01

    The Pacific walrus is a large benthivore with an annual range extending across the continental shelves of the Bering and Chukchi Seas. We used a discrete choice model to estimate site selection by adult radio-tagged walruses relative to the availability of the caloric biomass of benthic infauna and sea ice concentration in a prominent walrus wintering area in the northern Bering Sea (St. Lawrence Island polynya) in 2006, 2008, and 2009. At least 60% of the total caloric biomass of dominant macroinfauna in the study area was composed of members of the bivalve families Nuculidae, Tellinidae, and Nuculanidae. Model estimates indicated walrus site selection was related most strongly to tellinid bivalve caloric biomass distribution and that walruses selected lower ice concentrations from the mostly high ice concentrations that were available to them (quartiles: 76%, 93%, and 99%). Areas with high average predicted walrus site selection generally coincided with areas of high organic carbon input identified in other studies. Projected decreases in sea ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya and the potential for a concomitant decline of bivalves in the region could result in a northward shift in the wintering grounds of walruses in the northern Bering Sea. PMID:24717979

  14. Selected Resource Materials for Developing Energy Conservation Programs in the Government Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lengyel, Dorothy L.; And Others

    This annotated bibliography is a selected listing of reference materials for use by local government officials in the development of energy conservation programs. The references are listed under the agency through which they are available. Agency listings are alphabetized and include complete mailing addresses. There are 46 agency listings, many…

  15. Biomass resource potential for selected crops in Hawaii. [Koa haole (giant leucaena); napier and guinea grass

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, A.

    1982-06-01

    The biomass crops selected for review were koa haole (giant leucaena), napier and guinea grass, and eucalyptus (saligna, grandis, and globulus). The islands examined were Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, and Molokai. The potential land acreage for growing these crops was estimated grossly. As anticipated, the island of Hawaii had the largest land potential with eucalyptus having the greatest potential land acreage.

  16. Electronic Resources: Are Basic Criteria for the Selection of Materials Changing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holleman, Curt

    2000-01-01

    The four basic criteria for the selection of library materials--quality, library relevancy, aesthetic and technical aspects, and cost--remain the same in the electronic era of information. What they mean and how they are used has changed. But even quality and cost, the two most controversial criteria, carry great importance for the responsible…

  17. Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) resource selection in the Northern Bering Sea.

    PubMed

    Jay, Chadwick V; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M; Fischbach, Anthony S; McDonald, Trent L; Cooper, Lee W; Hornsby, Fawn

    2014-01-01

    The Pacific walrus is a large benthivore with an annual range extending across the continental shelves of the Bering and Chukchi Seas. We used a discrete choice model to estimate site selection by adult radio-tagged walruses relative to the availability of the caloric biomass of benthic infauna and sea ice concentration in a prominent walrus wintering area in the northern Bering Sea (St. Lawrence Island polynya) in 2006, 2008, and 2009. At least 60% of the total caloric biomass of dominant macroinfauna in the study area was composed of members of the bivalve families Nuculidae, Tellinidae, and Nuculanidae. Model estimates indicated walrus site selection was related most strongly to tellinid bivalve caloric biomass distribution and that walruses selected lower ice concentrations from the mostly high ice concentrations that were available to them (quartiles: 76%, 93%, and 99%). Areas with high average predicted walrus site selection generally coincided with areas of high organic carbon input identified in other studies. Projected decreases in sea ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya and the potential for a concomitant decline of bivalves in the region could result in a northward shift in the wintering grounds of walruses in the northern Bering Sea. PMID:24717979

  18. Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) resource selection in the northern Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jay, Chadwick V.; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.; Fischbach, Anthony S.; McDonald, Trent L.; Cooper, Lee W.; Hornsby, Fawn

    2014-01-01

    The Pacific walrus is a large benthivore with an annual range extending across the continental shelves of the Bering and Chukchi Seas. We used a discrete choice model to estimate site selection by adult radio-tagged walruses relative to the availability of the caloric biomass of benthic infauna and sea ice concentration in a prominent walrus wintering area in the northern Bering Sea (St. Lawrence Island polynya) in 2006, 2008, and 2009. At least 60% of the total caloric biomass of dominant macroinfauna in the study area was composed of members of the bivalve families Nuculidae, Tellinidae, and Nuculanidae. Model estimates indicated walrus site selection was related most strongly to tellinid bivalve caloric biomass distribution and that walruses selected lower ice concentrations from the mostly high ice concentrations that were available to them (quartiles: 76%, 93%, and 99%). Areas with high average predicted walrus site selection generally coincided with areas of high organic carbon input identified in other studies. Projected decreases in sea ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya and the potential for a concomitant decline of bivalves in the region could result in a northward shift in the wintering grounds of walruses in the northern Bering Sea.

  19. A Selected and Annotated Resource List of Materials on the Holocaust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    B'nai B'rith, New York, NY. Anti-Defamation League.

    This guide for students, teachers, and librarians in secondary schools lists over 200 books and films about the Holocaust. The contents have been selected to help students and others find out what happened during the Holocaust, understand some of the reasons for it, develop a better understanding of the Jewish people, and reflect on their own…

  20. Activities of the U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Division in North Carolina, 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, J. F., (compiler); Deckard, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Water resources programs conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in the state of North Carolina during 1985 and proposed programs for 1986 are described. This is the first in a series of biennial progress reports on Survey activities in the state. Activities such as gathering, interpreting and publishing hydrologic data and scientific information in support of state and local water resources planning, management, and regulatory programs are presented. The water resources programs described are funded through cooperative agreements with state and local agencies and through special agreements with other federal agencies. Cooperative programs are reviewed annually to insure that state, local and national priorities are being met. Groundwater withdrawals are estimated to have produced water level declines of 150 ft and more for large areas of the northeast and central Coastal Plain. Future demands for water quality and quantity are discussed.

  1. Somali Perspectives on Physical Activity: Photovoice to Address Barriers and Resources in San Diego

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kate; Mohamed, Amina Sheik; Dawson, Darius B.; Syme, Maggie; Abdi, Sahra; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background Though many immigrants enter the U.S. with a healthy body weight, this health advantage disappears the longer they reside in the U.S. To better understand the complexities of obesity change within a cultural framework, a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach, Photovoice, was utilized focusing on physical activity among Muslim Somali women. Objectives The CBPR partnership was formed to identify barriers and resources to engaging in physical activity with goals of advocacy and program development. Methods Muslim Somali women (n = 8) were recruited to participate, trained and provided cameras, and engaged in group discussions about the scenes they photographed. Results Participants identified several barriers, including safety concerns, minimal culturally appropriate resources, and financial constraints. Strengths included public resources and a community support system. The CBPR process identified opportunities and challenges to collaboration and dissemination processes. Conclusions The findings laid the framework for subsequent program development and community engagement. PMID:25981428

  2. Effects of solar activity in the Portuguese water resources SOLSPA 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Rita

    2002-03-01

    The hydrological time series can be used as guides of tendency and cyclic variation of climate. Although the climatic variability mechanisms are not totally understood, the solar activity variations can be associated with regional hydrometeorological variables. The water resources availability is becoming an urgent problem as the human pressure rises in water demand. The knowledge of hydroclimatic variables tendencies as the relationship between our activities and the quantity and quality of ground and surface resources, is an essential step in the formulation of a sustainable water resources management plane. The major purpose of this study is to use it as a starting point to assess and predict soil water availability and understand its connections with the solar variability.

  3. Coal resources of selected coal beds and zones in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie; Tewalt, Susan; Bragg, Linda

    2002-01-01

    The Appalachian Basin is one of the most important coal-producing regions in the world. Bituminous coal has been mined in the basin for the last three centuries, and the cumulative production is estimated at 34.5 billion short tons. Annual production in 1998 was about 452 million short tons; the basin's production is mostly in the northern (32 percent) and central (63 percent) coal regions. The coal is used primarily within the Eastern United States for electric power generation, but some of it is suitable for metallurgical uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is completing a National Coal Resource Assessment of five coal-producing regions of the United States, including the Appalachian Basin. The USGS, in cooperation with the State geological surveys of Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia, has completed a digital coal resource assessment of five of the top-producing coal beds and coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions -- the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay and Pond Creek coal zones, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. Of the 93 billion short tons of original coal in these units, about 66 billion short tons remain.

  4. Excellent activity and selectivity of Cu-SSZ-13 in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2010-10-21

    Superior activity and selectivity of a Cu ion-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolite in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 were observed, in comparison to Cu-beta and Cu-ZSM-5 zeolites. Cu-SSZ-13 was not only more active in the NOx SCR reaction over the entire temperature range studied (up to 550 °C), but also more selective toward nitrogen formation, resulting in significantly lower amounts of NOx by-products (i.e., NO2 and N2O) than the other two zeolites. In addition, Cu-SSZ-13 demonstrated the highest activity and N2 formation selectivity in the oxidation of NH3. The results of this study strongly suggest that Cu-SSZ-13 is a promising candidate as a catalyst for NOx SCR with great potential in after-treatment systems for either mobile or stationary sources.

  5. Efficacy of oxonia active against selected spore formers.

    PubMed

    Blakistone, B; Chuyate, R; Kautter, D; Charbonneau, J; Suit, K

    1999-03-01

    Alternatives to hydrogen peroxide are being sought for use in aseptic packaging systems because this sterilant is efficacious at temperatures higher than some of the newer packaging materials can tolerate. Earlier in this century, peracetic acid was known to be bactericidal, sporicidal, and virucidal but was not widely used because of handling, toxicity, and stability problems. Sanitizer suppliers have capitalized on the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid, and peracetic acid stabilized with a sequestering agent. Formulations have been improved and marketed as Oxonia Active, and its use as an alternative sterilant to hydrogen peroxide merits evaluation. Oxonia was assessed at a concentration of 2% and a temperature of 40 degrees C against a number of spore-forming organisms, including foodborne pathogens. Spores tested in aqueous suspension showed an order of sensitivity (least to greatest) to Oxonia as follows: Bacillus cereus > B. subtilis A > B. stearothermophilus > B. subtilis var. globigii > B. coagulans > Clostridium sporogenes (PA3679) > C. butyricum > C. botulinum type B (nonproteolytic) > C. botulinum type B (proteolytic) = C. botulinum type A = C. botulinum type E. B. subtilis A and B. stearothermophilus spores tested in the dry state were less sensitive to Oxonia than when tested in aqueous suspension. B. cereus, a foodborne pathogen, proved to be markedly less sensitive to Oxonia under the described test conditions. The decreased sensitivity to Oxonia by the foodborne pathogen B. cereus raises concern about the efficacy of the sterilant for aseptic packaging of low-acid foods. Further work will be needed to determine if this decreased sensitivity is an inherent property of the organism that affords unusual protection against Oxonia or if the challenge parameters selected were at the minimum conditions for efficacy. PMID:10090246

  6. Melanogenesis and Antityrosinase Activity of Selected South African Plants

    PubMed Central

    Mapunya, Manyatja Brenda; Nikolova, Roumiana Vassileva; Lall, Namrita

    2012-01-01

    Melanin is the pigment that is responsible for the colour of eyes, hair, and skin in humans. Tyrosinase is known to be the key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. Overactivity of this enzyme leads to dermatological disorders such as age spots, melanoma and sites of actinic damage. Ten plants belonging to four families (Asphodelaceae, Anacardiaceae, Oleaceae, and Rutaceae) were investigated for their effect on tyrosinase using both L-tyrosine and L-DOPA as substrates. Ethanol leaf extracts (500 μg/mL) of Aloe ferox, Aloe aculeata, Aloe pretoriensis, and Aloe sessiliflora showed 60%, 31%, 17%, and 13% inhibition of tyrosinase activity respectively, when L-tyrosine was used as a substrate. Harpephyllum caffrum (leaves) at a concentration of 500 μg/mL had an inhibitory effect of 70% on tyrosinase when L-DOPA was used as a substrate. The IC50 of Harpephyllum caffrum (leaves and bark) were found to be 51 ± 0.002 and 40 ± 0.035 μg/mL, respectively. Following the results obtained from the tyrosinase assay, extracts from Harpephyllum caffrum were selected for further testing on their effect on melanin production and their cytotoxicity on melanocytes in vitro. The IC50 of both extracts was found to be 6.25 μg/mL for melanocyte cells. Bark extract of Harpephyllum caffrum showed 26% reduction in melanin content of melanocyte cells at a concentration of 6.25 μg/mL. The leaf extract of this plant showed some toxicity on melanocyte cells. Therefore, the bark extract of Harpephyllum caffrum could be considered as an antityrosinase agent for dermatological disorders such as age spots and melasoma. PMID:22611429

  7. Acoustic gaze adjustments during active target selection in echolocating porpoises.

    PubMed

    Wisniewska, Danuta Maria; Johnson, Mark; Beedholm, Kristian; Wahlberg, Magnus; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2012-12-15

    Visually dominant animals use gaze adjustments to organize perceptual inputs for cognitive processing. Thereby they manage the massive sensory load from complex and noisy scenes. Echolocation, as an active sensory system, may provide more opportunities to control such information flow by adjusting the properties of the sound source. However, most studies of toothed whale echolocation have involved stationed animals in static auditory scenes for which dynamic information control is unnecessary. To mimic conditions in the wild, we designed an experiment with captive, free-swimming harbor porpoises tasked with discriminating between two hydrophone-equipped targets and closing in on the selected target; this allowed us to gain insight into how porpoises adjust their acoustic gaze in a multi-target dynamic scene. By means of synchronized cameras, an acoustic tag and on-target hydrophone recordings we demonstrate that porpoises employ both beam direction control and range-dependent changes in output levels and pulse intervals to accommodate their changing spatial relationship with objects of immediate interest. We further show that, when switching attention to another target, porpoises can set their depth of gaze accurately for the new target location. In combination, these observations imply that porpoises exert precise vocal-motor control that is tied to spatial perception akin to visual accommodation. Finally, we demonstrate that at short target ranges porpoises narrow their depth of gaze dramatically by adjusting their output so as to focus on a single target. This suggests that echolocating porpoises switch from a deliberative mode of sensorimotor operation to a reactive mode when they are close to a target. PMID:23175527

  8. Variation in active and passive resource inputs to experimental pools: mechanisms and possible consequences for food webs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraus, Johanna M.; Pletcher, Leanna T.; Vonesh, James R.

    2010-01-01

    1. Cross-ecosystem movements of resources, including detritus, nutrients and living prey, can strongly influence food web dynamics in recipient habitats. Variation in resource inputs is thought to be driven by factors external to the recipient habitat (e.g. donor habitat productivity and boundary conditions). However, inputs of or by ‘active’ living resources may be strongly influenced by recipient habitat quality when organisms exhibit behavioural habitat selection when crossing ecosystem boundaries. 2. To examine whether behavioural responses to recipient habitat quality alter the relative inputs of ‘active’ living and ‘passive’ detrital resources to recipient food webs, we manipulated the presence of caged predatory fish and measured biomass, energy and organic content of inputs to outdoor experimental pools of adult aquatic insects, frog eggs, terrestrial plant matter and terrestrial arthropods. 3. Caged fish reduced the biomass, energy and organic matter donated to pools by tree frog eggs by ∼70%, but did not alter insect colonisation or passive allochthonous inputs of terrestrial arthropods and plant material. Terrestrial plant matter and adult aquatic insects provided the most energy and organic matter inputs to the pools (40–50%), while terrestrial arthropods provided the least (7%). Inputs of frog egg were relatively small but varied considerably among pools and over time (3%, range = 0–20%). Absolute and proportional amounts varied by input type. 4. Aquatic predators can strongly affect the magnitude of active, but not passive, inputs and that the effect of recipient habitat quality on active inputs is variable. Furthermore, some active inputs (i.e. aquatic insect colonists) can provide similar amounts of energy and organic matter as passive inputs of terrestrial plant matter, which are well known to be important. Because inputs differ in quality and the trophic level they subsidise, proportional changes in input type could have

  9. Activities of the Alaska District, Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Elisabeth F.

    1990-01-01

    Thirteen projects of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resource Division active in Alaska in 1990 are described. Each description includes information on period of project, chief, funding sources, location, purpose, current status, and published or planned reports. The compilation also contains a bibliography of reports published by the Alaska District from 1987 through January 1990. (USGS)

  10. Active Remote Sensing of Natural Resources: Course Notes. Science Series No. 5. Final Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Eugene L.

    Presented is a portion of a research project which developed materials for teaching remote sensing of natural resources on an interdisciplinary basis at the graduate level. This volume contains notes developed for a course in active remote sensing. It is concerned with those methods or systems which generate the electromagnetic energy…

  11. Astronomical! 44 Activities, Experiments, and Projects. Classroom Resource 0-27440.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Ormiston H.

    This is a resource book for four major areas of study: basic astronomy, a star's life, the planets, and the atmosphere. The activities and demonstrations included can be done in a classroom setting during the day by using readily available materials. Topics covered include: refracting and reflecting telescopes, star finder, circumpolar…

  12. Stream mesocosm response sensitivities to simulated ion stress in produced waters from resource extraction activities

    EPA Science Inventory

    To increase the ecological relevance of laboratory exposures intent on determining species sensitivity to ion stress from resource extraction activities we have conducted several stream mesocosm dosing studies that pair single-species and community-level responses in-situ and all...

  13. Technology in College Unions and Student Activities: A Collection of Technology Resources from the ACUI Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of College Unions International (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    This publication presents a collection of technology resources from the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) community. Contents include: (1) Podcasting (Jeff Lail); (2) Video Podcasting (Ed Cabellon); (3) Building a Multimedia Production Center (Nathan Byrer); (4) Cloud Computing in the Student Union and Student Activities (TJ…

  14. Thematic Resources and Activities for Career Education: CEI Final Report: Vol. III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit 16, Lewisburg, PA.

    The book, Volume Three of a final report, is a collection of teachers' guides to units in career education, written by Pennsylvania teachers during a regional inservice institute in career education. The format used, Thematic Resources and Activities for Career Education (TRACE), incorporates the concerns of the Pennsylvania Career Development…

  15. Activities for Learning about Conservation of Forest Resources: A Guide for Leaders of Youth Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This guide is intended to support the leader of a youth group in increasing the awareness of members of the need for good forest conservation practices. Sections include: (1) science fundamentals; (2) making informative exhibits; (3) gaining community involvement; (4) Christmas activities; (5) games and crafts; and (6) a list of resources and…

  16. Global Issues: Activities and Resources for the High School Teacher. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, Kenneth A.; And Others

    Increasing student knowledge about other nations and interrelationships with them is the primary goal of this teaching guide. The activities and resources focus on six topics of continuing global importance: (1) trade and economic issues, (2) conflict and armaments, (3) modernization and development, (4) technology and the environment, (5) energy,…

  17. Readings and Activities for Character Education: A Resource Guide for Teachers and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Diane L.

    This resource guide, for teachers and students in the upper elementary and middle school grades, has been developed in response to the nationwide interest in asking schools to play an active role in preparing students to become informed and responsible citizens. The guide is divided into seven sections, one for each character trait: Caring, Civic…

  18. Small Schools Mathematics Curriculum, 9-12: Scope Objectives, Activities, Resources, Monitoring Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, JoAnne, Ed.; And Others

    The grade 9-12 mathematics curriculum learning objectives, activities, monitoring procedures and resources for small schools were developed during 1978-79 through the cooperative efforts of 10 Snohomish and Island County school districts, Educational Service District 189 and the Washington State Office of Public Instruction. The objectives were…

  19. 78 FR 8192 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request; Education and Human Resources Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... second notice for public comment; the first was published in the Federal Register at 77 FR 56234 and no... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request; Education and Human Resources...

  20. Making a Difference. A Resource Pack for People Who Want To Become More Active Citizens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadzie, Stella, Comp.; Turner, Cheryl, Ed.

    This document, which is a resource pack for individuals in the United Kingdom who want to become more active citizens, consists of information for group leaders and five learning modules. The section for group leaders contains the following: basic tips on leading a group; strategies for overcoming barriers to learning; glossary; and overview of…

  1. Small Schools Health Curriculum, K-3: Scope, Objectives, Activities, Resources, Monitoring Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Mike, Ed.; Destito, Therese, Ed.

    The K-3 health curriculum developed during 1975-77 by teachers in small school districts working with district and state health education specialists presents student learning objectives and suggested activities, monitoring procedures and resources which are correlated to the 10 Goals for Washington Common Schools and the nine Small Schools Health…

  2. Practical guidance on characterizing availability in resource selection functions under a use-availability design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Northrup, Joseph M.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Anderson, Charles R., Jr.; Wittemyer, George

    2013-01-01

    Habitat selection is a fundamental aspect of animal ecology, the understanding of which is critical to management and conservation. Global positioning system data from animals allow fine-scale assessments of habitat selection and typically are analyzed in a use-availability framework, whereby animal locations are contrasted with random locations (the availability sample). Although most use-availability methods are in fact spatial point process models, they often are fit using logistic regression. This framework offers numerous methodological challenges, for which the literature provides little guidance. Specifically, the size and spatial extent of the availability sample influences coefficient estimates potentially causing interpretational bias. We examined the influence of availability on statistical inference through simulations and analysis of serially correlated mule deer GPS data. Bias in estimates arose from incorrectly assessing and sampling the spatial extent of availability. Spatial autocorrelation in covariates, which is common for landscape characteristics, exacerbated the error in availability sampling leading to increased bias. These results have strong implications for habitat selection analyses using GPS data, which are increasingly prevalent in the literature. We recommend researchers assess the sensitivity of their results to their availability sample and, where bias is likely, take care with interpretations and use cross validation to assess robustness.

  3. Do Birds Select Habitat or Food Resources? Nearctic-Neotropic Migrants in Northeastern Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Jared D.; Johnson, Matthew D.; Ralph, C. John

    2014-01-01

    Nearctic-neotropic migrant birds need to replenish energy reserves during stopover periods to successfully complete their semiannual movements. In this study we used linear models to examine the habitat use of 11 migrant species in northeastern Costa Rica to better understand the influence of food and structural resources on the presence of birds during stopover periods. Our models indicated that frugivorous migrants primarily used food abundance, while insectivorous migrants chiefly used vegetation structure as cues for habitat use during stopover. In addition to habitat use models, we documented fruiting plant phenology and found a general relationship between migrant arrival and the timing of ripe fruit availability. Our results suggest that insectivorous migrants probably rely on structural features when using habitat because it may be inherently difficult to assess cryptic-arthropod availability during a short period of time in a novel habitat, such as stopover periods. PMID:24489701

  4. 40 CFR 60.2115 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, an electrostatic... filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, an electrostatic precipitator, or a... than a wet scrubber, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, fabric filter,...

  5. Available processing resources influence encoding-related brain activity before an event.

    PubMed

    Galli, Giulia; Gebert, A Dorothea; Otten, Leun J

    2013-09-01

    Effective cognitive functioning not only relies on brain activity elicited by an event, but also on activity that precedes it. This has been demonstrated in a number of cognitive domains, including memory. Here, we show that brain activity that precedes the effective encoding of a word into long-term memory depends on the availability of sufficient processing resources. We recorded electrical brain activity from the scalps of healthy adult men and women while they memorized intermixed visual and auditory words for later recall. Each word was preceded by a cue that indicated the modality of the upcoming word. The degree to which processing resources were available before word onset was manipulated by asking participants to make an easy or difficult perceptual discrimination on the cue. Brain activity before word onset predicted later recall of the word, but only in the easy discrimination condition. These findings indicate that anticipatory influences on long-term memory are limited in capacity and sensitive to the degree to which attention is divided between tasks. Prestimulus activity that affects later encoding can only be engaged when the necessary cognitive resources can be allocated to the encoding process. PMID:23219383

  6. Strain selection, biomass to biofuel conversion, and resource colocation have strong impacts on the economic performance of algae cultivation sites

    SciTech Connect

    Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard

    2014-09-16

    Decisions involving strain selection, biomass to biofuel technology, and the location of cultivation facilities can strongly influence the economic viability of an algae-based biofuel enterprise. In this contribution we summarize our past results in a new analysis to explore the relative economic impact of these design choices. We present strain-specific growth model results from two saline strains (Nannocloropsis salina, Arthrospira sp.), a fresh to brackish strain (Chlorella sp., DOE strain 1412), and a freshwater strain of the order Sphaeropleales. Biomass to biofuel conversion is compared between lipid extraction (LE) and hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) technologies. National-scale models of water, CO2 (as flue gas), land acquisition, site leveling, construction of connecting roads, and transport of HTL oil to existing refineries are used in conjunction with estimates of fuel value (from HTL) to prioritize and select from 88,692 unit farms (UF, 405 ha in pond area), a number sufficient to produce 136E+9 L yr-1 of renewable diesel (36 billion gallons yr-1, BGY). Strain selection and choice of conversion technology have large economic impacts, with differences between combinations of strains and biomass to biofuel technologies being up to $10 million dollars yr-1 UF-1. Results based on the most productive species, HTL-based fuel conversion, and resource costs show that the economic potential between geographic locations within the selection can differ by up to $4 million yr-1 UF-1, with 2.0 BGY of production possible from the most cost-effective sites. The local spatial variability in site rank is extreme, with very high and low rank sites within 10s of km of each other. Colocation with flue gas sources has a strong influence on site rank, but the most costly resource component varies from site to site. The highest rank sites are located predominantly in Florida and Texas, but most states south of 37°N latitude contain promising locations. Keywords: algae

  7. Structure-Activity Relationships for the Antifungal Activity of Selective Estrogen Receptor Antagonists Related to Tamoxifen

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Arielle; Martin, Jennifer A.; DiDone, Louis; Bradley, Erin K.; Mutz, Mitchell; Krysan, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is one of the most important invasive fungal infections and is a significant contributor to the mortality associated with HIV/AIDS. As part of our program to repurpose molecules related to the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) tamoxifen as anti-cryptococcal agents, we have explored the structure-activity relationships of a set of structurally diverse SERMs and tamoxifen derivatives. Our data provide the first insights into the structural requirements for the antifungal activity of this scaffold. Three key molecular characteristics affecting anti-cryptococcal activity emerged from our studies: 1) the presence of an alkylamino group tethered to one of the aromatic rings of the triphenylethylene core; 2) an appropriately sized aliphatic substituent at the 2 position of the ethylene moiety; and 3) electronegative substituents on the aromatic rings modestly improved activity. Using a cell-based assay of calmodulin antagonism, we found that the anti-cryptococcal activity of the scaffold correlates with calmodulin inhibition. Finally, we developed a homology model of C. neoformans calmodulin and used it to rationalize the structural basis for the activity of these molecules. Taken together, these data and models provide a basis for the further optimization of this promising anti-cryptococcal scaffold. PMID:26016941

  8. Multi-trophic resource selection function enlightens the behavioural game between wolves and their prey.

    PubMed

    Courbin, Nicolas; Fortin, Daniel; Dussault, Christian; Fargeot, Viviane; Courtois, Réhaume

    2013-09-01

    1. Habitat selection strategies translate into movement tactics, which reckon with the predator-prey spatial game. Strategic habitat selection analysis can therefore illuminate behavioural games. Cover types at potential encounter sites (i.e. intersections between movement paths of predator and prey) can be compared with cover types available (i) within the area of home-range-overlap (HRO) between predator and prey; and (ii) along the path (MP) of each species. Unlike the HRO scale, cover-type availability at MP scale differs between interacting species due to species-specific movement decisions. Scale differences in selection could therefore inform on divergences in fitness rewarding actions between predators and prey. 2. We used this framework to evaluate the spatial game between GPS-collared wolves (Canis lupus) versus caribou (Rangifer tarandus), and wolf versus moose (Alces alces). 3. Changes in cover-type availability between HRO and MP revealed differences in how each species fine-tuned its movements to habitat features. In contrast to caribou, wolves increased their encounter rate with regenerating cuts along their paths (MP) relative to the HRO level. As a consequence, wolves were less likely to cross caribou paths in areas with higher percentage of regenerating cuts than expected based on the availability along their paths, whereas caribou had a higher risk of intersecting wolf paths by crossing these areas, relative to random expectation along their paths. Unlike for caribou, availability of mixed and deciduous areas decreased from HRO to MP level for wolves and moose. Overall, wolves displayed stronger similarities in movement decisions with moose than with caribou, thereby revealing the focus of wolves on moose. 4. Our study reveals how differences in fine-scale movement tactics between species create asymmetric relative encounter probabilities between predators and prey, given their paths. Increase in relative risk of encounter for prey and decrease

  9. Classical-quantum arbitrarily varying wiretap channel: Ahlswede dichotomy, positivity, resources, super-activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boche, Holger; Cai, Minglai; Deppe, Christian; Nötzel, Janis

    2016-08-01

    We establish the Ahlswede dichotomy for arbitrarily varying classical-quantum wiretap channels, i.e., either the deterministic secrecy capacity of the channel is zero, or it equals its randomness-assisted secrecy capacity. We analyze the secrecy capacity of these channels when the sender and the receiver use various resources. It turns out that randomness, common randomness, and correlation as resources are very helpful for achieving a positive secrecy capacity. We prove the phenomenon "super-activation" for arbitrarily varying classical-quantum wiretap channels, i.e., two channels, both with zero deterministic secrecy capacity, if used together allow perfect secure transmission.

  10. Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bascietto, J.J.; Sharples, F.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1993-06-01

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at several sites owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120(a) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act also subjects DOE to liability under Section 107 of CERCLA for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. The Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process, by which natural resource injuries are determined and compensatory monetary damages are calculated, is not well known or understood by DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. Nevertheless, natural resource liabilities are potentially a significant source of additional monetary claims for CERCLA hazardous substance releases. This paper describes the requirements of NRDA and explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, in order to more quickly restore environmental services at the lowest total cost to the public. The first section of the paper explains the statutory and regulatory mandates for the NRDA process. The second section briefly describes the four phases of the NRDA process, while the third section examines the three steps in the assessment phase in considerable detail. Finally, the last section focuses on the integration of the CERCLA and NRDA processes.

  11. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Climate, Ambient Air Quality, and Noise (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Hamilton, C.B.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 withdrawing its Notice of Intent of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate and air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui, and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of hydrogen sulfide. the scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  12. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Climate, ambient air quality, and noise

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Reed, R.M.; Hamilton, C.B.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate add air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of sulfide. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  13. Dynamic resource allocation between pre- and postcopulatory episodes of sexual selection determines competitive fertilization success.

    PubMed

    Mehlis, Marion; Rick, Ingolf P; Bakker, Theo C M

    2015-10-22

    In polyandrous mating systems, male reproductive success depends on both mate-acquisition traits (precopulatory) and sperm competitive abilities (postcopulatory). Empirical data on the interaction between these traits are inconsistent; revealing positive, negative or no relationships. It is generally expected that the investment in pre- and postcopulatory traits is mediated by environmental conditions. To test how dietary resource availability affects sexual ornamentation, sperm quality and their interrelationship in three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), full-sibling groups were raised under three conditions differing in food quantity and/or quality (i.e. carotenoid content): (i) high-quantity/high-quality, (ii) high-quantity/low-quality or (iii) low-quantity/low-quality. After 1 year of feeding, food-restricted males developed a more intense breeding coloration and faster sperm compared with their well-fed brothers, indicating that they allocated relatively more in pre- and postcopulatory traits. Moreover, they outcompeted their well-fed, carotenoid-supplemented brothers in sperm competition trials with equal numbers of competing sperm, suggesting that food-restricted males maximize their present reproductive success. This may result in reduced future reproductive opportunities as food-restricted males suffered from a higher mortality, had an overall reduced body size, and sperm number available for fertilization. In accordance with theory, a trade-off between the investment in pre- and postcopulatory traits was observed in food-restricted males, whereas well-fed males were able to allocate to both traits resulting in a significantly positive relationship. PMID:26490787

  14. Losac, the First Hemolin that Exhibits Procogulant Activity through Selective Factor X Proteolytic Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Flores, Miryam Paola; Furlin, Daniel; Ramos, Oscar H. P.; Balan, Andrea; Konno, Katsuhiro; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana Marisa

    2011-01-01

    Envenoming by the contact of human skin with Lonomia obliqua caterpillars promotes a hemorrhagic syndrome characterized by a consumptive coagulopathy. Losac (Lonomia obliqua Stuart factor activator) is a component of the bristle of L. obliqua that is probably partially responsible for the observed syndrome because it activates factor X and is recognized by an effective antilonomic serum. Here we unveil the proteolytic activity of Losac and demonstrate the feasibility of its recombinant production. On the other hand, Losac has no homology to known proteases, but it can be inhibited by PMSF, a serine protease inhibitor. Instead, it shows closer homology to members of the hemolin family of proteins, a group of cell adhesion molecules. The recombinant protein (rLosac) shortened the coagulation time of normal and deficient plasmas, whereas it was ineffective in factor X-deficient plasma unless reconstituted with this protein. rLosac was able to activate factor X in a dose- and time-dependent manner but not γ-carboxyglutamic acid domainless factor X. Moreover, phospholipids and calcium ions increased rLosac activity. Also, rLosac had no effect on fibrin or fibrinogen, indicating its specificity for blood coagulation activation. Linear double reciprocal plots indicate that rLosac follows a Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Cleavage of factor X by rLosac resulted in fragments that are compatible with those generated by RVV-X (a well known factor X activator). Together, our results validate Losac as the first protein from the hemolin family exhibiting procoagulant activity through selective proteolysis on coagulation factor X. PMID:21177860

  15. The Relationship of Self-Esteem to Selected Personal and Environmental Resources of Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Alyce; Andre, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Examined self-esteem among 648 high school and college students. High masculinity scores and greater activity participation were significantly related to self-esteem for males and females in large and small schools. For males in small schools, athletic participation was significant predictor of self-esteem. For females in small schools,…

  16. Giving and taking: Representational building blocks of active resource-transfer events in human infants

    PubMed Central

    Tatone, Denis; Geraci, Alessandra; Csibra, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    Active resource transfer is a pervasive and distinctive feature of human sociality. We hypothesized that humans possess an action schema of giving specific for representing social interactions based on material exchange, and specified the set of necessary assumptions about giving events that this action schema should be equipped with. We tested this proposal by investigating how 12-month-old infants interpret abstract resource-transfer events. Across eight looking-time studies using a violation-of-expectation paradigm we found that infants were able to distinguish between kinematically identical giving and taking actions. Despite the surface similarity between these two actions, only giving was represented as an object-mediated social interaction. While we found no evidence that infants expected the target of a giving or taking action to reciprocate, the present results suggest that infants interpret giving as an inherently social action, which they can possibly use to map social relations via observing resource-transfer episodes. PMID:25614012

  17. Energy Expenditure of Selected Household Activities during Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Freedson, Patty S.; Roberts, Dawn E.; Schmidt, Michael D.; Fragala, Maren S.

    2007-01-01

    Accurately measuring pregnancy physical activity is critical to assess the percentage of pregnant women meeting the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) guidelines. In addition, valid assessment of pregnancy physical activity is important for epidemiologic studies assessing the relationship between physical activity and…

  18. Resource selection models are useful in predicting fine-scale distributions of black-footed ferrets in prairie dog colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eads, David A.; Jachowski, David S.; Biggins, Dean E.; Livieri, Travis M.; Matchett, Marc R.; Millspaugh, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    Wildlife-habitat relationships are often conceptualized as resource selection functions (RSFs)—models increasingly used to estimate species distributions and prioritize habitat conservation. We evaluated the predictive capabilities of 2 black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) RSFs developed on a 452-ha colony of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) in the Conata Basin, South Dakota. We used the RSFs to project the relative probability of occurrence of ferrets throughout an adjacent 227-ha colony. We evaluated performance of the RSFs using ferret space use data collected via postbreeding spotlight surveys June–October 2005–2006. In home ranges and core areas, ferrets selected the predicted "very high" and "high" occurrence categories of both RSFs. Count metrics also suggested selection of these categories; for each model in each year, approximately 81% of ferret locations occurred in areas of very high or high predicted occurrence. These results suggest usefulness of the RSFs in estimating the distribution of ferrets throughout a black-tailed prairie dog colony. The RSFs provide a fine-scale habitat assessment for ferrets that can be used to prioritize releases of ferrets and habitat restoration for prairie dogs and ferrets. A method to quickly inventory the distribution of prairie dog burrow openings would greatly facilitate application of the RSFs.

  19. A re-evaluation of a case-control model with contaminated controls for resource selection studies.

    PubMed

    Rota, Christopher T; Millspaugh, Joshua J; Kesler, Dylan C; Lehman, Chad P; Rumble, Mark A; Jachowski, Catherine M B

    2013-11-01

    1. A common sampling design in resource selection studies involves measuring resource attributes at sample units used by an animal and at sample units considered available for use. Few models can estimate the absolute probability of using a sample unit from such data, but such approaches are generally preferred over statistical methods that estimate a relative probability of use. 2. The case-control model that allows for contaminated controls, proposed by Lancaster & Imbens (1996) and Lele (2009), can estimate the absolute probability of using a sample unit from use-availability data. However, numerous misconceptions have likely prevented the widespread application of this model to resource selection studies. We address common misconceptions regarding the case-control model with contaminated controls and demonstrate its ability to estimate the absolute probability of use, prevalence and parameters associated with categorical covariates from use-availability data. 3. We fit the case-control model with contaminated controls to simulated data with varying prevalence (defined as the average probability of use across all sample units) and sample sizes (n1 = 500 used and na = 500 available samples; n1 = 1000 used and na = 1000 available samples). We then applied this model to estimate the probability Ozark hellbenders (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi) would use a location within a stream as a function of covariates. 4. The case-control model with contaminated controls provided unbiased estimates of all parameters at N = 2000 sample size simulation scenarios, particularly at low prevalence. However, this model produced increasingly variable maximum likelihood estimates of parameters as prevalence increased, particularly at N = 1000 sample size scenarios. We thus recommend at least 500-1000 used samples when fitting the case-control model with contaminated controls to use-availability data. Our application to hellbender data revealed selection for locations with

  20. Selective Activation of Neuronal Targets With Sinusoidal Electric Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Daniel K.; Eddington, Donald K.; Rizzo, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    Electric stimulation of the CNS is being evaluated as a treatment modality for a variety of neurological, psychiatric, and sensory disorders. Despite considerable success in some applications, existing stimulation techniques offer little control over which cell types or neuronal substructures are activated by stimulation. The ability to more precisely control neuronal activation would likely improve the clinical outcomes associated with these applications. Here, we show that specific frequencies of sinusoidal stimulation can be used to preferentially activate certain retinal cell types: photoreceptors are activated at 5 Hz, bipolar cells at 25 Hz, and ganglion cells at 100 Hz. In addition, low-frequency stimulation (≤25 Hz) did not activate passing axons but still elicited robust synaptically mediated responses in ganglion cells; therefore, elicited neural activity is confined to within a focal region around the stimulating electrode. Our results suggest that sinusoidal stimulation provides significantly improved control over elicited neural activity relative to conventional pulsatile stimulation. PMID:20810683

  1. In vitro phytotoxicity and antioxidant activity of selected flavonoids.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Laura; Mencherini, Teresa; Mancini, Emilia; Aquino, Rita Patrizia; De Almeida, Luiz Fernando Rolim; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The knowledge of flavonoids involved in plant-plant interactions and their mechanisms of action are poor and, moreover, the structural characteristics required for these biological activities are scarcely known. The objective of this work was to study the possible in vitro phytotoxic effects of 27 flavonoids on the germination and early radical growth of Raphanus sativus L. and Lepidium sativum L., with the aim to evaluate the possible structure/activity relationship. Moreover, the antioxidant activity of the same compounds was also evaluated. Generally, in response to various tested flavonoids, germination was only slightly affected, whereas significant differences were observed in the activity of the various tested flavonoids against radical elongation. DPPH test confirms the antioxidant activity of luteolin, quercetin, catechol, morin, and catechin. The biological activity recorded is discussed in relation to the structure of compounds and their capability to interact with cell structures and physiology. No correlation was found between phytotoxic and antioxidant activities. PMID:22754304

  2. Understanding How Resources and Capabilities Affect Performance: Actively Applying the Resource-Based View in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Norman T.

    2006-01-01

    The resource-based view is a strategic framework for understanding why some firms outperform others. Its importance is reflected in its wide inclusion in strategy texts as a tool for assessing a firm's internal strengths and weaknesses. This article outlines an experiential exercise that demonstrates how different bundles of resources and…

  3. The availability of attentional resources modulates the inhibitory strength related to weakly activated priming.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongchun; Wang, Yonghui; Liu, Peng; Dai, Dongyang; Di, Meilin; Chen, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    The current study investigated the role of attention in inhibitory processes (the inhibitory processes described in the current study refer only to those associated with masked or flanked priming) using a mixed paradigm involving the negative compatibility effect (NCE) and object-based attention. Accumulating evidence suggests that attention can be spread more easily within the same object, which increases the availability of attentional resources, than across different objects. Accordingly, we manipulated distractor location (with primes presented in the same object versus presented in different objects) together with prime/target compatibility (compatible versus incompatible) and prime-distractor stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA, 23 ms vs 70 ms). The aim was to investigate whether inhibitory processes related to weakly activated priming, which have been previously assumed to be automatic, depend on the availability of attentional resources. The results of Experiment 1 showed a significant NCE for the 70-ms SOA when the prime and distractor were presented in the same object (greater attentional resource availability); however, reversed NCEs were obtained for all other conditions. Experiment 2 was designed to disentangle whether the results of Experiment 1 were affected by the prime position, and the results indicated that the prime position did not modulate the NCE in Experiment 1. Together, these results are consistent with the claim that the availability of attentional resources modulates the inhibitory strength related to weakly activated priming. Specifically, if attentional resources are assigned to the distractor when it is presented in the same object as the prime, the strength of the inhibition elicited by the distractor may increase and reverse the activation elicited by the prime, which could lead to a significant NCE. PMID:27198916

  4. Michigan resource inventories: Characteristics and costs of selected projects using high altitude color infrared imagery. Remote Sensing Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enslin, W. R.; Hill-Rowley, R.

    1976-01-01

    The procedures and costs associated with mapping land cover/use and forest resources from high altitude color infrared (CIR) imagery are documented through an evaluation of several inventory efforts. CIR photos (1:36,000) were used to classify the forests of Mason County, Michigan into six species groups, three stocking levels, and three maturity classes at a cost of $4.58/sq. km. The forest data allow the pinpointing of marketable concentrations of selected timber types, and facilitate the establishment of new forest management cooperatives. Land cover/use maps and area tabulations were prepared from small scale CIR photography at a cost of $4.28/sq. km. and $3.03/sq. km. to support regional planning programs of two Michigan agencies. procedures were also developed to facilitate analysis of this data with other natural resource information. Eleven thematic maps were generated from Windsor Township, Michigan at a cost of $1,500 by integrating grid-geocoded land cover/use, soils, topographic, and well log data using an analytical computer program.

  5. Selected Energy Education Activities for Pennsylvania Middle School Grades. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hack, Nancy; And Others

    These activities are intended to help increase awareness and understanding of the energy situation and to encourage students to become energy conservationists. The document is divided into sections according to discipline area. A final section is devoted to interdisciplinary activities involving several discipline areas integrated with the energy…

  6. High School Girls' Perceptions of Selected Fitness Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Carol; Bretzing, Robyn

    2011-01-01

    High school students, and particularly girls, are not very active (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006). To help girls develop the abilities to enjoy lifetime, healthy physical activity, physical educators need to provide curricula that will achieve this goal. In the process, they need to make sure they are aligned with the current…

  7. Highly porous activated carbons from resource-recovered Leucaena leucocephala wood as capacitive deionization electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chia-Hung; Liu, Nei-Ling; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    Highly porous activated carbons were resource-recovered from Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. wood through combined chemical and physical activation (i.e., KOH etching followed by CO2 activation). This invasive species, which has severely damaged the ecological economics of Taiwan, was used as the precursor for producing high-quality carbonaceous electrodes for capacitive deionization (CDI). Carbonization and activation conditions strongly influenced the structure of chars and activated carbons. The total surface area and pore volume of activated carbons increased with increasing KOH/char ratio and activation time. Overgasification induced a substantial amount of mesopores in the activated carbons. In addition, the electrochemical properties and CDI electrosorptive performance of the activated carbons were evaluated; cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements revealed a typical capacitive behavior and electrical double layer formation, confirming ion electrosorption in the porous structure. The activated-carbon electrode, which possessed high surface area and both mesopores and micropores, exhibited improved capacitor characteristics and high electrosorptive performance. Highly porous activated carbons derived from waste L. leucocephala were demonstrated to be suitable CDI electrode materials. PMID:26135977

  8. Implications of climatic seasonality on activity patterns and resource use by sympatric peccaries in northern Pantanal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Gabriel Selbach; Coelho, Igor Pfeifer; Bastazini, Vinicius Augusto Galvão; Cordeiro, José Luís Passos; de Oliveira, Luiz Flamarion Barbosa

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the effects of climate seasonality from a thermal and water availability perspective on the activity patterns and resource use of Pecari tajacu and Tayassu pecari during wet and dry seasons in the northeastern Brazilian Pantanal. We used camera traps and temperature sensors to record species activity patterns in relation to temperature, established five habitat categories based on flooding intensity and local vegetation characteristics, assessed the activity patterns of each species in dry and wet periods and in artificial water bodies using circular statistical metrics, and calculated niche amplitude and overlap on three axes (temperature, time, and habitat) in both periods. Peccaries shared a strong resemblance in resource use and in their responses to seasonal variations in the tested gradients. The activity patterns of both species exhibited a significant correlation with air temperature on all the evaluated measures, and both species strongly reduced their activity when the air temperature exceeded 35 °C. High temperatures associated with low water availability were most likely responsible for the changes in species activity patterns, which resulted in an increased temporal overlap in habitat use throughout the dry season. However, the peccaries avoided intensively flooded habitats; therefore, the habitat gradient overlap was greater during the wet period. Our results show that an increase in niche overlap on the environmental gradient as a result of climatic seasonality may be partially compensated by a reduction in other niche dimensions. In this case, temporal partitioning appears to be an important, viable mechanism to reduce competition by potentially competing species.

  9. Summary. [California activities in remote sensing and management of water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    University of California activities in the development of remote sensing techniques and their application in the study of water resources within the state are summarized. It is pointed out that the summary is very lengthy due to fact that NASA had requested a dramatic reorientation of the study. For this reason it was felt that the co-investigators and other participants, need a rather detailed and systematic tabulation of the relevant facts that have been uncovered during the period since the reorientation.

  10. Mediator protein mutations that selectively abolish activated transcription.

    PubMed

    Myers, L C; Gustafsson, C M; Hayashibara, K C; Brown, P O; Kornberg, R D

    1999-01-01

    Deletion of any one of three subunits of the yeast Mediator of transcriptional regulation, Med2, Pgd1 (Hrs1), and Sin4, abolished activation by Gal4-VP16 in vitro. By contrast, other Mediator functions, stimulation of basal transcription and of TFIIH kinase activity, were unaffected. A different but overlapping Mediator subunit dependence was found for activation by Gcn4. The genetic requirements for activation in vivo were closely coincident with those in vitro. A whole genome expression profile of a Deltamed2 strain showed diminished transcription of a subset of inducible genes but only minor effects on "basal" transcription. These findings make an important connection between transcriptional activation in vitro and in vivo, and identify Mediator as a "global" transcriptional coactivator. PMID:9874773

  11. How targets select activation or repression in response to Wnt.

    PubMed

    Murgan, Sabrina; Bertrand, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    In metazoans, the Wnt signaling pathway plays a key role in the regulation of binary decisions during development. During this process different sets of target genes are activated in cells where the Wnt pathway is active (classic target genes) versus cells where the pathway is inactive (opposite target genes). While the mechanism of transcriptional activation is well understood for classic target genes, how opposite target genes are activated in the absence of Wnt remains poorly characterized. Here we discuss how the key transcriptional mediator of the Wnt pathway, the TCF family member POP-1, regulates opposite target genes during C. elegans development. We examine recent findings suggesting that the direction of the transcriptional output (activation or repression) can be determined by the way TCF is recruited and physically interacts with its target gene. PMID:27123368

  12. Activity of selected hydrolytic enzymes in Allium sativum L. anthers.

    PubMed

    Winiarczyk, Krystyna; Gębura, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine enzymatic activity in sterile Allium sativum anthers in the final stages of male gametophyte development (the stages of tetrads and free microspores). The analysed enzymes were shown to occur in the form of numerous isoforms. In the tetrad stage, esterase activity was predominant, which was manifested by the greater number of isoforms of the enzyme. In turn, in the microspore stage, higher numbers of isoforms of acid phosphatases and proteases were detected. The development of sterile pollen grains in garlic is associated with a high level of protease and acid phosphatase activity and lower level of esterase activities in the anther locule. Probably this is the first description of the enzymes activity (ACPH, EST, PRO) in the consecutives stages of cell wall formation which is considered to be one of the causes of male sterility in flowering plant. PMID:26901781

  13. Elevated temperature creep properties for selected active metal braze alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    Active metal braze alloys reduce the number of processes required for the joining of metal to ceramic components by eliminating the need for metallization and/or Ni plating of the ceramic surfaces. Titanium (Ti), V, and Zr are examples of active element additions which have been used successfully in such braze alloys. Since the braze alloy is expected to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch strains between the metal and ceramic materials, a knowledge of its elevated temperature mechanical properties is important. In particular, the issue of whether or not the creep strength of an active metal braze alloy is increased or decreased relative to its non-activated counterpart is important when designing new brazing processes and alloy systems. This paper presents a survey of high temperature mechanical properties for two pairs of conventional braze alloys and their active metal counterparts: (a) the conventional 72Ag-28Cu (Cusil) alloy, and the active braze alloy 62.2Ag- 36.2Cu-1.6Ti (Cusil ABA), and (b) the 82Au-18Ni (Nioro) alloy and the active braze alloy Mu-15.5M-0.75Mo-1.75V (Nioro ABA). For the case of the Cusil/Cusil ABA pair, the active metal addition contributes to solid solution strengthening of the braze alloy, resulting in a higher creep strength as compared to the non-active alloy. In the case of the Nioro/Nioro ABA pair, the Mo and V additions cause the active braze alloy to have a two-phase microstructure, which results in a reduced creep strength than the conventional braze alloy. The Garofalo sinh equation has been used to quantitatively describe the stress and temperature dependence of the deformation behavior. It will be observed that the effective stress exponent in the Garofalo sinh equation is a function of the instantaneous value of the stress argument.

  14. Survey of stranded gas and delivered costs to Europe of selected gas resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Two important trends affecting the expected growth of global gas markets are (1) the shift by many industrialized countries from coal-fired electricity generation to the use of natural gas to generate electricity and (2) the industrialization of the heavily populated Asian countries of India and China. This paper surveys discovered gas in stranded conventional gas accumulations and presents estimates of the cost of developing and producing stranded gas in selected countries. Stranded gas is natural gas in discovered or identified fields that is not currently commercially producible for either physical or economic reasons. Published reserves of gas at the global level do not distinguish between volumes of gas in producing fields and volumes in nonproducing fields. Data on stranded gas reported here-that is the volumes, geographical distribution, and size distributions of stranded gas fields at the country and regional level-are based on the examination of individual-field data and represent a significant improvement in information available to industry and government decision makers. Globally, stranded gas is pervasive, but large volumes in large accumulations are concentrated in only a few areas. The cost component of the paper focuses on stranded conventional gas accumulations in Africa and South America that have the potential to augment supplies to Europe. The methods described for the computation of extraction and transport costs are innovative in that they use information on the sizes and geographical distribution of the identified stranded gas fields. The costs are based on industry data specific to the country and geologic basin where the stranded gas is located. Gas supplies to Europe can be increased significantly at competitive costs by the development of stranded gas. Net extraction costs of producing the identified gas depend critically on the natural-gas-liquids (NGLs) content, the prevailing prices of liquids, the size of the gas accumulation, and the

  15. [Biological activities of natural resources around us are now in the limelight].

    PubMed

    Takaya, Y

    2000-11-01

    There are various kind of natural resources around us, and they must contain a lot of unknown bioactive substances. Some may be structurally very strange for us, and some are very familiar. But their biological activity was not unfortunately investigated in detail. Accordingly, exploring new types of pharmaceutical resources may give lead compounds of the drugs in the future. Among those natural resources, I examined squid ink and scallop soup. From squid ink, an antitumor glycoconjugate was obtained. Its polysaccharide moieties, illexin A, illexin B and illexin C, were isolated, and the spectral data and chemical transformation of their acid hydrolysate revealed to bear a unique branched repeating unit, [-3GlcA beta 1-4(GalNAc alpha 1-3)Fuc alpha 1-]n. Moreover, scallop soup gave antitumor glycogen by the action of protease. The fine structure of glycogen was investigated by the sequential enzyme digestion method using beta-amylase and pullulanase, while the unit chain was analyzed by high performance anion exchange chromatography. The results showed that the antitumor active glycogen was highly branched with shorter chain than glycogens without antitumor activity. PMID:11190195

  16. Antitumor activity of levan polysaccharides from selected microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang-Ho; Yoon, Eun Ju; Cha, Jaeho; Lee, Hyeon Gyu

    2004-04-01

    Levans were isolated from the cultures of Gluconoacetobacter xylinus (G-levan; Mw = 40,000), Microbacterium laevaniformans (M; Mw = 710,000), Rahnella aquatilis (R; Mw = 380,000), and Zymomonas mobilis (Z; Mw = 570,000). The levans were composed mainly of fructose residues when analyzed by TLC and HPLC, and their main backbones were beta-(2,6)-linkages with beta-(2,1)-branches by GC-MS and NMR. In the in vitro antitumor activity test of the levans against eight different tumor cell lines, relatively stronger activity was observed from the SNU-1 and HepG2. The M- (52.54-62.05%) and R-levan (52.15-58.58%) showed the significantly high activity against SNU-1, while M-levan showed the highest (49.93-61.82%) activity against HepG2. During the in vivo analysis of inhibitory activity of the levans against Sarcoma-180 growth, M-, R- and Z-levans showed strong antitumor activity (average 66%) but G-levan (42%) had significantly lower activity. PMID:15178007

  17. The unfolded protein response selectively targets active smoothened mutants.

    PubMed

    Marada, Suresh; Stewart, Daniel P; Bodeen, William J; Han, Young-Goo; Ogden, Stacey K

    2013-06-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway, an essential regulator of developmental patterning, has been implicated in playing causative and survival roles in a range of human cancers. The signal-transducing component of the pathway, Smoothened, has revealed itself to be an efficacious therapeutic target in combating oncogenic signaling. However, therapeutic challenges remain in cases where tumors acquire resistance to Smoothened antagonists, and also in cases where signaling is driven by active Smoothened mutants that exhibit reduced sensitivity to these compounds. We previously demonstrated that active Smoothened mutants are subjected to prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention, likely due to their mutations triggering conformation shifts that are detected by ER quality control. We attempted to exploit this biology and demonstrate that deregulated Hedgehog signaling driven by active Smoothened mutants is specifically attenuated by ER stressors that induce the unfolded protein response (UPR). Upon UPR induction, active Smoothened mutants are targeted by ER-associated degradation, resulting in attenuation of inappropriate pathway activity. Accordingly, we found that the UPR agonist thapsigargin attenuated mutant Smoothened-induced phenotypes in vivo in Drosophila melanogaster. Wild-type Smoothened and physiological Hedgehog patterning were not affected, suggesting that UPR modulation may provide a novel therapeutic window to be evaluated for targeting active Smoothened mutants in disease. PMID:23572559

  18. NASA Propulsion Sub-System Concept Studies and Risk Reduction Activities for Resource Prospector Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's exploration roadmap is focused on developing technologies and performing precursor missions to advance the state of the art for eventual human missions to Mars. One of the key components of this roadmap is various robotic missions to Near-Earth Objects, the Moon, and Mars to fill in some of the strategic knowledge gaps. The Resource Prospector (RP) project is one of these robotic precursor activities in the roadmap. RP is a multi-center and multi-institution project to investigate the polar regions of the Moon in search of volatiles. The mission is rated Class D and is approximately 10 days, assuming a five day direct Earth to Moon transfer. Because of the mission cost constraint, a trade study of the propulsion concepts was conducted with a focus on available low-cost hardware for reducing cost in development, while technical risk, system mass, and technology advancement requirements were also taken into consideration. The propulsion system for the lander is composed of a braking stage providing a high thrust to match the lander's velocity with the lunar surface and a lander stage performing the final lunar descent. For the braking stage, liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid methane (LCH4) propulsion systems, derived from the Morpheus experimental lander, and storable bi-propellant systems, including the 4th stage Peacekeeper (PK) propulsion components and Space Shuttle orbital maneuvering engine (OME), and a solid motor were considered for the study. For the lander stage, the trade study included miniaturized Divert Attitude Control System (DACS) thrusters (Missile Defense Agency (MDA) heritage), their enhanced thruster versions, ISE-100 and ISE-5, and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware. The lowest cost configuration of using the solid motor and the PK components while meeting the requirements was selected. The reference concept of the lander is shown in Figure 1. In the current reference configuration, the solid stage is the primary provider of delta

  19. Physical Activity Resources and Changes in Walking in a Cohort of Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Perdue, Leslie A.; Orwoll, Eric S.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Marshall, Lynn M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the influence of physical activity resources and neighborhood-level socioeconomic status (SES) on walking among community-dwelling older men. Methods. Participants reported time walked per day at baseline (2000–2002) and follow-up. Residential addresses were linked to a geographic information system database to assess proximity to parks, trails, and recreational facilities. Log-binomial regression analyses were conducted to test the hypothesis that men living near physical activity resources were more likely to increase or maintain time walked. Results. Average time walked per day declined by 6 minutes between baseline and follow-up (P < .05). There was a significant interaction of neighborhood SES and physical activity with walking time (P < .1). Proximity to parks and proximity to trails, respectively, were associated with a 22% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01, 1.47) and 34% (95% CI = 1.16, 1.55) higher likelihood of maintaining or increasing walking time in high-SES neighborhoods, but there was no association in low-SES neighborhoods. Proximity to recreational facilities was not associated with walking. Conclusions. Uncovering reasons that proximity to parks and trails is not associated with maintenance of walking activity among men in low-SES neighborhoods could provide new insight into ways to promote physical activity. PMID:20167887

  20. Comparative analysis on the distribution of protease activities among fruits and vegetable resources.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Qiao-Juan; Jiang, Zheng-Qiang

    2016-12-15

    In this study, a comparative analysis on the distribution of protease activities among 90 plant resources, including fruits and vegetables, has been performed. Protease activities of plant extracts were assayed at different pH values (pH 3.0, pH 7.5 and pH 10.5) using casein as a substrate. Ten fruits and thirteen vegetables show protease activities above 10U/g. Pineapple, fig and papaya, which are used for commercial protease production, exhibited high protease activities. Additionally, high protease activities were detected in kiwifruit (28.8U/g), broccoli (16.9U/g), ginger (16.6U/g), leek (32.7U/g) and red pepper (15.8U/g) at different pH values. SDS-PAGE and zymograms confirmed that various types of proteases existed in the five plant extracts and might be explored. Furthermore, five plant extracts were treated by different protease inhibitors. These results show that there are still many plant resources unexplored, which may be promising candidates for plant-derived protease production. PMID:27451238

  1. The Carbohydrate-Active EnZymes database (CAZy): an expert resource for Glycogenomics.

    PubMed

    Cantarel, Brandi L; Coutinho, Pedro M; Rancurel, Corinne; Bernard, Thomas; Lombard, Vincent; Henrissat, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    The Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme (CAZy) database is a knowledge-based resource specialized in the enzymes that build and breakdown complex carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. As of September 2008, the database describes the present knowledge on 113 glycoside hydrolase, 91 glycosyltransferase, 19 polysaccharide lyase, 15 carbohydrate esterase and 52 carbohydrate-binding module families. These families are created based on experimentally characterized proteins and are populated by sequences from public databases with significant similarity. Protein biochemical information is continuously curated based on the available literature and structural information. Over 6400 proteins have assigned EC numbers and 700 proteins have a PDB structure. The classification (i) reflects the structural features of these enzymes better than their sole substrate specificity, (ii) helps to reveal the evolutionary relationships between these enzymes and (iii) provides a convenient framework to understand mechanistic properties. This resource has been available for over 10 years to the scientific community, contributing to information dissemination and providing a transversal nomenclature to glycobiologists. More recently, this resource has been used to improve the quality of functional predictions of a number genome projects by providing expert annotation. The CAZy resource resides at URL: http://www.cazy.org/. PMID:18838391

  2. The legal regime for moon resource utilization and comparable solutions adopted for deep seabed activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viikari, L. E.

    2003-06-01

    The Moon and the deep seabed (including their natural resources) are the only environs in international law explicitly proclaimed as the common heritage of mankind. This would seem to necessitate a specific approach to the utilization of their natural resources, too, but this must be one that takes into account the fact that both domains are increasingly affected by commercialization and privatization. The premise of this paper is that a productive analogy can be drawn between the regulation of activities in these two areas, one that benefits space law in particular. The only directly relevant space treaty in this regard, the so-called Moon Treaty of 1979, was drafted in a quite different world; moreover, only 10 countries have ratified the Treaty, and none of these can be considered a major space faring nation. The law of the sea has been far more successful in solving such problems in its area than space law has in its own. Particularly noteworthy are the innovative amendments to the 1982 UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, which were able to accommodate the concerns of the industrialized states and could thus yield guidelines for the future development of the law of outer space where natural resource utilization is concerned. While utilization of the resources of celestial bodies of course mostly still lies ahead, the increasing pace in the development of human space activities suggests that now would be an ideal time to make legal rules governing the activities, which may be a reality sooner than we can ever expect.

  3. Do Neighborhood Physical Activity Resources and Land Use Influence Physical Activity among African American Public Housing Residents?

    PubMed

    Parker, Nathan H; O'Connor, Daniel P; Kao, Dennis T; Lee, Rebecca E

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have examined neighborhood influences on physical activity (PA) among low-income African Americans living in public housing. This study measured the associations of PA resources and land use with PA among 216 African Americans living in 12 low-income housing developments in Houston, Texas. Neighborhood measures included both detailed information from in-person audits and geographic information systems (GIS) data. Hierarchical linear regression models tested the associations of neighborhood PA resource availability and quality and land use density and diversity with individual-level, self-reported PA. Land use diversity was positively associated with walking among men after controlling for other neighborhood characteristics. Policies that promote land use diversity or improve the pedestrian environment in areas with diverse destinations may encourage PA among public housing residents. PMID:27524771

  4. Sustainable Resource Development in the Third World. Selected Papers from an International Symposium (Columbus, Ohio, September 1985). Westview Special Studies in Natural Resources and Energy Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southgate, Douglas D., Ed.; Disinger, John F., Ed.

    Over time, scientists, technologists, and resource managers in affluent countries have devised and institutionalized methodologies for exploiting and managing natural resources in their own environments with considerable success. In doing so, they have provided models, at least of development and affluence, that the less developed countries seek…

  5. Enzymatically active high-flux selectively gas-permeable membranes

    DOEpatents

    Jiang, Ying-Bing; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Rempe, Susan; FU, Yaqin; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2016-01-26

    An ultra-thin, catalyzed liquid transport medium-based membrane structure fabricated with a porous supporting substrate may be used for separating an object species such as a carbon dioxide object species. Carbon dioxide flux through this membrane structures may be several orders of magnitude higher than traditional polymer membranes with a high selectivity to carbon dioxide. Other gases such as molecular oxygen, molecular hydrogen, and other species including non-gaseous species, for example ionic materials, may be separated using variations to the membrane discussed.

  6. A Survey of Educational Activities and Resources Relevant to Mars and Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Heidi L. K.; Bleacher, L.

    2009-09-01

    Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) is a suite of instruments that will be onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, which was recently named Curiosity in a student-naming contest. SAM's three instruments are devoted to studying the chemical composition of the Martian surface and atmosphere and to understanding the planet's past habitability and potential habitability today. Curiosity is scheduled to launch in 2011, however many Education and Public Outreach (EPO) activities supported by the MSL mission are well underway. The SAM EPO plan includes elements of both formal and informal education in addition to outreach, such as incorporating data into the Mars Exploration Student Data Teams program, developing a museum exhibit and associated educational materials about SAM's research, and writing articles about the MSL mission and SAM's findings for ChemMatters magazine. One of the EPO projects currently being carried out by members of the SAM team is training secondary education teachers in Mars geology, astrobiology, and SAM science goals via professional development workshops. Several of the recent Mars missions have had extensive EPO components to them. As a result, numerous educational activities and resources have already been developed relating to understanding Mars and astrobiology. We have conducted a survey of these activities and resources previously created and have compiled those relevant and useful for our SAM teacher training workshops. Resources and activities have been modified as needed. In addition, we have identified areas in which no educational activities exist and are developing new curriculum specifically to address these gaps. This work is funded by the MN Space Grant Consortium and NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  7. Binuclear Rhodium(II) Complexes With Selective Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Bień, M; Lachowicz, T M; Rybka, A; Pruchnik, F P; Trynda, L

    1997-01-01

    Binuclear rhodium(II) complexes [Rh(2)Cl(2)(mu-OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)] {R = H, Me; N-N = 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen)} and [Rh(2)(mu-OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](RCOO)(2) (R = Me, Et;) have been synthesized and their structure and properties have been studied by electronic, IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Antibacterial activity of these complexes against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus has been investigated. The most active antibacterial agents against E. coli were [Rh(2)Cl(2)(mu-OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)] and [Rh(2)(mu-OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](RCOO)(2) {R = H and Me} which were considerably more active than the appropriate nitrogen ligands. The complexes show low activity against S. aureus. The activity of the complexes [Rh(2)(OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](OOCR)(2) against E. coli decreases in the series: R=H congruent withCH(3)>C(2)H(5)>C(3)H(7) congruent withC(4)H(9). The reverse order was found in the case of S. aureus. PMID:18475773

  8. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  9. Atmospheric Aerosols: Cloud Condensation Nucleus Activity of Selected Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenorn, T.; Henning, S.; Hartz, K. H.; Kiss, G.; Pandis, S.; Bilde, M.

    2005-12-01

    Gas/particle partitioning of vapors in the atmosphere plays a major role in both climate through micro meteorology and in the physical and chemical processes of a single particle. This work has focused on the cloud droplet activation of a number of pure and mixed compounds. The means used to investigate these processes have been the University of Copenhagen cloud condensation nucleus counter setup and the Carnegie Mellon University CCNC setup. The importance of correct water activity modeling has been addressed and it has been pointed out that the molecular mass is an important parameter to consider when choosing model compounds for cloud activation models. It was shown that both traditional Kohler theory and Kohler theory modified to account for limited solubility reproduce measurements of soluble compounds well. For less soluble compounds it is necessary to use Kohler theory modified to account for limited solubility. It was also shown that this works for mixtures of compounds containing both inorganic salts and dicarboxylic acids. It has also been shown that particle phase and humidity history is important for activation behavior of particles consisting of two slightly soluble organic substances (succinic and adipic acid) and a soluble salt (NaCl). Model parameters for terpene oxidation product cloud activation have been derived. These are based on two sets of average parameters covering monoterpene oxidation products and sesquiterpene oxidation products. All parameters except the solubility were estimated and an effective solubility was calculated as the fitting parameter. The average solubility of the model compound found for mono terpene oxidation products is similar to those of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate; however the higher molecular weight leads to a slightly higher activation diameter at fixed supersaturation. On a molar basis the monoterpene oxidation products show a 1.5 times higher effective solubility than the sesquiterpene oxidation products.

  10. Importance of surface carbide formation on the activity and selectivity of Pd surfaces in the selective hydrogenation of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Burch, Robbie; Hardacre, Christopher; Hu, P.; Hughes, Philip

    2016-04-01

    A recent experimental investigation (Kim et al. J. Catal. 306 (2013) 146-154) on the selective hydrogenation of acetylene over Pd nanoparticles with different shapes concluded that Pd(100) showed higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) for acetylene hydrogenation. However, our recent density functional calculations (Yang et al. J. Catal. 305 (2013) 264-276) observed that the clean Pd(111) surface should result in higher activity and ethylene selectivity compared with the clean Pd(100) surface for acetylene hydrogenation. In the current work, using density functional theory calculations, we find that Pd(100) in the carbide form gives rise to higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) carbide. These results indicate that the catalyst surface is most likely in the carbide form under the experimental reaction conditions. Furthermore, the adsorption energies of hydrogen atoms as a function of the hydrogen coverage at the surface and subsurface sites over Pd(100) are compared with those over Pd(111), and it is found that the adsorption of hydrogen atoms is always less favoured on Pd(100) over the whole coverage range. This suggests that the Pd(100) hydride surface will be less stable than the Pd(111) hydride surface, which is also in accordance with the experimental results reported.

  11. Selective Activation of Transcription by a Novel CCAAT Binding Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Sankar N.; Golumbek, Paul T.; Karsenty, Gerard; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    1988-07-01

    A novel CCAAT binding factor (CBF) composed of two different subunits has been extensively purified from rat liver. Both subunits are needed for specific binding to DNA. Addition of this purified protein to nuclear extracts of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts stimulates transcription from several promoters including the α 2(I) collagen, the α 1(I) collagen, the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat (RSV-LTR), and the adenovirus major late promoter. Point mutations in the CCAAT motif that show either no binding or a decreased binding of CBF likewise abolish or reduce activation of transcription by CBF. Activation of transcription requires, therefore, the specific binding of CBF to its recognition sites.

  12. Antioxidant activities of selective gluten free ancient grains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ancient grains were known for special nutritional values along with gluten free qualities. Amaranth, quinoa, teff, buckwheat flours were evaluated for pasting properties, water holding capacity, phenolic contents, and antioxidant activities (free and bound). They all had higher water holding capacit...

  13. ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS: SELECTED TECHNICAL PAPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the tremendous interest in the organic constituent removal by activated carbon, the two industrial categories displaying the most interest are the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries. EPA's Office of Research and Development has co-sponsored two technical s...

  14. Analysis of Selection Activities to Supplement Approval Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loup, Jean L.; Snoke, Helen Lloyd

    1991-01-01

    Describes two surveys of libraries by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) that were conducted to compare approval plans and to determine alternative acquisitions methods for materials in philosophy and political science. Time spent by selectors is examined, collection evaluation activities are described, and implications for resource…

  15. Thrombomodulin Binding Selects the Catalytically Active Form of Thrombin.

    PubMed

    Handley, Lindsey D; Treuheit, Nicholas A; Venkatesh, Varun J; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-01

    Human α-thrombin is a serine protease with dual functions. Thrombin acts as a procoagulant, cleaving fibrinogen to make the fibrin clot, but when bound to thrombomodulin (TM), it acts as an anticoagulant, cleaving protein C. A minimal TM fragment consisting of the fourth, fifth, and most of the sixth EGF-like domain (TM456m) that has been prepared has much improved solubility, thrombin binding capacity, and anticoagulant activity versus those of previous TM456 constructs. In this work, we compare backbone amide exchange of human α-thrombin in three states: apo, D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethylketone (PPACK)-bound, and TM456m-bound. Beyond causing a decreased level of amide exchange at their binding sites, TM and PPACK both cause a decreased level of amide exchange in other regions including the γ-loop and the adjacent N-terminus of the heavy chain. The decreased level of amide exchange in the N-terminus of the heavy chain is consistent with the historic model of activation of serine proteases, which involves insertion of this region into the β-barrel promoting the correct conformation of the catalytic residues. Contrary to crystal structures of thrombin, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results suggest that the conformation of apo-thrombin does not yet have the N-terminus of the heavy chain properly inserted for optimal catalytic activity, and that binding of TM allosterically promotes the catalytically active conformation. PMID:26468766

  16. Effects of selected surfactants on soil microbial activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactants (surface-active agents) facilitate and accentuate the emulsifying, dispersing, spreading, and wetting properties of liquids. Surfactants are used in industry to reduce the surface tension of liquid and to solubilize compounds. For agricultural pest management, surfactants are an import...

  17. Comparison of the Electromyographic Activation Level and Unilateral Selectivity of Erector Spinae during Different Selected Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Lan-Yuen; Wang, Yu-Lin; Huang, Yu-Han; Yang, Chich-Haung; Hou, Yi-You; Harn, Hans I-Chen; You, Yu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    For patients with scoliosis, core stabilization exercises may be beneficial in improving muscle strength and trunk dynamic control. However, few studies have examined whether the erector spinae (ES) activation status during unilateral spinal extensor strengthening meets the guideline for patients with spinal scoliosis. To determine ES activation…

  18. A Preliminary Study of the Microbial Resources and Their Biological Activities of the East China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoling; Liu, Xiaoyu; Long, Cong; Wang, Guoxiang; Gao, Yun; Liu, Junhua; Jiao, Binghua

    2011-01-01

    East China Sea is one of the four sea areas in China, which possesses peculiar ecological environment and many kinds of living creatures, especially the microorganisms. We established the East China Sea microorganism library (during 2006–2010) for the first time, which stored about 30000 strains that covered most kinds of the species. In this paper, 395 pure strains of East China Sea microorganism library which belong to 33 different genera were mainly introduced. Sulfitobacter, Halomonas, Bacillus, Pseudoalteromonas, and Idiomarina were the most dominant species. On the large-scale biological activity screening of the 395 strains, 100 strains possess different biological activities based on different screening models, of which 11.4% strains have antibacterial activities, 15.9% have cytotoxicity activities, and 6.1% have antioxidation activities. Besides, the secondary metabolites of 6 strains with strong biological activities were studied systematically; diketopiperazines and macrocyclic lactones are the active secondary metabolites. The species and the biological activity of microorganisms diversity, the abundant structure type of the secondary metabolites, and their bioactivities all indicate that East China Sea is a potent marine microorganisms-derived developing resource for drug discovery. PMID:21789045

  19. Selective activation of functional suppressor cells by human seminal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Witkin, S S

    1986-01-01

    The ability of seminal fluid (SF) to induce suppressor cell activity from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMN) was examined. PBMN were incubated with SF for 48 h, washed to remove SF components, treated with mitomycin C (mit C) and co-cultured with Raji cells, a lymphoblastoid cell line. Raji cell proliferation was inhibited by SF-treated PBMN proportionally to SF concentration. SF (50-200 micrograms), mit C-treated Raji cells or mit C-treated PBMN pre-incubated with phytohaemagglutinin were without effect on Raji cell growth. Suppressor T lymphocytes generated by incubation of PBMN with concanavalin A inhibited Raji cells to the same extent as did SF-treated PBMN. All activity was lost following heating at 56 degrees C for 30 min; freezing and thawing reduced the ability of SF to induce suppression by 50%. Dialysis of SF or treatment with antibody to prostaglandin E2 led to a 50% reduction in suppression. PMID:2943541

  20. Antioxidant and anticancer activities of selected persian gulf algae.

    PubMed

    Namvar, F; Baharara, J; Mahdi, A A

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of red (Gracillaria corticata), green (Ulva fasciata) and brown (Sargassum ilicifolium) seaweeds alcoholic extract, against five important human cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, HeLa, HepG2, and HT-29) proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were evaluated. The reducing activity and total polyphenol content were also investigated. MTT assay was used for cytotoxicity test. Morphological alterations were examined using phase contrast, fluorescent and electron microscopy. All the extracts were antiproliferative against all the cancer cell lines, dose-dependently, with G. corticata methanol extract (GCME) having the greatest inhibition activity against MCF-7 cell line. The percentage of apoptosis increased from 18 to 78 %. The cell cycle analysis also showed that GCME can induce apoptosis which confirm by TEM. Algal extract reducing activities were as follows: G. corticata > S. ilicifolium > U. fasciata. The GCME is a good source of potential complementary and alternative functional food for prevention and treatment of cancer. PMID:24478544

  1. Stereochemical Assignment of Strigolactone Analogues Confirms Their Selective Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Artuso, Emma; Ghibaudi, Elena; Lace, Beatrice; Marabello, Domenica; Vinciguerra, Daniele; Lombardi, Chiara; Koltai, Hinanit; Kapulnik, Yoram; Novero, Mara; Occhiato, Ernesto G; Scarpi, Dina; Parisotto, Stefano; Deagostino, Annamaria; Venturello, Paolo; Mayzlish-Gati, Einav; Bier, Ariel; Prandi, Cristina

    2015-11-25

    Strigolactones (SLs) are new plant hormones with various developmental functions. They are also soil signaling chemicals that are required for establishing beneficial mycorrhizal plant/fungus symbiosis. In addition, SLs play an essential role in inducing seed germination in root-parasitic weeds, which are one of the seven most serious biological threats to food security. There are around 20 natural SLs that are produced by plants in very low quantities. Therefore, most of the knowledge on SL signal transduction and associated molecular events is based on the application of synthetic analogues. Stereochemistry plays a crucial role in the structure-activity relationship of SLs, as compounds with an unnatural D-ring configuration may induce biological effects that are unrelated to SLs. We have synthesized a series of strigolactone analogues, whose absolute configuration has been elucidated and related with their biological activity, thus confirming the high specificity of the response. Analogues bearing the R-configured butenolide moiety showed enhanced biological activity, which highlights the importance of this stereochemical motif. PMID:26502774

  2. Anti-inflammatory activities of selected synthetic homoisoflavanones.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Mahidansha M; Kruger, Hendrik G; Bodenstein, Johannes; Smith, Peter; du Toit, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Four homoisoflavanones of the 3-benzylidene-4-chromanone type, some of which were previously isolated from Caesalpinia pulcherrima, were synthesised to determine their anti-inflammatory activity and cytotoxicity. A range of four different homoisoflavanones (compounds 4a-4d) were synthesised from the corresponding substituted phenols. ¹H- and ¹³C-NMR data together with high-resolution mass spectroscopy data were employed to elucidate the structures. Anti-inflammatory activity was determined in mice with acute croton oil-induced auricular dermatitis. In vitro cytotoxicity was tested against a Chinese hamster ovarian cell line using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) assay. Compound 4a exhibited a tendency to inhibit oedema in a dose-dependent manner after 3 and 6 h of treatment. Compounds 4b-4d also inhibited oedema, although a clear dose-response relationship was not observed. Compounds 4a-4c were found to be less cytotoxic than compound 4d. Compound 4b was the least cytotoxic. Compounds 4a-4d exhibited anti-inflammatory activity and varying levels of cytotoxicity. PMID:21950651

  3. Evaluation of Antileishmanial Activity of Selected Brazilian Plants and Identification of the Active Principles

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Valdir Cechinel; Meyre-Silva, Christiane; Niero, Rivaldo; Bolda Mariano, Luisa Nathália; Gomes do Nascimento, Fabiana; Vicente Farias, Ingrid; Gazoni, Vanessa Fátima; dos Santos Silva, Bruna; Giménez, Alberto; Gutierrez-Yapu, David; Salamanca, Efrain; Malheiros, Angela

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated extracts, fractions, and isolated compounds from some selected Brazilian medicinal plants against strains of promastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis and L. brasiliensis in vitro. The cell viability was determined, comparing the results with reference standards. The dichloromethane fractions of the roots, stems, and leaves of Allamanda schottii showed IC50 values between 14.0 and 2.0 μg/mL. Plumericin was the main active compound, with IC50 of 0.3 and 0.04 μg/mL against the two species of Leishmania analyzed. The hexane extract of Eugenia umbelliflora fruits showed IC50 of 14.3 and 5.7 μg/mL against L. amazonensis and L. brasiliensis, respectively. The methanolic extracts of the seeds of Garcinia achachairu and guttiferone A presented IC50 values of 35.9 and 10.4 μg/mL, against L. amazonensis, respectively. The ethanolic extracts of the stem barks of Rapanea ferruginea and the isolated compound, myrsinoic acid B, presented activity against L. brasiliensis with IC50 of 24.1 and 6.1 μg/mL. Chloroform fraction of Solanum sisymbriifolium exhibited IC50 of 33.8 and 20.5 μg/mL, and cilistol A was the main active principle, with IC50 of 6.6 and 3.1 μg/mL against L. amazonensis and L. brasiliensis, respectively. It is concluded that the analyzed plants are promising as new and effective antiparasitic agents. PMID:23840252

  4. Evaluation of antileishmanial activity of selected brazilian plants and identification of the active principles.

    PubMed

    Filho, Valdir Cechinel; Meyre-Silva, Christiane; Niero, Rivaldo; Bolda Mariano, Luisa Nathália; Gomes do Nascimento, Fabiana; Vicente Farias, Ingrid; Gazoni, Vanessa Fátima; Dos Santos Silva, Bruna; Giménez, Alberto; Gutierrez-Yapu, David; Salamanca, Efrain; Malheiros, Angela

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated extracts, fractions, and isolated compounds from some selected Brazilian medicinal plants against strains of promastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis and L. brasiliensis in vitro. The cell viability was determined, comparing the results with reference standards. The dichloromethane fractions of the roots, stems, and leaves of Allamanda schottii showed IC50 values between 14.0 and 2.0  μ g/mL. Plumericin was the main active compound, with IC50 of 0.3 and 0.04  μ g/mL against the two species of Leishmania analyzed. The hexane extract of Eugenia umbelliflora fruits showed IC50 of 14.3 and 5.7  μ g/mL against L. amazonensis and L. brasiliensis, respectively. The methanolic extracts of the seeds of Garcinia achachairu and guttiferone A presented IC50 values of 35.9 and 10.4  μ g/mL, against L. amazonensis, respectively. The ethanolic extracts of the stem barks of Rapanea ferruginea and the isolated compound, myrsinoic acid B, presented activity against L. brasiliensis with IC50 of 24.1 and 6.1  μ g/mL. Chloroform fraction of Solanum sisymbriifolium exhibited IC50 of 33.8 and 20.5  μ g/mL, and cilistol A was the main active principle, with IC50 of 6.6 and 3.1  μ g/mL against L. amazonensis and L. brasiliensis, respectively. It is concluded that the analyzed plants are promising as new and effective antiparasitic agents. PMID:23840252

  5. Characterizing China's energy consumption with selective economic factors and energy-resource endowment: a spatial econometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lei; Ji, Minhe; Bai, Ling

    2015-06-01

    Coupled with intricate regional interactions, the provincial disparity of energy-resource endowment and other economic conditions in China have created spatially complex energy consumption patterns that require analyses beyond the traditional ones. To distill the spatial effect out of the resource and economic factors on China's energy consumption, this study recast the traditional econometric model in a spatial context. Several analytic steps were taken to reveal different aspects of the issue. Per capita energy consumption (AVEC) at the provincial level was first mapped to reveal spatial clusters of high energy consumption being located in either well developed or energy resourceful regions. This visual spatial autocorrelation pattern of AVEC was quantitatively tested to confirm its existence among Chinese provinces. A Moran scatterplot was employed to further display a relatively centralized trend occurring in those provinces that had parallel AVEC, revealing a spatial structure with attraction among high-high or low-low regions and repellency among high-low or low-high regions. By a comparison between the ordinary least square (OLS) model and its spatial econometric counterparts, a spatial error model (SEM) was selected to analyze the impact of major economic determinants on AVEC. While the analytic results revealed a significant positive correlation between AVEC and economic development, other determinants showed some intricate influential patterns. The provinces endowed with rich energy reserves were inclined to consume much more energy than those otherwise, whereas changing the economic structure by increasing the proportion of secondary and tertiary industries also tended to consume more energy. Both situations seem to underpin the fact that these provinces were largely trapped in the economies that were supported by technologies of low energy efficiency during the period, while other parts of the country were rapidly modernized by adopting advanced

  6. Characterizing China's energy consumption with selective economic factors and energy-resource endowment: a spatial econometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lei; Ji, Minhe; Bai, Ling

    2014-09-01

    Coupled with intricate regional interactions, the provincial disparity of energy-resource endowment and other economic conditions in China have created spatially complex energy consumption patterns that require analyses beyond the traditional ones. To distill the spatial effect out of the resource and economic factors on China's energy consumption, this study recast the traditional econometric model in a spatial context. Several analytic steps were taken to reveal different aspects of the issue. Per capita energy consumption (AVEC) at the provincial level was first mapped to reveal spatial clusters of high energy consumption being located in either well developed or energy resourceful regions. This visual spatial autocorrelation pattern of AVEC was quantitatively tested to confirm its existence among Chinese provinces. A Moran scatterplot was employed to further display a relatively centralized trend occurring in those provinces that had parallel AVEC, revealing a spatial structure with attraction among high-high or low-low regions and repellency among high-low or low-high regions. By a comparison between the ordinary least square (OLS) model and its spatial econometric counterparts, a spatial error model (SEM) was selected to analyze the impact of major economic determinants on AVEC. While the analytic results revealed a significant positive correlation between AVEC and economic development, other determinants showed some intricate influential patterns. The provinces endowed with rich energy reserves were inclined to consume much more energy than those otherwise, whereas changing the economic structure by increasing the proportion of secondary and tertiary industries also tended to consume more energy. Both situations seem to underpin the fact that these provinces were largely trapped in the economies that were supported by technologies of low energy efficiency during the period, while other parts of the country were rapidly modernized by adopting advanced

  7. Most Common Types of Physical Activity Self-Selected by People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Weikert, Madeline; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Balantrapu, Swathi

    2011-01-01

    The promotion of physical activity for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) would benefit from information about the common types of physical activity self-selected by this population. This study examined the most frequent types of physical activity self-reported by a large sample of people with MS. The data were collected as part of the baseline assessment of a longitudinal investigation of physical activity in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). The participants (N = 272) were sent a battery of questionnaires through the US Postal Service that included the Modifiable Activity Questionnaire for assessing types of physical activity performed during the previous year. Walking was ranked number 1 for both the first and second most common types of physical activity self-selected by people with MS, and it was ranked number 4 as the third most common type of self-selected physical activity. Collectively, 79% of the sample reported walking as a frequent form of self-selected physical activity in the previous year. Other notable types of physical activities self-selected by people with MS were gardening (44%), weight training (34%), bicycling (30%), and calisthenics (20%). This information may assist clinicians and practitioners in the development of physical activity programs and recommendations for people with MS. PMID:24453701

  8. Selected Resources and Glossary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfaro, Daisy D.; Hoffman, Jennifer Lee

    2009-01-01

    Intercollegiate athletics is no longer an area of interest solely for coaches and athletic administrators; increasingly, this field has captured the curiosity of faculty, researchers, and the general public. Such attention has the potential to greatly affect the course the field of intercollegiate athletics takes in the years to come.…

  9. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Between 2001 and 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a set of eight Regional Application Centers (RACs) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies. By utilizing the thermal energy that is normally wasted when electricity is produced at central generating stations, Combined Heat and Power installations can save substantial amounts of energy compared to more traditional technologies. In addition, the location of CHP facilities at or near the point of consumption greatly reduces or eliminates electric transmission and distribution losses. The regional nature of the RACs allows each one to design and provide services that are most relevant to the specific economic and market conditions in its particular geographic area. Between them, the eight RACs provide services to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Through the end of the federal 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009), the primary focus of the RACs was on providing CHP-related information to targeted markets, encouraging the creation and adoption of public policies and incentives favorable to CHP, and providing CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. Beginning with the 2010 fiscal year, the focus of the regional centers broadened to include district energy and waste heat recovery and these entities became formally known as Clean Energy Application Centers, as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort to establish metrics to quantify the RACs accomplishments. That effort began with the development of a detailed logic model describing RAC operations and outcomes, which provided a basis for identifying important activities and accomplishments to track. A data collection spreadsheet soliciting information on those activities for FY 2008 and all previous years of RAC operations was developed and sent to the RACs in the summer of 2008. This

  10. Novel Cephalosporins Selectively Active on Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report two series of novel cephalosporins that are bactericidal to Mycobacterium tuberculosis alone of the pathogens tested, which only kill M. tuberculosis when its replication is halted by conditions resembling those believed to pertain in the host, and whose bactericidal activity is not dependent upon or enhanced by clavulanate, a β-lactamase inhibitor. The two classes of cephalosporins bear an ester or alternatively an oxadiazole isostere at C-2 of the cephalosporin ring system, a position that is almost exclusively a carboxylic acid in clinically used agents in the class. Representatives of the series kill M. tuberculosis within macrophages without toxicity to the macrophages or other mammalian cells. PMID:27144688

  11. Novel Cephalosporins Selectively Active on Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ben; Smith, Robert; Nguyen, Quyen; Roberts, Julia; Ling, Yan; Lopez Quezada, Landys; Somersan, Selin; Warrier, Thulasi; Little, David; Pingle, Maneesh; Zhang, David; Ballinger, Elaine; Zimmerman, Matthew; Dartois, Véronique; Hanson, Paul; Mitscher, Lester A; Porubsky, Patrick; Rogers, Steven; Schoenen, Frank J; Nathan, Carl; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2016-07-14

    We report two series of novel cephalosporins that are bactericidal to Mycobacterium tuberculosis alone of the pathogens tested, which only kill M. tuberculosis when its replication is halted by conditions resembling those believed to pertain in the host, and whose bactericidal activity is not dependent upon or enhanced by clavulanate, a β-lactamase inhibitor. The two classes of cephalosporins bear an ester or alternatively an oxadiazole isostere at C-2 of the cephalosporin ring system, a position that is almost exclusively a carboxylic acid in clinically used agents in the class. Representatives of the series kill M. tuberculosis within macrophages without toxicity to the macrophages or other mammalian cells. PMID:27144688

  12. Implications of climatic seasonality on activity patterns and resource use by sympatric peccaries in northern Pantanal.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Gabriel Selbach; Coelho, Igor Pfeifer; Bastazini, Vinicius Augusto Galvão; Cordeiro, José Luís Passos; de Oliveira, Luiz Flamarion Barbosa

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the effects of climate seasonality from a thermal and water availability perspective on the activity patterns and resource use of Pecari tajacu and Tayassu pecari during wet and dry seasons in the northeastern Brazilian Pantanal. We used camera traps and temperature sensors to record species activity patterns in relation to temperature, established five habitat categories based on flooding intensity and local vegetation characteristics, assessed the activity patterns of each species in dry and wet periods and in artificial water bodies using circular statistical metrics, and calculated niche amplitude and overlap on three axes (temperature, time, and habitat) in both periods. Peccaries shared a strong resemblance in resource use and in their responses to seasonal variations in the tested gradients. The activity patterns of both species exhibited a significant correlation with air temperature on all the evaluated measures, and both species strongly reduced their activity when the air temperature exceeded 35 °C. High temperatures associated with low water availability were most likely responsible for the changes in species activity patterns, which resulted in an increased temporal overlap in habitat use throughout the dry season. However, the peccaries avoided intensively flooded habitats; therefore, the habitat gradient overlap was greater during the wet period. Our results show that an increase in niche overlap on the environmental gradient as a result of climatic seasonality may be partially compensated by a reduction in other niche dimensions. In this case, temporal partitioning appears to be an important, viable mechanism to reduce competition by potentially competing species. PMID:26219606

  13. ZnO nanopellets have selective anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Gopala Krishna, Prashanth; Paduvarahalli Ananthaswamy, Prashanth; Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Bhangi Mutta, Nagabhushana; Sannaiah, Ananda; Shivanna, Yogisha

    2016-05-01

    This research work presents the synthesis of ZnO nanopellets (ZNPs) by low temperature hydrothermal approach and evaluation of their antibacterial activity, cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Structural and morphological studies conducted on the sample reveal hexagonal ZNPs in the size range of 250-500nm. Surface area measurements showed high porosity of the sample compared to conventional ZnO nanoparticles. Antimicrobial studies revealed their bactericidal nature against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, to better understand the parameters that affect the interactions between our ZNPs and mammalian cells, and thus their biocompatibility, we have examined the impact of cell culture conditions as well as of material properties on cytotoxicity by DPPH, blood hemolysis and MTT assay. The results showed good antioxidant capacity and biocompatibility of ZNPs at higher concentrations. MTT assay revealed the anticancer activity of ZNPs against prostate and breast cancer cell lines. Acute toxicity tests on Swiss albino mice showed no evident toxicity over a 14 days period. PMID:26952499

  14. Grazing by protozoa as selection factor for activated sludge bacteria.

    PubMed

    Güde, H

    1979-09-01

    In continuous culture enrichments that were inoculated with activated sludge and were fed with polymeric substrates, freely dispersed single-celled bacteria belonging to theCytophaga group dominated among the initial populations, irrespective of the activated sludge source. These populations were grazed by flagellated protozoa which after several days reached high cell densities. Other morphologic bacterial groups such as spiral-shaped or filamentous bacteria then became dominant. In defined mixed culture experiments with bacterial isolates from the enrichment cultures, it was shown that a "grazing-resistant"Microcyclus strain outgrew aCytophaga strain in the presence of grazing protozoa. In contrast, theCytophaga strain competed successfully with theMicrocyclus strain and with other "grazing-resistant" strains under protozoa-free conditions. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that assumed grazing resistance factors such as floccing or filamentous growth were lost by some of the strains when they were grown for several generations in continuous culture under the same conditions, but in the absence of protozoa. PMID:24232496

  15. Selective activity of butyrylcholinesterase in serum by a chemiluminescent assay.

    PubMed

    Yavo, B; Brunetti, I L; da Fonseca, L M; Catalani, L H; Campa, A

    2001-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that purified commercial esterase activity can be detected in a chemiluminescent assay based on the hydrolysis of 2-methyl-1-propenylbenzoate (MPB) to 2-methyl-1-propenol, which is subsequently oxidized by the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-H(2)O(2) system. The purpose of this study was to verify the applicability of this assay to human serum. The existence of an esterase activity capable of hydrolysing MPB is indicated by the fact that the MPB-serum-HRP-H(2)O(2) system consumes oxygen and emits light. Both signals were abolished by prior serum heat inactivation and were preserved when serum was stored at < or =4 degrees C. Addition of aliesterase inhibitors, such as fluoride ion and trichlorfon or the cholinesterase inhibitor eserine, totally prevents light emission. The butyrylcholinesterase-specific substrate benzoylcholine causes a delay in both O(2) uptake and light emission, while the specific acetylcholinesterase substrate, acetyl-beta-methylcholine, had practically no effect. Purified butyrylcholinesterase, but not acetylcholinesterase, triggered light emission. The finding that butyrylcholinesterase is responsible for the hydrolysis of MPB in serum should serve as the basis for the development of a specific chemiluminescent assay for this enzyme. PMID:11590700

  16. Transcriptomic Characterization of Innate and Acquired Immune Responses in Red-Legged Partridges (Alectoris rufa): A Resource for Immunoecology and Robustness Selection

    PubMed Central

    Sevane, Natalia; Cañon, Javier; Gil, Ignacio; Dunner, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Present and future challenges for wild partridge populations include the resistance against possible disease transmission after restocking with captive-reared individuals, and the need to cope with the stress prompted by new dynamic and challenging scenarios. Selection of individuals with the best immune ability may be a good strategy to improve general immunity, and hence adaptation to stress. In this study, non-infectious challenges with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and sheep red blood cells allowed the classification of red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) according to their overall immune responses (IR). Skin from the area of injection of PHA and spleen, both from animals showing extreme high and low IR, were selected to investigate the transcriptional profiles underlying the different ability to cope with pathogens and external aggressions. RNA-seq yielded 97 million raw reads from eight sequencing libraries and approximately 84% of the processed reads were mapped to the reference chicken genome. Differential expression analysis identified 1488 up- and 107 down-regulated loci in individuals with high IR versus low IR. Partridges displaying higher innate IR show an enhanced activation of host defence gene pathways complemented with a tightly controlled desensitization that facilitates the return to cellular homeostasis. These findings indicate that the immune system ability to respond to aggressions (either diseases or stress produced by environmental changes) involves extensive transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations, and expand our understanding on the molecular mechanisms of the avian immune system, opening the possibility of improving disease resistance or robustness using genome assisted selection (GAS) approaches for increased IR in partridges by using genes such as AVN or BF2 as markers. This study provides the first transcriptome sequencing data of the Alectoris genus, a resource for molecular ecology that enables integration of genomic tools

  17. Mixed methods evaluation of targeted selective anthelmintic treatment by resource-poor smallholder goat farmers in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Josephine G.; Ofithile, Mphoeng; Tavolaro, F. Marina; van Wyk, Jan A.; Evans, Kate; Morgan, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the threat of anthelmintic resistance, livestock farmers worldwide are encouraged to selectively apply treatments against gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs). Targeted selective treatment (TST) of individual animals would be especially useful for smallholder farmers in low-income economies, where cost-effective and sustainable intervention strategies will improve livestock productivity and food security. Supporting research has focused mainly on refining technical indicators for treatment, and much less on factors influencing uptake and effectiveness. We used a mixed method approach, whereby qualitative and quantitative approaches are combined, to develop, implement and validate a TST system for GINs in small ruminants, most commonly goats, among smallholder farmers in the Makgadikgadi Pans region of Botswana, and to seek better understanding of system performance within a cultural context. After the first six months of the study, 42 out of 47 enrolled farmers were followed up; 52% had monitored their animals using the taught inspection criteria and 26% applied TST during this phase. Uptake level showed little correlation with farmer characteristics, such as literacy and size of farm. Herd health significantly improved in those herds where anthelmintic treatment was applied: anaemia, as assessed using the five-point FAMACHA© scale, was 0.44–0.69 points better (95% confidence interval) and body condition score was 0.18–0.36 points better (95% C.I., five-point scale) in treated compared with untreated herds. Only targeting individuals in greatest need led to similar health improvements compared to treating the entire herd, leading to dose savings ranging from 36% to 97%. This study demonstrates that TST against nematodes can be implemented effectively by resource-poor farmers using a community-led approach. The use of mixed methods provides a promising system to integrate technical and social aspects of TST programmes for maximum uptake and effect. PMID

  18. Mixed methods evaluation of targeted selective anthelmintic treatment by resource-poor smallholder goat farmers in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Walker, Josephine G; Ofithile, Mphoeng; Tavolaro, F Marina; van Wyk, Jan A; Evans, Kate; Morgan, Eric R

    2015-11-30

    Due to the threat of anthelmintic resistance, livestock farmers worldwide are encouraged to selectively apply treatments against gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs). Targeted selective treatment (TST) of individual animals would be especially useful for smallholder farmers in low-income economies, where cost-effective and sustainable intervention strategies will improve livestock productivity and food security. Supporting research has focused mainly on refining technical indicators for treatment, and much less on factors influencing uptake and effectiveness. We used a mixed method approach, whereby qualitative and quantitative approaches are combined, to develop, implement and validate a TST system for GINs in small ruminants, most commonly goats, among smallholder farmers in the Makgadikgadi Pans region of Botswana, and to seek better understanding of system performance within a cultural context. After the first six months of the study, 42 out of 47 enrolled farmers were followed up; 52% had monitored their animals using the taught inspection criteria and 26% applied TST during this phase. Uptake level showed little correlation with farmer characteristics, such as literacy and size of farm. Herd health significantly improved in those herds where anthelmintic treatment was applied: anaemia, as assessed using the five-point FAMACHA(©) scale, was 0.44-0.69 points better (95% confidence interval) and body condition score was 0.18-0.36 points better (95% C.I., five-point scale) in treated compared with untreated herds. Only targeting individuals in greatest need led to similar health improvements compared to treating the entire herd, leading to dose savings ranging from 36% to 97%. This study demonstrates that TST against nematodes can be implemented effectively by resource-poor farmers using a community-led approach. The use of mixed methods provides a promising system to integrate technical and social aspects of TST programmes for maximum uptake and effect. PMID

  19. Evaluation of GalaxyDock Based on the Community Structure-Activity Resource 2013 and 2014 Benchmark Studies.

    PubMed

    Shin, Woong-Hee; Lee, Gyu Rie; Seok, Chaok

    2016-06-27

    We analyze the results of the GalaxyDock protein-ligand docking program in the two recent experiments of Community Structure-Activity Resource (CSAR), CSAR 2013 and 2014. GalaxyDock performs global optimization of a modified AutoDock3 energy function by employing the conformational space annealing method. The energy function of GalaxyDock is quite sensitive to atomic clashes. Such energy functions can be effective for sampling physically correct conformations but may not be effective for scoring when conformations are not fully optimized. In phase 1 of CSAR 2013, we successfully selected all four true binders of digoxigenin along with three false positives. However, the energy values were rather high due to insufficient optimization of the conformations docked to homology models. A posteriori relaxation of the model complex structures by GalaxyRefine improved the docking energy values and differentiated the true binders from the false positives better. In the scoring test of CSAR 2013 phase 2, we selected the best poses for each of the two targets. The results of CSAR 2013 phase 3 suggested that an improved method for generating initial conformations for GalaxyDock is necessary for targets involving bulky ligands. Finally, combining existing binding information with GalaxyDock energy-based optimization may be needed for more accurate binding affinity prediction. PMID:26583962

  20. Influence of time and length size feature selections for human activity sequences recognition.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hongqing; Chen, Long; Srinivasan, Raghavendiran

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, Viterbi algorithm based on a hidden Markov model is applied to recognize activity sequences from observed sensors events. Alternative features selections of time feature values of sensors events and activity length size feature values are tested, respectively, and then the results of activity sequences recognition performances of Viterbi algorithm are evaluated. The results show that the selection of larger time feature values of sensor events and/or smaller activity length size feature values will generate relatively better results on the activity sequences recognition performances. PMID:24075148