Science.gov

Sample records for activities specific activities

  1. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  2. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1996-06-11

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidation state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  3. Arylesterase Phenotype-Specific Positive Association Between Arylesterase Activity and Cholinesterase Specific Activity in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Yutaka; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Strickland, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cholinesterase (ChE) specific activity is the ratio of ChE activity to ChE mass and, as a biomarker of exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors, has a potential advantage over simple ChE activity. Objective: To examine the association of several potential correlates (serum arylesterase/paraoxonase activity, serum albumin, sex, age, month of blood collection, and smoking) with plasma ChE specific activity. Methods: We analyzed data from 195 cancer-free controls from a nested case-control study, accounting for potential confounding. Results: Arylesterase activity had an independent, statistically significant positive association with ChE specific activity, and its magnitude was the greatest for the arylesterase phenotype corresponding to the QQ PON1192 genotype followed by phenotypes corresponding to QR and RR genotypes. Serum albumin was positively associated with ChE specific activity. Conclusions: Plasma arylesterase activity was positively associated with plasma ChE specific activity. This observation is consistent with protection conferred by a metabolic phenotype resulting in reduced internal dose. PMID:24473115

  4. Histone chaperone specificity in Rtt109 activation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Jun; Sudhoff, Keely B; Andrews, Andrew J; Stargell, Laurie A; Luger, Karolin

    2008-01-01

    Rtt109 is a histone acetyltransferase that requires a histone chaperone for the acetylation of histone 3 at lysine 56 (H3K56). Rtt109 forms a complex with the chaperone Vps75 in vivo and is implicated in DNA replication and repair. Here we show that both Rtt109 and Vps75 bind histones with high affinity, but only the complex is efficient for catalysis. The C-terminal acidic domain of Vps75 contributes to activation of Rtt109 and is necessary for in vivo functionality of Vps75, but it is not required for interaction with either Rtt109 or histones. We demonstrate that Vps75 is a structural homolog of yeast Nap1 by solving its crystal structure. Nap1 and Vps75 interact with histones and Rtt109 with comparable affinities. However, only Vps75 stimulates Rtt109 enzymatic activity. Our data highlight the functional specificity of Vps75 in Rtt109 activation. PMID:19172749

  5. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project (LDRD) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There were two primary objectives for the work performed under this project. The first was to take advantage of capabilities and facilities at Los Alamos to produce the radionuclide {sup 32}Si in unusually high specific activity. The second was to combine the radioanalytical expertise at Los Alamos with the expertise at the University of California to develop methods for the application of {sup 32}Si in biological oceanographic research related to global climate modeling. The first objective was met by developing targetry for proton spallation production of {sup 32}Si in KCl targets and chemistry for its recovery in very high specific activity. The second objective was met by developing a validated field-useable, radioanalytical technique, based upon gas-flow proportional counting, to measure the dynamics of silicon uptake by naturally occurring diatoms.

  6. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2003-10-28

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  7. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2002-12-03

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  8. High specific activity platinum-195m

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Du, Miting; Beets, Arnold L.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    2004-10-12

    A new composition of matter includes .sup.195m Pt characterized by a specific activity of at least 30 mCi/mg Pt, generally made by method that includes the steps of: exposing .sup.193 Ir to a flux of neutrons sufficient to convert a portion of the .sup.193 Ir to .sup.195m Pt to form an irradiated material; dissolving the irradiated material to form an intermediate solution comprising Ir and Pt; and separating the Pt from the Ir by cation exchange chromatography to produce .sup.195m Pt.

  9. Photodynamic effect on specific antitumor immune activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonarx-Coinsmann, Veronique; Foultier, Marie-Therese; Morlet, Laurent; de Brito, Leonor X.; Patrice, Thierry

    1995-03-01

    In this study the effect of PDT on the antitumoral specific immunologic response was evaluated. We compared the specific cytolytic activity (CLA) by a chromium release assay of primed mouse spleen T lymphocytes sensitized against syngeneic mastocytoma P511 cells. P511 cells, or lymphocytes, or both cells were treated or not with photofrin and/or light (514 nm). Photofrin II alone (1 (mu) g/ml, 2 hours) reduced CLA 59% when P511 were treated. Photofrin II (1 (mu) g/ml) followed by light (25 Joules/sq cm) also reduced CLA 35%. Photofrin II alone (0.5 (mu) g/ml, 2 hours) reduced CLA 8% when only lymphocytes were treated. And Photofrin II (0.5 (mu) g/ml) followed by light (25 Joules/sq cm) also reduced CLA 45%. When both cells were treated with Photofrin II alone or followed by light (25 Joules/sq cm) the CLA was also reduced respectively 19, 41%.

  10. Activity Specificity, Physical and Psychosocial Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatfield, Frederick C.

    The position is taken that the physical parameters of one's involvement in activity learning depend in large measure upon the objectives of the participant. General comments regarding the physical parameters of most activity classes are made. Underlying commonalities existing among these parameters are identified as: (1) freedom from disease; (2)…

  11. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provide and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  12. Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents three activities: (1) investigating succession in a schoolground; (2) investigating oak galls; and (3) making sun prints (photographs made without camera or darkroom). Each activity includes a list of materials needed and procedures used. (JN)

  13. Perceptual Motor Activities for Specific Cognitive Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Charlene Kimbro

    The slide presentation depicts movement activities through which children can perceive and form concepts, thus building cognitive skills in certain areas. The presentation is based on the fact that children interact with their environments through all their senses and benefit from perceiving through their kinesthetic senses. The areas presented…

  14. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bippert, Judy

    1993-01-01

    Presents activities designed to give students an opportunity to solve concrete problems involving spatial relationships and logical thinking utilizing hands-on manipulatives. Provides teacher instructions and four reproducible worksheets. (MDH)

  15. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, Charlene; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students collect and organize data from a real-world simulation of the scientific concept of half life. Students collect data using a marble sifter, analyze the data using a graphing calculator, and determine an appropriate mathematical model. Includes reproducible worksheets. (MDH)

  16. 21 CFR 331.11 - Listing of specific active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... years or older. (c) Bismuth-containing active ingredients: (1) Bismuth aluminate. (2) Bismuth carbonate.... (8) Magnesium trisilicate. (h) Milk solids, dried. (i) Phosphate-containing active ingredients: (1... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Listing of specific active ingredients....

  17. 29 CFR 1630.16 - Specific activities permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specific activities permitted. 1630.16 Section 1630.16... activities permitted. (a) Religious entities. A religious corporation, association, educational institution... society of its activities. A religious entity may require that all applicants and employees conform to...

  18. 29 CFR 1630.16 - Specific activities permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Specific activities permitted. 1630.16 Section 1630.16... activities permitted. (a) Religious entities. A religious corporation, association, educational institution... society of its activities. A religious entity may require that all applicants and employees conform to...

  19. The specific activation of TRPC4 by Gi protein subtype.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae-Pyo; Lee, Kyu Pil; Park, Eun Jung; Sung, Tae Sik; Kim, Byung Joo; Jeon, Ju-Hong; So, Insuk

    2008-12-12

    The classical type of transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) is a molecular candidate for Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels in mammalian cells. Especially, TRPC4 has the similar properties to Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation channels (NSCCs) activated by muscarinic stimulation in visceral smooth muscles. In visceral smooth muscles, NSCCs activated by muscarinic stimulation were blocked by anti-Galphai/o antibodies. However, there is still no report which Galpha proteins are involved in the activation process of TRPC4. Among Galpha proteins, only Galphai protein can activate TRPC4 channel. The activation effect of Galphai was specific for TRPC4 because Galphai has no activation effect on TRPC5, TRPC6 and TRPV6. Coexpression with muscarinic receptor M2 induced TRPC4 current activation by muscarinic stimulation with carbachol, which was inhibited by pertussis toxin. These results suggest that Galphai is involved specifically in the activation of TRPC4.

  20. Suppression of Antigen-Specific Lymphocyte Activation in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, David; Pride, Michael W.; Brown, Eric L.; Risin, Diana; Pellis, Neal R.

    1999-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in astronauts during and after spaceflight, and in isolated immune cells in true and simulated microgravity. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T cells is severely suppressed in true and simulated microgravity. These recent findings with various polyclonal activators suggests a suppression of oligoclonal lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors that simulate aspects of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction (MLR), as a model for a primary immune response; a tetanus toxoid (TT) response and a B. burgdorferi (Bb) response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  1. A new specific DNA endonuclease activity in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Sargueil, B; Delahodde, A; Hatat, D; Tian, G L; Lazowska, J; Jacq, C

    1991-02-01

    Two group I intron-encoded proteins from the yeast mitochondrial genome have already been shown to have a specific DNA endonuclease activity. This activity mediates intron insertion by cleaving the DNA sequence corresponding to the splice junction of an intronless strain. We have discovered in mitochondrial extracts from the yeast strain 777-3A a new DNA endonuclease activity which cleaves the fused exon A3-exon A4 junction sequence of the CO XI gene.

  2. UML activity diagrams in requirements specification of logic controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobelna, Iwona; Grobelny, Michał

    2015-12-01

    Logic controller specification can be prepared using various techniques. One of them is the wide understandable and user-friendly UML language and its activity diagrams. Using formal methods during the design phase increases the assurance that implemented system meets the project requirements. In the approach we use the model checking technique to formally verify a specification against user-defined behavioral requirements. The properties are usually defined as temporal logic formulas. In the paper we propose to use UML activity diagrams in requirements definition and then to formalize them as temporal logic formulas. As a result, UML activity diagrams can be used both for logic controller specification and for requirements definition, what simplifies the specification and verification process.

  3. Stage-specific fucosyltransferase activity during mouse spermatogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cardullo, R.A.; Armant, D.R.; Millette, C.F.

    1986-05-01

    This laboratory is involved in the biochemical characterization of developing spermatogenic cells. The authors have measured the in vitro activity of fucosyltransferase (FT) in germ cells. FT activity was assayed with a procedure modified from Letts et al. using GDP-(/sup 14/C)-fucose and asialofetuin as substrates. After incubation for 15 minutes at 33/sup 0/C, the reaction was stopped by adding cold 500 mM EDTA. Radiolabeled asialofetuin was isolated using Bio-Gel P-10 chromatography. The FT activity of germ cells purified from seminiferous tubules was 18.5 +/- 1.7 pmol/mg protein-min. To see if this activity varied at different stages of development, germ cells were further separated in a STAPUT chamber using a 2-4% BSA gradient. Pachytene spermatocytes or round spermatids were purified to at least 87%. The FT activity in isolated pachytene spermatocytes was 24.4 +/- 1.2 pmol/mg protein-min while the activity in isolated round spermatids was 49.0 +/- 7.2 pmol/mg protein-min. These results suggest that the highest FT activity is in developing spermatogenic cells with round spermatids having nearly twice the FT activity as pachytene spermatocytes. This increase in FT activity may be biologically significant since it occurs at a time when the Golgi apparatus is undergoing differentiation and when stage-specific fucosylated proteins appear.

  4. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  5. Eye-specific retinogeniculate segregation independent of normal neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Huberman, Andrew D; Wang, Guo-Yong; Liets, Lauren C; Collins, Odell A; Chapman, Barbara; Chalupa, Leo M

    2003-05-09

    The segregation of initially intermingled left and right eye inputs to the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (DLGN) during development is thought to be in response to precise spatial and temporal patterns of spontaneous ganglion cell activity. To test this hypothesis, we disrupted the correlated activity of neighboring ganglion cells in the developing ferret retina through immunotoxin depletion of starburst amacrine cells. Despite the absence of this type of correlated activity, left and right eye inputs segregated normally in the DLGN. By contrast, when all spontaneous activity was blocked, the projections from the two eyes remained intermingled. Thus, certain features of normal neural activity patterns are not required for the formation of eye-specific projections to the DLGN.

  6. Stage-specific effects of Notch activation during skeletal myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Pengpeng; Yue, Feng; Sato, Yusuke; Wirbisky, Sara; Liu, Weiyi; Shan, Tizhong; Wen, Yefei; Zhou, Daoguo; Freeman, Jennifer; Kuang, Shihuan

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal myogenesis involves sequential activation, proliferation, self-renewal/differentiation and fusion of myogenic stem cells (satellite cells). Notch signaling is known to be essential for the maintenance of satellite cells, but its function in late-stage myogenesis, i.e. post-differentiation myocytes and post-fusion myotubes, is unknown. Using stage-specific Cre alleles, we uncovered distinct roles of Notch1 in mononucleated myocytes and multinucleated myotubes. Specifically, constitutive Notch1 activation dedifferentiates myocytes into Pax7 quiescent satellite cells, leading to severe defects in muscle growth and regeneration, and postnatal lethality. By contrast, myotube-specific Notch1 activation improves the regeneration and exercise performance of aged and dystrophic muscles. Mechanistically, Notch1 activation in myotubes upregulates the expression of Notch ligands, which modulate Notch signaling in the adjacent satellite cells to enhance their regenerative capacity. These results highlight context-dependent effects of Notch activation during myogenesis, and demonstrate that Notch1 activity improves myotube’s function as a stem cell niche. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17355.001 PMID:27644105

  7. Suppression of antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in modeled microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D.; Pride, M. W.; Brown, E. L.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in lymphocytes from astronauts during and after a space flight. It is difficult to ascribe this suppression to microgravity effects on immune cells in crew specimens, due to the complex physiological response to space flight and the resultant effect on in vitro immune performance. Use of isolated immune cells in true and modeled microgravity in immune performance tests, suggests a direct effect of microgravity on in vitro cellular function. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T-cells is severely suppressed in true and modeled microgravity. These recent findings suggest a potential suppression of oligoclonal antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors as an analog of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction, as a model for a primary immune response, a tetanus toxoid response and a Borrelia burgdorferi response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  8. Suppression of antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in modeled microgravity.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D; Pride, M W; Brown, E L; Risin, D; Pellis, N R

    2001-02-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in lymphocytes from astronauts during and after a space flight. It is difficult to ascribe this suppression to microgravity effects on immune cells in crew specimens, due to the complex physiological response to space flight and the resultant effect on in vitro immune performance. Use of isolated immune cells in true and modeled microgravity in immune performance tests, suggests a direct effect of microgravity on in vitro cellular function. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T-cells is severely suppressed in true and modeled microgravity. These recent findings suggest a potential suppression of oligoclonal antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors as an analog of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction, as a model for a primary immune response, a tetanus toxoid response and a Borrelia burgdorferi response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  9. Spontaneous and specific activation of chemical bonds in macromolecular fluids.

    PubMed

    Park, Insun; Shirvanyants, David; Nese, Alper; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S

    2010-09-08

    Mechanical activation of chemical bonds typically involves the application of external forces, which implies a broad distribution of bond tensions. We demonstrate that controlling the flow profile of a macromolecular fluid generates and delineates mechanical force concentration, enabling a hierarchical activation of chemical bonds on different length scales from the macroscopic to the molecular. Bond tension is spontaneously generated within brushlike macromolecules as they spread on a solid substrate. The molecular architecture creates an uneven distribution of tension in the covalent bonds, leading to spatially controlled bond scission. By controlling the flow rate and the gradient of the film pressure, one can sever the flowing macromolecules with high precision. Specific chemical bonds are activated within distinct macromolecules located in a defined area of a thin film. Furthermore, the flow-controlled loading rate enables quantitative analysis of the bond activation parameters.

  10. 50 CFR 654.27 - Specifically authorized activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specifically authorized activities. 654.27 Section 654.27 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STONE CRAB FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO...

  11. 50 CFR 654.27 - Specifically authorized activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specifically authorized activities. 654.27 Section 654.27 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STONE CRAB FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO...

  12. 40 CFR 60.759 - Specifications for active collection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... = age of the solid waste in the ith section, years CNMOC = concentration of nonmethane organic compounds... Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 60.759 Specifications for active collection systems. (a) Each owner or... condensate management, accessibility, compatibility with filling operations, integration with closure end...

  13. Unconscious Semantic Activation Depends on Feature-Specific Attention Allocation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spruyt, Adriaan; De Houwer, Jan; Everaert, Tom; Hermans, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether semantic activation by subliminally presented stimuli is dependent upon the extent to which participants assign attention to specific semantic stimulus features and stimulus dimensions. Participants pronounced visible target words that were preceded by briefly presented, masked prime words. Both affective and non-affective…

  14. Liver-specific activities of FGF19 require Klotho beta.

    PubMed

    Lin, Benjamin C; Wang, Manping; Blackmore, Craig; Desnoyers, Luc R

    2007-09-14

    Hepatocyte function is regulated by members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of proteins, but little is known about the specific molecular mechanisms of this endocrine pathway. FGF19 regulates bile acid homeostasis and gall bladder filling; FGF19 binds only to FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4), but its liver-specific activity cannot be explained solely by the distribution of this receptor. Although it has been suggested that Klotho beta (KLB) may have a role in mediating FGF19 activity, we have provided for the first time definitive evidence that KLB is required for FGF19 binding to FGFR4, intracellular signaling, and downstream modulation of gene expression. We have shown that FGFR4 is widely distributed in mouse, whereas KLB distribution is more restricted. Liver was the only organ in which both genes were abundantly expressed. We show that in mice, FGF19 injection triggers liver-specific induction of c-Fos and repression of CYP7A1. The tissue-specific activity of FGF19 supports the unique intersection of KLB and FGFR4 distribution in liver. These studies define KLB as a novel FGFR4 coreceptor required for FGF19 liver specific functions.

  15. Promoter-specific co-activation by Drosophila Mastermind

    PubMed Central

    Caudy, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Mastermind (Mam) is a co-activator protein of binary complexes consisting of Suppressor of Hairless (Su(H)) and Notch Intracellular Domain (NICD) proteins assembled on cis-regulatory regions of target genes activated by Notch signaling. Current evidence indicates that Mastermind is necessary and sufficient for the formation of a functional Su(H)/NICD/Mam ternary complex on at least one specific architecture of Su(H) binding sites, called the SPS element (Su(H) Paired Sites). However, using transcription assays with a combination of native and synthetic Notch target gene promoters in Drosophila cultured cells, we show here that co-activation of Su(H)/NICD complexes on SPS elements by Mam is promoter-specific. Our novel results suggest this promoter specificity is mediated by additional unknown cis-regulatory elements present in the native promoters that are required for the recruitment of Mam and formation of functional Su(H)/NICD/Mam complexes on SPS elements. Together, the findings in this study suggest Mam is not always necessary and sufficient for co-activation of binary Su(H)/NICD complexes on SPS elements. PMID:18930034

  16. [Specific risks of physical activity in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Paillard, T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the specific risks of physical activity in elderly subjects. These risks mainly consist of the loss of physical integrity and the weakening of the capabilities of metabolic regulation. The risk of impairment of physical integrity (e.g. injury) related to regular physical activity is not overall greater in elderly subjects than in young subjects. The choice of a physical activity that is suited to the elderly subject's physical and cognitive abilities largely limits these risks. When physical activity is adapted to suit elderly subjects, the number of accidents in relation to the number of participants is actually very low. In fact, participation in a program of education for prevention related to physical activity reduces the risk of accidents and injuries (and, thus, falls) occurring thereafter. In the case of metabolic risks, isometric muscular contractions carried out under certain conditions (duration: > 6 seconds; intensity: > 50% of maximal voluntary contraction) are inappropriate. Physical activity carried out in extreme thermal atmospheres (0-5° < and > 25-30°) should be avoided. Hydration is very important and liquids should be drunk well before any thirst sensation occurs.

  17. Oxadiazoles Have Butyrate-Specific Conditional Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Early, Julie V.; Casey, Allen; Martinez-Grau, Maria Angeles; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C.; Vieth, Michal; Ollinger, Juliane; Bailey, Mai Ann; Alling, Torey; Files, Megan; Ovechkina, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a global pathogen of huge importance which can adapt to several host niche environments in which carbon source availability is likely to vary. We developed and ran a phenotypic screen using butyrate as the sole carbon source to be more reflective of the host lung environment. We screened a library of ∼87,000 small compounds and identified compounds which demonstrated good antitubercular activity against M. tuberculosis grown with butyrate but not with glucose as the carbon source. Among the hits, we identified an oxadiazole series (six compounds) which had specific activity against M. tuberculosis but which lacked cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. PMID:27044545

  18. Functional Specificity of the Visual Word Form Area: General Activation for Words and Symbols but Specific Network Activation for Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinke, Karen; Fernandes, Myra; Schwindt, Graeme; O'Craven, Kathleen; Grady, Cheryl L.

    2008-01-01

    The functional specificity of the brain region known as the Visual Word Form Area (VWFA) was examined using fMRI. We explored whether this area serves a general role in processing symbolic stimuli, rather than being selective for the processing of words. Brain activity was measured during a visual 1-back task to English words, meaningful symbols…

  19. Nucleotide Specificity versus Complex Heterogeneity in Exonuclease Activity Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Enderlein, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    A recent publication reported on measurements of Exonuclease I activity using a real-time fluorescence method that measures the time required by molecules of Exonuclease I to hydrolyze single-stranded DNA that was synthesized to have two fluorescently labeled nucleotides. The observed fluorescence-intensity curves were interpreted as a sign of strong heterogeneity of the activity of Exonuclease I. Here, I propose a different model, which assumes that Exonuclease I activity is nucleotide-dependent, and that a fluorescent label bound to a nucleotide significantly slows its cleavage rate. The presented model fits the observed data equally well, but can be used to make specific predictions upon observable sequence dependence of measured fluorescence-intensity curves. PMID:17142274

  20. Impact of dewatering technologies on specific methanogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Batstone, Damien J; Lu, Yang; Jensen, Paul D

    2015-10-01

    Dewatering methods for recuperative thickening and final dewatering can potentially impact methanogenic activity and microbial community. This influences both the feasibility of recuperative thickening to increase solids residence time within a digester, and the utilisation of dewatered digestate as inoculum for new digesters. Thickening technology can reduce methanogenic activity through either air contact (rotary drum, DAF, or belt filter press), or by lysing cells through shear (centrifuge). To assess this, two plants with recuperative thickening (rotary drum) in their anaerobic digester, and five without recuperative thickening, had specific methanogenic activity tested in all related streams, including dewatering feed, thickened return, final cake, and centrate. All plants had high speed centrifuges for final dewatering. The digester microbial community was also assessed through 16s pyrotag sequencing and subsequent principal component analysis (PCA). The specific methanogenic activity of all samples was in the expected range of 0.2-0.4 gCOD gVS(-1)d(-1). Plants with recuperative thickening did not have lower digester activity. Centrifuge based dewatering had a significant and variable impact on methanogenic activity in all samples, ranging between 20% and 90% decrease but averaging 54%. Rotary drum based recuperative thickening had a far smaller impact on activity, with a 0% per-pass drop in activity in one plant, and a 20% drop in another. However, the presence of recuperative thickening was a major predictor of overall microbial community (PC1, p = 0.0024). Microbial community PC3 (mainly driven by a shift in methanogens) was a strong predictor for sensitivity in activity to shear (p = 0.0005, p = 0.00001 without outlier). The one outlier was related to a plant producing the wettest cake (17% solids). This indicates that high solids is a potential driver of sensitivity to shear, but that a resilient microbial community can also bestow resilience

  1. Specific activation of the paralemniscal pathway during nociception.

    PubMed

    Frangeul, Laura; Porrero, Cesar; Garcia-Amado, Maria; Maimone, Benedetta; Maniglier, Madlyne; Clascá, Francisco; Jabaudon, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Two main neuronal pathways connect facial whiskers to the somatosensory cortex in rodents: (i) the lemniscal pathway, which originates in the brainstem principal trigeminal nucleus and is relayed in the ventroposterior thalamic nucleus and (ii) the paralemniscal pathway, originating in the spinal trigeminal nucleus and relayed in the posterior thalamic nucleus. While lemniscal neurons are readily activated by whisker contacts, the contribution of paralemniscal neurons to perception is less clear. Here, we functionally investigated these pathways by manipulating input from the whisker pad in freely moving mice. We report that while lemniscal neurons readily respond to neonatal infraorbital nerve sectioning or whisker contacts in vivo, paralemniscal neurons do not detectably respond to these environmental changes. However, the paralemniscal pathway is specifically activated upon noxious stimulation of the whisker pad. These findings reveal a nociceptive function for paralemniscal neurons in vivo that may critically inform context-specific behaviour during environmental exploration.

  2. Novel strategies for ultrahigh specific activity targeted nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dong

    2012-12-13

    We have developed novel strategies optimized for preparing high specific activity radiolabeled nanoparticles, targeting nuclear imaging of low abundance biomarkers. Several compounds have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64 for radiolabeling of SCK-nanoparticles via Copper(I) catalyzed or copper-free alkyne-azide cyclolization. Novel strategies have been developed to achieve ultrahigh specific activity with administrable amount of dose for human study using copper-free chemistry. Ligands for carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12), a low abundance extracellular biomarker for the responsiveness of breast cancer to endocrine therapie, have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64, and one of them has been evaluated in animal models. The results of this project will lead to major improvements in the use of nanoparticles in nuclear imaging and will significantly advance their potential for detecting low abundance biomarkers of medical importance.

  3. ISO Technical Specification for the Ionosphere -IRI Recent Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilitza, Dieter; Reinisch, Bodo; Tamara, Gulyaeva

    ISO Technical Specification TS 16457 recommends the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) for the specification of ionospheric densities and temperatures. We review the latest develop-ments towards improving the IRI model and the newest version of the model IRI-2010. IRI-2010 includes several important improvements and additions. This presentation introduces these changes and discusses their benefits. The changes affect primarily the density profiles in the bottomside ionosphere and the density and height of the F2 peak, the point of highest density in the ionosphere. An important new addition to the model is the inclusion of auroral boundaries and their movement with magnetic activity. We will also discuss the status of other ongoing IRI activities and some of the recent applications of the IRI model. The homepage for the IRI project is at http://IRI.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

  4. Fundamental Activity Constraints Lead to Specific Interpretations of the Connectome

    PubMed Central

    van Albada, Sacha J.; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2017-01-01

    The continuous integration of experimental data into coherent models of the brain is an increasing challenge of modern neuroscience. Such models provide a bridge between structure and activity, and identify the mechanisms giving rise to experimental observations. Nevertheless, structurally realistic network models of spiking neurons are necessarily underconstrained even if experimental data on brain connectivity are incorporated to the best of our knowledge. Guided by physiological observations, any model must therefore explore the parameter ranges within the uncertainty of the data. Based on simulation results alone, however, the mechanisms underlying stable and physiologically realistic activity often remain obscure. We here employ a mean-field reduction of the dynamics, which allows us to include activity constraints into the process of model construction. We shape the phase space of a multi-scale network model of the vision-related areas of macaque cortex by systematically refining its connectivity. Fundamental constraints on the activity, i.e., prohibiting quiescence and requiring global stability, prove sufficient to obtain realistic layer- and area-specific activity. Only small adaptations of the structure are required, showing that the network operates close to an instability. The procedure identifies components of the network critical to its collective dynamics and creates hypotheses for structural data and future experiments. The method can be applied to networks involving any neuron model with a known gain function. PMID:28146554

  5. Method of preparing high specific activity platinum-195m

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Du, Miting; Beets, Arnold L.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    2004-06-15

    A method of preparing high-specific-activity .sup.195m Pt includes the steps of: exposing .sup.193 Ir to a flux of neutrons sufficient to convert a portion of the .sup.193 Ir to .sup.195m Pt to form an irradiated material; dissolving the irradiated material to form an intermediate solution comprising Ir and Pt; and separating the Pt from the Ir by cation exchange chromatography to produce .sup.195m Pt.

  6. Method for preparing high specific activity 177Lu

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Du, Miting; Beets, Arnold L.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    2004-04-06

    A method of separating lutetium from a solution containing Lu and Yb, particularly reactor-produced .sup.177 Lu and .sup.177 Yb, includes the steps of: providing a chromatographic separation apparatus containing LN resin; loading the apparatus with a solution containing Lu and Yb; and eluting the apparatus to chromatographically separate the Lu and the Yb in order to produce high-specific-activity .sup.177 Yb.

  7. Accelerator Production and Separations for High Specific Activity Rhenium-186

    SciTech Connect

    Jurisson, Silvia S.; Wilbur, D. Scott

    2016-04-01

    Tungsten and osmium targets were evaluated for the production of high specific activity rhenium-186. Rhenium-186 has potential applications in radiotherapy for the treatment of a variety of diseases, including targeting with monoclonal antibodies and peptides. Methods were evaluated using tungsten metal, tungsten dioxide, tungsten disulfide and osmium disulfide. Separation of the rhenium-186 produced and recycling of the enriched tungsten-186 and osmium-189 enriched targets were developed.

  8. Prior probability modulates anticipatory activity in category-specific areas.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Sabrina; Lepsien, Jöran; Kotz, Sonja A; Bar, Moshe

    2016-02-01

    Bayesian models are currently a dominant framework for describing human information processing. However, it is not clear yet how major tenets of this framework can be translated to brain processes. In this study, we addressed the neural underpinning of prior probability and its effect on anticipatory activity in category-specific areas. Before fMRI scanning, participants were trained in two behavioral sessions to learn the prior probability and correct order of visual events within a sequence. The events of each sequence included two different presentations of a geometric shape and one picture of either a house or a face, which appeared with either a high or a low likelihood. Each sequence was preceded by a cue that gave participants probabilistic information about which items to expect next. This allowed examining cue-related anticipatory modulation of activity as a function of prior probability in category-specific areas (fusiform face area and parahippocampal place area). Our findings show that activity in the fusiform face area was higher when faces had a higher prior probability. The finding of a difference between levels of expectations is consistent with graded, probabilistically modulated activity, but the data do not rule out the alternative explanation of a categorical neural response. Importantly, these differences were only visible during anticipation, and vanished at the time of stimulus presentation, calling for a functional distinction when considering the effects of prior probability. Finally, there were no anticipatory effects for houses in the parahippocampal place area, suggesting sensitivity to stimulus material when looking at effects of prediction.

  9. GTP-specific fab fragment-based GTPase activity assay.

    PubMed

    Kopra, Kari; Rozwandowicz-Jansen, Anita; Syrjänpää, Markku; Blaževitš, Olga; Ligabue, Alessio; Veltel, Stefan; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Abankwa, Daniel; Härmä, Harri

    2015-03-17

    GTPases are central cellular signaling proteins, which cycle between a GDP-bound inactive and a GTP-bound active conformation in a controlled manner. Ras GTPases are frequently mutated in cancer and so far only few experimental inhibitors exist. The most common methods for monitoring GTP hydrolysis rely on luminescent GDP- or GTP-analogs. In this study, the first GTP-specific Fab fragment and its application are described. We selected Fab fragments using the phage display technology. Six Fab fragments were found against 2'/3'-GTP-biotin and 8-GTP-biotin. Selected antibody fragments allowed specific detection of endogenous, free GTP. The most potent Fab fragment (2A4(GTP)) showed over 100-fold GTP-specificity over GDP, ATP, or CTP and was used to develop a heterogeneous time-resolved luminescence based assay for the monitoring of GTP concentration. The method allows studying the GEF dependent H-Ras activation (GTP binding) and GAP-catalyzed H-Ras deactivation (GTP hydrolysis) at nanomolar protein concentrations.

  10. The activation of modality-specific representations during discourse processing.

    PubMed

    Kurby, Christopher A; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2013-09-01

    Previous research has shown that readers generate mental images of events. Most studies have investigated imagery during the reading of short texts, which also included explicit judgment tasks. In two fMRI studies, we assessed whether modality-specific imagery occurs during naturalistic, discourse comprehension. We identified clauses in the texts that elicited auditory, motor, or visual imagery. In both studies, reading motor imagery clauses was associated with increases in activity in left postcentral and precentral sulci, and reading auditory imagery clauses was associated with increases in left superior temporal gyrus and perisylvian language-related regions. Study 2 compared presentation of connected discourse to a condition in which unconnected sentences were presented, preventing the establishment of global coherence. Sensorimotor imagery was strongest when readers were able to generate a globally coherent discourse representation. Overall, these results suggest that modality-specific imagery occurs during discourse comprehension and it is dependent on the development of discourse-level representations.

  11. Specific modulation of protein activity by using a bioorthogonal reaction.

    PubMed

    Warner, John B; Muthusamy, Anand K; Petersson, E James

    2014-11-24

    Unnatural amino acids with bioorthogonal reactive groups have the potential to provide a rapid and specific mechanism for covalently inhibiting a protein of interest. Here, we use mutagenesis to insert an unnatural amino acid containing an azide group (Z) into the target protein at positions such that a "click" reaction with an alkyne modulator (X) will alter the function of the protein. This bioorthogonally reactive pair can engender specificity of X for the Z-containing protein, even if the target is otherwise identical to another protein, allowing for rapid target validation in living cells. We demonstrate our method using inhibition of the Escherichia coli enzyme aminoacyl transferase by both active-site occlusion and allosteric mechanisms. We have termed this a "clickable magic bullet" strategy, and it should be generally applicable to studying the effects of protein inhibition, within the limits of unnatural amino acid mutagenesis.

  12. The Activation of Modality-Specific Representations During Discourse Processing

    PubMed Central

    Kurby, Christopher A.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown that readers generate mental images of events. Most studies have investigated imagery during the reading of short texts, which also included explicit judgment tasks. In two fMRI studies, we assessed whether modality-specific imagery occurs during naturalistic, discourse comprehension. We identified clauses in the texts that elicited auditory, motor, or visual imagery. In both studies, reading motor imagery clauses was associated with increases in activity in left postcentral and precentral sulci, and reading auditory imagery clauses was associated with increases in left superior temporal gyrus and perisylvian language-related regions. Study 2 compared presentation of connected discourse to a condition in which unconnected sentences were presented, preventing the establishment of global coherence. Sensorimotor imagery was strongest when readers were able to generate a globally coherent discourse representation. Overall, these results suggest that modality-specific imagery occurs during discourse comprehension and it is dependent on the development of discourse-level representations. PMID:23933473

  13. Bioreactor Transient Exposure Activates Specific Neurotrophic Pathway in Cortical Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmitti, V.; Benedetti, E.; Caracciolo, V.; Sebastiani, P.; Di Loreto, S.

    2010-02-01

    Altered gravity forces might influence neuroplasticity and can provoke changes in biochemical mechanisms. In this contest, neurotrophins have a pivotal role, particularly nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). A suspension of dissociated cortical cells from rat embryos was exposed to 24 h of microgravity before plating in normal adherent culture system. Expression and transductional signalling pathways of NGF and BDNF were assessed at the end of maturational process (8-10 days in vitro). Rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWV) pre-exposition did not induce changes in NGF expression and its high affinity receptor TrkA. On the contrary both BDNF expression and its high affinity receptor TrkB were strongly up-regulated, inducing Erk-5, but not Erk-1/2 activation and, in turn, MEF2C over-expression and activation. According to our previous and present results, we postulate that relatively short microgravitational stimuli, applied to neural cells during the developmental stage, exert a long time activation of specific neurotrophic pathways.

  14. Human DJ-1-specific Transcriptional Activation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice. PMID:20938049

  15. Human DJ-1-specific transcriptional activation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2010-12-17

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice.

  16. Increased antitumor activity of tumor-specific peptide modified thymopentin.

    PubMed

    Lao, Xingzhen; Li, Bin; Liu, Meng; Chen, Jiao; Gao, Xiangdong; Zheng, Heng

    2014-12-01

    Thymopoietin pentapeptide (thymopentin, TP5), an immunomodulatory peptide, has been successfully used as an immune system enhancer for treating immune deficiency, cancer, and infectious diseases. However, poor penetration into tumors remains a key limitation to the efficacy and application of TP5. iRGD (CRGDK/RGPD/EC) has been introduced to certain anticancer agents, and increased specific tumor penetrability of drugs and cell internalization have been observed. In the present study, we fused this iRGD fragment with the C-terminal of TP5 to yield a new product, TP5-iRGD. Cell attachment assay showed that TP5-iRGD exhibits more extensive attachment to the melanoma cell line B16F10 than wild-type TP5. Tumor cell viability assay showed that iRGD conjugation with the TP5 C-terminus increases the basal antiproliferative activity of the pentapeptide against the melanoma cell line B16F10, the human lung cancer cell line H460, and the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Subsequent injections of TP5-iRGD inhibited in vivo melanoma progression more efficiently than the native TP5. Murine spleen lymphocyte proliferation assay also showed that TP5-iRGD and the parent pentapeptide feature nearly identical spleen lymphocyte proliferation activities. We built an integrin αvβ3 and TP5-iRGD computational binding model to investigate the mechanism by which TP5-iRGD promotes increased activity further. Conjugation with iRGD promotes binding to integrin αvβ3, thereby increasing the tumor-homing efficiency of the resultant peptide. These experimental and computational observations of increased TP5-iRGD activity help broaden the usage of TP5 and reflect the great application potential of the peptide as an anticancer agent.

  17. Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases: peroxidase hydroperoxide specificity and cyclooxygenase activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiayan; Seibold, Steve A; Rieke, Caroline J; Song, Inseok; Cukier, Robert I; Smith, William L

    2007-06-22

    The cyclooxygenase (COX) activity of prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases (PGHSs) converts arachidonic acid and O2 to prostaglandin G2 (PGG2). PGHS peroxidase (POX) activity reduces PGG2 to PGH2. The first step in POX catalysis is formation of an oxyferryl heme radical cation (Compound I), which undergoes intramolecular electron transfer forming Intermediate II having an oxyferryl heme and a Tyr-385 radical required for COX catalysis. PGHS POX catalyzes heterolytic cleavage of primary and secondary hydroperoxides much more readily than H2O2, but the basis for this specificity has been unresolved. Several large amino acids form a hydrophobic "dome" over part of the heme, but when these residues were mutated to alanines there was little effect on Compound I formation from H2O2 or 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, a surrogate substrate for PGG2. Ab initio calculations of heterolytic bond dissociation energies of the peroxyl groups of small peroxides indicated that they are almost the same. Molecular Dynamics simulations suggest that PGG2 binds the POX site through a peroxyl-iron bond, a hydrogen bond with His-207 and van der Waals interactions involving methylene groups adjoining the carbon bearing the peroxyl group and the protoporphyrin IX. We speculate that these latter interactions, which are not possible with H2O2, are major contributors to PGHS POX specificity. The distal Gln-203 four residues removed from His-207 have been thought to be essential for Compound I formation. However, Q203V PGHS-1 and PGHS-2 mutants catalyzed heterolytic cleavage of peroxides and exhibited native COX activity. PGHSs are homodimers with each monomer having a POX site and COX site. Cross-talk occurs between the COX sites of adjoining monomers. However, no cross-talk between the POX and COX sites of monomers was detected in a PGHS-2 heterodimer comprised of a Q203R monomer having an inactive POX site and a G533A monomer with an inactive COX site.

  18. Target-specific control of lymphoid-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp) activity

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Zandra E.; Bishop, Anthony C.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoid-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp), a member of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) superfamily of enzymes, is an important mediator of human-leukocyte signaling. Lyp has also emerged as a potential anti-autoimmune therapeutic target, owing to the association of a Lyp-activating mutation with an array of autoimmune disorders. Toward the goal of generating a selective inhibitor of Lyp activity that could be used for investigating Lyp’s roles in cell signaling and autoimmune-disease progression, here we report that Lyp’s PTP domain can be readily sensitized to target-specific inhibition by a cell-permeable small molecule. Insertion of a tetracysteine-motif-containing peptide at a conserved position in Lyp’s catalytic domain generated a mutant enzyme (Lyp-CCPGCC) that retains activity comparable to that of wild-type Lyp in the absence of added ligand. Upon addition of a tetracysteine-targeting biarsenical compound (FlAsH), however, the activity of the Lyp-CCPGCC drops dramatically, as assayed with either small-molecule or phosphorylated-peptide PTP substrates. We show that FlAsH-induced Lyp-CCPGCC inhibition is potent, specific, rapid, and independent of the nature of the PTP substrate used in the inhibition assay. Moreover, we show that FlAsH can be used to specifically target overexpressed Lyp-CCPGCC in a complex proteomic mixture. Since the mammalian-cell permeability of FlAsH is well established, it is likely that FlAsH-mediated inhibition of Lyp-CCPGCC will be useful for specifically targeting Lyp activity in engineered leukocytes and autoimmune-disease models. PMID:20594861

  19. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (Mw 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  20. Activities-Specific Balance Confidence in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nilsagård, Ylva; Carling, Anna; Forsberg, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the validity of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC) in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Design. A multicentre, cross-sectional study. Setting. Six rural and urban Swedish sites, including specialized units at hospitals and primary care centers. Participants. A sample of 84 PwMS with subjective gait and balance impairment but still able to walk 100 m (comparable with EDSS 1–6). Outcome Measures. Timed Up and Go, Timed Up and Gocog, 25-foot Timed Walk Test, Four Square Step Test, Dynamic Gait Index, Chair Stand Test, 12-item MS Walking Scale, self-reported falls, and use of assistive walking device were used for validation. Results. The concurrent convergent validity was moderate to good (0.50 to −0.75) with the highest correlation found for the 12-item MS Walking Scale. The ABC discriminated between multiple fallers and nonfallers but not between men and women. Ecological validity is suggested since ABC discriminated between users of assistive walking device and nonusers. The internal consistency was high at α = 0.95, and interitem correlations were between 0.30 and 0.83. Conclusion. This study supports the validity of the ABC for persons with mild-to-moderate MS. The participants lacked balance confidence in many everyday activities, likely restricting their participation in society. PMID:22919491

  1. Activities-specific balance confidence in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nilsagård, Ylva; Carling, Anna; Forsberg, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the validity of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC) in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Design. A multicentre, cross-sectional study. Setting. Six rural and urban Swedish sites, including specialized units at hospitals and primary care centers. Participants. A sample of 84 PwMS with subjective gait and balance impairment but still able to walk 100 m (comparable with EDSS 1-6). Outcome Measures. Timed Up and Go, Timed Up and Go(cog), 25-foot Timed Walk Test, Four Square Step Test, Dynamic Gait Index, Chair Stand Test, 12-item MS Walking Scale, self-reported falls, and use of assistive walking device were used for validation. Results. The concurrent convergent validity was moderate to good (0.50 to -0.75) with the highest correlation found for the 12-item MS Walking Scale. The ABC discriminated between multiple fallers and nonfallers but not between men and women. Ecological validity is suggested since ABC discriminated between users of assistive walking device and nonusers. The internal consistency was high at α = 0.95, and interitem correlations were between 0.30 and 0.83. Conclusion. This study supports the validity of the ABC for persons with mild-to-moderate MS. The participants lacked balance confidence in many everyday activities, likely restricting their participation in society.

  2. RNase H Activity: Structure, Specificity, and Function in Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Sharon J.; Champoux, James J.

    2008-01-01

    This review compares the well-studied RNase H activities of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) and Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) reverse transcriptases. The RNase H domains of HIV-1 and MoMLV are structurally very similar, with functions assigned to conserved subregions like the RNase H primer grip and the connection subdomain, as well as to distinct features like the C-helix and loop in MoMLV RNase H. Like cellular RNases H, catalysis by the retroviral enzymes appears to involve a two-metal ion mechanism. Unlike cellular RNases H, the retroviral RNases H display three different modes of cleavage: internal, DNA 3′ end-directed, and RNA 5′ end-directed. All three modes of cleavage appear to have roles in reverse transcription. Nucleotide sequence is an important determinant of cleavage specificity with both enzymes exhibiting a preference for specific nucleotides at discrete positions flanking an internal cleavage site as well as during tRNA primer removal and plus-strand primer generation. RNA 5′ end-directed and DNA 3′ end-directed cleavages show similar sequence preferences at the positions closest to a cleavage site. A model for how RNase H selects cleavage sites is presented that incorporates both sequence preferences and the concept of a defined window for allowable cleavage from a recessed end. Finally, the RNase H activity of HIV-1 is considered as a target for anti-virals as well as a participant in drug resistance. PMID:18261820

  3. Demographic and Regional Determinants of Participation in Specific Exercise Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-28

    Health and Physical Readiness Program. Questionnaires included self-report measures of the frequency and duration of 10 common exercise activities and... exercise behavior was assessed as the estimated frequency and duration of participation in each of ten types of physical activity . The recall method of...acceptable 6 method in the present study (3). The physical activities were aerobic dance/ exercise class, baseball, basketball, bicycling, calisthenics

  4. Specific cerebellar activation during Braille reading in blind subjects.

    PubMed

    Gizewski, Elke R; Timmann, Dagmar; Forsting, Michael

    2004-07-01

    The traditional view that the cerebellum is involved only in the control of movements has been changed recently. It has been suggested that the human cerebellum is involved in cognition and language. Likewise, besides cortical activity in sensorimotor and visual areas, an increased global activation of the cerebellum has been revealed during Braille reading in blind subjects. Our purpose was to investigate whether there is cerebellar activation during Braille reading by blind subjects other than sensorimotor activation related to finger movements. Early blind and normal sighted subjects were studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during Braille reading, tactile discrimination of nonsense dots, dots forming symbols, and finger tapping. The experiments were done in block design. Echo planar imaging sequences were carried out on a 1.5-T MR scanner. All blind individuals reading Braille showed robust activation of the posterior and lateral aspects of cerebellar hemispheral lobules Crus I bilaterally but more predominately on the right side. Additionally, activation was present in the medial cerebellum within lobules IV, V, and VIIIA, predominantly on the right. Discriminating nonsense dots did not reveal any activation of Crus I, but did reveal activation within the medial part of lobules IV, V, and VIIIA, predominately on the right. Analysis of sighted subjects during reading of printed text revealed activation of the posterolateral cerebellar hemisphere in Crus I bilaterally, predominantly on the right. Tactile analysis of dots representing symbols revealed an activation in lobules IV and VIII and in right Crus II but not in Crus I. In conclusion, parts of cerebellar activation during Braille reading in blind subjects (i.e., within lobules IV, V, and VIII) overlap with the known hand representation within the cerebellum and are likely related to the sensorimotor part of the task. Cerebellar activation during Braille reading within bilateral Crus I

  5. 29 CFR 1630.16 - Specific activities permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... C09, Atlanta, GA 30333.) If an individual with a disability is disabled by one of the infectious or...) (1), (2), and (3) of this section are permitted unless these activities are being used as...

  6. 29 CFR 1630.16 - Specific activities permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... C09, Atlanta, GA 30333.) If an individual with a disability is disabled by one of the infectious or...) (1), (2), and (3) of this section are permitted unless these activities are being used as...

  7. 29 CFR 1630.16 - Specific activities permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... C09, Atlanta, GA 30333.) If an individual with a disability is disabled by one of the infectious or...) (1), (2), and (3) of this section are permitted unless these activities are being used as...

  8. RelEx: Visualization for Actively Changing Overlay Network Specifications.

    PubMed

    Sedlmair, M; Frank, A; Munzner, T; Butz, A

    2012-12-01

    We present a network visualization design study focused on supporting automotive engineers who need to specify and optimize traffic patterns for in-car communication networks. The task and data abstractions that we derived support actively making changes to an overlay network, where logical communication specifications must be mapped to an underlying physical network. These abstractions are very different from the dominant use case in visual network analysis, namely identifying clusters and central nodes, that stems from the domain of social network analysis. Our visualization tool RelEx was created and iteratively refined through a full user-centered design process that included a full problem characterization phase before tool design began, paper prototyping, iterative refinement in close collaboration with expert users for formative evaluation, deployment in the field with real analysts using their own data, usability testing with non-expert users, and summative evaluation at the end of the deployment. In the summative post-deployment study, which entailed domain experts using the tool over several weeks in their daily practice, we documented many examples where the use of RelEx simplified or sped up their work compared to previous practices.

  9. The effect of trypsin and chymotrypsin on the bactericidal activity and specific antibody activity of bovine colostrum.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, J H; Arzabe, R; Piñeiro, A; Olivito, A M

    1977-01-01

    Digestion of bovine colostral whey with trypsin or chymotrypsin caused a progressive loss of the complement-mediated bactericidal activity of naturally-occurring colostral antibodies of E. coli 0111. Bactericidal activity was associated primarily with IgG1 immunoglobulin and to a lesser extent with IgM. Chymotrypsin preferentially attacked IgM, destroying its antibacterial activity and producing an apparent decrease in its mol wt. Trypsin preferentially attacked IgG1, but loss of antibacterial activity was in this case not accompanied by a decrease in molecular weight. Using colostral whey with antiperoxidase activity it was shown that the kinetics of loss of specific antibody activity were similar to those of loss of bactericidal activity. It is therefore suggested that trypsin may cause a loss of specific antibody activity of colostral IgG1 without cleaving the immunoglobulin molecule. PMID:321342

  10. Active stream segregation specifically involves the left human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Deike, Susann; Scheich, Henning; Brechmann, André

    2010-06-14

    An important aspect of auditory scene analysis is the sequential grouping of similar sounds into one "auditory stream" while keeping competing streams separate. In the present low-noise fMRI study we presented sequences of alternating high-pitch (A) and low-pitch (B) complex harmonic tones using acoustic parameters that allow the perception of either two separate streams or one alternating stream. However, the subjects were instructed to actively and continuously segregate the A from the B stream. This was controlled by the additional instruction to listen for rare level deviants only in the low-pitch stream. Compared to the control condition in which only one non-separable stream was presented the active segregation of the A from the B stream led to a selective increase of activation in the left auditory cortex (AC). Together with a similar finding from a previous study using a different acoustic cue for streaming, namely timbre, this suggests that the left auditory cortex plays a dominant role in active sequential stream segregation. However, we found cue differences within the left AC: Whereas in the posterior areas, including the planum temporale, activation increased for both acoustic cues, the anterior areas, including Heschl's gyrus, are only involved in stream segregation based on pitch.

  11. Synthesis of a high specific activity methyl sulfone tritium isotopologue of fevipiprant (NVP-QAW039).

    PubMed

    Luu, Van T; Goujon, Jean-Yves; Meisterhans, Christian; Frommherz, Matthias; Bauer, Carsten

    2015-05-15

    The synthesis of a triple tritiated isotopologue of the CRTh2 antagonist NVP-QAW039 (fevipiprant) with a specific activity >3 TBq/mmol is described. Key to the high specific activity is the methylation of a bench-stable dimeric disulfide precursor that is in situ reduced to the corresponding thiol monomer and methylated with [(3)H3]MeONos having per se a high specific activity. The high specific activity of the tritiated active pharmaceutical ingredient obtained by a build-up approach is discussed in the light of the specific activity usually to be expected if hydrogen tritium exchange methods were applied.

  12. Activation of specific apoptotic caspases with an engineered small-molecule-activated protease.

    PubMed

    Gray, Daniel C; Mahrus, Sami; Wells, James A

    2010-08-20

    Apoptosis is a conserved cellular pathway that results in the activation of cysteine-aspartyl proteases, or caspases. To dissect the nonredundant roles of the executioner caspase-3, -6, and -7 in orchestrating apoptosis, we have developed an orthogonal protease to selectively activate each isoform in human cells. Our approach uses a split-tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease under small-molecule control, which we call the SNIPer, with caspase alleles containing genetically encoded TEV cleavage sites. These studies reveal that all three caspases are transiently activated but only activation of caspase-3 or -7 is sufficient to induce apoptosis. Proteomic analysis shown here and from others reveals that 20 of the 33 subunits of the 26S proteasome can be cut by caspases, and we demonstrate synergy between proteasome inhibition and dose-dependent caspase activation. We propose a model of proteolytic reciprocal negative regulation with mechanistic implications for the combined clinical use of proteasome inhibitors and proapoptotic drugs.

  13. Quantitation of fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-specific protease activity in mouse, baboon and human fluids and organs.

    PubMed

    Keane, Fiona M; Yao, Tsun-Wen; Seelk, Stefanie; Gall, Margaret G; Chowdhury, Sumaiya; Poplawski, Sarah E; Lai, Jack H; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Farrell, Penny; Vieira de Ribeiro, Ana Julia; Osborne, Brenna; Yu, Denise M T; Seth, Devanshi; Rahman, Khairunnessa; Haber, Paul; Topaloglu, A Kemal; Wang, Chuanmin; Thomson, Sally; Hennessy, Annemarie; Prins, John; Twigg, Stephen M; McLennan, Susan V; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Bachovchin, William W; Gorrell, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The protease fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a specific marker of activated mesenchymal cells in tumour stroma and fibrotic liver. A specific, reliable FAP enzyme assay has been lacking. FAP's unique and restricted cleavage of the post proline bond was exploited to generate a new specific substrate to quantify FAP enzyme activity. This sensitive assay detected no FAP activity in any tissue or fluid of FAP gene knockout mice, thus confirming assay specificity. Circulating FAP activity was ∼20- and 1.3-fold less in baboon than in mouse and human plasma, respectively. Serum and plasma contained comparable FAP activity. In mice, the highest levels of FAP activity were in uterus, pancreas, submaxillary gland and skin, whereas the lowest levels were in brain, prostate, leukocytes and testis. Baboon organs high in FAP activity included skin, epididymis, bladder, colon, adipose tissue, nerve and tongue. FAP activity was greatly elevated in tumours and associated lymph nodes and in fungal-infected skin of unhealthy baboons. FAP activity was 14- to 18-fold greater in cirrhotic than in non-diseased human liver, and circulating FAP activity was almost doubled in alcoholic cirrhosis. Parallel DPP4 measurements concorded with the literature, except for the novel finding of high DPP4 activity in bile. The new FAP enzyme assay is the first to be thoroughly characterised and shows that FAP activity is measurable in most organs and at high levels in some. This new assay is a robust tool for specific quantitation of FAP enzyme activity in both preclinical and clinical samples, particularly liver fibrosis.

  14. 21 CFR 331.11 - Listing of specific active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ion; maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. for persons up to 60 years old and 100 mEq. for persons 60...., 8 grams calcium carbonate). (e) Citrate-containing active ingredients: Citrate ion, as citric acid... effervescent preparation); maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. of bicarbonate ion for persons up to 60...

  15. 21 CFR 331.11 - Listing of specific active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ion; maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. for persons up to 60 years old and 100 mEq. for persons 60...., 8 grams calcium carbonate). (e) Citrate-containing active ingredients: Citrate ion, as citric acid... effervescent preparation); maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. of bicarbonate ion for persons up to 60...

  16. 21 CFR 331.11 - Listing of specific active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ion; maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. for persons up to 60 years old and 100 mEq. for persons 60...., 8 grams calcium carbonate). (e) Citrate-containing active ingredients: Citrate ion, as citric acid... effervescent preparation); maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. of bicarbonate ion for persons up to 60...

  17. 21 CFR 331.11 - Listing of specific active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ion; maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. for persons up to 60 years old and 100 mEq. for persons 60...., 8 grams calcium carbonate). (e) Citrate-containing active ingredients: Citrate ion, as citric acid... effervescent preparation); maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. of bicarbonate ion for persons up to 60...

  18. 50 CFR 635.32 - Specifically authorized activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... approved food bank networks; or chartering arrangements. Such activities must be authorized in writing and... a conventional dart tag or a microchip Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag applied by the collector at the time of the collection. Both types of tags will be supplied by NMFS. Conventional dart...

  19. 50 CFR 635.32 - Specifically authorized activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... approved food bank networks; or chartering arrangements. Such activities must be authorized in writing and... a conventional dart tag or a microchip Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag applied by the collector at the time of the collection. Both types of tags will be supplied by NMFS. Conventional dart...

  20. 50 CFR 635.32 - Specifically authorized activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... approved food bank networks; or chartering arrangements. Such activities must be authorized in writing and... a conventional dart tag or a microchip Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag applied by the collector at the time of the collection. Both types of tags will be supplied by NMFS. Conventional dart...

  1. 50 CFR 635.32 - Specifically authorized activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... approved food bank networks; or chartering arrangements. Such activities must be authorized in writing and... a conventional dart tag or a microchip Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag applied by the collector at the time of the collection. Both types of tags will be supplied by NMFS. Conventional dart...

  2. Reported frequency of physical activity in a large epidemiological study: relationship to specific activities and repeatability over time

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background How overall physical activity relates to specific activities and how reported activity changes over time may influence interpretation of observed associations between physical activity and health. We examine the relationships between various physical activities self-reported at different times in a large cohort study of middle-aged UK women. Methods At recruitment, Million Women Study participants completed a baseline questionnaire including questions on frequency of strenuous and of any physical activity. About 3 years later 589,896 women also completed a follow-up questionnaire reporting the hours they spent on a range of specific activities. Time spent on each activity was used to estimate the associated excess metabolic equivalent hours (MET-hours) and this value was compared across categories of physical activity reported at recruitment. Additionally, 18,655 women completed the baseline questionnaire twice, at intervals of up to 4 years; repeatability over time was assessed using the weighted kappa coefficient (κweighted) and absolute percentage agreement. Results The average number of hours per week women reported doing specific activities was 14.0 for housework, 4.5 for walking, 3.0 for gardening, 0.2 for cycling, and 1.4 for all strenuous activity. Time spent and the estimated excess MET-hours associated with each activity increased with increasing frequency of any or strenuous physical activity reported at baseline (tests for trend, P < 0.003), although the associations for housework were by far the weakest (Spearman correlations, 0.01 and -0.03 respectively for housework, and 0.11-0.37 for all other activities). Repeatability of responses to physical activity questions on the baseline questionnaire declined significantly over time. For strenuous activity, absolute agreement was 64% (κweighted = 0.71) for questionnaires administered less than 6 months apart, and 52% (κweighted = 0.51) for questionnaires more than 2 years apart. Corresponding

  3. Specific pathways mediating inflammasome activation by Candida parapsilosis

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Adél; Zajta, Erik; Csonka, Katalin; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Netea, Mihai G.; Gácser, Attila

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis are human pathogens causing severe infections. The NLRP3 inflammasome plays a crucial role in host defence against C. albicans, but it has been previously unknown whether C. parapsilosis activates this complex. Here we show that C. parapsilosis induces caspase-1 activation and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion in THP-1, as well as primary, human macrophages. IL-1β secretion was dependent on NLRP3, K+-efflux, TLR4, IRAK, Syk, caspase-1, caspase-8 and NADPH-oxidase. Importantly, while C. albicans induced robust IL-1β release after 4 h, C. parapsilosis was not able to stimulate the production of IL-1β after this short incubation period. We also found that C. parapsilosis was phagocytosed to a lesser extent, and induced significantly lower ROS production and lysosomal cathepsin B release compared to C. albicans, suggesting that the low extent of inflammasome activation by C. parapsilosis may result from a delay in the so-called “signal 2”. In conclusion, this is the first study to examine the molecular pathways responsible for the IL-1β production in response to a non-albicans Candida species, and these results enhance our understanding about the immune response against C. parapsilosis. PMID:28225025

  4. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Activates Specific Regions in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive therapy. Our result shows that rTMS applied in conditions effective in animal models of depression induces different patterns of immediate-early gene expression than does electroconvulsive stimulation. In particular, rTMS evokes strong neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) and in other regions involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. The response in PVT is independent of the orientation of the stimulation probe relative to the head. Part of this response is likely because of direct activation, as repetitive magnetic stimulation also activates PVT neurons in brain slices.

  5. Are the correlates of active school transport context-specific?

    PubMed Central

    Larouche, R; Sarmiento, O L; Broyles, S T; Denstel, K D; Church, T S; Barreira, T V; Chaput, J-P; Fogelholm, M; Hu, G; Kuriyan, R; Kurpad, A; Lambert, E V; Maher, C; Maia, J; Matsudo, V; Olds, T; Onywera, V; Standage, M; Tremblay, M S; Tudor-Locke, C; Zhao, P; Katzmarzyk, P T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Previous research consistently indicates that children who engage in active school transport (AST) are more active than their peers who use motorized modes (car or bus). However, studies of the correlates of AST have been conducted predominantly in high-income countries and have yielded mixed findings. Using data from a heterogeneous sample of 12 country sites across the world, we investigated the correlates of AST in 9–11-year olds. METHODS: The analytical sample comprised 6555 children (53.8% girls), who reported their main travel mode to school and the duration of their school trip. Potential individual and neighborhood correlates of AST were assessed with a parent questionnaire adapted from previously validated instruments. Multilevel generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) were used to examine the associations between individual and neighborhood variables and the odds of engaging in AST while controlling for the child's school. Site moderated the relationship of seven of these variables with AST; therefore we present analyses stratified by site. RESULTS: The prevalence of AST varied from 5.2 to 79.4% across sites and the school-level intra-class correlation ranged from 0.00 to 0.56. For each site, the final GLMM included a different set of correlates of AST. Longer trip duration (that is, ⩾16 min versus ⩽15 min) was associated with lower odds of AST in eight sites. Other individual and neighborhood factors were associated with AST in three sites or less. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate wide variability in the prevalence and correlates of AST in a large sample of children from twelve geographically, economically and culturally diverse country sites. This suggests that AST interventions should not adopt a ‘one size fits all' approach. Future research should also explore the association between psychosocial factors and AST in different countries. PMID:27152191

  6. Threshold occupancy and specific cation binding modes in the hammerhead ribozyme active site are required for active conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Giambaşu, George M.; Sosa, Carlos P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between formation of active in-line attack conformations and monovalent (Na+) and divalent (Mg2+) metal ion binding in the hammerhead ribozyme has been explored with molecular dynamics simulations. To stabilize repulsions between negatively charged groups, different requirements of threshold occupancy of metal ions were observed in the reactant and activated precursor states both in the presence or absence of a Mg2+ in the active site. Specific bridging coordination patterns of the ions are correlated with the formation of active in-line attack conformations and can be accommodated in both cases. Furthermore, simulation results suggest that the hammerhead ribozyme folds to form an electronegative recruiting pocket that attracts high local concentrations of positive charge. The present simulations help to reconcile experiments that probe the metal ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis and support the supposition that Mg2+, in addition to stabilizing active conformations, plays a specific chemical role in catalysis. PMID:19265710

  7. Cell-free activation of phagocyte NADPH-oxidase: tissue and differentiation-specific expression of cytosolic cofactor activity.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, J F; Akard, L P; Schell, M J; Gabig, T G

    1987-06-30

    We examined a variety of tissues for the presence of cytosolic cofactor activity that would support arachidonate-dependent cell-free activation of NADPH-oxidase in isolated human neutrophil membranes. Cofactor activity was not found in cytosol isolated from erythrocytes, lymphocytes, placenta, brain, liver, or the human promyelocytic leukemic cell line HL-60. Induction of differentiation in HL-60 cells led to expression of cytosolic cofactor activity. In dimethylsulphoxide-induced HL-60 cells the level of cytosolic cofactor activity was closely correlated with phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated whole cell superoxide production. These results strongly suggest that the cytosolic cofactor is a phagocyte-specific regulatory protein of physiologic importance in NADPH-oxidase activation.

  8. Focused ultrasound modulates region-specific brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung-Schik; Bystritsky, Alexander; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Fischer, Krisztina; Min, Byoung-Kyong; McDannold, Nathan J.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrated the in vivo feasibility of using focused ultrasound (FUS) to transiently modulate (through either stimulation or suppression) the function of regional brain tissue in rabbits. FUS was delivered in a train of pulses at low acoustic energy, far below the cavitation threshold, to the animal's somatomotor and visual areas, as guided by anatomical and functional information from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The temporary alterations in the brain function affected by the sonication were characterized by both electrophysiological recordings and functional brain mapping achieved through the use of functional MRI (fMRI). The modulatory effects were bimodal, whereby the brain activity could either be stimulated or selectively suppressed. Histological analysis of the excised brain tissue after the sonication demonstrated that the FUS did not elicit any tissue damages. Unlike transcranial magnetic stimulation, FUS can be applied to deep structures in the brain with greater spatial precision. Transient modulation of brain function using image-guided and anatomically-targeted FUS would enable the investigation of functional connectivity between brain regions and will eventually lead to a better understanding of localized brain functions. It is anticipated that the use of this technology will have an impact on brain research and may offer novel therapeutic interventions in various neurological conditions and psychiatric disorders. PMID:21354315

  9. Active medulloblastoma enhancers reveal subgroup-specific cellular origins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Charles Y; Erkek, Serap; Tong, Yiai; Yin, Linlin; Federation, Alexander J; Zapatka, Marc; Haldipur, Parthiv; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Risch, Thomas; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Worst, Barbara C; Ju, Bensheng; Orr, Brent A; Zeid, Rhamy; Polaski, Donald R; Segura-Wang, Maia; Waszak, Sebastian M; Jones, David T W; Kool, Marcel; Hovestadt, Volker; Buchhalter, Ivo; Sieber, Laura; Johann, Pascal; Chavez, Lukas; Gröschel, Stefan; Ryzhova, Marina; Korshunov, Andrey; Chen, Wenbiao; Chizhikov, Victor V; Millen, Kathleen J; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Eils, Roland; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O; Pfister, Stefan M; Bradner, James E; Northcott, Paul A

    2016-02-04

    Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour, often inflicting devastating consequences on the developing child. Genomic studies have revealed four distinct molecular subgroups with divergent biology and clinical behaviour. An understanding of the regulatory circuitry governing the transcriptional landscapes of medulloblastoma subgroups, and how this relates to their respective developmental origins, is lacking. Here, using H3K27ac and BRD4 chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) coupled with tissue-matched DNA methylation and transcriptome data, we describe the active cis-regulatory landscape across 28 primary medulloblastoma specimens. Analysis of differentially regulated enhancers and super-enhancers reinforced inter-subgroup heterogeneity and revealed novel, clinically relevant insights into medulloblastoma biology. Computational reconstruction of core regulatory circuitry identified a master set of transcription factors, validated by ChIP-seq, that is responsible for subgroup divergence, and implicates candidate cells of origin for Group 4. Our integrated analysis of enhancer elements in a large series of primary tumour samples reveals insights into cis-regulatory architecture, unrecognized dependencies, and cellular origins.

  10. Substrate specificity of an actively assembling amyloid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Heier, Jason L; Mikolajczak, Dorian J; Böttcher, Christoph; Koksch, Beate

    2017-01-01

    In the presence of Zn(2+) , the catalytic, amyloid-forming peptide Ac-IHIHIQI-NH2 , was found to exhibit enhanced selectivity for hydrophobic p-nitrophenyl ester substrates while in the process of self-assembly. As opposed to the substrate p-nitrophenyl acetate, which was more effectively hydrolyzed with Ac-IHIHIQI-NH2 in its fully fibrillar state, the hydrophobic substrate Z-L-Phe-ONp was converted with a second-order rate constant more than 11-times greater when the catalyst was actively assembling. Under such conditions, Z-L-Phe-ONp hydrolysis proceeded at a greater velocity than the more hydrophilic and otherwise more labile ester Boc-L-Asn-ONp. When assembling, the catalyst also showed increased selectivity for the L-enantiomer of Z-Phe-ONp. These findings suggest the occurrence of increased interactions of hydrophobic moieties of the substrate with exposed hydrophobic surfaces of the assembling peptides and present valuable features for future de novo design consideration.

  11. Active medulloblastoma enhancers reveal subgroup-specific cellular origins

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Charles Y.; Erkek, Serap; Tong, Yiai; Yin, Linlin; Federation, Alexander J.; Zapatka, Marc; Haldipur, Parthiv; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Risch, Thomas; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Worst, Barbara C.; Ju, Bensheng; Orr, Brent A.; Zeid, Rhamy; Polaski, Donald R.; Segura-Wang, Maia; Waszak, Sebastian M.; Jones, David T.W.; Kool, Marcel; Hovestadt, Volker; Buchhalter, Ivo; Sieber, Laura; Johann, Pascal; Chavez, Lukas; Gröschel, Stefan; Ryzhova, Marina; Korshunov, Andrey; Chen, Wenbiao; Chizhikov, Victor V.; Millen, Kathleen J.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Eils, Roland; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Bradner, James E.; Northcott, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour, often inflicting devastating consequences on the developing child. Genomic studies have revealed four distinct molecular subgroups with divergent biology and clinical behaviour. An understanding of the regulatory circuitry governing the transcriptional landscapes of medulloblastoma subgroups, and how this relates to their respective developmental origins, is lacking. Using H3K27ac and BRD4 ChIP-Seq, coupled with tissue-matched DNA methylation and transcriptome data, we describe the active cis-regulatory landscape across 28 primary medulloblastoma specimens. Analysis of differentially regulated enhancers and super-enhancers reinforced inter-subgroup heterogeneity and revealed novel, clinically relevant insights into medulloblastoma biology. Computational reconstruction of core regulatory circuitry identified a master set of transcription factors, validated by ChIP-Seq, that are responsible for subgroup divergence and implicate candidate cells-of-origin for Group 4. Our integrated analysis of enhancer elements in a large series of primary tumour samples reveals insights into cis-regulatory architecture, unrecognized dependencies, and cellular origins. PMID:26814967

  12. A situation-specific theory of Midlife Women's Attitudes Toward Physical Activity (MAPA).

    PubMed

    Im, Eun-Ok; Stuifbergen, Alexa K; Walker, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a situation specific theory-the Midlife Women's Attitudes Toward Physical Activity (MAPA) theory-that explains how women's attitudes toward physical activity influence their participation in physical activity. Using the integrative approach of Im, the theory was developed based on the Attitude, Social Influence, and Self Efficacy Model; a review of the related literature; and a study of women's attitudes toward physical activity. As a situation-specific theory, the MAPA theory can be linked easily to nursing practice and research projects related to physical activity in midlife women, especially interventions aimed at increasing midlife women's participation in physical activity.

  13. Lactobacillus plantarum phytase activity is due to non-specific acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Zamudio, M; González, A; Medina, J A

    2001-03-01

    Microbial phytases suitable for food fermentations could be obtained from lactic acid bacteria isolated from natural vegetable fermentations. Phytase activity was evaluated for six lactic acid bacteria cultures. Although the highest activity was found for Lactobacillus plantarum, the phytase activity was very low. Further characterization of the enzyme with phytate-degrading activity showed a molecular weight of 52 kDa and an optimum activity at pH 5.5 and 65 degrees C. Enzyme activity was due to a non-specific acid phosphatase which had a higher hydrolysis rate with monophosphorylated compounds such as acetyl phosphate that could explain the low phytase activity.

  14. Specification of High Activity Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    The report is concerned with making recommendations for the specifications of gamma ray sources, which relate to the quantity of radioactive material and the radiation emitted. Primary consideration is given to sources in teletherapy and to a lesser extent those used in industrial radiography and in irradiation units used in industry and research.…

  15. Sensitivity and Specificity of Hypnosis Effects on Gastric Myoelectrical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Enck, Paul; Weimer, Katja; Muth, Eric R.; Zipfel, Stephan; Martens, Ute

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The effects of hypnosis on physiological (gastrointestinal) functions are incompletely understood, and it is unknown whether they are hypnosis-specific and gut-specific, or simply unspecific effects of relaxation. Design Sixty-two healthy female volunteers were randomly assigned to either a single session of hypnotic suggestion of ingesting an appetizing meal and an unappetizing meal, or to relax and concentrate on having an appetizing or unappetizing meal, while the electrogastrogram (EGG) was recorded. At the end of the session, participants drank water until they felt full, in order to detect EGG-signal changes after ingestion of a true gastric load. During both conditions participants reported their subjective well-being, hunger and disgust at several time points. Results Imagining eating food induced subjective feelings of hunger and disgust as well as changes in the EGG similar to, but more pronounced than those seen with a real gastric water load during both hypnosis and relaxation conditions. These effects were more pronounced when imagining an appetizing meal than with an unappetizing meal. There was no significant difference between the hypnosis and relaxation conditions. Conclusion Imagination with and without hypnosis exhibits similar changes in subjective and objective measures in response to imagining an appetizing and an unappetizing food, indicating high sensitivity but low specificity. PMID:24358287

  16. Modulation of p47PHOX activity by site-specific phosphorylation: Akt-dependent activation of the NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Hoyal, Carolyn R.; Gutierrez, Abel; Young, Brandon M.; Catz, Sergio D.; Lin, Jun-Hsiang; Tsichlis, Philip N.; Babior, Bernard M.

    2003-01-01

    The leukocyte NADPH oxidase catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to O\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{_{2}^{-}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} at the expense of NADPH. Extensive phosphorylation of the oxidase subunit p47PHOX occurs during the activation of the enzyme in intact cells. p47PHOX carrying certain serine-to-alanine mutations fails to support NADPH oxidase activity in intact cells, suggesting that the phosphorylation of specific serines on p47PHOX is required for the activation of the oxidase. Earlier studies with both intact cells and a kinase-dependent, cell-free system have suggested that protein kinase C can phosphorylate those serines of p47PHOX whose phosphorylation is necessary for its activity. Work with inhibitors suggested that a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent pathway also can activate the oxidase. Phosphorylation of p47PHOX by Akt (protein kinase B), whose activation depends on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, could be the final step in such a pathway. We now find that Akt activates the oxidase in vitro by phosphorylating serines S304 and S328 of p47PHOX. These results suggest that Akt could participate in the activation of the leukocyte NADPH oxidase. PMID:12704229

  17. Strain specificity in antimicrobial activity of silver and copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ruparelia, Jayesh P; Chatterjee, Arup Kumar; Duttagupta, Siddhartha P; Mukherji, Suparna

    2008-05-01

    The antimicrobial properties of silver and copper nanoparticles were investigated using Escherichia coli (four strains), Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus (three strains). The average sizes of the silver and copper nanoparticles were 3 nm and 9 nm, respectively, as determined through transmission electron microscopy. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectra of silver and copper nanoparticles revealed that while silver was in its pure form, an oxide layer existed on the copper nanoparticles. The bactericidal effect of silver and copper nanoparticles were compared based on diameter of inhibition zone in disk diffusion tests and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of nanoparticles dispersed in batch cultures. Bacterial sensitivity to nanoparticles was found to vary depending on the microbial species. Disk diffusion studies with E. coli and S. aureus revealed greater effectiveness of the silver nanoparticles compared to the copper nanoparticles. B. subtilis depicted the highest sensitivity to nanoparticles compared to the other strains and was more adversely affected by the copper nanoparticles. Good correlation was observed between MIC and MBC (r2=0.98) measured in liquid cultures. For copper nanoparticles a good negative correlation was observed between the inhibition zone observed in disk diffusion test and MIC/MBC determined based on liquid cultures with the various strains (r2=-0.75). Although strain-specific variation in MIC/MBC was negligible for S. aureus, some strain-specific variation was observed for E. coli.

  18. When a Step Is Not a Step! Specificity Analysis of Five Physical Activity Monitors

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Sandra; ÓLaighin, Gearóid

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Physical activity is an essential aspect of a healthy lifestyle for both physical and mental health states. As step count is one of the most utilized measures for quantifying physical activity it is important that activity-monitoring devices be both sensitive and specific in recording actual steps taken and disregard non-stepping body movements. The objective of this study was to assess the specificity of five activity monitors during a variety of prescribed non-stepping activities. Methods Participants wore five activity monitors simultaneously for a variety of prescribed activities including deskwork, taking an elevator, taking a bus journey, automobile driving, washing and drying dishes; functional reaching task; indoor cycling; outdoor cycling; and indoor rowing. Each task was carried out for either a specific duration of time or over a specific distance. Activity monitors tested were the ActivPAL micro™, NL-2000™ pedometer, Withings Smart Activity Monitor Tracker (Pulse O2)™, Fitbit One™ and Jawbone UP™. Participants were video-recorded while carrying out the prescribed activities and the false positive step count registered on each activity monitor was obtained and compared to the video. Results All activity monitors registered a significant number of false positive steps per minute during one or more of the prescribed activities. The Withings™ activity performed best, registering a significant number of false positive steps per minute during the outdoor cycling activity only (P = 0.025). The Jawbone™ registered a significant number of false positive steps during the functional reaching task and while washing and drying dishes, which involved arm and hand movement (P < 0.01 for both). The ActivPAL™ registered a significant number of false positive steps during the cycling exercises (P < 0.001 for both). Conclusion As a number of false positive steps were registered on the activity monitors during the non-stepping activities, the

  19. Energy Landscape Topography Reveals the Underlying Link Between Binding Specificity and Activity of Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jin

    2016-06-14

    Enzyme activity (often quantified by kcat/Km) is the main function of enzyme when it is active against the specific substrate. Higher or lower activities are highly desired for the design of novel enzyme and drug resistance. However, it is difficult to measure the activities of all possible variants and find the "hot-spot" within the limit of experimental time. In this study, we explore the underlying energy landscape of enzyme-substrate interactions and introduce the intrinsic specificity ratio (ISR), which reflects the landscape topography. By studying two concrete systems, we uncover the statistical correlation between the intrinsic specificity and the enzyme activity kcat/Km. This physics-based concept and method show that the energy landscape topography is valuable for understanding the relationship between enzyme specificity and activity. In addition, it can reveal the underlying mechanism of enzyme-substrate actions and has potential applications on enzyme design.

  20. Energy Landscape Topography Reveals the Underlying Link Between Binding Specificity and Activity of Enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Enzyme activity (often quantified by kcat/Km) is the main function of enzyme when it is active against the specific substrate. Higher or lower activities are highly desired for the design of novel enzyme and drug resistance. However, it is difficult to measure the activities of all possible variants and find the “hot-spot” within the limit of experimental time. In this study, we explore the underlying energy landscape of enzyme-substrate interactions and introduce the intrinsic specificity ratio (ISR), which reflects the landscape topography. By studying two concrete systems, we uncover the statistical correlation between the intrinsic specificity and the enzyme activity kcat/Km. This physics-based concept and method show that the energy landscape topography is valuable for understanding the relationship between enzyme specificity and activity. In addition, it can reveal the underlying mechanism of enzyme-substrate actions and has potential applications on enzyme design.

  1. Energy Landscape Topography Reveals the Underlying Link Between Binding Specificity and Activity of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme activity (often quantified by kcat/Km) is the main function of enzyme when it is active against the specific substrate. Higher or lower activities are highly desired for the design of novel enzyme and drug resistance. However, it is difficult to measure the activities of all possible variants and find the “hot-spot” within the limit of experimental time. In this study, we explore the underlying energy landscape of enzyme-substrate interactions and introduce the intrinsic specificity ratio (ISR), which reflects the landscape topography. By studying two concrete systems, we uncover the statistical correlation between the intrinsic specificity and the enzyme activity kcat/Km. This physics-based concept and method show that the energy landscape topography is valuable for understanding the relationship between enzyme specificity and activity. In addition, it can reveal the underlying mechanism of enzyme-substrate actions and has potential applications on enzyme design. PMID:27298067

  2. Specific Sirt1 Activator-mediated Improvement in Glucose Homeostasis Requires Sirt1-Independent Activation of AMPK.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jun; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Um, Jee-Hyun; Brown, Alexandra L; Xu, Xihui; Kang, Hyeog; Ke, Hengming; Feng, Xuesong; Ryall, James; Philp, Andrew; Schenk, Simon; Kim, Myung K; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Chung, Jay H

    2017-03-14

    The specific Sirt1 activator SRT1720 increases mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle, presumably by activating Sirt1. However, Sirt1 gain of function does not increase mitochondrial function, which raises a question about the central role of Sirt1 in SRT1720 action. Moreover, it is believed that the metabolic effects of SRT1720 occur independently of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important metabolic regulator that increases mitochondrial function. Here, we show that SRT1720 activates AMPK in a Sirt1-independent manner and SRT1720 activates AMPK by inhibiting a cAMP degrading phosphodiesterase (PDE) in a competitive manner. Inhibiting the cAMP effector protein Epac prevents SRT1720 from activating AMPK or Sirt1 in myotubes. Moreover, SRT1720 does not increase mitochondrial function or improve glucose tolerance in AMPKα2 knockout mice. Interestingly, weight loss induced by SRT1720 is not sufficient to improve glucose tolerance. Therefore, contrary to current belief, the metabolic effects produced by SRT1720 require AMPK, which can be activated independently of Sirt1.

  3. Comparison of four specific dynamic office chairs with a conventional office chair: impact upon muscle activation, physical activity and posture.

    PubMed

    Ellegast, Rolf P; Kraft, Kathrin; Groenesteijn, Liesbeth; Krause, Frank; Berger, Helmut; Vink, Peter

    2012-03-01

    Prolonged and static sitting postures provoke physical inactivity at VDU workplaces and are therefore discussed as risk factors for the musculoskeletal system. Manufacturers have designed specific dynamic office chairs featuring structural elements which promote dynamic sitting and therefore physical activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of four specific dynamic chairs on erector spinae and trapezius EMG, postures/joint angles and physical activity intensity (PAI) compared to those of a conventional standard office chair. All chairs were fitted with sensors for measurement of the chair parameters (backrest inclination, forward and sideward seat pan inclination), and tested in the laboratory by 10 subjects performing 7 standardized office tasks and by another 12 subjects in the field during their normal office work. Muscle activation revealed no significant differences between the specific dynamic chairs and the reference chair. Analysis of postures/joint angles and PAI revealed only a few differences between the chairs, whereas the tasks performed strongly affected the measured muscle activation, postures and kinematics. The characteristic dynamic elements of each specific chair yielded significant differences in the measured chair parameters, but these characteristics did not appear to affect the sitting dynamics of the subjects performing their office tasks.

  4. Context Specificity of Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling: The Story as Told by Caenorhabditis elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Andrusiak, Matthew G.; Jin, Yishi

    2016-01-01

    Stress-associated p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades trigger specific cellular responses and are involved in multiple disease states. At the root of MAP kinase signaling complexity is the differential use of common components on a context-specific basis. The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans was developed as a system to study genes required for development and nervous system function. The powerful genetics of C. elegans in combination with molecular and cellular dissections has led to a greater understanding of how p38 and JNK signaling affects many biological processes under normal and stress conditions. This review focuses on the studies revealing context specificity of different stress-activated MAPK components in C. elegans. PMID:26907690

  5. Echicetin coated polystyrene beads: a novel tool to investigate GPIb-specific platelet activation and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Navdaev, Alexey; Subramanian, Hariharan; Petunin, Alexey; Clemetson, Kenneth J; Gambaryan, Stepan; Walter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    von Willebrand factor/ristocetin (vWF/R) induces GPIb-dependent platelet agglutination and activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, which also binds vWF. These conditions make it difficult to investigate GPIb-specific signaling pathways in washed platelets. Here, we investigated the specific mechanisms of GPIb signaling using echicetin-coated polystyrene beads, which specifically activate GPIb. We compared platelet activation induced by echicetin beads to vWF/R. Human platelets were stimulated with polystyrene beads coated with increasing amounts of echicetin and platelet activation by echicetin beads was then investigated to reveal GPIb specific signaling. Echicetin beads induced αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation of washed platelets, while under the same conditions vWF/R treatment led only to αIIbβ3-independent platelet agglutination. The average distance between the echicetin molecules on the polystyrene beads must be less than 7 nm for full platelet activation, while the total amount of echicetin used for activation is not critical. Echicetin beads induced strong phosphorylation of several proteins including p38, ERK and PKB. Synergistic signaling via P2Y12 and thromboxane receptor through secreted ADP and TxA2, respectively, were important for echicetin bead triggered platelet activation. Activation of PKG by the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway inhibited echicetin bead-induced platelet aggregation. Echicetin-coated beads are powerful and reliable tools to study signaling in human platelets activated solely via GPIb and GPIb-triggered pathways.

  6. Future of low specific activity molybdenum-99/technetium-99m generator.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, A

    2012-10-01

    In last few years, the shortage of molybdenum-99 (99Mo) was felt in the developed and developing countries hospitals, where diagnostic nuclear medicine is practiced. To overcome the shortage of 99Mo various routes of its production by accelerators and reactors generating low and high specific activity products have been planned. High specific activity 99Mo obtained by fission of uranium-235 (235U) has completely dominated in the manufacturing of technetium-99m (99mTc) generators in last 3-4 decades, but due to proliferation and dirty bomb, issues non fission routes of 99Mo production are emphasized. Future of low specific activity 99Mo is discussed.

  7. Active specific immunotherapy using the immune reaction of a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Y.; Imanaka, K.; Ashida, C.; Takashima, H.; Imajo, Y.; Kimura, S.

    1983-04-01

    Active specific immunotherapy using the immune reaction of a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue was studied on the transplanted MM46 tumor of female C3H/He mice after radiotherapy. MM46 tumor cells were inoculated into the right hind paws of mice. On the 5th day, irradiation with the dose irradiated tumor tissue (2000 rad on the fifth day), were injected into the left hind paws of the tumor-bearing mice. Effectiveness of this active specific immunotherapy against tumor was evaluated by the regression of tumor and survival rate of mice. Tumor was markedly regressed and survival rate was significantly increased by the active specific immunitherapy.

  8. Glucocorticoid activity of various progesterone analogs: correlation between specific binding in thymus and liver and biologic activity.

    PubMed

    DiSorbo, D; Rosen, F; McPartland, R P; Milholland, R J

    1977-03-11

    When tested in an in vitro assay system, progesterone and various analogs of this steroid were shown to compete with [3H] triamcinolone acetonide (TA) for specific glucocorticoid receptors in both rat liver and thymus. Of these analogs, the following derivatives of progesterone were potent competitors of TA binding and, when injected into adrenalectomized rats, induced regression of the thymus and marked increases in hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase activity: 11 beta-hydroxyl, 6 alpha-methyl, 6 alpha, 16 alpha-dimethyl, and 6 alpha-methyl-17 alpha-hydroxyl. In contrast, progesterone, 16 alpha-methyl, and 17 alpha-hydroxy progesterone competed with TA in vitro but failed to elicit either gluco- or antiglucocorticoid activity in vivo. Also, we observed that the oral contraceptive 6 alpha-methyl-17-(1-propynyl)testosterone competes very effectively with TA in a cell-free preparation of rat liver and induces an increase in hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase activity. The 11 beta-hydroxyl group has previously been thought to be essential for glucocorticoid activity. Our studies indicate that substitution of progesterone or testosterone with a 6 alpha-methyl group negates the need for an 11 beta-hydroxyl substitutuent as a prerequisite for glucocorticoid activity.

  9. Single-molecule catalysis mapping quantifies site-specific activity and uncovers radial activity gradient on single 2D nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Andoy, Nesha May; Zhou, Xiaochun; Choudhary, Eric; Shen, Hao; Liu, Guokun; Chen, Peng

    2013-02-06

    Shape-controlled metal nanocrystals are a new generation of nanoscale catalysts. Depending on their shapes, these nanocrystals exhibit various surface facets, and the assignments of their surface facets have routinely been used to rationalize or predict their catalytic activity in a variety of chemical transformations. Recently we discovered that for 1-dimensional (1D) nanocrystals (Au nanorods), the catalytic activity is not constant along the same side facets of single nanorods but rather differs significantly and further shows a gradient along its length, which we attributed to an underlying gradient of surface defect density resulting from their linear decay in growth rate during synthesis (Nat. Nanotechnol.2012, 7, 237-241). Here we report that this behavior also extends to 2D nanocrystals, even for a different catalytic reaction. By using super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to map out the locations of catalytic events within individual triangular and hexagonal Au nanoplates in correlation with scanning electron microscopy, we find that the catalytic activity within the flat {111} surface facet of a Au nanoplate exhibits a 2D radial gradient from the center toward the edges. We propose that this activity gradient results from a growth-dependent surface defect distribution. We also quantify the site-specific activity at different regions within a nanoplate: The corner regions have the highest activity, followed by the edge regions and then the flat surface facets. These discoveries highlight the spatial complexity of catalytic activity at the nanoscale as well as the interplay amid nanocrystal growth, morphology, and surface defects in determining nanocatalyst properties.

  10. Rapid, Specific, No-wash, Far-red Fluorogen Activation in Subcellular Compartments by Targeted Fluorogen Activating Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Live cell imaging requires bright photostable dyes that can target intracellular organelles and proteins with high specificity in a no-wash protocol. Organic dyes possess the desired photochemical properties and can be covalently linked to various protein tags. The currently available fluorogenic dyes are in the green/yellow range where there is high cellular autofluorescence and the near-infrared (NIR) dyes need to be washed out. Protein-mediated activation of far-red fluorogenic dyes has the potential to address these challenges because the cell-permeant dye is small and nonfluorescent until bound to its activating protein, and this binding is rapid. In this study, three single chain variable fragment (scFv)-derived fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs), which activate far-red emitting fluorogens, were evaluated for targeting, brightness, and photostability in the cytosol, nucleus, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and endoplasmic reticulum with a cell-permeant malachite green analog in cultured mammalian cells. Efficient labeling was achieved within 20–30 min for each protein upon the addition of nM concentrations of dye, producing a signal that colocalized significantly with a linked mCerulean3 (mCer3) fluorescent protein and organelle specific dyes but showed divergent photostability and brightness properties dependent on the FAP. These FAPs and the ester of malachite green dye (MGe) can be used as specific, rapid, and wash-free labels for intracellular sites in live cells with far-red excitation and emission properties, useful in a variety of multicolor experiments. PMID:25650487

  11. Benchmark studies of induced radioactivity produced in LHC materials, Part I: Specific activities.

    PubMed

    Brugger, M; Khater, H; Mayer, S; Prinz, A; Roesler, S; Ulrici, L; Vincke, H

    2005-01-01

    Samples of materials which will be used in the LHC machine for shielding and construction components were irradiated in the stray radiation field of the CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility. After irradiation, the specific activities induced in the various samples were analysed with a high-precision gamma spectrometer at various cooling times, allowing identification of isotopes with a wide range of half-lives. Furthermore, the irradiation experiment was simulated in detail with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. A comparison of measured and calculated specific activities shows good agreement, supporting the use of FLUKA for estimating the level of induced activity in the LHC.

  12. Self-Efficacy and Social Support as Mediators Between Culturally Specific Dance and Lifestyle Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Murrock, Carolyn J.; Madigan, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Culturally specific dance has the potential to generate health benefits but is seldom used even among studies advocating culturally specific interventions. This study examined the components of self-efficacy and social support as mediators between culturally specific dance and lifestyle physical activity in African American women (N = 126). An experimental design compared intervention and control groups for mediating effects of self-efficacy and social support on lifestyle physical activity. Findings indicated that only outcome expectations and social support from friends mediated effects. Culturally specific dance is a first step in encouraging African American women to become more physically active and improve health outcomes. The implications are that culturally specific dance programs can improve health outcomes by including members of underserved populations. PMID:18763475

  13. Tissue-specific activity of the pro-opiomelanocortin gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Jeannotte, L.; Trifiro, M.A.; Plante, R.K.; Chamberland, M.; Drouin, J.

    1987-11-01

    The pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene is specifically expressed in corticotroph cells of the anterior pituitary. To define the POMC promoter sequences responsible for tissue-specific expression, we assessed POMC promoter activity by gene transfer into POMC-expressing pituitary tumor cells (AtT-20) and fibroblast L cells. The rat POMC promoter was only efficiently utilized and correctly transcribed in AtT-20 cells. 5'-End deletion analysis revealed two promoter regions for activity in AtT-20 cells. When tested by fusion to a heterologuous promoter, DNA fragments corresponding to both regions exhibited tissue-specific activity, suggesting the presence of at least two tissue-specific DNA sequence elements within the promoter. In summary, POMC promoter sequences from -480 to -34 base pairs appear sufficient to mimic the specificity of anterior pituitary expression.

  14. Reduced plantarflexor specific torque in the elderly is associated with a lower activation capacity.

    PubMed

    Morse, Christopher I; Thom, Jeanette M; Davis, Mark G; Fox, Ken R; Birch, Karen M; Narici, Marco V

    2004-06-01

    Previous studies have reported a decrease in muscle torque per cross-sectional area in old age. This investigation aimed at determining the influence of agonists muscle activation and antagonists co-activation on the specific torque of the plantarflexors (PF) in recreationally active elderly males (EM) and, for comparison, in young men (YM). Twenty-one EM, aged 70-82 years, and 14 YM, aged 19-35 years, performed isometric maximum voluntary contractions (MVC). Activation was assessed by comparing the amplitude of interpolated supramaximal twitch doublets at MVC, with post-tetanic doublet peak torque. Co-activation of the tibialis anterior (TA) was evaluated as the ratio of TA-integrated EMG (IEMG) activity during PF MVC compared to TA IEMG during maximal voluntary dorsiflexion. Triceps surae muscle volume (VOL) was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and PF peak torque was normalised to VOL (PT/VOL) since the later approximates physiological cross-sectional area (CSA) more closely than anatomical CSA. Also, physical activity level, assessed by accelerometry, was significantly lower (21%) in the elderly males. In comparison to the YM group, a greater difference in PT (39%) than VOL (19%) was found in the EM group. PT/VOL and activation capacity were respectively lower by 25% and 21% in EM compared to YM, whereas co-activation was not significantly different. In EM PT/VOL correlated with activation (R(2)=0.31, P<0.01). In conclusion, a reduction in activation capacity may contribute significantly to the decline in specific torque in the plantar flexors of elderly males. The hypothesis is put forward that reduced physical activity is partialy responsible for the reduced activation capacity in the elderly.

  15. The activation of a specific DNA binding protein by neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Teale, B.; Singh, S.; Cohen, D.

    1995-08-30

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the quality of ionizing radiation is critical for activation of a radiation-specific DNA binding protein. We have previously shown that after exposing Epstein Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cells to ionizing radiation, a specific DNA binding factor appears in the nucleus apparently as a result of translocation from the cytoplasm. This protein binds to a number of different genomic sequences and a consensus motif has been identified. Because the protein was not activated by UV light, it was of interest whether high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation was capable of activation. We describe here the activation of a specific DNA binding protein by high LET neutron radiation. The protein binds a region adjacent to and overlapping with the distal repeat within a 179 base-pair fragment of the well-characterized Simian Virus (SV40) bidirectional promoter/enhancer element. The appearance of the DNA binding activity was dose dependent and reached a maximum level by 90 min postirradiation. A reduction in DNA binding activity was evident at later times after irradiation. The specific nature of this response and the rapidity of activation may indicate a pivotal role for this protein in repair or in some other aspect of the cellular response to radiation damage. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Core promoter specificities of the Sp1 and VP16 transcriptional activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Emami, K H; Navarre, W W; Smale, S T

    1995-01-01

    The core promoter compositions of mammalian protein-coding genes are highly variable; some contain TATA boxes, some contain initiator (Inr) elements, and others contain both or neither of these basal elements. The underlying reason for this heterogeneity remains a mystery, as recent studies have suggested that TATA-containing and Inr-containing core promoters direct transcription initiation by similar mechanisms and respond similarly to a wide variety of upstream activators. To analyze in greater detail the influence of core promoter structure on transcriptional activation, we compared activation by GAL4-VP16 and Sp1 through synthetic core promoters containing a TATA box, an Inr, or both TATA and Inr. Striking differences were found between the two activators, most notably in the relative strengths of the TATA/Inr and Inr core promoters: the TATA/Inr promoter was much stronger than the Inr promoter when transcription was activated by GAL4-VP16, but the strengths of the two promoters were more comparable when transcription was activated by Sp1. To define the domains of Sp1 responsible for efficient activation through an Inr, several Sp1 deletion mutants were tested as GAL4 fusion proteins. The results reveal that the glutamine-rich activation domains, which previously were found to interact with Drosophila TAF110, preferentially stimulate Inr-containing core promoters. In contrast, efficient activation through TATA appears to require additional domains of Sp1. These results demonstrate that activation domains differ in their abilities to function with specific core promoters, suggesting that the core promoter structure found in a given gene may reflect a preference of the regulators of that gene. Furthermore, the core promoter preference of an activation domain may be related to a specific mechanism of action, which may provide a functional criterion for grouping activation domains into distinct classes. PMID:7565743

  17. The Role of Specificity, Targeted Learning Activities, and Prior Knowledge for the Effects of Relevance Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roelle, Julian; Lehmkuhl, Nina; Beyer, Martin-Uwe; Berthold, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    In 2 experiments we examined the role of (a) specificity, (b) the type of targeted learning activities, and (c) learners' prior knowledge for the effects of relevance instructions on learning from instructional explanations. In Experiment 1, we recruited novices regarding the topic of atomic structure (N = 80) and found that "specific"…

  18. Process effects on activated carbon with large specific surface area from corn cob.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing; Xie, Ke-Chang; Lv, Yong-Kang; Bao, Wei-Ren

    2006-01-01

    The main factors that affect the large specific surface area (SSA) of the activated carbon from agricultural waste corn cobs were studied by chemically activated method with solution of KOH and soap which acted as surfactant. The experiment showed that not only the activation temperature, activation time and the mass ratio of KOH to the carbonized material, but also the activated methods using activator obviously influenced the SSA of activated carbon. The experimental operating conditions were as follows: the carbonized temperature being 450 degrees C and keeping time being 4 h using N2 as protective gas; the activation temperature being 850 degrees C and holding time being 1.2 h; the mass ratio of KOH to carbonized material being 4.0; the time of soaking carbonized material in the solution of KOH and soap being 30 min. Under the optimal conditions, the SSA of activated carbon from corn cobs reached 2700 m2/g. And the addition of the soap as surfactant may shorten the soaking time. The structure of the activated carbon prepared had narrow distribution of pore size and the micro-pores accounted for 78%. The advantages of the method described were easy and feasible.

  19. Neural network versus activity-specific prediction equations for energy expenditure estimation in children.

    PubMed

    Ruch, Nicole; Joss, Franziska; Jimmy, Gerda; Melzer, Katarina; Hänggi, Johanna; Mäder, Urs

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the energy expenditure (EE) estimations of activity-specific prediction equations (ASPE) and of an artificial neural network (ANNEE) based on accelerometry with measured EE. Forty-three children (age: 9.8 ± 2.4 yr) performed eight different activities. They were equipped with one tri-axial accelerometer that collected data in 1-s epochs and a portable gas analyzer. The ASPE and the ANNEE were trained to estimate the EE by including accelerometry, age, gender, and weight of the participants. To provide the activity-specific information, a decision tree was trained to recognize the type of activity through accelerometer data. The ASPE were applied to the activity-type-specific data recognized by the tree (Tree-ASPE). The Tree-ASPE precisely estimated the EE of all activities except cycling [bias: -1.13 ± 1.33 metabolic equivalent (MET)] and walking (bias: 0.29 ± 0.64 MET; P < 0.05). The ANNEE overestimated the EE of stationary activities (bias: 0.31 ± 0.47 MET) and walking (bias: 0.61 ± 0.72 MET) and underestimated the EE of cycling (bias: -0.90 ± 1.18 MET; P < 0.05). Biases of EE in stationary activities (ANNEE: 0.31 ± 0.47 MET, Tree-ASPE: 0.08 ± 0.21 MET) and walking (ANNEE 0.61 ± 0.72 MET, Tree-ASPE: 0.29 ± 0.64 MET) were significantly smaller in the Tree-ASPE than in the ANNEE (P < 0.05). The Tree-ASPE was more precise in estimating the EE than the ANNEE. The use of activity-type-specific information for subsequent EE prediction equations might be a promising approach for future studies.

  20. Relative Contributions of Specific Activity Histories and Spontaneous Processes to Size Remodeling of Glutamatergic Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Dvorkin, Roman; Ziv, Noam E.

    2016-01-01

    The idea that synaptic properties are defined by specific pre- and postsynaptic activity histories is one of the oldest and most influential tenets of contemporary neuroscience. Recent studies also indicate, however, that synaptic properties often change spontaneously, even in the absence of specific activity patterns or any activity whatsoever. What, then, are the relative contributions of activity history-dependent and activity history-independent processes to changes synapses undergo? To compare the relative contributions of these processes, we imaged, in spontaneously active networks of cortical neurons, glutamatergic synapses formed between the same axons and neurons or dendrites under the assumption that their similar activity histories should result in similar size changes over timescales of days. The size covariance of such commonly innervated (CI) synapses was then compared to that of synapses formed by different axons (non-CI synapses) that differed in their activity histories. We found that the size covariance of CI synapses was greater than that of non-CI synapses; yet overall size covariance of CI synapses was rather modest. Moreover, momentary and time-averaged sizes of CI synapses correlated rather poorly, in perfect agreement with published electron microscopy-based measurements of mouse cortex synapses. A conservative estimate suggested that ~40% of the observed size remodeling was attributable to specific activity histories, whereas ~10% and ~50% were attributable to cell-wide and spontaneous, synapse-autonomous processes, respectively. These findings demonstrate that histories of naturally occurring activity patterns can direct glutamatergic synapse remodeling but also suggest that the contributions of spontaneous, possibly stochastic, processes are at least as great. PMID:27776122

  1. Roles of s3 site residues of nattokinase on its activity and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuming; Feng, Chi; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-09-01

    Nattokinase (Subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with high fibrinolytic activity. To probe their roles on protease activity and substrate specificity, three residues of S3 site (Gly(100), Ser(101) and Leu(126)) were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis. Kinetics parameters of 20 mutants were measured using tetrapeptides as substrates, and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. Results of mutation analysis showed that Gly(100) and Ser(101) had reverse steric and electrostatic effects. Residues with bulky or positively charged side chains at position 100 decreased the substrate binding and catalytic activity drastically, while residues with the same characters at position 101 could obviously enhance protease and fibrinolytic activity of NK. Mutation of Leu(126) might impair the structure of the active cleft and drastically decreased the activity of NK. Kinetics studies of the mutants showed that S3 residues were crucial to keep protease activity while they moderately affected substrate specificity of NK. The present study provided some original insight into the P3-S3 interaction in NK and other subtilisins, as well as showed successful protein engineering cases to improve NK as a potential therapeutic agent.

  2. Distribution of glycosylinositol phosphoceramide-specific phospholipase D activity in plants.

    PubMed

    Kida, Takashi; Itoh, Aoi; Kimura, Akari; Matsuoka, Hisatsugu; Imai, Hiroyuki; Kogure, Kentaro; Tokumura, Akira; Tanaka, Tamotsu

    2016-11-08

    Previously, we detected an unknown sphingophospholipid in cabbage leaves and identified it as phytoceramide-1-phosphate (PC1P). We also found an enzyme activity that produces PC1P by glycosylinositol phosphoceramide (GIPC)-specific hydrolysis in cabbage leaves. To characterize the GIPC-specific phospholipase D (GIPC-PLD) activity, we investigated distributions of GIPC-PLD activity in 25 tissues of 10 plants. In most plants, the GIPC-PLD activity was the highest in roots. Young leaves of cabbage and Welsh onion had higher activities than corresponding aged outer leaves. The GIPC-PLD activities in leaves, stems and roots of mung bean were higher in the sprouting stage than in more mature stages. We also examined the distribution of substrate GIPC and product PC1P and found that GIPC was ubiquitously distributed at 50-280 nmol/g (wet wt) in tissues of plants, whereas PC1P was detectable (3-60 nmol/g wet wt.) only in tissues showing considerable GIPC-PLD activity. These results suggest a possibility that GIPC-PLD activity is involved in plant growth.

  3. Premotor Cortex Activation Elicited during Word Comprehension Relies on Access of Specific Action Concepts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nan; Wang, Xiaoying; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Yanping; Li, Xingshan; Bi, Yanchao

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between the lexical-semantic and sensory-motor systems is an important topic in cognitive neuroscience. An important finding indicating that these two systems interact is that reading action verbs activates the motor system of the human brain. Two constraints have been proposed to modulate this activation: the effector information associated with the action concepts and statistical regularities between sublexical features and grammatical classes. Using fMRI, we examined whether these two types of information can activate the motor system in the absence of specific motor-semantic content by manipulating the existence of a sublexical cue, called the hand radical, which strongly indicates the semantic feature "hand-related" and grammatical class "verb." Although hand radical characters referring to specific manual actions evoked stronger activation in the premotor cortex than the control characters, hand radical pseudocharacters did not evoke specific activation within the motor system. These results indicated that activation of the premotor cortex during word reading relies on the access of specific action concepts.

  4. Membrane-associated forms of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase activity in rat pituitary. Tissue specificity.

    PubMed

    May, V; Cullen, E I; Braas, K M; Eipper, B A

    1988-06-05

    Membrane-associated peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) activity was investigated in rat anterior and neurointermediate pituitary tissues and in pituitary AtT-20/D-16v and GH3 cell lines. A substantial fraction of total pituitary PAM activity was found to be membrane-associated. Triton X-100, N-octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside, and Zwittergent were effective in solubilizing PAM activity from crude pituitary membranes. The distribution of enzyme activity between soluble and membrane-associated forms was tissue-specific. In the anterior pituitary lobe and pituitary cell lines, 40-60% of total PAM activity was membrane-associated while only 10% of the alpha-amidating activity in the neurointermediate lobe was membrane-associated. Soluble and membrane-associated forms of PAM shared nearly identical characteristics with respect to copper and ascorbate requirements, pH optima, and Km values. Upon subcellular fractionation of anterior and neurointermediate pituitary lobe homogenates on Percoll gradients, 12-18% of total PAM activity was found in the rough endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi fractions and 42-60% was localized to secretory granule fractions. For both tissues, membrane-associated PAM activity was enriched in the rough endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi pool, whereas most of the secretory granule-associated enzyme activity was soluble.

  5. Pyrimidine-specific 5' nucleotidase activity in bovine erythrocytes: effect of phlebotomy and lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.W.; Duncan, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Erythrocyte pyrimidine-specific 5' nucleotidase (PY5'N) (E.C. 3.1.3.5) was measured in healthy, anemic, and lead-poisoned calves to determine whether low activity of PY5'N is associated with the propensity of cattle to develop basophilic stippling of erythrocytes. Low activity of PY5'N has been associated with basophilic stippling of erythrocytes in persons with inherited hemolytic anemia and with lead poisoning. A radiometric technique, using (/sup 14/C)cytidine monophosphate as the substrate, was used to measured PY5'N activity. The erythrocytes from 4 healthy calves had much lower activity (mean of 7.1 +/- 1.6 nmols of (/sup 14/C)cytidine monophosphate hydrolyzed/min/g of hemoglobin) than has been reported for human erythrocytes. The pH response curve of bovine PY5'N was similar to that of the human enzyme, with maximal activity around pH 7. Experimental hemorrhagic anemia in these calves increased PY5'N activity 6-to 7-fold, with peak activity occurring concomitantly with maximum reticulocytosis. Two of the calves were then given lead per os, and the PY5'N activity decreased within 24 hours to base-line values. In the 2 other calves not given lead, the PY5'N activity declined slowly, but did not reach base-line values after 14 days.

  6. Successful Remembering Elicits Event-Specific Activity Patterns in Lateral Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Marvin M.

    2014-01-01

    Remembering a past event involves reactivation of content-specific patterns of neural activity in high-level perceptual regions (e.g., ventral temporal cortex, VTC). In contrast, the subjective experience of vivid remembering is typically associated with increased activity in lateral parietal cortex (LPC)—“retrieval success effects” that are thought to generalize across content types. However, the functional significance of LPC activation during memory retrieval remains a subject of active debate. In particular, theories are divided with respect to whether LPC actively represents retrieved content or if LPC activity only scales with content reactivation elsewhere (e.g., VTC). Here, we report a human fMRI study of visual memory recall (faces vs scenes) in which complementary forms of multivoxel pattern analysis were used to test for and compare content reactivation within LPC and VTC. During recall of visual images, we observed robust reactivation of broad category information (face vs scene) in both VTC and LPC. Moreover, recall-related activity patterns in LPC, but not VTC, differentiated between individual events. Importantly, these content effects were particularly evident in areas of LPC (namely, angular gyrus) in which activity scaled with subjective reports of recall vividness. These findings provide striking evidence that LPC not only signals that memories have been successfully recalled, but actively represents what is being remembered. PMID:24899726

  7. Controlling nuclear JAKs and STATs for specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Noon-Song, Ezra N.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Dabelic, Rea; Canton, Johnathan; Johnson, Howard M.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interact with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-associated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. {yields} We show that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also associate with IFNGR1 in the nucleus. {yields} The activated Janus kinases are responsible for phosphorylation of tyrosine 41 on histone H3, an important epigenetic event for specific gene activation. -- Abstract: We previously showed that gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interacted with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-activated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. Recent studies have suggested that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also played a role in gene activation by phosphorylation of histone H3 on tyrosine 41. This study addresses the question of the role of activated JAKs in specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}. We carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by PCR in IFN{gamma} treated WISH cells and showed association of pJAK1, pJAK2, IFNGR1, and STAT1 on the same DNA sequence of the IRF-1 gene promoter. The {beta}-actin gene, which is not activated by IFN{gamma}, did not show this association. The movement of activated JAK to the nucleus and the IRF-1 promoter was confirmed by the combination of nuclear fractionation, confocal microscopy and DNA precipitation analysis using the biotinylated GAS promoter. Activated JAKs in the nucleus was associated with phosphorylated tyrosine 41 on histone H3 in the region of the GAS promoter. Unphosphorylated JAK2 was found to be constitutively present in the nucleus and was capable of undergoing activation in IFN{gamma} treated cells, most likely via nuclear IFNGR1. Association of pJAK2 and IFNGR1 with histone H3 in IFN{gamma} treated cells was demonstrated by histone H3 immunoprecipitation. Unphosphorylated STAT1 protein was associated with histone H3 of untreated cells. IFN

  8. Phosphatase activity and specific methanogenic activity in an anaerobic reactor treating sludge from a brackish recirculation aquaculture system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuedong; Ferreira, Rui B; Spanjers, Henri; van Lier, Jules B

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment of high salinity sludge from marine/brackish recirculation aquaculture systems is potentially limited by inhibition of enzymatic activities and cell lysis resulting from high osmotic pressures. To further address these limitations the following investigations were conducted: effect of salinity on phosphatase activity (PA), soluble microbial products (SMP) production, and presence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS); effect of iron (III) chloride (FeCl3) on PA and specific methanogenic activity (SMA); effect of addition of the compatible solute glycine betaine (GB) and potassium on PA, as well as on SMP and EPS production, all under saline conditions. The results show that salinity has different effects on PA of anaerobes under starvation and feeding conditions. FeCl3 increased the SMA of the sludge by 22.5% at 100 mg FeCl3/L compared with a control group (0 mg FeCl3/L). Furthermore, results of analysis of variance tests show that betaine increased the polysaccharide content of EPS and polypeptide content of SMP. However, addition of 1 mM potassium chloride did not show a significant effect on EPS and SMP composition. In conclusion, anaerobic digestion of salty sludges from a brackish aquaculture recirculation system may not be negatively affected by FeCl3 addition to concentrate waste streams, whereas GB boosts the production of SMP and EPS.

  9. Characterization of coumarin-specific prenyltransferase activities in Citrus limon peel.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Ryosuke; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Koeduka, Takao; Sasaki, Kanako; Tsurumaru, Yusuke; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi; Azuma, Jun-Ichi; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2012-01-01

    Coumarins, a large group of polyphenols, play important roles in the defense mechanisms of plants, and they also exhibit various biological activities beneficial to human health, often enhanced by prenylation. Despite the high abundance of prenylated coumarins in citrus fruits, there has been no report on coumarin-specific prenyltransferase activity in citrus. In this study, we detected both O- and C-prenyltransferase activities of coumarin substrates in a microsome fraction prepared from lemon (Citrus limon) peel, where large amounts of prenylated coumarins accumulate. Bergaptol was the most preferred substrate out of various coumarin derivatives tested, and geranyl diphosphate (GPP) was accepted exclusively as prenyl donor substrate. Further enzymatic characterization of bergaptol 5-O-geranyltransferase activity revealed its unique properties: apparent K(m) values for GPP (9 µM) and bergaptol (140 µM) and a broad divalent cation requirement. These findings provide information towards the discovery of a yet unidentified coumarin-specific prenyltransferase gene.

  10. Radioiodination of interleukin 2 to high specific activities by the vapor-phase chloramine T method

    SciTech Connect

    Siekierka, J.J.; DeGudicibus, S.

    1988-08-01

    Recombinant human interleukin 2 (IL-2) was radioiodinated utilizing the vapor phase chloramine T method of iodination. The method is rapid, reproducible, and allows the efficient radioiodination of IL-2 to specific activities higher than those previously attained with full retention of biological activity. IL-2 radioiodinated by this method binds with high affinity to receptors present on phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes and should be useful for the study of receptor structure and function.

  11. A reassessment of the role of activity in the formation of eye-specific retinogeniculate projections.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, Leo M

    2007-10-01

    In all mammalian species the projections from the two eyes to the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus terminate in separate layers or territories. This mature projection pattern is refined early in development from an initial state where the inputs of the two eyes are overlapping. Here I discuss the results of studies showing that the formation of segregated eye-specific retinogeniculate projections involves activity-mediated binocular competition. I conclude that while retinal activity undoubtedly is involved in this process, the results of recent studies cast doubt on the prevalent notion that retinal waves of activity play an instructional role in the formation of segregated retinal projections.

  12. Activation of tumoricidal properties in human blood monocytes by muramyl dipeptide requires specific intracellular interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fogler, W.E.; Fidler, I.J.

    1986-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism by which muramyl dipeptide (MDP) activates antitumor cytotoxic properties in normal and interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..)-primed human peripheral blood monocytes. The structurally and functionally active MDP analog, nor-muramyl dipeptide (nor-MDP), and (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP were used as reference glycopeptides. Direct activation of normal, noncytotoxic monocytes by nor-MDP was enhanced its encapsulation within multilamellar vesicles (MLV). Studies with (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP revealed that the activation of monocytes by nor-MDP was not attributable to its interaction with a specific cell surface receptor, nor did it result merely from the internalization by monocytes of glycopeptide. Subthreshold concentrations of nor-MDP could activate tumor cytotoxic properties in IFN-..gamma..-primed monocytes. The intracellular interaction of (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP with IFN-..gamma..-primed monocytes was specific in that intracellular levels of radiolabeled material could be displaced and recovered as intact molecules by unlabeled nor-MDP, but not by a biologically inactive MDP stereoisomer. Collectively, these results suggest that the activation of tumoricidal properties in human blood monocytes by MDP occurs subsequent to intracellular interaction with specific MDP receptors.

  13. Active tissue-specific DNA demethylation conferred by somatic cell nuclei in stable heterokaryons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Pomerantz, Jason H.; Sen, George; Palermo, Adam T.; Blau, Helen M.

    2007-01-01

    DNA methylation is among the most stable epigenetic marks, ensuring tissue-specific gene expression in a heritable manner throughout development. Here we report that differentiated mesodermal somatic cells can confer tissue-specific changes in DNA methylation on epidermal progenitor cells after fusion in stable multinucleate heterokaryons. Myogenic factors alter regulatory regions of genes in keratinocyte cell nuclei, demethylating and activating a muscle-specific gene and methylating and silencing a keratinocyte-specific gene. Because these changes occur in the absence of DNA replication or cell division, they are mediated by an active mechanism. Thus, the capacity to transfer epigenetic changes to other nuclei is not limited to embryonic stem cells and oocytes but is also a property of highly specialized mammalian somatic cells. These results suggest the possibility of directing the reprogramming of readily available postnatal human progenitor cells toward specific tissue cell types. PMID:17360535

  14. Assessment of multifunctional activity of bioactive peptides derived from fermented milk by specific Lactobacillus plantarum strains.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Toalá, J E; Santiago-López, L; Peres, C M; Peres, C; Garcia, H S; Vallejo-Cordoba, B; González-Córdova, A F; Hernández-Mendoza, A

    2017-01-01

    Milk-derived bioactive peptides with a single activity (e.g., antioxidant, immunomodulatory, or antimicrobial) have been previously well documented; however, few studies describe multifunctional bioactive peptides, which may be preferred over single-activity peptides, as they can simultaneously trigger, modulate, or inhibit multiple physiological pathways. Hence, the aim of this study was to assess the anti-inflammatory, antihemolytic, antioxidant, antimutagenic, and antimicrobial activities of crude extracts (CE) and peptide fractions (<3 and 3-10 kDa) obtained from fermented milks with specific Lactobacillus plantarum strains. Overall, CE showed higher activity than both peptide fractions (<3 and 3-10 kDa) in most of the activities assessed. Furthermore, activity of <3 kDa was generally higher, or at least equal, to the 3 to 10 kDa peptide fractions. In particular, L. plantarum 55 crude extract or their fractions showed the higher anti-inflammatory (723.68-1,759.43μg/mL of diclofenac sodium equivalents), antihemolytic (36.65-74.45% of inhibition), and antioxidant activity [282.8-362.3µmol of Trolox (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO) equivalents]. These results provide valuable evidence of multifunctional role of peptides derived of fermented milk by the action of specific L. plantarum strains. Thus, they may be considered for the development of biotechnological products to be used to reduce the risk of disease or to enhance a certain physiological function.

  15. Specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity (A QSI) of thiophenones and their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Scheie, Anne Aamdal; Benneche, Tore; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-12-09

    Disease caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens is becoming a serious problem, both in human and veterinary medicine. The inhibition of quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, is a promising alternative strategy to control disease. In this study, we determined the quorum sensing-disrupting activity of 20 thiophenones towards the quorum sensing model bacterium V. harveyi. In order to exclude false positives, we propose a new parameter (AQSI) to describe specific quorum sensing activity. AQSI is defined as the ratio between inhibition of quorum sensing-regulated activity in a reporter strain and inhibition of the same activity when it is independent of quorum sensing. Calculation of AQSI allowed to exclude five false positives, whereas the six most active thiophenones (TF203, TF307, TF319, TF339, TF342 and TF403) inhibited quorum sensing at 0.25 μM, with AQSI higher than 10. Further, we determined the protective effect and toxicity of the thiophenones in a highly controlled gnotobiotic model system with brine shrimp larvae. There was a strong positive correlation between the specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity of the thiophenones and the protection of brine shrimp larvae against pathogenic V. harveyi. Four of the most active quorum sensing-disrupting thiophenones (TF 203, TF319, TF339 and TF342) were considered to be promising since they have a therapeutic potential of at least 10.

  16. Chemical synthesis of high specific-activity (/sup 35/S)adenosylhomocysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, P.H.; Hoffman, R.M.

    1986-11-01

    The study of the family of transmethylases, critical to normal cellular function and often altered in cancer, can be facilitated by the availability of a high specific-activity S-adenosylhomocysteine. The authors report the two-step preparation of (/sup 35/S)adenosylhomocysteine from (/sup 35/S)methionine at a specific activity of 1420 Ci/mmol in an overall yield of 24% by a procedure involving demethylation of the (/sup 35/S)methionine to (/sup 35/S)homocysteine followed by condensation with 5'-chloro-5'-deoxyadenosine. The ease of the reactions, ready availability and low cost of the reagents and high specific-activity and stability of the product make the procedure an attractive one with many uses, and superior to current methodology.

  17. Toward understanding RhoGTPase specificity: structure, function and local activation

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Antje; Reinhard, Nathalie R; Hordijk, Peter L

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are regulated through the concerted action of cytoskeletal dynamics and adhesion proteins, the activity of which is governed by RhoGTPases. Specific RhoGTPase signaling requires spatio-temporal activation and coordination of subsequent protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. The nature, location and duration of these interactions are dependent on polarized extracellular triggers, such as cell-cell contact, and intracellular modifying events, such as phosphorylation. RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC are highly homologous GTPases that, however, succeed in generating specific intracellular responses. Here, we discuss the key features that contribute to this specificity. These not only include the well-studied switch regions, the conformation of which is nucleotide-dependent, but also additional regions and seemingly small differences in primary sequence that also contribute to specific interactions. These differences translate into differential surface charge distribution, local exposure of amino acid side-chains and isoform-specific post-translational modifications. The available evidence supports the notion that multiple regions in RhoA/B/C cooperate to provide specificity in binding to regulators and effectors. These specific interactions are highly regulated in time and space. We therefore subsequently discuss current approaches means to visualize and analyze localized GTPase activation using biosensors that allow imaging of isoform-specific, localized regulation. PMID:25483298

  18. Site-directed mutagenesis of an alkaline phytase: influencing specificity, activity and stability in acidic milieu.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thuy T; Mamo, Gashaw; Búxo, Laura; Le, Nhi N; Gaber, Yasser; Mattiasson, Bo; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2011-07-10

    Site-directed mutagenesis of a thermostable alkaline phytase from Bacillus sp. MD2 was performed with an aim to increase its specific activity and activity and stability in an acidic environment. The mutation sites are distributed on the catalytic surface of the enzyme (P257R, E180N, E229V and S283R) and in the active site (K77R, K179R and E227S). Selection of the residues was based on the idea that acid active phytases are more positively charged around their catalytic surfaces. Thus, a decrease in the content of negatively charged residues or an increase in the positive charges in the catalytic region of an alkaline phytase was assumed to influence the enzyme activity and stability at low pH. Moreover, widening of the substrate-binding pocket is expected to improve the hydrolysis of substrates that are not efficiently hydrolysed by wild type alkaline phytase. Analysis of the phytase variants revealed that E229V and S283R mutants increased the specific activity by about 19% and 13%, respectively. Mutation of the active site residues K77R and K179R led to severe reduction in the specific activity of the enzyme. Analysis of the phytase mutant-phytate complexes revealed increase in hydrogen bonding between the enzyme and the substrate, which might retard the release of the product, resulting in decreased activity. On the other hand, the double mutant (K77R-K179R) phytase showed higher stability at low pH (pH 2.6-3.0). The E227S variant was optimally active at pH 5.5 (in contrast to the wild type enzyme that had an optimum pH of 6) and it exhibited higher stability in acidic condition. This mutant phytase, displayed over 80% of its initial activity after 3h incubation at pH 2.6 while the wild type phytase retained only about 40% of its original activity. Moreover, the relative activity of this mutant phytase on calcium phytate, sodium pyrophosphate and p-nitro phenyl phosphate was higher than that of the wild type phytase.

  19. Sequence of the lid affects activity and specificity of Candida rugosa lipase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Brocca, Stefania; Secundo, Francesco; Ossola, Mattia; Alberghina, Lilia; Carrea, Giacomo; Lotti, Marina

    2003-10-01

    The fungus Candida rugosa produces multiple lipase isoenzymes (CRLs) with distinct differences in substrate specificity, in particular with regard to selectivity toward the fatty acyl chain length. Moreover, isoform CRL3 displays high activity towards cholesterol esters. Lipase isoenzymes share over 80% sequence identity but diverge in the sequence of the lid, a mobile loop that modulates access to the active site. In the active enzyme conformation, the open lid participates in the substrate-binding site and contributes to substrate recognition. To address the role of the lid in CRL activity and specificity, we substituted the lid sequences from isoenzymes CRL3 and CRL4 in recombinant rCRL1, thus obtaining enzymes differing only in this stretch of residues. Swapping the CRL3 lid was sufficient to confer to CRL1 cholesterol esterase activity. On the other hand, a specific shift in the chain-length specificity was not observed. Chimeric proteins displayed different sensitivity to detergents in the reaction medium.

  20. Mercury specifically induces LINE-1 activity in a human neuroblastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Laleh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Tabrizi, Mina; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein; Akrami, Seyed Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    L1 retro-elements comprise 17% of the human genome. Approximately 100 copies of these autonomous mobile elements are active in our DNA and can cause mutations, gene disruptions, and genomic instability. Therefore, human cells control the activities of L1 elements, in order to prevent their deleterious effects through different mechanisms. However, some toxic agents increase the retrotransposition activity of L1 elements in somatic cells. In order to identify specific effects of neurotoxic metals on L1 activity in neuronal cells, we studied the effects of mercury and cobalt on L1-retroelement activity by measuring levels of cellular transcription, protein expression, and genomic retrotransposition in a neuroblastoma cell line compared with the effects in three non-neuronal cell lines. Our results show that mercury increased the expression of L1 RNA, the activity of the L1 5'UTR, and L1 retrotransposition exclusively in the neuroblastoma cell line but not in non-neuronal cell lines. However, cobalt increased the expression of L1 RNA in neuroblastoma cells, HeLa cells, and wild-type human fibroblasts, and also increased the activity of the L1 5'UTR as well as the SV40 promoter in HeLa cells but not in neuroblastoma cells. Exposure to cobalt did not result in increased retrotransposition activity in HeLa cells or neuroblastoma cells. We conclude that non-toxic levels of the neurotoxic agent mercury could influence DNA by increasing L1 activities, specifically in neuronal cells, and may make these cells susceptible to neurodegeneration over time.

  1. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana; Gritsenko, Natalia; Rask, Lene; Mainbakh, Yuli; Zilberstein, Yael; Yagil, Ezra; Kolot, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression of a cytotoxic gene. In the present study we developed a new cancer specific binary expression system activated by the Integrase (Int) of the lambdoid phage HK022. We demonstrate the validity of this system by the specific expression of a luciferase (luc) reporter in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells and in a lung cancer mouse model. Due to the absence viral vectors and of cytotoxicity the Int based binary system offers advantages over previously described counterparts and may therefore be developed into a safer cancer cell killing system. PMID:27117628

  2. 2,4-Dichlorophenol hydroxylase for chlorophenol removal: Substrate specificity and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hejun; Li, Qingchao; Zhan, Yang; Fang, Xuexun; Yu, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophenols (CPs) are common environmental pollutants. As such, different treatments have been assessed to facilitate their removal. In this study, 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) hydroxylase was used to systematically investigate the activity and removal ability of 19CP congeners at 25 and 0 °C. Results demonstrated that 2,4-DCP hydroxylase exhibited a broad substrate specificity to CPs. The activities of 2,4-DCP hydroxylase against specific CP congeners, including 3-CP, 2,3,6-trichlorophenol, 2-CP, and 2,3-DCP, were higher than those against 2,4-DCP, which is the preferred substrate of previously reported 2,4-DCP hydroxylase. To verify whether cofactors are necessary to promote hydroxylase activity against CP congeners, we added FAD and found that the added FAD induced a 1.33-fold to 5.13-fold significant increase in hydroxylase activity against different CP congeners. The metabolic pathways of the CP degradation in the enzymatic hydroxylation step were preliminarily proposed on the basis of the analyses of the enzymatic activities against 19CP congeners. We found that the high activity and removal rate of 2,4-DCP hydroxylase against CPs at 0 °C enhance the low-temperature-adaptability of this enzyme to the CP congeners; as such, the proposed removal process may be applied to biochemical, bioremediation, and industrial processes, particularly in cold environments.

  3. Site-specific phosphorylation and microtubule dynamics control Pyrin inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wenqing; Yang, Jieling; Liu, Wang; Wang, Yupeng; Shao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Pyrin, encoded by the MEFV gene, is best known for its gain-of-function mutations causing familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), an autoinflammatory disease. Pyrin forms a caspase-1–activating inflammasome in response to inactivating modifications of Rho GTPases by various bacterial toxins or effectors. Pyrin-mediated innate immunity is unique in that it senses bacterial virulence rather than microbial molecules, but its mechanism of activation is unknown. Here we show that Pyrin was phosphorylated in bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells. We identified Ser-205 and Ser-241 in mouse Pyrin whose phosphorylation resulted in inhibitory binding by cellular 14-3-3 proteins. The two serines underwent dephosphorylation upon toxin stimulation or bacterial infection, triggering 14-3-3 dissociation, which correlated with Pyrin inflammasome activation. We developed antibodies specific for phosphorylated Ser-205 and Ser-241, which confirmed the stimuli-induced dephosphorylation of endogenous Pyrin. Mutational analyses indicated that both phosphorylation and signal-induced dephosphorylation of Ser-205/241 are important for Pyrin activation. Moreover, microtubule drugs, including colchicine, commonly used to treat FMF, effectively blocked activation of the Pyrin inflammasome. These drugs did not affect Pyrin dephosphorylation and 14-3-3 dissociation but inhibited Pyrin-mediated apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing CARD (ASC) aggregation. Our study reveals that site-specific (de)phosphorylation and microtubule dynamics critically control Pyrin inflammasome activation, illustrating a fine and complex mechanism in cytosolic immunity. PMID:27482109

  4. Oligodendrocyte-specific activation of PERK signaling protects mice against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wensheng; Lin, Yifeng; Li, Jin; Fenstermaker, Ali G; Way, Sharon W; Clayton, Benjamin; Jamison, Stephanie; Harding, Heather P; Ron, David; Popko, Brian

    2013-04-03

    There is compelling evidence that oligodendrocyte apoptosis, in response to CNS inflammation, contributes significantly to the development of the demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Therefore, approaches designed to protect oligodendrocytes would likely have therapeutic value. Activation of pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) signaling in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress increases cell survival under various cytotoxic conditions. Moreover, there is evidence that PERK signaling is activated in oligodendrocytes within demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis and EAE. Our previous study demonstrated that CNS delivery of the inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ before EAE onset protected mice against EAE, and this protection was dependent on PERK signaling. In our current study, we sought to elucidate the role of PERK signaling in oligodendrocytes during EAE. We generated transgenic mice that allow for temporally controlled activation of PERK signaling, in the absence of ER stress, specifically in oligodendrocytes. We demonstrated that persistent activation of PERK signaling was not deleterious to oligodendrocyte viability or the myelin of adult animals. Importantly, we found that enhanced activation of PERK signaling specifically in oligodendrocytes significantly attenuated EAE disease severity, which was associated with reduced oligodendrocyte apoptosis, demyelination, and axonal degeneration. This effect was not the result of an altered degree of the inflammatory response in EAE mice. Our results provide direct evidence that activation of PERK signaling in oligodendrocytes is cytoprotective, protecting mice against EAE.

  5. Tumor-Specific Multiple Stimuli-Activated Dendrimeric Nanoassemblies with Metabolic Blockade Surmount Chemotherapy Resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Yachao; Xu, Xianghui; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Yunkun; Zhang, Zhijun; Gu, Zhongwei

    2017-01-24

    Chemotherapy resistance remains a serious impediment to successful antitumor therapy around the world. However, existing chemotherapeutic approaches are difficult to cope with the notorious multidrug resistance in clinical treatment. Herein, we developed tumor-specific multiple stimuli-activated dendrimeric nanoassemblies with a metabolic blockade to completely combat both physiological barriers and cellular factors of multidrug resistance. With a sophisticated molecular and supramolecular engineering, this type of tumor-specific multiple stimuli-activated nanoassembly based on dendrimeric prodrugs can hierarchically break through the sequential physiological barriers of drug resistance, including stealthy dendritic PEGylated corona to optimize blood transportation, robust nanostructures for efficient tumor passive targeting and accumulation, enzyme-activated tumor microenvironment targeted to deepen tumor penetration and facilitate cellular uptake, cytoplasmic redox-sensitive disintegration for sufficient release of encapsulated agents, and lysosome acid-triggered nucleus delivery of antitumor drugs. In the meantime, we proposed a versatile tactic of a tumor-specific metabolism blockade for provoking several pathways (ATP restriction, apoptotic activation, and anti-apoptotic inhibition) to restrain multiple cellular factors of drug resistance. The highly efficient antitumor activity to drug-resistant MCF-7R tumor in vitro and in vivo supports this design and strongly defeats both physiological barriers and cellular factors of chemotherapy resistance. This work sets up an innovative dendrimeric nanosystem to surmount multidrug resistance, contributing to the development of a comprehensive nanoparticulate strategy for future clinical applications.

  6. Mitochondria are required for antigen-specific T cell activation through reactive oxygen species signaling.

    PubMed

    Sena, Laura A; Li, Sha; Jairaman, Amit; Prakriya, Murali; Ezponda, Teresa; Hildeman, David A; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Schumacker, Paul T; Licht, Jonathan D; Perlman, Harris; Bryce, Paul J; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2013-02-21

    It is widely appreciated that T cells increase glycolytic flux during activation, but the role of mitochondrial flux is unclear. Here, we have shown that mitochondrial metabolism in the absence of glucose metabolism is sufficient to support interleukin-2 (IL-2) induction. Furthermore, we used mice with reduced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) production in T cells (T-Uqcrfs(-/-) mice) to show that mitochondria are required for T cell activation to produce mROS for activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and subsequent IL-2 induction. These mice could not induce antigen-specific expansion of T cells in vivo, but Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells retained the ability to proliferate in vivo under lymphopenic conditions. This suggests that Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells were not lacking bioenergetically but rather lacked specific ROS-dependent signaling events needed for antigen-specific expansion. Thus, mitochondrial metabolism is a critical component of T cell activation through the production of complex III ROS.

  7. Orexin-dependent activation of layer VIb enhances cortical network activity and integration of non-specific thalamocortical inputs.

    PubMed

    Hay, Y Audrey; Andjelic, Sofija; Badr, Sammy; Lambolez, Bertrand

    2015-11-01

    Neocortical layer VI is critically involved in thalamocortical activity changes during the sleep/wake cycle. It receives dense projections from thalamic nuclei sensitive to the wake-promoting neuropeptides orexins, and its deepest part, layer VIb, is the only cortical lamina reactive to orexins. This convergence of wake-promoting inputs prompted us to investigate how layer VIb can modulate cortical arousal, using patch-clamp recordings and optogenetics in rat brain slices. We found that the majority of layer VIb neurons were excited by nicotinic agonists and orexin through the activation of nicotinic receptors containing α4-α5-β2 subunits and OX2 receptor, respectively. Specific effects of orexin on layer VIb neurons were potentiated by low nicotine concentrations and we used this paradigm to explore their intracortical projections. Co-application of nicotine and orexin increased the frequency of excitatory post-synaptic currents in the ipsilateral cortex, with maximal effect in infragranular layers and minimal effect in layer IV, as well as in the contralateral cortex. The ability of layer VIb to relay thalamocortical inputs was tested using photostimulation of channelrhodopsin-expressing fibers from the orexin-sensitive rhomboid nucleus in the parietal cortex. Photostimulation induced robust excitatory currents in layer VIa neurons that were not pre-synaptically modulated by orexin, but exhibited a delayed, orexin-dependent, component. Activation of layer VIb by orexin enhanced the reliability and spike-timing precision of layer VIa responses to rhomboid inputs. These results indicate that layer VIb acts as an orexin-gated excitatory feedforward loop that potentiates thalamocortical arousal.

  8. Swallow-related cerebral cortical activity maps are not specific to deglutition.

    PubMed

    Kern, M; Birn, R; Jaradeh, S; Jesmanowicz, A; Cox, R; Hyde, J; Shaker, R

    2001-04-01

    Cortical representation of swallow-related motor tasks has not been systematically investigated. In this study, we elucidated and compared these cortical representations to those of volitional swallow using block-trial and single-trial methods. Fourteen volunteers were studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Cortical activation during both swallowing and swallow-related motor tasks that can be performed independent of swallowing, such as jaw clenching, lip pursing, and tongue rolling, was found in four general areas: the anterior cingulate, motor/premotor cortex, insula, and occipital/parietal region corresponding to Brodmann's areas 7, 19, and 31. Regions of activity, volume of activated voxels, and increases in signal intensity were found to be similar between volitional swallow and swallow-related motor tasks. These findings, using both block-trial and single-trial techniques, suggest that cerebral cortical regions activated during swallowing may not be specific to deglutitive function.

  9. Human PHOSPHO1 exhibits high specific phosphoethanolamine and phosphocholine phosphatase activities

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Human PHOSPHO1 is a phosphatase enzyme for which expression is upregulated in mineralizing cells. This enzyme has been implicated in the generation of Pi for matrix mineralization, a process central to skeletal development. PHOSPHO1 is a member of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily of Mg2+-dependent hydrolases. However, substrates for PHOSPHO1 are, as yet, unidentified and little is known about its activity. We show here that PHOSPHO1 exhibits high specific activities toward phosphoethanolamine (PEA) and phosphocholine (PCho). Optimal enzymic activity was observed at approx. pH 6.7. The enzyme shows a high specific Mg2+-dependence, with apparent Km values of 3.0 μM for PEA and 11.4 μM for PCho. These results provide a novel mechanism for the generation of Pi in mineralizing cells from PEA and PCho. PMID:15175005

  10. Tonotopic and Field-Specific Representation of Long-Lasting Sustained Activity in Rat Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shiramatsu, Tomoyo I.; Noda, Takahiro; Akutsu, Kan; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Cortical information processing of the onset, offset, and continuous plateau of an acoustic stimulus should play an important role in acoustic object perception. To date, transient activities responding to the onset and offset of a sound have been well investigated and cortical subfields and topographic representation in these subfields, such as place code of sound frequency, have been well characterized. However, whether these cortical subfields with tonotopic representation are inherited in the sustained activities that follow transient activities and persist during the presentation of a long-lasting stimulus remains unknown, because sustained activities do not exhibit distinct, reproducible, and time-locked responses in their amplitude to be characterized by grand averaging. To address this gap in understanding, we attempted to decode sound information from densely mapped sustained activities in the rat auditory cortex using a sparse parameter estimation method called sparse logistic regression (SLR), and investigated whether and how these activities represent sound information. A microelectrode array with a grid of 10 × 10 recording sites within an area of 4.0 mm × 4.0 mm was implanted in the fourth layer of the auditory cortex in rats under isoflurane anesthesia. Sustained activities in response to long-lasting constant pure tones were recorded. SLR then was applied to discriminate the sound-induced band-specific power or phase-locking value from those of spontaneous activities. The highest decoding performance was achieved in the high-gamma band, indicating that cortical inhibitory interneurons may contribute to the sparse tonotopic representation in sustained activities by mediating synchronous activities. The estimated parameter in the SLR decoding revealed that the informative recording site had a characteristic frequency close to the test frequency. In addition, decoding of the four test frequencies demonstrated that the decoding performance of the SLR

  11. Influence of mesophase activation conditions on the specific capacitance of the resulting carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, E.; Ruiz, V.; Santamaría, R.; Blanco, C.; Granda, M.; Menéndez, R.; Juarez-Galán, J. M.; Rodríguez-Reinoso, F.

    Mesophase pitch AR24 was directly activated with KOH using different proportions of the activating agent and activation temperatures, to study the effect on the textural characteristics of the resultant activated carbons and how these characteristics influence their behaviour as electrodes in supercapacitors. The textural properties of the activated carbons were studied by gas adsorption and immersion calorimetry. The results indicate that all the carbons produced were mainly microporous, with pore size around 1 nm. The behaviour of these carbons as electrodes in supercapacitors was studied from galvanostatic charge-discharge cycles. The specific capacitance values obtained were very high, reaching 400 and 200 F g -1 at low and high current densities respectively, for the sample activated with (5:1) KOH to mesophase ratio. Nevertheless, the reasons for this high capacitance values cannot be explained only on the basis of the textural characteristics of the activated carbons, as the results indicated that other factors might be also playing a significant role in their electrochemical behaviour.

  12. A benefit-cost framework of motivation for a specific activity.

    PubMed

    Studer, B; Knecht, S

    2016-01-01

    How can an individual be motivated to perform a target exercise or activity? This question arises in training, therapeutic, and education settings alike, yet despite-or even because of-the large range of extant motivation theories, finding a clear answer to this question can be challenging. Here we propose an application-friendly framework of motivation for a specific activity or exercise that incorporates core concepts from several well-regarded psychological and economic theories of motivation. The key assumption of this framework is that motivation for performing a given activity is determined by the expected benefits and the expected costs of (performance of) the activity. Benefits comprise positive feelings, gains, and rewards experienced during performance of the activity (intrinsic benefits) or achieved through the activity (extrinsic benefits). Costs entail effort requirements, time demands, and other expenditure (intrinsic costs) as well as unwanted associated outcomes and missing out on alternative activities (extrinsic costs). The expected benefits and costs of a given exercise are subjective and state dependent. We discuss convergence of the proposed framework with a selection of extant motivation theories and briefly outline neurobiological correlates of its main components and assumptions. One particular strength of our framework is that it allows to specify five pathways to increasing motivation for a target exercise, which we illustrate and discuss with reference to previous empirical data.

  13. Context Fear Learning Specifically Activates Distinct Populations of Neurons in Amygdala and Hypothalamus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trogrlic, Lidia; Wilson, Yvette M.; Newman, Andrew G.; Murphy, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The identity and distribution of neurons that are involved in any learning or memory event is not known. In previous studies, we identified a discrete population of neurons in the lateral amygdala that show learning-specific activation of a c-"fos"-regulated transgene following context fear conditioning. Here, we have extended these studies to…

  14. Specification for installation of the crew activity planning system coaxial cable communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. A.; Roman, G. S.

    1979-01-01

    The specification used to install a broadband coaxial cable communication system to support remote terminal operations on the Crew Activity Planning system at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center are reported. The system supports high speed communications between a Harris Slash 8 computer and one or more Sanders Graphic 7 displays.

  15. Specific and Nonspecific Neural Activity during Selective Processing of Visual Representations in Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Hwamee; Leung, Hoi-Chung

    2010-01-01

    In this fMRI study, we investigated prefrontal cortex (PFC) and visual association regions during selective information processing. We recorded behavioral responses and neural activity during a delayed recognition task with a cue presented during the delay period. A specific cue ("Face" or "Scene") was used to indicate which one of the two…

  16. Are There Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Suicidal Activity among Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Kalman J.; Harrow, Martin; Faull, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Are there gender-specific risk factors for suicidal activity among patients with schizophrenia and depression? A total of 74 schizophrenia patients (51 men, 23 women) and 77 unipolar nonpsychotic depressed patients (26 men, 51 women) from the Chicago Follow-up Study were studied prospectively at 2 years posthospitalization and again at 7.5 years.…

  17. Transportation impact analysis for the shipment of low specific activity nitric acid. Revisison 1

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.R.

    1995-05-16

    This is in support of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility Low Specific Activity (LSA) Nitric Acid Shipment Environmental Assessment. It analyzes potential toxicological and radiological risks associated with transportation of PUREX Facility LSA Nitric Acid from the Hanford Site to Portsmouth VA, Baltimore MD, and Port Elizabeth NJ.

  18. Context-Specific Associations of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior With Cognition in Children

    PubMed Central

    Aggio, Daniel; Smith, Lee; Fisher, Abigail; Hamer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated how overall and specific domains of physical activity and sedentary behavior at the age of 7 years were associated with cognition at the age of 11 years in 8,462 children from the Millennium Cohort Study. Data were collected from 2001 to 2013. Participation in domains of physical activity and sedentary behavior at 7 years of age were reported. Activity levels were also measured objectively. Cognition was assessed using the British Ability Scales. General linear models were used to assess longitudinal associations of physical activity and sedentary behavior, measured both objectively and via self-report, with cognition. Analyses were adjusted for prespecified covariates. Sports/physical activity club attendance (B = 0.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.2, 1.1), doing homework (B = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.0, 0.9), and objectively measured sedentary time (B = 0.8, 95% CI: 0.1, 1.4) at age 7 years were positively associated with cognition at age 11 years in final the models. Television viewing was negatively associated with cognition (B = −1.7, 95% CI: −2.4, −1.0), although the association was attenuated to the null after adjustments for baseline cognition. Objectively measured light physical activity was inversely associated with cognition (B = −0.7, 95% CI: −1.3, −0.1). Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was also inversely associated with cognition in girls only (B = −1.1, 95% CI: −2.0, −0.3). Associations of physical activity and sedentary behavior with cognition appear to be context-specific in young people. PMID:27226249

  19. Specific induction of endogenous viral restriction factors using CRISPR/Cas-derived transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Hal P; Kornepati, Anand V R; Marshall, Joy B; Kennedy, Edward M; Cullen, Bryan R

    2015-12-29

    Whereas several mammalian proteins can restrict the replication of HIV-1 and other viruses, these are often not expressed in relevant target cells. A potential method to inhibit viral replication might therefore be to use synthetic transcription factors to induce restriction factor expression. In particular, mutants of the RNA-guided DNA binding protein Cas9 that have lost their DNA cleavage activity could be used to recruit transcription activation domains to specific promoters. However, initial experiments revealed only weak activation unless multiple promoter-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) were used. Recently, the recruitment of multiple transcription activation domains by a single sgRNA, modified to contain MS2-derived stem loops that recruit fusion proteins consisting of the MS2 coat protein linked to transcription activation domains, was reported to induce otherwise silent cellular genes. Here, we demonstrate that such "synergistic activation mediators" can induce the expression of two restriction factors, APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3B (A3B), in human cells that normally lack these proteins. We observed modest activation of endogenous A3G or A3B expression using single sgRNAs but high expression when two sgRNAs were used. Whereas the induced A3G and A3B proteins both blocked infection by an HIV-1 variant lacking a functional vif gene by inducing extensive dC-to-dU editing, only the induced A3B protein inhibited wild-type HIV-1. These data demonstrate that Cas9-derived transcriptional activators have the potential to be used for screens for endogenous genes that affect virus replication and raise the possibility that synthetic transcription factors might prove clinically useful if efficient delivery mechanisms could be developed.

  20. Tissue-specific SMARCA4 binding at active and repressed regulatory elements during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Attanasio, Catia; Nord, Alex S; Zhu, Yiwen; Blow, Matthew J; Biddie, Simon C; Mendenhall, Eric M; Dixon, Jesse; Wright, Crystal; Hosseini, Roya; Akiyama, Jennifer A; Holt, Amy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Shoukry, Malak; Afzal, Veena; Ren, Bing; Bernstein, Bradley E; Rubin, Edward M; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A

    2014-06-01

    The SMARCA4 (also known as BRG1 in humans) chromatin remodeling factor is critical for establishing lineage-specific chromatin states during early mammalian development. However, the role of SMARCA4 in tissue-specific gene regulation during embryogenesis remains poorly defined. To investigate the genome-wide binding landscape of SMARCA4 in differentiating tissues, we engineered a Smarca4(FLAG) knock-in mouse line. Using ChIP-seq, we identified ∼51,000 SMARCA4-associated regions across six embryonic mouse tissues (forebrain, hindbrain, neural tube, heart, limb, and face) at mid-gestation (E11.5). The majority of these regions was distal from promoters and showed dynamic occupancy, with most distal SMARCA4 sites (73%) confined to a single or limited subset of tissues. To further characterize these regions, we profiled active and repressive histone marks in the same tissues and examined the intersection of informative chromatin states and SMARCA4 binding. This revealed distinct classes of distal SMARCA4-associated elements characterized by activating and repressive chromatin signatures that were associated with tissue-specific up- or down-regulation of gene expression and relevant active/repressed biological pathways. We further demonstrate the predicted active regulatory properties of SMARCA4-associated elements by retrospective analysis of tissue-specific enhancers and direct testing of SMARCA4-bound regions in transgenic mouse assays. Our results indicate a dual active/repressive function of SMARCA4 at distal regulatory sequences in vivo and support its role in tissue-specific gene regulation during embryonic development.

  1. Accuracy of Optimized Branched Algorithms to Assess Activity-Specific PAEE

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Andy G.; Hill, James O.; Byrnes, William C.; Browning, Raymond C.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess the activity-specific accuracy achievable by branched algorithm (BA) analysis of simulated daily-living physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) within a sedentary population. METHODS Sedentary men (n=8) and women (n=8) first performed a treadmill calibration protocol, during which heart rate (HR), accelerometry (ACC), and PAEE were measured in 1-minute epochs. From these data, HR-PAEE, and ACC-PAEE regressions were constructed and used in each of six analytic models to predict PAEE from ACC and HR data collected during a subsequent simulated daily-living protocol. Criterion PAEE was measured during both protocols via indirect calorimetry. The accuracy achieved by each model was assessed by the root mean square of the difference between model-predicted daily–living PAEE and the criterion daily-living PAEE (expressed here as % of mean daily living PAEE). RESULTS Across the range of activities an unconstrained post hoc optimized branched algorithm best predicted criterion PAEE. Estimates using individual calibration were generally more accurate than those using group calibration (14 vs. 16 % error, respectively). These analyses also performed well within each of the six daily-living activities, but systematic errors appeared for several of those activities, which may be explained by an inability of the algorithm to simultaneously accommodate a heterogeneous range of activities. Analyses of between mean square error by subject and activity suggest that optimization involving minimization of RMS for total daily-living PAEE is associated with decreased error between subjects but increased error between activities. CONCLUSION The performance of post hoc optimized branched algorithms may be limited by heterogeneity in the daily-living activities being performed. PMID:19952842

  2. Promiscuous activity of ER glucosidase II discovered through donor specificity analysis of UGGT

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Atsushi; Totani, Kiichiro; Matsuo, Ichiro; Ito, Yukishige

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} UGGT has a narrow donor specificity. {yields} UGGT gave several non-natural high-mannose-type glycans. {yields} G-II has a promiscuous activity as broad specificity hexosidase. -- Abstract: In glycoprotein quality control system in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), UGGT (UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase) and glucosidase II (G-II) play key roles. UGGT serves as a glycoprotein folding sensor by virtue of its unique specificity to glucosylate glycoproteins at incompletely folded stage. By using various UDP-Glc analogues, we first analyzed donor specificity of UGGT, which was proven to be rather narrow. However, marginal activity was observed with UDP-galactose and UDP-glucuronic acid as well as with 3-, 4- and 6-deoxy glucose analogues to give corresponding transfer products. Intriguingly, G-II smoothly converted all of them back to Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}, providing an indication that G-II has a promiscuous activity as a broad specificity hexosidase.

  3. Screening of DUB activity and specificity by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ritorto, Maria Stella; Ewan, Richard; Perez-Oliva, Ana B.; Knebel, Axel; Buhrlage, Sara J.; Wightman, Melanie; Kelly, Sharon M.; Wood, Nicola T.; Virdee, Satpal; Gray, Nathanael S.; Morrice, Nicholas A.; Alessi, Dario R.; Trost, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Deubiquitylases (DUBs) are key regulators of the ubiquitin system which cleave ubiquitin moieties from proteins and polyubiquitin chains. Several DUBs have been implicated in various diseases and are attractive drug targets. We have developed a sensitive and fast assay to quantify in vitro DUB enzyme activity using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Unlike other current assays, this method uses unmodified substrates, such as diubiquitin topoisomers. By analysing 42 human DUBs against all diubiquitin topoisomers we provide an extensive characterization of DUB activity and specificity. Our results confirm the high specificity of many members of the OTU and JAB/MPN/Mov34 metalloenzyme DUB families and highlight that all USPs tested display low linkage selectivity. We also demonstrate that this assay can be deployed to assess the potency and specificity of DUB inhibitors by profiling 11 compounds against a panel of 32 DUBs. PMID:25159004

  4. Synthesis of high specific activity (1- sup 3 H) farnesyl pyrophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Saljoughian, M.; Morimoto, H.; Williams, P.G.

    1991-08-01

    The synthesis of tritiated farnesyl pyrophosphate with high specific activity is reported. trans-trans Farnesol was oxidized to the corresponding aldehyde followed by reduction with lithium aluminium tritide (5%-{sup 3}H) to give trans-trans (1-{sup 3}H)farnesol. The specific radioactivity of the alcohol was determined from its triphenylsilane derivative, prepared under very mild conditions. The tritiated alcohol was phosphorylated by initial conversion to an allylic halide, and subsequent treatment of the halide with tris-tetra-n-butylammonium hydrogen pyrophosphate. The hydride procedure followed in this work has advantages over existing methods for the synthesis of tritiated farnesyl pyrophosphate, with the possibility of higher specific activity and a much higher yield obtained. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Monovalent engagement of the BCR activates ovalbumin-specific transnuclear B cells

    PubMed Central

    Avalos, Ana M.; Bilate, Angelina M.; Witte, Martin D.; Tai, Albert K.; He, Jiang; Frushicheva, Maria P.; Thill, Peter D.; Meyer-Wentrup, Friederike; Theile, Christopher S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Valency requirements for B cell activation upon antigen encounter are poorly understood. OB1 transnuclear B cells express an IgG1 B cell receptor (BCR) specific for ovalbumin (OVA), the epitope of which can be mimicked using short synthetic peptides to allow antigen-specific engagement of the BCR. By altering length and valency of epitope-bearing synthetic peptides, we examined the properties of ligands required for optimal OB1 B cell activation. Monovalent engagement of the BCR with an epitope-bearing 17-mer synthetic peptide readily activated OB1 B cells. Dimers of the minimal peptide epitope oriented in an N to N configuration were more stimulatory than their C to C counterparts. Although shorter length correlated with less activation, a monomeric 8-mer peptide epitope behaved as a weak agonist that blocked responses to cell-bound peptide antigen, a blockade which could not be reversed by CD40 ligation. The 8-mer not only delivered a suboptimal signal, which blocked subsequent responses to OVA, anti-IgG, and anti-kappa, but also competed for binding with OVA. Our results show that fine-tuning of BCR-ligand recognition can lead to B cell nonresponsiveness, activation, or inhibition. PMID:24493799

  6. A trypanosome metacyclic VSG gene promoter with two functionally distinct, life cycle stage-specific activities.

    PubMed

    Graham, S V; Wymer, B; Barry, J D

    1998-04-15

    In the mammalian bloodstream, African trypanosomes express the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), continual switching of which allows evasion of the host immune response. Bloodstream VSG genes are transcribed from polycistronic bloodstream expression sites with promoters which are located 45-60 kb upstream. These promoters are not exclusively stage-regulated, being active in the insect midgut stage where VSG is not expressed. However, the metacyclic VSG (M-VSG) genes, a small subset activated when VSG synthesis begins in the metacyclic stage in the tsetse fly salivary glands, are transcriptionally activated specifically in that stage from promoters <3 kb upstream. Using deletion mapping and transient transfection, we show that the entire 1.22 M-VSG gene promoter region (171 bp) is required for full activity in metacyclic-derived trypanosomes. However, a subsidiary, bloodstream stage-specific activity is present in its 5' half which directs transcription initiation very close to the initiation site used in metacyclic-derived trypanosomes. Our results imply that the M-VSG gene promoter is longer and more complex than other VSG gene promoters.

  7. Discrete elements within the SV40 enhancer region display different cell-specific enhancer activities.

    PubMed Central

    Ondek, B; Shepard, A; Herr, W

    1987-01-01

    The SV40 enhancer contains three genetically defined elements, called A, B and C, that can functionally compensate for one another. By using short, synthetic DNA oligonucleotides, we show that each of these elements can act autonomously as an enhancer when present as multiple tandem copies. Analysis of a progressive series of B element oligomers shows a single element is ineffective as an enhancer and that the activity of two or more elements increases with copy number. Assay in five different cell lines of two separate enhancers containing six tandem copies of either the B or C element shows that these elements possess different cell-specific activities. Parallel oligomer enhancer constructs containing closely spaced double point mutations display no enhancer activity in any of the cell lines tested, indicating that these elements represent single units of enhancer function. These elements contain either a 'core' or 'octamer' consensus sequence but these consensus sequences alone are not sufficient for enhancer activity. The different cell-specific activities of the B and C elements are consistent with functional interactions with different trans-acting factors. We discuss how tandem duplication of such dissimilar elements, as in the wild-type SV40 72-bp repeats, can serve to expand the conditions under which an enhancer can function. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3036487

  8. Engineering Neprilysin Activity and Specificity to Create a Novel Therapeutic for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Carl I.; Burrell, Matthew; Olsson, Lise-Lotte; Fowler, Susan B.; Digby, Sarah; Sandercock, Alan; Snijder, Arjan; Tebbe, Jan; Haupts, Ulrich; Grudzinska, Joanna; Jermutus, Lutz; Andersson, Christin

    2014-01-01

    Neprilysin is a transmembrane zinc metallopeptidase that degrades a wide range of peptide substrates. It has received attention as a potential therapy for Alzheimer’s disease due to its ability to degrade the peptide amyloid beta. However, its broad range of peptide substrates has the potential to limit its therapeutic use due to degradation of additional peptides substrates that tightly regulate many physiological processes. We sought to generate a soluble version of the ectodomain of neprilysin with improved activity and specificity towards amyloid beta as a potential therapeutic for Alzheimer’s disease. Extensive amino acid substitutions were performed at positions surrounding the active site and inner surface of the enzyme and variants screened for activity on amyloid beta 1–40, 1–42 and a variety of other physiologically relevant peptides. We identified several mutations that modulated and improved both enzyme selectivity and intrinsic activity. Neprilysin variant G399V/G714K displayed an approximately 20-fold improved activity on amyloid beta 1–40 and up to a 3,200-fold reduction in activity on other peptides. Along with the altered peptide substrate specificity, the mutant enzyme produced a markedly altered series of amyloid beta cleavage products compared to the wild-type enzyme. Crystallisation of the mutant enzyme revealed that the amino acid substitutions result in alteration of the shape and size of the pocket containing the active site compared to the wild-type enzyme. The mutant enzyme offers the potential for the more efficient degradation of amyloid beta in vivo as a therapeutic for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25089527

  9. Wobble Pairs of the HDV Ribozyme Play Specific Roles in Stabilization of Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sripathi, Kamali N.; Banáš, Pavel; Reblova, Kamila; Šponer, Jiři; Otyepka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the only known human pathogen whose genome contains a catalytic RNA motif (ribozyme). The overall architecture of the HDV ribozyme is that of a double-nested pseudoknot, with two GU pairs flanking the active site. Although extensive studies have shown that mutation of either wobble results in decreased catalytic activity, little work has focused on linking these mutations to specific structural effects on catalytic fitness. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations based on an activated structure to probe the active site dynamics as a result of wobble pair mutations. In both wild-type and mutant ribozymes, the in-line fitness of the active site (as a measure of catalytic proficiency) strongly depends on the presence of a C75(N3H3+)N1(O5′) hydrogen bond, which positions C75 as the general acid for the reaction. Our mutational analyses show that each GU wobble supports catalytically fit conformations in distinct ways; the reverse G25U20 wobble promotes high in-line fitness, high occupancy of the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) general-acid hydrogen bond and stabilization of the G1U37 wobble, while the G1U37 wobble acts more locally by stabilizing high in-line fitness and the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) hydrogen bond. We also find that stable type I A-minor and P1.1 hydrogen bonding above and below the active site, respectively, prevent local structural disorder from spreading and disrupting global conformation. Taken together, our results define specific, often redundant architectural roles for several structural motifs of the HDV ribozyme active site, expanding the known roles of these motifs within all HDV-like ribozymes and other structured RNAs. PMID:25631765

  10. Substrate specificities and activities of AZAP family Arf GAPs in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, Ellen J; Davis, Kathryn K; Casanova, James E

    2008-01-01

    The ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are important regulators of vesicular transport in eukaryotic cells. Like other GTPases, the Arfs require guanine nucleotide exchange factors to facilitate GTP loading and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) to promote GTP hydrolysis. Whereas there are only six mammalian Arfs, the human genome encodes over 20 proteins containing Arf GAP domains. A subset of these, referred to as AZAPs (Randazzo PA, Hirsch DS. Cell Signal 16: 401-413, 2004), are characterized by the presence of at least one NH(2)-terminal pleckstrin homology domain and two or more ankyrin repeats following the GAP domain. The substrate specificities of these proteins have been previously characterized by using in vitro assay systems. However, a limitation of such assays is that they may not accurately represent intracellular conditions, including posttranslational modifications, or subcellular compartmentalization. Here we present a systematic analysis of the GAP activity of seven AZAPs in vivo, using an assay for measurement of cellular Arf-GTP (Santy LC, Casanova JE. J Cell Biol 154: 599-610, 2001). In agreement with previous in vitro results, we found that ACAP1 and ACAP2 have robust, constitutive Arf6 GAP activity in vivo, with little activity toward Arf1. In contrast, although ARAP1 was initially reported to be an Arf1 GAP, we found that it acts primarily on Arf6 in vivo. Moreover, this activity appears to be regulated through a mechanism involving the NH(2)-terminal sterile-alpha motif. AGAP1 is unique among the AZAPs in its specificity for Arf1, and this activity is dependent on its NH(2)-terminal GTPase-like domain. Finally, we found that expression of AGAP1 induces a surprising reciprocal activation of Arf6, which suggests that regulatory cross talk exists among Arf isoforms.

  11. Proximity-activated nanoparticles: in vitro performance of specific structural modification by enzymatic cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Adam Smith, R; Sewell, Sarah L; Giorgio, Todd D

    2008-01-01

    The development and in vitro performance of a modular nanoscale system capable of specific structural modification by enzymatic activity is described in this work. Due to its small physical size and adaptable characteristics, this system has the potential for utilization in targeted delivery systems and biosensing. Nanoparticle probes were synthesized containing two distinct fluorescent species including a quantum dot base particle and fluorescently labeled cleavable peptide substrate. Activity of these probes was monitored by gel electrophoresis with quantitative cleavage measurements made by fluorometric analysis. The model proximity-activated nanoparticles studied here exhibit significant susceptibility to cleavage by matrix metalloprotease-7 (MMP-7) at physiologically relevant concentrations, with nearly complete cleavage of available substrate molecules after 24 hours. This response is specific to MMP-7 enzyme activity, as cleavage is completely inhibited with the addition of EDTA. Utilization of enzyme-specific modification is a sensitive approach with broad applications for targeted therapeutics and biosensing. The versatility of this nanoparticle system is highlighted in its modular design, as it has the capability to integrate characteristics for detection, biosensing, targeting, and payload delivery into a single, multifunctional nanoparticle structure. PMID:18488420

  12. Erythroblast transformation by FLI-1 depends upon its specific DNA binding and transcriptional activation properties.

    PubMed

    Ano, Sabine; Pereira, Rui; Pironin, Martine; Lesault, Isabelle; Milley, Caroline; Lebigot, Ingrid; Quang, Christine Tran; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2004-01-23

    FLI-1 is a transcriptional regulator of the ETS family of proteins. Insertional activation at the FLI-1 locus is an early event in F-murine leukemia virus-induced erythroleukemia. Consistent with its essential role in erythroid transformation, enforced expression of FLI-1 in primary erythroblasts strongly impairs the response of these cells to erythropoietin (Epo), a cytokine essential to erythropoiesis. We show here that point mutations in the ETS domain that abolished FLI-1 binding to specific DNA elements (ETS-binding sites) suppressed the ability of FLI-1 to transform erythroblasts. The exchange of the entire ETS domain (DNA binding domain) of FLI-1 for that of PU.1 changed the DNA binding specificity of FLI-1 for that of PU.1 and impaired FLI-1 transforming properties. In contrast, ETS domain swapping mutants that maintained the DNA binding specificity of FLI-1 did not affect the ability of FLI-1 to transform erythroblasts. Deletion and swapping mutants that failed to inhibit the DNA binding activity of FLI-1 but impaired its transcriptional activation properties were also transformation-defective. Taken together, these results show that both the ability of FLI-1 to inhibit Epo-induced differentiation of erythroblasts and to confer enhanced cell survival in the absence of Epo critically depend upon FLI-1 ETS-binding site-dependent transcriptional activation properties.

  13. Semenogelins I and II bind zinc and regulate the activity of prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Magnus; Linse, Sara; Frohm, Birgitta; Lundwall, Ake; Malm, Johan

    2005-04-15

    In semen, the gel proteins SgI and SgII (semenogelins I and II) are digested by PSA (prostate-specific antigen), resulting in liquefaction and release of motile spermatozoa. Semen contains a high concentration of Zn2+, which is known to inhibit the protease activity of PSA. We characterized the binding of Zn2+ to SgI and SgII and found evidence that these proteins are involved in regulating the activity of PSA. Intact SgI and SgII and synthetic semenogelin peptides were used in the experiments. Binding of Zn2+ was studied by radioligand blotting, titration with a zinc (II) fluorophore chelator and NMR analysis. A chromogenic substrate was used to measure the enzymatic activity of PSA. SgI and SgII bound Zn2+ with a stoichiometry of at least 10 mol (mol of protein)(-1) and with an average dissociation constant of approx. 5 microM per site. Moreover, Zn2+-inhibited PSA was activated by exposure to SgI or SgII. Since both proteins have high affinity for Zn2+ and are the dominating proteins in semen, they probably represent the major Zn2+ binders in semen, one function of which may be to regulate the activity of PSA. The system is self-regulating, and PSA is maintained in an active state by its substrate.

  14. Improving specific activity and thermostability of Escherichia coli phytase by structure-based rational design.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzu-Hui; Chen, Chun-Chi; Cheng, Ya-Shan; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Lin, Cheng-Yen; Lai, Hui-Lin; Huang, Ting-Yung; Liu, Je-Ruei; Guo, Rey-Ting

    2014-04-10

    Escherichia coli phytase (EcAppA) which hydrolyzes phytate has been widely applied in the feed industry, but the need to improve the enzyme activity and thermostability remains. Here, we conduct rational design with two strategies to enhance the EcAppA performance. First, residues near the substrate binding pocket of EcAppA were modified according to the consensus sequence of two highly active Citrobacter phytases. One out of the eleven mutants, V89T, exhibited 17.5% increase in catalytic activity, which might be a result of stabilized protein folding. Second, the EcAppA glycosylation pattern was modified in accordance with the Citrobacter phytases. An N-glycosylation motif near the substrate binding site was disrupted to remove spatial hindrance for phytate entry and product departure. The de-glycosylated mutants showed 9.6% increase in specific activity. On the other hand, the EcAppA mutants that adopt N-glycosylation motifs from CbAppA showed improved thermostability that three mutants carrying single N-glycosylation motif exhibited 5.6-9.5% residual activity after treatment at 80°C (1.8% for wild type). Furthermore, the mutant carrying all three glycosylation motifs exhibited 27% residual activity. In conclusion, a successful rational design was performed to obtain several useful EcAppA mutants with better properties for further applications.

  15. [Evaluation of specific activity of preparations of allergens from synanthropic insects].

    PubMed

    Berzhets, V M; Radikova, O V; Khlgatian, S V; Berzhets, A I; Kropotova, I S

    2006-01-01

    Physical, chemical and immunobiological characteristics of allergens from synanthropic insects were studied by tests for anaphylaxis, indirect degranulation of mast cells test and ELISA. Sera from 20 patients with severe and intermediate atopic asthma with sensiblization to common allergens have been studied. All extracts of allergens from synanthropic insects (german cockroach, oriental cockroach, american cockroach, speckled feeder cockroach, cricket, common house fly, brown house moth, confused flour beetle, rice weevil, grain weevil) have specific activity. Extracts of allergens from common house fly, brown house moth, german cockroach and oriental cockroach had the strongest allergenic activity as measured by ELISA. Obtained allergens can be used for insect allergy diagnostics.

  16. Translational Regulation of Specific mRNAs Controls Feedback Inhibition and Survival during Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Schott, Johanna; Reitter, Sonja; Philipp, Janine; Haneke, Katharina; Schäfer, Heiner; Stoecklin, Georg

    2014-01-01

    For a rapid induction and efficient resolution of the inflammatory response, gene expression in cells of the immune system is tightly regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The control of mRNA translation has emerged as an important determinant of protein levels, yet its role in macrophage activation is not well understood. We systematically analyzed the contribution of translational regulation to the early phase of the macrophage response by polysome fractionation from mouse macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Individual mRNAs whose translation is specifically regulated during macrophage activation were identified by microarray analysis. Stimulation with LPS for 1 h caused translational activation of many feedback inhibitors of the inflammatory response including NF-κB inhibitors (Nfkbid, Nfkbiz, Nr4a1, Ier3), a p38 MAPK antagonist (Dusp1) and post-transcriptional suppressors of cytokine expression (Zfp36 and Zc3h12a). Our analysis showed that their translation is repressed in resting and de-repressed in activated macrophages. Quantification of mRNA levels at a high temporal resolution by RNASeq allowed us to define groups with different expression patterns. Thereby, we were able to distinguish mRNAs whose translation is actively regulated from mRNAs whose polysomal shifts are due to changes in mRNA levels. Active up-regulation of translation was associated with a higher content in AU-rich elements (AREs). For one example, Ier3 mRNA, we show that repression in resting cells as well as de-repression after stimulation depends on the ARE. Bone-marrow derived macrophages from Ier3 knockout mice showed reduced survival upon activation, indicating that IER3 induction protects macrophages from LPS-induced cell death. Taken together, our analysis reveals that translational control during macrophage activation is important for cellular survival as well as the expression of anti-inflammatory feedback inhibitors that promote the

  17. Effects of dynamic and static stretching within general and activity specific warm-up protocols.

    PubMed

    Samson, Michael; Button, Duane C; Chaouachi, Anis; Behm, David G

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of static and dynamic stretching protocols within general and activity specific warm-ups. Nine male and ten female subjects were tested under four warm-up conditions including a 1) general aerobic warm-up with static stretching, 2) general aerobic warm-up with dynamic stretching, 3) general and specific warm-up with static stretching and 4) general and specific warm-up with dynamic stretching. Following all conditions, subjects were tested for movement time (kicking movement of leg over 0.5 m distance), countermovement jump height, sit and reach flexibility and 6 repetitions of 20 metre sprints. Results indicated that when a sport specific warm-up was included, there was an 0.94% improvement (p = 0.0013) in 20 meter sprint time with both the dynamic and static stretch groups. No such difference in sprint performance between dynamic and static stretch groups existed in the absence of the sport specific warm-up. The static stretch condition increased sit and reach range of motion (ROM) by 2.8% more (p = 0.0083) than the dynamic condition. These results would support the use of static stretching within an activity specific warm-up to ensure maximal ROM along with an enhancement in sprint performance. Key pointsActivity specific warm-up may improve sprint performance.Static stretching was more effective than dynamic stretching for increasing static range of motion.There was no effect of the warm-up protocols on countermovement jump height or movement time.

  18. Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Dubois, Gwendoline; Valton, Julien; Thomas, Séverine; Stella, Stefano; Maréchal, Alan; Langevin, Stéphanie; Benomari, Nassima; Bertonati, Claudia; Silva, George H; Daboussi, Fayza; Epinat, Jean-Charles; Montoya, Guillermo; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    A key issue when designing and using DNA-targeting nucleases is specificity. Ideally, an optimal DNA-targeting tool has only one recognition site within a genomic sequence. In practice, however, almost all designer nucleases available today can accommodate one to several mutations within their target site. The ability to predict the specificity of targeting is thus highly desirable. Here, we describe the first comprehensive experimental study focused on the specificity of the four commonly used repeat variable diresidues (RVDs; NI:A, HD:C, NN:G and NG:T) incorporated in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN). The analysis of >15 500 unique TALEN/DNA cleavage profiles allowed us to monitor the specificity gradient of the RVDs along a TALEN/DNA binding array and to present a specificity scoring matrix for RVD/nucleotide association. Furthermore, we report that TALEN can only accommodate a relatively small number of position-dependent mismatches while maintaining a detectable activity at endogenous loci in vivo, demonstrating the high specificity of these molecular tools. We thus envision that the results we provide will allow for more deliberate choices of DNA binding arrays and/or DNA targets, extending our engineering capabilities.

  19. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system. PMID:24912488

  20. Sunspot groups with high flare activity: Specific features of magnetic configuration, morphology, and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fursyak, Yu. A.

    2016-12-01

    Specific features of the magnetic configuration, morphological structure, dynamics, and evolution of sunspot groups of the current (24th) cycle of solar activity with high flare activity are considered. The gradients of longitudinal magnetic fields at places of δ-configuration are calculated. The main finding is a time delay of 24-30 h between the time when the magnetic field gradient reaches a critical level of 0.1 G/km and the time when the first of powerful flares occurs in the active region. The study is based on data from the SDO and GOES-15 spacecrafts and ground-based solar telescopes (TST-2 at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the 150-foot telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory).

  1. Integrative analysis of breast cancer reveals prognostic haematopoietic activity and patient-specific immune response profiles

    PubMed Central

    Varn, Frederick S.; Andrews, Erik H.; Mullins, David W.; Cheng, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional programmes active in haematopoietic cells enable a variety of functions including dedifferentiation, innate immunity and adaptive immunity. Understanding how these programmes function in the context of cancer can provide valuable insights into host immune response, cancer severity and potential therapy response. Here we present a method that uses the transcriptomes of over 200 murine haematopoietic cells, to infer the lineage-specific haematopoietic activity present in human breast tumours. Correlating this activity with patient survival and tumour purity reveals that the transcriptional programmes of many cell types influence patient prognosis and are found in environments of high lymphocytic infiltration. Collectively, these results allow for a detailed and personalized assessment of the patient immune response to a tumour. When combined with routinely collected patient biopsy genomic data, this method can enable a richer understanding of the complex interplay between the host immune system and cancer. PMID:26725977

  2. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease N{sup pro}

    SciTech Connect

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer; Ruggli, Nicolas; Choi, Kyung H.

    2014-03-15

    Pestivirus N{sup pro} is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N{sup pro} blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N{sup pro'}s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N{sup pro} proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N{sup pro'}s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N{sup pro} does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N{sup pro'}s autoproteolysis is studied using N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N{sup pro} prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position.

  3. Self-Specific Stimuli Interact Differently than Non-Self-Specific Stimuli with Eyes-Open Versus Eyes-Closed Spontaneous Activity in Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Pengmin; Grimm, Simone; Duncan, Niall W.; Holland, Giles; Guo, Jia shen; Fan, Yan; Weigand, Anne; Baudewig, Juergen; Bajbouj, Malek; Northoff, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that there may be a distinct relationship between spontaneous neural activity and subsequent or concurrent self-specific stimulus-induced activity. This study aims to test the impact of spontaneous activity as recorded in an eyes-open (EO) resting state as opposed to eyes-closed (EC) on self-specific versus non-self-specific auditory stimulus-induced activity in fMRI. In our first experiment we used self-specific stimuli comprised of the subject’s own name and non-self-specific stimuli comprised of a friend’s name and an unknown name, presented during EO versus EC baselines in a 3 name condition × 2 baseline design. In Experiment 2 we directly measured spontaneous activity in the absence of stimuli during EO versus EC to confirm a modulatory effect of the two baseline conditions in the regions found to show an interaction effect in Experiment 1. Spontaneous activity during EO was significantly higher than during EC in bilateral auditory cortex and non-self-specific names yielded stronger signal changes relative to EO baseline than to EC. In contrast, there was no difference in response to self-specific names relative to EO baseline than to EC despite the difference between spontaneous activity levels. These results support an impact of spontaneous activity on stimulus-induced activity, moreover an impact that depends on the high-level stimulus characteristic of self-specificity. PMID:23908625

  4. Synthesis and investigation of the specific activity of the DNA-doxorubicin conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokorev, A. V.; Zaborovskiy, A. V.; Kotlyarov, A. A.; Balykova, L. A.; Malkina, M. A.; Kargina, I. V.; Gromova, E. V.; Medvezhonkov, V. Yu; Gurevich, K. G.; Shchukin, S. A.; Pyataev, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, the method of obtaining the conjugate of the anticancer chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin to the exogenous double-stranded DNA of the sturgeons is proposed (the source: commercial drug “Derinat”). The optimal conditions for synthesis of conjugate (pH, temperature and the mass ratio of the components), ensuring the highest degree of binding the chemotherapeutic agent to a carrier, were picked out. Clearing the conjugate from the non-encapsulated chemotherapeutic agent was being made by ultrafiltration method. The investigation of the toxicity and specific antineoplastic activity of the synthesized complex was conducted. The performance of the drug toxicity were established on the intact mice in compliance with the accepted standards. The antineoplastic activity was evaluated upon the Tumor Growth Inhibition Index and Metastasis Inhibition Index on mice with the transplanted Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC). It was demonstrated that the conjugate toxicity is approximately lower that the one of the unconjugated doxorubicin (LD 50 was equal 14.6 mg/kg and 9.9 mg/kg for the conjugate and doxorubicin, respectively). The specific antineoplastic activity was investigated in equitoxic doses of the drug. It was established that the conjugate being administered in equitoxic doses possesses a stronger antineoplastic activity, than the water-soluble drug (maximum 35% more as to the tumor volume and 51% more as to the Tumor Growth Inhibition index).

  5. Activity Level-Dependent Synapse-Specific AMPA Receptor Trafficking Regulates Transmission Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, J. Julius

    2009-01-01

    Central glutamatergic synapses may express AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors (AMPA-Rs) with distinct gating properties and exhibit different transmission dynamics, which are important for computing various synaptic inputs received at different populations of synapses. However, how glutamatergic synapses acquire AMPA-Rs with distinct kinetics to influence synaptic integration remains poorly understood. Here I report synapse-specific trafficking of distinct AMPA-Rs in rat cortical layer 4 stellate and layer 5 pyramidal neurons. The analysis indicates that in single layer 4 stellate neurons thalamocortical synapses generate faster synaptic responses than intracortical synapses. Moreover, GluR1-containing AMPA-Rs traffic selectively into intracortical synapses, and this process requires sensory experience-dependent activity and slows down transmission kinetics. GluR4-containing AMPA-Rs traffic more heavily into thalamocortical synapses than intracortical synapses, and this process requires spontaneous synaptic activity and speeds up transmission kinetics. GluR2-containing AMPA-Rs traffic equally into both thalamocortical and intracortical synapses, and this process requires no synaptic activity and resets transmission kinetics. Notably, synaptic trafficking of distinct AMPA-Rs differentially regulates synaptic integration. Thus, synapse-specific AMPA-R trafficking coarsely sets and synaptic activity finely tunes transmission kinetics and integration properties at different synapses in central neurons. PMID:19439609

  6. Changes in jump performance and muscle activity following soccer-specific exercise.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Jon; Armstrong, Neil; Williams, Craig

    2008-01-15

    The jump performance of ten youth soccer players (mean age 15.8 years, s= 0.4) was assessed before and after 42 min of soccer-specific exercise performed on a non-motorized treadmill. A squat, countermovement, and drop jump were performed on a force platform and simultaneously surface EMG activity of four lower limb muscles was collected. Jump height deteriorated across all conditions with mean reductions of - 1.4 cm (s = 1.6; P < 0.05), - 3.0 cm (s = 2.9; P < 0.05), and -2.3 cm (s = 1.7; P < 0.01) in the squat, countermovement, and drop jump respectively. The impact force in the drop jump was the only force variable to show a significant change with fatigue (P < 0.05). Following the prolonged exercise, reductions in total muscle activity were non-significant for the squat jump, approached significance for the counter-ovement jump (P = 0.07), and achieved significance for the drop jump (P < 0.05). The results showed that completing soccer-specific exercise reduced performance in all jump tasks. Reductions in muscle activity were greatest for the drop jump, suggesting an influence of muscle stretch and loading on reduced muscle activity when fatigued.

  7. Radionuclide preparations with high specific activity and gamma-sources on their basis

    SciTech Connect

    Chesanov, V.V.; Demchenko, N.F.; Karasev, V.I.

    1993-12-31

    According to expert`s estimations, the following radionuclides and specific activities will be in great demand in the future: cobalt 60 (400-500Ci/g), iridium 192 (500-800 Ci/g), ytterbium 169 (800-1000 Ci/g), thulium 170 (700-800 Ci/g), selenium 75 (500-800 Ci/g), antimony 124 (30-40 Ci/g), and gadolinium 153 (not less than 50 Ci/g). In addition, the Phosphorus 33 radionuclide preparations with specific activity more than 100,000 Ci/g applied in biochemical investigations are in considerable demand. This paper discusses the investigations and developmental results performed with the preparation and sources of the mentioned radionuclides. The research reactors utilized are also described.

  8. Radioactive preparations with high specific activity and gamma-sources on their base

    SciTech Connect

    Chesanov, V.V.; Demchenko, N.F.; Karasev, V.T.

    1993-12-31

    According to expert`s estimations, the following radionuclides and specific activities will be in great demand in the future: cobalt 60 (400-500Ci/g), iridium 192 (500-800 Ci/g), ytterbium 169 (800-1000 Ci/g), thullium 170 (700-800 Ci/g), selenium 75 (500-800 Ci/g), antimony 124 (30-40 Ci/g), and gadolinium 153 (not less than 50 Ci/g). In addition, the Phosphorus 33 radionuclide preparations with specific activity more than 100,000 Ci/g applied in biochemical investigations are in considerable demand. This paper discusses the investigations and developmental results performed with the preparation and sources of the mentioned radionuclides. Applications are also discussed. All medical and industrial sources are safe and reliable and do not contaminate the environment. Due to ISO 2919-80 classification they are assigned to special form substances.

  9. The vegetation-to-air concentration ratio in a specific activity atmospheric tritium model

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.; Bauer, L.R.

    1994-03-01

    Specific activity models are frequently used to estimate the concentration of tritium oxide in vegetation. In such models, a single value represents the ratio (R) of the specific activity of tritium oxide in vegetation to the specific activity of atmospheric tritium oxide. Federal agencies such as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency have not established a consensus default for R. Literature on this topic suggests that a site-specific distribution of R should be developed when feasible. In this study, a distribution of R is established for the Savannah River Site. Environmental tritium concentrations in air and vegetation measured on and around the Savannah River Site over a 9-y period form the basis for the analysis. For dose assessments of chronic atmospheric tritium releases at the Savannah River Site, R is best parameterized by a normal distribution with a mean of 0.54 and one standard deviation of 0.10. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission default for R is approximately equal to the Savannah River Site site-specific estimate. Based on the results, the default value for R recognized by the Environmental Protection Agency overestimates tritium concentrations in vegetation and, therefore, doses from foodstuff consumption pathways at humid sites. For the Savannah River Site, the magnitude of the error is on the order of a factor of 2. This consideration may be important if an estimated dose approaches an as-low-as-reasonably-achievable or regulatory threshold. Conversely, without the benefit of site-specific data, ingestion doses may be underestimated in regions with dry climates. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. The vegetation-to-air concentration ratio in a specific activity atmospheric tritium model.

    PubMed

    Hamby, D M; Bauer, L R

    1994-03-01

    Specific activity models are frequently used to estimate the concentration of tritium oxide in vegetation. In such models, a single value represents the ratio (R) of the specific activity of tritium oxide in vegetation to the specific activity of atmospheric tritium oxide. Federal agencies such as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency have not established a consensus default for R. Literature on this topic suggests that a site-specific distribution of R should be developed when feasible. In this study, a distribution of R is established for the Savannah River Site. Environmental tritium concentrations in air and vegetation measured on and around the Savannah River Site over a 9-y period form the basis for the analysis. For dose assessments of chronic atmospheric tritium releases at the Savannah River Site, R is best parameterized by a normal distribution with a mean of 0.54 and one standard deviation of 0.10. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission default for R is approximately equal to the Savannah River Site site-specific estimate. Based on the results, the default value for R recognized by the Environmental Protection Agency overestimates tritium concentrations in vegetation and, therefore, doses from foodstuff consumption pathways at humid sites. For the Savannah River Site, the magnitude of the error is on the order of a factor of 2. This consideration may be important if an estimated dose approaches an as-low-as-reasonably-achievable or regulatory threshold. Conversely, without the benefit of site-specific data, ingestion doses may be underestimated in regions with dry climates.

  11. TRPV1 temperature activation is specifically sensitive to strong decreases in amino acid hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Pagán, Jason O; Iversen, Edwin S; Grandl, Jörg

    2017-04-03

    Several transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels can be directly activated by hot or cold temperature with high sensitivity. However, the structures and molecular mechanism giving rise to their high temperature sensitivity are not fully understood. One hypothesized mechanism assumes that temperature activation is driven by the exposure of hydrophobic residues to solvent. This mechanism further predicts that residues are exposed to solvent in a coordinated fashion, but without necessarily being located in close proximity to each other. However, there is little experimental evidence supporting this mechanism in TRP channels. Here, we combined high-throughput mutagenesis, functional screening, and deep sequencing to identify mutations from a total of ~7,300 TRPV1 random mutant clones. We found that strong decreases in hydrophobicity of amino acids are better tolerated for activation by capsaicin than for activation by hot temperature, suggesting that strong hydrophobicity might be specifically required for temperature activation. Altogether, our work provides initial correlative support for a previously hypothesized temperature mechanism in TRP ion channels.

  12. Microglial activation is a pharmacologically specific marker for the neurotoxic amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Dowgiert, Jennifer; Geddes, Timothy J; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina; Liu, Xiuli; Kuhn, Donald M

    2004-09-09

    Neurotoxic amphetamines cause damage to monoamine nerve terminals of the striatum by unknown mechanisms. Microglial activation contributes to the neuronal damage that accompanies injury, disease, and inflammation, but a role for these cells in amphetamine-induced neurotoxicity has received little attention. We show presently that D-methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), D-amphetamine, and p-chloroamphetamine, each of which has been linked to dopamine (DA) or serotonin nerve terminal damage, result in microglial activation in the striatum. The non-neurotoxic amphetamines l-methamphetamine, fenfluramine, and DOI do not have this effect. All drugs that cause microglial activation also increase expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). At a minimum, microglial activation serves as a pharmacologically specific marker for striatal nerve terminal damage resulting only from those amphetamines that exert neurotoxicity. Because microglia are known to produce many of the reactive species (e.g., nitric oxide, superoxide, cytokines) that mediate the neurotoxicity of the amphetamine-class of drugs, their activation could represent an early and essential event in the neurotoxic cascade associated with high-dose amphetamine intoxication.

  13. Layer-specific optogenetic activation of pyramidal neurons causes beta–gamma entrainment of neonatal networks

    PubMed Central

    Bitzenhofer, Sebastian H; Ahlbeck, Joachim; Wolff, Amy; Wiegert, J. Simon; Gee, Christine E.; Oertner, Thomas G.; Hanganu-Opatz, Ileana L.

    2017-01-01

    Coordinated activity patterns in the developing brain may contribute to the wiring of neuronal circuits underlying future behavioural requirements. However, causal evidence for this hypothesis has been difficult to obtain owing to the absence of tools for selective manipulation of oscillations during early development. We established a protocol that combines optogenetics with electrophysiological recordings from neonatal mice in vivo to elucidate the substrate of early network oscillations in the prefrontal cortex. We show that light-induced activation of layer II/III pyramidal neurons that are transfected by in utero electroporation with a high-efficiency channelrhodopsin drives frequency-specific spiking and boosts network oscillations within beta–gamma frequency range. By contrast, activation of layer V/VI pyramidal neurons causes nonspecific network activation. Thus, entrainment of neonatal prefrontal networks in fast rhythms relies on the activation of layer II/III pyramidal neurons. This approach used here may be useful for further interrogation of developing circuits, and their behavioural readout. PMID:28216627

  14. SUMOylation of DRIL1 Directs Its Transcriptional Activity Towards Leukocyte Lineage-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    van Lohuizen, Maarten; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    DRIL1 is an ARID family transcription factor that can immortalize primary mouse fibroblasts, bypass RASV12-induced cellular senescence and collaborate with RASV12 or MYC in mediating oncogenic transformation. It also activates immunoglobulin heavy chain transcription and engages in heterodimer formation with E2F to stimulate E2F-dependent transcription. Little, however, is known about the regulation of DRIL1 activity. Recently, DRIL1 was found to interact with the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9, but the functional relevance of this association has not been assessed. Here, we show that DRIL1 is sumoylated both in vitro and in vivo at lysine 398. Moreover, we provide evidence that PIASy functions as a specific SUMO E3-ligase for DRIL1 and promotes its sumoylation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, consistent with the subnuclear localization of PIASy in the Matrix-Associated Region (MAR), SUMO-modified DRIL1 species are found exclusively in the MAR fraction. This post-translational modification interferes neither with the subcellular localization nor the DNA-binding activity of the protein. In contrast, DRIL1 sumoylation impairs its interaction with E2F1 in vitro and modifies its transcriptional activity in vivo, driving transcription of subset of genes regulating leukocyte fate. Taken together, these results identify sumoylation as a novel post-translational modification of DRIL1 that represents an important mechanism for targeting and modulating DRIL1 transcriptional activity. PMID:19436740

  15. Gender specific changes in cortical activation patterns during exposure to artificial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Stefan; Robinson, Ryan; Smith, Craig; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Goswami, Nandu

    2014-11-01

    Keeping astronauts healthy during long duration spaceflight remains a challenge. Artificial gravity (AG) generated by a short arm human centrifuges (SAHC) is proposed as the next generation of integrated countermeasure devices that will allow human beings to safely spend extended durations in space, although comparatively little is known about any psychological side effects of AG on brain function. 16 participants (8 male and 8 female, GENDER) were exposed to 10 min at a baseline gravitational load (G-Load) of +.03 Gz, then 10 min at +.6 Gz for females and +.8 Gz for males, before being exposed to increasing levels of AG in a stepped manner by increasing the acceleration by +.1 Gz every 3 min until showing signs of pre-syncope. EEG recordings were taken of brain activity during 2 min time periods at each AG level. Analysing the results of the mixed total population of participants by two way ANOVA, a significant effect of centrifugation on alpha and beta activity was found (p<.01). Furthermore results revealed a significant interaction between G-LOAD and GENDER alpha-activity (p<.01), but not for beta-activity. Although the increase in alpha and beta activity with G-LOAD does not reflect a general model of cortical arousal and therefore cannot support previous findings reporting that AG may be a cognitively arousing environment, the gender specific responses identified in this study may have wider implications for EEG and AG research.

  16. Schistosoma mansoni Hemozoin Modulates Alternative Activation of Macrophages via Specific Suppression of Retnla Expression and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, Martha; Evans, D. Andrew; Gunn, Matt

    2013-01-01

    The trematode Schistosoma mansoni is one of the etiological agents of schistosomiasis, a key neglected tropical disease responsible for an estimated annual loss of 70 million disability-adjusted life years. Hematophagy represents the primary nutrient acquisition pathway of this parasite, but digestion of hemoglobin also liberates toxic heme. Schistosomes detoxify heme via crystallization into hemozoin, which is subsequently regurgitated into the host's circulation. Here we demonstrate that during experimental schistosomiasis, hemozoin accumulating in the mouse liver is taken up by phagocytes at a time coincident with the development of the egg-induced T-helper 2 (Th2) granulomatous immune response. Furthermore, the uptake of hemozoin also coincides with the hepatic expression of markers of alternative macrophage activation. Alternatively activated macrophages are a key effector cell population associated with protection against schistosomiasis, making hemozoin well placed to play an important immunomodulatory role in this disease. To systematically explore this hypothesis, S. mansoni hemozoin was purified and added to in vitro bone marrow-derived macrophage cultures concurrently exposed to cytokines chosen to reflect the shifting state of macrophage activation in vivo. Macrophages undergoing interleukin-4 (IL-4)-induced alternative activation in the presence of hemozoin developed a phenotype specifically lacking in Retnla, a characteristic alternatively activated macrophage product associated with regulation of Th2 inflammatory responses. As such, in addition to its important detoxification role during hematophagy, we propose that schistosome hemozoin also provides a potent immunomodulatory function in the coevolved network of host-parasite relationships during schistosomiasis. PMID:23090958

  17. Farnesyl pyrophosphate is a novel pain-producing molecule via specific activation of TRPV3.

    PubMed

    Bang, Sangsu; Yoo, Sungjae; Yang, Tae-Jin; Cho, Hawon; Hwang, Sun Wook

    2010-06-18

    Temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential ion channels (thermoTRPs) expressed in epidermal keratinocytes and sensory afferents play an important role as peripheral pain detectors for our body. Many natural and synthetic compounds have been found to act on the thermoTRPs leading to altered nociception, but little is known about endogenous painful molecules activating TRPV3. Here, we show that farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), an intermediate metabolite in the mevalonate pathway, specifically activates TRPV3 among six thermoTRPs using Ca(2+) imaging and electrophysiology with cultured keratinocytes and TRPV3-overexpressing cells. Agonistic potencies of related compounds in the FPP metabolism were ignorable. Voltage-dependence of TRPV3 was shifted by FPP, which appears to be the activation mechanism. An intraplantar injection of FPP acutely elicits nociceptive behaviors in inflamed animals, indicating that FPP is a novel endogenous pain-producing substance via TRPV3 activation. Co-culture experiments demonstrated that this FPP-evoked signal in the keratinocytes is transmitted to sensory neurons. In addition, FPP reduced TRPV3 heat threshold resulting in heightened behavioral sensitivity to noxious heat. Taken together, our data suggest that FPP is the firstly identified endogenous TRPV3 activator that causes nociception. Our results may provide useful chemical information to elucidate TRPV3 physiology and novel pain-related metabolisms.

  18. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on antioxidant enzyme activities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is strain-specific.

    PubMed

    Bayliak, M; Semchyshyn, H; Lushchak, V

    2006-09-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the survival and activity of antioxidant and associated enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied. A difference found in the response of wild-type yeast strains treated with hydrogen peroxide was probably related to the different protective effects of antioxidant enzymes in these strains. Exposure of wild-type YPH250 cells to 0.25 mM H(2)O(2) for 30 min increased activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) by 3.4- and 2-fold, respectively. However, no activation of catalase in the EG103 strain, as well as of SOD in the YPH98 and EG103 wild strains was detected, which was in parallel to lower survival of these strains under oxidative stress. There is a strong positive correlation (R(2) = 0.95) between activities of catalase and SOD in YPH250 cells treated with different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. It is conceivable that catalase would protect SOD against inactivation caused by oxidative stress and vice versa. Finally, yeast cell treatment with hydrogen peroxide can lead to either a H(2)O(2)-induced increase in activities of antioxidant and associated enzymes or their decrease depending on the H(2)O(20 concentration used or the yeast strain specificity.

  19. Tissue-specific metabolic activation and mutagenicity of 3-nitrobenzanthrone in MutaMouse.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guosheng; Gingerich, John; Soper, Lynda; Douglas, George R; White, Paul A

    2008-10-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a mutagen and suspected human carcinogen detected in diesel exhaust, airborne particulate matter, and urban soil. We investigated the tissue specific mutagenicity of 3-NBA at the lacZ locus of transgenic MutaMouse following acute single dose or 28-day repeated-dose oral administration. In the acute high dose (50 mg/kg) exposure, increased lacZ mutant frequency was observed in bone marrow and colonic epithelium, but not in liver and bladder. In the repeated-dose study, a dose-dependent increase in lacZ mutant frequency was observed in bone marrow and liver (2- and 4-fold increase above control), but not in lung or intestinal epithelium. In addition, a concentration-dependent increase in mutant frequency (8.5-fold above control) was observed for MutaMouse FE1 lung epithelial cells exposed in vitro. 1-Nitropyrene reductase, 3-NBA reductase, and acetyltransferase activities were measured in a variety of MutaMouse specimens in an effort to link metabolic activation and mutagenicity. High 3-NBA nitroreductase activities were observed in lung, liver, colon and bladder, and detectable N-acetyltransferase activities were found in all tissues except bone marrow. The relatively high 3-NBA nitroreductase activity in MutaMouse tissues, as compared with those in Salmonella TA98 and TA100, suggests that 3-NBA is readily reduced and activated in vivo. High 3-NBA nitroreductase levels in liver and colon are consistent with the elevated lacZ mutant frequency values, and previously noted inductions of hepatic DNA adducts. Despite an absence of induced lacZ mutations, the highest 3-NBA reductase activity was detected in lung. Further studies are warranted, especially following inhalation or intratracheal exposures.

  20. Cryoenzymology in mixed solvents without cosolvent effects on enzyme specific activity.

    PubMed Central

    Douzou, P; Balny, C

    1977-01-01

    Water-soluble polyelectrolytes in interaction with proteins are described. These polyelectrolytes make it possible to investigate enzyme-catalyzed reactions in cooled mixed solvents without the usual effects of their organic solvent component on enzyme specific activity. The applicability of techniques developed is illustrated by results obtained on several systems. The possibility of an electrostatic "sorting out" of solvents and its potentialities in cryoenzymology are discussed. PMID:18734

  1. Isolation of cell type-specific apoptotic bodies by fluorescence-activated cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Atkin-Smith, Georgia K.; Paone, Stephanie; Zanker, Damien J.; Duan, Mubing; Phan, Than K.; Chen, Weisan; Hulett, Mark D.; Poon, Ivan K. H.

    2017-01-01

    Apoptotic bodies (ApoBDs) are membrane-bound extracellular vesicles that can mediate intercellular communication in physiological and pathological settings. By combining recently developed analytical strategies with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), we have developed a method that enables the isolation of ApoBDs from cultured cells to 99% purity. In addition, this approach also enables the identification and isolation of cell type-specific ApoBDs from tissue, bodily fluid and blood-derived samples. PMID:28057919

  2. StrigoQuant: A genetically encoded biosensor for quantifying strigolactone activity and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Samodelov, Sophia L.; Beyer, Hannes M.; Guo, Xiujie; Augustin, Maximilian; Jia, Kun-Peng; Baz, Lina; Ebenhöh, Oliver; Beyer, Peter; Weber, Wilfried; Al-Babili, Salim; Zurbriggen, Matias D.

    2016-01-01

    Strigolactones are key regulators of plant development and interaction with symbiotic fungi; however, quantitative tools for strigolactone signaling analysis are lacking. We introduce a genetically encoded hormone biosensor used to analyze strigolactone-mediated processes, including the study of the components involved in the hormone perception/signaling complex and the structural specificity and sensitivity of natural and synthetic strigolactones in Arabidopsis, providing quantitative insights into the stereoselectivity of strigolactone perception. Given the high specificity, sensitivity, dynamic range of activity, modular construction, ease of implementation, and wide applicability, the biosensor StrigoQuant will be useful in unraveling multiple levels of strigolactone metabolic and signaling networks. PMID:27847871

  3. The level of cholinergic nucleus basalis activation controls the specificity of auditory associative memory.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Norman M; Miasnikov, Alexandre A; Chen, Jemmy C

    2006-11-01

    Learning involves not only the establishment of memory per se, but also the specific details of its contents. In classical conditioning, the former concerns whether an association was learned while the latter discloses what was learned. The neural bases of associativity have been studied extensively while neural mechanisms of memory specificity have been neglected. Stimulation of the cholinergic nucleus basalis (NBs) paired with a preceding tone induces CS-specific associative memory. As different levels of acetylcholine may be released naturally during different learning situations, we asked whether the level of activation of the cholinergic neuromodulatory system can control the degree of detail that is encoded and retrieved. Adult male rats were tested pre- and post-training for behavioral responses (interruption of ongoing respiration) to tones of various frequencies (1-15 kHz, 70 dB, 2 s). Training consisted of 200 trials/day of tone (8.0 kHz, 70 dB, 2 s) either paired or unpaired with NBs (CS-NBs = 1.8 s) at moderate (65.7+/-9.0 microA, one day) or weak (46.7+/-12.1 microA, three training days) levels of stimulation, under conditions of controlled behavioral state (pre-trial stable respiration rate). Post-training (24 h) responses to tones revealed that moderate activation induced both associative and CS-specific behavioral memory, whereas weak activation produced associative memory lacking frequency specificity. The degree of memory specificity 24 h after training was positively correlated with the magnitude of CS-elicited increase in gamma activity within the EEG during training, but only in the moderate NBs group. Thus, a low level of acetylcholine released by the nucleus basalis during learning is sufficient to induce associativity whereas a higher level of release enables the storage of greater experiential detail. gamma waves, which are thought to reflect the coordinated activity of cortical cells, appear to index the encoding of CS detail. The findings

  4. [Liver monoamine oxidase activity of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis. the substrate-inhibitory specificity].

    PubMed

    Iagodina, O V; Basova, I N

    2013-01-01

    Based on data of substrate-inhibitory analysis with use of specific inhibitors--deprenyl, chlorgi-lin--and specific substrates--serotonin, noradrenalin, benzylamine, beta-phenylethylamine, and N-methylhistamine--a suggestion is put forward about the possible existence of one molecular form of monoamine oxidase (MAO) in liver of mature individuals of the European lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis. There are determined kinetic parameters of monoamine oxidase deamination of eight substrates, which indicates the large spectrum of substrate specificity of the lamprey liver MAO. The studied enzyme does not deaminate histamine and putrescine and is not sensitive to 10(-2) M semicarbaside. Results of study of the substrate-inhibitor specificity allow us to suggest some resemblance of catalytic properties of the lamprey liver MAO and the mammalian form A MAO. The revealed low activity of the enzyme at deamination of all used substrates seems to be connected with low detoxational functional of the lamprey liver.

  5. Early Category-Specific Cortical Activation Revealed by Visual Stimulus Inversion

    PubMed Central

    Meeren, Hanneke K. M.; Hadjikhani, Nouchine; Ahlfors, Seppo P.; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2008-01-01

    Visual categorization may already start within the first 100-ms after stimulus onset, in contrast with the long-held view that during this early stage all complex stimuli are processed equally and that category-specific cortical activation occurs only at later stages. The neural basis of this proposed early stage of high-level analysis is however poorly understood. To address this question we used magnetoencephalography and anatomically-constrained distributed source modeling to monitor brain activity with millisecond-resolution while subjects performed an orientation task on the upright and upside-down presented images of three different stimulus categories: faces, houses and bodies. Significant inversion effects were found for all three stimulus categories between 70–100-ms after picture onset with a highly category-specific cortical distribution. Differential responses between upright and inverted faces were found in well-established face-selective areas of the inferior occipital cortex and right fusiform gyrus. In addition, early category-specific inversion effects were found well beyond visual areas. Our results provide the first direct evidence that category-specific processing in high-level category-sensitive cortical areas already takes place within the first 100-ms of visual processing, significantly earlier than previously thought, and suggests the existence of fast category-specific neocortical routes in the human brain. PMID:18946504

  6. Music training leads to the development of timbre-specific gamma band activity.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Antoine J; Roberts, Larry E; Chau, Wilkin; Trainor, Laurel J; Miller, Lee M

    2008-05-15

    Oscillatory gamma band activity (GBA, 30-100 Hz) has been shown to correlate with perceptual and cognitive phenomena including feature binding, template matching, and learning and memory formation. We hypothesized that if GBA reflects highly learned perceptual template matching, we should observe its development in musicians specific to the timbre of their instrument of practice. EEG was recorded in adult professional violinists and amateur pianists as well as in 4- and 5-year-old children studying piano in the Suzuki method before they commenced music lessons and 1 year later. The adult musicians showed robust enhancement of induced (non-time-locked) GBA, specifically to their instrument of practice, with the strongest effect in professional violinists. Consistent with this result, the children receiving piano lessons exhibited increased power of induced GBA for piano tones with 1 year of training, while children not taking lessons showed no effect. In comparison to induced GBA, evoked (time-locked) gamma band activity (30-90 Hz, approximately 80 ms latency) was present only in adult groups. Evoked GBA was more pronounced in musicians than non-musicians, with synchronization equally exhibited for violin and piano tones but enhanced for these tones compared to pure tones. Evoked gamma activity may index the physical properties of a sound and is modulated by acoustical training, while induced GBA may reflect higher perceptual learning and is shaped by specific auditory experiences.

  7. FRET-based detection of isozyme-specific activities of transglutaminases.

    PubMed

    Tatsukawa, Hideki; Liu, Hong Hong; Oba, Shota; Kamiya, Noriho; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Hitomi, Kiyotaka

    2017-03-01

    Transglutaminases (TGs) comprise a protein family in which the members catalyze the formation of isopeptide bonds between glutamine and lysine residues in various proteins. Expression studies on its three major members, FXIII, TG1, and TG2, have been performed in a relatively large number of mammalian tissues in comparison with those on the other isozymes. We previously identified a highly reactive substrate peptide, including glutamine, for each isozyme from a phage display library and developed a method for detecting isozyme-specific activities by incorporating a labeled substrate peptide into lysine residues of proteins. Here, we describe genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based probes composed of each fluorescence protein (Cerulean and EVenus) fused with substrate peptides. The probe pairs, designated as Trac-MTG (His-CerΔ11-LQ/EV-K-His) containing linker and substrate peptide sequence for microbial TG (MTG), increased the EVenus:Cerulean fluorescence intensity ratio by more than 1.5-fold. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Trac-TG1 (His-CerΔ11-K5) and Trac-TG2 (His-CerΔ11-T26) containing substrate peptide sequence for mammalian TGs successfully detected the isozyme-specific activity of TG1 and TG2, respectively. In this study, we developed a rapid and convenient experimental system for measuring the isozyme-specific activity of TGs. The application of these probes for analyses in cells and tissues will be helpful for elucidating the physiological and pathological functions of TGs.

  8. Sequestration of nanoparticles by an EPS matrix reduces the particle-specific bactericidal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Kang, Fuxing; Gao, Yanzheng; Mao, Xuewei; Hu, Xiaojie

    2016-02-01

    Most artificial nanomaterials are known to exhibit broad-spectrum bactericidal activity; however, the defence mechanisms that bacteria use based on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to detoxify nanoparticles (NPs) are not well known. We ruled out the possibility of ion-specific bactericidal activity by showing the lack of equivalent dissolved zinc and silicon toxicity and determined the particle-specific toxicity of ZnO and SiO2 nanoparticles (ZnONPs/SiO2NPs) through dialysis isolation experiments. Surprisingly, the manipulation of the E. coli EPS (i.e., no EPS manipulation or EPS removal by sonication/centrifugation) showed that their particle-specific bactericidal activity could be antagonized by NP-EPS sequestration. The survival rates of pristine E. coli (no EPS manipulation) reached 65% (ZnONPs, 500 mg L‑1) and 79% (SiO2NPs, 500 mg L‑1), whereas survival rates following EPS removal by sonication/centrifugation were 11% and 63%, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with fluorescence micro-titration analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that protein-like substances (N-H and C-N in amide II) and secondary carbonyl groups (C=O) in the carboxylic acids of EPS acted as important binding sites that were involved in NP sequestration. Accordingly, the amount and composition of EPS produced by bacteria have important implications for the bactericidal efficacy and potential environmental effects of NPs.

  9. Music training leads to the development of timbre-specific gamma band activity

    PubMed Central

    Shahin, Antoine J.; Roberts, Larry E.; Chau, Wilkin; Trainor, Laurel J.; Miller, Lee M.

    2015-01-01

    Oscillatory gamma band activity (GBA, 30–100Hz) has been shown to correlate with perceptual and cognitive phenomena including feature binding, template matching, and learning and memory formation. We hypothesized that if GBA reflects highly learned perceptual template matching, we should observe its development in musicians specific to the timbre of their instrument of practice. EEG was recorded in adult professional violinists and amateur pianists as well as in four- and five-year-old children studying piano in the Suzuki method before they commenced music lessons and one year later. The adult musicians showed robust enhancement of induced (non-time-locked) GBA, specifically to their instrument of practice, with the strongest effect in professional violinists. Consistent with this result, the children receiving piano lessons exhibited increased power of induced GBA for piano tones with one year of training, while children not taking lessons showed no effect. In comparison to induced GBA, evoked (time-locked) gamma band activity (30–90 Hz, ~80 ms latency) was present only in adult groups. Evoked GBA was more pronounced in musicians than non-musicians, with synchronization equally exhibited for violin and piano tones but enhanced for these tones compared to pure tones. Evoked gamma activity may index the physical properties of a sound and is modulated by acoustical training, while induced GBA may reflect higher perceptual learning and is shaped by specific auditory experiences. PMID:18375147

  10. A dynamic model for generating actuator specifications for small arms barrel active stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Anupam; Brei, Diann; Luntz, Jonathan; Lavigna, Chris

    2006-03-01

    Due to stresses encountered in combat, it is known that soldier marksmanship noticeably decreases regardless of prior training. Active stabilization systems in small arms have potential to address this problem to increase soldier survivability and mission effectiveness. The key to success is proper actuator design, but this is highly dependent on proper specification which is challenging due to the human/weapon interaction. This paper presents a generic analytical dynamic model which is capable of defining the necessary actuation specifications for a wide range of small arms platforms. The model is unique because it captures the human interface--shoulder and arm--that introduces the jitter disturbance in addition to the geometry, inertial properties and active stabilization stiffness of the small arms platform. Because no data to date is available for actual shooter-induced disturbance in field conditions, a method is given using the model to back-solve from measured shooting range variability data the disturbance amplitude information relative to the input source (arm or shoulder). As examples of the applicability of the model to various small arms systems, two different weapon systems were investigated: the M24 sniper weapon and the M16 assault rifle. In both cases, model based simulations provided valuable insight into impact on the actuation specifications (force, displacement, phase, frequency) due to the interplay of the human-weapon-active stabilization interface including the effect of shooter-disturbance frequency, disturbance location (shoulder vs. arm), and system parameters (stiffness, barrel rotation).

  11. Sequestration of nanoparticles by an EPS matrix reduces the particle-specific bactericidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Kang, Fuxing; Gao, Yanzheng; Mao, Xuewei; Hu, Xiaojie

    2016-01-01

    Most artificial nanomaterials are known to exhibit broad-spectrum bactericidal activity; however, the defence mechanisms that bacteria use based on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to detoxify nanoparticles (NPs) are not well known. We ruled out the possibility of ion-specific bactericidal activity by showing the lack of equivalent dissolved zinc and silicon toxicity and determined the particle-specific toxicity of ZnO and SiO2 nanoparticles (ZnONPs/SiO2NPs) through dialysis isolation experiments. Surprisingly, the manipulation of the E. coli EPS (i.e., no EPS manipulation or EPS removal by sonication/centrifugation) showed that their particle-specific bactericidal activity could be antagonized by NP-EPS sequestration. The survival rates of pristine E. coli (no EPS manipulation) reached 65% (ZnONPs, 500 mg L−1) and 79% (SiO2NPs, 500 mg L−1), whereas survival rates following EPS removal by sonication/centrifugation were 11% and 63%, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with fluorescence micro-titration analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that protein-like substances (N-H and C-N in amide II) and secondary carbonyl groups (C=O) in the carboxylic acids of EPS acted as important binding sites that were involved in NP sequestration. Accordingly, the amount and composition of EPS produced by bacteria have important implications for the bactericidal efficacy and potential environmental effects of NPs. PMID:26856606

  12. The Amino Acid Specificity for Activation of Phenylalanine Hydroxylase Matches the Specificity for Stabilization of Regulatory Domain Dimers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengnan; Hinck, Andrew P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-08-25

    Liver phenylalanine hydroxylase is allosterically activated by phenylalanine. The structural changes that accompany activation have not been identified, but recent studies of the effects of phenylalanine on the isolated regulatory domain of the enzyme support a model in which phenylalanine binding promotes regulatory domain dimerization. Such a model predicts that compounds that stabilize the regulatory domain dimer will also activate the enzyme. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation were used to determine the ability of different amino acids and phenylalanine analogues to stabilize the regulatory domain dimer. The abilities of these compounds to activate the enzyme were analyzed by measuring their effects on the fluorescence change that accompanies activation and on the activity directly. At concentrations of 10-50 mM, d-phenylalanine, l-methionine, l-norleucine, and (S)-2-amino-3-phenyl-1-propanol were able to activate the enzyme to the same extent as 1 mM l-phenylalanine. Lower levels of activation were seen with l-4-aminophenylalanine, l-leucine, l-isoleucine, and 3-phenylpropionate. The ability of these compounds to stabilize the regulatory domain dimer agreed with their ability to activate the enzyme. These results support a model in which allosteric activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase is linked to dimerization of regulatory domains.

  13. Functional human Th17 clones with WT1-specific helper activity.

    PubMed

    Tachino, Sho; Fujiki, Fumihiro; Oka, Yoshihiro; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Morimoto, Soyoko; Lin, Yu-Hung; Tamanaka, Taichi; Kondo, Kenta; Nakajima, Hiroko; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Hosen, Naoki; Oji, Yusuke; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Sugiyama, Haruo

    2013-04-01

    Th17 plays important roles in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Although the importance of Th17 in tumor immunity has also been suggested, precise roles of tumor-associated antigen-specific Th17 still remain poorly understood, especially in humans. We previously identified WT1332, a 16-mer helper epitope derived from tumor-associated antigen Wilms' tumor gene 1 (WT1) product, and WT1332-specific Th1 clones were established. In the present study, WT1-specific Th17 clones were established by the stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with the WT1332 helper peptide under human Th17-polarizing conditions. The WT1-specific Th17 clone exhibited the helper function for proliferation of conventional CD4(+) T cells in the antigenic stimulation-specific manner. This is the first report of establishment of functional Th17 clones with both antigen (WT1332) specificity and antigen-specific helper activity. Th17 clones established here and the method to establish antigen-specific Th17 clones should be a useful tool to further analyze the roles of human Th17 in tumor immunity.

  14. Control of Substrate Specificity by Active-Site Residues in Nitrobenzene Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Kou-San; Parales, Rebecca E.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrobenzene 1,2-dioxygenase from Comamonas sp. strain JS765 catalyzes the initial reaction in nitrobenzene degradation, forming catechol and nitrite. The enzyme also oxidizes the aromatic rings of mono- and dinitrotoluenes at the nitro-substituted carbon, but the basis for this specificity is not understood. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was used to modify the active site of nitrobenzene dioxygenase, and the contribution of specific residues in controlling substrate specificity and enzyme performance was evaluated. The activities of six mutant enzymes indicated that the residues at positions 258, 293, and 350 in the α subunit are important for determining regiospecificity with nitroarene substrates and enantiospecificity with naphthalene. The results provide an explanation for the characteristic specificity with nitroarene substrates. Based on the structure of nitrobenzene dioxygenase, substitution of valine for the asparagine at position 258 should eliminate a hydrogen bond between the substrate nitro group and the amino group of asparagine. Up to 99% of the mononitrotoluene oxidation products formed by the N258V mutant were nitrobenzyl alcohols rather than catechols, supporting the importance of this hydrogen bond in positioning substrates in the active site for ring oxidation. Similar results were obtained with an I350F mutant, where the formation of the hydrogen bond appeared to be prevented by steric interference. The specificity of enzymes with substitutions at position 293 varied depending on the residue present. Compared to the wild type, the F293Q mutant was 2.5 times faster at oxidizing 2,6-dinitrotoluene while retaining a similar Km for the substrate based on product formation rates and whole-cell kinetics. PMID:16517627

  15. Performance Effects of Repetition Specific Gluteal Activation Protocols on Acceleration in Male Rugby Union Players

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Lorna; Kenny, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Warm-up protocols have the potential to cause an acute enhancement of dynamic sprinting performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three repetition specific gluteal activation warm-up protocols on acceleration performance in male rugby union players. Forty male academy rugby union players were randomly assigned to one of 4 groups (control, 5, 10 or 15 repetition gluteal activation group) and performed 10 m sprints at baseline and 30 s, 2, 4, 6 and 8 min after their specific intervention protocol. Five and ten meter sprint times were the dependent variable and dual-beam timing gates were used to record all sprint times. Repeated measures analysis of variance found no significant improvement in 5 and 10 m sprint times between baseline and post warm-up scores (p ≥ 0.05) for all groups. There were no reported significant differences between groups at any of the rest interval time points (p ≥ 0.05). However, when individual responses to the warm-up protocols were analyzed, the 15 repetition gluteal activation group had faster 10 m times post-intervention and this improvement was significant (p = 0.021). These results would indicate that there is no specific rest interval for any of the gluteal interventions that results in a potentiation effect on acceleration performance. However, the individual response analysis would seem to indicate that a 15 repetition gluteal activation warm-up protocol has a potentiating effect on acceleration performance provided that the rest interval is adequately and individually determined. PMID:28031755

  16. Cruciform-extruding regulatory element controls cell-specific activity of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, E L; Peng, H; Esparza, F M; Maltchenko, S Z; Stachowiak, M K

    1998-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is expressed specifically in catecholaminergic cells. We have identified a novel regulatory sequence in the upstream region of the bovine TH gene promoter formed by a dyad symmetry element (DSE1;-352/-307 bp). DSE1 supports TH promoter activity in TH-expressing bovine adrenal medulla chromaffin (BAMC) cells and inhibits promoter activity in non-expressing TE671 cells. DNase I footprinting of relaxed TH promoter DNA showed weak binding of nuclear BAMC cell proteins to a short sequence in the right DSE1 arm. In BAMC cells, deletion of the right arm markedly reduced the expression of luciferase from the TH promoter. However, deletion of the left DSE1 arm or its reversed orientation (RevL) also inactivated the TH promoter. In supercoiled TH promoter, DSE1 assumes a cruciform-like conformation i.e., it binds cruciform-specific 2D3 antibody, and S1 nuclease-cleavage and OsO4-modification assays have identified an imperfect cruciform extruded by the DSE1. DNase I footprinting of supercoiled plasmid showed that cruciformed DSE1 is targeted by nuclear proteins more efficiently than the linear duplex isomer and that the protected site encompasses the left arm and center of DSE1. Our results suggest that the disruption of intrastrand base-pairing preventing cruciform formation and protein binding to DSE1 is responsible for its inactivation in DSE1 mutants. DSE1 cruciform may act as a target site for activator (BAMC cells) and repressor (TE671) proteins. Its extrusion emerges as a novel mechanism that controls cell-specific promoter activity. PMID:9512554

  17. Non-specific binding sites help to explain mixed inhibition in mushroom tyrosinase activities.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Sorour; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Fazli, Mostafa

    2016-10-21

    Inhibition and activation studies of tyrosinase could prove beneficial to agricultural, food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Although non-competitive and mixed-inhibition are frequent modes observed in kinetics studies on mushroom tyrosinase (MT) activities, the phenomena are left unexplained. In this study, dual effects of phthalic acid (PA) and cinnamic acid (CA) on MT during mono-phenolase activity were demonstrated. PA activated and inhibited MT at concentrations lower and higher than 150 μM, respectively. In contrast, CA inhibited and activated MT at concentrations lower and higher than 5 μM. The mode of inhibition for both effectors was mixed-type. Complex kinetics of MT in the presence of a modulator could partly be ascribed to its mixed-cooperativity. However, to explain mixed-inhibition mode, it is necessary to demonstrate how the ternary complex of substrate/enzyme/effector is formed. Therefore, we looked for possible non-specific binding sites using MT tropolone-bound PDB (2Y9X) in the computational studies. When tropolone was in MTPa (active site), PA and CA occupied different pockets (named MTPb and MTPc, respectively). The close Moldock scores of PA binding posed in MTPb and MTPa suggested that MTPb could be a secondary binding site for PA. Similar results were obtained for CA. Ensuing results from 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations for 2Y9X-effector complexes indicated that the structures were gradually stabilized during simulation. Tunnel analysis by using CAVER Analyst and CHEXVIS resulted in identifying two distinct channels that assumingly participate in exchanging the effectors when the direct channel to MTPa is not accessible.

  18. Domain-Specific Self-Reported and Objectively Measured Physical Activity in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sprengeler, Ole; Wirsik, Norman; Hebestreit, Antje; Herrmann, Diana; Ahrens, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the extent that different domains contribute to total sedentary (SED), light (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). We aimed to identify domain-specific physical activity (PA) patterns in school-aged children who were assessed by questionnaire and accelerometry. For the study, 298 German school children and adolescents aged 6–17 years wore an accelerometer for one week and completed a PA recall-questionnaire for the same period. Spearman coefficients (r) were used to evaluate the agreement between self-reported and objectively measured PA in five domains (transport, school hours, physical education, leisure-time, organized sports activities). School hours mainly contributed to the total objectively measured SED, LPA and MVPA (55%, 53% and 46%, respectively), whilst sports activities contributed only 24% to total MVPA. Compared to accelerometry, the proportion of self-reported LPA and MVPA during school hours was substantially underestimated but overestimated during leisure-time. The agreement of self-reported and objectively measured PA was low for total LPA (r = 0.09, 95% CI (confidence interval): −0.03–0.20) and total MVPA (r = 0.21, 95% CI: 0.10–0.32), while moderate agreement was only found for total SED (r = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.34–0.53), LPA during transport (r = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.49–0.67) and MVPA during organized sports activities (r = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.38–0.67). Since school hours mainly contribute to total SED, LPA and MVPA and self-reported LPA and MVPA during school were importantly underestimated compared to objectively measured LPA and MVPA, the application of objective measurements is compulsory to characterize the entire activity pattern of school-aged children. PMID:28257046

  19. Rapid direct methods for enumeration of specific, active bacteria in water and biofilms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFeters, G. A.; Pyle, B. H.; Lisle, J. T.; Broadaway, S. C.

    1999-01-01

    Conventional methods for detecting indicator and pathogenic bacteria in water may underestimate the actual population due to sublethal environmental injury, inability of the target bacteria to take up nutrients and other physiological factors which reduce bacterial culturability. Rapid and direct methods are needed to more accurately detect and enumerate active bacteria. Such a methodological advance would provide greater sensitivity in assessing the microbiological safety of water and food. The principle goal of this presentation is to describe novel approaches we have formulated for the rapid and simultaneous detection of bacteria plus the determination of their physiological activity in water and other environmental samples. The present version of our method involves the concentration of organisms by membrane filtration or immunomagnetic separation and combines an intracellular fluorochrome (CTC) for assessment of respiratory activity plus fluorescent-labelled antibody detection of specific bacteria. This approach has also been successfully used to demonstrate spatial and temporal heterogeneities of physiological activities in biofilms when coupled with cryosectioning. Candidate physiological stains include those capable of determining respiratory activity, membrane potential, membrane integrity, growth rate and cellular enzymatic activities. Results obtained thus far indicate that immunomagnetic separation can provide a high degree of sensitivity in the recovery of seeded target bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7) in water and hamburger. The captured and stained target bacteria are then enumerated by either conventional fluorescence microscopy or ChemScan(R), a new instrument that is very sensitive and rapid. The ChemScan(R) laser scanning instrument (Chemunex, Paris, France) provides the detection of individual fluorescently labelled bacterial cells using three emission channels in less than 5 min. A high degree of correlation has been demonstrated between

  20. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase activity is inhibited by bisphosphonates: role of divalent cations.

    PubMed

    Vaisman, Diego N; McCarthy, Antonio D; Cortizo, Ana M

    2005-05-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are drugs widely used in the treatment of various bone diseases. BPs localize to bone mineral, and their concentration in resorption lacunae could reach almost millimolar levels. Bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is a membrane-bound exoenzyme that has been implicated in bone formation and mineralization. In this study, we investigated the possible direct effect of three N-containing BPs (alendronate, pamidronate, and zoledronate) on the specific activity of bone ALP obtained from an extract of UMR106 rat osteosarcoma cells. Enzymatic activity was measured by spectrophotometric detection of p-nitrophenol product and by in situ visualization of ALP bands after an electrophoresis on cellulose acetate gels. Because ALP is a metalloprotein that contains Zn2+ and Mg2+, both of which are necessary for catalytic function, we also evaluated the participation of these divalent cations in the possible effect of BPs on enzymatic activity. All BPs tested were found to dose-dependently inhibit spectrophotometrically measured ALP activity (93-42% of basal) at concentrations of BPs between 10-5 M and 10-4 M, the order of potency being zoledronate approximately equals alendronate > pamidronate. However, coincubation with excess Zn2+ or Mg2+ completely abolished this inhibitory effect. Electrophoretic analysis rendered very similar results: namely a decrease in the enzymatic activity of the bone-ALP band by BPs and a reversion of this inhibition by divalent cations. This study shows that N-containing BPs directly inhibit bone-ALP activity, in a concentration range to which this exoenzyme is probably exposed in vivo. In addition, this inhibitory effect is most possibly the result of the chelation of Zn2+ and Mg2+ ions by BPs.

  1. Expression and Genetic Activation of Cyclic Di-GMP-Specific Phosphodiesterases in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Alberto; Hee, Chee-Seng; Ozaki, Shogo; Mazur, Adam; Boehm, Alex; Schirmer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular levels of the bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) are controlled by antagonistic activities of diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases. The phosphodiesterase PdeH was identified as a key regulator of motility in Escherichia coli, while deletions of any of the other 12 genes encoding potential phosphodiesterases did not interfere with motility. To analyze the roles of E. coli phosphodiesterases, we demonstrated that most of these proteins are expressed under laboratory conditions. We next isolated suppressor mutations in six phosphodiesterase genes, which reinstate motility in the absence of PdeH by reducing cellular levels of c-di-GMP. Expression of all mutant alleles also led to a reduction of biofilm formation. Thus, all of these proteins are bona fide phosphodiesterases that are capable of interfering with different c-di-GMP-responsive output systems by affecting the global c-di-GMP pool. This argues that E. coli possesses several phosphodiesterases that are inactive under laboratory conditions because they lack appropriate input signals. Finally, one of these phosphodiesterases, PdeL, was studied in more detail. We demonstrated that this protein acts as a transcription factor to control its own expression. Motile suppressor alleles led to a strong increase of PdeL activity and elevated pdeL transcription, suggesting that enzymatic activity and transcriptional control are coupled. In agreement with this, we showed that overall cellular levels of c-di-GMP control pdeL transcription and that this control depends on PdeL itself. We thus propose that PdeL acts both as an enzyme and as a c-di-GMP sensor to couple transcriptional activity to the c-di-GMP status of the cell. IMPORTANCE Most bacteria possess multiple diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases. Genetic studies have proposed that these enzymes show signaling specificity by contributing to distinct cellular processes without much cross talk. Thus, spatial

  2. Structure activity relationship and modeling studies of inhibitors of lysine specific demethylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lianghao; Wei, Liping; Pai, Eric; Yao, Yuan; Song, Yongcheng

    2017-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of histone play important roles in gene transcription. Aberrant methylation of histone lysine sidechains have been often found in cancer. Lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), which can demethylate histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) and other proteins, has recently been found to be a drug target for acute myeloid leukemia. To understand structure activity/selectivity relationships of LSD1 inhibitors, several series of cyclopropylamine and related compounds were synthesized and tested for their activities against LSD1 and related monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B. Several cyclopropylamine containing compounds were found to be highly potent and selective inhibitors of LSD1. A novel series cyclopropylimine compounds also exhibited strong inhibitory activity against LSD1. Structure activity relationships (SAR) of these compounds are discussed. Docking studies were performed to provide possible binding models of a representative compound in LSD1 and MAO-A. Moreover, these modeling studies can rationalize the observed SARs and selectivity. PMID:28158205

  3. NADH-dependent decavanadate reductase, an alternative activity of NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase protein.

    PubMed

    Rao, A V; Ramasarma, T

    2000-05-01

    The well known NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) obtained from pig heart was found to oxidize NADH with accompanying consumption of oxygen (NADH:O(2)=1:1) in presence of polyvanadate. This activity of the soluble IDH-protein has the following features common with the previously described membrane-enzymes: heat-sensitive, active only with NADH but not NADPH, increased rates in acidic pH, dependence on concentrations of the enzyme, NADH, decavanadate and metavanadate (the two constituents of polyvanadate), and sensitivity to SOD and EDTA. Utilizing NADH as the electron source the IDH protein was able to reduce decavanadate but not metavanadate. This reduced form of vanadyl (V(IV)) was similar in its eight-band electron spin resonance spectrum to vanadyl sulfate but had a 20-fold higher absorbance at its 700 nm peak. This decavanadate reductase activity of the protein was sensitive to heat and was not inhibited by SOD and EDTA. The IDH protein has the additional enzymic activity of NADH-dependent decavanadate reductase and is an example of "one protein--many functions".

  4. The evolution of lineage-specific regulatory activities in the human embryonic limb.

    PubMed

    Cotney, Justin; Leng, Jing; Yin, Jun; Reilly, Steven K; DeMare, Laura E; Emera, Deena; Ayoub, Albert E; Rakic, Pasko; Noonan, James P

    2013-07-03

    The evolution of human anatomical features likely involved changes in gene regulation during development. However, the nature and extent of human-specific developmental regulatory functions remain unknown. We obtained a genome-wide view of cis-regulatory evolution in human embryonic tissues by comparing the histone modification H3K27ac, which provides a quantitative readout of promoter and enhancer activity, during human, rhesus, and mouse limb development. Based on increased H3K27ac, we find that 13% of promoters and 11% of enhancers have gained activity on the human lineage since the human-rhesus divergence. These gains largely arose by modification of ancestral regulatory activities in the limb or potential co-option from other tissues and are likely to have heterogeneous genetic causes. Most enhancers that exhibit gain of activity in humans originated in mammals. Gains at promoters and enhancers in the human limb are associated with increased gene expression, suggesting they include molecular drivers of human morphological evolution.

  5. In vivo bioimaging with tissue-specific transcription factor activated luciferase reporters

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Suzanne M. K.; Delhove, Juliette M. K. M.; Perocheau, Dany P.; Karda, Rajvinder; Rahim, Ahad A.; Howe, Steven J.; Ward, Natalie J.; Birrell, Mark A.; Belvisi, Maria G.; Arbuthnot, Patrick; Johnson, Mark R.; Waddington, Simon N.; McKay, Tristan R.

    2015-01-01

    The application of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter cassettes in vitro is widespread but potential for in vivo application has not yet been realized. Bioluminescence imaging enables non-invasive tracking of gene expression in transfected tissues of living rodents. However the mature immune response limits luciferase expression when delivered in adulthood. We present a novel approach of tissue-targeted delivery of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter lentiviruses to neonatal rodents as an alternative to the existing technology of generating germline transgenic light producing rodents. At this age, neonates acquire immune tolerance to the conditionally responsive luciferase reporter. This simple and transferrable procedure permits surrogate quantitation of transcription factor activity over the lifetime of the animal. We show principal efficacy by temporally quantifying NFκB activity in the brain, liver and lungs of somatotransgenic reporter mice subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. This response is ablated in Tlr4−/− mice or when co-administered with the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone. Furthermore, we show the malleability of this technology by quantifying NFκB-mediated luciferase expression in outbred rats. Finally, we use somatotransgenic bioimaging to longitudinally quantify LPS- and ActivinA-induced upregulation of liver specific glucocorticoid receptor and Smad2/3 reporter constructs in somatotransgenic mice, respectively. PMID:26138224

  6. A serendipitous discovery of antifreeze protein-specific activity in C-linked antifreeze glycoprotein analogs.

    PubMed

    Eniade, Adewale; Purushotham, Madhusudhan; Ben, Robert N; Wang, J B; Horwath, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    Structurally diverse carbon-linked (C-linked) analogs of antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP) have been prepared via linear or convergent solid phase synthesis. These analogs range in molecular weight from approx 1.5-4.1 KDa and do not possess the beta-D-galactose-1,3-alpha-D-N-acetylgalactosamine carbohydrate moiety or the L-threonine-L-alanine-L-alanine polypeptide backbone native to the AFGP wild-type. Despite these dramatic structural modifications, the 2.7-KDa and 4.1-KDa analogs possess antifreeze protein-specific activity as determined by recrystallization-inhibition (RI) and thermal hysteresis (TH) assays. These analogs are weaker than the wild-type in their activity, but nanoliter osmometry indicates that these compounds are binding to ice and affecting a localized freezing point depression. This is the first example of a C-linked AFGP analog that possesses TH and RI activity and suggests that the rational design and synthesis of chemically and biologically stable AFGP analogs is a feasible and worthwhile endeavor. Given the low degree of TH activity, these compounds may prove useful for the protection of cells during freezing and thawing cycles.

  7. [Effect of preparations exhibiting cytokinin-like activity on the specific density of leaf in grasses].

    PubMed

    Cherniad'ev, I I

    2002-01-01

    The effects of synthetic preparations exhibiting cytokinin-like activity (6-benzylaminopurine, Thidiazuron, and kartolin-2) on the specific leaf area (SLA) were studied in plants of the family Gramineae (wheat, Triticum aestivum L.; meadow fescue, Festuca pratensis Huds.; and reed fescue, F. arindinacea Schreb.). At the early stages of ontogeny (until the leaf area reached 50-60% of the maximum value), treatment of plants of the three species with cytokinin-like preparations caused an increase in SLA. The SLA value in these plants was correlated with the rate of photosynthetic assimilation of carbon dioxide and activities of carbon metabolism enzymes: ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39), NAD-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37), and NADP-glyceraldehydrophosphate dehydrogenase complex, which includes phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) and glyceraldehydrophosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13). However, there was no correlation of SLA with the activity of phospho(enol)pyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31), an anaplerotic carboxylation enzyme of grasses. SLA is suggested to reflect the state and activity of the photosynthetic apparatus and can be recommended as a characteristic of photosynthesis variability (e.g., caused by cytokinin-like preparations).

  8. Behavioral studies on the enantiomers of butaclamol demonstrating absolute optical specificity for neuroleptic activity.

    PubMed

    Voith, K; Cummings, J R

    1976-08-01

    Butaclamol is a member of a new chemical class for which antipsychotic activity in humans has been demonstrated. Butaclamol, a racemate, has been resolved into its optical isomers and a separation of activities was found to occur between the (+) and (-) enantiomers. The present experiments show that at doses ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 mg/kg the (+) enantiomer abolished amphetamine-induced (a) stereotyped behavior and (b) rotational behavior in rats with unilateral lesions in the substantia nigra. It also inhibited the lever-pressing response in the continuous (Sidman) avoidance procedure, blocked discriminated avoidance behavior, and decreased ambulation and rearing in the open field. In contrast, the (-) enantiomer was devoid of behavioral activity at 100-500 times larger doses. At considerably higher doses (+)-butaclamol antagonized epinephrine-induced mortality. Again, the (-)-butaclamol was devoid of this activity as well. The significance of absolute optical specifity manifested by a neuroleptic drug is discussed in the light of dopaminergic and adrenergic mechanisms.

  9. Neural crest specification and migration independently require NSD3-related lysine methyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Jacques-Fricke, Bridget T.; Gammill, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    Neural crest precursors express genes that cause them to become migratory, multipotent cells, distinguishing them from adjacent stationary neural progenitors in the neurepithelium. Histone methylation spatiotemporally regulates neural crest gene expression; however, the protein methyltransferases active in neural crest precursors are unknown. Moreover, the regulation of methylation during the dynamic process of neural crest migration is unclear. Here we show that the lysine methyltransferase NSD3 is abundantly and specifically expressed in premigratory and migratory neural crest cells. NSD3 expression commences before up-regulation of neural crest genes, and NSD3 is necessary for expression of the neural plate border gene Msx1, as well as the key neural crest transcription factors Sox10, Snail2, Sox9, and FoxD3, but not gene expression generally. Nevertheless, only Sox10 histone H3 lysine 36 dimethylation requires NSD3, revealing unexpected complexity in NSD3-dependent neural crest gene regulation. In addition, by temporally limiting expression of a dominant negative to migratory stages, we identify a novel, direct requirement for NSD3-related methyltransferase activity in neural crest migration. These results identify NSD3 as the first protein methyltransferase essential for neural crest gene expression during specification and show that NSD3-related methyltransferase activity independently regulates migration. PMID:25318671

  10. Substrate-binding specificity of chitinase and chitosanase as revealed by active-site architecture analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijia; Shao, Shangjin; Li, Linlin; Cheng, Zhi; Tian, Li; Gao, Peiji; Wang, Lushan

    2015-12-11

    Chitinases and chitosanases, referred to as chitinolytic enzymes, are two important categories of glycoside hydrolases (GH) that play a key role in degrading chitin and chitosan, two naturally abundant polysaccharides. Here, we investigate the active site architecture of the major chitosanase (GH8, GH46) and chitinase families (GH18, GH19). Both charged (Glu, His, Arg, Asp) and aromatic amino acids (Tyr, Trp, Phe) are observed with higher frequency within chitinolytic active sites as compared to elsewhere in the enzyme structure, indicating significant roles related to enzyme function. Hydrogen bonds between chitinolytic enzymes and the substrate C2 functional groups, i.e. amino groups and N-acetyl groups, drive substrate recognition, while non-specific CH-π interactions between aromatic residues and substrate mainly contribute to tighter binding and enhanced processivity evident in GH8 and GH18 enzymes. For different families of chitinolytic enzymes, the number, type, and position of substrate atoms bound in the active site vary, resulting in different substrate-binding specificities. The data presented here explain the synergistic action of multiple enzyme families at a molecular level and provide a more reasonable method for functional annotation, which can be further applied toward the practical engineering of chitinases and chitosanases.

  11. Identification of artesunate as a specific activator of ferroptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Eling, Nils; Reuter, Lukas; Hazin, John; Hamacher-Brady, Anne; Brady, Nathan R

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic KRas reprograms pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells to states which are highly resistant to apoptosis. Thus, a major preclinical goal is to identify effective strategies for killing PDAC cells. Artesunate (ART) is an anti-malarial that specifically induces programmed cell death in different cancer cell types, in a manner initiated by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generation. In this study we demonstrate that ART specifically induced ROS- and lysosomal iron-dependent cell death in PDAC cell lines. Highest cytotoxicity was obtained in PDAC cell lines with constitutively-active KRas, and ART did not affect non-neoplastic human pancreatic ductal epithelial (HPDE) cells. We determined that ART did not induce apoptosis or necroptosis. Instead, ART induced ferroptosis, a recently described mode of ROS- and iron-dependent programmed necrosis which can be activated in Ras-transformed cells. Co-treatment with the ferroptosis inhibitor ferrostatin-1 blocked ART-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death, and increased long-term cell survival and proliferation. Importantly, analysis of PDAC patient mRNA expression indicates a dependency on antioxidant homeostasis and increased sensitivity to free intracellular iron, both of which correlate with Ras-driven sensitivity to ferroptosis. Overall, our findings suggest that ART activation of ferroptosis is an effective, novel pathway for killing PDAC cells.

  12. What's up? Emotion-specific activation of vertical space during language processing.

    PubMed

    Dudschig, Carolin; de la Vega, Irmgard; Kaup, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between language processing and vertical space has been shown for various groups of words including valence words, implicit location words, and words referring to religious concepts. However, it remains unclear whether these are single phenomena or whether there is an underlying common mechanism. Here, we show that the evaluation of word valence interacts with motor responses in the vertical dimension, with positive (negative) evaluations facilitating upward (downward) responses. When valence evaluation was not required, implicit location words (e.g., bird, shoe) influenced motor responses whereas valence words (e.g., kiss, hate) did not. Importantly, a subset of specific emotional valence words that are commonly associated with particular bodily postures (e.g., proud→upright; sad→slouched) did automatically influence motor responses. Together, this suggests that while the vertical spatial dimension is not directly activated by word valence, it is activated when processing words referring to emotional states with stereotypical bodily-postures. These results provide strong evidence that the activation of spatial associations during language processing is experience-specific in nature and cannot be explained with reference to a general mapping between all valence words and space (i.e., all positive and negative words generally relate to spatial processing). These findings support the experiential view of language comprehension, suggesting that the automatic reactivation of bodily experiences is limited to word groups referring to emotions or entities directly associated with spatial experiences (e.g., posture or location in the world).

  13. Structure-activity relationship studies on a novel family of specific HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bonache, María-Cruz; Chamorro, Cristina; Lobatón, Esther; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan; Velázquez, Sonsoles; Camarasa, María-José; San-Félix, Ana

    2003-09-01

    We have previously reported the discovery and preliminary structure-activity relationships of a new class of specific HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors whose prototype compound is the 1-[2',5'-bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-beta-D-ribofuranosyl]-3-N-[(carboxy) methyl]-thymine. In an attempt to increase the inhibitory efficacy against HIV-1 RT of this new class of nucleosides, and to further explore the structural features required for anti-HIV-1 activity, different types of modifications have been carried out on the prototype compound. These include substitution of the tert-butyldimethylsilyl groups by other liphophilic groups, replacement of the carboxy group at the N-3 position of the nucleobase by other functional groups, change in the length of the spacer between the thymine and the carboxylic acid residue and substitution of the thymine moiety by other pyrimidine (uracil, 5-ethyluracil) or purine (hypoxanthine) nucleobases. In addition, the most salient structural features of this new class of HIV-1-specific nucleosides have been incorporated into classical HIV RT nucleoside inhibitors such as ddl, AZT, d4T. Our studies demonstrate that both the carboxymethyl moiety at the nucleobase and tert-butyldimethylsilyl groups at the sugar are important structural components since deletion of either of them is detrimental to the antiviral activity.

  14. Synaptic activity bidirectionally regulates a novel sequence-specific S-Q phosphoproteome in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Siddoway, Benjamin; Hou, Hailong; Yang, Hongtian; Petralia, Ronald; Xia, Houhui

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a critical role in neuronal transcription, translation, cell viability, and synaptic plasticity. In neurons, phospho-enzymes and specific substrates directly link glutamate release and post-synaptic depolarization to these cellular functions; however, many of these enzymes and their protein substrates remain uncharacterized or unidentified. In this article, we identify a novel, synaptically-driven neuronal phosphoproteome characterized by a specific motif of serine/threonine-glutamine ([S/T]-Q, abbreviated as SQ). These SQ-containing substrates are predominantly localized to dendrites, synapses, the soma; and activation of this SQ phosphoproteome by bicuculline application is induced via calcium influx through L-type calcium channels. On the other hand, acute application of NMDA can inactivate this SQ phosphoproteome. We demonstrate that the SQ motif kinase Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) can also localize to dendrites and dendritic spines, in addition to other subcellular compartments, and is activated by bicuculline application. Pharmacology studies indicate that ATM and its sister kinase ATR up-regulate these neuronal SQ substrates. Phosphoproteomics identified over 150 SQ-containing substrates whose phosphorylation is bidirectionally-regulated by synaptic activity. PMID:24117848

  15. Active training and driving-specific feedback improve older drivers' visual search prior to lane changes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Driving retraining classes may offer an opportunity to attenuate some effects of aging that may alter driving skills. Unfortunately, there is evidence that classroom programs (driving refresher courses) do not improve the driving performance of older drivers. The aim of the current study was to evaluate if simulator training sessions with video-based feedback can modify visual search behaviors of older drivers while changing lanes in urban driving. Methods In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the video-based feedback training, 10 older drivers who received a driving refresher course and feedback about their driving performance were tested with an on-road standardized evaluation before and after participating to a simulator training program (Feedback group). Their results were compared to a Control group (12 older drivers) who received the same refresher course and in-simulator active practice as the Feedback group without receiving driving-specific feedback. Results After attending the training program, the Control group showed no increase in the frequency of the visual inspection of three regions of interests (rear view and left side mirrors, and blind spot). In contrast, for the Feedback group, combining active training and driving-specific feedbacks increased the frequency of blind spot inspection by 100% (32.3 to 64.9% of verification before changing lanes). Conclusions These results suggest that simulator training combined with driving-specific feedbacks helped older drivers to improve their visual inspection strategies, and that in-simulator training transferred positively to on-road driving. In order to be effective, it is claimed that driving programs should include active practice sessions with driving-specific feedbacks. Simulators offer a unique environment for developing such programs adapted to older drivers' needs. PMID:22385499

  16. Preparation, characterization, and determination of immunological activities of transfer factor specific to human sperm antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianwei; Kong, Cui; Yuan, Zhaohong; Luo, Junmin; Ma, Rui; Yu, Jiang; Cao, Jinghe

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The objective of this study was to prepare, characterize, and determine immunological activities of specific transfer factor (STF) specific to human sperm antigen (HSA) for the preparation of antisperm contraceptive vaccine that can be used as an immunocontraceptive. METHODS. HSA-STF was prepared using the spleens of rabbits vaccinated with HSA. The specific immunological activities were examined by lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT), leukocyte adhesion inhibition test (LAIT), and by determining the concentrations of IL-4, γ -IFN, and IL-21. HSA-STF was a helveolous substance, having a pH value of 7.0 ± 0.4 and UV absorption maxima at 258 ± 6 nm. It contained seventeen amino acids; glycine and glutamic acids were the highest in terms of concentrations (38.8 μ g/mL and 36.3 μ g/mL, resp.). RESULTS. The concentration of polypeptide was 2.34 ± 0.31 mg/mL, and ribose was 0.717 ± 0.043 mg/mL. The stimulation index for lymphocyte proliferation test was 1.84, and the leukocyte adhesion inhibition rate was 37.7%. There was a statistically significant difference between the cultural lymphocytes with HSA-STF and non-HSA-STF for γ -IFN and IL-21 (P < 0.05), but there was no statistical significance for IL-4 (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION. HSA-STF was prepared and characterized successfully. It had immunological activity which could transfer the immune response specific to HSA and prove to be a potential candidate for the development of male immunocontraceptive agents.

  17. Sex-specific foraging behavior in response to fishing activities in a threatened seabird

    PubMed Central

    García-Tarrasón, Manuel; Bécares, Juan; Bateman, Santiago; Arcos, José Manuel; Jover, Lluís; Sanpera, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Some seabird species have learnt to efficiently exploit fishing discards from trawling activities. However, a discard ban has been proposed as necessary in Europe to ensure the sustainability of the seas. It is of crucial importance for the management and conservation purposes to study the potential consequences of a discard ban on the foraging ecology of threatened seabirds. We assessed the influence of fishing activities on the feeding habits of 22 male and 15 female Audouin's gulls (Larus audouinii) from the Ebro Delta (Mediterranean Sea) during the breeding period using GPS loggers together with Stable Isotope Analysis (SIA), which provided new insights into their foraging behavior and trophic ecology, respectively. GPS data revealed different sex-specific foraging patterns between workdays and weekends. Females were highly consistent in that they foraged at sea throughout the week even though discarding stops at weekends. In contrast, males switched from foraging at sea during the week (when discards are produced) to an increased use of rice field habitats at weekends (when fishermen do not work). This sex-specific foraging behavior could be related to specific nutritional requirements associated with previous egg production, an energetically demanding period for females. However, on a broader time scale integrated by the SIA, both sexes showed a high degree of individual specialization in their trophic ecology. The need to obtain detailed information on the dependence and response of seabirds to fishing activities is crucial in conservation sciences. In this regard, sex-specific foraging behavior in relation to fisheries has been overlooked, despite the ecological and conservation implications. For instance, this situation may lead to sex differentiation in bycatch mortality in longlines when trawlers do not operate. Moreover, any new fisheries policy will need to be implemented gradually to facilitate the adaptation of a specialized species to a discard ban

  18. Sex-specific foraging behavior in response to fishing activities in a threatened seabird.

    PubMed

    García-Tarrasón, Manuel; Bécares, Juan; Bateman, Santiago; Arcos, José Manuel; Jover, Lluís; Sanpera, Carolina

    2015-06-01

    Some seabird species have learnt to efficiently exploit fishing discards from trawling activities. However, a discard ban has been proposed as necessary in Europe to ensure the sustainability of the seas. It is of crucial importance for the management and conservation purposes to study the potential consequences of a discard ban on the foraging ecology of threatened seabirds. We assessed the influence of fishing activities on the feeding habits of 22 male and 15 female Audouin's gulls (Larus audouinii) from the Ebro Delta (Mediterranean Sea) during the breeding period using GPS loggers together with Stable Isotope Analysis (SIA), which provided new insights into their foraging behavior and trophic ecology, respectively. GPS data revealed different sex-specific foraging patterns between workdays and weekends. Females were highly consistent in that they foraged at sea throughout the week even though discarding stops at weekends. In contrast, males switched from foraging at sea during the week (when discards are produced) to an increased use of rice field habitats at weekends (when fishermen do not work). This sex-specific foraging behavior could be related to specific nutritional requirements associated with previous egg production, an energetically demanding period for females. However, on a broader time scale integrated by the SIA, both sexes showed a high degree of individual specialization in their trophic ecology. The need to obtain detailed information on the dependence and response of seabirds to fishing activities is crucial in conservation sciences. In this regard, sex-specific foraging behavior in relation to fisheries has been overlooked, despite the ecological and conservation implications. For instance, this situation may lead to sex differentiation in bycatch mortality in longlines when trawlers do not operate. Moreover, any new fisheries policy will need to be implemented gradually to facilitate the adaptation of a specialized species to a discard ban

  19. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-10-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  20. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  1. Polyfunctional Specific Response to Echinococcus Granulosus Associates to the Biological Activity of the Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Linda; Vanini, Valentina; Petruccioli, Elisa; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Schininà, Vincenzo; Busi Rizzi, Elisa; Ludovisi, Alessandra; Corpolongo, Angela; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Pozio, Edoardo; Teggi, Antonella; Goletti, Delia

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a complex disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus (E.granulosus), and its immunophatogenesis is still not clearly defined. A peculiar feature of chronic CE is the coexistence of Th1 and Th2 responses. It has been suggested that Th1 cytokines are related to disease resistance, whereas Th2 cytokines are related to disease susceptibility and chronicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by multi-parametric flow cytometry (FACS), the presence of CE specific immune signatures. Methodology/Principal Findings We enrolled 54 subjects with suspected CE; 42 of them had a confirmed diagnosis, whereas 12 were classified as NO-CE. Based on the ultrasonography images, CE patients were further categorized as being in "active stages" (25) and "inactive stages" (17). The ability of CD4+ T-cells to produce IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, Th2 cytokines or IL-10 was assessed by FACS on antigen-specific T-cells after overnight stimulation with Antigen B (AgB) of E.granulosus. Cytokine profiles were evaluated in all the enrolled subjects. The results show that none of the NO-CE subjects had a detectable AgB-specific response. Among the CE patients, the frequency and proportions of AgB-specific CD4+ T-cells producing IL-2+TNF-α+Th2+ or TNF-α+Th2+ were significantly increased in the “active stages” group compared to the “inactive stages” group. Moreover, an increased proportion of the total polyfunctional subsets, as triple-and double-functional CD4 T-cells, was found in CE patients with active disease. The response to the mitogen, used as a control stimulus to evaluate the immune competence status, was characterized by the same cytokine subsets in all the subjects enrolled, independent of CE. Conclusions We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that polyfunctional T-cell subsets as IL-2+TNF-α+Th2+ triple-positive and TNF-α+Th2+ double-positive specific T-cells associate with cyst biological activity. These results contribute

  2. Activity-dependent regulation of genes implicated in X-linked non-specific mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Boda, B; Mas, C; Muller, D

    2002-01-01

    X-linked forms of non-specific mental retardation are complex disorders, for which mutations in several genes have recently been identified. These include OPHN1, GDI1, PAK3, IL1RAPL, TM4SF2, FMR2 and RSK2. To investigate the mechanisms through which alterations of these gene products could result in cognitive impairment, we analyzed their expression using quantitative PCR technique in two in vitro models of activity-dependent gene regulation: kainate-induced seizures and long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP). We found that the level of expression of four genes, PAK3, IL1RAPL, RSK2 and TM4SF2, was significantly up-regulated following kainate treatment. Furthermore we observed a significant increase in mRNA levels of PAK3 and IL1RAPL following LTP induction. These results suggest a possible role for these four genes in activity-dependent brain plasticity.

  3. Active route learning in virtual environments: disentangling movement control from intention, instruction specificity, and navigation control.

    PubMed

    von Stülpnagel, Rul; Steffens, Melanie C

    2013-09-01

    Active navigation research examines how physiological and psychological involvement in navigation benefits spatial learning. However, existing conceptualizations of active navigation comprise separable, distinct factors. This research disentangles the contributions of movement control (i.e., self-contained vs. observed movement) as a central factor from learning intention (Experiment 1), instruction specificity and instruction control (Experiment 2), as well as navigation control (Experiment 3) to spatial learning in virtual environments. We tested the effects of these factors on landmark recognition (landmark knowledge), tour-integration and route navigation (route knowledge). Our findings suggest that movement control leads to robust advantages in landmark knowledge as compared to observed movement. Advantages in route knowledge do not depend on learning intention, but on the need to elaborate spatial information. Whenever the necessary level of elaboration is assured for observed movement, too, the development of route knowledge is not inferior to that for self-contained movement.

  4. Influence of fermentation conditions on specific activity of the enzymes alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase from yeasts.

    PubMed

    Mauricio, J C; Ortega, J M

    1993-01-01

    The effects of anaerobic, semi-aerobic and short aeration fermentation conditions and the addition of ergosterol and oleic acid to musts on the specific activity of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ADH and ALDH) from two yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii, were studied. ADH I biosynthesis only occurred during the first few hours of fermentation. ADH II from S. cerevisiae and ALDH-NADP+ from the two yeast species behaved as constitutive enzymes under all fermentation conditions. ADH II from T. delbrueckii was only synthesized in small amounts, and its activity was always lower than in S. cerevisiae, where it was responsible for the termination of alcoholic fermentation during the steady growth phase.

  5. Biologically active protein fragments containing specific binding regions of serum albumin or related proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, biologically active protein fragments can be constructed which contain only those specific portions of the serum albumin family of proteins such as regions known as subdomains IIA and IIIA which are primarily responsible for the binding properties of the serum albumins. The artificial serums that can be prepared from these biologically active protein fragments are advantageous in that they can be produced much more easily than serums containing the whole albumin, yet still retain all or most of the original binding potential of the full albumin proteins. In addition, since the protein fragment serums of the present invention can be made from non-natural sources using conventional recombinant DNA techniques, they are far safer than serums containing natural albumin because they do not carry the potentially harmful viruses and other contaminants that will be found in the natural substances.

  6. Diazirine photocrosslinking recruits activated FTO demethylase complexes for specific N(6)-methyladenosine recognition.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyun Seok; Hayashi, Gosuke; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2015-06-19

    N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) is a prevalent modification of RNAs. m(6)A exists in mRNA and plays an important role in RNA biological pathways and in RNA epigenetic regulation. We applied diazirine photocrosslinking to the event of m(6)A recognition mediated by the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) demethylase. A highly photoreactive diazirine adjacent to m(6)A on the RNA successfully recruited activated FTO complexes with an m(6)A preference. The process of recognition of m(6)A via FTO using diazirine photocrosslinking was controlled by the α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) cosubstrate and the Fe(II) cofactor, which are involved in m(6)A oxidative demethylation. In addition, FTO bound to ssRNAs prior to the m(6)A recognition process. Diazirine photocrosslinking contributes to increasing the chances of capturing activated FTO complexes with specific m(6)A recognition and provides new insights into the dynamic FTO oxidative demethylation process.

  7. The effect of sleep-specific brain activity versus reduced stimulus interference on declarative memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Piosczyk, Hannah; Holz, Johannes; Feige, Bernd; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Weber, Friederike; Landmann, Nina; Kuhn, Marion; Frase, Lukas; Riemann, Dieter; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Nissen, Christoph

    2013-08-01

    Studies suggest that the consolidation of newly acquired memories and underlying long-term synaptic plasticity might represent a major function of sleep. In a combined repeated-measures and parallel-group sleep laboratory study (active waking versus sleep, passive waking versus sleep), we provide evidence that brief periods of daytime sleep (42.1 ± 8.9 min of non-rapid eye movement sleep) in healthy adolescents (16 years old, all female), compared with equal periods of waking, promote the consolidation of declarative memory (word-pairs) in participants with high power in the electroencephalographic sleep spindle (sigma) frequency range. This observation supports the notion that sleep-specific brain activity when reaching a critical dose, beyond a mere reduction of interference, promotes synaptic plasticity in a hippocampal-neocortical network that underlies the consolidation of declarative memory.

  8. Conformational Adaptation of Asian Macaque TRIMCyp Directs Lineage Specific Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Hué, Stéphane; Rose, Nicola J.; Marzetta, Flavia; James, Leo C.; Towers, Greg J.

    2010-01-01

    TRIMCyps are anti-retroviral proteins that have arisen independently in New World and Old World primates. All TRIMCyps comprise a CypA domain fused to the tripartite domains of TRIM5α but they have distinct lentiviral specificities, conferring HIV-1 restriction in New World owl monkeys and HIV-2 restriction in Old World rhesus macaques. Here we provide evidence that Asian macaque TRIMCyps have acquired changes that switch restriction specificity between different lentiviral lineages, resulting in species-specific alleles that target different viruses. Structural, thermodynamic and viral restriction analysis suggests that a single mutation in the Cyp domain, R69H, occurred early in macaque TRIMCyp evolution, expanding restriction specificity to the lentiviral lineages found in African green monkeys, sooty mangabeys and chimpanzees. Subsequent mutations have enhanced restriction to particular viruses but at the cost of broad specificity. We reveal how specificity is altered by a scaffold mutation, E143K, that modifies surface electrostatics and propagates conformational changes into the active site. Our results suggest that lentiviruses may have been important pathogens in Asian macaques despite the fact that there are no reported lentiviral infections in current macaque populations. PMID:20808866

  9. Protein Stabilization and Enzyme Activation in Ionic Liquids: Specific Ion Effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    There are still debates on whether the hydration of ions perturbs the water structure, and what is the degree of such disturbance; therefore, the origin of Hofmeister effect on protein stabilization continues being questioned. For this reason, it is suggested to use the ‘specific ion effect’ instead of other misleading terms such as Hofmeister effect, Hofmeister series, lyotropic effect, and lyotropic series. In this review, we firstly discuss the controversial aspect of inorganic ion effects on water structures, and several possible contributors to the specific ion effect of protein stability. Due to recent overwhelming attraction of ionic liquids (ILs) as benign solvents in many enzymatic reactions, we further evaluate the structural properties and molecular-level interactions in neat ILs and their aqueous solutions. Next, we systematically compare the specific ion effects of ILs on enzyme stability and activity, and conclude that (a) the specificity of many enzymatic systems in diluted aqueous IL solutions is roughly in line with the traditional Hofmeister series albeit some exceptions; (b) however, the specificity follows a different track in concentrated or neat ILs because other factors (such as hydrogen-bond basicity, nucelophilicity, and hydrophobicity, etc) are playing leading roles. In addition, we demonstrate some examples of biocatalytic reactions in IL systems that are guided by the empirical specificity rule. PMID:26949281

  10. Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase tissue-specific activities: evidence for baseline levels in mammalian tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Uziel, M.; Griffin, G.D.; Walsh, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The tissue-specific activities of arylhydrocarbon hydroxylase benzo(a)pyrene (AHH(BaP)) in human, mouse, rat, and hamster tissues have been reviewed. Three categories of AHH activities are defined: baseline values from tissues that have been protected from adventitious exposures to AHH inducers; background levels from tissues where there have been no overt measures to protect against exposure; and induced levels resulting from overt exposure to chemical inducers. Evidence that the baseline category exists is derived from the observations that an upper limit of AHH tissue-specific activity of about 1.5 nmol/h x g tissue occurs in human placenta, human foreskin, lymphocyte, and epitheliod and fibroblastoid cell lines; mouse lung and liver; rat fetal liver, and noninducible rat cell lines from lung, liver, embryo kidney, and adrenals; and hamster kidney. The collected values for nonexposed tissues range from 0.02 nmol/h x g to values less than 1.5 nmol/h x g. The most consistent observation of this type was from human placental material from nonsmoking mothers. Animals raised under standard laboratory conditions without special dietary precautions show background AHH activities that range from 2 nmol/h x g to 200 nmol/h x g in portal of entry tissues such as liver, lung, and intestines. Almost all tissue samples showed induced AHH levels of up to 500 nmol/h x g when those tissues were overtly exposed to substances containing chemical inducers of AHH. Measurements of placental AHH from smoking mothers showed that more than 95% of those samples had AHH values exceeding 2.5 nmol/h x g.

  11. Effects of active vs. passive recovery on repeated rugby-specific exercises.

    PubMed

    Jougla, A; Micallef, J P; Mottet, D

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of active vs. passive recovery on performance of a rugby-specific intermittent test in rugby union players. Seven male rugby players (20.6+/-0.5 yrs; 181.9+/-10.0 cm; 94.5+/-12.8 kg) performed in random order, over two separate sessions, a specific repeated-sprint rugby test, the Narbonne test (6 x 4 consecutive actions: 1, scrummaging; 2, agility sprinting; 3, tackling; 4, straight sprinting) with 30s of passive or active recovery (running at 50% of maximal aerobic speed). The Narbonne tests were completed before (pre-test) and after (post-test) a 30-min rugby match. During the Narbonne test, scrum forces, agility and sprint times, heart rate and rate of perceived exertion were measured. Scrum forces were lower in active (74.9+/-13.4 kg) than in passive recovery (90.4+/-20.9 kg), only during the post-test (p<0.05). Fatigue index (%) (p<0.05) and total sprint time (s) (p<0.01) were significantly greater in active than in passive recovery, both during the pre-test (11.5+/-5.7% vs. 6.7+/-4.5% and 18.1+/-1.3s vs. 16.9+/-0.9s) and the post-test (7.3+/-3.3% vs. 4.3+/-1.5% and 18.3+/-1.6s vs. 16.9+/-1.1s). Consequently, the results indicated that passive recovery enabled better performance during the Narbonne test. However, it is obviously impractical to suggest that players should stand still during and following repeated-sprint bouts: the players have to move to ensure they have taken an optimal position.

  12. A novel cinnamic acid derivative that inhibits Cdc25 dual-specificity phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Yoshimi; Masuko, Norio; Ohkubo, Shuichi; Kitade, Makoto; Nagai, Kentaro; Okazaki, Shinji; Wierzba, Konstanty; Terada, Tadafumi; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Yamada, Yuji

    2005-09-01

    The Cdc25 dual-specificity phosphatases are key regulators of cell cycle progression through activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk). Three homologs exist in humans: Cdc25A, Cdc25B, and Cdc25C. Cdc25A and Cdc25B have oncogenic properties and are overexpressed in some types of tumors. Compounds that inhibit Cdc25 dual-specificity phosphatase activity might thus be potent anticancer agents. We screened several hundred compounds in a library using an in vitro phosphatase assay, with colorimetric measurement of the conversion of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) to p-nitrophenol by the catalytic domain of recombinant human Cdc25, and discovered TPY-835, which inhibits Cdc25A and Cdc25B activity (IC50 = 5.1 and 5.7 microM, respectively). TPY-835 had mixed inhibition kinetics for Cdc25A and Cdc25B. TPY-835 caused cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase in human lung cancer cells (A549 and SBC-5) but not cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. After treatment with TPY-835, the activation of Cdk2 was suppressed and phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein was decreased in SBC-5 cells. In addition, TPY-835 induced an increase of the sub-G1 phase cell population after 48-72 h treatment. The growth inhibitory effects of TPY-835 against cisplatin (CDDP)-, camptothecin- and 5-FU-resistant cell lines are comparable to the growth inhibitory effect on their parental lines, thus indicating that TPY-835 did not show cross-resistance to these cell lines. These results suggest that TPY-835 is a promising candidate for constructing a novel class of antitumor agents that can control the cell cycle progression of cancer cells.

  13. Activity, specificity, and titer of naturally occurring canine anti-DEA 7 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Spada, Eva; Proverbio, Daniela; Baggiani, Luciana; Canzi, Ilaria; Perego, Roberta

    2016-11-01

    The reported prevalence of naturally occurring anti-dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA) 7 antibodies in DEA 7-negative dogs is as high as 50%. Characterization of these antibodies may better define their importance in canine transfusion medicine. We determined in vitro activity, specificity, and titer of anti-DEA 7 antibodies in DEA 7-negative dogs. Plasma samples from 317 DEA 7-negative dogs were cross-matched with DEA 7-positive red blood cells (RBCs) using gel column technology. Agglutination occurred with DEA 7-positive RBCs but not with DEA 7-negative RBCs in 73 samples (23%), which were hence classified as containing anti-DEA 7 antibodies. These samples were evaluated for hemolytic and agglutinating activity, strength of agglutination, and antibody specificity and titers. All samples showed agglutination but none showed hemolysis. Gel agglutination was graded as 1+ for 20 samples (27%), 2+ for 49 samples (67%), 3+ for 4 samples (6%); no samples were graded 4+. The agglutination titer was <1:2 for 51 samples (73%), 1:2 for 13 samples (19%), 1:4 for 4 samples (5%), and 1:8 for 2 samples (3%). Of 16 samples treated with 2-mercaptoethanol, 11 samples (69%) contained only IgM, 4 samples (25%) exhibited only IgG activity, and 1 sample (6%) had both IgG and IgM activity. Low titers of warm, weakly agglutinating, mostly naturally occurring IgM anti-DEA 7 antibodies were found in 23% of DEA 7-negative dogs. The presence of naturally occurring anti-DEA 7 antibodies suggests that cross-matching of canine blood recipients is advisable, even at first transfusion, to minimize delayed transfusion reactions.

  14. Inhibitory activities of short linear motifs underlie Hox interactome specificity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baëza, Manon; Viala, Séverine; Heim, Marjorie; Dard, Amélie; Hudry, Bruno; Duffraisse, Marilyne; Rogulja-Ortmann, Ana; Brun, Christine; Merabet, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Hox proteins are well-established developmental regulators that coordinate cell fate and morphogenesis throughout embryogenesis. In contrast, our knowledge of their specific molecular modes of action is limited to the interaction with few cofactors. Here, we show that Hox proteins are able to interact with a wide range of transcription factors in the live Drosophila embryo. In this context, specificity relies on a versatile usage of conserved short linear motifs (SLiMs), which, surprisingly, often restrains the interaction potential of Hox proteins. This novel buffering activity of SLiMs was observed in different tissues and found in Hox proteins from cnidarian to mouse species. Although these interactions remain to be analysed in the context of endogenous Hox regulatory activities, our observations challenge the traditional role assigned to SLiMs and provide an alternative concept to explain how Hox interactome specificity could be achieved during the embryonic development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06034.001 PMID:25869471

  15. In vitro synthesis of a Major Facilitator Transporter for specific active transport across Droplet Interface Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Heather E.; Harris, Nicola J.; Booth, Paula J.

    2016-01-01

    Nature encapsulates reactions within membrane-bound compartments, affording sequential and spatial control over biochemical reactions. Droplet Interface Bilayers are evolving into a valuable platform to mimic this key biological feature in artificial systems. A major issue is manipulating flow across synthetic bilayers. Droplet Interface Bilayers must be functionalised, with seminal work using membrane-inserting toxins, ion channels and pumps illustrating the potential. Specific transport of biomolecules, and notably transport against a concentration gradient, across these bilayers has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we successfully incorporate the archetypal Major Facilitator Superfamily transporter, lactose permease, into Droplet Interface Bilayers and demonstrate both passive and active, uphill transport. This paves the way for controllable transport of sugars, metabolites and other essential biomolecular substrates of this ubiquitous transporter superfamily in DIB networks. Furthermore, cell-free synthesis of lactose permease during DIB formation also results in active transport across the interface bilayer. This adds a specific disaccharide transporter to the small list of integral membrane proteins that can be synthesised via in vitro transcription/translation for applications of DIB-based artificial cell systems. The introduction of a means to promote specific transport of molecules across Droplet Interface Bilayers against a concentration gradient gives a new facet to droplet networks. PMID:27996025

  16. Relationship of Species-Specific Filament Levels to Filamentous Bulking in Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiangying; Lou, Inchio; de los Reyes, Francis L.

    2004-01-01

    To examine the relationship between activated-sludge bulking and levels of specific filamentous bacteria, we developed a statistics-based quantification method for estimating the biomass levels of specific filaments using 16S rRNA-targeted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. The results of quantitative FISH for the filament Sphaerotilus natans were similar to the results of quantitative membrane hybridization in a sample from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant. Laboratory-scale reactors were operated under different flow conditions to develop bulking and nonbulking sludge and were bioaugmented with S. natans cells to stimulate bulking. Instead of S. natans, the filament Eikelboom type 1851 became dominant in the reactors. Levels of type 1851 filaments extending out of the flocs correlated strongly with the sludge volume index, and extended filament lengths of approximately 6 × 108 μm ml−1 resulted in bulking in laboratory-scale and full-scale activated-sludge samples. Quantitative FISH showed that high levels of filaments occurred inside the flocs in nonbulking sludge, supporting the “substrate diffusion limitation” hypothesis for bulking. The approach will allow the monitoring of incremental improvements in bulking control methods and the delineation of the operational conditions that lead to bulking due to specific filaments. PMID:15066840

  17. Stability and activity of an Enterobacter aerogenes-specific bacteriophage under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Verthé, K; Possemiers, S; Boon, N; Vaneechoutte, M; Verstraete, W

    2004-09-01

    A bacteriophage, designated UZ1 and showing lytic activity against a clinically important strain (BE1) of Enterobacter aerogenes was isolated from hospital sewage. The stability and lytic activity against this strain under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions was evaluated. After addition of bacteriophage UZ1 to a liquid feed at gastric pH 2, the phage was immediately inactivated and could not be recovered. However, by use of an antacid to neutralize stomach acidity, no significant changes in phage titer were observed after 2 h incubation at 37 degrees C. After supplementing pancreatic juice and further incubation for 4 h, the phage titer remained stable. The persistence of UZ1 in a mixed microbial ecosystem that was representative for the large intestine was monitored using an in vitro simulation of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem. A pulse administration of bacteriophage UZ1 at a concentration of 10(5) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml to reactor 3 (which simulates the ascending colon) showed that, in the absence of the host, bacteriophage UZ1 persisted for 13 days in the simulated colon, while the theoretical washout was calculated at 16 days. To assess its lytic activity in an intestinal microbial ecosystem, a green fluorescent protein (gfp)-labeled E. aerogenes BE1 strain was constructed and gfp-specific primers were designed in order to quantify the host strain using real-time PCR. It was observed that bacteriophage UZ1 was able to replicate and showed lytic activity against E. aerogenes BE1/ gfp in an intestinal microbial ecosystem. Indeed, after 17 h a 2 log unit reduction of E. aerogenes BE1/ gfp was measured as compared with the assay without bacteriophage UZ1, while the phage titer increased by 2 log units at an initial multiplicity of infection of 0.07 PFU/colony-forming unit. This is the first report of an in vitro model to study bacteriophage activity in the complex intestinal microbial community.

  18. Preparatory band specific premotor cortical activity differentiates upper and lower extremity movement.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Lewis A; Carpenter, Mackenzie; Mizelle, J C; Forrester, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Event related desynchronization (ERD) allows evaluation of brain signals in multiple frequency dimensions. The purpose of this study was to determine left hemispheric non-primary motor cortex differences at varying frequencies of premovement ERD for similar movements by end-effectors of the upper and lower extremities. We recorded 32-channel electroencephalography (EEG) while subjects performed self-paced right ankle dorsiflexion and wrist extension. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded over the tibialis anterior and extensor carpi ulnaris. EEG was analyzed for premovement ERD within the alpha (8-12 Hz), low beta (13-18 Hz) and high beta (18-22 Hz) frequencies over the premotor, motor, and sensory areas of the left and mesial cortex from -1.5 to 0 s before movement. Within the alpha and high beta bands, wrist movements showed limited topography, but greater ERD over posterior premotor cortex areas. Alpha ERD was also significantly greater over the lateral motor cortex for wrist movements. In the low beta band, wrist movements provided extensive ERD differences to include the left motor and mesial/lateral premotor areas, whereas ankle movements showed only limited ERD activity. Overall, alpha and high beta activity demonstrated distinctions that are consistent with mapping of wrist and ankle representations over the sensorimotor strip, whereas the low beta representation demonstrated the clearest distinctions between the limbs over widespread brain areas, particularly the lateral premotor cortex. This suggests limited leg premovement activity at the dorsolateral premotor cortex. Low beta ERD may be reflect joint or limb specific preparatory activity in the premotor area. Further work is required to better evaluate the extent of this low beta activity for multiple comparative joints.

  19. Involvement of SOX proteins in lens-specific activation of crystallin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kamachi, Y; Sockanathan, S; Liu, Q; Breitman, M; Lovell-Badge, R; Kondoh, H

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the mechanism of delta 1-crystallin gene activation, which occurs early in lens cell differentiation, and have previously shown that an essential element of the delta 1-crystallin enhancer is bound by a group of nuclear factors, delta EF2, among which delta EF2a is highly enriched in lens cells. In this report we show that the cDNA of delta EF2a codes for the chicken SOX-2 protein (cSOX-2), which is structurally related to the sex-determining factor SRY. Sox-2 is expressed at high levels in the early developing lens in both chicken and mouse embryos. Overexpression of delta EF2a/cSOX-2 increased delta 1-crystallin enhancer activity to a plateau in lens cells, but not in fibroblasts, consistent with the previously drawn conclusion that delta EF2a activates transcription only in concert with another factor present in the lens. This result supports the model that SOX proteins act as architectural components in the activating complex formed on an enhancer, as indicated for another HMG domain protein, lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (LEF-1). We also show that SOX protein binding is essential for lens-specific promoter activity of the mouse gamma F-crystallin gene. This work is the first to show delta- and gamma-crystallin genes as examples of direct regulatory targets of SOX proteins and provides evidence that diversified crystallin genes are regulated, at least partly, by a common mechanism. Images PMID:7628452

  20. Aberrant Oscillatory Activity during Simple Movement in Task-Specific Focal Hand Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Hinkley, Leighton B N; Dolberg, Rebecca; Honma, Susanne; Findlay, Anne; Byl, Nancy N; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2012-01-01

    In task-specific focal hand dystonia (tspFHD), the temporal dynamics of cortical activity in the motor system and how these processes are related to impairments in sensory and motor function are poorly understood. Here, we use time-frequency reconstructions of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data to elaborate the temporal and spatial characteristics of cortical activity during movement. A self-paced finger tapping task during MEG recording was performed by 11 patients with tspFHD and 11 matched healthy controls. In both groups robust changes in beta (12-30 Hz) and high gamma (65-90 Hz) oscillatory activity were identified over sensory and motor cortices during button press. A significant decrease [p < 0.05, 1% False Discovery Rate (FDR) corrected] in high gamma power during movements of the affected hand was identified over ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex in the period prior to (-575 ms) and following (725 ms) button press. Furthermore, an increase (p < 0.05, 1% FDR corrected) in beta power suppression following movement of the affected hand was identified over visual cortex in patients with tspFHD. For movements of the unaffected hand, a significant (p < 0.05, 1% FDR corrected) increase in beta power suppression was identified over secondary somatosensory cortex (S2) in the period following button press in patients with tspFHD. Oscillatory activity within in the tspFHD group was however not correlated with clinical measures. Understanding these aberrant oscillatory dynamics can provide the groundwork for interventions that focus on modulating the timing of this activity.

  1. Molecular Evolution of the Porcine Type I Interferon Family: Subtype-Specific Expression and Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yongming; Bergkamp, Joseph; Blecha, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs), key antiviral cytokines, evolve to adapt with ever-changing viral threats during vertebrate speciation. Due to novel pathogenic pressure associated with Suidae speciation and domestication, porcine IFNs evolutionarily engender both molecular and functional diversification, which have not been well addressed in pigs, an important livestock species and animal model for biomedical sciences. Annotation of current swine genome assembly Sscrofa10.2 reveals 57 functional genes and 16 pseudogenes of type I IFNs. Subfamilies of multiple IFNA, IFNW and porcine-specific IFND genes are separated into four clusters with ∼60 kb intervals within the IFNB/IFNE bordered region in SSC1, and each cluster contains mingled subtypes of IFNA, IFNW and IFND. Further curation of the 57 functional IFN genes indicates that they include 18 potential artifactual duplicates. We performed phylogenetic construction as well as analyses of gene duplication/conversion and natural selection and showed that porcine type I IFN genes have been undergoing active diversification through both gene duplication and conversion. Extensive analyses of the non-coding sequences proximal to all IFN coding regions identified several genomic repetitive elements significantly associated with different IFN subtypes. Family-wide studies further revealed their molecular diversity with respect to differential expression and restrictive activity on the resurgence of a porcine endogenous retrovirus. Based on predicted 3-D structures of representative animal IFNs and inferred activity, we categorized the general functional propensity underlying the structure-activity relationship. Evidence indicates gene expansion of porcine type I IFNs. Genomic repetitive elements that associated with IFN subtypes may serve as molecular signatures of respective IFN subtypes and genomic mechanisms to mediate IFN gene evolution and expression. In summary, the porcine type I IFN profile has been phylogenetically

  2. Subtle Changes in Motif Positioning Cause Tissue-Specific Effects on Robustness of an Enhancer's Activity

    PubMed Central

    Erceg, Jelena; Saunders, Timothy E.; Girardot, Charles; Devos, Damien P.; Hufnagel, Lars; Furlong, Eileen E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Deciphering the specific contribution of individual motifs within cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) is crucial to understanding how gene expression is regulated and how this process is affected by sequence variation. But despite vast improvements in the ability to identify where transcription factors (TFs) bind throughout the genome, we are limited in our ability to relate information on motif occupancy to function from sequence alone. Here, we engineered 63 synthetic CRMs to systematically assess the relationship between variation in the content and spacing of motifs within CRMs to CRM activity during development using Drosophila transgenic embryos. In over half the cases, very simple elements containing only one or two types of TF binding motifs were capable of driving specific spatio-temporal patterns during development. Different motif organizations provide different degrees of robustness to enhancer activity, ranging from binary on-off responses to more subtle effects including embryo-to-embryo and within-embryo variation. By quantifying the effects of subtle changes in motif organization, we were able to model biophysical rules that explain CRM behavior and may contribute to the spatial positioning of CRM activity in vivo. For the same enhancer, the effects of small differences in motif positions varied in developmentally related tissues, suggesting that gene expression may be more susceptible to sequence variation in one tissue compared to another. This result has important implications for human eQTL studies in which many associated mutations are found in cis-regulatory regions, though the mechanism for how they affect tissue-specific gene expression is often not understood. PMID:24391522

  3. Strain-specific antiviral activity of iminosugars against human influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, S.; Miller, J. L.; Harvey, D. J.; Gu, Y.; Rosenthal, P. B.; Zitzmann, N.; McCauley, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Drugs that target host cell processes can be employed to complement drugs that specifically target viruses, and iminosugar compounds that inhibit host α-glucosidases have been reported to show antiviral activity against multiple viruses. Here the effect and mechanism of two iminosugar α-glucosidase inhibitors, N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ) and N-nonyl-deoxynojirimycin (NN-DNJ), on human influenza A viruses was examined. Methods The viruses examined were a recently circulating seasonal influenza A(H3N2) virus strain A/Brisbane/10/2007, an older H3N2 strain A/Udorn/307/72, and A/Lviv/N6/2009, a strain representative of the currently circulating pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Results The inhibitors had the strongest effect on Brisbane/10 and NN-DNJ was more potent than NB-DNJ. Both compounds showed antiviral activity in cell culture against three human influenza A viruses in a strain-specific manner. Consistent with its action as an α-glucosidase inhibitor, NN-DNJ treatment resulted in an altered glycan processing of influenza haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), confirmed by MS. NN-DNJ treatment was found to reduce the cell surface expression of the H3 subtype HA. The level of sialidase activity of NA was reduced in infected cells, but the addition of exogenous sialidase to the cells did not complement the NN-DNJ-mediated inhibition of virus replication. Using reassortant viruses, the drug susceptibility profile was determined to correlate with the origin of the HA. Conclusions NN-DNJ inhibits influenza A virus replication in a strain-specific manner that is dependent on the HA. PMID:25223974

  4. Effect of compost temperature on oxygen uptake rate, specific growth rate and enzymatic activity of microorganisms in dairy cattle manure.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Fumihito; Iwabuchi, Kazunori

    2006-05-01

    Investigations were carried out to find out the relationship between temperature and microbial activity in dairy cattle manure composting using oxygen uptake rate, specific growth rate and enzymatic activities during autothermal and isothermal composting experiments. In autothermal composting, oxygen uptake rate and specific growth rate were found to be most intensive in order of 43 degrees C, 60 degrees C and 54 degrees C. Isothermal composting at 54 degrees C resulted highest levels of enzymatic activity and promoted the volatile solids reduction. Based on the maximum enzymatic activity, specific growth rate appeared to be more closely linked with microbial activity in compost than with oxygen uptake rate. The enhancement of specific growth rate, enzymatic activity and volatile solids reduction were induced at 54 degrees C in cattle manure composting.

  5. Research activities at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology for the regional ionospheric specification and forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouya, Zahra; Terkildsen, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The Australian Space Forecast Centre (ASFC) provides space weather forecasts to a diverse group of customers. Space Weather Services (SWS) within the Australian Bureau of Meteorology is focussed both on developing tailored products and services for the key customer groups, and supporting ASFC operations. Research in SWS is largely centred on the development of data-driven models using a range of solar-terrestrial data. This paper will cover some data requirements , approaches and recent SWS activities for data driven modelling with a focus on the regional Ionospheric specification and forecasting.

  6. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) Product Specification Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassy, Joe; Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas; Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project.

  7. Target design considerations for high specific activity [{sup 11}C]O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Alexoff, D.L.; Schlyer, D.J.; McDonald, K.; Wolf, A.P.

    1993-12-31

    In the routine preparation of {sup 11}C-labeled compounds through N-[{sup 11}C]-methylation using [{sup 11}C]H{sub 3}I, total masses are always higher than synthesis mass contribution, suggesting that the target system contributes carrier carbon to the final product mass. This conclusion prompted this evaluation of target materials and target design for [{sup 11}C]O{sub 2} production. Ultimately, one is faced with the sprospect of compromising between [{sup 11}C]O{sub 2} specific activity and the amount that can be extracted from the target after a reasonable irradiation time.

  8. Increasing Specificity of Correlate Research: Exploring Correlates of Children’s Lunchtime and After-School Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Rebecca M.; Ridley, Kate; Olds, Timothy S.; Dollman, James

    2014-01-01

    Background The lunchtime and after-school contexts are critical windows in a school day for children to be physically active. While numerous studies have investigated correlates of children’s habitual physical activity, few have explored correlates of physical activity occurring at lunchtime and after-school from a social-ecological perspective. Exploring correlates that influence physical activity occurring in specific contexts can potentially improve the prediction and understanding of physical activity. Using a context-specific approach, this study investigated correlates of children’s lunchtime and after-school physical activity. Methods Cross-sectional data were collected from 423 South Australian children aged 10.0–13.9 years (200 boys; 223 girls) attending 10 different schools. Lunchtime and after-school physical activity was assessed using accelerometers. Correlates were assessed using purposely developed context-specific questionnaires. Correlated Component Regression analysis was conducted to derive correlates of context-specific physical activity and determine the variance explained by prediction equations. Results The model of boys’ lunchtime physical activity contained 6 correlates and explained 25% of the variance. For girls, the model explained 17% variance from 9 correlates. Enjoyment of walking during lunchtime was the strongest correlate for both boys and girls. Boys’ and girls’ after-school physical activity models explained 20% variance from 14 correlates and 7% variance from the single item correlate, “I do an organised sport or activity after-school because it gets you fit”, respectively. Conclusions Increasing specificity of correlate research has enabled the identification of unique features of, and a more in-depth interpretation of, lunchtime and after-school physical activity behaviour and is a potential strategy for advancing the physical activity correlate research field. The findings of this study could be used to inform

  9. 41 CFR 102-75.130 - If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report... the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report? If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, the reporting agency must include information on the type...

  10. Covalently attached oligodeoxyribonucleotides induce RNase activity of a short peptide and modulate its base specificity

    PubMed Central

    Mironova, Nadezhda L.; Pyshnyi, Dmytryi V.; Ivanova, Eugenya M.; Zenkova, Marina A.; Gross, Hans J.; Vlassov, Valentin V.

    2004-01-01

    New artificial ribonucleases, conjugates of short oligodeoxyribonucleotides with peptides containing alternating arginine and leucine, were synthesized and characterized in terms of their catalytic activity and specificity of RNA cleavage. The conjugates efficiently cleave different RNAs within single-stranded regions. Depending on the sequence and length of the oligonucleotide, the conjugates display either G–X>>Pyr–A or Pyr–A>>G–X cleavage specificity. Preferential RNA cleavage at G–X phosphodiester bonds was observed for conjugate NH2-Gly-[ArgLeu]4-CCAAACA. The conjugates function as true catalysts, exhibiting reaction turnover up to 175 for 24 h. Our data show that in the conjugate the oligonucleotide plays the role of a factor which provides an ‘active‘ conformation of the peptide via intramolecular interactions, and that it is the peptide residue itself which is responsible for substrate affinity and catalysis. PMID:15047859

  11. Species-specific calls evoke asymmetric activity in the monkey's temporal poles.

    PubMed

    Poremba, Amy; Malloy, Megan; Saunders, Richard C; Carson, Richard E; Herscovitch, Peter; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2004-01-29

    It has often been proposed that the vocal calls of monkeys are precursors of human speech, in part because they provide critical information to other members of the species who rely on them for survival and social interactions. Both behavioural and lesion studies suggest that monkeys, like humans, use the auditory system of the left hemisphere preferentially to process vocalizations. To investigate the pattern of neural activity that might underlie this particular form of functional asymmetry in monkeys, we measured local cerebral metabolic activity while the animals listened passively to species-specific calls compared with a variety of other classes of sound. Within the superior temporal gyrus, significantly greater metabolic activity occurred on the left side than on the right, only in the region of the temporal pole and only in response to monkey calls. This functional asymmetry was absent when these regions were separated by forebrain commissurotomy, suggesting that the perception of vocalizations elicits concurrent interhemispheric interactions that focus the auditory processing within a specialized area of one hemisphere.

  12. Getting ready for an emotion: specific premotor brain activities for self-administered emotional pictures

    PubMed Central

    Perri, Rinaldo L.; Berchicci, Marika; Lucci, Giuliana; Cimmino, Rocco L.; Bello, Annalisa; Di Russo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Emotional perception has been extensively studied, but only a few studies have investigated the brain activity preceding exposure to emotional stimuli, especially when they are triggered by the subject himself. Here, we sought to investigate the emotional expectancy by means of movement related cortical potentials (MRCPs) in a self-paced task, in which the subjects begin the affective experience by pressing a key. In this experiment, participants had to alternatively press two keys to concomitantly display positive, negative, neutral, and scrambled images extracted from the International Affective Pictures System (IAPS). Each key press corresponded to a specific emotional category, and the experimenter communicated the coupling before each trial so that the subjects always knew the valence of the forthcoming picture. The main results of the present study included a bilateral positive activity in prefrontal areas during expectancy of more arousing pictures (positive and negative) and an early and sustained positivity over occipital areas, especially during negative expectancy. In addition, we observed more pronounced and anteriorly distributed Late Positive Potential (LPPs) components in the emotional conditions. In conclusion, these results show that emotional expectancy can influence brain activity in both motor preparation and stimulus perception, suggesting enhanced pre-processing in the to-be-stimulated areas. We propose that before a predictable emotional stimulus, both appetitive and defensive motivational systems act to facilitate the forthcoming processing of survival-relevant contents by means of an enhancement of attention toward more arousing pictures. PMID:24904344

  13. Complete Atrial-Specific Knockout of Sodium-Calcium Exchange Eliminates Sinoatrial Node Pacemaker Activity

    PubMed Central

    Groenke, Sabine; Larson, Eric D.; Alber, Sarah; Zhang, Rui; Lamp, Scott T.; Ren, Xiaoyan; Nakano, Haruko; Jordan, Maria C.; Karagueuzian, Hrayr S.; Roos, Kenneth P.; Nakano, Atsushi; Proenza, Catherine; Philipson, Kenneth D.; Goldhaber, Joshua I.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of sinoatrial node (SAN) pacemaker activity in the heart is controversial. The leading candidates are diastolic depolarization by “funny” current (If) through HCN4 channels (the “Membrane Clock“ hypothesis), depolarization by cardiac Na-Ca exchange (NCX1) in response to intracellular Ca cycling (the "Calcium Clock" hypothesis), and a combination of the two (“Coupled Clock”). To address this controversy, we used Cre/loxP technology to generate atrial-specific NCX1 KO mice. NCX1 protein was undetectable in KO atrial tissue, including the SAN. Surface ECG and intracardiac electrograms showed no atrial depolarization and a slow junctional escape rhythm in KO that responded appropriately to β-adrenergic and muscarinic stimulation. Although KO atria were quiescent they could be stimulated by external pacing suggesting that electrical coupling between cells remained intact. Despite normal electrophysiological properties of If in isolated patch clamped KO SAN cells, pacemaker activity was absent. Recurring Ca sparks were present in all KO SAN cells, suggesting that Ca cycling persists but is uncoupled from the sarcolemma. We conclude that NCX1 is required for normal pacemaker activity in murine SAN. PMID:24278453

  14. A Silver-Specific DNAzyme with a New Silver Aptamer and Salt-Promoted Activity.

    PubMed

    Saran, Runjhun; Kleinke, Kimberly; Zhou, Wenhu; Yu, Tianmeng; Liu, Juewen

    2017-04-11

    Most RNA-cleaving DNAzymes require a metal ion to interact with the scissile phosphate for activity. Therefore, few unmodified DNAzymes work with thiophilic metals because of their low affinity for phosphate. Recently, an Ag(+)-specific Ag10c DNAzyme was reported via in vitro selection. Herein, Ag10c is characterized to rationalize the role of the strongly thiophilic Ag(+). Systematic mutation studies indicate that Ag10c is a highly conserved DNAzyme and its Ag(+) binding is unrelated to C-Ag(+)-C interaction. Its activity is enhanced by increasing Na(+) concentrations in buffer. At the same metal concentration, activity decreases in the following order: Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+). Ag10c binds one Na(+) ion and two Ag(+) ions for catalysis. The pH-rate profile has a slope of ∼1, indicating a single deprotonation step. Phosphorothioate substitution at the scissile phosphate suggests that Na(+) interacts with the pro-Rp oxygen of the phosphate, and dimethyl sulfate footprinting indicates that the DNAzyme loop is a silver aptamer binding two Ag(+) ions. Therefore, Ag(+) exerts its function allosterically, while the scissile phosphate interacts with Na(+), Li(+), Na(+), or Mg(2+). This work suggests the possibility of isolating thiophilic metal aptamers based on DNAzyme selection, and it also demonstrates a new Ag(+) aptamer.

  15. ChIP-seq Accurately Predicts Tissue-Specific Activity of Enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Visel, Axel; Blow, Matthew J.; Li, Zirong; Zhang, Tao; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Holt, Amy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Shoukry, Malak; Wright, Crystal; Chen, Feng; Afzal, Veena; Ren, Bing; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2009-02-01

    A major yet unresolved quest in decoding the human genome is the identification of the regulatory sequences that control the spatial and temporal expression of genes. Distant-acting transcriptional enhancers are particularly challenging to uncover since they are scattered amongst the vast non-coding portion of the genome. Evolutionary sequence constraint can facilitate the discovery of enhancers, but fails to predict when and where they are active in vivo. Here, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation with the enhancer-associated protein p300, followed by massively-parallel sequencing, to map several thousand in vivo binding sites of p300 in mouse embryonic forebrain, midbrain, and limb tissue. We tested 86 of these sequences in a transgenic mouse assay, which in nearly all cases revealed reproducible enhancer activity in those tissues predicted by p300 binding. Our results indicate that in vivo mapping of p300 binding is a highly accurate means for identifying enhancers and their associated activities and suggest that such datasets will be useful to study the role of tissue-specific enhancers in human biology and disease on a genome-wide scale.

  16. Penicillin V acylase from Pectobacterium atrosepticum exhibits high specific activity and unique kinetics.

    PubMed

    Avinash, V S; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; Suresh, C G; Pundle, Archana

    2015-08-01

    Penicillin V acylases (PVAs, E.C.3.5.11) belong to the Ntn hydrolase super family of enzymes that catalyze the deacylation of the side chain from phenoxymethyl penicillin (penicillin V). Penicillin acylases find use in the pharmaceutical industry for the production of semi-synthetic antibiotics. PVAs employ the N-terminal cysteine residue as catalytic nucleophile and are structurally and evolutionarily related to bile salt hydrolases (BSHs). Here, we report the cloning and characterization of a PVA enzyme from the Gram-negative plant pathogen, Pectobacterium atrosepticum (PaPVA). The enzyme was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli attaining a very high yield (250 mg/l) and a comparatively high specific activity (430 IU/mg). The enzyme showed marginally better pH and thermo-stability over PVAs characterized from Gram-positive bacteria. The enzyme also showed enhanced activity in presence of organic solvents and detergents. The enzyme kinetics turned out to be significantly different from that of previously reported PVAs, displaying positive cooperativity and substrate inhibition. The presence of bile salts had a modulating effect on PaPVA activity. Sequence analysis and characterization reveal the distinctive nature of these enzymes and underscore the need to study PVAs from Gram-negative bacteria.

  17. Multiplex Detection of Protease Activity with Quantum Dot Nanosensors Prepared by Intein-Mediated Specific Bioconjugation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zuyong; Xing, Yun; So, Min-Kyung; Koh, Ai Leen; Sinclair, Robert; Rao, Jianghong

    2009-01-01

    We report here a protease sensing nanoplatform based on semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (QD-BRET) to detect the protease activity in complex biological samples. These nanosensors consist of bioluminescent proteins as the BRET donor, quantum dots as the BRET acceptor, and protease substrates sandwiched between the two as a sensing group. An intein-mediated conjugation strategy was developed for site-specific conjugation of proteins to QDs in preparing these QD nanosensors. In this traceless ligation, the intein itself is spliced out and excluded from the final conjugation product. With this method, we have synthesized a series of QD nanosensors for highly sensitive detection of an important class of protease matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. We demonstrated that these nanosensors can detect the MMP activity in buffers and in mouse serum with the sensitivity to a few ng/ml, and secreted proteases by tumor cells. The suitability of these nanosensors for a multiplex protease assay has also been shown. PMID:18922019

  18. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase 48 regulates Mdm2 protein levels independent of its deubiquitinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Cetkovská, Kateřina; Šustová, Hana; Uldrijan, Stjepan

    2017-01-01

    The overexpression of Mdm2 has been linked to the loss of p53 tumour suppressor activity in several human cancers. Here, we present results suggesting that ubiquitin-specific peptidase 48 (USP48), a deubiquitinase that has been linked in previous reports to the NF-κB signaling pathway, is a novel Mdm2 binding partner that promotes Mdm2 stability and enhances Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation. In contrast to other deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) that have been previously implicated in the regulation of Mdm2 protein stability, USP48 did not induce Mdm2 stabilization by significantly reducing Mdm2 ubiquitination levels. Moreover, two previously characterized USP48 mutants lacking deubiquitinase activity were also capable of efficiently stabilizing Mdm2, indicating that USP48 utilizes a non-canonical, deubiquitination-independent mechanism to promote Mdm2 oncoprotein stability. This study represents, to the best of our knowledge, the first report suggesting DUB-mediated target protein stabilization that is independent of its deubiquitinase activity. In addition, our results suggest that USP48 might represent a new mechanism of crosstalk between the NF-κB and p53 stress response pathways. PMID:28233861

  19. Activity and specificity of TRV-mediated gene editing in plants.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zahir; Abul-Faraj, Aala; Piatek, Marek; Mahfouz, Magdy M

    2015-01-01

    Plant trait engineering requires efficient targeted genome-editing technologies. Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)/ CRISPR associated (Cas) type II system is used for targeted genome-editing applications across eukaryotic species including plants. Delivery of genome engineering reagents and recovery of mutants remain challenging tasks for in planta applications. Recently, we reported the development of Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated genome editing in Nicotiana benthamiana. TRV infects the growing points and possesses small genome size; which facilitate cloning, multiplexing, and agroinfections. Here, we report on the persistent activity and specificity of the TRV-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 system for targeted modification of the Nicotiana benthamiana genome. Our data reveal the persistence of the TRV- mediated Cas9 activity for up to 30 d post-agroinefection. Further, our data indicate that TRV-mediated genome editing exhibited no off-target activities at potential off-targets indicating the precision of the system for plant genome engineering. Taken together, our data establish the feasibility and exciting possibilities of using virus-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 for targeted engineering of plant genomes.

  20. NO signalling decodes frequency of neuronal activity and generates synapse-specific plasticity in mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Namiki, Shigeyuki; Kakizawa, Sho; Hirose, Kenzo; Iino, Masamitsu

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger regulating neuronal functions. To visualize NO signalling in the brain, we generated a novel fluorescent NO indicator, which consists of the heme-binding region (HBR) of soluble guanylyl cyclase and the green fluorescent protein. The indicator (HBR–GFP) was expressed in the Purkinje cells of the mouse cerebellum and we imaged NO signals in acute cerebellar slices upon parallel fibre (PF) activation with a train of burst stimulations (BS, each BS consisting of five pulses at 50 Hz). Our results showed that the intensity of synaptic NO signal decays steeply with the distance from the synaptic input near PF–Purkinje cell synapses and generates synapse-specific long-term potentiation (LTP). Furthermore, the NO release level has a bell-shaped dependence on the frequency of PF activity. At an optimal frequency (1 Hz), but not at a low frequency (0.25 Hz) of a train of 60 BS, NO release as well as LTP was induced. However, both NO release and LTP were significantly reduced at higher frequencies (2–4 Hz) of BS train due to cannabinoid receptor-mediated retrograde inhibition of NO generation at the PF terminals. These results suggest that synaptic NO signalling decodes the frequency of neuronal activity to mediate synaptic plasticity at the PF–Purkinje cell synapse. PMID:15919714

  1. Specific hunger- and satiety-induced tuning of guinea pig enteric nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Roosen, Lina; Boesmans, Werend; Dondeyne, Marjan; Depoortere, Inge; Tack, Jan; Vanden Berghe, Pieter

    2012-09-01

    Although hunger and satiety are mainly centrally regulated, there is convincing evidence that also gastrointestinal motor activity and hormone fluctuations significantly contribute to appetite signalling. In this study, we investigated how motility and enteric nerve activity are set by fasting and feeding. By means of video-imaging, we tested whether peristaltic activity differs in ex vivo preparations from fasted and re-fed guinea pigs. Ca(2+) imaging was used to investigate whether the feeding state directly alters neuronal activity, either occurring spontaneously or evoked by (an)orexigenic signalling molecules. We found that pressure-induced (2 cmH(2)O) peristaltic activity occurs at a higher frequency in ileal segments from re-fed animals (re-fed versus fasted, 6.12 ± 0.22 vs. 4.84 ± 0.52 waves min(-1), P = 0.028), even in vitro hours after death. Myenteric neuronal responses were tuned to the feeding status, since neurons in tissues from re-fed animals remained hyper-responsive to high K(+)-evoked depolarization (P < 0.001) and anorexigenic molecules (P < 0.001), while being less responsive to orexigenic ghrelin (P = 0.013). This illustrates that the feeding status remains ‘imprinted' ex vivo. We were able to reproduce this feeding state-related memory in vitro and found humoral feeding state-related factors to be implicated. Although the molecular link with hyperactivity is not entirely elucidated yet, glucose-dependent pathways are clearly involved in tuning neuronal excitability. We conclude that a bistable memory system that tunes neuronal responses to fasting and re-feeding is present in the enteric nervous system, increasing responses to depolarization and anorexigenic molecules in the re-fed state, while decreasing responses to orexigenic ghrelin. Unlike the hypothalamus, where specific cell populations sensitive to either orexigenic or anorexigenic molecules exist, the enteric feeding state-related memory system is present at the functional level

  2. Specific detection of the cleavage activity of mycobacterial enzymes using a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, Morten Leth; Harmsen, Charlotte; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping

    2015-12-01

    We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes.We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization of the QD-based DNA Nanosensor. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06326d

  3. Qualitative analysis of sequence specific binding of flavones to DNA using restriction endonuclease activity assays.

    PubMed

    Duran, Elizabeth; Ramsauer, Victoria P; Ballester, Maria; Torrenegra, Ruben D; Rodriguez, Oscar E; Winkle, Stephen A

    2013-08-01

    Flavones, found in nature as secondary plant metabolites, have shown efficacy as anti-cancer agents. We have examined the binding of two flavones, 5,7-dihydroxy-3,6,8-trimethoxy-2-phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one (5,7-dihydroxy-3,6,8-trimethoxy flavone; FlavA) and 3,5-dihydroxy-6,7,8-trimethoxy-2-phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one (3,5-dihydroxy-6,7,8-trimethoxy flavone; FlavB), to phiX174 RF DNA using restriction enzyme activity assays employing the restriction enzymes Alw44, AvaII, BssHII, DraI, MluI, NarI, NciI, NruI, PstI, and XhoI. These enzymes possess differing target and flanking sequences allowing for observation of sequence specificity analysis. Using restriction enzymes that cleave once with a mixture of supercoiled and relaxed DNA substrates provides for observation of topological effects on binding. FlavA and FlavB show differing sequence specificities in their respective binding to phiX. For example, with relaxed DNA, FlavA shows inhibition of cleavage with DraI (reaction site (5') TTTAAA) but not BssHII ((5') GCGCGC) while FlavB shows the opposite results. Evidence for tolological specificity is also observed, Molecular modeling and conformational analysis of the flavones suggests that the phenyl ring of FlavB is coplanar with the flavonoid ring while the phenyl ring of FlavA is at an angle relative to the flavonoid ring. This may account for aspects of the observed sequence and topological specificities in the effects on restriction enzyme activity.

  4. Domain-specific physical activity and health-related quality of life in university students.

    PubMed

    Pedišić, Zeljko; Rakovac, Marija; Titze, Sylvia; Jurakić, Danijel; Oja, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Information on the relationship between domain-specific physical activity (PA) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the general population and specific groups is still scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between PA in work, transport, domestic and leisure-time domains and HRQoL among university students. PA and HRQoL were assessed in a random stratified sample of 1750 university students using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire - long form and 12-item Short Form Health Survey, respectively. The Spearman's rank correlations, adjusted for age, community size, personal monthly budget, body mass index, smoking habits and alcohol intake ranged from -0.11 to 0.18 in female students and -0.29 to 0.19 in male students. Leisure-time, domestic, transport-related PA and total PA were positively related to HRQoL. Inverse correlations with HRQoL were only found for work-related PA in male students. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that only leisure-time PA was related to the Physical Summary Component score (β = 0.08 for females and β = 0.10 for males, P < 0.05). Domain-specific PA levels were not significantly related to the Mental Component Summary score. To get a more comprehensive insight in the relationship between PA and HRQoL, future studies should not only analyse total PA levels but also domain-specific PA levels. The evidence on the positive relationship of leisure-time, transport and domestic PA with HRQoL can potentially be used to support evidence-based promotion of PA in a university setting, and as a hypothesis for future longitudinal studies on such potential causal relationships.

  5. Episodic specificity induction impacts activity in a core brain network during construction of imagined future experiences

    PubMed Central

    Madore, Kevin P.; Szpunar, Karl K.; Addis, Donna Rose; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent behavioral work suggests that an episodic specificity induction—brief training in recollecting the details of a past experience—enhances performance on subsequent tasks that rely on episodic retrieval, including imagining future experiences, solving open-ended problems, and thinking creatively. Despite these far-reaching behavioral effects, nothing is known about the neural processes impacted by an episodic specificity induction. Related neuroimaging work has linked episodic retrieval with a core network of brain regions that supports imagining future experiences. We tested the hypothesis that key structures in this network are influenced by the specificity induction. Participants received the specificity induction or one of two control inductions and then generated future events and semantic object comparisons during fMRI scanning. After receiving the specificity induction compared with the control, participants exhibited significantly more activity in several core network regions during the construction of imagined events over object comparisons, including the left anterior hippocampus, right inferior parietal lobule, right posterior cingulate cortex, and right ventral precuneus. Induction-related differences in the episodic detail of imagined events significantly modulated induction-related differences in the construction of imagined events in the left anterior hippocampus and right inferior parietal lobule. Resting-state functional connectivity analyses with hippocampal and inferior parietal lobule seed regions and the rest of the brain also revealed significantly stronger core network coupling following the specificity induction compared with the control. These findings provide evidence that an episodic specificity induction selectively targets episodic processes that are commonly linked to key core network regions, including the hippocampus. PMID:27601666

  6. Episodic specificity induction impacts activity in a core brain network during construction of imagined future experiences.

    PubMed

    Madore, Kevin P; Szpunar, Karl K; Addis, Donna Rose; Schacter, Daniel L

    2016-09-20

    Recent behavioral work suggests that an episodic specificity induction-brief training in recollecting the details of a past experience-enhances performance on subsequent tasks that rely on episodic retrieval, including imagining future experiences, solving open-ended problems, and thinking creatively. Despite these far-reaching behavioral effects, nothing is known about the neural processes impacted by an episodic specificity induction. Related neuroimaging work has linked episodic retrieval with a core network of brain regions that supports imagining future experiences. We tested the hypothesis that key structures in this network are influenced by the specificity induction. Participants received the specificity induction or one of two control inductions and then generated future events and semantic object comparisons during fMRI scanning. After receiving the specificity induction compared with the control, participants exhibited significantly more activity in several core network regions during the construction of imagined events over object comparisons, including the left anterior hippocampus, right inferior parietal lobule, right posterior cingulate cortex, and right ventral precuneus. Induction-related differences in the episodic detail of imagined events significantly modulated induction-related differences in the construction of imagined events in the left anterior hippocampus and right inferior parietal lobule. Resting-state functional connectivity analyses with hippocampal and inferior parietal lobule seed regions and the rest of the brain also revealed significantly stronger core network coupling following the specificity induction compared with the control. These findings provide evidence that an episodic specificity induction selectively targets episodic processes that are commonly linked to key core network regions, including the hippocampus.

  7. NFκB-inducing kinase inhibits NFκB activity specifically in neurons of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xianrong; Phanavanh, Bounleut; Hamdan, Hamdan; Moerman-Herzog, Andréa M; Barger, Steven W

    2016-04-01

    The control of NFκB in CNS neurons appears to differ from that in other cell types. Studies have reported induction of NFκB in neuronal cultures and immunostaining in vivo, but others have consistently detected little or no transcriptional activation by NFκB in brain neurons. To test if neurons lack some component of the signal transduction system for NFκB activation, we transfected cortical neurons with several members of this signaling system along with a luciferase-based NFκB-reporter plasmid; RelA was cotransfected in some conditions. No component of the NFκB pathway was permissive for endogenous NFκB activity, and none stimulated the activity of exogenous RelA. Surprisingly, however, the latter was inhibited by cotransfection of NFκB-inducing kinase (NIK). Fluorescence imaging of RelA indicated that co-expression of NIK sequestered RelA in the cytoplasm, similar to the effect of IκBα. NIK-knockout mice showed elevated expression of an NFκB-reporter construct in neurons in vivo. Cortical neurons cultured from NIK-knockout mice showed elevated expression of an NFκB-reporter transgene. Consistent with data from other cell types, a C-terminal fragment of NIK suppressed RelA activity in astrocytes as well as neurons. Therefore, the inhibitory ability of the NIK C-terminus was unbiased with regard to cell type. However, inhibition of NFκB by full-length NIK is a novel outcome that appears to be specific to CNS neurons. This has implications for unique aspects of transcription in the CNS, perhaps relevant to aspects of development, neuroplasticity, and neuroinflammation. Full-length NIK was found to inhibit (down arrow) transcriptional activation of NFκB in neurons, while it elevated (up arrow) activity in astrocytes. Deletion constructs corresponding to the N-terminus or C-terminus also inhibited NFκB in neurons, while only the C-terminus did so in astrocytes. One possible explanation is that the inhibition in neurons occurs via two different

  8. Very high specific activity ⁶⁶/⁶⁸Ga from zinc targets for PET.

    PubMed

    Engle, J W; Lopez-Rodriguez, V; Gaspar-Carcamo, R E; Valdovinos, H F; Valle-Gonzalez, M; Trejo-Ballado, F; Severin, G W; Barnhart, T E; Nickles, R J; Avila-Rodriguez, M A

    2012-08-01

    This work describes the production of very high specific activity (66/68)Ga from (nat)Zn(p,n) and (66)Zn(p,n) using proton irradiations between 7 and 16 MeV, with emphasis on (66)Ga for use with common bifunctional chelates. Principal radiometallic impurities are (65)Zn from (p,x) and (67)Ga from (p,n). Separation of radiogallium from target material is accomplished with cation exchange chromatography in hydrochloric acid solution. Efficient recycling of Zn target material is possible using electrodeposition of Zn from its chloride form, but these measures are not necessary to achieve high specific activity or near-quantitative radiolabeling yields from natural targets. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) measures less than 2 ppb non-radioactive gallium in the final product, and the reactivity of (66)Ga with common bifunctional chelates, decay corrected to the end of irradiation, is 740 GBq/μmol (20 Ci/μmol) using natural zinc as a target material. Recycling enriched (66)Zn targets increased the reactivity of (66)Ga with common bifunctional chelates.

  9. Specific activity and hazards of granite samples collected from the Eastern Desert of Egypt.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Wafaa

    2004-01-01

    Fifty granitic rock samples were collected from different plutons in the central part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt and were analyzed for specific concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K radionuclei. The measurements were carried out using a high performance and stability Nomad Plus spectroscopy system attached to a 1.7 keV (FWHM) HPGe detector. The spectra were analyzed using the direct gamma counting comparison method as well as the traditional absolute efficiency curve method. The highest average value of (238)U concentration (1184 Bq kg(-1)) was observed at EI Misikat region whereas the highest average values of (40)K and (232)Th concentration (2301.8 and 162.5 Bq kg(-1) respectively), were detected at Gabal Homret Waggat area. The radium equivalent activity (Ra(eq)), the absorbed dose rate (D), the external hazard index (H(ex)) and the annual gonadal dose equivalent were also calculated and compared to the international recommended values. Radon exhalation rate from the rock samples were measured using the activated charcoal canister method. The average value of radon exhalation varies from 0.052 to 0.69 Bq m(-2) h(-1) and depends on the specific concentration of uranium.

  10. Unnatural amino acids increase activity and specificity of synthetic substrates for human and malarial cathepsin C.

    PubMed

    Poreba, Marcin; Mihelic, Marko; Krai, Priscilla; Rajkovic, Jelena; Krezel, Artur; Pawelczak, Malgorzata; Klemba, Michael; Turk, Dusan; Turk, Boris; Latajka, Rafal; Drag, Marcin

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian cathepsin C is primarily responsible for the removal of N-terminal dipeptides and activation of several serine proteases in inflammatory or immune cells, while its malarial parasite ortholog dipeptidyl aminopeptidase 1 plays a crucial role in catabolizing the hemoglobin of its host erythrocyte. In this report, we describe the systematic substrate specificity analysis of three cathepsin C orthologs from Homo sapiens (human), Bos taurus (bovine) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria parasite). Here, we present a new approach with a tailored fluorogenic substrate library designed and synthesized to probe the S1 and S2 pocket preferences of these enzymes with both natural and a broad range of unnatural amino acids. Our approach identified very efficiently hydrolyzed substrates containing unnatural amino acids, which resulted in the design of significantly better substrates than those previously known. Additionally, in this study significant differences in terms of the structures of optimal substrates for human and malarial orthologs are important from the therapeutic point of view. These data can be also used for the design of specific inhibitors or activity-based probes.

  11. Shh and ZRS enhancer colocalisation is specific to the zone of polarising activity

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Iain; Lettice, Laura A.; Hill, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Limb-specific Shh expression is regulated by the (∼1 Mb distant) ZRS enhancer. In the mouse, limb bud-restricted spatiotemporal Shh expression occurs from ∼E10 to E11.5 at the distal posterior margin and is essential for correct autopod formation. Here, we have analysed the higher-order chromatin conformation of Shh in expressing and non-expressing tissues, both by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and by chromosome conformation capture (5C). Conventional and super-resolution light microscopy identified significantly elevated frequencies of Shh/ZRS colocalisation only in the Shh-expressing regions of the limb bud, in a conformation consistent with enhancer-promoter loop formation. However, in all tissues and at all developmental stages analysed, Shh-ZRS spatial distances were still consistently shorter than those to a neural enhancer located between Shh and ZRS in the genome. 5C identified a topologically associating domain (TAD) over the Shh/ZRS genomic region and enriched interactions between Shh and ZRS throughout E11.5 embryos. Shh/ZRS colocalisation, therefore, correlates with the spatiotemporal domain of limb bud-specific Shh expression, but close Shh and ZRS proximity in the nucleus occurs regardless of whether the gene or enhancer is active. We suggest that this constrained chromatin configuration optimises the opportunity for the active enhancer to locate and instigate the expression of Shh. PMID:27402708

  12. Regulation of visual Wulst cell responsiveness by imprinting causes stimulus-specific activation of rostral cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakamori, Tomoharu; Kato, Tomomi; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kohichi; Ohki-Hamazaki, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    Imprinting behaviour in chicks can be induced exclusively during a short period after hatching. During this period, visual information on the imprinting stimulus is conveyed to the visual Wulst (VW) in the telencephalon, which corresponds to the visual cortex of mammals, and then to the memory-storing region known as the intermediate medial mesopallium. These two regions are indispensable for imprinting. We previously showed that imprinting training altered the response pattern of the VW to the imprinting stimulus; however, the precise distribution of cells and the mechanism involved with this altered response remains unclear. Here we showed that a specific population of rostral VW cells responded to the imprinting stimulus by analysing the subcellular localization of Arc/arg3.1 transcripts in VW cells. GABAergic parvalbumin (PV) cells are abundant in the dorsal region of this area, and imprinting training doubled the number of activated PV-positive neurons. An injection of bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, in the dorsal VW disturbed the rostral distribution of responsive cells and thus resulted in a lack of imprinting. These results suggest that activated PV cells restrict VW cells response to dorsal area to form a specific imprinting pathway. PMID:28230107

  13. Adenovirus E1A specifically blocks SWI/SNF-dependent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M E; Cairns, B R; Levinson, R S; Yamamoto, K R; Engel, D A; Smith, M M

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the adenovirus E1A243 oncoprotein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces a slow-growth phenotype with accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This effect is due to the N-terminal and CR1 domains of E1A243, which in rodent cells are involved in triggering cellular transformation and also in binding to the cellular transcriptional coactivator p300. A genetic screen was undertaken to identify genes required for the function of E1A243 in S. cerevisiae. This screen identified SNF12, a gene encoding the 73-kDa subunit of the SWI/SNF transcriptional regulatory complex. Mutation of genes encoding known members of the SWI/SNF complex also led to loss of E1A function, suggesting that the SWI/SNF complex is a target of E1A243. Moreover, expression of E1A in wild-type cells specifically blocked transcriptional activation of the INO1 and SUC2 genes, whose activation pathways are distinct but have a common requirement for the SWI/SNF complex. These data demonstrate a specific functional interaction between E1A and the SWI/SNF complex and suggest that a similar interaction takes place in rodent and human cells. PMID:8816487

  14. Time, space and emotion: fMRI reveals content-specific activation during text comprehension.

    PubMed

    Ferstl, Evelyn C; von Cramon, D Yves

    2007-11-12

    Story comprehension involves building a situation model of the text, i.e., a representation containing information on the who, where, when and why of the story. Using fMRI at 3T, domain-specific activations for three different information aspects were sought. Twenty participants read two sentence stories half of which contained inconsistencies concerning emotional, temporal or spatial information. Partly replicating previous results [E.C. Ferstl, M. Rinck, D.Y. von Cramon, Emotional and temporal aspects of situation model processing during text comprehension: an event-related fMRI study, J. Cogn. Neurosci. 17 (2005) 724-739], the anterior lateral prefrontal cortex/orbito-frontal cortex proved important for processing temporal information. The left anterior temporal lobe was particularly important during emotional stories. Most importantly, spatial information elicited bilateral activation in the collateral sulci and the posterior cingulate cortex, areas important for visuo-spatial cognition. These findings provide further evidence for content-specific processes during text comprehension.

  15. Deep brain optical measurements of cell type-specific neural activity in behaving mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guohong; Jun, Sang Beom; Jin, Xin; Luo, Guoxiang; Pham, Michael D; Lovinger, David M; Vogel, Steven S; Costa, Rui M

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genetically encoded fluorescent sensors enable the monitoring of cellular events from genetically defined groups of neurons in vivo. In this protocol, we describe how to use a time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC)-based fiber optics system to measure the intensity, emission spectra and lifetime of fluorescent biosensors expressed in deep brain structures in freely moving mice. When combined with Cre-dependent selective expression of genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicators (GECIs), this system can be used to measure the average neural activity from a specific population of cells in mice performing complex behavioral tasks. As an example, we used viral expression of GCaMPs in striatal projection neurons (SPNs) and recorded the fluorescence changes associated with calcium spikes from mice performing a lever-pressing operant task. The whole procedure, consisting of virus injection, behavior training and optical recording, takes 3-4 weeks to complete. With minor adaptations, this protocol can also be applied to recording cellular events from other cell types in deep brain regions, such as dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area. The simultaneously recorded fluorescence signals and behavior events can be used to explore the relationship between the neural activity of specific brain circuits and behavior.

  16. Spinal segment-specific transcutaneous stimulation differentially shapes activation pattern among motor pools in humans

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Darryn A.; Dy, Christine J.; Gurley, Katelyn M.; Smith, Valerie L.; Angeli, Claudia; Harkema, Susan J.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury P.

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous and epidural electrical spinal cord stimulation techniques are becoming more valuable as electrophysiological and clinical tools. Recently, we observed selective activation of proximal and distal motor pools during epidural spinal stimulation. In the present study, we hypothesized that the characteristics of recruitment curves obtained from leg muscles will reflect a relative preferential activation of proximal and distal motor pools based on their arrangement along the lumbosacral enlargement. The purpose was to describe the electrophysiological responses to transcutaneous stimulation in leg muscles innervated by motoneurons from different segmental levels. Stimulation delivered along the rostrocaudal axis of the lumbosacral enlargement in the supine position resulted in a selective topographical recruitment of proximal and distal leg muscles, as described by threshold intensity, slope of the recruitment curves, and plateau point intensity and magnitude. Relatively selective recruitment of proximal and distal motor pools can be titrated by optimizing the site and intensity level of stimulation to excite a given combination of motor pools. The slope of the recruitment of particular muscles allows characterization of the properties of afferents projecting to specific motoneuron pools, as well as to the type and size of the motoneurons. The location and intensity of transcutaneous spinal electrical stimulation are critical to target particular neural structures across different motor pools in investigation of specific neuromodulatory effects. Finally, the asymmetry in bilateral evoked potentials is inevitable and can be attributed to both anatomical and functional peculiarities of individual muscles or muscle groups. PMID:25814642

  17. Drug conjugated nanoparticles activated by cancer cell specific mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan-Sheng; Zamora, Edward A.; Gordon, David J.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Gordon, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a customizable approach to cancer therapy in which a gold nanoparticle (Au-NP) delivers a drug that is selectively activated within the cancer cell by the presence of an mRNA unique to the cancer cell. Fundamental to this approach is the observation that the amount of drug released from the Au-NP is proportional to both the presence and abundance of the cancer cell specific mRNA in a cell. As proof-of-principle, we demonstrate both the efficient delivery and selective release of the multi-kinase inhibitor dasatinib from Au-NPs in leukemia cells with resulting efficacy in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, these Au-NPs reduce toxicity against hematopoietic stem cells and T-cells. This approach has the potential to improve the therapeutic efficacy of a drug and minimize toxicity while being highly customizable with respect to both the cancer cell specific mRNAs targeted and drugs activated. PMID:27203672

  18. Structural basis for specific ligation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chyuan-Chuan; Baiga, Thomas J.; Downes, Michael; La Clair, James J.; Atkins, Annette R.; Richard, Stephane B.; Fan, Weiwei; Stockley-Noel, Theresa A.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Noel, Joseph P.; Evans, Ronald M.

    2017-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family comprises three subtypes: PPARα, PPARγ, and PPARδ. PPARδ transcriptionally modulates lipid metabolism and the control of energy homeostasis; therefore, PPARδ agonists are promising agents for treating a variety of metabolic disorders. In the present study, we develop a panel of rationally designed PPARδ agonists. The modular motif affords efficient syntheses using building blocks optimized for interactions with subtype-specific residues in the PPARδ ligand-binding domain (LBD). A combination of atomic-resolution protein X-ray crystallographic structures, ligand-dependent LBD stabilization assays, and cell-based transactivation measurements delineate structure–activity relationships (SARs) for PPARδ-selective targeting and structural modulation. We identify key ligand-induced conformational transitions of a conserved tryptophan side chain in the LBD that trigger reorganization of the H2′–H3 surface segment of PPARδ. The subtype-specific conservation of H2′–H3 sequences suggests that this architectural remodeling constitutes a previously unrecognized conformational switch accompanying ligand-dependent PPARδ transcriptional regulation. PMID:28320959

  19. Allopurinol reduces antigen-specific and polyclonal activation of human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mazliah, Damián; Albareda, María C.; Alvarez, María G.; Lococo, Bruno; Bertocchi, Graciela L.; Petti, Marcos; Viotti, Rodolfo J.; Laucella, Susana A.

    2012-01-01

    Allopurinol is the most popular commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor and it is widely used for treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Although, several anti-inflammatory actions of allopurinol have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, there have been few studies on the action of allopurinol on T cells. In the current study, we have assessed the effect of allopurinol on antigen-specific and mitogen-driven activation and cytokine production in human T cells. Allopurinol markedly decreased the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2-producing T cells, either after polyclonal or antigen-specific stimulation with Herpes Simplex virus 1, Influenza (Flu) virus, tetanus toxoid and Trypanosoma cruzi-derived antigens. Allopurinol attenuated CD69 upregulation after CD3 and CD28 engagement and significantly reduced the levels of spontaneous and mitogen-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in T cells. The diminished T cell activation and cytokine production in the presence of allopurinol support a direct action of allopurinol on human T cells, offering a potential pharmacological tool for the management of cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23049532

  20. The Polymerase Activity of Mammalian DNA Pol ζ Is Specifically Required for Cell and Embryonic Viability

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sabine S.; Tomida, Junya; Boulware, Karen S.; Bhetawal, Sarita; Wood, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase ζ (pol ζ) is exceptionally important for maintaining genome stability. Inactivation of the Rev3l gene encoding the polymerase catalytic subunit causes a high frequency of chromosomal breaks, followed by lethality in mouse embryos and in primary cells. Yet it is not known whether the DNA polymerase activity of pol ζ is specifically essential, as the large REV3L protein also serves as a multiprotein scaffold for translesion DNA synthesis via multiple conserved structural domains. We report that Rev3l cDNA rescues the genomic instability and DNA damage sensitivity of Rev3l-null immortalized mouse fibroblast cell lines. A cDNA harboring mutations of conserved catalytic aspartate residues in the polymerase domain of REV3L could not rescue these phenotypes. To investigate the role of REV3L DNA polymerase activity in vivo, a Rev3l knock-in mouse was constructed with this polymerase-inactivating alteration. No homozygous mutant mice were produced, with lethality occurring during embryogenesis. Primary fibroblasts from mutant embryos showed growth defects, elevated DNA double-strand breaks and cisplatin sensitivity similar to Rev3l-null fibroblasts. We tested whether the severe Rev3l-/- phenotypes could be rescued by deletion of DNA polymerase η, as has been reported with chicken DT40 cells. However, Rev3l-/- Polh-/- mice were inviable, and derived primary fibroblasts were as sensitive to DNA damage as Rev3l-/- Polh+/+ fibroblasts. Therefore, the functions of REV3L in maintaining cell viability, embryonic viability and genomic stability are directly dependent on its polymerase activity, and cannot be ameliorated by an additional deletion of pol η. These results validate and encourage the approach of targeting the DNA polymerase activity of pol ζ to sensitize tumors to DNA damaging agents. PMID:26727495

  1. TRPA1 contributes to specific mechanically activated currents and sensory neuron mechanical hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Brierley, Stuart M; Castro, Joel; Harrington, Andrea M; Hughes, Patrick A; Page, Amanda J; Rychkov, Grigori Y; Blackshaw, L Ashley

    2011-07-15

    The mechanosensory role of TRPA1 and its contribution to mechanical hypersensitivity in sensory neurons remains enigmatic. We elucidated this role by recording mechanically activated currents in conjunction with TRPA1 over- and under-expression and selective pharmacology. First, we established that TRPA1 transcript, protein and functional expression are more abundant in smaller-diameter neurons than larger-diameter neurons, allowing comparison of two different neuronal populations. Utilising whole cell patch clamping, we applied calibrated displacements to neurites of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in short-term culture and recorded mechanically activated currents termed intermediately (IAMCs), rapidly (RAMCs) or slowly adapting (SAMCs). Trpa1 deletion (–/–) significantly reduced maximum IAMC amplitude by 43% in small-diameter neurons compared with wild-type (+/+) neurons. All other mechanically activated currents in small- and large-diameter Trpa1−/− neurons were unaltered. Seventy-three per cent of Trpa1+/+ small-diameter neurons responding to the TRPA1 agonist allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC) displayed IAMCs to neurite displacement, which were significantly enhanced after AITC addition. The TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 significantly decreased Trpa1+/+ IAMC amplitudes, but only in AITC responsive neurons. Using a transfection system we also showed TRPA1 over-expression in Trpa1+/+ small-diameter neurons increases IAMC amplitude, an effect reversed by HC-030031. Furthermore, TRPA1 introduction into Trpa1−/− small-diameter neurons restored IAMC amplitudes to Trpa1+/+ levels, which was subsequently reversed by HC-030031. In summary our data demonstrate TRPA1 makes a contribution to normal mechanosensation in a specific subset of DRG neurons. Furthermore, they also provide new evidence illustrating mechanisms by which sensitisation or over-expression of TRPA1 enhances nociceptor mechanosensitivity. Overall, these findings suggest TRPA1 has the capacity to

  2. Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C and sphingomyelinase activities in bacteria of the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Pomerantsev, A P; Kalnin, K V; Osorio, M; Leppla, S H

    2003-11-01

    Bacillus anthracis is nonhemolytic, even though it is closely related to the highly hemolytic Bacillus cereus. Hemolysis by B. cereus results largely from the action of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) and sphingomyelinase (SPH), encoded by the plc and sph genes, respectively. In B. cereus, these genes are organized in an operon regulated by the global regulator PlcR. B. anthracis contains a highly similar cereolysin operon, but it is transcriptionally silent because the B. anthracis PlcR is truncated at the C terminus. Here we report the cloning, expression, purification, and enzymatic characterization of PC-PLC and SPH from B. cereus and B. anthracis. We also investigated the effects of expressing PlcR on the expression of plc and sph. In B. cereus, PlcR was found to be a positive regulator of plc but a negative regulator of sph. Replacement of the B. cereus plcR gene by its truncated orthologue from B. anthracis eliminated the activities of both PC-PLC and SPH, whereas introduction into B. anthracis of the B. cereus plcR gene with its own promoter did not activate cereolysin expression. Hemolytic activity was detected in B. anthracis strains containing the B. cereus plcR gene on a multicopy plasmid under control of the strong B. anthracis protective antigen gene promoter or in a strain carrying a multicopy plasmid containing the entire B. cereus plc-sph operon. Slight hemolysis and PC-PLC activation were found when PlcR-producing B. anthracis strains were grown under anaerobic-plus-CO(2) or especially under aerobic-plus-CO(2) conditions. Unmodified parental B. anthracis strains did not demonstrate obvious hemolysis under the same conditions.

  3. TRPA1 contributes to specific mechanically activated currents and sensory neuron mechanical hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, Stuart M; Castro, Joel; Harrington, Andrea M; Hughes, Patrick A; Page, Amanda J; Rychkov, Grigori Y; Blackshaw, L Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The mechanosensory role of TRPA1 and its contribution to mechanical hypersensitivity in sensory neurons remains enigmatic. We elucidated this role by recording mechanically activated currents in conjunction with TRPA1 over- and under-expression and selective pharmacology. First, we established that TRPA1 transcript, protein and functional expression are more abundant in smaller-diameter neurons than larger-diameter neurons, allowing comparison of two different neuronal populations. Utilising whole cell patch clamping, we applied calibrated displacements to neurites of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in short-term culture and recorded mechanically activated currents termed intermediately (IAMCs), rapidly (RAMCs) or slowly adapting (SAMCs). Trpa1 deletion (–/–) significantly reduced maximum IAMC amplitude by 43% in small-diameter neurons compared with wild-type (+/+) neurons. All other mechanically activated currents in small- and large-diameter Trpa1−/− neurons were unaltered. Seventy-three per cent of Trpa1+/+ small-diameter neurons responding to the TRPA1 agonist allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC) displayed IAMCs to neurite displacement, which were significantly enhanced after AITC addition. The TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 significantly decreased Trpa1+/+ IAMC amplitudes, but only in AITC responsive neurons. Using a transfection system we also showed TRPA1 over-expression in Trpa1+/+ small-diameter neurons increases IAMC amplitude, an effect reversed by HC-030031. Furthermore, TRPA1 introduction into Trpa1−/− small-diameter neurons restored IAMC amplitudes to Trpa1+/+ levels, which was subsequently reversed by HC-030031. In summary our data demonstrate TRPA1 makes a contribution to normal mechanosensation in a specific subset of DRG neurons. Furthermore, they also provide new evidence illustrating mechanisms by which sensitisation or over-expression of TRPA1 enhances nociceptor mechanosensitivity. Overall, these findings suggest TRPA1 has the

  4. Truncation and Activation of Dual Specificity Tyrosine Phosphorylation-regulated Kinase 1A by Calpain I

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nana; Yin, Xiaomin; Gu, Jianlan; Zhang, Xinhua; Shi, Jianhua; Qian, Wei; Ji, Yuhua; Cao, Maohong; Gu, Xiaosong; Ding, Fei; Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation and dysregulation of exon 10 splicing of Tau are pivotally involved in pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) and/or other tauopathies. Alternative splicing of Tau exon 10, which encodes the second microtubule-binding repeat, generates Tau isoforms containing three and four microtubule-binding repeats, termed 3R-Taus and 4R-Taus, respectively. Dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) lies at the Down syndrome critical region of chromosome 21. Overexpression of this kinase may contribute to the early Tau pathology in Down syndrome via phosphorylation of Tau and dysregulation of Tau exon 10. Here, we report that Dyrk1A was truncated at the C terminus and was associated with overactivation of calpain I in AD brain. Calpain I proteolyzed Dyrk1A in vitro first at the C terminus and further at the N terminus and enhanced its kinase activity toward Tau via increased Vmax but not Km. C-terminal truncation of Dyrk1A resulted in stronger activity than its full-length protein in promotion of exon 10 exclusion and phosphorylation of Tau. Dyrk1A was truncated in kainic acid-induced excitotoxic mouse brains and coincided with an increase in 3R-Tau expression and phosphorylation of Tau via calpain activation. Moreover, truncation of Dyrk1A was correlated with an increase in the ratio of 3R-Tau/4R-Tau and Tau hyperphosphorylation in AD brain. Collectively, these findings suggest that truncation/activation of Dyrk1A by Ca2+/calpain I might contribute to Tau pathology via promotion of exon 10 exclusion and hyperphosphorylation of Tau in AD brain. PMID:25918155

  5. Foxi3 deficiency compromises hair follicle stem cell specification and activation

    PubMed Central

    Shirokova, Vera; Biggs, Leah C.; Jussila, Maria; Ohyama, Takahiro; Groves, Andrew K.; Mikkola, Marja L.

    2017-01-01

    The hair follicle is an ideal system to study stem cell specification and homeostasis due to its well characterized morphogenesis and stereotypic cycles of stem cell activation upon each hair cycle to produce a new hair shaft. The adult hair follicle stem cell niche consists of two distinct populations, the bulge and the more activation-prone secondary hair germ. Hair follicle stem cells are set aside during early stages of morphogenesis. This process is known to depend on the Sox9 transcription factor, but otherwise the establishment of the hair follicle stem cell niche is poorly understood. Here we show that that mutation of Foxi3, a Forkhead family transcription factor mutated in several hairless dog breeds, compromises stem cell specification. Further, loss of Foxi3 impedes hair follicle downgrowth and progression of the hair cycle. Genome-wide profiling revealed a number of downstream effectors of Foxi3 including transcription factors with a recognized function in hair follicle stem cells such as Lhx2, Runx1, and Nfatc1, suggesting that the Foxi3 mutant phenotype results from simultaneous downregulation of several stem cell signature genes. We show that Foxi3 displays a highly dynamic expression pattern during hair morphogenesis and cycling, and identify Foxi3 as a novel secondary hair germ marker. Absence of Foxi3 results in poor hair regeneration upon hair plucking, and a sparse fur phenotype in unperturbed mice that exacerbates with age, caused by impaired secondary hair germ activation leading to progressive depletion of stem cells. Thus, Foxi3 regulates multiple aspects of hair follicle development and homeostasis. PMID:26992132

  6. Optimized expression and specific activity of IL-12 by directed molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Steven R.; Chang, Jean C. C.; Ong, Randal; Dawes, Glenn; Stemmer, Willem P. C.; Punnonen, Juha

    2003-01-01

    DNA delivery of IL-12 has shown promise in reducing the toxic side effects associated with administration of recombinant human (h)IL-12 protein while maintaining the ability to inhibit tumor growth and abolish tumor metastases in animal models. We have developed a more potent version of IL-12 by using DNA shuffling and screening to improve its expression in human cells and specific activity on human T cells. The most improved evolved IL-12 (EvIL-12) derived from seven mammalian genes encoding both the p35 and p40 subunits of IL-12 showed a 128-fold improvement in human T cell proliferation compared with native hIL-12 during the initial screening of supernatants from transected cells. When purified hIL-12 and EvIL-12 proteins were compared in vitro in human T cell proliferation and Th1 differentiation assays, it was demonstrated that EvIL-12 exhibited a concomitant 10-fold increase in the specific activity of the protein compared with hIL-12. Furthermore, DNA shuffling improved the level of expression and homogeneity of the heterodimer synthesized by 293 human embryonic kidney cells transfected with EvIL-12 by at least 10-fold. Molecular analysis of the variant revealed strategic placement of amino acid substitutions that potentially may facilitate heterodimer formation and product expression. The enhanced expression and biological activity of EvIL-12 may improve the effectiveness of IL-12 gene-based vaccines and therapeutics without the toxic side effects sometimes associated with hIL-12 protein administration. PMID:12529500

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity in HIV-exposed seronegative persons.

    PubMed

    Bernard, N F; Yannakis, C M; Lee, J S; Tsoukas, C M

    1999-03-01

    Repeated exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) does not always result in seroconversion. Understanding the conditions that permit or protect against progressive infection with HIV is important for vaccine development. Nineteen subjects at risk for HIV infection were CCR-5 genotyped and screened for virus-specific memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). None had the Delta32CCR-5/Delta32CCR-5 genotype associated with HIV resistance. HIV-specific CTL were detected in 7 (41.1%) of 17 exposed uninfected subjects versus 0 of 14 seronegative subjects with no HIV risk factors (P=.006, chi2 test). Recognition of virus by CTL in exposed uninfected subjects was major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted and multispecific, and specificity could change with time. Activity could persist up to 34 months after the last virus exposure. The presence of HIV-specific CTL in a greater proportion of seronegative HIV-exposed versus unexposed subjects supports the notion that in some cases, virus exposure induces HIV immunity without seroconversion or disease progression.

  8. Specific activation of human interleukin-5 depends on de novo synthesis of an AP-1 complex.

    PubMed

    Schwenger, Gretchen T F; Kok, Chee Choy; Arthaningtyas, Estri; Thomas, Marc A; Sanderson, Colin J; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A

    2002-12-06

    It is clear from the biology of eosinophilia that a specific regulatory mechanism must exist. Because interleukin-5 (IL5) is the key regulatory cytokine, it follows that a gene-specific control of IL5 expression must exist that differs even from closely related cytokines such as IL4. Two features of IL5 induction make it unique compared with other cytokines; first, induction by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which inhibits other T-cell-derived cytokines, and second, sensitivity to protein synthesis inhibitors, which have no effect on other cytokines. This study has utilized the activation of different transcription factors by different stimuli in a human T-cell line to study the role of conserved lymphokine element 0 (CLE0) in the specific induction of IL5. In unstimulated cells the ubiquitous Oct-1 binds to CLE0. Stimulation induces de novo synthesis of the AP-1 members JunD and Fra-2, which bind to CLE0. The amount of IL5 produced correlates with the production of the AP-1 complex, suggesting a key role in IL5 expression. The formation of the AP-1 complex is essential, but the rate-limiting step is the synthesis of AP-1, especially Fra-2. This provides an explanation for the sensitivity of IL5 to protein synthesis inhibitors and a mechanism for the specific induction of IL5 compared with other cytokines.

  9. On-chip activation and subsequent detection of individual antigen-specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qing; Han, Qing; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M.; Kent, Sally C.; Raddassi, Khadir; Nilsson, Björn; Nepom, Gerald T.; Hafler, David A.; Love, J. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The frequencies of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in samples of human tissue has been difficult to determine accurately ex vivo, particularly for autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis or Type 1 diabetes. Conventional approaches involve the expansion of primary T cells in vitro to increase the numbers of cells, and a subsequent assessment of the frequencies of antigen-specific T cells in the expanded population by limiting dilution or by using fluorescently labeled tetramers of peptide-loaded major histocompatibility complex (MHC) receptors. Here we describe an alternative approach that uses arrays of subnanoliter wells coated with recombinant peptide-loaded MHC Class II monomers to isolate and stimulate individual CD4+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner. In these experiments, activation was monitored using microengraving to capture two cytokines (IFNγ and IL-17) released from single cells. This new method should enable direct enumeration of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells ex vivo from clinical samples. PMID:20000848

  10. Post-transcription initiation function of the ubiquitous SAGA complex in tissue-specific gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Weake, Vikki M.; Dyer, Jamie O.; Seidel, Christopher; Box, Andrew; Swanson, Selene K.; Peak, Allison; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Abmayr, Susan M.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2011-01-01

    The Spt–Ada–Gcn5–acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex was discovered from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and has been well characterized as an important transcriptional coactivator that interacts both with sequence-specific transcription factors and the TATA-binding protein TBP. SAGA contains a histone acetyltransferase and a ubiquitin protease. In metazoans, SAGA is essential for development, yet little is known about the function of SAGA in differentiating tissue. We analyzed the composition, interacting proteins, and genomic distribution of SAGA in muscle and neuronal tissue of late stage Drosophila melanogaster embryos. The subunit composition of SAGA was the same in each tissue; however, SAGA was associated with considerably more transcription factors in muscle compared with neurons. Consistent with this finding, SAGA was found to occupy more genes specifically in muscle than in neurons. Strikingly, SAGA occupancy was not limited to enhancers and promoters but primarily colocalized with RNA polymerase II within transcribed sequences. SAGA binding peaks at the site of RNA polymerase pausing at the 5′ end of transcribed sequences. In addition, many tissue-specific SAGA-bound genes required its ubiquitin protease activity for full expression. These data indicate that in metazoans SAGA plays a prominent post-transcription initiation role in tissue-specific gene expression. PMID:21764853

  11. Oncogene KRAS activates fatty acid synthase, resulting in specific ERK and lipid signatures associated with lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gouw, Arvin M; Eberlin, Livia S; Margulis, Katherine; Sullivan, Delaney K; Toal, Georgia G; Tong, Ling; Zare, Richard N; Felsher, Dean W

    2017-04-11

    KRAS gene mutation causes lung adenocarcinoma. KRAS activation has been associated with altered glucose and glutamine metabolism. Here, we show that KRAS activates lipogenesis, and this activation results in distinct proteomic and lipid signatures. By gene expression analysis, KRAS is shown to be associated with a lipogenesis gene signature and specific induction of fatty acid synthase (FASN). Through desorption electrospray ionization MS imaging (DESI-MSI), specific changes in lipogenesis and specific lipids are identified. By the nanoimmunoassay (NIA), KRAS is found to activate the protein ERK2, whereas ERK1 activation is found in non-KRAS-associated human lung tumors. The inhibition of FASN by cerulenin, a small molecule antibiotic, blocked cellular proliferation of KRAS-associated lung cancer cells. Hence, KRAS is associated with activation of ERK2, induction of FASN, and promotion of lipogenesis. FASN may be a unique target for KRAS-associated lung adenocarcinoma remediation.

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopy based neurofeedback training increases specific motor imagery related cortical activation compared to sham feedback.

    PubMed

    Kober, S E; Wood, G; Kurzmann, J; Friedrich, E V C; Stangl, M; Wippel, T; Väljamäe, A; Neuper, C

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we implemented a real-time feedback system based on multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Prior studies indicated that NIRS-based neurofeedback can enhance motor imagery related cortical activation. To specify these prior results and to confirm the efficacy of NIRS-based neurofeedback, we examined changes in blood oxygenation level collected in eight training sessions. One group got real feedback about their own brain activity (N=9) and one group saw a playback of another person's feedback recording (N=8). All participants performed motor imagery of a right hand movement. Real neurofeedback induced specific and focused brain activation over left motor areas. This focal brain activation became even more specific over the eight training sessions. In contrast, sham feedback led to diffuse brain activation patterns over the whole cortex. These findings can be useful when training patients with focal brain lesions to increase activity of specific brain areas for rehabilitation purpose.

  13. Does cue context matter? Examining the specificity of cue-related activation of positive and negative alcohol expectancies.

    PubMed

    Wardell, Jeffrey D; Read, Jennifer P

    2013-12-01

    Consistent with the Encoding Specificity principle, positive alcohol expectancies may be activated by cues in drinking contexts because they are more closely associated with these cues in memory than are negative expectancies. However, there is little research examining the specificity of cue-induced alcohol expectancy activation. This study investigated the relative activation of positive and negative expectancies in response to positive and negative cue contexts. We also examined whether these effects were stronger for heavier and more problematic drinkers. College student drinkers were randomly assigned to listen to vignettes describing either positive or negative drinking scenarios (cue exposure). Participants also completed an implicit measure of alcohol expectancy activation (modified Stroop task) both before and after the cue exposure, as well as self-report measures of alcohol use and alcohol-related problems. We found that alcohol-related problems moderated the effects of cue condition on expectancy activation, such that specific activation of positive relative to negative expectancies in response to positive cues was observed only for drinkers with higher levels of alcohol problems. No differences in activation of positive versus negative expectancies were observed for more problematic drinkers in the negative cue condition or for less problematic drinkers in either cue condition. The results are partially consistent with the Encoding Specificity principle, showing that positive contextual cues can selectively activate positive alcohol expectancies for more problematic drinkers. Findings may have implications for interventions that target automatic expectancy processes, suggesting potential utility in targeting specific expectancies in specific contexts.

  14. Variation in energy expenditure among black-legged kittiwakes: Effects of activity-specific metabolic rates and activity budgets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jodice, P.G.R.; Roby, D.D.; Suryan, R.M.; Irons, D.B.; Kaufman, A.M.; Turco, K.R.; Visser, G. Henk

    2003-01-01

    We sought to determine the effect of variation in time-activity budgets (TABs) and foraging behavior on energy expenditure rates of parent black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla). We quantified TABs using direct observations of radio-tagged adults and simultaneously measured field metabolic rates (FMR) of these same individuals (n = 20) using the doubly labeled water technique. Estimated metabolic rates of kittiwakes attending their brood at the nest or loafing near the colony were similar (ca. 1.3 x basal metabolic rate [BMR]), although loafing during foraging trips was more costly (2.9 x BMR). Metabolic rates during commuting flight (7.3 x BMR) and prey-searching flight (6.2 x BMR) were similar, while metabolic rates during plunge diving were much higher (ca. 47 x BMR). The proportion of the measurement interval spent foraging had a positive effect on FMR (R2 = 0.68), while the combined proportion of time engaged in nest attendance and loafing near the colony had a negative effect on FMR (R2 = 0.72). Thus, more than two-thirds of the variation in kittiwake FMR could be explained by the allocation of time among various activities. The high energetic cost of plunge diving relative to straight flight and searching flight suggests that kittiwakes can optimize their foraging strategy under conditions of low food availability by commuting long distances to feed in areas where gross foraging efficiency is high.

  15. Identification of orthologous target pairs with shared active compounds and comparison of organism-specific activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    A systematic search for active small molecules shared by orthologous targets was carried out, leading to the identification of 803 compound-based orthologous target pairs covering a total of 938 orthologues, 358 unique targets and 98 organisms. Many orthologous target pairs were found to have substantial compound coverage, enabling the introduction of an orthologous target pairs classification including 'organism cliffs' and 'potency-retaining' pairs. A total of 158 orthologous target pairs involving human orthologues were identified, which were typically associated with drug discovery-relevant targets, organism combinations and compound data. Orthologous target pairs with human orthologues included 83 potency-retaining orthologous target pairs covering a variety of targets and organisms. On the basis of these orthologous target pairs, the compound search was further extended and 1149 potent compounds were identified that only had reported activities for non-human orthologues of 48 therapeutic targets, but not their human counterparts, hence providing a large pool of candidate compounds for further evaluation. The complete set of orthologous target pairs identified in our analysis, the orthologous target pairs classification including associated data and all candidate compounds are made freely available.

  16. Sex-specific associations of moderate and vigorous physical activity with physical fitness in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kidokoro, T; Tanaka, H; Naoi, K; Ueno, K; Yanaoka, T; Kashiwabara, K; Miyashita, M

    2016-11-01

    The present study examined the sex-specific associations of moderate and vigorous physical activity (VPA) with physical fitness in 300 Japanese adolescents aged 12-14 years. Participants were asked to wear an accelerometer to evaluate physical activity (PA) levels of various intensities (i.e. moderate PA (MPA), 3-5.9 metabolic equivalents (METs); VPA, ≥6 METs; moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA), ≥3 METs). Eight fitness items were assessed (grip strength, bent-leg sit-up, sit-and-reach, side step, 50 m sprint, standing long jump, handball throw, and distance running) as part of the Japanese standardised fitness test. A fitness composite score was calculated using Japanese fitness norms, and participants were categorised according to their score from category A (most fit) to category E (least fit), with participants in categories D and E defined as having low fitness. It was found that for boys, accumulating more than 80.7 min/day of MVPA may reduce the probability of low fitness (odds ratio (ORs) [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 0.17 [0.06-0.47], p = .001). For girls, accumulating only 8.4 min of VPA could reduce the likelihood of exhibiting low fitness (ORs [95% CI] = 0.23 [0.05-0.89], p = .032). These results reveal that there are sex-specific differences in the relationship between PA and physical fitness in adolescents, suggesting that sex-specific PA recommendation may be needed to improve physical fitness in adolescents.

  17. Bovine proenteropeptidase is activated by trypsin, and the specificity of enteropeptidase depends on the heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Lu, D; Yuan, X; Zheng, X; Sadler, J E

    1997-12-12

    Enteropeptidase, also known as enterokinase, initiates the activation of pancreatic hydrolases by cleaving and activating trypsinogen. Enteropeptidase is synthesized as a single-chain protein, whereas purified enteropeptidase contains a approximately 47-kDa serine protease domain (light chain) and a disulfide-linked approximately 120-kDa heavy chain. The heavy chain contains an amino-terminal membrane-spanning segment and several repeated structural motifs of unknown function. To study the role of heavy chain motifs in substrate recognition, secreted variants of recombinant bovine proenteropeptidase were constructed by replacing the transmembrane domain with a signal peptide. Secreted variants containing both the heavy chain (minus the transmembrane domain) and the catalytic light chain (pro-HL-BEK (where BEK is bovine enteropeptidase)) or only the catalytic domain (pro-L-BEK) were expressed in baby hamster kidney cells and purified. Single-chain pro-HL-BEK and pro-L-BEK were zymogens with extremely low catalytic activity, and both were activated readily by trypsin cleavage. Trypsinogen was activated efficiently by purified enteropeptidase from bovine intestine (Km = 5.6 microM and kcat = 4.0 s-1) and by HL-BEK (Km = 5.6 microM and kcat = 2.2 s-1), but not by L-BEK (Km = 133 microM and kcat = 0.1 s-1); HL-BEK cleaved trypsinogen at pH 5.6 with 520-fold greater catalytic efficiency than did L-BEK. Qualitatively similar results were obtained at pH 8.4. In contrast to this striking difference in trypsinogen recognition, the small synthetic substrate Gly-Asp-Asp-Asp-Asp-Lys-beta-naphthylamide was cleaved with similar kinetic parameters by both HL-BEK (Km = 0.27 mM and kcat = 0.07 s-1) and L-BEK (Km = 0.60 mM and kcat = 0.06 s-1). The presence of the heavy chain also influenced the rate of reaction with protease inhibitors. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor preferred HL-BEK (initial Ki = 99 nM and final Ki* = 1.8 nM) over L-BEK (Ki = 698 nM and Ki* = 6.2 nM). Soybean

  18. Identification of lipase encoding genes from Antarctic seawater bacteria using degenerate primers: expression of a cold-active lipase with high specific activity.

    PubMed

    Parra, Loreto P; Espina, Giannina; Devia, Javier; Salazar, Oriana; Andrews, Barbara; Asenjo, Juan A

    2015-01-01

    Cold-active enzymes are valuable catalysts showing high activity at low and moderate temperatures and low thermostability. Among cold-active enzymes, lipases offer a great potential in detergent, cosmetic, biofuel and food or feed industries. In this paper we describe the identification of novel lipase coding genes and the expression of a lipase with high activity at low temperatures. The genomic DNA from Antarctic seawater bacteria showing lipolytic activity at 4°C was used to amplify five DNA fragments that partially encode novel lipases using specifically designed COnsensus-DEgenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primers (CODEHOP). All the fragments were found to have a high identity with an α/β-hydrolase domain-containing protein identified by the sequencing of the complete genome of Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400. The complete sequence of one of the lipase-coding gene fragments, lipE13, was obtained by genome walking. Considering that the other fragments had a high identity to the putative lipase from S. frigidimarina NCIMB 400, the complete lipase genes were amplified using oligonucleotide primers designed based on the 5' and 3' regions of the coding sequence of the related protein. This strategy allowed the amplification of 3 lipase-encoding genes of which one was expressed in the periplasm using the Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pET-22b(+) expression system. The recombinant protein was obtained with activity toward p-nitrophenyl caproate showing a high specific activity between 15 and 25°C.

  19. Ouabain-specific antibodies: immunochemical properties and reversal of Na+, K+-activated adenosine triphosphatase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Thomas W.

    1972-01-01

    Antibodies with high affinity and specificity for the cardiac glycoside ouabain were raised in rabbits. The antigen used was a conjugate of ouabain linked through its rhamnose moiety to terminal α-amino groups of poly D,L alanyl-human serum albumin. Ouabain-specific antibodies were present as early as 3 wk, and rose steadily in titer over the initial 20-33 wk of immunization. Levels as high as 6.5 mg specific immunoglobulin per ml antiserum were reached in one rabbit at the end of 45 wk. The average intrinsic association constants for ouabain were 1.3 × 109 M-1 and 1.6 × 109 M-1 in antisera studied in detail, and there was evidence of restricted heterogeneity of binding site affinities. A high degree of specificity was demonstrated. Significant cross-reactivity occurred only with other cardioactive steroid compounds such as acetyl strophanthidin, digoxin, and digitoxin, while endogenous steroids did not cross-react even when present in 1000-fold excess. A rapid and convenient radioimmunoassay procedure for plasma or urine ouabain concentrations was developed using these antibodies. Competition between ouabain-3H tracer and unlabeled ouabain for specific antibody binding sites allowed the measurement of ouabain concentrations as low as 0.1 ng/ml or less without need for extraction procedures. The high association constants observed in these studies permit antibody reversal of established myocardial effects of ouabain. Both blockade and reversal of ouabain inhibition of canine myocardial microsomal Na+, K+-activated ATPase by antibody were documented, suggesting a possible mechanism for reversal of cellular effects. PMID:4260123

  20. Active-R filter

    DOEpatents

    Soderstrand, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational amplifier-type active filter in which the only capacitor in the circuit is the compensating capacitance of the operational amplifiers, the various feedback and coupling elements being essentially solely resistive.

  1. Active induction of tumor-specific IgE antibodies by oral mimotope vaccination.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Angelika B; Untersmayr, Eva; Knittelfelder, Regina; Duschl, Albert; Pehamberger, Hubert; Zielinski, Christoph C; Scheiner, Otto; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2007-04-01

    A role of IgE antibodies in cancer surveillance has been implicated for a long time. Studies dealing with IgE antibodies directly targeted to tumor antigens have shown marked anticancer effects mediated by this antibody class. Thus, the basic function of IgE antibodies may be to control tumor growth. Thus far, cancer-specific IgE has only been applied passively. Consequently, the aim of this study was to establish an active vaccination protocol to induce tumor antigen-specific IgE antibodies, and to evaluate functional properties. We previously generated epitope mimics, so-called mimotopes, for the epitope recognized by the anti-HER-2 antibody trastuzumab. Upon i.p. immunizations, IgG antibodies with trastuzumab-like properties could be elicited. In the present study, we immunized BALB/c mice via the oral route with these trastuzumab mimotopes, under simultaneous neutralization and suppression of gastric acid. As shown in preceding experiments, this feeding regimen effectively induces Th2 immune responses. Oral immunizations with trastuzumab mimotopes under hypoacidic conditions indeed resulted in the formation of IgE antibodies towards the HER-2 antigen. Moreover, anti-HER-2 IgE-sensitized effector cells mediated SK-BR-3 target cell lysis in an antibody-dependent cytotoxicity assay. We conclude that directed and epitope-specific induction of IgE against tumor antigens is feasible with an oral mimotope vaccination regimen, and that these antibodies mediate anticancer effects.

  2. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Canals, Isaac; Soriano, Jordi; Orlandi, Javier G.; Torrent, Roger; Richaud-Patin, Yvonne; Jiménez-Delgado, Senda; Merlin, Simone; Follenzi, Antonia; Consiglio, Antonella; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel; Raya, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration. PMID:26411903

  3. Tyrosine-Specific Chemical Modification with in Situ Hemin-Activated Luminol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinichi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-20

    Tyrosine-specific chemical modification was achieved using in situ hemin-activated luminol derivatives. Tyrosine residues in peptide and protein were modified effectively with N-methylated luminol derivatives under oxidative conditions in the presence of hemin and H2O2. Both single and double modifications of the tyrosine residue occurred in the reaction of angiotensin II with N-methylated luminol derivative 9. Tyrosine-specific chemical modification of the model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) revealed that the surface-exposed tyrosine residues were selectively modified with 9. We succeeded in the functionalization of several proteins using azide-conjugated compound 18 using alkyne-conjugated probes by copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) or dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO)-mediated copper-free click chemistry. This tyrosine-specific modification was orthogonal to conventional lysine modification by N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester, and dual functionalization by fluorescence modification of tyrosine residues and PEG modification of lysine residues was achieved without affecting the modification efficiency.

  4. Body side-specific control of motor activity during turning in a walking animal

    PubMed Central

    Gruhn, Matthias; Rosenbaum, Philipp; Bockemühl, Till; Büschges, Ansgar

    2016-01-01

    Animals and humans need to move deftly and flexibly to adapt to environmental demands. Despite a large body of work on the neural control of walking in invertebrates and vertebrates alike, the mechanisms underlying the motor flexibility that is needed to adjust the motor behavior remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated optomotor-induced turning and the neuronal mechanisms underlying the differences between the leg movements of the two body sides in the stick insect Carausius morosus. We present data to show that the generation of turning kinematics in an insect are the combined result of descending unilateral commands that change the leg motor output via task-specific modifications in the processing of local sensory feedback as well as modification of the activity of local central pattern generating networks in a body-side-specific way. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the specificity of such modifications in a defined motor task. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13799.001 PMID:27130731

  5. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Canals, Isaac; Soriano, Jordi; Orlandi, Javier G; Torrent, Roger; Richaud-Patin, Yvonne; Jiménez-Delgado, Senda; Merlin, Simone; Follenzi, Antonia; Consiglio, Antonella; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel; Raya, Angel

    2015-10-13

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration.

  6. Multiple DNA binding activities of the novel site-specific recombinase, Piv, from Moraxella lacunata.

    PubMed

    Tobiason, D M; Lenich, A G; Glasgow, A C

    1999-04-02

    The recombinase, Piv, is essential for site-specific DNA inversion of the type IV pilin DNA segment in Moraxella lacunata and Moraxella bovis. Piv shows significant homology with the transposases of the IS110/IS492 family of insertion elements, but, surprisingly, Piv contains none of the conserved amino acid motifs of the lambda Int or Hin/Res families of site-specific recombinases. Therefore, Piv may mediate site-specific recombination by a novel mechanism. To begin to determine how Piv may assemble a synaptic nucleoprotein structure for DNA cleavage and strand exchange, we have characterized the interaction of Piv with the DNA inversion region of M. lacunata. Gel shift and nuclease/chemical protection assays, competition and dissociation rate analyses, and cooperativity studies indicate that Piv binds two distinct recognition sequences. One recognition sequence, found at multiple sites within and outside of the invertible segment, is bound by Piv protomers with high affinity. The second recognition sequence is located at the recombination cross-over sites at the ends of the invertible element; Piv interacts with this sequence as an oligomer with apparent low affinity. A model is proposed for the role of the different Piv binding sites of the M. lacunata inversion region in the formation of an active synaptosome.

  7. Regulation of Dpp activity by tissue-specific cleavage of an upstream site within the prodomain

    PubMed Central

    Sopory, Shailaja; Kwon, Sunjong; Wehrli, Marcel; Christian, Jan L.

    2010-01-01

    BMP4 is synthesized as an inactive precursor that is cleaved at two sites during maturation: initially at a site (S1) adjacent to the ligand domain, and then at an upstream site (S2) within the prodomain. Cleavage at the second site regulates the stability of mature BMP4 and this in turn influences its signaling intensity and range of action. The Drosophila ortholog of BMP4, Dpp, functions as a long- or short-range signaling molecule in the wing disc or embryonic midgut, respectively but mechanisms that differentially regulate its bioactivity in these tissues have not been explored. In the current studies we demonstrate, by dpp mutant rescue, that cleavage at the S2 site of proDpp is required for development of the wing and leg imaginal discs, whereas cleavage at the S1 site is sufficient to rescue Dpp function in the midgut. Both the S1 and S2 site of proDpp are cleaved in the wing disc, and S2-cleavage is essential to generate sufficient ligand to exceed the threshold for pMAD activation at both short- and long-range in most cells. By contrast, proDpp is cleaved at the S1 site alone in the embryonic mesoderm and this generates sufficient ligand to activate physiological target genes in neighboring cells. These studies provide the first biochemical and genetic evidence that that selective cleavage of the S2 site of proDPP provides a tissue-specific mechanism for regulating Dpp activity, and that differential cleavage can contribute to, but is not an absolute determinant of signaling range. PMID:20659445

  8. Antinociceptive activity of NK1 receptor antagonists: non-specific effects of racemic RP67580.

    PubMed Central

    Rupniak, N. M.; Boyce, S.; Williams, A. R.; Cook, G.; Longmore, J.; Seabrook, G. R.; Caeser, M.; Iversen, S. D.; Hill, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    1. Release of substance P in the dorsal horn is considered a primary event in the perception of pain. The profile of racemic RP67580, a non-peptide antagonist at the NK1 (substance P) receptor, was examined in a range of antinociception tests on rodents. 2. At doses up to 30 mg kg-1, s.c. racemic RP67580 exhibited antinociceptive activity in writhing and formalin paw tests in mice and gerbils. Acetic acid induced writhing and the licking response to formalin were reduced to 40-50% of the level observed in vehicle-treated animals (P < 0.05). However, this agent was not active in mouse tail flick, rat paw pressure or rat and guinea-pig formalin paw tests. 3. Like racemic RP67580, the calcium channel blockers nifedipine (30 mg kg-1, i.p.) and verapamil (10 or 20 mg kg-1, s.c.) inhibited the response to formalin by approximately 60% in gerbils (P < 0.05 compared with vehicle-treated animals). 4. Evidence for calcium channel antagonist activity of RP67580 was obtained in vitro. Racemic RP67580 inhibited calcium entry into depolarized strips of guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus (apparent KB = 587 +/- 115 nM), inhibited [3H]-diltiazem binding to rabbit skeletal membranes (IC50 = 298 nM) and depressed high threshold calcium currents in neurones cultured from rat cortex (10% inhibition at 10 microM). 5. These findings indicate that the acute antinociceptive effects of RP67580 may not be attributable to a specific interaction with NK1 receptors and may be mediated via calcium channel blockade. PMID:8306108

  9. Specific activation of the TLR1-TLR2 heterodimer by small-molecule agonists

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kui; Gao, Meng; Godfroy, James I.; Brown, Peter N.; Kastelowitz, Noah; Yin, Hang

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists activate both the innate and the adaptive immune systems. These TLR agonists have been exploited as potent vaccine adjuvants and antitumor agents. We describe the identification and characterization of a small molecule, N-methyl-4-nitro-2-(4-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-1H-imidazol-1-yl)aniline (CU-T12-9), that directly targets TLR1/2 to initiate downstream signaling. CU-T12-9 specifically induces TLR1/2 activation, which can be blocked by either the anti-hTLR1 or the anti-hTLR2 antibody, but not the anti-hTLR6 antibody. Using a variety of different biophysical assays, we have demonstrated the binding mode of CU-T12-9. By binding to both TLR1 and TLR2, CU-T12-9 facilitates the TLR1/2 heterodimeric complex formation, which in turn activates the downstream signaling. Fluorescence anisotropy assays revealed competitive binding to the TLR1/2 complex between CU-T12-9 and Pam3CSK4 with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 54.4 nM. Finally, we showed that CU-T12-9 signals through nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and invokes an elevation of the downstream effectors tumor necrosis factor–α (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Thus, our studies not only provide compelling new insights into the regulation of TLR1/2 signaling transduction but also may facilitate future therapeutic developments. PMID:26101787

  10. CpGB DNA activates dermal macrophages and specifically recruits inflammatory monocytes into the skin.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Allison L; Rice, Lisa; Affandi, Alsya J; DiMarzio, Michael; Rifkin, Ian R; Stifano, Giuseppina; Christmann, Romy B; Lafyatis, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) drives innate immune responses after recognition of foreign or endogenous DNA containing unmethylated CpG motifs. DNA-mediated TLR9 activation is highly implicated in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune skin diseases, yet its contribution to the inflammation seen in these diseases remains unclear. In this study, TLR9 ligand, CpGB DNA, was administered to mice via a subcutaneous osmotic pump with treatment lasting 1 or 4 weeks. Gene expression and immunofluorescence analyses were used to determine chemokine expression and cell recruitment in the skin surrounding the pump outlet. CpGB DNA skin treatment dramatically induced a marked influx of CD11b+ F4/80+ macrophages, increasing over 4 weeks of treatment, and induction of IFNγ and TNFα expression. Chemokines, CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10, were highly induced in CpGB DNA-treated skin, although abrogation of these signalling pathways individually did not alter macrophage accumulation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that TLR9 activation in the skin increased circulating CD11b+ CD115+ Ly6C(hi) inflammatory monocytes following 1 week of CpGB DNA treatment. Additionally, skin-resident CD11b+ cells were found to initially take up subcutaneous CpGB DNA and propagate the subsequent immune response. Using diphtheria toxin-induced monocyte depletion mouse model, gene expression analysis demonstrated that CD11b+ cells are responsible for the CpGB DNA-induced cytokine and chemokine response. Overall, these data demonstrate that chronic TLR9 activation induces a specific inflammatory response, ultimately leading to a striking and selective accumulation of macrophages in the skin.

  11. Preparation and characterization of high-specific-surface-area activated carbons from K2CO3-treated waste polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, J; Yamamoto, N; Horikawa, T; Muroyama, K; Gomes, V G

    2005-01-15

    An activated carbon with high specific surface area was prepared from polyurethane foam by chemical activation with K2CO3 and the influences of carbonization temperature and impregnation ratio on the pore structure of the prepared activated carbon were investigated. It was found that the specific surface area of the activated carbon was at a maximum value (about 2800 m(2)/g) at a carbonization temperature of 1073 K and at an impregnation ratio of 1.0. It was concluded that the polyurethane foam structure was modified during impregnation by K2CO3, K2CO3 promoted charring during carbonization, and then the weight loss behavior was changed below 700 and above 1000 K, carbon in the char was consumed by K2CO3 reduction, and this led to the high specific surface area. The prepared activated carbon had a very sharp micropore size distribution, compared with the commercial activated carbon having high specific surface area. The amounts of three organic vapors (benzene, acetone, and octane) adsorbed on the prepared activated carbons was much larger than those on the traditional coconut shell AC and the same as those on the commercial activated carbon except for octane. We surmised that the high specific surface area was due to the modification of the carbonization behavior of polyurethane foam by K2CO3.

  12. Activation of GATA4 gene expression at the early stage of cardiac specification

    PubMed Central

    Yilbas, Ayse E.; Hamilton, Alison; Wang, Yingjian; Mach, Hymn; Lacroix, Natascha; Davis, Darryl R.; Chen, Jihong; Li, Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there are no effective treatments to directly repair damaged heart tissue after cardiac injury since existing therapies focus on rescuing or preserving reversibly damaged tissue. Cell-based therapies using cardiomyocytes generated from stem cells present a promising therapeutic approach to directly replace damaged myocardium with new healthy tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the commitment of stem cells into cardiomyocytes are not fully understood and will be critical to guide this new technology into the clinic. Since GATA4 is a critical regulator of cardiac differentiation, we examined the molecular basis underlying the early activation of GATA4 gene expression during cardiac differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Our studies demonstrate the direct involvement of histone acetylation and transcriptional coactivator p300 in the regulation of GATA4 gene expression. More importantly, we show that histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity is important for GATA4 gene expression with the use of curcumin, a HAT inhibitor. In addition, the widely used histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances both histone acetylation and cardiac specification. PMID:24790981

  13. Tissue Specific Expression of Cre in Rat Tyrosine Hydroxylase and Dopamine Active Transporter-Positive Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenyi; Brown, Andrew; Fisher, Dan; Wu, Yumei; Warren, Joe; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    The rat is a preferred model system over the mouse for neurological studies, and cell type-specific Cre expression in the rat enables precise ablation of gene function in neurons of interest, which is especially valuable for neurodegenerative disease modeling and optogenetics. Yet, few such Cre rats are available. Here we report the characterization of two Cre rats, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-Cre and dopamine active transporter (DAT or Slc6a3)-Cre, by using a combination of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as well as a fluorescent reporter for Cre activity. We detected Cre expression in expected neurons in both Cre lines. Interestingly, we also found that in Th-Cre rats, but not DAT-Cre rats, Cre is expressed in female germ cells, allowing germline excision of the floxed allele and hence the generation of whole-body knockout rats. In summary, our data demonstrate that targeted integration of Cre cassette lead to faithful recapitulation of expression pattern of the endogenous promoter, and mRNA FISH, in addition to IHC, is an effective method for the analysis of the spatiotemporal gene expression patterns in the rat brain, alleviating the dependence on high quality antibodies that are often not available against rat proteins. The Th-Cre and the DAT-Cre rat lines express Cre in selective subsets of dopaminergic neurons and should be particularly useful for researches on Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26886559

  14. A small circular TAR RNA decoy specifically inhibits Tat-activated HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Bohjanen, P R; Colvin, R A; Puttaraju, M; Been, M D; Garcia-Blanco, M A

    1996-01-01

    Linear TAR RNA has previously been used as a decoy to inhibit HIV-1 transcription in vitro and HIV-1 replication in vivo. A 48 nucleotide circular RNA containing the stem, bulge and loop of the HIV-1 TAR element was synthesized using the self-splicing activity of a group I permuted intron-exon and was tested for its ability to function as a TAR decoy in vitro. This small circular TAR molecule was exceptionally stable in HeLa nuclear extracts, whereas a similar linear TAR molecule was rapidly degraded. The TAR circle bound specifically to Tfr38, a peptide containing the TAR-binding region of Tat. The ability of Tat to trans-activate transcription from the HIV-1 promoter in vitro was efficiently inhibited by circular TAR RNA but not by TAR circles that contained either bulge or loop mutations. TAR circles did not inhibit transactivation exclusively by binding to Tat since this inhibition was not reversed by adding excess Tat to the transcription reaction. Together, these data suggest that TAR circles act as decoys that inhibit transactivation by binding to Tat and at least one cellular factor. These data also demonstrate the utility of small circular RNA molecules as tools for biochemical studies. PMID:8871552

  15. Young Finnish Unemployed Men's Experiences of Having Participated in a Specific Active Labor Market Program.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Ove; Häggström, Elisabeth; Nyström, Lisbet

    2015-09-07

    The purpose of the present study was to describe young Finnish unemployed men's experiences of having participated in a specific active labor market program, intended to fight unemployment and offered at a resource center. Fifteen young unemployed Finnish men in the age range 18 to 27 years were interviewed face-to-face. Purposive sampling was used to increase the variation among informants. The interview texts were analyzed using both manifest and latent qualitative content analysis. The present results reported that the young men felt that they, thanks to the program at the resource center, had acquired daily routines and could ultimately believe in the future. The young men described how they now had a structure, economic support, and that they could return to their daily life. The informants also described how they could see new possibilities and believe in oneself. There is a lack of empirical studies assessing the possible impact of active labor market programs on the unemployed based on participants' own experiences. Further research is needed to describe and elucidate in more detail the effects of targeted support measures and the needs of unemployed men of different ages and living in different contexts.

  16. Structural Determinants for Activity and Specificity of the Bacterial Toxin LlpA

    PubMed Central

    Lebbe, Eline K. M.; Spaepen, Stijn; Loris, Remy; De Mot, René

    2013-01-01

    Lectin-like bacteriotoxic proteins, identified in several plant-associated bacteria, are able to selectively kill closely related species, including several phytopathogens, such as Pseudomonas syringae and Xanthomonas species, but so far their mode of action remains unrevealed. The crystal structure of LlpABW, the prototype lectin-like bacteriocin from Pseudomonas putida, reveals an architecture of two monocot mannose-binding lectin (MMBL) domains and a C-terminal β-hairpin extension. The C-terminal MMBL domain (C-domain) adopts a fold very similar to MMBL domains from plant lectins and contains a binding site for mannose and oligomannosides. Mutational analysis indicates that an intact sugar-binding pocket in this domain is crucial for bactericidal activity. The N-terminal MMBL domain (N-domain) adopts the same fold but is structurally more divergent and lacks a functional mannose-binding site. Differential activity of engineered N/C-domain chimers derived from two LlpA homologues with different killing spectra, disclosed that the N-domain determines target specificity. Apparently this bacteriocin is assembled from two structurally similar domains that evolved separately towards dedicated functions in target recognition and bacteriotoxicity. PMID:23468636

  17. Structure-based engineering of a pectate lyase with improved specific activity for ramie degumming.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanping; Liu, Yang; Chang, Zhenying; Wang, Huilin; Leier, André; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T; Ma, Yanhe; Li, Jian; Song, Jiangning

    2017-04-01

    Biotechnological applications of microbial pectate lyases (Pels) in plant fiber processing are promising, eco-friendly substitutes for conventional chemical degumming processes. However, to potentiate the enzymes' use for industrial applications, resolving the molecular structure to elucidate catalytic mechanisms becomes necessary. In this manuscript, we report the high resolution (1.45 Å) crystal structure of pectate lyase (pelN) from Paenibacillus sp. 0602 in apo form. Through sequence alignment and structural superposition with other members of the polysaccharide lyase (PL) family 1 (PL1), we determined that pelN shares the characteristic right-handed β-helix and is structurally similar to other members of the PL1 family, while exhibiting key differences in terms of catalytic and substrate binding residues. Then, based on information from structure alignments with other PLs, we engineered a novel pelN. Our rational design yielded a pelN mutant with a temperature for enzymatic activity optimally shifted from 67.5 to 60 °C. Most importantly, this pelN mutant displayed both higher specific activity and ramie fiber degumming ability when compared with the wild-type enzyme. Altogether, our rational design method shows great potential for industrial applications. Moreover, we expect the reported high-resolution crystal structure to provide a solid foundation for future rational, structure-based engineering of genetically enhanced pelNs.

  18. Activation of GATA4 gene expression at the early stage of cardiac specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, Ayse; Hamilton, Alison; Wang, Yingjian; Mach, Hymn; Lacroix, Natascha; Davis, Darryl; Chen, Jihong; LI, Qiao

    2014-03-01

    Currently, there are no effective treatments to directly repair damaged heart tissue after cardiac injury since existing therapies focus on rescuing or preserving reversibly damaged tissue. Cell-based therapies using cardiomyocytes generated from stem cells present a promising therapeutic approach to directly replace damaged myocardium with new healthy tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the commitment of stem cells into cardiomyocytes are not fully understood and will be critical to guide this new technology into the clinic. Since GATA4 is a critical regulator of cardiac differentiation, we examined the molecular basis underlying the early activation of GATA4 gene expression during cardiac differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Our studies demonstrate the direct involvement of histone acetylation and transcriptional coactivator p300 in the regulation of GATA4 gene expression. More importantly, we show that histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity is important for GATA4 gene expression with the use of curcumin, a HAT inhibitor. In addition, the widely used histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances both histone acetylation and cardiac specification.

  19. Treponemal infection specifically enhances node T-cell regulation of macrophage activity.

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, D R; Bagasra, O; Jacobs, R F

    1986-01-01

    Hamsters experimentally inoculated in the inguinal region with Treponema pallidum subsp. endemicum develop considerable pathology at that site. We examined the cell populations from these inguinal lymph nodes to determine their intercellular responses to infection. In vitro, syphilitic-node T cells markedly suppressed C3b receptor-mediated ingestion (C3bMI) in syphilitic macrophages derived from sites both proximal and distal to the inoculation. This activity was more pronounced when node T cells rather than peritoneal T cells were used. When treponemal preparations or live treponemes were added to the coculture system, the suppression was specifically enhanced, whereas the addition of heterologous agents did not promote this effect. Syphilitic macrophages from either compartment cultured alone showed no significant inhibition of C3bMI. In parallel studies on syphilitic macrophages, we observed that the expression of Ia quickly became elevated and was sustained throughout the infection. Moreover, in vitro culturing of the syphilitic-node T cells with these macrophages did not alter this function. These observations suggest that the syphilitic node contains a subpopulation of T cells that can selectively suppress macrophage C3bMI activity and concurrently regulate their cellular response to treponemal infection. PMID:3531014

  20. X-ray structure of human aromatase reveals an androgen-specific active site.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debashis; Griswold, Jennifer; Erman, Mary; Pangborn, Walter

    2010-02-28

    Aromatase is a unique cytochrome P450 that catalyzes the removal of the 19-methyl group and aromatization of the A-ring of androgens for the synthesis of estrogens. All human estrogens are synthesized via this enzymatic aromatization pathway. Aromatase inhibitors thus constitute a frontline therapy for estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Despite decades of intense investigation, this enzyme of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane has eluded all structure determination efforts. We have determined the crystal structure of the highly active aromatase purified from human placenta, in complex with its natural substrate androstenedione. The structure shows the binding mode of androstenedione in the catalytically active oxidized high-spin ferric state of the enzyme. Hydrogen bond-forming interactions and tight packing hydrophobic side chains that complement the puckering of the steroid backbone provide the molecular basis for the exclusive androgenic specificity of aromatase. Locations of catalytic residues and water molecules shed new light on the mechanism of the aromatization step. The structure also suggests a membrane integration model indicative of the passage of steroids through the lipid bilayer.

  1. Substrate and Inhibitor Specificity of the Type II p21-Activated Kinase, PAK6

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jia; Ha, Byung Hak; Lou, Hua Jane; Morse, Elizabeth M.; Zhang, Rong; Calderwood, David A.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2013-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are important effectors of Rho-family small GTPases. The PAK family consists of two groups, type I and type II, which have different modes of regulation and signaling. PAK6, a type II PAK, influences behavior and locomotor function in mice and has an ascribed role in androgen receptor signaling. Here we show that PAK6 has a peptide substrate specificity very similar to the other type II PAKs, PAK4 and PAK5 (PAK7). We find that PAK6 catalytic activity is inhibited by a peptide corresponding to its N-terminal pseudosubstrate. Introduction of a melanoma-associated mutation, P52L, into this peptide reduces pseudosubstrate autoinhibition of PAK6, and increases phosphorylation of its substrate PACSIN1 (Syndapin I) in cells. Finally we determine two co-crystal structures of PAK6 catalytic domain in complex with ATP-competitive inhibitors. We determined the 1.4 Å co-crystal structure of PAK6 with the type II PAK inhibitor PF-3758309, and the 1.95 Å co-crystal structure of PAK6 with sunitinib. These findings provide new insights into the structure-function relationships of PAK6 and may facilitate development of PAK6 targeted therapies. PMID:24204982

  2. High specific activity enantiomerically enriched juvenile hormones: synthesis and binding assay.

    PubMed Central

    Prestwich, G D; Wawrzeńczyk, C

    1985-01-01

    A stereoselective total synthesis of chiral juvenile hormone I is described that allows stoichiometric introduction of two tritium atoms in the final step. Both optical antipodes of the pivotal epoxy alcohol intermediate were prepared in 95% enantiomeric excess by the Sharpless epoxidation of a (Z)-allylic alcohol. Elaboration of the hydroxy-methyl group to a vinyl group followed by selective homogeneous tritiation affords optically active juvenile hormone I analogs at 58 Ci/mmol. Competitive binding of the labeled 10R, 11S and 10S,11R enantiomers with unlabeled enantiomers to the hemolymph binding protein of Manduca sexta larvae was determined by using a dextran-coated charcoal assay. The natural 10R,11S enantiomer has twice the relative binding affinity of the 10S,11R enantiomer. The availability of such high specific activity optically pure hormones will contribute substantially to the search for high-affinity receptors for juvenile hormones in the nuclei of cells. Moreover, the chiral 12-hydroxy-(10R,11S)-epoxy intermediate allows modification of juvenile hormone for solid-phase biochemical and radioimmunochemical work without altering either the biologically important carbomethoxy or epoxy recognition sites. PMID:3860862

  3. High specific activity enantiomerically enriched juvenile hormones: synthesis and binding assay.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, G D; Wawrzeńczyk, C

    1985-08-01

    A stereoselective total synthesis of chiral juvenile hormone I is described that allows stoichiometric introduction of two tritium atoms in the final step. Both optical antipodes of the pivotal epoxy alcohol intermediate were prepared in 95% enantiomeric excess by the Sharpless epoxidation of a (Z)-allylic alcohol. Elaboration of the hydroxy-methyl group to a vinyl group followed by selective homogeneous tritiation affords optically active juvenile hormone I analogs at 58 Ci/mmol. Competitive binding of the labeled 10R, 11S and 10S,11R enantiomers with unlabeled enantiomers to the hemolymph binding protein of Manduca sexta larvae was determined by using a dextran-coated charcoal assay. The natural 10R,11S enantiomer has twice the relative binding affinity of the 10S,11R enantiomer. The availability of such high specific activity optically pure hormones will contribute substantially to the search for high-affinity receptors for juvenile hormones in the nuclei of cells. Moreover, the chiral 12-hydroxy-(10R,11S)-epoxy intermediate allows modification of juvenile hormone for solid-phase biochemical and radioimmunochemical work without altering either the biologically important carbomethoxy or epoxy recognition sites.

  4. Preparation of a specific bamboo based activated carbon and its application for ciprofloxacin removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y X; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S

    2015-11-15

    The studied bamboo based activated carbon (BbAC) with high specific surface area (SSA) and high micro pore volume was prepared from bamboo scraps by the combined activation of H3PO4 and K2CO3. The BbAC was characterized based on the N2 adsorption isotherm at 77K. The results showed that the SSA and pore volume of BbAC increased with increasing impregnation ratio and reached maxima at the impregnation ratio of 3:1 at 750°C. Under these optimal conditions, the BbAC obtained could have a maximum SSA of 2237 m(2)/g and a maximum total pore volume of 1.23 cm(3)/g with the micro pore ratio of more than 90%. The adsorption performance of ciprofloxacin (CIP) on the BbAC was determined at 298 K. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were employed to describe the adsorption equilibrium and the kinetic data were fitted by pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order kinetic models. The results showed that the Langmuir model and the pseudo second-order kinetic model presented better fittings for the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics data, respectively. The maximum adsorption amount of CIP (613 mg/g) on the BbAC was much higher than the report in the literature. Conclusively, the BbAC could be a promising adsorption material for CIP removal from water.

  5. Effect of humic acid in leachate on specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengfei; Xian, Ping; Yang, Longhui; Liu, Xi; Zhan, Longhui; Bu, Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    In order to find out the effects of humic acid (HA) in anaerobic-treated landfill leachate on granular sludge, the anaerobic biodegradability of HA as well as the influences of HA on the total cumulative methane production, the anaerobic methanization process and the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) of granular sludge are studied in this paper. Experimental results show that as a non-biodegradable organic pollutant, HA is also difficult to be decomposed by microbes in the anaerobic reaction process. Presence of HA and changes in the concentration have no significant influences on the total cumulative methane production and the anaerobic methanization process of granular sludge. Besides, the total cumulative methane production cannot reflect the inhibition of toxics on the methanogenic activity of granular sludge on the premise of sufficient reaction time. Results also show that HA plays a promoting role on SMA of granular sludge. Without buffering agent the SMA value increased by 19.2% on average due to the buffering and regulating ability of HA, while with buffering agent the SMA value increased by 5.4% on average due to the retaining effect of HA on the morphology of the sludge particles. However, in the presence of leachate the SMA value decreased by 27.6% on average, because the toxic effect of the toxics in the leachate on granular sludge is much larger than the promoting effect of HA.

  6. Signaling, Regulation, and Specificity of the Type II p21-activated Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Byung Hak; Morse, Elizabeth M.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are a family of six serine/threonine kinases that act as key effectors of RHO family GTPases in mammalian cells. PAKs are subdivided into two groups: type I PAKs (PAK1, PAK2, and PAK3) and type II PAKs (PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6). Although these groups are involved in common signaling pathways, recent work indicates that the two groups have distinct modes of regulation and have both unique and common substrates. Here, we review recent insights into the molecular level details that govern regulation of type II PAK signaling. We also consider mechanisms by which signal transduction is regulated at the level of substrate specificity. Finally, we discuss the implications of these studies for clinical targeting of these kinases. PMID:25855792

  7. Specification of haematopoietic stem cell fate via modulation of mitochondrial activity

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Nicola; Girotra, Mukul; Naveiras, Olaia; Nikitin, Gennady; Campos, Vasco; Giger, Sonja; Roch, Aline; Auwerx, Johan; Lutolf, Matthias P.

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) differ from their committed progeny by relying primarily on anaerobic glycolysis rather than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. However, whether this change in the metabolic program is the cause or the consequence of the unique function of HSCs remains unknown. Here we show that enforced modulation of energy metabolism impacts HSC self-renewal. Lowering the mitochondrial activity of HSCs by chemically uncoupling the electron transport chain drives self-renewal under culture conditions that normally induce rapid differentiation. We demonstrate that this metabolic specification of HSC fate occurs through the reversible decrease of mitochondrial mass by autophagy. Our data thus reveal a causal relationship between mitochondrial metabolism and fate choice of HSCs and also provide a valuable tool to expand HSCs outside of their native bone marrow niches. PMID:27731316

  8. Search and Rescue in Space Activities: Is There a Specific Legal Regime?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriakopoulos, George D.

    2013-09-01

    As space exploration has always been a dangerous activity, this paper examines if a "space" search and rescue regime can validly be claimed to exist. Regarding vessels in distress, the Hamburg Convention provided for SAR regions "by way of mutual regional arrangements" between States. Regarding aircraft in distress, specific SAR Regions have been established, in conformity with Annex 12 to the Chicago Convention. In space, art. V of the OST, if broadly interpreted, could be applied to "space-to space" rescue operations. This principle is further elaborated by the Rescue Agreement, although the latter does not apply in "deep space" distress situations. Finally, The Moon Agreement applies this framework to "Persons on the Moon". It follows that Space Law provides for SAR operations on the level of principle, as no integrated legal regime seems to exist. Therefore, the Air/Sea SAR regimes could serve as models for a comprehensive space regulation.

  9. Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 1, Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    DOE is deactivating the PUREX plant at Hanford; this will involve the disposition of about 692,000 liters (183,000 gallons) of surplus nitric acid contaminated with low levels of U and other radionuclides. The nitric acid, designated as low specific activity, is stored in 4 storage tanks at PUREX. Five principal alternatives were evaluated: transfer for reuse (sale to BNF plc), no action, continued storage in Hanford upgraded or new facility, consolidation of DOE surplus acid, and processing the LSA nitric acid as waste. The transfer to BNF plc is the preferred alternative. From the analysis, it is concluded that the proposed disposition and transportation of the acid does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

  10. Cysteamine, the natural metabolite of pantetheinase, shows specific activity against Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Ayi, Kodjo; Bongfen, Silayuv E; Tam, Mifong; Radovanovic, Irena; Gauthier, Susan; Santiago, Helton; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Roffê, Ester; Sher, Alan; Mullick, Alaka; Fortin, Anny; Stevenson, Mary M; Kain, Kevin C; Gros, Philippe

    2010-08-01

    In mice, loss of pantetheinase activity causes susceptibility to infection with Plasmodium chabaudi AS. Treatment of mice with the pantetheinase metabolite cysteamine reduces blood-stage replication of P. chabaudi and significantly increases survival. Similarly, a short exposure of Plasmodium to cysteamine ex vivo is sufficient to suppress parasite infectivity in vivo. This effect of cysteamine is specific and not observed with a related thiol (dimercaptosuccinic acid) or with the pantethine precursor of cysteamine. Also, cysteamine does not protect against infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi or the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, suggesting cysteamine acts directly against the parasite and does not modulate host inflammatory response. Cysteamine exposure also blocks replication of P. falciparum in vitro; moreover, these treated parasites show higher levels of intact hemoglobin. This study highlights the in vivo action of cysteamine against Plasmodium and provides further evidence for the involvement of pantetheinase in host response to this infection.

  11. Is Neural Activity Detected by ERP-Based Brain-Computer Interfaces Task Specific?

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Markus A.; Almeida, Inês; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) that are based on event-related potentials (ERPs) can estimate to which stimulus a user pays particular attention. In typical BCIs, the user silently counts the selected stimulus (which is repeatedly presented among other stimuli) in order to focus the attention. The stimulus of interest is then inferred from the electroencephalogram (EEG). Detecting attention allocation implicitly could be also beneficial for human-computer interaction (HCI), because it would allow software to adapt to the user’s interest. However, a counting task would be inappropriate for the envisaged implicit application in HCI. Therefore, the question was addressed if the detectable neural activity is specific for silent counting, or if it can be evoked also by other tasks that direct the attention to certain stimuli. Approach Thirteen people performed a silent counting, an arithmetic and a memory task. The tasks required the subjects to pay particular attention to target stimuli of a random color. The stimulus presentation was the same in all three tasks, which allowed a direct comparison of the experimental conditions. Results Classifiers that were trained to detect the targets in one task, according to patterns present in the EEG signal, could detect targets in all other tasks (irrespective of some task-related differences in the EEG). Significance The neural activity detected by the classifiers is not strictly task specific but can be generalized over tasks and is presumably a result of the attention allocation or of the augmented workload. The results may hold promise for the transfer of classification algorithms from BCI research to implicit relevance detection in HCI. PMID:27792781

  12. Ceruloplasmin ferroxidase activity stimulates cellular iron uptake by a trivalent cation-specific transport mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attieh, Z. K.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Seshadri, V.; Tripoulas, N. A.; Fox, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    The balance required to maintain appropriate cellular and tissue iron levels has led to the evolution of multiple mechanisms to precisely regulate iron uptake from transferrin and low molecular weight iron chelates. A role for ceruloplasmin (Cp) in vertebrate iron metabolism is suggested by its potent ferroxidase activity catalyzing conversion of Fe2+ to Fe3+, by identification of yeast copper oxidases homologous to Cp that facilitate high affinity iron uptake, and by studies of "aceruloplasminemic" patients who have extensive iron deposits in multiple tissues. We have recently shown that Cp increases iron uptake by cultured HepG2 cells. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which Cp stimulates cellular iron uptake. Cp stimulated the rate of non-transferrin 55Fe uptake by iron-deficient K562 cells by 2-3-fold, using a transferrin receptor-independent pathway. Induction of Cp-stimulated iron uptake by iron deficiency was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, consistent with a transcriptionally induced or regulated transporter. Cp-stimulated iron uptake was completely blocked by unlabeled Fe3+ and by other trivalent cations including Al3+, Ga3+, and Cr3+, but not by divalent cations. These results indicate that Cp utilizes a trivalent cation-specific transporter. Cp ferroxidase activity was required for iron uptake as shown by the ineffectiveness of two ferroxidase-deficient Cp preparations, copper-deficient Cp and thiomolybdate-treated Cp. We propose a model in which iron reduction and subsequent re-oxidation by Cp are essential for an iron uptake pathway with high ion specificity.

  13. Expression of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C isoenzymes in cultured astrocytes activated after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita; Fabrizi, Cinzia; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Cocco, L

    2010-04-01

    Signal transduction pathways, involved in cell cycle and activities, depend on various components including lipid signalling molecules, such as phosphoinositides and related enzymes. Many evidences support the hypothesis that inositol lipid cycle is involved in astrocytes activation during neurodegeneration. Previous studies investigated the pattern of expression of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) family isoforms in astrocytes, individuating in cultured neonatal rat astrocytes, supposed to be quiescent cells, the absence of some isoforms, accordingly to their well known tissue specificity. The same study was conducted in cultured rat astrocytoma C6 cells and designed a different pattern of expression of PI-PLCs in the neoplastic counterpart, accordingly to literature suggesting a PI signalling involvement in tumour progression. It is not clear the role of PI-PLC isoforms in inflammation; recent data demonstrate they are involved in cytokines production, with special regard to IL-6. PI-PLCs expression in LPS treated neonatal rat astrocytes performed by using RT-PCR, observed at 3, 6, 18 and 24 h intervals, expressed: PI-PLC beta1, beta4 and gamma1 in all intervals analysed; PI-PLC delta1 at 6, 18 and 24 h; PI-PLC delta3 at 6 h after treatment. PI-PLC beta3, delta4 and epsilon, present in untreated astrocytes, were not detected after LPS treatment. Immunocytochemical analysis, performed to visualize the sub-cellular distribution of the expressed isoforms, demonstrated different patterns of localisation at different times of exposure. These observations suggest that PI-PLCs expression and distribution may play a role in ongoing inflammation process of CNS.

  14. Breadth of Scientific Activities and Network Station Specifications in the IGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. W.; Springer, T. A.; Reigber, Ch.

    1999-01-01

    This presentation provides a brief overview of the scientific activities of the International GPS Service (IGS). This was an approved activity of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) with official start of service on 1 Jan 1994. The mission of the IGS is "To provide a service to support geodetic and geophysical research activities, through GPS data and data products." The presentation explains the concept of the IGS working group, and pilot projects, and reviews the current working groups and pilot projects.

  15. Carbon-14 Specific Activity Model Validation for Biota in Wetland Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Yankovich, T.L.; Sharp, K.J.; Benz, M.L.; Carr, J.; Killey, R.W.D.

    2008-01-15

    In many cases, contaminants, such as radionuclides, can show highly localized spatial distributions in natural systems. Therefore, a key question for environmental assessment and monitoring becomes, how can these localized distributions of contaminants in the environment lead to organism exposure, and ultimately, the potential for effects to receptor biota? To address this question, an important first step is to conduct field surveys at sites of interest to map out the spatial distribution and extent of contaminants in areas that are being occupied and utilized by resident receptor biota. Work can then be conducted to establish predictive relationships between contaminant concentrations in biota tissues and those in environmental media with which biota interact, to gain an understanding of how representative ambient contaminant concentrations are of biota exposure. The objectives of this study were: - To conduct a field survey in a wetland ecosystem to characterize the spatial distribution of carbon- 14 ({sup 14}C), a radionuclide with dynamics in natural systems that can be described using a specific activity model; and - To determine whether {sup 14}C concentrations in environmental media reflect those measured in tissues of resident flora and fauna. A detailed field campaign was carried out in summer 2001 to characterize the spatial distribution and areal coverage of {sup 14}C in Duke Swamp, a wetland ecosystem on Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL)'s Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site that receives {sup 14}C through releases from an up-gradient Waste Management Area (WMA), primarily through groundwater influx. Sampling of surface vegetation (dominantly comprised of Sphagnum moss) was conducted at a total of 69 locations, with complementary sampling of air, soil, fungi, aerial insects, ground-dwelling insects, amphibians, small mammals and snakes being carried out at a subset of five locations with varying {sup 14}C concentrations. Concentrations of {sup 14

  16. Phosphate oxygen isotope ratio proxy for specific microbial activity in marine sediments (Peru Margin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Blake, R. E.

    2005-12-01

    Oxygen (O) isotope ratios of biogenic apatites have been widely used as paleotemperature and environmental geochemical proxies. With improved knowledge of the phosphate O isotope effects of different P cycling pathways, the δ18O value of inorganic phosphate (δ18OP) has been proposed as a useful proxy and tracer of biological reactions and P cycling in natural environments[1,2,3,4]. Being the only way of removing P from oceanic water, sedimentary P burial is one of the most important processes during biogeochemical cycling of P. The high concentrations of organic matter and pronounced microbial activity at ODP Site 1230 along the Peru Margin result in unusually high interstitial water phosphate concentrations, which provides a unique opportunity to use δ18OP to investigate inorganic phosphate (Pi) regeneration and P cycling pathways in marine sediments. The isotopic measurements of both dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) and bulk sediment Pi show that DIP δ18OP values are affected by three different processes, which are all induced by specific microbial activities present in the sediments. In sediments at ~ 65 to 120 mbsf, porewater DIP is derived from dissolved organophosphorus compounds (DOP) through enzymatic degradation pathways, evidenced by both DIP δ18OP values and interstitial water chemistry. Measured porewater DIP δ18OP values also suggest that 4 to 8% of interstitial water DIP reflects regeneration of Pi from Porg by microbially-synthesized enzymes. Throughout the sediment column and especially at ~ 120 to 150 mbsf, DIP is released from the sediments by microbially-induced reductive dissolution of Fe-oxides, which contributes to the overall high DIP concentrations at Site 1230. The third and dominant process controlling measured DIP δ18OP values is microbial turnover of regenerated Pi. The presence of high microbial activities in organic-rich Site 1230 sediments promotes the remobilization of P and affects marine P cycling by potentially enhancing

  17. Teaching an old dog new tricks: Suppressing activation of specific mitogen-activated kinases as a potential virulence function of the bacterial AvrRpt2 effector protein

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT AvrRpt2 is one of the first Pseudomonas syringae effector proteins demonstrated to be delivered into host cells. It suppresses plant immunity by modulating auxin signaling and cleavage of the membrane-localized defense regulator RIN4. We recently uncovered a novel potential virulence function of AvrRpt2, where it specifically blocked activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, MPK4 and MPK11, but not of MPK3 and MPK6. Putative AvrRpt2 homologs from different phytopathogens and plant-associated bacteria showed distinct activities with respect to MPK4/11 activation suppression and RIN4 cleavage. Apart from differences in sequence similarity, 3 of the analyzed homologs were apparently “truncated.” To examine the role of the AvrRpt2 N-terminus, we modeled the structures of these AvrRpt2 homologs and performed deletion and domain swap experiments. Our results strengthen the finding that RIN4 cleavage is irrelevant for the ability to suppress defense-related MPK4/11 activation and indicate that full protease activity or cleavage specificity is affected by the N-terminus. PMID:27830985

  18. Enrichment of specific electro-active microorganisms and enhancement of methane production by adding granular activated carbon in anaerobic reactors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Yeol; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Hee-Deung

    2016-04-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) via conductive materials can provide significant benefits to anaerobic methane formation in terms of production amount and rate. Although granular activated carbon (GAC) demonstrated its applicability in facilitating DIET in methanogenesis, DIET in continuous flow anaerobic reactors has not been verified. Here, evidences of DIET via GAC were explored. The reactor supplemented with GAC showed 1.8-fold higher methane production rate than that without GAC (35.7 versus 20.1±7.1mL-CH4/d). Around 34% of methane formation was attributed to the biomass attached to GAC. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene demonstrated the enrichment of exoelectrogens (e.g. Geobacter) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens (e.g. Methanospirillum and Methanolinea) from the biomass attached to GAC. Furthermore, anodic and cathodic currents generation was observed in an electrochemical cell containing GAC biomass. Taken together, GAC supplementation created an environment for enriching the microorganisms involved in DIET, which increased the methane production rate.

  19. Approximated maximum adsorption of His-tagged enzyme/mutants on Ni2+-NTA for comparison of specific activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanli; Long, Gaobo; Yang, Xiaolan; Hu, Xiaolei; Feng, Yiran; Tan, Deng; Xie, Yanling; Pu, Jun; Liao, Fei

    2015-03-01

    By approximating maximum activities of six-histidine (6His)-tagged enzyme/mutants adsorbed on Ni2+-NTA-magnetic-submicron-particle (Ni2+-NTA-MSP), a facile approach was tested for comparing enzyme specific activities in cell lysates. On a fixed quantity of Ni2+-NTA-MSP, the activity of an adsorbed 6His-tagged enzyme/mutant was measured via spectrophotometry; the activity after saturation adsorption (Vs) was predicted from response curve with quantities of total proteins from the same lysate as the predictor; Vs was equivalent of specific activity for comparison. This approach required abundance of a 6His-tagged enzyme/mutant over 3% among total proteins in lysate, an accurate series of quantities of total proteins from the same lysate, the largest activity generated by enzyme occupying over 85% binding sites on Ni2+-NTA-MSP and the minimum activity as absorbance change rates of 0.003 min(-1) for analysis. The prediction of Vs tolerated errors in concentrations of total proteins in lysates and was effective to 6His-tagged alkaline phosphatase and its 6His-tagged mutant in lysates. Notably, of those two 6His-tagged enzymes, Vs was effectively approximated with just one optimized quantity of lysates. Hence, this approach with Ni2+-NTA-MSP worked for comparison of specific activities of 6His-tagged enzyme/mutants in lysates when they had sufficient abundance among proteins and activities of adsorbed enzymes were measurable.

  20. Responses of absolute and specific soil enzyme activities to long term additions of organic and mineral fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Dong, Wenyi; Dai, Xiaoqin; Schaeffer, Sean; Yang, Fengting; Radosevich, Mark; Xu, Lili; Liu, Xiyu; Sun, Xiaomin

    2015-12-01

    Long-term phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) applications may seriously affect soil microbial activity. A long-term field fertilizer application trial was established on reddish paddy soils in the subtropical region of southern China in 1998. We assessed the effects of swine manure and seven different rates or ratios of NPK fertilizer treatments on (1) the absolute and specific enzyme activities per unit of soil organic carbon (SOC) or microbial biomass carbon (MBC) involved in C, N, and P transformations and (2) their relationships with soil environmental factors and soil microbial community structures. The results showed that manure applications led to increases in the absolute and specific activities of soil β-1,4-glucosidase(βG), β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG), and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The absolute and specific acid phosphatase (AP) activities decreased as mineral P fertilizer application rates and ratios increased. Redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that there were negative correlations between absolute and specific AP activities, pH, and total P contents, while there were positive correlations between soil absolute and specific βG, NAG, and LAP enzyme activities, and SOC and total N contents. RDA showed that the contents of actinomycete and Gram-positive bacterium PLFA biomarkers are more closely related to the absolute and specific enzyme activities than the other PLFA biomarkers (P<0.01). Our results suggest that both the absolute and specific enzyme activities could be used as sensitive soil quality indicators that provide useful linkages with the microbial community structures and environmental factors. To maintain microbial activity and to minimize environmental impacts, P should be applied as a combination of inorganic and organic forms, and total P fertilizer application rates to subtropical paddy soils should not exceed 44 kg P ha(-1) year(-1).

  1. Papain-catalyzed peptide bond formation: enzyme-specific activation with guanidinophenyl esters.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Roseri J A C; Zarzycka, Barbara; Amatdjais-Groenen, Helene I V; Jans, Sander C B; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; van Delft, Floris L; Nabuurs, Sander B; Rutjes, Floris P J T

    2011-09-19

    The substrate mimetics approach is a versatile method for small-scale enzymatic peptide-bond synthesis in aqueous systems. The protease-recognized amino acid side chain is incorporated in an ester leaving group, the substrate mimetic. This shift of the specific moiety enables the acceptance of amino acids and peptide sequences that are normally not recognized by the enzyme. The guanidinophenyl group (OGp), a known substrate mimetic for the serine proteases trypsin and chymotrypsin, has now been applied for the first time in combination with papain, a cheap and commercially available cysteine protease. To provide insight in the binding mode of various Z-X(AA)-OGp esters, computational docking studies were performed. The results strongly point at enzyme-specific activation of the OGp esters in papain through a novel mode of action, rather than their functioning as mimetics. Furthermore, the scope of a model dipeptide synthesis was investigated with respect to both the amino acid donor and the nucleophile. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to prioritize 22 natural and unnatural amino acid donors for synthesis. Experimental results correlate well with the predicted ranking and show that nearly all amino acids are accepted by papain.

  2. Cell-specific ATP7A transport sustains copper-dependent tyrosinase activity in melanosomes.

    PubMed

    Setty, Subba Rao Gangi; Tenza, Danièle; Sviderskaya, Elena V; Bennett, Dorothy C; Raposo, Graça; Marks, Michael S

    2008-08-28

    Copper is a cofactor for many cellular enzymes and transporters. It can be loaded onto secreted and endomembrane cuproproteins by translocation from the cytosol into membrane-bound organelles by ATP7A or ATP7B transporters, the genes for which are mutated in the copper imbalance syndromes Menkes disease and Wilson disease, respectively. Endomembrane cuproproteins are thought to incorporate copper stably on transit through the trans-Golgi network, in which ATP7A accumulates by dynamic cycling through early endocytic compartments. Here we show that the pigment-cell-specific cuproenzyme tyrosinase acquires copper only transiently and inefficiently within the trans-Golgi network of mouse melanocytes. To catalyse melanin synthesis, tyrosinase is subsequently reloaded with copper within specialized organelles called melanosomes. Copper is supplied to melanosomes by ATP7A, a cohort of which localizes to melanosomes in a biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 (BLOC-1)-dependent manner. These results indicate that cell-type-specific localization of a metal transporter is required to sustain metallation of an endomembrane cuproenzyme, providing a mechanism for exquisite spatial control of metalloenzyme activity. Moreover, because BLOC-1 subunits are mutated in subtypes of the genetic disease Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, these results also show that defects in copper transporter localization contribute to hypopigmentation, and hence perhaps other systemic defects, in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome.

  3. Cell-specific ATP7A transport sustains copper-dependent tyrosinase activity in melanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gangi Setty, Subba Rao; Tenza, Danièle; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Raposo, Graça; Marks, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Copper is a cofactor for many cellular enzymes and transporters1. To load onto secreted and endomembrane cuproproteins, copper is translocated from the cytosol into membrane-bound organelles by ATP7A or ATP7B transporters, the genes for which are mutated in the copper imbalance syndromes, Menkes and Wilson disease, respectively2. Endomembrane cuproproteins are thought to stably incorporate copper upon transit through the trans Golgi network (TGN), within which ATP7A3 accumulates by dynamic cycling through early endocytic compartments4. Here we show that the pigment cell-specific cuproenzyme tyrosinase acquires copper only transiently and inefficiently within the TGN of melanocytes. To catalyze melanin synthesis, tyrosinase is subsequently reloaded with copper within specialized organelles called melanosomes. Copper is supplied to melanosomes by ATP7A, a cohort of which localizes to melanosomes in a Biogenesis of Lysosome-related Organelles Complex-1 (BLOC-1)-dependent manner. These results indicate that cell type-specific localization of a metal transporter is required to sustain metallation of an endomembrane cuproenzyme, providing a mechanism for exquisite spatial control of metalloenzyme activity. Moreover, as BLOC-1 subunits are mutated in subtypes of the genetic disease, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS), these results also show that defects in copper transporter localization contribute to hypopigmentation, and hence perhaps other systemic defects, in HPS. PMID:18650808

  4. FOXA1 potentiates lineage-specific enhancer activation through modulating TET1 expression and function

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yeqing A.; Zhao, Jonathan C.; Fong, Ka-wing; Kim, Jung; Li, Shangze; Song, Chunxiao; Song, Bing; Zheng, Bin; He, Chuan; Yu, Jindan

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box A1 (FOXA1) is an FKHD family protein that plays pioneering roles in lineage-specific enhancer activation and gene transcription. Through genome-wide location analyses, here we show that FOXA1 expression and occupancy are, in turn, required for the maintenance of these epigenetic signatures, namely DNA hypomethylation and histone 3 lysine 4 methylation. Mechanistically, this involves TET1, a 5-methylcytosine dioxygenase. We found that FOXA1 induces TET1 expression via direct binding to its cis-regulatory elements. Further, FOXA1 physically interacts with the TET1 protein through its CXXC domain. TET1 thus co-occupies FOXA1-dependent enhancers and mediates local DNA demethylation and concomitant histone 3 lysine 4 methylation, further potentiating FOXA1 recruitment. Consequently, FOXA1 binding events are markedly reduced following TET1 depletion. Together, our results suggest that FOXA1 is not only able to recognize but also remodel the epigenetic signatures at lineage-specific enhancers, which is mediated, at least in part, by a feed-forward regulatory loop between FOXA1 and TET1. PMID:27257062

  5. Reliability of the Chinese Version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Priscilla C.; Miller, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To translate the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale into a Chinese version and assess the reliability between Chinese versions and between Chinese and English versions of this outcome measure. Method Descriptive study using a 4-week test-retest design. Data were collected from a convenience sample of community living Chinese immigrants. Of the 79 participants, data from 71 subjects were included in the analysis. Two subsamples were formed to assess the reliability between Chinese versions (n=33) and between Chinese and English versions (n=38) of the scale. Results Internal consistency of the ABC was 0.98. Test-retest reliability was ICC=0.87 (95% CI, 0.76–0.93) for the Chinese versions and ICC = 0.88 (95% CI, 0.78–0.94) for Chinese and English versions. The total group ICC=.90 (95% CI, 0.84–0.94). Conclusions Balance confidence has been identified as an important area for clinical and research inquiry however collecting this information from Chinese speaking individuals has been limited by a lack of language specific measures. The Chinese version of the ABC has demonstrated acceptable measurement properties in this sample and should permit measurement of this unique construct in the Chinese population. PMID:17083176

  6. Pharmacogenomic identification of small molecules for lineage specific manipulation of subventricular zone germinal activity

    PubMed Central

    Marcy, Guillaume; Pieropan, Francesca; Rivera, Andrea; Donega, Vanessa; Cantù, Claudio; Williams, Gareth; Berninger, Benedikt; Butt, Arthur M.; Raineteau, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Strategies for promoting neural regeneration are hindered by the difficulty of manipulating desired neural fates in the brain without complex genetic methods. The subventricular zone (SVZ) is the largest germinal zone of the forebrain and is responsible for the lifelong generation of interneuron subtypes and oligodendrocytes. Here, we have performed a bioinformatics analysis of the transcriptome of dorsal and lateral SVZ in early postnatal mice, including neural stem cells (NSCs) and their immediate progenies, which generate distinct neural lineages. We identified multiple signaling pathways that trigger distinct downstream transcriptional networks to regulate the diversity of neural cells originating from the SVZ. Next, we used a novel in silico genomic analysis, searchable platform-independent expression database/connectivity map (SPIED/CMAP), to generate a catalogue of small molecules that can be used to manipulate SVZ microdomain-specific lineages. Finally, we demonstrate that compounds identified in this analysis promote the generation of specific cell lineages from NSCs in vivo, during postnatal life and adulthood, as well as in regenerative contexts. This study unravels new strategies for using small bioactive molecules to direct germinal activity in the SVZ, which has therapeutic potential in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28350803

  7. A Catalytic DNA Activated by a Specific Strain of Bacterial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhifa; Wu, Zaisheng; Chang, Dingran; Zhang, Wenqing; Tram, Kha; Lee, Christine; Kim, Peter; Salena, Bruno J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pathogenic strains of bacteria are known to cause various infectious diseases and there is a growing demand for molecular probes that can selectively recognize them. Here we report a special DNAzyme (catalytic DNA), RFD‐CD1, that shows exquisite specificity for a pathogenic strain of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). RFD‐CD1 was derived by an in vitro selection approach where a random‐sequence DNA library was allowed to react with an unpurified molecular mixture derived from this strain of C. difficle, coupled with a subtractive selection strategy to eliminate cross‐reactivities to unintended C. difficile strains and other bacteria species. RFD‐CD1 is activated by a truncated version of TcdC, a transcription factor, that is unique to the targeted strain of C. difficle. Our study demonstrates for the first time that in vitro selection offers an effective approach for deriving functional nucleic acid probes that are capable of achieving strain‐specific recognition of bacterial pathogens. PMID:26676768

  8. Species-Specific Minimal Sequence Motif for Oligodeoxyribonucleotides Activating Mouse TLR9.

    PubMed

    Pohar, Jelka; Lainšček, Duško; Fukui, Ryutaro; Yamamoto, Chikako; Miyake, Kensuke; Jerala, Roman; Benčina, Mojca

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated CpG recapitulate the activation of TLR9 by microbial DNA. ODNs are potent stimulators of the immune response in cells expressing TLR9. Despite extensive use of mice as experimental animals in basic and applied immunological research, the key sequence determinants that govern the activation of mouse TLR9 by ODNs have not been well defined. We performed a systematic investigation of the sequence motif of B class phosphodiester ODNs to identify the sequence properties that govern mouse TLR9 activation. In contrast to ODNs activating human TLR9, where the minimal sequence motif for the receptor activation comprises a pair of closely positioned CpGs we found that the mouse TLR9 requires a single CpG positioned 4-6 nt from the 5'-end. Activation is augmented by a 5'TCC sequence one to three nucleotides from the CG. The distance of the CG dinucleotide of four to six nucleotides from the 5'-end and the ODN's length fine-tunes activation of mouse macrophages. Length of the ODN <23 and >29 nt decreases activation of dendritic cells. The ODNs with minimal sequence induce Th1-type cytokine synthesis in dendritic cells and confirm the expression of cell surface markers in B cells. Identification of the minimal sequence provides an insight into the sequence selectivity of mouse TLR9 and points to the differences in the receptor selectivity between species probably as a result of differences in the receptor binding sites.

  9. Functionally Specific Oscillatory Activity Correlates between Visual and Auditory Cortex in the Blind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schepers, Inga M.; Hipp, Joerg F.; Schneider, Till R.; Roder, Brigitte; Engel, Andreas K.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have shown that the visual cortex of blind humans is activated in non-visual tasks. However, the electrophysiological signals underlying this cross-modal plasticity are largely unknown. Here, we characterize the neuronal population activity in the visual and auditory cortex of congenitally blind humans and sighted controls in a…

  10. Specifics of Information Basis of Educational Activity of a Bachelor Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slepko, Yury N.; Baranova, Natalia A.; Fayurshina, Elena A.; Mitiukov, Nicholas W.

    2016-01-01

    The discussion of the results of an empirical research of the problem of forming the information basis of educational activity of students studying in pedagogical higher education institution is carried out in the article. The information basis of educational activity is considered by the authors as a subsystem of psychological system of…

  11. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta; Lital , Schultz; Peter G. , Zhang; Zhiwen

    2010-10-12

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  12. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2011-08-30

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  13. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital [San Diego, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  14. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  15. Rapid activation of specific phospholipase(s) D by cytokinin in Amaranthus assay system.

    PubMed

    Kravets, Volodymir S; Kolesnikov, Yaroslav S; Kretynin, Sergey V; Getman, Irina A; Romanov, Georgy A

    2010-03-01

    The suggested link between intracellular cytokinin signaling and phospholipase D (PLD, EC 3.1.4.4.) activity (Romanov et al. 2000, 2002) was investigated. The activity of PLD in the early period of cytokinin action was studied in vivo in derooted Amaranthus caudatus seedlings, using the level of phosphatidylbutanol production as a measure of PLD activity. Rapid activation of phosphatidylbutanol synthesis was demonstrated as early as within 5 min of cytokinin administration. Neomycin, a known phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) antagonist, strongly repressed both physiological cytokinin effect and cytokinin-dependent PLD activation. N-acylethanolamine (NAE 12), an inhibitor of alpha-class PLD, did not influence significantly cytokinin effect on Amaranthus seedlings. Together, results suggest the involvement of PIP(2)-dependent non-class alpha-PLD in the molecular mechanism of cytokinin action.

  16. Site-specific profiles of estrogenic activity in agricultural areas of California's inland waters.

    PubMed

    Lavado, Ramon; Loyo-Rosales, Jorge E; Floyd, Emily; Kolodziej, Edward P; Snyder, Shane A; Sedlak, David L; Schlenk, Daniel

    2009-12-15

    To evaluate the occurrence and sources of compounds capable of feminizing fish in agriculturally impacted waterways of the Central Valley of California, water samples were extracted and subjected to chemical analyses as well as in vitro and in vivo measurements of vitellogenin in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Among the 16 sites sampled, 6 locations frequently exhibited elevated concentrations of estrogenic substances with 17beta-estradiol equivalents up to 242 ng/L in vitro and 12 microg/kg in vivo. The patterns of activity varied among sites, with two sites showing elevated activity only in vitro, two showing elevated activity only in vivo, and two showing elevated activity in both assays. Sequential elution of solid-phase extraction (SPE) disks followed by bioassay-guided fractionation was used to characterize water samples from the two locations where activity was observed in both bioassays. The highest estrogenic activity was observed in the most nonpolar fractions (80-100% methanol eluent) from the Napa River, while most of the activity in the Sacramento River Delta eluted in the 60% methanol eluent. Quantitative analyses of SPE extracts and additional HPLC fractionation of the SPE extracts by GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS indicated concentrations of steroid hormones, alkylphenol polyethoxylates, and herbicides that were at least 1-3 orders of magnitude below bioassay 17beta-estradiol equivalent calculations. Given the different patterns of activity and chemical properties of the estrogenic compounds, it appears that estrogenic activity in these agriculturally impacted surface waters is attributable to multiple compounds. Further investigation is needed to identify the compounds causing the estrogenic activity and to determine the potential impacts of these compounds on feral fish.

  17. Activation Domain-Specific and General Transcription Stimulation by Native Histone Acetyltransferase Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Keiko; Steger, David J.; Eberharter, Anton; Workman, Jerry L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent progress in identifying the catalytic subunits of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes has implicated histone acetylation in the regulation of transcription. Here, we have analyzed the function of two native yeast HAT complexes, SAGA (Spt-Ada-Gcn5 Acetyltransferase) and NuA4 (nucleosome acetyltransferase of H4), in activating transcription from preassembled nucleosomal array templates in vitro. Each complex was tested for the ability to enhance transcription driven by GAL4 derivatives containing either acidic, glutamine-rich, or proline-rich activation domains. On nucleosomal array templates, the SAGA complex selectively stimulates transcription driven by the VP16 acidic activation domain in an acetyl coenzyme A-dependent manner. In contrast, the NuA4 complex facilitates transcription mediated by any of the activation domains tested if allowed to preacetylate the nucleosomal template, indicating a general stimulatory effect of histone H4 acetylation. However, when the extent of acetylation by NuA4 is limited, the complex also preferentially stimulates VP16-driven transcription. SAGA and NuA4 interact directly with the VP16 activation domain but not with a glutamine-rich or proline-rich activation domain. These data suggest that recruitment of the SAGA and NuA4 HAT complexes by the VP16 activation domain contributes to HAT-dependent activation. In addition, extensive H4/H2B acetylation by NuA4 leads to a general activation of transcription, which is independent of activator-NuA4 interactions. PMID:9858608

  18. Extracellular matrix-specific focal adhesions in vascular smooth muscle produce mechanically active adhesion sites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhe; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Hill, Michael A.; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2008-01-01

    Integrin-mediated mechanotransduction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in the physiological control of tissue blood flow and vascular resistance. To test whether force applied to specific extracellular matrix (ECM)-integrin interactions could induce myogenic-like mechanical activity at focal adhesion sites, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to apply controlled forces to specific ECM adhesion sites on arteriolar VSMCs. The tip of AFM probes were fused with a borosilicate bead (2∼5 μm) coated with fibronectin (FN), collagen type I (CNI), laminin (LN), or vitronectin (VN). ECM-coated beads induced clustering of α5- and β3-integrins and actin filaments at sites of bead-cell contact indicative of focal adhesion formation. Step increases of an upward (z-axis) pulling force (800∼1,600 pN) applied to the bead-cell contact site for FN-specific focal adhesions induced a myogenic-like, force-generating response from the VSMC, resulting in a counteracting downward pull by the cell. This micromechanical event was blocked by cytochalasin D but was enhanced by jasplakinolide. Function-blocking antibodies to α5β1- and αvβ3-integrins also blocked the micromechanical cell event in a concentration-dependent manner. Similar pulling experiments with CNI, VN, or LN failed to induce myogenic-like micromechanical events. Collectively, these results demonstrate that mechanical force applied to integrin-FN adhesion sites induces an actin-dependent, myogenic-like, micromechanical event. Focal adhesions formed by different ECM proteins exhibit different mechanical characteristics, and FN appears of particular relevance in its ability to strongly attach to VSMCs and to induce myogenic-like, force-generating reactions from sites of focal adhesion in response to externally applied forces. PMID:18495809

  19. Context-dependent activation of reduced autobiographical memory specificity as an avoidant coping style.

    PubMed

    Debeer, Elise; Raes, Filip; Williams, J Mark G; Hermans, Dirk

    2011-12-01

    According to the affect-regulation hypothesis (Williams et al., 2007), reduced autobiographical memory specificity (rAMS) or overgeneral memory (OGM) might be considered a cognitive avoidance strategy; that is, people learn to avoid the emotionally painful consequences associated with the retrieval of specific negative memories. Based on this hypothesis, one would predict significant negative associations between AMS and avoidant coping. However, studies investigating this prediction have led to equivocal results. In the present study we tested a possible explanation for these contradictory findings. It was hypothesized that rAMS (in part) reflects an avoidant coping strategy, which might only become apparent under certain conditions, that is, conditions that signal the possibility of 'danger.' To test this hypothesis, we assessed AMS and behavioral avoidance but experimentally manipulated the instructions. In the neutral condition, two parallel versions of the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT) were presented under neutral instructions. In the threat condition, the first AMT was presented under neutral instructions, while the second AMT was presented under 'threat instructions.' Results showed no significant correlations between avoidance and OGM under neutral conditions but significant and markedly stronger correlations under threat conditions, with more avoidance being associated with fewer specific and more categoric memories. In addition, high avoiders showed a stronger reduction in AMS in the threat condition as compared with the neutral condition, while low avoiders showed no such difference between conditions. The data confirm that OGM can be considered as part of a broader avoidant coping style. However, more importantly, they show that, at least in nonclinical individuals, the activation of this coping style may depend on the context.

  20. Activity and specificity of the human SUV39H2 protein lysine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Schuhmacher, Maren Kirstin; Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Kusevic, Denis; Weirich, Sara; Jeltsch, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The SUV39H1 and SUV39H2 enzymes introduce H3K9me3, which is essential for the viability of mammalian cells. It was the aim of the present work to investigate the substrate specificity and product pattern of SUV39H2. Methylation of peptide SPOT arrays showed that SUV39H2 recognizes a long motif on H3 comprising T6-K14, with highly specific readout of R8, S10, T11 and G12 and partial specificity at T6, A7, G13 and K14. Modification of R8 and phosphorylation of S10 or T11 lead to a reduction or loss of SUV39H2 activity towards H3K9. The specificity of SUV39H2 differs from other H3K9 PKMTs, like Dim-5 or G9a, and these biochemical differences can be explained by the structures of the corresponding enzymes. Based on the specificity profile we identified additional non-histone candidate substrates in human proteins, but all of them were only weakly methylated by SUV39H2 at the peptide level. We conclude that SUV39H2 displays a high preference for the methylation of H3. Using the catalytic SET domain we show here that the enzyme prefers H3K9me0 as a substrate over H3K9me1 and H3K9me2 and it introduces the first two methyl groups into H3K9me0 in a processive reaction. SUV39H2 can transfer up to three methyl groups to lysine 9 of histone H3 but the last methylation reaction is much slower than the first two steps. We also demonstrate that the N324K mutant in the SET domain of SUV39H2 that has been shown to cause an inherited nasal skin disease in Labrador Retrievers renders SUV39H2 inactive. Differences in the circular dichroism spectra of wild type and mutant proteins indicated that the mutation causes slight structural changes.

  1. Detection, quantification, and glycotyping of prion protein in specifically activated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates.

    PubMed

    Triantaphyllidou, I E; Sklaviadis, T; Vynios, D H

    2006-12-15

    The conversion of a normal glycoprotein, prion protein (PrP(C)), to its abnormal protease-resistant isoform (PrP(Sc)) seems to be one of the main factors underlying the pathogenesis of spongiform encephalopathies. There are many studies indicating that PrP interacts with glycosaminoglycans, and we exploited this interaction to develop a sensitive solid phase assay for detection of both PrP forms. Glycosaminoglycans, such as chondroitin sulfate and heparin, were immobilized by their negative charge to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) plate wells activated by glutaraldehyde and spermine. PrP in the samples examined (recombinant PrP or tissue homogenate) was allowed to interact with glycans. The interaction of recombinant PrP was more efficient against immobilized chondroitin sulfate of type A, and a linear correlation with concentration was demonstrated. From this curve, the concentration of each one of the PrP isoforms in biological samples can be determined. In addition, and taking into account that glycosylation of prion protein is species specific, we used similarly activated ELISA plate wells to determine different PrP glycoforms. A monoclonal antibody against PrP was immobilized, and PrP present in the samples (brain homogenates) was bound and visualized by various lectins. The most interesting outcome of the study is the differential binding of ricinus communis agglutinin I to the normal and scrapie brain homogenates. Dattura stramonium lectin and wheat germ agglutinin seem to bind almost equally to both samples, and all three have an increased sensitivity to PrP(Sc) after proteinase K digestion.

  2. A novel carotenoid cleavage activity involved in the biosynthesis of Citrus fruit-specific apocarotenoid pigments

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, María J.; Alquézar, Berta; Al-Babili, Salim

    2013-01-01

    Citrus is the first tree crop in terms of fruit production. The colour of Citrus fruit is one of the main quality attributes, caused by the accumulation of carotenoids and their derivative C30 apocarotenoids, mainly β-citraurin (3-hydroxy-β-apo-8′-carotenal), which provide an attractive orange-reddish tint to the peel of oranges and mandarins. Though carotenoid biosynthesis and its regulation have been extensively studied in Citrus fruits, little is known about the formation of C30 apocarotenoids. The aim of this study was to the identify carotenoid cleavage enzyme(s) [CCD(s)] involved in the peel-specific C30 apocarotenoids. In silico data mining revealed a new family of five CCD4-type genes in Citrus. One gene of this family, CCD4b1, was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of different Citrus species in a pattern correlating with the accumulation of C30 apocarotenoids. Moreover, developmental processes and treatments which alter Citrus fruit peel pigmentation led to changes of β-citraurin content and CCD4b1 transcript levels. These results point to the involvement of CCD4b1 in β-citraurin formation and indicate that the accumulation of this compound is determined by the availability of the presumed precursors zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin. Functional analysis of CCD4b1 by in vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated the asymmetric cleavage activity at the 7′,8′ double bond in zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin, confirming its role in C30 apocarotenoid biosynthesis. Thus, a novel plant carotenoid cleavage activity targeting the 7′,8′ double bond of cyclic C40 carotenoids has been identified. These results suggest that the presented enzyme is responsible for the biosynthesis of C30 apocarotenoids in Citrus which are key pigments in fruit coloration. PMID:24006419

  3. Transferrin Binding to Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Activated by Phytohemagglutinin Involves a Specific Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Robert M.; Werner, Phillip; Arnaud, Philippe; Galbraith, Gillian M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Immunohistological studies have indicated that membrane sites binding transferrin are present upon activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In this study, we have investigated transferrin uptake in human lymphocytes exposed to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), by quantitative radiobinding and immunofluorescence in parallel. In stimulated lymphocytes, binding was maximal after a 30-min incubation, being greatest at 37°C, and greater at 22°C than at 4°C. Although some shedding and endocytosis of transferrin occurred at 22° and 37°C, these factors, and resulting synthesis of new sites, did not affect measurement of binding which was found to be saturable, reversible, and specific for transferrin (Ka 0.5-2.5 × 108 M−1). Binding was greater after a 48-h exposure to PHA than after 24 h, and was maximal at 66 h. Sequential Scatchard analysis revealed no significant elevation in affinity of interaction. However, although the total number of receptors increased, the proportion of cells in which binding of ligand was detected immunohistologically increased in parallel, and after appropriate correction, the cellular density of receptors remained relatively constant throughout (60,000-80,000 sites/cell). Increments in binding during the culture period were thus due predominantly to expansion of a population of cells bearing receptors. Similar differences in binding were apparent upon comparison of cells cultured in different doses of PHA, and in unstimulated cells binding was negligible. Transferrin receptors appear, therefore, to be readily detectable only upon lymphocytes that have been activated. Images PMID:6253523

  4. Tumor-Specific Peptide, Selected from a Phage Peptide Library, Enhances Antitumor Activity of Lactaptin

    PubMed Central

    Makartsova, Anna A.; Fomin, Alexandr S.; Nushtaeva, Anna A.; Koval, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    A recombinant analogue of lactaptin (RL2), a new potential anticancer molecule, induces apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. The tumor suppression efficacy of RL2 was shown against mouse hepatoma-1 cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells. The RL2-based therapeutic drug lactaptin is distributed evenly throughout the organism, which reduces its antitumor efficacy. In the current study, we obtained a genetic construct that allows production of the recombinant fusion protein T3-RL2, consisting of RL2 and T3 peptide (YTYDPWLIFPAN), in E. coli cells. T3 peptide was selected from a phage peptide library as a result of two screenings: in vitro using MDA-MB-231 cell culture and in vivo using a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer MDA-MB-231. It was shown that the displayed peptide T3 provides binding and internalization of phage particles by MDA-MB-231 cells and their specific accumulation in MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue. In addition, based on the nucleotide sequences coding RL2 and the known tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, we obtained genetic constructs that provide synthesis of fusion proteins RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His. We studied the cytotoxic activity of fusion proteins T3-RL2, RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His in vitro using MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human adenocarcinoma cells. The in vitro results showed that the fusion proteins inhibit proliferation of both cell cultures, and their cytotoxic activity is higher than that of RL2. In vivo experiments on the study of the antitumor efficacy of the obtained fusion proteins demonstrated that T3-RL2 protein significantly inhibits MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in a xenograft model compared with RL2, while the antitumor effect of RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His proteins is comparable to the effect of RL2. PMID:27513518

  5. Determination of plasma lactic acid concentration and specific activity using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bleiberg, B; Steinberg, J J; Katz, S D; Wexler, J; LeJemtel, T

    1991-08-23

    Assessment of lactate metabolism is of particular interest during exercise and in disease states such as diabetes, shock, and absorptive abnormalities of short-chain fatty acids by the colon. We describe an analytical method that introduces radio-active tracers and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to simultaneously analyze concentrations and specific activities (SAs) of plasma lactate. The HPLC conditions included separation on a reversed-phase column (octadecylsilane) and an isocratic buffer (30% acetonitrile in water). [3H]Acetate served as an internal standard. Lactate and acetate were extracted from plasma samples with diethyl ether following a pH adjustment to less than 1.0 and back-extracted into a hydrophilic phase with sodium carbonate (2 mM, pH greater than 10.0). Lactate is detected in the ultraviolet range (242 and 320 nm) by derivatization with alpha-bromoacetophenone. Control plasma samples were studied after an overnight fast for precision and analytical recovery. Calibration curves were linear in the range 0.18-6.0 mM (r = 0.92). The precision was 3% and the analytical recovery was 87%. The detection limit of the method was 36 pmol. Determination of lactate metabolism was performed in a patient with chronic congestive heart failure who was administered primed-continuous L-[U-14C]lactate (10 microCi bolus and 0.3 microCi/min continuously) during a 60-min rest period. Mean arterial lactate concentration and SA were 1.69 +/- 0.2 mM and 253.8 +/- 22 dpm/mumol, respectively. Systemic lactate turnover was 25.65 mumol/kg per min. Lactic acid systemic turnover, organ uptake and release rates can be accurately determined by isocratic HPLC.

  6. Transplant experiments uncover Baltic Sea basin-specific responses in bacterioplankton community composition and metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lindh, Markus V.; Figueroa, Daniela; Sjöstedt, Johanna; Baltar, Federico; Lundin, Daniel; Andersson, Agneta; Legrand, Catherine; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenically induced changes in precipitation are projected to generate increased river runoff to semi-enclosed seas, increasing loads of terrestrial dissolved organic matter and decreasing salinity. To determine how bacterial community structure and functioning adjust to such changes, we designed microcosm transplant experiments with Baltic Proper (salinity 7.2) and Bothnian Sea (salinity 3.6) water. Baltic Proper bacteria generally reached higher abundances than Bothnian Sea bacteria in both Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea water, indicating higher adaptability. Moreover, Baltic Proper bacteria growing in Bothnian Sea water consistently showed highest bacterial production and beta-glucosidase activity. These metabolic responses were accompanied by basin-specific changes in bacterial community structure. For example, Baltic Proper Pseudomonas and Limnobacter populations increased markedly in relative abundance in Bothnian Sea water, indicating a replacement effect. In contrast, Roseobacter and Rheinheimera populations were stable or increased in abundance when challenged by either of the waters, indicating an adjustment effect. Transplants to Bothnian Sea water triggered the initial emergence of particular Burkholderiaceae populations, and transplants to Baltic Proper water triggered Alteromonadaceae populations. Notably, in the subsequent re-transplant experiment, a priming effect resulted in further increases to dominance of these populations. Correlated changes in community composition and metabolic activity were observed only in the transplant experiment and only at relatively high phylogenetic resolution. This suggested an importance of successional progression for interpreting relationships between bacterial community composition and functioning. We infer that priming effects on bacterial community structure by natural episodic events or climate change induced forcing could translate into long-term changes in bacterial ecosystem process rates. PMID

  7. Antibodies to liver membrane antigens in chronic active hepatitis (CAH). II. Specificity for autoimmune CAH.

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, I H; Kronborg, I J; Mackay, I R

    1983-01-01

    An immunoradiometric assay for IgG class autoantibody to liver membrane antigens, based on serum binding to glutaraldehyde treated monkey hepatocytes, was used to examine sera from patients with chronic active hepatitis (CAH) and other acute and chronic liver diseases. All sera from normals and patients showed binding, up to a titre of 1/2,048. For comparison of assays, results were normalized by selecting two reference sera, one with a high degree of binding, and one from a healthy subject with a low degree of binding: at a dilution of 1/2,048, these sera were given binding values of 100% and 0%. The values for the binding of unknown sera at the same dilution were calculated from these two reference values. For 26 patients with autoimmune CAH, the mean (+/- s.d.) percentage binding value (70 +/- 33%) was significantly higher than the mean value for 26 healthy subjects (10 +/- 15%), and high binding values were significantly associated with biochemically active hepatitis. The mean percentage binding value was moderately increased for eight patients with HBsAg associated CAH (42 +/- 12%), 13 patients with alcoholic hepatitis with cirrhosis (37 +/- 25%) and 45 patients with acute viral hepatitis A (40 +/- 27%) or B (52 +/- 37%). At a cut-off binding value of 65%, the assay as a single diagnostic procedure was shown to have a 70% sensitivity and a 95% specificity for the diagnosis of autoimmune CAH. Better understanding of the pathogenetic significance of antibodies to liver membrane antigens in CAH and other liver diseases will depend upon biochemical analysis of the presumably multiple antigenic determinants on the hepatocyte membrane. PMID:6616969

  8. A novel carotenoid cleavage activity involved in the biosynthesis of Citrus fruit-specific apocarotenoid pigments.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, María J; Alquézar, Berta; Alós, Enriqueta; Medina, Víctor; Carmona, Lourdes; Bruno, Mark; Al-Babili, Salim; Zacarías, Lorenzo

    2013-11-01

    Citrus is the first tree crop in terms of fruit production. The colour of Citrus fruit is one of the main quality attributes, caused by the accumulation of carotenoids and their derivative C30 apocarotenoids, mainly β-citraurin (3-hydroxy-β-apo-8'-carotenal), which provide an attractive orange-reddish tint to the peel of oranges and Mandarins. Though carotenoid biosynthesis and its regulation have been extensively studied in Citrus fruits, little is known about the formation of C30 apocarotenoids. The aim of this study was to the identify carotenoid cleavage enzyme(s) [CCD(s)] involved in the peel-specific C30 apocarotenoids. In silico data mining revealed a new family of five CCD4-type genes in Citrus. One gene of this family, CCD4b1, was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of different Citrus species in a pattern correlating with the accumulation of C30 apocarotenoids. Moreover, developmental processes and treatments which alter Citrus fruit peel pigmentation led to changes of β-citraurin content and CCD4b1 transcript levels. These results point to the involvement of CCD4b1 in β-citraurin formation and indicate that the accumulation of this compound is determined by the availability of the presumed precursors zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin. Functional analysis of CCD4b1 by in vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated the asymmetric cleavage activity at the 7',8' double bond in zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin, confirming its role in C30 apocarotenoid biosynthesis. Thus, a novel plant carotenoid cleavage activity targeting the 7',8' double bond of cyclic C40 carotenoids has been identified. These results suggest that the presented enzyme is responsible for the biosynthesis of C30 apocarotenoids in Citrus which are key pigments in fruit coloration.

  9. Expression of Aspergillus nidulans phy gene in Nicotiana benthamiana produces active phytase with broad specificities.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tae-Kyun; Oh, Sung; Kim, Seongdae; Park, Jae Sung; Vinod, Nagarajan; Jang, Kyung Min; Kim, Sei Chang; Choi, Chang Won; Ko, Suk-Min; Jeong, Dong Kee; Udayakumar, Rajangam

    2014-09-03

    A full-length phytase gene (phy) of Aspergillus nidulans was amplified from the cDNA library by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and it was introduced into a bacterial expression vector, pET-28a. The recombinant protein (rPhy-E, 56 kDa) was overexpressed in the insoluble fraction of Escherichia coli culture, purified by Ni-NTA resin under denaturing conditions and injected into rats as an immunogen. To express A. nidulans phytase in a plant, the full-length of phy was cloned into a plant expression binary vector, pPZP212. The resultant construct was tested for its transient expression by Agrobacterium-infiltration into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Compared with a control, the agro-infiltrated leaf tissues showed the presence of phy mRNA and its high expression level in N. benthamiana. The recombinant phytase (rPhy-P, 62 kDa) was strongly reacted with the polyclonal antibody against the nonglycosylated rPhy-E. The rPhy-P showed glycosylation, two pH optima (pH 4.5 and pH 5.5), an optimum temperature at 45~55 °C, thermostability and broad substrate specificities. After deglycosylation by peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase-F), the rPhy-P significantly lost the phytase activity and retained 1/9 of the original activity after 10 min of incubation at 45 °C. Therefore, the deglycosylation caused a significant reduction in enzyme thermostability. In animal experiments, oral administration of the rPhy-P at 1500 U/kg body weight/day for seven days caused a significant reduction of phosphorus excretion by 16% in rat feces. Besides, the rPhy-P did not result in any toxicological changes and clinical signs.

  10. Human Serum-Specific Activation of Alternative Sigma Factors, the Stress Responders in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Tang-Siegel, Gaoyan; Bumgarner, Roger; Ruiz, Teresa; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Chen, Weizhen; Chen, Casey

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a known pathogen causing periodontal disease and infective endocarditis, is a survivor in the periodontal pocket and blood stream; both environments contain serum as a nutrient source. To screen for unknown virulence factors associated with this microorganism, A. actinomycetemcomitans was grown in serum-based media to simulate its in vivo environment. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans showed distinct growth phenotypes only in the presence of human serum, and they were grouped into high- and low-responder groups. High-responders comprised mainly serotype c strains, and showed an unusual growth phenomenon, featuring a second, rapid increase in turbidity after 9-h incubation that reached a final optical density 2- to 7-fold higher than low-responders. Upon further investigation, the second increase in turbidity was not caused by cell multiplication, but by cell death. Whole transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq identified 35 genes that were up-regulated by human serum, but not horse serum, in high-responders but not in low-responders, including prominently an alternative sigma factor rpoE (σE). A lacZ reporter construct driven by the 132-bp rpoE promoter sequence of A. actinomycetemcomitans responded dramatically to human serum within 90 min of incubation only when the construct was carried by a high responder strain. The rpoE promoter is 100% identical among high- and low-responder strains. Proteomic investigation showed potential interactions between human serum protein, e.g. apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The data clearly indicated a different activation process for rpoE in high- versus low-responder strains. This differential human serum-specific activation of rpoE, a putative extra-cytoplasmic stress responder and global regulator, suggests distinct in vivo adaptations among different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:27490177

  11. RNA-Seq Reveals Activation of Both Common and Cytokine-Specific Pathways following Neutrophil Priming

    PubMed Central

    Moots, Robert J.; Edwards, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are central to the pathology of inflammatory diseases, where they can damage host tissue through release of reactive oxygen metabolites and proteases, and drive inflammation via secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Many cytokines, such as those generated during inflammation, can induce a similar “primed” phenotype in neutrophils, but it is unknown if different cytokines utilise common or cytokine-specific pathways to induce these functional changes. Here, we describe the transcriptomic changes induced in control human neutrophils during priming in vitro with pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and GM-CSF) using RNA-seq. Priming led to the rapid expression of a common set of transcripts for cytokines, chemokines and cell surface receptors (CXCL1, CXCL2, IL1A, IL1B, IL1RA, ICAM1). However, 580 genes were differentially regulated by TNF-α and GM-CSF treatment, and of these 58 were directly implicated in the control of apoptosis. While these two cytokines both delayed apoptosis, they induced changes in expression of different pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Bioinformatics analysis predicted that these genes were regulated via differential activation of transcription factors by TNF-α and GM-CSF and these predictions were confirmed using functional assays: inhibition of NF-κB signalling abrogated the protective effect of TNF-α (but not that of GM-CSF) on neutrophil apoptosis, whereas inhibition of JAK/STAT signalling abrogated the anti-apoptotic effect of GM-CSF, but not that of TNF-α (p<0.05). These data provide the first characterisation of the human neutrophil transcriptome following GM-CSF and TNF-α priming, and demonstrate the utility of this approach to define functional changes in neutrophils following cytokine exposure. This may provide an important, new approach to define the molecular properties of neutrophils after in vivo activation during inflammation. PMID:23554905

  12. Photosynthetic Trichomes Contain a Specific Rubisco with a Modified pH-Dependent Activity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Laterre, Raphaëlle; Remacle, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is the most abundant enzyme in plants and is responsible for CO2 fixation during photosynthesis. This enzyme is assembled from eight large subunits (RbcL) encoded by a single chloroplast gene and eight small subunits (RbcS) encoded by a nuclear gene family. Rubisco is primarily found in the chloroplasts of mesophyll (C3 plants), bundle-sheath (C4 plants), and guard cells. In certain species, photosynthesis also takes place in the secretory cells of glandular trichomes, which are epidermal outgrowths (hairs) involved in the secretion of specialized metabolites. However, photosynthesis and, in particular, Rubisco have not been characterized in trichomes. Here, we show that tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) trichomes contain a specific Rubisco small subunit, NtRbcS-T, which belongs to an uncharacterized phylogenetic cluster (T). This cluster contains RbcS from at least 33 species, including monocots, many of which are known to possess glandular trichomes. Cluster T is distinct from the cluster M, which includes the abundant, functionally characterized RbcS isoforms expressed in mesophyll or bundle-sheath cells. Expression of NtRbcS-T in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and purification of the full Rubisco complex showed that this isoform conferred higher Vmax and Km values as well as higher acidic pH-dependent activity than NtRbcS-M, an isoform expressed in the mesophyll. This observation was confirmed with trichome extracts. These data show that an ancient divergence allowed for the emergence of a so-far-uncharacterized RbcS cluster. We propose that secretory trichomes have a particular Rubisco uniquely adapted to secretory cells where CO2 is released by the active specialized metabolism. PMID:28250069

  13. Specific features of sensorimotor cerebral cortex activity modulation by dopamine releaser amantadine.

    PubMed

    Storozhuk, Viktor M; Zinyuk, Larissa E

    2007-09-01

    The modulatory effects of amantadine (1-adamantanamine) on the activity of sensorimotor cerebral cortex neurones during microiontophoretic application of agonists of glutamatergic and GABA-ergic (gamma-aminobutyric acid) transmission were studied. In non-anaesthetised cats, dopamine (DA) released by amantadine application in a small area of the neocortex increased baseline and evoked neuronal activity, providing stabilization and optimum course of both the neuronal and the conditioned responses of the animal. Amantadine eliminates a decrease in the level of neuronal baseline and evoked activity and marked increase in the latency of neuronal activation and conditioned movement mediated by D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride ((S)-5-aminosulfonyl-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) methyl]-2-methoamantadineybenzamide) or GABA. This is reflected by a proportionate decrease in the onset of neuronal impulse reaction and latency of conditioned movement. Combined NMDA (N-methyl-D: -aspartate) and amantadine application also caused a considerable increase in baseline and evoked activity, but produced a slightly weaker effect than that evoked by NMDA application alone. A decrease in the baseline and evoked neuronal activity after NMDA withdrawn lasted during next control session (up to 40 min). The ability of DA releaser amantadine to alleviate significant increase in the latency of neuronal responses and conditioned movement induced by sulpiride or GABA suggests that dopamine modulates the activity of GABA-ergic inhibitory fast spike interneurons in the cat sensorimotor cortex during conditioning.

  14. [Specifics of perception of acoustic image of intrinsic bioelectric brain activity].

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, K V; Leonova, M K; Miroshnikov, D B; Klimenko, V M

    2014-06-01

    We studied the particularities of perception of the acoustic image of intrinsic EEG. We found that the assessment of perception of sounds, the presentation of which was synchronized and was agreed with current bioelectric brain activity, is higher that assessment of perception of acoustic EEG image presented in recorded form. Presentation of recorded acoustic image of EEG is accompanied by increased activity of beta-band in the frontal areas, while real-time presentation of acoustic EEG image is accompanied by the increase of slow wave activity: theta- and delta-bands of occipital areas of the brain. Increase activity in theta- and delta-bands of occipital areas in sessions of hearing the acoustic image of EEG in real time depend on the baseline frequency structure of EEG and correlates with expression of alpha-, beta- and theta-bands of bioelectric brain activity in both frontal and occipital areas. We suppose that presentation of sounds synchronized and agreed with the current bioelectric activity, activated the regulatory brain structures.

  15. Ceramides increase the activity of the secretory phospholipase A2 and alter its fatty acid specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Koumanov, Kamen S; Momchilova, Albena B; Quinn, Peter J; Wolf, Claude

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of human recombinant secretory type II phospholipase A(2) activity by ceramide and cholesterol was investigated using model glycerophospholipid substrates composed of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine dispersed in aqueous medium. Enzyme activity was monitored by measurement of released fatty acids using capillary GC-MS. Fatty acids from the sn-2 position of the phospholipids were hydrolysed by the enzyme in proportion to the relative abundance of the phospholipid in the substrate. Addition of increasing amounts of ceramide to the substrate progressively enhanced phospholipase activity. The increased activity was accomplished largely by preferential hydrolysis of polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly arachidonic acid, derived from phosphatidylethanolamine. The addition of sphingomyelin to the substrate glycerophospholipids inhibited phospholipase activity but its progressive substitution by ceramide, so as to mimic sphingomyelinase activity, counteracted the inhibition. The presence of cholesterol in dispersions of glycerophospholipid-substrate-containing ceramides suppressed activation of the enzyme resulting from the presence of ceramide. The molecular basis of enzyme modulation was investigated by analysis of the phase structure of the dispersed lipid substrate during temperature scans from 46 to 20 degrees C using small-angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction. These studies indicated that intermediate structures created after ceramide-dependent phase separation of hexagonal and lamellar phases represent the most susceptible form of the substrate for enzyme hydrolysis. PMID:11903045

  16. Peak triceps surae muscle activity is not specific to knee flexion angles during MVIC.

    PubMed

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Schneiders, Anthony G; García, José A; Sullivan, S John; Simoneau, Guy G

    2011-10-01

    There is limited research on peak activity of the separate triceps surae muscles in select knee flexion (KF) positions during a maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) used to normalize EMG signals. The aim of this study was to determine how frequent peak activity occurred during an MVIC for soleus (SOL), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), and gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) in select KF positions, and if these peaks were recorded in similar KF positions. Forty-eight healthy individuals performed unilateral plantar-flexion MVIC in standing with 0°KF and 45°KF, and in sitting with 90°KF. Surface EMG of SOL, GM, and GL were collected and processed in 250 ms epochs to determine peak root-mean-square amplitude. Peak activity was most frequently captured in standing and rarely in sitting, with no position selective to SOL, GM or GL activity. Peak GM and GL activity was more frequent in 0°KF than 45°KF, and more often in similar KF positions than not. Peak SOL activity was just as likely in 45°KF as 0°KF, and more in positions similar to GM, but not GL. The EMG amplitudes were at least 20% greater in positions that captured peak activity over those that did not. The overall findings support performing an MVIC in more than one KF position to normalize triceps surae EMG. It is emphasized that no KF position is selective to SOL, GM, or GL alone.

  17. New strategy for specific activation of recombinant microbial pro-transglutaminase by introducing an enterokinase cleavage site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Wang, Bin; Yang, Hui-Lin; Pan, Li

    2013-03-01

    Recombinant microbial transglutaminase (rMTG) is usually expressed as a soluble zymogen (pro-rMTG) in heterologous expression systems but proteolytic activation of the inactive pro-rMTG is essential. Instead of screening proteases for activating pro-rMTG, we examined an alternative method by introducing a specific cleavage site of enterokinase between the pro-peptide and mature rMTG, generating three pro-rMTG variants (Pro-mrMTG, Pro-m-rMTG and mPro-rMTG). Pro-mrMTG and Pro-m-rMTG were activated by enterokinase without degrading mature rMTG. The activation productivity of Pro-m-rMTG by enterokinase reached 92 % after 22 h activation, while the activation productivity of Pro-rMTG activated by trypsin was 47 %. MALDI-MS analysis revealed that the pro-peptide including the cleavage site was specifically removed from Pro-m-rMTG after activation. This methodology has the potential to be applied in rMTG production by incorporating highly specific cleavage sites of other proteases.

  18. Recombinant production of Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 trans-activator and characterization of its DNA-binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chun Shen; Goh, Siang Ling; Krishnan, Gopala; Ng, Ching Ching

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the recombinant production of a biologically active Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 trans-activator, i.e., Z-encoded broadly reactive activator (ZEBRA), that recognized specific DNA motifs. We used auto-induction for histidine-tagged BZLF1 expression in Escherichia coli and immobilized cobalt affinity membrane chromatography for protein purification under native conditions. We obtained the purified BZLF1 at a yield of 5.4mg per gram of wet weight cells at 75% purity, in which 27% of the recombinant BZLF1 remained biologically active. The recombinant BZLF1 bound to oligonucleotides containing ZEBRA response elements, either AP-1 or ZIIIB, but not a ZIIIB mutant. The recombinant BZLF1 showed a specific DNA-binding activity which could be useful for functional studies.

  19. A specific CD4 epitope bound by tregalizumab mediates activation of regulatory T cells by a unique signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Helling, Bianca; König, Martin; Dälken, Benjamin; Engling, Andre; Krömer, Wolfgang; Heim, Katharina; Wallmeier, Holger; Haas, Jürgen; Wildemann, Brigitte; Fritz, Brigitte; Jonuleit, Helmut; Kubach, Jan; Dingermann, Theodor; Radeke, Heinfried H; Osterroth, Frank; Uherek, Christoph; Czeloth, Niklas; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a specialized subpopulation of T cells, which are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. The immunomodulatory effects of Tregs depend on their activation status. Here we show that, in contrast to conventional anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), the humanized CD4-specific monoclonal antibody tregalizumab (BT-061) is able to selectively activate the suppressive properties of Tregs in vitro. BT-061 activates Tregs by binding to CD4 and activation of signaling downstream pathways. The specific functionality of BT-061 may be explained by the recognition of a unique, conformational epitope on domain 2 of the CD4 molecule that is not recognized by other anti-CD4 mAbs. We found that, due to this special epitope binding, BT-061 induces a unique phosphorylation of T-cell receptor complex-associated signaling molecules. This is sufficient to activate the function of Tregs without activating effector T cells. Furthermore, BT-061 does not induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results demonstrate that BT-061 stimulation via the CD4 receptor is able to induce T-cell receptor-independent activation of Tregs. Selective activation of Tregs via CD4 is a promising approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases where insufficient Treg activity has been described. Clinical investigation of this new approach is currently ongoing. PMID:25512343

  20. Get Active

    MedlinePlus

    ... Basics: Health Benefits What are the benefits of physical activity? Physical activity increases your chances of living longer. ... pain Help you feel better about yourself Is physical activity for everyone? Yes! Physical activity is good for ...

  1. /sup 3/H-DFMA metabolism in tobacco: non-specific, arginase mediated inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Slocum, R.D.; Feirer, R.L.

    1987-04-01

    ..cap alpha..-Difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) is a specific, enzyme-activated, irreversible inhibit of arginine decarboxylase (ADC) in vitro. ADC catalyzes the first step leading to putrescine biosynthesis and the activity of this enzyme is closely linked to overall polyamine (PA) biosynthesis in non-meristematic plant tissues. Consequently, ADC represents an important target enzyme for inhibitors of PA metabolism. DFMA has been shown to inhibit ADC activity in a variety of tissues in vivo but its specificity in tobacco was questioned since ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity was also inhibited. Further studies have shown that (/sup 3/H)-DFMA is efficiently hydrolyzed in tobacco to (/sup 3/H)-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an irreversible inhibitor of ODC. Tobacco and bovine arginases also catalyze the hydrolysis of DFMA in vitro, suggesting a role for this enzyme in mediating the non-specific inhibition of ODC by DFMA in tobacco flowers.

  2. Anti-human cytomegalovirus activity of cytokines produced by CD4+ T-cell clones specifically activated by IE1 peptides in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Davignon, J L; Castanié, P; Yorke, J A; Gautier, N; Clément, D; Davrinche, C

    1996-01-01

    The control of latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections by the immune system is poorly understood. We have previously shown that CD4+ T cells specific for the human CMV major regulatory protein IE1 are frequent in latently infected healthy blood donors. In order to learn about the possible role of these cells, we have developed IE1-specific CD4+ T-cell clones and, in this study, analyzed their epitope specificity and function in vitro. We measured their cytokine production when stimulated with specific IE1 peptides or whole recombinant IE1 protein. Their cytokine profiles, as deduced from gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-6 production, were of the Th0- and Th1-like phenotypes. Supernatants from IE1-specific clones producing IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were shown to inhibit CMV replication in U373 MG cells. This effect was due, as found by using cytokine-specific neutralizing antibodies, mostly to IFN-gamma, which was secreted at higher levels than TNF-alpha. To better assess the anti-CMV activity of cytokines, recombinant IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were used and shown to have a synergistic effect on the inhibition of CMV replication and protein expression. Thus, IE1-specific CD4+ T cells display in vitro anti-CMV activity through cytokine secretion and may play a role in the control of in vivo latent infections. PMID:8642638

  3. Organelle-Specific Activity-Based Protein Profiling in Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Susan D.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Chrisler, William B.; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-02-06

    A multimodal acidic organelle targeting activity-based probe was developed for analysis of subcellular native enzymatic activity of cells by fluorescent microscopy and mass spectrometry. A cathepsin reactive warhead was conjugated to an acidotropic amine, and a clickable alkyne for appendage of AlexaFluor 488 or biotin reporter tags. This probe accumulated in punctate vesicles surrounded by LAMP1, a lysosome marker, as observed by Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) in J774 mouse macrophage cells. Biotin conjugation, affinity purification, and analysis of in vivo labeled J774 by mass spectrometry showed that the probe was very selective for Cathepsins B and Z, two lysosomal cysteine proteases. Analysis of starvation induced autophagy, which is an increase in cell component catabolism involving lysosomes, showed a large increase in tagged protein number and an increase in cathepsin activity. Organelle targeting activity-based probes and subsequent analysis of resident proteins by mass spectrometry is enabled by tuning the physicochemical properties of the probe.

  4. Lumican Inhibits SNAIL-Induced Melanoma Cell Migration Specifically by Blocking MMP-14 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stasiak, Marta; Boncela, Joanna; Perreau, Corinne; Karamanou, Konstantina; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Proult, Isabelle; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Chakravarti, Shukti; Maquart, François-Xavier; Kowalska, M. Anna; Wegrowski, Yanusz; Brézillon, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan, inhibits MMP-14 activity and melanoma cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Snail triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transitions endowing epithelial cells with migratory and invasive properties during tumor progression. The aim of this work was to investigate lumican effects on MMP-14 activity and migration of Snail overexpressing B16F1 (Snail-B16F1) melanoma cells and HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Lumican inhibits the Snail induced MMP-14 activity in B16F1 but not in HT-29 cells. In Snail-B16F1 cells, lumican inhibits migration, growth, and melanoma primary tumor development. A lumican-based strategy targeting Snail-induced MMP-14 activity might be useful for melanoma treatment. PMID:26930497

  5. Allele-specific transcriptional activity of the variable number of tandem repeats in 5' region of the DRD4 gene is stimulus specific in human neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Paredes, U M; Quinn, J P; D'Souza, U M

    2013-03-01

    The dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene includes several variable number of tandem repeat loci that have been suggested to modulate DRD4 gene expression patterns. Previous studies showed differential basal activity of the two most common variants of a tandem repeat (120 bp per repeat unit) located in the 5' region adjacent to the DRD4 promoter in human cell lines. In this communication, we further characterized the ability of this polymorphic repeat to elicit tissue-, allele- and stimuli-specific transcriptional activity in vitro. The short and long variants of the DRD4 5' tandem repeat were cloned into a luciferase reporter gene construct containing the SV40 promoter. The luciferase constructs were cotransfected with expression vectors of two ubiquitously expressed human transcription factors (TFs), CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2), into human cell lines and primary cultures of neonate rat cortex and luciferase activity measured. Overexpression with these TFs resulted in differential cell- and allele-specific transcriptional activities of the luciferase constructs. The results of our experiments show that variants of this tandem repeat in the 5' promoter of the DRD4 gene will direct differential reporter gene transcriptional activity in a cell-type-specific manner dependent on the signal pathways activated.

  6. Simultaneous activation of viral antigen-specific memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells using mRNA-electroporated CD40-activated autologous B-cells.

    PubMed

    Van den Bosch, Glenn A; Van Gulck, Ellen; Ponsaerts, Peter; Nijs, Griet; Lenjou, Marc; Apers, Ludwig; Kint, Ilse; Heyndrickx, Leo; Vanham, Guido; Van Bockstaele, Dirk R; Berneman, Zwi N; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I

    2006-01-01

    Recently, it has become obvious that not only CD8 T-cells, but also CD4 T-helper cells are required for the induction of an effective, long-lasting cellular immune response. In view of the clinical importance of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we developed 2 strategies to simultaneously reactivate viral antigen-specific memory CD4 and CD8 T-cells of CMV-seropositive and HIV-seropositive subjects using mRNA-electroporated autologous CD40-activated B cells. In the setting of HIV, we provide evidence that CD40-activated B cells can be cultured from HAART-naive HIV-1 seropositive patients. These cells not only express and secrete the HIV p24 antigen after electroporation with codon-optimized HIV-1 gag mRNA, but can also be used to in vitro reactivate Gag antigen-specific interferon-gamma-producing CD4 and CD8 autologous T-cells. For the CMV-specific approach, we applied mRNA coding for the pp65 protein coupled to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 to transfect CD40-activated B cells to induce CMV antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cells. More detailed analysis of the activated interferon-gamma-producing CMV pp65 tetramer positive CD8 T-cells revealed an effector memory phenotype with the capacity to produce interleukin-2. Our findings clearly show that the concomitant activation of both CD4 and CD8 (memory) T-cells using mRNA-electroporated CD40-B cells is feasible in CMV and HIV-1-seropositive persons, which indicates the potential value of this approach for application in cellular immunotherapy of infectious diseases.

  7. Lysine Specific Demethylase 1 has Dual Functions as a Major Regulator of Androgen Receptor Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Changmeng; He, Housheng Hansen; Gao, Shuai; Chen, Sen; Yu, Ziyang; Gao, Yanfei; Chen, Shaoyong; Chen, Mei Wei; Zhang, Jesse; Ahmed, Musaddeque; Wang, Yang; Metzger, Eric; Schüle, Roland; Liu, X. Shirley; Brown, Myles; Balk, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysine Specific Demethylase 1 (LSD1, KDM1A) functions as a transcriptional corepressor through demethylation of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4), but has coactivator function on some genes through unclear mechanisms. We show that LSD1, interacting with CoREST, associates with and coactivates androgen receptor (AR) on a large fraction of androgen-stimulated genes. A subset of these AR/LSD1-associated enhancer sites have histone 3 threonine 6 phosphorylation (H3T6ph), and these sites are further enriched for androgen-stimulated genes. Significantly, despite its coactivator activity, LSD1 still mediates H3K4me2 demethylation at these androgen-stimulated enhancers. FOXA1 is also associated with LSD1 at AR regulated enhancer sites, and a FOXA1 interaction with LSD1 enhances binding of both proteins at these sites. These findings show LSD1 functions broadly as a regulator of AR function, that it maintains a transcriptional repression function at AR-regulated enhancers through H3K4 demethylation, and has a distinct AR-linked coactivator function mediated by demethylation of other substrates. PMID:25482560

  8. Specific Types of Family Support and Adolescent Non-school Physical Activity Levels

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Joanna L.; Wenthe, Phyllis J.; Letuchy, Elena M.; Levy, Steven M.; Janz, Kathleen F.

    2012-01-01

    In a sample of 291 adolescents (mean age 13 yr), seven psychosocial factors, including family support, were examined in relation to accelerometry-derived physical activity (PA) measured after school and during the weekend. Gender-specific stepwise linear regression analyses determined which combinations of factors explained the variance in non-school moderate to vigorous PA and non-school total PA after adjusting for % BF, age, and maturity (p ≤ 0.05). Being praised by a family member and % BF explained 13% of the variance in female non-school MVPA, while being praised and maturity explained 13% of the variance in non-school total PA. Having a family member watch him participate, % BF, and age explained 11.5% of the variance in male non-school MVPA, while having a family member participate with him explained 6.4% of the variance in non-school total PA. Despite adolescents’ growing independence, family support continues to influence PA levels. PMID:22971551

  9. The effects of basic fitness parameters on the implementation of specific military activities.

    PubMed

    Sporiš, Goran; Harasin, Dražen; Baić, Mario; Krističević, Tomislav; Krakan, Ivan; Milanović, Zoran; Cular, Dražen; Bagarić-Krakan, Lucija

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether basic fitness parameters have the impact on the specific military activity such as walking 18 km with 25 kg of load. The members of Croatian Armed Forces (30 soldiers) were tested before the beginning of the training program. The study has included variables for the assessment of muscular endurance: push-ups in 2 minutes, sit-ups in 2 minutes, maximum number of pull-ups before dropping from the bar, bench press with 70% of body weight-max number of repetitions, max number of squats for 60 seconds, then the variables for the assessment of aerobic capacity: the 3200m run and relative oxygen uptake using the direct method of measurement on a treadmill as well as the variable for the assessment of body fat (body fat %). As the criterion variable, it was used the 18 km walking with 25 kg of load. The results of the regression analysis have shown statistically significant relation of predictor variables with the criterion variable. The two variables, 3200m run and RVO2 had a significant Beta coefficient. Based on the obtained results it could be concluded that great cardio-respiratory endurance has a much larger impact on the walking length of 18 km with a load of 25 kg than other fitness parameters.

  10. Mechanism and specificity of pentachloropseudilin-mediated inhibition of myosin motor activity.

    PubMed

    Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Taft, Manuel H; Martin, René; Heissler, Sarah M; Preller, Matthias; Hartmann, Falk K; Brandstaetter, Hemma; Kendrick-Jones, John; Tsiavaliaris, Georgios; Gutzeit, Herwig O; Fedorov, Roman; Buss, Folma; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Coluccio, Lynne M; Manstein, Dietmar J

    2011-08-26

    Here, we report that the natural compound pentachloropseudilin (PClP) acts as a reversible and allosteric inhibitor of myosin ATPase and motor activity. IC(50) values are in the range from 1 to 5 μm for mammalian class-1 myosins and greater than 90 μm for class-2 and class-5 myosins, and no inhibition was observed with class-6 and class-7 myosins. We show that in mammalian cells, PClP selectively inhibits myosin-1c function. To elucidate the structural basis for PClP-induced allosteric coupling and isoform-specific differences in the inhibitory potency of the compound, we used a multifaceted approach combining direct functional, crystallographic, and in silico modeling studies. Our results indicate that allosteric inhibition by PClP is mediated by the combined effects of global changes in protein dynamics and direct communication between the catalytic and allosteric sites via a cascade of small conformational changes along a conserved communication pathway.

  11. Two flagellotropic phages and one pilus-specific phage active against Asticcacaulis biprosthecum.

    PubMed

    Pate, J L; Petzold, S J; Umbreit, T H

    1979-04-15

    Three phages active against cells of Asticcacaulis biprosthecum attach to receptor sites located at the pole of the cell where pili, flagella, and holdfast are produced. Phage phiAcS2, a large phage with a prolate cylindrical head and flexible, noncontractile tail, attaches to flagella as well as to receptor sites at the pole of the cell. Attachment to flagella occurs at the region where head and tail of the phage are joined, leaving the distal end of the tail free for attachment to receptor sites at the cell surface. Phages phiAcM2 and phiAcM4, are identical in appearance to each other, possessing prolate cylindrical heads and flexible, noncontractile tails, and are smaller than phage phiAcS2. Phage phiAcM4, exhibits the same flagellotropic characteristic as described for phage phiAcS2, including the manner of attachment to flagella. Phage phiAcM2 has no affinity for flagella, but attaches by the distal end of the tail to pili and to receptor sites at the pole of the cell. Mechanical removal of flagella and pili protects against infection by all three phages. Studies with phage-resistant mutants and with KCN-treated cells suggest that pili are required for infection by both flagellotropic and pilus-specific phages.

  12. Bcl-xl-specific antibody labels activated microglia associated with Alzheimer's disease and other pathological states.

    PubMed

    Drache, B; Diehl, G E; Beyreuther, K; Perlmutter, L S; König, G

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the production of a monoclonal antibody raised against Bcl-xl, and includes an initial study of bcl-xl expression in neuropathology including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Bcl-xl is a potent apoptotic inhibitor and is known to be the predominant Bcl-x isoform in brain. To examine the expression of bcl-xl in aged brain and neurodegenerative disease, we raised a Bcl-xl-specific monoclonal antibody. In aged human brain, the highest bcl-xl expression was observed in cerebellum. By immunohistochemistry, significant bcl-xl expression was detected in reactive microglia of patients with AD and other neurological diseases such as progressive supranuclear palsy. Bcl-xl-positive microglia frequently colocalized with beta-amyloid plaques in AD and with activated astrocytes in non-AD and AD brains, suggesting a general role for Bcl-xl in regions of pathology. High levels of Bcl-xl protein might render microglia more resistant to cytotoxic environments such as areas of neurodegeneration and astrogliosis.

  13. DbpA: a DEAD box protein specifically activated by 23s rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller-Pace, F V; Nicol, S M; Reid, A D; Lane, D P

    1993-01-01

    The Escherichia coli protein DbpA is a member of the 'DEAD box' family of putative RNA-dependent ATPases and RNA helicases, so called because they share the highly conserved motif Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp, together with several other conserved elements. We have investigated DbpA expression under conditions where an endogenous promoter is used. In this context, translation initiation does not occur at the previously identified AUG, but at an upstream, in-frame GUG. Mutation of the GUG initiation codon to AUG virtually abolishes DbpA expression, suggesting an unusual translation initiation mechanism. Using an inducible overexpression plasmid, we have purified milligram quantities of DbpA to homogeneity and shown that the purified protein hydrolyses ATP in an RNA-dependent manner. This ATPase activity is interesting in that, unlike that of other DEAD box proteins investigated to date, it absolutely requires a specific bacterial RNA, which we have identified as 23S rRNA. This observation is particularly significant since DbpA will bind other RNAs and DNA, but will only hydrolyse ATP in the presence of 23S rRNA. Images PMID:8253085

  14. Gene networks activated by specific patterns of action potentials in dorsal root ganglia neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Philip R.; Cohen, Jonathan E.; Iacobas, Dumitru A.; Iacobas, Sanda; Fields, R. Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks underlie the long-term changes in cell specification, growth of synaptic connections, and adaptation that occur throughout neonatal and postnatal life. Here we show that the transcriptional response in neurons is exquisitely sensitive to the temporal nature of action potential firing patterns. Neurons were electrically stimulated with the same number of action potentials, but with different inter-burst intervals. We found that these subtle alterations in the timing of action potential firing differentially regulates hundreds of genes, across many functional categories, through the activation or repression of distinct transcriptional networks. Our results demonstrate that the transcriptional response in neurons to environmental stimuli, coded in the pattern of action potential firing, can be very sensitive to the temporal nature of action potential delivery rather than the intensity of stimulation or the total number of action potentials delivered. These data identify temporal kinetics of action potential firing as critical components regulating intracellular signalling pathways and gene expression in neurons to extracellular cues during early development and throughout life. PMID:28256583

  15. Specific activity and isotope abundances of strontium in purified strontium-82

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzsimmons, J. M.; Medvedev, D. G.; Mausner, L. F.

    2015-11-12

    A linear accelerator was used to irradiate a rubidium chloride target with protons to produce strontium-82 (Sr-82), and the Sr-82 was purified by ion exchange chromatography. The amount of strontium associated with the purified Sr-82 was determined by either: ICP-OES or method B which consisted of a summation of strontium quantified by gamma spectroscopy and ICP-MS. The summation method agreed within 10% to the ICP-OES for the total mass of strontium and the subsequent specific activities were determined to be 0.25–0.52 TBq mg-1. Method B was used to determine the isotope abundances by weight% of the purified Sr-82, and the abundances were: Sr-82 (10–20.7%), Sr-83 (0–0.05%), Sr-84 (35–48.5%), Sr-85 (16–25%), Sr-86 (12.5–23%), Sr-87 (0%), and Sr-88 (0–10%). The purified strontium contained mass amounts of Sr-82, Sr-84, Sr-85, Sr-86, and Sr-88 in abundances not associated with natural abundance, and 90% of the strontium was produced by the proton irradiation. A comparison of ICP-OES and method B for the analysis of Sr-82 indicated analysis by ICP-OES would be easier to determine total mass of strontium and comply with regulatory requirements. An ICP-OES analytical method for Sr-82 analysis was established and validated according to regulatory guidelines.

  16. Mechanism and Specificity of Pentachloropseudilin-mediated Inhibition of Myosin Motor Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Taft, Manuel H.; Martin, René; Heissler, Sarah M.; Preller, Matthias; Hartmann, Falk K.; Brandstaetter, Hemma; Kendrick-Jones, John; Tsiavaliaris, Georgios; Gutzeit, Herwig O.; Fedorov, Roman; Buss, Folma; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Coluccio, Lynne M.; Manstein, Dietmar J.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report that the natural compound pentachloropseudilin (PClP) acts as a reversible and allosteric inhibitor of myosin ATPase and motor activity. IC50 values are in the range from 1 to 5 μm for mammalian class-1 myosins and greater than 90 μm for class-2 and class-5 myosins, and no inhibition was observed with class-6 and class-7 myosins. We show that in mammalian cells, PClP selectively inhibits myosin-1c function. To elucidate the structural basis for PClP-induced allosteric coupling and isoform-specific differences in the inhibitory potency of the compound, we used a multifaceted approach combining direct functional, crystallographic, and in silico modeling studies. Our results indicate that allosteric inhibition by PClP is mediated by the combined effects of global changes in protein dynamics and direct communication between the catalytic and allosteric sites via a cascade of small conformational changes along a conserved communication pathway. PMID:21680745

  17. Isomer-specific biodegradation of nonylphenol in an activated sludge bioreactor and structure-biodegradability relationship.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhijiang; Reif, Rubén; Gan, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Nonylphenol (NP), one of the priority hazardous substances, is in fact a mixture of numerous isomers. It is inconclusive whether or not biodegradation during wastewater treatment process is isomer-specific, leading to the environmental release of NP in different isomer profiles. In this study, we evaluated the isomer selectivity of 19 NP isomers in a laboratory-scale continuous flow conventional activated sludge bioreactor under various operational conditions. The removal efficiency of NP isomers ranged from 90 to 99%, depending on the operational conditions and isomer structures. Isomer selective biodegradation resulted in the increase of composition of recalcitrant isomers, such as, NP₁₉₃a/b, NP₁₁₀a and NP₁₉₄ in the effluent. Moreover, biodegradability was related to the bulkiness of α-substituents and followed α-dimethyl > α-ethyl-α-methyl > α-methyl-α-n-propyl > α-iso-propyl-α-methyl. Steric effect index, a quantitative descriptor of steric hindrance, was linearly correlated with residues of NP isomers in the effluent (R² = 0.76). Decrease of temperature to 10 °C decreased the overall biodegradability and also enhanced the relative enrichment of recalcitrant isomers. These findings suggest that isomer compositions of NP entering the environment may be different from those in technical mixtures and that isomeric selectivity should be taken into account to better understand the occurrence, fate, and ecological risks of NP.

  18. Simple procedure for the synthesis of high specific activity tritiated (6S)-5-formyltetrahydrofolate

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, R.G.; Colman, P.D.

    1982-05-01

    The 5-position of tetrahydrofolate was found to be unusually reactive with low concentrations of formic acid in the presence of a water-soluble carbodiimide. The product of this reaction has neutral and acid ultraviolet spectra and chromatographic behavior consistent with its identity as 5-formyltetrahydrofolate (leucovoriun). When enzymatically synthesized (6S)-tetrahydrofolate was used as starting material, the product supported the growth of folate-depleted L1210 cells at one-half the concentration required for authentic (6R,S)-leucovorin. This reaction has been used to produce high specific activity (44 Ci/mmol) (/sup 3/H)(6S)-5-formyltetrahydrofolate in high yield. Experiments with (/sup 14/C)formic acid indicate that 1 mol of formate reacted per mol of tetrahydrofolate but that no reaction occurred with a variety of other folate compounds. (6S)-5-Formyltetrahydrofolate, labeled in the formyl group with /sup 14/C, has also been synthesized using this reaction. These easily produced, labeled folates should allow close examination of the transport and utilization of leucovorin and of the mechanism of reversal of methotrexate toxicity by reduced folate cofactors.

  19. Distinct Substrate Specificity and Catalytic Activity of the Pseudoglycosyltransferase VldE

    PubMed Central

    Abuelizz, Hatem A.; Mahmud, Taifo

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The pseudoglycosyltransferase (PsGT) VldE is a glycosyltransferase-like protein that is similar to trehalose 6-phosphate synthase (OtsA). However, in contrast to OtsA, which catalyzes condensation between UDP-glucose and glucose 6-phosphate, VldE couples two pseudosugars to give a product with an α,α-N-pseudoglycosidic linkage. Despite their unique catalytic activity and important role in natural products biosynthesis, little is known about the molecular basis governing their substrate specificity and catalysis. Here, we report comparative biochemical and kinetic studies using recombinant OtsA, VldE, and their chimeric proteins with a variety of sugar and pseudosugar substrates. We found that the chimeric enzymes can produce hybrid pseudo-(amino)disaccharides and an amino group in the acceptor is necessary to facilitate a coupling reaction with a pseudosugar donor. Furthermore, we found that the N-terminal domains of the enzymes not only play a major role in selecting the acceptors, but also control the type of nucleotidyl diphosphate moiety of the donors. PMID:26051218

  20. Gene networks activated by specific patterns of action potentials in dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Philip R; Cohen, Jonathan E; Iacobas, Dumitru A; Iacobas, Sanda; Fields, R Douglas

    2017-03-03

    Gene regulatory networks underlie the long-term changes in cell specification, growth of synaptic connections, and adaptation that occur throughout neonatal and postnatal life. Here we show that the transcriptional response in neurons is exquisitely sensitive to the temporal nature of action potential firing patterns. Neurons were electrically stimulated with the same number of action potentials, but with different inter-burst intervals. We found that these subtle alterations in the timing of action potential firing differentially regulates hundreds of genes, across many functional categories, through the activation or repression of distinct transcriptional networks. Our results demonstrate that the transcriptional response in neurons to environmental stimuli, coded in the pattern of action potential firing, can be very sensitive to the temporal nature of action potential delivery rather than the intensity of stimulation or the total number of action potentials delivered. These data identify temporal kinetics of action potential firing as critical components regulating intracellular signalling pathways and gene expression in neurons to extracellular cues during early development and throughout life.

  1. Opportunities to exploit non-neutralizing HIV-specific antibody activity

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Margaret E.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies act as a nexus between innate and adaptive immunity: they provide a means to engage a spectrum of innate immune effector cells in order to clear viral particles and infected cells, and prime antigen presentation. This functional landscape is remarkably complex, and depends on antibody isotype, subclass, and glycosylation; the expression levels and patterns of a suite of Fc receptors with both complementary and opposing activities; and a host of innate immune cells capable of differential responses to opsonized particles and present at different sites. In vivo, even neutralizing antibodies rely on their ability to act as molecular beacons and recruit innate immune effector cells in order to provide protection, and results from both human and macaque studies have implicated these effector functions in vaccine-mediated protection. Thus, while enhancing effector function is a tractable handle for potentiating antibody-mediated protection from HIV infection, success will depend critically on leveraging understanding of the means by which antibodies with specific functional profiles could be elicited, which effector functions could provide optimal protection, and perhaps most critically, how to efficiently recruit the innate effector cells present at sites of infection. PMID:24191934

  2. Modality specific cerebro-cerebellar activations in verbal working memory: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Kirschen, Matthew P; Chen, S H Annabel; Desmond, John E

    2010-01-01

    Verbal working memory (VWM) engages frontal and temporal/parietal circuits subserving the phonological loop, as well as, superior and inferior cerebellar regions which have projections from these neocortical areas. Different cerebro-cerebellar circuits may be engaged for integrating aurally- and visually-presented information for VWM. The present fMRI study investigated load (2, 4, or 6 letters) and modality (auditory and visual) dependent cerebro-cerebellar VWM activation using a Sternberg task. FMRI revealed modality-independent activations in left frontal (BA 6/9/44), insular, cingulate (BA 32), and bilateral inferior parietal/supramarginal (BA 40) regions, as well as in bilateral superior (HVI) and right inferior (HVIII) cerebellar regions. Visual presentation evoked prominent activations in right superior (HVI/CrusI) cerebellum, bilateral occipital (BA19) and left parietal (BA7/40) cortex while auditory presentation showed robust activations predominantly in bilateral temporal regions (BA21/22). In the cerebellum, we noted a visual to auditory emphasis of function progressing from superior to inferior and from lateral to medial regions. These results extend our previous findings of fMRI activation in cerebro-cerebellar networks during VWM, and demonstrate both modality dependent commonalities and differences in activations with increasing memory load.

  3. Mapping brain activation and information during category-specific visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Linden, David E J; Oosterhof, Nikolaas N; Klein, Christoph; Downing, Paul E

    2012-01-01

    How is working memory for different visual categories supported in the brain? Do the same principles of cortical specialization that govern the initial processing and encoding of visual stimuli also apply to their short-term maintenance? We investigated these questions with a delayed discrimination paradigm for faces, bodies, flowers, and scenes and applied both univariate and multivariate analyses to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Activity during encoding followed the well-known specialization in posterior areas. During the delay interval, activity shifted to frontal and parietal regions but was not specialized for category. Conversely, activity in visual areas returned to baseline during that interval but showed some evidence of category specialization on multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA). We conclude that principles of cortical activation differ between encoding and maintenance of visual material. Whereas perceptual processes rely on specialized regions in occipitotemporal cortex, maintenance involves the activation of a frontoparietal network that seems to require little specialization at the category level. We also confirm previous findings that MVPA can extract information from fMRI signals in the absence of suprathreshold activation and that such signals from visual areas can reflect the material stored in memory.

  4. High salt primes a specific activation state of macrophages, M(Na).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wu-Chang; Zheng, Xiao-Jun; Du, Lin-Juan; Sun, Jian-Yong; Shen, Zhu-Xia; Shi, Chaoji; Sun, Shuyang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Qin, Mu; Liu, Xu; Tao, Jun; Jia, Lijun; Fan, Heng-Yu; Zhou, Bin; Yu, Ying; Ying, Hao; Hui, Lijian; Liu, Xiaolong; Yi, Xianghua; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Lanjing; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2015-08-01

    High salt is positively associated with the risk of many diseases. However, little is known about the mechanisms. Here we showed that high salt increased proinflammatory molecules, while decreased anti-inflammatory and proendocytic molecules in both human and mouse macrophages. High salt also potentiated lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation and suppressed interleukin 4-induced macrophage activation. High salt induced the proinflammatory aspects by activating p38/cFos and/or Erk1/2/cFos pathways, while inhibited the anti-inflammatory and proendocytic aspects by Erk1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 pathway. Consistent with the in vitro results, high-salt diet increased proinflammatory gene expression of mouse alveolar macrophages. In mouse models of acute lung injury, high-salt diet aggravated lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary macrophage activation and inflammation in lungs. These results identify a novel macrophage activation state, M(Na), and high salt as a potential environmental risk factor for lung inflammation through the induction of M(Na).

  5. Intracellular calcium-dependent regulation of the sperm-specific calcium-activated potassium channel, hSlo3, by the BKCa activator LDD175

    PubMed Central

    Wijerathne, Tharaka Darshana; Kim, Jihyun; Yang, Dongki

    2017-01-01

    Plasma membrane hyperpolarization associated with activation of Ca2+-activated K+ channels plays an important role in sperm capacitation during fertilization. Although Slo3 (slowpoke homologue 3), together with the auxiliary γ2-subunit, LRRC52 (leucine-rich-repeat–containing 52), is known to mediate the pH-sensitive, sperm-specific K+ current KSper in mice, the molecular identity of this channel in human sperm remains controversial. In this study, we tested the classical BKCa activators, NS1619 and LDD175, on human Slo3, heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells together with its functional interacting γ2 subunit, hLRRC52. As previously reported, Slo3 K+ current was unaffected by iberiotoxin or 4-aminopyridine, but was inhibited by ~50% by 20 mM TEA. Extracellular alkalinization potentiated hSlo3 K+ current, and internal alkalinization and Ca2+ elevation induced a leftward shift its activation voltage. NS1619, which acts intracellularly to modulate hSlo1 gating, attenuated hSlo3 K+ currents, whereas LDD175 increased this current and induced membrane potential hyperpolarization. LDD175-induced potentiation was not associated with a change in the half-activation voltage at different intracellular pHs (pH 7.3 and pH 8.0) in the absence of intracellular Ca2+. In contrast, elevation of intracellular Ca2+ dramatically enhanced the LDD175-induced leftward shift in the half-activation potential of hSlo3. Therefore, the mechanism of action does not involve pH-dependent modulation of hSlo3 gating; instead, LDD175 may modulate Ca2+-dependent activation of hSlo3. Thus, LDD175 potentially activates native KSper and may induce membrane hyperpolarization-associated hyperactivation in human sperm. PMID:28280418

  6. Patterns of Gene-Specific and Total Transcriptional Activity during the Plasmodium falciparum Intraerythrocytic Developmental Cycle ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Jennifer S.; Militello, Kevin T.; Sims, Peter A.; Patel, Vishal P.; Kasper, Jacob M.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    2009-01-01

    The relationships among gene regulatory mechanisms in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum throughout its asexual intraerythrocytic developmental cycle (IDC) remain poorly understood. To investigate the level and nature of transcriptional activity and its role in controlling gene expression during the IDC, we performed nuclear run-on on whole-transcriptome samples from time points throughout the IDC and found a peak in RNA polymerase II-dependent transcriptional activity related to both the number of nuclei per parasite and variable transcriptional activity per nucleus over time. These differential total transcriptional activity levels allowed the calculation of the absolute transcriptional activities of individual genes from gene-specific nuclear run-on hybridization data. For half of the genes analyzed, sense-strand transcriptional activity peaked at the same time point as total activity. The antisense strands of several genes were substantially transcribed. Comparison of the transcriptional activity of the sense strand of each gene to its steady-state RNA abundance across the time points assayed revealed both correlations and discrepancies, implying transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation, respectively. Our results demonstrate that such comparisons can effectively indicate gene regulatory mechanisms in P. falciparum and suggest that genes with diverse transcriptional activity levels and patterns combine to produce total transcriptional activity levels tied to parasite development during the IDC. PMID:19151330

  7. Exposure and Metabolic Activation Biomarkers of Carcinogenic Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamines.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Stephen S; Stepanov, Irina; Carmella, Steven G

    2016-01-19

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the world, and cigarette smoking is its main cause. Oral cavity cancer is another debilitating and often fatal cancer closely linked to tobacco product use. While great strides have been made in decreasing tobacco use in the United States and some other countries, there are still an estimated 1 billion men and 250 million women in the world who are cigarette smokers and there are hundreds of millions of smokeless tobacco users, all at risk for cancer. Worldwide, lung cancer kills about three people per minute. This Account focuses on metabolites and biomarkers of two powerful tobacco-specific nitrosamine carcinogens, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), considered to be among the main causes of lung cancer and oral cavity cancer in people who use tobacco products. Three properties of NNK and NNN are critical for successful biomarker studies: they are present in all tobacco products, they are tobacco-specific and are not found in any other product, and they are strong carcinogens. NNK and NNN are converted in humans to urinary metabolites that can be quantified by mass spectrometry as biomarkers of exposure to these carcinogens. They are also metabolized to diazonium ions and related electrophiles that react with DNA to form addition products that can be detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. These urinary metabolites and DNA addition products can serve as biomarkers of exposure and metabolic activation, respectively. The biomarkers of exposure, in particular the urinary NNK metabolites 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) and its glucuronides, have been extensively applied to document tobacco-specific lung carcinogen uptake in smokers and nonsmokers exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke. Highly sensitive mass spectrometric methods have been developed for quantitative analysis of these NNK metabolites as well as metabolites of NNN in human urine

  8. Conformational transition of FGFR kinase activation revealed by site-specific unnatural amino acid reporter and single molecule FRET

    PubMed Central

    Perdios, Louis; Lowe, Alan R.; Saladino, Giorgio; Bunney, Tom D.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.; Chin, Jason W.; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinases share significant structural similarity; however, structural features alone are insufficient to explain their diverse functions. Thus, bridging the gap between static structure and function requires a more detailed understanding of their dynamic properties. For example, kinase activation may occur via a switch-like mechanism or by shifting a dynamic equilibrium between inactive and active states. Here, we utilize a combination of FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to probe the activation mechanism of the kinase domain of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR). Using genetically-encoded, site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in regions essential for activation, followed by specific labeling with fluorescent moieties, we generated a novel class of FRET-based reporter to monitor conformational differences corresponding to states sampled by non phosphorylated/inactive and phosphorylated/active forms of the kinase. Single molecule FRET analysis in vitro, combined with MD simulations, shows that for FGFR kinase, there are populations of inactive and active states separated by a high free energy barrier resulting in switch-like activation. Compared to recent studies, these findings support diversity in features of kinases that impact on their activation mechanisms. The properties of these FRET-based constructs will also allow further studies of kinase dynamics as well as applications in vivo. PMID:28045057

  9. Conformational transition of FGFR kinase activation revealed by site-specific unnatural amino acid reporter and single molecule FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdios, Louis; Lowe, Alan R.; Saladino, Giorgio; Bunney, Tom D.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.; Chin, Jason W.; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinases share significant structural similarity; however, structural features alone are insufficient to explain their diverse functions. Thus, bridging the gap between static structure and function requires a more detailed understanding of their dynamic properties. For example, kinase activation may occur via a switch-like mechanism or by shifting a dynamic equilibrium between inactive and active states. Here, we utilize a combination of FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to probe the activation mechanism of the kinase domain of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR). Using genetically-encoded, site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in regions essential for activation, followed by specific labeling with fluorescent moieties, we generated a novel class of FRET-based reporter to monitor conformational differences corresponding to states sampled by non phosphorylated/inactive and phosphorylated/active forms of the kinase. Single molecule FRET analysis in vitro, combined with MD simulations, shows that for FGFR kinase, there are populations of inactive and active states separated by a high free energy barrier resulting in switch-like activation. Compared to recent studies, these findings support diversity in features of kinases that impact on their activation mechanisms. The properties of these FRET-based constructs will also allow further studies of kinase dynamics as well as applications in vivo.

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinase activity is involved in effector functions triggered by the CD94/NKG2-C NK receptor specific for HLA-E.

    PubMed

    Carretero, M; Llano, M; Navarro, F; Bellón, T; López-Botet, M

    2000-10-01

    The CD94/NKG2C heterodimer constitutes an activating receptor involved in NK cell-mediated recognition of the class lb molecule HLA-E. It transduces the triggering signal through an ITAM-bearing molecule, DAP12/KARAP, coupled non-covalently to the receptor. Here we show that specific engagement of the receptor complex expressed on the surface of an NK clone induced the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). By the use of the MEK inhibitor PD098059 we demonstrate that the MAPK pathway participates in the CD94-dependent TNF-alpha production and cytotoxicity. Moreover, we transferred the activating function by transfection of the heterologous RBL cell line with CD94/NKG2-C/DAP12. In this system, cross-linking of the receptor induced calcium mobilization, serotonin release and phosphorylation of MAPK.

  11. A comprehensive panel of turn-on caspase biosensors for investigating caspase specificity and caspase activation pathways.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Sujan S; Campbell, Sean T; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2011-10-17

    Caspases play a central role in apoptosis, differentiation, and proliferation, and represent important therapeutic targets for treating cancer and inflammatory disorders. Toward the goal of developing new tools to probe caspase substrate cleavage specificity as well as to systematically interrogate caspase activation pathways, we have constructed and investigated a comprehensive panel of caspase biosensors with a split-luciferase enabled bioluminescent read out. We first interrogated the panel of caspase biosensors for substrate cleavage specificity of caspase 1-10 in widely utilized in vitro translation systems, namely, rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL) and wheat germ extract (WGE). Commercial RRL was found to be unsuitable for investigating caspase specificity, owing to surprising levels of endogenous caspase activity, while specificity profiles of the caspase sensors in WGE agree very well with traditional peptide probes. The full panel of biosensors was utilized for studying caspase activation and inhibition in several mammalian cytosolic extracts, clearly demonstrating that they can be utilized to directly monitor activation or inhibition of procaspase 3/7. Furthermore, the complete panel of caspase biosensors also provided new insights into caspase activation pathways wherein we surprisingly discovered the activation of procaspase 3/7 by caspase 4/5.

  12. Design of a specific activator for skeletal muscle sodium channels uncovers channel architecture.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lior; Ilan, Nitza; Gur, Maya; Stühmer, Walter; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2007-10-05

    Gating modifiers of voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)s) are important tools in neuroscience research and may have therapeutic potential in medicinal disorders. Analysis of the bioactive surface of the scorpion beta-toxin Css4 (from Centruroides suffusus suffusus) toward rat brain (rNa(v)1.2a) and skeletal muscle (rNa(v)1.4) channels using binding studies revealed commonality but also substantial differences, which were used to design a specific activator, Css4(F14A/E15A/E28R), of rNa(v)1.4 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The therapeutic potential of Css4(F14A/E15A/E28R) was tested using an rNa(v)1.4 mutant carrying the same mutation present in the genetic disorder hypokalemic periodic paralysis. The activator restored the impaired gating properties of the mutant channel expressed in oocytes, thus offering a tentative new means for treatment of neuromuscular disorders with reduced muscle excitability. Mutant double cycle analysis employing toxin residues involved in the construction of Css4(F14A/E15A/E28R) and residues whose equivalents in the rat brain channel rNa(v)1.2a were shown to affect Css4 binding revealed significant coupling energy (>1.3 kcal/mol) between F14A and E592A at Domain-2/voltage sensor segments 1-2 (D2/S1-S2), R27Q and E1251N at D3/SS2-S6, and E28R with both E650A at D2/S3-S4 and E1251N at D3/SS2-S6. These results show that despite the differences in interactions with the rat brain and skeletal muscle Na(v)s, Css4 recognizes a similar region on both channel subtypes. Moreover, our data indicate that the S3-S4 loop of the voltage sensor module in Domain-2 is in very close proximity to the SS2-S6 segment of the pore module of Domain-3 in rNa(v)1.4. This is the first experimental evidence that the inter-domain spatial organization of mammalian Na(v)s resembles that of voltage-gated potassium channels.

  13. Conceptual approaches for the development of dynamic specific activity models of 14C transfer from surface water to humans.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, S C; Ciffroy, P; Siclet, F; Damois, C; Sheppard, M I; Stephenson, M

    2006-01-01

    Carbon-14 is a particularly interesting radionuclide from the perspective of dose estimation. Many nuclear facilities, including power reactors, release 14C into the environment, and much of this is as 14CO2. This mixes readily with stable CO2, and hence enters the food chain as fundamental biomolecules. This isotopic mixing is often used as the basis for dose assessment models. The present model was developed for the situation of 14C releases to surface waters, where there are distinct changes in the water 14C activity concentrations throughout the year. Complete isotopic mixing (equilibrium) cannot be assumed. The model computes the specific activity (activity of 14C per mass of total C) in water, phytoplankton, fish, crops, meat, milk and air, following a typical irrigation-based food-chain scenario. For most of the biotic compartments, the specific activity is a function of the specific activity in the previous time step, the specific activity of the substrate media, and the C turnover rate in the tissue. The turnover rate is taken to include biochemical turnover, growth dilution and mortality, recognizing that it is turnover of C in the population, not a tissue or an individual, that is relevant. Attention is paid to the incorporation of 14C into the surface water biota and the loss of any remaining 14CO2 from the surface water-air interface under its own activity concentration gradient. For certain pathways, variants in the conceptual model are presented, in order to fully discuss the possibilities. As an example, a new model of the soil-to-plant specific activity relationship is proposed, where the degassing of both 14C and stable C from the soil is considered. Selection of parameter values to represent the turnover rates as modeled is important, and is dealt with in a companion paper.

  14. Specificity of sexual arousal for sexual activities in men and women with conventional and masochistic sexual interests.

    PubMed

    Chivers, Meredith L; Roy, Carolyn; Grimbos, Teresa; Cantor, James M; Seto, Michael C

    2014-07-01

    Prior studies consistently report that men's genital responses correspond to their sexual activity interests (consenting vs. coercive sex) whereas women's responses do not. For women, however, these results may be confounded by the sexual activities studied and lack of suitable controls. We examined the subjective and genital arousal responses of men and women with conventional (22 men and 15 women) or masochistic sexual interests (16 men and 17 women) to narratives describing conventional sex or masochistic sex. The aims of the studies were twofold: (1) to examine whether gender differences in the specificity of sexual arousal previously observed for gender also exist for sexual activity interests; and (2) to examine whether men and women with masochistic sexual interests demonstrate specificity of sexual response for their preferred sexual activities. Surprisingly, the pattern of results was very similar for men and women. Both men and women with conventional sexual interests (WCI) reported more sexual arousal, and responded more genitally, to conventional than to masochistic sex, demonstrating specificity of sexual arousal for their preferred sexual activities. Despite showing specificity for conventional sexual activities, the genital responses of WCI were still gender nonspecific. In contrast, women and men with masochistic sexual interests demonstrated nonspecific subjective and genital responses to conventional and masochistic sex. Indices of genital and subjective sexual arousal to masochistic versus conventional stimuli were positively and significantly correlated with self-reported thoughts, fantasies, interests, and behaviors involving masochism. The results suggest that gender similarities in the specificity of sexual arousal for sexual activity exist despite consistent gender differences in the specificity of sexual arousal for gender.

  15. Epigenetic Therapy of Hematopoietic Malignancies: Novel Approaches for Tissue-Specific and Global Inhibition of EZH2 Enzymatic Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0232 TITLE: Epigenetic Therapy of Hematopoietic Malignancies: Novel Approaches for Tissue - Specific and Global...Therapy of Hematopoietic Malignancies: Novel Approaches for Tissue - Specific and Global Inhibition of EZH2 Enzymatic Activities 5b. GRANT NUMBER...binding of EZH2 in B- versus T- cell lineages, and to identify the responsible tissue -specific recruiters. 2. KEYWORDS: Hematopoietic cancer, PRC2

  16. Balancing the stability and the catalytic specificities of OP hydrolases with enhanced V-agent activities.

    PubMed

    Reeves, T E; Wales, M E; Grimsley, J K; Li, P; Cerasoli, D M; Wild, J R

    2008-06-01

    Rational site-directed mutagenesis and biophysical analyses have been used to explore the thermodynamic stability and catalytic capabilities of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and its genetically modified variants. There are clear trade-offs in the stability of modifications that enhance catalytic activities. For example, the H254R/H257L variant has higher turnover numbers for the chemical warfare agents VX (144 versus 14 s(-1) for the native enzyme (wild type) and VR (Russian VX, 465 versus 12 s(-1) for wild type). These increases are accompanied by a loss in stability in which the total Gibb's free energy for unfolding is 19.6 kcal/mol, which is 5.7 kcal/mol less than that of the wild-type enzyme. X-ray crystallographic studies support biophysical data that suggest amino acid residues near the active site contribute to the chemical and thermal stability through hydrophobic and cation-pi interactions. The cation-pi interactions appear to contribute an additional 7 kcal/mol to the overall global stability of the enzyme. Using rational design, it has been possible to make amino acid changes in this region that restored the stability, yet maintained effective V-agent activities, with turnover numbers of 68 and 36 s(-1) for VX and VR, respectively. This study describes the first rationally designed, stability/activity balance for an OPH enzyme with a legitimate V-agent activity, and its crystal structure.

  17. Insights into Substrate Specificity and Metal Activation of Mammalian Tetrahedral Aspartyl Aminopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Farquhar, Erik R.; Chance, Mark R.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kiser, Philip D.

    2012-07-11

    Aminopeptidases are key enzymes involved in the regulation of signaling peptide activity. Here, we present a detailed biochemical and structural analysis of an evolutionary highly conserved aspartyl aminopeptidase called DNPEP. We show that this peptidase can cleave multiple physiologically relevant substrates, including angiotensins, and thus may play a key role in regulating neuron function. Using a combination of x-ray crystallography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and single particle electron microscopy analysis, we provide the first detailed structural analysis of DNPEP. We show that this enzyme possesses a binuclear zinc-active site in which one of the zinc ions is readily exchangeable with other divalent cations such as manganese, which strongly stimulates the enzymatic activity of the protein. The plasticity of this metal-binding site suggests a mechanism for regulation of DNPEP activity. We also demonstrate that DNPEP assembles into a functionally relevant tetrahedral complex that restricts access of peptide substrates to the active site. These structural data allow rationalization of the enzyme's preference for short peptide substrates with N-terminal acidic residues. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the physiology and bioinorganic chemistry of DNPEP and other M18 family aminopeptidases.

  18. Corticosterone targets distinct steps of synaptic transmission via concentration specific activation of mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sreejata; Sikdar, Sujit K

    2014-02-01

    Hippocampal neurons are affected by chronic stress and have a high density of cytoplasmic mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors (MR and GR). Detailed studies on the genomic effects of the stress hormone corticosterone at physiologically relevant concentrations on different steps in synaptic transmission are limited. In this study, we tried to delineate how activation of MR and GR by different concentrations of corticosterone affects synaptic transmission at various levels. The effect of 3-h corticosterone (25, 50, and 100 nM) treatment on depolarization-mediated calcium influx, vesicular release and properties of miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) were studied in cultured hippocampal neurons. Activation of MR with 25 nM corticosterone treatment resulted in enhanced depolarization-mediated calcium influx via a transcription-dependent process and increased frequency of mEPSCs with larger amplitude. On the other hand, activation of GR upon 100 nM corticosterone treatment resulted in increase in the rate of vesicular release via the genomic actions of GR. Furthermore, GR activation led to significant increase in the frequency of mEPSCs with larger amplitude and faster decay. Our studies indicate that differential activation of the dual receptor system of MR and GR by corticosterone targets the steps in synaptic transmission differently.

  19. Specific capture of the hydrolysate on magnetic beads for sensitive detecting plant vacuolar processing enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Cheng, Meng; Zeng, Lizhang; Liu, Weipeng; Zhang, Tao; Xing, Da

    2016-05-15

    Conventional plant protease detection always suffers from high background interference caused by the complex coloring metabolites in plant cells. In this study, a bio-modified magnetic beads-based strategy was developed for sensitive and quantitative detection of plant vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) activity. Cleavage of the peptide substrate (ESENCRK-FITC) after asparagine residue by VPE resulted in the 2-cyano-6-amino-benzothiazole (CABT)-functionalized magnetic beads capture of the severed substrate CRK-FITC via a condensation reaction between CABT and cysteine (Cys). The catalytic activity was subsequently obtained by the confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry quantitative analysis. The sensor system integrated advantages of (i) the high efficient enrichment and separation capabilities of magnetic beads and (ii) the catalyst-free properties of the CABT-Cys condensation reaction. It exhibited a linear relationship between the fluorescence signal and the concentration of severed substrate in the range of 10-600 pM. The practical results showed that, compared with normal growth conditions, VPE activity was increased by 2.7-fold (307.2 ± 25.3 μM min(-1)g(-1)) upon cadmium toxicity stress. This platform effectively overcame the coloring metabolites-caused background interference, showing fine applicability for the detection of VPE activity in real samples. The strategy offers great sensitivity and may be further extended to other protease activity detection.

  20. Dynamics of beryllium-7 specific activity in relation to meteorological variables, tropopause height, teleconnection indices and sunspot number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvan, D.; Stratimirović, Đ.; Blesić, S.; Djurdjevic, V.; Miljković, V.; Ajtić, J.

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of the beryllium-7 specific activity in surface air over 1987-2011 is analyzed using wavelet transform (WT) analysis and time-dependent detrended moving average (tdDMA) method. WT analysis gives four periodicities in the beryllium-7 specific activity: one month, three months, one year, and three years. These intervals are further used in tdDMA to calculate local autocorrelation exponents for precipitation, tropopause height and teleconnection indices. Our results show that these parameters share common periods with the beryllium-7 surface concentration. tdDMA method indicates that on the characteristic intervals of one year and shorter, the beryllium-7 specific activity is strongly autocorrelated. On the three-year interval, the beryllium-7 specific activity shows periods of anticorrelation, implying slow changes in its dynamics that become evident only over a prolonged period of time. A comparison of the Hurst exponents of all the variables on the one- and three-year intervals suggest some similarities in their dynamics. Overall, a good agreement in the behavior of the teleconnection indices and specific activity of beryllium-7 in surface air is noted.

  1. Specificity of binding of beta-glucoside activators of ryegrass (1-->3)-beta-glucan synthase and the synthesis of some potential photoaffinity activators.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, K; Johnson, E; Stone, B A

    1996-01-01

    Structure-activity relationships among glycoside activators of ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) (1-->3)-beta-glucan synthase were investigated using a number of natural and synthetic glycosides, including some carrying photoaffinity functions. There is an absolute requirement for a beta-D-glycosyl moiety in the activator, both S- and N-glucosides are active, and the position of the glucosidic linkage in beta-glucose disaccharides has a significant effect on the affinity of binding. However, the binding requirement does not extend beyond a single beta-D-glucosyl residue, and beta-D-oligoglucosides are less effective than disaccharides. The nature of the aglycon has a major influence on the binding affinity. Hydrophobic aglycons lower the concentration required for half-maximal stimulation of the enzyme obtained from an Eadie-Hofstee plot of kinetic data (Ka) for activation, but charge aglycons increase Ka. Relative to methyl-beta-D-glucoside and cellobiose (Ka 1.1 mM), the most potent compounds tested were N-[4-(benzoyl)benzoyl]-beta-D-glucosylamine and 2'-[4-azidosalicylamino]ethyl-1-thio-beta-D-glucoside with K(a)s of approximately 30 microM. The latter also was tested for its potential to specifically label the beta-glucoside-binding site on the synthase, but under the conditions used the binding was found to be nonspecific. PMID:8756503

  2. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Sunita A; Tyerman, Stephen D; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A; Ryan, Peter R; Gilliham, Matthew; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-07-29

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms.

  3. Kinetic isotope effects for RNA cleavage by 2'-O- transphosphorylation: Nucleophilic activation by specific base

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Michael E; Dai, Qing; Gu, Hong; Kellerman, Dan; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Anderson, Vernon E

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the interactions between catalysts and transition states during RNA strand cleavage, primary 18O kinetic isotope effects and solvent D2O isotope effects were measured to probe the mechanism of base-catalyzed 2'-O-transphosphorylation of the RNA dinucleotide 5'-UpG-3'. The observed 18O KIEs for the nucleophilic 2'-O and in the 5'-O leaving group at pH 14 are both large relative to reactions of phosphodiesters with good leaving groups, indicating that the reaction catalyzed by hydroxide has a transition state (TS) with advanced phosphorus-oxygen bond fission to the leaving group (18kLG = 1.034 ± 0.004) and phosphorous-nucleophile bond formation (18kNUC = 0.984 ± 0.004). A breakpoint in the pH dependence of the 2'-O-transphosphorylation rate to a pH independent phase above pH 13 has been attributed to the pKa of the 2'-OH nucleophile. A smaller nucleophile KIE is observed at pH 12 (18kNUC = 0.995 ± 0.004) that is interpreted as the combined effect of the equilibrium isotope effect (~1.02) on deprotonation of the 2′-hydroxyl nucleophile and the intrinsic KIE on the nucleophilic addition step (ca. 0.981). An alternative mechanism in which the hydroxide ion acts as a general base is considered unlikely given the lack of a solvent deuterium isotope effect above the breakpoint in the pH versus rate profile. These results represent the first direct analysis of the transition state for RNA strand cleavage. The primary 18O KIE results and the lack of a kinetic solvent deuterium isotope effect together provide strong evidence for a late transition state and 2'-O nucleophile activation by specific base catalysis. PMID:20669950

  4. Context-Specific and Immune Cell-Dependent Antitumor Activities of α1-Antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Ofer; Freixo-Lima, Gabriella S.; Kaner, Ziv; Lior, Yotam; Rider, Peleg; Lewis, Eli C.

    2016-01-01

    α1-antitrypsin (AAT), a circulating glycoprotein that rises during acute phase responses and healthy pregnancies, exhibits immunomodulatory properties in several T-cell-dependent immune pathologies. However, AAT does not directly interfere with T-cell responses; instead, it facilitates polarization of macrophages and dendritic cells towards M2-like and tolerogenic cells, respectively. AAT also allows NK cell responses against tumor cells, while attenuating DC-dependent induction of autoimmune NK cell activities. Since AAT-treated macrophages bear resemblance to cancer-promoting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), it became imperative to examine the possible induction of tumor permissive conditions by AAT. Here, AAT treatment is examined for its effect on tumor development, metastatic spread, and tumor immunology. Systemic AAT treatment of mice inoculated with B16-F10 melanoma cells resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and metastatic spread. Using NK cell-resistant RMA cells, we show that AAT interferes with tumor development in a CD8+ T-cell-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, upon analysis of tumor cellular composition, we identified functional tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells alongside M1-like TAMs in AAT-treated mice. Based on the ability of AAT to undergo chemical modifications, we emulated conditions of elevated reactive nitrogen and oxygen species. Indeed, macrophages were stimulated by treatment with nitrosylated AAT, and IFNγ transcripts were significantly elevated in tumors extracted soon after ischemia-reperfusion challenge. These context-specific changes may explain the differential effects of AAT on immune responses towards tumor cells versus benign antigenic targets. These data suggest that systemically elevated levels of AAT may accommodate its physiological function in inflammatory resolution, without compromising tumor-targeting immune responses. PMID:28003813

  5. Lexical Activation during Sentence Comprehension in Adolescents with History of Specific Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Borovsky, Arielle; Burns, Erin; Elman, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Julia L.

    2015-01-01

    One remarkable characteristic of speech comprehension in typically developing (TD) children and adults is the speed with which the listener can integrate information across multiple lexical items to anticipate upcoming referents. Although children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) show lexical deficits (Sheng & McGregor, 2010) and slower speed of processing (Leonard et al., 2007), relatively little is known about how these deficits manifest in real-time sentence comprehension. In this study, we examine lexical activation in the comprehension of simple transitive sentences in adolescents with a history of SLI and age-matched, TD peers. Participants listened to sentences that consisted of the form, Article-Agent-Action-Article-Theme, (e.g., The pirate chases the ship) while viewing pictures of four objects that varied in their relationship to the Agent and Action of the sentence (e.g., Target, Agent-Related, Action-Related, and Unrelated). Adolescents with SLI were as fast as their TD peers to fixate on the sentence’s final item (the Target) but differed in their post-action onset visual fixations to the Action-Related item. Additional exploratory analyses of the spatial distribution of their visual fixations revealed that the SLI group had a qualitatively different pattern of fixations to object images than did the control group. The findings indicate that adolescents with SLI integrate lexical information across words to anticipate likely or expected meanings with the same relative fluency and speed as do their TD peers. However, the failure of the SLI group to show increased fixations to Action-Related items after the onset of the action suggests lexical integration deficits that result in failure to consider alternate sentence interpretations. PMID:24099807

  6. Sex- and strain-specific expression and vomeronasal activity of mouse ESP family peptides.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Hiroko; Sato, Koji; Nodari, Francesco; Haga, Sachiko; Holy, Timothy E; Touhara, Kazushige

    2007-11-06

    Male mice secrete exocrine-gland-secreting peptide 1 (ESP1) from the extraorbital lacrimal gland into tear fluid [1]. Other mice detect ESP1 through sensory neurons in the vomeronasal organ (VNO), a secondary olfactory system that senses pheromonal information, including sex, strain, and species. ESP1 is now known to be a member of a multigene family that encodes peptides of various lengths. We herein performed genomic and expression analyses of the ESP family. The ESP family consists of 38 members in mice and 10 members in rat but is absent from the human genome, suggesting rapid molecular evolution. In addition to the male-specific ESP1, we discovered one, which we designated ESP36, that, in adult BALB/c mice, is expressed only in the female extraorbital lacrimal gland. The sexually dimorphic expression is ensured by the release of testosterone after puberty. However, we observed dramatic differences in the expression levels of ESPs between strains. Finally, all ESPs elicited an electrical response in the vomeronasal epithelium but not in the main olfactory epithelium. Multielectrode recording of VNO activity demonstrated that ESP1 induces action potentials in vomeronasal neurons, leading to an increase in the spike firing rate, and that ESP1 is recognized by narrowly tuned vomeronasal sensory neurons. Sexual dimorphism and strain differences of ESPs and their reception in the VNO suggest that the ESP family can convey information about sex and individual identity via the vomeronasal system. The chemosensation of this nonvolatile peptide family by direct contact appears to be one of strategies for sociosexual communication in rodent species.

  7. Specificity and biologic activities of novel anti-membrane IgM antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Welt, Rachel S.; Welt, Jonathan A.; Kostyal, David; Gangadharan, Yamuna D; Raymond, Virginia; Welt, Sydney

    2016-01-01

    The concept that the B-cell Receptor (BCR) initiates a driver pathway in lymphoma-leukemia has been clinically validated. Previously described unique BCR Ig-class-specific sequences (proximal domains (PDs)), are not expressed in serum Ig (sIg). As a consequence of sequence and structural differences in the membrane IgM (mIgM) μ-Constant Domain 4, additional epitopes distinguish mIgM from sIgM. mAbs generated to linear and conformational epitopes, restricted to mIgM and not reacting with sIgM, were generated despite the relative hydrophobicity of the PDm sequence. Anti-PD mAbs (mAb1, mAb2, and mAb3) internalize mIgM. Anti-mIgM mAb4, which recognizes a distinct non-ligand binding site epitope, mediates mIgM internalization, and in low-density cultures, growth inhibition, anti-clonogenic activity, and apoptosis. We show that mAb-mediated mIgM internalization generally does not interrupt BCR-directed cell growth, however, mAb4 binding to a non-ligand binding site in the mIgM PDm-μC4 domain induces both mIgM internalization and anti-tumor effects. BCR micro-clustering in many B-cell leukemia and lymphoma lines is demonstrated by SEM micrographs using these new mAb reagents. mAb4 is a clinical candidate as a mediator of inhibition of the BCR signaling pathway. As these agents do not bind to non-mIgM B-cells, nor cross-react to non-lymphatic tissues, they may spare B-cell/normal tissue destruction as mAb-drug conjugates. PMID:27732950

  8. Context-Specific and Immune Cell-Dependent Antitumor Activities of α1-Antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Ofer; Freixo-Lima, Gabriella S; Kaner, Ziv; Lior, Yotam; Rider, Peleg; Lewis, Eli C

    2016-01-01

    α1-antitrypsin (AAT), a circulating glycoprotein that rises during acute phase responses and healthy pregnancies, exhibits immunomodulatory properties in several T-cell-dependent immune pathologies. However, AAT does not directly interfere with T-cell responses; instead, it facilitates polarization of macrophages and dendritic cells towards M2-like and tolerogenic cells, respectively. AAT also allows NK cell responses against tumor cells, while attenuating DC-dependent induction of autoimmune NK cell activities. Since AAT-treated macrophages bear resemblance to cancer-promoting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), it became imperative to examine the possible induction of tumor permissive conditions by AAT. Here, AAT treatment is examined for its effect on tumor development, metastatic spread, and tumor immunology. Systemic AAT treatment of mice inoculated with B16-F10 melanoma cells resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and metastatic spread. Using NK cell-resistant RMA cells, we show that AAT interferes with tumor development in a CD8+ T-cell-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, upon analysis of tumor cellular composition, we identified functional tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells alongside M1-like TAMs in AAT-treated mice. Based on the ability of AAT to undergo chemical modifications, we emulated conditions of elevated reactive nitrogen and oxygen species. Indeed, macrophages were stimulated by treatment with nitrosylated AAT, and IFNγ transcripts were significantly elevated in tumors extracted soon after ischemia-reperfusion challenge. These context-specific changes may explain the differential effects of AAT on immune responses towards tumor cells versus benign antigenic targets. These data suggest that systemically elevated levels of AAT may accommodate its physiological function in inflammatory resolution, without compromising tumor-targeting immune responses.

  9. Substrate specificity and sequence-dependent activity of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (Mag).

    PubMed

    Lingaraju, Gondichatnahalli M; Kartalou, Maria; Meira, Lisiane B; Samson, Leona D

    2008-06-01

    DNA glycosylases initiate base excision repair by first binding, then excising aberrant DNA bases. Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a 3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA glycosylase, Mag, that recognizes 3MeA and various other DNA lesions including 1,N6-ethenoadenine (epsilon A), hypoxanthine (Hx) and abasic (AP) sites. In the present study, we explore the relative substrate specificity of Mag for these lesions and in addition, show that Mag also recognizes cisplatin cross-linked adducts, but does not catalyze their excision. Through competition binding and activity studies, we show that in the context of a random DNA sequence Mag binds epsilon A and AP-sites the most tightly, followed by the cross-linked 1,2-d(ApG) cisplatin adduct. While epsilon A binding and excision by Mag was robust in this sequence context, binding and excision of Hx was extremely poor. We further studied the recognition of epsilon A and Hx by Mag, when these lesions are present at different positions within A:T and G:C tracts. Overall, epsilon A was slightly less well excised from each position within the A:T and G:C tracts compared to excision from the random sequence, whereas Hx excision was greatly increased in these sequence contexts (by up to 7-fold) compared to the random sequence. However, given most sequence contexts, Mag had a clear preference for epsilon A relative to Hx, except in the TTXTT (X=epsilon A or Hx) sequence context from which Mag removed both lesions with almost equal efficiency. We discuss how DNA sequence context affects base excision by various 3MeA DNA glycosylases.

  10. Characterization of a Novel Human-Specific STING Agonist that Elicits Antiviral Activity Against Emerging Alphaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Sali, Tina M.; Pryke, Kara M.; Abraham, Jinu; Liu, Andrew; Archer, Iris; Broeckel, Rebecca; Staverosky, Julia A.; Smith, Jessica L.; Al-Shammari, Ahmed; Amsler, Lisi; Sheridan, Kayla; Nilsen, Aaron; Streblow, Daniel N.; DeFilippis, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic stimulation of innate immune processes represents an attractive strategy to achieve multiple therapeutic outcomes including inhibition of virus replication, boosting antitumor immunity, and enhancing vaccine immunogenicity. In light of this we sought to identify small molecules capable of activating the type I interferon (IFN) response by way of the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). A high throughput in vitro screen yielded 4-(2-chloro-6-fluorobenzyl)-N-(furan-2-ylmethyl)-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b][1,4]thiazine-6-carboxamide (referred to herein as G10), which was found to trigger IRF3/IFN-associated transcription in human fibroblasts. Further examination of the cellular response to this molecule revealed expression of multiple IRF3-dependent antiviral effector genes as well as type I and III IFN subtypes. This led to the establishment of a cellular state that prevented replication of emerging Alphavirus species including Chikungunya virus, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis virus, and Sindbis virus. To define cellular proteins essential to elicitation of the antiviral activity by the compound we employed a reverse genetics approach that utilized genome editing via CRISPR/Cas9 technology. This allowed the identification of IRF3, the IRF3-activating adaptor molecule STING, and the IFN-associated transcription factor STAT1 as required for observed gene induction and antiviral effects. Biochemical analysis indicates that G10 does not bind to STING directly, however. Thus the compound may represent the first synthetic small molecule characterized as an indirect activator of human STING-dependent phenotypes. In vivo stimulation of STING-dependent activity by an unrelated small molecule in a mouse model of Chikungunya virus infection blocked viremia demonstrating that pharmacologic activation of this signaling pathway may represent a feasible strategy for combating emerging Alphaviruses. PMID:26646986

  11. Specific associations between types of physical activity and components of mental health.

    PubMed

    Asztalos, Melinda; Wijndaele, Katrien; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Philippaerts, Renaat; Matton, Lynn; Duvigneaud, Nathalie; Thomis, Martine; Duquet, William; Lefevre, Johan; Cardon, Greet

    2009-07-01

    Findings of previous studies suggest that the relationship between physical activity and mental health may change across different domains of physical activity, different dimensions of mental health, and different population subgroups. The present study examined associations between five types of physical activity with different contents: housework, leisure active transportation, biking to/from work, walking to/from work, and sports participation, and two dimensions of mental health: perceived stress and psychological distress, in 1919 participants aged 20-65 years, using the data from the Flemish Policy Research Centre Sport, Physical Activity and Health. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed with the total sample, and with the sample stratified by gender, age, and occupational category. Further, separate models were used in the gender and age subgroups of each occupational category. Sports participation was the only type of physical activity inversely associated with both stress (OR=0.375; CI: 0.200-0.704) and distress (OR=0.480; CI: 0.253-0.910). Sports participation related to less distress in unemployed mid-aged adults, and to less stress in unemployed women, unemployed young adults, and young adults with blue-collar jobs. Housework was associated with more stress and more distress in women with blue-collar jobs. In young adults with white-collar jobs, however, an inverse association between housework and distress was found. Biking to and from work was associated with more stress in men with blue-collar jobs. Results invite consideration for the utility, and perhaps the necessity, of differentiated health recommendations for physical health and for mental health in different population subgroups.

  12. Specific alpha-galactosidase inhibitors, N-methylcalystegines--structure/activity relationships of calystegines from Lycium chinense.

    PubMed

    Asano, N; Kato, A; Miyauchi, M; Kizu, H; Tomimori, T; Matsui, K; Nash, R J; Molyneux, R J

    1997-09-01

    An examination of the roots of Lycium chinense (Solanaceae) has resulted in the discovery of 14 calystegines, a cycloheptane bearing an amino group and three hydroxyl groups, and two polyhydroxylated piperidine alkaloids. Calystegines A7 and B5, in addition to the previously known calystegines A3, A5, A6, B1, B2, B3, B4, C1, C2 and N1, were isolated and determined as 1alpha,2beta,4alpha-trihydroxy-nortropane and 1alpha,2alpha,4alpha,7alpha-tetrahydroxy-nort ropane, respectively. L. chinense also had two polyhydroxytropanes bearing a methyl group on the nitrogen atom, unlike the previously reported nortropane alkaloids. They were established as N-methylcalystegines B2 and C1, and their N-methyl groups were found to be axially oriented from NOE experiments. 1Beta-amino-3beta,4beta,5alpha-trihydroxycyclohepta ne was also present in L. chinense and may be a biosynthetic precursor of the calystegines that occur in this plant. Two polyhydroxypiperidine alkaloids, fagomine and 6-deoxyfagomine, were isolated. Calystegine B2 is a potent competitive inhibitor of almond beta-glucosidase (Ki = 1.9 microM) and coffee bean alpha-galactosidase (Ki = 0.86 microM), while N-methylcalystegine B2 was a more potent competitive inhibitor of the latter enzyme (Ki = 0.47 microM) than the parent compound but showed a marked lack of inhibitory activities towards most other glycosidases. Since this compound is a very specific inhibitor of alpha-galactosidase and inhibits rat liver lysosomal alpha-galactosidase with a Ki of 1.8 microM, it may provide a useful experimental model for the lysosomal storage disorder, Fabry's disease. The addition of a hydroxyl group at C6exo, as in calystegines B1 and C1, enhances the inhibitory potential towards beta-glucosidase and beta-galactosidase but markedly lowers or abolishes inhibition towards alpha-galactosidase. Hence, the N-methylation of calystegine C1 did not enhance its inhibition of alpha-galactosidase. The chemical N-methylation of calystegines

  13. Specific activities of poetam preparation (superlow-doses of antibodies to erythropoietin) and recombinant erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Dygai, A M; Zhdanov, V V; Udut, E V; Simanina, E V; Gur'yantseva, L A; Khrichkova, T Yu; Epshtein, O I; Sergeeva, S A

    2006-09-01

    We compared the capacity of superlow-dose of antibodies to erythropoietin (Poetam) and recombinant erythropoietin (Recormon) to stimulate the recovery of adriamycin-suppressed erythropoiesis in mice. Both preparations exhibited high erythron activation capacity and considerably increased the content of erythrocytes and reticulocytes in the peripheral blood and content of erythrokaryocytes and erythroid precursors in the hemopoietic tissue of experimental animals. The effect of Recormon manifested immediately after injection, while the effect of Poetam was somewhat delayed, but more lasting (due to activation of host erythropoietin system).

  14. Composite Event Specification and Detection for Supporting Active Capability in an OODBMS: Semantics Architecture and Implementation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-01

    For all outgoing edges i from ’n’ propagate parameters in node ’n’ to the nodei connected by edge i activate-operator-node( nodej ); Delete propagated...El E2 Figure 6: Detection of X in recent mode PROCEDURE activate-operator-node( nodej ) /* Recent Context */ CASE nodei is of type a primitive or...composite event has been signalled to nodej */ AND(E1, E2): if left event el is signalled if E2’s list is not empty Pass <e2, el> to the parent Replace el in

  15. Lenalidomide enhances antigen-specific activity and decreases CD45RA expression of T cells from patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Neuber, Brigitte; Herth, Isabelle; Tolliver, Claudia; Schoenland, Stefan; Hegenbart, Ute; Hose, Dirk; Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Ho, Anthony D; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Klein, Bernard; Hundemer, Michael

    2011-07-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the specific T cell response against the multiple myeloma Ag HM1.24 is enhanced by the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide (Revlimid). Ag-specific CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells against the HM1.24 Ag were expanded in vitro by dendritic cells in 29 healthy donors and 26 patients with plasma cell dyscrasias. Ag-specific activation was analyzed by IFN-γ, granzyme B, and perforin secretion using ELISA, ELISPOT assay, and intracellular staining, and generation of Ag-specific T cells was analyzed by tetramer staining. Expression of T cell maturation markers (CD45RA, CD45R0, CCR7, and CD28) was investigated by flow cytometry. We found that activation of HM1.24-specific T cells from healthy donors and patients with plasma cell dyscrasias was enhanced significantly by lenalidomide and furthermore that the impact of lenalidomide on T cells depends on the duration of the exposure. Notably, lenalidomide supports the downregulation of CD45RA on T cells upon activation, observed in healthy donors and in patients in vitro and also in patients during lenalidomide therapy in vivo. We showed for the first time, to our knowledge, that lenalidomide enhances the Ag-specific activation of T cells and the subsequent downregulation of CD45RA expression of T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  16. A novel mouse model of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma induced by liver-specific Kras activation and Pten deletion

    PubMed Central

    Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Terakado, Yumi; Nakagawa, Hayato; Hikiba, Yohko; Fujii, Tomoaki; Matsubara, Daisuke; Noguchi, Rei; Zhu, Chi; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Kudo, Yotaro; Asaoka, Yoshinari; Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Ijichi, Hideaki; Tateishi, Keisuke; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Maeda, Shin; Koike, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Recently, several types of cells have been considered as the origin of ICC, namely cholangiocytes, liver progenitor cells, and hepatocytes. Here, we have established a novel mouse model of ICC by liver-specific Kras activation and Pten deletion. An activating mutation of Kras in combination with deletion of Pten was introduced in embryonic hepatic bipotential progenitor cells (so-called hepatoblasts) and mature hepatocytes using the Cre-loxP system. As a result, liver-specific Kras activation and homozygous Pten deletion cooperated to induce ICCs exclusively. In contrast, Kras activation in combination with heterozygous Pten deletion induced both ICCs and HCCs, whereas Kras activation alone resulted in HCCs but not ICCs. Furthermore, a cell-lineage visualization system using tamoxifen-inducible Cre-loxP demonstrated that the ICCs did not originate from hepatocytes but from cholangiocytes. Our data suggest that mice carrying liver-specific Kras activation in combination with homozygous Pten deletion should be useful for the investigation of therapeutic strategies for human ICC. PMID:27032374

  17. Tissue-specific changes of glutamine synthetase activity in oats after rhizosphere infestation by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, T.J.; Temple, S.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C.

    1996-05-15

    Oats (Avena sativa L. lodi) tolerant of rhizosphere infestation by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci when challenged by the pathogen experience tissue-specific alterations of ammonia assimilatory capabilities. Altered ammonia assimilatory potentials between root and leaf tissue result from selective inactivation of glutamine synthetase (GS) by the toxin Tabtoxinine-B-lactam (TBL). Root GS is sensitive and leaf GSs are resistant to TBL inactivation. With prolonged challenge by the pathogen root GS activity decreases but leaf GS specific activity increase. Higher leaf GS activity is due to decreased rates of degradation rather than increased GS synthesis. Higher leaf GS activity and elevated levels of GS polypeptide appear to result from a limited interaction between GS and TBL leading to the accumulation of a less active but more stable GS holoenzyme. Tolerant challenged oats besides surviving rhizosphere infestation, experience enhanced growth. A strong correlation exists between leaf GS activity and whole plant fresh weight, suggesting that tissue-specific changes in ammonia assimilatory capability provides the plant a more efficient mechanism for uptake and utilization of nitrogen.

  18. A Discrete Population of Neurons in the Lateral Amygdala Is Specifically Activated by Contextual Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Yvette M.; Murphy, Mark

    2009-01-01

    There is no clear identification of the neurons involved in fear conditioning in the amygdala. To search for these neurons, we have used a genetic approach, the "fos-tau-lacZ" (FTL) mouse, to map functionally activated expression in neurons following contextual fear conditioning. We have identified a discrete population of neurons in the lateral…

  19. Metabolic, anabolic, and mitogenic insulin responses: A tissue-specific perspective for insulin receptor activators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin acts as the major regulator of the fasting-to-fed metabolic transition by altering substrate metabolism, promoting energy storage, and helping activate protein synthesis. In addition to its glucoregulatory and other metabolic properties, insulin can also act as a growth factor. The metabolic...

  20. Engineering of a red-light-activated human cAMP/cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Carlos; Taiber, Sandra; Yeh, Chen-Min; Wittig, Charlotte Helene; Hegemann, Peter; Ryu, Soojin; Wunder, Frank; Möglich, Andreas

    2014-06-17

    Sensory photoreceptors elicit vital physiological adaptations in response to incident light. As light-regulated actuators, photoreceptors underpin optogenetics, which denotes the noninvasive, reversible, and spatiotemporally precise perturbation by light of living cells and organisms. Of particular versatility, naturally occurring photoactivated adenylate cyclases promote the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP under blue light. Here, we have engineered a light-activated phosphodiesterase (LAPD) with complementary light sensitivity and catalytic activity by recombining the photosensor module of Deinococcus radiodurans bacterial phytochrome with the effector module of Homo sapiens phosphodiesterase 2A. Upon red-light absorption, LAPD up-regulates hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP by up to sixfold, whereas far-red light can be used to down-regulate activity. LAPD also mediates light-activated cAMP and cGMP hydrolysis in eukaryotic cell cultures and in zebrafish embryos; crucially, the biliverdin chromophore of LAPD is available endogenously and does not need to be provided exogenously. LAPD thus establishes a new optogenetic modality that permits light control over diverse cAMP/cGMP-mediated physiological processes. Because red light penetrates tissue more deeply than light of shorter wavelengths, LAPD appears particularly attractive for studies in living organisms.

  1. Determination of the specific activities of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and B by capillary electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for the determination of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and methionine sulfoxide reductase B activities in mouse liver is described. The method is based on detection of the 4-(dimethylamino)azobenzene-4’-sulfonyl derivative of L-methionine (dabsyl Met), the ...

  2. Object categories specific brain activity classification with simultaneous EEG-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rana Fayyaz; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Kamel, Nidal; Reza, Faruque

    2015-01-01

    Any kind of visual information is encoded in terms of patterns of neural activity occurring inside the brain. Decoding neural patterns or its classification is a challenging task. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and Electroencephalography (EEG) are non-invasive neuroimaging modalities to capture the brain activity pattern in term of images and electric potential respectively. To get higher spatiotemporal resolution of human brain from these two complementary neuroimaging modalities, simultaneous EEG-fMRI can be helpful. In this paper, we proposed a framework for classifying the brain activity patterns with simultaneous EEG-fMRI. We have acquired five human participants' data with simultaneous EEG-fMRI by showing different object categories. Further, combined analysis of EEG and fMRI data was carried out. Extracted information through combine analysis is passed to support vector machine (SVM) classifier for classification purpose. We have achieved better classification accuracy using simultaneous EEG-fMRI i.e., 81.8% as compared to fMRI data standalone. This shows that multimodal neuroimaging can improve the classification accuracy of brain activity patterns as compared to individual modalities reported in literature.

  3. Reduced Specificity of Hippocampal and Posterior Ventrolateral Prefrontal Activity during Relational Retrieval in Normal Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giovanello, Kelly S.; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of episodic memory in young adults demonstrate greater functional neural activity in ventrolateral pFC and hippocampus during retrieval of relational information as compared with item information. We tested the hypothesis that healthy older adults--individuals who exhibit behavioral declines in relational memory--would show…

  4. Cortical Reinstatement Mediates the Relationship Between Content-Specific Encoding Activity and Subsequent Recollection Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Alan M.; Rissman, Jesse; Kiani, Roozbeh; Wagner, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    Episodic recollection entails the conscious remembrance of event details associated with previously encountered stimuli. Recollection depends on both the establishment of cortical representations of event features during stimulus encoding and the cortical reinstatement of these representations at retrieval. Here, we used multivoxel pattern analyses of functional magnetic resonance imaging data to examine how cortical and hippocampal activity at encoding and retrieval drive recollective memory decisions. During encoding, words were associated with face or scene source contexts. At retrieval, subjects were cued to recollect the source associate of each presented word. Neurally derived estimates of encoding strength and pattern reinstatement in occipitotemporal cortex were computed for each encoding and retrieval trial, respectively. Analyses demonstrated that (1) cortical encoding strength predicted subsequent memory accuracy and reaction time, (2) encoding strength predicted encoding-phase hippocampal activity, and (3) encoding strength and retrieval-phase hippocampal activity predicted the magnitude of cortical reinstatement. Path analyses further indicated that cortical reinstatement partially mediated both the effect of cortical encoding strength and the effect of retrieval-phase hippocampal activity on subsequent source memory performance. Taken together, these results indicate that memory-guided decisions are driven in part by a pathway leading from hippocampally linked cortical encoding of event attributes to hippocampally linked cortical reinstatement at retrieval. PMID:23921785

  5. Liamocin oil from Aureobasidium pullulans has antibacterial activity with specificity for species of Streptococcus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Liamocin oil from Aureobasidium pullulans NRRL 50380 was tested for antibacterial activity. Liamocins inhibited growth of Streptococcus agalactiae, S. uberis, S. mitis, S. infantarius, and S. mutans, with minimum inhibitory concentrations from 20 'g/ml to 78 'g/ml. Enterococcus faecalis was less sus...

  6. Gender-Specific Associations between Personality Traits, Physical Activity, and Body Size Dissatisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lodewyk, Ken; Sullivan, Philip

    2017-01-01

    A recently validated trait personality framework is the HEXACO (honesty-humility, emotionality, extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness to experience). Little is yet known about how the HEXACO personality dimensions and its subsets--particularly the dimension of honesty-humility--relates to physical activity and body size…

  7. Lentivirally Engineered DC activate AFP-specific T cells which Inhibit Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Fu, Xiaohui; Song, Zhenshun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lu, Chongde; Ding, Guanghui; Wu, Mengchao

    2012-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a tumor-associated antigen for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is an established biomarker for HCC. In this study, we created a lentivirus expressing the AFP antigen and investigated the antitumor activity of AFP-specific CD8+ T cells, with and without CD4+ T cells, which were activated by either AFP peptide-pulsed or Lenti-AFP-engineered DC in vitro and in vivo. AFP-specific T cells could efficiently kill HepG2 HCC cells, and produced IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, perforin and granzyme B, with minimal production of IL-10 (a negative regulator of T cell activation). Both strategies activated AFP-specific T cells, but the lentiviral strategy was superior by several measures. Data also support an impact of CD4+ T cells in supporting anti-tumor activity. In vivo studies in a xenograft HCC tumor model also showed that AFP-specific T cells could markedly suppress HCC tumor formation and morbidity in tumor-bearing nude mice, as well as regulate serum levels of related cytokines and antitumor molecules. In parallel with human in vitro T cell cultures, the in vivo model demonstrated superior anti-tumor effects and Th1-skewing with Lenti-AFP-DC. This study supports the superiority of a full-length antigen lentivirus-based DC vaccine strategy over peptides, and provides new insight into the design of DC-based vaccines. PMID:21491085

  8. Exactin: A specific inhibitor of Factor X activation by extrinsic tenase complex from the venom of Hemachatus haemachatus

    PubMed Central

    Girish, Vallerinteavide Mavelli; Kini, R. Manjunatha

    2016-01-01

    Unwanted clots lead to heart attack and stroke that result in a large number of deaths. Currently available anticoagulants have some drawbacks including their non-specific actions. Therefore novel anticoagulants that target specific steps in the coagulation pathway are being sought. Here we describe the identification and characterization of a novel anticoagulant protein from the venom of Hemachatus haemachatus (African Ringhals cobra) that specifically inhibits factor X (FX) activation by the extrinsic tenase complex (ETC) and thus named as exactin. Exactin belongs to the three-finger toxin (3FTx) family, with high sequence identity to neurotoxins and low identity to the well-characterized 3FTx anticoagulants-hemextin and naniproin. It is a mixed-type inhibitor of ETC with the kinetic constants, Ki’ and Ki determined as 30.62 ± 7.73 nM and 153.75 ± 17.96 nM, respectively. Exactin does not bind to the active site of factor VIIa and factor Xa based on its weak inhibition (IC50 ≫ 300 μM) to the amidolytic activities of these proteases. Exactin shows exquisite macromolecular specificity to FX activation as compared to factor IX activation by ETC. Exactin thus displays a distinct mechanism when compared to other anticoagulants targeting ETC, with its selective preference to ETC-FX [ES] complex. PMID:27558950

  9. Recurrent activity in higher order, modality non-specific brain regions: a Granger causality analysis of autobiographic memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Lou, Hans C; Joensson, Morten; Biermann-Ruben, Katja; Schnitzler, Alfons; Østergaard, Leif; Kjaer, Troels W; Gross, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that the workings of the brain are mainly intrinsically generated recurrent neuronal activity, with sensory inputs as modifiers of such activity in both sensory and higher order modality non-specific regions. This is supported by the demonstration of recurrent neuronal activity in the visual system as a response to visual stimulation. In contrast recurrent activity has never been demonstrated before in higher order modality non-specific regions. Using magneto-encephalography and Granger causality analysis, we tested in a paralimbic network the hypothesis that stimulation may enhance causal recurrent interaction between higher-order, modality non-specific regions. The network includes anterior cingulate/medial prefrontal and posterior cingulate/medial parietal cortices together with pulvinar thalami, a network known to be effective in autobiographic memory retrieval and self-awareness. Autobiographic memory retrieval of previous personal judgments of visually presented words was used as stimuli. It is demonstrated that the prestimulus condition is characterized by causal, recurrent oscillations which are maximal in the lower gamma range. When retrieving previous judgments of visually presented adjectives, this activity is dramatically increased during the stimulus task as ascertained by Granger causality analysis. Our results confirm the hypothesis that stimulation may enhance causal interaction between higher order, modality non-specific brain regions, exemplified in a network of autobiographical memory retrieval.

  10. Lentivirally engineered dendritic cells activate AFP-specific T cells which inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Butterfield, Lisa H; Fu, Xiaohui; Song, Zhenshun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lu, Chongde; Ding, Guanghui; Wu, Mengchao

    2011-07-01

    α-fetoprotein (AFP), a tumor-associated antigen for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is an established biomarker for HCC. In this study, we created a lentivirus expressing the AFP antigen and investigated the anti-tumor activity of AFP-specific CD8+ T cells, with and without CD4+ T cells, which were activated by either AFP peptide-pulsed or Lenti-AFP-engineered Dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and in vivo. AFP-specific T cells could efficiently kill HepG2 HCC cells, and produced IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, perforin and granzyme B, with minimal production of IL-10 (a negative regulator of T cell activation). Both strategies activated AFP-specific T cells, but the lentiviral strategy was superior by several measures. Data also support an impact of CD4+ T cells in supporting anti-tumor activity. In vivo studies in a xenograft HCC tumor model also showed that AFP-specific T cells could markedly suppress HCC tumor formation and morbidity in tumor-bearing nude mice, as well as regulate serum levels of related cytokines and anti-tumor molecules. In parallel with human in vitro T cell cultures, the in vivo model demonstrated superior anti-tumor effects and Th1-skewing with Lenti-AFP-DCs. This study supports the superiority of a full-length antigen lentivirus-based DCs vaccine strategy over peptides, and provides new insight into the design of DCs-based vaccines.

  11. Task-specific stability in muscle activation space during unintentional movements.

    PubMed

    Falaki, Ali; Towhidkhah, Farzad; Zhou, Tao; Latash, Mark L

    2014-11-01

    We used robot-generated perturbations applied during position-holding tasks to explore stability of induced unintentional movements in a multidimensional space of muscle activations. Healthy subjects held the handle of a robot against a constant bias force and were instructed not to interfere with hand movements produced by changes in the external force. Transient force changes were applied leading to handle displacement away from the initial position and then back toward the initial position. Intertrial variance in the space of muscle modes (eigenvectors in the muscle activations space) was quantified within two subspaces, corresponding to unchanged handle coordinate and to changes in the handle coordinate. Most variance was confined to the former subspace in each of the three phases of movement, the initial steady state, the intermediate position, and the final steady state. The same result was found when the changes in muscle activation were analyzed between the initial and final steady states. Changes in the dwell time between the perturbation force application and removal led to different final hand locations undershooting the initial position. The magnitude of the undershot scaled with the dwell time, while the structure of variance in the muscle activation space did not depend on the dwell time. We conclude that stability of the hand coordinate is ensured during both intentional and unintentional actions via similar mechanisms. Relative equifinality in the external space after transient perturbations may be associated with varying states in the redundant space of muscle activations. The results fit a hierarchical scheme for the control of voluntary movements with referent configurations and redundant mapping between the levels of the hierarchy.

  12. A novel cathelicidin from Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor showed specific activity to its habitat bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tongyi; Zhan, Bo; Gao, Yuanyuan

    2015-10-25

    Toad Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor is still used in China as traditional Chinese medicine. However, present investigations on its skin secretions were mainly focused on the bufadienolides, the proteins/peptides contained in the secretions are largely unknown. A cDNA encoding a novel cathelicidin termed BG-CATH was identified by analysis of the toad skin transcriptome. The BG-CATH precursor was predicted to have 2 possible cleavage sites following dibasic cleavage signals at its C-terminal, which will generate two mature peptides, BG-CATH37 and BG-CATH(5-37). Phylogenetic analysis suggests that amphibian cathelicidins might evolve from common ancestors. The two predicted mature cathelicidins from B. bufo gargarizans were synthesized and both of them showed weak antimicrobial activities against human pathogenic bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus (MIC ≥ 200 μg/mL). However, BG-CATH37 and BG-CATH(5-37) had strong antimicrobial activities against aquatic bacteria of Vibrio splendidus, Streptococcus iniae and Aeromorus hydrophila, which were common microorganisms in the habitat of B. bufo gargarizans (MIC 3.125-40 μg/mL). BG-CATH37 and BG-CATH(5-37) showed no hemolytic activity even at high concentrations (400 μg/mL). CD spectra analysis suggested that structure rigidity of BG-CATH37 and BG-CATH(5-37) might play an important role to regulate their biological activities. Selective antimicrobial activity against habitat microorganisms might reflect the adaptation of amphibians to their living environments.