Science.gov

Sample records for activities specific activities

  1. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1996-06-11

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidation state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  2. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  3. Enzyme Specific Activity in Functionalized Nanoporous Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Chenghong; Soares, Thereza A.; Shin, Yongsoon; Liu, Jun; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2008-03-26

    Enzyme specific activity can be increased or decreased to a large extent by changing protein loading density in functionalized nanoporous support, where organophosphorus hydrolase can display a constructive orientation and thus leave a completely open entrance for substrate even at higher protein loading density, but glucose oxidase can not.

  4. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project (LDRD) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There were two primary objectives for the work performed under this project. The first was to take advantage of capabilities and facilities at Los Alamos to produce the radionuclide {sup 32}Si in unusually high specific activity. The second was to combine the radioanalytical expertise at Los Alamos with the expertise at the University of California to develop methods for the application of {sup 32}Si in biological oceanographic research related to global climate modeling. The first objective was met by developing targetry for proton spallation production of {sup 32}Si in KCl targets and chemistry for its recovery in very high specific activity. The second objective was met by developing a validated field-useable, radioanalytical technique, based upon gas-flow proportional counting, to measure the dynamics of silicon uptake by naturally occurring diatoms.

  5. Active site specificity of plasmepsin II.

    PubMed Central

    Westling, J.; Cipullo, P.; Hung, S. H.; Saft, H.; Dame, J. B.; Dunn, B. M.

    1999-01-01

    Members of the aspartic proteinase family of enzymes have very similar three-dimensional structures and catalytic mechanisms. Each, however, has unique substrate specificity. These distinctions arise from variations in amino acid residues that line the active site subsites and interact with the side chains of the amino acids of the peptides that bind to the active site. To understand the unique binding preferences of plasmepsin II, an enzyme of the aspartic proteinase class from the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, chromogenic octapeptides having systematic substitutions at various positions in the sequence were analyzed. This enabled the design of new, improved substrates for this enzyme (Lys-Pro-Ile-Leu-Phe*Nph-Ala/Glu-Leu-Lys, where * indicates the cleavage point). Additionally, the crystal structure of plasmepsin II was analyzed to explain the binding characteristics. Specific amino acids (Met13, Ser77, and Ile287) that were suspected of contributing to active site binding and specificity were chosen for site-directed mutagenesis experiments. The Met13Glu and Ile287Glu single mutants and the Met13Glu/Ile287Glu double mutant gain the ability to cleave substrates containing Lys residues. PMID:10548045

  6. High specific activity platinum-195m

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Du, Miting; Beets, Arnold L.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    2004-10-12

    A new composition of matter includes .sup.195m Pt characterized by a specific activity of at least 30 mCi/mg Pt, generally made by method that includes the steps of: exposing .sup.193 Ir to a flux of neutrons sufficient to convert a portion of the .sup.193 Ir to .sup.195m Pt to form an irradiated material; dissolving the irradiated material to form an intermediate solution comprising Ir and Pt; and separating the Pt from the Ir by cation exchange chromatography to produce .sup.195m Pt.

  7. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2003-10-28

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  8. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2002-12-03

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  9. Mechanisms of Specificity for Hox Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zandvakili, Arya; Gebelein, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Metazoans encode clusters of paralogous Hox genes that are critical for proper development of the body plan. However, there are a number of unresolved issues regarding how paralogous Hox factors achieve specificity to control distinct cell fates. First, how do Hox paralogs, which have very similar DNA binding preferences in vitro, drive different transcriptional programs in vivo? Second, the number of potential Hox binding sites within the genome is vast compared to the number of sites bound. Hence, what determines where in the genome Hox factors bind? Third, what determines whether a Hox factor will activate or repress a specific target gene? Here, we review the current evidence that is beginning to shed light onto these questions. In particular, we highlight how cooperative interactions with other transcription factors (especially PBC and HMP proteins) and the sequences of cis-regulatory modules provide a basis for the mechanisms of Hox specificity. We conclude by integrating a number of the concepts described throughout the review in a case study of a highly interrogated Drosophila cis-regulatory module named “The Distal-less Conserved Regulatory Element” (DCRE). PMID:27583210

  10. Photodynamic effect on specific antitumor immune activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonarx-Coinsmann, Veronique; Foultier, Marie-Therese; Morlet, Laurent; de Brito, Leonor X.; Patrice, Thierry

    1995-03-01

    In this study the effect of PDT on the antitumoral specific immunologic response was evaluated. We compared the specific cytolytic activity (CLA) by a chromium release assay of primed mouse spleen T lymphocytes sensitized against syngeneic mastocytoma P511 cells. P511 cells, or lymphocytes, or both cells were treated or not with photofrin and/or light (514 nm). Photofrin II alone (1 (mu) g/ml, 2 hours) reduced CLA 59% when P511 were treated. Photofrin II (1 (mu) g/ml) followed by light (25 Joules/sq cm) also reduced CLA 35%. Photofrin II alone (0.5 (mu) g/ml, 2 hours) reduced CLA 8% when only lymphocytes were treated. And Photofrin II (0.5 (mu) g/ml) followed by light (25 Joules/sq cm) also reduced CLA 45%. When both cells were treated with Photofrin II alone or followed by light (25 Joules/sq cm) the CLA was also reduced respectively 19, 41%.

  11. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provide and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  12. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1994-09-13

    A process for the preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  13. Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents three activities: (1) investigating succession in a schoolground; (2) investigating oak galls; and (3) making sun prints (photographs made without camera or darkroom). Each activity includes a list of materials needed and procedures used. (JN)

  14. 10 CFR 810.8 - Activities requiring specific authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Activities requiring specific authorization. 810.8 Section 810.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.8 Activities requiring specific authorization. Unless generally authorized by § 810.7, a person requires specific authorization by the Secretary of Energy...

  15. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Mally

    1992-01-01

    A series of four activities are presented to enhance students' abilities to appreciate and use trigonometry as a tool in problem solving. Activities cover problems applying the law of sines, the law of cosines, and matching equivalent trigonometric expressions. A teacher's guide, worksheets, and answers are provided. (MDH)

  16. 10 CFR 810.8 - Activities requiring specific authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Activities requiring specific authorization. 810.8 Section 810.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.8 Activities requiring specific authorization. Unless generally authorized by § 810.7, a person requires...

  17. 10 CFR 810.8 - Activities requiring specific authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Activities requiring specific authorization. 810.8 Section 810.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.8 Activities requiring specific authorization. Unless generally authorized by § 810.7, a person requires...

  18. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, Charlene; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students collect and organize data from a real-world simulation of the scientific concept of half life. Students collect data using a marble sifter, analyze the data using a graphing calculator, and determine an appropriate mathematical model. Includes reproducible worksheets. (MDH)

  19. Suppression of Antigen-Specific Lymphocyte Activation in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, David; Pride, Michael W.; Brown, Eric L.; Risin, Diana; Pellis, Neal R.

    1999-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in astronauts during and after spaceflight, and in isolated immune cells in true and simulated microgravity. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T cells is severely suppressed in true and simulated microgravity. These recent findings with various polyclonal activators suggests a suppression of oligoclonal lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors that simulate aspects of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction (MLR), as a model for a primary immune response; a tetanus toxoid (TT) response and a B. burgdorferi (Bb) response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  20. Mechanism of dual specificity kinase activity of DYRK1A.

    PubMed

    Walte, Agnes; Rüben, Katharina; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Preisinger, Christian; Bamberg-Lemper, Simone; Hilz, Nikolaus; Bracher, Franz; Becker, Walter

    2013-09-01

    The function of many protein kinases is controlled by the phosphorylation of a critical tyrosine residue in the activation loop. Dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinases (DYRKs) autophosphorylate on this tyrosine residue but phosphorylate substrates on aliphatic amino acids. This study addresses the mechanism of dual specificity kinase activity in DYRK1A and related kinases. Tyrosine autophosphorylation of DYRK1A occurred rapidly during in vitro translation and did not depend on the non-catalytic domains or other proteins. Expression in bacteria as well as in mammalian cells revealed that tyrosine kinase activity of DYRK1A is not restricted to the co-translational autophosphorylation in the activation loop. Moreover, mature DYRK1A was still capable of tyrosine autophosphorylation. Point mutants of DYRK1A and DYRK2 lacking the activation loop tyrosine showed enhanced tyrosine kinase activity. A series of structurally diverse DYRK1A inhibitors was used to pharmacologically distinguish different conformational states of the catalytic domain that are hypothesized to account for the dual specificity kinase activity. All tested compounds inhibited substrate phosphorylation with higher potency than autophosphorylation but none of the tested inhibitors differentially inhibited threonine and tyrosine kinase activity. Finally, the related cyclin-dependent kinase-like kinases (CLKs), which lack the activation loop tyrosine, autophosphorylated on tyrosine both in vitro and in living cells. We propose a model of DYRK autoactivation in which tyrosine autophosphorylation in the activation loop stabilizes a conformation of the catalytic domain with enhanced serine/threonine kinase activity without disabling tyrosine phosphorylation. The mechanism of dual specificity kinase activity probably applies to related serine/threonine kinases that depend on tyrosine autophosphorylation for maturation. PMID:23809146

  1. Site–Specific Monoubiquitination Activates Ras by Impeding GTPase Activating Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Rachael; Lewis, Steven M.; Sasaki, Atsuo T.; Wilkerson, Emily M.; Locasale, Jason W.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Kuhlman, Brian; Dohlman, Henrik G.; Campbell, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell growth and differentiation are controlled by growth factor receptors coupled to the GTPase Ras. Oncogenic mutations disrupt GTPase activity leading to persistent Ras signaling and cancer progression. Recent evidence indicates that monoubiquitination of Ras leads to Ras activation. Mutation of the primary site of monoubiquitination impairs the ability of activated K–Ras to promote tumor growth. To determine the mechanism of human Ras activation we chemically ubiquitinated the protein and analyzed its function by NMR, computational modeling, and biochemical activity measurements. We established that monoubiquitination has little effect on Ras GTP binding, GTP hydrolysis, or exchange factor activation, but severely abrogates the response to GTPase activating proteins in a site–specific manner. These findings reveal a new mechanism by which Ras can trigger persistent signaling in the absence of receptor activation or an oncogenic mutation. PMID:23178454

  2. UML activity diagrams in requirements specification of logic controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobelna, Iwona; Grobelny, Michał

    2015-12-01

    Logic controller specification can be prepared using various techniques. One of them is the wide understandable and user-friendly UML language and its activity diagrams. Using formal methods during the design phase increases the assurance that implemented system meets the project requirements. In the approach we use the model checking technique to formally verify a specification against user-defined behavioral requirements. The properties are usually defined as temporal logic formulas. In the paper we propose to use UML activity diagrams in requirements definition and then to formalize them as temporal logic formulas. As a result, UML activity diagrams can be used both for logic controller specification and for requirements definition, what simplifies the specification and verification process.

  3. Stage-specific fucosyltransferase activity during mouse spermatogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cardullo, R.A.; Armant, D.R.; Millette, C.F.

    1986-05-01

    This laboratory is involved in the biochemical characterization of developing spermatogenic cells. The authors have measured the in vitro activity of fucosyltransferase (FT) in germ cells. FT activity was assayed with a procedure modified from Letts et al. using GDP-(/sup 14/C)-fucose and asialofetuin as substrates. After incubation for 15 minutes at 33/sup 0/C, the reaction was stopped by adding cold 500 mM EDTA. Radiolabeled asialofetuin was isolated using Bio-Gel P-10 chromatography. The FT activity of germ cells purified from seminiferous tubules was 18.5 +/- 1.7 pmol/mg protein-min. To see if this activity varied at different stages of development, germ cells were further separated in a STAPUT chamber using a 2-4% BSA gradient. Pachytene spermatocytes or round spermatids were purified to at least 87%. The FT activity in isolated pachytene spermatocytes was 24.4 +/- 1.2 pmol/mg protein-min while the activity in isolated round spermatids was 49.0 +/- 7.2 pmol/mg protein-min. These results suggest that the highest FT activity is in developing spermatogenic cells with round spermatids having nearly twice the FT activity as pachytene spermatocytes. This increase in FT activity may be biologically significant since it occurs at a time when the Golgi apparatus is undergoing differentiation and when stage-specific fucosylated proteins appear.

  4. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  5. Mechanisms of specificity in neuronal activity-regulated gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Michelle R.; West, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is a highly adaptable organ that is capable of converting sensory information into changes in neuronal function. This plasticity allows behavior to be accommodated to the environment, providing an important evolutionary advantage. Neurons convert environmental stimuli into long-lasting changes in their physiology in part through the synaptic activity-regulated transcription of new gene products. Since the neurotransmitter-dependent regulation of Fos transcription was first discovered nearly 25 years ago, a wealth of studies have enriched our understanding of the molecular pathways that mediate activity-regulated changes in gene transcription. These findings show that a broad range of signaling pathways and transcriptional regulators can be engaged by neuronal activity to sculpt complex programs of stimulus-regulated gene transcription. However, the shear scope of the transcriptional pathways engaged by neuronal activity raises the question of how specificity in the nature of the transcriptional response is achieved in order to encode physiologically relevant responses to divergent stimuli. Here we summarize the general paradigms by which neuronal activity regulates transcription while focusing on the molecular mechanisms that confer differential stimulus-, cell-type-, and developmental-specificity upon activity-regulated programs of neuronal gene transcription. In addition, we preview some of the new technologies that will advance our future understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of activity-regulated gene transcription in the brain. PMID:21620929

  6. Suppression of antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in modeled microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D.; Pride, M. W.; Brown, E. L.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in lymphocytes from astronauts during and after a space flight. It is difficult to ascribe this suppression to microgravity effects on immune cells in crew specimens, due to the complex physiological response to space flight and the resultant effect on in vitro immune performance. Use of isolated immune cells in true and modeled microgravity in immune performance tests, suggests a direct effect of microgravity on in vitro cellular function. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T-cells is severely suppressed in true and modeled microgravity. These recent findings suggest a potential suppression of oligoclonal antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors as an analog of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction, as a model for a primary immune response, a tetanus toxoid response and a Borrelia burgdorferi response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  7. Stress causes tissue-specific changes in the sialyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Dabelic, Sanja; Flögel, Mirna; Maravić, Gordana; Lauc, Gordan

    2004-01-01

    Numerous pathological conditions are associated with specific changes in glycosylation. Recent studies clearly demonstrated a link between stress and the development and course of many diseases. Biochemical mechanisms that link stress and diseases are still not fully understood, but there are some indications that changes in glycosylation are involved in this process. Influence of acute and chronic psychological stress on protein sialylation as well as the activity of sialyltransferases, enzymes that synthesize sialoglycoproteins, has been studied on Fischer rats. Liver, spleen, kidney, skeletal muscle, heart, adrenal gland, serum, cerebellum, hippocampus, medulla oblongata and cortex have been analyzed. Statistically significant tissue- and type of stress-specific changes in total sialyltransferase (ST) activity were observed. Acute stress resulted in 39% increase of ST activity in liver and spleen, while at the same time there was 43% decrease in ST activity in cerebellum. In chronic stress, ST activity increased in spleen (93%) and decreased in liver (17%), cerebellum (38%) and hippocampus (64%). Western-blot analysis using Maackia amurensis and Sambucus nigra lectins did not reveal any difference in protein sialylation. The results of serum corticosterone analysis indicate that showed increase in acute stress and decrease in chronic stress are in good accordance with the hypothesis that corticosterone has a role in the regulation of liver ST activity. PMID:15241940

  8. Unconscious Semantic Activation Depends on Feature-Specific Attention Allocation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spruyt, Adriaan; De Houwer, Jan; Everaert, Tom; Hermans, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether semantic activation by subliminally presented stimuli is dependent upon the extent to which participants assign attention to specific semantic stimulus features and stimulus dimensions. Participants pronounced visible target words that were preceded by briefly presented, masked prime words. Both affective and non-affective…

  9. Internet Content-Based Activities for English for Specific Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marco, Maria Jose Luzon

    2002-01-01

    Describes the benefits of a content-based approach to English for specific purposes, (ESP) examines how WebQuests can be integrated into a content-based ESP syllabus, analyze the different types of WebQuests suitable for ESP teaching, and discuses the limitations of this type of activity and the factors that should be considered when using…

  10. Essentials of specifications for activated alumina in defluoridation technology.

    PubMed

    Misra, S K

    2006-10-01

    Worldwide, fluoride occurs naturally in some aquifers at concentrations above the WHO guideline values or Bureau of Indian Standards or CPHEEO - MUD - GOI parametric values. Fluoride in excess of the permissible limits in drinking water causes a number of endemic conditions referred to collectively as "fluorosis". Endemic fluorosis remains a challenging national health problem in India and Rajasthan is one of the worst affected states in India though a wide range of chemical and physical defluoridation systems were evolved and tried. Still activated alumina is one of the most widely used and liked defluoridation material currently available. Boom in the advanced and versatile alumina technology has opened new vistas to avail the strong potential of selective alumina adsorbents which are application-specific. Non-regenerable and specialty alumina offer tremendous scope to defluoridate drinking water. Indian industries are manufacturing regenerable activated alumina for defluoridation of drinking water. In order to ensure application of an adsorbent, which caters the desired results with minimum interferences, health risks and long service life span, it is inevitable to draw out dimensions which define precisely the attributes of activated alumina. Specifications for activated alumina intended for defluoridation of drinking water, specific operating and performance requirements, and limitations expressed by critical analysis of cardinal characteristics pave way for adoption of acceptable specifications and code of practice at national level. PMID:18179116

  11. Chemically sulfated natural galactomannans with specific antiviral and anticoagulant activities.

    PubMed

    Muschin, Tegshi; Budragchaa, Davaanyam; Kanamoto, Taisei; Nakashima, Hideki; Ichiyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shuqin, Han; Yoshida, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Naturally occurring galactomannans were sulfated to give sulfated galactomannans with degrees of substitution of 0.7-1.4 per sugar unit and molecular weights of M¯n=0.6×10(4)-2.4×10(4). Sulfated galactomannans were found to have specific biological activities in vitro such as anticoagulant, anti-HIV and anti-Dengue virus activities. The biological activities were compared with those of standard dextran and curdlan sulfates, which are polysaccharides with potent antiviral activity and low cytotoxicity. It was found that sulfated galactomannans had moderate to high anticoagulant activity, 13.4-36.6unit/mg, compared to that of dextran and curdlan sulfates, 22.7 and 10.0unit/mg, and high anti-HIV and anti-Dengue virus activities, 0.04-0.8μg/mL and 0.2-1.1μg/mL, compared to those curdlan sulfates, 0.1μg/mL, respectively. The cytotoxicity on MT-4 and LCC-MK2 cells was low. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of sulfated galactomannans revealed strong interaction with poly-l-lysine as a model compound of virus proteins, and suggested that the specific biological activities might originate in the electrostatic interaction of negatively charged sulfate groups of sulfated galactomannans and positively charged amino groups of surface proteins of viruses. These results suggest that sulfated galactomannans effectively prevented the infection of cells by viruses and the degree of substitution and molecular weights played important roles in the biological activities. PMID:27154517

  12. Functional Specificity of the Visual Word Form Area: General Activation for Words and Symbols but Specific Network Activation for Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinke, Karen; Fernandes, Myra; Schwindt, Graeme; O'Craven, Kathleen; Grady, Cheryl L.

    2008-01-01

    The functional specificity of the brain region known as the Visual Word Form Area (VWFA) was examined using fMRI. We explored whether this area serves a general role in processing symbolic stimuli, rather than being selective for the processing of words. Brain activity was measured during a visual 1-back task to English words, meaningful symbols…

  13. A specific, transmembrane interface regulates fibroblast activation protein (FAP) homodimerization, trafficking and exopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Wonganu, Benjamaporn; Berger, Bryan W

    2016-08-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a cell-surface serine protease which promotes invasiveness of certain epithelial cancers and is therefore a potential target for cancer drug development and delivery. Unlike dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV), FAP exhibits prolyl endopeptidase activity and is active as a homodimer with specificity for type I collagen. The mechanism that regulates FAP homodimerization and its relation to prolyl endopeptidase activity is not completely understood. Here, we investigate key residues in the FAP TM domain that may be significant for FAP homodimerization. Mutations to predicted TM interfacial residues (G10L, S14L, and A18L) comprising a small-X3-small motif reduced FAP TM-CYTO dimerization relative to wild type as measured using the AraTM assay, whereas predicted off-interface residues showed no significant change from wild type. The results implied that the predicted small-X3-small dimer interface affect stabilization of FAP TM-CYTO homodimerization. Compared with FAPwild-type, the interfacial TM residue G10L significantly decreased FAP endopeptidase activity more than 25%, and also reduced cell-surface versus intracellular expression relative to other interfacial residues S14L and A18L. Thus, our results suggest FAP dimerization is important for both trafficking and protease activity, and is dependent on a specific TM interface. PMID:27155568

  14. Impact of dewatering technologies on specific methanogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Batstone, Damien J; Lu, Yang; Jensen, Paul D

    2015-10-01

    Dewatering methods for recuperative thickening and final dewatering can potentially impact methanogenic activity and microbial community. This influences both the feasibility of recuperative thickening to increase solids residence time within a digester, and the utilisation of dewatered digestate as inoculum for new digesters. Thickening technology can reduce methanogenic activity through either air contact (rotary drum, DAF, or belt filter press), or by lysing cells through shear (centrifuge). To assess this, two plants with recuperative thickening (rotary drum) in their anaerobic digester, and five without recuperative thickening, had specific methanogenic activity tested in all related streams, including dewatering feed, thickened return, final cake, and centrate. All plants had high speed centrifuges for final dewatering. The digester microbial community was also assessed through 16s pyrotag sequencing and subsequent principal component analysis (PCA). The specific methanogenic activity of all samples was in the expected range of 0.2-0.4 gCOD gVS(-1)d(-1). Plants with recuperative thickening did not have lower digester activity. Centrifuge based dewatering had a significant and variable impact on methanogenic activity in all samples, ranging between 20% and 90% decrease but averaging 54%. Rotary drum based recuperative thickening had a far smaller impact on activity, with a 0% per-pass drop in activity in one plant, and a 20% drop in another. However, the presence of recuperative thickening was a major predictor of overall microbial community (PC1, p = 0.0024). Microbial community PC3 (mainly driven by a shift in methanogens) was a strong predictor for sensitivity in activity to shear (p = 0.0005, p = 0.00001 without outlier). The one outlier was related to a plant producing the wettest cake (17% solids). This indicates that high solids is a potential driver of sensitivity to shear, but that a resilient microbial community can also bestow resilience

  15. Novel strategies for ultrahigh specific activity targeted nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dong

    2012-12-13

    We have developed novel strategies optimized for preparing high specific activity radiolabeled nanoparticles, targeting nuclear imaging of low abundance biomarkers. Several compounds have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64 for radiolabeling of SCK-nanoparticles via Copper(I) catalyzed or copper-free alkyne-azide cyclolization. Novel strategies have been developed to achieve ultrahigh specific activity with administrable amount of dose for human study using copper-free chemistry. Ligands for carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12), a low abundance extracellular biomarker for the responsiveness of breast cancer to endocrine therapie, have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64, and one of them has been evaluated in animal models. The results of this project will lead to major improvements in the use of nanoparticles in nuclear imaging and will significantly advance their potential for detecting low abundance biomarkers of medical importance.

  16. Method of preparing high specific activity platinum-195m

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Du, Miting; Beets, Arnold L.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    2004-06-15

    A method of preparing high-specific-activity .sup.195m Pt includes the steps of: exposing .sup.193 Ir to a flux of neutrons sufficient to convert a portion of the .sup.193 Ir to .sup.195m Pt to form an irradiated material; dissolving the irradiated material to form an intermediate solution comprising Ir and Pt; and separating the Pt from the Ir by cation exchange chromatography to produce .sup.195m Pt.

  17. Method for preparing high specific activity 177Lu

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Du, Miting; Beets, Arnold L.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    2004-04-06

    A method of separating lutetium from a solution containing Lu and Yb, particularly reactor-produced .sup.177 Lu and .sup.177 Yb, includes the steps of: providing a chromatographic separation apparatus containing LN resin; loading the apparatus with a solution containing Lu and Yb; and eluting the apparatus to chromatographically separate the Lu and the Yb in order to produce high-specific-activity .sup.177 Yb.

  18. Regulation of platelet activating factor receptor coupled phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C activity

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were two-fold. The first was to establish whether binding of platelet activating factor (PAF) to its receptor was integral to the stimulation of polyphosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) in rabbit platelets. The second was to determine regulatory features of this receptor-coupled mechanism. ({sup 3}H)PAF binding demonstrated two binding sites, a high affinity site with a inhibitory constant (Ki) of 2.65 nM and a low affinity site with a Ki of 0.80 {mu}M. PAF receptor coupled activation of phosphoinositide-specific PLC was studied in platelets which were made refractory, by short term pretreatments, to either PAF or thrombin. Saponin-permeabilized rabbit platelets continue to regulate the mechanism(s) coupling PAF receptors to PLC stimulation. However, TRP{gamma}S and GDP{beta}S, which affect guanine nucleotide regulatory protein functions, were unable to modulate the PLC activity to any appreciable extent as compared to PAF. The possible involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) activation in regulating PAF-stimulated PLC activity was studied in rabbit platelets pretreated with staurosporine followed by pretreatments with PAF or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA).

  19. Differential Reovirus-Specific and Herpesvirus-Specific Activator Protein 1 Activation of Secretogranin II Leads to Altered Virus Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Berard, Alicia R.; Severini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses utilize host cell machinery for propagation and manage to evade cellular host defense mechanisms in the process. Much remains unknown regarding how the host responds to viral infection. We recently performed global proteomic screens of mammalian reovirus TIL- and T3D-infected and herpesvirus (herpes simplex virus 1 [HSV-1])-infected HEK293 cells. The nonenveloped RNA reoviruses caused an upregulation, whereas the enveloped DNA HSV-1 caused a downregulation, of cellular secretogranin II (SCG2). SCG2, a member of the granin family that functions in hormonal peptide sorting into secretory vesicles, has not been linked to virus infections previously. We confirmed SCG2 upregulation and found SCG2 phosphorylation by 18 h postinfection (hpi) in reovirus-infected cells. We also found a decrease in the amount of reovirus secretion from SCG2 knockdown cells. Similar analyses of cells infected with HSV-1 showed an increase in the amount of secreted virus. Analysis of the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)/Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) pathway indicated that each virus activates different pathways leading to activator protein 1 (AP-1) activation, which is the known SCG2 transcription activator. We conclude from these experiments that the negative correlation between SCG2 quantity and virus secretion for both viruses indicates a virus-specific role for SCG2 during infection. IMPORTANCE Mammalian reoviruses affect the gastrointestinal system or cause respiratory infections in humans. Recent work has shown that all mammalian reovirus strains (most specifically T3D) may be useful oncolytic agents. The ubiquitous herpes simplex viruses cause common sores in mucosal areas of their host and have coevolved with hosts over many years. Both of these virus species are prototypical representatives of their viral families, and investigation of these viruses can lead to further knowledge of how they and the other more pathogenic members of their respective

  20. Enhancer-specific modulation of E protein activity.

    PubMed

    Markus, Maurice; Du, Zhimei; Benezra, Robert

    2002-02-22

    Homodimeric complexes of members of the E protein family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors are important for tissue-specific activation of genes in B lymphocytes (Bain, G., Gruenwald, S., and Murre, C. (1993) Mol. Cell Biol. 13, 3522-3529; Shen, C. P., and Kadesch, T. (1995) Mol. Cell Biol. 15, 4518-4524; Jacobs, Y., et al. (1994) Mol. Cell Biol. 14, 4087-4096; Wilson, R. B., et al. (1991) Mol. Cell Biol. 11, 6185-6191). These homodimers, however, have little activity on myogenic enhancers (Weintraub, H., Genetta, T., and Kadesch, T. (1994) Genes Dev. 8, 2203-2211). We report here the identification of a novel cis-acting transcriptional repression domain in the E protein family of bHLH transcription factors. This domain, the Rep domain, is present in each of the known vertebrate E proteins. Extensive mapping analysis demonstrates that this domain is an acidic region of 30 amino acids with a predicted loop structure. Fusion studies indicate that the Rep domain can repress both of the E protein transactivation domains (AD1 and AD2). Physiologically, the Rep domain plays a key role in maintaining E protein homodimers in an inactive state on myogenic enhancers. In addition, we demonstrate that Rep domain mediated repression of AD1 is a necessary for the function of MyoD-E protein heterodimeric complexes. These studies demonstrate that the Rep domain is important for modulating the transcriptional activity of E proteins and provide key insights into both the selectivity and mechanism of action of E protein containing bHLH protein complexes. PMID:11724804

  1. Specific activation of the thyrotropin receptor by trypsin.

    PubMed

    Van Sande, J; Massart, C; Costagliola, S; Allgeier, A; Cetani, F; Vassart, G; Dumont, J E

    1996-05-31

    The identification of 16 different activating mutations in the TSH receptor, found in patients suffering from toxic autonomous adenomas or congenital hyperthyroidism, leads to the concept that this receptor is in a constrained conformation in its wild-type form. We used mild trypsin treatment of CHO-K1 cells or COS-7 cells, stably or transiently transfected with the human TSH receptor, respectively, and measured its consequences on the TSH receptor coupled cascades, i.e. cyclic AMP and inositol-phosphates accumulation. A 2-min, 0.01% trypsin treatment increased stably cyclic AMP but not inositol-phosphates formation. This was not observed after chymotrypsin, thrombin and endoproteinase glu C treatment. The TSH action on cyclic AMP was decreased by only 25%. The effect was also observed in cells expressing the dog TSH receptor. It was not observed in MSH receptor, LH receptor expressing or mock transfected cells (vector alone). It is therefore specific for the TSH receptor, for its action on the Gs/adenylate cyclase cascade, and for the proteolytic cleavage caused by trypsin. Using monoclonal (A. Johnstone and P. Shepherd, personal communication) and polyclonal antibodies directed against the extracellular domain of the TSH receptor, it was shown that treatment by trypsin removes or destroys a VFFEEQ epitope (residues 354-359) from the receptor. The effect mimics the action of TSH as it activates Gs alpha and enhances the action of forskolin. It is not reversible in 1 h. The results support the concept that activation of the receptor (by hormone, autoantibodies, mutations or mild proteolysis) might involve the relief of a built-in negative constrain. They suggest that the C-terminal portion of the large extracellular domain plays a role in the maintenance of this constrain. PMID:8807635

  2. Activities-Specific Balance Confidence in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nilsagård, Ylva; Carling, Anna; Forsberg, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the validity of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC) in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Design. A multicentre, cross-sectional study. Setting. Six rural and urban Swedish sites, including specialized units at hospitals and primary care centers. Participants. A sample of 84 PwMS with subjective gait and balance impairment but still able to walk 100 m (comparable with EDSS 1–6). Outcome Measures. Timed Up and Go, Timed Up and Gocog, 25-foot Timed Walk Test, Four Square Step Test, Dynamic Gait Index, Chair Stand Test, 12-item MS Walking Scale, self-reported falls, and use of assistive walking device were used for validation. Results. The concurrent convergent validity was moderate to good (0.50 to −0.75) with the highest correlation found for the 12-item MS Walking Scale. The ABC discriminated between multiple fallers and nonfallers but not between men and women. Ecological validity is suggested since ABC discriminated between users of assistive walking device and nonusers. The internal consistency was high at α = 0.95, and interitem correlations were between 0.30 and 0.83. Conclusion. This study supports the validity of the ABC for persons with mild-to-moderate MS. The participants lacked balance confidence in many everyday activities, likely restricting their participation in society. PMID:22919491

  3. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-05-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (M w 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  4. Allele-specific DNA methylation reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Izzi, Benedetta; Pistoni, Mariaelena; Cludts, Katrien; Akkor, Pinar; Lambrechts, Diether; Verfaillie, Catherine; Verhamme, Peter; Freson, Kathleen; Hoylaerts, Marc F

    2016-08-18

    Genetic variation in the PEAR1 locus is linked to platelet reactivity and cardiovascular disease. The major G allele of rs12041331, an intronic cytosine guanine dinucleotide-single-nucleotide polymorphism (CpG-SNP), is associated with higher PEAR1 expression in platelets and endothelial cells than the minor A allele. The molecular mechanism underlying this difference remains elusive. We have characterized the histone modification profiles of the intronic region surrounding rs12041331 and identified H3K4Me1 enhancer-specific enrichment for the region that covers the CpG-SNP. Interestingly, methylation studies revealed that the CpG site is fully methylated in leukocytes of GG carriers. Nuclear protein extracts from megakaryocytes, endothelial cells, vs control HEK-293 cells show a 3-fold higher affinity for the methylated G allele compared with nonmethylated G or A alleles in a gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay. To understand the positive relationship between methylation and gene expression, we studied DNA methylation at 4 different loci of PEAR1 during in vitro megakaryopoiesis. During differentiation, the CpG-SNP remained fully methylated, while we observed rapid methylation increases at the CpG-island overlapping the first 5'-untranslated region exon, paralleling the increased PEAR1 expression. In the same region, A-allele carriers of rs12041331 showed significantly lower DNA methylation at CGI1 compared with GG homozygote. This CpG-island contains binding sites for the methylation-sensitive transcription factor CTCF, whose binding is known to play a role in enhancer activation and/or repression. In conclusion, we report the molecular characterization of the first platelet function-related CpG-SNP, a genetic predisposition that reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity through allele-specific DNA methylation. PMID:27313330

  5. 50 CFR 654.27 - Specifically authorized activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STONE CRAB FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO Management... acquisition of information and data, activities otherwise prohibited by the regulations in this part....

  6. 50 CFR 654.27 - Specifically authorized activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STONE CRAB FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO Management... acquisition of information and data, activities otherwise prohibited by the regulations in this part....

  7. Application-specific architectures of CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szelezniak, Michal; Besson, Auguste; Claus, Gilles; Colledani, Claude; Degerli, Yavuz; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Deveaux, Michael; Dorokhov, Andrei; Dulinski, Wojciech; Fourches, Nicolas; Goffe, Mathieu; Grandjean, Damien; Guilloux, Fabrice; Heini, Sebastien; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hu, Christine; Jaaskelainen, Kimmo; Li, Yan; Lutz, Pierre; Orsini, Fabienne; Pellicioli, Michel; Shabetai, Alexandre; Valin, Isabelle; Winter, Marc

    2006-11-01

    Several development directions intended to adapt and optimize monolithic active pixel sensors for specific applications are presented in this work. The first example, compatible with the STAR microvertex upgrade, is based on a simple two-transistor pixel circuitry. It is suited for a long integration time, room-temperature operation and minimum power dissipation. In another approach for this application, a specific readout method is proposed, allowing optimization of the integration time independently of the full frame-readout time. The circuit consists of an in-pixel front-end voltage amplifier, with a gain on the order of five, followed by two analog memory cells. The extended version of this scheme, based on the implementation of more memory cells per pixel, is the solution considered for the outer layers of a microvertex detector at the international linear collider. For the two innermost layers, a circuit allowing fast frame scans together with on-line, on-chip data sparsification is proposed. The first results of this prototype demonstrate that the fixed pattern dispersion is reduced below a noise level of 15 e -, allowing the use of a single comparator or a low-resolution ADC per pixel column. A common element for most of the mentioned readout schemes is a low-noise, low power consumption, layout efficient in-pixel amplifier. A review of possible solutions for this element together with some experimental results is presented.

  8. 10 CFR 810.8 - Activities requiring specific authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... technology for an activity in any foreign country. (c) Engaging in or providing assistance or training in any... plutonium, or the production of heavy water; (2) Constructing, fabricating, operating, or maintaining...

  9. 10 CFR 810.8 - Activities requiring specific authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... technology for an activity in any foreign country. (c) Engaging in or providing assistance or training in any... plutonium, or the production of heavy water; (2) Constructing, fabricating, operating, or maintaining...

  10. Sequence-specific DNA primer effects on telomerase polymerization activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M S; Blackburn, E H

    1993-01-01

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase synthesizes one strand of telomeric DNA by copying a template sequence within the RNA moiety of the enzyme. Kinetic studies of this polymerization reaction were used to analyze the mechanism and properties of the telomerase from Tetrahymena thermophila. This enzyme synthesizes TTGGGG repeats, the telomeric DNA sequence of this species, by elongating a DNA primer whose 3' end base pairs with the template-forming domain of the RNA. The enzyme was found to act nonprocessively with short (10- to 12-nucleotide) primers but to become processive as TTGGGG repeats were added. Variation of the 5' sequences of short primers with a common 3' end identified sequence-specific effects which are distinct from those involving base pairing of the 3' end of the primer with the RNA template and which can markedly induce enzyme activity by increasing the catalytic rate of the telomerase polymerization reaction. These results identify an additional mechanistic basis for telomere and DNA end recognition by telomerase in vivo. Images PMID:8413255

  11. Organ- and species-specific biological activity of rosmarinic acid.

    PubMed

    Iswandana, R; Pham, B T; van Haaften, W T; Luangmonkong, T; Oosterhuis, D; Mutsaers, H A M; Olinga, P

    2016-04-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA), a compound found in several plant species, has beneficial properties, including anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. We investigated the toxicity, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects of RA using precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) and precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) prepared from human, mouse, and rat tissue. PCLS and PCIS were cultured up to 48h in the absence or presence of RA. Gene expression of the inflammatory markers: IL-6, IL-8/CXCL1/KC, and IL-1β, as well as the fibrosis markers: pro-collagen 1a1, heat shock protein 47, α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin (Fn2) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) were evaluated by qPCR. RA was only toxic in murine PCIS. RA failed to mitigate the inflammatory response in most models, while it clearly reduced IL-6 and CXCL1/KC gene expression in murine PCIS at non-toxic concentrations. With regard to fibrosis, RA decreased the gene levels of Fn2 and PAI-1 in murine PCLS, and Fn2 in murine PCIS. Yet, no effect was observed on the gene expression of fibrosis markers in human and rat PCIS. In conclusion, we observed clear organ- and species-specific effects of RA. RA had little influence on inflammation. However, our study further establishes RA as a potential candidate for the treatment of liver fibrosis. PMID:26804033

  12. The effect of trypsin and chymotrypsin on the bactericidal activity and specific antibody activity of bovine colostrum.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, J H; Arzabe, R; Piñeiro, A; Olivito, A M

    1977-01-01

    Digestion of bovine colostral whey with trypsin or chymotrypsin caused a progressive loss of the complement-mediated bactericidal activity of naturally-occurring colostral antibodies of E. coli 0111. Bactericidal activity was associated primarily with IgG1 immunoglobulin and to a lesser extent with IgM. Chymotrypsin preferentially attacked IgM, destroying its antibacterial activity and producing an apparent decrease in its mol wt. Trypsin preferentially attacked IgG1, but loss of antibacterial activity was in this case not accompanied by a decrease in molecular weight. Using colostral whey with antiperoxidase activity it was shown that the kinetics of loss of specific antibody activity were similar to those of loss of bactericidal activity. It is therefore suggested that trypsin may cause a loss of specific antibody activity of colostral IgG1 without cleaving the immunoglobulin molecule. PMID:321342

  13. Synthesis of a high specific activity methyl sulfone tritium isotopologue of fevipiprant (NVP-QAW039).

    PubMed

    Luu, Van T; Goujon, Jean-Yves; Meisterhans, Christian; Frommherz, Matthias; Bauer, Carsten

    2015-05-15

    The synthesis of a triple tritiated isotopologue of the CRTh2 antagonist NVP-QAW039 (fevipiprant) with a specific activity >3 TBq/mmol is described. Key to the high specific activity is the methylation of a bench-stable dimeric disulfide precursor that is in situ reduced to the corresponding thiol monomer and methylated with [(3)H3]MeONos having per se a high specific activity. The high specific activity of the tritiated active pharmaceutical ingredient obtained by a build-up approach is discussed in the light of the specific activity usually to be expected if hydrogen tritium exchange methods were applied. PMID:25881897

  14. Quantitation of fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-specific protease activity in mouse, baboon and human fluids and organs.

    PubMed

    Keane, Fiona M; Yao, Tsun-Wen; Seelk, Stefanie; Gall, Margaret G; Chowdhury, Sumaiya; Poplawski, Sarah E; Lai, Jack H; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Farrell, Penny; Vieira de Ribeiro, Ana Julia; Osborne, Brenna; Yu, Denise M T; Seth, Devanshi; Rahman, Khairunnessa; Haber, Paul; Topaloglu, A Kemal; Wang, Chuanmin; Thomson, Sally; Hennessy, Annemarie; Prins, John; Twigg, Stephen M; McLennan, Susan V; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Bachovchin, William W; Gorrell, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The protease fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a specific marker of activated mesenchymal cells in tumour stroma and fibrotic liver. A specific, reliable FAP enzyme assay has been lacking. FAP's unique and restricted cleavage of the post proline bond was exploited to generate a new specific substrate to quantify FAP enzyme activity. This sensitive assay detected no FAP activity in any tissue or fluid of FAP gene knockout mice, thus confirming assay specificity. Circulating FAP activity was ∼20- and 1.3-fold less in baboon than in mouse and human plasma, respectively. Serum and plasma contained comparable FAP activity. In mice, the highest levels of FAP activity were in uterus, pancreas, submaxillary gland and skin, whereas the lowest levels were in brain, prostate, leukocytes and testis. Baboon organs high in FAP activity included skin, epididymis, bladder, colon, adipose tissue, nerve and tongue. FAP activity was greatly elevated in tumours and associated lymph nodes and in fungal-infected skin of unhealthy baboons. FAP activity was 14- to 18-fold greater in cirrhotic than in non-diseased human liver, and circulating FAP activity was almost doubled in alcoholic cirrhosis. Parallel DPP4 measurements concorded with the literature, except for the novel finding of high DPP4 activity in bile. The new FAP enzyme assay is the first to be thoroughly characterised and shows that FAP activity is measurable in most organs and at high levels in some. This new assay is a robust tool for specific quantitation of FAP enzyme activity in both preclinical and clinical samples, particularly liver fibrosis. PMID:24371721

  15. Quantitation of fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-specific protease activity in mouse, baboon and human fluids and organs☆

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fiona M.; Yao, Tsun-Wen; Seelk, Stefanie; Gall, Margaret G.; Chowdhury, Sumaiya; Poplawski, Sarah E.; Lai, Jack H.; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Farrell, Penny; Vieira de Ribeiro, Ana Julia; Osborne, Brenna; Yu, Denise M.T.; Seth, Devanshi; Rahman, Khairunnessa; Haber, Paul; Topaloglu, A. Kemal; Wang, Chuanmin; Thomson, Sally; Hennessy, Annemarie; Prins, John; Twigg, Stephen M.; McLennan, Susan V.; McCaughan, Geoffrey W.; Bachovchin, William W.; Gorrell, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    The protease fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a specific marker of activated mesenchymal cells in tumour stroma and fibrotic liver. A specific, reliable FAP enzyme assay has been lacking. FAP's unique and restricted cleavage of the post proline bond was exploited to generate a new specific substrate to quantify FAP enzyme activity. This sensitive assay detected no FAP activity in any tissue or fluid of FAP gene knockout mice, thus confirming assay specificity. Circulating FAP activity was ∼20- and 1.3-fold less in baboon than in mouse and human plasma, respectively. Serum and plasma contained comparable FAP activity. In mice, the highest levels of FAP activity were in uterus, pancreas, submaxillary gland and skin, whereas the lowest levels were in brain, prostate, leukocytes and testis. Baboon organs high in FAP activity included skin, epididymis, bladder, colon, adipose tissue, nerve and tongue. FAP activity was greatly elevated in tumours and associated lymph nodes and in fungal-infected skin of unhealthy baboons. FAP activity was 14- to 18-fold greater in cirrhotic than in non-diseased human liver, and circulating FAP activity was almost doubled in alcoholic cirrhosis. Parallel DPP4 measurements concorded with the literature, except for the novel finding of high DPP4 activity in bile. The new FAP enzyme assay is the first to be thoroughly characterised and shows that FAP activity is measurable in most organs and at high levels in some. This new assay is a robust tool for specific quantitation of FAP enzyme activity in both preclinical and clinical samples, particularly liver fibrosis. PMID:24371721

  16. Cell-specific activity of neprilysin 2 isoforms and enzymic specificity compared with neprilysin.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Christiane; Voisin, Stéphanie; Gros, Claude; Schwartz, Jean-Charles; Ouimet, Tanja

    2002-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) 2 is a recently cloned glycoprotein displaying a high degree of sequence identity with neprilysin (EC 3.4.24.11), the prototypical member of the M13 subfamily of metalloproteases. Whereas NEP is involved in the metabolism of several bioactive peptides by plasma membranes of various cells, the enzymic properties and physiological functions of NEP2 are unknown. Here we characterize the cell-expression modalities and enzymic specificity of two alternatively spliced isoforms of NEP2 in Chinese hamster ovary and AtT20 cells. In the two cell lines, both isoforms are type II glycoproteins inserted in the endoplasmic reticulum as inactive precursors. Maturation detected by Western-blot analysis of glycosidase digests was cell-specific and more efficient in the endocrine cell line. The enzymic activity of both isoforms semi-purified from AtT20 cells reveals comparable specificities in terms of model substrates, pH optima and inhibitory patterns. NEP2 activity was compared with that of NEP regarding potencies of transition-state inhibitors, modes of hydrolysis, maximal hydrolysis rates and apparent affinities of bioactive peptides. Although all transition-state inhibitors of NEP inhibited NEP2 activity, albeit with different potencies, and many peptides were cleaved at the same amide bond by both peptidases, differences could be observed, i.e. in the hydrolysis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone and cholecystokinin, which occurred at different sites and more efficiently in the case of NEP2. Differences in cleavage of bioactive peptides, in cell-trafficking patterns and in tissue distribution indicate that NEP and NEP2 play distinct physiological roles in spite of their high degree of sequence identity. PMID:11964170

  17. Structural basis of specific inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activators inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lihu; Liu, Min; Zeng, Tu; Shi, Xiaoli; Yuan, Cai; Andreasen, Peter A.; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of death worldwide [1]. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is the FDA-approved thrombolytic drug for ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. tPA is a multi-domain serine protease of the trypsin-family [2] and catalyses the critical step in fibrinolysis [3], converting the zymogen plasminogen to the active serine protease plasmin, which degrades the fibrin network of thrombi and blood clots. tPA is rapidly inactivated by endogenous plasminogen activators inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) [4] (Fig. 1). Engineering on tPA to reduce its inhibition by PAI-1 without compromising its thrombolytic effect is a continuous effort [5]. Tenecteplase (TNK-tPA) is a newer generation of tPA variant showing slower inhibition by PAI-1 [6]. Extensive studies to understand the molecular interactions between tPA and PAI-1 have been carried out [7], [8], [9], [10], [11], [12], [13], [14], [15], [16], [17], [18], however, the precise details at atomic resolution remain unknown. We report the crystal structure of tPA·PAI-1 complex here. The methods required to achieve these data include: (1) recombinant expression and purification of a PAI-1 variant (14-1B) containing four mutations (N150H, K154T, Q319L, and M354I), and a tPA serine protease domain (tPA-SPD) variant with three mutations (C122A, N173Q, and S195A, in the chymotrypsin numbering) [19]; (2) formation of a tPA-SPD·PAI-1 Michaëlis complex in vitro [19]; and (3) solving the three-dimensional structure for this complex by X-ray crystallography [deposited in the PDB database as 5BRR]. The data explain the specificity of PAI-1 for tPA and uPA [19], [20], and provide structural basis to design newer generation of PAI-1-resistant tPA variants as thrombolytic agents [19]. PMID:26909366

  18. Structural basis of specific inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activators inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lihu; Liu, Min; Zeng, Tu; Shi, Xiaoli; Yuan, Cai; Andreasen, Peter A; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-03-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of death worldwide [1]. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is the FDA-approved thrombolytic drug for ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. tPA is a multi-domain serine protease of the trypsin-family [2] and catalyses the critical step in fibrinolysis [3], converting the zymogen plasminogen to the active serine protease plasmin, which degrades the fibrin network of thrombi and blood clots. tPA is rapidly inactivated by endogenous plasminogen activators inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) [4] (Fig. 1). Engineering on tPA to reduce its inhibition by PAI-1 without compromising its thrombolytic effect is a continuous effort [5]. Tenecteplase (TNK-tPA) is a newer generation of tPA variant showing slower inhibition by PAI-1 [6]. Extensive studies to understand the molecular interactions between tPA and PAI-1 have been carried out [7], [8], [9], [10], [11], [12], [13], [14], [15], [16], [17], [18], however, the precise details at atomic resolution remain unknown. We report the crystal structure of tPA·PAI-1 complex here. The methods required to achieve these data include: (1) recombinant expression and purification of a PAI-1 variant (14-1B) containing four mutations (N150H, K154T, Q319L, and M354I), and a tPA serine protease domain (tPA-SPD) variant with three mutations (C122A, N173Q, and S195A, in the chymotrypsin numbering) [19]; (2) formation of a tPA-SPD·PAI-1 Michaëlis complex in vitro [19]; and (3) solving the three-dimensional structure for this complex by X-ray crystallography [deposited in the PDB database as 5BRR]. The data explain the specificity of PAI-1 for tPA and uPA [19], [20], and provide structural basis to design newer generation of PAI-1-resistant tPA variants as thrombolytic agents [19]. PMID:26909366

  19. 21 CFR 331.11 - Listing of specific active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ion; maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. for persons up to 60 years old and 100 mEq. for persons 60...., 8 grams calcium carbonate). (e) Citrate-containing active ingredients: Citrate ion, as citric acid... effervescent preparation); maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. of bicarbonate ion for persons up to 60...

  20. 21 CFR 331.11 - Listing of specific active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ion; maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. for persons up to 60 years old and 100 mEq. for persons 60...., 8 grams calcium carbonate). (e) Citrate-containing active ingredients: Citrate ion, as citric acid... effervescent preparation); maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. of bicarbonate ion for persons up to 60...

  1. 21 CFR 331.11 - Listing of specific active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ion; maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. for persons up to 60 years old and 100 mEq. for persons 60...., 8 grams calcium carbonate). (e) Citrate-containing active ingredients: Citrate ion, as citric acid... effervescent preparation); maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. of bicarbonate ion for persons up to 60...

  2. 21 CFR 331.11 - Listing of specific active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ion; maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. for persons up to 60 years old and 100 mEq. for persons 60...., 8 grams calcium carbonate). (e) Citrate-containing active ingredients: Citrate ion, as citric acid... effervescent preparation); maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. of bicarbonate ion for persons up to 60...

  3. 21 CFR 331.11 - Listing of specific active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ion; maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. for persons up to 60 years old and 100 mEq. for persons 60...., 8 grams calcium carbonate). (e) Citrate-containing active ingredients: Citrate ion, as citric acid... effervescent preparation); maximum daily dosage limit 200 mEq. of bicarbonate ion for persons up to 60...

  4. The protein structures that shape caspase activity, specificity, activation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Salvesen, Guy S.

    2004-01-01

    The death morphology commonly known as apoptosis results from a post-translational pathway driven largely by specific limited proteolysis. In the last decade the structural basis for apoptosis regulation has moved from nothing to ‘quite good’, and we now know the fundamental structures of examples from the initiator phase, the pre-mitochondrial regulator phase, the executioner phase, inhibitors and their antagonists, and even the structures of some substrates. The field is as well advanced as the best known of proteolytic pathways, the coagulation cascade. Fundamentally new mechanisms in protease regulation have been disclosed. Structural evidence suggests that caspases have an unusual catalytic mechanism, and that they are activated by apparently unrelated events, depending on which position in the apoptotic pathway they occupy. Some naturally occurring caspase inhibitors have adopted classic inhibition strategies, but other have revealed completely novel mechanisms. All of the structural and mechanistic information can, and is, being applied to drive therapeutic strategies to combat overactivation of apoptosis in degenerative disease, and underactivation in neoplasia. We present a comprehensive review of the caspases, their regulators and inhibitors from a structural and mechanistic point of view, and with an aim to consolidate the many threads that define the rapid growth of this field. PMID:15450003

  5. Nanoliposomes containing Eucalyptus citriodora as antibiotic with specific antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Cui, Haiying; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Xuejing; Bortolini, Christian; Chen, Menglin; Liu, Lei; Dong, Mingdong

    2015-02-14

    Bacterial infections are a serious issue for public health and represent one of the major challenges of modern medicine. In this work, a selective antimicrobial strategy based on triggering of pore-forming toxin, which is secreted by infective bacteria, was designed to fight Staphylococcus aureus. The antimicrobial activity is realized by employing Eucalyptus citriodora oil as antibiotic which in this study is encapsulated in nanoliposomes. PMID:25573466

  6. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Activates Specific Regions in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive therapy. Our result shows that rTMS applied in conditions effective in animal models of depression induces different patterns of immediate-early gene expression than does electroconvulsive stimulation. In particular, rTMS evokes strong neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) and in other regions involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. The response in PVT is independent of the orientation of the stimulation probe relative to the head. Part of this response is likely because of direct activation, as repetitive magnetic stimulation also activates PVT neurons in brain slices.

  7. When activity requires breaking up: LEKTI proteolytic activation cascade for specific proteinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Furio, Laetitia; Hovnanian, Alain

    2011-11-01

    Lymphoepithelial Kazal-type related inhibitor (LEKTI) is a multidomain proteinase inhibitor whose defective expression causes Netherton syndrome (NS). LEKTI is encoded by SPINK5, which is also a susceptibility gene for atopic disease. In this issue, Fortugno et al. report an elegant and thorough study of the LEKTI proteolytic activation process in which they identify the precise nature of the cleavage sites used and the bioactive fragments generated. They propose a proteolytic activation model in human skin and confirm differential inhibition of kallikrein (KLK) 5, 7, and 14 by the major physiological LEKTI fragments. They show that these bioactive fragments inhibit KLK-mediated proteolysis of desmoglein 1 (DSG1) and suggest a fine-tuned inhibition process controlling target serine proteinase (SP) activity. PMID:21997416

  8. Novel antimicrobial peptide specifically active against Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Suwandecha, T; Srichana, T; Balekar, N; Nakpheng, T; Pangsomboon, K

    2015-09-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, the major etiologic agent of chronic periodontitis, produces a broad spectrum of virulence factors, including outer membrane vesicles, lipopolysaccharides, hemolysins and proteinases. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) including bacteriocins have been found to inhibit the growth of P. gingivalis; however, these peptides are relatively large molecules. Hence, it is difficult to synthesize them by a scale-up production. Therefore, this study aimed to synthesize a shorter AMP that was still active against P. gingivalis. A peptide that contained three cationic amino acids (Arg, His and Lys), two anionic amino acids (Glu and Asp), hydrophobic amino acids residues (Leu, Ile, Val, Ala and Pro) and hydrophilic residues (Ser and Gly) was obtained and named Pep-7. Its bioactivity and stability were tested after various treatments. The mechanism of action of Pep-7 and its toxicity to human red blood cells were investigated. The Pep-7 inhibited two pathogenic P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 and P. gingivalis ATCC 53978 (wp50) strains at a minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 1.7 µM, but was ineffective against other oral microorganisms (P. intermedia, Tannerella forsythensis, Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus sanguinis). From transmission electron microscopy studies, Pep-7 caused pore formation at the poles of the cytoplasmic membranes of P. gingivalis. A concentration of Pep-7 at four times that of its MBC induced some hemolysis but only at 0.3%. The Pep-7 was heat stable under pressure (autoclave at 110 and 121 °C) and possessed activity over a pH range of 6.8-8.5. It was not toxic to periodontal cells over a range of 70.8-4.4 μM and did not induce toxic pro-inflammatory cytokines. The Pep-7 showed selective activity against Porphyromonas sp. by altering the permeability barriers of P. gingivalis. The Pep-7 was not mutagenic in vitro. This work highlighted the potential for the use of this synthetic Pep-7 against P. gingivalis. PMID:26041027

  9. Target cell-specific modulation of neuronal activity by astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. S.; Angulo, M. C.; Audinat, E.; Charpak, S.

    2006-06-01

    Interaction between astrocytes and neurons enriches the behavior of brain circuits. By releasing glutamate and ATP, astrocytes can directly excite neurons and modulate synaptic transmission. In the rat olfactory bulb, we demonstrate that the release of GABA by astrocytes causes long-lasting and synchronous inhibition of mitral and granule cells. In addition, astrocytes release glutamate, leading to a selective activation of granule-cell NMDA receptors. Thus, by releasing excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, astrocytes exert a complex modulatory control on the olfactory network. glutamate | GABA | inhibition | olfactory bulb | synchronization

  10. Site-specific monoubiquitination activates Ras by impeding GTPase-activating protein function

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, G Aaron; Gunawardena, Harsha P; Baker, Rachael; Campbell, Sharon L

    2013-01-01

    KRas has recently been shown to be activated by monoubiquitination (mUb). Similar to oncogenic mutations, mUb of Ras at position 147 activates Ras by causing a defect in GTPase activating protein (GAP) function. To characterize the mechanism by which mUb impairs GAP-mediated downregulation of Ras, we made various modifications at position 147 of Ras and examined the impact on Ras sensitivity to GAP function. Whereas small modifications (iodoacetamide and glutathione) at position 147 of Ras do not affect GAP-mediated hydrolysis, ligation of Ras to UbG76C (native linker), UbX77C (one residue longer), and PDZ2 (with a native ubiquitin linker) was defective in GAP-mediated GTP hydrolysis. However, restoration of GAP activity was observed for Ras modified with the PDZ2 domain containing a shorter and stiffer linker region than ubiquitin. Therefore, the properties of the linker region dictate whether modification affects GAP-mediated hydrolysis, and our data indicate that the GAP defect requires a minimum linker length of 7 to 8 residues. PMID:24030601

  11. Threshold occupancy and specific cation binding modes in the hammerhead ribozyme active site are required for active conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Giambaşu, George M.; Sosa, Carlos P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between formation of active in-line attack conformations and monovalent (Na+) and divalent (Mg2+) metal ion binding in the hammerhead ribozyme has been explored with molecular dynamics simulations. To stabilize repulsions between negatively charged groups, different requirements of threshold occupancy of metal ions were observed in the reactant and activated precursor states both in the presence or absence of a Mg2+ in the active site. Specific bridging coordination patterns of the ions are correlated with the formation of active in-line attack conformations and can be accommodated in both cases. Furthermore, simulation results suggest that the hammerhead ribozyme folds to form an electronegative recruiting pocket that attracts high local concentrations of positive charge. The present simulations help to reconcile experiments that probe the metal ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis and support the supposition that Mg2+, in addition to stabilizing active conformations, plays a specific chemical role in catalysis. PMID:19265710

  12. Are the correlates of active school transport context-specific?

    PubMed Central

    Larouche, R; Sarmiento, O L; Broyles, S T; Denstel, K D; Church, T S; Barreira, T V; Chaput, J-P; Fogelholm, M; Hu, G; Kuriyan, R; Kurpad, A; Lambert, E V; Maher, C; Maia, J; Matsudo, V; Olds, T; Onywera, V; Standage, M; Tremblay, M S; Tudor-Locke, C; Zhao, P; Katzmarzyk, P T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Previous research consistently indicates that children who engage in active school transport (AST) are more active than their peers who use motorized modes (car or bus). However, studies of the correlates of AST have been conducted predominantly in high-income countries and have yielded mixed findings. Using data from a heterogeneous sample of 12 country sites across the world, we investigated the correlates of AST in 9–11-year olds. METHODS: The analytical sample comprised 6555 children (53.8% girls), who reported their main travel mode to school and the duration of their school trip. Potential individual and neighborhood correlates of AST were assessed with a parent questionnaire adapted from previously validated instruments. Multilevel generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) were used to examine the associations between individual and neighborhood variables and the odds of engaging in AST while controlling for the child's school. Site moderated the relationship of seven of these variables with AST; therefore we present analyses stratified by site. RESULTS: The prevalence of AST varied from 5.2 to 79.4% across sites and the school-level intra-class correlation ranged from 0.00 to 0.56. For each site, the final GLMM included a different set of correlates of AST. Longer trip duration (that is, ⩾16 min versus ⩽15 min) was associated with lower odds of AST in eight sites. Other individual and neighborhood factors were associated with AST in three sites or less. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate wide variability in the prevalence and correlates of AST in a large sample of children from twelve geographically, economically and culturally diverse country sites. This suggests that AST interventions should not adopt a ‘one size fits all' approach. Future research should also explore the association between psychosocial factors and AST in different countries. PMID:27152191

  13. Specification of High Activity Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    The report is concerned with making recommendations for the specifications of gamma ray sources, which relate to the quantity of radioactive material and the radiation emitted. Primary consideration is given to sources in teletherapy and to a lesser extent those used in industrial radiography and in irradiation units used in industry and research.…

  14. Bacteriophage PSP3 and phiR73 activator proteins: analysis of promoter specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Julien, B; Calendar, R

    1996-01-01

    Transcription from the late promoters of bacteriophage P2 and its satellite phage P4 is activated by a unique class of small, zinc-binding proteins. Using plasmid expression systems, we compared activators from two P2-like (helper) phages with those encoded by two satellite phages. The helper phage activators have more activity on the P4 phage sid promoter. In contrast, the satellite phage activators function better on the four late P2 promoters and on the P4 late leftward promoter. We purified one activator encoded by a P2-like phage and an activator from a satellite phage and determined their binding sites within the P2 and P4 late promoters. Differences in activity levels correlate with binding specificities; promoters that function best with the satellite phage activators have only one activator binding site centered at -55, while the P4 sid promoter, which has more activity with helper phage activators, has a second binding site centered at -18. Surprisingly, DNase I footprinting revealed only very minor differences in promoter binding by the two activators reported here and the P4 activator reported previously. Thus, the differences in transcriptional activity are probably due to interactions between the activators and RNA polymerase, rather than interactions between the activators and DNA. PMID:8824611

  15. Sensitivity and Specificity of Hypnosis Effects on Gastric Myoelectrical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Enck, Paul; Weimer, Katja; Muth, Eric R.; Zipfel, Stephan; Martens, Ute

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The effects of hypnosis on physiological (gastrointestinal) functions are incompletely understood, and it is unknown whether they are hypnosis-specific and gut-specific, or simply unspecific effects of relaxation. Design Sixty-two healthy female volunteers were randomly assigned to either a single session of hypnotic suggestion of ingesting an appetizing meal and an unappetizing meal, or to relax and concentrate on having an appetizing or unappetizing meal, while the electrogastrogram (EGG) was recorded. At the end of the session, participants drank water until they felt full, in order to detect EGG-signal changes after ingestion of a true gastric load. During both conditions participants reported their subjective well-being, hunger and disgust at several time points. Results Imagining eating food induced subjective feelings of hunger and disgust as well as changes in the EGG similar to, but more pronounced than those seen with a real gastric water load during both hypnosis and relaxation conditions. These effects were more pronounced when imagining an appetizing meal than with an unappetizing meal. There was no significant difference between the hypnosis and relaxation conditions. Conclusion Imagination with and without hypnosis exhibits similar changes in subjective and objective measures in response to imagining an appetizing and an unappetizing food, indicating high sensitivity but low specificity. PMID:24358287

  16. Energy Landscape Topography Reveals the Underlying Link Between Binding Specificity and Activity of Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme activity (often quantified by kcat/Km) is the main function of enzyme when it is active against the specific substrate. Higher or lower activities are highly desired for the design of novel enzyme and drug resistance. However, it is difficult to measure the activities of all possible variants and find the "hot-spot" within the limit of experimental time. In this study, we explore the underlying energy landscape of enzyme-substrate interactions and introduce the intrinsic specificity ratio (ISR), which reflects the landscape topography. By studying two concrete systems, we uncover the statistical correlation between the intrinsic specificity and the enzyme activity kcat/Km. This physics-based concept and method show that the energy landscape topography is valuable for understanding the relationship between enzyme specificity and activity. In addition, it can reveal the underlying mechanism of enzyme-substrate actions and has potential applications on enzyme design. PMID:27298067

  17. Energy Landscape Topography Reveals the Underlying Link Between Binding Specificity and Activity of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme activity (often quantified by kcat/Km) is the main function of enzyme when it is active against the specific substrate. Higher or lower activities are highly desired for the design of novel enzyme and drug resistance. However, it is difficult to measure the activities of all possible variants and find the “hot-spot” within the limit of experimental time. In this study, we explore the underlying energy landscape of enzyme-substrate interactions and introduce the intrinsic specificity ratio (ISR), which reflects the landscape topography. By studying two concrete systems, we uncover the statistical correlation between the intrinsic specificity and the enzyme activity kcat/Km. This physics-based concept and method show that the energy landscape topography is valuable for understanding the relationship between enzyme specificity and activity. In addition, it can reveal the underlying mechanism of enzyme-substrate actions and has potential applications on enzyme design. PMID:27298067

  18. Energy Landscape Topography Reveals the Underlying Link Between Binding Specificity and Activity of Enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Enzyme activity (often quantified by kcat/Km) is the main function of enzyme when it is active against the specific substrate. Higher or lower activities are highly desired for the design of novel enzyme and drug resistance. However, it is difficult to measure the activities of all possible variants and find the “hot-spot” within the limit of experimental time. In this study, we explore the underlying energy landscape of enzyme-substrate interactions and introduce the intrinsic specificity ratio (ISR), which reflects the landscape topography. By studying two concrete systems, we uncover the statistical correlation between the intrinsic specificity and the enzyme activity kcat/Km. This physics-based concept and method show that the energy landscape topography is valuable for understanding the relationship between enzyme specificity and activity. In addition, it can reveal the underlying mechanism of enzyme-substrate actions and has potential applications on enzyme design.

  19. LPS Down-Regulates Specificity Protein 1 Activity by Activating NF-κB Pathway in Endotoxemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaobing; Liu, Hong; Gong, Yong-Sheng; Liu, Shu Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background Specificity protein (Sp) 1 mediates the transcription of a large number of constitutive genes encoding physiological mediators. NF-κB mediates the expression of hundreds of inducible genes encoding pathological mediators. Crosstalk between Sp1 and NF-κB pathways could be pathophysiologically significant, but has not been studied. This study examined the crosstalk between the two pathways and defined the role of NF-κB signaling in LPS-induced down-regulation of Sp1 activity. Methods and Main Findings Challenge of wild type mice with samonelia enteritidis LPS (10 mg/kg, i.p.) down-regulated Sp1 binding activity in lungs in a time-dependent manner, which was concomitantly associated with an increased NF-κB activity. LPS down-regulates Sp1 activity by inducing an LPS inducible Sp1-degrading enzyme (LISPDE) activity, which selectively degrades Sp1 protein, resulting in Sp1 down-regulation. Blockade of NF-κB activation in mice deficient in NF-κB p50 gene (NF-κB-KO) suppressed LISPDE activity, prevented Sp1 protein degradation, and reversed the down-regulation of Sp1 DNA binding activity and eNOS expression (an indicator of Sp1 transactivation activity). Inhibition of LISPDE activity using a selective LISPDE inhibitor mimicked the effects of NF-κB blockade. Pretreatment of LPS-challenged WT mice with a selective LISPDE inhibitor increased nuclear Sp1 protein content, restored Sp1 DNA binding activity and reversed eNOS protein down-regulation in lungs. Enhancing tissue level of Sp1 activity by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated Sp1 down-regulation increased tissue level of IL-10 and decreased tissue level of TNF- αin the lungs. Conclusions NF-κB signaling mediates LPS-induced down-regulation of Sp1 activity. Activation of NF-κB pathway suppresses Sp1 activity and Sp1-mediated anti-inflammatory signals. Conversely, Sp1 signaling counter-regulates NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. Crosstalk between NF-κB and Sp1 pathways regulates the balance between pro

  20. Patient specific proteolytic activity of monocyte-derived macrophages and osteoclasts predicted with temporal kinase activation states during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Keon-Young; Li, Weiwei A.; Platt, Manu O.

    2012-01-01

    Patient-to-patient variability in disease progression continues to complicate clinical decisions of treatment regimens for cardiovascular diseases, metastatic cancers and osteoporosis. Here, we investigated if monocytes, circulating white blood cells that enter tissues and contribute to disease progression by differentiating into macrophages or osteoclasts, could be useful in understanding this variability. Monocyte-derived macrophages and osteoclasts produce cysteine cathepsins, powerful extracellular matrix proteases which have been mechanistically linked to accelerated atherosclerotic, osteoporotic, and tumor progression. We hypothesized that multivariate analysis of temporal kinase activation states during monocyte differentiation could predict cathepsin proteolytic responses of monocyte-derived macrophages and osteoclasts in a patient-specific manner. Freshly isolated primary monocytes were differentiated with M-CSF or RANKL into macrophages or osteoclasts, respectively, and phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt, p38 MAPK, JNK, c-jun, and IκB-α were measured at days 1, 3, 6, and 9. In parallel, cell diameters and numbers of nuclei were measured, and multiplex cathepsin zymography was used to quantify cathepsins K, L, S, and V activity from cell extracts and conditioned media. There was extensive patient-to-patient variability in temporal kinase activation states, cell morphologies, and cathepsin K, L, S, and V proteolytic activity. Partial least squares regression models trained with temporal kinase activation states successfully predicted patient-specific morphological characteristics (mean cell diameter and number of nuclei) and patient-specific cathepsin proteolytic activity with predictability as high as 95%, even with the challenge of incorporating the complex, unknown cues from individual patients’ unique genetic and biochemical backgrounds. This personalized medicine approach considers patient variability in kinase signals to predict cathepsin activity

  1. The Activity Chain Safety and Liveness Specification of Composite Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Huang, Xiaomei

    Web service composition is most impressing method for development and deployment of e-business. Description and modeling the behavior requirements of composite Web services for users and verifying composite Web service compliance to specific requirements is an important key in design of services. But most work does not address the issue of how to model the requirements that the BPEL4WS processes are supposed to satisfy. The specifications in verification works are general temporal relation based on activity or scenario in essence. Distinguish with these work, we propose a novel concept of behavior specification based on activity chain in which granularity is between activity and scenario. Chain existence mode, chain absence mode are designed to express such behavioral requirements based on activity chain that is similar with safety or liveness specification based on activity respectively. Encode them on Labeled Transition System LTS and then give them exact operation semantics. Finally, an example is illustrated.

  2. The core-specific lysosomal alpha(1-6)-mannosidase activity depends on aspartamidohydrolase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Haeuw, J F; Grard, T; Alonso, C; Strecker, G; Michalski, J C

    1994-01-01

    The substrate specificity of the core-specific rat liver lysosomal alpha(1-6)-mannosidase was investigated using mannosylated oligosaccharides and glycoasparagines. Hydrolysis of Man(alpha 1-6) linkage hydrolysis was demonstrated to follow the action of endoglycosidases, namely aspartyl-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase and endo-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. The results are discussed with respect to the nature of the carbohydrate materials stored in the tissues and excreted in the urine from patients suffering from aspartylglucosaminuria and fucosidosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8110182

  3. Activation of enhancer elements by the homeobox gene Cdx2 is cell line specific.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J K; Levy, T; Suh, E R; Traber, P G

    1997-01-01

    Cdx2 is a caudal-related homeodomain transcription factor that is expressed in complex patterns during mouse development and at high levels in the intestinal epithelium of adult mice. Cdx2 activates transcription of intestinal gene promoters containing specific binding sites. Moreover, Cdx2 has been shown to induce intestinal differentiation in cell lines. In this study, we show that Cdx2 is able to bind to two well defined enhancer elements in the HoxC8 gene. We then demonstrate that Cdx2 is able to activate transcription of heterologous promoters when its DNA binding element is placed in an enhancer context. Furthermore, the ability to activate enhancer elements is cell-line dependent. When the Cdx2 activation domain was linked to the Gal4 DNA binding domain, the chimeric protein was able to activate Gal4 enhancer constructs in an intestinal cell line, but was unable to activate transcription in NIH3T3 cells. These data suggest that there are cell-specific factors that allow the Cdx2 activation domain to function in the activation of enhancer elements. We hypothesize that either a co-activator protein or differential phosphorylation of the activation domain may be the mechanism for intestinal cell line-specific function of Cdx2 and possibly in other tissues in early development. PMID:9171078

  4. Active specific immunotherapy using the immune reaction of a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Y.; Imanaka, K.; Ashida, C.; Takashima, H.; Imajo, Y.; Kimura, S.

    1983-04-01

    Active specific immunotherapy using the immune reaction of a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue was studied on the transplanted MM46 tumor of female C3H/He mice after radiotherapy. MM46 tumor cells were inoculated into the right hind paws of mice. On the 5th day, irradiation with the dose irradiated tumor tissue (2000 rad on the fifth day), were injected into the left hind paws of the tumor-bearing mice. Effectiveness of this active specific immunotherapy against tumor was evaluated by the regression of tumor and survival rate of mice. Tumor was markedly regressed and survival rate was significantly increased by the active specific immunitherapy.

  5. Identification of specific activities associated with fall-related injuries, active component, U.S. Army, 2011.

    PubMed

    Hauschild, Veronique D; Schuh, Anna; Taylor, Bonnie J; Canham-Chervak, Michelle; Jones, Bruce H

    2016-06-01

    Although falls continue to be a leading mechanism of serious injuries among military populations, interventions must target activities or hazards that can be controlled or managed. This project aimed to identify activities most frequently associated with Army soldier fall-related injuries to prioritize prevention strategies for this substantial health burden. Narrative data from Army safety, medical evacuation, and casualty reporting systems were reviewed to select incidents meeting inclusion criteria and assign established codes. Nondeployed (n=988) and deployed (n=254) injury rates were not statistically different (2.20 per 1,000 non-deployed person-years [p-yrs], 2.21 per 1,000 deployed p-yrs, respectively). More than 75% of injuries were temporarily disabling fractures, sprains, and strains, primarily to lower extremities. The most frequent activities associated with non-deployed fall injuries were sports (e.g., snowboarding and basketball; 22%), parachuting (20%), walking/marching (19%), and climbing (15%). Ice and snow were the leading hazard (43%). The most common associated activities among deployed soldiers were occupational tasks (53%), walking/patrolling (24%), climbing (23%), and sports (17%). Specific interventions that target the activities and hazards identified in this investigation are suggested as priorities to reduce Army fall-related injuries. PMID:27362343

  6. Single-molecule catalysis mapping quantifies site-specific activity and uncovers radial activity gradient on single 2D nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Andoy, Nesha May; Zhou, Xiaochun; Choudhary, Eric; Shen, Hao; Liu, Guokun; Chen, Peng

    2013-02-01

    Shape-controlled metal nanocrystals are a new generation of nanoscale catalysts. Depending on their shapes, these nanocrystals exhibit various surface facets, and the assignments of their surface facets have routinely been used to rationalize or predict their catalytic activity in a variety of chemical transformations. Recently we discovered that for 1-dimensional (1D) nanocrystals (Au nanorods), the catalytic activity is not constant along the same side facets of single nanorods but rather differs significantly and further shows a gradient along its length, which we attributed to an underlying gradient of surface defect density resulting from their linear decay in growth rate during synthesis (Nat. Nanotechnol.2012, 7, 237-241). Here we report that this behavior also extends to 2D nanocrystals, even for a different catalytic reaction. By using super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to map out the locations of catalytic events within individual triangular and hexagonal Au nanoplates in correlation with scanning electron microscopy, we find that the catalytic activity within the flat {111} surface facet of a Au nanoplate exhibits a 2D radial gradient from the center toward the edges. We propose that this activity gradient results from a growth-dependent surface defect distribution. We also quantify the site-specific activity at different regions within a nanoplate: The corner regions have the highest activity, followed by the edge regions and then the flat surface facets. These discoveries highlight the spatial complexity of catalytic activity at the nanoscale as well as the interplay amid nanocrystal growth, morphology, and surface defects in determining nanocatalyst properties. PMID:23320465

  7. Specific activities of antioxidative enzymes in the cochlea of guinea pigs at different stages of development.

    PubMed

    Zelck, U; Nowak, R; Karnstedt, U; Koitschev, A; Käcker, N

    1993-01-01

    Significant activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were found in the cochleas of guinea pigs of different ages. The specific activities of SOD and GSH-Px (expressed as units/mg protein) increased significantly from fetal animals to animals 2 days old and then to 6-month-old animals. PMID:8369116

  8. Rapid, Specific, No-wash, Far-red Fluorogen Activation in Subcellular Compartments by Targeted Fluorogen Activating Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Live cell imaging requires bright photostable dyes that can target intracellular organelles and proteins with high specificity in a no-wash protocol. Organic dyes possess the desired photochemical properties and can be covalently linked to various protein tags. The currently available fluorogenic dyes are in the green/yellow range where there is high cellular autofluorescence and the near-infrared (NIR) dyes need to be washed out. Protein-mediated activation of far-red fluorogenic dyes has the potential to address these challenges because the cell-permeant dye is small and nonfluorescent until bound to its activating protein, and this binding is rapid. In this study, three single chain variable fragment (scFv)-derived fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs), which activate far-red emitting fluorogens, were evaluated for targeting, brightness, and photostability in the cytosol, nucleus, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and endoplasmic reticulum with a cell-permeant malachite green analog in cultured mammalian cells. Efficient labeling was achieved within 20–30 min for each protein upon the addition of nM concentrations of dye, producing a signal that colocalized significantly with a linked mCerulean3 (mCer3) fluorescent protein and organelle specific dyes but showed divergent photostability and brightness properties dependent on the FAP. These FAPs and the ester of malachite green dye (MGe) can be used as specific, rapid, and wash-free labels for intracellular sites in live cells with far-red excitation and emission properties, useful in a variety of multicolor experiments. PMID:25650487

  9. Self-Efficacy and Social Support as Mediators Between Culturally Specific Dance and Lifestyle Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Murrock, Carolyn J.; Madigan, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Culturally specific dance has the potential to generate health benefits but is seldom used even among studies advocating culturally specific interventions. This study examined the components of self-efficacy and social support as mediators between culturally specific dance and lifestyle physical activity in African American women (N = 126). An experimental design compared intervention and control groups for mediating effects of self-efficacy and social support on lifestyle physical activity. Findings indicated that only outcome expectations and social support from friends mediated effects. Culturally specific dance is a first step in encouraging African American women to become more physically active and improve health outcomes. The implications are that culturally specific dance programs can improve health outcomes by including members of underserved populations. PMID:18763475

  10. Preparation of activated carbon with large specific surface area from reed black liquor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Zhang, J P; Yang, G; Li, Z H

    2007-05-01

    Activated carbon with large specific surface area and well-developed porosity was prepared from pyrolysis of K2CO3-impregnated lignin precipitated from reed pulp black liquors. The impregnation ratio was 1:1. The effect of activation temperature upon the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area and pore volume of the carbon was closely investigated. Increasing activation temperature led to an opening and widening of the porous structure below 800'C. Above 800'C, the excess widening of pore led to the decrease of BET surface area and micropore volume. The BET surface area and pore volume of the carbon activated at 800 degrees C were 1395 m(2) g(-1) and 0.7702 ml g(-1) , respectively. The potential application of the carbon activated at 800 degrees C for removal of Cr (VI) was also investigated. The experimental results showed that it had good adsorption capacity. PMID:17615958

  11. Increasing cleavage specificity and activity of restriction endonuclease KpnI

    PubMed Central

    Vasu, Kommireddy; Nagamalleswari, Easa; Zahran, Mai; Imhof, Petra; Xu, Shuang-yong; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chan, Siu-Hong; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2013-01-01

    Restriction enzyme KpnI is a HNH superfamily endonuclease requiring divalent metal ions for DNA cleavage but not for binding. The active site of KpnI can accommodate metal ions of different atomic radii for DNA cleavage. Although Mg2+ ion higher than 500 μM mediates promiscuous activity, Ca2+ suppresses the promiscuity and induces high cleavage fidelity. Here, we report that a conservative mutation of the metal-coordinating residue D148 to Glu results in the elimination of the Ca2+-mediated cleavage but imparting high cleavage fidelity with Mg2+. High cleavage fidelity of the mutant D148E is achieved through better discrimination of the target site at the binding and cleavage steps. Biochemical experiments and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the mutation inhibits Ca2+-mediated cleavage activity by altering the geometry of the Ca2+-bound HNH active site. Although the D148E mutant reduces the specific activity of the enzyme, we identified a suppressor mutation that increases the turnover rate to restore the specific activity of the high fidelity mutant to the wild-type level. Our results show that active site plasticity in coordinating different metal ions is related to KpnI promiscuous activity, and tinkering the metal ion coordination is a plausible way to reduce promiscuous activity of metalloenzymes. PMID:23963701

  12. Cyclotron production of ``very high specific activity'' platinum radiotracers in No Carrier Added form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birattari, C.; Bonardi, M.; Groppi, F.; Gini, L.; Gallorini, M.; Sabbioni, E.; Stroosnijder, M. F.

    2001-12-01

    At the "Radiochemistry Laboratory" of Accelerators and Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, LASA, several production and quality assurance methods for short-lived and high specific activity radionuclides, have been developed. Presently, the irradiations are carried out at the Scanditronix MC40 cyclotron (K=38; p, d, He-4 and He-3) of JRC-Ispra, Italy, of the European Community, while both chemical purity and specific activity determination are carried out at the TRIGA MARK II research reactor of University of Pavia and at LASA itself. In order to optimize the irradiation conditions for platinum radiotracer production, both thin- and thick-target excitation function of natOs(α,xn) nuclear reactions were measured. A very selective radiochemical separation to obtain Pt radiotracers in No Carrier Added form, has been developed. Both real specific activity and chemical purity of radiotracer, have been determined by neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrometry. An Isotopic Dilution Factor (IDF) of the order of 50 is achieved.

  13. Targeted disruption of cocaine-activated accumbens neurons prevents context-specific sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Koya, Eisuke; Golden, Sam A.; Harvey, Brandon K.; Guez, Danielle H.; Berkow, Alexander; Simmons, Danielle E.; Bossert, Jennifer M.; Nair, Sunila G.; Uejima, Jamie L.; Marin, Marcelo T.; Mitchell, Timothy; Farquhar, David; Ghosh, Sukhen; Mattson, Brandi J.; Hope, Bruce T.

    2009-01-01

    Learned associations between effects of abused drugs and the drug administration environment play important roles in drug addiction. Histochemical and electrophysiological studies suggest that these associations are encoded in sparsely distributed nucleus accumbens neurons that are selectively activated by drugs and drug-associated cues. Although correlations between accumbens neuronal activity and responsivity to drugs and drug cues have been observed, no technique exists for selectively manipulating these activated neurons and establishing their causal role in behavioral effects of drugs and drug cues. Here we describe a novel method, termed ‘Daun02-inactivation method’, that selectively inactivates a minority of neurons activated by cocaine in an environment repeatedly paired with cocaine to demonstrate a causal role for these activated neurons in context-specific cocaine-induced psychomotor sensitization in rats. This method provides a new tool to study causal roles of selectively activated neurons in behavioral effects of drugs and drug cues and in other learned behaviors. PMID:19620976

  14. The Role of Specificity, Targeted Learning Activities, and Prior Knowledge for the Effects of Relevance Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roelle, Julian; Lehmkuhl, Nina; Beyer, Martin-Uwe; Berthold, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    In 2 experiments we examined the role of (a) specificity, (b) the type of targeted learning activities, and (c) learners' prior knowledge for the effects of relevance instructions on learning from instructional explanations. In Experiment 1, we recruited novices regarding the topic of atomic structure (N = 80) and found that "specific"…

  15. Recognition of military-specific physical activities with body-fixed sensors.

    PubMed

    Wyss, Thomas; Mäder, Urs

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an algorithm for recognizing military-specific, physically demanding activities using body-fixed sensors. To develop the algorithm, the first group of study participants (n = 15) wore body-fixed sensors capable of measuring acceleration, step frequency, and heart rate while completing six military-specific activities: walking, marching with backpack, lifting and lowering loads, lifting and carrying loads, digging, and running. The accuracy of the algorithm was tested in these isolated activities in a laboratory setting (n = 18) and in the context of daily military training routine (n = 24). The overall recognition rates during isolated activities and during daily military routine activities were 87.5% and 85.5%, respectively. We conclude that the algorithm adequately recognized six military-specific physical activities based on sensor data alone both in a laboratory setting and in the military training environment. By recognizing type of physical activities this objective method provides additional information on military-job descriptions. PMID:21121495

  16. Roles of s3 site residues of nattokinase on its activity and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuming; Feng, Chi; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-09-01

    Nattokinase (Subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with high fibrinolytic activity. To probe their roles on protease activity and substrate specificity, three residues of S3 site (Gly(100), Ser(101) and Leu(126)) were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis. Kinetics parameters of 20 mutants were measured using tetrapeptides as substrates, and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. Results of mutation analysis showed that Gly(100) and Ser(101) had reverse steric and electrostatic effects. Residues with bulky or positively charged side chains at position 100 decreased the substrate binding and catalytic activity drastically, while residues with the same characters at position 101 could obviously enhance protease and fibrinolytic activity of NK. Mutation of Leu(126) might impair the structure of the active cleft and drastically decreased the activity of NK. Kinetics studies of the mutants showed that S3 residues were crucial to keep protease activity while they moderately affected substrate specificity of NK. The present study provided some original insight into the P3-S3 interaction in NK and other subtilisins, as well as showed successful protein engineering cases to improve NK as a potential therapeutic agent. PMID:17673485

  17. Wounding Induces the Rapid and Transient Activation of a Specific MAP Kinase Pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Bogre, L.; Ligterink, W.; Meskiene, I.; Barker, P. J.; Heberle-Bors, E.; Huskisson, N. S.; Hirt, H.

    1997-01-01

    Mechanical injury in plants induces responses that are involved not only in healing but also in defense against a potential pathogen. To understand the intracellular signaling mechanism of wounding, we have investigated the involvement of protein kinases. Using specific antibodies, we showed that wounding alfalfa leaves specifically induces the transient activation of the p44MMK4 kinase, which belongs to the family of mitogen-activated protein kinases. Whereas activation of the MMK4 pathway is a post-translational process and was not blocked by [alpha]-amanitin and cycloheximide, inactivation depends on de novo transcription and translation of a protein factor(s). After wound-induced activation, the MMK4 pathway was subject to a refractory period of 25 min, during which time restimulation was not possible, indicating that the inactivation mechanism is only transiently active. After activation of the p44MMK4 kinase by wounding, transcript levels of the MMK4 gene increased, suggesting that the MMK4 gene may be a direct target of the MMK4 pathway. In contrast, transcripts of the wound-inducible MsWIP gene, encoding a putative proteinase inhibitor, were detected only several hours after wounding. Abscisic acid, methyl jasmonic acid, and electrical activity are known to mediate wound signaling in plants. However, none of these factors was able to activate the p44MMK4 kinase in the absence of wounding, suggesting that the MMK4 pathway acts independently of these signals. PMID:12237344

  18. Location-specific activation of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus by localized inflammation.

    PubMed

    Belevych, Natalya; Buchanan, Krystal; Chen, Qun; Bailey, Michael; Quan, Ning

    2010-10-01

    The existence of an immunological homunculus has been proposed, but evidence for location-specific response of the central nervous system to immunological stimulation is lacking. In this study, we show that inflammation induced by injection of casein into one of the causes c-fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) in an asymmetrical manner: much stronger activation is always induced in the contralateral PVN. Unilateral sciatic nerve transection abolished the casein-induced PVN activation if casein was injected into the hindlimb with the nerve transection, but had no effect if casein was injected into the hindlimb with intact nerve innervation. Injection of casein into one the forelimbs also caused contralateral PNV activation. Further, stronger PVN activation was found in the anterior PVN after the forelimb injection, but in the posterior PVN after the hindlimb injection. Casein-induced PVN activation is absent in IL-1R1 KO, IL-6 KO, TNFα KO, and in C3H/HeJ (TLR4 mutant) animals. In comparison, injection of LPS, a systemic inflammagen, into one hindlimb induced bilateral PVN activation but injection of live Escherichia coli into one hindlimb induced contralateral PVN activation. These results support the notion that local inflammation may activate the PVN by neural routes in a location-specific manner. PMID:20570615

  19. Controlling nuclear JAKs and STATs for specific gene activation by IFNγ

    PubMed Central

    Noon-Song, Ezra N.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Dabelic, Rea; Canton, Johnathan; Johnson, Howard M.

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed that gamma interferon (IFNγ) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interacted with the promoter region of IFNγ-activated genes along with transcription factor STAT1α. Recent studies have suggested that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also played a role in gene activation by phosphorylation of histone H3 on tyrosine 41. This study addresses the question of the role of activated JAKs in specific gene activation by IFNγ. We carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by PCR in IFNγ treated WISH cells and showed association of pJAK1, pJAK2, IFNGR1, and STAT1 on the same DNA sequence of the IRF-1 gene promoter. The β-actin gene, which is not activated by IFNγ, did not show this association. The movement of activated JAK to the nucleus and the IRF-1 promoter was confirmed by the combination of nuclear fractionation, confocal microscopy and DNA precipitation analysis using the biotinylated GAS promoter. Activated JAKs in the nucleus was associated with phosphorylated tyrosine 41 on histone H3 in the region of the GAS promoter. Unphosphorylated JAK2 was found to be constitutively present in the nucleus and was capable of undergoing activation in IFNγ treated cells, most likely via nuclear IFNGR1. Association of pJAK2 and IFNGR1 with histone H3 in IFNγ treated cells was demonstrated by histone H3 immunoprecipitation. Unphosphorylated STAT1 protein was associated with histone H3 of untreated cells. IFNγ treatment resulted in its disassociation and then re-association as pSTAT1. The results suggest a novel role for activated JAKs in epigenetic events for specific gene activation. PMID:21689637

  20. Successful Remembering Elicits Event-Specific Activity Patterns in Lateral Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Marvin M.

    2014-01-01

    Remembering a past event involves reactivation of content-specific patterns of neural activity in high-level perceptual regions (e.g., ventral temporal cortex, VTC). In contrast, the subjective experience of vivid remembering is typically associated with increased activity in lateral parietal cortex (LPC)—“retrieval success effects” that are thought to generalize across content types. However, the functional significance of LPC activation during memory retrieval remains a subject of active debate. In particular, theories are divided with respect to whether LPC actively represents retrieved content or if LPC activity only scales with content reactivation elsewhere (e.g., VTC). Here, we report a human fMRI study of visual memory recall (faces vs scenes) in which complementary forms of multivoxel pattern analysis were used to test for and compare content reactivation within LPC and VTC. During recall of visual images, we observed robust reactivation of broad category information (face vs scene) in both VTC and LPC. Moreover, recall-related activity patterns in LPC, but not VTC, differentiated between individual events. Importantly, these content effects were particularly evident in areas of LPC (namely, angular gyrus) in which activity scaled with subjective reports of recall vividness. These findings provide striking evidence that LPC not only signals that memories have been successfully recalled, but actively represents what is being remembered. PMID:24899726

  1. Identification of novel target genes specifically activated by deregulated E2F in human normal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Hodaka; Ozono, Eiko; Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P; Okuno, Junko; Shimizu, Emi; Kurayoshi, Kenta; Kugawa, Kazuyuki; Toh, Hiroyuki; Ohtani, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    The transcription factor E2F is the principal target of the tumor suppressor pRB. E2F plays crucial roles not only in cell proliferation by activating growth-related genes but also in tumor suppression by activating pro-apoptotic and growth-suppressive genes. We previously reported that, in human normal fibroblasts, the tumor suppressor genes ARF, p27(Kip1) and TAp73 are activated by deregulated E2F activity induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but not by physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. In contrast, growth-related E2F targets are activated by both E2F activities, underscoring the roles of deregulated E2F in tumor suppression in the context of dysfunctional pRB. In this study, to further understand the roles of deregulated E2F, we explored new targets that are specifically activated by deregulated E2F using DNA microarray. The analysis identified nine novel targets (BIM, RASSF1, PPP1R13B, JMY, MOAP1, RBM38, ABTB1, RBBP4 and RBBP7), many of which are involved in the p53 and RB tumor suppressor pathways. Among these genes, the BIM gene was shown to be activated via atypical E2F-responsive promoter elements and to contribute to E2F1-mediated apoptosis. Our results underscore crucial roles of deregulated E2F in growth suppression to counteract loss of pRB function. PMID:26201719

  2. Phase advancement and nucleus-specific timing of thalamocortical activity during slow cortical oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Slézia, Andrea; Hangya, Balázs; Ulbert, István; Acsády, László

    2011-01-01

    The exact timing of cortical afferent activity is instrumental for the correct coding and retrieval of internal and external stimuli. Thalamocortical inputs represent the most significant subcortical pathway to the cortex, but the precise timing and temporal variability of thalamocortical activity is not known. To examine this question, we studied the phase of thalamic action potentials relative to cortical oscillations and established correlations among phase, the nuclear location of the thalamocortical neurons and the frequency of cortical activity. The phase of thalamic action potentials depended on the exact frequency of the slow cortical oscillation both on long (minutes) and short (single wave) time scales. Faster waves were accompanied by phase advancement in both cases. Thalamocortical neurons located in different nuclei fired at significantly different phases of the slow waves but were active at similar phase of spindle oscillations. Different thalamic nuclei displayed distinct burst patterns. Bursts with higher number of action potentials displayed progressive phase advancement in a nucleus-specific manner. Thalamic neurons located along nuclear borders were characterized by mixed burst and phase properties. Our data demonstrate that the temporal relationship between cortical and thalamic activity is not fixed but displays dynamic changes during oscillatory activity. The timing depends on the precise location and exact activity of thalamocortical cells and the ongoing cortical network pattern. This variability of thalamic output and its coupling to cortical activity can enable thalamocortical neurons to actively participate in the coding and retrieval of complex cortical signals. PMID:21228169

  3. Only Specific Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Chitinases and [beta]-1,3-Glucanases Exhibit Antifungal Activity.

    PubMed Central

    Sela-Buurlage, M. B.; Ponstein, A. S.; Bres-Vloemans, S. A.; Melchers, L. S.; Van Den Elzen, PJM.; Cornelissen, BJC.

    1993-01-01

    Different isoforms of chitinases and [beta]-1,3-glucanases of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Samsun NN) were tested for their antifungal activities. The class I, vacuolar chitinase and [beta]-1,3-glucanase isoforms were the most active against Fusarium solani germlings, resulting in lysis of the hyphal tips and in growth inhibition. In additon, we observed that the class I chitinase and [beta]-1,3-glucanase acted synergistically. The class II isoforms of the two hydrolases exhibited no antifungal activity. However, the class II chitinases showed limited growth inhibitory activity in combination with higher amounts of class I [beta]-1,3-glucanase. The class II [beta]-1,3-glucanases showed no inhibitory activity in any combination. In transgenic tobacco plants producing modified forms of either a class I chitinase or a class I [beta]-1,3-glucanase, or both, these proteins were targeted extracellularly. Both modified proteins lack their C-terminal propeptide, which functions as a vacuolar targeting signal. Extracellular targeting had no effect on the specific activities of the chitinase and [beta]-1,3-glucanase enzymes. Furthermore, the extracellular washing fluid (EF) from leaves of transgenic plants expressing either of the secreted class I enzymes exhibited antifungal activity on F. solani germlings in vitro comparable to that of the purified vacuolar class I proteins. Mixing EF fractions from these plants revealed synergism in inhibitory activity against F. solani; the mixed fractions exhibited inhibitory activity similar to that of EF from plants expressing both secreted enzymes. PMID:12231736

  4. Pyrimidine-specific 5' nucleotidase activity in bovine erythrocytes: effect of phlebotomy and lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.W.; Duncan, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Erythrocyte pyrimidine-specific 5' nucleotidase (PY5'N) (E.C. 3.1.3.5) was measured in healthy, anemic, and lead-poisoned calves to determine whether low activity of PY5'N is associated with the propensity of cattle to develop basophilic stippling of erythrocytes. Low activity of PY5'N has been associated with basophilic stippling of erythrocytes in persons with inherited hemolytic anemia and with lead poisoning. A radiometric technique, using (/sup 14/C)cytidine monophosphate as the substrate, was used to measured PY5'N activity. The erythrocytes from 4 healthy calves had much lower activity (mean of 7.1 +/- 1.6 nmols of (/sup 14/C)cytidine monophosphate hydrolyzed/min/g of hemoglobin) than has been reported for human erythrocytes. The pH response curve of bovine PY5'N was similar to that of the human enzyme, with maximal activity around pH 7. Experimental hemorrhagic anemia in these calves increased PY5'N activity 6-to 7-fold, with peak activity occurring concomitantly with maximum reticulocytosis. Two of the calves were then given lead per os, and the PY5'N activity decreased within 24 hours to base-line values. In the 2 other calves not given lead, the PY5'N activity declined slowly, but did not reach base-line values after 14 days.

  5. Controlling nuclear JAKs and STATs for specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Noon-Song, Ezra N.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Dabelic, Rea; Canton, Johnathan; Johnson, Howard M.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interact with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-associated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. {yields} We show that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also associate with IFNGR1 in the nucleus. {yields} The activated Janus kinases are responsible for phosphorylation of tyrosine 41 on histone H3, an important epigenetic event for specific gene activation. -- Abstract: We previously showed that gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interacted with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-activated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. Recent studies have suggested that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also played a role in gene activation by phosphorylation of histone H3 on tyrosine 41. This study addresses the question of the role of activated JAKs in specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}. We carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by PCR in IFN{gamma} treated WISH cells and showed association of pJAK1, pJAK2, IFNGR1, and STAT1 on the same DNA sequence of the IRF-1 gene promoter. The {beta}-actin gene, which is not activated by IFN{gamma}, did not show this association. The movement of activated JAK to the nucleus and the IRF-1 promoter was confirmed by the combination of nuclear fractionation, confocal microscopy and DNA precipitation analysis using the biotinylated GAS promoter. Activated JAKs in the nucleus was associated with phosphorylated tyrosine 41 on histone H3 in the region of the GAS promoter. Unphosphorylated JAK2 was found to be constitutively present in the nucleus and was capable of undergoing activation in IFN{gamma} treated cells, most likely via nuclear IFNGR1. Association of pJAK2 and IFNGR1 with histone H3 in IFN{gamma} treated cells was demonstrated by histone H3 immunoprecipitation. Unphosphorylated STAT1 protein was associated with histone H3 of untreated cells. IFN

  6. Laser acupuncture induced specific cerebral cortical and subcortical activations in humans.

    PubMed

    Siedentopf, Christian M; Koppelstaetter, Florian; Haala, Ilka Anna; Haid, Veronika; Rhomberg, Paul; Ischebeck, Anja; Buchberger, Waltraud; Felber, Stephan; Schlager, Andreas; Golaszewski, Stefan M

    2005-09-01

    As recent studies demonstrated, acupuncture can elicit activity in specific brain areas. This study aims to explore further the central effect using laser acupuncture. We investigated the cerebral effects of laser acupuncture at both acupoints GB43 with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). As a control condition the laser was mounted at the same acupoints but without application of laser stimulation. The group results showed significant brain activations within the thalamus, nucleus subthalamicus, nucleus ruber, the brainstem, and the Brodmann areas 40 and 22 for the acupuncture condition. No significant brain activations were observed within the placebo condition. The activations we observed were laser acupuncture-specific and predominantly ipsilateral. This supports the assumption that acupuncture is mediated by meridians, since meridians do not cross to the other side. Furthermore, we could show that laser acupuncture allows one to design a pure placebo condition. PMID:15990948

  7. Activation mechanism of thiol protease precursor from broiler chicken specific Staphylococcus aureus strain CH-91.

    PubMed

    Wladyka, Benedykt; Dubin, Grzegorz; Dubin, Adam

    2011-01-10

    Staphylococcus aureus strain CH-91 isolated from chicken dermatitis lesions produces large quantities of thiol protease implicated in disease formation. Observed overproduction requires efficient activation of the protease precursor which mechanism is studied here in detail. Wild type and mutant precursor forms are expressed in E. coli to test different hypotheses on the activation process. It is demonstrated that wild type precursor undergoes rapid autocatalytic processing whereas proteolytically inactive catalytic triad cysteine mutant (C(249)A) of the precursor is stable, but can be processed by minute quantities of active protease. It is concluded that limited intramolecular proteolysis is mainly responsible for efficient activation but, a positive feedback loop also contributes to the process. Both activation pathways allow efficient production of mature extracellular thiol protease, a putative virulence factor specific for avian strains of S. aureus. PMID:20598816

  8. Specific pollen allergen activates eosinophils of the patient with chronic allergic contact urticaria.

    PubMed

    Panaszek, B; Małolepszy, J; Kuryszko, J; Litwa, M

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the activation of eosinophils in an unique case of a young man with atopy manifested as chronic pollen contact urticaria. In order to reveal the role of eosinophils in that case, the study was performed by means of monoclonal antibodies EG2 and chemiluminescence. In addition, comparative electron microscopic study of peripheral blood and skin infiltrating eosinophils were performed for which the name ultrastructural morphometric analysis of intracytoplasmic eosinophil granules has been proposed. The results indicated, that 40% of peripheral blood eosinophils were activated spontaneously and they were more active than those in skin infiltrates. Specific pollen allergen caused activation of 100% of peripheral blood eosinophils. The study suggests presence of a systemic pattern of eosinophil activation in atopy. PMID:7487362

  9. DREAM Controls the On/Off Switch of Specific Activity-Dependent Transcription Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mellström, Britt; Sahún, Ignasi; Ruiz-Nuño, Ana; Murtra, Patricia; Gomez-Villafuertes, Rosa; Savignac, Magali; Oliveros, Juan C.; Gonzalez, Paz; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Knafo, Shira; Zhuo, Min; Higuera-Matas, Alejandro; Errington, Michael L.; Maldonado, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier; Jefferys, John G. R.; Bliss, Tim V. P.; Dierssen, Mara

    2014-01-01

    Changes in nuclear Ca2+ homeostasis activate specific gene expression programs and are central to the acquisition and storage of information in the brain. DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator), also known as calsenilin/KChIP-3 (K+ channel interacting protein 3), is a Ca2+-binding protein that binds DNA and represses transcription in a Ca2+-dependent manner. To study the function of DREAM in the brain, we used transgenic mice expressing a Ca2+-insensitive/CREB-independent dominant active mutant DREAM (daDREAM). Using genome-wide analysis, we show that DREAM regulates the expression of specific activity-dependent transcription factors in the hippocampus, including Npas4, Nr4a1, Mef2c, JunB, and c-Fos. Furthermore, DREAM regulates its own expression, establishing an autoinhibitory feedback loop to terminate activity-dependent transcription. Ablation of DREAM does not modify activity-dependent transcription because of gene compensation by the other KChIP family members. The expression of daDREAM in the forebrain resulted in a complex phenotype characterized by loss of recurrent inhibition and enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP) in the dentate gyrus and impaired learning and memory. Our results indicate that DREAM is a major master switch transcription factor that regulates the on/off status of specific activity-dependent gene expression programs that control synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. PMID:24366545

  10. Specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity (A QSI) of thiophenones and their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Scheie, Anne Aamdal; Benneche, Tore; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Disease caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens is becoming a serious problem, both in human and veterinary medicine. The inhibition of quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, is a promising alternative strategy to control disease. In this study, we determined the quorum sensing-disrupting activity of 20 thiophenones towards the quorum sensing model bacterium V. harveyi. In order to exclude false positives, we propose a new parameter (AQSI) to describe specific quorum sensing activity. AQSI is defined as the ratio between inhibition of quorum sensing-regulated activity in a reporter strain and inhibition of the same activity when it is independent of quorum sensing. Calculation of AQSI allowed to exclude five false positives, whereas the six most active thiophenones (TF203, TF307, TF319, TF339, TF342 and TF403) inhibited quorum sensing at 0.25 μM, with AQSI higher than 10. Further, we determined the protective effect and toxicity of the thiophenones in a highly controlled gnotobiotic model system with brine shrimp larvae. There was a strong positive correlation between the specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity of the thiophenones and the protection of brine shrimp larvae against pathogenic V. harveyi. Four of the most active quorum sensing-disrupting thiophenones (TF 203, TF319, TF339 and TF342) were considered to be promising since they have a therapeutic potential of at least 10. PMID:26647822

  11. Specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity (AQSI) of thiophenones and their therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; Aamdal Scheie, Anne; Benneche, Tore; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Disease caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens is becoming a serious problem, both in human and veterinary medicine. The inhibition of quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, is a promising alternative strategy to control disease. In this study, we determined the quorum sensing-disrupting activity of 20 thiophenones towards the quorum sensing model bacterium V. harveyi. In order to exclude false positives, we propose a new parameter (AQSI) to describe specific quorum sensing activity. AQSI is defined as the ratio between inhibition of quorum sensing-regulated activity in a reporter strain and inhibition of the same activity when it is independent of quorum sensing. Calculation of AQSI allowed to exclude five false positives, whereas the six most active thiophenones (TF203, TF307, TF319, TF339, TF342 and TF403) inhibited quorum sensing at 0.25 μM, with AQSI higher than 10. Further, we determined the protective effect and toxicity of the thiophenones in a highly controlled gnotobiotic model system with brine shrimp larvae. There was a strong positive correlation between the specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity of the thiophenones and the protection of brine shrimp larvae against pathogenic V. harveyi. Four of the most active quorum sensing-disrupting thiophenones (TF 203, TF319, TF339 and TF342) were considered to be promising since they have a therapeutic potential of at least 10. PMID:26647822

  12. A sandwich ELISA for the conformation-specific quantification of the activated form of human Bax.

    PubMed

    Teijido, Oscar; Ganesan, Yogesh Tengarai; Llanos, Raul; Peton, Ashley; Urtecho, Jean-Baptiste; Soprani, Adauri; Villamayor, Aimee; Antonsson, Bruno; Manon, Stéphen; Dejean, Laurent

    2016-03-15

    Bcl-2 family proteins are critical regulators of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), which represents the point of no return of apoptotic cell death. The exposure of the Bax N-terminus at the mitochondria reflects Bax activation; and this activated configuration of the Bax protein is associated with MOMP. N-terminal exposure can be detected using specific monoclonal and/or polyclonal antibodies, and the onset of activated Bax has extensively been used as an early marker of apoptosis. The protocols of immunoprecipitation and/or immunocytochemistry commonly used to detect activated Bax are long and tedious, and allow semiquantification of the antigen at best. The sandwich ELISA protocol we developed has a 5 ng/mL detection limit and is highly specific for the activated conformation of Bax. This ELISA allows a rapid quantification of activated human Bax in whole cells and isolated mitochondria protein extracts. These properties grant this assay the potential to further clarify the prognostic and diagnostic value of activated Bax in disorders associated with deregulated apoptotic pathways such as degenerative diseases or cancer. PMID:26748144

  13. Goal-directed behavior under emotional distraction is preserved by enhanced task-specific activation.

    PubMed

    Wessa, Michèle; Heissler, Janine; Schönfelder, Sandra; Kanske, Philipp

    2013-03-01

    Despite the distracting effects of emotional stimuli on concurrent task performance, humans are able to uphold goal-directed behavior. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that this effect is due to the enhanced recruitment of task-specific neural resources. In a two-step functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we first localized those areas involved in mental arithmetics by contrasting arithmetic problems with a number detection task. The resulting activation maps were then used as masks in a second experiment that compared the effects of neutral and emotional distracter images on mental arithmetics. We found increased response times in the emotional distracter condition, accompanied by enhanced activation in task-specific areas, including superior parietal cortex, dorsolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. This activation increase correlated with larger behavioral impairment through emotional distraction. Similar error rates in both conditions indicate that cognitive task performance is preserved through enhanced recruitment of task-specific neural resources when emotional distracter stimuli are present. PMID:22302842

  14. Future of low specific activity molybdenum-99/technetium-99m generator.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, A

    2012-10-01

    In last few years, the shortage of molybdenum-99 (99Mo) was felt in the developed and developing countries hospitals, where diagnostic nuclear medicine is practiced. To overcome the shortage of 99Mo various routes of its production by accelerators and reactors generating low and high specific activity products have been planned. High specific activity 99Mo obtained by fission of uranium-235 (235U) has completely dominated in the manufacturing of technetium-99m (99mTc) generators in last 3-4 decades, but due to proliferation and dirty bomb, issues non fission routes of 99Mo production are emphasized. Future of low specific activity 99Mo is discussed. PMID:22642420

  15. Sequence of the lid affects activity and specificity of Candida rugosa lipase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Brocca, Stefania; Secundo, Francesco; Ossola, Mattia; Alberghina, Lilia; Carrea, Giacomo; Lotti, Marina

    2003-10-01

    The fungus Candida rugosa produces multiple lipase isoenzymes (CRLs) with distinct differences in substrate specificity, in particular with regard to selectivity toward the fatty acyl chain length. Moreover, isoform CRL3 displays high activity towards cholesterol esters. Lipase isoenzymes share over 80% sequence identity but diverge in the sequence of the lid, a mobile loop that modulates access to the active site. In the active enzyme conformation, the open lid participates in the substrate-binding site and contributes to substrate recognition. To address the role of the lid in CRL activity and specificity, we substituted the lid sequences from isoenzymes CRL3 and CRL4 in recombinant rCRL1, thus obtaining enzymes differing only in this stretch of residues. Swapping the CRL3 lid was sufficient to confer to CRL1 cholesterol esterase activity. On the other hand, a specific shift in the chain-length specificity was not observed. Chimeric proteins displayed different sensitivity to detergents in the reaction medium. PMID:14500889

  16. Sequence of the lid affects activity and specificity of Candida rugosa lipase isoenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Brocca, Stefania; Secundo, Francesco; Ossola, Mattia; Alberghina, Lilia; Carrea, Giacomo; Lotti, Marina

    2003-01-01

    The fungus Candida rugosa produces multiple lipase isoenzymes (CRLs) with distinct differences in substrate specificity, in particular with regard to selectivity toward the fatty acyl chain length. Moreover, isoform CRL3 displays high activity towards cholesterol esters. Lipase isoenzymes share over 80% sequence identity but diverge in the sequence of the lid, a mobile loop that modulates access to the active site. In the active enzyme conformation, the open lid participates in the substrate-binding site and contributes to substrate recognition. To address the role of the lid in CRL activity and specificity, we substituted the lid sequences from isoenzymes CRL3 and CRL4 in recombinant rCRL1, thus obtaining enzymes differing only in this stretch of residues. Swapping the CRL3 lid was sufficient to confer to CRL1 cholesterol esterase activity. On the other hand, a specific shift in the chain-length specificity was not observed. Chimeric proteins displayed different sensitivity to detergents in the reaction medium. PMID:14500889

  17. Natural variation in Fc glycosylation of HIV-specific antibodies impacts antiviral activity

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Margaret E.; Crispin, Max; Yu, Xiaojie; Baruah, Kavitha; Boesch, Austin W.; Harvey, David J.; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Heizen, Erin L.; Ercan, Altan; Choi, Ickwon; Streeck, Hendrik; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Scanlan, Chris; Alter, Galit

    2013-01-01

    While the induction of a neutralizing antibody response against HIV remains a daunting goal, data from both natural infection and vaccine-induced immune responses suggest that it may be possible to induce antibodies with enhanced Fc effector activity and improved antiviral control via vaccination. However, the specific features of naturally induced HIV-specific antibodies that allow for the potent recruitment of antiviral activity and the means by which these functions are regulated are poorly defined. Because antibody effector functions are critically dependent on antibody Fc domain glycosylation, we aimed to define the natural glycoforms associated with robust Fc-mediated antiviral activity. We demonstrate that spontaneous control of HIV and improved antiviral activity are associated with a dramatic shift in the global antibody-glycosylation profile toward agalactosylated glycoforms. HIV-specific antibodies exhibited an even greater frequency of agalactosylated, afucosylated, and asialylated glycans. These glycoforms were associated with enhanced Fc-mediated reduction of viral replication and enhanced Fc receptor binding and were consistent with transcriptional profiling of glycosyltransferases in peripheral B cells. These data suggest that B cell programs tune antibody glycosylation actively in an antigen-specific manner, potentially contributing to antiviral control during HIV infection. PMID:23563315

  18. Catalase activity of different Candida species after exposition to specific antiserum

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaka, Natália R.S.; Unterkircher, Carmelinda S.; Shimizu, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Antisera were developed in rabbits after challenge with intracellular antigens of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis. Microorganism catalase has been correlated with virulence, resistance to drugs and immunogenicity. The intracellular catalase is consistently present in strains of Candida and in this paper, the enzyme activity was analysed by PAGE after exposition to antisera. The catalases of C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis were immunogenic and differed in their binding to specific antibodies raised in rabbits. Tests of cross-reactivity between different Candida species showed that when antiserum from C. albicans immunized rabbit was incubated with intracellular extracts of these three Candida species, the catalases activities were abolished. However, the antisera from C. parapsilosis or C. tropicalis immunized rabbits did not affect the catalase activity of C. albicans; the enzyme of C. albicans was inactivated only by the antiserum to the catalase of own C. albicans. The antiserum to the catalase of C. tropicalis was species-specific and did not cross-react with catalases of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis. The activities of Aspergillus niger and bovine catalases were not affected by the antiserum from any Candida immunized rabbits. This report is a preliminary study of specific antisera that react against intracellular catalase of Candida sp. and neutralize the enzymatic activity. Further study is necessary to develop species-specific antibody once differences in the susceptibility of the Candida species to commonly used antifungal drugs make identification to the species level important. PMID:24031174

  19. Specific activity measurement of ⁶⁴Cu: a comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Mastren, Tara; Guthrie, James; Eisenbeis, Paul; Voller, Tom; Mebrahtu, Efrem; Robertson, J David; Lapi, Suzanne E

    2014-08-01

    Effective specific activity of (64)Cu (amount of radioactivity per µmol metal) is important in order to determine purity of a particular (64)Cu lot and to assist in optimization of the purification process. Metal impurities can affect effective specific activity and therefore it is important to have a simple method that can measure trace amounts of metals. This work shows that ion chromatography (IC) yields similar results to ICP mass spectrometry for copper, nickel and iron contaminants in (64)Cu production solutions. PMID:24709610

  20. Behavioral state-specific inhibitory postsynaptic potentials impinge on cat lumbar motoneurons during active sleep.

    PubMed

    Morales, F R; Boxer, P; Chase, M H

    1987-11-01

    High-gain intracellular records were obtained from lumbar motoneurons in intact, undrugged cats during naturally occurring states of wakefulness, quiet sleep, and active sleep. Spontaneous, discrete, inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) were found to impinge on lumbar motoneurons during all states of sleep and wakefulness. IPSPs which occurred during wakefulness and quiet sleep were of relatively low amplitude and had a low frequency of occurrence. During the state of active sleep there occurred a great increase in inhibitory input. This was the result of the appearance of large-amplitude IPSPs and of an increase in the frequency of low-amplitude IPSPs which were indistinguishable from those recorded during wakefulness and quiet sleep. In addition to a difference in amplitude, the time course of the large IPSPs recorded during active sleep further differentiated them from the smaller IPSPs recorded during wakefulness, quiet sleep, and active sleep; i.e., their rise-time and half-width were of longer duration and their rate-of-rise was significantly faster. We suggest that the large, active sleep-specific IPSPs reflect the activity of a group of inhibitory interneurons which are inactive during wakefulness and quiet sleep and which discharge during active sleep. These as yet unidentified interneurons would then serve as the last link in the brain stem-spinal cord inhibitory system which is responsible for producing muscle atonia during the state of active sleep. PMID:3666087

  1. Tissue-specific inhibition and recovery of esterase activities in Lumbricus terrestris experimentally exposed to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Vejares, Sandra González; Sabat, Pablo; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C

    2010-04-01

    Exposure and effect assessment of organophosphate (OP) pesticides generally involves the use of cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition. In earthworm, this enzyme activity is often measured in homogenates from the whole organism. Here we examine the tissue-specific response of ChE and carboxylesterase (CE) activities in Lumbricus terrestris experimentally exposed to chlorpyrifos-spiked field soils. Esterases were measured in different gut segments and in the seminal vesicles of earthworms following acute exposure (2 d) to the OP and during 35d of a recovery period. We found that inhibition of both esterase activities was dependent on the tissue. Cholinesterase activity decreased in the pharynx, crop, foregut and seminal vesicles in a concentration-dependent way, whereas CE activity (4-nitrophenyl valerate) was strongly inhibited in these tissues. Gizzard CE activity was not inhibited by the OP, even an increase of enzyme activity was evident during the recovery period. These results suggest that both esterases should be determined jointly in selected tissues of earthworms. Moreover, the high levels of gut CE activity and its inhibition and recovery dynamic following OP exposure suggest that this esterase could play an important role as an enzymatic barrier against OP uptake from the ingested contaminated soil. PMID:20045489

  2. The risks and consequences from the transport of low specific activity materials by truck

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, N.C.; McClure, J.D.; Cashwell, J.W.; Ostmeyer, R.O.; Wangler, M.

    1989-01-01

    The packaging and transport category of low specific activity (LSA) material was conceived for radioactive materials (RAM) that were considered inherently safe for transport. Such materials could be transported in ''strong, tight'' packages. The primary concern for the radionuclide content in LSA materials was associated with the potential for inhalation of particulate radioactive material. Thus, the specifications for the category in terms of specific activity were structured to preclude excessive inhalation hazard. The current version of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regulations maintains the inhalation-related limits but also shows concern that the restrictions on the LSA category may not preclude an excessive external radiation hazard for gamma-emitting materials. This paper presents the results of an investigation of the potential for such excessive external radiation hazards, particularly for LSA materials with specific activity levels near the current regulatory limit. Analyses are discussed that were performed to evaluate the potential radiological impacts of highway accidents leading to the release of high radiation level-low specific activity (HRL-LSA) materials from their packagings. The results of the analyses are intended to provide a basis for evaluating restrictions on the quantity of gamma-emitting radionuclides that can be contained in an LSA shipment. 8 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase.

    PubMed

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana; Gritsenko, Natalia; Rask, Lene; Mainbakh, Yuli; Zilberstein, Yael; Yagil, Ezra; Kolot, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression of a cytotoxic gene. In the present study we developed a new cancer specific binary expression system activated by the Integrase (Int) of the lambdoid phage HK022. We demonstrate the validity of this system by the specific expression of a luciferase (luc) reporter in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells and in a lung cancer mouse model. Due to the absence viral vectors and of cytotoxicity the Int based binary system offers advantages over previously described counterparts and may therefore be developed into a safer cancer cell killing system. PMID:27117628

  4. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana; Gritsenko, Natalia; Rask, Lene; Mainbakh, Yuli; Zilberstein, Yael; Yagil, Ezra; Kolot, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression of a cytotoxic gene. In the present study we developed a new cancer specific binary expression system activated by the Integrase (Int) of the lambdoid phage HK022. We demonstrate the validity of this system by the specific expression of a luciferase (luc) reporter in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells and in a lung cancer mouse model. Due to the absence viral vectors and of cytotoxicity the Int based binary system offers advantages over previously described counterparts and may therefore be developed into a safer cancer cell killing system. PMID:27117628

  5. Site-specific phosphorylation and microtubule dynamics control Pyrin inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenqing; Yang, Jieling; Liu, Wang; Wang, Yupeng; Shao, Feng

    2016-08-16

    Pyrin, encoded by the MEFV gene, is best known for its gain-of-function mutations causing familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), an autoinflammatory disease. Pyrin forms a caspase-1-activating inflammasome in response to inactivating modifications of Rho GTPases by various bacterial toxins or effectors. Pyrin-mediated innate immunity is unique in that it senses bacterial virulence rather than microbial molecules, but its mechanism of activation is unknown. Here we show that Pyrin was phosphorylated in bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells. We identified Ser-205 and Ser-241 in mouse Pyrin whose phosphorylation resulted in inhibitory binding by cellular 14-3-3 proteins. The two serines underwent dephosphorylation upon toxin stimulation or bacterial infection, triggering 14-3-3 dissociation, which correlated with Pyrin inflammasome activation. We developed antibodies specific for phosphorylated Ser-205 and Ser-241, which confirmed the stimuli-induced dephosphorylation of endogenous Pyrin. Mutational analyses indicated that both phosphorylation and signal-induced dephosphorylation of Ser-205/241 are important for Pyrin activation. Moreover, microtubule drugs, including colchicine, commonly used to treat FMF, effectively blocked activation of the Pyrin inflammasome. These drugs did not affect Pyrin dephosphorylation and 14-3-3 dissociation but inhibited Pyrin-mediated apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing CARD (ASC) aggregation. Our study reveals that site-specific (de)phosphorylation and microtubule dynamics critically control Pyrin inflammasome activation, illustrating a fine and complex mechanism in cytosolic immunity. PMID:27482109

  6. 2,4-Dichlorophenol hydroxylase for chlorophenol removal: Substrate specificity and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hejun; Li, Qingchao; Zhan, Yang; Fang, Xuexun; Yu, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophenols (CPs) are common environmental pollutants. As such, different treatments have been assessed to facilitate their removal. In this study, 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) hydroxylase was used to systematically investigate the activity and removal ability of 19CP congeners at 25 and 0 °C. Results demonstrated that 2,4-DCP hydroxylase exhibited a broad substrate specificity to CPs. The activities of 2,4-DCP hydroxylase against specific CP congeners, including 3-CP, 2,3,6-trichlorophenol, 2-CP, and 2,3-DCP, were higher than those against 2,4-DCP, which is the preferred substrate of previously reported 2,4-DCP hydroxylase. To verify whether cofactors are necessary to promote hydroxylase activity against CP congeners, we added FAD and found that the added FAD induced a 1.33-fold to 5.13-fold significant increase in hydroxylase activity against different CP congeners. The metabolic pathways of the CP degradation in the enzymatic hydroxylation step were preliminarily proposed on the basis of the analyses of the enzymatic activities against 19CP congeners. We found that the high activity and removal rate of 2,4-DCP hydroxylase against CPs at 0 °C enhance the low-temperature-adaptability of this enzyme to the CP congeners; as such, the proposed removal process may be applied to biochemical, bioremediation, and industrial processes, particularly in cold environments. PMID:26672451

  7. Mitochondria are required for antigen-specific T cell activation through reactive oxygen species signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sena, Laura A.; Li, Sha; Jairaman, Amit; Prakriya, Murali; Ezponda, Teresa; Hildeman, David A.; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Schumacker, Paul T.; Licht, Jonathan D.; Perlman, Harris; Bryce, Paul J.; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY It is widely appreciated that T cells increase glycolytic flux during activation, however the role of mitochondrial flux is unclear. Here we have shown that mitochondrial metabolism, in the absence of glucose metabolism, was sufficient to support interleukin-2 (IL-2) induction. Furthermore, we used mice with reduced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) production in T cells (T-Uqcrfs−/− mice) to show that mitochondria are required for T cell activation to produce mROS for activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and subsequent IL-2 induction. These mice could not induce antigen-specific expansion of T cells in vivo, however Uqcrfs1−/− T cells retained the ability to proliferate in vivo under lymphopenic conditions. This suggests that Uqcrfs1−/− T cells were not lacking bioenergetically, but rather lacked specific ROS-dependent signaling events needed for antigen-specific expansion. Thus, mitochondrial metabolism is a critical component of T cell activation through production of complex III ROS. PMID:23415911

  8. Sequence specific inhibition of human type II phospholipase A2 enzyme activity by phosphorothioate oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, C F; Chiang, M Y; Wilson-Lingardo, L; Wyatt, J R

    1994-01-01

    Phosphorothioate oligonucleotides were identified which directly inhibited human type II phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzyme activity in a sequence specific manner. The minimum pharmacophore common to all oligonucleotides which inhibited PLA2 enzyme activity consisted of two sets of three or more consecutive guanosine residues in a row. These oligonucleotides appear to form G quartets resulting in the formation of oligonucleotide aggregates. Additionally, a phosphorothioate backbone was required to be effective inhibitors of type II PLA2. The activity of one oligodeoxynucleotide, IP 3196 (5'-GGGTGGGTATAGAAGGGCTCC-3') has been characterized in more detail. IP 3196 inhibited PLA2 enzyme activity when the substrate was presented in the form of a phospholipid bilayer but not when presented in the form of a mixed micelle with anionic detergents. Human type II PLA2 was 50-fold more sensitive to inhibition by IP 3196 than venom and pancreatic type I enzymes. These data demonstrate that phosphorothioate oligonucleotides can specifically inhibit human type II PLA2 enzyme activity in a sequence specific manner. PMID:8065936

  9. Neural activity promotes long-distance, target-specific regeneration of adult retinal axons.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Hwan A; Stafford, Benjamin K; Nguyen, Phong L; Lien, Brian V; Wang, Chen; Zukor, Katherine; He, Zhigang; Huberman, Andrew D

    2016-08-01

    Axons in the mammalian CNS fail to regenerate after injury. Here we show that if the activity of mouse retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is increased by visual stimulation or using chemogenetics, their axons regenerate. We also show that if enhancement of neural activity is combined with elevation of the cell-growth-promoting pathway involving mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), RGC axons regenerate long distances and re-innervate the brain. Analysis of genetically labeled RGCs revealed that this regrowth can be target specific: RGC axons navigated back to their correct visual targets and avoided targets incorrect for their function. Moreover, these regenerated connections were successful in partially rescuing a subset of visual behaviors. Our findings indicate that combining neural activity with activation of mTOR can serve as powerful tool for enhancing axon regeneration, and they highlight the remarkable capacity of CNS neurons to re-establish accurate circuit connections in adulthood. PMID:27399843

  10. Tissue-specific activity of two manganese superoxide dismutase promoters in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Van Camp, W; Hérouart, D; Willekens, H; Takahashi, H; Saito, K; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D

    1996-01-01

    In eukaryotes, manganese superoxide dismutase is a nuclear-encoded protein that scavenges superoxide radicals in the mitochondrial matrix. We have isolated two manganese superoxide dismutase genes from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia L. and fused the 5' upstream regulatory region of these genes to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. The two gene fusions displayed a differential tissue specificity in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Promoter activity of the SodA1 gene fusion was found in the pollen, middle layer, and stomium of anthers, but was usually undetectable in vegetative organs of mature plants. The SodA2 gene fusion was expressed in the leaves, stems, roots, and flowers. SodA2 promoter activity was most prominent in the vascular bundles, stomata, axillary buds, pericycle, stomium, and pollen. Histochemical analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity suggested that the spatial expression of the two gene fusions is generally correlated with mitochondrial respiratory activity. PMID:8883376

  11. Can Specific Protein-Lipid Interactions Stabilize an Active State of the Beta 2 Adrenergic Receptor?

    PubMed

    Neale, Chris; Herce, Henry D; Pomès, Régis; García, Angel E

    2015-10-20

    G-protein-coupled receptors are eukaryotic membrane proteins with broad biological and pharmacological relevance. Like all membrane-embedded proteins, their location and orientation are influenced by lipids, which can also impact protein function via specific interactions. Extensive simulations totaling 0.25 ms reveal a process in which phospholipids from the membrane's cytosolic leaflet enter the empty G-protein binding site of an activated β2 adrenergic receptor and form salt-bridge interactions that inhibit ionic lock formation and prolong active-state residency. Simulations of the receptor embedded in an anionic membrane show increased lipid binding, providing a molecular mechanism for the experimental observation that anionic lipids can enhance receptor activity. Conservation of the arginine component of the ionic lock among Rhodopsin-like G-protein-coupled receptors suggests that intracellular lipid ingression between receptor helices H6 and H7 may be a general mechanism for active-state stabilization. PMID:26488656

  12. Non-specific activation of the epithelial sodium channel by the CFTR chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Georg; Szellas, Tanjef; Riordan, John R.; Friedrich, Thomas; Hartung, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis is caused by mutation of the gene coding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Controversial studies reported regulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by CFTR. We found that uptake of 22Na+ through ENaC is modulated by activation of CFTR in oocytes, coexpressing CFTR and ENaC, depending on extracellular chloride concentration. Furthermore we found that the effect of CFTR activation could be mimicked by other chloride channels. Voltage– and patch–clamp measurements, however, showed neither stimulation nor inhibition of ENaC-mediated conductance by activated CFTR. We conclude that the observed modulation of 22Na+ uptake by activated CFTR is due to the effect of CFTR-mediated chloride conductance on the membrane potential. These findings argue against the notion of a specific influence of CFTR on ENaC and emphasize the chloride channel function of CFTR. PMID:11266369

  13. Non-specific activation of the epithelial sodium channel by the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Nagel, G; Szellas, T; Riordan, J R; Friedrich, T; Hartung, K

    2001-03-01

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis is caused by mutation of the gene coding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Controversial studies reported regulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by CFTR. We found that uptake of (22)Na(+) through ENaC is modulated by activation of CFTR in oocytes, coexpressing CFTR and ENaC, depending on extracellular chloride concentration. Furthermore we found that the effect of CFTR activation could be mimicked by other chloride channels. Voltage- and patch-clamp measurements, however, showed neither stimulation nor inhibition of ENaC-mediated conductance by activated CFTR. We conclude that the observed modulation of (22)Na(+) uptake by activated CFTR is due to the effect of CFTR-mediated chloride conductance on the membrane potential. These findings argue against the notion of a specific influence of CFTR on ENaC and emphasize the chloride channel function of CFTR. PMID:11266369

  14. Electrochemical assay of active prostate-specific antigen (PSA) using ferrocene-functionalized peptide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Ning; He, Yuqing; Mao, Xun; Sun, Yuhan; Zhang, Xibao; Li, Chen-Zhong; Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Guodong

    2010-03-24

    This paper presents a novel approach to electrochemically determine enzymatically active PSA using ferrocene-functionalized helix peptide (CHSSLKQK). The principle of electrochemical measurement is based on the specific proteolytic cleavage events of the FC-peptide on the gold electrode surface in the presence of PSA, resulting the change of the current signal of the electrode. The percentage of the decreased current is linear with the concentration of active PSA at the range of 0.5-40 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.2 ng/mL. The direct transduction of peptide cleavage events into an electrical signal provides a simple, sensitive method for detecting the enzymatic activity of PSA and determining the active PSA concentration.

  15. Elimination of dendritic spines with long-term memory is specific to active circuits

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Jeff; Cowansage, Kiriana; Baumgärtel, Karsten; Mayford, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Structural changes in brain circuits active during learning are thought to be important for long-term memory storage. If these changes support long-term information storage they might be expected to be present at distant timepoints after learning, as well as specific to the circuit activated with learning, and sensitive to the contingencies of the behavioral paradigm. Here, we show such changes in the hippocampus as a result of contextual fear conditioning. There were significantly fewer spines specifically on active neurons of fear-conditioned mice. This spine loss did not occur in homecage mice or in mice exposed to the training context alone. Mice exposed to unpaired shocks showed a generalized reduction in spines. These learning-related changes in spine density could reflect a direct mechanism of encoding or alternately could reflect a compensatory adaptation to previously described enhancement in transmission due to glutamate receptor insertion. PMID:22956846

  16. Enhancement of neutralizing activity of influenza virus-specific antibodies by serum components.

    PubMed

    Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Feng, Jingqi; Eid, Mark; Zharikova, Darya; Gerhard, Walter

    2006-09-01

    The role of serum components in enhancing virus neutralizing (VN) activity of influenza virus A/PR/8/34 hemagglutinin (HA)-specific MAbs in vitro was investigated. The degree of enhancement depended on the MAb's fine specificity and heavy chain isotype and on type of serum. Greatest enhancement (>100-fold) was seen with sera from immunodeficient mice that lacked serum immunoglobulin. At least two serum components were involved: C1q and a heat-resistant factor. C1q was mandatory for enhancement, and other components of the complement system were not required. C1q appeared to operate by improving MAb-mediated inhibition of virus attachment to host cells and was most effective with MAbs that inhibited virus attachment poorly on their own. The heat-resistant factor enhanced VN activity only in the presence of C1q and appeared to operate by enhancing VN activity at a post-attachment stage. PMID:16777168

  17. Tonotopic and Field-Specific Representation of Long-Lasting Sustained Activity in Rat Auditory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Shiramatsu, Tomoyo I; Noda, Takahiro; Akutsu, Kan; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Cortical information processing of the onset, offset, and continuous plateau of an acoustic stimulus should play an important role in acoustic object perception. To date, transient activities responding to the onset and offset of a sound have been well investigated and cortical subfields and topographic representation in these subfields, such as place code of sound frequency, have been well characterized. However, whether these cortical subfields with tonotopic representation are inherited in the sustained activities that follow transient activities and persist during the presentation of a long-lasting stimulus remains unknown, because sustained activities do not exhibit distinct, reproducible, and time-locked responses in their amplitude to be characterized by grand averaging. To address this gap in understanding, we attempted to decode sound information from densely mapped sustained activities in the rat auditory cortex using a sparse parameter estimation method called sparse logistic regression (SLR), and investigated whether and how these activities represent sound information. A microelectrode array with a grid of 10 × 10 recording sites within an area of 4.0 mm × 4.0 mm was implanted in the fourth layer of the auditory cortex in rats under isoflurane anesthesia. Sustained activities in response to long-lasting constant pure tones were recorded. SLR then was applied to discriminate the sound-induced band-specific power or phase-locking value from those of spontaneous activities. The highest decoding performance was achieved in the high-gamma band, indicating that cortical inhibitory interneurons may contribute to the sparse tonotopic representation in sustained activities by mediating synchronous activities. The estimated parameter in the SLR decoding revealed that the informative recording site had a characteristic frequency close to the test frequency. In addition, decoding of the four test frequencies demonstrated that the decoding performance of the SLR

  18. Tonotopic and Field-Specific Representation of Long-Lasting Sustained Activity in Rat Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shiramatsu, Tomoyo I.; Noda, Takahiro; Akutsu, Kan; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Cortical information processing of the onset, offset, and continuous plateau of an acoustic stimulus should play an important role in acoustic object perception. To date, transient activities responding to the onset and offset of a sound have been well investigated and cortical subfields and topographic representation in these subfields, such as place code of sound frequency, have been well characterized. However, whether these cortical subfields with tonotopic representation are inherited in the sustained activities that follow transient activities and persist during the presentation of a long-lasting stimulus remains unknown, because sustained activities do not exhibit distinct, reproducible, and time-locked responses in their amplitude to be characterized by grand averaging. To address this gap in understanding, we attempted to decode sound information from densely mapped sustained activities in the rat auditory cortex using a sparse parameter estimation method called sparse logistic regression (SLR), and investigated whether and how these activities represent sound information. A microelectrode array with a grid of 10 × 10 recording sites within an area of 4.0 mm × 4.0 mm was implanted in the fourth layer of the auditory cortex in rats under isoflurane anesthesia. Sustained activities in response to long-lasting constant pure tones were recorded. SLR then was applied to discriminate the sound-induced band-specific power or phase-locking value from those of spontaneous activities. The highest decoding performance was achieved in the high-gamma band, indicating that cortical inhibitory interneurons may contribute to the sparse tonotopic representation in sustained activities by mediating synchronous activities. The estimated parameter in the SLR decoding revealed that the informative recording site had a characteristic frequency close to the test frequency. In addition, decoding of the four test frequencies demonstrated that the decoding performance of the SLR

  19. The length of a lantibiotic hinge region has profound influence on antimicrobial activity and host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liang; van Heel, Auke J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2015-01-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized (methyl)lanthionine containing peptides which can efficiently inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria. As lantibiotics kill bacteria efficiently and resistance to them is difficult to be obtained, they have the potential to be used in many applications, e.g., in pharmaceutical industry or food industry. Nisin can inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to lipid II and by making pores in their membrane. The C-terminal part of nisin is known to play an important role during translocation over the membrane and forming pore complexes. However, as the thickness of bacterial membranes varies between different species and environmental conditions, this property could have an influence on the pore forming activity of nisin. To investigate this, the so-called “hinge region” of nisin (residues NMK) was engineered to vary from one to six amino acid residues and specific activity against different indicators was compared. Antimicrobial activity in liquid culture assays showed that wild type nisin is most active, while truncation of the hinge region dramatically reduced the activity of the peptide. However, one or two amino acids extensions showed only slightly reduced activity against most indicator strains. Notably, some variants (+2, +1, −1, −2) exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than nisin in agar well diffusion assays against Lactococcus lactis MG1363, Listeria monocytogenes, Enterococcus faecalis VE14089, Bacillus sporothermodurans IC4 and Bacillus cereus 4153 at certain temperatures. PMID:25688235

  20. Prefusion F–specific antibodies determine the magnitude of RSV neutralizing activity in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Ngwuta, Joan O.; Chen, Man; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Joyce, M. Gordon; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Kumar, Azad; Yassine, Hadi M.; Moin, Syed M.; Killikelly, April M.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Rundlet, Emily J.; Sastry, Mallika; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B. E.; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Nason, Martha C.; Capella, Cristina; Peeples, Mark E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; McLellan, Jason S.; Kwong, Peter D.; Graham, Barney S.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is estimated to claim more lives among infants <1 year old than any other single pathogen, except malaria, and poses a substantial global health burden. Viral entry is mediated by a type I fusion glycoprotein (F) that transitions from a metastable prefusion (pre-F) to a stable postfusion (post-F) trimer. A highly neutralization-sensitive epitope, antigenic site Ø, is found only on pre-F. We determined what fraction of neutralizing (NT) activity in human sera is dependent on antibodies specific for antigenic site Ø or other antigenic sites on F in healthy subjects from ages 7 to 93 years. Adsorption of individual sera with stabilized pre-F protein removed >90% of NT activity and depleted binding antibodies to both F conformations. In contrast, adsorption with post-F removed ~30% of NT activity, and binding antibodies to pre-F were retained. These findings were consistent across all age groups. Protein competition neutralization assays with pre-F mutants in which sites Ø or II were altered to knock out binding of antibodies to the corresponding sites showed that these sites accounted for ~35 and <10% of NT activity, respectively. Binding competition assays with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) indicated that the amount of site Ø–specific antibodies correlated with NT activity, whereas the magnitude of binding competed by site II mAbs did not correlate with neutralization. Our results indicate that RSV NT activity in human sera is primarily derived from pre-F–specific antibodies, and therefore, inducing or boosting NT activity by vaccination will be facilitated by using pre-F antigens that preserve site Ø. PMID:26468324

  1. Active-site Arg --> Lys substitutions alter reaction and substrate specificity of aspartate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Vacca, R A; Giannattasio, S; Graber, R; Sandmeier, E; Marra, E; Christen, P

    1997-08-29

    Arg386 and Arg292 of aspartate aminotransferase bind the alpha and the distal carboxylate group, respectively, of dicarboxylic substrates. Their substitution with lysine residues markedly decreased aminotransferase activity. The kcat values with L-aspartate and 2-oxoglutarate as substrates under steady-state conditions at 25 degrees C were 0.5, 2.0, and 0.03 s-1 for the R292K, R386K, and R292K/R386K mutations, respectively, kcat of the wild-type enzyme being 220 s-1. Longer dicarboxylic substrates did not compensate for the shorter side chain of the lysine residues. Consistent with the different roles of Arg292 and Arg386 in substrate binding, the effects of their substitution on the activity toward long chain monocarboxylic (norleucine/2-oxocaproic acid) and aromatic substrates diverged. Whereas the R292K mutation did not impair the aminotransferase activity toward these substrates, the effect of the R386K substitution was similar to that on the activity toward dicarboxylic substrates. All three mutant enzymes catalyzed as side reactions the beta-decarboxylation of L-aspartate and the racemization of amino acids at faster rates than the wild-type enzyme. The changes in reaction specificity were most pronounced in aspartate aminotransferase R292K, which decarboxylated L-aspartate to L-alanine 15 times faster (kcat = 0.002 s-1) than the wild-type enzyme. The rates of racemization of L-aspartate, L-glutamate, and L-alanine were 3, 5, and 2 times, respectively, faster than with the wild-type enzyme. Thus, Arg --> Lys substitutions in the active site of aspartate aminotransferase decrease aminotransferase activity but increase other pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent catalytic activities. Apparently, the reaction specificity of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes is not only achieved by accelerating the specific reaction but also by preventing potential side reactions of the coenzyme substrate adduct. PMID:9268327

  2. Chemical synthesis of nucleoside-gamma-[32P]triphosphates of high specific activity.

    PubMed

    Janecka, A; Panusz, H; Pankowski, J; Koziołkiewicz, W

    1980-01-01

    A simple chemical procedure for the preparation of four common ribonucleoside 5-gamma-[32P]triphosphates of high specific activity (up to 10 Ci/mmole) based on the condensation of orthophosphoric acid with the corresponding nucleoside 5-diphosphate in the presence of ethyl chloroformate as well as the methods of purification and identification of the products are described. PMID:7375446

  3. Are There Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Suicidal Activity among Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Kalman J.; Harrow, Martin; Faull, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Are there gender-specific risk factors for suicidal activity among patients with schizophrenia and depression? A total of 74 schizophrenia patients (51 men, 23 women) and 77 unipolar nonpsychotic depressed patients (26 men, 51 women) from the Chicago Follow-up Study were studied prospectively at 2 years posthospitalization and again at 7.5 years.…

  4. Specification for installation of the crew activity planning system coaxial cable communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. A.; Roman, G. S.

    1979-01-01

    The specification used to install a broadband coaxial cable communication system to support remote terminal operations on the Crew Activity Planning system at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center are reported. The system supports high speed communications between a Harris Slash 8 computer and one or more Sanders Graphic 7 displays.

  5. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  6. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  7. Specific and Nonspecific Neural Activity during Selective Processing of Visual Representations in Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Hwamee; Leung, Hoi-Chung

    2010-01-01

    In this fMRI study, we investigated prefrontal cortex (PFC) and visual association regions during selective information processing. We recorded behavioral responses and neural activity during a delayed recognition task with a cue presented during the delay period. A specific cue ("Face" or "Scene") was used to indicate which one of the two…

  8. Transportation impact analysis for the shipment of low specific activity nitric acid. Revisison 1

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.R.

    1995-05-16

    This is in support of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility Low Specific Activity (LSA) Nitric Acid Shipment Environmental Assessment. It analyzes potential toxicological and radiological risks associated with transportation of PUREX Facility LSA Nitric Acid from the Hanford Site to Portsmouth VA, Baltimore MD, and Port Elizabeth NJ.

  9. Designing Class Activities to Meet Specific Core Training Competencies: A Developmental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guth, Lorraine J.; McDonnell, Kelly A.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a developmental model for designing and utilizing class activities to meet specific Association for Specialists in Group Work (ASGW) core training competencies for group workers. A review of the relevant literature about teaching group work and meeting core training standards is provided. The authors suggest a process by…

  10. Context Fear Learning Specifically Activates Distinct Populations of Neurons in Amygdala and Hypothalamus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trogrlic, Lidia; Wilson, Yvette M.; Newman, Andrew G.; Murphy, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The identity and distribution of neurons that are involved in any learning or memory event is not known. In previous studies, we identified a discrete population of neurons in the lateral amygdala that show learning-specific activation of a c-"fos"-regulated transgene following context fear conditioning. Here, we have extended these studies to…

  11. Context-Specific Associations of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior With Cognition in Children.

    PubMed

    Aggio, Daniel; Smith, Lee; Fisher, Abigail; Hamer, Mark

    2016-06-15

    In the present study, we investigated how overall and specific domains of physical activity and sedentary behavior at the age of 7 years were associated with cognition at the age of 11 years in 8,462 children from the Millennium Cohort Study. Data were collected from 2001 to 2013. Participation in domains of physical activity and sedentary behavior at 7 years of age were reported. Activity levels were also measured objectively. Cognition was assessed using the British Ability Scales. General linear models were used to assess longitudinal associations of physical activity and sedentary behavior, measured both objectively and via self-report, with cognition. Analyses were adjusted for prespecified covariates. Sports/physical activity club attendance (B = 0.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.2, 1.1), doing homework (B = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.0, 0.9), and objectively measured sedentary time (B = 0.8, 95% CI: 0.1, 1.4) at age 7 years were positively associated with cognition at age 11 years in final the models. Television viewing was negatively associated with cognition (B = -1.7, 95% CI: -2.4, -1.0), although the association was attenuated to the null after adjustments for baseline cognition. Objectively measured light physical activity was inversely associated with cognition (B = -0.7, 95% CI: -1.3, -0.1). Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was also inversely associated with cognition in girls only (B = -1.1, 95% CI: -2.0, -0.3). Associations of physical activity and sedentary behavior with cognition appear to be context-specific in young people. PMID:27226249

  12. Specific induction of endogenous viral restriction factors using CRISPR/Cas-derived transcriptional activators

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, Hal P.; Kornepati, Anand V. R.; Marshall, Joy B.; Kennedy, Edward M.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas several mammalian proteins can restrict the replication of HIV-1 and other viruses, these are often not expressed in relevant target cells. A potential method to inhibit viral replication might therefore be to use synthetic transcription factors to induce restriction factor expression. In particular, mutants of the RNA-guided DNA binding protein Cas9 that have lost their DNA cleavage activity could be used to recruit transcription activation domains to specific promoters. However, initial experiments revealed only weak activation unless multiple promoter-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) were used. Recently, the recruitment of multiple transcription activation domains by a single sgRNA, modified to contain MS2-derived stem loops that recruit fusion proteins consisting of the MS2 coat protein linked to transcription activation domains, was reported to induce otherwise silent cellular genes. Here, we demonstrate that such “synergistic activation mediators” can induce the expression of two restriction factors, APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3B (A3B), in human cells that normally lack these proteins. We observed modest activation of endogenous A3G or A3B expression using single sgRNAs but high expression when two sgRNAs were used. Whereas the induced A3G and A3B proteins both blocked infection by an HIV-1 variant lacking a functional vif gene by inducing extensive dC-to-dU editing, only the induced A3B protein inhibited wild-type HIV-1. These data demonstrate that Cas9-derived transcriptional activators have the potential to be used for screens for endogenous genes that affect virus replication and raise the possibility that synthetic transcription factors might prove clinically useful if efficient delivery mechanisms could be developed. PMID:26668372

  13. Context-Specific Associations of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior With Cognition in Children

    PubMed Central

    Aggio, Daniel; Smith, Lee; Fisher, Abigail; Hamer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated how overall and specific domains of physical activity and sedentary behavior at the age of 7 years were associated with cognition at the age of 11 years in 8,462 children from the Millennium Cohort Study. Data were collected from 2001 to 2013. Participation in domains of physical activity and sedentary behavior at 7 years of age were reported. Activity levels were also measured objectively. Cognition was assessed using the British Ability Scales. General linear models were used to assess longitudinal associations of physical activity and sedentary behavior, measured both objectively and via self-report, with cognition. Analyses were adjusted for prespecified covariates. Sports/physical activity club attendance (B = 0.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.2, 1.1), doing homework (B = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.0, 0.9), and objectively measured sedentary time (B = 0.8, 95% CI: 0.1, 1.4) at age 7 years were positively associated with cognition at age 11 years in final the models. Television viewing was negatively associated with cognition (B = −1.7, 95% CI: −2.4, −1.0), although the association was attenuated to the null after adjustments for baseline cognition. Objectively measured light physical activity was inversely associated with cognition (B = −0.7, 95% CI: −1.3, −0.1). Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was also inversely associated with cognition in girls only (B = −1.1, 95% CI: −2.0, −0.3). Associations of physical activity and sedentary behavior with cognition appear to be context-specific in young people. PMID:27226249

  14. Specific induction of endogenous viral restriction factors using CRISPR/Cas-derived transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Hal P; Kornepati, Anand V R; Marshall, Joy B; Kennedy, Edward M; Cullen, Bryan R

    2015-12-29

    Whereas several mammalian proteins can restrict the replication of HIV-1 and other viruses, these are often not expressed in relevant target cells. A potential method to inhibit viral replication might therefore be to use synthetic transcription factors to induce restriction factor expression. In particular, mutants of the RNA-guided DNA binding protein Cas9 that have lost their DNA cleavage activity could be used to recruit transcription activation domains to specific promoters. However, initial experiments revealed only weak activation unless multiple promoter-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) were used. Recently, the recruitment of multiple transcription activation domains by a single sgRNA, modified to contain MS2-derived stem loops that recruit fusion proteins consisting of the MS2 coat protein linked to transcription activation domains, was reported to induce otherwise silent cellular genes. Here, we demonstrate that such "synergistic activation mediators" can induce the expression of two restriction factors, APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3B (A3B), in human cells that normally lack these proteins. We observed modest activation of endogenous A3G or A3B expression using single sgRNAs but high expression when two sgRNAs were used. Whereas the induced A3G and A3B proteins both blocked infection by an HIV-1 variant lacking a functional vif gene by inducing extensive dC-to-dU editing, only the induced A3B protein inhibited wild-type HIV-1. These data demonstrate that Cas9-derived transcriptional activators have the potential to be used for screens for endogenous genes that affect virus replication and raise the possibility that synthetic transcription factors might prove clinically useful if efficient delivery mechanisms could be developed. PMID:26668372

  15. Differential Neural Activity during Search of Specific and General Autobiographical Memories elicited by Musical Cues

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Jaclyn Hennessey; Addis, Donna Rose; Giovanello, Kelly S.

    2011-01-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies that have examined autobiographical memory specificity have utilized retrieval cues associated with prior searches of the event, potentially changing the retrieval processes being investigated. In the current study, musical cues were used to naturally elicit memories from multiple levels of specificity (i.e., lifetime period, general event, and event-specific). Sixteen young adults participated in a neuroimaging study in which they retrieved autobiographical memories associated with musical cues. These musical cues led to the retrieval of highly emotional memories that had low levels of prior retrieval. Retrieval of all autobiographical memory levels was associated with activity in regions in the autobiographical memory network, specifically the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, and right medial temporal lobe. Owing to the use of music, memories from varying levels of specificity were retrieved, allowing for comparison of event memory and abstract personal knowledge, as well as comparison of specific and general event memory. Dorsolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal regions were engaged during event retrieval relative to personal knowledge retrieval, and retrieval of specific event memories was associated with increased activity in the bilateral medial temporal lobe and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex relative to retrieval of general event memories. These results suggest that the initial search processes for memories of different specificity levels preferentially engage different components of the autobiographical memory network. The potential underlying causes of these neural differences are discussed. PMID:21600227

  16. Promiscuous activity of ER glucosidase II discovered through donor specificity analysis of UGGT

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Atsushi; Totani, Kiichiro; Matsuo, Ichiro; Ito, Yukishige

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} UGGT has a narrow donor specificity. {yields} UGGT gave several non-natural high-mannose-type glycans. {yields} G-II has a promiscuous activity as broad specificity hexosidase. -- Abstract: In glycoprotein quality control system in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), UGGT (UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase) and glucosidase II (G-II) play key roles. UGGT serves as a glycoprotein folding sensor by virtue of its unique specificity to glucosylate glycoproteins at incompletely folded stage. By using various UDP-Glc analogues, we first analyzed donor specificity of UGGT, which was proven to be rather narrow. However, marginal activity was observed with UDP-galactose and UDP-glucuronic acid as well as with 3-, 4- and 6-deoxy glucose analogues to give corresponding transfer products. Intriguingly, G-II smoothly converted all of them back to Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}, providing an indication that G-II has a promiscuous activity as a broad specificity hexosidase.

  17. Activation energies of colloidal particle aggregation: towards a quantitative characterization of specific ion effects.

    PubMed

    Tian, Rui; Yang, Gang; Li, Hang; Gao, Xiaodan; Liu, Xinmin; Zhu, Hualing; Tang, Ying

    2014-05-21

    A quantitative description of specific ion effects is an essential and focused topic in colloidal and biological science. In this work, the dynamic light scattering technique was employed to study the aggregation kinetics of colloidal particles in the various alkali ion solutions with a wide range of concentrations. It indicated that the activation energies could be used to quantitatively characterize specific ion effects, which was supported by the results of effective hydrodynamic diameters, aggregation rates and critical coagulation concentrations. At a given concentration of 25 mmol L(-1), the activation energies for Li(+) are 1.2, 5.7, 28, and 126 times as much for Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+), respectively. Most importantly, the activation energy differences between two alkali cation species increase sharply with decrease of electrolyte concentrations, implying the more pronounced specific ion effects at lower concentrations. The dominant role of electrolyte cations during the aggregation of negatively charged colloidal particles was confirmed by alternative anions. Among the various theories, only the polarization effect can give a rational interpretation of the above specific ion effects, and this is substantially supported by the presence of strong electric fields from montmorillonite surfaces and its association mainly with electrolyte cations and montmorillonite particles. The classical induction theory, although with inclusion of electric field, requires significant corrections because it predicts an opposite trend to the experimentally observed specific ion effects. PMID:24603654

  18. Identification of an important motif that controls the activity and specificity of sugar transporters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Yu, Chenzhao; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-07-01

    Efficient glucose-xylose co-utilization is critical for economical biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. To enable glucose-xylose co-utilization, a highly active xylose specific transporter without glucose inhibition is desirable. However, our understanding of the structure-activity/specificity relationship of sugar transporters in general is limited, which hinders our ability to engineer xylose-specific transporters. In this study, via homology modeling and analysis of hexose sugar transporter HXT14 mutants, we identified a highly conserved YYX(T/P) motif that plays an important role in controlling the activity and specificity of sugar transporters. We demonstrated that mutating the two tyrosine residues of the motif to phenylalanine, respectively, improved glucose transport capacity across several different sugar transporters. Furthermore, we illustrated that by engineering the fourth position in the YYX(T/P) motif, the sugar specificity of transporters was significantly altered or even reversed towards xylose. Finally, using the engineered sugar transporter, genuine glucose-xylose co-fermentation was achieved. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1460-1467. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26724683

  19. Screening of DUB activity and specificity by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ritorto, Maria Stella; Ewan, Richard; Perez-Oliva, Ana B.; Knebel, Axel; Buhrlage, Sara J.; Wightman, Melanie; Kelly, Sharon M.; Wood, Nicola T.; Virdee, Satpal; Gray, Nathanael S.; Morrice, Nicholas A.; Alessi, Dario R.; Trost, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Deubiquitylases (DUBs) are key regulators of the ubiquitin system which cleave ubiquitin moieties from proteins and polyubiquitin chains. Several DUBs have been implicated in various diseases and are attractive drug targets. We have developed a sensitive and fast assay to quantify in vitro DUB enzyme activity using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Unlike other current assays, this method uses unmodified substrates, such as diubiquitin topoisomers. By analysing 42 human DUBs against all diubiquitin topoisomers we provide an extensive characterization of DUB activity and specificity. Our results confirm the high specificity of many members of the OTU and JAB/MPN/Mov34 metalloenzyme DUB families and highlight that all USPs tested display low linkage selectivity. We also demonstrate that this assay can be deployed to assess the potency and specificity of DUB inhibitors by profiling 11 compounds against a panel of 32 DUBs. PMID:25159004

  20. Screening of DUB activity and specificity by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ritorto, Maria Stella; Ewan, Richard; Perez-Oliva, Ana B; Knebel, Axel; Buhrlage, Sara J; Wightman, Melanie; Kelly, Sharon M; Wood, Nicola T; Virdee, Satpal; Gray, Nathanael S; Morrice, Nicholas A; Alessi, Dario R; Trost, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Deubiquitylases (DUBs) are key regulators of the ubiquitin system which cleave ubiquitin moieties from proteins and polyubiquitin chains. Several DUBs have been implicated in various diseases and are attractive drug targets. We have developed a sensitive and fast assay to quantify in vitro DUB enzyme activity using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Unlike other current assays, this method uses unmodified substrates, such as diubiquitin topoisomers. By analysing 42 human DUBs against all diubiquitin topoisomers we provide an extensive characterization of DUB activity and specificity. Our results confirm the high specificity of many members of the OTU and JAB/MPN/Mov34 metalloenzyme DUB families and highlight that all USPs tested display low linkage selectivity. We also demonstrate that this assay can be deployed to assess the potency and specificity of DUB inhibitors by profiling 11 compounds against a panel of 32 DUBs. PMID:25159004

  1. Synthesis of high specific activity (1- sup 3 H) farnesyl pyrophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Saljoughian, M.; Morimoto, H.; Williams, P.G.

    1991-08-01

    The synthesis of tritiated farnesyl pyrophosphate with high specific activity is reported. trans-trans Farnesol was oxidized to the corresponding aldehyde followed by reduction with lithium aluminium tritide (5%-{sup 3}H) to give trans-trans (1-{sup 3}H)farnesol. The specific radioactivity of the alcohol was determined from its triphenylsilane derivative, prepared under very mild conditions. The tritiated alcohol was phosphorylated by initial conversion to an allylic halide, and subsequent treatment of the halide with tris-tetra-n-butylammonium hydrogen pyrophosphate. The hydride procedure followed in this work has advantages over existing methods for the synthesis of tritiated farnesyl pyrophosphate, with the possibility of higher specific activity and a much higher yield obtained. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Diversity between mammalian tolloid proteinases: Oligomerisation and non-catalytic domains influence activity and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Bayley, Christopher P.; Ruiz Nivia, Hilda D.; Dajani, Rana; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Collins, Richard F.; Rada, Heather; Bird, Louise E.; Baldock, Clair

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian tolloid family of metalloproteinases is essential for tissue patterning and extracellular matrix assembly. The four members of the family: bone morphogenetic protein-1 (BMP-1), mammalian tolloid (mTLD), tolloid-like (TLL)-1 and TLL-2 differ in their substrate specificity and activity levels, despite sharing similar domain organization. We have previously described a model of substrate exclusion by dimerisation to explain differences in the activities of monomeric BMP-1 and dimers of mTLD and TLL-1. Here we show that TLL-2, the least active member of the tolloid family, is predominantly monomeric in solution, therefore it appears unlikely that substrate exclusion via dimerisation is a mechanism for regulating TLL-2 activity. X-ray scattering and electron microscopy structural and biophysical analyses reveal an elongated shape for the monomer and flexibility in the absence of calcium. Furthermore, we show that TLL-2 can cleave chordin in vitro, similar to other mammalian tolloids, but truncated forms of TLL-2 mimicking BMP-1 are unable to cleave chordin. However, both the N- and C-terminal non-catalytic domains from all mammalian tolloids bind chordin with high affinity. The mechanisms underlying substrate specificity and activity in the tolloid family are complex with variation between family members and depend on both multimerisation and substrate interaction. PMID:26902455

  3. A flower-specific Myb protein activates transcription of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes.

    PubMed

    Sablowski, R W; Moyano, E; Culianez-Macia, F A; Schuch, W; Martin, C; Bevan, M

    1994-01-01

    Synthesis of flavonoid pigments in flowers requires the co-ordinated expression of genes encoding enzymes in th phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway. Some cis-elements involved in the transcriptional control of these genes have been defined. We report binding of petal-specific activities from tobacco and Antirrhinum majus (snapdragon) to an element conserved in promoters of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and implicated in expression in flowers. These binding activities were inhibited by antibodies raised against Myb305, a flower-specific Myb protein previously cloned from Antirrhinum by sequence homology. Myb305 bound to the same element and formed a DNA-protein complex with the same mobility as the Antirrhinum petal protein in electrophoretic mobility shift experiments. Myb305 activated expression from its binding site in yeast and in tobacco protoplasts. In protoplasts, activation also required a G-box-like element, suggesting co-operation with other elements and factors. The results strongly suggest a role for Myb305-related proteins in the activation of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes in flowers. This is consistent with the genetically demonstrated role of plant Myb proteins in the regulation of genes involved in flavonoid synthesis. PMID:8306956

  4. Cardiac myocyte-specific AHR activation phenocopies TCDD-induced toxicity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lanham, Kevin A; Plavicki, Jessica; Peterson, Richard E; Heideman, Warren

    2014-09-01

    Exposure of zebrafish embryos to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) activates the zebrafish aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 (AHR) to produce developmental and cardiovascular toxicity. AHR is found in the heart; however, AHR activation by TCDD is not confined to the heart and occurs throughout the organism. In order to understand the cause of cardiotoxicity, we constructed a constitutively active AHR (caAHR) based on the zebrafish AHR2 and expressed it specifically in cardiomyocytes. We show that AHR activation within the cardiomyocytes can account for the heart failure induced by TCDD. Expression of the caAHR within the heart produced cardiac malformations, loss of circulation, and pericardial edema. The heart-specific activation of AHR reproduced several other well-characterized endpoints of TCDD toxicity outside of the cardiovascular system, including defects in swim bladder and craniofacial development. This work identifies a single cellular site of TCDD action, the myocardial cell, that can account for the severe cardiovascular collapse observed following early life stage exposure to TCDD, and contributes to other forms of toxicity. PMID:25037585

  5. Category-specific activations during word generation reflect experiential sensorimotor modalities

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kai; Palmer, Erica D.; Basho, Surina; Zadra, Jonathan R.; Müller, Ralph-Axel

    2009-01-01

    According to the sensorimotor theory of lexicosemantic organization, semantic representations are neurally distributed and anatomically linked to category-specific sensory areas. Previous functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated category specificity in lexicosemantic representations. However, little evidence is available from word generation paradigms, which provide access to semantic representations while minimizing confounds resulting from low-level perceptual features of stimulus presentation. In this study, 13 healthy young adults underwent fMRI scanning while performing a word generation task, generating exemplars to nine different semantic categories. Each semantic category was assigned to one of three superordinate category types, based upon sensorimotor modalities (visual, motor, somatosensory) presumed to predominate in lexical acquisition. For word generation overall, robust activation was seen in left inferior frontal cortex. Analyses by sensorimotor modality categories yielded activations in brain regions related to perceptual and motor processing: Visual categories activated extrastriate cortex, motor categories activated the intraparietal sulcus and posterior middle temporal cortex, and somatosensory categories activated postcentral and inferior parietal regions. Our results are consistent with the sensorimotor theory, according to which lexicosemantic representations are distributed across brain regions participating in sensorimotor processing associated with the experiential components of lexicosemantic acquisition. PMID:19559802

  6. Site-specific Interaction Mapping of Phosphorylated Ubiquitin to Uncover Parkin Activation.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Koji; Queliconi, Bruno B; Koyano, Fumika; Saeki, Yasushi; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Tanaka, Keiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki

    2015-10-16

    Damaged mitochondria are eliminated through autophagy machinery. A cytosolic E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin, a gene product mutated in familial Parkinsonism, is essential for this pathway. Recent progress has revealed that phosphorylation of both Parkin and ubiquitin at Ser(65) by PINK1 are crucial for activation and recruitment of Parkin to the damaged mitochondria. However, the mechanism by which phosphorylated ubiquitin associates with and activates phosphorylated Parkin E3 ligase activity remains largely unknown. Here, we analyze interactions between phosphorylated forms of both Parkin and ubiquitin at a spatial resolution of the amino acid residue by site-specific photo-crosslinking. We reveal that the in-between-RING (IBR) domain along with RING1 domain of Parkin preferentially binds to ubiquitin in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, another approach, the Fluoppi (fluorescent-based technology detecting protein-protein interaction) assay, also showed that pathogenic mutations in these domains blocked interactions with phosphomimetic ubiquitin in mammalian cells. Molecular modeling based on the site-specific photo-crosslinking interaction map combined with mass spectrometry strongly suggests that a novel binding mechanism between Parkin and ubiquitin leads to a Parkin conformational change with subsequent activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. PMID:26260794

  7. Cardiac Myocyte-Specific AHR Activation Phenocopies TCDD-Induced Toxicity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lanham, Kevin A.; Plavicki, Jessica; Peterson, Richard E.; Heideman, Warren

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of zebrafish embryos to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) activates the zebrafish aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 (AHR) to produce developmental and cardiovascular toxicity. AHR is found in the heart; however, AHR activation by TCDD is not confined to the heart and occurs throughout the organism. In order to understand the cause of cardiotoxicity, we constructed a constitutively active AHR (caAHR) based on the zebrafish AHR2 and expressed it specifically in cardiomyocytes. We show that AHR activation within the cardiomyocytes can account for the heart failure induced by TCDD. Expression of the caAHR within the heart produced cardiac malformations, loss of circulation, and pericardial edema. The heart-specific activation of AHR reproduced several other well-characterized endpoints of TCDD toxicity outside of the cardiovascular system, including defects in swim bladder and craniofacial development. This work identifies a single cellular site of TCDD action, the myocardial cell, that can account for the severe cardiovascular collapse observed following early life stage exposure to TCDD, and contributes to other forms of toxicity. PMID:25037585

  8. Wobble Pairs of the HDV Ribozyme Play Specific Roles in Stabilization of Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sripathi, Kamali N.; Banáš, Pavel; Reblova, Kamila; Šponer, Jiři; Otyepka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the only known human pathogen whose genome contains a catalytic RNA motif (ribozyme). The overall architecture of the HDV ribozyme is that of a double-nested pseudoknot, with two GU pairs flanking the active site. Although extensive studies have shown that mutation of either wobble results in decreased catalytic activity, little work has focused on linking these mutations to specific structural effects on catalytic fitness. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations based on an activated structure to probe the active site dynamics as a result of wobble pair mutations. In both wild-type and mutant ribozymes, the in-line fitness of the active site (as a measure of catalytic proficiency) strongly depends on the presence of a C75(N3H3+)N1(O5′) hydrogen bond, which positions C75 as the general acid for the reaction. Our mutational analyses show that each GU wobble supports catalytically fit conformations in distinct ways; the reverse G25U20 wobble promotes high in-line fitness, high occupancy of the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) general-acid hydrogen bond and stabilization of the G1U37 wobble, while the G1U37 wobble acts more locally by stabilizing high in-line fitness and the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) hydrogen bond. We also find that stable type I A-minor and P1.1 hydrogen bonding above and below the active site, respectively, prevent local structural disorder from spreading and disrupting global conformation. Taken together, our results define specific, often redundant architectural roles for several structural motifs of the HDV ribozyme active site, expanding the known roles of these motifs within all HDV-like ribozymes and other structured RNAs. PMID:25631765

  9. Neuronal activity is required for the development of specific cortical interneuron subtypes.

    PubMed

    De Marco García, Natalia V; Karayannis, Theofanis; Fishell, Gord

    2011-04-21

    Electrical activity has been shown to regulate development in a variety of species and in various structures, including the retina, spinal cord and cortex. Within the mammalian cortex specifically, the development of dendrites and commissural axons in pyramidal cells is activity-dependent. However, little is known about the developmental role of activity in the other major cortical population of neurons, the GABA-producing interneurons. These neurons are morphologically and functionally heterogeneous and efforts over the past decade have focused on determining the mechanisms that contribute to this diversity. It was recently discovered that 30% of all cortical interneurons arise from a relatively novel source within the ventral telencephalon, the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE). Owing to their late birth date, these interneurons populate the cortex only after the majority of other interneurons and pyramidal cells are already in place and have started to functionally integrate. Here we demonstrate in mice that for CGE-derived reelin (Re)-positive and calretinin (Cr)-positive (but not vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-positive) interneurons, activity is essential before postnatal day 3 for correct migration, and that after postnatal day 3, glutamate-mediated activity controls the development of their axons and dendrites. Furthermore, we show that the engulfment and cell motility 1 gene (Elmo1), a target of the transcription factor distal-less homeobox 1 (Dlx1), is selectively expressed in Re(+) and Cr(+) interneurons and is both necessary and sufficient for activity-dependent interneuron migration. Our findings reveal a selective requirement for activity in shaping the cortical integration of specific neuronal subtypes. PMID:21460837

  10. Engineering neprilysin activity and specificity to create a novel therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Webster, Carl I; Burrell, Matthew; Olsson, Lise-Lotte; Fowler, Susan B; Digby, Sarah; Sandercock, Alan; Snijder, Arjan; Tebbe, Jan; Haupts, Ulrich; Grudzinska, Joanna; Jermutus, Lutz; Andersson, Christin

    2014-01-01

    Neprilysin is a transmembrane zinc metallopeptidase that degrades a wide range of peptide substrates. It has received attention as a potential therapy for Alzheimer's disease due to its ability to degrade the peptide amyloid beta. However, its broad range of peptide substrates has the potential to limit its therapeutic use due to degradation of additional peptides substrates that tightly regulate many physiological processes. We sought to generate a soluble version of the ectodomain of neprilysin with improved activity and specificity towards amyloid beta as a potential therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease. Extensive amino acid substitutions were performed at positions surrounding the active site and inner surface of the enzyme and variants screened for activity on amyloid beta 1-40, 1-42 and a variety of other physiologically relevant peptides. We identified several mutations that modulated and improved both enzyme selectivity and intrinsic activity. Neprilysin variant G399V/G714K displayed an approximately 20-fold improved activity on amyloid beta 1-40 and up to a 3,200-fold reduction in activity on other peptides. Along with the altered peptide substrate specificity, the mutant enzyme produced a markedly altered series of amyloid beta cleavage products compared to the wild-type enzyme. Crystallisation of the mutant enzyme revealed that the amino acid substitutions result in alteration of the shape and size of the pocket containing the active site compared to the wild-type enzyme. The mutant enzyme offers the potential for the more efficient degradation of amyloid beta in vivo as a therapeutic for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25089527

  11. Production of 191Pt radiotracer with high specific activity for the development of preconcentration procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, M.; Strijckmans, K.; Cornelis, R.; Dewaele, J.; Dams, R.

    1994-04-01

    A radiotracer of Pt with suitable nuclear characteristics and high specific activity (i.e. activity to mass ratio) is a powerful tool when developing preconcentration methods for the determination of base-line levels of Pt in e.g. environmental and biological samples. Two methods were developed for the production of 191Pt with high specific activity and radionuclidic purity: (1) via the 190Pt(n, γ) 191Pt reaction by neutron irradiation of enriched Pt in a nuclear reactor at high neutron fluence rate and (2) via the 191Ir(p, n) 191Pt reaction by proton irradiation of natural Ir with a cyclotron, at an experimentally optimized proton energy. For the latter method it was necessary to separate Pt from the Ir matrix. For that reason either liquid-liquid extraction with dithizone or adsorption chromatography were used. The yields, the specific activities and the radionuclidic purities were experimentally determined as a function of the proton energy and compared to the former method. The half-life of 191Pt was accurately determined to be 2.802 ± 0.025 d.

  12. Functional adaptation of cortical interneurons to attenuated activity is subtype-specific.

    PubMed

    Karayannis, Theofanis; De Marco García, Natalia V; Fishell, Gordon J

    2012-01-01

    Functional neuronal homeostasis has been studied in a variety of model systems and contexts. Many studies have shown that there are a number of changes that can be activated within individual cells or networks in order to compensate for perturbations or changes in levels of activity. Dissociating the cell autonomous from the network-mediated events has been complicated due to the difficulty of sparsely targeting specific populations of neurons in vivo. Here, we make use of a recent in vivo approach we developed that allows for the sparse labeling and manipulation of activity within superficial caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE)-derived GABAergic interneurons. Expression of the inward rectifying potassium channel Kir2.1 cell-autonomously reduced neuronal activity and lead to specific developmental changes in their intrinsic electrophysiological properties and the synaptic input they received. In contrast to previous studies on homeostatic scaling of pyramidal cells, we did not detect any of the typically observed compensatory mechanisms in these interneurons. Rather, we instead saw a specific alteration of the kinetics of excitatory synaptic events within the reelin-expressing subpopulation of interneurons. These results provide the first in vivo observations for the capacity of interneurons to cell-autonomously regulate their excitability. PMID:23015781

  13. Enhancement of Chaperone Activity of Plant-Specific Thioredoxin through γ-Ray Mediated Conformational Change

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Sik; Jung, Hyun Suk; Park, Soo-Kwon; Lee, Eun Mi; Singh, Sudhir; Lee, Yuno; Lee, Kyun Oh; Lee, Sang Yeol; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2015-01-01

    AtTDX, a thioredoxin-like plant-specific protein present in Arabidospis is a thermo-stable and multi-functional enzyme. This enzyme is known to act as a thioredoxin and as a molecular chaperone depending upon its oligomeric status. The present study examines the effects of γ-irradiation on the structural and functional changes of AtTDX. Holdase chaperone activity of AtTDX was increased and reached a maximum at 10 kGy of γ-irradiation and declined subsequently in a dose-dependent manner, together with no effect on foldase chaperone activity. However, thioredoxin activity decreased gradually with increasing irradiation. Electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography analysis showed that AtTDX had a tendency to form high molecular weight (HMW) complexes after γ-irradiation and γ-ray-induced HMW complexes were tightly associated with a holdase chaperone activity. The hydrophobicity of AtTDX increased with an increase in irradiation dose till 20 kGy and thereafter decreased further. Analysis of the secondary structures of AtTDX using far UV-circular dichroism spectra revealed that the irradiation remarkably increased the exposure of β-sheets and random coils with a dramatic decrease in α-helices and turn elements in a dose-dependent manner. The data of the present study suggest that γ-irradiation may be a useful tool for increasing holdase chaperone activity without adversely affecting foldase chaperone activity of thioredoxin-like proteins. PMID:26580605

  14. Shape-specific activation of occipital cortex in an early blind echolocation expert.

    PubMed

    Arnott, Stephen R; Thaler, Lore; Milne, Jennifer L; Kish, Daniel; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2013-04-01

    We have previously reported that an early-blind echolocating individual (EB) showed robust occipital activation when he identified distant, silent objects based on echoes from his tongue clicks (Thaler, Arnott, & Goodale, 2011). In the present study we investigated the extent to which echolocation activation in EB's occipital cortex reflected general echolocation processing per se versus feature-specific processing. In the first experiment, echolocation audio sessions were captured with in-ear microphones in an anechoic chamber or hallway alcove as EB produced tongue clicks in front of a concave or flat object covered in aluminum foil or a cotton towel. All eight echolocation sessions (2 shapes×2 surface materials×2 environments) were then randomly presented to him during a sparse-temporal scanning fMRI session. While fMRI contrasts of chamber versus alcove-recorded echolocation stimuli underscored the importance of auditory cortex for extracting echo information, main task comparisons demonstrated a prominent role of occipital cortex in shape-specific echo processing in a manner consistent with latent, multisensory cortical specialization. Specifically, relative to surface composition judgments, shape judgments elicited greater BOLD activity in ventrolateral occipital areas and bilateral occipital pole. A second echolocation experiment involving shape judgments of objects located 20° to the left or right of straight ahead activated more rostral areas of EB's calcarine cortex relative to location judgments of those same objects and, as we previously reported, such calcarine activity was largest when the object was located in contralateral hemispace. Interestingly, other echolocating experts (i.e., a congenitally blind individual in Experiment 1, and a late blind individual in Experiment 2) did not show the same pattern of feature-specific echo-processing calcarine activity as EB, suggesting the possible significance of early visual experience and early

  15. Contexts for dopamine specification by calcium spike activity in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Ulloa, Norma A.; Spitzer, Nicholas C.; Dulcis, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-dependent electrical activity plays a significant role in neurotransmitter specification at early stages of development. To test the hypothesis that activity-dependent differentiation depends on molecular context we investigated the development of dopaminergic neurons in the central nervous system of larval Xenopus laevis. We find that different dopaminergic nuclei respond to manipulation of this early electrical activity by ion channel misexpression with different increases and decreases in numbers of dopaminergic neurons. Focusing on the ventral suprachiasmatic nucleus and the spinal cord in order to gain insight into these differences, we identify distinct subpopulations of neurons that express characteristic combinations of GABA and NPY as co-transmitters and Lim1,2 and Nurr1 transcription factors. We demonstrate that the developmental state of neurons identified by their spatial location and expression of these molecular markers is correlated with characteristic spontaneous calcium spike activity. Different subpopulations of dopaminergic neurons respond differently to manipulation of this early electrical activity. Moreover, retinohypothalamic circuit activation of the ventral suprachiasmatic nucleus recruits expression of dopamine selectively in reserve pool neurons that already express GABA and neuropeptide Y. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that spontaneously active neurons expressing GABA are most susceptible to activity-dependent expression of dopamine both in the spinal cord and in the brain. Because loss of dopaminergic neurons plays a role in neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, understanding how subpopulations of neurons become dopaminergic may lead to protocols for differentiation of neurons in vitro to replace those that have been lost in vivo. PMID:21209192

  16. Autoantigen-Specific B Cell Activation in FAS-Deficient Rheumatoid Factor Immunoglobulin Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haowei; Shlomchik, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    In systemic autoimmune disease, self-tolerance fails, leading to autoantibody production. A central issue in immunology is to understand the origins of activated self-reactive B cells. We have used immunoglobulin (Ig) transgenic mice to investigate the regulation of autoreactive B cells with specificity for self-IgG2a (the rheumatoid factor [RF] specificity) to understand how normal mice regulate RF autoantibodies and how this fails in autoimmune mice. We previously showed that normal mice do not tolerize the AM14 RF clone, nor do they appear to activate it. Here we show that in Fas-deficient autoimmune mice, the picture is quite different. RF B cells are activated to divide and secrete, but only when the autoantigen is present. Thus, B cells that are ignored rather than anergized in normal mice can be stimulated to produce autoantibody in Fas-deficient mice. This demonstrates a novel developmental step at which intact Fas–Fas ligand signaling is required to regulate B cells in order to prevent autoimmunity. These data also establish the relevance of ignorant self-specific B cells to autoantibody production in disease and prove that in the case of the RF specificity, the nominal autoantigen IgG2a is the driving autoantigen in vivo. PMID:10477549

  17. Enrichment and isolation of a ruminal bacterium with a very high specific activity of ammonia production.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B; Strobel, H J; Chen, G J

    1988-01-01

    When mixed ruminal bacteria were inoculated into semicontinuous cultures (25% transfer every other day) containing lactate, dulcitol, pectin, or xylose and Trypticase (1 g/liter) as the sole nitrogen source, the specific activity of ammonia production increased. The greatest enrichment was observed with lactate and xylose, and in these cases the specific rate of ammonia production was eightfold higher than that of the ruminal fluid control (approximately 35 nmol of ammonia per mg of protein per min). Isolates with different morphologies were obtained from each of the enrichments, but in no case did the specific activity of any isolate exceed that of the mixed ruminal bacteria. If Trypticase (15 g/liter) was used as the only energy and nitrogen source, there was an even greater increase in ammonia production, and two monensin-sensitive bacteria, a Peptostreptococcus species and a Clostridium species, were obtained. The Peptostreptococcus species was unable to grow on any of 25 carbohydrate or carbohydrate derivatives tested; but the Clostridium species was able to use glucose, maltose, fructose, cellobiose, trehalose, sorbitol, and salicin as energy sources. Neither organism was able to grow in the absence of an amino acid source, but growth rates on Trypticase were greater than 0.35/h. The specific activities of ammonia production were 346 and 427 nmol/mg of protein per min for strains of Peptostreptococcus and Clostridium, respectively. Megasphaera elsdenii and Bacteroides ruminicola, previously isolated ruminal ammonia producers, had specific activities of only 11 and 19 nmol of ammonia per mg of protein per min, respectively. The most probable number of Clostridium species in ruminal fluid was less than 10(3)/ml, but the Peptostreptococcus species was present at 10(8)/ml.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3377500

  18. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system. PMID:24912488

  19. DNA binding specificity and sequence of Xanthomonas campestris catabolite gene activator protein-like protein.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Q; Ebright, R H

    1992-01-01

    The Xanthomonas campestris catabolite gene activator protein-like protein (CLP) can substitute for the Escherichia coli catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) in transcription activation at the lac promoter (V. de Crecy-Lagard, P. Glaser, P. Lejeune, O. Sismeiro, C. Barber, M. Daniels, and A. Danchin, J. Bacteriol. 172:5877-5883, 1990). We show that CLP has the same DNA binding specificity as CAP at positions 5, 6, and 7 of the DNA half site. In addition, we show that the amino acids at positions 1 and 2 of the recognition helix of CLP are identical to the amino acids at positions 1 and 2 of the recognition helix of CAP:i.e., Arg at position 1 and Glu at position 2. PMID:1322886

  20. Specific Inhibition of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 Activity Induces Motor Neuron Development in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kanungo, Jyotshnabala; Zheng, Ya-Li; Amin, Niranjana D.; Kaur, Sukhbir; Ramchandran, Ramani; Pant, Harish C.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5) is a ubiquitous protein activated by specific activators, p35 and p39. Cdk5 regulates neuronal migration, differentiation, axonogenesis, synaptic transmission and apoptosis. However, its role in motor neuron development remains unexplored. Here, using gain and loss-of-function analyses in developing zebrafish embryos, we report that cdk5 plays a critical role in spinal and cranial motor neuron development. Cdk5 knockdown results in supernumerary spinal and cranial motor neurons. While a dominant negative, kinase-dead cdk5 promotes the generation of supernumerary motor neurons; over-expression of cdk5 suppresses motor neuron development. Thus, modulating cdk5 activity seems promising in inducing motor neuron development in vivo. PMID:19523926

  1. Antiviral activity and specific modes of action of bacterial prodigiosin against Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Zeng, Cheng; Liu, RenHua; Chen, Jie; Li, Ru; Wang, XinYan; Bai, WenWen; Liu, XiaoYuan; Xiang, TingTing; Zhang, Lin; Wan, YongJi

    2016-05-01

    Prodigiosin, the tripyrrole red pigment, is a bacterial secondary metabolite with multiple bioactivities; however, the antiviral activity has not been reported yet. In the present study, we found the antiviral activity of bacterial prodigiosin on Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV)-infected cells in vitro, with specific modes of action. Prodigiosin at nontoxic concentrations selectively killed virus-infected cells, inhibited viral gene transcription, especially viral early gene ie-1, and prevented virus-mediated membrane fusion. Under prodigiosin treatment, both progeny virus production and viral DNA replication were significantly inhibited. Fluorescent assays showed that prodigiosin predominantly located in cytoplasm which suggested it might interact with cytoplasm factors to inhibit virus replication. In conclusion, the present study clearly indicates that prodigiosin possesses significant antiviral activity against BmNPV. PMID:26685856

  2. Behavior-Specific Influences for Physical Activity Among African American Women.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Hope; Yates, Bernice C; Blanchard, Shirley; Zimmerman, Lani M; Hudson, Diane; Pozehl, Bunny

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe physical activity (PA) behaviors and physical functioning of prehypertensive and Stage I hypertensive African American Women (AAW) and to examine the relationships between PA behavior, physical functioning, personal factors, and behavior-specific influences. Pender's Health Promotion Model was the conceptual framework for the study. A cross-sectional design and convenience sample were used. The PA domain where the greatest amount of time was spent was in work-related activity, followed by household, leisure time, and transportation activity. Personal factors most strongly correlated to lower PA were greater body mass index and waist circumference. AAW perceived moderate barriers to PA and minimal family and friend social support for PA. Future interventions need to focus on removing barriers to and improving social support for PA among AAW. PMID:27044446

  3. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-06-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system.

  4. Integrative analysis of breast cancer reveals prognostic haematopoietic activity and patient-specific immune response profiles

    PubMed Central

    Varn, Frederick S.; Andrews, Erik H.; Mullins, David W.; Cheng, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional programmes active in haematopoietic cells enable a variety of functions including dedifferentiation, innate immunity and adaptive immunity. Understanding how these programmes function in the context of cancer can provide valuable insights into host immune response, cancer severity and potential therapy response. Here we present a method that uses the transcriptomes of over 200 murine haematopoietic cells, to infer the lineage-specific haematopoietic activity present in human breast tumours. Correlating this activity with patient survival and tumour purity reveals that the transcriptional programmes of many cell types influence patient prognosis and are found in environments of high lymphocytic infiltration. Collectively, these results allow for a detailed and personalized assessment of the patient immune response to a tumour. When combined with routinely collected patient biopsy genomic data, this method can enable a richer understanding of the complex interplay between the host immune system and cancer. PMID:26725977

  5. Integrative analysis of breast cancer reveals prognostic haematopoietic activity and patient-specific immune response profiles.

    PubMed

    Varn, Frederick S; Andrews, Erik H; Mullins, David W; Cheng, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional programmes active in haematopoietic cells enable a variety of functions including dedifferentiation, innate immunity and adaptive immunity. Understanding how these programmes function in the context of cancer can provide valuable insights into host immune response, cancer severity and potential therapy response. Here we present a method that uses the transcriptomes of over 200 murine haematopoietic cells, to infer the lineage-specific haematopoietic activity present in human breast tumours. Correlating this activity with patient survival and tumour purity reveals that the transcriptional programmes of many cell types influence patient prognosis and are found in environments of high lymphocytic infiltration. Collectively, these results allow for a detailed and personalized assessment of the patient immune response to a tumour. When combined with routinely collected patient biopsy genomic data, this method can enable a richer understanding of the complex interplay between the host immune system and cancer. PMID:26725977

  6. Context-specific behavioral surprise is differentially correlated with activity in anterior and posterior brain systems.

    PubMed

    Tobia, Michael J; Gläscher, Jan; Sommer, Tobias

    2016-06-15

    This experiment investigated whether behavioral surprise, an information-theoretic measure of the amount of memory and information integration associated with a response, is correlated with neural activity during decision making. A total of 30 participants (age 18-30) were scanned with functional MRI while completing 240 trials of a sequential decision-making task in which they selected an amount to wager from four possible values on each trial. Behavioral surprise was computed trial by trial using both context-free and context-specific formulations, and was used as a parametric modulator in functional MRI analyses. Whereas context-free surprise was not significantly correlated, two sets of clusters (P<0.005; cluster size>156 voxels) were differentially modulated by context-specific behavioral surprise. An anterior system comprised of the inferior frontal gyrus and anterior cingulate (each bilaterally), and left caudate, was positively modulated. A posterior system comprised of the posterior cingulate, parahippocampal gyrus and posterior hippocampus (each bilaterally), and left angular gyrus, was negatively modulated. These anticorrelated systems indicate that more surprising (resource demanding) actions recruit greater activity from the anterior system and less activity from the posterior system and less surprising actions (memory-guided) recruit greater activity from the posterior system and less activity from the anterior system. These results show that context-specific behavioral surprise is a unique neural signal and may be related to mechanisms for both cognitive control and memory-guided behavior, and support contemporary theories that the brain is a statistical observer of external and internal events. PMID:27110868

  7. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease N{sup pro}

    SciTech Connect

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer; Ruggli, Nicolas; Choi, Kyung H.

    2014-03-15

    Pestivirus N{sup pro} is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N{sup pro} blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N{sup pro'}s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N{sup pro} proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N{sup pro'}s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N{sup pro} does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N{sup pro'}s autoproteolysis is studied using N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N{sup pro} prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position.

  8. Organ-specific adaptive signaling pathway activation in metastatic breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Riesa M.; Craven, Kelly E.; Krishnamurthy, Purna; Goswami, Chirayu P.; Badve, Sunil; Crooks, Peter; Mathews, William P.; Bhat-Nakshatri, Poornima; Nakshatri, Harikrishna

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasizes to bone, visceral organs, and/or brain depending on the subtype, which may involve activation of a host organ-specific signaling network in metastatic cells. To test this possibility, we determined gene expression patterns in MDA-MB-231 cells and its mammary fat pad tumor (TMD-231), lung-metastasis (LMD-231), bone-metastasis (BMD-231), adrenal-metastasis (ADMD-231) and brain-metastasis (231-BR) variants. When gene expression between metastases was compared, 231-BR cells showed the highest gene expression difference followed by ADMD-231, LMD-231, and BMD-231 cells. Neuronal transmembrane proteins SLITRK2, TMEM47, and LYPD1 were specifically overexpressed in 231-BR cells. Pathway-analyses revealed activation of signaling networks that would enable cancer cells to adapt to organs of metastasis such as drug detoxification/oxidative stress response/semaphorin neuronal pathway in 231-BR, Notch/orphan nuclear receptor signals involved in steroidogenesis in ADMD-231, acute phase response in LMD-231, and cytokine/hematopoietic stem cell signaling in BMD-231 cells. Only NF-κB signaling pathway activation was common to all except BMD-231 cells. We confirmed NF-κB activation in 231-BR and in a brain metastatic variant of 4T1 cells (4T1-BR). Dimethylaminoparthenolide inhibited NF-κB activity, LYPD1 expression, and proliferation of 231-BR and 4T1-BR cells. Thus, transcriptome change enabling adaptation to host organs is likely one of the mechanisms associated with organ-specific metastasis and could potentially be targeted therapeutically. PMID:25926557

  9. Organ-specific adaptive signaling pathway activation in metastatic breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Riesa M; Craven, Kelly E; Krishnamurthy, Purna; Goswami, Chirayu P; Badve, Sunil; Crooks, Peter; Mathews, William P; Bhat-Nakshatri, Poornima; Nakshatri, Harikrishna

    2015-05-20

    Breast cancer metastasizes to bone, visceral organs, and/or brain depending on the subtype, which may involve activation of a host organ-specific signaling network in metastatic cells. To test this possibility, we determined gene expression patterns in MDA-MB-231 cells and its mammary fat pad tumor (TMD-231), lung-metastasis (LMD-231), bone-metastasis (BMD-231), adrenal-metastasis (ADMD-231) and brain-metastasis (231-BR) variants. When gene expression between metastases was compared, 231-BR cells showed the highest gene expression difference followed by ADMD-231, LMD-231, and BMD-231 cells. Neuronal transmembrane proteins SLITRK2, TMEM47, and LYPD1 were specifically overexpressed in 231-BR cells. Pathway-analyses revealed activation of signaling networks that would enable cancer cells to adapt to organs of metastasis such as drug detoxification/oxidative stress response/semaphorin neuronal pathway in 231-BR, Notch/orphan nuclear receptor signals involved in steroidogenesis in ADMD-231, acute phase response in LMD-231, and cytokine/hematopoietic stem cell signaling in BMD-231 cells. Only NF-κB signaling pathway activation was common to all except BMD-231 cells. We confirmed NF-κB activation in 231-BR and in a brain metastatic variant of 4T1 cells (4T1-BR). Dimethylaminoparthenolide inhibited NF-κB activity, LYPD1 expression, and proliferation of 231-BR and 4T1-BR cells. Thus, transcriptome change enabling adaptation to host organs is likely one of the mechanisms associated with organ-specific metastasis and could potentially be targeted therapeutically. PMID:25926557

  10. Self-Specific Stimuli Interact Differently than Non-Self-Specific Stimuli with Eyes-Open Versus Eyes-Closed Spontaneous Activity in Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Pengmin; Grimm, Simone; Duncan, Niall W.; Holland, Giles; Guo, Jia shen; Fan, Yan; Weigand, Anne; Baudewig, Juergen; Bajbouj, Malek; Northoff, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that there may be a distinct relationship between spontaneous neural activity and subsequent or concurrent self-specific stimulus-induced activity. This study aims to test the impact of spontaneous activity as recorded in an eyes-open (EO) resting state as opposed to eyes-closed (EC) on self-specific versus non-self-specific auditory stimulus-induced activity in fMRI. In our first experiment we used self-specific stimuli comprised of the subject’s own name and non-self-specific stimuli comprised of a friend’s name and an unknown name, presented during EO versus EC baselines in a 3 name condition × 2 baseline design. In Experiment 2 we directly measured spontaneous activity in the absence of stimuli during EO versus EC to confirm a modulatory effect of the two baseline conditions in the regions found to show an interaction effect in Experiment 1. Spontaneous activity during EO was significantly higher than during EC in bilateral auditory cortex and non-self-specific names yielded stronger signal changes relative to EO baseline than to EC. In contrast, there was no difference in response to self-specific names relative to EO baseline than to EC despite the difference between spontaneous activity levels. These results support an impact of spontaneous activity on stimulus-induced activity, moreover an impact that depends on the high-level stimulus characteristic of self-specificity. PMID:23908625

  11. Specific NFκB subunit activation and kinetics of cytokine induction in adenoviral keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Rajaiya, Jaya; Sadeghi, Neda

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Corneal inflammation associated with ocular adenoviral infection is caused by leukocytic infiltration of the subepithelial stroma in response to expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by infected corneal cells. We have shown that these two chemokines are activated by the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 for IL-8, and Jun-terminal kinase (JNK) for MCP-1. It is also well established that transcription of each of these chemokines is tightly controlled by the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) transcription factor family. Therefore, we sought to better understand the differential regulation of chemokine expression by NFκB in adenoviral infection of the cornea. Methods Primary keratocytes derived from human donor corneas were treated with signaling inhibitors and small interfering RNA specific to MAPKs, and infected with adenovirus for different time periods before analysis. Activation of specific NFκB subunits was analyzed by western blot, confocal microscopy, electromobility shift assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation, and chemokine expression was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Upon adenoviral infection, NFκB p65, p50, and cREL subunits translocate to the nucleus. This translocation is blocked by inhibitors of specific MAPK signaling pathways. Confocal microscopy showed that inhibitors of the p38, JNK, and ERK pathways differentially inhibited NFκB nuclear translocation, while PP2, an inhibitor of Src family kinases, completely inhibited NFκB nuclear translocation. Western blot analysis revealed that activation of specific NFκB subunits was time dependent following infection. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that binding of NFκB p65 and p50 subunits to the IL-8 promoter upon viral infection was differentially reduced by chemical inhibitors of MAPKs. Electromobility shift assay and luciferase assay analysis

  12. The exosome contains domains with specific endoribonuclease, exoribonuclease and cytoplasmic mRNA decay activities.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Daneen; Tsanova, Borislava; Barbas, Ana; Reis, Filipa Pereira; Dastidar, Eeshita Ghosh; Sanchez-Rotunno, Maya; Arraiano, Cecília Maria; van Hoof, Ambro

    2009-01-01

    The eukaryotic exosome is a ten-subunit 3' exoribonucleolytic complex responsible for many RNA-processing and RNA-degradation reactions. How the exosome accomplishes this is unknown. Rrp44 (also known as Dis3), a member of the RNase II family of enzymes, is the catalytic subunit of the exosome. We show that the PIN domain of Rrp44 has endoribonucleolytic activity. The PIN domain is preferentially active toward RNA with a 5' phosphate, suggesting coordination of 5' and 3' processing. We also show that the endonuclease activity is important in vivo. Furthermore, the essential exosome subunit Csl4 does not contain any domains that are required for viability, but its zinc-ribbon domain is required for exosome-mediated mRNA decay. These results suggest that specific exosome domains contribute to specific functions, and that different RNAs probably interact with the exosome differently. The combination of an endoRNase and an exoRNase activity seems to be a widespread feature of RNA-degrading machines. PMID:19060898

  13. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 promotes brown adipose tissue thermogenesis via repressing glucocorticoid activation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xing; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Chen, Yi; Serag, Sara; Lavery, Gareth G; Gygi, Steve P; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2016-08-15

    Brown adipocytes display phenotypic plasticity, as they can switch between the active states of fatty acid oxidation and energy dissipation versus a more dormant state. Cold exposure or β-adrenergic stimulation favors the active thermogenic state, whereas sympathetic denervation or glucocorticoid administration promotes more lipid accumulation. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these switches is incomplete. Here we found that LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1), a histone demethylase, regulates brown adipocyte metabolism in two ways. On the one hand, LSD1 associates with PRDM16 to repress expression of white fat-selective genes. On the other hand, LSD1 represses HSD11B1 (hydroxysteroid 11-β-dehydrogenase isozyme 1), a key glucocorticoid-activating enzyme, independently from PRDM16. Adipose-specific ablation of LSD1 impaired mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation capacity of the brown adipose tissue, reduced whole-body energy expenditure, and increased fat deposition, which can be significantly alleviated by simultaneously deleting HSD11B1. These findings establish a novel regulatory pathway connecting histone modification and hormone activation with mitochondrial oxidative capacity and whole-body energy homeostasis. PMID:27566776

  14. Activity Level-Dependent Synapse-Specific AMPA Receptor Trafficking Regulates Transmission Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, J. Julius

    2009-01-01

    Central glutamatergic synapses may express AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors (AMPA-Rs) with distinct gating properties and exhibit different transmission dynamics, which are important for computing various synaptic inputs received at different populations of synapses. However, how glutamatergic synapses acquire AMPA-Rs with distinct kinetics to influence synaptic integration remains poorly understood. Here I report synapse-specific trafficking of distinct AMPA-Rs in rat cortical layer 4 stellate and layer 5 pyramidal neurons. The analysis indicates that in single layer 4 stellate neurons thalamocortical synapses generate faster synaptic responses than intracortical synapses. Moreover, GluR1-containing AMPA-Rs traffic selectively into intracortical synapses, and this process requires sensory experience-dependent activity and slows down transmission kinetics. GluR4-containing AMPA-Rs traffic more heavily into thalamocortical synapses than intracortical synapses, and this process requires spontaneous synaptic activity and speeds up transmission kinetics. GluR2-containing AMPA-Rs traffic equally into both thalamocortical and intracortical synapses, and this process requires no synaptic activity and resets transmission kinetics. Notably, synaptic trafficking of distinct AMPA-Rs differentially regulates synaptic integration. Thus, synapse-specific AMPA-R trafficking coarsely sets and synaptic activity finely tunes transmission kinetics and integration properties at different synapses in central neurons. PMID:19439609

  15. Synthesis of Isomeric Phosphoubiquitin Chains Reveals that Phosphorylation Controls Deubiquitinase Activity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Huguenin-Dezot, Nicolas; De Cesare, Virginia; Peltier, Julien; Knebel, Axel; Kristaryianto, Yosua Adi; Rogerson, Daniel T; Kulathu, Yogesh; Trost, Matthias; Chin, Jason W

    2016-07-26

    Ubiquitin is post-translationally modified by phosphorylation at several sites, but the consequences of these modifications are largely unknown. Here, we synthesize multi-milligram quantities of ubiquitin phosphorylated at serine 20, serine 57, and serine 65 via genetic code expansion. We use these phosphoubiquitins for the enzymatic assembly of 20 isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers, with different sites of isopeptide linkage and/or phosphorylation. We discover that phosphorylation of serine 20 on ubiquitin converts UBE3C from a dual-specificity E3 ligase into a ligase that primarily synthesizes K48 chains. We profile the activity of 31 deubiquitinases on the isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers in 837 reactions, and we discover that phosphorylation at distinct sites in ubiquitin can activate or repress cleavage of a particular linkage by deubiquitinases and that phosphorylation at a single site in ubiquitin can control the specificity of deubiquitinases for distinct ubiquitin linkages. PMID:27425610

  16. Specific activation of dendritic cells enhances clearance of Bacillus anthracis following infection.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Iain J T; Mann, Elizabeth R; Stokes, Margaret G; English, Nicholas R; Knight, Stella C; Williamson, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells are potent activators of the immune system and have a key role in linking innate and adaptive immune responses. In the current study we have used ex vivo pulsed bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC) in a novel adoptive transfer strategy to protect against challenge with Bacillus anthracis, in a murine model. Pre-pulsing murine BMDC with either recombinant Protective Antigen (PA) or CpG significantly upregulated expression of the activation markers CD40, CD80, CD86 and MHC-II. Passive transfusion of mice with pulsed BMDC, concurrently with active immunisation with rPA in alum, significantly enhanced (p<0.001) PA-specific splenocyte responses seven days post-immunisation. Parallel studies using ex vivo DCs expanded from human peripheral blood and activated under the same conditions as the murine DC, demonstrated that human DCs had a PA dose-related significant increase in the markers CD40, CD80 and CCR7 and that the increases in CD40 and CD80 were maintained when the other activating components, CpG and HK B. anthracis were added to the rPA in culture. Mice vaccinated on a single occasion intra-muscularly with rPA and alum and concurrently transfused intra-dermally with pulsed BMDC, demonstrated 100% survival following lethal B. anthracis challenge and had significantly enhanced (p<0.05) bacterial clearance within 2 days, compared with mice vaccinated with rPA and alum alone. PMID:25380285

  17. A Novel Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Is Responsive to Raf and Mediates Growth Factor Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Janulis, Mark; Trakul, Nicholas; Greene, Geoffrey; Schaefer, Erik M.; Lee, J. D.; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2001-01-01

    The proto-oncogene Raf is a major regulator of growth and differentiation. Previous studies from a number of laboratories indicate that Raf activates a signaling pathway that is independent of the classic MEK1,2-ERK1,2 cascade. However, no other signaling cascade downstream of Raf has been identified. We describe a new member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family, p97, an ERK5-related kinase that is activated and Raf associated when cells are stimulated by Raf. Furthermore, p97 is selectively responsive to different growth factors, providing a mechanism for specificity in cellular signaling. Thus, p97 is activated by the neurogenic factor fibroblast growth factor (FGF) but not the mitogenic factor epidermal growth factor (EGF) in neuronal cells. Conversely, the related kinase ERK5 is activated by EGF but not FGF. p97 phosphorylates transcription factors such as Elk-1 and Ets-2 but not MEF2C at transactivating sites, whereas ERK5 phosphorylates MEF2C but not Elk-1 or Ets-2. Finally, p97 is expressed in a number of cell types including primary neural and NIH 3T3 cells. Taken together, these results identify a new signaling pathway that is distinct from the classic Raf-MEK1,2-ERK1,2 kinase cascade and can be selectively stimulated by growth factors that produce discrete biological outcomes. PMID:11238956

  18. Hippocampus-specific fMRI group activation analysis using the continuous medial representation.

    PubMed

    Yushkevich, Paul A; Detre, John A; Mechanic-Hamilton, Dawn; Fernández-Seara, María A; Tang, Kathy Z; Hoang, Angela; Korczykowski, Marc; Zhang, Hui; Gee, James C

    2007-05-01

    We present a new shape-based approach for regional group activation analysis in fMRI studies. The method restricts anatomical normalization, spatial smoothing and random effects statistical analysis to the space inside and around a structure of interest. Normalization involves finding intersubject correspondences between manually outlined masks, and it leverages the continuous medial representation, which makes it possible to extend surface-based shape correspondences to the space inside and outside of structures. Our approach is an alternative to whole-brain normalization in cases where the latter may fail due to anatomical variability or pathology. It also provides an opportunity to analyze the shape and thickness of structures concurrently with functional activation. We apply the technique to the hippocampus and evaluate it using data from a visual scene encoding fMRI study, where activation in the hippocampus is expected. We produce detailed statistical maps of hippocampal activation, as well as maps comparing activation inside and outside of the hippocampus. We find that random effects statistics computed by the new approach are more significant than those produced using the Statistical Parametric Mapping framework (Friston, K.J., Holmes, A.P., Worsley, K.J., Poline, J.-P., Firth, C.D., Frackowiak, R.S.J. 1994, Statistical parametric maps in functional imaging: a general linear approach. Human Brain Mapping, 2(4): 189-210) at low levels of smoothing, suggesting that greater specificity can be achieved by the new method without a severe tradeoff in sensitivity. PMID:17383900

  19. SUMOylation of DRIL1 Directs Its Transcriptional Activity Towards Leukocyte Lineage-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    van Lohuizen, Maarten; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    DRIL1 is an ARID family transcription factor that can immortalize primary mouse fibroblasts, bypass RASV12-induced cellular senescence and collaborate with RASV12 or MYC in mediating oncogenic transformation. It also activates immunoglobulin heavy chain transcription and engages in heterodimer formation with E2F to stimulate E2F-dependent transcription. Little, however, is known about the regulation of DRIL1 activity. Recently, DRIL1 was found to interact with the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9, but the functional relevance of this association has not been assessed. Here, we show that DRIL1 is sumoylated both in vitro and in vivo at lysine 398. Moreover, we provide evidence that PIASy functions as a specific SUMO E3-ligase for DRIL1 and promotes its sumoylation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, consistent with the subnuclear localization of PIASy in the Matrix-Associated Region (MAR), SUMO-modified DRIL1 species are found exclusively in the MAR fraction. This post-translational modification interferes neither with the subcellular localization nor the DNA-binding activity of the protein. In contrast, DRIL1 sumoylation impairs its interaction with E2F1 in vitro and modifies its transcriptional activity in vivo, driving transcription of subset of genes regulating leukocyte fate. Taken together, these results identify sumoylation as a novel post-translational modification of DRIL1 that represents an important mechanism for targeting and modulating DRIL1 transcriptional activity. PMID:19436740

  20. Gender specific changes in cortical activation patterns during exposure to artificial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Stefan; Robinson, Ryan; Smith, Craig; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Goswami, Nandu

    2014-11-01

    Keeping astronauts healthy during long duration spaceflight remains a challenge. Artificial gravity (AG) generated by a short arm human centrifuges (SAHC) is proposed as the next generation of integrated countermeasure devices that will allow human beings to safely spend extended durations in space, although comparatively little is known about any psychological side effects of AG on brain function. 16 participants (8 male and 8 female, GENDER) were exposed to 10 min at a baseline gravitational load (G-Load) of +.03 Gz, then 10 min at +.6 Gz for females and +.8 Gz for males, before being exposed to increasing levels of AG in a stepped manner by increasing the acceleration by +.1 Gz every 3 min until showing signs of pre-syncope. EEG recordings were taken of brain activity during 2 min time periods at each AG level. Analysing the results of the mixed total population of participants by two way ANOVA, a significant effect of centrifugation on alpha and beta activity was found (p<.01). Furthermore results revealed a significant interaction between G-LOAD and GENDER alpha-activity (p<.01), but not for beta-activity. Although the increase in alpha and beta activity with G-LOAD does not reflect a general model of cortical arousal and therefore cannot support previous findings reporting that AG may be a cognitively arousing environment, the gender specific responses identified in this study may have wider implications for EEG and AG research.

  1. Schistosoma mansoni Hemozoin Modulates Alternative Activation of Macrophages via Specific Suppression of Retnla Expression and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, Martha; Evans, D. Andrew; Gunn, Matt

    2013-01-01

    The trematode Schistosoma mansoni is one of the etiological agents of schistosomiasis, a key neglected tropical disease responsible for an estimated annual loss of 70 million disability-adjusted life years. Hematophagy represents the primary nutrient acquisition pathway of this parasite, but digestion of hemoglobin also liberates toxic heme. Schistosomes detoxify heme via crystallization into hemozoin, which is subsequently regurgitated into the host's circulation. Here we demonstrate that during experimental schistosomiasis, hemozoin accumulating in the mouse liver is taken up by phagocytes at a time coincident with the development of the egg-induced T-helper 2 (Th2) granulomatous immune response. Furthermore, the uptake of hemozoin also coincides with the hepatic expression of markers of alternative macrophage activation. Alternatively activated macrophages are a key effector cell population associated with protection against schistosomiasis, making hemozoin well placed to play an important immunomodulatory role in this disease. To systematically explore this hypothesis, S. mansoni hemozoin was purified and added to in vitro bone marrow-derived macrophage cultures concurrently exposed to cytokines chosen to reflect the shifting state of macrophage activation in vivo. Macrophages undergoing interleukin-4 (IL-4)-induced alternative activation in the presence of hemozoin developed a phenotype specifically lacking in Retnla, a characteristic alternatively activated macrophage product associated with regulation of Th2 inflammatory responses. As such, in addition to its important detoxification role during hematophagy, we propose that schistosome hemozoin also provides a potent immunomodulatory function in the coevolved network of host-parasite relationships during schistosomiasis. PMID:23090958

  2. Isoform-specific roles of the GTPase activating protein Nadrin in cytoskeletal reorganization of platelets.

    PubMed

    Beck, S; Fotinos, A; Lang, F; Gawaz, M; Elvers, M

    2013-01-01

    Cytoskeletal reorganization of activated platelets plays a crucial role in hemostasis and thrombosis and implies activation of Rho GTPases. Rho GTPases are important regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics and function as molecular switches that cycle between an inactive and an active state. They are regulated by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that stimulate GTP hydrolysis to terminate Rho signaling. The regulation of Rho GTPases in platelets is not explored. A detailed characterization of Rho regulation is necessary to understand activation and inactivation of Rho GTPases critical for platelet activation and aggregation. Nadrin is a RhoGAP regulating cytoplasmic protein explored in the central nervous system. Five Nadrin isoforms are known that share a unique GAP domain, a serine/threonine/proline-rich domain, a SH3-binding motif and an N-terminal BAR domain but differ in their C-terminus. Here we identified Nadrin in platelets where it co-localizes to actin-rich regions and Rho GTPases. Different Nadrin isoforms selectively regulate Rho GTPases (RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1) and cytoskeletal reorganization suggesting that - beside the GAP domain - the C-terminus of Nadrin determines Rho specificity and influences cell physiology. Furthermore, Nadrin controls RhoA-mediated stress fibre and focal adhesion formation. Spreading experiments on fibrinogen revealed strongly reduced cell adhesion upon Nadrin overexpression. Unexpectedly, the Nadrin BAR domain controls Nadrin-GAP activity and acts as a guidance domain to direct this GAP to its substrate at the plasma membrane. Our results suggest a critical role for Nadrin in the regulation of RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1 in platelets and thus for platelet adhesion and aggregation. PMID:22975681

  3. Cloning and expression of hybrid streptokinase towards clot-specific activity.

    PubMed

    Buniya, Harith K; Murugan, Vadivel; Thangadurai, Chinnathambi

    2014-03-01

    Streptokinase (SK) is a thrombolytic agent that is widely used to treat myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. The lack of fibrin specificity of SK for the clot lysis is one of the limitations of SK. In this study, we have incorporated the finger and Kringle 2 domains from the human tissue type plasminogen activator gene (t-PA) at the 5' end of the SK gene. These domains are responsible for specific binding to fibrin. We have used the pRSETB vector in an attempt to express the hybrid streptokinase possessing specificity for fibrin. On this regard, three hybrid streptokinase were constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3): the finger domain with SK (FSK), the Kringle 2 domain with SK (KSK) and the finger domain+Kringle 2 with SK (FKSK). The activities of the hybrid SKs were assessed by caseinolytic assay and clot lysis assay. All hybrid SKs were found to activate plasminogen in the caseinolytic plate assay. In the clot lysis assay, KSK and FSK were able to dissolute human blood and artificial clots in a fibrin-dependent manner unlike the SK and FKSK proteins. PMID:24440164

  4. Sequestration of nanoparticles by an EPS matrix reduces the particle-specific bactericidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Kang, Fuxing; Gao, Yanzheng; Mao, Xuewei; Hu, Xiaojie

    2016-01-01

    Most artificial nanomaterials are known to exhibit broad-spectrum bactericidal activity; however, the defence mechanisms that bacteria use based on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to detoxify nanoparticles (NPs) are not well known. We ruled out the possibility of ion-specific bactericidal activity by showing the lack of equivalent dissolved zinc and silicon toxicity and determined the particle-specific toxicity of ZnO and SiO2 nanoparticles (ZnONPs/SiO2NPs) through dialysis isolation experiments. Surprisingly, the manipulation of the E. coli EPS (i.e., no EPS manipulation or EPS removal by sonication/centrifugation) showed that their particle-specific bactericidal activity could be antagonized by NP-EPS sequestration. The survival rates of pristine E. coli (no EPS manipulation) reached 65% (ZnONPs, 500 mg L−1) and 79% (SiO2NPs, 500 mg L−1), whereas survival rates following EPS removal by sonication/centrifugation were 11% and 63%, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with fluorescence micro-titration analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that protein-like substances (N-H and C-N in amide II) and secondary carbonyl groups (C=O) in the carboxylic acids of EPS acted as important binding sites that were involved in NP sequestration. Accordingly, the amount and composition of EPS produced by bacteria have important implications for the bactericidal efficacy and potential environmental effects of NPs. PMID:26856606

  5. Music training leads to the development of timbre-specific gamma band activity.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Antoine J; Roberts, Larry E; Chau, Wilkin; Trainor, Laurel J; Miller, Lee M

    2008-05-15

    Oscillatory gamma band activity (GBA, 30-100 Hz) has been shown to correlate with perceptual and cognitive phenomena including feature binding, template matching, and learning and memory formation. We hypothesized that if GBA reflects highly learned perceptual template matching, we should observe its development in musicians specific to the timbre of their instrument of practice. EEG was recorded in adult professional violinists and amateur pianists as well as in 4- and 5-year-old children studying piano in the Suzuki method before they commenced music lessons and 1 year later. The adult musicians showed robust enhancement of induced (non-time-locked) GBA, specifically to their instrument of practice, with the strongest effect in professional violinists. Consistent with this result, the children receiving piano lessons exhibited increased power of induced GBA for piano tones with 1 year of training, while children not taking lessons showed no effect. In comparison to induced GBA, evoked (time-locked) gamma band activity (30-90 Hz, approximately 80 ms latency) was present only in adult groups. Evoked GBA was more pronounced in musicians than non-musicians, with synchronization equally exhibited for violin and piano tones but enhanced for these tones compared to pure tones. Evoked gamma activity may index the physical properties of a sound and is modulated by acoustical training, while induced GBA may reflect higher perceptual learning and is shaped by specific auditory experiences. PMID:18375147

  6. Sequestration of nanoparticles by an EPS matrix reduces the particle-specific bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Kang, Fuxing; Gao, Yanzheng; Mao, Xuewei; Hu, Xiaojie

    2016-01-01

    Most artificial nanomaterials are known to exhibit broad-spectrum bactericidal activity; however, the defence mechanisms that bacteria use based on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to detoxify nanoparticles (NPs) are not well known. We ruled out the possibility of ion-specific bactericidal activity by showing the lack of equivalent dissolved zinc and silicon toxicity and determined the particle-specific toxicity of ZnO and SiO2 nanoparticles (ZnONPs/SiO2NPs) through dialysis isolation experiments. Surprisingly, the manipulation of the E. coli EPS (i.e., no EPS manipulation or EPS removal by sonication/centrifugation) showed that their particle-specific bactericidal activity could be antagonized by NP-EPS sequestration. The survival rates of pristine E. coli (no EPS manipulation) reached 65% (ZnONPs, 500 mg L(-1)) and 79% (SiO2NPs, 500 mg L(-1)), whereas survival rates following EPS removal by sonication/centrifugation were 11% and 63%, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with fluorescence micro-titration analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that protein-like substances (N-H and C-N in amide II) and secondary carbonyl groups (C=O) in the carboxylic acids of EPS acted as important binding sites that were involved in NP sequestration. Accordingly, the amount and composition of EPS produced by bacteria have important implications for the bactericidal efficacy and potential environmental effects of NPs. PMID:26856606

  7. How to produce high specific activity tin-117m using alpha particle beam.

    PubMed

    Duchemin, C; Essayan, M; Guertin, A; Haddad, F; Michel, N; Métivier, V

    2016-09-01

    Tin-117m is an interesting radionuclide for both diagnosis and therapy, thanks to the gamma-ray and electron emissions, respectively, resulting from its decay to tin-117g. The high specific activity of tin-117m is required in many medical applications, and it can be obtained using a high energy alpha particle beam and a cadmium target. The experiments performed at the ARRONAX cyclotron (Nantes, France) using an alpha particle beam delivered at 67.4MeV provide a measurement of the excitation function of the Cd-nat(α,x)Sn-117m reaction and the produced contaminants. The Cd-116(α,3n)Sn-117m production cross section has been deduced from these experimental results using natural cadmium. Both production yield and specific activity as a function of the projectile energy have been calculated. These informations help to optimize the irradiation conditions to produce tin-117m with the required specific activity using α particles with a cadmium target. PMID:27344526

  8. A dynamic model for generating actuator specifications for small arms barrel active stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Anupam; Brei, Diann; Luntz, Jonathan; Lavigna, Chris

    2006-03-01

    Due to stresses encountered in combat, it is known that soldier marksmanship noticeably decreases regardless of prior training. Active stabilization systems in small arms have potential to address this problem to increase soldier survivability and mission effectiveness. The key to success is proper actuator design, but this is highly dependent on proper specification which is challenging due to the human/weapon interaction. This paper presents a generic analytical dynamic model which is capable of defining the necessary actuation specifications for a wide range of small arms platforms. The model is unique because it captures the human interface--shoulder and arm--that introduces the jitter disturbance in addition to the geometry, inertial properties and active stabilization stiffness of the small arms platform. Because no data to date is available for actual shooter-induced disturbance in field conditions, a method is given using the model to back-solve from measured shooting range variability data the disturbance amplitude information relative to the input source (arm or shoulder). As examples of the applicability of the model to various small arms systems, two different weapon systems were investigated: the M24 sniper weapon and the M16 assault rifle. In both cases, model based simulations provided valuable insight into impact on the actuation specifications (force, displacement, phase, frequency) due to the interplay of the human-weapon-active stabilization interface including the effect of shooter-disturbance frequency, disturbance location (shoulder vs. arm), and system parameters (stiffness, barrel rotation).

  9. Music training leads to the development of timbre-specific gamma band activity

    PubMed Central

    Shahin, Antoine J.; Roberts, Larry E.; Chau, Wilkin; Trainor, Laurel J.; Miller, Lee M.

    2015-01-01

    Oscillatory gamma band activity (GBA, 30–100Hz) has been shown to correlate with perceptual and cognitive phenomena including feature binding, template matching, and learning and memory formation. We hypothesized that if GBA reflects highly learned perceptual template matching, we should observe its development in musicians specific to the timbre of their instrument of practice. EEG was recorded in adult professional violinists and amateur pianists as well as in four- and five-year-old children studying piano in the Suzuki method before they commenced music lessons and one year later. The adult musicians showed robust enhancement of induced (non-time-locked) GBA, specifically to their instrument of practice, with the strongest effect in professional violinists. Consistent with this result, the children receiving piano lessons exhibited increased power of induced GBA for piano tones with one year of training, while children not taking lessons showed no effect. In comparison to induced GBA, evoked (time-locked) gamma band activity (30–90 Hz, ~80 ms latency) was present only in adult groups. Evoked GBA was more pronounced in musicians than non-musicians, with synchronization equally exhibited for violin and piano tones but enhanced for these tones compared to pure tones. Evoked gamma activity may index the physical properties of a sound and is modulated by acoustical training, while induced GBA may reflect higher perceptual learning and is shaped by specific auditory experiences. PMID:18375147

  10. The Amino Acid Specificity for Activation of Phenylalanine Hydroxylase Matches the Specificity for Stabilization of Regulatory Domain Dimers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Liver phenylalanine hydroxylase is allosterically activated by phenylalanine. The structural changes that accompany activation have not been identified, but recent studies of the effects of phenylalanine on the isolated regulatory domain of the enzyme support a model in which phenylalanine binding promotes regulatory domain dimerization. Such a model predicts that compounds that stabilize the regulatory domain dimer will also activate the enzyme. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation were used to determine the ability of different amino acids and phenylalanine analogues to stabilize the regulatory domain dimer. The abilities of these compounds to activate the enzyme were analyzed by measuring their effects on the fluorescence change that accompanies activation and on the activity directly. At concentrations of 10–50 mM, d-phenylalanine, l-methionine, l-norleucine, and (S)-2-amino-3-phenyl-1-propanol were able to activate the enzyme to the same extent as 1 mM l-phenylalanine. Lower levels of activation were seen with l-4-aminophenylalanine, l-leucine, l-isoleucine, and 3-phenylpropionate. The ability of these compounds to stabilize the regulatory domain dimer agreed with their ability to activate the enzyme. These results support a model in which allosteric activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase is linked to dimerization of regulatory domains. PMID:26252467

  11. Highly specific and potently activating Vγ9Vδ2-T cell specific nanobodies for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Renée C G; Lougheed, Sinéad M; van der Kruk, Liza; Stam, Anita G; Hooijberg, Erik; Roovers, Rob C; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P; Verheul, Henk M W; de Gruijl, Tanja D; van der Vliet, Hans J

    2016-08-01

    Vγ9Vδ2-T cells constitute the predominant subset of γδ-T cells in human peripheral blood and have been shown to play an important role in antimicrobial and antitumor immune responses. Several efforts have been initiated to exploit these cells for cancer immunotherapy, e.g. by using phosphoantigens, adoptive cell transfer, and by a bispecific monoclonal antibody based approach. Here, we report the generation of a novel set of Vγ9Vδ2-T cell specific VHH (or nanobody). VHH have several advantages compared to conventional antibodies related to their small size, stability, ease of generating multispecific molecules and low immunogenicity. With high specificity and affinity, the anti-Vγ9Vδ2-T cell receptor VHHs are shown to be useful for FACS, MACS and immunocytochemistry. In addition, some VHH were found to specifically activate Vγ9Vδ2-T cells. Besides being of possible immunotherapeutic value, these single domain antibodies will be of great value in the further study of this important immune effector cell subset. PMID:27373969

  12. Regulation of cellular signals from nutritional molecules: a specific role for phytochemicals, beyond antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Virgili, Fabio; Marino, Maria

    2008-11-01

    Phytochemicals (PhC) are a ubiquitous class of plant secondary metabolites. A "recommended" human diet should warrant a high proportion of energy from fruits and vegetables, therefore providing, among other factors, a huge intake of PhC, in general considered "health promoting" by virtue of their antioxidant activity and positive modulation, either directly or indirectly, of the cellular and tissue redox balance. Diet acts through multiple pathways and the association between the consumption of specific food items and the risk of degenerative diseases is extremely complex. Recent literature suggests that molecules having a chemical structure compatible with a putative antioxidant capacity can actually "perform" activities and roles independent of such capacity, interacting with cellular functions at different levels, such as affecting enzyme activities, binding to membrane or nuclear receptors as either an elective ligand or a ligand mimic. Inductive or signaling effects may occur at concentrations much lower than that required for effective antioxidant activity. Therefore, the "antioxidant hypothesis" is to be considered in some cases an intellectual "shortcut" possibly biasing the real understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of various classes of food items. In the past few years, many exciting new indications elucidating the mechanisms of polyphenols have been published. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of the mechanisms by which specific molecules of nutritional interest, and in particular polyphenols, play a role in cellular response and in preventing pathologies. In particular, their direct interaction with nuclear receptors and their ability to modulate the activity of key enzymes involved in cell signaling and antioxidant responses are presented and discussed. PMID:18762244

  13. Probing Kinase Activation and Substrate Specificity with an Engineered Monomeric IKK2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic subunits of the IκB kinase (IKK), IKK1/IKKα, and IKK2/IKKβ function in vivo as dimers in association with the necessary scaffolding subunit NEMO/IKKγ. Recent X-ray crystal structures of IKK2 suggested that dimerization might be mediated by a smaller protein–protein interaction than previously thought. Here, we report that removal of a portion of the scaffold dimerization domain (SDD) of human IKK2 yields a kinase subunit that remains monomeric in solution. Expression in baculovirus-infected Sf9 insect cells and purification of this engineered monomeric human IKK2 enzyme allows for in vitro analysis of its substrate specificity and mechanism of activation. We find that the monomeric enzyme, which contains all of the amino-terminal kinase and ubiquitin-like domains as well as the more proximal portions of the SDD, functions in vitro to direct phosphorylation exclusively to residues S32 and S36 of its IκBα substrate. Thus, the NF-κB-inducing potential of IKK2 is preserved in the engineered monomer. Furthermore, we observe that our engineered IKK2 monomer readily autophosphorylates activation loop serines 177 and 181 in trans. However, when residues that were previously observed to interfere with IKK2 trans autophosphorylation in transfected cells are mutated within the context of the monomer, the resulting Sf9 cell expressed and purified proteins were significantly impaired in their trans autophosphorylation activity in vitro. This study further defines the determinants of substrate specificity and provides additional evidence in support of a model in which activation via trans autophosphorylation of activation loop serines in IKK2 requires transient assembly of higher-order oligomers. PMID:24611898

  14. Preparation and immunoreactivity of high specific activity indium-111-DTPA labeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) using ultrapure indium-111

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, S.S.; Neumann, R.D.; Gottschalk, A.

    1986-10-01

    The preparation of high-specific activity /sup 111/In-DTPA-MoAb without increasing the number of DTPA molecules per Ab was investigated. Instant thin layer chromatography was used to assay the relationship between labeling efficiencies and specific activities. With ultrapurified /sup 111/In, the specific activity of the radiolabeled MoAb approached the expected theoretic maximum of 100 muCi/microgram. The bioactivity of such high-specific activity preparation showed no degradation as measured by in vitro cell binding assay.

  15. Intralaminar stimulation of the inferior colliculus facilitates frequency-specific activation in the auditory cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allitt, B. J.; Benjaminsen, C.; Morgan, S. J.; Paolini, A. G.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Auditory midbrain implants (AMI) provide inadequate frequency discrimination for open set speech perception. AMIs that can take advantage of the tonotopic laminar of the midbrain may be able to better deliver frequency specific perception and lead to enhanced performance. Stimulation strategies that best elicit frequency specific activity need to be identified. This research examined the characteristic frequency (CF) relationship between regions of the auditory cortex (AC), in response to stimulated regions of the inferior colliculus (IC), comparing monopolar, and intralaminar bipolar electrical stimulation. Approach. Electrical stimulation using multi-channel micro-electrode arrays in the IC was used to elicit AC responses in anaesthetized male hooded Wistar rats. The rate of activity in AC regions with CFs within 3 kHz (CF-aligned) and unaligned CFs was used to assess the frequency specificity of responses. Main results. Both monopolar and bipolar IC stimulation led to CF-aligned neural activity in the AC. Altering the distance between the stimulation and reference electrodes in the IC led to changes in both threshold and dynamic range, with bipolar stimulation with 400 µm spacing evoking the lowest AC threshold and widest dynamic range. At saturation, bipolar stimulation elicited a significantly higher mean spike count in the AC at CF-aligned areas than at CF-unaligned areas when electrode spacing was 400 µm or less. Bipolar stimulation using electrode spacing of 400 µm or less also elicited a higher rate of elicited activity in the AC in both CF-aligned and CF-unaligned regions than monopolar stimulation. When electrodes were spaced 600 µm apart no benefit over monopolar stimulation was observed. Furthermore, monopolar stimulation of the external cortex of the IC resulted in more localized frequency responses than bipolar stimulation when stimulation and reference sites were 200 µm apart. Significance. These findings have implications for the

  16. Rapid direct methods for enumeration of specific, active bacteria in water and biofilms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFeters, G. A.; Pyle, B. H.; Lisle, J. T.; Broadaway, S. C.

    1999-01-01

    Conventional methods for detecting indicator and pathogenic bacteria in water may underestimate the actual population due to sublethal environmental injury, inability of the target bacteria to take up nutrients and other physiological factors which reduce bacterial culturability. Rapid and direct methods are needed to more accurately detect and enumerate active bacteria. Such a methodological advance would provide greater sensitivity in assessing the microbiological safety of water and food. The principle goal of this presentation is to describe novel approaches we have formulated for the rapid and simultaneous detection of bacteria plus the determination of their physiological activity in water and other environmental samples. The present version of our method involves the concentration of organisms by membrane filtration or immunomagnetic separation and combines an intracellular fluorochrome (CTC) for assessment of respiratory activity plus fluorescent-labelled antibody detection of specific bacteria. This approach has also been successfully used to demonstrate spatial and temporal heterogeneities of physiological activities in biofilms when coupled with cryosectioning. Candidate physiological stains include those capable of determining respiratory activity, membrane potential, membrane integrity, growth rate and cellular enzymatic activities. Results obtained thus far indicate that immunomagnetic separation can provide a high degree of sensitivity in the recovery of seeded target bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7) in water and hamburger. The captured and stained target bacteria are then enumerated by either conventional fluorescence microscopy or ChemScan(R), a new instrument that is very sensitive and rapid. The ChemScan(R) laser scanning instrument (Chemunex, Paris, France) provides the detection of individual fluorescently labelled bacterial cells using three emission channels in less than 5 min. A high degree of correlation has been demonstrated between

  17. Non-specific binding sites help to explain mixed inhibition in mushroom tyrosinase activities.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Sorour; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Fazli, Mostafa

    2016-10-21

    Inhibition and activation studies of tyrosinase could prove beneficial to agricultural, food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Although non-competitive and mixed-inhibition are frequent modes observed in kinetics studies on mushroom tyrosinase (MT) activities, the phenomena are left unexplained. In this study, dual effects of phthalic acid (PA) and cinnamic acid (CA) on MT during mono-phenolase activity were demonstrated. PA activated and inhibited MT at concentrations lower and higher than 150 μM, respectively. In contrast, CA inhibited and activated MT at concentrations lower and higher than 5 μM. The mode of inhibition for both effectors was mixed-type. Complex kinetics of MT in the presence of a modulator could partly be ascribed to its mixed-cooperativity. However, to explain mixed-inhibition mode, it is necessary to demonstrate how the ternary complex of substrate/enzyme/effector is formed. Therefore, we looked for possible non-specific binding sites using MT tropolone-bound PDB (2Y9X) in the computational studies. When tropolone was in MTPa (active site), PA and CA occupied different pockets (named MTPb and MTPc, respectively). The close Moldock scores of PA binding posed in MTPb and MTPa suggested that MTPb could be a secondary binding site for PA. Similar results were obtained for CA. Ensuing results from 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations for 2Y9X-effector complexes indicated that the structures were gradually stabilized during simulation. Tunnel analysis by using CAVER Analyst and CHEXVIS resulted in identifying two distinct channels that assumingly participate in exchanging the effectors when the direct channel to MTPa is not accessible. PMID:27344491

  18. Crystal structures of human tissue kallikrein 4: activity modulation by a specific zinc binding site.

    PubMed

    Debela, Mekdes; Magdolen, Viktor; Grimminger, Valerie; Sommerhoff, Christian; Messerschmidt, Albrecht; Huber, Robert; Friedrich, Rainer; Bode, Wolfram; Goettig, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Human tissue kallikrein 4 (hK4) belongs to a 15-member family of closely related serine proteinases. hK4 is predominantly expressed in prostate, activates hK3/PSA, and is up-regulated in prostate and ovarian cancer. We have identified active monomers of recombinant hK4 besides inactive oligomers in solution. hK4 crystallised in the presence of zinc, nickel, and cobalt ions in three crystal forms containing cyclic tetramers and octamers. These structures display a novel metal site between His25 and Glu77 that links the 70-80 loop with the N-terminal segment. Micromolar zinc as present in prostatic fluid inhibits the enzymatic activity of hK4 against fluorogenic substrates. In our measurements, wild-type hK4 exhibited a zinc inhibition constant (IC50) of 16 microM including a permanent residual activity, in contrast to the zinc-independent mutants H25A and E77A. Since the Ile16 N terminus of wild-type hK4 becomes more accessible for acetylating agents in the presence of zinc, we propose that zinc affects the hK4 active site via the salt-bridge formed between the N terminus and Asp194 required for a functional active site. hK4 possesses an unusual 99-loop that creates a groove-like acidic S2 subsite. These findings explain the observed specificity of hK4 for the P1 to P4 substrate residues. Moreover, hK4 shows a negatively charged surface patch, which may represent an exosite for prime-side substrate recognition. PMID:16950394

  19. Pip, a novel IRF family member, is a lymphoid-specific, PU.1-dependent transcriptional activator.

    PubMed

    Eisenbeis, C F; Singh, H; Storb, U

    1995-06-01

    The immunoglobulin light-chain gene enhancers E kappa 3', E lambda 2-4, and E lambda 3-1 contain a conserved cell type-specific composite element essential for their activities. This element binds a B cell-specific heterodimeric protein complex that consists of the Ets family member PU.1 and a second factor (NF-EM5), whose participation in the formation of the complex is dependent on the presence of DNA-bound PU.1. In this report we describe the cloning and characterization of Pip (PU.1 interaction partner), a lymphoid-specific protein that is most likely NF-EM5. As expected, the Pip protein binds the composite element only in the presence of PU.1; furthermore, the formation of this ternary complex is critically dependent on phosphorylation of PU.1 at serine-148. The Pip gene is expressed specifically in lymphoid tissues in both B- and T-cell lines. When coexpressed in NIH-3T3 cells, Pip and PU.1 function as mutually dependent transcription activators of the composite element. The amino-terminal DNA-binding domain of Pip exhibits a high degree of homology to the DNA-binding domains of members of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family, which includes IRF-1, IRF-2, ICSBP, and ISGF3 gamma. PMID:7797077

  20. Expression and Genetic Activation of Cyclic Di-GMP-Specific Phosphodiesterases in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Alberto; Hee, Chee-Seng; Ozaki, Shogo; Mazur, Adam; Boehm, Alex; Schirmer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular levels of the bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) are controlled by antagonistic activities of diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases. The phosphodiesterase PdeH was identified as a key regulator of motility in Escherichia coli, while deletions of any of the other 12 genes encoding potential phosphodiesterases did not interfere with motility. To analyze the roles of E. coli phosphodiesterases, we demonstrated that most of these proteins are expressed under laboratory conditions. We next isolated suppressor mutations in six phosphodiesterase genes, which reinstate motility in the absence of PdeH by reducing cellular levels of c-di-GMP. Expression of all mutant alleles also led to a reduction of biofilm formation. Thus, all of these proteins are bona fide phosphodiesterases that are capable of interfering with different c-di-GMP-responsive output systems by affecting the global c-di-GMP pool. This argues that E. coli possesses several phosphodiesterases that are inactive under laboratory conditions because they lack appropriate input signals. Finally, one of these phosphodiesterases, PdeL, was studied in more detail. We demonstrated that this protein acts as a transcription factor to control its own expression. Motile suppressor alleles led to a strong increase of PdeL activity and elevated pdeL transcription, suggesting that enzymatic activity and transcriptional control are coupled. In agreement with this, we showed that overall cellular levels of c-di-GMP control pdeL transcription and that this control depends on PdeL itself. We thus propose that PdeL acts both as an enzyme and as a c-di-GMP sensor to couple transcriptional activity to the c-di-GMP status of the cell. IMPORTANCE Most bacteria possess multiple diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases. Genetic studies have proposed that these enzymes show signaling specificity by contributing to distinct cellular processes without much cross talk. Thus, spatial

  1. Net Increase of platelet membrane tyrosine specific-protein kinase activity by phorbol myristate acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Noriko; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Iwama, Minako; Kobayashi, Bonro )

    1990-01-01

    Tyrosine protein kinase (TPK) activity in rabbit platelets after stimulation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or thrombin was directly estimated by {sup 32}P incorporation from ({gamma}-{sup 32})ATP into synthetic peptide angiotensin II. By PMA-treatment a net increase of TPK activity was obtained, while thrombin acted on the TPK quickly but stimulation was limited within the range attained by the control after lengthy incubation. The responsive TPK to these stimulators was localized mainly in membrane but much less in cytosol. The specific activity of the particulate TPK was low in the sonicate of control ice cold platelets but increased about 6-fold when the platelets were incubated at 37{degree}C. On a brief contact of platelets with PMA at 37{degrees}C the TPK was fully activated and reached a maximum value about 130% of the control. Determination of phosphotyrosine phosphatase in the stimulated platelet sonicate revealed that its participation in the above described increase of {sup 32}P-incorporation was meagre. The quick response suggested a possible role of TPK in the signal transduction through the platelet cell membrane.

  2. Improving the specific synthetic activity of a penicillin g acylase using DNA family shuffling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng; Zhang, Ai-Hui; Wang, Jing-Ru; Chen, Mao-Lin; Li, Ren-Bao; Yang, Sheng; Yuan, Zhong-Yi

    2003-06-01

    Penicillin G Acylas (PGA) of Providencia rettgeri (ATCC 25599) was evolved using a modified DNA family shuffling method. The identity of pga genes from Escherichia coli, Kluyvera citrophila and Providencia rettgeri ranges from 62.5% to 96.9%. The pga genes from above three species were recombined and shuffled to create interspecies pga gene fusion libraries. By substituting assembled chimaeras for corresponding region of pETPPGA, different recombinants were constructed and expressed in E. coli JM109(DE3). Mutants with obvious beta-lactam synthetic activity were selected from the plates and the ratios of synthesis to hydrolysis (S/H) were determined subsequently. It was shown that the primary structures of selected positives exhibited significant diversity among each library. The best mutant possessed 40% higher synthetic activity than the wild type enzyme of PrPGA. It was further proved in this study that the domain of alpha subunit contributed much more to improve the specific activity of synthesis. Results showed a recombinant PGA with higher synthetic activity was acquired by the method of DNA shuffling. PMID:12796820

  3. Sin Nombre hantavirus nucleocapsid protein exhibits a metal-dependent DNA-specific endonucleolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Möncke-Buchner, Elisabeth; Szczepek, Michal; Bokelmann, Marcel; Heinemann, Patrick; Raftery, Martin J; Krüger, Detlev H; Reuter, Monika

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that the nucleocapsid protein of Sin Nombre hantavirus (SNV-N) has a DNA-specific endonuclease activity. Upon incubation of SNV-N with DNA in the presence of magnesium or manganese, we observed DNA digestion in sequence-unspecific manner. In contrast, RNA was not affected under the same conditions. Moreover, pre-treatment of SNV-N with RNase before DNA cleavage increased the endonucleolytic activity. Structure-based protein fold prediction using known structures from the PDB database revealed that Asp residues in positions 88 and 103 of SNV-N show sequence similarity with the active site of the restriction endonuclease HindIII. Crystal structure of HindIII predicts that residues Asp93 and Asp108 are essential for coordination of the metal ions required for HindIII DNA cleavage. Therefore, we hypothesized that homologous residues in SNV-N, Asp88 and Asp103, may have a similar function. Replacing Asp88 and Asp103 by alanine led to an SNV-N protein almost completely abrogated for endonuclease activity. PMID:27261891

  4. Two evolutionarily conserved repression domains in the Drosophila Kruppel protein differ in activator specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna-Rose, W; Licht, J D; Hansen, U

    1997-01-01

    To identify biologically functional regions in the product of the Drosophila melanogaster gene Kruppel, we cloned the Kruppel homolog from Drosophila virilis. Both the previously identified amino (N)-terminal repression region and the DNA-binding region of the D. virilis Kruppel protein are greater than 96% identical to those of the D. melanogaster Kruppel protein, demonstrating a selective pressure to maintain the integrity of each region during 60 million to 80 million years of evolution. An additional region in the carboxyl (C) terminus of Kruppel that was most highly conserved was examined further. A 42-amino-acid stretch within the conserved C-terminal region also encoded a transferable repression domain. The short, C-terminal repression region is a composite of three subregions of distinct amino acid composition, each containing a high proportion of either basic, proline, or acidic residues. Mutagenesis experiments demonstrated, unexpectedly, that the acidic residues contribute to repression function. Both the N-terminal and C-terminal repression regions were tested for the ability to affect transcription mediated by a variety of activator proteins. The N-terminal repression region was able to inhibit transcription in the presence of multiple activators. However, the C-terminal repression region inhibited transcription by only a subset of the activator proteins. The different activator specificities of the two regions suggest that they repress transcription by different mechanisms and may play distinct biological roles during Drosophila development. PMID:9234738

  5. In vivo bioimaging with tissue-specific transcription factor activated luciferase reporters

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Suzanne M. K.; Delhove, Juliette M. K. M.; Perocheau, Dany P.; Karda, Rajvinder; Rahim, Ahad A.; Howe, Steven J.; Ward, Natalie J.; Birrell, Mark A.; Belvisi, Maria G.; Arbuthnot, Patrick; Johnson, Mark R.; Waddington, Simon N.; McKay, Tristan R.

    2015-01-01

    The application of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter cassettes in vitro is widespread but potential for in vivo application has not yet been realized. Bioluminescence imaging enables non-invasive tracking of gene expression in transfected tissues of living rodents. However the mature immune response limits luciferase expression when delivered in adulthood. We present a novel approach of tissue-targeted delivery of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter lentiviruses to neonatal rodents as an alternative to the existing technology of generating germline transgenic light producing rodents. At this age, neonates acquire immune tolerance to the conditionally responsive luciferase reporter. This simple and transferrable procedure permits surrogate quantitation of transcription factor activity over the lifetime of the animal. We show principal efficacy by temporally quantifying NFκB activity in the brain, liver and lungs of somatotransgenic reporter mice subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. This response is ablated in Tlr4−/− mice or when co-administered with the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone. Furthermore, we show the malleability of this technology by quantifying NFκB-mediated luciferase expression in outbred rats. Finally, we use somatotransgenic bioimaging to longitudinally quantify LPS- and ActivinA-induced upregulation of liver specific glucocorticoid receptor and Smad2/3 reporter constructs in somatotransgenic mice, respectively. PMID:26138224

  6. Caste-specific visual adaptations to distinct daily activity schedules in Australian Myrmecia ants.

    PubMed

    Narendra, Ajay; Reid, Samuel F; Greiner, Birgit; Peters, Richard A; Hemmi, Jan M; Ribi, Willi A; Zeil, Jochen

    2011-04-22

    Animals are active at different times of the day and their activity schedules are shaped by competition, time-limited food resources and predators. Different temporal niches provide different light conditions, which affect the quality of visual information available to animals, in particular for navigation. We analysed caste-specific differences in compound eyes and ocelli in four congeneric sympatric species of Myrmecia ants, with emphasis on within-species adaptive flexibility and daily activity rhythms. Each caste has its own lifestyle: workers are exclusively pedestrian; alate females lead a brief life on the wing before becoming pedestrian; alate males lead a life exclusively on the wing. While workers of the four species range from diurnal, diurnal-crepuscular, crepuscular-nocturnal to nocturnal, the activity times of conspecific alates do not match in all cases. Even within a single species, we found eye area, facet numbers, facet sizes, rhabdom diameters and ocelli size to be tuned to the distinct temporal niche each caste occupies. We discuss these visual adaptations in relation to ambient light levels, visual tasks and mode of locomotion. PMID:20926444

  7. Caste-specific visual adaptations to distinct daily activity schedules in Australian Myrmecia ants

    PubMed Central

    Narendra, Ajay; Reid, Samuel F.; Greiner, Birgit; Peters, Richard A.; Hemmi, Jan M.; Ribi, Willi A.; Zeil, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Animals are active at different times of the day and their activity schedules are shaped by competition, time-limited food resources and predators. Different temporal niches provide different light conditions, which affect the quality of visual information available to animals, in particular for navigation. We analysed caste-specific differences in compound eyes and ocelli in four congeneric sympatric species of Myrmecia ants, with emphasis on within-species adaptive flexibility and daily activity rhythms. Each caste has its own lifestyle: workers are exclusively pedestrian; alate females lead a brief life on the wing before becoming pedestrian; alate males lead a life exclusively on the wing. While workers of the four species range from diurnal, diurnal-crepuscular, crepuscular-nocturnal to nocturnal, the activity times of conspecific alates do not match in all cases. Even within a single species, we found eye area, facet numbers, facet sizes, rhabdom diameters and ocelli size to be tuned to the distinct temporal niche each caste occupies. We discuss these visual adaptations in relation to ambient light levels, visual tasks and mode of locomotion. PMID:20926444

  8. Activation of Plant Plasma Membrane Ca2+-Permeable Channels by Race-Specific Fungal Elicitors.

    PubMed Central

    Gelli, A.; Higgins, V. J.; Blumwald, E.

    1997-01-01

    The response of plant cells to invading pathogens is regulated by fluctuations in cytosolic Ca2+ levels that are mediated by Ca2+-permeable channels located at the plasma membrane of the host cell. The mechanisms by which fungal elicitors can induce Ca2+ uptake by the host cell were examined by the application of conventional patch-clamp techniques. Whole-cell and single-channel experiments on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) protoplasts revealed a race-specific fungal elicitor-induced activation of a plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel. The presence of the fungal elicitor resulted in a greater probability of channel opening. Guanosine 5[prime]-[[beta]-thio]diphosphate, a GDP analog that locks heterotrimeric G-proteins into their inactivated state, abolished the channel activation induced by the fungal elicitor, whereas guanosine 5[prime][[gamma]-thio]triphosphate, a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog that locks heterotrimeric G-proteins into their activated state, produced an effect similar to that observed with the fungal elicitor. Mastoparan, which stimulates GTPase activity, mimicked the effect of GTP[[gamma

  9. Human Thalamus Regulates Cortical Activity via Spatially Specific and Structurally Constrained Phase-Amplitude Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Malekmohammadi, Mahsa; Elias, W. Jeff; Pouratian, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Although the thalamus is believed to regulate and coordinate cortical activity both within and across functional regions, such as motor and visual cortices, direct evidence for such regulation and the mechanism of regulation remains poorly described. Using simultaneous invasive recordings of cortical and thalamic electrophysiological activity in 2 awake and spontaneously behaving human subjects, we provide direct evidence of thalamic regulation of cortical activity through a mechanism of phase-amplitude coupling (PAC), in which the phase of low frequency oscillations regulates the amplitude of higher frequency oscillations. Specifically, we show that cortical PAC between the theta phase and beta amplitude is spatially dependent on and time variant with the magnitude of thalamocortical theta coherence. Moreover, using causality analysis and MR diffusion tractography, we provide evidence that thalamic theta activity drives cortical theta oscillations and PAC across structures and that these thalamocortical relationships are structurally constrained by anatomic pathways. This relationship allows for new evidence of thalamocortical PAC. Given the diffuse connectivity of the thalamus with the cerebral cortex, thalamocortical PAC may play an important role in addressing the binding problem, including both integration and segregation of information within and across cortical areas. PMID:24408958

  10. Tumor cell-specific bioluminescence platform to identify stroma-induced changes to anticancer drug activity.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Douglas W; Delmore, Jake; Weisberg, Ellen; Negri, Joseph M; Geer, D Corey; Klippel, Steffen; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Schlossman, Robert L; Munshi, Nikhil C; Kung, Andrew L; Griffin, James D; Richardson, Paul G; Anderson, Kenneth C; Mitsiades, Constantine S

    2010-04-01

    Conventional anticancer drug screening is typically performed in the absence of accessory cells of the tumor microenvironment, which can profoundly alter antitumor drug activity. To address this limitation, we developed the tumor cell-specific in vitro bioluminescence imaging (CS-BLI) assay. Tumor cells (for example, myeloma, leukemia and solid tumors) stably expressing luciferase are cultured with nonmalignant accessory cells (for example, stromal cells) for selective quantification of tumor cell viability, in presence versus absence of stromal cells or drug treatment. CS-BLI is high-throughput scalable and identifies stroma-induced chemoresistance in diverse malignancies, including imatinib resistance in leukemic cells. A stroma-induced signature in tumor cells correlates with adverse clinical prognosis and includes signatures for activated Akt, Ras, NF-kappaB, HIF-1alpha, myc, hTERT and IRF4; for biological aggressiveness; and for self-renewal. Unlike conventional screening, CS-BLI can also identify agents with increased activity against tumor cells interacting with stroma. One such compound, reversine, shows more potent activity in an orthotopic model of diffuse myeloma bone lesions than in conventional subcutaneous xenografts. Use of CS-BLI, therefore, enables refined screening of candidate anticancer agents to enrich preclinical pipelines with potential therapeutics that overcome stroma-mediated drug resistance and can act in a synthetic lethal manner in the context of tumor-stroma interactions. PMID:20228816

  11. Identification of artesunate as a specific activator of ferroptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Eling, Nils; Reuter, Lukas; Hazin, John; Hamacher-Brady, Anne; Brady, Nathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic KRas reprograms pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells to states which are highly resistant to apoptosis. Thus, a major preclinical goal is to identify effective strategies for killing PDAC cells. Artesunate (ART) is an anti-malarial that specifically induces programmed cell death in different cancer cell types, in a manner initiated by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generation. In this study we demonstrate that ART specifically induced ROS- and lysosomal iron-dependent cell death in PDAC cell lines. Highest cytotoxicity was obtained in PDAC cell lines with constitutively-active KRas, and ART did not affect non-neoplastic human pancreatic ductal epithelial (HPDE) cells. We determined that ART did not induce apoptosis or necroptosis. Instead, ART induced ferroptosis, a recently described mode of ROS- and iron-dependent programmed necrosis which can be activated in Ras-transformed cells. Co-treatment with the ferroptosis inhibitor ferrostatin-1 blocked ART-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death, and increased long-term cell survival and proliferation. Importantly, analysis of PDAC patient mRNA expression indicates a dependency on antioxidant homeostasis and increased sensitivity to free intracellular iron, both of which correlate with Ras-driven sensitivity to ferroptosis. Overall, our findings suggest that ART activation of ferroptosis is an effective, novel pathway for killing PDAC cells. PMID:26097885

  12. Cell-Specific Production and Antimicrobial Activity of Naphthoquinones in Roots of Lithospermum erythrorhizon1

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, Lindy A.; Michaels, Paula J.; Flores, Hector E.

    1999-01-01

    Pigmented naphthoquinone derivatives of shikonin are produced at specific times and in specific cells of Lithospermum erythrorhizon roots. Normal pigment development is limited to root hairs and root border cells in hairy roots grown on “noninducing” medium, whereas induction of additional pigment production by abiotic (CuSO4) or biotic (fungal elicitor) factors increases the amount of total pigment, changes the ratios of derivatives produced, and initiates production of pigment de novo in epidermal cells. When the biological activity of these compounds was tested against soil-borne bacteria and fungi, a wide range of sensitivity was recorded. Acetyl-shikonin and β-hydroxyisovaleryl-shikonin, the two most abundant derivatives in both Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed “hairy-root” cultures and greenhouse-grown plant roots, were the most biologically active of the seven compounds tested. Hyphae of the pathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani, Pythium aphanidermatum, and Nectria hematococca induced localized pigment production upon contact with the roots. Challenge by R. solani crude elicitor increased shikonin derivative production 30-fold. We have studied the regulation of this suite of related, differentially produced, differentially active compounds to understand their role(s) in plant defense at the cellular level in the rhizosphere. PMID:9952436

  13. What's up? Emotion-specific activation of vertical space during language processing.

    PubMed

    Dudschig, Carolin; de la Vega, Irmgard; Kaup, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between language processing and vertical space has been shown for various groups of words including valence words, implicit location words, and words referring to religious concepts. However, it remains unclear whether these are single phenomena or whether there is an underlying common mechanism. Here, we show that the evaluation of word valence interacts with motor responses in the vertical dimension, with positive (negative) evaluations facilitating upward (downward) responses. When valence evaluation was not required, implicit location words (e.g., bird, shoe) influenced motor responses whereas valence words (e.g., kiss, hate) did not. Importantly, a subset of specific emotional valence words that are commonly associated with particular bodily postures (e.g., proud→upright; sad→slouched) did automatically influence motor responses. Together, this suggests that while the vertical spatial dimension is not directly activated by word valence, it is activated when processing words referring to emotional states with stereotypical bodily-postures. These results provide strong evidence that the activation of spatial associations during language processing is experience-specific in nature and cannot be explained with reference to a general mapping between all valence words and space (i.e., all positive and negative words generally relate to spatial processing). These findings support the experiential view of language comprehension, suggesting that the automatic reactivation of bodily experiences is limited to word groups referring to emotions or entities directly associated with spatial experiences (e.g., posture or location in the world). PMID:25454886

  14. Pain Inhibition by Optogenetic Activation of Specific Anterior Cingulate Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ling; Uhelski, Megan L.; Anand, Sanjay; Romero-Ortega, Mario; Kim, Young-tae; Fuchs, Perry N.; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Cumulative evidence from both humans and animals suggests that the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is important for pain-related perception, and thus a likely target for pain relief therapy. However, use of existing electrode based ACC stimulation has not significantly reduced pain, at least in part due to the lack of specificity and likely co-activation of both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Herein, we report a dramatic reduction of pain behavior in transgenic mice by optogenetic stimulation of the inhibitory neural circuitry of the ACC expressing channelrhodopsin-2. Electrophysiological measurements confirmed that stimulation of ACC inhibitory neurons is associated with decreased neural activity in the ACC. Further, a distinct optogenetic stimulation intensity and frequency-dependent inhibition of spiking activity in the ACC was observed. Moreover, we confirmed specific electrophysiological responses from different neuronal units in the thalamus, in response to particular types of painful stimuli (i,e., formalin injection, pinch), which we found to be modulated by optogenetic control of the ACC inhibitory neurons. These results underscore the inhibition of the ACC as a clinical alternative in inhibiting chronic pain, and leads to a better understanding of the pain processing circuitry of the cingulate cortex. PMID:25714399

  15. The Rasch-built Pompe-specific activity (R-PAct) scale.

    PubMed

    van der Beek, N A M E; Hagemans, M L C; van der Ploeg, A T; van Doorn, P A; Merkies, I S J

    2013-03-01

    We constructed a patient-based interval scale using Rasch analysis, specifically suited to quantify the effects of Pompe disease on patient's ability to carry out daily life activities and their social participation: Rasch-built Pompe-specific Activity scale. Between July 2005 and April 2011, 186 patients aged 16 or older, participated to develop this scale. External construct validity was determined through correlations with the MRC sumscore and Rotterdam Handicap Scale. Furthermore, test-retest reliability was determined in a subgroup of 44 patients. Finally, individual person-level responsiveness was used to determine the proportion of patients demonstrating significant improvement or deterioration during their natural disease course, or during treatment with enzyme replacement therapy. Of the original 49 items, 31 were removed after investigation of model fit, internal reliability, threshold examination, item bias, and local dependency. The remaining 18 items were ordered on a linearly weighted scale and demonstrated good discriminative ability (Person Separation Index 0.96), external construct validity (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for MRC sumscore 0.82, and for the Rotterdam handicap scale 0.86), reliability of person's location (ability comparison: ICC 0.95), and responsiveness. We therefore conclude that the R-PAct scale enables us to accurately detect limitations in activities and social participation throughout the entire disease spectrum in patients with Pompe disease. PMID:23273871

  16. Acetohydroxyacid synthase activity and transcripts profiling reveal tissue-specific regulation of ahas genes in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Ochogavía, Ana C; Breccia, Gabriela; Vega, Tatiana; Felitti, Silvina A; Picardi, Liliana A; Nestares, Graciela

    2014-07-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) is the target site of several herbicides and catalyses the first step in the biosynthesis of branched chain amino acid. Three genes coding for AHAS catalytic subunit (ahas1, ahas2 and ahas3) have been reported for sunflower. The aim of this work was to study the expression pattern of ahas genes family and AHAS activity in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Different organs (leaves, hypocotyls, roots, flowers and embryos) were evaluated at several developmental stages. The transcriptional profile was studied through RT-qPCR. The highest expression for ahas1 was shown in leaves, where all the induced and natural gene mutations conferring herbicide resistance were found. The maximal expression of ahas2 and ahas3 occurred in immature flowers and embryos. The highest AHAS activity was found in leaves and immature embryos. Correlation analysis among ahas gene expression and AHAS activity was discussed. Our results show that differences in ahas genes expression are tissue-specific and temporally regulated. Moreover, the conservation of multiple AHAS isoforms in sunflower seems to result from different expression requirements controlled by tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms at different developmental stages. PMID:24908515

  17. Identification of three kinds of mutually related composite elements conferring S phase-specific transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Taoka, K; Kaya, H; Nakayama, T; Araki, T; Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    1999-06-01

    Conservation of the Oct motif (CGCGGATC) is a remarkable feature of plant histone gene promoters. Many of the Oct motifs are paired with a distinct motif, Hex, TCA or CCAAT-box, constituting the type I element (CCACGTCANCGATCCGCG), type II element (TCACGCGGATC) and type III element (GATCCGCG-N14-ACCAATCA). To clarify the roles of these Oct-containing composite elements (OCEs) in cell cycle-dependent and tissue-specific expression, we performed gain-of-function experiments with transgenic tobacco cell lines and plants harboring a derivative of the 35S core promoter/beta-glucuronidase fusion gene in which three or four copies of an OCE had been placed upstream. Although their activities were slightly different, results showed that each of the three types of OCEs could confer the ability to direct S phase-specific expression on a heterologous promoter. In transgenic plants, the type I and III elements exhibited a similar activity, directing expression in meristematic tissues, whereas the activity of the type II element appeared to be restricted to young cotyledons and maturating guard cells. Mutational analyses demonstrated that the co-operation of Oct with another module (Hex, TCA or CCAAT-box) was absolutely required for both temporal and spatial regulation. Thus, OCEs play a pivotal role in regulation of the expression of plant histone genes. PMID:10417712

  18. Active training and driving-specific feedback improve older drivers' visual search prior to lane changes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Driving retraining classes may offer an opportunity to attenuate some effects of aging that may alter driving skills. Unfortunately, there is evidence that classroom programs (driving refresher courses) do not improve the driving performance of older drivers. The aim of the current study was to evaluate if simulator training sessions with video-based feedback can modify visual search behaviors of older drivers while changing lanes in urban driving. Methods In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the video-based feedback training, 10 older drivers who received a driving refresher course and feedback about their driving performance were tested with an on-road standardized evaluation before and after participating to a simulator training program (Feedback group). Their results were compared to a Control group (12 older drivers) who received the same refresher course and in-simulator active practice as the Feedback group without receiving driving-specific feedback. Results After attending the training program, the Control group showed no increase in the frequency of the visual inspection of three regions of interests (rear view and left side mirrors, and blind spot). In contrast, for the Feedback group, combining active training and driving-specific feedbacks increased the frequency of blind spot inspection by 100% (32.3 to 64.9% of verification before changing lanes). Conclusions These results suggest that simulator training combined with driving-specific feedbacks helped older drivers to improve their visual inspection strategies, and that in-simulator training transferred positively to on-road driving. In order to be effective, it is claimed that driving programs should include active practice sessions with driving-specific feedbacks. Simulators offer a unique environment for developing such programs adapted to older drivers' needs. PMID:22385499

  19. Activation of a muscle-specific actin gene promoter in serum-stimulated fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Stoflet, E S; Schmidt, L J; Elder, P K; Korf, G M; Foster, D N; Strauch, A R; Getz, M J

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of AKR-2B mouse fibroblasts with serum growth factors or inhibitors of protein synthesis, such as cycloheximide, results in a stimulation of cytoskeletal beta-actin transcription but has no effect on transcription of muscle-specific isotypes, such as the vascular smooth muscle (VSM) alpha-actin gene. Deletion mapping and site-specific mutagenesis studies demonstrated that a single "CArG" element of the general form CC(A/T)6GG was necessary and possibly sufficient to impart serum and cycloheximide-inducibility to the beta-actin promoter. Although the VSM alpha-actin promoter exhibits at least three similar sequence elements, it remained refractory to serum and cycloheximide induction. However, deletion of a 33 base pair sequence between -191 and -224 relative to the transcription start site resulted in the transcriptional activation of this muscle-specific promoter in rapidly growing or serum-stimulated fibroblasts. Although the activity of this truncated promoter was potentiated by cycloheximide in a manner indistinguishable from that of the beta-actin promoter, this was dependent on a more complex array of interacting elements. These included at least one CArG box and a putative upstream activating element closely associated with the -191 to -224 inhibitory sequences. These results demonstrate that the expression of a muscle-specific actin gene in fibroblasts is suppressed by a cis-acting negative control element and that in the absence of this element, the promoter is responsive to growth factor-induced signal transduction pathways. Images PMID:1421567

  20. Sex-specific foraging behavior in response to fishing activities in a threatened seabird

    PubMed Central

    García-Tarrasón, Manuel; Bécares, Juan; Bateman, Santiago; Arcos, José Manuel; Jover, Lluís; Sanpera, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Some seabird species have learnt to efficiently exploit fishing discards from trawling activities. However, a discard ban has been proposed as necessary in Europe to ensure the sustainability of the seas. It is of crucial importance for the management and conservation purposes to study the potential consequences of a discard ban on the foraging ecology of threatened seabirds. We assessed the influence of fishing activities on the feeding habits of 22 male and 15 female Audouin's gulls (Larus audouinii) from the Ebro Delta (Mediterranean Sea) during the breeding period using GPS loggers together with Stable Isotope Analysis (SIA), which provided new insights into their foraging behavior and trophic ecology, respectively. GPS data revealed different sex-specific foraging patterns between workdays and weekends. Females were highly consistent in that they foraged at sea throughout the week even though discarding stops at weekends. In contrast, males switched from foraging at sea during the week (when discards are produced) to an increased use of rice field habitats at weekends (when fishermen do not work). This sex-specific foraging behavior could be related to specific nutritional requirements associated with previous egg production, an energetically demanding period for females. However, on a broader time scale integrated by the SIA, both sexes showed a high degree of individual specialization in their trophic ecology. The need to obtain detailed information on the dependence and response of seabirds to fishing activities is crucial in conservation sciences. In this regard, sex-specific foraging behavior in relation to fisheries has been overlooked, despite the ecological and conservation implications. For instance, this situation may lead to sex differentiation in bycatch mortality in longlines when trawlers do not operate. Moreover, any new fisheries policy will need to be implemented gradually to facilitate the adaptation of a specialized species to a discard ban

  1. Sex-specific foraging behavior in response to fishing activities in a threatened seabird.

    PubMed

    García-Tarrasón, Manuel; Bécares, Juan; Bateman, Santiago; Arcos, José Manuel; Jover, Lluís; Sanpera, Carolina

    2015-06-01

    Some seabird species have learnt to efficiently exploit fishing discards from trawling activities. However, a discard ban has been proposed as necessary in Europe to ensure the sustainability of the seas. It is of crucial importance for the management and conservation purposes to study the potential consequences of a discard ban on the foraging ecology of threatened seabirds. We assessed the influence of fishing activities on the feeding habits of 22 male and 15 female Audouin's gulls (Larus audouinii) from the Ebro Delta (Mediterranean Sea) during the breeding period using GPS loggers together with Stable Isotope Analysis (SIA), which provided new insights into their foraging behavior and trophic ecology, respectively. GPS data revealed different sex-specific foraging patterns between workdays and weekends. Females were highly consistent in that they foraged at sea throughout the week even though discarding stops at weekends. In contrast, males switched from foraging at sea during the week (when discards are produced) to an increased use of rice field habitats at weekends (when fishermen do not work). This sex-specific foraging behavior could be related to specific nutritional requirements associated with previous egg production, an energetically demanding period for females. However, on a broader time scale integrated by the SIA, both sexes showed a high degree of individual specialization in their trophic ecology. The need to obtain detailed information on the dependence and response of seabirds to fishing activities is crucial in conservation sciences. In this regard, sex-specific foraging behavior in relation to fisheries has been overlooked, despite the ecological and conservation implications. For instance, this situation may lead to sex differentiation in bycatch mortality in longlines when trawlers do not operate. Moreover, any new fisheries policy will need to be implemented gradually to facilitate the adaptation of a specialized species to a discard ban

  2. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-10-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  3. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  4. Site-specific fatty chain-modified exenatide analogs with balanced glucoregulatory activity and prolonged in vivo activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lidan; Huang, Xun; Han, Jing; Cai, Xingguang; Dai, Yuxuan; Chu, Yingying; Wang, Chuandong; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2016-06-15

    The therapeutic utility of exenatide (Ex-4) is limited due to short plasma half-life of 2.4h and thus numerous approaches have been used to obtain a longer action time. However, such strategies often attend to one thing and lose another. The study aimed to identify a candidate with balanced glucoregulatory activity and prolonged in vivo activity. A series of fatty chain conjugates of Ex-4 were designed and synthesized. First, thirteen cysteine modified peptides (1-13) were prepared. Peptides 1, 10, and 13 showed improved glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activate potency and were thus selected for second step modifications to yield conjugates I-1-I-9. All conjugates retained significant GLP-1 receptor activate potency and more importantly exerted enhanced albumin-binding properties and in vitro plasma stability. The protracted antidiabetic effects of the most stable I-3 were further confirmed by both multiple intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and hypoglycemic efficacies test in vivo. Furthermore, once daily injection of I-3 to streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic mice achieved long-term beneficial effects on hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) lowering and glucose tolerance. Once daily injection of I-3 to diet induced obesity (DIO) mice also achieved favorable effects on food intake, body weight, and blood chemistry. Our results suggested that I-3 was a promising agent deserving further investigation to treat obesity patients with diabetes. PMID:27155328

  5. Potent KCNQ2/3-Specific Channel Activator Suppresses In Vivo Epileptic Activity and Prevents the Development of Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Kalappa, Bopanna I.; Soh, Heun; Duignan, Kevin M.; Furuya, Takeru; Edwards, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Kv7 (KCNQ) channels are voltage-dependent potassium channels that are activated at resting membrane potentials and therefore provide a powerful brake on neuronal excitability. Genetic or experience-dependent reduction of KCNQ2/3 channel activity is linked with disorders that are characterized by neuronal hyperexcitability, such as epilepsy and tinnitus. Retigabine, a small molecule that activates KCNQ2–5 channels by shifting their voltage-dependent opening to more negative voltages, is an US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved anti-epileptic drug. However, recently identified side effects have limited its clinical use. As a result, the development of improved KCNQ2/3 channel activators is crucial for the treatment of hyperexcitability-related disorders. By incorporating a fluorine substituent in the 3-position of the tri-aminophenyl ring of retigabine, we synthesized a small-molecule activator (SF0034) with novel properties. Heterologous expression of KCNQ2/3 channels in HEK293T cells showed that SF0034 was five times more potent than retigabine at shifting the voltage dependence of KCNQ2/3 channels to more negative voltages. Moreover, unlike retigabine, SF0034 did not shift the voltage dependence of either KCNQ4 or KCNQ5 homomeric channels. Conditional deletion of Kcnq2 from cerebral cortical pyramidal neurons showed that SF0034 requires the expression of KCNQ2/3 channels for reducing the excitability of CA1 hippocampal neurons. Behavioral studies demonstrated that SF0034 was a more potent and less toxic anticonvulsant than retigabine in rodents. Furthermore, SF0034 prevented the development of tinnitus in mice. We propose that SF0034 provides, not only a powerful tool for investigating ion channel properties, but, most importantly, it provides a clinical candidate for treating epilepsy and preventing tinnitus. PMID:26063916

  6. Polyfunctional Specific Response to Echinococcus Granulosus Associates to the Biological Activity of the Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Linda; Vanini, Valentina; Petruccioli, Elisa; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Schininà, Vincenzo; Busi Rizzi, Elisa; Ludovisi, Alessandra; Corpolongo, Angela; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Pozio, Edoardo; Teggi, Antonella; Goletti, Delia

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a complex disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus (E.granulosus), and its immunophatogenesis is still not clearly defined. A peculiar feature of chronic CE is the coexistence of Th1 and Th2 responses. It has been suggested that Th1 cytokines are related to disease resistance, whereas Th2 cytokines are related to disease susceptibility and chronicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by multi-parametric flow cytometry (FACS), the presence of CE specific immune signatures. Methodology/Principal Findings We enrolled 54 subjects with suspected CE; 42 of them had a confirmed diagnosis, whereas 12 were classified as NO-CE. Based on the ultrasonography images, CE patients were further categorized as being in "active stages" (25) and "inactive stages" (17). The ability of CD4+ T-cells to produce IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, Th2 cytokines or IL-10 was assessed by FACS on antigen-specific T-cells after overnight stimulation with Antigen B (AgB) of E.granulosus. Cytokine profiles were evaluated in all the enrolled subjects. The results show that none of the NO-CE subjects had a detectable AgB-specific response. Among the CE patients, the frequency and proportions of AgB-specific CD4+ T-cells producing IL-2+TNF-α+Th2+ or TNF-α+Th2+ were significantly increased in the “active stages” group compared to the “inactive stages” group. Moreover, an increased proportion of the total polyfunctional subsets, as triple-and double-functional CD4 T-cells, was found in CE patients with active disease. The response to the mitogen, used as a control stimulus to evaluate the immune competence status, was characterized by the same cytokine subsets in all the subjects enrolled, independent of CE. Conclusions We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that polyfunctional T-cell subsets as IL-2+TNF-α+Th2+ triple-positive and TNF-α+Th2+ double-positive specific T-cells associate with cyst biological activity. These results contribute

  7. Biologically active protein fragments containing specific binding regions of serum albumin or related proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, biologically active protein fragments can be constructed which contain only those specific portions of the serum albumin family of proteins such as regions known as subdomains IIA and IIIA which are primarily responsible for the binding properties of the serum albumins. The artificial serums that can be prepared from these biologically active protein fragments are advantageous in that they can be produced much more easily than serums containing the whole albumin, yet still retain all or most of the original binding potential of the full albumin proteins. In addition, since the protein fragment serums of the present invention can be made from non-natural sources using conventional recombinant DNA techniques, they are far safer than serums containing natural albumin because they do not carry the potentially harmful viruses and other contaminants that will be found in the natural substances.

  8. Inhibition of phagocytic activity by the N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific lectin from Amaranthus leucocarpus.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, G; Gorocica, P; Agundis, C; Pérez, A; Molina, J; Zenteno, E

    1998-06-01

    Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin (ALL), specific for N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, induces inhibition of the erythrophagocytic activity of resident murine peritoneal macrophages and of the macrophage-like cell line J-774. This effect was observed only in macrophages that were Mac-2 (CD11c/CD18 or CR4) negative, indicating that macrophage activation induces important modification to the glycosylation (mainly O-glycosylation) of the membrane. Receptors for IgM and C3b remain unaltered after lectin treatment. Ultrastructural analysis revealed (a) that ALL induced the formation of pinocytic vacuoles, and (b) a regular distribution over the macrophage membrane as well as endosomal vesicles of the gold labeled ALL. Our results suggest that macrophage membrane glycoproteins with constitutive N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues participate in the regulation of pinocytic-phagocytic vacuole formation. PMID:9881768

  9. In vivo structure-activity relationship studies support allosteric targeting of a dual specificity phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Korotchenko, Vasiliy N; Saydmohammed, Manush; Vollmer, Laura L; Bakan, Ahmet; Sheetz, Kyle; Debiec, Karl T; Greene, Kristina A; Agliori, Christine S; Bahar, Ivet; Day, Billy W; Vogt, Andreas; Tsang, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Dual specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6) functions as a feedback attenuator of fibroblast growth factor signaling during development. In vitro high throughput chemical screening attempts to discover DUSP6 inhibitors have yielded limited success. However, in vivo whole-organism screens of zebrafish identified compound 1 (BCI) as an allosteric inhibitor of DUSP6. Here we designed and synthesized a panel of analogues to define the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of DUSP6 inhibition. In vivo high-content analysis in transgenic zebrafish, coupled with cell-based chemical complementation assays, identified structural features of the pharmacophore of 1 that were essential for biological activity. In vitro assays of DUSP hyperactivation corroborated the results from in vivo and cellular SAR. The results reinforce the notion that DUSPs are druggable through allosteric mechanisms and illustrate the utility of zebrafish as a model organism for in vivo SAR analyses. PMID:24909879

  10. Active route learning in virtual environments: disentangling movement control from intention, instruction specificity, and navigation control.

    PubMed

    von Stülpnagel, Rul; Steffens, Melanie C

    2013-09-01

    Active navigation research examines how physiological and psychological involvement in navigation benefits spatial learning. However, existing conceptualizations of active navigation comprise separable, distinct factors. This research disentangles the contributions of movement control (i.e., self-contained vs. observed movement) as a central factor from learning intention (Experiment 1), instruction specificity and instruction control (Experiment 2), as well as navigation control (Experiment 3) to spatial learning in virtual environments. We tested the effects of these factors on landmark recognition (landmark knowledge), tour-integration and route navigation (route knowledge). Our findings suggest that movement control leads to robust advantages in landmark knowledge as compared to observed movement. Advantages in route knowledge do not depend on learning intention, but on the need to elaborate spatial information. Whenever the necessary level of elaboration is assured for observed movement, too, the development of route knowledge is not inferior to that for self-contained movement. PMID:22922991

  11. Monoclonal antibodies against a specific nonhistone chromosomal protein of Drosophila associated with active genes.

    PubMed

    Howard, G C; Abmayr, S M; Shinefeld, L A; Sato, V L; Elgin, S C

    1981-01-01

    Hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies have been produced by fusion of NS-1 mouse myeloma cells with the spleen cells of mice inoculated with a 60-65,000-mol wt fraction of proteins released from Drosophila embryo nuclei treated with DNase I. The antibodies secreted by the hybridomas were examined with polytene chromosomes of formaldehyde-fixed salivary gland squashes by an immunofluorescence assay. Most of the clonal antibodies obtained resulted in specific staining of the chromosomes relative to the cytoplasmic debris. In the case of clone 28, the antibodies showed a preferential association with sites of gene activity, both puffs and loci identified as puffing at some time during the third instar and prepupal period. In larvae that were heat shocked (exposed to 35 degrees C for 15 min before removal and fixation of the glands), the antibodies of clone 28 stained preferentially the induced heat-shock loci while continuing to stain most of the normal set of loci. The antigen for clone 28 was identified as a single protein of approximately 62,000 mol wt by using the antibodies followed by 125I-rabbit anti-mouse Ig to stain nitrocellulose replicas of SDS polyacrylamide gels of total chromosomal proteins. This study demonstrates that monoclonal antibodies can be used successfully in immunofluorescence staining of formaldehyde-fixed polytene chromosomes. The results verify the hypothesis that a specific nonhistone chromosomal protein is preferentially associated with the set of loci that includes both active sites and those scheduled to be active at some time in this developmental program. Such proteins may play a general role in the mechanisms of cell determination and gene activation. PMID:6782108

  12. Effects of active vs. passive recovery on repeated rugby-specific exercises.

    PubMed

    Jougla, A; Micallef, J P; Mottet, D

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of active vs. passive recovery on performance of a rugby-specific intermittent test in rugby union players. Seven male rugby players (20.6+/-0.5 yrs; 181.9+/-10.0 cm; 94.5+/-12.8 kg) performed in random order, over two separate sessions, a specific repeated-sprint rugby test, the Narbonne test (6 x 4 consecutive actions: 1, scrummaging; 2, agility sprinting; 3, tackling; 4, straight sprinting) with 30s of passive or active recovery (running at 50% of maximal aerobic speed). The Narbonne tests were completed before (pre-test) and after (post-test) a 30-min rugby match. During the Narbonne test, scrum forces, agility and sprint times, heart rate and rate of perceived exertion were measured. Scrum forces were lower in active (74.9+/-13.4 kg) than in passive recovery (90.4+/-20.9 kg), only during the post-test (p<0.05). Fatigue index (%) (p<0.05) and total sprint time (s) (p<0.01) were significantly greater in active than in passive recovery, both during the pre-test (11.5+/-5.7% vs. 6.7+/-4.5% and 18.1+/-1.3s vs. 16.9+/-0.9s) and the post-test (7.3+/-3.3% vs. 4.3+/-1.5% and 18.3+/-1.6s vs. 16.9+/-1.1s). Consequently, the results indicated that passive recovery enabled better performance during the Narbonne test. However, it is obviously impractical to suggest that players should stand still during and following repeated-sprint bouts: the players have to move to ensure they have taken an optimal position. PMID:19560972

  13. Evaluation of the specificity and effectiveness of selected oral hygiene actives in salivary biofilm microcosms.

    PubMed

    Ledder, Ruth G; Sreenivasan, Prem K; DeVizio, William; McBain, Andrew J

    2010-12-01

    The microbiological effects of biocidal products used for the enhancement of oral hygiene relate to the active compound(s) as well as other formulation components. Here, we test the specificities of selected actives in the absence of multiple excipients. Salivary ecosystems were maintained in tissue culture plate-based hydroxyapatite disc models (HDMs) and modified drip-flow biofilm reactors (MDFRs). Test compounds stannous fluoride (SF), SDS, triclosan (TCS), zinc lactate (ZL) and ZL with SF in combination (ZLSF) were delivered to the HDMs once and four times daily for 6 days to MDFRs. Plaques were characterized by differential viable counting and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). TCS and SDS were the most effective compounds against HDM plaques, significantly reducing total viable counts (P<0.05), whilst SF, ZL and ZLSF were comparatively ineffective. TCS exhibited specificity for streptococci (P<0.01) and Gram-negative anaerobes (P<0.01) following a single dosing and also on repeated dosing in MDFRs. In contrast to single exposures, multiple dosing with ZLSF also significantly reduced all bacterial groups, whilst SF and ZL caused significant but transient reductions. According to PCR-DGGE analyses, significant (P<0.05) reductions in eubacterial diversity occurred following 6 day dosing with both TCS and ZLSF. Concordance of MDFR eubacterial profiles with salivary inocula ranged between 58 and 97%. TCS and ZL(SF) exhibited similar specificities to those reported for formulations. TCS was the most potent antibacterial, after single and multiple dosage regimens. PMID:20724503

  14. The roadmap for estimation of cell-type-specific neuronal activity from non-invasive measurements.

    PubMed

    Uhlirova, Hana; Kılıç, Kıvılcım; Tian, Peifang; Sakadžić, Sava; Gagnon, Louis; Thunemann, Martin; Desjardins, Michèle; Saisan, Payam A; Nizar, Krystal; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Hagler, Donald J; Vandenberghe, Matthieu; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A; Silva, Gabriel A; Masliah, Eliezer; Kleinfeld, David; Vinogradov, Sergei; Buxton, Richard B; Einevoll, Gaute T; Boas, David A; Dale, Anders M; Devor, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The computational properties of the human brain arise from an intricate interplay between billions of neurons connected in complex networks. However, our ability to study these networks in healthy human brain is limited by the necessity to use non-invasive technologies. This is in contrast to animal models where a rich, detailed view of cellular-level brain function with cell-type-specific molecular identity has become available due to recent advances in microscopic optical imaging and genetics. Thus, a central challenge facing neuroscience today is leveraging these mechanistic insights from animal studies to accurately draw physiological inferences from non-invasive signals in humans. On the essential path towards this goal is the development of a detailed 'bottom-up' forward model bridging neuronal activity at the level of cell-type-specific populations to non-invasive imaging signals. The general idea is that specific neuronal cell types have identifiable signatures in the way they drive changes in cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate of O2 (measurable with quantitative functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging), and electrical currents/potentials (measurable with magneto/electroencephalography). This forward model would then provide the 'ground truth' for the development of new tools for tackling the inverse problem-estimation of neuronal activity from multimodal non-invasive imaging data.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574309

  15. Relationship of species-specific filament levels to filamentous bulking in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jiangying; Lou, Inchio; de los Reyes, Francis L

    2004-04-01

    To examine the relationship between activated-sludge bulking and levels of specific filamentous bacteria, we developed a statistics-based quantification method for estimating the biomass levels of specific filaments using 16S rRNA-targeted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. The results of quantitative FISH for the filament Sphaerotilus natans were similar to the results of quantitative membrane hybridization in a sample from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant. Laboratory-scale reactors were operated under different flow conditions to develop bulking and nonbulking sludge and were bioaugmented with S. natans cells to stimulate bulking. Instead of S. natans, the filament Eikelboom type 1851 became dominant in the reactors. Levels of type 1851 filaments extending out of the flocs correlated strongly with the sludge volume index, and extended filament lengths of approximately 6 x 10(8) micro m ml(-1) resulted in bulking in laboratory-scale and full-scale activated-sludge samples. Quantitative FISH showed that high levels of filaments occurred inside the flocs in nonbulking sludge, supporting the "substrate diffusion limitation" hypothesis for bulking. The approach will allow the monitoring of incremental improvements in bulking control methods and the delineation of the operational conditions that lead to bulking due to specific filaments. PMID:15066840

  16. KDR activating mutations in human angiosarcomas are sensitive to specific kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Antonescu, Cristina R; Yoshida, Akihiko; Guo, Tianhuo; Chang, Ning-En; Zhang, Lei; Agaram, Narasimhan P; Qin, Li-Xuan; Brennan, Murray F; Singer, Samuel; Maki, Robert G

    2009-09-15

    Angiosarcomas (AS) represent a heterogeneous group of malignant vascular tumors occurring not only in different anatomic locations but also in distinct clinical settings, such as radiation or associated chronic lymphedema. Although representing only 1% to 2% of soft tissue sarcomas, vascular sarcomas provide unique insight into the general process of tumor angiogenesis. However, no molecular candidates have been identified to guide a specific therapeutic intervention. By expression profiling, AS show distinct up-regulation of vascular-specific receptor tyrosine kinases, including TIE1, KDR, SNRK, TEK, and FLT1. Full sequencing of these five candidate genes identified 10% of patients harboring KDR mutations. A KDR-positive genotype was associated with strong KDR protein expression and was restricted to the breast anatomic site with or without prior exposure to radiation. Transient transfection of KDR mutants into COS-7 cells showed ligand-independent activation of the kinase, which was inhibited by specific KDR inhibitors. These data provide a basis for the activity of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-directed therapy in the treatment of primary and radiation-induced AS. PMID:19723655

  17. Instrument specific brain activation in sensorimotor and auditory representation in musicians.

    PubMed

    Gebel, B; Braun, Ch; Kaza, E; Altenmüller, E; Lotze, M

    2013-07-01

    Musicians show a remarkable ability to interconnect motor patterns and sensory processing in the somatosensory and auditory domains. Many of these processes are specific for the instrument used. We were interested in the cerebral and cerebellar representations of these instrument-specific changes and therefore applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in two groups of instrumentalists with different instrumental training for comparable periods (approximately 15 years). The first group (trumpet players) uses tight finger and lip interaction; the second (pianists as control group) uses only the extremities for performance. fMRI tasks were balanced for instructions (piano and trumpet notes), sensory feedback (keypad and trumpet), and hand-lip interaction on the trumpet. During fMRI, both groups switched between different devices (trumpet or keypad) and performance was combined with or without auditory feedback. Playing the trumpet without any tone emission or using the mouthpiece showed an instrument training-specific activation increase in trumpet players. This was evident for the posterior-superior cerebellar hemisphere, the dominant primary sensorimotor cortex, and the left Heschl's gyrus. Additionally, trumpet players showed increased activity in the bilateral Heschl's gyrus during actual trumpet playing, although they showed significantly decreased loudness while playing with the mouthpiece in the scanner compared to pianists. PMID:23454048

  18. Inhibitory activities of short linear motifs underlie Hox interactome specificity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baëza, Manon; Viala, Séverine; Heim, Marjorie; Dard, Amélie; Hudry, Bruno; Duffraisse, Marilyne; Rogulja-Ortmann, Ana; Brun, Christine; Merabet, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Hox proteins are well-established developmental regulators that coordinate cell fate and morphogenesis throughout embryogenesis. In contrast, our knowledge of their specific molecular modes of action is limited to the interaction with few cofactors. Here, we show that Hox proteins are able to interact with a wide range of transcription factors in the live Drosophila embryo. In this context, specificity relies on a versatile usage of conserved short linear motifs (SLiMs), which, surprisingly, often restrains the interaction potential of Hox proteins. This novel buffering activity of SLiMs was observed in different tissues and found in Hox proteins from cnidarian to mouse species. Although these interactions remain to be analysed in the context of endogenous Hox regulatory activities, our observations challenge the traditional role assigned to SLiMs and provide an alternative concept to explain how Hox interactome specificity could be achieved during the embryonic development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06034.001 PMID:25869471

  19. The Self-Specific Activation Receptor SLAM Family Is Critical for NK Cell Education.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shasha; Yang, Meixiang; Du, Juan; Li, Dan; Li, Zehua; Cai, Chenxu; Ma, Yuanwu; Zhang, Lianfeng; Tian, Zhigang; Dong, Zhongjun

    2016-08-16

    NK cell education, a term describing a process for NK cell acquisition of functional competence, is primarily achieved by self-MHC-I-specific inhibitory receptors. In this study, we have demonstrated that SLAM family receptors (SFRs) redundantly expressed on hematopoietic cells function as self-specific activation receptors critical for NK cell education. To overcome gene redundancy, we generated mice simultaneously lacking seven SFRs, revealing that NK-cell-mediated rejection of semi-allogeneic hematopoietic cells largely depended on the presence of SFRs on target cells. This stimulatory effect was determined by the presence of SFR-coupled adaptors; however, SFR-deficient mice displayed enhanced reactivity to hematopoietic cells. These findings demonstrate that SFRs endow NK cells with an ability to kill hematopoietic cells during the effector phase; however, the sustained engagement of SFRs can desensitize NK cell responses during an education process. Therefore, self-specific activating ligands may be "tolerogens" for NK cells, akin to self-antigens that induce T cell tolerance. PMID:27521267

  20. Specific marker of feigned memory impairment: The activation of left superior frontal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zi-Xiang; Xue, Li; Liang, Chun-Yu; Wang, Li-Li; Mei, Wei; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Hu

    2015-11-01

    Faking memory impairment means normal people complain lots of memory problems without organic damage in forensic assessments. Using alternative forced-choice paradigm, containing digital or autobiographical information, previous neuroimaging studies have indicated that faking memory impairment could cause the activation in the prefrontal and parietal regions, and might involve a fronto-parietal-subcortical circuit. However, it is still unclear whether different memory types have influence on faking or not. Since different memory types, such as long-term memory (LTM) and short-term memory (STM), were found supported by different brain areas, we hypothesized that feigned STM or LTM impairment had distinct neural activation mapping. Besides that, some common neural correlates may act as the general characteristic of feigned memory impairment. To verify this hypothesis, the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) combined with an alternative word forced-choice paradigm were used in this study. A total of 10 right-handed participants, in this study, had to perform both STW and LTM tasks respectively under answering correctly, answering randomly and feigned memory impairment conditions. Our results indicated that the activation of the left superior frontal gyrus and the left medial frontal gyrus was associated with feigned LTM impairment, whereas the left superior frontal gyrus, the left precuneus and the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) were highly activated while feigning STM impairment. Furthermore, an overlapping was found in the left superior frontal gyrus, and it suggested that the activity of the left superior frontal gyrus might be acting as a specific marker of feigned memory impairment. PMID:26479324

  1. An antenna-biased carboxylesterase is specifically active to plant volatiles in Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    He, Peng; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Yang, Ke; Li, Zhao-Qun; Dong, Shuang-Lin

    2015-09-01

    Odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs) in sensillar lymph are proposed to play important roles in the maintenance of the sensitivity of the olfactory sensilla, by timely degrading the odorants that have already fulfilled the activation of the odorant receptor (OR). Here we reported the cloning and characterization of an ODE gene (SexiCXE10) from the polyphagous insect pest Spodoptera exigua. SexiCXE10 is a carboxylesterase (CXE) gene, encoding a protein with 538 amino acid residues, and bearing typical characteristics of Carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE, EC 3.1.1.1.) gene family. Tissue-temporal expression pattern by qPCR revealed that the SexiCXE10 mRNA was highly antenna biased, and maintained at high level throughout the adult stage. Further fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated that SexiCXE10 mRNA signal was detected under sensilla basiconica and short and long sensilla trichodea. Finally, enzymatic study using purified recombinant enzyme showed that SexiCXE10 had high activity specifically for ester plant volatiles with 7-10 carbon atoms, while no activity was found with S. exigua sex pheromone components and plant volatiles with more carbon atoms. In addition, SexiCXE10 displayed lower activity at acidic pH (pH 5.0), while higher activity was found at neutral and alkaline conditions (pH 6.5-9.0). Our results suggest that SexiCXE10 may play an important role in the degradation of the host plant volatiles, and thus contributes to the high sensitivity of the olfactory system in S. exigua. Meanwhile, the CXE would be a potential target for developing behavioral antagonists and pesticides against S. exigua. PMID:26267057

  2. Tissue-specific promoters active in CD44+CD24-/low breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bauerschmitz, Gerd J; Ranki, Tuuli; Kangasniemi, Lotta; Ribacka, Camilla; Eriksson, Minna; Porten, Marius; Herrmann, Isabell; Ristimäki, Ari; Virkkunen, Pekka; Tarkkanen, Maija; Hakkarainen, Tanja; Kanerva, Anna; Rein, Daniel; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2008-07-15

    It has been proposed that human tumors contain stem cells that have a central role in tumor initiation and posttreatment relapse. Putative breast cancer stem cells may reside in the CD44(+)CD24(-/low) population. Oncolytic adenoviruses are attractive for killing of these cells because they enter through infection and are therefore not susceptible to active and passive mechanisms that render stem cells resistant to many drugs. Although adenoviruses have been quite safe in cancer trials, preclinical work suggests that toxicity may eventually be possible with more active agents. Therefore, restriction of virus replication to target tissues with tissues-specific promoters is appealing for improving safety and can be achieved without loss of efficacy. We extracted CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells from pleural effusions of breast cancer patients and found that modification of adenovirus type 5 tropism with the serotype 3 knob increased gene delivery to CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells. alpha-Lactalbumin, cyclo-oxygenase 2, telomerase, and multidrug resistance protein promoters were studied for activity in CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells, and a panel of oncolytic viruses was subsequently constructed. Each virus featured 5/3 chimerism of the fiber and a promoter controlling expression of E1A, which was also deleted in the Rb binding domain for additional tumor selectivity. Cell killing assays identified Ad5/3-cox2L-d24 and Ad5/3-mdr-d24 as the most active agents, and these viruses were able to completely eradicate CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells in vitro. In vivo, these viruses had significant antitumor activity in CD44(+)CD24(-/low)-derived tumors. These findings may have relevance for elimination of cancer stem cells in humans. PMID:18632604

  3. Linkage Specificity and Role of Properdin in Activation of the Alternative Complement Pathway by Fungal Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sarika; Specht, Charles A.; Huang, Haibin; Ostroff, Gary R.; Ram, Sanjay; Rice, Peter A.; Levitz, Stuart M.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fungal cell walls are predominantly composed of glucans, mannans, and chitin. Recognition of these glycans by the innate immune system is a critical component of host defenses against the mycoses. Complement, an important arm of innate immunity, plays a significant role in fungal pathogenesis, especially the alternative pathway (AP). Here we determine that the glycan monosaccharide composition and glycosidic linkages affect AP activation and C3 deposition. Furthermore, properdin, a positive regulator of the AP, contributes to these functions. AP activation by glycan particles that varied in composition and linkage was measured by C3a generation in serum treated with 10 mM EGTA and 10 mM Mg2+ (Mg-EGTA-treated serum) (AP specific; properdin functional) or Mg-EGTA-treated serum that lacked functional properdin. Particles that contained either β1→3 or β1→6 glucans or both generated large and similar amounts of C3a when the AP was intact. Blocking properdin function resulted in 5- to 10-fold-less C3a production by particulate β1→3 glucans. However, particulate β1→6 glucans generated C3a via the AP only in the presence of intact properdin. Interestingly, zymosan and glucan-mannan particles (GMP), which contain both β-glucans and mannans, also required properdin to generate C3a. The β1→4 glycans chitin and chitosan minimally activated C3 even when properdin was functional. Finally, properdin binding to glucan particles (GP) and zymosan in serum required active C3. Properdin colocalized with bound C3, suggesting that in the presence of serum, properdin bound indirectly to glycans through C3 convertases. These findings provide a better understanding of how properdin facilitates AP activation by fungi through interaction with the cell wall components. PMID:21878570

  4. Early organ-specific endothelial activation during hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    van Meurs, Matijs; Wulfert, Francis M; Knol, Ageeth J; De Haes, Ann; Houwertjes, Martin; Aarts, Leon P H J; Molema, Grietje

    2008-02-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is a complication of hemorrhagic shock (HS) and related to high morbidity and mortality. Interaction of activated neutrophils and endothelial cells is considered to play a prominent role in the pathophysiology of MODS. Insight in the nature and molecular basis of endothelial cell activation during HS can assist in identifying new rational targets for early therapeutic intervention. In this study, we examined the kinetics and organ specificity of endothelial cell activation in a mouse model of HS. Anesthetized male mice were subjected to controlled hemorrhage to a MAP of 30 mmHg. Mice were killed after 15, 30, 60, or 90 min of HS. After 90 min of hemorrhagic shock, a group of mice was resuscitated with 6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4. Untreated mice and sham shock mice that underwent instrumentation and 90 min of anesthesia without shock served as controls. Gene expression levels of inflammatory endothelial cell activation (P-selectin, E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1) and hypoxia-responsive genes (vascular endothelial growth factor and hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha) were quantified in kidney, liver, lung, brain, and heart tissue by quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, we examined a selection of these genes with regard to protein expression and localization using immunohistochemical analysis. Induction of inflammatory genes occurred early during HS and already before resuscitation. Expression of adhesion molecules was significantly induced in all organs, albeit to a different extent depending on the organ. Endothelial genes CD31 and VE-cadherin, which function in endothelial cell homeostasis and integrity, were not affected during the shock phase except for VE-cadherin in the liver, which showed increased mRNA levels. The rapid inflammatory activation was not paralleled by induction of hypoxia-responsive genes. This study demonstrated

  5. Cloning and characterization of a novel Athspr promoter specifically active in vascular tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Yang, Tao; Li, Xiaoying; Hao, Hongyan; Xu, Shengtao; Cheng, Wei; Sun, Yingli; Wang, Chongying

    2014-05-01

    The vascular system--xylem, phloem and the cambium--is essential for water supply, nutrient transport, and physical support in higher plants. Although it is known that vascular-specific gene expression is regulated by cis-acting regulatory sequences in promoters, it is largely unknown how many regulatory elements exist and what their roles are in promoters. To understand the regulatory elements of vascular-specific promoters and their roles in vascular development, a T-DNA insertion mutant showing delayed growth and diminished resistance to environmental stress was isolated using promoter trap strategy. The novel gene, Arabidopsis thaliana heat shock protein-related (Athspr), was cloned from Arabidopsis ecotype C24. Strong GUS (β-glucuronidase) staining in the original promoter trap line was found in the vascular tissues of all organs in the mutant. The Athspr promoter was cloned and fused with GUS and eGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) reporter genes to verify its vascular-specific expression in Arabidopsis. Further histochemical analysis in transgenic plants demonstrated a similar GUS expression pattern in the vascular tissues. In addition, ATHSPR-eGFP driven by Athspr promoter was observed in vascular bundles of the transgenic seedling roots. Finally, comparative analysis with promoter motifs from 37 genes involved in vascular development revealed that Athspr and all other promoters active in vascular tissues contained regulatory elements responding to phytohormones, light, biotic and abiotic stresses, as well as those regulating tissue-specific expression. These results demonstrated that the Athspr promoter has a vascular tissue-specific activity and Athspr may have multiple functions in vascular development and resistance against various stresses. PMID:24675528

  6. Tolerance induction in memory CD4 T cells requires two rounds of antigen-specific activation.

    PubMed

    David, Alexandria; Crawford, Frances; Garside, Paul; Kappler, John W; Marrack, Philippa; MacLeod, Megan

    2014-05-27

    A major goal for immunotherapy is to tolerize the immune cells that coordinate tissue damage in autoimmune and alloantigen responses. CD4 T cells play a central role in many of these conditions and improved antigen-specific regulation or removal of these cells could revolutionize current treatments. A confounding factor is that little is known about whether and how tolerance is induced in memory CD4 T cells. We used MHC class II tetramers to track and analyze a population of endogenous antigen-specific memory CD4 T cells exposed to soluble peptide in the absence of adjuvant. We found that such memory T cells proliferated and reentered the memory pool apparently unperturbed by the incomplete activation signals provided by the peptide. Upon further restimulation in vivo, CD4 memory T cells that had been previously exposed to peptide proliferated, provided help to primary responding B cells, and migrated to inflamed sites. However, these reactivated memory cells failed to survive. The reduction in T-cell number was marked by low expression of the antiapoptotic molecule B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) and increased expression of activated caspase molecules. Consequently, these cells failed to sustain a delayed-type hypersensitivity response. Moreover, following two separate exposures to soluble antigen, no T-cell recall response and no helper activity for B cells could be detected. These results suggest that the induction of tolerance in memory CD4 T cells is possible but that deletion and permanent removal of the antigen-specific T cells requires reactivation following exposure to the tolerogenic antigen. PMID:24821788

  7. Ion specific effects of alkali cations on the catalytic activity of HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Pokorná, Jana; Heyda, Jan; Konvalinka, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 protease (HIV-1 PR), an important therapeutic target for the treatment of AIDS, is one of the most well-studied enzymes. However, there is still much to learn about the regulation of the activity and inhibition of this key viral enzyme. Specifically, the mechanism of activation of HIV-1 PR from the viral polyprotein upon HIV maturation is still not understood. It has been suggested that external factors like pH or salt concentration might contribute to regulation of this crucial step in the viral life cycle. Recently, we analyzed the activity of HIV-1 PR in aqueous solutions of sodium and potassium chloride by experimental determination of enzyme kinetics and molecular dynamics simulations. We showed that the effect of salt concentration is cation-specific [Heyda et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2009 (11), 7599]. In this study, we extended this analysis for other alkali cations and found that the dependence of the initial velocity of peptide substrate hydrolysis on the nature of the cation follows the Hofmeister series, with the exception of caesium. Significantly higher catalytic efficiencies both in terms of substrate binding (K(M)) and turnover number (kcat) are observed in the presence of K+ compared to Na+ or Li+ at corresponding salt concentrations. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that both lithium and sodium are attracted more strongly than potassium and caesium to the protein surface, mostly due to stronger interactions with carboxylate side chain groups of aspartates and glutamates. Furthermore, we observed a surprising decrease in the K(M) value for a specific substrate at very low salt concentration. The molecular mechanism of this phenomenon will be further analyzed. PMID:23795510

  8. Subtle Changes in Motif Positioning Cause Tissue-Specific Effects on Robustness of an Enhancer's Activity

    PubMed Central

    Erceg, Jelena; Saunders, Timothy E.; Girardot, Charles; Devos, Damien P.; Hufnagel, Lars; Furlong, Eileen E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Deciphering the specific contribution of individual motifs within cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) is crucial to understanding how gene expression is regulated and how this process is affected by sequence variation. But despite vast improvements in the ability to identify where transcription factors (TFs) bind throughout the genome, we are limited in our ability to relate information on motif occupancy to function from sequence alone. Here, we engineered 63 synthetic CRMs to systematically assess the relationship between variation in the content and spacing of motifs within CRMs to CRM activity during development using Drosophila transgenic embryos. In over half the cases, very simple elements containing only one or two types of TF binding motifs were capable of driving specific spatio-temporal patterns during development. Different motif organizations provide different degrees of robustness to enhancer activity, ranging from binary on-off responses to more subtle effects including embryo-to-embryo and within-embryo variation. By quantifying the effects of subtle changes in motif organization, we were able to model biophysical rules that explain CRM behavior and may contribute to the spatial positioning of CRM activity in vivo. For the same enhancer, the effects of small differences in motif positions varied in developmentally related tissues, suggesting that gene expression may be more susceptible to sequence variation in one tissue compared to another. This result has important implications for human eQTL studies in which many associated mutations are found in cis-regulatory regions, though the mechanism for how they affect tissue-specific gene expression is often not understood. PMID:24391522

  9. Effects of exogenous corticosterone treatment on alloantigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity in mice.

    PubMed

    DeKrey, G K; Kerkvliet, N I

    1995-05-01

    The intent of this study was to examine the effects of stress-like plasma corticosterone (CS) elevation on the generation of alloantigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity in mice. Elevation of plasma CS was achieved by infusion of exogenous CS via osmotic pumps. CS infusion at 16 mg/kg/day on days -4 through 10 relative to alloantigen challenge led to slight, but significant, suppression of CTL activity on day 10 but no elevation of plasma CS levels. Infusion of lower CS doses (1, 2, 4 or 8 mg/kg/day) had no effect on CTL activity. Serial sampling of mice infused with CS at 0.09, 0.9 or 9 mg/kg/day over a 14-day period indicated that only the 9 mg/kg/day infusion rate caused significant plasma CS elevation. Peak CS levels (approximately 500 ng/ml) were observed 1 day after the start of CS infusion, but CS levels fell to below 200 ng/ml by day 7 and were approximately 50 ng/ml on day 12 indicating that elevated plasma CS levels could not be maintained for extended periods by CS infusion. An attempt to define the windows of CS sensitivity during CTL development was made by infusing mice with CS at doses of 10-16 mg/kg/day on days 0-3, 3-6, 4-7, 5-8 and 6-9, relative to alloantigen challenge; however, CS infusion had no effect on CTL activity. In contrast, dexamethasone infusion (9.4 mg/kg/day) on days 0 to 3 suppressed CTL activity by approximately 90% indicating that the generation of CTL activity is sensitive to high dose GC treatment, but is refractory to stress-like CS elevation. In mixed lymphocyte-tumor cell cultures, CTL activity was suppressed by CS (2.5 x 10(-8) M) if added on the first day of culture but not if added on subsequent days. These results suggest that CTL are most sensitive to CS-induced suppression if exposed near to the time of alloantigen challenge. PMID:7752086

  10. Research activities at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology for the regional ionospheric specification and forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouya, Zahra; Terkildsen, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The Australian Space Forecast Centre (ASFC) provides space weather forecasts to a diverse group of customers. Space Weather Services (SWS) within the Australian Bureau of Meteorology is focussed both on developing tailored products and services for the key customer groups, and supporting ASFC operations. Research in SWS is largely centred on the development of data-driven models using a range of solar-terrestrial data. This paper will cover some data requirements , approaches and recent SWS activities for data driven modelling with a focus on the regional Ionospheric specification and forecasting.

  11. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) Product Specification Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassy, Joe; Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas; Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project.

  12. Target design considerations for high specific activity [{sup 11}C]O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Alexoff, D.L.; Schlyer, D.J.; McDonald, K.; Wolf, A.P.

    1993-12-31

    In the routine preparation of {sup 11}C-labeled compounds through N-[{sup 11}C]-methylation using [{sup 11}C]H{sub 3}I, total masses are always higher than synthesis mass contribution, suggesting that the target system contributes carrier carbon to the final product mass. This conclusion prompted this evaluation of target materials and target design for [{sup 11}C]O{sub 2} production. Ultimately, one is faced with the sprospect of compromising between [{sup 11}C]O{sub 2} specific activity and the amount that can be extracted from the target after a reasonable irradiation time.

  13. 41 CFR 102-75.130 - If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Utilization of Excess Real Property Title Report § 102-75.130 If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report? If hazardous... activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title...

  14. 41 CFR 102-75.130 - If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Utilization of Excess Real Property Title Report § 102-75.130 If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report? If hazardous... activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title...

  15. 41 CFR 102-75.130 - If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Utilization of Excess Real Property Title Report § 102-75.130 If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report? If hazardous... activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title...

  16. 41 CFR 102-75.130 - If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Utilization of Excess Real Property Title Report § 102-75.130 If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report? If hazardous... activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title...

  17. 41 CFR 102-75.130 - If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Utilization of Excess Real Property Title Report § 102-75.130 If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report? If hazardous... activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title...

  18. Crosstalk among electrical activity, trophic factors and morphogenetic proteins in the regulation of neurotransmitter phenotype specification.

    PubMed

    Borodinsky, Laura N; Belgacem, Yesser H

    2016-04-01

    Morphogenetic proteins are responsible for patterning the embryonic nervous system by enabling cell proliferation that will populate all the neural structures and by specifying neural progenitors that imprint different identities in differentiating neurons. The adoption of specific neurotransmitter phenotypes is crucial for the progression of neuronal differentiation, enabling neurons to connect with each other and with target tissues. Preliminary neurotransmitter specification originates from morphogen-driven neural progenitor specification through the combinatorial expression of transcription factors according to morphogen concentration gradients, which progressively restrict the identity that born neurons adopt. However, neurotransmitter phenotype is not immutable, instead trophic factors released from target tissues and environmental stimuli change expression of neurotransmitter-synthesizing enzymes and specific vesicular transporters modifying neuronal neurotransmitter identity. Here we review studies identifying the mechanisms of catecholaminergic, GABAergic, glutamatergic, cholinergic and serotonergic early specification and of the plasticity of these neurotransmitter phenotypes during development and in the adult nervous system. The emergence of spontaneous electrical activity in developing neurons recruits morphogenetic proteins in the process of neurotransmitter phenotype plasticity, which ultimately equips the nervous system and the whole organism with adaptability for optimal performance in a changing environment. PMID:26686293

  19. Stage specific activity of synthetic antimalarial endoperoxides, N-89 and N-251, against Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masayuki; Koyama, Takahiko; Sanai, Hitomi; Sato, Akira; Hiramoto, Akiko; Masuyama, Araki; Nojima, Masatomo; Wataya, Yusuke; Kim, Hye-Sook

    2015-02-01

    We have reported that two endoperoxides, N-89 and N-251, synthesized in 2001, possess potent antimalarial activities. Aiming at their eventual use for curing malaria in humans, we have been investigating various aspects of their antimalarial actions. Here we show that N-89 and N-251 inhibit the growth of Plasmodium falciparum within human erythrocytes in vitro at its lifecycle stage 'trophozoite' specifically. It is known that artemisinin compounds, which are currently used for curing malaria, have other stage-specificities. Therefore, it is likely that the antimalarial mechanism of N-89 and N-251 differs from those of artemisinin compounds. As malaria parasites resistant to artemisinin-based combination therapy are currently emerging in some tropical regions, N-89 and N-251 are candidates for overcoming these new problems. PMID:25449979

  20. Versatile strategy for controlling the specificity and activity of engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jennifer S Y; Kim, Ji Young; Kazane, Stephanie A; Choi, Sei-Hyun; Yun, Hwa Young; Kim, Min Soo; Rodgers, David T; Pugh, Holly M; Singer, Oded; Sun, Sophie B; Fonslow, Bryan R; Kochenderfer, James N; Wright, Timothy M; Schultz, Peter G; Young, Travis S; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Cao, Yu

    2016-01-26

    The adoptive transfer of autologous T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has emerged as a promising cancer therapy. Despite impressive clinical efficacy, the general application of current CAR-T--cell therapy is limited by serious treatment-related toxicities. One approach to improve the safety of CAR-T cells involves making their activation and proliferation dependent upon adaptor molecules that mediate formation of the immunological synapse between the target cancer cell and T-cell. Here, we describe the design and synthesis of structurally defined semisynthetic adaptors we refer to as "switch" molecules, in which anti-CD19 and anti-CD22 antibody fragments are site-specifically modified with FITC using genetically encoded noncanonical amino acids. This approach allows the precise control over the geometry and stoichiometry of complex formation between CD19- or CD22-expressing cancer cells and a "universal" anti-FITC-directed CAR-T cell. Optimization of this CAR-switch combination results in potent, dose-dependent in vivo antitumor activity in xenograft models. The advantage of being able to titrate CAR-T-cell in vivo activity was further evidenced by reduced in vivo toxicity and the elimination of persistent B-cell aplasia in immune-competent mice. The ability to control CAR-T cell and cancer cell interactions using intermediate switch molecules may expand the scope of engineered T-cell therapy to solid tumors, as well as indications beyond cancer therapy. PMID:26759368

  1. ROS-activated anticancer prodrugs: a new strategy for tumor-specific damage

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiaohua; Gandhi, Varsha

    2013-01-01

    Targeting tumor cells is an important strategy to improve the selectivity of cancer therapies. With the advanced studies in cancer biology, we know that cancer cells are usually under increased oxidative stress. The high level of reactive oxygen species in cancer cells has been exploited for developing novel therapeutic strategies to preferentially kill cancer cells. Our group, amongst others, have used boronic acids/esters as triggers for developing ROS-activated anticancer prodrugs that target cancer cells. The selectivity was achieved by combining a specific reaction between boronates and H2O2 with the efficient masking of drug toxicity in the prodrug via boronates. Prodrugs activated via ferrocene-mediated oxidation have also been developed to improve the selectivity of anticancer drugs. We describe how the strategies of ROS-activation can be used for further development of new ROS-targeting prodrugs, eventually leading to novel approaches and/or combined technology for more efficient and selective treatment of cancers. PMID:22900465

  2. Highly sensitive assay for acetylcholinesterase activity and inhibition based on a specifically reactive photonic nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Li, Xuesong; Cui, Jiecheng; Li, Jian; Lan, Yue; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Hui; Li, Guangtao

    2014-09-10

    Assays for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with high sensitivity and high selectivity as well as facile manipulation have been urgently required in various fields. In this work, a reaction-based photonic strategy was developed for the efficient assay of AChE activity and inhibition based on the synergetic combination of the specific thiol-maleimide addition reaction with photonic porous structure. It was found that various applications including detection of AChE activity, measurement of the related enzymatic kinetics, and screening of inhibitors could be efficiently implemented using such strategy. Remarkably, the unique photonic nanostructure endows the constructed sensing platform with high sensitivity with a limit of detection (LOD) of 5 mU/mL for AChE activity, high selectivity, and self-reporting signaling. Moreover, the label-free solid film-based sensing approach described here has advantages of facile manipulation and bare-eye readout, compared with conventional liquid-phase methods, exhibiting promising potential in practical application for the AChE assay. PMID:25130420

  3. Penicillin V acylase from Pectobacterium atrosepticum exhibits high specific activity and unique kinetics.

    PubMed

    Avinash, V S; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; Suresh, C G; Pundle, Archana

    2015-08-01

    Penicillin V acylases (PVAs, E.C.3.5.11) belong to the Ntn hydrolase super family of enzymes that catalyze the deacylation of the side chain from phenoxymethyl penicillin (penicillin V). Penicillin acylases find use in the pharmaceutical industry for the production of semi-synthetic antibiotics. PVAs employ the N-terminal cysteine residue as catalytic nucleophile and are structurally and evolutionarily related to bile salt hydrolases (BSHs). Here, we report the cloning and characterization of a PVA enzyme from the Gram-negative plant pathogen, Pectobacterium atrosepticum (PaPVA). The enzyme was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli attaining a very high yield (250 mg/l) and a comparatively high specific activity (430 IU/mg). The enzyme showed marginally better pH and thermo-stability over PVAs characterized from Gram-positive bacteria. The enzyme also showed enhanced activity in presence of organic solvents and detergents. The enzyme kinetics turned out to be significantly different from that of previously reported PVAs, displaying positive cooperativity and substrate inhibition. The presence of bile salts had a modulating effect on PaPVA activity. Sequence analysis and characterization reveal the distinctive nature of these enzymes and underscore the need to study PVAs from Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25931393

  4. Activity and specificity of TRV-mediated gene editing in plants

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Zahir; Abul-faraj, Aala; Piatek, Marek; Mahfouz, Magdy M

    2015-01-01

    Plant trait engineering requires efficient targeted genome-editing technologies. Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)/ CRISPR associated (Cas) type II system is used for targeted genome-editing applications across eukaryotic species including plants. Delivery of genome engineering reagents and recovery of mutants remain challenging tasks for in planta applications. Recently, we reported the development of Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated genome editing in Nicotiana benthamiana. TRV infects the growing points and possesses small genome size; which facilitate cloning, multiplexing, and agroinfections. Here, we report on the persistent activity and specificity of the TRV-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 system for targeted modification of the Nicotiana benthamiana genome. Our data reveal the persistence of the TRV- mediated Cas9 activity for up to 30 d post-agroinefection. Further, our data indicate that TRV-mediated genome editing exhibited no off-target activities at potential off-targets indicating the precision of the system for plant genome engineering. Taken together, our data establish the feasibility and exciting possibilities of using virus-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 for targeted engineering of plant genomes. PMID:26039254

  5. ChIP-seq Accurately Predicts Tissue-Specific Activity of Enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Visel, Axel; Blow, Matthew J.; Li, Zirong; Zhang, Tao; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Holt, Amy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Shoukry, Malak; Wright, Crystal; Chen, Feng; Afzal, Veena; Ren, Bing; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2009-02-01

    A major yet unresolved quest in decoding the human genome is the identification of the regulatory sequences that control the spatial and temporal expression of genes. Distant-acting transcriptional enhancers are particularly challenging to uncover since they are scattered amongst the vast non-coding portion of the genome. Evolutionary sequence constraint can facilitate the discovery of enhancers, but fails to predict when and where they are active in vivo. Here, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation with the enhancer-associated protein p300, followed by massively-parallel sequencing, to map several thousand in vivo binding sites of p300 in mouse embryonic forebrain, midbrain, and limb tissue. We tested 86 of these sequences in a transgenic mouse assay, which in nearly all cases revealed reproducible enhancer activity in those tissues predicted by p300 binding. Our results indicate that in vivo mapping of p300 binding is a highly accurate means for identifying enhancers and their associated activities and suggest that such datasets will be useful to study the role of tissue-specific enhancers in human biology and disease on a genome-wide scale.

  6. SRT1720, a SIRT1 specific activator, protected H2O2-induced senescent endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui-Lin; Lu, Zhao-Yang; Huang, Jing-Juan; Qi, Jia; Hu, An; Su, Zhi-Xiao; Zhang, Lan; Li, Yue; Shi, Yi-Qin; Hao, Chang-Ning; Duan, Jun-Li

    2016-01-01

    Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) plays a critical role in maintaining vascular homeostasis via modulating senescent-related signal pathway, however, the molecular mechanism remains modest clarified. The purpose of this study was to examine whether SIRT1 specific activator SRT1720 would exhibit pro-angiogenic and anti-aging properties in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced endothelial senescence, and determine the underlying mechanisms. We pre-treated senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with SRT1720, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity, apoptosis, migration, tube formation, proliferation and angiogenic factors were quantitatively examined. The results revealed that pharmacologic activation of SIRT1 by SRT1720 rescued apoptotic HUVECs and upregulated angiogenic response through reinforcing the protein expressions of angiogenic and survival factors in vitro. Furthermore, we confirmed that the expressions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and phosphoryl-Akt were augmented in SRT1720-treated senescent HUVECs. In conclusion, our data indicated that SRT1720 could protect against endothelial senescence and maintain cell function via Akt/eNOS/VEGF axis. PMID:27508009

  7. SRT1720, a SIRT1 specific activator, protected H2O2-induced senescent endothelium.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui-Lin; Lu, Zhao-Yang; Huang, Jing-Juan; Qi, Jia; Hu, An; Su, Zhi-Xiao; Zhang, Lan; Li, Yue; Shi, Yi-Qin; Hao, Chang-Ning; Duan, Jun-Li

    2016-01-01

    Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) plays a critical role in maintaining vascular homeostasis via modulating senescent-related signal pathway, however, the molecular mechanism remains modest clarified. The purpose of this study was to examine whether SIRT1 specific activator SRT1720 would exhibit pro-angiogenic and anti-aging properties in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced endothelial senescence, and determine the underlying mechanisms. We pre-treated senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with SRT1720, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity, apoptosis, migration, tube formation, proliferation and angiogenic factors were quantitatively examined. The results revealed that pharmacologic activation of SIRT1 by SRT1720 rescued apoptotic HUVECs and upregulated angiogenic response through reinforcing the protein expressions of angiogenic and survival factors in vitro. Furthermore, we confirmed that the expressions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and phosphoryl-Akt were augmented in SRT1720-treated senescent HUVECs. In conclusion, our data indicated that SRT1720 could protect against endothelial senescence and maintain cell function via Akt/eNOS/VEGF axis. PMID:27508009

  8. Stimulus-specific adaptation in the inferior colliculus of the mouse: anesthesia and spontaneous activity effects.

    PubMed

    Duque, Daniel; Malmierca, Manuel S

    2015-11-01

    Rapid behavioral responses to unexpected events in the acoustic environment are critical for survival. Stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA) is the process whereby some auditory neurons respond better to rare stimuli than to repetitive stimuli. Most experiments on SSA have been performed under anesthesia, and it is unknown if SSA sensitivity is altered by the anesthetic agent. Only a direct comparison can answer this question. Here, we recorded extracellular single units in the inferior colliculus of awake and anesthetized mice under an oddball paradigm that elicits SSA. Our results demonstrate that SSA is similar, but not identical, in the awake and anesthetized preparations. The differences are mostly due to the higher spontaneous activity observed in the awake animals, which also revealed a high incidence of inhibitory receptive fields. We conclude that SSA is not an artifact of anesthesia and that spontaneous activity modulates neuronal SSA differentially, depending on the state of arousal. Our results suggest that SSA may be especially important when nervous system activity is suppressed during sleep-like states. This may be a useful survival mechanism that allows the organism to respond to danger when sleeping. PMID:25115620

  9. Specific activity of polypyrrole nanoparticulate immunoreagents: comparison of surface chemistry and immobilization options.

    PubMed

    Pope, M R; Armes, S P; Tarcha, P J

    1996-01-01

    Polypyrrole-based colloids with differing surface chemistries were compared with respect to the specific activity of immobilized antibody. Monoclonal antibody to the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was modified by incorporation of cystamine into the Fc-carbohydrate, followed by reduction with dithiothreitol resulting in the generation of 4.5 free thiols per IgG. The reduced IgG was added to clean, unmodified and surface-modified polypyrrole colloids. Functionalized colloids included carboxylate-modified polypyrrole, poly[pyrrole-co-1-(2-carboxyethyl) pyrrole]-silica composite, and amine forms of the carboxylated colloids. The amine-functionalized colloids were subsequently treated with sulfosuccinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate to provide thiol-reactive maleimide surface groups. Following the conjugation of IgG to the colloids, bound and soluble antibody activity was quantitated using a sequentially competitive immunoassay for hCG, based on an automated commercial hCG kit. The results indicated that all forms of polypyrrole retained the equivalence of between 12 and 33 micrograms of IgG activity/mg of colloidal solids, relative to the unmodified soluble IgG. PMID:8853457

  10. Synthesis and Evaluation of Potent KCNQ2/3-Specific Channel Activators.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Reed, Nicholas; Liu, Ruiting; Aizenman, Elias; Wipf, Peter; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2016-06-01

    KQT-like subfamily (KCNQ) channels are voltage-gated, noninactivating potassium ion channels, and their down-regulation has been implicated in several hyperexcitability-related disorders, including epilepsy, neuropathic pain, and tinnitus. Activators of these channels reduce the excitability of central and peripheral neurons, and, as such, have therapeutic utility. Here, we synthetically modified several moieties of the KCNQ2-5 channel activator retigabine, an anticonvulsant approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. By introducing a CF3-group at the 4-position of the benzylamine moiety, combined with a fluorine atom at the 3-position of the aniline ring, we generated Ethyl (2-amino-3-fluoro-4-((4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl)amino)phenyl)carbamate (RL648_81), a new KCNQ2/3-specific activator that is >15 times more potent and also more selective than retigabine. We suggest that RL648_81 is a promising clinical candidate for treating or preventing neurologic disorders associated with neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:27005699

  11. Phenotype Specific Analyses Reveal Distinct Regulatory Mechanism for Chronically Activated p53

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Jonathan M.; Menon, Suraj; Pérez-Mancera, Pedro A.; Tomimatsu, Kosuke; Bermejo-Rodriguez, Camino; Ito, Yoko; Chandra, Tamir; Narita, Masako; Lyons, Scott K.; Lynch, Andy G.; Kimura, Hiroshi; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya; Tavaré, Simon; Narita, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    The downstream functions of the DNA binding tumor suppressor p53 vary depending on the cellular context, and persistent p53 activation has recently been implicated in tumor suppression and senescence. However, genome-wide information about p53-target gene regulation has been derived mostly from acute genotoxic conditions. Using ChIP-seq and expression data, we have found distinct p53 binding profiles between acutely activated (through DNA damage) and chronically activated (in senescent or pro-apoptotic conditions) p53. Compared to the classical ‘acute’ p53 binding profile, ‘chronic’ p53 peaks were closely associated with CpG-islands. Furthermore, the chronic CpG-island binding of p53 conferred distinct expression patterns between senescent and pro-apoptotic conditions. Using the p53 targets seen in the chronic conditions together with external high-throughput datasets, we have built p53 networks that revealed extensive self-regulatory ‘p53 hubs’ where p53 and many p53 targets can physically interact with each other. Integrating these results with public clinical datasets identified the cancer-associated lipogenic enzyme, SCD, which we found to be directly repressed by p53 through the CpG-island promoter, providing a mechanistic link between p53 and the ‘lipogenic phenotype’, a hallmark of cancer. Our data reveal distinct phenotype associations of chronic p53 targets that underlie specific gene regulatory mechanisms. PMID:25790137

  12. Activity and specificity of TRV-mediated gene editing in plants.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zahir; Abul-Faraj, Aala; Piatek, Marek; Mahfouz, Magdy M

    2015-01-01

    Plant trait engineering requires efficient targeted genome-editing technologies. Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)/ CRISPR associated (Cas) type II system is used for targeted genome-editing applications across eukaryotic species including plants. Delivery of genome engineering reagents and recovery of mutants remain challenging tasks for in planta applications. Recently, we reported the development of Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated genome editing in Nicotiana benthamiana. TRV infects the growing points and possesses small genome size; which facilitate cloning, multiplexing, and agroinfections. Here, we report on the persistent activity and specificity of the TRV-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 system for targeted modification of the Nicotiana benthamiana genome. Our data reveal the persistence of the TRV- mediated Cas9 activity for up to 30 d post-agroinefection. Further, our data indicate that TRV-mediated genome editing exhibited no off-target activities at potential off-targets indicating the precision of the system for plant genome engineering. Taken together, our data establish the feasibility and exciting possibilities of using virus-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 for targeted engineering of plant genomes. PMID:26039254

  13. Gene-Specific Involvement of β-Oxidation in Wound-Activated Responses in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, M. Cruz; Martínez, Cristina; Buchala, Antony; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; León, José

    2004-01-01

    The coordinated induced expression of β-oxidation genes is essential to provide the energy supply for germination and postgerminative development. However, very little is known about other functions of β-oxidation in nonreserve organs. We have identified a gene-specific pattern of induced β-oxidation gene expression in wounded leaves of Arabidopsis. Mechanical damage triggered the local and systemic induction of only ACX1 among acyl-coenzyme A oxidase (ACX) genes, and KAT2/PED1 among 3-ketoacyl-coenzyme A thiolase (KAT) genes in Arabidopsis. In turn, wounding induced KAT5/PKT2 only systemically. Although most of the β-oxidation genes were activated by wound-related factors such as dehydration and abscisic acid, jasmonic acid (JA) induced only ACX1 and KAT5. Reduced expression of ACX1 or KAT2 genes, in transgenic plants expressing their corresponding mRNAs in antisense orientation, correlated with defective wound-activated synthesis of JA and with reduced expression of JA-responsive genes. Induced expression of JA-responsive genes by exogenous application of JA was unaffected in those transgenic plants, suggesting that ACX1 and KAT2 play a major role in driving wound-activated responses by participating in the biosynthesis of JA in wounded Arabidopsis plants. PMID:15141068

  14. Large, colorful, or noisy? Attribute- and modality-specific activations during retrieval of perceptual attribute knowledge.

    PubMed

    Kellenbach, M L; Brett, M; Patterson, K

    2001-09-01

    Position emission tomography was used to investigate whether retrieval of perceptual knowledge from long-term memory activates unique cortical regions associated with the modality and/or attribute type retrieved. Knowledge about the typical color, size, and sound of common objects and animals was probed, in response to written words naming the objects. Relative to a nonsemantic control task, all the attribute judgments activated similar left temporal and frontal regions. Visual (color, size) knowledge selectively activated the right posterior inferior temporal (PIT) cortex, whereas sound judgments elicited selective activation in the left posterior superior temporal gyrus and the adjacent parietal cortex. All of the attribute judgments activated a left PIT region, but color retrieval generated more activation in this area. Size judgments activated the right medial parietal cortex. These results indicate that the retrieval of perceptual semantic information activates not only a general semantic network, but also cortical areas specialized for the modality and attribute type of the knowledge retrieved. PMID:12467121

  15. Specific hunger- and satiety-induced tuning of guinea pig enteric nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Roosen, Lina; Boesmans, Werend; Dondeyne, Marjan; Depoortere, Inge; Tack, Jan; Vanden Berghe, Pieter

    2012-09-01

    Although hunger and satiety are mainly centrally regulated, there is convincing evidence that also gastrointestinal motor activity and hormone fluctuations significantly contribute to appetite signalling. In this study, we investigated how motility and enteric nerve activity are set by fasting and feeding. By means of video-imaging, we tested whether peristaltic activity differs in ex vivo preparations from fasted and re-fed guinea pigs. Ca(2+) imaging was used to investigate whether the feeding state directly alters neuronal activity, either occurring spontaneously or evoked by (an)orexigenic signalling molecules. We found that pressure-induced (2 cmH(2)O) peristaltic activity occurs at a higher frequency in ileal segments from re-fed animals (re-fed versus fasted, 6.12 ± 0.22 vs. 4.84 ± 0.52 waves min(-1), P = 0.028), even in vitro hours after death. Myenteric neuronal responses were tuned to the feeding status, since neurons in tissues from re-fed animals remained hyper-responsive to high K(+)-evoked depolarization (P < 0.001) and anorexigenic molecules (P < 0.001), while being less responsive to orexigenic ghrelin (P = 0.013). This illustrates that the feeding status remains ‘imprinted' ex vivo. We were able to reproduce this feeding state-related memory in vitro and found humoral feeding state-related factors to be implicated. Although the molecular link with hyperactivity is not entirely elucidated yet, glucose-dependent pathways are clearly involved in tuning neuronal excitability. We conclude that a bistable memory system that tunes neuronal responses to fasting and re-feeding is present in the enteric nervous system, increasing responses to depolarization and anorexigenic molecules in the re-fed state, while decreasing responses to orexigenic ghrelin. Unlike the hypothalamus, where specific cell populations sensitive to either orexigenic or anorexigenic molecules exist, the enteric feeding state-related memory system is present at the functional level

  16. Prolonged Activation of Virus-Specific CD8+T Cells after Acute B19 Infection

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen, causing erythema infectiosum, arthropathy, transient aplastic crisis, and intrauterine fetal death. The phenotype of CD8+ T cells in acute B19 infection has not been studied previously. Methods and Findings The number and phenotype of B19-specific CD8+ T cell responses during and after acute adult infection was studied using HLA–peptide multimeric complexes. Surprisingly, these responses increased in magnitude over the first year post-infection despite resolution of clinical symptoms and control of viraemia, with T cell populations specific for individual epitopes comprising up to 4% of CD8+ T cells. B19-specific T cells developed and maintained an activated CD38+ phenotype, with strong expression of perforin and CD57 and downregulation of CD28 and CD27. These cells possessed strong effector function and intact proliferative capacity. Individuals tested many years after infection exhibited lower frequencies of B19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, typically 0.05%–0.5% of CD8+ T cells, which were perforin, CD38, and CCR7 low. Conclusion This is the first example to our knowledge of an “acute” human viral infection inducing a persistent activated CD8+ T cell response. The likely explanation—analogous to that for cytomegalovirus infection—is that this persistent response is due to low-level antigen exposure. CD8+ T cells may contribute to the long-term control of this significant pathogen and should be considered during vaccine development. PMID:16253012

  17. Specific detection of the cleavage activity of mycobacterial enzymes using a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, Morten Leth; Harmsen, Charlotte; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping

    2015-12-01

    We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes.We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization of the QD-based DNA Nanosensor. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06326d

  18. NFκB-inducing kinase inhibits NFκB activity specifically in neurons of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xianrong; Phanavanh, Bounleut; Hamdan, Hamdan; Moerman-Herzog, Andréa M; Barger, Steven W

    2016-04-01

    The control of NFκB in CNS neurons appears to differ from that in other cell types. Studies have reported induction of NFκB in neuronal cultures and immunostaining in vivo, but others have consistently detected little or no transcriptional activation by NFκB in brain neurons. To test if neurons lack some component of the signal transduction system for NFκB activation, we transfected cortical neurons with several members of this signaling system along with a luciferase-based NFκB-reporter plasmid; RelA was cotransfected in some conditions. No component of the NFκB pathway was permissive for endogenous NFκB activity, and none stimulated the activity of exogenous RelA. Surprisingly, however, the latter was inhibited by cotransfection of NFκB-inducing kinase (NIK). Fluorescence imaging of RelA indicated that co-expression of NIK sequestered RelA in the cytoplasm, similar to the effect of IκBα. NIK-knockout mice showed elevated expression of an NFκB-reporter construct in neurons in vivo. Cortical neurons cultured from NIK-knockout mice showed elevated expression of an NFκB-reporter transgene. Consistent with data from other cell types, a C-terminal fragment of NIK suppressed RelA activity in astrocytes as well as neurons. Therefore, the inhibitory ability of the NIK C-terminus was unbiased with regard to cell type. However, inhibition of NFκB by full-length NIK is a novel outcome that appears to be specific to CNS neurons. This has implications for unique aspects of transcription in the CNS, perhaps relevant to aspects of development, neuroplasticity, and neuroinflammation. Full-length NIK was found to inhibit (down arrow) transcriptional activation of NFκB in neurons, while it elevated (up arrow) activity in astrocytes. Deletion constructs corresponding to the N-terminus or C-terminus also inhibited NFκB in neurons, while only the C-terminus did so in astrocytes. One possible explanation is that the inhibition in neurons occurs via two different

  19. Altered host behaviour and brain serotonergic activity caused by acanthocephalans: evidence for specificity

    PubMed Central

    Tain, Luke; Perrot-Minnot, Marie-Jeanne; Cézilly, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Manipulative parasites can alter the phenotype of intermediate hosts in various ways. However, it is unclear whether such changes are just by-products of infection or adaptive and enhance transmission to the final host. Here, we show that the alteration of serotonergic activity is functionally linked to the alteration of specific behaviour in the amphipod Gammarus pulex infected with acanthocephalan parasites. Pomphorhynchus laevis and, to a lesser extent, Pomphorhynchus tereticollis altered phototactism, but not geotactism, in G. pulex, whereas the reverse was true for Polymorphus minutus. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) injected to uninfected G. pulex mimicked the altered phototactism, but had no effect on geotactism. Photophilic G. pulex infected with P. laevis or P. tereticollis showed a 40% increase in brain 5-HT immunoreactivity compared to photophobic, uninfected individuals. In contrast, brain 5-HT immunoreactivity did not differ between P. minutus-infected and uninfected G. pulex. Finally, brain 5-HT immunoreactivity differed significantly among P. tereticollis-infected individuals in accordance with their degree of manipulation. Our results demonstrate that altered 5-HT activity is not the mere consequence of infection by acanthocephalans but is specifically linked to the disruption of host photophobic behaviour, whereas the alteration of other behaviours such as geotactism may rely on distinct physiological routes. PMID:17015346

  20. Distinct sequence elements control the specificity of G protein activation by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Lechleiter, J; Hellmiss, R; Duerson, K; Ennulat, D; David, N; Clapham, D; Peralta, E

    1990-01-01

    Relatively little is understood concerning the mechanisms by which subtypes of receptors, G proteins and effector enzymes interact to transduce specific signals. Through expression of normal, hybrid and deletion mutant receptors in Xenopus oocytes, we determined the G protein coupling characteristics of the functionally distinct m2 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtypes and identified the critical receptor sequences responsible for G protein specificity. Activation of a pertussis toxin insensitive G protein pathway, leading to a rapid and transient release of intracellular Ca2+ characteristic of the m3 receptor, could be specified by the transfer of as few as nine amino acids from the m3 to the m2 receptor. In a reciprocal manner, transfer of no more than 21 residues from the m2 to the m3 receptor was sufficient to specify activation of a pertussis toxin sensitive G protein coupled to a slow and oscillatory Ca2+ release pathway typical of the m2 subtype. Notably, these critical residues occur within the same region of the third cytoplasmic domain of functionally distinct mAChR subtypes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2124972

  1. Shh and ZRS enhancer colocalisation is specific to the zone of polarising activity.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Iain; Lettice, Laura A; Hill, Robert E; Bickmore, Wendy A

    2016-08-15

    Limb-specific Shh expression is regulated by the (∼1 Mb distant) ZRS enhancer. In the mouse, limb bud-restricted spatiotemporal Shh expression occurs from ∼E10 to E11.5 at the distal posterior margin and is essential for correct autopod formation. Here, we have analysed the higher-order chromatin conformation of Shh in expressing and non-expressing tissues, both by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and by chromosome conformation capture (5C). Conventional and super-resolution light microscopy identified significantly elevated frequencies of Shh/ZRS colocalisation only in the Shh-expressing regions of the limb bud, in a conformation consistent with enhancer-promoter loop formation. However, in all tissues and at all developmental stages analysed, Shh-ZRS spatial distances were still consistently shorter than those to a neural enhancer located between Shh and ZRS in the genome. 5C identified a topologically associating domain (TAD) over the Shh/ZRS genomic region and enriched interactions between Shh and ZRS throughout E11.5 embryos. Shh/ZRS colocalisation, therefore, correlates with the spatiotemporal domain of limb bud-specific Shh expression, but close Shh and ZRS proximity in the nucleus occurs regardless of whether the gene or enhancer is active. We suggest that this constrained chromatin configuration optimises the opportunity for the active enhancer to locate and instigate the expression of Shh. PMID:27402708

  2. Unnatural amino acids increase activity and specificity of synthetic substrates for human and malarial cathepsin C.

    PubMed

    Poreba, Marcin; Mihelic, Marko; Krai, Priscilla; Rajkovic, Jelena; Krezel, Artur; Pawelczak, Malgorzata; Klemba, Michael; Turk, Dusan; Turk, Boris; Latajka, Rafal; Drag, Marcin

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian cathepsin C is primarily responsible for the removal of N-terminal dipeptides and activation of several serine proteases in inflammatory or immune cells, while its malarial parasite ortholog dipeptidyl aminopeptidase 1 plays a crucial role in catabolizing the hemoglobin of its host erythrocyte. In this report, we describe the systematic substrate specificity analysis of three cathepsin C orthologs from Homo sapiens (human), Bos taurus (bovine) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria parasite). Here, we present a new approach with a tailored fluorogenic substrate library designed and synthesized to probe the S1 and S2 pocket preferences of these enzymes with both natural and a broad range of unnatural amino acids. Our approach identified very efficiently hydrolyzed substrates containing unnatural amino acids, which resulted in the design of significantly better substrates than those previously known. Additionally, in this study significant differences in terms of the structures of optimal substrates for human and malarial orthologs are important from the therapeutic point of view. These data can be also used for the design of specific inhibitors or activity-based probes. PMID:24381006

  3. Deep brain optical measurements of cell type–specific neural activity in behaving mice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guohong; Jun, Sang Beom; Jin, Xin; Luo, Guoxiang; Pham, Michael D; Lovinger, David M; Vogel, Steven S; Costa, Rui M

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genetically encoded fluorescent sensors enable the monitoring of cellular events from genetically defined groups of neurons in vivo. In this protocol, we describe how to use a time-correlated single-photon counting (tcspc)–based fiber optics system to measure the intensity, emission spectra and lifetime of fluorescent biosensors expressed in deep brain structures in freely moving mice. When combined with cre-dependent selective expression of genetically encoded ca2+ indicators (GecIs), this system can be used to measure the average neural activity from a specific population of cells in mice performing complex behavioral tasks. as an example, we used viral expression of GcaMps in striatal projection neurons (spns) and recorded the fluorescence changes associated with calcium spikes from mice performing a lever-pressing operant task. the whole procedure, consisting of virus injection, behavior training and optical recording, takes 3–4 weeks to complete. With minor adaptations, this protocol can also be applied to recording cellular events from other cell types in deep brain regions, such as dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area. the simultaneously recorded fluorescence signals and behavior events can be used to explore the relationship between the neural activity of specific brain circuits and behavior. PMID:24784819

  4. Op18/Stathmin Mediates Multiple Region-Specific Tubulin and Microtubule-Regulating Activities

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Niklas; Segerman, Bo; Howell, Bonnie; Fridell, Kajsa; Cassimeris, Lynne; Gullberg, Martin

    1999-01-01

    Oncoprotein18/stathmin (Op18) is a regulator of microtubule (MT) dynamics that binds tubulin heterodimers and destabilizes MTs by promoting catastrophes (i.e., transitions from growing to shrinking MTs). Here, we have performed a deletion analysis to mechanistically dissect Op18 with respect to (a) modulation of tubulin GTP hydrolysis and exchange, (b) tubulin binding in vitro, and (c) tubulin association and MT-regulating activities in intact cells. The data reveal distinct types of region-specific Op18 modulation of tubulin GTP metabolism, namely inhibition of nucleotide exchange and stimulation or inhibition of GTP hydrolysis. These regulatory activities are mediated via two-site cooperative binding to tubulin by multiple nonessential physically separated regions of Op18. In vitro analysis revealed that NH2- and COOH-terminal truncations of Op18 have opposite effects on the rates of tubulin GTP hydrolysis. Transfection of human leukemia cells with these two types of mutants result in similar decrease of MT content, which in both cases appeared independent of a simple tubulin sequestering mechanism. However, the NH2- and COOH-terminal–truncated Op18 mutants regulate MTs by distinct mechanisms as evidenced by morphological analysis of microinjected newt lung cells. Hence, mutant analysis shows that Op18 has the potential to regulate tubulin/MTs by more than one specific mechanism. PMID:10491392

  5. Allopurinol reduces antigen-specific and polyclonal activation of human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mazliah, Damián; Albareda, María C.; Alvarez, María G.; Lococo, Bruno; Bertocchi, Graciela L.; Petti, Marcos; Viotti, Rodolfo J.; Laucella, Susana A.

    2012-01-01

    Allopurinol is the most popular commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor and it is widely used for treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Although, several anti-inflammatory actions of allopurinol have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, there have been few studies on the action of allopurinol on T cells. In the current study, we have assessed the effect of allopurinol on antigen-specific and mitogen-driven activation and cytokine production in human T cells. Allopurinol markedly decreased the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2-producing T cells, either after polyclonal or antigen-specific stimulation with Herpes Simplex virus 1, Influenza (Flu) virus, tetanus toxoid and Trypanosoma cruzi-derived antigens. Allopurinol attenuated CD69 upregulation after CD3 and CD28 engagement and significantly reduced the levels of spontaneous and mitogen-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in T cells. The diminished T cell activation and cytokine production in the presence of allopurinol support a direct action of allopurinol on human T cells, offering a potential pharmacological tool for the management of cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23049532

  6. Shh and ZRS enhancer colocalisation is specific to the zone of polarising activity

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Iain; Lettice, Laura A.; Hill, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Limb-specific Shh expression is regulated by the (∼1 Mb distant) ZRS enhancer. In the mouse, limb bud-restricted spatiotemporal Shh expression occurs from ∼E10 to E11.5 at the distal posterior margin and is essential for correct autopod formation. Here, we have analysed the higher-order chromatin conformation of Shh in expressing and non-expressing tissues, both by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and by chromosome conformation capture (5C). Conventional and super-resolution light microscopy identified significantly elevated frequencies of Shh/ZRS colocalisation only in the Shh-expressing regions of the limb bud, in a conformation consistent with enhancer-promoter loop formation. However, in all tissues and at all developmental stages analysed, Shh-ZRS spatial distances were still consistently shorter than those to a neural enhancer located between Shh and ZRS in the genome. 5C identified a topologically associating domain (TAD) over the Shh/ZRS genomic region and enriched interactions between Shh and ZRS throughout E11.5 embryos. Shh/ZRS colocalisation, therefore, correlates with the spatiotemporal domain of limb bud-specific Shh expression, but close Shh and ZRS proximity in the nucleus occurs regardless of whether the gene or enhancer is active. We suggest that this constrained chromatin configuration optimises the opportunity for the active enhancer to locate and instigate the expression of Shh. PMID:27402708

  7. Spinal segment-specific transcutaneous stimulation differentially shapes activation pattern among motor pools in humans.

    PubMed

    Sayenko, Dimitry G; Atkinson, Darryn A; Dy, Christine J; Gurley, Katelyn M; Smith, Valerie L; Angeli, Claudia; Harkema, Susan J; Edgerton, V Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury P

    2015-06-01

    Transcutaneous and epidural electrical spinal cord stimulation techniques are becoming more valuable as electrophysiological and clinical tools. Recently, we observed selective activation of proximal and distal motor pools during epidural spinal stimulation. In the present study, we hypothesized that the characteristics of recruitment curves obtained from leg muscles will reflect a relative preferential activation of proximal and distal motor pools based on their arrangement along the lumbosacral enlargement. The purpose was to describe the electrophysiological responses to transcutaneous stimulation in leg muscles innervated by motoneurons from different segmental levels. Stimulation delivered along the rostrocaudal axis of the lumbosacral enlargement in the supine position resulted in a selective topographical recruitment of proximal and distal leg muscles, as described by threshold intensity, slope of the recruitment curves, and plateau point intensity and magnitude. Relatively selective recruitment of proximal and distal motor pools can be titrated by optimizing the site and intensity level of stimulation to excite a given combination of motor pools. The slope of the recruitment of particular muscles allows characterization of the properties of afferents projecting to specific motoneuron pools, as well as to the type and size of the motoneurons. The location and intensity of transcutaneous spinal electrical stimulation are critical to target particular neural structures across different motor pools in investigation of specific neuromodulatory effects. Finally, the asymmetry in bilateral evoked potentials is inevitable and can be attributed to both anatomical and functional peculiarities of individual muscles or muscle groups. PMID:25814642

  8. Organ-specific systemic lupus erythematosus activity during pregnancy is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, Sara K; Guan, Hongshu; Fine, Alexander; Costenbader, Karen H; Bermas, Bonnie

    2016-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease of reproductive-age women, and thus questions regarding how disease influences pregnancy outcomes arise. We investigated whether five specific types of SLE activity during the 6 months before conception or during pregnancy (nephritis, cytopenias, skin disease, arthritis, serositis) were associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. We performed a retrospective cohort study of pregnancy outcomes among women with SLE at the Brigham and Women's Hospital Lupus Center. Adverse pregnancy outcomes included pre-eclampsia, pre-term delivery, elective termination due to SLE, spontaneous miscarriage at weeks 12-20, and stillbirth. SLE and obstetric history, laboratories, and medications were obtained from electronic medical records. Generalized linear mixed models adjusting for potential confounders were used to identify predictors of any adverse pregnancy outcome. Most pregnancies resulted in a live term delivery (76.5 %). After adjustment for Hispanic ethnicity, prior adverse pregnancy outcome and medication use 6 months before conception, nephritis during pregnancy (odds ratio (OR) 3.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.0-12.8), cytopenias during pregnancy (OR 3.9, 95 % CI 1.3-11.4), and serositis during pregnancy (OR 5.9, 95 % CI 1.0-34.0) were significantly associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Specific types of SLE disease activity during pregnancy were related to adverse pregnancy outcome. Nephritis, cytopenias, and serositis carried a higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcome, suggesting that these abnormalities should be carefully monitored during pregnancy. PMID:27166627

  9. Acyl carrier protein-specific 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase activates 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kyle C; Hoeferlin, L Alexis; Oleinik, Natalia V; Krupenko, Natalia I; Krupenko, Sergey A

    2010-01-15

    4'-Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTs) catalyze the transfer of 4'-phosphopantetheine (4-PP) from coenzyme A to a conserved serine residue of their protein substrates. In humans, the number of pathways utilizing the 4-PP post-translational modification is limited and may only require a single broad specificity PPT for all phosphopantetheinylation reactions. Recently, we have shown that one of the enzymes of folate metabolism, 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH), requires a 4-PP prosthetic group for catalysis. This moiety acts as a swinging arm to couple the activities of the two catalytic domains of FDH and allows the conversion of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate to tetrahydrofolate and CO2. In the current study, we demonstrate that the broad specificity human PPT converts apo-FDH to holoenzyme and thus activates FDH catalysis. Silencing PPT by small interfering RNA in A549 cells prevents FDH modification, indicating the lack of alternative enzymes capable of accomplishing this transferase reaction. Interestingly, PPT-silenced cells demonstrate significantly reduced proliferation and undergo strong G(1) arrest, suggesting that the enzymatic function of PPT is essential and nonredundant. Our study identifies human PPT as the FDH-modifying enzyme and supports the hypothesis that mammals utilize a single enzyme for all phosphopantetheinylation reactions. PMID:19933275

  10. The Polymerase Activity of Mammalian DNA Pol ζ Is Specifically Required for Cell and Embryonic Viability

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sabine S.; Tomida, Junya; Boulware, Karen S.; Bhetawal, Sarita; Wood, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase ζ (pol ζ) is exceptionally important for maintaining genome stability. Inactivation of the Rev3l gene encoding the polymerase catalytic subunit causes a high frequency of chromosomal breaks, followed by lethality in mouse embryos and in primary cells. Yet it is not known whether the DNA polymerase activity of pol ζ is specifically essential, as the large REV3L protein also serves as a multiprotein scaffold for translesion DNA synthesis via multiple conserved structural domains. We report that Rev3l cDNA rescues the genomic instability and DNA damage sensitivity of Rev3l-null immortalized mouse fibroblast cell lines. A cDNA harboring mutations of conserved catalytic aspartate residues in the polymerase domain of REV3L could not rescue these phenotypes. To investigate the role of REV3L DNA polymerase activity in vivo, a Rev3l knock-in mouse was constructed with this polymerase-inactivating alteration. No homozygous mutant mice were produced, with lethality occurring during embryogenesis. Primary fibroblasts from mutant embryos showed growth defects, elevated DNA double-strand breaks and cisplatin sensitivity similar to Rev3l-null fibroblasts. We tested whether the severe Rev3l-/- phenotypes could be rescued by deletion of DNA polymerase η, as has been reported with chicken DT40 cells. However, Rev3l-/- Polh-/- mice were inviable, and derived primary fibroblasts were as sensitive to DNA damage as Rev3l-/- Polh+/+ fibroblasts. Therefore, the functions of REV3L in maintaining cell viability, embryonic viability and genomic stability are directly dependent on its polymerase activity, and cannot be ameliorated by an additional deletion of pol η. These results validate and encourage the approach of targeting the DNA polymerase activity of pol ζ to sensitize tumors to DNA damaging agents. PMID:26727495

  11. Transgenic mice with a constitutively active aryl hydrocarbon receptor display a gender-specific bone phenotype.

    PubMed

    Wejheden, Carolina; Brunnberg, Sara; Larsson, Sune; Lind, P Monica; Lind, Pia M; Andersson, Göran; Hanberg, Annika

    2010-03-01

    Bone tissue homeostasis is governed by hormones, growth factors, and cytokines and can be distorted by environmental pollutants, such as ligands to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). A transgenic mouse expressing a constitutively active aryl hydrocarbon receptor (CA-AhR), mimicking continuous low-dose exposure to AhR ligands, was used to explore potential long-term effects of these ligands on bone. The density, content, and dimensions of cortical and trabecular bone, as well as physical properties, were significantly altered in female transgenic mice, while almost no alterations were detected in males. Osteoclast volume density and serum level of C-telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), reflecting osteoclast activity, were both increased by approximately 60% in female CA-AhR mice, while serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) 5b, reflecting osteoclast numbers, was unchanged. Subsequently, the resorption index (CTX/TRAP 5b) was increased by 90%, indicating increased osteoclast activity in female CA-AhR. Moreover, the protein level of the osteoclast collagenase cathepsin K was increased by 40% in bone extracts of female CA-AhR mice. The messenger RNA expression of several osteoclast- and osteoblast-associated genes was altered in female transgenic mice but not in males. Notably, early markers for osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation were normal, while the expression of functional markers of osteoclasts and osteoblasts were reduced. In conclusion, a low continuous activation of the AhR leads to a skeletal phenotype with increased bone resorption associated with more ductile bones in females but not in males. The results indicate the presence of an interaction between the AhR and a female-specific mechanism implicated in inhibition of osteoclast development and function. Female bone tissue appears more susceptible to dioxins and other AhR ligands than male bone tissue. PMID:19934163

  12. Active Components of Fungus Shiraia bambusiscola Can Specifically Induce BGC823 Gastric Cancer Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shubing; Qiu, Dewen; Liu, Jingjiang; Li, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Objective Gastric cancer is a major health issue worldwide. Using a therapeutic approach, with minor side-effects, is very essential for the treatment of the gastric cancer. Shiraia bambusicola is a parasitic fungus which is widely used in China for curing several diseases with little side-effects. However, the mechanisms are not well understood yet. The aim of this study was to further understand the pharmacological mechanisms of Shiraia bambusicola and investigate whether it can be used for curing gastric cancer. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we mainly tested the effect of active components extracted from Shiraia bambusicola on BGC823, A549 and HepG2 cells. We used MTT assay to test cell viability. We also analyzed morphologic changes caused by apoptosis using Hoechst 33342 fluorescence staining, as well as cell cycle status and apoptosis ratio using flow-cytometer. In addition, protein expression level was tested by Western-blotting assay. Results BGC-823 cell proliferation was specifically inhibited by active components of Shiraia bambusicola. Meanwhile, these active components could induce BGC-823 cells apoptosis and retard the cell cycle in S/G2 phase. We also determined that two critical protein markers cleaved Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), involved in apoptosis process, were regulated by these active components. Conclusion These data shed light on the treatment of human gastric cancer and conclude that Shiraia bambusicola can be a good therapeutic candidate for treatment of this malignancy. PMID:27540519

  13. Phosphatidylcholine-Specific Phospholipase C and Sphingomyelinase Activities in Bacteria of the Bacillus cereus Group

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantsev, A. P.; Kalnin, K. V.; Osorio, M.; Leppla, S. H.

    2003-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is nonhemolytic, even though it is closely related to the highly hemolytic Bacillus cereus. Hemolysis by B. cereus results largely from the action of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) and sphingomyelinase (SPH), encoded by the plc and sph genes, respectively. In B. cereus, these genes are organized in an operon regulated by the global regulator PlcR. B. anthracis contains a highly similar cereolysin operon, but it is transcriptionally silent because the B. anthracis PlcR is truncated at the C terminus. Here we report the cloning, expression, purification, and enzymatic characterization of PC-PLC and SPH from B. cereus and B. anthracis. We also investigated the effects of expressing PlcR on the expression of plc and sph. In B. cereus, PlcR was found to be a positive regulator of plc but a negative regulator of sph. Replacement of the B. cereus plcR gene by its truncated orthologue from B. anthracis eliminated the activities of both PC-PLC and SPH, whereas introduction into B. anthracis of the B. cereus plcR gene with its own promoter did not activate cereolysin expression. Hemolytic activity was detected in B. anthracis strains containing the B. cereus plcR gene on a multicopy plasmid under control of the strong B. anthracis protective antigen gene promoter or in a strain carrying a multicopy plasmid containing the entire B. cereus plc-sph operon. Slight hemolysis and PC-PLC activation were found when PlcR-producing B. anthracis strains were grown under anaerobic-plus-CO2 or especially under aerobic-plus-CO2 conditions. Unmodified parental B. anthracis strains did not demonstrate obvious hemolysis under the same conditions. PMID:14573681

  14. Novel Cycloheximide Derivatives Targeting the Moonlighting Protein Mip Exhibit Specific Antimicrobial Activity Against Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Rasch, Janine; Theuerkorn, Martin; Ünal, Can; Heinsohn, Natascha; Tran, Stefan; Fischer, Gunter; Weiwad, Matthias; Steinert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) and Mip-like proteins are virulence factors in a wide range of pathogens including Legionella pneumophila. These proteins belong to the FK506 binding protein (FKBP) family of peptidyl-prolyl-cis/trans-isomerases (PPIases). In L. pneumophila, the PPIase activity of Mip is required for invasion of macrophages, transmigration through an in vitro lung–epithelial barrier, and full virulence in the guinea pig infection model. Additionally, Mip is a moonlighting protein that binds to collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. Here, we describe the development and synthesis of cycloheximide derivatives with adamantyl moieties as novel FKBP ligands, and analyze their effect on the viability of L. pneumophila and other bacteria. All compounds efficiently inhibited PPIase activity of the prototypic human FKBP12 as well as Mip with IC50-values as low as 180 nM and 1.7 μM, respectively. Five of these derivatives inhibited the growth of L. pneumophila at concentrations of 30–40 μM, but exhibited no effect on other tested bacterial species indicating a specific spectrum of antibacterial activity. The derivatives carrying a 3,5-dimethyladamantan-1-[yl]acetamide substitution (MT_30.32), and a 3-ethyladamantan-1-[yl]acetamide substitution (MT_30.51) had the strongest effects in PPIase- and liquid growth assays. MT_30.32 and MT_30.51 were also inhibitory in macrophage infection studies without being cytotoxic. Accordingly, by applying a combinatorial approach, we were able to generate novel, hybrid inhibitors consisting of cycloheximide and adamantane, two known FKBP inhibitors that interact with different parts of the PPIase domain, respectively. Interestingly, despite the proven Mip-inhibitory activity, the viability of a Mip-deficient strain was affected to the same degree as its wild type. Hence, we also propose that cycloheximide derivatives with adamantyl moieties are potent PPIase inhibitors with multiple targets in L

  15. Phosphorylation regulates the water channel activity of the seed-specific aquaporin alpha-TIP.

    PubMed

    Maurel, C; Kado, R T; Guern, J; Chrispeels, M J

    1995-07-01

    The vacuolar membrane protein alpha-TIP is a seed-specific protein of the Major Intrinsic Protein family. Expression of alpha-TIP in Xenopus oocytes conferred a 4- to 8-fold increase in the osmotic water permeability (Pf) of the oocyte plasma membrane, showing that alpha-TIP forms water channels and is thus a new aquaporin. alpha-TIP has three putative phosphorylation sites on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane (Ser7, Ser23 and Ser99), one of which (Ser7) has been shown to be phosphorylated. We present several lines of evidence that the activity of this aquaporin is regulated by phosphorylation. First, mutation of the putative phosphorylation sites in alpha-TIP (Ser7Ala, Ser23Ala and Ser99Ala) reduced the apparent water transport activity of alpha-TIP in oocytes, suggesting that phosphorylation of alpha-TIP occurs in the oocytes and participates in the control of water channel activity. Second, exposure of oocytes to the cAMP agonists 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, which stimulate endogenous protein kinase A (PKA), increased the water transport activity of alpha-TIP by 80-100% after 60 min. That the protein can be phosphorylated by PKA was demonstrated by phosphorylating alpha-TIP in isolated oocyte membranes with the bovine PKA catalytic subunit. Third, the integrity of the three sites at positions 7, 23 and 99 was necessary for the cAMP-dependent increase in the Pf of oocytes expressing alpha-TIP, as well as for in vitro phosphorylation of alpha-TIP. These findings demonstrate that the alpha-TIP water channel can be modulated via phosphorylation of Ser7, Ser23 and Ser99.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7542585

  16. Foxi3 Deficiency Compromises Hair Follicle Stem Cell Specification and Activation.

    PubMed

    Shirokova, Vera; Biggs, Leah C; Jussila, Maria; Ohyama, Takahiro; Groves, Andrew K; Mikkola, Marja L

    2016-07-01

    The hair follicle is an ideal system to study stem cell specification and homeostasis due to its well characterized morphogenesis and stereotypic cycles of stem cell activation upon each hair cycle to produce a new hair shaft. The adult hair follicle stem cell niche consists of two distinct populations, the bulge and the more activation-prone secondary hair germ (HG). Hair follicle stem cells are set aside during early stages of morphogenesis. This process is known to depend on the Sox9 transcription factor, but otherwise the establishment of the hair follicle stem cell niche is poorly understood. Here, we show that that mutation of Foxi3, a Forkhead family transcription factor mutated in several hairless dog breeds, compromises stem cell specification. Further, loss of Foxi3 impedes hair follicle downgrowth and progression of the hair cycle. Genome-wide profiling revealed a number of downstream effectors of Foxi3 including transcription factors with a recognized function in hair follicle stem cells such as Lhx2, Runx1, and Nfatc1, suggesting that the Foxi3 mutant phenotype results from simultaneous downregulation of several stem cell signature genes. We show that Foxi3 displays a highly dynamic expression pattern during hair morphogenesis and cycling, and identify Foxi3 as a novel secondary HG marker. Absence of Foxi3 results in poor hair regeneration upon hair plucking, and a sparse fur phenotype in unperturbed mice that exacerbates with age, caused by impaired secondary HG activation leading to progressive depletion of stem cells. Thus, Foxi3 regulates multiple aspects of hair follicle development and homeostasis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1896-1908. PMID:26992132

  17. Fast and Specific Assessment of the Halogenating Peroxidase Activity in Leukocyte-enriched Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Jörg; Schwarz, Pauline; Bäcker, Ingo; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a protocol for the quick and standardized enrichment of leukocytes from small whole blood samples is described. This procedure is based on the hypotonic lysis of erythrocytes and can be applied to human samples as well as to blood of non-human origin. The small initial sample volume of about 50 to 100 µl makes this method applicable to recurrent blood sampling from small laboratory animals. Moreover, leukocyte enrichment is achieved within minutes and with low material efforts regarding chemicals and instrumentation, making this method applicable in multiple laboratory environments. Standardized purification of leukocytes is combined with a highly selective staining method to evaluate halogenating peroxidase activity of the heme peroxidases, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), i.e., the formation of hypochlorous and hypobromous acid (HOCl and HOBr). While MPO is strongly expressed in neutrophils, the most abundant immune cell type in human blood as well as in monocytes, the related enzyme EPO is exclusively expressed in eosinophils. The halogenating activity of these enzymes is addressed by using the almost HOCl- and HOBr-specific dye aminophenyl fluorescein (APF) and the primary peroxidase substrate hydrogen peroxide. Upon subsequent flow cytometry analysis all peroxidase-positive cells (neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils) are distinguishable and their halogenating peroxidase activity can be quantified. Since APF staining may be combined with the application of cell surface markers, this protocol can be extended to specifically address leukocyte sub-fractions. The method is applicable to detect HOCl and HOBr production both in human and in rodent leukocytes. Given the widely and diversely discussed immunological role of these enzymatic products in chronic inflammatory diseases, this protocol may contribute to a better understanding of the immunological relevance of leukocyte-derived heme peroxidases. PMID:27501318

  18. Variation in energy expenditure among black-legged kittiwakes: effects of activity-specific metabolic rates and activity budgets.

    PubMed

    Jodice, P G R; Roby, D D; Suryan, R M; Irons, D B; Kaufman, A M; Turco, K R; Visser, G H

    2003-01-01

    We sought to determine the effect of variation in time-activity budgets (TABs) and foraging behavior on energy expenditure rates of parent black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla). We quantified TABs using direct observations of radio-tagged adults and simultaneously measured field metabolic rates (FMR) of these same individuals (n=20) using the doubly labeled water technique. Estimated metabolic rates of kittiwakes attending their brood at the nest or loafing near the colony were similar (ca. 1.3 x basal metabolic rate [BMR]), although loafing during foraging trips was more costly (2.9 x BMR). Metabolic rates during commuting flight (7.3 x BMR) and prey-searching flight (6.2 x BMR) were similar, while metabolic rates during plunge diving were much higher (ca. 47 x BMR). The proportion of the measurement interval spent foraging had a positive effect on FMR (R2=0.68), while the combined proportion of time engaged in nest attendance and loafing near the colony had a negative effect on FMR (R2=0.72). Thus, more than two-thirds of the variation in kittiwake FMR could be explained by the allocation of time among various activities. The high energetic cost of plunge diving relative to straight flight and searching flight suggests that kittiwakes can optimize their foraging strategy under conditions of low food availability by commuting long distances to feed in areas where gross foraging efficiency is high. PMID:12905124

  19. Variation in energy expenditure among black-legged kittiwakes: Effects of activity-specific metabolic rates and activity budgets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jodice, P.G.R.; Roby, D.D.; Suryan, R.M.; Irons, D.B.; Kaufman, A.M.; Turco, K.R.; Visser, G.H.

    2003-01-01

    We sought to determine the effect of variation in time-activity budgets (TABs) and foraging behavior on energy expenditure rates of parent black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla). We quantified TABs using direct observations of radio-tagged adults and simultaneously measured field metabolic rates (FMR) of these same individuals (n = 20) using the doubly labeled water technique. Estimated metabolic rates of kittiwakes attending their brood at the nest or loafing near the colony were similar (ca. 1.3 x basal metabolic rate [BMR]), although loafing during foraging trips was more costly (2.9 x BMR). Metabolic rates during commuting flight (7.3 x BMR) and prey-searching flight (6.2 x BMR) were similar, while metabolic rates during plunge diving were much higher (ca. 47 x BMR). The proportion of the measurement interval spent foraging had a positive effect on FMR (R2 = 0.68), while the combined proportion of time engaged in nest attendance and loafing near the colony had a negative effect on FMR (R2 = 0.72). Thus, more than two-thirds of the variation in kittiwake FMR could be explained by the allocation of time among various activities. The high energetic cost of plunge diving relative to straight flight and searching flight suggests that kittiwakes can optimize their foraging strategy under conditions of low food availability by commuting long distances to feed in areas where gross foraging efficiency is high.

  20. Identification of orthologous target pairs with shared active compounds and comparison of organism-specific activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    A systematic search for active small molecules shared by orthologous targets was carried out, leading to the identification of 803 compound-based orthologous target pairs covering a total of 938 orthologues, 358 unique targets and 98 organisms. Many orthologous target pairs were found to have substantial compound coverage, enabling the introduction of an orthologous target pairs classification including 'organism cliffs' and 'potency-retaining' pairs. A total of 158 orthologous target pairs involving human orthologues were identified, which were typically associated with drug discovery-relevant targets, organism combinations and compound data. Orthologous target pairs with human orthologues included 83 potency-retaining orthologous target pairs covering a variety of targets and organisms. On the basis of these orthologous target pairs, the compound search was further extended and 1149 potent compounds were identified that only had reported activities for non-human orthologues of 48 therapeutic targets, but not their human counterparts, hence providing a large pool of candidate compounds for further evaluation. The complete set of orthologous target pairs identified in our analysis, the orthologous target pairs classification including associated data and all candidate compounds are made freely available. PMID:25931211

  1. Endurance exercise training induces fat depot-specific differences in basal autophagic activity.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Goki; Kato, Hisashi; Izawa, Tetsuya

    2015-10-23

    The purpose of this study was to uncover the effect of exercise training on the expression of autophagy marker proteins in epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT), inguinal WAT (iWAT), and the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) collected from eWAT. Male Wistar rats aged 4-5 weeks were randomly divided into two groups, sedentary control (n = 7) and exercise-trained (n = 7). Rats in the exercise-trained group were exercised on a treadmill set at a 5° incline 5 days/week for 9 weeks. We determined that the expression levels of an autophagosome-associating form of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II and of p62 were significantly higher in eWAT from exercise-trained than from control rats, while those of adipose-specific deletion of autophagy-related protein (ATG7) and lysosomal-associated membrane protein type 2A (LAMP2a) showed no difference between groups. However, in iWAT, the expression levels of LC3-II and ATG7 were significantly higher in exercise-trained than in control rats. The expression of p62 was highly correlated with that of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a master regulator of adipogenesis and lipid metabolism, in both WAT types (eWAT, r = 0.856, P < 0.05; iWAT, r = 0.762, P < 0.05), whereas LC3-II and PPARγ levels were highly correlated in eWAT (r = 0.765, P < 0.05) but not in iWAT (r = -0.306, ns). In SVF, the expression levels of LC3II, ATG7, and LAMP2a were significantly higher in exercise-trained than in control rats. These results suggest that exercise training suppresses basal autophagy activity in eWAT, but that this activity is enhanced in iWAT and SVF collected from eWAT. Thus, the adaptation of basal autophagic activity following exercise training exhibits fat depot-specific differences. PMID:26381175

  2. Active-R filter

    DOEpatents

    Soderstrand, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational amplifier-type active filter in which the only capacitor in the circuit is the compensating capacitance of the operational amplifiers, the various feedback and coupling elements being essentially solely resistive.

  3. Identification of lipase encoding genes from Antarctic seawater bacteria using degenerate primers: expression of a cold-active lipase with high specific activity.

    PubMed

    Parra, Loreto P; Espina, Giannina; Devia, Javier; Salazar, Oriana; Andrews, Barbara; Asenjo, Juan A

    2015-01-01

    Cold-active enzymes are valuable catalysts showing high activity at low and moderate temperatures and low thermostability. Among cold-active enzymes, lipases offer a great potential in detergent, cosmetic, biofuel and food or feed industries. In this paper we describe the identification of novel lipase coding genes and the expression of a lipase with high activity at low temperatures. The genomic DNA from Antarctic seawater bacteria showing lipolytic activity at 4°C was used to amplify five DNA fragments that partially encode novel lipases using specifically designed COnsensus-DEgenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primers (CODEHOP). All the fragments were found to have a high identity with an α/β-hydrolase domain-containing protein identified by the sequencing of the complete genome of Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400. The complete sequence of one of the lipase-coding gene fragments, lipE13, was obtained by genome walking. Considering that the other fragments had a high identity to the putative lipase from S. frigidimarina NCIMB 400, the complete lipase genes were amplified using oligonucleotide primers designed based on the 5' and 3' regions of the coding sequence of the related protein. This strategy allowed the amplification of 3 lipase-encoding genes of which one was expressed in the periplasm using the Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pET-22b(+) expression system. The recombinant protein was obtained with activity toward p-nitrophenyl caproate showing a high specific activity between 15 and 25°C. PMID:25435506

  4. 67-kDa laminin receptor-dependent protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activation elicits melanoma-specific antitumor activity overcoming drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Shuntaro; Huang, Yuhui; Umeda, Daisuke; Yamada, Shuhei; Yamashita, Shuya; Kumazoe, Motofumi; Kim, Yoonhee; Murata, Motoki; Yamada, Koji; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2014-11-21

    The Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway has been identified as a major, druggable regulator of melanoma. Mutational activation of BRAF is the most prevalent genetic alteration in human melanoma, resulting in constitutive melanoma hyperproliferation. A selective BRAF inhibitor showed remarkable clinical activity in patients with mutated BRAF. Unfortunately, most patients acquire resistance to the BRAF inhibitor, highlighting the urgent need for new melanoma treatment strategies. Green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) inhibits cell proliferation independently of BRAF inhibitor sensitivity, suggesting that increased understanding of the anti-melanoma activity of EGCG may provide a novel therapeutic target. Here, by performing functional genetic screening, we identified protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a critical factor in the suppression of melanoma cell proliferation. We demonstrated that tumor-overexpressed 67-kDa laminin receptor (67LR) activates PP2A through adenylate cyclase/cAMP pathway eliciting inhibitions of oncoproteins and activation of tumor suppressor Merlin. Activating 67LR/PP2A pathway leading to melanoma-specific mTOR inhibition shows strong synergy with the BRAF inhibitor PLX4720 in the drug-resistant melanoma. Moreover, SET, a potent inhibitor of PP2A, is overexpressed on malignant melanoma. Silencing of SET enhances 67LR/PP2A signaling. Collectively, activation of 67LR/PP2A signaling may thus be a novel rational strategy for melanoma-specific treatment. PMID:25294877

  5. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Canals, Isaac; Soriano, Jordi; Orlandi, Javier G.; Torrent, Roger; Richaud-Patin, Yvonne; Jiménez-Delgado, Senda; Merlin, Simone; Follenzi, Antonia; Consiglio, Antonella; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel; Raya, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration. PMID:26411903

  6. Activation and repression by oncogenic MYC shape tumour-specific gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Walz, Susanne; Lorenzin, Francesca; Morton, Jennifer; Wiese, Katrin E; von Eyss, Björn; Herold, Steffi; Rycak, Lukas; Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Karim, Saadia; Bartkuhn, Marek; Roels, Frederik; Wüstefeld, Torsten; Fischer, Matthias; Teichmann, Martin; Zender, Lars; Wei, Chia-Lin; Sansom, Owen; Wolf, Elmar; Eilers, Martin

    2014-07-24

    In mammalian cells, the MYC oncoprotein binds to thousands of promoters. During mitogenic stimulation of primary lymphocytes, MYC promotes an increase in the expression of virtually all genes. In contrast, MYC-driven tumour cells differ from normal cells in the expression of specific sets of up- and downregulated genes that have considerable prognostic value. To understand this discrepancy, we studied the consequences of inducible expression and depletion of MYC in human cells and murine tumour models. Changes in MYC levels activate and repress specific sets of direct target genes that are characteristic of MYC-transformed tumour cells. Three factors account for this specificity. First, the magnitude of response parallels the change in occupancy by MYC at each promoter. Functionally distinct classes of target genes differ in the E-box sequence bound by MYC, suggesting that different cellular responses to physiological and oncogenic MYC levels are controlled by promoter affinity. Second, MYC both positively and negatively affects transcription initiation independent of its effect on transcriptional elongation. Third, complex formation with MIZ1 (also known as ZBTB17) mediates repression of multiple target genes by MYC and the ratio of MYC and MIZ1 bound to each promoter correlates with the direction of response. PMID:25043018

  7. Body side-specific control of motor activity during turning in a walking animal

    PubMed Central

    Gruhn, Matthias; Rosenbaum, Philipp; Bockemühl, Till; Büschges, Ansgar

    2016-01-01

    Animals and humans need to move deftly and flexibly to adapt to environmental demands. Despite a large body of work on the neural control of walking in invertebrates and vertebrates alike, the mechanisms underlying the motor flexibility that is needed to adjust the motor behavior remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated optomotor-induced turning and the neuronal mechanisms underlying the differences between the leg movements of the two body sides in the stick insect Carausius morosus. We present data to show that the generation of turning kinematics in an insect are the combined result of descending unilateral commands that change the leg motor output via task-specific modifications in the processing of local sensory feedback as well as modification of the activity of local central pattern generating networks in a body-side-specific way. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the specificity of such modifications in a defined motor task. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13799.001 PMID:27130731

  8. Pyridinone derivatives: Specific human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors with antiviral activity

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M.E.; Nunberg, J.H.; O'Brien, J.A.; Quintero, J.C.; Schleif, W.A.; Freund, K.F.; Gaul, S.L.; Saari, W.S.; Wai, J.S.; Hoffman, J.M.; Anderson, P.S.; Emini, E.A.; Stern, A.M. ); Hupe, D.J. )

    1991-08-01

    Derivatives of pyridinones were found to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) activity and prevent the spread of HIV-1 infection in cell culture without an appreciable effect on other retroviral or cellular polymerases. 3-{l brace}((4,7-Dimethyl-1,3-benzoxazol-2-yl)methyl)amino{r brace}-5-ethyl-6-methylpyridin-2(1H)-one(L-679,639) and 3-{l brace}((4,7-dichloro-1,3-benzoxazol-2-yl)methyl)amino{r brace}-5-ethyl-6-methylpyridin-2(1H)-one (L-697,661), two compounds within this series, had HIV-1 RT IC{sub 50} values in the range of 20-800 nM, depending upon the template-primer used. The most potent inhibition was obtained with rC{center dot}dG, reversible slow-binding noncompetitive inhibition was observed. ({sup 3}H)L-697,639 bound preferentially to enzyme-template-primer complexes. This binding was magnesium-dependent and saturable with a stoichiometry of 1 mol of ({sup 3}H)L-697,639 per mol of RT heterodimer. Synergism between 3{prime}-azido-3{prime}-deoxythymidine or dideoxyinosine and either of these compounds was also demonstrated in cell culture. Based upon their specificity for HIV-1 RT activity, template-primer dependence on potency and ability to displace ({sup 3}H)L-697,639; a tetrahydroimidazo(4,5,1-jk)(1,4)-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione derivative R82150 and the dipyridodiazepinone BI-RG-587 appear to inhibit RT activity by the same mechanism as the pyridinones.

  9. Versatile strategy for controlling the specificity and activity of engineered T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jennifer S. Y.; Kim, Ji Young; Kazane, Stephanie A.; Choi, Sei-hyun; Yun, Hwa Young; Kim, Min Soo; Rodgers, David T.; Pugh, Holly M.; Singer, Oded; Sun, Sophie B.; Fonslow, Bryan R.; Kochenderfer, James N.; Wright, Timothy M.; Schultz, Peter G.; Young, Travis S.; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Cao, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of autologous T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has emerged as a promising cancer therapy. Despite impressive clinical efficacy, the general application of current CAR–T-cell therapy is limited by serious treatment-related toxicities. One approach to improve the safety of CAR-T cells involves making their activation and proliferation dependent upon adaptor molecules that mediate formation of the immunological synapse between the target cancer cell and T-cell. Here, we describe the design and synthesis of structurally defined semisynthetic adaptors we refer to as “switch” molecules, in which anti-CD19 and anti-CD22 antibody fragments are site-specifically modified with FITC using genetically encoded noncanonical amino acids. This approach allows the precise control over the geometry and stoichiometry of complex formation between CD19- or CD22-expressing cancer cells and a “universal” anti-FITC–directed CAR-T cell. Optimization of this CAR–switch combination results in potent, dose-dependent in vivo antitumor activity in xenograft models. The advantage of being able to titrate CAR–T-cell in vivo activity was further evidenced by reduced in vivo toxicity and the elimination of persistent B-cell aplasia in immune-competent mice. The ability to control CAR-T cell and cancer cell interactions using intermediate switch molecules may expand the scope of engineered T-cell therapy to solid tumors, as well as indications beyond cancer therapy. PMID:26759368

  10. Antinociceptive activity of NK1 receptor antagonists: non-specific effects of racemic RP67580.

    PubMed Central

    Rupniak, N. M.; Boyce, S.; Williams, A. R.; Cook, G.; Longmore, J.; Seabrook, G. R.; Caeser, M.; Iversen, S. D.; Hill, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    1. Release of substance P in the dorsal horn is considered a primary event in the perception of pain. The profile of racemic RP67580, a non-peptide antagonist at the NK1 (substance P) receptor, was examined in a range of antinociception tests on rodents. 2. At doses up to 30 mg kg-1, s.c. racemic RP67580 exhibited antinociceptive activity in writhing and formalin paw tests in mice and gerbils. Acetic acid induced writhing and the licking response to formalin were reduced to 40-50% of the level observed in vehicle-treated animals (P < 0.05). However, this agent was not active in mouse tail flick, rat paw pressure or rat and guinea-pig formalin paw tests. 3. Like racemic RP67580, the calcium channel blockers nifedipine (30 mg kg-1, i.p.) and verapamil (10 or 20 mg kg-1, s.c.) inhibited the response to formalin by approximately 60% in gerbils (P < 0.05 compared with vehicle-treated animals). 4. Evidence for calcium channel antagonist activity of RP67580 was obtained in vitro. Racemic RP67580 inhibited calcium entry into depolarized strips of guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus (apparent KB = 587 +/- 115 nM), inhibited [3H]-diltiazem binding to rabbit skeletal membranes (IC50 = 298 nM) and depressed high threshold calcium currents in neurones cultured from rat cortex (10% inhibition at 10 microM). 5. These findings indicate that the acute antinociceptive effects of RP67580 may not be attributable to a specific interaction with NK1 receptors and may be mediated via calcium channel blockade. PMID:8306108

  11. CpGB DNA activates dermal macrophages and specifically recruits inflammatory monocytes into the skin.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Allison L; Rice, Lisa; Affandi, Alsya J; DiMarzio, Michael; Rifkin, Ian R; Stifano, Giuseppina; Christmann, Romy B; Lafyatis, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) drives innate immune responses after recognition of foreign or endogenous DNA containing unmethylated CpG motifs. DNA-mediated TLR9 activation is highly implicated in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune skin diseases, yet its contribution to the inflammation seen in these diseases remains unclear. In this study, TLR9 ligand, CpGB DNA, was administered to mice via a subcutaneous osmotic pump with treatment lasting 1 or 4 weeks. Gene expression and immunofluorescence analyses were used to determine chemokine expression and cell recruitment in the skin surrounding the pump outlet. CpGB DNA skin treatment dramatically induced a marked influx of CD11b+ F4/80+ macrophages, increasing over 4 weeks of treatment, and induction of IFNγ and TNFα expression. Chemokines, CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10, were highly induced in CpGB DNA-treated skin, although abrogation of these signalling pathways individually did not alter macrophage accumulation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that TLR9 activation in the skin increased circulating CD11b+ CD115+ Ly6C(hi) inflammatory monocytes following 1 week of CpGB DNA treatment. Additionally, skin-resident CD11b+ cells were found to initially take up subcutaneous CpGB DNA and propagate the subsequent immune response. Using diphtheria toxin-induced monocyte depletion mouse model, gene expression analysis demonstrated that CD11b+ cells are responsible for the CpGB DNA-induced cytokine and chemokine response. Overall, these data demonstrate that chronic TLR9 activation induces a specific inflammatory response, ultimately leading to a striking and selective accumulation of macrophages in the skin. PMID:25425469

  12. Mitochondrial Complex 1 Activity Measured by Spectrophotometry Is Reduced across All Brain Regions in Ageing and More Specifically in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function, in particular complex 1 of the electron transport chain (ETC), has been shown to decrease during normal ageing and in neurodegenerative disease. However, there is some debate concerning which area of the brain has the greatest complex 1 activity. It is important to identify the pattern of activity in order to be able to gauge the effect of age or disease related changes. We determined complex 1 activity spectrophotometrically in the cortex, brainstem and cerebellum of middle aged mice (70–71 weeks), a cerebellar ataxic neurodegeneration model (pcd5J) and young wild type controls. We share our updated protocol on the measurements of complex1 activity and find that mitochondrial fractions isolated from frozen tissues can be measured for robust activity. We show that complex 1 activity is clearly highest in the cortex when compared with brainstem and cerebellum (p<0.003). Cerebellum and brainstem mitochondria exhibit similar levels of complex 1 activity in wild type brains. In the aged brain we see similar levels of complex 1 activity in all three-brain regions. The specific activity of complex 1 measured in the aged cortex is significantly decreased when compared with controls (p<0.0001). Both the cerebellum and brainstem mitochondria also show significantly reduced activity with ageing (p<0.05). The mouse model of ataxia predictably has a lower complex 1 activity in the cerebellum, and although reductions are measured in the cortex and brain stem, the remaining activity is higher than in the aged brains. We present clear evidence that complex 1 activity decreases across the brain with age and much more specifically in the cerebellum of the pcd5j mouse. Mitochondrial impairment can be a region specific phenomenon in disease, but in ageing appears to affect the entire brain, abolishing the pattern of higher activity in cortical regions. PMID:27333203

  13. Centrosome movements in vivo correlate with specific neurite formation downstream of LIM homeodomain transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Erica F; Halloran, Mary C

    2012-10-01

    Neurons must develop complex structure to form proper connections in the nervous system. The initiation of axons in defined locations on the cell body and their extension to synaptic targets are critical steps in neuronal morphogenesis, yet the mechanisms controlling axon formation in vivo are poorly understood. The centrosome has been implicated in multiple aspects of neuronal morphogenesis; however, its function in axon development is under debate. Conflicting results from studies of centrosome function in axonogenesis suggest that its role is context dependent and underscore the importance of studying centrosome function as neurons develop in their natural environment. Using live imaging of zebrafish Rohon-Beard (RB) sensory neurons in vivo, we discovered a spatiotemporal relationship between centrosome position and the formation of RB peripheral, but not central, axons. We tested centrosome function by laser ablation and found that centrosome disruption inhibited peripheral axon outgrowth. In addition, we show that centrosome position and motility are regulated by LIM homeodomain transcription factor activity, which is specifically required for the development of RB peripheral axons. Furthermore, we show a correlation between centrosome mislocalization and ectopic axon formation in bashful (laminin alpha 1) mutants. Thus, both intrinsic transcription factor activity and extracellular cues can influence centrosome position and axon formation in vivo. This study presents the first positive association between the centrosome and axon formation in vivo and suggests that the centrosome is important for differential neurite formation in neurons with complex axonal morphologies. PMID:22899847

  14. Substrate and Inhibitor Specificity of the Type II p21-Activated Kinase, PAK6

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jia; Ha, Byung Hak; Lou, Hua Jane; Morse, Elizabeth M.; Zhang, Rong; Calderwood, David A.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2013-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are important effectors of Rho-family small GTPases. The PAK family consists of two groups, type I and type II, which have different modes of regulation and signaling. PAK6, a type II PAK, influences behavior and locomotor function in mice and has an ascribed role in androgen receptor signaling. Here we show that PAK6 has a peptide substrate specificity very similar to the other type II PAKs, PAK4 and PAK5 (PAK7). We find that PAK6 catalytic activity is inhibited by a peptide corresponding to its N-terminal pseudosubstrate. Introduction of a melanoma-associated mutation, P52L, into this peptide reduces pseudosubstrate autoinhibition of PAK6, and increases phosphorylation of its substrate PACSIN1 (Syndapin I) in cells. Finally we determine two co-crystal structures of PAK6 catalytic domain in complex with ATP-competitive inhibitors. We determined the 1.4 Å co-crystal structure of PAK6 with the type II PAK inhibitor PF-3758309, and the 1.95 Å co-crystal structure of PAK6 with sunitinib. These findings provide new insights into the structure-function relationships of PAK6 and may facilitate development of PAK6 targeted therapies. PMID:24204982

  15. Inflammasome Activation Can Mediate Tissue-Specific Pathogenesis or Protection in Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Melehani, Jason H; Duncan, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive coccus that interacts with human hosts on a spectrum from quiet commensal to deadly pathogen. S. aureus is capable of infecting nearly every tissue in the body resulting in cellulitis, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, brain abscesses, bacteremia, and more. S. aureus has a wide range of factors that promote infection, and each site of infection triggers a different response in the human host. In particular, the different patterns of inflammasome activation mediate tissue-specific pathogenesis or protection in S. aureus infection. Although still a nascent field, understanding the unique host-pathogen interactions in each infection and the role of inflammasomes in mediating pathogenesis may lead to novel strategies for treating S. aureus infections. Reviews addressing S. aureus virulence and pathogenesis (Thammavongsa et al. 2015), as well as epidemiology and pathophysiology (Tong et al. 2015), have recently been published. This review will focus on S. aureus factors that activate inflammasomes and their impact on innate immune signaling and bacterial survival. PMID:27460814

  16. Tissue Specific Expression of Cre in Rat Tyrosine Hydroxylase and Dopamine Active Transporter-Positive Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenyi; Brown, Andrew; Fisher, Dan; Wu, Yumei; Warren, Joe; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    The rat is a preferred model system over the mouse for neurological studies, and cell type-specific Cre expression in the rat enables precise ablation of gene function in neurons of interest, which is especially valuable for neurodegenerative disease modeling and optogenetics. Yet, few such Cre rats are available. Here we report the characterization of two Cre rats, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-Cre and dopamine active transporter (DAT or Slc6a3)-Cre, by using a combination of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as well as a fluorescent reporter for Cre activity. We detected Cre expression in expected neurons in both Cre lines. Interestingly, we also found that in Th-Cre rats, but not DAT-Cre rats, Cre is expressed in female germ cells, allowing germline excision of the floxed allele and hence the generation of whole-body knockout rats. In summary, our data demonstrate that targeted integration of Cre cassette lead to faithful recapitulation of expression pattern of the endogenous promoter, and mRNA FISH, in addition to IHC, is an effective method for the analysis of the spatiotemporal gene expression patterns in the rat brain, alleviating the dependence on high quality antibodies that are often not available against rat proteins. The Th-Cre and the DAT-Cre rat lines express Cre in selective subsets of dopaminergic neurons and should be particularly useful for researches on Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26886559

  17. High specific activity enantiomerically enriched juvenile hormones: synthesis and binding assay.

    PubMed Central

    Prestwich, G D; Wawrzeńczyk, C

    1985-01-01

    A stereoselective total synthesis of chiral juvenile hormone I is described that allows stoichiometric introduction of two tritium atoms in the final step. Both optical antipodes of the pivotal epoxy alcohol intermediate were prepared in 95% enantiomeric excess by the Sharpless epoxidation of a (Z)-allylic alcohol. Elaboration of the hydroxy-methyl group to a vinyl group followed by selective homogeneous tritiation affords optically active juvenile hormone I analogs at 58 Ci/mmol. Competitive binding of the labeled 10R, 11S and 10S,11R enantiomers with unlabeled enantiomers to the hemolymph binding protein of Manduca sexta larvae was determined by using a dextran-coated charcoal assay. The natural 10R,11S enantiomer has twice the relative binding affinity of the 10S,11R enantiomer. The availability of such high specific activity optically pure hormones will contribute substantially to the search for high-affinity receptors for juvenile hormones in the nuclei of cells. Moreover, the chiral 12-hydroxy-(10R,11S)-epoxy intermediate allows modification of juvenile hormone for solid-phase biochemical and radioimmunochemical work without altering either the biologically important carbomethoxy or epoxy recognition sites. PMID:3860862

  18. Effect of humic acid in leachate on specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengfei; Xian, Ping; Yang, Longhui; Liu, Xi; Zhan, Longhui; Bu, Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    In order to find out the effects of humic acid (HA) in anaerobic-treated landfill leachate on granular sludge, the anaerobic biodegradability of HA as well as the influences of HA on the total cumulative methane production, the anaerobic methanization process and the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) of granular sludge are studied in this paper. Experimental results show that as a non-biodegradable organic pollutant, HA is also difficult to be decomposed by microbes in the anaerobic reaction process. Presence of HA and changes in the concentration have no significant influences on the total cumulative methane production and the anaerobic methanization process of granular sludge. Besides, the total cumulative methane production cannot reflect the inhibition of toxics on the methanogenic activity of granular sludge on the premise of sufficient reaction time. Results also show that HA plays a promoting role on SMA of granular sludge. Without buffering agent the SMA value increased by 19.2% on average due to the buffering and regulating ability of HA, while with buffering agent the SMA value increased by 5.4% on average due to the retaining effect of HA on the morphology of the sludge particles. However, in the presence of leachate the SMA value decreased by 27.6% on average, because the toxic effect of the toxics in the leachate on granular sludge is much larger than the promoting effect of HA. PMID:25915186

  19. Ciguatoxins activate specific cold pain pathways to elicit burning pain from cooling.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Irina; Touska, Filip; Hess, Andreas; Hinsbey, Rachel; Sattler, Simon; Lampert, Angelika; Sergejeva, Marina; Sharov, Anastasia; Collins, Lindon S; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Engel, Matthias; Cabot, Peter J; Wood, John N; Vlachová, Viktorie; Reeh, Peter W; Lewis, Richard J; Zimmermann, Katharina

    2012-10-01

    Ciguatoxins are sodium channel activator toxins that cause ciguatera, the most common form of ichthyosarcotoxism, which presents with peripheral sensory disturbances, including the pathognomonic symptom of cold allodynia which is characterized by intense stabbing and burning pain in response to mild cooling. We show that intraplantar injection of P-CTX-1 elicits cold allodynia in mice by targeting specific unmyelinated and myelinated primary sensory neurons. These include both tetrodotoxin-resistant, TRPA1-expressing peptidergic C-fibres and tetrodotoxin-sensitive A-fibres. P-CTX-1 does not directly open heterologously expressed TRPA1, but when co-expressed with Na(v) channels, sodium channel activation by P-CTX-1 is sufficient to drive TRPA1-dependent calcium influx that is responsible for the development of cold allodynia, as evidenced by a large reduction of excitatory effect of P-CTX-1 on TRPA1-deficient nociceptive C-fibres and of ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia in TRPA1-null mutant mice. Functional MRI studies revealed that ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia enhanced the BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent) signal, an effect that was blunted in TRPA1-deficient mice, confirming an important role for TRPA1 in the pathogenesis of cold allodynia. PMID:22850668

  20. High specific activity enantiomerically enriched juvenile hormones: synthesis and binding assay

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, G.D.; Wawrzenczyk, C.

    1985-08-01

    A stereoselective total synthesis of chiral juvenile hormone I is described that allows stoichiometric introduction of two tritium atoms in the final step. Both optical antipodes of the pivotal epoxy alcohol intermediate were prepared in 95% enantiomeric excess by the Sharpless epoxidation of a (Z)-allylic alcohol. Elaboration of the hydroxy-methyl group to a vinyl group followed by selective homogeneous tritiation affords optically active juvenile hormone I analogs at 58 Ci/mmol. Competitive binding of the labeled 10R, 11S and 10S,11R enantiomers with unlabeled enantiomers to the hemolymph binding protein of Manduca sexta larvae was determined by using a dextran-coated charcoal assay. The natural 10R,11S enantiomer has twice the relative binding affinity of the 10S,11R enantiomer. The availability of such high specific activity optically pure hormones will contribute substantially to the search for high-affinity receptors for juvenile hormones in the nuclei of cells. Moreover, the chiral 12-hydroxy-(10R,11S)-epoxy intermediate allows modification of juvenile hormone for solid-phase biochemical and radioimmunochemical work without altering either the biologically important carbomethoxy or epoxy recognition sites.

  1. Ciguatoxins activate specific cold pain pathways to elicit burning pain from cooling

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Irina; Touska, Filip; Hess, Andreas; Hinsbey, Rachel; Sattler, Simon; Lampert, Angelika; Sergejeva, Marina; Sharov, Anastasia; Collins, Lindon S; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Engel, Matthias; Cabot, Peter J; Wood, John N; Vlachová, Viktorie; Reeh, Peter W; Lewis, Richard J; Zimmermann, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Ciguatoxins are sodium channel activator toxins that cause ciguatera, the most common form of ichthyosarcotoxism, which presents with peripheral sensory disturbances, including the pathognomonic symptom of cold allodynia which is characterized by intense stabbing and burning pain in response to mild cooling. We show that intraplantar injection of P-CTX-1 elicits cold allodynia in mice by targeting specific unmyelinated and myelinated primary sensory neurons. These include both tetrodotoxin-resistant, TRPA1-expressing peptidergic C-fibres and tetrodotoxin-sensitive A-fibres. P-CTX-1 does not directly open heterologously expressed TRPA1, but when co-expressed with Nav channels, sodium channel activation by P-CTX-1 is sufficient to drive TRPA1-dependent calcium influx that is responsible for the development of cold allodynia, as evidenced by a large reduction of excitatory effect of P-CTX-1 on TRPA1-deficient nociceptive C-fibres and of ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia in TRPA1-null mutant mice. Functional MRI studies revealed that ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia enhanced the BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent) signal, an effect that was blunted in TRPA1-deficient mice, confirming an important role for TRPA1 in the pathogenesis of cold allodynia. PMID:22850668

  2. Tissue Specific Expression of Cre in Rat Tyrosine Hydroxylase and Dopamine Active Transporter-Positive Neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyi; Brown, Andrew; Fisher, Dan; Wu, Yumei; Warren, Joe; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    The rat is a preferred model system over the mouse for neurological studies, and cell type-specific Cre expression in the rat enables precise ablation of gene function in neurons of interest, which is especially valuable for neurodegenerative disease modeling and optogenetics. Yet, few such Cre rats are available. Here we report the characterization of two Cre rats, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-Cre and dopamine active transporter (DAT or Slc6a3)-Cre, by using a combination of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as well as a fluorescent reporter for Cre activity. We detected Cre expression in expected neurons in both Cre lines. Interestingly, we also found that in Th-Cre rats, but not DAT-Cre rats, Cre is expressed in female germ cells, allowing germline excision of the floxed allele and hence the generation of whole-body knockout rats. In summary, our data demonstrate that targeted integration of Cre cassette lead to faithful recapitulation of expression pattern of the endogenous promoter, and mRNA FISH, in addition to IHC, is an effective method for the analysis of the spatiotemporal gene expression patterns in the rat brain, alleviating the dependence on high quality antibodies that are often not available against rat proteins. The Th-Cre and the DAT-Cre rat lines express Cre in selective subsets of dopaminergic neurons and should be particularly useful for researches on Parkinson's disease. PMID:26886559

  3. Akt Specific Activator SC79 Protects against Early Brain Injury following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingding; Zhang, Huasheng; Hao, Shuangying; Yan, Huiying; Zhang, Zihuan; Hu, Yangchun; Zhuang, Zong; Li, Wei; Zhou, Mengliang; Li, Kuanyu; Hang, Chunhua

    2016-06-15

    A growing body of evidence demonstrates that Akt may serve as a therapeutic target for treatment of early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of Akt specific activator SC79 in an experimental rat model of SAH. SAH was induced by injecting 300 μL of blood into the prechiasmatic cistern. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of SC79 (30 min post-SAH) induced the p-Akt (Ser473) expression in a dose-dependent manner. A single ICV dose treatment of SC79 (100 μg/rat) significantly increased the expression of Bcl-2 and p-GSK-3β (Ser9), decreased the protein levels of Bax, cytoplasm cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3, indicating the antiapoptotic effect of SC79. As a result, the number of apoptotic cells was reduced 24 h post SAH. Moreover, SC79 treatment alleviated SAH-induced oxidative stress, restored mitochondrial morphology, and improved neurological deficits. Strikingly, treatment of SC79 provided a beneficial outcome against neurologic deficit with a therapeutic window of at least 4 h post SAH by ICV injection and 30 min post SAH by intraperitoneal injection. Collectively, SC79 exerts its neuroprotective effect likely through the dual activities of antioxidation and antiapoptosis. These data provide a basic platform to consider SC79 as a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of SAH. PMID:26983552

  4. Activation of GATA4 gene expression at the early stage of cardiac specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, Ayse; Hamilton, Alison; Wang, Yingjian; Mach, Hymn; Lacroix, Natascha; Davis, Darryl; Chen, Jihong; LI, Qiao

    2014-03-01

    Currently, there are no effective treatments to directly repair damaged heart tissue after cardiac injury since existing therapies focus on rescuing or preserving reversibly damaged tissue. Cell-based therapies using cardiomyocytes generated from stem cells present a promising therapeutic approach to directly replace damaged myocardium with new healthy tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the commitment of stem cells into cardiomyocytes are not fully understood and will be critical to guide this new technology into the clinic. Since GATA4 is a critical regulator of cardiac differentiation, we examined the molecular basis underlying the early activation of GATA4 gene expression during cardiac differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Our studies demonstrate the direct involvement of histone acetylation and transcriptional coactivator p300 in the regulation of GATA4 gene expression. More importantly, we show that histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity is important for GATA4 gene expression with the use of curcumin, a HAT inhibitor. In addition, the widely used histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances both histone acetylation and cardiac specification.

  5. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity specific for hemagglutinin (H) protein of canine distemper virus in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hirama, Kyoko; Togashi, Ken-ichi; Wakasa, Chiaki; Yoneda, Misako; Nishi, Toshiya; Endo, Yasuyuki; Miura, Ryuichi; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Kai, Chieko

    2003-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses to hemagglutinin (H) protein of canine distemper virus (CDV) were evaluated in dogs using the replication-deficient adenovirus protein expression system. Skin fibroblasts were isolated from two dogs and were infected with recombinant adenovirus bearing the CDV-H gene (Ade-CDVH). CTL assay was performed using fibroblasts expressing CDV-H protein as target cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) collected from the same dogs one week after immunization of CDV as effector cells. Specific cytotoxic activity was observed against autologous but not heterologous fibroblasts expressing CDV-H protein. These results indicate that the CTL epitope(s) were localized in the H protein. PMID:12576714

  6. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of category-specific cortical activation: evidence for semantic maps.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, M; Kischka, U; Gückel, F; Bellemann, M E; Kammer, T; Seyyedi, S; Weisbrod, M; Schwartz, A; Brix, G

    1998-04-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine the pattern of cortical activity during a picture naming task. Subjects (n=12) had to covertly name either animals or furniture items. Functional scanning was performed using a conventional 1.5-Tesla whole-body MRI system. Images obtained during naming the two categories were compared using a non-parametric test. The study revealed evidence for domain-specific lexical regions in left middle, right middle and inferior frontal areas, as well as in superior and middle temporal areas. The results corroborate neuropsychological data and demonstrate directly and non-invasively in human volunteers that semantic representations in frontal and temporal areas are, to some degree, localized and possibly implemented as multiple maps. A completely distributed storage of semantic information is rendered unlikely. PMID:9593960

  7. Structure-Specific nuclease activities of Artemis and the Artemis: DNA-PKcs complex

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Howard H.Y.; Lieber, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Artemis is a vertebrate nuclease with both endo- and exonuclease activities that acts on a wide range of nucleic acid substrates. It is the main nuclease in the non-homologous DNA end-joining pathway (NHEJ). Not only is Artemis important for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in NHEJ, it is essential in opening the DNA hairpin intermediates that are formed during V(D)J recombination. Thus, humans with Artemis deficiencies do not have T- or B-lymphocytes and are diagnosed with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). While Artemis is the only vertebrate nuclease capable of opening DNA hairpins, it has also been found to act on other DNA substrates that share common structural features. Here, we discuss the key structural features that all Artemis DNA substrates have in common, thus providing a basis for understanding how this structure-specific nuclease recognizes its DNA targets. PMID:27198222

  8. Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 1, Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    DOE is deactivating the PUREX plant at Hanford; this will involve the disposition of about 692,000 liters (183,000 gallons) of surplus nitric acid contaminated with low levels of U and other radionuclides. The nitric acid, designated as low specific activity, is stored in 4 storage tanks at PUREX. Five principal alternatives were evaluated: transfer for reuse (sale to BNF plc), no action, continued storage in Hanford upgraded or new facility, consolidation of DOE surplus acid, and processing the LSA nitric acid as waste. The transfer to BNF plc is the preferred alternative. From the analysis, it is concluded that the proposed disposition and transportation of the acid does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

  9. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Tissue-specific activation of cortisol in Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Stuart A; Hassan-Smith, Zaki K; Lavery, Gareth G

    2016-08-01

    Glucocorticoids are widely prescribed for their anti-inflammatory properties, but have 'Cushingoid' side effects including visceral obesity, muscle myopathy, hypertension, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, and hepatic steatosis. These features are replicated in patients with much rarer endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) excess (Cushing's syndrome), which has devastating consequences if left untreated. Current medical therapeutic options that reverse the tissue-specific consequences of hypercortisolism are limited. In this article, we review the current evidence that local GC metabolism via the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) plays a central role in mediating the adverse metabolic complications associated with circulatory GC excess - challenging our current view that simple delivery of active GCs from the circulation represents the most important mode of GC action. Furthermore, we explore the potential for targeting this enzyme as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of both endogenous and exogenous Cushing's syndrome. PMID:26957494

  10. Cysteamine, the natural metabolite of pantetheinase, shows specific activity against Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Ayi, Kodjo; Bongfen, Silayuv E; Tam, Mifong; Radovanovic, Irena; Gauthier, Susan; Santiago, Helton; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Roffê, Ester; Sher, Alan; Mullick, Alaka; Fortin, Anny; Stevenson, Mary M; Kain, Kevin C; Gros, Philippe

    2010-08-01

    In mice, loss of pantetheinase activity causes susceptibility to infection with Plasmodium chabaudi AS. Treatment of mice with the pantetheinase metabolite cysteamine reduces blood-stage replication of P. chabaudi and significantly increases survival. Similarly, a short exposure of Plasmodium to cysteamine ex vivo is sufficient to suppress parasite infectivity in vivo. This effect of cysteamine is specific and not observed with a related thiol (dimercaptosuccinic acid) or with the pantethine precursor of cysteamine. Also, cysteamine does not protect against infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi or the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, suggesting cysteamine acts directly against the parasite and does not modulate host inflammatory response. Cysteamine exposure also blocks replication of P. falciparum in vitro; moreover, these treated parasites show higher levels of intact hemoglobin. This study highlights the in vivo action of cysteamine against Plasmodium and provides further evidence for the involvement of pantetheinase in host response to this infection. PMID:20219464

  11. Cysteamine, the natural metabolite of pantetheinase, shows specific activity against Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Ayi, Kodjo; Bongfen, Silayuv E.; Tam, Mifong; Radovanovic, Irena; Gauthier, Susan; Santiago, Helton; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Roffê, Ester; Sher, Alan; Mullick, Alaka; Fortin, Anny; Stevenson, Mary M.; Kain, Kevin C.; Gros, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In mice, loss of pantetheinase activity causes susceptibility to infection with Plasmodium chabaudi AS. Treatment of mice with the pantetheinase metabolite cysteamine reduces blood-stage replication of P. chabaudi and significantly increases survival. Similarly, a short exposure of Plasmodium to cysteamine ex vivo is sufficient to suppress parasite infectivity in vivo. This effect of cysteamine is specific and not observed with a related thiol (dimercaptosuccinic acid) or with the pantethine precursor of cysteamine. Also, cysteamine does not protect against infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi or the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, suggesting cysteamine acts directly against the parasite and does not modulate host inflammatory response. Cysteamine exposure also blocks replication of P. falciparum in vitro; moreover, these treated parasites show higher levels of intact hemoglobin. This study highlights the in vivo action of cysteamine against Plasmodium and provides further evidence for the involvement of pantetheinase in host response to this infection. PMID:20219464

  12. The retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain: from molecular structure to biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Redzic, Jasmina S.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Isern, Nancy G.; Jones, David N.M.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2011-06-18

    CD147 is a type I transmembrane protein that is involved in inflammatory diseases, cancer progression, and multiple human pathogens utilize CD147 for efficient infection. In several cancers, CD147 expression is so high that it is now used as a prognostic marker. The two primary isoforms of CD147 that are related to cancer progression have been identified, differing in their number of immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. These include CD147 Ig1-Ig2 that is ubiquitously expressed in most tissues and CD147 Ig0-Ig1-Ig2 that is retinal specific and implicated in retinoblastoma. However, little is known in regard to the retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain despite its potential role in retinoblastoma. Thus, here we have extensively characterized the CD147 Ig0 domain by elucidating its three-dimensional structure through crystallography and its solution behavior through several biophysical methods that include nuclear magnetic resonance. Furthermore, we have utilized this data together with mutagenesis to probe the biological activity of CD147-containing proteins both with and without the CD147 Ig0 domain within several model cell lines. Our findings reveal that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a potent stimulator of interleukin-6, which is a well-known contributor to retinoblastoma and suggest that the CD147 Ig0 domain has its own receptor distinct from that of the other CD147 Ig-like domains, CD147 Ig1-Ig2. Furthermore, we show that the CD147 Ig0 dimer is the functional unit required for activity and can be disrupted by a single point mutation.

  13. The retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain: from molecular structure to biological activity.

    PubMed

    Redzic, Jasmina S; Armstrong, Geoffrey S; Isern, Nancy G; Jones, David N M; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Eisenmesser, Elan Zohar

    2011-08-01

    CD147 is a type I transmembrane protein that is involved in inflammatory diseases, cancer progression, and multiple human pathogens utilize CD147 for efficient infection. CD147 expression is so high in several cancers that it is now used as a prognostic marker. The two primary isoforms of CD147 that are related to cancer progression have been identified, differing in their number of immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. These include CD147 Ig1-Ig2, which is ubiquitously expressed in most tissues, and CD147 Ig0-Ig1-Ig2, which is retinal specific and implicated in retinoblastoma. However, little is known in regard to the retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain despite its potential role in retinoblastoma. We present the first crystal structure of the human CD147 Ig0 domain and show that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a crystallographic dimer with an I-type domain structure, which maintained in solution. Furthermore, we have utilized our structural data together with mutagenesis to probe the biological activity of CD147-containing proteins, both with and without the CD147 Ig0 domain, within several model cell lines. Our findings reveal that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a potent stimulator of interleukin-6 and suggest that the CD147 Ig0 domain has its own receptor distinct from that of the other CD147 Ig-like domains, CD147 Ig1-Ig2. Finally, we show that the CD147 Ig0 dimer is the functional unit required for activity and can be disrupted by a single point mutation. PMID:21620857

  14. Tissue-Specific Activation of a Single Gustatory Receptor Produces Opposing Behavioral Responses in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Ryan M.; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Understanding sensory systems that perceive environmental inputs and neural circuits that select appropriate motor outputs is essential for studying how organisms modulate behavior and make decisions necessary for survival. Drosophila melanogaster oviposition is one such important behavior, in which females evaluate their environment and choose to lay eggs on substrates they may find aversive in other contexts. We employed neurogenetic techniques to characterize neurons that influence the choice between repulsive positional and attractive egg-laying responses toward the bitter-tasting compound lobeline. Surprisingly, we found that neurons expressing Gr66a, a gustatory receptor normally involved in avoidance behaviors, receive input for both attractive and aversive preferences. We hypothesized that these opposing responses may result from activation of distinct Gr66a-expressing neurons. Using tissue-specific rescue experiments, we found that Gr66a-expressing neurons on the legs mediate positional aversion. In contrast, pharyngeal taste cells mediate the egg-laying attraction to lobeline, as determined by analysis of mosaic flies in which subsets of Gr66a neurons were silenced. Finally, inactivating mushroom body neurons disrupted both aversive and attractive responses, suggesting that this brain structure is a candidate integration center for decision-making during Drosophila oviposition. We thus define sensory and central neurons critical to the process by which flies decide where to lay an egg. Furthermore, our findings provide insights into the complex nature of gustatory perception in Drosophila. We show that tissue-specific activation of bitter-sensing Gr66a neurons provides one mechanism by which the gustatory system differentially encodes aversive and attractive responses, allowing the female fly to modulate her behavior in a context-dependent manner. PMID:22798487

  15. Carbohydrate binding activity in human spermatozoa: localization, specificity, and involvement in sperm-egg fusion.

    PubMed

    Gabriele, A; D'Andrea, G; Cordeschi, G; Properzi, G; Giammatteo, M; De Stefano, C; Romano, R; Francavilla, F; Francavilla, S

    1998-06-01

    Sperm carbohydrate binding activity is involved in gamete recognition. We identified a human sperm protein extracted under reducing conditions, and with a molecular mass of 65 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and which binds D-mannose coupled to albumin (DMA) in presence of cations and a neutral pH. Epifluorescence microscopy showed that fluorescein-DMA binds to dead or permeabilized sperm heads. The DMA-binding activity of human sperm heads was highly specific for a polysaccharide structure containing charged sugar residues. After capacitation, or induction of the acrosome reaction using solubilized zonae pellucidae, fluorescein-DMA was bound respectively to 10.3% (+/- 3.5%) and to 37.6% (+/- 2.1%) of viable sperm heads. The sequential analysis of viable spermatozoa for fluorescein-DMA binding and for rhodamine-Pisum sativum agglutinin binding, showed that DMA-binding sites are present in viable acrosome-reacted spermatozoa. Three dimensional analysis of fluorescence and ultrastructural studies showed that DMA-binding sites are mostly restricted to the sub-acrosomal space of the equatorial segment. Incubation of spermatozoa and zona-free hamster eggs in the presence of DMA was associated with a dose-dependent significant reduction in the number of spermatozoa bound to the oolemma, compared with a control, and to a dose-dependent inhibition of oocyte penetration. This effect was highly specific for DMA, suggesting that DMA-binding sites in human spermatozoa are involved in sperm-egg fusion. PMID:9665337

  16. Ceruloplasmin ferroxidase activity stimulates cellular iron uptake by a trivalent cation-specific transport mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attieh, Z. K.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Seshadri, V.; Tripoulas, N. A.; Fox, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    The balance required to maintain appropriate cellular and tissue iron levels has led to the evolution of multiple mechanisms to precisely regulate iron uptake from transferrin and low molecular weight iron chelates. A role for ceruloplasmin (Cp) in vertebrate iron metabolism is suggested by its potent ferroxidase activity catalyzing conversion of Fe2+ to Fe3+, by identification of yeast copper oxidases homologous to Cp that facilitate high affinity iron uptake, and by studies of "aceruloplasminemic" patients who have extensive iron deposits in multiple tissues. We have recently shown that Cp increases iron uptake by cultured HepG2 cells. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which Cp stimulates cellular iron uptake. Cp stimulated the rate of non-transferrin 55Fe uptake by iron-deficient K562 cells by 2-3-fold, using a transferrin receptor-independent pathway. Induction of Cp-stimulated iron uptake by iron deficiency was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, consistent with a transcriptionally induced or regulated transporter. Cp-stimulated iron uptake was completely blocked by unlabeled Fe3+ and by other trivalent cations including Al3+, Ga3+, and Cr3+, but not by divalent cations. These results indicate that Cp utilizes a trivalent cation-specific transporter. Cp ferroxidase activity was required for iron uptake as shown by the ineffectiveness of two ferroxidase-deficient Cp preparations, copper-deficient Cp and thiomolybdate-treated Cp. We propose a model in which iron reduction and subsequent re-oxidation by Cp are essential for an iron uptake pathway with high ion specificity.

  17. Subcellular Targeting of Methylmercury Lyase Enhances Its Specific Activity for Organic Mercury Detoxification in Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Bizily, Scott P.; Kim, Tehryung; Kandasamy, Muthugapatti K.; Meagher, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    Methylmercury is an environmental pollutant that biomagnifies in the aquatic food chain with severe consequences for humans and other animals. In an effort to remove this toxin in situ, we have been engineering plants that express the bacterial mercury resistance enzymes organomercurial lyase MerB and mercuric ion reductase MerA. In vivo kinetics experiments suggest that the diffusion of hydrophobic organic mercury to MerB limits the rate of the coupled reaction with MerA (Bizily et al., 2000). To optimize reaction kinetics for organic mercury compounds, the merB gene was engineered to target MerB for accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum and for secretion to the cell wall. Plants expressing the targeted MerB proteins and cytoplasmic MerA are highly resistant to organic mercury and degrade organic mercury at 10 to 70 times higher specific activity than plants with the cytoplasmically distributed wild-type MerB enzyme. MerB protein in endoplasmic reticulum-targeted plants appears to accumulate in large vesicular structures that can be visualized in immunolabeled plant cells. These results suggest that the toxic effects of organic mercury are focused in microenvironments of the secretory pathway, that these hydrophobic compartments provide more favorable reaction conditions for MerB activity, and that moderate increases in targeted MerB expression will lead to significant gains in detoxification. In summary, to maximize phytoremediation efficiency of hydrophobic pollutants in plants, it may be beneficial to target enzymes to specific subcellular environments. PMID:12586871

  18. Neuron-specific enolase as a novel biomarker reflecting tuberculosis activity and treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sung-Jin; Jeong, Jee-Yeong; Jang, Tae-Won; Jung, Mann-Hong; Chun, Bong-Kwon; Cha, Hee-Jae; Oak, Chul-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: It is not clear which tests are indicative of the activity and severity of tuberculosis (TB). This study aimed to investigate the predictive value of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and to determine the origin of NSE in TB patients. Methods: A single-center retrospective analysis was conducted on newly diagnosed TB patients between January and December 2010. Patients were categorized into one of two disease groups (focal segmental or extensive) based on chest X-ray. Pre- and post-treatment NSE concentrations were evaluated. To determine the origin of serum NSE concentration, NSE staining was compared with macrophage-specific CD68 staining in lung tissues and with a tissue microarray using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Results: A total of 60 newly diagnosed TB patients were analyzed. In TB patients, NSE serum concentration was significantly increased and NSE level decreased after treatment (p < 0.001). In proportion to serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration, the mean serum concentration of NSE in the extensive group (25.12 ng/mL) was significantly higher than that in the focal segmental group (20.23 ng/mL, p = 0.04). Immunohistochemical staining revealed a large number of macrophages that stained positively for both NSE and CD68 in TB tissues. In addition, NSE signals mostly co-localized with CD68 signals in the tissue microarray of TB patients. Conclusions: Our results suggest that NSE may be a practical parameter that can be used to monitor TB activity and treatment response. Elevated serum NSE level originates, at least in part, from macrophages in granulomatous lesions. PMID:27271274

  19. Breadth of Scientific Activities and Network Station Specifications in the IGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. W.; Springer, T. A.; Reigber, Ch.

    1999-01-01

    This presentation provides a brief overview of the scientific activities of the International GPS Service (IGS). This was an approved activity of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) with official start of service on 1 Jan 1994. The mission of the IGS is "To provide a service to support geodetic and geophysical research activities, through GPS data and data products." The presentation explains the concept of the IGS working group, and pilot projects, and reviews the current working groups and pilot projects.

  20. Specific IgG activity against diarrheagenic bacteria in bovine immune milk and effect of pH on its antigen-binding activity upon heating.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Long; Xu, Long Bing; Huang, Xin Hua

    2010-05-01

    Bovine colostrum and milk antibodies of calving and lactating cows immunized with a multivalent vaccine consisting of whole cells of three different species of pathogenic bacteria including four strains of enterotoxigenic Escherischia coli, five strains of enteropathogenic Esch. coli, three strains of enteroinvasive Esch. coli, two strains of Samonella typhi, and one strain each of Shigellia dysenteriae, Sh. sonnei and Sh. flexneri were generated, respectively. A significantly elevated activity and titre of specific IgG from bovine immune colostrum were seen for only 5 days after calving of immunized cows, however, the levels of specific IgG could be obtained continuously from the milk of immunized lactating cows until the 11th week of the entire experiment period. Subsequently, we observed that the high specific IgG activity in immune milk was relatively stable under pH 5.0-7.0 at 37 degrees C. Of importance, we identified that the specific IgG preserved its biological function for high antigen-binding activity at pH 5.5-6.5 for 30 min of heat treatment at 70 degrees C and for 350 s at 72 degrees C. Our findings suggest that the specific IgG from milk antibodies of immunized lactating cows may be used as an abundant source of hyper-immune products for prevention of multibacteria-induced diarrhea, however, the effect of pH on its antigen-binding activity upon heating should be carefully considered and designed. PMID:20196896

  1. Carbon-14 Specific Activity Model Validation for Biota in Wetland Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Yankovich, T.L.; Sharp, K.J.; Benz, M.L.; Carr, J.; Killey, R.W.D.

    2008-01-15

    In many cases, contaminants, such as radionuclides, can show highly localized spatial distributions in natural systems. Therefore, a key question for environmental assessment and monitoring becomes, how can these localized distributions of contaminants in the environment lead to organism exposure, and ultimately, the potential for effects to receptor biota? To address this question, an important first step is to conduct field surveys at sites of interest to map out the spatial distribution and extent of contaminants in areas that are being occupied and utilized by resident receptor biota. Work can then be conducted to establish predictive relationships between contaminant concentrations in biota tissues and those in environmental media with which biota interact, to gain an understanding of how representative ambient contaminant concentrations are of biota exposure. The objectives of this study were: - To conduct a field survey in a wetland ecosystem to characterize the spatial distribution of carbon- 14 ({sup 14}C), a radionuclide with dynamics in natural systems that can be described using a specific activity model; and - To determine whether {sup 14}C concentrations in environmental media reflect those measured in tissues of resident flora and fauna. A detailed field campaign was carried out in summer 2001 to characterize the spatial distribution and areal coverage of {sup 14}C in Duke Swamp, a wetland ecosystem on Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL)'s Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site that receives {sup 14}C through releases from an up-gradient Waste Management Area (WMA), primarily through groundwater influx. Sampling of surface vegetation (dominantly comprised of Sphagnum moss) was conducted at a total of 69 locations, with complementary sampling of air, soil, fungi, aerial insects, ground-dwelling insects, amphibians, small mammals and snakes being carried out at a subset of five locations with varying {sup 14}C concentrations. Concentrations of {sup 14

  2. Post-activation Potentiation in Propulsive Force after Specific Swimming Strength Training.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, A C; Barroso, R; Andries, O

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether a conditioning activity (8×12.5 m with 2.5 min-interval using both hand paddles and parachute) induced post-activation potentiation in swimming propulsive force and whether a swimmer's force level affected a post-activation potentiation response. 8 competitive swimmers (5 males and 3 females, age: 18.4±1.3 years; IPS=796±56) performed a 10 s maximum tethered swimming test 8 and 4 min before (the highest value was considered as PRE), and 2.5 and 6.5 min after (POST1 and POST2, respectively) the conditioning activity. Rate of force development was not affected, but peak force in POST1 (p=0.02) and impulse in both POST1 (p=0.007) and POST2 (p=0.004) were reduced. Possibly the conditioning activity induced greater fatigue than post-activation potentiation benefits. For instance, the number of repetitions might have been excessive, and rest intervals between the conditioning activity and POST1 and POST2 were possibly too short. There were positive correlations between PRE peak force and changes in peak force and rate of force development. Although conditioning activity was detrimental, positive correlations suggest that weaker swimmers experience a deterioration of performance more than the stronger ones. This conditioning activity is not recommended for swimmers with the current competitive level before a competitive event. PMID:26667922

  3. Activities and specificities of homodimeric TALENs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Aouida, Mustapha; Piatek, Marek J; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth K; Mahfouz, Magdy M

    2014-05-01

    The development of highly efficient genome engineering reagents is of paramount importance to launch the next wave of biotechnology. TAL effectors have been developed as an adaptable DNA binding scaffold that can be engineered to bind to any user-defined sequence. Thus, TAL-based DNA binding modules have been used to generate chimeric proteins for a variety of targeted genome modifications across eukaryotic species. For example, TAL effectors fused to the catalytic domain of FokI endonuclease (TALENs) were used to generate site-specific double strand breaks (DSBs), the repair of which can be harnessed to dictate user-desired, genome-editing outcomes. To cleave DNA, FokI endonuclease must dimerize which can be achieved using a pair of TALENs that bind to the DNA targeted in a tail-to-tail orientation with proper spacing allowing the dimer formation. Because TALENs binding to DNA are dependent on their repeat sequences and nucleotides binding specificities, homodimers and heterodimers binding can be formed. In the present study, we used several TALEN monomers with increased repeats binding degeneracy to allow homodimer formation at increased number of genomic loci. We assessed their binding specificities and genome modification activities. Our results indicate that homodimeric TALENs could be used to modify the yeast genome in a site-specific manner and their binding to the promoter regions might modulate the expression of target genes. Taken together, our data indicate that homodimeric TALENs could be used to achieve different engineering possibilities of biotechnological applications and that their transcriptional modulations need to be considered when analyzing their phenotypic effects. PMID:24081604

  4. The ADAMTS13 metalloprotease domain: roles of subsites in enzyme activity and specificity.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Rens; Lane, David A; Crawley, James T B

    2010-10-21

    ADAMTS13 modulates von Willebrand factor (VWF) platelet-tethering function by proteolysis of the Tyr1605-Met1606 bond in the VWF A2 domain. To examine the role of the metalloprotease domain of ADAMTS13 in scissile bond specificity, we identified 3 variable regions (VR1, -2, and -3) in the ADAMTS family metalloprotease domain that flank the active site, which might be important for specificity. Eight composite sequence swaps (to residues in ADAMTS1 or ADAMTS2) and 18 single-point mutants were generated in these VRs and expressed. Swapping VR1 (E184-R193) of ADAMTS13 with that of ADAMTS1 or ADAMTS2 abolished/severely impaired ADAMTS13 function. Kinetic analysis of VR1 point mutants using VWF115 as a short substrate revealed reduced proteolytic function (k(cat)/K(m) reduced by 2- to 10-fold) as a result of D187A, R190A, and R193A substitutions. Analysis of VR2 (F216-V220) revealed a minor importance of this region. Mutants of VR3 (G236-A261) proteolysed wild-type VWF115 normally. However, using either short or full-length VWF substrates containing the P1' M1606A mutation, we identified residues within VR3 (D252-P256) that influence P1' amino acid specificity, we hypothesize, by shaping the S1' pocket. It is concluded that 2 subsites, D187-R193 and D252-P256, in the metalloprotease domain play an important role in cleavage efficiency and site specificity. PMID:20647566

  5. Phosphate oxygen isotope ratio proxy for specific microbial activity in marine sediments (Peru Margin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Blake, R. E.

    2005-12-01

    Oxygen (O) isotope ratios of biogenic apatites have been widely used as paleotemperature and environmental geochemical proxies. With improved knowledge of the phosphate O isotope effects of different P cycling pathways, the δ18O value of inorganic phosphate (δ18OP) has been proposed as a useful proxy and tracer of biological reactions and P cycling in natural environments[1,2,3,4]. Being the only way of removing P from oceanic water, sedimentary P burial is one of the most important processes during biogeochemical cycling of P. The high concentrations of organic matter and pronounced microbial activity at ODP Site 1230 along the Peru Margin result in unusually high interstitial water phosphate concentrations, which provides a unique opportunity to use δ18OP to investigate inorganic phosphate (Pi) regeneration and P cycling pathways in marine sediments. The isotopic measurements of both dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) and bulk sediment Pi show that DIP δ18OP values are affected by three different processes, which are all induced by specific microbial activities present in the sediments. In sediments at ~ 65 to 120 mbsf, porewater DIP is derived from dissolved organophosphorus compounds (DOP) through enzymatic degradation pathways, evidenced by both DIP δ18OP values and interstitial water chemistry. Measured porewater DIP δ18OP values also suggest that 4 to 8% of interstitial water DIP reflects regeneration of Pi from Porg by microbially-synthesized enzymes. Throughout the sediment column and especially at ~ 120 to 150 mbsf, DIP is released from the sediments by microbially-induced reductive dissolution of Fe-oxides, which contributes to the overall high DIP concentrations at Site 1230. The third and dominant process controlling measured DIP δ18OP values is microbial turnover of regenerated Pi. The presence of high microbial activities in organic-rich Site 1230 sediments promotes the remobilization of P and affects marine P cycling by potentially enhancing

  6. Enrichment of specific electro-active microorganisms and enhancement of methane production by adding granular activated carbon in anaerobic reactors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Yeol; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Hee-Deung

    2016-04-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) via conductive materials can provide significant benefits to anaerobic methane formation in terms of production amount and rate. Although granular activated carbon (GAC) demonstrated its applicability in facilitating DIET in methanogenesis, DIET in continuous flow anaerobic reactors has not been verified. Here, evidences of DIET via GAC were explored. The reactor supplemented with GAC showed 1.8-fold higher methane production rate than that without GAC (35.7 versus 20.1±7.1mL-CH4/d). Around 34% of methane formation was attributed to the biomass attached to GAC. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene demonstrated the enrichment of exoelectrogens (e.g. Geobacter) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens (e.g. Methanospirillum and Methanolinea) from the biomass attached to GAC. Furthermore, anodic and cathodic currents generation was observed in an electrochemical cell containing GAC biomass. Taken together, GAC supplementation created an environment for enriching the microorganisms involved in DIET, which increased the methane production rate. PMID:26836607

  7. Assessing General and Specific Attitudes in Human Learning Behavior: An Activity Perspective and a Multilevel Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Jun; Willson, Victor L.

    2008-01-01

    This article proposes a multilevel modeling approach to study the general and specific attitudes formed in human learning behavior. Based on the premises of activity theory, it conceptualizes the unit of analysis for attitude measurement as a scalable and evolving activity system rather than a single action. Measurement issues related to this…

  8. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BRAIN AND OVARY AROMATASE ACTIVITY AND ISOFORM-SPECIFIC AROMATASE MRNA EXPRESSION IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing evidence that some chemicals present in the environment have the capacity to inhibit, or potentially induce, aromatase activity. This study compared aromatase activities and isoform-specific mRNA expression in brain and ovary tissue from non-exposed fathead min...

  9. Responses of absolute and specific soil enzyme activities to long term additions of organic and mineral fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Dong, Wenyi; Dai, Xiaoqin; Schaeffer, Sean; Yang, Fengting; Radosevich, Mark; Xu, Lili; Liu, Xiyu; Sun, Xiaomin

    2015-12-01

    Long-term phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) applications may seriously affect soil microbial activity. A long-term field fertilizer application trial was established on reddish paddy soils in the subtropical region of southern China in 1998. We assessed the effects of swine manure and seven different rates or ratios of NPK fertilizer treatments on (1) the absolute and specific enzyme activities per unit of soil organic carbon (SOC) or microbial biomass carbon (MBC) involved in C, N, and P transformations and (2) their relationships with soil environmental factors and soil microbial community structures. The results showed that manure applications led to increases in the absolute and specific activities of soil β-1,4-glucosidase(βG), β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG), and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The absolute and specific acid phosphatase (AP) activities decreased as mineral P fertilizer application rates and ratios increased. Redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that there were negative correlations between absolute and specific AP activities, pH, and total P contents, while there were positive correlations between soil absolute and specific βG, NAG, and LAP enzyme activities, and SOC and total N contents. RDA showed that the contents of actinomycete and Gram-positive bacterium PLFA biomarkers are more closely related to the absolute and specific enzyme activities than the other PLFA biomarkers (P<0.01). Our results suggest that both the absolute and specific enzyme activities could be used as sensitive soil quality indicators that provide useful linkages with the microbial community structures and environmental factors. To maintain microbial activity and to minimize environmental impacts, P should be applied as a combination of inorganic and organic forms, and total P fertilizer application rates to subtropical paddy soils should not exceed 44 kg P ha(-1) year(-1). PMID:26196069

  10. Comparison of measured and calculated concrete and rebar specific activity during decommissioning of the Dalhousie SLOWPOKE-2 reactor.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip G; Everall, Dave; Ariani, Imelda; Tsang, Kwok

    2013-07-01

    Following the defuelling and dismantling of the Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor (DUSR) in 2011, the reactor pool concrete and rebar were sampled to support the unconditional free release of the material such that the facility could be classified for unrestricted use. A detailed MCNP5 model of the critical core assembly was simulated to calculate the thermal, intermediate and fast neutron flux profile below the reactor pool floor. The neutron fluxes were used to calculate the specific activity of significant radionuclides in the concrete and rebar. The calculated specific activity and consequently the calculated neutron fluxes were validated at a number of sample locations. The calculated concrete and rebar specific activity were found to be in good agreement with the measured specific activity at the sample locations. The unrestricted use of the facility was granted through the approval of the licence to abandon the facility in August 2011. PMID:23658212

  11. A Catalytic DNA Activated by a Specific Strain of Bacterial Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhifa; Wu, Zaisheng; Chang, Dingran; Zhang, Wenqing; Tram, Kha; Lee, Christine; Kim, Peter; Salena, Bruno J; Li, Yingfu

    2016-02-01

    Pathogenic strains of bacteria are known to cause various infectious diseases and there is a growing demand for molecular probes that can selectively recognize them. Here we report a special DNAzyme (catalytic DNA), RFD-CD1, that shows exquisite specificity for a pathogenic strain of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). RFD-CD1 was derived by an in vitro selection approach where a random-sequence DNA library was allowed to react with an unpurified molecular mixture derived from this strain of C. difficle, coupled with a subtractive selection strategy to eliminate cross-reactivities to unintended C. difficile strains and other bacteria species. RFD-CD1 is activated by a truncated version of TcdC, a transcription factor, that is unique to the targeted strain of C. difficle. Our study demonstrates for the first time that in vitro selection offers an effective approach for deriving functional nucleic acid probes that are capable of achieving strain-specific recognition of bacterial pathogens. PMID:26676768

  12. Specific Interaction with Cardiolipin Triggers Functional Activation of Dynamin-Related Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Bustillo-Zabalbeitia, Itsasne; Montessuit, Sylvie; Raemy, Etienne; Basañez, Gorka; Terrones, Oihana; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Dynamin-Related Protein 1 (Drp1), a large GTPase of the dynamin superfamily, is required for mitochondrial fission in healthy and apoptotic cells. Drp1 activation is a complex process that involves translocation from the cytosol to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) and assembly into rings/spirals at the MOM, leading to membrane constriction/division. Similar to dynamins, Drp1 contains GTPase (G), bundle signaling element (BSE) and stalk domains. However, instead of the lipid–interacting Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domain present in the dynamins, Drp1 contains the so-called B insert or variable domain that has been suggested to play an important role in Drp1 regulation. Different proteins have been implicated in Drp1 recruitment to the MOM, although how MOM-localized Drp1 acquires its fully functional status remains poorly understood. We found that Drp1 can interact with pure lipid bilayers enriched in the mitochondrion-specific phospholipid cardiolipin (CL). Building on our previous study, we now explore the specificity and functional consequences of this interaction. We show that a four lysine module located within the B insert of Drp1 interacts preferentially with CL over other anionic lipids. This interaction dramatically enhances Drp1 oligomerization and assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis. Our results add significantly to a growing body of evidence indicating that CL is an important regulator of many essential mitochondrial functions. PMID:25036098

  13. Cancer-Specific Synthetic Lethality between ATR and CHK1 Kinase Activities.

    PubMed

    Sanjiv, Kumar; Hagenkort, Anna; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Koolmeister, Tobias; Reaper, Philip M; Mortusewicz, Oliver; Jacques, Sylvain A; Kuiper, Raoul V; Schultz, Niklas; Scobie, Martin; Charlton, Peter A; Pollard, John R; Berglund, Ulrika Warpman; Altun, Mikael; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-01-12

    ATR and CHK1 maintain cancer cell survival under replication stress and inhibitors of both kinases are currently undergoing clinical trials. As ATR activity is increased after CHK1 inhibition, we hypothesized that this may indicate an increased reliance on ATR for survival. Indeed, we observe that replication stress induced by the CHK1 inhibitor AZD7762 results in replication catastrophe and apoptosis, when combined with the ATR inhibitor VE-821 specifically in cancer cells. Combined treatment with ATR and CHK1 inhibitors leads to replication fork arrest, ssDNA accumulation, replication collapse, and synergistic cell death in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of CDK reversed replication stress and synthetic lethality, demonstrating that regulation of origin firing by ATR and CHK1 explains the synthetic lethality. In conclusion, this study exemplifies cancer-specific synthetic lethality between two proteins in the same pathway and raises the prospect of combining ATR and CHK1 inhibitors as promising cancer therapy. PMID:26748709

  14. Cancer-Specific Synthetic Lethality between ATR and CHK1 Kinase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Sanjiv, Kumar; Hagenkort, Anna; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Koolmeister, Tobias; Reaper, Philip M.; Mortusewicz, Oliver; Jacques, Sylvain A.; Kuiper, Raoul V.; Schultz, Niklas; Scobie, Martin; Charlton, Peter A.; Pollard, John R.; Berglund, Ulrika Warpman; Altun, Mikael; Helleday, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Summary ATR and CHK1 maintain cancer cell survival under replication stress and inhibitors of both kinases are currently undergoing clinical trials. As ATR activity is increased after CHK1 inhibition, we hypothesized that this may indicate an increased reliance on ATR for survival. Indeed, we observe that replication stress induced by the CHK1 inhibitor AZD7762 results in replication catastrophe and apoptosis, when combined with the ATR inhibitor VE-821 specifically in cancer cells. Combined treatment with ATR and CHK1 inhibitors leads to replication fork arrest, ssDNA accumulation, replication collapse, and synergistic cell death in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of CDK reversed replication stress and synthetic lethality, demonstrating that regulation of origin firing by ATR and CHK1 explains the synthetic lethality. In conclusion, this study exemplifies cancer-specific synthetic lethality between two proteins in the same pathway and raises the prospect of combining ATR and CHK1 inhibitors as promising cancer therapy. PMID:26748709

  15. DEVELOPMENTAL REGULATION OF PROTEIN KINASE B ACTIVATION IS ISOFORM SPECIFIC IN SKELETAL MUSCLE OF NEONATAL PIGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The postprandial activation of the insulin signaling pathway that leads to translation initiation is enhanced in skeletal muscle of the neonate and decreases with development in parallel with the developmental decline in muscle protein synthesis. Our previous study showed that the activity of protei...

  16. Functionally Specific Oscillatory Activity Correlates between Visual and Auditory Cortex in the Blind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schepers, Inga M.; Hipp, Joerg F.; Schneider, Till R.; Roder, Brigitte; Engel, Andreas K.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have shown that the visual cortex of blind humans is activated in non-visual tasks. However, the electrophysiological signals underlying this cross-modal plasticity are largely unknown. Here, we characterize the neuronal population activity in the visual and auditory cortex of congenitally blind humans and sighted controls in a…

  17. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2011-08-30

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  18. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  19. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  20. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta; Lital , Schultz; Peter G. , Zhang; Zhiwen

    2010-10-12

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  1. Activation Domain-Specific and General Transcription Stimulation by Native Histone Acetyltransferase Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Keiko; Steger, David J.; Eberharter, Anton; Workman, Jerry L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent progress in identifying the catalytic subunits of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes has implicated histone acetylation in the regulation of transcription. Here, we have analyzed the function of two native yeast HAT complexes, SAGA (Spt-Ada-Gcn5 Acetyltransferase) and NuA4 (nucleosome acetyltransferase of H4), in activating transcription from preassembled nucleosomal array templates in vitro. Each complex was tested for the ability to enhance transcription driven by GAL4 derivatives containing either acidic, glutamine-rich, or proline-rich activation domains. On nucleosomal array templates, the SAGA complex selectively stimulates transcription driven by the VP16 acidic activation domain in an acetyl coenzyme A-dependent manner. In contrast, the NuA4 complex facilitates transcription mediated by any of the activation domains tested if allowed to preacetylate the nucleosomal template, indicating a general stimulatory effect of histone H4 acetylation. However, when the extent of acetylation by NuA4 is limited, the complex also preferentially stimulates VP16-driven transcription. SAGA and NuA4 interact directly with the VP16 activation domain but not with a glutamine-rich or proline-rich activation domain. These data suggest that recruitment of the SAGA and NuA4 HAT complexes by the VP16 activation domain contributes to HAT-dependent activation. In addition, extensive H4/H2B acetylation by NuA4 leads to a general activation of transcription, which is independent of activator-NuA4 interactions. PMID:9858608

  2. Context-dependent activation of reduced autobiographical memory specificity as an avoidant coping style.

    PubMed

    Debeer, Elise; Raes, Filip; Williams, J Mark G; Hermans, Dirk

    2011-12-01

    According to the affect-regulation hypothesis (Williams et al., 2007), reduced autobiographical memory specificity (rAMS) or overgeneral memory (OGM) might be considered a cognitive avoidance strategy; that is, people learn to avoid the emotionally painful consequences associated with the retrieval of specific negative memories. Based on this hypothesis, one would predict significant negative associations between AMS and avoidant coping. However, studies investigating this prediction have led to equivocal results. In the present study we tested a possible explanation for these contradictory findings. It was hypothesized that rAMS (in part) reflects an avoidant coping strategy, which might only become apparent under certain conditions, that is, conditions that signal the possibility of 'danger.' To test this hypothesis, we assessed AMS and behavioral avoidance but experimentally manipulated the instructions. In the neutral condition, two parallel versions of the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT) were presented under neutral instructions. In the threat condition, the first AMT was presented under neutral instructions, while the second AMT was presented under 'threat instructions.' Results showed no significant correlations between avoidance and OGM under neutral conditions but significant and markedly stronger correlations under threat conditions, with more avoidance being associated with fewer specific and more categoric memories. In addition, high avoiders showed a stronger reduction in AMS in the threat condition as compared with the neutral condition, while low avoiders showed no such difference between conditions. The data confirm that OGM can be considered as part of a broader avoidant coping style. However, more importantly, they show that, at least in nonclinical individuals, the activation of this coping style may depend on the context. PMID:22142214

  3. Intracellular redox-activated anticancer drug delivery by functionalized hollow mesoporous silica nanoreservoirs with tumor specificity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhong; Hu, Yan; Cai, Kaiyong; Ding, Xingwei; Zhang, Quan; Li, Menghuan; Ma, Xing; Zhang, Beilu; Zeng, Yongfei; Li, Peizhou; Li, Jinghua; Liu, Junjie; Zhao, Yanli

    2014-09-01

    In this study, a type of intracellular redox-triggered hollow mesoporous silica nanoreservoirs (HMSNs) with tumor specificity was developed in order to deliver anticancer drug (i.e., doxorubicin (DOX)) to the target tumor cells with high therapeutic efficiency and reduced side effects. Firstly, adamantanamine was grafted onto the orifices of HMSNs using a redox-cleavable disulfide bond as an intermediate linker. Subsequently, a synthetic functional molecule, lactobionic acid-grafted-β-cyclodextrin (β-CD-LA), was immobilized on the surface of HMSNs through specific complexation with the adamantyl group, where β-CD served as an end-capper to keep the loaded drug within HMSNs. β-CD-LA on HMSNs could also act as a targeting agent towards tumor cells (i.e., HepG2 cells), since the lactose group in β-CD-LA is a specific ligand binding with the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) on HepG2 cells. In vitro studies demonstrated that DOX-loaded nanoreservoirs could be selectively endocytosed by HepG2 cells, releasing therapeutic DOX into cytoplasm and efficiently inducing the apoptosis and cell death. In vivo investigations further confirmed that DOX-loaded nanoreservoirs could permeate into the tumor sites and actively interact with tumor cells, which inhibited the tumor growth with the minimized side effect. On the whole, this drug delivery system exhibits a great potential as an efficient carrier for targeted tumor therapy in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24930850

  4. Transferrin Binding to Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Activated by Phytohemagglutinin Involves a Specific Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Robert M.; Werner, Phillip; Arnaud, Philippe; Galbraith, Gillian M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Immunohistological studies have indicated that membrane sites binding transferrin are present upon activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In this study, we have investigated transferrin uptake in human lymphocytes exposed to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), by quantitative radiobinding and immunofluorescence in parallel. In stimulated lymphocytes, binding was maximal after a 30-min incubation, being greatest at 37°C, and greater at 22°C than at 4°C. Although some shedding and endocytosis of transferrin occurred at 22° and 37°C, these factors, and resulting synthesis of new sites, did not affect measurement of binding which was found to be saturable, reversible, and specific for transferrin (Ka 0.5-2.5 × 108 M−1). Binding was greater after a 48-h exposure to PHA than after 24 h, and was maximal at 66 h. Sequential Scatchard analysis revealed no significant elevation in affinity of interaction. However, although the total number of receptors increased, the proportion of cells in which binding of ligand was detected immunohistologically increased in parallel, and after appropriate correction, the cellular density of receptors remained relatively constant throughout (60,000-80,000 sites/cell). Increments in binding during the culture period were thus due predominantly to expansion of a population of cells bearing receptors. Similar differences in binding were apparent upon comparison of cells cultured in different doses of PHA, and in unstimulated cells binding was negligible. Transferrin receptors appear, therefore, to be readily detectable only upon lymphocytes that have been activated. Images PMID:6253523

  5. Expression of Aspergillus nidulans phy Gene in Nicotiana benthamiana Produces Active Phytase with Broad Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Tae-Kyun; Oh, Sung; Kim, Seongdae; Park, Jae Sung; Vinod, Nagarajan; Jang, Kyung Min; Kim, Sei Chang; Choi, Chang Won; Ko, Suk-Min; Jeong, Dong Kee; Udayakumar, Rajangam

    2014-01-01

    A full-length phytase gene (phy) of Aspergillus nidulans was amplified from the cDNA library by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and it was introduced into a bacterial expression vector, pET-28a. The recombinant protein (rPhy-E, 56 kDa) was overexpressed in the insoluble fraction of Escherichia coli culture, purified by Ni-NTA resin under denaturing conditions and injected into rats as an immunogen. To express A. nidulans phytase in a plant, the full-length of phy was cloned into a plant expression binary vector, pPZP212. The resultant construct was tested for its transient expression by Agrobacterium-infiltration into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Compared with a control, the agro-infiltrated leaf tissues showed the presence of phy mRNA and its high expression level in N. benthamiana. The recombinant phytase (rPhy-P, 62 kDa) was strongly reacted with the polyclonal antibody against the nonglycosylated rPhy-E. The rPhy-P showed glycosylation, two pH optima (pH 4.5 and pH 5.5), an optimum temperature at 45~55 °C, thermostability and broad substrate specificities. After deglycosylation by peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase-F), the rPhy-P significantly lost the phytase activity and retained 1/9 of the original activity after 10 min of incubation at 45 °C. Therefore, the deglycosylation caused a significant reduction in enzyme thermostability. In animal experiments, oral administration of the rPhy-P at 1500 U/kg body weight/day for seven days caused a significant reduction of phosphorus excretion by 16% in rat feces. Besides, the rPhy-P did not result in any toxicological changes and clinical signs. PMID:25192284

  6. A novel carotenoid cleavage activity involved in the biosynthesis of Citrus fruit-specific apocarotenoid pigments

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, María J.; Alquézar, Berta; Al-Babili, Salim

    2013-01-01

    Citrus is the first tree crop in terms of fruit production. The colour of Citrus fruit is one of the main quality attributes, caused by the accumulation of carotenoids and their derivative C30 apocarotenoids, mainly β-citraurin (3-hydroxy-β-apo-8′-carotenal), which provide an attractive orange-reddish tint to the peel of oranges and mandarins. Though carotenoid biosynthesis and its regulation have been extensively studied in Citrus fruits, little is known about the formation of C30 apocarotenoids. The aim of this study was to the identify carotenoid cleavage enzyme(s) [CCD(s)] involved in the peel-specific C30 apocarotenoids. In silico data mining revealed a new family of five CCD4-type genes in Citrus. One gene of this family, CCD4b1, was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of different Citrus species in a pattern correlating with the accumulation of C30 apocarotenoids. Moreover, developmental processes and treatments which alter Citrus fruit peel pigmentation led to changes of β-citraurin content and CCD4b1 transcript levels. These results point to the involvement of CCD4b1 in β-citraurin formation and indicate that the accumulation of this compound is determined by the availability of the presumed precursors zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin. Functional analysis of CCD4b1 by in vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated the asymmetric cleavage activity at the 7′,8′ double bond in zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin, confirming its role in C30 apocarotenoid biosynthesis. Thus, a novel plant carotenoid cleavage activity targeting the 7′,8′ double bond of cyclic C40 carotenoids has been identified. These results suggest that the presented enzyme is responsible for the biosynthesis of C30 apocarotenoids in Citrus which are key pigments in fruit coloration. PMID:24006419

  7. Transplant experiments uncover Baltic Sea basin-specific responses in bacterioplankton community composition and metabolic activities.

    PubMed

    Lindh, Markus V; Figueroa, Daniela; Sjöstedt, Johanna; Baltar, Federico; Lundin, Daniel; Andersson, Agneta; Legrand, Catherine; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenically induced changes in precipitation are projected to generate increased river runoff to semi-enclosed seas, increasing loads of terrestrial dissolved organic matter and decreasing salinity. To determine how bacterial community structure and functioning adjust to such changes, we designed microcosm transplant experiments with Baltic Proper (salinity 7.2) and Bothnian Sea (salinity 3.6) water. Baltic Proper bacteria generally reached higher abundances than Bothnian Sea bacteria in both Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea water, indicating higher adaptability. Moreover, Baltic Proper bacteria growing in Bothnian Sea water consistently showed highest bacterial production and beta-glucosidase activity. These metabolic responses were accompanied by basin-specific changes in bacterial community structure. For example, Baltic Proper Pseudomonas and Limnobacter populations increased markedly in relative abundance in Bothnian Sea water, indicating a replacement effect. In contrast, Roseobacter and Rheinheimera populations were stable or increased in abundance when challenged by either of the waters, indicating an adjustment effect. Transplants to Bothnian Sea water triggered the initial emergence of particular Burkholderiaceae populations, and transplants to Baltic Proper water triggered Alteromonadaceae populations. Notably, in the subsequent re-transplant experiment, a priming effect resulted in further increases to dominance of these populations. Correlated changes in community composition and metabolic activity were observed only in the transplant experiment and only at relatively high phylogenetic resolution. This suggested an importance of successional progression for interpreting relationships between bacterial community composition and functioning. We infer that priming effects on bacterial community structure by natural episodic events or climate change induced forcing could translate into long-term changes in bacterial ecosystem process rates. PMID

  8. Specific repression of β-globin promoter activity by nuclear ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Broyles, Robert H.; Belegu, Visar; DeWitt, Christina R.; Shah, Sandeep N.; Stewart, Charles A.; Pye, Quentin N.; Floyd, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Developmental hemoglobin switching involves sequential globin gene activations and repressions that are incompletely understood. Earlier observations, described herein, led us to hypothesize that nuclear ferritin is a repressor of the adult β-globin gene in embryonic erythroid cells. Our data show that a ferritin-family protein in K562 cell nuclear extracts binds specifically to a highly conserved CAGTGC motif in the β-globin promoter at −153 to −148 bp from the cap site, and mutation of the CAGTGC motif reduces binding 20-fold in competition gel-shift assays. Purified human ferritin that is enriched in ferritin-H chains also binds the CAGTGC promoter segment. Expression clones of ferritin-H markedly repress β-globin promoter-driven reporter gene expression in cotransfected CV-1 cells in which the β-promoter has been stimulated with the transcription activator erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF). We have constructed chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter plasmids containing either a wild-type or mutant β-globin promoter for the −150 CAGTGC motif and have compared the constructs for susceptibility to repression by ferritin-H in cotransfection assays. We find that stimulation by cotransfected EKLF is retained with the mutant promoter, whereas repression by ferritin-H is lost. Thus, mutation of the −150 CAGTGC motif not only markedly reduces in vitro binding of nuclear ferritin but also abrogates the ability of expressed ferritin-H to repress this promoter in our cell transfection assay, providing a strong link between DNA binding and function, and strong support for our proposal that nuclear ferritin-H is a repressor of the human β-globin gene. Such a repressor could be helpful in treating sickle cell and other genetic diseases. PMID:11481480

  9. Human Serum-Specific Activation of Alternative Sigma Factors, the Stress Responders in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Tang-Siegel, Gaoyan; Bumgarner, Roger; Ruiz, Teresa; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Chen, Weizhen; Chen, Casey

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a known pathogen causing periodontal disease and infective endocarditis, is a survivor in the periodontal pocket and blood stream; both environments contain serum as a nutrient source. To screen for unknown virulence factors associated with this microorganism, A. actinomycetemcomitans was grown in serum-based media to simulate its in vivo environment. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans showed distinct growth phenotypes only in the presence of human serum, and they were grouped into high- and low-responder groups. High-responders comprised mainly serotype c strains, and showed an unusual growth phenomenon, featuring a second, rapid increase in turbidity after 9-h incubation that reached a final optical density 2- to 7-fold higher than low-responders. Upon further investigation, the second increase in turbidity was not caused by cell multiplication, but by cell death. Whole transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq identified 35 genes that were up-regulated by human serum, but not horse serum, in high-responders but not in low-responders, including prominently an alternative sigma factor rpoE (σE). A lacZ reporter construct driven by the 132-bp rpoE promoter sequence of A. actinomycetemcomitans responded dramatically to human serum within 90 min of incubation only when the construct was carried by a high responder strain. The rpoE promoter is 100% identical among high- and low-responder strains. Proteomic investigation showed potential interactions between human serum protein, e.g. apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The data clearly indicated a different activation process for rpoE in high- versus low-responder strains. This differential human serum-specific activation of rpoE, a putative extra-cytoplasmic stress responder and global regulator, suggests distinct in vivo adaptations among different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:27490177

  10. Transplant experiments uncover Baltic Sea basin-specific responses in bacterioplankton community composition and metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lindh, Markus V.; Figueroa, Daniela; Sjöstedt, Johanna; Baltar, Federico; Lundin, Daniel; Andersson, Agneta; Legrand, Catherine; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenically induced changes in precipitation are projected to generate increased river runoff to semi-enclosed seas, increasing loads of terrestrial dissolved organic matter and decreasing salinity. To determine how bacterial community structure and functioning adjust to such changes, we designed microcosm transplant experiments with Baltic Proper (salinity 7.2) and Bothnian Sea (salinity 3.6) water. Baltic Proper bacteria generally reached higher abundances than Bothnian Sea bacteria in both Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea water, indicating higher adaptability. Moreover, Baltic Proper bacteria growing in Bothnian Sea water consistently showed highest bacterial production and beta-glucosidase activity. These metabolic responses were accompanied by basin-specific changes in bacterial community structure. For example, Baltic Proper Pseudomonas and Limnobacter populations increased markedly in relative abundance in Bothnian Sea water, indicating a replacement effect. In contrast, Roseobacter and Rheinheimera populations were stable or increased in abundance when challenged by either of the waters, indicating an adjustment effect. Transplants to Bothnian Sea water triggered the initial emergence of particular Burkholderiaceae populations, and transplants to Baltic Proper water triggered Alteromonadaceae populations. Notably, in the subsequent re-transplant experiment, a priming effect resulted in further increases to dominance of these populations. Correlated changes in community composition and metabolic activity were observed only in the transplant experiment and only at relatively high phylogenetic resolution. This suggested an importance of successional progression for interpreting relationships between bacterial community composition and functioning. We infer that priming effects on bacterial community structure by natural episodic events or climate change induced forcing could translate into long-term changes in bacterial ecosystem process rates. PMID

  11. Human Serum-Specific Activation of Alternative Sigma Factors, the Stress Responders in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Tang-Siegel, Gaoyan; Bumgarner, Roger; Ruiz, Teresa; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Chen, Weizhen; Chen, Casey

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a known pathogen causing periodontal disease and infective endocarditis, is a survivor in the periodontal pocket and blood stream; both environments contain serum as a nutrient source. To screen for unknown virulence factors associated with this microorganism, A. actinomycetemcomitans was grown in serum-based media to simulate its in vivo environment. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans showed distinct growth phenotypes only in the presence of human serum, and they were grouped into high- and low-responder groups. High-responders comprised mainly serotype c strains, and showed an unusual growth phenomenon, featuring a second, rapid increase in turbidity after 9-h incubation that reached a final optical density 2- to 7-fold higher than low-responders. Upon further investigation, the second increase in turbidity was not caused by cell multiplication, but by cell death. Whole transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq identified 35 genes that were up-regulated by human serum, but not horse serum, in high-responders but not in low-responders, including prominently an alternative sigma factor rpoE (σE). A lacZ reporter construct driven by the 132-bp rpoE promoter sequence of A. actinomycetemcomitans responded dramatically to human serum within 90 min of incubation only when the construct was carried by a high responder strain. The rpoE promoter is 100% identical among high- and low-responder strains. Proteomic investigation showed potential interactions between human serum protein, e.g. apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The data clearly indicated a different activation process for rpoE in high- versus low-responder strains. This differential human serum-specific activation of rpoE, a putative extra-cytoplasmic stress responder and global regulator, suggests distinct in vivo adaptations among different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:27490177

  12. Tumor-Specific Peptide, Selected from a Phage Peptide Library, Enhances Antitumor Activity of Lactaptin

    PubMed Central

    Makartsova, Anna A.; Fomin, Alexandr S.; Nushtaeva, Anna A.; Koval, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    A recombinant analogue of lactaptin (RL2), a new potential anticancer molecule, induces apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. The tumor suppression efficacy of RL2 was shown against mouse hepatoma-1 cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells. The RL2-based therapeutic drug lactaptin is distributed evenly throughout the organism, which reduces its antitumor efficacy. In the current study, we obtained a genetic construct that allows production of the recombinant fusion protein T3-RL2, consisting of RL2 and T3 peptide (YTYDPWLIFPAN), in E. coli cells. T3 peptide was selected from a phage peptide library as a result of two screenings: in vitro using MDA-MB-231 cell culture and in vivo using a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer MDA-MB-231. It was shown that the displayed peptide T3 provides binding and internalization of phage particles by MDA-MB-231 cells and their specific accumulation in MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue. In addition, based on the nucleotide sequences coding RL2 and the known tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, we obtained genetic constructs that provide synthesis of fusion proteins RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His. We studied the cytotoxic activity of fusion proteins T3-RL2, RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His in vitro using MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human adenocarcinoma cells. The in vitro results showed that the fusion proteins inhibit proliferation of both cell cultures, and their cytotoxic activity is higher than that of RL2. In vivo experiments on the study of the antitumor efficacy of the obtained fusion proteins demonstrated that T3-RL2 protein significantly inhibits MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in a xenograft model compared with RL2, while the antitumor effect of RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His proteins is comparable to the effect of RL2. PMID:27513518

  13. Pyridinone derivatives: specific human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors with antiviral activity.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, M E; Nunberg, J H; O'Brien, J A; Quintero, J C; Schleif, W A; Freund, K F; Gaul, S L; Saari, W S; Wai, J S; Hoffman, J M

    1991-01-01

    Derivatives of pyridinones were found to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) activity and prevent the spread of HIV-1 infection in cell culture without an appreciable effect on other retroviral or cellular polymerases. 3-[( (4,7-Dimethyl-1,3-benzoxazol-2-yl) methyl]amino ]-5-ethyl-6-methylpyridin-2(1H)-one (L-697,639) and 3-[[ (4,7-dichloro-1,3-benzoxazol-2-yl) methyl]amino]-5-ethyl-6-methylpyridin-2(1H)-one (L-697,661), two compounds within this series, had HIV-1 RT IC50 values in the range of 20-800 nM, depending upon the template-primer used. The most potent inhibition was obtained with rC.dG and dA.dT as template--primers. With rC.dG, reversible slow-binding non-competitive inhibition was observed. [3H]L-697,639 bound preferentially to enzyme-template-primer complexes. This binding was magnesium-dependent and saturable with a stoichiometry of 1 mol of [3H]L-697,639 per mol of RT heterodimer. Displacement of [3H]L-697,639 was seen with phosphonoformate. In human T-lymphoid-cell culture, L-697,639 and L-697,661 inhibited the spread of HIV-1 infection by at least 95% at concentrations of 12-200 nM. Synergism between 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine or dideoxyinosine and either of these compounds was also demonstrated in cell culture. Based upon their specificity for HIV-1 RT activity, template-primer dependence on potency and ability to displace [3H]L-697,639; a tetrahydroimidazo [4,5,1-jk] [1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione derivative R82150 and the dipyridodiazepinone BI-RG-587 appear to inhibit RT activity by the same mechanism as the pyridinones. PMID:1713693

  14. Activity of increased specific and non-specific esterases and glutathione transferases associated with resistance to permethrin in pediculus humanus capitis (phthiraptera: pediculidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Silvia; Zerba, Eduardo; Picollo, Maria I; Audino, Paola Gonzalez

    2010-01-01

    Enhanced metabolism by oxidative enzymes is a major cause of pyrethroid resistance in insects. In this work, we evaluated the role of specific and non-specific esterases in head louse populations from Buenos Aires with different levels of resistance to permethrin. As esterase activity is substrate-dependent, four different esters were used as unspecific substrates in order to obtain a better characterization of the possible role of these enzymes in the resistance phenomenon. The unspecific substrates were phenylthioacetate, 1- and 2-naphtyl-acetate, and p-nitrophenyl acetate. A 7-coumaryl permethrate was synthesized and used as a specific substrate to measure pyrethroid esterases by a very sensitive microfluorometric method. The results on pyrethroid esterase activity obtained with this substrate showed that these enzymes contribute to the detoxifying activity in resistant populations, although no correlation was found between pyrethroid esterase activity and resistance ratios. In this study, we established that the activity of esterase against specific and non-specific substrates is increased in pyrethroid-resistant populations of head lice from Buenos Aires. Also, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) resistance values demonstrated that there is a DDT cross-resistance phenomenon in pyrethroid-resistant head louse populations and suggested that an alteration in the receptor of the nervous system (kdr gen) is a key factor of the resistance phenomena in these head louse populations. PMID:19921258

  15. Production of radiohalogens and [11C]-methane at high specific activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, Jonathon Andrew

    2005-07-01

    The halogens, occupying Group VII of the periodic table, play an important role in the biochemical processes underlying health and disease. A variety of positron emitters covering a broad range of half-lives permit the imaging of the body's physiochemical behavior using PET. Neutron deficient isotopes of the halogen group can be produced by (p,n) reactions from enriched targets with low energy (<13MeV) biomedical cyclotrons. These cyclotrons are distributed relatively evenly throughout the United States at research institutions and commercial distribution sites (i.e., 100+ CTI RDS 11MeV proton cyclotrons). However, these sites concentrate on the core group of positron emitters: 15O, 13N, 11C, and primarily 18F-fluoride. The simplicity of the production process insures their role in the clinical/research environment, labeling H215 O, 13NH3, CH3-compounds and 18F-FDG. Halogens with half-lives longer than 18F have been avoided due to a combination of several factors, such as complexity of the target systems, expense of the enriched substrate, low reaction yields, and extensive post-processing to reclaim the target material. PET research over the last decade has forced a match between drug development and emerging small animal instrumentation, shifting focus to agents labeled with high specific activity 11CH3I and the long-lived radiohalogens, 76Br and 124I. A steady local supply of 18F-fluoride, 11C-methane, 76B-bromide, and 124I-iodide is essential to seize today's research opportunities or for limited distribution outside of our local area. To keep pace, new targetry developments are implemented to reliably produce these isotopes on a batch basis. The research presented details improvements on existing production methods for 18F-fluoride intended for nucleophilic substitution and high specific activity 11C-methane (→CH3I) for the N-methylation of a half-dozen neuroligands. A significant effort is placed on the novel use of low energy cyclotrons for the production

  16. Co-activation: its association with weakness and specific neurological pathology

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Monica E; Wiles, Charles M; van Deursen, Robert WM

    2006-01-01

    Background Net agonist muscle strength is in part determined by the degree of antagonist co-activation. The level of co-activation might vary in different neurological disorders causing weakness or might vary with agonist strength. Aim This study investigated whether antagonist co-activation changed a) with the degree of muscle weakness and b) with the nature of the neurological lesion causing weakness. Methods Measures of isometric quadriceps and hamstrings strength were obtained. Antagonist (hamstring) co-activation during knee extension was calculated as a ratio of hamstrings over quadriceps activity both during an isometric and during a functional sit to stand (STS) task (using kinematics) in groups of patients with extrapyramidal (n = 15), upper motor neuron (UMN) (n = 12), lower motor neuron (LMN) with (n = 18) or without (n = 12) sensory loss, primary muscle or neuromuscular junction disorder (n = 17) and in healthy matched controls (n = 32). Independent t-tests or Mann Witney U tests were used to compare between the groups. Correlations between variables were also investigated. Results In healthy subjects mean (SD) co-activation of hamstrings during isometric knee extension was 11.8 (6.2)% and during STS was 20.5 (12.9)%. In patients, co-activation ranged from 7 to 17% during isometric knee extension and 15 to 25% during STS. Only the extrapyramidal group had lower co-activation levels than healthy matched controls (p < 0.05). Agonist isometric muscle strength and co-activation correlated only in muscle disease (r = -0.6, p < 0.05) and during STS in UMN disorders (r = -0.7, p < 0.5). Conclusion It is concluded that antagonist co-activation does not systematically vary with the site of neurological pathology when compared to healthy matched controls or, in most patient groups, with strength. The lower co-activation levels found in the extrapyramidal group require confirmation and further investigation. Co-activation may be relevant to individuals with muscle

  17. The role of membrane fusion activity of a whole inactivated influenza virus vaccine in (re)activation of influenza-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Budimir, Natalija; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Huckriede, Anke; de Haan, Aalzen

    2010-12-01

    Induction of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity against conserved influenza antigens, e.g. nucleoprotein (NP) could be a step towards cross-protective influenza vaccine. The major challenge for non-replicating influenza vaccines aiming for activation of CTLs is targeting of antigen to the MHC class I processing and presentation pathway of professional antigen presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DCs). Intrinsic fusogenic properties of the vaccine particle itself can enable direct cytosolic delivery of the antigen by enhancing release of the antigen from the endosome to the cytosol. Alternatively, the vaccine particle would need to possess the capacity to activate DCs thereby triggering cell-intrinsic mechanisms of cross-presentation, processes that do not require fusion. Here, using fusion-active and fusion-inactive whole inactivated virus (WIV) as a vaccine model, we studied the relative contribution of these two pathways on priming and reactivation of influenza NP-specific CTLs in a murine model. We show that activation of bone marrow-derived DCs by WIV, as well as reactivation of NP-specific CTLs in vitro and in vivo were not affected by inactivation of membrane fusion of the WIV particles. However, in vivo priming of naive CTLs was optimal only upon vaccination with fusion-active WIV. Thus, DC-intrinsic mechanisms of cross-presentation are involved in the activation of CTLs upon vaccination with WIV. However, for optimal priming of naive CTLs these mechanisms should be complemented by delivery of antigen to the cytosol mediated by the membrane fusion capacity of the WIV particles. PMID:20965298

  18. Hemagglutination activities of group B, C, D, and G streptococci: demonstration of novel sugar-specific cell-binding activities in Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed Central

    Kurl, D N; Haataja, S; Finne, J

    1989-01-01

    A total of 378 streptococcal isolates of Lancefield groups B, C, D and G were tested for their ability to hemagglutinate untreated, sialidase-treated, and endo-beta-galactosidase-treated human erythrocytes. Of the 43 strains showing positive hemagglutination, 9 were inhibitable with neutral monosaccharides. Four strains were inhibited with galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine, whereas five were inhibited with galactose only. A third, sialic acid-specific adhesion activity was suggested for two additional strains on the basis of their agglutination of native and endo-beta-galactosidase-treated but not sialidase-treated erythrocytes. All the sugar-specific agglutination activities detected were confined to Streptococcus suis strains of group D streptococci, whereas streptococci of other groups did not exhibit these types of hemagglutination activities. The adhesins were sensitive to proteases and heat treatment, which indicates that they were proteins. The hemagglutinating isolates of S. suis originated from pig brain and lung, human brain, and the tonsils of healthy pigs. No clear correlation with a particular serotype was observed. These results demonstrate the occurrence of unique sugar-specific adherence activities in S. suis, an important pig pathogen with occasional human pathogenicity. PMID:2492258

  19. Anti-human cytomegalovirus activity of cytokines produced by CD4+ T-cell clones specifically activated by IE1 peptides in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Davignon, J L; Castanié, P; Yorke, J A; Gautier, N; Clément, D; Davrinche, C

    1996-01-01

    The control of latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections by the immune system is poorly understood. We have previously shown that CD4+ T cells specific for the human CMV major regulatory protein IE1 are frequent in latently infected healthy blood donors. In order to learn about the possible role of these cells, we have developed IE1-specific CD4+ T-cell clones and, in this study, analyzed their epitope specificity and function in vitro. We measured their cytokine production when stimulated with specific IE1 peptides or whole recombinant IE1 protein. Their cytokine profiles, as deduced from gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-6 production, were of the Th0- and Th1-like phenotypes. Supernatants from IE1-specific clones producing IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were shown to inhibit CMV replication in U373 MG cells. This effect was due, as found by using cytokine-specific neutralizing antibodies, mostly to IFN-gamma, which was secreted at higher levels than TNF-alpha. To better assess the anti-CMV activity of cytokines, recombinant IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were used and shown to have a synergistic effect on the inhibition of CMV replication and protein expression. Thus, IE1-specific CD4+ T cells display in vitro anti-CMV activity through cytokine secretion and may play a role in the control of in vivo latent infections. PMID:8642638

  20. Physical activity recommendations for children with specific chronic health conditions: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis, hemophilia, asthma and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Philpott, J; Houghton, K; Luke, A

    2010-04-01

    As a group, children with a chronic disease or disability are less active than their healthy peers. There are many reasons for suboptimal physical activity, including biological, psychological and social factors. Furthermore, the lack of specific guidelines for 'safe' physical activity participation poses a barrier to increasing activity. Physical activity provides significant general health benefits and may improve disease outcomes. Each child with a chronic illness should be evaluated by an experienced physician for activity counselling and for identifing any contraindications to participation. The present statement reviews the benefits and risks of participation in sport and exercise for children with juvenile arthritis, hemophilia, asthma and cystic fibrosis. Guidelines for participation are included. PMID:21455465

  1. Physical activity recommendations for children with specific chronic health conditions: juvenile idiopathic arthritis, hemophilia, asthma, and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Philpott, John F; Houghton, Kristin; Luke, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    As a group, children with a chronic disease or disability are less active than their healthy peers. There are many reasons for suboptimal physical activity, including biological, psychological, and social factors. Furthermore, the lack of specific guidelines for 'safe' physical activity participation poses a barrier to increasing activity. Physical activity provides significant general health benefits and may improve disease outcomes. Each child with a chronic illness should be evaluated by an experienced physician for activity counselling and for identifying any contraindications to participation. The present statement reviews the benefits and risks of participation in sport and exercise for children with juvenile arthritis, hemophilia, asthma, and cystic fibrosis. Guidelines for participation are included. PMID:20445355

  2. Lumican Inhibits SNAIL-Induced Melanoma Cell Migration Specifically by Blocking MMP-14 Activity.

    PubMed

    Stasiak, Marta; Boncela, Joanna; Perreau, Corinne; Karamanou, Konstantina; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Proult, Isabelle; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Chakravarti, Shukti; Maquart, François-Xavier; Kowalska, M Anna; Wegrowski, Yanusz; Brézillon, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan, inhibits MMP-14 activity and melanoma cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Snail triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transitions endowing epithelial cells with migratory and invasive properties during tumor progression. The aim of this work was to investigate lumican effects on MMP-14 activity and migration of Snail overexpressing B16F1 (Snail-B16F1) melanoma cells and HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Lumican inhibits the Snail induced MMP-14 activity in B16F1 but not in HT-29 cells. In Snail-B16F1 cells, lumican inhibits migration, growth, and melanoma primary tumor development. A lumican-based strategy targeting Snail-induced MMP-14 activity might be useful for melanoma treatment. PMID:26930497

  3. Lumican Inhibits SNAIL-Induced Melanoma Cell Migration Specifically by Blocking MMP-14 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stasiak, Marta; Boncela, Joanna; Perreau, Corinne; Karamanou, Konstantina; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Proult, Isabelle; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Chakravarti, Shukti; Maquart, François-Xavier; Kowalska, M. Anna; Wegrowski, Yanusz; Brézillon, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan, inhibits MMP-14 activity and melanoma cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Snail triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transitions endowing epithelial cells with migratory and invasive properties during tumor progression. The aim of this work was to investigate lumican effects on MMP-14 activity and migration of Snail overexpressing B16F1 (Snail-B16F1) melanoma cells and HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Lumican inhibits the Snail induced MMP-14 activity in B16F1 but not in HT-29 cells. In Snail-B16F1 cells, lumican inhibits migration, growth, and melanoma primary tumor development. A lumican-based strategy targeting Snail-induced MMP-14 activity might be useful for melanoma treatment. PMID:26930497

  4. Bacillus subtilis ccpA gene mutants specifically defective in activation of acetoin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Turinsky, A J; Moir-Blais, T R; Grundy, F J; Henkin, T M

    2000-10-01

    A large number of carbon source utilization pathways are repressed in Bacillus subtilis by the global regulator CcpA, which also acts as an activator of carbon excretion pathways during growth in media containing glucose. In this study, CcpA mutants defective in transcriptional activation of the alsSD operon, which is involved in acetoin biosynthesis, were identified. These mutants retained normal glucose repression of amyE, encoding alpha-amylase, and acsA, encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase, and normal activation of ackA, which is involved in acetate excretion; in these ccpA mutants the CcpA functions of activation of the acetate and acetoin excretion pathways appear to be separated. PMID:10986270

  5. Organelle-Specific Activity-Based Protein Profiling in Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Susan D.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Chrisler, William B.; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-02-06

    A multimodal acidic organelle targeting activity-based probe was developed for analysis of subcellular native enzymatic activity of cells by fluorescent microscopy and mass spectrometry. A cathepsin reactive warhead was conjugated to an acidotropic amine, and a clickable alkyne for appendage of AlexaFluor 488 or biotin reporter tags. This probe accumulated in punctate vesicles surrounded by LAMP1, a lysosome marker, as observed by Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) in J774 mouse macrophage cells. Biotin conjugation, affinity purification, and analysis of in vivo labeled J774 by mass spectrometry showed that the probe was very selective for Cathepsins B and Z, two lysosomal cysteine proteases. Analysis of starvation induced autophagy, which is an increase in cell component catabolism involving lysosomes, showed a large increase in tagged protein number and an increase in cathepsin activity. Organelle targeting activity-based probes and subsequent analysis of resident proteins by mass spectrometry is enabled by tuning the physicochemical properties of the probe.

  6. Engineering of Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120 for Constitutive Solvent Tolerance and Increased Specific Styrene Epoxidation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Volmer, Jan; Neumann, Christoph; Schmid, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The application of whole cells as biocatalysts is often limited by the toxicity of organic solvents, which constitute interesting substrates/products or can be used as a second phase for in situ product removal and as tools to control multistep biocatalysis. Solvent-tolerant bacteria, especially Pseudomonas strains, are proposed as promising hosts to overcome such limitations due to their inherent solvent tolerance mechanisms. However, potential industrial applications suffer from tedious, unproductive adaptation processes, phenotypic variability, and instable solvent-tolerant phenotypes. In this study, genes described to be involved in solvent tolerance were identified in Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120, and adaptive solvent tolerance was proven by cultivation in the presence of 1% (vol/vol) toluene. Deletion of ttgV, coding for the specific transcriptional repressor of solvent efflux pump TtgGHI gene expression, led to constitutively solvent-tolerant mutants of P. taiwanensis VLB120 and VLB120ΔC. Interestingly, the increased amount of solvent efflux pumps enhanced not only growth in the presence of toluene and styrene but also the biocatalytic performance in terms of stereospecific styrene epoxidation, although proton-driven solvent efflux is expected to compete with the styrene monooxygenase for metabolic energy. Compared to that of the P. taiwanensis VLB120ΔC parent strain, the maximum specific epoxidation activity of P. taiwanensis VLB120ΔCΔttgV doubled to 67 U/g of cells (dry weight). This study shows that solvent tolerance mechanisms, e.g., the solvent efflux pump TtgGHI, not only allow for growth in the presence of organic compounds but can also be used as tools to improve redox biocatalysis involving organic solvents. PMID:25128338

  7. Barriers for recess physical activity: a gender specific qualitative focus group exploration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many children, in particular girls, do not reach the recommended amount of daily physical activity. School recess provides an opportunity for both boys and girls to be physically active, but barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. This study explores gender differences in children’s perceptions of barriers to recess physical activity. Based on the socio-ecological model four types of environmental barriers were distinguished: natural, social, physical and organizational environment. Methods Data were collected through 17 focus groups (at 17 different schools) with in total 111 children (53 boys) from fourth grade, with a mean age of 10.4 years. The focus groups included an open group discussion, go-along group interviews, and a gender segregated post-it note activity. A content analysis of the post-it notes was used to rank the children’s perceived barriers. This was verified by a thematic analysis of transcripts from the open discussions and go-along interviews. Results The most frequently identified barriers for both boys and girls were weather, conflicts, lack of space, lack of play facilities and a newly-found barrier, use of electronic devices. While boys and girls identified the same barriers, there were both inter- and intra-gender differences in the perception of these barriers. Weather was a barrier for all children, apart from the most active boys. Conflicts were perceived as a barrier particularly by those boys who played ballgames. Girls said they would like to have more secluded areas added to the school playground, even in large schoolyards where lack of space was not a barrier. This aligned with girls’ requests for more “hanging-out” facilities, whereas boys primarily wanted activity promoting facilities. Conclusion Based on the results from this study, we recommend promoting recess physical activity through a combination of actions, addressing barriers within the natural, social, physical and

  8. Structural variants of yeast prions show conformer-specific requirements for chaperone activity

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Kevin C.; True, Heather L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Molecular chaperones monitor protein homeostasis and defend against the misfolding and aggregation of proteins that is associated with protein conformational disorders. In these diseases, a variety of different aggregate structures can form. These are called prion strains, or variants, in prion diseases, and cause variation in disease pathogenesis. Here, we use variants of the yeast prions [RNQ+] and [PSI+] to explore the interactions of chaperones with distinct aggregate structures. We found that prion variants show striking variation in their relationship with Hsp40s. Specifically, the yeast Hsp40 Sis1, and its human ortholog Hdj1, had differential capacities to process prion variants, suggesting that Hsp40 selectivity has likely changed through evolution. We further show that such selectivity involves different domains of Sis1, with some prion conformers having a greater dependence on particular Hsp40 domains. Moreover, [PSI+] variants were more sensitive to certain alterations in Hsp70 activity as compared to [RNQ+] variants. Collectively, our data indicate that distinct chaperone machinery is required, or has differential capacity, to process different aggregate structures. Elucidating the intricacies of chaperone-client interactions, and how these are altered by particular client structures, will be crucial to understanding how this system can go awry in disease and contribute to pathological variation. PMID:25060529

  9. Active transport, substrate specificity, and methylation of Hg(II) in anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Schasfer, Jeffra; Rocks, Sara; Zheng, Wang; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua; Morel, Francois M

    2011-01-01

    The formation of methylmercury (MeHg), which is biomagnified in aquatic food chains and poses a risk to human health, is effected by some iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (FeRB and SRB) in anaerobic environments. However, very little is known regarding the mechanism of uptake of inorganic Hg by these organisms, in part because of the inherent difficulty in measuring the intracellular Hg concentration. By using the FeRB Geobacter sulfurreducens and the SRB Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as model organisms, we demonstrate that Hg(II) uptake occurs by active transport. We also establish that Hg(II) uptake by G. sulfurreducens is highly dependent on the characteristics of the thiols that bind Hg(II) in the external medium, with some thiols promoting uptake and methylation and others inhibiting both. The Hg(II) uptake system of D. desulfuricans has a higher affinity than that of G. sulfurreducens and promotes Hg methylation in the presence of stronger complexing thiols. We observed a tight coupling between Hg methylation and MeHg export from the cell, suggesting that these two processes may serve to avoid the build up and toxicity of cellular Hg. Our results bring up the question of whether cellular Hg uptake is specific for Hg(II) or accidental, occurring via some essential metal importer. Our data also point at Hg(II) complexation by thiols as an important factor controlling Hg methylation in anaerobic environments.

  10. Prostate-specific antigen as a marker of disease activity in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Partin, Alan W; Hanks, Gerald E; Klein, Eric A; Moul, Judd W; Nelson, William G; Scher, Howard I

    2002-09-01

    Despite the impact of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing on the detection and management of prostate cancer, controversy about its usefulness as a marker of disease activity continues. This review, based on a recent roundtable discussion, examines whether PSA measurements can be used rationally in several clinical settings. Following radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy, prediction of survival by PSA level is most reliable in high-risk patients. PSA doubling time after radiation therapy is the strongest predictor of biochemical failure. PSA measurements have been associated with inconsistent results following hormonal treatment; reduced PSA levels may result from antiandrogen treatment, which decreases expression of the PSA gene, and therefore, the level of PSA production. In the setting of primary and secondary cancer prevention, PSA is important in risk stratification when selecting patients for studies. Part 2 of this two-part article, which began in the August issue, discusses the role of PSA in hormonal and drug therapies and in primary and secondary chemoprevention. PMID:12380948

  11. Measurement of General and Specific Approaches to Physical Activity Parenting: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Samantha; Cohen, Alysia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Parents play a significant role in shaping youth physical activity (PA). However, interventions targeting PA parenting have been ineffective. Methodological inconsistencies related to the measurement of parental influences may be a contributing factor. The purpose of this article is to review the extant peer-reviewed literature related to the measurement of general and specific parental influences on youth PA. Methods A systematic review of studies measuring constructs of PA parenting was conducted. Computerized searches were completed using PubMed, MEDLINE, Academic Search Premier, SPORTDiscus, and PsycINFO. Reference lists of the identified articles were manually reviewed as well as the authors' personal collections. Articles were selected on the basis of strict inclusion criteria and details regarding the measurement protocols were extracted. A total of 117 articles met the inclusionary criteria. Methodological articles that evaluated the validity and reliability of PA parenting measures (n=10) were reviewed separately from parental influence articles (n=107). Results A significant percentage of studies used measures with indeterminate validity and reliability. A significant percentage of articles did not provide sample items, describe the response format, or report the possible range of scores. No studies were located that evaluated sensitivity to change. Conclusion The reporting of measurement properties and the use of valid and reliable measurement scales need to be improved considerably. PMID:23944923

  12. Simple procedure for the synthesis of high specific activity tritiated (6S)-5-formyltetrahydrofolate

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, R.G.; Colman, P.D.

    1982-05-01

    The 5-position of tetrahydrofolate was found to be unusually reactive with low concentrations of formic acid in the presence of a water-soluble carbodiimide. The product of this reaction has neutral and acid ultraviolet spectra and chromatographic behavior consistent with its identity as 5-formyltetrahydrofolate (leucovoriun). When enzymatically synthesized (6S)-tetrahydrofolate was used as starting material, the product supported the growth of folate-depleted L1210 cells at one-half the concentration required for authentic (6R,S)-leucovorin. This reaction has been used to produce high specific activity (44 Ci/mmol) (/sup 3/H)(6S)-5-formyltetrahydrofolate in high yield. Experiments with (/sup 14/C)formic acid indicate that 1 mol of formate reacted per mol of tetrahydrofolate but that no reaction occurred with a variety of other folate compounds. (6S)-5-Formyltetrahydrofolate, labeled in the formyl group with /sup 14/C, has also been synthesized using this reaction. These easily produced, labeled folates should allow close examination of the transport and utilization of leucovorin and of the mechanism of reversal of methotrexate toxicity by reduced folate cofactors.

  13. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase specifically binds to the poliovirus IRES to activate translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Dmitri E.; Hirnet, Juliane; Terenin, Ilya M.; Dmitriev, Sergey E.; Niepmann, Michael; Shatsky, Ivan N.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to the host cell environment to efficiently take-over the host cell's machinery is crucial in particular for small RNA viruses like picornaviruses that come with only small RNA genomes and replicate exclusively in the cytosol. Their Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements are specific RNA structures that facilitate the 5′ end-independent internal initiation of translation both under normal conditions and when the cap-dependent host protein synthesis is shut-down in infected cells. A longstanding issue is which host factors play a major role in this internal initiation. Here, we show that the functionally most important domain V of the poliovirus IRES uses tRNAGly anticodon stem–loop mimicry to recruit glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) to the apical part of domain V, adjacent to the binding site of the key initiation factor eIF4G. The binding of GARS promotes the accommodation of the initiation region of the IRES in the mRNA binding site of the ribosome, thereby greatly enhancing the activity of the IRES at the step of the 48S initiation complex formation. Moonlighting functions of GARS that may be additionally needed for other events of the virus–host cell interaction are discussed. PMID:22373920

  14. Isomer-specific biodegradation of nonylphenol in an activated sludge bioreactor and structure-biodegradability relationship.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhijiang; Reif, Rubén; Gan, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Nonylphenol (NP), one of the priority hazardous substances, is in fact a mixture of numerous isomers. It is inconclusive whether or not biodegradation during wastewater treatment process is isomer-specific, leading to the environmental release of NP in different isomer profiles. In this study, we evaluated the isomer selectivity of 19 NP isomers in a laboratory-scale continuous flow conventional activated sludge bioreactor under various operational conditions. The removal efficiency of NP isomers ranged from 90 to 99%, depending on the operational conditions and isomer structures. Isomer selective biodegradation resulted in the increase of composition of recalcitrant isomers, such as, NP₁₉₃a/b, NP₁₁₀a and NP₁₉₄ in the effluent. Moreover, biodegradability was related to the bulkiness of α-substituents and followed α-dimethyl > α-ethyl-α-methyl > α-methyl-α-n-propyl > α-iso-propyl-α-methyl. Steric effect index, a quantitative descriptor of steric hindrance, was linearly correlated with residues of NP isomers in the effluent (R² = 0.76). Decrease of temperature to 10 °C decreased the overall biodegradability and also enhanced the relative enrichment of recalcitrant isomers. These findings suggest that isomer compositions of NP entering the environment may be different from those in technical mixtures and that isomeric selectivity should be taken into account to better understand the occurrence, fate, and ecological risks of NP. PMID:25462736

  15. Electrical brain stimulation improves cognitive performance by modulating functional connectivity and task-specific activation.

    PubMed

    Meinzer, Marcus; Antonenko, Daria; Lindenberg, Robert; Hetzer, Stefan; Ulm, Lena; Avirame, Keren; Flaisch, Tobias; Flöel, Agnes

    2012-02-01

    Excitatory anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (atDCS) can improve human cognitive functions, but neural underpinnings of its mode of action remain elusive. In a cross-over placebo ("sham") controlled study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate neurofunctional correlates of improved language functions induced by atDCS over a core language area, the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Intrascanner transcranial direct current stimulation-induced changes in overt semantic word generation assessed behavioral modulation; task-related and task-independent (resting-state) fMRI characterized language network changes. Improved word-retrieval during atDCS was paralleled by selectively reduced task-related activation in the left ventral IFG, an area specifically implicated in semantic retrieval processes. Under atDCS, resting-state fMRI revealed increased connectivity of the left IFG and additional major hubs overlapping with the language network. In conclusion, atDCS modulates endogenous low-frequency oscillations in a distributed set of functionally connected brain areas, possibly inducing more efficient processing in critical task-relevant areas and improved behavioral performance. PMID:22302824

  16. The retrieval of self-defining memories is associated with the activation of specific working selves.

    PubMed

    Çili, Soljana; Stopa, Lusia

    2015-01-01

    This article presents two studies that investigated the impact of the retrieval of self-defining memories on individuals' sense of self. Participants recalled positive and/or negative self-defining memories, rated memory characteristics and completed measures focusing on different self-aspects. Study 1 found that participants reported higher state self-esteem after recalling a positive memory than after recalling a negative one. They also reported lower negative self-consistency and higher state self-concept clarity and positive self-consistency, but this result became non-significant after controlling for state self-esteem. Study 2 found that participants reported higher state self-esteem, a marginally higher proportion of recreation/exploration, goals and a marginally lower proportion of achievement goals after recalling a positive memory than after recalling a negative one. They also reported a higher proportion of self-cognitions referring to emotional states after recalling memories from which they had not abstracted meaning than after recalling memories from which they had done this. These findings suggest that the retrieval of vivid, emotional and highly self-relevant memories may be accompanied by the activation of specific self-representations or working selves. They also suggest that the experience of memory-related intrusive images may temporarily influence individuals' sense of self. The implications of these findings for clinical practice are discussed. PMID:24528183

  17. Cell wall substrate specificity of six different lysozymes and lysozyme inhibitory activity of bacterial extracts.

    PubMed

    Nakimbugwe, Dorothy; Masschalck, Barbara; Deckers, Daphne; Callewaert, Lien; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2006-06-01

    We have investigated the specificity of six different lysozymes for peptidoglycan substrates obtained by extraction of a number of gram-negative bacteria and Micrococcus lysodeikticus with chloroform/Tris-HCl buffer (chloroform/buffer). The lysozymes included two that are commercially available (hen egg white lysozyme or HEWL, and mutanolysin from Streptomyces globisporus or M1L), and four that were chromatographically purified (bacteriophage lambda lysozyme or LaL, bacteriophage T4 lysozyme or T4L, goose egg white lysozyme or GEWL, and cauliflower lysozyme or CFL). HEWL was much more effective on M. lysodeikticus than on any of the gram-negative cell walls, while the opposite was found for LaL. Also the gram-negative cell walls showed remarkable differences in susceptibility to the different lysozymes, even for closely related species like Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium. These differences could not be due to the presence of lysozyme inhibitors such as Ivy from E. coli in the cell wall substrates because we showed that chloroform extraction effectively removed this inhibitor. Interestingly, we found strong inhibitory activity to HEWL in the chloroform/buffer extracts of Salmonella Typhimurium, and to LaL in the extracts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggesting that other lysozyme inhibitors than Ivy exist and are probably widespread in gram-negative bacteria. PMID:16684100

  18. Cell cycle-specific cleavage of Scc2 regulates its cohesin deposition activity

    PubMed Central

    Woodman, Julie; Fara, Tyler; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Trejo, Michael; Luong, Nancy; Hansen, Kirk C.; Megee, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Sister chromatid cohesion (SCC), efficient DNA repair, and the regulation of some metazoan genes require the association of cohesins with chromosomes. Cohesins are deposited by a conserved heterodimeric loading complex composed of the Scc2 and Scc4 proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but how the Scc2/Scc4 deposition complex regulates the spatiotemporal association of cohesin with chromosomes is not understood. We examined Scc2 chromatin association during the cell division cycle and found that the affinity of Scc2 for chromatin increases biphasically during the cell cycle, increasing first transiently in late G1 phase and then again later in G2/M. Inactivation of Scc2 following DNA replication reduces cellular viability, suggesting that this post S-phase increase in Scc2 chromatin binding affinity is biologically relevant. Interestingly, high and low Scc2 chromatin binding levels correlate strongly with the presence of full-length or amino-terminally cleaved forms of Scc2, respectively, and the appearance of the cleaved Scc2 species is promoted in vitro either by treatment with specific cell cycle-staged cellular extracts or by dephosphorylation. Importantly, Scc2 cleavage eliminates Scc2–Scc4 physical interactions, and an scc2 truncation mutant that mimics in vivo Scc2 cleavage is defective for cohesin deposition. These observations suggest a previously unidentified mechanism for the spatiotemporal regulation of cohesin association with chromosomes through cell cycle regulation of Scc2 cohesin deposition activity by Scc2 dephosphorylation and cleavage. PMID:24778232

  19. Ultrasensitive and specific measurement of protease activity using functionalized photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Bakul; Mai, Kelly; Lowe, Stuart B; Wakefield, Denis; Di Girolamo, Nick; Gaus, Katharina; Reece, Peter J; Gooding, J Justin

    2015-10-01

    Herein is presented a microsensor technology as a diagnostic tool for detecting specific matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) at very low concentrations. MMP-2 and MMP-9 are detected using label free porous silicon (PSi) photonic crystals that have been made selective for a given MMP by filling the nanopores with synthetic polymeric substrates containing a peptide sequence for that MMP. Proteolytic cleavage of the peptide sequence results in a shift in wavelength of the main peak in the reflectivity spectrum of the PSi device, which is dependent on the amount of MMP present. The ability to detect picogram amounts of MMP-2 and MMP-9 released by primary retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is demonstrated. It was found that both cell types secrete higher amounts of MMP-2 than MMP-9 in their stimulated state, with RPE cells producing higher amounts of MMPs than IPE cells. The microsensor performance was compared to conventional protease detection systems, including gelatin zymography and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). It was found that the PSi microsensors were more sensitive than gelatin zymography; PSi microsensors detected the presence of both MMP-2 and MMP-9 while zymography could only detect MMP-2. The MMP-2 and MMP-9 quantification correlated well with the ELISA. This new method of detecting protease activity shows superior performance to conventional protease assays and has the potential for translation to high-throughput multiplexed analysis. PMID:26312479

  20. Opportunities to exploit non-neutralizing HIV-specific antibody activity

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Margaret E.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies act as a nexus between innate and adaptive immunity: they provide a means to engage a spectrum of innate immune effector cells in order to clear viral particles and infected cells, and prime antigen presentation. This functional landscape is remarkably complex, and depends on antibody isotype, subclass, and glycosylation; the expression levels and patterns of a suite of Fc receptors with both complementary and opposing activities; and a host of innate immune cells capable of differential responses to opsonized particles and present at different sites. In vivo, even neutralizing antibodies rely on their ability to act as molecular beacons and recruit innate immune effector cells in order to provide protection, and results from both human and macaque studies have implicated these effector functions in vaccine-mediated protection. Thus, while enhancing effector function is a tractable handle for potentiating antibody-mediated protection from HIV infection, success will depend critically on leveraging understanding of the means by which antibodies with specific functional profiles could be elicited, which effector functions could provide optimal protection, and perhaps most critically, how to efficiently recruit the innate effector cells present at sites of infection. PMID:24191934

  1. High salt primes a specific activation state of macrophages, M(Na).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wu-Chang; Zheng, Xiao-Jun; Du, Lin-Juan; Sun, Jian-Yong; Shen, Zhu-Xia; Shi, Chaoji; Sun, Shuyang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Qin, Mu; Liu, Xu; Tao, Jun; Jia, Lijun; Fan, Heng-Yu; Zhou, Bin; Yu, Ying; Ying, Hao; Hui, Lijian; Liu, Xiaolong; Yi, Xianghua; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Lanjing; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2015-08-01

    High salt is positively associated with the risk of many diseases. However, little is known about the mechanisms. Here we showed that high salt increased proinflammatory molecules, while decreased anti-inflammatory and proendocytic molecules in both human and mouse macrophages. High salt also potentiated lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation and suppressed interleukin 4-induced macrophage activation. High salt induced the proinflammatory aspects by activating p38/cFos and/or Erk1/2/cFos pathways, while inhibited the anti-inflammatory and proendocytic aspects by Erk1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 pathway. Consistent with the in vitro results, high-salt diet increased proinflammatory gene expression of mouse alveolar macrophages. In mouse models of acute lung injury, high-salt diet aggravated lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary macrophage activation and inflammation in lungs. These results identify a novel macrophage activation state, M(Na), and high salt as a potential environmental risk factor for lung inflammation through the induction of M(Na). PMID:26206316

  2. MODALITY SPECIFIC CEREBRO-CEREBELLAR ACTIVATIONS IN VERBAL WORKING MEMORY: AN FMRI STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Annabel Chen, S. H.; Desmond, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Verbal working memory (VWM) engages frontal and temporal/parietal circuits subserving the phonological loop, as well as, superior and inferior cerebellar regions which have projections from these neocortical areas. Different cerebro-cerebellar circuits may be engaged for integrating aurally- and visually-presented information for VWM. The present fMRI study investigated load (2, 4, or 6 letters) and modality (auditory and visual) dependent cerebro-cerebellar VWM activation using a Sternberg task. FMRI revealed modality-independent activations in left frontal (BA 6/9/44), insular, cingulate (BA 32), and bilateral inferior parietal/supramarginal (BA 40) regions, as well as in bilateral superior (HVI) and right inferior (HVIII) cerebellar regions. Visual presentation evoked prominent activations in right superior (HVI/CrusI) cerebellum, bilateral occipital (BA19) and left parietal (BA7/40) cortex while auditory presentation showed robust activations predominately in bilateral temporal regions (BA21/22). In the cerebellum, we noted a visual to auditory emphasis of function progressing from superior to inferior and from lateral to medial regions. These results extend our previous findings of fMRI activation in cerebro-cerebellar networks during VWM, and demonstrate both modality dependent commonalities and differences in activations with increasing memory load. PMID:20714061

  3. Cilofungin (LY121019), an antifungal agent with specific activity against Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, G S; Myles, C; Pratt, K J; Washington, J A

    1988-01-01

    Cilofungin (LY121019) is an antifungal agent that interferes with beta-glucan synthesis in the cells walls of fungi. The activity of this agent against 256 clinical isolates of yeasts was determined. It was found to be very active in vitro against Candida albicans (MIC for 90% of isolates [MIC90], less than or equal to 0.31 microgram/ml; minimal fungicidal concentration for 90% of isolates [MFC90], less than or equal to 0.31 micrograms/ml) and C. tropicalis (MIC90, less than or equal to 0.31 microgram/ml; MFC90, less than or equal to 0.31 microgram/ml) and moderately active against Torulopsis glabrata (MIC90 and MFC90, less than or equal to 20 micrograms/ml). All C. parapsilosis, Cryptococcus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were resistant. The activity of cilofungin was affected by medium and inoculum size. Antibiotic medium no. 3 was used as the standard medium. Isolates of C. albicans and C. tropicalis demonstrated a paradoxical effect in Sabouraud dextrose broth and yeast nitrogen base broth in that growth was partially inhibited at MICs equivalent to those in antibiotic medium no. 3, but growth continued, in many instances, throughout all concentrations tested. There was decreased activity of cilofungin with inocula greater than 10(5) CFU/ml. The temperature and duration of incubation did not affect its activity. Images PMID:3058017

  4. Alternative catalytic anions differentially modulate human alpha-amylase activity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Maurus, Robert; Begum, Anjuman; Williams, Leslie K; Fredriksen, Jason R; Zhang, Ran; Withers, Stephen G; Brayer, Gary D

    2008-03-18

    A mechanistic study of the essential allosteric activation of human pancreatic alpha-amylase by chloride ion has been conducted by exploring a wide range of anion substitutions through kinetic and structural experiments. Surprisingly, kinetic studies indicate that the majority of these alternative anions can induce some level of enzymatic activity despite very different atomic geometries, sizes, and polyatomic natures. These data and subsequent structural studies attest to the remarkable plasticity of the chloride binding site, even though earlier structural studies of wild-type human pancreatic alpha-amylase suggested this site would likely be restricted to chloride binding. Notably, no apparent relationship is observed between anion binding affinity and relative activity, emphasizing the complexity of the relationship between chloride binding parameters and the activation mechanism that facilitates catalysis. Of the anions studied, particularly intriguing in terms of observed trends in substrate kinetics and their novel atomic compositions were the nitrite, nitrate, and azide anions, the latter of which was found to enhance the relative activity of human pancreatic alpha-amylase by nearly 5-fold. Structural studies have provided considerable insight into the nature of the interactions formed in the chloride binding site by the nitrite and nitrate anions. To probe the role such interactions play in allosteric activation, further structural analyses were conducted in the presence of acarbose, which served as a sensitive reporter molecule of the catalytic ability of these modified enzymes to carry out its expected rearrangement by human pancreatic alpha-amylase. These studies show that the largest anion of this group, nitrate, can comfortably fit in the chloride binding pocket, making all the necessary hydrogen bonds. Further, this anion has nearly the same ability to activate human pancreatic alpha-amylase and leads to the production of the same acarbose product

  5. Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Human IgM Fc Receptor Inhibit Ligand-binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kubagawa, Yoshiki; Honjo, Kazuhito; Kang, Dong-Won

    2014-01-01

    A panel of six different murine hybridoma clones secreting IgG monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the human IgM Fc receptor (FcμR) was generated. All MAbs specifically precipitated a major protein of ∼60 kDa from membrane lysates of FcμR-bearing, but not FcμR-negative, cells as did IgM-ligands. Pre-incubation of membrane lysate of FcμR-bearing cells with these MAbs completely removed the ∼60 kDa IgM-reactive protein. By using recombinant human/mouse chimeric FcμR proteins, the epitope recognized by HM7 and HM10 MAbs was mapped to the Ig-like domain of human FcμR, whereas the other MAbs recognized the stalk region. Pre-incubation of FcμR+ cells with the Ig-like domain-specific MAbs, but not with others, markedly inhibited subsequent IgM-ligand binding. A similar, but much weaker, inhibition was also observed when the incubation order was reversed. When FcμR+ cells were simultaneously incubated with both IgM-ligands and MAbs, HM7 MAb efficiently competed with IgM for FcμR binding. Unlike control Jurkat cells, FcμR-bearing cells were resistant to apoptosis induced by agonistic IgM anti-Fas MAb (CH11); however, addition of the HM7 MAb inhibited the interaction of the Fc portion of CH11 MAb with FcμR, thereby promoting apoptosis of FcμR-bearing Jurkat cells. The variable regions of the HM7 MAb were composed of Ighv14-3, Ighd1-2, and Ighj2 for the γ2b heavy chain and Igk3-4 and Igkj2 for the κ light chain. These findings suggest that HM7 MAb efficiently blocks the ligand-binding activity of FcμR. PMID:25545208

  6. Activity-based ubiquitin-specific protease (USP) profiling of virus-infected and malignant human cells

    PubMed Central

    Ovaa, Huib; Kessler, Benedikt M.; Rolén, Ulrika; Galardy, Paul J.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Masucci, Maria G.

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin (Ub)-specific proteases (USP) removes Ub from Ub conjugates and regulates a variety of cellular processes. The human genome contains many putative USP-encoding genes, but little is known about USP tissue distribution, pattern of expression, activity, and substrate specificity. We have used a chemistry-based functional proteomics approach to identify active USPs in normal, virus-infected, and tumor-derived human cells. Depending on tissue origin and stage of activation/differentiation, different USP activity profiles were revealed. The activity of specific USPs, including USP5, -7, -9, -13, -15, and -22, was up-regulated by mitogen activation or virus infection in normal T and B lymphocytes. UCH-L1 was highly expressed in tumor cell lines of epithelial and hematopoietic cell origin but was not detected in freshly isolated and mitogen-activated cells. Up-regulation of this USP was a late event in the establishment of Epstein–Barr virus-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines and correlated with enhanced proliferation, suggesting a possible role in growth transformation. PMID:14982996

  7. Exposure and Metabolic Activation Biomarkers of Carcinogenic Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamines.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Stephen S; Stepanov, Irina; Carmella, Steven G

    2016-01-19

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the world, and cigarette smoking is its main cause. Oral cavity cancer is another debilitating and often fatal cancer closely linked to tobacco product use. While great strides have been made in decreasing tobacco use in the United States and some other countries, there are still an estimated 1 billion men and 250 million women in the world who are cigarette smokers and there are hundreds of millions of smokeless tobacco users, all at risk for cancer. Worldwide, lung cancer kills about three people per minute. This Account focuses on metabolites and biomarkers of two powerful tobacco-specific nitrosamine carcinogens, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), considered to be among the main causes of lung cancer and oral cavity cancer in people who use tobacco products. Three properties of NNK and NNN are critical for successful biomarker studies: they are present in all tobacco products, they are tobacco-specific and are not found in any other product, and they are strong carcinogens. NNK and NNN are converted in humans to urinary metabolites that can be quantified by mass spectrometry as biomarkers of exposure to these carcinogens. They are also metabolized to diazonium ions and related electrophiles that react with DNA to form addition products that can be detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. These urinary metabolites and DNA addition products can serve as biomarkers of exposure and metabolic activation, respectively. The biomarkers of exposure, in particular the urinary NNK metabolites 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) and its glucuronides, have been extensively applied to document tobacco-specific lung carcinogen uptake in smokers and nonsmokers exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke. Highly sensitive mass spectrometric methods have been developed for quantitative analysis of these NNK metabolites as well as metabolites of NNN in human urine

  8. The Chinese Hamster Dihydrofolate Reductase Replication Origin Beta Is Active at Multiple Ectopic Chromosomal Locations and Requires Specific DNA Sequence Elements for Activity

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Amy L.; Fanning, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    To identify cis-acting genetic elements essential for mammalian chromosomal DNA replication, a 5.8-kb fragment from the Chinese hamster dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) locus containing the origin beta (ori-β) initiation region was stably transfected into random ectopic chromosomal locations in a hamster cell line lacking the endogenous DHFR locus. Initiation at ectopic ori-β in uncloned pools of transfected cells was measured using a competitive PCR-based nascent strand abundance assay and shown to mimic that at the endogenous ori-β region in Chinese hamster ovary K1 cells. Initiation activity of three ectopic ori-β deletion mutants was reduced, while the activity of another deletion mutant was enhanced. The results suggest that a 5.8-kb fragment of the DHFR ori-β region is sufficient to direct initiation and that specific DNA sequences in the ori-β region are required for efficient initiation activity. PMID:11158297

  9. Inducible Conditional Vascular-Specific Overexpression of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Beta/Delta Leads to Rapid Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Vukolic, Ana; Baudouy, Delphine; Michiels, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are nuclear receptors which function as ligand-activated transcription factors. Among them, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta (PPARβ/δ) is highly expressed in the heart and thought to have cardioprotective functions due to its beneficial effects in metabolic syndrome. As we already showed that PPARβ/δ activation resulted in an enhanced cardiac angiogenesis and growth without impairment of heart function, we were interested to determine the effects of a specific activation of PPARβ/δ in the vasculature on cardiac performance under normal and in chronic ischemic heart disease conditions. We analyzed the effects of a specific PPARβ/δ overexpression in endothelial cells on the heart using an inducible conditional vascular-specific mouse model. We demonstrate that vessel-specific overexpression of PPARβ/δ induces rapid cardiac angiogenesis and growth with an increase in cardiomyocyte size. Upon myocardial infarction, vascular overexpression of PPARβ/δ, despite the enhanced cardiac vessel formation, does not protect against chronic ischemic injury. Our results suggest that the proper balance of PPARβ/δ activation in the different cardiac cell types is required to obtain beneficial effects on the outcome in chronic ischemic heart disease. PMID:27057154

  10. Notch3 Activation Promotes Invasive Glioma Formation in a Tissue Site-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pierfelice, Tarran J.; Schreck, Karisa C.; Dang, Louis; Asnaghi, Laura; Gaiano, Nicholas; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2010-01-01

    While Notch signaling has been widely implicated in neoplastic growth, direct evidence for in vivo initiation of neoplasia by the pathway in murine models has been limited to tumors of lymphoid, breast, and choroid plexus cells. To examine tumorigenic potential in the eye and brain, we injected retroviruses encoding activated forms of Notch1, Notch2, or Notch3 into embryonic mice. Interestingly, the majority of animals infected with active Notch3 developed proliferative lesions comprised of pigmented ocular choroid cells, retinal and optic nerve glia, and lens epithelium. Notch3-induced lesions in the choroid, retina, and optic nerve were capable of invading adjacent tissues, suggesting that they were malignant tumors. While Notch3 activation induced choroidal tumors in up to 67% of eyes, Notch1 or Notch2 activation never resulted in such tumors. Active forms of Notch1 and Notch2 did generate a few small proliferative glial nodules in the retina and optic nerve, while Notch3 was ten-fold more efficient at generating growths, many of which were large invasive gliomas. Expression of active Notch1/Notch3 chimeric receptors implicated the RAM (RBPjk-association molecule) and transactivation domains (TAD) of Notch3 in generating choroidal and glial tumors, respectively. In contrast to our findings in the optic nerve and retina, introduction of active Notch receptors, including Notch3, into the brain never caused glial tumors. Our results highlight the differential ability of Notch receptor paralogs to initiate malignant tumor formation, and suggest that glial precursors of the optic nerve, but not the brain, are susceptible to transformation by Notch3. PMID:21245095

  11. Biophysical and mutagenic analysis of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase activity and specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, D S; Secundo, F; Phillips, R S; Dong, J; Scott, R A; Zeikus, J G

    1997-01-01

    The Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E adhB gene encoding the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (secondary ADH) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli at more than 10% of total protein. The recombinant enzyme was purified in high yield (67%) by heat-treatment at 85 degrees C and (NH4)2SO4 precipitation. Site-directed mutants (C37S, H59N, D150N, D150Eand D150C were analysed to test the peptide sequence comparison-based predictions of amino acids responsible for putative catalytic Zn binding. X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the presence of a protein-bound Zn atom with ZnS1(imid)1(N,O)3 co-ordination sphere. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry measured 0.48 Zn atoms per wild-type secondary ADH subunit. The C37S, H59N and D150N mutant enzymes bound only 0.11, 0.13 and 0.33 Zn per subunit respectively,suggesting that these residues are involved in Zn liganding. The D150E and D150C mutants retained 0.47 and 1.2 Zn atoms per subunit, indicating that an anionic side-chain moiety at this position preserves the bound Zn. All five mutant enzymes had activity, suggesting that the T. ethanolicus secondary ADH requires a properly co-ordinated catalytic Zn atom. The His-59 and Asp-150 mutations also altered secondary ADH affinity for propan-2-ol over a 140-fold range, whereas the overall change in affinity for ethanol spanned a range of only 7-fold, supporting the importance of the metal in secondary ADH substrate binding. The lack of significant changes in cofactor affinity as a result of these catalytic Zn ligand mutations suggested that secondary ADH substrate-and cofactor-binding sites are structurally distinct. Altering Gly198 to Asp reduced the enzyme specific activity 2.7-fold, increased the Km(app) for NADP+ 225-fold, and decreased the Km(app) for NAD+ 3-fold, supporting the prediction that the enzyme binds nicotinamide cofactor in a Rossmann fold. Our data indicate therefore that, unlike the liver primary ADH

  12. Force-specific activation of Smad1/5 regulates vascular endothelial cell cycle progression in response to disturbed flow.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Lee, Pei-Ling; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lee, Chih-I; Yang, Tung-Lin; Chuang, Han-Sheng; Lin, Wei-Wen; Lin, Ting-Er; Lim, Seh Hong; Wei, Shu-Yi; Chen, Yuh-Lien; Chien, Shu; Chiu, Jeng-Jiann

    2012-05-15

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are constantly exposed to blood flow-induced shear stress, but the mechanism of force-specific activation of their signaling to modulate cellular function remains unclear. We have demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein receptor (BMPR)-specific Smad1/5 can be force-specifically activated by oscillatory shear stress (OSS) in ECs to cause cell cycle progression. Smad1/5 is highly activated in ECs of atherosclerotic lesions in diseased human coronary arteries from patients with end-stage heart failure undergoing heart transplantation and from apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Application of OSS (0.5 ± 4 dyn/cm(2)) causes the sustained activation of Smad1/5 in ECs through activations of mammalian target of rapamycin and p70S6 kinase, leading to up-regulation of cyclin A and down-regulations of p21(CIP1) and p27(KIP1) and, hence, EC cycle progression. En face examination of rat aortas reveals high levels of phospho-Smad1/5 in ECs of the inner, but not the outer, curvature of aortic arch, nor the straight segment of thoracic aorta [corrected]. Immunohistochemical and en face examinations of the experimentally stenosed abdominal aorta in rats show high levels of phospho-Smad1/5 in ECs at poststenotic sites, where OSS occurs. These OSS activations of EC Smad1/5 in vitro and in vivo are not inhibited by the BMP-specific antagonist Noggin and, hence, are independent of BMP ligand. Transfecting ECs with Smad1/5-specific small interfering RNAs inhibits the OSS-induced EC cycle progression. Our findings demonstrate the force-specificity of the activation of Smad1/5 and its contribution to cell cycle progression in ECs induced by disturbed flow. PMID:22550179

  13. Balancing the stability and the catalytic specificities of OP hydrolases with enhanced V-agent activities.

    PubMed

    Reeves, T E; Wales, M E; Grimsley, J K; Li, P; Cerasoli, D M; Wild, J R

    2008-06-01

    Rational site-directed mutagenesis and biophysical analyses have been used to explore the thermodynamic stability and catalytic capabilities of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and its genetically modified variants. There are clear trade-offs in the stability of modifications that enhance catalytic activities. For example, the H254R/H257L variant has higher turnover numbers for the chemical warfare agents VX (144 versus 14 s(-1) for the native enzyme (wild type) and VR (Russian VX, 465 versus 12 s(-1) for wild type). These increases are accompanied by a loss in stability in which the total Gibb's free energy for unfolding is 19.6 kcal/mol, which is 5.7 kcal/mol less than that of the wild-type enzyme. X-ray crystallographic studies support biophysical data that suggest amino acid residues near the active site contribute to the chemical and thermal stability through hydrophobic and cation-pi interactions. The cation-pi interactions appear to contribute an additional 7 kcal/mol to the overall global stability of the enzyme. Using rational design, it has been possible to make amino acid changes in this region that restored the stability, yet maintained effective V-agent activities, with turnover numbers of 68 and 36 s(-1) for VX and VR, respectively. This study describes the first rationally designed, stability/activity balance for an OPH enzyme with a legitimate V-agent activity, and its crystal structure. PMID:18434422

  14. Rational design of tryptophan-rich antimicrobial peptides with enhanced antimicrobial activities and specificities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Yuan; Huang, Kuo-Chun; Yip, Bak-Sau; Tu, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Heng-Li; Cheng, Hsi-Tsung; Cheng, Jya-Wei

    2010-11-01

    Trp-rich antimicrobial peptides play important roles in the host innate defense mechanism of many plants and animals. A series of short Trp-rich peptides derived from the C-terminal region of Bothrops asper myothoxin II, a Lys49 phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), were found to reproduce the antimicrobial activities of their parent molecule. Of these peptides, KKWRWWLKALAKK-designated PEM-2-was found to display improved activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. To improve the antimicrobial activity of PEM-2 for potential clinical applications further, we determined the solution structure of PEM-2 bound to membrane-mimetic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles by two-dimensional NMR methods. The DPC micelle-bound structure of PEM-2 adopts an α-helical conformation and the positively charged residues are clustered together to form a hydrophilic patch. The surface electrostatic potential map indicates that two of the three tryptophan residues are packed against the peptide backbone and form a hydrophobic face with Leu7, Ala9, and Leu10. A variety of biophysical and biochemical experiments, including circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, and microcalorimetry, were used to show that PEM-2 interacted with negatively charged phospholipid vesicles and efficiently induced dye release from these vesicles, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of PEM-2 could be due to interactions with bacterial membranes. Potent analogues of PEM-2 with enhanced antimicrobial and less pronounced hemolytic activities were designed with the aid of these structural studies. PMID:20865718

  15. Specific capture of the hydrolysate on magnetic beads for sensitive detecting plant vacuolar processing enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Cheng, Meng; Zeng, Lizhang; Liu, Weipeng; Zhang, Tao; Xing, Da

    2016-05-15

    Conventional plant protease detection always suffers from high background interference caused by the complex coloring metabolites in plant cells. In this study, a bio-modified magnetic beads-based strategy was developed for sensitive and quantitative detection of plant vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) activity. Cleavage of the peptide substrate (ESENCRK-FITC) after asparagine residue by VPE resulted in the 2-cyano-6-amino-benzothiazole (CABT)-functionalized magnetic beads capture of the severed substrate CRK-FITC via a condensation reaction between CABT and cysteine (Cys). The catalytic activity was subsequently obtained by the confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry quantitative analysis. The sensor system integrated advantages of (i) the high efficient enrichment and separation capabilities of magnetic beads and (ii) the catalyst-free properties of the CABT-Cys condensation reaction. It exhibited a linear relationship between the fluorescence signal and the concentration of severed substrate in the range of 10-600 pM. The practical results showed that, compared with normal growth conditions, VPE activity was increased by 2.7-fold (307.2 ± 25.3 μM min(-1)g(-1)) upon cadmium toxicity stress. This platform effectively overcame the coloring metabolites-caused background interference, showing fine applicability for the detection of VPE activity in real samples. The strategy offers great sensitivity and may be further extended to other protease activity detection. PMID:26797250

  16. Activation-specific metabolic requirements for NK cell IFN-γ production1

    PubMed Central

    Keppel, Molly P.; Topcagic, Nermina; Mah, Annelise Y.; Vogel, Tiphanie P.; Cooper, Megan A.

    2014-01-01

    There has been increasing recognition of the importance of cellular metabolism and metabolic substrates for the function and differentiation of immune cells. Here, for the first time, we investigate the metabolic requirements for production of IFN-γ by freshly isolated NK cells. Primary murine NK cells mainly utilize mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation at rest and with short-term activation. Remarkably, we discovered significant differences in the metabolic requirements of murine NK cell IFN-γ production depending upon the activation signal. Stimulation of NK cell IFN-γ production was independent of glycolysis or mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation when cells were activated with IL-12+IL-18. By contrast, stimulation via activating NK receptors required glucose-driven oxidative phosphorylation. Prolonged treatment with high-dose, but not low dose, IL-15 eliminated the metabolic requirement for receptor stimulation. In summary, this study demonstrates that metabolism provides an essential second signal for induction of IFN-γ production by activating NK cell receptors that can be reversed with prolonged high-dose IL-15 treatment. PMID:25595780

  17. Insights into Substrate Specificity and Metal Activation of Mammalian Tetrahedral Aspartyl Aminopeptidase*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Farquhar, Erik R.; Chance, Mark R.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kiser, Philip D.

    2012-01-01

    Aminopeptidases are key enzymes involved in the regulation of signaling peptide activity. Here, we present a detailed biochemical and structural analysis of an evolutionary highly conserved aspartyl aminopeptidase called DNPEP. We show that this peptidase can cleave multiple physiologically relevant substrates, including angiotensins, and thus may play a key role in regulating neuron function. Using a combination of x-ray crystallography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and single particle electron microscopy analysis, we provide the first detailed structural analysis of DNPEP. We show that this enzyme possesses a binuclear zinc-active site in which one of the zinc ions is readily exchangeable with other divalent cations such as manganese, which strongly stimulates the enzymatic activity of the protein. The plasticity of this metal-binding site suggests a mechanism for regulation of DNPEP activity. We also demonstrate that DNPEP assembles into a functionally relevant tetrahedral complex that restricts access of peptide substrates to the active site. These structural data allow rationalization of the enzyme's preference for short peptide substrates with N-terminal acidic residues. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the physiology and bioinorganic chemistry of DNPEP and other M18 family aminopeptidases. PMID:22356908

  18. Insights into Substrate Specificity and Metal Activation of Mammalian Tetrahedral Aspartyl Aminopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Farquhar, Erik R.; Chance, Mark R.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kiser, Philip D.

    2012-07-11

    Aminopeptidases are key enzymes involved in the regulation of signaling peptide activity. Here, we present a detailed biochemical and structural analysis of an evolutionary highly conserved aspartyl aminopeptidase called DNPEP. We show that this peptidase can cleave multiple physiologically relevant substrates, including angiotensins, and thus may play a key role in regulating neuron function. Using a combination of x-ray crystallography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and single particle electron microscopy analysis, we provide the first detailed structural analysis of DNPEP. We show that this enzyme possesses a binuclear zinc-active site in which one of the zinc ions is readily exchangeable with other divalent cations such as manganese, which strongly stimulates the enzymatic activity of the protein. The plasticity of this metal-binding site suggests a mechanism for regulation of DNPEP activity. We also demonstrate that DNPEP assembles into a functionally relevant tetrahedral complex that restricts access of peptide substrates to the active site. These structural data allow rationalization of the enzyme's preference for short peptide substrates with N-terminal acidic residues. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the physiology and bioinorganic chemistry of DNPEP and other M18 family aminopeptidases.

  19. Rational design and validation of an anti-protein kinase C active-state specific antibody based on conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Darlene Aparecida; Andrade, Victor Piana de; Silva, Gabriela Ávila Fernandes; Neves, José Ivanildo; Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes de; Alves, Maria Julia Manso; Devi, Lakshmi A.; Schechtman, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays a regulatory role in key pathways in cancer. However, since phosphorylation is a step for classical PKC (cPKC) maturation and does not correlate with activation, there is a lack of tools to detect active PKC in tissue samples. Here, a structure-based rational approach was used to select a peptide to generate an antibody that distinguishes active from inactive cPKC. A peptide conserved in all cPKCs, C2Cat, was chosen since modeling studies based on a crystal structure of PKCβ showed that it is localized at the interface between the C2 and catalytic domains of cPKCs in an inactive kinase. Anti-C2Cat recognizes active cPKCs at least two-fold better than inactive kinase in ELISA and immunoprecipitation assays, and detects the temporal dynamics of cPKC activation upon receptor or phorbol stimulation. Furthermore, the antibody is able to detect active PKC in human tissue. Higher levels of active cPKC were observed in the more aggressive triple negative breast cancer tumors as compared to the less aggressive estrogen receptor positive tumors. Thus, this antibody represents a reliable, hitherto unavailable and a valuable tool to study PKC activation in cells and tissues. Similar structure-based rational design strategies can be broadly applied to obtain active-state specific antibodies for other signal transduction molecules. PMID:26911897

  20. Rational design and validation of an anti-protein kinase C active-state specific antibody based on conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Pena, Darlene Aparecida; Andrade, Victor Piana de; Silva, Gabriela Ávila Fernandes; Neves, José Ivanildo; Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes de; Alves, Maria Julia Manso; Devi, Lakshmi A; Schechtman, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays a regulatory role in key pathways in cancer. However, since phosphorylation is a step for classical PKC (cPKC) maturation and does not correlate with activation, there is a lack of tools to detect active PKC in tissue samples. Here, a structure-based rational approach was used to select a peptide to generate an antibody that distinguishes active from inactive cPKC. A peptide conserved in all cPKCs, C2Cat, was chosen since modeling studies based on a crystal structure of PKCβ showed that it is localized at the interface between the C2 and catalytic domains of cPKCs in an inactive kinase. Anti-C2Cat recognizes active cPKCs at least two-fold better than inactive kinase in ELISA and immunoprecipitation assays, and detects the temporal dynamics of cPKC activation upon receptor or phorbol stimulation. Furthermore, the antibody is able to detect active PKC in human tissue. Higher levels of active cPKC were observed in the more aggressive triple negative breast cancer tumors as compared to the less aggressive estrogen receptor positive tumors. Thus, this antibody represents a reliable, hitherto unavailable and a valuable tool to study PKC activation in cells and tissues. Similar structure-based rational design strategies can be broadly applied to obtain active-state specific antibodies for other signal transduction molecules. PMID:26911897

  1. Progranulin Deficiency Promotes Circuit-Specific Synaptic Pruning by Microglia via Complement Activation.

    PubMed

    Lui, Hansen; Zhang, Jiasheng; Makinson, Stefanie R; Cahill, Michelle K; Kelley, Kevin W; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Shang, Yulei; Oldham, Michael C; Martens, Lauren Herl; Gao, Fuying; Coppola, Giovanni; Sloan, Steven A; Hsieh, Christine L; Kim, Charles C; Bigio, Eileen H; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Rademakers, Rosa; Mackenzie, Ian R; Seeley, William W; Karydas, Anna; Miller, Bruce L; Borroni, Barbara; Ghidoni, Roberta; Farese, Robert V; Paz, Jeanne T; Barres, Ben A; Huang, Eric J

    2016-05-01

    Microglia maintain homeostasis in the brain, but whether aberrant microglial activation can cause neurodegeneration remains controversial. Here, we use transcriptome profiling to demonstrate that deficiency in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) gene progranulin (Grn) leads to an age-dependent, progressive upregulation of lysosomal and innate immunity genes, increased complement production, and enhanced synaptic pruning in microglia. During aging, Grn(-/-) mice show profound microglia infiltration and preferential elimination of inhibitory synapses in the ventral thalamus, which lead to hyperexcitability in the thalamocortical circuits and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)-like grooming behaviors. Remarkably, deleting C1qa gene significantly reduces synaptic pruning by Grn(-/-) microglia and mitigates neurodegeneration, behavioral phenotypes, and premature mortality in Grn(-/-) mice. Together, our results uncover a previously unrecognized role of progranulin in suppressing aberrant microglia activation during aging. These results represent an important conceptual advance that complement activation and microglia-mediated synaptic pruning are major drivers, rather than consequences, of neurodegeneration caused by progranulin deficiency. PMID:27114033

  2. A modality-specific feedforward component of choice-related activity in MT

    PubMed Central

    Smolyanskaya, Alexandra; Haefner, Ralf M.; Lomber, Stephen G.; Born, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The activity of individual sensory neurons can be predictive of an animal's choices. These decision signals arise from network properties dependent on feedforward and feedback inputs; however, the relative contributions of these inputs are poorly understood. We determined the role of feedforward pathways to decision signals in MT by recording neuronal activity while monkeys performed motion and depth tasks. During each session, we reversibly inactivated V2 and V3, which provide feedforward input to MT that conveys more information about depth than motion. We thus monitored the choice-related activity of the same neuron both before and during V2/V3 inactivation. During inactivation, MT neurons became less predictive of decisions for the depth task but not the motion task, indicating that a feedforward pathway that gives rise to tuning preferences also contributes to decision signals. We show that our data are consistent with V2/V3 input conferring structured noise correlations onto the MT population. PMID:26139374

  3. A Modality-Specific Feedforward Component of Choice-Related Activity in MT.

    PubMed

    Smolyanskaya, Alexandra; Haefner, Ralf M; Lomber, Stephen G; Born, Richard T

    2015-07-01

    The activity of individual sensory neurons can be predictive of an animal's choices. These decision signals arise from network properties dependent on feedforward and feedback inputs; however, the relative contributions of these inputs are poorly understood. We determined the role of feedforward pathways to decision signals in MT by recording neuronal activity while monkeys performed motion and depth tasks. During each session, we reversibly inactivated V2 and V3, which provide feedforward input to MT that conveys more information about depth than motion. We thus monitored the choice-related activity of the same neuron both before and during V2/V3 inactivation. During inactivation, MT neurons became less predictive of decisions for the depth task but not the motion task, indicating that a feedforward pathway that gives rise to tuning preferences also contributes to decision signals. We show that our data are consistent with V2/V3 input conferring structured noise correlations onto the MT population. PMID:26139374

  4. Kinetic isotope effects for RNA cleavage by 2'-O- transphosphorylation: Nucleophilic activation by specific base

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Michael E; Dai, Qing; Gu, Hong; Kellerman, Dan; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Anderson, Vernon E

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the interactions between catalysts and transition states during RNA strand cleavage, primary 18O kinetic isotope effects and solvent D2O isotope effects were measured to probe the mechanism of base-catalyzed 2'-O-transphosphorylation of the RNA dinucleotide 5'-UpG-3'. The observed 18O KIEs for the nucleophilic 2'-O and in the 5'-O leaving group at pH 14 are both large relative to reactions of phosphodiesters with good leaving groups, indicating that the reaction catalyzed by hydroxide has a transition state (TS) with advanced phosphorus-oxygen bond fission to the leaving group (18kLG = 1.034 ± 0.004) and phosphorous-nucleophile bond formation (18kNUC = 0.984 ± 0.004). A breakpoint in the pH dependence of the 2'-O-transphosphorylation rate to a pH independent phase above pH 13 has been attributed to the pKa of the 2'-OH nucleophile. A smaller nucleophile KIE is observed at pH 12 (18kNUC = 0.995 ± 0.004) that is interpreted as the combined effect of the equilibrium isotope effect (~1.02) on deprotonation of the 2′-hydroxyl nucleophile and the intrinsic KIE on the nucleophilic addition step (ca. 0.981). An alternative mechanism in which the hydroxide ion acts as a general base is considered unlikely given the lack of a solvent deuterium isotope effect above the breakpoint in the pH versus rate profile. These results represent the first direct analysis of the transition state for RNA strand cleavage. The primary 18O KIE results and the lack of a kinetic solvent deuterium isotope effect together provide strong evidence for a late transition state and 2'-O nucleophile activation by specific base catalysis. PMID:20669950

  5. Potent In Vitro and In Vivo Activity of Plantibody Specific for Porphyromonas gingivalis FimA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Suk; Moon, Ji-Hoi; Kim, Tae-Geum; Lee, Jin-Yong

    2016-04-01

    Fimbrial protein fimbrillin (FimA), a major structural subunit of Porphyromonas gingivalis, has been suggested as a vaccine candidate to control P. gingivalis-induced periodontal disease. Previously, cDNAs encoding IgG monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against purified FimA from P. gingivalis 2561 have been cloned, and the MAbs have been produced in rice cell suspension. Here we examined the biological activities of the plant-produced MAb specific for FimA (anti-FimA plantibody) of P. gingivalis in vitro and in vivo. The anti-FimA plantibody recognized oligomeric/polymeric forms of native FimA in immunoblot analysis and showed high affinity for native FimA (KD = 0.11 nM). Binding of P. gingivalis (10(8) cells) to 2 mg of saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads was reduced by 53.8% in the presence of 1 μg/ml plantibody. Anti-FimA plantibody (10 μg/ml) reduced invasion of periodontal ligament cells by P. gingivalis (multiplicity of infection, 100) by 68.3%. Intracellular killing of P. gingivalis opsonized with the anti-FimA plantibody by mouse macrophages was significantly increased (77.1%) compared to killing of bacterial cells with irrelevant IgG (36.7%). In a mouse subcutaneous chamber model, the number of recoverable P. gingivalis cells from the chamber fluid was significantly reduced when the numbers of bacterial cells opsonized with anti-FimA plantibody were compared with the numbers of bacterial cells with irrelevant IgG, 66.7% and 37.1%, respectively. These in vitro and in vivo effects of anti-FimA plantibody were comparable to those of the parental MAb. Further studies with P. gingivalis strains with different types of fimbriae are needed to investigate the usefulness of anti-FimA plantibody for passive immunization to control P. gingivalis-induced periodontal disease. PMID:26865596

  6. Plasma reciprocal pool specific activity predicts that of intracellular free leucine for protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Horber, F.F.; Horber-Feyder, C.M.; Krayer, S.; Schwenk, W.F.; Haymond, M.W. )

    1989-09-01

    We previously proposed that, during the infusion of either labeled leucine or its alpha-ketoacid, alpha-ketoisocaproate (KIC), the plasma specific activity (SA) of the transaminated product of the infused tracer (reciprocal pool SA) may better reflect the intracellular leucine SA than the plasma SA of either infused tracer (primary pool SA). To test this hypothesis, 14 dogs were simultaneously infused intravenously with (3H)leucine and (14C)KIC, and blood and tissue compartments were sampled. The ratios of (3H)-leucine to (14C)leucine (3H)/(14C)leucine in mixed tissue proteins and in the intracellular space of striated muscle were the same as the ratio of the isotope infusion rates and similar, although slightly lower (P less than 0.01), than (3H)KIC/(14C)leucine SA (ratio of reciprocal pool SA) in plasma. Plasma (3H)KIC/(14C)leucine SA were essentially identical to the (3H)/(14C) of leucine in (1) mixed liver proteins, (2) intrahepatic free leucine, and (3) fibrin. The (3H)/(14C)leucine in mixed renal proteins and in the intracellular space of kidney and erythrocytes were similar to those of the venous plasma (3H)/(14C)leucine SA. The plasma (3H)KIC and (14C)leucine SA (the reciprocal pool SA) were similar to the SA of (3H)- and (14C)leucine in the intracellular space of all organs investigated with the exception of kidney. Therefore, in postabsorptive dogs, the plasma SA of the transaminated product of the infused labeled KIC or leucine is an excellent predictor of the intracellular leucine SA in all tissues investigated with the exception of kidney.

  7. Highly specific fluorescence detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity via photo-induced electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Tao, Mangjuan; Shi, Zhilu; Cheng, Rui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Baoxin; Jin, Yan

    2015-09-15

    Sensitive and reliable study of the activity of polynucleotide kinase (PNK) and its potential inhibitors is of great importance for biochemical interaction related to DNA phosphorylation as well as development of kinase-targeted drug discovery. To achieve facile and reliable detection of PNK activity, we report here a novel fluorescence method for PNK assay based on a combination of exonuclease cleavage reaction and photo-induced electron transfer (PIET) by using T4 PNK as a model target. The fluorescence of 3'-carboxyfluorescein-labeled DNA probe (FDNA) is effectively quenched by deoxyguanosines at the 5' end of its complementary DNA (cDNA) due to an effective PIET between deoxyguanosines and fluorophore. Whereas FDNA/cDNA hybrid is phosphorylated by PNK and then immediately cleaved by lambda exonuclease (λ exo), fluorescence is greatly restored due to the break of PIET. This homogeneous PNK activity assay does not require a complex design by taking advantage of the quenching ability of deoxyguanosines, making the proposed strategy facile and cost-effective. The activity of PNK can be sensitively detected in the range of 0.005 to 10 U mL(-1) with a detection limit of 2.1×10(-3) U mL(-1). Research on inhibition efficiency of different inhibitors demonstrated that it can be explored to evaluate inhibition capacity of inhibitors. The application for detection of PNK activity in complex matrix achieved satisfactory results. Therefore, this PIET strategy opens a promising avenue for studying T4 PNK activity as well as evaluating PNK inhibitors, which is of great importance for discovering kinase-targeted drugs. PMID:26050629

  8. Characterization of a Novel Human-Specific STING Agonist that Elicits Antiviral Activity Against Emerging Alphaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Sali, Tina M.; Pryke, Kara M.; Abraham, Jinu; Liu, Andrew; Archer, Iris; Broeckel, Rebecca; Staverosky, Julia A.; Smith, Jessica L.; Al-Shammari, Ahmed; Amsler, Lisi; Sheridan, Kayla; Nilsen, Aaron; Streblow, Daniel N.; DeFilippis, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic stimulation of innate immune processes represents an attractive strategy to achieve multiple therapeutic outcomes including inhibition of virus replication, boosting antitumor immunity, and enhancing vaccine immunogenicity. In light of this we sought to identify small molecules capable of activating the type I interferon (IFN) response by way of the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). A high throughput in vitro screen yielded 4-(2-chloro-6-fluorobenzyl)-N-(furan-2-ylmethyl)-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b][1,4]thiazine-6-carboxamide (referred to herein as G10), which was found to trigger IRF3/IFN-associated transcription in human fibroblasts. Further examination of the cellular response to this molecule revealed expression of multiple IRF3-dependent antiviral effector genes as well as type I and III IFN subtypes. This led to the establishment of a cellular state that prevented replication of emerging Alphavirus species including Chikungunya virus, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis virus, and Sindbis virus. To define cellular proteins essential to elicitation of the antiviral activity by the compound we employed a reverse genetics approach that utilized genome editing via CRISPR/Cas9 technology. This allowed the identification of IRF3, the IRF3-activating adaptor molecule STING, and the IFN-associated transcription factor STAT1 as required for observed gene induction and antiviral effects. Biochemical analysis indicates that G10 does not bind to STING directly, however. Thus the compound may represent the first synthetic small molecule characterized as an indirect activator of human STING-dependent phenotypes. In vivo stimulation of STING-dependent activity by an unrelated small molecule in a mouse model of Chikungunya virus infection blocked viremia demonstrating that pharmacologic activation of this signaling pathway may represent a feasible strategy for combating emerging Alphaviruses. PMID:26646986

  9. Isolation of an activator-dependent, promoter-specific chromatin remodeling factor

    PubMed Central

    Ehrensberger, Andreas H.; Kornberg, Roger D.

    2011-01-01

    Repressed PHO5 gene chromatin, isolated from yeast in the native state, was remodeled by yeast extract in a gene activator-dependent, ATP-dependent manner. The product of the reaction bore the hallmark of the process in vivo, the selective removal of promoter nucleosomes, without effect on open reading frame nucleosomes. Fractionation of the extract identified a single protein, chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 1 (Chd1), capable of the remodeling activity. Deletion of the CHD1 gene in an isw1Δ pho80Δ strain abolished PHO5 gene expression, demonstrating the relevance of the remodeling reaction in vitro to the process in vivo. PMID:21646535

  10. Isolation of an activator-dependent, promoter-specific chromatin remodeling factor.

    PubMed

    Ehrensberger, Andreas H; Kornberg, Roger D

    2011-06-21

    Repressed PHO5 gene chromatin, isolated from yeast in the native state, was remodeled by yeast extract in a gene activator-dependent, ATP-dependent manner. The product of the reaction bore the hallmark of the process in vivo, the selective removal of promoter nucleosomes, without effect on open reading frame nucleosomes. Fractionation of the extract identified a single protein, chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 1 (Chd1), capable of the remodeling activity. Deletion of the CHD1 gene in an isw1Δ pho80Δ strain abolished PHO5 gene expression, demonstrating the relevance of the remodeling reaction in vitro to the process in vivo. PMID:21646535

  11. Strain- and sex-specific differences in daily flight activity and the circadian clock of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Rund, Samuel S C; Lee, Samuel J; Bush, Brian R; Duffield, Giles E

    2012-12-01

    Anopheles gambiae, the primary African malaria vector, is currently speciating into two incipient species, the so-called "molecular forms" M and S. While some geographic areas may contain only one form, in many areas both forms are found coexisting, but reproductively isolated. It appears that spatial segregation of mating swarms may contribute significantly to reproductive isolation as in many locales single-form swarms exist almost exclusively even though they are in close geographic proximity. The mechanism causing this spatial segregation is not well understood. Here, we compare the locomotor flight activity of M and S form male and female An. gambiae mosquitoes with the goal of identifying potential strain-specific temporal differences that could potentially serve as a mating barrier. We use an infrared beam break method to monitor flight activity of individual mosquitoes with a minute-to-minute time resolution under both LD cycle and constant dark conditions. We compare daily total flight activity, activity onset, peak in early nocturnal activity, the build up of dusk-related activity, and the free-running circadian period length. Our investigations revealed strain- and sex-specific differences in total daily activity. In both forms, males commenced nightly flight activity earlier than females, and this corresponded with a significantly shorter circadian period length in males compared to females. We note strain-specific differences in this response to dusk as males of the M form have a pronounced build up in flight activity relative to the S form males prior to complete darkness. This is likely driven by a differential response to the decreasing light intensity at dusk. We hypothesize that this behavioral difference could be a temporal factor contributing to the assembly of single-form swarms. PMID:23068991

  12. Effect of pregnancy-specific β1-glycoprotein on indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase activity in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Zamorina, S A; Timganova, V P; Bochkova, M S; Khramtsov, P V; Raev, M B

    2016-07-01

    The role of heterogenic human pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (PSG), obtained by the authors' technology, in the regulation of the indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity in female blood monocytes has been studied in vitro. PSG stimulated IDO activity under the conditions of induction of the monocytes by interferon-γ. Upon the induction of cell proliferation by lipopolysaccharides, the stimulating effect was obtained only with 10 μg/mL of PSG. Enhanced IDO activity is probably a factor of peripheral immunological tolerance and antimicrobial protection against intracellular infections in the gestation period. PMID:27595833

  13. Tissue-specific changes of glutamine synthetase activity in oats after rhizosphere infestation by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, T.J.; Temple, S.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C.

    1996-05-15

    Oats (Avena sativa L. lodi) tolerant of rhizosphere infestation by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci when challenged by the pathogen experience tissue-specific alterations of ammonia assimilatory capabilities. Altered ammonia assimilatory potentials between root and leaf tissue result from selective inactivation of glutamine synthetase (GS) by the toxin Tabtoxinine-B-lactam (TBL). Root GS is sensitive and leaf GSs are resistant to TBL inactivation. With prolonged challenge by the pathogen root GS activity decreases but leaf GS specific activity increase. Higher leaf GS activity is due to decreased rates of degradation rather than increased GS synthesis. Higher leaf GS activity and elevated levels of GS polypeptide appear to result from a limited interaction between GS and TBL leading to the accumulation of a less active but more stable GS holoenzyme. Tolerant challenged oats besides surviving rhizosphere infestation, experience enhanced growth. A strong correlation exists between leaf GS activity and whole plant fresh weight, suggesting that tissue-specific changes in ammonia assimilatory capability provides the plant a more efficient mechanism for uptake and utilization of nitrogen.

  14. A novel mouse model of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma induced by liver-specific Kras activation and Pten deletion.

    PubMed

    Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Terakado, Yumi; Nakagawa, Hayato; Hikiba, Yohko; Fujii, Tomoaki; Matsubara, Daisuke; Noguchi, Rei; Zhu, Chi; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Kudo, Yotaro; Asaoka, Yoshinari; Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Ijichi, Hideaki; Tateishi, Keisuke; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Maeda, Shin; Koike, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Recently, several types of cells have been considered as the origin of ICC, namely cholangiocytes, liver progenitor cells, and hepatocytes. Here, we have established a novel mouse model of ICC by liver-specific Kras activation and Pten deletion. An activating mutation of Kras in combination with deletion of Pten was introduced in embryonic hepatic bipotential progenitor cells (so-called hepatoblasts) and mature hepatocytes using the Cre-loxP system. As a result, liver-specific Kras activation and homozygous Pten deletion cooperated to induce ICCs exclusively. In contrast, Kras activation in combination with heterozygous Pten deletion induced both ICCs and HCCs, whereas Kras activation alone resulted in HCCs but not ICCs. Furthermore, a cell-lineage visualization system using tamoxifen-inducible Cre-loxP demonstrated that the ICCs did not originate from hepatocytes but from cholangiocytes. Our data suggest that mice carrying liver-specific Kras activation in combination with homozygous Pten deletion should be useful for the investigation of therapeutic strategies for human ICC. PMID:27032374

  15. A novel mouse model of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma induced by liver-specific Kras activation and Pten deletion

    PubMed Central

    Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Terakado, Yumi; Nakagawa, Hayato; Hikiba, Yohko; Fujii, Tomoaki; Matsubara, Daisuke; Noguchi, Rei; Zhu, Chi; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Kudo, Yotaro; Asaoka, Yoshinari; Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Ijichi, Hideaki; Tateishi, Keisuke; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Maeda, Shin; Koike, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Recently, several types of cells have been considered as the origin of ICC, namely cholangiocytes, liver progenitor cells, and hepatocytes. Here, we have established a novel mouse model of ICC by liver-specific Kras activation and Pten deletion. An activating mutation of Kras in combination with deletion of Pten was introduced in embryonic hepatic bipotential progenitor cells (so-called hepatoblasts) and mature hepatocytes using the Cre-loxP system. As a result, liver-specific Kras activation and homozygous Pten deletion cooperated to induce ICCs exclusively. In contrast, Kras activation in combination with heterozygous Pten deletion induced both ICCs and HCCs, whereas Kras activation alone resulted in HCCs but not ICCs. Furthermore, a cell-lineage visualization system using tamoxifen-inducible Cre-loxP demonstrated that the ICCs did not originate from hepatocytes but from cholangiocytes. Our data suggest that mice carrying liver-specific Kras activation in combination with homozygous Pten deletion should be useful for the investigation of therapeutic strategies for human ICC. PMID:27032374

  16. Metabolic, anabolic, and mitogenic insulin responses: A tissue-specific perspective for insulin receptor activators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin acts as the major regulator of the fasting-to-fed metabolic transition by altering substrate metabolism, promoting energy storage, and helping activate protein synthesis. In addition to its glucoregulatory and other metabolic properties, insulin can also act as a growth factor. The metabolic...

  17. Characterization of the helicase activity and substrate specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis UvrD.

    PubMed

    Curti, Elena; Smerdon, Stephen J; Davis, Elaine O

    2007-03-01

    UvrD is a helicase that is widely conserved in gram-negative bacteria. A uvrD homologue was identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis on the basis of the homology of its encoded protein with Escherichia coli UvrD, with which it shares 39% amino acid identity, distributed throughout the protein. The gene was cloned, and a histidine-tagged form of the protein was expressed and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein had in vitro ATPase activity that was dependent upon the presence of DNA. Oligonucleotides as short as four nucleotides were sufficient to promote the ATPase activity. The DNA helicase activity of the enzyme was only fueled by ATP and dATP. UvrD preferentially unwound 3'-single-stranded tailed duplex substrates over 5'-single-stranded ones, indicating that the protein had a duplex-unwinding activity with 3'-to-5' polarity. A 3' single-stranded DNA tail of 18 nucleotides was required for effective unwinding. By using a series of synthetic oligonucleotide substrates, we demonstrated that M. tuberculosis UvrD has an unwinding preference towards nicked DNA duplexes and stalled replication forks, representing the likely sites of action in vivo. The potential role of M. tuberculosis UvrD in maintenance of bacterial genomic integrity makes it a promising target for drug design against M. tuberculosis. PMID:17158674

  18. Liamocin oil from Aureobasidium pullulans has antibacterial activity with specificity for species of Streptococcus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Liamocin oil from Aureobasidium pullulans NRRL 50380 was tested for antibacterial activity. Liamocins inhibited growth of Streptococcus agalactiae, S. uberis, S. mitis, S. infantarius, and S. mutans, with minimum inhibitory concentrations from 20 'g/ml to 78 'g/ml. Enterococcus faecalis was less sus...

  19. Object categories specific brain activity classification with simultaneous EEG-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rana Fayyaz; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Kamel, Nidal; Reza, Faruque

    2015-08-01

    Any kind of visual information is encoded in terms of patterns of neural activity occurring inside the brain. Decoding neural patterns or its classification is a challenging task. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and Electroencephalography (EEG) are non-invasive neuroimaging modalities to capture the brain activity pattern in term of images and electric potential respectively. To get higher spatiotemporal resolution of human brain from these two complementary neuroimaging modalities, simultaneous EEG-fMRI can be helpful. In this paper, we proposed a framework for classifying the brain activity patterns with simultaneous EEG-fMRI. We have acquired five human participants' data with simultaneous EEG-fMRI by showing different object categories. Further, combined analysis of EEG and fMRI data was carried out. Extracted information through combine analysis is passed to support vector machine (SVM) classifier for classification purpose. We have achieved better classification accuracy using simultaneous EEG-fMRI i.e., 81.8% as compared to fMRI data standalone. This shows that multimodal neuroimaging can improve the classification accuracy of brain activity patterns as compared to individual modalities reported in literature. PMID:26736635

  20. Determination of the specific activities of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and B by capillary electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for the determination of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and methionine sulfoxide reductase B activities in mouse liver is described. The method is based on detection of the 4-(dimethylamino)azobenzene-4’-sulfonyl derivative of L-methionine (dabsyl Met), the ...

  1. Mutations that confer resistance to 2-deoxyglucose reduce the specific activity of hexokinase from Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Youderian, P; Lawes, M C; Creighton, C; Cook, J C; Saier, M H

    1999-04-01

    The glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose (2dGlc) inhibits the growth and multicellular development of Myxococcus xanthus. Mutants of M. xanthus resistant to 2dGlc, designated hex mutants, arise at a low spontaneous frequency. Expression of the Escherichia coli glk (glucokinase) gene in M. xanthus hex mutants restores 2dGlc sensitivity, suggesting that these mutants arise upon the loss of a soluble hexokinase function that phosphorylates 2dGlc to form the toxic intermediate, 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate. Enzyme assays of M. xanthus extracts reveal a soluble hexokinase (ATP:D-hexose-6-phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.1) activity but no phosphotransferase system activities. The hex mutants have lower levels of hexokinase activities than the wild type, and the levels of hexokinase activity exhibited by the hex mutants are inversely correlated with the ability of 2dGlc to inhibit their growth and sporulation. Both 2dGlc and N-acetylglucosamine act as inhibitors of glucose turnover by the M. xanthus hexokinase in vitro, consistent with the finding that glucose and N-acetylglucosamine can antagonize the toxic effects of 2dGlc in vivo. PMID:10094702

  2. Reduced Specificity of Hippocampal and Posterior Ventrolateral Prefrontal Activity during Relational Retrieval in Normal Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giovanello, Kelly S.; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of episodic memory in young adults demonstrate greater functional neural activity in ventrolateral pFC and hippocampus during retrieval of relational information as compared with item information. We tested the hypothesis that healthy older adults--individuals who exhibit behavioral declines in relational memory--would show…

  3. Cortical Reinstatement Mediates the Relationship Between Content-Specific Encoding Activity and Subsequent Recollection Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Alan M.; Rissman, Jesse; Kiani, Roozbeh; Wagner, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    Episodic recollection entails the conscious remembrance of event details associated with previously encountered stimuli. Recollection depends on both the establishment of cortical representations of event features during stimulus encoding and the cortical reinstatement of these representations at retrieval. Here, we used multivoxel pattern analyses of functional magnetic resonance imaging data to examine how cortical and hippocampal activity at encoding and retrieval drive recollective memory decisions. During encoding, words were associated with face or scene source contexts. At retrieval, subjects were cued to recollect the source associate of each presented word. Neurally derived estimates of encoding strength and pattern reinstatement in occipitotemporal cortex were computed for each encoding and retrieval trial, respectively. Analyses demonstrated that (1) cortical encoding strength predicted subsequent memory accuracy and reaction time, (2) encoding strength predicted encoding-phase hippocampal activity, and (3) encoding strength and retrieval-phase hippocampal activity predicted the magnitude of cortical reinstatement. Path analyses further indicated that cortical reinstatement partially mediated both the effect of cortical encoding strength and the effect of retrieval-phase hippocampal activity on subsequent source memory performance. Taken together, these results indicate that memory-guided decisions are driven in part by a pathway leading from hippocampally linked cortical encoding of event attributes to hippocampally linked cortical reinstatement at retrieval. PMID:23921785

  4. Engineering of a red-light–activated human cAMP/cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase

    PubMed Central

    Gasser, Carlos; Taiber, Sandra; Yeh, Chen-Min; Wittig, Charlotte Helene; Hegemann, Peter; Ryu, Soojin; Wunder, Frank; Möglich, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Sensory photoreceptors elicit vital physiological adaptations in response to incident light. As light-regulated actuators, photoreceptors underpin optogenetics, which denotes the noninvasive, reversible, and spatiotemporally precise perturbation by light of living cells and organisms. Of particular versatility, naturally occurring photoactivated adenylate cyclases promote the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP under blue light. Here, we have engineered a light-activated phosphodiesterase (LAPD) with complementary light sensitivity and catalytic activity by recombining the photosensor module of Deinococcus radiodurans bacterial phytochrome with the effector module of Homo sapiens phosphodiesterase 2A. Upon red-light absorption, LAPD up-regulates hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP by up to sixfold, whereas far-red light can be used to down-regulate activity. LAPD also mediates light-activated cAMP and cGMP hydrolysis in eukaryotic cell cultures and in zebrafish embryos; crucially, the biliverdin chromophore of LAPD is available endogenously and does not need to be provided exogenously. LAPD thus establishes a new optogenetic modality that permits light control over diverse cAMP/cGMP-mediated physiological processes. Because red light penetrates tissue more deeply than light of shorter wavelengths, LAPD appears particularly attractive for studies in living organisms. PMID:24889611

  5. Voluntary physical activity prevents insulin resistance in a tissue specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Sarvas, Jessica L; Otis, Jeffrey S; Khaper, Neelam; Lees, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity and a sedentary lifestyle are risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes. Here, we identified the effects 8 weeks of voluntary physical activity had on the prevention of insulin resistance in mouse skeletal muscles and liver (a hallmark of T2D). To do this, 8 week old C57BL/6J mice with (RUN) and without (SED) voluntary access to running wheels were fed a standard rodent chow ad libitum for 8 weeks. In the liver, there was a 2.5-fold increase in insulin stimulated AktSER473 phosphorylation, and a threefold increase in insulin-stimulated (0.5 U/kg) GSK3βSER9 phosphorylation in RUN compared to SED mice. Although not induced in skeletal muscles, there was a twofold increase in SOCS3 expression in SED compared to RUN mice in the liver. There was no difference in the glucose tolerance test between groups. This study was the first to show differences in liver insulin sensitivity after 8 weeks of voluntary physical activity, and increased SOCS3 expression in the liver of sedentary mice compared to active mice. These findings demonstrate that even in young mice that would normally be considered healthy, the lack of physical activity leads to insulin resistance representing the initial pathogenesis of impaired glucose metabolism leading to type 2 diabetes. PMID:25713323

  6. Using an Active Sensor to Calculate Site-Specific Nitrogen Sidedress Recommendations for Corn in Pennsylvania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Active sensors mounted on typical agricultural equipment could potentially be used to improve N (nitrogen) fertilizer recommendations and minimize nitrate losses to the environment, if N status and Economic Optimum N Rate (EONR) can be accurately determined for corn (Zea mays L). This study examine...

  7. A Discrete Population of Neurons in the Lateral Amygdala Is Specifically Activated by Contextual Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Yvette M.; Murphy, Mark

    2009-01-01

    There is no clear identification of the neurons involved in fear conditioning in the amygdala. To search for these neurons, we have used a genetic approach, the "fos-tau-lacZ" (FTL) mouse, to map functionally activated expression in neurons following contextual fear conditioning. We have identified a discrete population of neurons in the lateral…

  8. Tissue-specific regulation of expression and activity of P-glycoprotein in adjuvant arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Achira, Meguru; Totsuka, Ryuichi; Fujimura, Hisako; Kume, Toshiyuki

    2002-07-01

    Cyclosporine A and steroids are effective against rheumatoid arthritis and also known as substrates of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). We investigated the effect of arthritis on the hepatic and intestinal P-gp activity in rats, and substantiated the expression level of the hepatic P-gp. Doxorubicin was used as a P-gp substrate. Cumulative biliary excretion and intestinal exsorption of doxorubicin following intravenous administration were compared between adjuvant arthritis (AA) and normal rats. Intestinal P-gp activity was also investigated by intestinal everted sac method, and hepatic P-gp was detected by FITC-labeled antibody and visualized using a confocal laser microscope system. Biliary clearance of doxorubicin in AA rats was significantly decreased from that in normal rats. The expression level of the hepatic P-gp in AA rats was very low compared to normal rats, indicating down-regulation. Intestinal exsorption clearance was not different between AA and normal rats. Permeability of doxorubicin across intestinal everted sac was comparable between AA and normal rats, corresponding to in vivo study. In AA rats, hepatic P-gp activity was decreased due to the reduction of expression level, but intestinal P-gp activity was not changed. Different regulation systems may be involved in liver and intestine. PMID:12113888

  9. Beyond Rhyme or Reason: ERPs Reveal Task-Specific Activation of Orthography on Spoken Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattamadilok, Chotiga; Perre, Laetitia; Ziegler, Johannes C.

    2011-01-01

    Metaphonological tasks, such as rhyme judgment, have been the primary tool for the investigation of the effects of orthographic knowledge on spoken language. However, it has been recently argued that the orthography effect in rhyme judgment does not reflect the automatic activation of orthographic codes but rather stems from sophisticated response…

  10. Exactin: A specific inhibitor of Factor X activation by extrinsic tenase complex from the venom of Hemachatus haemachatus

    PubMed Central

    Girish, Vallerinteavide Mavelli; Kini, R. Manjunatha

    2016-01-01

    Unwanted clots lead to heart attack and stroke that result in a large number of deaths. Currently available anticoagulants have some drawbacks including their non-specific actions. Therefore novel anticoagulants that target specific steps in the coagulation pathway are being sought. Here we describe the identification and characterization of a novel anticoagulant protein from the venom of Hemachatus haemachatus (African Ringhals cobra) that specifically inhibits factor X (FX) activation by the extrinsic tenase complex (ETC) and thus named as exactin. Exactin belongs to the three-finger toxin (3FTx) family, with high sequence identity to neurotoxins and low identity to the well-characterized 3FTx anticoagulants-hemextin and naniproin. It is a mixed-type inhibitor of ETC with the kinetic constants, Ki’ and Ki determined as 30.62 ± 7.73 nM and 153.75 ± 17.96 nM, respectively. Exactin does not bind to the active site of factor VIIa and factor Xa based on its weak inhibition (IC50 ≫ 300 μM) to the amidolytic activities of these proteases. Exactin shows exquisite macromolecular specificity to FX activation as compared to factor IX activation by ETC. Exactin thus displays a distinct mechanism when compared to other anticoagulants targeting ETC, with its selective preference to ETC-FX [ES] complex. PMID:27558950

  11. Exactin: A specific inhibitor of Factor X activation by extrinsic tenase complex from the venom of Hemachatus haemachatus.

    PubMed

    Girish, Vallerinteavide Mavelli; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2016-01-01

    Unwanted clots lead to heart attack and stroke that result in a large number of deaths. Currently available anticoagulants have some drawbacks including their non-specific actions. Therefore novel anticoagulants that target specific steps in the coagulation pathway are being sought. Here we describe the identification and characterization of a novel anticoagulant protein from the venom of Hemachatus haemachatus (African Ringhals cobra) that specifically inhibits factor X (FX) activation by the extrinsic tenase complex (ETC) and thus named as exactin. Exactin belongs to the three-finger toxin (3FTx) family, with high sequence identity to neurotoxins and low identity to the well-characterized 3FTx anticoagulants-hemextin and naniproin. It is a mixed-type inhibitor of ETC with the kinetic constants, Ki' and Ki determined as 30.62 ± 7.73 nM and 153.75 ± 17.96 nM, respectively. Exactin does not bind to the active site of factor VIIa and factor Xa based on its weak inhibition (IC50 ≫ 300 μM) to the amidolytic activities of these proteases. Exactin shows exquisite macromolecular specificity to FX activation as compared to factor IX activation by ETC. Exactin thus displays a distinct mechanism when compared to other anticoagulants targeting ETC, with its selective preference to ETC-FX [ES] complex. PMID:27558950

  12. Lentivirally Engineered DC activate AFP-specific T cells which Inhibit Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Fu, Xiaohui; Song, Zhenshun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lu, Chongde; Ding, Guanghui; Wu, Mengchao

    2012-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a tumor-associated antigen for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is an established biomarker for HCC. In this study, we created a lentivirus expressing the AFP antigen and investigated the antitumor activity of AFP-specific CD8+ T cells, with and without CD4+ T cells, which were activated by either AFP peptide-pulsed or Lenti-AFP-engineered DC in vitro and in vivo. AFP-specific T cells could efficiently kill HepG2 HCC cells, and produced IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, perforin and granzyme B, with minimal production of IL-10 (a negative regulator of T cell activation). Both strategies activated AFP-specific T cells, but the lentiviral strategy was superior by several measures. Data also support an impact of CD4+ T cells in supporting anti-tumor activity. In vivo studies in a xenograft HCC tumor model also showed that AFP-specific T cells could markedly suppress HCC tumor formation and morbidity in tumor-bearing nude mice, as well as regulate serum levels of related cytokines and antitumor molecules. In parallel with human in vitro T cell cultures, the in vivo model demonstrated superior anti-tumor effects and Th1-skewing with Lenti-AFP-DC. This study supports the superiority of a full-length antigen lentivirus-based DC vaccine strategy over peptides, and provides new insight into the design of DC-based vaccines. PMID:21491085

  13. Expression of Overdominance for Specific Activity at the Phosphoglucomutase-2 Locus in the Pacific Oyster, Crassostrea Gigas

    PubMed Central

    Pogson, G. H.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental and genetic components of specific activity variation at the phosphoglucomutase-2 locus in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, were examined to assess the direct role played by this polymorphism in a heterozygosity/growth relationship. Both environmental variables studied, season and intertidal position, exerted highly significant effects on phosphoglucomutase specific activity but no interactions occurred between these factors and Pgm-2 genotype. Highly significant differences were also detected between Pgm-2 genotypes. The three most common heterozygotes (Pgm-2(92/100), Pgm-2(96/100) and Pgm-2(100/104)) consistently expressed greater specific activities than the Pgm-2(92/92), Pgm-2(96/96), Pgm-2(100/100) and Pgm-2(104/104) homozygotes. Overall, the specific activities of heterozygotes for the Pgm-2(100) allele exceeded heterozygotes by 24% and 20% in the mantle and adductor muscle tissues, respectively. Heterozygotes formed between the three less frequent Pgm-2(92), Pgm-2(96) and Pgm-2(104) alleles differed sharply from those possessing the Pgm-2(100) allele in being indistinguishable from homozygotes. The possibility of these patterns arising from the undetected presence of an inactive Pgm-2 allele was examined and found to be inconsistent with all of its predicted effects on the specific activity data. Genuine overdominance was shown to be capable of explaining the specific activities of ten structural locus genotypes, allelic frequency distributions in natural populations, and the maintenance of the enzyme polymorphism in a balanced state. The results provide evidence favoring the overdominance explanation for one locus involved in a heterozygosity/growth relationship and suggest that the reported effects of this locus on adult body weight may have been caused by the greater flux capacities of heterozygotes for the Pgm-2(100) allele. PMID:1829426

  14. Physical activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001941.htm Physical activity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Physical activity -- which includes an active lifestyle and routine exercise -- ...

  15. A novel cathelicidin from Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor showed specific activity to its habitat bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tongyi; Zhan, Bo; Gao, Yuanyuan

    2015-10-25

    Toad Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor is still used in China as traditional Chinese medicine. However, present investigations on its skin secretions were mainly focused on the bufadienolides, the proteins/peptides contained in the secretions are largely unknown. A cDNA encoding a novel cathelicidin termed BG-CATH was identified by analysis of the toad skin transcriptome. The BG-CATH precursor was predicted to have 2 possible cleavage sites following dibasic cleavage signals at its C-terminal, which will generate two mature peptides, BG-CATH37 and BG-CATH(5-37). Phylogenetic analysis suggests that amphibian cathelicidins might evolve from common ancestors. The two predicted mature cathelicidins from B. bufo gargarizans were synthesized and both of them showed weak antimicrobial activities against human pathogenic bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus (MIC ≥ 200 μg/mL). However, BG-CATH37 and BG-CATH(5-37) had strong antimicrobial activities against aquatic bacteria of Vibrio splendidus, Streptococcus iniae and Aeromorus hydrophila, which were common microorganisms in the habitat of B. bufo gargarizans (MIC 3.125-40 μg/mL). BG-CATH37 and BG-CATH(5-37) showed no hemolytic activity even at high concentrations (400 μg/mL). CD spectra analysis suggested that structure rigidity of BG-CATH37 and BG-CATH(5-37) might play an important role to regulate their biological activities. Selective antimicrobial activity against habitat microorganisms might reflect the adaptation of amphibians to their living environments. PMID:26091834

  16. Task-specific stability in muscle activation space during unintentional movements.

    PubMed

    Falaki, Ali; Towhidkhah, Farzad; Zhou, Tao; Latash, Mark L

    2014-11-01

    We used robot-generated perturbations applied during position-holding tasks to explore stability of induced unintentional movements in a multidimensional space of muscle activations. Healthy subjects held the handle of a robot against a constant bias force and were instructed not to interfere with hand movements produced by changes in the external force. Transient force changes were applied leading to handle displacement away from the initial position and then back toward the initial position. Intertrial variance in the space of muscle modes (eigenvectors in the muscle activations space) was quantified within two subspaces, corresponding to unchanged handle coordinate and to changes in the handle coordinate. Most variance was confined to the former subspace in each of the three phases of movement, the initial steady state, the intermediate position, and the final steady state. The same result was found when the changes in muscle activation were analyzed between the initial and final steady states. Changes in the dwell time between the perturbation force application and removal led to different final hand locations undershooting the initial position. The magnitude of the undershot scaled with the dwell time, while the structure of variance in the muscle activation space did not depend on the dwell time. We conclude that stability of the hand coordinate is ensured during both intentional and unintentional actions via similar mechanisms. Relative equifinality in the external space after transient perturbations may be associated with varying states in the redundant space of muscle activations. The results fit a hierarchical scheme for the control of voluntary movements with referent configurations and redundant mapping between the levels of the hierarchy. PMID:25092272

  17. Inhibition of Plasma Kallikrein by a Highly Specific Active Site Blocking Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Kenniston, Jon A.; Faucette, Ryan R.; Martik, Diana; Comeau, Stephen R.; Lindberg, Allison P.; Kopacz, Kris J.; Conley, Gregory P.; Chen, Jie; Viswanathan, Malini; Kastrapeli, Niksa; Cosic, Janja; Mason, Shauna; DiLeo, Mike; Abendroth, Jan; Kuzmic, Petr; Ladner, Robert C.; Edwards, Thomas E.; TenHoor, Christopher; Adelman, Burt A.; Nixon, Andrew E.; Sexton, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma kallikrein (pKal) proteolytically cleaves high molecular weight kininogen to generate the potent vasodilator and the pro-inflammatory peptide, bradykinin. pKal activity is tightly regulated in healthy individuals by the serpin C1-inhibitor, but individuals with hereditary angioedema (HAE) are deficient in C1-inhibitor and consequently exhibit excessive bradykinin generation that in turn causes debilitating and potentially fatal swelling attacks. To develop a potential therapeutic agent for HAE and other pKal-mediated disorders, we used phage display to discover a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (DX-2930) against pKal. In vitro experiments demonstrated that DX-2930 potently inhibits active pKal (Ki = 0.120 ± 0.005 nm) but does not target either the zymogen (prekallikrein) or any other serine protease tested. These findings are supported by a 2.1-Å resolution crystal structure of pKal complexed to a DX-2930 Fab construct, which establishes that the pKal active site is fully occluded by the antibody. DX-2930 injected subcutaneously into cynomolgus monkeys exhibited a long half-life (t½ ∼12.5 days) and blocked high molecular weight kininogen proteolysis in activated plasma in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, subcutaneous DX-2930 reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats. A potent and long acting inhibitor of pKal activity could be an effective treatment option for pKal-mediated diseases, such as HAE. PMID:24970892

  18. Identification of a Male-Specific RNA Binding Protein That Regulates Sex-Specific Splicing of Bmdsx by Increasing RNA Binding Activity of BmPSI▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka G.; Imanishi, Shigeo; Dohmae, Naoshi; Asanuma, Miwako; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2010-01-01

    Bmdsx is a sex-determining gene in the silkworm and is alternatively spliced in males and females. CE1 is a splicing silencer element responsible for the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx. To identify sex-specific factors implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, we performed RNA affinity chromatography using CE1 RNA as a ligand. We have identified BmIMP, a Bombyx homolog of IGF-II mRNA binding protein (IMP), as a male-specific factor that specifically binds to CE1. The gene encoding BmIMP is localized on the Z chromosome and is male-specifically expressed in various tissues. Antisense inhibition of BmIMP expression increased female-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown analyses demonstrated that BmIMP physically interacts with BmPSI, which has been identified as a factor implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, through the KH domains of BmIMP. The functional consequence of this interaction was examined using RNA mobility shift analysis. BmIMP increased BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity by decreasing the rate of BmPSI dissociation from CE1 RNA. Truncation analysis of BmIMP suggested that the KH domains are responsible for enhancing BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity. These results suggest that BmIMP may enhance the male-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA by increasing RNA binding activity of BmPSI. PMID:20956562

  19. Rescue of PINK1 protein null-specific mitochondrial complex IV deficits by ginsenoside Re activation of nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Song, Karen; Yoon, Seung-Hee; Shehzad, Omer; Kim, Yeong-Shik; Son, Jin H

    2012-12-28

    PINK1, linked to familial Parkinson's disease, is known to affect mitochondrial function. Here we identified a novel regulatory role of PINK1 in the maintenance of complex IV activity and characterized a novel mechanism by which NO signaling restored complex IV deficiency in PINK1 null dopaminergic neuronal cells. In PINK1 null cells, levels of specific chaperones, including Hsp60, leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat-containing (LRPPRC), and Hsp90, were severely decreased. LRPPRC and Hsp90 were found to act upstream of Hsp60 to regulate complex IV activity. Specifically, knockdown of Hsp60 resulted in a decrease in complex IV activity, whereas antagonistic inhibition of Hsp90 by 17-(allylamino) geldanamycin decreased both Hsp60 and complex IV activity. In contrast, overexpression of the PINK1-interacting factor LRPPRC augmented complex IV activity by up-regulating Hsp60. A similar recovery of complex IV activity was also induced by coexpression of Hsp90 and Hsp60. Drug screening identified ginsenoside Re as a compound capable of reversing the deficit in complex IV activity in PINK1 null cells through specific increases of LRPPRC, Hsp90, and Hsp60 levels. The pharmacological effects of ginsenoside Re could be reversed by treatment of the pan-NOS inhibitor L-NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) and could also be reproduced by low-level NO treatment. These results suggest that PINK1 regulates complex IV activity via interactions with upstream regulators of Hsp60, such as LRPPRC and Hsp90. Furthermore, they demonstrate that treatment with ginsenoside Re enhances functioning of the defective PINK1-Hsp90/LRPPRC-Hsp60-complex IV signaling axis in PINK1 null neurons by restoring NO levels, providing potential for new therapeutics targeting mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. PMID:23144451

  20. Combined Use of the Canine Adenovirus-2 and DREADD-Technology to Activate Specific Neural Pathways In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Boender, Arjen J.; de Jong, Johannes W.; Boekhoudt, Linde; Luijendijk, Mieneke C. M.; van der Plasse, Geoffrey; Adan, Roger A. H.

    2014-01-01

    We here describe a technique to transiently activate specific neural pathways in vivo. It comprises the combined use of a CRE-recombinase expressing canine adenovirus-2 (CAV-2) and an adeno-associated virus (AAV-hSyn-DIO-hM3D(Gq)-mCherry) that contains the floxed inverted sequence of the designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADD) hM3D(Gq)-mCherry. CAV-2 retrogradely infects projection neurons, which allowed us to specifically express hM3D(Gq)-mCherry in neurons that project from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to the nucleus accumbens (Acb), the majority of which were dopaminergic. Activation of hM3D(Gq)-mCherry by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of clozapine-N-oxide (CNO) leads to increases in neuronal activity, which enabled us to specifically activate VTA to Acb projection neurons. The VTA to Acb pathway is part of the mesolimbic dopamine system and has been implicated in behavioral activation and the exertion of effort. Injections of all doses of CNO led to increases in progressive ratio (PR) performance. The effect of the lowest dose of CNO was suppressed by administration of a DRD1-antagonist, suggesting that CNO-induced increases in PR-performance are at least in part mediated by DRD1-signaling. We hereby validate the combined use of CAV-2 and DREADD-technology to activate specific neural pathways and determine consequent changes in behaviorally relevant paradigms. PMID:24736748

  1. Addictive and non-addictive drugs induce distinct and specific patterns of ERK activation in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Valjent, Emmanuel; Pagès, Christiane; Hervé, Denis; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2004-04-01

    A major goal of research on addiction is to identify the molecular mechanisms of long-lasting behavioural alterations induced by drugs of abuse. Cocaine and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the striatum and blockade of the ERK pathway prevents establishment of conditioned place preference to these drugs. However, it is not known whether activation of ERK in the striatum is specific for these two drugs and/or this brain region. We studied the appearance of phospho-ERK immunoreactive neurons in CD-1 mouse brain following acute administration of drugs commonly abused by humans, cocaine, morphine, nicotine and THC, or of other psychoactive compounds including caffeine, scopolamine, antidepressants and antipsychotics. Each drug generated a distinct regional pattern of ERK activation. All drugs of abuse increased ERK phosphorylation in nucleus accumbens, lateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, central amygdala and deep layers of prefrontal cortex, through a dopamine D1 receptor-dependent mechanism. Although some non-addictive drugs moderately activated ERK in a few of these areas, they never induced this combined pattern of strong activation. Antidepressants and caffeine activated ERK in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Typical antipsychotics mildly activated ERK in dorsal striatum and superficial prefrontal cortex, whereas clozapine had no effect in the striatum, but more widespread effects in cortex and amygdala. Our results outline a subset of structures in which ERK activation might specifically contribute to the long-term effects of drugs of abuse, and suggest mapping ERK activation in brain as a way to identify potential sites of action of psychoactive drugs. PMID:15078556

  2. Specific activity and activity ratios of radionuclides in soil collected about 20 km from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant: Radionuclide release to the south and southwest.

    PubMed