Science.gov

Sample records for activities stressing development

  1. Stress and Androgen Activity During Fetal Development

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Shanna H.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal stress is known to alter hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, and more recent evidence suggests that it may also affect androgen activity. In animal models, prenatal stress disrupts the normal surge of testosterone in the developing male, whereas in females, associations differ by species. In humans, studies show that (1) associations between prenatal stress and child outcomes are often sex-dependent, (2) prenatal stress predicts several disorders with notable sex differences in prevalence, and (3) prenatal exposure to stressful life events may be associated with masculinized reproductive tract development and play behavior in girls. In this minireview, we examine the existing literature on prenatal stress and androgenic activity and present new, preliminary data indicating that prenatal stress may also modify associations between prenatal exposure to diethylhexyl phthalate, (a synthetic, antiandrogenic chemical) and reproductive development in infant boys. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to both chemical and nonchemical stressors may alter sex steroid pathways in the maternal-placental-fetal unit and ultimately alter hormone-dependent developmental endpoints. PMID:26241065

  2. Stress and Androgen Activity During Fetal Development.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Emily S; Swan, Shanna H

    2015-10-01

    Prenatal stress is known to alter hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, and more recent evidence suggests that it may also affect androgen activity. In animal models, prenatal stress disrupts the normal surge of testosterone in the developing male, whereas in females, associations differ by species. In humans, studies show that (1) associations between prenatal stress and child outcomes are often sex-dependent, (2) prenatal stress predicts several disorders with notable sex differences in prevalence, and (3) prenatal exposure to stressful life events may be associated with masculinized reproductive tract development and play behavior in girls. In this minireview, we examine the existing literature on prenatal stress and androgenic activity and present new, preliminary data indicating that prenatal stress may also modify associations between prenatal exposure to diethylhexyl phthalate, (a synthetic, antiandrogenic chemical) and reproductive development in infant boys. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to both chemical and nonchemical stressors may alter sex steroid pathways in the maternal-placental-fetal unit and ultimately alter hormone-dependent developmental endpoints. PMID:26241065

  3. Maternal stress, nutrition and physical activity: Impact on immune function, CNS development and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Teixeira, Antônio L; Silverman, Marni N

    2015-08-18

    Evidence suggests that maternal and fetal immune dysfunction may impact fetal brain development and could play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders, although the definitive pathophysiological mechanisms are still not completely understood. Stress, malnutrition and physical inactivity are three maternal behavioral lifestyle factors that can influence immune and central nervous system (CNS) functions in both the mother and fetus, and may therefore, increase risk for neurodevelopmental/psychiatric disorders. First, we will briefly review some aspects of maternal-fetal immune system interactions and development of immune tolerance. Second, we will discuss the bidirectional communication between the immune system and CNS and the pathways by which immune dysfunction could contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. Third, we will discuss the effects of prenatal stress and malnutrition (over and undernutrition) on perinatal programming of the CNS and immune system, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. Finally, we will discuss the beneficial impact of physical fitness during pregnancy on the maternal-fetal unit and infant and how regular physical activity and exercise can be an effective buffer against stress- and inflammatory-related disorders. Although regular physical activity has been shown to promote neuroplasticity and an anti-inflammatory state in the adult, there is a paucity of studies evaluating its impact on CNS and immune function during pregnancy. Implementing stress reduction, proper nutrition and ample physical activity during pregnancy and the childbearing period may be an efficient strategy to counteract the impact of maternal stress and malnutrition/obesity on the developing fetus. Such behavioral interventions could have an impact on early development of the CNS and immune system and contribute to the prevention of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Further research is needed to elucidate this relationship and the underlying

  4. Effects of heat stress on development, reproduction and activities of protective enzymes in Mononychellus mcgregori.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fuping; Chen, Qing; Chen, Zhishui; Lu, Hui; Xu, Xuelian; Jing, Fulin

    2014-06-01

    Mononychellus mcgregori is a pest mite of cassava. Since its invasion into China in 2008 it has spread rapidly. In order to determine the potential distribution and to analyze its invasion, diffusion and ecological adaptation mechanisms, we investigated the effect of high-temperature stress (30, 33, 36, 39 and 42 °C) on its development and reproduction, and the activity of protective enzymes in the mite. The results indicated significant influences: (1) adults could not lay eggs after they had been exposed to 42 °C for 4 h or longer; (2) egg development was slower and egg hatchability decreased after exposure of adults to 33-42 °C for 1 h; (3) offspring development (all stages) was slower after exposure of adults to 33-42 °C for 2 h or more; and (4) polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) activities in the adults increased to high levels after exposure to 33-42 °C for 1 h, and superoxide dismutase activity increased only after exposure to 42 °C for 1 h. In conclusion, exposure to high temperatures for only 1 h probably has an important impact on the mite's population growth. The significant increase of PPO, POD, APX, and CAT activities in adults may partially explain how M. mcgregori survive exposure to a relatively high temperature. PMID:24595882

  5. Jasmonate signaling in plant stress responses and development - active and inactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Wasternack, Claus; Strnad, Miroslav

    2016-09-25

    Jasmonates (JAs) are lipid-derived signals mediating plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses and in plant development. Following the elucidation of each step in their biosynthesis and the important components of perception and signaling, several activators, repressors and co-repressors have been identified which contribute to fine-tuning the regulation of JA-induced gene expression. Many of the metabolic reactions in which JA participates, such as conjugation with amino acids, glucosylation, hydroxylation, carboxylation, sulfation and methylation, lead to numerous compounds with different biological activities. These metabolites may be highly active, partially active in specific processes or inactive. Hydroxylation, carboxylation and sulfation inactivate JA signaling. The precursor of JA biosynthesis, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), has been identified as a JA-independent signaling compound. An increasing number of OPDA-specific processes is being identified. To conclude, the numerous JA compounds and their different modes of action allow plants to respond specifically and flexibly to alterations in the environment. PMID:26581489

  6. Fiber networks amplify active stress.

    PubMed

    Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase P; Lenz, Martin

    2016-03-15

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. Although these fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. Here we theoretically study force transmission in these networks. We find that collective fiber buckling in the vicinity of a local active unit results in a rectification of stress towards strongly amplified isotropic contraction. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks' disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. Our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks and shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue. PMID:26921325

  7. Reactive Oxygene Species and Thioredoxin Activity in Plants at Development of Hypergravity and Oxidative Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadko, Sergiy

    Early increasing of reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, including H2O2, occurs in plant cells under various impacts and than these ROS can function as signaling molecules in starting of cell stress responses. At the same time thioredoxins (TR) are significant ROS and H2O2 sensors and transmitters to activation of various redox sensitive proteins, transcription factors and MAP kinases. This study was aimed to investigate early increasing of ROS and H2O2 contents and TR activity in the pea roots and in tissue culture under hypergravity and oxidative stresses. Pea roots of 3-5 days old seedlings and 12-14 days old tissue culture of Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. The pea seedlings were grown on wet filter paper and the tissue culture was grown on MS medium in dark conditions under 24oC. Hypergravity stress was induced by centrifugation at 10 and 15 g. Chemiluminescence (ChL) intensity for ROS concentration, H2O2 content and TR activity were determined. All experiments were repeated by 3-5 times. Early and reliable increasing of ChL intensity and H2O2 contents in the pea roots and in the tissue culture took place under hypergravity and oxidative stresses to 30, 60 and 90 min. At the same time TR activity increased on 11 and 19 percents only to 60 and 90 min. Thus under hypergravity and oxidative stresses in both investigated plants take place early increasing of ROS and H2O2 contents which as second messengers lead to increasing of TR activity with creating of ROS-TR stress signaling pathway.

  8. The influence of motor activity on the development of cardiac arrhythmias during experimental emotional stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulyaninskiy, L. S.; Urmancheyeva, T. G.; Stepanyan, Y. P.; Fufacheva, A. A.; Gritsak, A. V.; Kuznetsova, B. A.; Kvitka, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental emotional stress which can produce various disorders of cardiac rhythm: sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, ventricular, extrasystoles and paroxysmal ventricular tachysystoles was studied. In these conditions the adrenalin content in the blood and myocardium is increased 3 to 4 times. It is found that moderate motor activity leads to a relative decrease of adrenalin in the myocardium and arrest of cardiac arrhythmias.

  9. Relations between different coping strategies for social stress, tumor development and neuroendocrine and immune activity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Azpiroz, A; De Miguel, Z; Fano, E; Vegas, O

    2008-07-01

    This study analyzes the effects of acute social stress and different coping strategies employed in response to it on the development of B16F10 melanoma pulmonary metastases, the activation of the HPA axis and the NKG2D receptor expression. To this end, male OF1 mice were subjected to 24h of social stress using the sensorial contact model. This model includes three 5-min sessions of direct social interaction with resident cagemates selected for consistent levels of aggression. Subjects' behavior was videotaped and assessed. Six days after the first social interaction (1st social stress), the animals were inoculated with tumor cells or vehicle, and six days later, both tumor-bearing and non tumor-bearing mice were subjected to a second 24h sensorial contact social stress session (2nd social stress). One hour after the 2nd social interaction, corticosterone levels and NKG2D receptor expression were determined. Lung metastatic foci numbers were determined 21 days after inoculation (15 days post-stress). Social stress increased the number of pulmonary metastases and the serum corticosterone level. A combination of cluster and discriminant analyses established the existence of two types of coping strategies: (1) a passive-reactive strategy characterized by subjects dedicating a greater percentage of time to submission, flee and avoidance behaviors; and (2) an active-proactive strategy, characterized by subjects dedicating a greater percentage of time to attack and non social exploration behaviors. Subjects belonging to the passive-reactive group were found to have a higher number of tumor foci, a higher level of corticosterone and a lower NKG2D receptor expression than subjects in the active-proactive group. These data indicate the relationship between different coping strategies for social stress and tumor development. PMID:18061400

  10. Fiber networks amplify active stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Martin; Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. While fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. I will present a comprehensive theoretical study of force transmission in these networks. I will show that the linear, small-force response of the networks is remarkably simple, as the macroscopic active stress depends only on the geometry of the force-exerting unit. In contrast, as non-linear buckling occurs around these units, local active forces are rectified towards isotropic contraction and strongly amplified. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks' disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. I will show that our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks, and that they shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue.

  11. Regulation of delta-aminolevulinate synthase activity during the development of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Barannik, T V

    1999-06-01

    Activities of rat liver delta-aminolevulinate synthetase (delta-ALAS), glutathione reductase (GR), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), GSH content in the liver, and the absorption spectrum of blood serum were investigated after CoCl2, HgCl2, or beta-adrenoblocker (propranolol) injection and after CoCl2 and propranolol co-administration. Inhibition of the activity of the key heme biosynthesis enzyme delta-ALAS was most pronounced and prolonged during the first hours after CoCl2 and CoCl2 plus propranolol injections; this was associated with accumulation of Co2+--protoporphyrin-containing products of hemolysis. Inhibition of delta-ALAS after propranolol injection is not mediated by hemolysis. A decrease in GSH content precedes the induction of heme biosynthesis only in the case of HgCl2 administration, and this was associated with inhibition of GR and G6PDH. The decreased GSH content during the first hours after injection of propranolol and co-administration of CoCl2 and propranolol was not followed by increase in delta-ALAS activity 24 h after the injection. The mechanisms of the increase in the free heme content in the liver during the early stages of oxidative stress and the regulation of the key heme biosynthesis enzyme are discussed. PMID:10395986

  12. Stress and Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ross A.

    2014-01-01

    Children's early social experiences shape their developing neurological and biological systems for good or for ill, writes Ross Thompson, and the kinds of stressful experiences that are endemic to families living in poverty can alter children's neurobiology in ways that undermine their health, their social competence, and their ability…

  13. Stress and child development.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ross A

    2014-01-01

    Children's early social experiences shape their developing neurological and biological systems for good or for ill, writes Ross Thompson, and the kinds of stressful experiences that are endemic to families living in poverty can alter children's neurobiology in ways that undermine their health, their social competence, and their ability to succeed in school and in life. For example, when children are born into a world where resources are scarce and violence is a constant possibility, neurobiological changes may make them wary and vigilant, and they are likely to have a hard time controlling their emotions, focusing on tasks, and forming healthy relationships. Unfortunately, these adaptive responses to chronic stress serve them poorly in situations, such as school and work, where they must concentrate and cooperate to do well. But thanks to the plasticity of the developing brain and other biological systems, the neurobiological response to chronic stress can be buffered and even reversed, Thompson writes, especially when we intervene early in children's lives. In particular, warm and nurturing relationships between children and adults can serve as a powerful bulwark against the neurobiological changes that accompany stress, and interventions that help build such relationships have shown particular promise. These programs have targeted biological parents, of course, but also foster parents, teachers and other caregivers, and more distant relatives, such as grandparents. For this reason, Thompson suggests that the concept of two-generation programs may need to be expanded, and that we should consider a "multigenerational" approach to helping children living in poverty cope and thrive in the face of chronic stress. PMID:25518702

  14. Preimplantation Stress and Development

    PubMed Central

    Feuer, Sky; Rinaudo, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis holds that inappropriate environmental cues in utero, a period marked by tremendous developmental sensitivity, facilitate cellular reprogramming to ultimately predispose disease in adulthood. In this review, we analyze if stress during early stages of development can affect future health. This has wide clinical importance, given that 5 million children have been conceived with assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Because the primary outcome of assisted reproduction procedures is delivery at term of a live, healthy baby, the postnatal effects occurring outside of the neonatal period are often overlooked. To this end, the long-term outcome of ART is appropriately the most relevant concern of the field today. Evidence of adverse consequences is controversial. The majority of studies have concluded no obvious problems in IVF-conceived children, although a number of isolated cases of imprinted diseases, cancers, or malformations have been reported. Given that animal studies suggest alteration of metabolic pathways following preimplantation stress, it will be of great importance to follow-up ART individuals as they enter later stages of adult life. PMID:24203919

  15. Experimentally Induced Stress Validated by EMG Activity

    PubMed Central

    Luijcks, Rosan; Hermens, Hermie J.; Bodar, Lonneke; Vossen, Catherine J.; Os, Jim van.; Lousberg, Richel

    2014-01-01

    Experience of stress may lead to increased electromyography (EMG) activity in specific muscles compared to a non-stressful situation. The main aim of this study was to develop and validate a stress-EMG paradigm in which a single uncontrollable and unpredictable nociceptive stimulus was presented. EMG activity of the trapezius muscles was the response of interest. In addition to linear time effects, non-linear EMG time courses were also examined. Taking into account the hierarchical structure of the dataset, a multilevel random regression model was applied. The stress paradigm, executed in N = 70 subjects, consisted of a 3-minute baseline measurement, a 3-minute pre-stimulus stress period and a 2-minute post-stimulus phase. Subjects were unaware of the precise moment of stimulus delivery and its intensity level. EMG activity during the entire experiment was conform a priori expectations: the pre-stimulus phase showed a significantly higher mean EMG activity level compared to the other two phases, and an immediate EMG response to the stimulus was demonstrated. In addition, the analyses revealed significant non-linear EMG time courses in all three phases. Linear and quadratic EMG time courses were significantly modified by subjective anticipatory stress level, measured just before the start of the stress task. Linking subjective anticipatory stress to EMG stress reactivity revealed that subjects with a high anticipatory stress level responded with more EMG activity during the pre-stimulus stress phase, whereas subjects with a low stress level showed an inverse effect. Results suggest that the stress paradigm presented here is a valid test to quantify individual differences in stress susceptibility. Further studies with this paradigm are required to demonstrate its potential use in mechanistic clinical studies. PMID:24736740

  16. Cytoglobin deficiency promotes liver cancer development from hepatosteatosis through activation of the oxidative stress pathway.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Le Thi Thanh; Matsumoto, Yoshinari; Thuy, Tuong Thi Van; Hai, Hoang; Suoh, Maito; Urahara, Yuka; Motoyama, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Hideki; Tamori, Akihiro; Kubo, Shoji; Takemura, Shigekazu; Morita, Takashi; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Kawada, Norifumi

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the role of cytoglobin (Cygb), a globin expressed in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), in the development of liver fibrosis and cancer in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Cygb expression was assessed in patients with NASH and hepatocellular carcinoma. Mouse NASH model was generated in Cygb-deficient (Cygb(-/-)) or wild-type (WT) mice by giving a choline-deficient amino acid-defined diet and, in some of them, macrophage deletion and N-acetyl cysteine treatment were used. Primary-cultured mouse HSCs isolated from WT (HSCs(Cygb-wild)) or Cygb(-/-) (HSCs(Cygb-null)) mice were characterized. As results, the expression of CYGB was reduced in patients with NASH and hepatocellular carcinoma. Choline-deficient amino acid treatment for 8 weeks induced prominent inflammation and fibrosis in Cygb(-/-) mice, which was inhibited by macrophage deletion. Surprisingly, at 32 weeks, despite no tumor formation in the WT mice, all Cygb(-/-) mice developed liver cancer, which was ameliorated by N-acetyl cysteine treatment. Altered expression of 31 genes involved in the metabolism of reactive oxygen species was notable in Cygb(-/-) mice. Both HSCs(Cygb-null) and Cygb siRNA-transfected-HSCs(Cygb-wild) exhibited the preactivation condition. Our findings provide important insights into the role that Cygb, expressed in HSCs during liver fibrosis, plays in cancer development with NASH. PMID:25665792

  17. Development of a Detailed Stress Map of Oklahoma for Avoidance of Potentially Active Faults When Siting Wastewater Injection Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, R. C., II; Zoback, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    We report progress on a project to create a detailed map of in situ stress orientations and relative magnitudes throughout the state of Oklahoma. It is well known that the past 5 years has seen a remarkable increase in seismicity in much of the state, potentially related to waste water injection. The purpose of this project is to attempt to utilize detailed knowledge of the stress field to identify which pre-existing faults could be potentially active in response to injection-related pore pressure increases. Over 50 new stress orientations have been obtained, principally utilizing wellbore image data provided by the oil and gas industry. These data reveal a very uniform ENE direction of maximum compressive stress through much of the state. As earthquake focal plane mechanisms indicate strike-slip faulting, the stress orientation data indicate which pre-existing faults are potentially active. The data are consistent with slip on the near-vertical, NE-trending fault associated with at least one of the M 5+ earthquakes in the Prague, OK sequence in 2011. If successful, it would demonstrate that combining detailed information about pre-existing faults and the current stress field could be used to guide the siting of injection wells so as to decrease the potential for injection-related seismicity.

  18. Developing psychophysiological profiles for monitoring stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldow, Roberta L.; Bergen, Michael T.; Belin, Kari; Bululu, Luba; Couso, Olivita; McLaughlin, Joselyn; Short, Kenneth R.; Servatius, Richard J.

    2006-05-01

    Training prepares first responders for disasters including terrorist attacks. To train effectively it should be as realistic as possible and elicit the stress response. We are developing a profile that will be a marker for intensity of stress as well as differentiate stress from exertion. We have monitored stress during several training scenarios for different groups including civilian SWAT teams and the military. In addition, we can monitor stress to exposure to nonlethal weapons. We have monitored stress during exposure to blunt impact using a paintball paradigm. We have measured salivary substances (such as cortisol and DHEA [markers for the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis]) and amylase [marker for the sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system], physiological parameters (such as activity and heart rate), and neuropsychological assessment tools (such as Borg's perceived exertion scale, Spielberger's STAI and Thayer's ADC). With these neuroendocrine, physiological and behavioral indices in hand, we are poised to examine stress induction in preparedness in trainees.

  19. Effects of 4-phenylbutyric acid on the process and development of diabetic nephropathy induced in rats by streptozotocin: Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress-oxidative activation

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Zhifeng; Feng Bing; Mu Jiao; Qi Wei; Zeng Wei; Guo Yanhong; Pang Qi; Ye Zilin; Liu Li; Yuan Fahuan

    2010-07-15

    Oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN), although the precise regulatory mechanism is still unclear. Recent reports have shown that chemical molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) can suppress oxidative stress by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We therefore hypothesized that 4-PBA could provide renoprotection through the suppression of oxidative stress in DN rats. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into three groups: a normal control (NC) group, a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced DN model group, and a DN plus 4-PBA (1 g/kg) treatment group. At the end of 4, 8, and 12 weeks, hydroxyproline content, NADPH oxidase activity and the expression of phosphorylation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1{alpha} (p-IRE1{alpha}), p47phox, nitrotyrosine (NT) and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the kidneys of all rats were determined; malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in serum and urine were also detected; renal nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) activity in all of the rats was examined at the end of 12 weeks. Compared with the NC group, the DN rats showed a significant increase in hydroxyproline content, NADPH oxidase activity, NF-{kappa}B activity, the expression of p-IRE1{alpha}, p47phox, NT and Nrf2 in renal tissue; markedly, MDA levels were higher and SOD activity was lower in serum and urine of DN rats than in NC rats for the indicated time. These alterations were inhibited by the administration of 4-PBA. These findings first demonstrated that treatment with 4-PBA significantly inhibits the process and development of diabetic nephropathy in rats through the regulation of ER stress-oxidative activation.

  20. The SrkA Kinase Is Part of the SakA Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Interactome and Regulates Stress Responses and Development in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Jaimes-Arroyo, Rafael; Lara-Rojas, Fernando; Bayram, Özgür; Valerius, Oliver; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and many other eukaryotes use specialized mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) of the Hog1/p38 family to transduce environmental stress signals. In Aspergillus nidulans, the MAPK SakA and the transcription factor AtfA are components of a central multiple stress-signaling pathway that also regulates development. Here we characterize SrkA, a putative MAPK-activated protein kinase, as a novel component of this pathway. ΔsrkA and ΔsakA mutants share a derepressed sexual development phenotype. However, ΔsrkA mutants are not sensitive to oxidative stress, and in fact, srkA inactivation partially suppresses the sensitivity of ΔsakA mutant conidia to H2O2, tert-butyl-hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), and menadione. In the absence of stress, SrkA shows physical interaction with nonphosphorylated SakA in the cytosol. We show that H2O2 induces a drastic change in mitochondrial morphology consistent with a fission process and the relocalization of SrkA to nuclei and mitochondria, depending on the presence of SakA. SakA-SrkA nuclear interaction is also observed during normal asexual development in dormant spores. Using SakA and SrkA S-tag pulldown and purification studies coupled to mass spectrometry, we found that SakA interacts with SrkA, the stress MAPK MpkC, the PPT1-type phosphatase AN6892, and other proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, mRNA stability and protein synthesis, mitochondrial function, and other stress-related responses. We propose that oxidative stress induces DNA damage and mitochondrial fission and that SakA and SrkA mediate cell cycle arrest and regulate mitochondrial function during stress. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SakA and SrkA regulate the remodelling of cell physiology during oxidative stress and development. PMID:25820520

  1. Mechanisms of Cell Propulsion by Active Stresses.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, A E

    2011-07-01

    The mechanisms by which cytoskeletal flows and cell-substrate interactions interact to generate cell motion are explored using a simplified model of the cytoskeleton as a viscous gel containing active stresses. This model yields explicit general results relating cell speed and traction forces to the distributions of active stress and cell-substrate friction. It is found that 1) the cell velocity is given by a function that quantifies the asymmetry of the active-stress distribution, 2) gradients in cell-substrate friction can induce motion even when the active stresses are symmetrically distributed, 3) the traction-force dipole is enhanced by protrusive stresses near the cell edges or contractile stresses near the center of the cell, and 4) the cell velocity depends biphasically on the cell-substrate adhesion strength if active stress is enhanced by adhesion. Specific experimental tests of the calculated dependences are proposed. PMID:21804763

  2. Mechanisms of Cell Propulsion by Active Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, A. E.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cytoskeletal flows and cell-substrate interactions interact to generate cell motion are explored using a simplified model of the cytoskeleton as a viscous gel containing active stresses. This model yields explicit general results relating cell speed and traction forces to the distributions of active stress and cell-substrate friction. It is found that 1) the cell velocity is given by a function that quantifies the asymmetry of the active-stress distribution, 2) gradients in cell-substrate friction can induce motion even when the active stresses are symmetrically distributed, 3) the traction-force dipole is enhanced by protrusive stresses near the cell edges or contractile stresses near the center of the cell, and 4) the cell velocity depends biphasically on the cell-substrate adhesion strength if active stress is enhanced by adhesion. Specific experimental tests of the calculated dependences are proposed. PMID:21804763

  3. Cellular cholesterol accumulation modulates high fat high sucrose (HFHS) diet-induced ER stress and hepatic inflammasome activation in the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Bashiri, Amir; Nesan, Dinushan; Tavallaee, Ghazaleh; Sue-Chue-Lam, Ian; Chien, Kevin; Maguire, Graham F; Naples, Mark; Zhang, Jing; Magomedova, Lilia; Adeli, Khosrow; Cummins, Carolyn L; Ng, Dominic S

    2016-07-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is the form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease posing risk to progress into serious long term complications. Human and pre-clinical models implicate cellular cholesterol dysregulation playing important role in its development. Mouse model studies suggest synergism between dietary cholesterol and fat in contributing to NASH but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Our laboratory previously reported the primary importance of hepatic endoplasmic reticulum cholesterol (ER-Chol) in regulating hepatic ER stress by comparing the responses of wild type, Ldlr-/-xLcat+/+ and Ldlr-/-xLcat-/- mice, to a 2% high cholesterol diet (HCD). Here we further investigated the roles of ER-Chol and ER stress in HFHS diet-induced NASH using the same strains. With HFHS diet feeding, both WT and Ldlr-/-xLcat+/+ accumulate ER-Chol in association with ER stress and inflammasome activation but the Ldlr-/-xLcat-/- mice are protected. By contrast, all three strains accumulate cholesterol crystal, in correlation with ER-Chol, albeit less so in Ldlr-/-xLcat-/- mice. By comparison, HCD feeding per se (i) is sufficient to promote steatosis and activate inflammasomes, and (ii) results in dramatic accumulation of cholesterol crystal which is linked to inflammasome activation in Ldlr-/-xLcat-/- mice, independent of ER-Chol. Our data suggest that both dietary fat and cholesterol each independently promote steatosis, cholesterol crystal accumulation and inflammasome activation through distinct but complementary pathways. In vitro studies using palmitate-induced hepatic steatosis in HepG2 cells confirm the key roles by cellular cholesterol in the induction of steatosis and inflammasome activations. These novel findings provide opportunities for exploring a cellular cholesterol-focused strategy for treatment of NASH. PMID:27090939

  4. Pediatric stress: hormonal mediators and human development.

    PubMed

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Kino, Tomoshige; Souvatzoglou, Emmanuil; Chrousos, George P

    2003-01-01

    Stress activates the central and peripheral components of the stress system, i.e., the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the arousal/sympathetic system. The principal effectors of the stress system are corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), arginine vasopressin, the proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and beta-endorphin, the glucocorticoids, and the catecholamines norepinephrine and epinephrine. Appropriate responsiveness of the stress system to stressors is a crucial prerequisite for a sense of well-being, adequate performance of tasks and positive social interactions. By contrast, inappropriate responsiveness of the stress system may impair growth and development, and may account for a number of endocrine, metabolic, autoimmune and psychiatric disorders. The development and severity of these conditions primarily depend on the genetic vulnerability of the individual, the exposure to adverse environmental factors and the timing of the stressful event(s), given that prenatal life, infancy, childhood and adolescence are critical periods characterized by increased vulnerability to stressors. The developing brain undergoes rapid growth and is characterized by high turnover of neuronal connections during the prenatal and early postnatal life. These processes and, hence, brain plasticity, slow down during childhood and puberty, and plateau in young adulthood. Hormonal actions in early life, and to a much lesser extent later, can be organizational, i.e., can have effects that last for long periods of time, often for the entire life of the individual. Hormones of the stress system and sex steroids have such effects, which influence the behavior and certain physiologic functions of individuals for life. Exposure of the developing brain to severe and/or prolonged stress may result in hyperactivity/hyperreactivity of the stress system, with resultant amygdala hyperfunction (fear reaction), decreased activity of the hippocampus

  5. Stress among charge nurses: tool development and stress measurement.

    PubMed

    Admi, Hanna; Moshe-Eilon, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and implement a tool for measuring the role stress of charge nurses. Tools are lacking regarding measurement of nursing role stressors, particularly for charge nurses. Based on focus groups and in-depth interviews with charge nurses within a large tertiary hospital, a charge nurse stress questionnaire was developed which measures six factors of stress: authority-responsibility conflict, patient-nurse interaction, deficient resources, managerial decision making, role conflict, and overload. The prominent stressors on charge nurses were specific to the role. Mean levels of stress were significantly higher for nurses who attended post-graduate clinical courses than for those who did not. The mean level of stress was higher for department nurse managers than for nurses without a managerial position. This tool was designed to measure charge nurse stress demonstrates reliability, and highlights the specific stressors demanded by the role. Preparation and ongoing support for fulfilling this position are recommended. PMID:20672537

  6. Stress-inducible phosphoprotein 1 has unique cochaperone activity during development and regulates cellular response to ischemia via the prion protein.

    PubMed

    Beraldo, Flavio H; Soares, Iaci N; Goncalves, Daniela F; Fan, Jue; Thomas, Anu A; Santos, Tiago G; Mohammad, Amro H; Roffé, Martin; Calder, Michele D; Nikolova, Simona; Hajj, Glaucia N; Guimaraes, Andre L; Massensini, Andre R; Welch, Ian; Betts, Dean H; Gros, Robert; Drangova, Maria; Watson, Andrew J; Bartha, Robert; Prado, Vania F; Martins, Vilma R; Prado, Marco A M

    2013-09-01

    Stress-inducible phosphoprotein 1 (STI1) is part of the chaperone machinery, but it also functions as an extracellular ligand for the prion protein. However, the physiological relevance of these STI1 activities in vivo is unknown. Here, we show that in the absence of embryonic STI1, several Hsp90 client proteins are decreased by 50%, although Hsp90 levels are unaffected. Mutant STI1 mice showed increased caspase-3 activation and 50% impairment in cellular proliferation. Moreover, placental disruption and lack of cellular viability were linked to embryonic death by E10.5 in STI1-mutant mice. Rescue of embryonic lethality in these mutants, by transgenic expression of the STI1 gene, supported a unique role for STI1 during embryonic development. The response of STI1 haploinsufficient mice to cellular stress seemed compromised, and mutant mice showed increased vulnerability to ischemic insult. At the cellular level, ischemia increased the secretion of STI1 from wild-type astrocytes by 3-fold, whereas STI1 haploinsufficient mice secreted half as much STI1. Interesting, extracellular STI1 prevented ischemia-mediated neuronal death in a prion protein-dependent way. Our study reveals essential roles for intracellular and extracellular STI1 in cellular resilience. PMID:23729591

  7. Development of stress intensification factors

    SciTech Connect

    Minichiello, J.C.; Rodabaugh, E.C.

    1995-12-01

    B31.1 Equation 13A, B31.3 Equation 18, and Section 3 Paragraphs NC/ND-3653 EQS. (10), (10a), and 11 all use i-factors (SIFs) to compute stresses in piping due to displacement induced loadings. Appendix D of the B31 Standards and Figure NC/ND-3673.2(b)-1 of Section 3 give values of i-factors for commonly used piping components. A need occasionally arises to establish i-factors for other components (e.g., a branch connection in an elbow). In order to provide guidance on the development of these factors, a new draft Appendix has been prepared to assure that the experimental procedures and interpretation of the test results leading to new i-factors are consistent with the basis for existing i-factors. This paper discusses the background to the proposed Appendix, using the Section 3 version as a model, and also provides the authors` opinions an the need for experimental verification (vs purely analytical computation) of i-factors. The Appendix proposed is to be part of Appendix 2 of Section 3.

  8. The Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling Components in the Fungal Development, Stress Response and Virulence of the Fungal Cereal Pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Yueqiang; Zhong, Shaobin

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been demonstrated to be involved in fungal development, sexual reproduction, pathogenicity and/or virulence in many filamentous plant pathogenic fungi, but genes for MAPKs in the fungal cereal pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana have not been characterized. In this study, orthologues of three MAPK genes (CsSLT2, CsHOG1 and CsFUS3) and one MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) gene (CsSTE11) were identified in the whole genome sequence of the B. sorokiniana isolate ND90Pr, and knockout mutants were generated for each of them. The ∆Csfus3 and ∆Csste11 mutants were defective in conidiation and formation of appressoria-like structures, showed hypersensitivity to oxidative stress and lost pathogenicity on non-wounded leaves of barley cv. Bowman. When inoculated on wounded leaves of Bowman, the ∆Csfus3 and ∆Csste11 mutants were reduced in virulence compared to the wild type. No morphological changes were observed in the ∆Cshog1 mutants in comparison with the wild type; however, they were slightly reduced in growth under oxidative stress and were hypersensitive to hyperosmotic stress. The ∆Cshog1 mutants formed normal appressoria-like structures but were reduced in virulence when inoculated on Bowman leaves. The ∆Csslt2 mutants produced more vegetative hyphae, had lighter pigmentation, were more sensitive to cell wall degrading enzymes, and were reduced in virulence on Bowman leaves, although they formed normal appressoria like the wild type. Root infection assays indicated that the ∆Cshog1 and ∆Csslt2 mutants were able to infect barley roots while the ∆Csfus3 and ∆Csste11 failed to cause any symptoms. However, no significant difference in virulence was observed for ∆Cshog1 mutants while ∆Csslt2 mutants showed significantly reduced virulence on barley roots in comparison with the wild type. Our results indicated that all of these MAPK and MAPKKK genes are involved in the regulation of fungal development under

  9. Maternal mediation, stress inoculation, and the development of neuroendocrine stress resistance in primates

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Karen J.; Buckmaster, Christine L.; Sundlass, Karan; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Lyons, David M.

    2006-01-01

    The stress inoculation hypothesis presupposes that brief intermittent stress exposure early in life induces the development of subsequent stress resistance in human and nonhuman primates. Rodent studies, however, suggest a role for maternal care rather than stress exposure per se (i.e., the maternal mediation hypothesis). To investigate these two hypotheses, we examined maternal care and the development of stress resistance after exposure to brief intermittent infant stress (IS), mother–infant stress (MIS), or no stress (NS) protocols administered to 30 monkeys between postnatal weeks 17 and 27. Unlike rodents, the IS condition did not permanently increase primate maternal care, nor did measures of total maternal care predict subsequent offspring hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal-axis responsivity. Although MIS infants received less maternal care than IS and NS infants, both IS and MIS monkeys developed subsequent stress resistance. These findings indicate that rearing differences in the development of stress resistance are more closely related to differences in prior stress exposure than to differences in maternal care. A second experiment confirmed this conclusion in a different cohort of 25 monkeys exposed as infants to high foraging-demand (HFD) or low foraging-demand (LFD) conditions. HFD infants exhibited intermittent elevations in cortisol levels and received less maternal care than LFD infants. In keeping with a key prediction of the stress inoculation hypothesis, HFD males responded to stress in adulthood with diminished hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal-axis activation compared with LFD males. Results from both experiments demonstrate that stress inoculation, rather than high levels of maternal care, promotes the development of primate stress resistance. PMID:16473950

  10. Stress causes tissue-specific changes in the sialyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Dabelic, Sanja; Flögel, Mirna; Maravić, Gordana; Lauc, Gordan

    2004-01-01

    Numerous pathological conditions are associated with specific changes in glycosylation. Recent studies clearly demonstrated a link between stress and the development and course of many diseases. Biochemical mechanisms that link stress and diseases are still not fully understood, but there are some indications that changes in glycosylation are involved in this process. Influence of acute and chronic psychological stress on protein sialylation as well as the activity of sialyltransferases, enzymes that synthesize sialoglycoproteins, has been studied on Fischer rats. Liver, spleen, kidney, skeletal muscle, heart, adrenal gland, serum, cerebellum, hippocampus, medulla oblongata and cortex have been analyzed. Statistically significant tissue- and type of stress-specific changes in total sialyltransferase (ST) activity were observed. Acute stress resulted in 39% increase of ST activity in liver and spleen, while at the same time there was 43% decrease in ST activity in cerebellum. In chronic stress, ST activity increased in spleen (93%) and decreased in liver (17%), cerebellum (38%) and hippocampus (64%). Western-blot analysis using Maackia amurensis and Sambucus nigra lectins did not reveal any difference in protein sialylation. The results of serum corticosterone analysis indicate that showed increase in acute stress and decrease in chronic stress are in good accordance with the hypothesis that corticosterone has a role in the regulation of liver ST activity. PMID:15241940

  11. Left brain cortical activity modulates stress effects on social behavior.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunee; Hong, Jiso; Park, Young-Gyun; Chae, Sujin; Kim, Yong; Kim, Daesoo

    2015-01-01

    When subjected to stress, some individuals develop maladaptive symptoms whereas others retain normal behavior. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is known to control these adaptive responses to stress. Here, we show that mPFC neurons in the left hemisphere control stress effects on social behavior. Mice made socially avoidant by the stress of chronic social defeats showed depressed neural activity in the left mPFC. Photoactivation of these neurons reversed social avoidance and restored social activity. Despite social defeats, resilient mice with normal sociability showed normal firing rates in the left mPFC; however, photoinhibition of these neurons induced social avoidance. The same photomodulation administered to the right mPFC caused no significant effects. These results explain how stressed individuals develop maladaptive behaviors through left cortical depression, as reported in mood and anxiety disorders. PMID:26302668

  12. Left brain cortical activity modulates stress effects on social behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunee; Hong, Jiso; Park, Young-Gyun; Chae, Sujin; Kim, Yong; Kim, Daesoo

    2015-01-01

    When subjected to stress, some individuals develop maladaptive symptoms whereas others retain normal behavior. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is known to control these adaptive responses to stress. Here, we show that mPFC neurons in the left hemisphere control stress effects on social behavior. Mice made socially avoidant by the stress of chronic social defeats showed depressed neural activity in the left mPFC. Photoactivation of these neurons reversed social avoidance and restored social activity. Despite social defeats, resilient mice with normal sociability showed normal firing rates in the left mPFC; however, photoinhibition of these neurons induced social avoidance. The same photomodulation administered to the right mPFC caused no significant effects. These results explain how stressed individuals develop maladaptive behaviors through left cortical depression, as reported in mood and anxiety disorders. PMID:26302668

  13. Does prenatal stress affect the motoric development of rat pups?

    PubMed

    Patin, V; Vincent, A; Lordi, B; Caston, J

    2004-04-19

    Pregnant rats were exposed to an acute or a repeated stress (presence of a cat) either at the 10th or the 14th gestational day, and the development of their offspring was studied during the first 2 weeks of life. Motor development was measured by different tests: rooting reflex, vibrissae placing response, righting reflex, negative geotaxis. Other landmarks such as eye opening and spontaneous locomotor activity were also recorded. The results showed that, except for the rooting reflex which was most often enhanced (while not significantly) in prenatally stressed rats, the development of the vibrissae placing response, the righting reflex and the negative geotaxis behavior was delayed in the offspring of dams stressed at the 10th gestational day and not (or almost not) in the offspring of dams stressed at the 14th gestational day, the delay being more severe when the prenatal stress was repeated than when it was acutely administered. The spontaneous motor activity was also altered in repeatedly prenatally stressed rats, whatever the day of pregnancy when it was administered, while it was unaffected in acutely prenatally stressed animals. The delay in motor reflexes development was interpreted as alterations in maturation of nervous structures sustaining motor skills, while permanent decrease of spontaneous motor activity was explained by emotional and motivational alterations due to prenatal stress. PMID:15063088

  14. Cardiovascular reactivity, stress, and physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Jung; Webb, Heather E.; Zourdos, Michael C.; Acevedo, Edmund O.

    2013-01-01

    Psychological stress has been proposed as a major contributor to the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Acute mental stress can activate the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM) axis, eliciting the release of catecholamines (NE and EPI) resulting in the elevation of heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP). Combined stress (psychological and physical) can exacerbate these cardiovascular responses, which may partially contribute to the elevated risk of CVD and increased proportionate mortality risks experienced by some occupations (e.g., firefighting and law enforcement). Studies have supported the benefits of physical activity on physiological and psychological health, including the cardiovascular response to acute stress. Aerobically trained individuals exhibit lower sympathetic nervous system (e.g., HR) reactivity and enhanced cardiovascular efficiency (e.g., lower vascular reactivity and decreased recovery time) in response to physical and/or psychological stress. In addition, resistance training has been demonstrated to attenuate cardiovascular responses and improve mental health. This review will examine stress-induced cardiovascular reactivity and plausible explanations for how exercise training and physical fitness (aerobic and resistance exercise) can attenuate cardiovascular responses to stress. This enhanced functionality may facilitate a reduction in the incidence of stroke and myocardial infarction. Finally, this review will also address the interaction of obesity and physical activity on cardiovascular reactivity and CVD. PMID:24223557

  15. Development and testing of virtual reality exposure therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder in active duty service members who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    McLay, Robert N; Graap, Kenneth; Spira, James; Perlman, Karen; Johnston, Scott; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Difede, JoAnn; Deal, William; Oliver, David; Baird, Alicia; Bordnick, Patrick S; Spitalnick, Josh; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Rizzo, Albert

    2012-06-01

    This study was an open-label, single-group, treatment-development project aimed at developing and testing a method for applying virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) to active duty service members diagnosed with combat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Forty-two service members with PTSD were enrolled, and 20 participants completed treatment. The PTSD Checklist-Military version, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 for depression, and the Beck Anxiety Inventory were used as outcome measures. Of those who completed post-treatment assessment, 75% had experienced at least a 50% reduction in PTSD symptoms and no longer met DSM-IV criteria for PTSD at post treatment. Average PSTD scores decreased by 50.4%, depression scores by 46.6%, and anxiety scores by 36%. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that statistically significant improvements in PTSD, depression, and anxiety occurred over the course of treatment and were maintained at follow up. There were no adverse events associated with VRET treatment. This study provides preliminary support for the use of VRET in combat-related PTSD. Further study will be needed to determine the wider utility of the method and to determine if it offers advantages over other established PTSD treatment modalities. PMID:22730837

  16. Stress and structure development in polymeric coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaessen, Diane Melissa

    2002-09-01

    The main goal of this research is to measure the stress evolution in various polymer coating systems to establish the mechanisms responsible for stress development, stress relaxation, and defect formation. Investigated systems include ultraviolet (UV)-curable coatings, dense and porous coatings from polymer solutions, and latex coatings. Coating stress was measured using a controlled environment stress apparatus based on a cantilever deflection principle. For acrylate coatings, it was found that by cycling a UV-lamp on and off, keeping the total dose constant, coating stress was lowered by 60% by decreasing the cycle period. A stress minimum was also found to exist for a given dose of radiation. The lower stress is attributed to stress relaxation and/or slower reaction during dark periods. A viscoelastic stress model of this process was formulated and predicted stress values close to those observed experimentally. During drying of cellulose acetate (CA) coatings cast in acetone, final stress increased from 10 to 45 MPa as coating thickness decreased from 60 to 10 mum. This thickness dependent coating stress for a solvent-cast polymer coating is a new finding and is attributed to (1) less shrinkage in thicker coatings due to more trapped solvent (from skinning) and (2) greater amounts of polymer stress relaxation in thicker coatings. For porous CA coatings prepared by dry-cast phase separation, final in-plane stresses ranged from 20 MPa for coatings containing small pores (˜1 mum) to 5 MPa for coatings containing small pores and macrovoids (˜200 mum). For these coatings, a small amount of stress relaxation occurs due to capillary pressure relief. A stress plateau for the macrovoid-containing coating is likely caused by stress-induced rupture of the polymer-rich phase. Measured stress in pigment-free latex coatings was much lower (˜0.3 MPa) than UV-curable and solvent-cast polymer coatings and was found to increase with increasing latex glass transition

  17. Chronic variable stress activates hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Courties, Gabriel; Dutta, Partha; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Zaltsman, Alex; von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Bode, Christoph; Fricchione, Gregory L.; Denninger, John; Lin, Charles P.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Libby, Peter; Swirski, Filip K.; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to psychosocial stress is a risk factor for many diseases, including atherosclerosis1,2. While incompletely understood, interaction between the psyche and the immune system provides one potential mechanism linking stress and disease inception and progression. Known crosstalk between the brain and immune system includes the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, which centrally drives glucocorticoid production in the adrenal cortex, and the sympathetic–adrenal–medullary axis, which controls stress–induced catecholamine release in support of the fight–or–flight reflex3,4. It remains unknown however if chronic stress changes hematopoietic stem cell activity. Here we show that stress increases proliferation of these most primitive progenitors, giving rise to higher levels of disease–promoting inflammatory leukocytes. We found that chronic stress induced monocytosis and neutrophilia in humans. While investigating the source of leukocytosis in mice, we discovered that stress activates upstream hematopoietic stem cells. Sympathetic nerve fibers release surplus noradrenaline, which uses the β3 adrenergic receptor to signal bone marrow niche cells to decrease CXCL12 levels. Consequently, elevated hematopoietic stem cell proliferation increases output of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. When atherosclerosis–prone ApoE−/− mice encounter chronic stress, accelerated hematopoiesis promotes plaque features associated with vulnerable lesions that cause myocardial infarction and stroke in humans. PMID:24952646

  18. Stress, Early Brain Development, and Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnar, Megan R.; Barr, Ronald G.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews research on the effect of stress hormones, particularly glucocorticoids, on the brain and early development. It describes the psychological and social processes that reduce stress hormone responses to threatening and painful procedures. Research on the cognitive and emotional effects of synthetic glucocorticoids is also discussed.…

  19. Arctigenin alleviates ER stress via activating AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yuan; Sun, Xiao-xiao; Ye, Ji-ming; He, Li; Yan, Shou-sheng; Zhang, Hao-hao; Hu, Li-hong; Yuan, Jun-ying; Yu, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the protective effects of arctigenin (ATG), a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan from Arctium lappa L (Compositae), against ER stress in vitro and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: A cell-based screening assay for ER stress regulators was established. Cell viability was measured using MTT assay. PCR and Western blotting were used to analyze gene and protein expression. Silencing of the CaMKKβ, LKB1, and AMPKα1 genes was achieved by RNA interference (RNAi). An ATP bioluminescent assay kit was employed to measure the intracellular ATP levels. Results: ATG (2.5, 5 and 10 μmol/L) inhibited cell death and unfolded protein response (UPR) in a concentration-dependent manner in cells treated with the ER stress inducer brefeldin A (100 nmol/L). ATG (1, 5 and 10 μmol/L) significantly attenuated protein synthesis in cells through inhibiting mTOR-p70S6K signaling and eEF2 activity, which were partially reversed by silencing AMPKα1 with RNAi. ATG (1-50 μmol/L) reduced intracellular ATP level and activated AMPK through inhibiting complex I-mediated respiration. Pretreatment of cells with the AMPK inhibitor compound C (25 μmol/L) rescued the inhibitory effects of ATG on ER stress. Furthermore, ATG (2.5 and 5 μmol/L) efficiently activated AMPK and reduced the ER stress and cell death induced by palmitate (2 mmol/L) in INS-1 β cells. Conclusion: ATG is an effective ER stress alleviator, which protects cells against ER stress through activating AMPK, thus attenuating protein translation and reducing ER load. PMID:22705729

  20. Dynamics of active cellular response under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitive nature of cells and the elastic response of the matrix, we predict the dynamics of orientation of cells. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the forces generated by cells in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material can be used to distinguish systems in which cell activity is controlled by stress from those where cell activity is controlled by strain. Reference: Nature Physics, vol. 3, pp 655 (2007).

  1. Active control of underground stresses through rock pressurization

    SciTech Connect

    Vandergrift, T.L.

    1995-06-01

    To significantly increase the stability of underground excavations while exploiting the full advantages of confined rock strength, methods must be developed to actively control the distribution of stresses near the excavation. This US Bureau of Mines study examines theoretical and practical aspects of rock pressurization, an active stress control concept that induces compressive stress in the wall rock through repeated hydraulic fracturing with a settable fluid. Numerical analyses performed by incorporating the rock pressurization concept into a variety of boundary-element models indicate that rock pressurization has the potential to improve underground excavation stability in three ways: (1) by relocating stress concentrations away from the weak opening surface to stronger, confined wall rock; (2) by inducing additional stresses in a biaxial stress field to reduce the difference between the principal stress components near the surface of the opening, and (3) by counteracting the tensile stresses induced in the rock around internally loaded openings. Practical aspects of the rock pressurization concept were investigated through a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments. The use of sulfur as a settable fluid for hydraulic fracturing was demonstrated, although problems related to sulfur viscosity suggest that other molten materials, such as wax, may be better suited to practical field application of the rock pressurization concept.

  2. Parent Stress and the Active Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Karen; Prom, Megan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to look at whether a child's activity level was correlated with the level of stress a mother experiences. Parents can describe their children as having distinct and recognizable patterns of behavior as young as in infancy (Paaren, Hewitt, Lemery, Bihun & Goldsmith, 2000). Even at birth, some children are much…

  3. Stress and Coping Activity: Reframing Negative Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Jamie S.; Gourley, Mary K.; Madson, Laura; Le Blanc, Katya

    2011-01-01

    Stress management and coping techniques are not only relevant in many psychology courses but also personally relevant for undergraduate students. In this article, the authors describe an activity designed to provide students with practice evaluating and challenging negative self-talk. Students responded to scenarios individually, were paired with…

  4. Fault activation due to glacially induced stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, R.; Lund, B.; Wu, P. P.

    2013-12-01

    Melting glaciers worldwide have an effect on sea level, but also on the stability of pre-existing faults. The load due to continental ice sheets or glaciers depresses the surface below, leading to changes in the lithospheric stresses. The accumulation of ice mass increases the vertical stress, and the horizontal stresses increase due to the accompanying flexure of the lithosphere. During deglaciation, ice-mass loss causes a simultaneous decrease in vertical stress; however, horizontal stresses decrease only slowly due to the slow readjusting of the Earth. After the end of deglaciation, only the induced horizontal stresses remain as the process of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) proceeds visco-elastically. The modelling of this process and the estimation of fault slip is enabled by a new GIA-fault model. However, this finite-element model is only available in two dimensions, and the extension to three dimensions is a necessary step further to allow the comparison of obtained fault slips to observations of glacially induced faults in Europe and North America. The model has several input parameters, which affect the activation time of faults and their resulting slip (e.g. ice history, rheology of the Earth, frictional properties, pore-fluid pressure). We will present the results of the new 3D model and show the sensitivity of faults with respect to modelling parameters. Furthermore, a comparison to observations will be presented.

  5. Fault activation due to glacially induced stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Rebekka; Lund, Björn

    2014-05-01

    Melting glaciers worldwide have an effect on sea level, but also on the stability of pre-existing faults. The load due to continental ice sheets or glaciers depresses the surface below, leading to changes in the lithospheric stresses. The accumulation of ice mass increases the vertical stress, and the horizontal stresses increase due to the accompanying flexure of the lithosphere. During deglaciation, ice-mass loss causes a simultaneous decrease in vertical stress; however, horizontal stresses decrease only slowly due to the slow readjusting of the Earth. After the end of deglaciation, only the induced horizontal stresses remain as the process of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) proceeds visco-elastically. The modelling of this process and the estimation of fault slip is enabled by a new GIA-fault model. However, this finite-element model is only available in two dimensions, and the extension to three dimensions is a necessary step further to allow the comparison of obtained fault slips to observations of glacially induced faults in Europe and North America. The model has several input parameters, which affect the activation time of faults and their resulting slip (e.g. ice history, rheology of the Earth, frictional properties, pore-fluid pressure). We will present the results of the new 3D model and show the sensitivity of faults with respect to modelling parameters. Furthermore, a comparison to observations will be presented.

  6. Connecting local active forces to macroscopic stress in elastic media.

    PubMed

    Ronceray, Pierre; Lenz, Martin

    2015-02-28

    In contrast with ordinary materials, living matter drives its own motion by generating active, out-of-equilibrium internal stresses. These stresses typically originate from localized active elements embedded in an elastic medium, such as molecular motors inside the cell or contractile cells in a tissue. While many large-scale phenomenological theories of such active media have been developed, a systematic understanding of the emergence of stress from the local force-generating elements is lacking. In this paper, we present a rigorous theoretical framework to study this relationship. We show that the medium's macroscopic active stress tensor is equal to the active elements' force dipole tensor per unit volume in both continuum and discrete linear homogeneous media of arbitrary geometries. This relationship is conserved on average in the presence of disorder, but can be violated in nonlinear elastic media. Such effects can lead to either a reinforcement or an attenuation of the active stresses, giving us a glimpse of the ways in which nature might harness microscopic forces to create active materials. PMID:25594831

  7. Swim pressure: stress generation in active matter.

    PubMed

    Takatori, S C; Yan, W; Brady, J F

    2014-07-11

    We discover a new contribution to the pressure (or stress) exerted by a suspension of self-propelled bodies. Through their self-motion, all active matter systems generate a unique swim pressure that is entirely athermal in origin. The origin of the swim pressure is based upon the notion that an active body would swim away in space unless confined by boundaries-this confinement pressure is precisely the swim pressure. Here we give the micromechanical basis for the swim stress and use this new perspective to study self-assembly and phase separation in active soft matter. The swim pressure gives rise to a nonequilibrium equation of state for active matter with pressure-volume phase diagrams that resemble a van der Waals loop from equilibrium gas-liquid coexistence. Theoretical predictions are corroborated by Brownian dynamics simulations. Our new swim stress perspective can help analyze and exploit a wide class of active soft matter, from swimming bacteria to catalytic nanobots to molecular motors that activate the cellular cytoskeleton. PMID:25062240

  8. Development of a bedrest muscle stress apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booher, C. R.; Hooper, S. L.; Setzer, D. N.

    1979-01-01

    In attempting further to define the deleterious effects of spaceflight on the human body, measurement systems and techniques were devised to determine the loss of skeletal muscle strength and tone as a result of spaceflight exposure. In order to determine how the muscle degradation process progresses with time during nonuse, a system for measuring muscle stress during bedrest was developed. The Bedrest Muscle Stress Apparatus is configured to slip snugly over the foot board of a standard hospital bed. Data collected with this device correlated well with pre- and post-bedrest data collected with the original skeletal muscle stress apparatus.

  9. Social Support Can Buffer against Stress and Shape Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hostinar, Camelia E.; Gunnar, Megan R.

    2015-01-01

    Social support from close relationship partners is an important resource for coping with stress, particularly during childhood. We discuss ethical challenges associated with studying stress and its social buffering in the laboratory, as well as emerging evidence regarding two potential neural substrates for the social buffering of stress: hypothalamic oxytocin activity and activation of areas in the prefrontal cortex associated with effective self-regulation. We also address the role of early-life social experiences in shaping brain development, as well as recommendations for practice and policy that would advance the ethical treatment of children and reduce social inequalities in early-life experiences and opportunities–e.g., investing in programs that prevent child maltreatment and facilitating access to high-quality child care for economically disadvantaged families. We also debate the ethical implications of using oxytocin nasal sprays to simulate the stress-reducing properties of social support and advise waiting for more evidence before recommending their use. PMID:26478822

  10. ER stress induces NLRP3 inflammasome activation and hepatocyte death

    PubMed Central

    Lebeaupin, C; Proics, E; de Bieville, C H D; Rousseau, D; Bonnafous, S; Patouraux, S; Adam, G; Lavallard, V J; Rovere, C; Le Thuc, O; Saint-Paul, M C; Anty, R; Schneck, A S; Iannelli, A; Gugenheim, J; Tran, A; Gual, P; Bailly-Maitre, B

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of chronic liver disease is constantly increasing, owing to the obesity epidemic. However, the causes and mechanisms of inflammation-mediated liver damage remain poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is an initiator of cell death and inflammatory mechanisms. Although obesity induces ER stress, the interplay between hepatic ER stress, NLRP3 inflammasome activation and hepatocyte death signaling has not yet been explored during the etiology of chronic liver diseases. Steatosis is a common disorder affecting obese patients; moreover, 25% of these patients develop steatohepatitis with an inherent risk for progression to hepatocarcinoma. Increased plasma LPS levels have been detected in the serum of patients with steatohepatitis. We hypothesized that, as a consequence of increased plasma LPS, ER stress could be induced and lead to NLRP3 inflammasome activation and hepatocyte death associated with steatohepatitis progression. In livers from obese mice, administration of LPS or tunicamycin results in IRE1α and PERK activation, leading to the overexpression of CHOP. This, in turn, activates the NLRP3 inflammasome, subsequently initiating hepatocyte pyroptosis (caspase-1, -11, interleukin-1β secretion) and apoptosis (caspase-3, BH3-only proteins). In contrast, the LPS challenge is blocked by the ER stress inhibitor TUDCA, resulting in: CHOP downregulation, reduced caspase-1, caspase-11, caspase-3 activities, lowered interleukin-1β secretion and rescue from cell death. The central role of CHOP in mediating the activation of proinflammatory caspases and cell death was characterized by performing knockdown experiments in primary mouse hepatocytes. Finally, the analysis of human steatohepatitis liver biopsies showed a correlation between the upregulation of inflammasome and ER stress markers, as well as liver injury. We demonstrate here that ER stress leads to hepatic NLRP3 inflammasome pyroptotic death, thus contributing as a novel mechanism of

  11. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib induces testicular toxicity by upregulation of oxidative stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and deregulation of germ cell development in adult murine testis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Fu, Jianfang; Zhang, Shun; Zhao, Jie; Xie, Nianlin; Cai, Guoqing

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how chemotherapeutic agents mediate testicular toxicity is crucial in light of compelling evidence that male infertility, one of the severe late side effects of intensive cancer treatment, occurs more often than they are expected to. Previous study demonstrated that bortezomib (BTZ), a 26S proteasome inhibitor used to treat refractory multiple myeloma (MM), exerts deleterious impacts on spermatogenesis in pubertal mice via unknown mechanisms. Here, we showed that intermittent treatment with BTZ resulted in fertility impairment in adult mice, evidenced by testicular atrophy, desquamation of immature germ cells and reduced caudal sperm storage. These deleterious effects may originate from the elevated apoptosis in distinct germ cells during the acute phase and the subsequent disruption of Sertoli–germ cell anchoring junctions (AJs) during the late recovery. Mechanistically, balance between AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and Akt/ERK pathway appeared to be indispensable for AJ integrity during the late testicular recovery. Of particular interest, the upregulated testicular apoptosis and the following disturbance of Sertoli–germ cell interaction may both stem from the excessive oxidative stress elicited by BTZ exposure. We also provided the in vitro evidence that AMPK-dependent mechanisms counteract follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) proliferative effects in BTZ-exposed Sertoli cells. Collectively, BTZ appeared to efficiently prevent germ cells from normal development via multiple mechanisms in adult mice. Employment of antioxidants and/or AMPK inhibitor may represent an attractive strategy of fertility preservation in male MM patients exposed to conventional BTZ therapy and warrants further investigation. - Highlights: • Intermittent treatment with BTZ caused fertility impairment in adult mice. • BTZ treatment elicited apoptosis during early phase of testicular recovery. • Up-regulation of oxidative stress by BTZ treatment

  12. A Trichoderma atroviride stress-activated MAPK pathway integrates stress and light signals.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Naranjo, Edgardo Ulises; García-Esquivel, Mónica; Medina-Castellanos, Elizabeth; Correa-Pérez, Víctor Alejandro; Parra-Arriaga, Jorge Luis; Landeros-Jaime, Fidel; Cervantes-Chávez, José Antonio; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo

    2016-06-01

    Cells possess stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) signalling pathways, which are activated practically in response to any cellular insult, regulating responses for survival and adaptation to harmful environmental changes. To understand the function of SAPK pathways in T. atroviride, mutants lacking the MAPKK Pbs2 and the MAPK Tmk3 were analysed under several cellular stresses, and in their response to light. All mutants were highly sensitive to cellular insults such as osmotic and oxidative stress, cell wall damage, high temperature, cadmium, and UV irradiation. Under oxidative stress, the Tmk3 pathway showed specific roles during development, which in conidia are essential for tolerance to oxidant agents and appear to play a minor role in mycelia. The function of this pathway was more evident in Δpbs2 and Δtmk3 mutant strains when combining oxidative stress or cell wall damage with light. Light stimulates tolerance to osmotic stress through Tmk3 independently of the photoreceptor Blr1. Strikingly, photoconidiation and expression of blue light regulated genes was severally affected in Δtmk3 and Δpbs2 strains, indicating that this pathway regulates light responses. Furthermore, Tmk3 was rapidly phosphorylated upon light exposure. Thus, our data indicate that Tmk3 signalling cooperates with the Blr photoreceptor complex in the activation of gene expression. PMID:26878111

  13. The Effects of Stress on Physical Activity and Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Stults-Kolehmainen, Matthew A.; Sinha, Rajita

    2013-01-01

    to show an inverse association. 85.7 % of higher-quality prospective research (≥7 on a 9-point scale) showed the same trend. Interestingly, some prospective studies (18.2 %) report evidence that PA was positively impacted by stress (behavioral activation). This should not be surprising as some individuals utilize exercise to cope with stress. Several other factors may moderate stress and PA relationships, such as stages of change for exercise. Habitually active individuals exercise more in the face of stress, and those in beginning stages exercise less. Consequently, stress may have a differential impact on exercise adoption, maintenance, and relapse. Preliminary evidence suggests that combining stress management programming with exercise interventions may allay stress-related reductions in PA, though rigorous testing of these techniques has yet to be produced. Conclusions Overall, the majority of the literature finds that the experience of stress impairs efforts to be physically active. Future work should center on the development of a theory explaining the mechanisms underlying the multifarious influences of stress on PA behaviors. PMID:24030837

  14. Directory of Development Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Control Data Corp., Minneapolis, Minn.

    Assembled in a loose leaf notebook, this collection of independent on-the-job activities is designed to facilitate employee development and intended to help improve an organization's performance appraisal system. The on-the-job development activities described derive from job descriptions, performance appraisal forms, and discussions with job…

  15. Cellular Stress Responses and Monitored Cellular Activities.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Naito, Yoshifumi; Kato, Hideya; Amaya, Fumimasa

    2016-08-01

    To survive, organisms require mechanisms that enable them to sense changes in the outside environment, introduce necessary responses, and resist unfavorable distortion. Consequently, through evolutionary adaptation, cells have become equipped with the apparatus required to monitor their fundamental intracellular processes and the mechanisms needed to try to offset malfunction without receiving any direct signals from the outside environment. It has been shown recently that eukaryotic cells are equipped with a special mechanism that monitors their fundamental cellular functions and that some pathogenic proteobacteria can override this monitoring mechanism to cause harm. The monitored cellular activities involved in the stressed intracellular response have been researched extensively in Caenorhabditis elegans, where discovery of an association between key mitochondrial activities and innate immune responses was named "cellular associated detoxification and defenses (cSADD)." This cellular surveillance pathway (cSADD) oversees core cellular activities such as mitochondrial respiration and protein transport into mitochondria, detects xenobiotics and invading pathogens, and activates the endocrine pathways controlling behavior, detoxification, and immunity. The cSADD pathway is probably associated with cellular responses to stress in human inflammatory diseases. In the critical care field, the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes (e.g., respiratory distress syndromes and sepsis) involves the disturbance of mitochondrial respiration leading to cell death. Up-to-date knowledge about monitored cellular activities and cSADD, especially focusing on mitochondrial involvement, can probably help fill a knowledge gap regarding the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes in the critical care field. PMID:26954943

  16. Ethanol Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Zunji; Wang, Xin; Liu, Ying; Fan, Zhiqin; Chen, Gang; Xu, Mei; Bower, Kimberley A.; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Li, Mingtao; Fang, Shengyun; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Background Ethanol exposure during brain development causes profound damages to the central nervous system (CNS). The underlying cellular/molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is involved in posttranslational protein processing and transport. The accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen triggers ER stress, which is characterized by translational attenuation, synthesis of ER chaperone proteins, and activation of transcription factors. Sustained ER stress ultimately leads to cell death. ER stress is implicated in various neurodegenerative processes. Methods Using a third trimester equivalent mouse model of ethanol exposure, we tested the hypothesis that ethanol induces ER stress in the developing brain. Seven-day-old C57BL/6 mice were acutely exposed to ethanol by subcutaneous injection and the expression of ER stress-inducible proteins (ERSIPs) and signaling pathways associated with ER stress were examined. Results Ethanol exposure significantly increased the expression of ERSIPs and activated signaling pathways associated with ER stress; these include ATF6, CHOP/GADD153, GRP78, and mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor as well as the phosphorylation of IRE1α, eIF2α, PERK, and PKR. The ethanol-induced increase in ERSIPs occurred within 4 hours of ethanol injection, and levels of some ERSIPs remained elevated after 24 hours of ethanol exposure. Ethanol-induced increase in phosphorylated eIF2α, caspase-12, and CHOP was distributed in neurons of specific areas of the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus. Conclusions Our finding indicates that ethanol induces ER stress in immature neurons, providing novel insight into ethanol’s detrimental effect on the developing CNS. PMID:21599712

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress activates transglutaminase 2 leading to protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    LEE, JIN-HAENG; JEONG, JAEHO; JEONG, EUI MAN; CHO, SUNG-YUP; KANG, JEONG WOOK; LIM, JISUN; HEO, JINBEOM; KANG, HYUNSOOK; KIM, IN-GYU; SHIN, DONG-MYUNG

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant activation of transglutaminase 2 (TGase2) contributes to a variety of protein conformational disorders such as neurodegenerative diseases and age-related cataracts. The accumulation of improperly folded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR), which promotes either repair or degradation of the damaged proteins. Inadequate UPR results in protein aggregation that may contribute to the development of age-related degenerative diseases. TGase2 is a calcium-dependent enzyme that irreversibly modifies proteins by forming cross-linked protein aggregates. Intracellular TGase2 is activated by oxidative stress which generates large quantities of unfolded proteins. However, the relationship between TGase2 activity and UPR has not yet been established. In the present study, we demonstrated that ER stress activated TGase2 in various cell types. TGase2 activation was dependent on the ER stress-induced increase in the intracellular calcium ion concentration but not on the TGase2 protein expression level. Enzyme substrate analysis revealed that TGase2-mediated protein modification promoted protein aggregation concurrently with decreasing water solubility. Moreover, treatment with KCC009, a TGase2 inhibitor, abrogated ER stress-induced TGase2 activation and subsequent protein aggregation. However, TGase2 activation had no effect on ER stress-induced cell death. These results demonstrate that the accumulation of misfolded proteins activates TGase2, which further accelerates the formation of protein aggregates. Therefore, we suggest that inhibition of TGase2 may be a novel strategy by which to prevent the protein aggregation in age-related degenerative diseases. PMID:24481335

  18. Algorithm-development activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, Kendall L.

    1994-01-01

    The task of algorithm-development activities at USF continues. The algorithm for determining chlorophyll alpha concentration, (Chl alpha) and gelbstoff absorption coefficient for SeaWiFS and MODIS-N radiance data is our current priority.

  19. Fractalkine Attenuates Microglial Cell Activation Induced by Prenatal Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Trojan, Ewa; Głombik, Katarzyna; Chamera, Katarzyna; Roman, Adam; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The potential contribution of inflammation to the development of neuropsychiatric diseases has recently received substantial attention. In the brain, the main immune cells are the microglia. As they are the main source of inflammatory factors, it is plausible that the regulation of their activation may be a potential therapeutic target. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) and its receptor CX3CR1 play a crucial role in the control of the biological activity of the microglia. In the present study, using microglial cultures we investigated whether fractalkine is able to reverse changes in microglia caused by a prenatal stress procedure. Our study found that the microglia do not express fractalkine. Prenatal stress decreases the expression of the fractalkine receptor, which in turn is enhanced by the administration of exogenous fractalkine. Moreover, treatment with fractalkine diminishes the prenatal stress-induced overproduction of proinflammatory factors such as IL-1β, IL-18, IL-6, TNF-α, CCL2, or NO in the microglial cells derived from prenatally stressed newborns. In conclusion, the present results revealed that the pathological activation of microglia in prenatally stressed newborns may be attenuated by fractalkine administration. Therefore, understanding of the role of the CX3CL1-CX3CR1 system may help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the neuron-microglia interaction and its role in pathological conditions in the brain. PMID:27239349

  20. Estimation of restraint stress in rats using salivary amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Tetsuya; Takimura, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Ichinose, Mitsuyuki

    2012-09-01

    The rat is an ideal model animal for studying physical and psychological stresses. Recent human studies have shown that salivary amylase activity is a useful biomarker of stress in our social life. To estimate the usefulness of amylase activity as a biomarker of stress in rats, we analyzed changes in physiological parameters including amylase activity and anatomical variables, which were induced by a mild restraint of paws (10 min, 3 times/week, 9 weeks). The quantities of food and water intake and excretion amount of the stress rats were smaller than those of the control rats during the experimental period (5-13 weeks). The body weight of the stress rats decreased compared with that of the control rats. Moreover, the enlargement of the adrenal gland was confirmed in the stress rats, indicating that the mild restraint caused a chronic stress response. The amylase activities of the stress rats were significantly greater than those of the control rats at 5 weeks of age. However, the amylase activity of the stress rats decreased compared with that of the control rats after 6 weeks of age. These results indicate that amylase activity is increased by acute stress and reduced by chronic stress, which is caused by repeated restraint stress. In conclusion, amylase activity is a useful biomarker of acute and chronic stresses in rats. PMID:22753135

  1. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib induces testicular toxicity by upregulation of oxidative stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and deregulation of germ cell development in adult murine testis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Fu, Jianfang; Zhang, Shun; Zhao, Jie; Xie, Nianlin; Cai, Guoqing

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how chemotherapeutic agents mediate testicular toxicity is crucial in light of compelling evidence that male infertility, one of the severe late side effects of intensive cancer treatment, occurs more often than they are expected to. Previous study demonstrated that bortezomib (BTZ), a 26S proteasome inhibitor used to treat refractory multiple myeloma (MM), exerts deleterious impacts on spermatogenesis in pubertal mice via unknown mechanisms. Here, we showed that intermittent treatment with BTZ resulted in fertility impairment in adult mice, evidenced by testicular atrophy, desquamation of immature germ cells and reduced caudal sperm storage. These deleterious effects may originate from the elevated apoptosis in distinct germ cells during the acute phase and the subsequent disruption of Sertoli-germ cell anchoring junctions (AJs) during the late recovery. Mechanistically, balance between AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and Akt/ERK pathway appeared to be indispensable for AJ integrity during the late testicular recovery. Of particular interest, the upregulated testicular apoptosis and the following disturbance of Sertoli-germ cell interaction may both stem from the excessive oxidative stress elicited by BTZ exposure. We also provided the in vitro evidence that AMPK-dependent mechanisms counteract follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) proliferative effects in BTZ-exposed Sertoli cells. Collectively, BTZ appeared to efficiently prevent germ cells from normal development via multiple mechanisms in adult mice. Employment of antioxidants and/or AMPK inhibitor may represent an attractive strategy of fertility preservation in male MM patients exposed to conventional BTZ therapy and warrants further investigation. PMID:25886977

  2. Stress monitoring versus microseismic ruptures in an active deep mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonnellier, Alice; Bouffier, Christian; Bigarré, Pascal; Nyström, Anders; Österberg, Anders; Fjellström, Peter

    2015-04-01

    monitoring data coming from the mine in quasi-real time and facilitates information exchanges and decision making for experts and stakeholders. On the basis of these data acquisition and sharing, preliminary analysis has been started to highlight whether stress variations and seismic sources behaviour might be directly bound with mine working evolution and could improve the knowledge on the equilibrium states inside the mine. Knowing such parameters indeed will be a potential solution to understand better the response of deep mining activities to the exploitation solicitations and to develop, if possible, methods to prevent from major hazards such as rock bursts and other ground failure phenomena.

  3. Social stress, autonomic neural activation, and cardiac activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Sgoifo, A; Koolhaas, J; De Boer, S; Musso, E; Stilli, D; Buwalda, B; Meerlo, P

    1999-11-01

    Animal models of social stress represent a useful experimental tool to investigate the relationship between psychological stress, autonomic neural activity and cardiovascular disease. This paper summarizes the results obtained in a series of experiments performed on rats and aimed at verifying whether social challenges produce specific modifications in the autonomic neural control of heart rate and whether these changes can be detrimental for cardiac electrical stability. Short-term electrocardiographic recordings were performed via radiotelemetry and the autonomic input to the heart evaluated by means of time-domain heart rate variability measures. Compared to other stress contexts, a social defeat experience produces a strong shift of autonomic balance toward sympathetic dominance, poorly antagonized by vagal rebound, and associated with the occurrence of cardiac tachyarrhythmias. These effects were particularly severe when a wild-type strain of rats was studied. The data also suggest that the cardiac autonomic responses produced by different types of social contexts (dominant-subordinate interaction, dominant-dominant confrontation, social defeat) are related to different degrees of emotional activation, which in turn are likely modulated by the social rank of the experimental animal and the opponent, the prior experience with the stressor, and the level of controllability over the stimulus. PMID:10580306

  4. Silicon ribbon stress-strain activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, B. K.; Shih, C. F.; Kuo, C. P.; Phillips, W. M.

    1984-01-01

    The finite element method is used to investigate stress/strain in silicon ribbon. Failure considerations such as residual stress, buckling material non-linearity and creep are discussed. Temperature profiles are presented.

  5. Aging causes decreased resistance to multiple stresses and a failure to activate specific stress response pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bergsma, Alexis L.; Senchuk, Megan M.; Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we examine the relationship between stress resistance and aging. We find that resistance to multiple types of stress peaks during early adulthood and then declines with age. To dissect the underlying mechanisms, we use C. elegans transcriptional reporter strains that measure the activation of different stress responses including: the heat shock response, mitochondrial unfolded protein response, endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response, hypoxia response, SKN-1-mediated oxidative stress response, and the DAF-16-mediated stress response. We find that the decline in stress resistance with age is at least partially due to a decreased ability to activate protective mechanisms in response to stress. In contrast, we find that any baseline increase in stress caused by the advancing age is too mild to detectably upregulate any of the stress response pathways. Further exploration of how worms respond to stress with increasing age revealed that the ability to mount a hormetic response to heat stress is also lost with increasing age. Overall, this work demonstrates that resistance to all types of stress declines with age. Based on our data, we speculate that the decrease in stress resistance with advancing age results from a genetically-programmed inactivation of stress response pathways, not accumulation of damage. PMID:27053445

  6. Aging causes decreased resistance to multiple stresses and a failure to activate specific stress response pathways.

    PubMed

    Dues, Dylan J; Andrews, Emily K; Schaar, Claire E; Bergsma, Alexis L; Senchuk, Megan M; Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we examine the relationship between stress resistance and aging. We find that resistance to multiple types of stress peaks during early adulthood and then declines with age. To dissect the underlying mechanisms, we use C. elegans transcriptional reporter strains that measure the activation of different stress responses including: the heat shock response, mitochondrial unfolded protein response, endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response, hypoxia response, SKN-1-mediated oxidative stress response, and the DAF-16-mediated stress response. We find that the decline in stress resistance with age is at least partially due to a decreased ability to activate protective mechanisms in response to stress. In contrast, we find that any baseline increase in stress caused by the advancing age is too mild to detectably upregulate any of the stress response pathways. Further exploration of how worms respond to stress with increasing age revealed that the ability to mount a hormetic response to heat stress is also lost with increasing age. Overall, this work demonstrates that resistance to all types of stress declines with age. Based on our data, we speculate that the decrease in stress resistance with advancing age results from a genetically-programmed inactivation of stress response pathways, not accumulation of damage. PMID:27053445

  7. Dynamics of telomerase activity in response to acute psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Elissa S.; Lin, Jue; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Puterman, E; Karan, Lori; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase activity plays an essential role in cel0l survival, by lengthening telomeres and promoting cell growth and longevity. It is now possible to quantify the low levels of telomerase activity in human leukocytes. Low basal telomerase activity has been related to chronic stress in people and to chronic glucocorticoid exposure in vitro. Here we test whether leukocyte telomerase activity changes under acute psychological stress. We exposed 44 elderly women, including 22 high stress dementia caregivers and 22 matched low stress controls, to a brief laboratory psychological stressor, while examining changes in telomerase activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). At baseline, caregivers had lower telomerase activity levels than controls, but during stress telomerase activity increased similarly in both groups. Across the entire sample, subsequent telomerase activity increased by 18% one hour after the end of the stressor (p<0.01). The increase in telomerase activity was independent of changes in numbers or percentages of monocytes, lymphocytes, and specific T cell types, although we cannot fully rule out some potential contribution from immune cell redistribution in the change in telomerase activity. Telomerase activity increases were associated with greater cortisol increases in response to the stressor. Lastly, psychological response to the tasks (greater threat perception) was also related to greater telomerase activity increases in controls. These findings uncover novel relationships of dynamic telomerase activity with exposure to an acute stressor, and with two classic aspects of the stress response -- perceived psychological stress and neuroendocrine (cortisol) responses to the stressor. PMID:20018236

  8. Mechanisms and Management of Stress Fractures in Physically Active Persons

    PubMed Central

    Romani, William A.; Gieck, Joe H.; Perrin, David H.; Saliba, Ethan N.; Kahler, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the anatomy of bone and the physiology of bone remodeling as a basis for the proper management of stress fractures in physically active people. Data Sources: We searched PubMed for the years 1965 through 2000 using the key words stress fracture, bone remodeling, epidemiology, and rehabilitation. Data Synthesis: Bone undergoes a normal remodeling process in physically active persons. Increased stress leads to an acceleration of this remodeling process, a subsequent weakening of bone, and a higher susceptibility to stress fracture. When a stress fracture is suspected, appropriate management of the injury should begin immediately. Effective management includes a cyclic process of activity and rest that is based on the remodeling process of bone. Conclusions/Recommendations: Bone continuously remodels itself to withstand the stresses involved with physical activity. Stress fractures occur as the result of increased remodeling and a subsequent weakening of the outer surface ofthe bone. Once a stress fracture is suspected, a cyclic management program that incorporates the physiology of bone remodeling should be initiated. The cyclic program should allow the physically active person to remove the source of the stress to the bone, maintain fitness, promote a safe return to activity, and permit the bone to heal properly. PMID:16558676

  9. Dynamic neural activity during stress signals resilient coping.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajita; Lacadie, Cheryl M; Constable, R Todd; Seo, Dongju

    2016-08-01

    Active coping underlies a healthy stress response, but neural processes supporting such resilient coping are not well-known. Using a brief, sustained exposure paradigm contrasting highly stressful, threatening, and violent stimuli versus nonaversive neutral visual stimuli in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we show significant subjective, physiologic, and endocrine increases and temporally related dynamically distinct patterns of neural activation in brain circuits underlying the stress response. First, stress-specific sustained increases in the amygdala, striatum, hypothalamus, midbrain, right insula, and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) regions supported the stress processing and reactivity circuit. Second, dynamic neural activation during stress versus neutral runs, showing early increases followed by later reduced activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), left DLPFC, hippocampus, and left insula, suggested a stress adaptation response network. Finally, dynamic stress-specific mobilization of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VmPFC), marked by initial hypoactivity followed by increased VmPFC activation, pointed to the VmPFC as a key locus of the emotional and behavioral control network. Consistent with this finding, greater neural flexibility signals in the VmPFC during stress correlated with active coping ratings whereas lower dynamic activity in the VmPFC also predicted a higher level of maladaptive coping behaviors in real life, including binge alcohol intake, emotional eating, and frequency of arguments and fights. These findings demonstrate acute functional neuroplasticity during stress, with distinct and separable brain networks that underlie critical components of the stress response, and a specific role for VmPFC neuroflexibility in stress-resilient coping. PMID:27432990

  10. New design deforming controlling system of the active stressed lap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Li; Wang, Daxing

    2008-07-01

    A 450mm diameter active stressed lap has been developed in NIAOT by 2003. We design a new lap in 2007. This paper puts on emphases on introducing the new deforming control system of the lap. Aiming at the control characteristic of the lap, a new kind of digital deforming controller is designed. The controller consists of 3 parts: computer signal disposing, motor driving and force sensor signal disposing. Intelligent numeral PID method is applied in the controller instead of traditional PID. In the end, the result of new deformation are given.

  11. Restraint stress increases hemichannel activity in hippocampal glial cells and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Juan A.; Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; Díaz-Galarce, Raúl; Rojas, Sebastián; Maturana, Carola J.; Stehberg, Jimmy; Sáez, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Stress affects brain areas involved in learning and emotional responses, which may contribute in the development of cognitive deficits associated with major depression. These effects have been linked to glial cell activation, glutamate release and changes in neuronal plasticity and survival including atrophy of hippocampal apical dendrites, loss of synapses and neuronal death. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions, we recently unveiled a sequential activation of glial cells that release ATP and glutamate via hemichannels inducing neuronal death due to activation of neuronal NMDA/P2X7 receptors and pannexin1 hemichannels. In the present work, we studied if stress-induced glia activation is associated to changes in hemichannel activity. To this end, we compared hemichannel activity of brain cells after acute or chronic restraint stress in mice. Dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices revealed that acute stress induces opening of both Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels in astrocytes, which were further increased by chronic stress; whereas enhanced Panx1 hemichannel activity was detected in microglia and neurons after acute/chronic and chronic stress, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of NMDA/P2X7 receptors reduced the chronic stress-induced hemichannel opening, whereas blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels fully reduced ATP and glutamate release in hippocampal slices from stressed mice. Thus, we propose that gliotransmitter release through hemichannels may participate in the pathogenesis of stress-associated psychiatric disorders and possibly depression. PMID:25883550

  12. Brain activation induced by psychological stress in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Castro, M N; Villarreal, M F; Bolotinsky, N; Papávero, E; Goldschmidt, M G; Costanzo, E Y; Drucaroff, L; Wainsztein, A; de Achával, D; Pahissa, J; Bär, K-J; Nemeroff, C B; Guinjoan, S M

    2015-10-01

    Environmental influences are critical for the expression of genes putatively related to the behavioral and cognitive phenotypes of schizophrenia. Among such factors, psychosocial stress has been proposed to play a major role in the expression of symptoms. However, it is unsettled how stress interacts with pathophysiological pathways to produce the disease. We studied 21 patients with schizophrenia and 21 healthy controls aged 18 to 50years with 3T-fMRI, in which a period of 6min of resting state acquisition was followed by a block design, with three blocks of 1-min control-task, 1-min stress-task and 1-min rest after-task. Self-report of stress and PANSS were measured. Limbic structures were activated in schizophrenia patients by simple tasks and remained active during, and shortly after stress. In controls, stress-related brain activation was more time-focused, and restricted to the stressful task itself. Negative symptom severity was inversely related to activation of anterior cingulum and orbitofrontal cortex. Results might represent the neurobiological aspect of hyper-reactivity to normal stressful situations previously described in schizophrenia, thus providing evidence on the involvement of limbic areas in the response to stress in schizophrenia. Patients present a pattern of persistent limbic activation probably contributing to hypervigilance and subsequent psychotic thought distortions. PMID:26190301

  13. The Response Regulator RRG-1 Functions Upstream of a Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathway Impacting Asexual Development, Female Fertility, Osmotic Stress, and Fungicide Resistance in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Carol A.; Greer-Phillips, Suzanne E.

    2007-01-01

    Two-component systems, consisting of proteins with histidine kinase and/or response regulator domains, regulate environmental responses in bacteria, Archaea, fungi, slime molds, and plants. Here, we characterize RRG-1, a response regulator protein from the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. The cell lysis phenotype of Δrrg-1 mutants is reminiscent of osmotic-sensitive (os) mutants, including nik-1/os-1 (a histidine kinase) and strains defective in components of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway: os-4 (MAPK kinase kinase), os-5 (MAPK kinase), and os-2 (MAPK). Similar to os mutants, Δrrg-1 strains are sensitive to hyperosmotic conditions, and they are resistant to the fungicides fludioxonil and iprodione. Like os-5, os-4, and os-2 mutants, but in contrast to nik-1/os-1 strains, Δrrg-1 mutants do not produce female reproductive structures (protoperithecia) when nitrogen starved. OS-2-phosphate levels are elevated in wild-type cells exposed to NaCl or fludioxonil, but they are nearly undetectable in Δrrg-1 strains. OS-2-phosphate levels are also low in Δrrg-1, os-2, and os-4 mutants under nitrogen starvation. Analysis of the rrg-1D921N allele, mutated in the predicted phosphorylation site, provides support for phosphorylation-dependent and -independent functions for RRG-1. The data indicate that RRG-1 controls vegetative cell integrity, hyperosmotic sensitivity, fungicide resistance, and protoperithecial development through regulation of the OS-4/OS-5/OS-2 MAPK pathway. PMID:17392518

  14. High activity of the stress promoter contributes to susceptibility to stress in the tree shrew.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hui; Sun, Yun-Jun; Lv, Yan-Hong; Ni, Rong-Jun; Shu, Yu-Mian; Feng, Xiu-Yu; Wang, Yu; Shan, Qing-Hong; Zu, Ya-Nan; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Stress is increasingly present in everyday life in our fast-paced society and involved in the pathogenesis of many psychiatric diseases. Corticotrophin-releasing-hormone (CRH) plays a pivotal role in regulating the stress responses. The tree shrews are highly vulnerable to stress which makes them the promising animal models for studying stress responses. However, the mechanisms underlying their high stress-susceptibility remained unknown. Here we confirmed that cortisol was the dominate corticosteroid in tree shrew and was significantly increased after acute stress. Our study showed that the function of tree shrew CRH - hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis was nearly identical to human that contributed little to their hyper-responsiveness to stress. Using CRH transcriptional regulation analysis we discovered a peculiar active glucocorticoid receptor response element (aGRE) site within the tree shrew CRH promoter, which continued to recruit co-activators including SRC-1 (steroid receptor co-activator-1) to promote CRH transcription under basal or forskolin/dexamethasone treatment conditions. Basal CRH mRNA increased when the aGRE was knocked into the CRH promoter in human HeLa cells using CAS9/CRISPR. The aGRE functioned critically to form the "Stress promoter" that contributed to the higher CRH expression and susceptibility to stress. These findings implicated novel molecular bases of the stress-related diseases in specific populations. PMID:27125313

  15. High activity of the stress promoter contributes to susceptibility to stress in the tree shrew

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Hui; Sun, Yun-Jun; Lv, Yan-Hong; Ni, Rong-Jun; Shu, Yu-Mian; Feng, Xiu-Yu; Wang, Yu; Shan, Qing-Hong; Zu, Ya-Nan; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Stress is increasingly present in everyday life in our fast-paced society and involved in the pathogenesis of many psychiatric diseases. Corticotrophin-releasing-hormone (CRH) plays a pivotal role in regulating the stress responses. The tree shrews are highly vulnerable to stress which makes them the promising animal models for studying stress responses. However, the mechanisms underlying their high stress-susceptibility remained unknown. Here we confirmed that cortisol was the dominate corticosteroid in tree shrew and was significantly increased after acute stress. Our study showed that the function of tree shrew CRH - hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis was nearly identical to human that contributed little to their hyper-responsiveness to stress. Using CRH transcriptional regulation analysis we discovered a peculiar active glucocorticoid receptor response element (aGRE) site within the tree shrew CRH promoter, which continued to recruit co-activators including SRC-1 (steroid receptor co-activator-1) to promote CRH transcription under basal or forskolin/dexamethasone treatment conditions. Basal CRH mRNA increased when the aGRE was knocked into the CRH promoter in human HeLa cells using CAS9/CRISPR. The aGRE functioned critically to form the “Stress promoter” that contributed to the higher CRH expression and susceptibility to stress. These findings implicated novel molecular bases of the stress-related diseases in specific populations. PMID:27125313

  16. Experimental Development of a Novel Stress Sensor for in situ Stress Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Polsky, Yarom; Lance, Michael J; Mattus, Catherine H; Daniels, Ryan J

    2016-01-01

    This paper will describe ongoing work to adapt a previously demonstrated method for measuring stress in ceramics to develop a borehole deployed in situ stress sensor. The method involves the use of a cementitious material which exhibits a strong piezo-spectroscopic stress response as a downhole stress gage. A description of the conceptual approach will be provided along with preliminary analysis and proof-of-concept laboratory results.

  17. Adolescents Coping with Stress: Development and Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.; Skinner, Ellen A.

    2008-01-01

    This article summarizes what is known about stress, stress reactions, and coping among adolescents. Throughout, it focuses on typical developmental patterns by highlighting the emerging experiences of adolescents and how they differ from children and adults. It also briefly discusses differences between individuals, boys and girls, and…

  18. Stress: Professional Development Needs of Extension Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Place, Nick T.; Jacob, Steve

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 314 of 422 extension faculty showed a variety of levels of job stress, primarily from time pressures and overcommitment. Those who used formal planning and time management techniques had lower stress scores. Time with family was a common coping mechanism. (Contains 19 references.) (SK)

  19. 78 FR 16536 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed New Collection; Comments Requested: Stress...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... Information Collection Activities; Proposed New Collection; Comments Requested: Stress Resiliency Study... new collection; comments requested. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Stress Resiliency Study... MPD officers' perceived stress, responses to stressful experiences, stress and its relationship...

  20. Development and Evaluation of the Air Travel Stress Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bricker, Jonathan B.

    2005-01-01

    Despite anecdotal evidence suggesting that air travel is personally demanding, little research has examined air travel stress. To address these issues, the author developed and evaluated the 1st known measure of air travel stress-the Air Travel Stress Scale-in 3 studies. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis indicated 3 components: (a)…

  1. The unpredictability of prolonged activation of stress response pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lamech, Lilian T.

    2015-01-01

    In response to stress, cellular compartments activate signaling pathways that mediate transcriptional programs to promote survival and reestablish homeostasis. Manipulation of the magnitude and duration of the activation of stress responses has been proposed as a strategy to prevent or repair the damage associated with aging or degenerative diseases. However, as these pathways likely evolved to respond specifically to transient perturbations, the unpredictability of prolonged activation should be considered. PMID:26101215

  2. Chronic psychological stress activates BMP4-dependent extramedullary erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Vignjević, Sanja; Budeč, Mirela; Marković, Dragana; Dikić, Dragoslava; Mitrović, Olivera; Mojsilović, Slavko; Durić, Sanja Vranješ; Koko, Vesna; Cokić, Bojana Beleslin; Cokić, Vladan; Jovčić, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Psychological stress affects different physiological processes including haematopoiesis. However, erythropoietic effects of chronic psychological stress remain largely unknown. The adult spleen contains a distinct microenvironment favourable for rapid expansion of erythroid progenitors in response to stressful stimuli, and emerging evidence suggests that inappropriate activation of stress erythropoiesis may predispose to leukaemic transformation. We used a mouse model to study the influence of chronic psychological stress on erythropoiesis in the spleen and to investigate potential mediators of observed effects. Adult mice were subjected to 2 hrs daily restraint stress for 7 or 14 consecutive days. Our results showed that chronic exposure to restraint stress decreased the concentration of haemoglobin in the blood, elevated circulating levels of erythropoietin and corticosterone, and resulted in markedly increased number of erythroid progenitors and precursors in the spleen. Western blot analysis revealed significantly decreased expression of both erythropoietin receptor and glucocorticoid receptor in the spleen of restrained mice. Furthermore, chronic stress enhanced the expression of stem cell factor receptor in the red pulp. Moreover, chronically stressed animals exhibited significantly increased expression of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) in the red pulp as well as substantially enhanced mRNA expression levels of its receptors in the spleen. These findings demonstrate for the first time that chronic psychological stress activates BMP4-dependent extramedullary erythropoiesis and leads to the prolonged activation of stress erythropoiesis pathways. Prolonged activation of these pathways along with an excessive production of immature erythroid cells may predispose chronically stressed subjects to a higher risk of leukaemic transformation. PMID:24283209

  3. Silicon stress/strain activities at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1986-01-01

    In-house Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) work is described for silicon stress/strain, including the study of fracture mechanics, and on the high-temperature test program in which the low-strain response of silicon sheet materials above 1000 C is being measured and high temperature material property data are being determined.

  4. Stress development in particulate, nano-composite and polymeric coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Karan

    2009-12-01

    The main goal of this research is to study the stress, structural and mechanical property development during the drying of particulate coatings, nano-composite coatings and VOC compliant refinish clearcoats. The results obtained during this research establish the mechanism for the stress development during drying in various coating systems. Coating stress was measured using a controlled environment stress apparatus based on cantilever deflection principle. The stress evolution in alumina coatings made of 0.4 mum size alumina particles was studied and the effect of a lateral drying was investigated. The stress does not develop until the later stages of drying. A peak stress was observed during drying and the peak stress originates due to the formation of pendular rings between the particles. Silica nanocomposite coatings were fabricated from suspension of nano sized silicon dioxide particles (20 nm) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer. The stress in silica nano-composite goes through maximum as the amount of polymer in the coating increases. The highest final stress was found to be ˜ 110MPa at a PVA content of 60 wt%. Observations from SEM, nitrogen gas adsorption, camera imaging, and nano-indentation were also studied to correlate the coatings properties during drying to measured stress. A model VOC compliant two component (2K) acrylic-polyol refinish clearcoat was prepared to study the effects of a new additive on drying, curing, rheology and stress development at room temperature. Most of the drying of the low VOC coatings occurred before appreciable (20%) crosslinking. Tensile stress developed in the same timeframe as drying and then relaxed over a longer time scale. Model low VOC coatings prepared with the additive had higher peak stresses than those without the additive. In addition, rheological data showed that the additive resulted in greater viscosity buildup during drying.

  5. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress.

    PubMed

    De, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response. PMID:18851081

  6. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A.

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  7. Restraint stress in biobehavioral research: Recent developments.

    PubMed

    Buynitsky, Tatyana; Mostofsky, David I

    2009-07-01

    In the 15 years since the publication of two previous reviews on restraint stress much advancement has been made in the field. However, while previous reviews have focused mainly on drug effects, recent research has focused on broader implications in the health fields. This research has placed an increased emphasis on stress effects in physiological, immunological, endocrine and developmental processes as well as the impact of stress on numerous disorders. A major problem with our review was the inability to identify a large number of articles focusing on restraint and immobilization, since those keywords were often omitted from the title or not referred to within the body of the article. It seems likely that additional reviews with extended literature research of this field are required. PMID:19463853

  8. Decreased Prolidase Activity in Patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Mahmut; Atli, Abdullah; Kaplan, İbrahim; Kaya, Mehmet Cemal; Bez, Yasin; Özdemir, Pınar Güzel; Sır, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many neurochemical systems have been implicated in the development of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The prolidase enzyme is a cytosolic exopeptidase that detaches proline or hydroxyproline from the carboxyl terminal position of dipeptides. Prolidase has important biological effects, and to date, its role in the etiology of PTSD has not been studied. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate prolidase activity in patients with PTSD. Methods The study group consisted of patients who were diagnosed with PTSD after the earthquake that occurred in the province of Van in Turkey in 2011 (n=25); the first control group consisted of patients who experienced the earthquake but did not show PTSD symptoms (n=26) and the second control group consisted of patients who have never been exposed to a traumatic event (n=25). Prolidase activities in the patients and the control groups were determined by the ELISA method using commercial kits. Results Prolidase activity in the patient group was significantly lower when compared to the control groups. Prolidase activity was also significantly lower in the traumatized healthy subjects compared to the other healthy group (p<0.01). Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that the decrease in prolidase activity may have neuroprotective effects in patients with PTSD. PMID:27482243

  9. Family History Predicts Stress Fracture in Active Female Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Loud, Keith J.; Micheli, Lyle J.; Bristol, Stephanie; Austin, S. Bryn; Gordon, Catherine M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Increased physical activity and menstrual irregularity have been associated with increased risk for stress fracture among adult women active in athletics. The purposes of this study were to determine whether menstrual irregularity is also a risk factor for stress fracture in active female adolescents and to estimate the quantity of exercise associated with an increased risk for this injury. PATIENTS AND METHODS A case-control study was conducted of 13- to 22-year-old females diagnosed with their first stress fracture, each matched prospectively on age and self-reported ethnicity with 2 controls. Patients with chronic illnesses or use of medications known to affect bone mineral density were excluded, including use of hormonal preparations that could alter menstrual cycles. The primary outcome, stress fracture in any extremity or the spine, was confirmed radiographically. Girls with stress fracture had bone mineral density measured at the lumbar spine by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. RESULTS The mean ± SD age of the 168 participants was 15.9 ± 2.1 years; 91.7% were postmenarchal, with a mean age at menarche of 13.1 ± 1.1 years. The prevalence of menstrual irregularity was similar among cases and controls. There was no significant difference in the mean hours per week of total physical activity between girls in this sample with stress fracture (8.2 hours/week) and those without (7.4 hours/week). In multivariate models, case subjects had nearly 3 times the odds of having a family member with osteoporosis or osteopenia. In secondary analyses, participants with stress fracture had a low mean spinal bone mineral density for their age. CONCLUSIONS Among highly active female adolescents, only family history was independently associated with stress fracture. The magnitude of this association suggests that further investigations of inheritable skeletal factors are warranted in this population, along with evaluation of bone mineral density in girls with stress

  10. Exploiting the yeast stress-activated signaling network to inform on stress biology and disease signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yi-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Healthy cells utilize intricate systems to monitor their environment and mount robust responses in the event of cellular stress. Whether stress arises from external insults or defects due to mutation and disease, cells must be able to respond precisely to mount the appropriate defenses. Multi-faceted stress responses are generally coupled with arrest of growth and cell-cycle progression, which both limits the transmission of damaged materials and serves to reallocate limited cellular resources toward defense. Therefore, stress defense versus rapid growth represent competing interests in the cell. How eukaryotic cells set the balance between defense versus proliferation, and in particular knowledge of the regulatory networks that control this decision, are poorly understood. In this perspective, we expand upon our recent work inferring the stress-activated signaling network in budding yeast, which captures pathways controlling stress defense and regulators of growth and cell-cycle progression. We highlight similarities between the yeast and mammalian stress responses and explore how stress-activated signaling networks in yeast can inform on signaling defects in human cancers. PMID:25957506

  11. Activation of glucosidase via stress-induced polymerization rapidly increases active pools of abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Hee; Piao, Hai Lan; Kim, Ho-Youn; Choi, Sang Mi; Jiang, Fan; Hartung, Wolfram; Hwang, Ildoo; Kwak, June M; Lee, In-Jung; Hwang, Inhwan

    2006-09-22

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone critical for plant growth, development, and adaptation to various stress conditions. Plants have to adjust ABA levels constantly to respond to changing physiological and environmental conditions. To date, the mechanisms for fine-tuning ABA levels remain elusive. Here we report that AtBG1, a beta-glucosidase, hydrolyzes glucose-conjugated, biologically inactive ABA to produce active ABA. Loss of AtBG1 causes defective stomatal movement, early germination, abiotic stress-sensitive phenotypes, and lower ABA levels, whereas plants with ectopic AtBG1 accumulate higher ABA levels and display enhanced tolerance to abiotic stress. Dehydration rapidly induces polymerization of AtBG1, resulting in a 4-fold increase in enzymatic activity. Furthermore, diurnal increases in ABA levels are attributable to polymerization-mediated AtBG1 activation. We propose that the activation of inactive ABA pools by polymerized AtBG1 is a mechanism by which plants rapidly adjust ABA levels and respond to changing environmental cues. PMID:16990135

  12. Stress Reorganization and Response in Active Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Rhoda J.; Liverpool, Tanniemola B.

    2014-07-01

    We present a microscopic model of a disordered viscoelastic active solid, i.e., an active material whose long time behavior is elastic as opposed to viscous. It is composed of filaments, passive cross-links, and molecular motors powered by stored chemical energy, e.g., actomyosin powered by adenosine triphosphate. Our model allows us to study the collective behavior of contractile active elements and how their interaction with each other and the passive elastic elements determines the macroscopic mechanical properties of the active material. As a result of the (un)binding dynamics of the active elements, we find that this system provides a highly responsive material with a dynamic mechanical response strongly dependent on the amount of deformation.

  13. GABAA receptor-acting neurosteroids: A role in the development and regulation of the stress response

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Benjamin G.; Cunningham, Linda; Mitchell, Scott G.; Swinny, Jerome D.; Lambert, Jeremy J.; Belelli, Delia

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity by stress is a fundamental survival mechanism and HPA-dysfunction is implicated in psychiatric disorders. Adverse early life experiences, e.g. poor maternal care, negatively influence brain development and programs an abnormal stress response by encoding long-lasting molecular changes, which may extend to the next generation. How HPA-dysfunction leads to the development of affective disorders is complex, but may involve GABAA receptors (GABAARs), as they curtail stress-induced HPA axis activation. Of particular interest are endogenous neurosteroids that potently modulate the function of GABAARs and exhibit stress-protective properties. Importantly, neurosteroid levels rise rapidly during acute stress, are perturbed in chronic stress and are implicated in the behavioural changes associated with early-life adversity. We will appraise how GABAAR-active neurosteroids may impact on HPA axis development and the orchestration of the stress-evoked response. The significance of these actions will be discussed in the context of stress-associated mood disorders. PMID:24929099

  14. Differential effects of mental concentration and acute psychosocial stress on cervical muscle activity and posture.

    PubMed

    Shahidi, Bahar; Haight, Ashley; Maluf, Katrina

    2013-10-01

    Physical and psychosocial stressors in the workplace have been independently associated with the development of neck pain, yet interactions among these risk factors remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of mentally challenging computer work performed with and without exposure to a psychosocial stressor on cervical muscle activity and posture. Changes in cervical posture and electromyography of upper trapezius, cervical extensor, and sternocleidomastoid muscles were compared between a resting seated posture at baseline, a low stress condition with mental concentration, and a high stress condition with mental concentration and psychosocial stress in sixty healthy office workers. Forward head posture significantly increased with mental concentration compared to baseline, but did not change with further introduction of the stressor. Muscle activity significantly increased from the low stress to high stress condition for both the dominant and non-dominant upper trapezius, with no corresponding change in activity of the cervical extensors or flexors between stress conditions. These findings suggest that upper trapezius muscles are selectively activated by psychosocial stress independent of changes in concentration or posture, which may have implications for the prevention of stress-related trapezius myalgia in the workplace. PMID:23800438

  15. Differential effects of mental concentration and acute psychosocial stress on cervical muscle activity and posture

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi, Bahar; Haight, Ashley; Maluf, Katrina

    2013-01-01

    Physical and psychosocial stressors in the workplace have been independently associated with the development of neck pain, yet interactions among these risk factors remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of mentally challenging computer work performed with and without exposure to a psychosocial stressor on cervical muscle activity and posture. Changes in cervical posture and electromyography of upper trapezius, cervical extensor, and sternocleidomastoid muscles were compared between a resting seated posture at baseline, a low stress condition with mental concentration, and a high stress condition with mental concentration and psychosocial stress in sixty healthy office workers. Forward head posture significantly increased with mental concentration compared to baseline, but did not change with further introduction of the stressor. Muscle activity significantly increased from the low stress to high stress condition for both the dominant and non-dominant upper trapezius, with no corresponding change in activity of the cervical extensors or flexors between stress conditions. These findings suggest that upper trapezius muscles are selectively activated by psychosocial stress independent of changes in concentration or posture, which may have implications for the prevention of stress-related trapezius myalgia in the workplace. PMID:23800438

  16. Shielding Flowers Developing under Stress: Translating Theory to Field Application

    PubMed Central

    Chayut, Noam; Sobol, Shiri; Nave, Nahum; Samach, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Developing reproductive organs within a flower are sensitive to environmental stress. A higher incidence of environmental stress during this stage of a crop plants’ developmental cycle will lead to major breaches in food security. Clearly, we need to understand this sensitivity and try and overcome it, by agricultural practices and/or the breeding of more tolerant cultivars. Although passion fruit vines initiate flowers all year round, flower primordia abort during warm summers. This restricts the season of fruit production in regions with warm summers. Previously, using controlled chambers, stages in flower development that are sensitive to heat were identified. Based on genetic analysis and physiological experiments in controlled environments, gibberellin activity appeared to be a possible point of horticultural intervention. Here, we aimed to shield flowers of a commercial cultivar from end of summer conditions, thus allowing fruit production in new seasons. We conducted experiments over three years in different settings, and our findings consistently show that a single application of an inhibitor of gibberellin biosynthesis to vines in mid-August can cause precocious flowering of ~2–4 weeks, leading to earlier fruit production of ~1 month. In this case, knowledge obtained on phenology, environmental constraints and genetic variation, allowed us to reach a practical solution. PMID:27135506

  17. Shielding Flowers Developing under Stress: Translating Theory to Field Application.

    PubMed

    Chayut, Noam; Sobol, Shiri; Nave, Nahum; Samach, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Developing reproductive organs within a flower are sensitive to environmental stress. A higher incidence of environmental stress during this stage of a crop plants' developmental cycle will lead to major breaches in food security. Clearly, we need to understand this sensitivity and try and overcome it, by agricultural practices and/or the breeding of more tolerant cultivars. Although passion fruit vines initiate flowers all year round, flower primordia abort during warm summers. This restricts the season of fruit production in regions with warm summers. Previously, using controlled chambers, stages in flower development that are sensitive to heat were identified. Based on genetic analysis and physiological experiments in controlled environments, gibberellin activity appeared to be a possible point of horticultural intervention. Here, we aimed to shield flowers of a commercial cultivar from end of summer conditions, thus allowing fruit production in new seasons. We conducted experiments over three years in different settings, and our findings consistently show that a single application of an inhibitor of gibberellin biosynthesis to vines in mid-August can cause precocious flowering of ~2-4 weeks, leading to earlier fruit production of ~1 month. In this case, knowledge obtained on phenology, environmental constraints and genetic variation, allowed us to reach a practical solution. PMID:27135506

  18. Aircraft stress sequence development: A complex engineering process made simple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, K. H.; Butts, D. G.; Sparks, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    Development of stress sequences for critical aircraft structure requires flight measured usage data, known aircraft loads, and established relationships between aircraft flight loads and structural stresses. Resulting cycle-by-cycle stress sequences can be directly usable for crack growth analysis and coupon spectra tests. Often, an expert in loads and spectra development manipulates the usage data into a typical sequence of representative flight conditions for which loads and stresses are calculated. For a fighter/trainer type aircraft, this effort is repeated many times for each of the fatigue critical locations (FCL) resulting in expenditure of numerous engineering hours. The Aircraft Stress Sequence Computer Program (ACSTRSEQ), developed by Southwest Research Institute under contract to San Antonio Air Logistics Center, presents a unique approach for making complex technical computations in a simple, easy to use method. The program is written in Microsoft Visual Basic for the Microsoft Windows environment.

  19. Intrinsic mechanisms of pain inhibition: activation by stress.

    PubMed

    Terman, G W; Shavit, Y; Lewis, J W; Cannon, J T; Liebeskind, J C

    1984-12-14

    Portions of the brain stem seem normally to inhibit pain. In man and laboratory animals these brain areas and pathways from them to spinal sensory circuits can be activated by focal stimulation. Endogenous opioids appear to be implicated although separate nonopioid mechanisms are also evident. Stress seems to be a natural stimulus triggering pain suppression. Properties of electric footshock have been shown to determine the opioid or nonopioid basis of stress-induced analgesia. Two different opioid systems can be activated by different footshock paradigms. This dissection of stress analgesia has begun to integrate divergent findings concerning pain inhibition and also to account for some of the variance that has obscured the reliable measurement of the effects of stress on tumor growth and immune function. PMID:6505691

  20. Piano Playing Reduces Stress More than Other Creative Art Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toyoshima, Kumiko; Fukui, Hajime; Kuda, Kiyoto

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have been conducted on the physiological effects of creative art activities. In this study, the effects of creative art activities on human stress were investigated, and their effects were compared in 57 healthy college students (27 males and 30 females). Subjects were divided into four groups, each of which participated in 30-minute…

  1. The role of physical activity and heart rate variability for the control of work related stress

    PubMed Central

    Tonello, Laís; Rodrigues, Fábio B.; Souza, Jeniffer W. S.; Campbell, Carmen S. G.; Leicht, Anthony S.; Boullosa, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) and exercise are often used as tools to reduce stress and therefore the risk for developing cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Meanwhile, heart rate variability (HRV) has been utilized to assess both stress and PA or exercise influences. The objective of the present review was to examine the current literature in regards to workplace stress, PA/exercise and HRV to encourage further studies. We considered original articles from known databases (PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge) over the last 10 years that examined these important factors. A total of seven studies were identified with workplace stress strongly associated with reduced HRV in workers. Longitudinal workplace PA interventions may provide a means to improve worker stress levels and potentially cardiovascular risk with mechanisms still to be clarified. Future studies are recommended to identify the impact of PA, exercise, and fitness on stress levels and HRV in workers and their subsequent influence on cardiovascular health. PMID:24600407

  2. Autophagy is activated for cell survival after endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Maiko; Hino, Shin-ichiro; Saito, Atsushi; Morikawa, Keisuke; Kondo, Shinichi; Kanemoto, Soshi; Murakami, Tomohiko; Taniguchi, Manabu; Tanii, Ichiro; Yoshinaga, Kazuya; Shiosaka, Sadao; Hammarback, James A; Urano, Fumihiko; Imaizumi, Kazunori

    2006-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells deal with accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by the unfolded protein response, involving the induction of molecular chaperones, translational attenuation, and ER-associated degradation, to prevent cell death. Here, we found that the autophagy system is activated as a novel signaling pathway in response to ER stress. Treatment of SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells with ER stressors markedly induced the formation of autophagosomes, which were recognized at the ultrastructural level. The formation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-LC3-labeled structures (GFP-LC3 "dots"), representing autophagosomes, was extensively induced in cells exposed to ER stress with conversion from LC3-I to LC3-II. In IRE1-deficient cells or cells treated with c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, the autophagy induced by ER stress was inhibited, indicating that the IRE1-JNK pathway is required for autophagy activation after ER stress. In contrast, PERK-deficient cells and ATF6 knockdown cells showed that autophagy was induced after ER stress in a manner similar to the wild-type cells. Disturbance of autophagy rendered cells vulnerable to ER stress, suggesting that autophagy plays important roles in cell survival after ER stress. PMID:17030611

  3. Academic Expectations Stress Inventory: Development, Factor Analysis, Reliability, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ang, Rebecca P.; Huan, Vivien S.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the development and initial validation of obtained scores from the Academic Expectations Stress Inventory (AESI), which measures expectations as a source of academic stress in middle and high school Asian students. In the first study, exploratory factor analysis results from 721 adolescents suggested a nine-item scale with…

  4. Development and Analyses of the Coping Stress Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadzella, Bernadette M.; Pierce, Devin; Young, Adena

    2008-01-01

    This is a report on the development of a coping stress inventory and the analyses of the data collected from 344 participants. The Coping Stress Inventory, CSI, with 16 items intercorrelated in the categories (Behavioral, Emotional, and Cognitive Appraisal). The internal consistency for the CSI was 0.77. Responses to the CSI were compared (a)…

  5. Traumatic Experience in Infancy: How Responses to Stress Affect Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witten, Molly Romer

    2010-01-01

    Responses to traumatic stress during the earliest years of life can change quickly and can be difficult to identify because of the young child's rapid rate of development. The symptoms of traumatic stress will depend on the child's developmental level and individual coping styles, as well as the quality and nature of the child's most important…

  6. Mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.; Myers, P. N.

    1995-01-01

    The authors introduce the chapter with a discussion of lessons from nature, agriculture, and landscapes; terms and definitions; and an historical perspective of mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development. Topics include developmental responses to mechanical stress; mechanical stress-environment interactions; metabolic, productivity, and compositional changes; hormonal involvement; mechanoperception and early transduction mechanisms; applications in agriculture; and research implications. The discussion of hormonal involvement in mechanical stress physiology includes ethylene, auxin, gibberellins, and other phytohormones. The discussion of applications in agriculture examines windbreaks, nursery practices, height control and conditioning, and enhancement of growth and productivity. Implications for research are related to handling plant materials, space biology, and future research needs.

  7. Stress affects salivary alpha-Amylase activity in bonobos.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Verena; Deschner, Tobias; Möstl, Erich; Selzer, Dieter; Hohmann, Gottfried

    2012-01-18

    Salivary alpha-Amylase (sAA) is a starch digesting enzyme. In addition to its function in the context of nutrition, sAA has also turned out to be useful for monitoring sympathetic nervous system activity. Recent studies on humans have found a relationship between intra-individual changes in sAA activity and physical and psychological stress. In studies on primates and other vertebrates, non-invasive monitoring of short-term stress responses is usually based on measurements of cortisol levels, which are indicative of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity. The few studies that have used both cortisol levels and sAA activity indicate that these two markers may respond differently and independently to different types of stress such that variation in the degree of the activation of different stress response systems might reflect alternative coping mechanisms or individual traits. Here, we present the first data on intra- and inter-individual variation of sAA activity in captive bonobos and compare the results with information from other ape species and humans. Our results indicate that sAA activity in the bonobo samples was significantly lower than in the human samples but within the range of other great ape species. In addition, sAA activity was significantly higher in samples collected at times when subjects had been exposed to stressors (judged by changes in behavioral patterns and cortisol levels) than in samples collected at other times. Our results indicate that bonobos possess functioning sAA and, as in other species, sAA activity is influenced by autonomic nervous system activity. Monitoring sAA activity could therefore be a useful tool for evaluating stress in bonobos. PMID:21945369

  8. Stress development and relaxation during sputter deposition film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanyu

    The stress development and relaxation of magnetron sputtered copper and amorphous-silicon (a-Si) films at room temperature are studied. Samples were prepared as a function of pressure and deposition power. In-situ stress measurements with the wafer curvature method were made using a helium neon gas laser system with a 10mm beam splitter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to perform post-growth microstructural and surface analysis. SEM cross-section analysis was used to determine the final film thickness. Phase compositions were studied by X-ray diffraction. The growth rates of copper films decreased with increasing pressure. Copper film stress development followed a non-monotonic compressive, tensile then tensile relaxation curve. In order to investigate further the nature of the stress relaxation, stress curves both after deposition was stopped and after it is restarted were also measured. Correlations between growth rate and pressure were also observed in a-Si sputter deposition. In some contrast to what was observed for Cu deposition, stress measurement during a-Si deposition showed a trend of tensile development and relaxation at all pressures studied. In a new approach to understanding stress relaxation during film growth, an acoustic emission (AE) system is introduced to measure the AE energy during sputter deposition. Evidence shows a certain relation between the strain energy of films calculated using the measured stresses and AE energy recorded during the deposition. AE energy occurs immediately after deposition starts and follows the trend of stress development (increasing hits and energies) and relaxation (decreasing hits and energies). No further signal was detected after deposition, matching the results of stress curve measurements showing that stress magnitude after deposition stays at the same level as before deposition stopped. Results also show a lower AE energy magnitude with increasing deposition

  9. Ants cushion applied stress by active rearrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongyang; Hyatt, John; Mlot, Nathan; Gerov, Michael; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Hu, David

    2013-11-01

    Fire ants, Solenopsis invicta, link their bodies together to form waterproof rafts, which in turn drip, spread, and coagulate, demonstrating properties of an active material that can change state from a liquid to a solid. This soft-matter phase transition is important when the raft interacts with environmental forces such as raindrops and crashing waves. We study this active behavior through plate-on-plate rheology on the ants, extracting the active components by comparison with the rheological behavior of a collection of dead ants. In controlled shear tests, both and live and dead ants show properties of a non-Newtonian fluid, specifically, shear-thinning behavior. In oscillatory tests, live ants exhibit a rare behavior in which their storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G'') have approximately the same value over three orders magnitudes of frequency and two orders of magnitude of strain, indicating the ants are neither fluid nor solid. In comparison, dead ants are more solid-like, with a storage modulus twice as large as their loss modulus. This striking active behavior arises from rearrangement of their bodies and storage and dissipation of energy with the ants' muscles.

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Stimulates p53 Expression through NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wan-Chi; Chuang, Yu-Chi; Chang, Yung-Sheng; Lai, Ming-Derg; Teng, Yen-Ni; Su, Ih-Jen; Wang, Clay C. C.; Lee, Kuan-Han; Hung, Jui-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    Background Induction of apoptosis by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated as the major factor in the development of multiple diseases. ER stress also appears to be a potentially useful major response to many chemotherapeutic drugs and environmental chemical compounds. A previous study has indicated that one major apoptotic regulator, p53, is significantly increased in response to ER stress, and participates in ER stress-induced apoptosis. However, the regulators of p53 expression during ER stress are still not fully understood. Principal Findings In this report, we demonstrate that induction of p53 expression is mediated through NF-κB signaling pathways during ER stress in MCF-7 cells. Tunicamycin or brefeldin A, two ER stress inducers, increased p53 expression in MCF-7 and Hela cells. We found p53 nuclear localization, activity, and phosphorylation at serine 15 on p53 increased during ER stress. Nuclear translocation of NF-κB and activity of NF-κB were also observed during ER stress. ER stress-induced p53 expression was significantly inhibited by coincubation with the NF-κB inhibitor, Bay 11-7082 and downregulation of NF-κB p65 expression. The role of p53 in mediating Brefeldin A-induced apoptosis was also investigated. Induction of p53 expression by Brefeldin A was correlated to Brefeldin A-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, downregulation of p53 expression by p53 siRNA significantly reduced Brefeldin A-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Significance Taken together, NF-κB activation and induction of p53 expression is essential for ER stress-induced cell death which is important for therapeutic effects of clinical cancer drugs. Our results may provide insight into the mechanism of cancer chemotherapy efficacy that is associated with induction of ER stress. PMID:22859938

  11. 3D Stress Modelling of a Neotectonically Active Area in Northwestern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradmann, Sofie; Keiding, Marie; Olesen, Odleiv; Maystrenko, Yuriy

    2016-04-01

    The Nordland area in NW Norway is one of the tectonically most active areas in Fennoscandia. It exhibits patterns of extension, which are in contradiction to the first-order regional stress pattern which reflects compression from ridge-push. The regional stress field stems from the interaction of ridge push and GIA (glacial isostatic adjustment); the local stress field mainly results from gravitational stresses as well as the flexural effects of sediment erosion and re-deposition. Whereas the first three effects are fairly well constrained, the latter is only poorly known and is the focus of this study. A number of data sets are collected within the project: Seismicity is monitored by a 2-year local seismic network and the stress regime at depth is derived from fault plane solutions. Surface deformation is recorded by a dense GPS network and DInSAR satellites. In-situ stresses are measured in a couple of relevant boreholes. We develop 3D finite element numerical models of crustal scale, using existing geometric constraints from previous geophysical studies. Internal body forces (e.g. variations in topography) already yield significant deviatoric stresses, which are often omitted in stress models. We apply the far-field stress fields (GIA, ridge-push, sediment redistribution) as effective force boundary conditions to the sides or base of the model. This way, we can account for all stress sources at once, but can also vary them separately in order to examine their relative contributions to the observed stress and strain rate fields. We develop a best-fit model using the different seismological and geodetic data sets collected and compiled within the project. Effects of lateral density changes and pre-existing weakness zones on stress localization are studied in connection to observed clusters of enhanced seismic activity.

  12. Aerospace Activities and Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robert M.; Piper, Martha

    1975-01-01

    Describes how science activities can be used to stimulate language development in the elementary grades. Two aerospace activities are described involving liquid nitrogen and the launching of a weather balloon which integrate aerospace interests into the development of language skills. (BR)

  13. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis induces cellular oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Spiers, Jereme G.; Chen, Hsiao-Jou Cortina; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal gland in response to stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis induce activity in the cellular reduction-oxidation (redox) system. The redox system is a ubiquitous chemical mechanism allowing the transfer of electrons between donor/acceptors and target molecules during oxidative phosphorylation while simultaneously maintaining the overall cellular environment in a reduced state. The objective of this review is to present an overview of the current literature discussing the link between HPA axis-derived glucocorticoids and increased oxidative stress, particularly focussing on the redox changes observed in the hippocampus following glucocorticoid exposure. PMID:25646076

  14. SEAP activity serves for demonstrating ER stress induction by glucolipotoxicity as well as testing ER stress inhibitory potential of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Lenin, Raji; Mohan, Viswanathan; Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy

    2015-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is emerging as a unifying paradigm and one of the underlying mechanisms in the genesis of diabetes and its complications. While this has prompted the development of ER stress inhibitors, there is a limitation in monitoring of ER stress in vitro and in vivo by reliable methodologies. We validated the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) activity as a surrogate marker of ER stress in mouse β-TC6 cells exposed to glucolipotoxicity or tunicamycin and studied insulin secretion along with alterations in ER stress markers. SEAP activity assay was measured using the Great EscAPe SEAP kit, insulin levels were determined by Mercodia reagents and mRNA expression of ER stress markers was quantified by real-time PCR. SEAP activity in β-cells was significantly decreased (indicating increased ER stress) on exposure either to glucolipotoxicity or tunicamycin. This was accompanied by an increased mRNA expression of ER stress markers (GRP-78, PERK, IRE1α, ATF6, XBP-1, and CHOP) and decreased insulin secretion. Treating the cells with phenylbutyric acid normalized SEAP activity, decreased mRNA expression of ER stress markers and improved insulin secretion. Interestingly, cells exposed to different classes of anti-diabetes agents or compounds such as resveratrol resisted ER stress. Methylglyoxal also induces ER stress and this was counteracted by aminoguanidine. Out study demonstrates SEAP activity as a novel ER stress monitoring assay to investigate the therapeutic value of agents with ER stress inhibitory potential. Future studies should focus on the exercise of adopting this reporter assay for high-throughput screening mode of drug discovery. PMID:25776571

  15. Activation of autophagy by unfolded proteins during endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaochen; Srivastava, Renu; Howell, Stephen H; Bassham, Diane C

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress is defined as the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, and is caused by conditions such as heat or agents that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress, including tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Autophagy, a major pathway for degradation of macromolecules in the vacuole, is activated by these stress agents in a manner dependent on inositol-requiring enzyme 1b (IRE1b), and delivers endoplasmic reticulum fragments to the vacuole for degradation. In this study, we examined the mechanism for activation of autophagy during endoplasmic reticulum stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. The chemical chaperones sodium 4-phenylbutyrate and tauroursodeoxycholic acid were found to reduce tunicamycin- or dithiothreitol-induced autophagy, but not autophagy caused by unrelated stresses. Similarly, over-expression of BINDING IMMUNOGLOBULIN PROTEIN (BIP), encoding a heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) molecular chaperone, reduced autophagy. Autophagy activated by heat stress was also found to be partially dependent on IRE1b and to be inhibited by sodium 4-phenylbutyrate, suggesting that heat-induced autophagy is due to accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression in Arabidopsis of the misfolded protein mimics zeolin or a mutated form of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY*) also induced autophagy in an IRE1b-dependent manner. Moreover, zeolin and CPY* partially co-localized with the autophagic body marker GFP-ATG8e, indicating delivery to the vacuole by autophagy. We conclude that accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum is a trigger for autophagy under conditions that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:26616142

  16. Stress versus temperature dependent activation energies in creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from that of dislocation climb to one of obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change, there occurs a change in the activation energy. It is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does a good job of correlating steady-state creep data, while a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy does a less desirable job of correlating the same data. Applications are made to copper and a LiF-22 mol. percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  17. Stress versus temperature dependence of activation energies for creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1992-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is associated with lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from dislocation climb to obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change in deformation mechanism occurs a change in the activation energy. When the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is obstacle-controlled dislocation glide, it is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does better than a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy in correlating steady-state creep data for both copper and LiF-22mol percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  18. Qualitative Development of the PROMIS® Pediatric Stress Response Item Banks

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, William; Pajer, Kathleen; Riley, Anne W.; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the qualitative development of the Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) Pediatric Stress Response item banks. Methods Stress response concepts were specified through a literature review and interviews with content experts, children, and parents. A library comprising 2,677 items derived from 71 instruments was developed. Items were classified into conceptual categories; new items were written and redundant items were removed. Items were then revised based on cognitive interviews (n = 39 children), readability analyses, and translatability reviews. Results 2 pediatric Stress Response sub-domains were identified: somatic experiences (43 items) and psychological experiences (64 items). Final item pools cover the full range of children’s stress experiences. Items are comprehensible among children aged ≥8 years and ready for translation. Conclusions Child- and parent-report versions of the item banks assess children’s somatic and psychological states when demands tax their adaptive capabilities. PMID:23124904

  19. The wheat MAP kinase phosphatase 1 alleviates salt stress and increases antioxidant activities in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Ikram; Ebel, Chantal; Belgaroui, Nibras; Ghorbel, Mouna; Amara, Imène; Hanin, Moez

    2016-04-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs) are important negative regulators in the MAPK signaling pathways, which play crucial roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. We have previously shown that the heterologous expression of a durum wheat MKP, TMKP1, results in increased tolerance to salt stress in yeast but its particular contribution in salt stress tolerance in plants was not investigated. Here, TMKP1 was overexpressed in Arabidopsis thaliana and physiological changes were assessed in transgenic plants exposed to stress conditions. Under salt stress and especially LiCl, the TMKP1 overexpressors displayed higher germination rates in comparison to wild type plants. The enhancement of salt stress tolerance was accompanied by increased antioxidant enzyme activities, namely superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxydases. Such increases in antioxidant activities were concomitant with lower malondialdehyde, superoxide anion O2(-) and hydrogen peroxide levels in the TMKP1 transgenic seedlings. Moreover, we provide evidence that, in contrast to the Arabidopsis ortholog AtMKP1, TMKP1 acts as a positive regulator of salt stress tolerance via its ectopic expression in the Arabidopsis mkp1 mutant. PMID:26927025

  20. YoeB toxin is activated during thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Brian D; Garza-Sánchez, Fernando; Hayes, Christopher S

    2015-08-01

    Type II toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules are thought to mediate stress-responses by temporarily suppressing protein synthesis while cells redirect transcription to adapt to environmental change. Here, we show that YoeB, a ribosome-dependent mRNase toxin, is activated in Escherichia coli cells grown at elevated temperatures. YoeB activation is dependent on Lon protease, suggesting that thermal stress promotes increased degradation of the YefM antitoxin. Though YefM is efficiently degraded in response to Lon overproduction, we find that Lon antigen levels do not increase during heat shock, indicating that another mechanism accounts for temperature-induced YefM proteolysis. These observations suggest that YefM/YoeB functions in adaptation to temperature stress. However, this response is distinct from previously described models of TA function. First, YoeB mRNase activity is maintained over several hours of culture at 42°C, indicating that thermal activation is not transient. Moreover, heat-activated YoeB does not induce growth arrest nor does it suppress global protein synthesis. In fact, E. coli cells proliferate more rapidly at elevated temperatures and instantaneously accelerate their growth rate in response to acute heat shock. We propose that heat-activated YoeB may serve a quality control function, facilitating the recycling of stalled translation complexes through ribosome rescue pathways. PMID:26147890

  1. YoeB toxin is activated during thermal stress

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Brian D; Garza-Sánchez, Fernando; Hayes, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    Type II toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules are thought to mediate stress-responses by temporarily suppressing protein synthesis while cells redirect transcription to adapt to environmental change. Here, we show that YoeB, a ribosome-dependent mRNase toxin, is activated in Escherichia coli cells grown at elevated temperatures. YoeB activation is dependent on Lon protease, suggesting that thermal stress promotes increased degradation of the YefM antitoxin. Though YefM is efficiently degraded in response to Lon overproduction, we find that Lon antigen levels do not increase during heat shock, indicating that another mechanism accounts for temperature-induced YefM proteolysis. These observations suggest that YefM/YoeB functions in adaptation to temperature stress. However, this response is distinct from previously described models of TA function. First, YoeB mRNase activity is maintained over several hours of culture at 42°C, indicating that thermal activation is not transient. Moreover, heat-activated YoeB does not induce growth arrest nor does it suppress global protein synthesis. In fact, E. coli cells proliferate more rapidly at elevated temperatures and instantaneously accelerate their growth rate in response to acute heat shock. We propose that heat-activated YoeB may serve a quality control function, facilitating the recycling of stalled translation complexes through ribosome rescue pathways. PMID:26147890

  2. Research and Development. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    Research and Development is a laboratory-oriented course that includes the appropriate common essential elements for industrial technology education plus concepts and skills related to research and development. This guide provides teachers of the course with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an…

  3. Chronic stress-induced oxidative damage and hyperlipidemia are accompanied by atherosclerotic development in rats.

    PubMed

    Devaki, M; Nirupama, R; Yajurvedi, H N

    2013-03-01

    Although stress-induced hyperlipidemia and increased oxidative stress have been reported and implicated in etiology of atherosclerosis, experimental evidence for stress-induced atherosclerotic development concomitant with these alterations is lacking. In this study, exposure of adult male albino Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) to restraint for 1 h and after a gap of 4 h to forced swimming for 15 min every day for 2, 4, or 24 weeks resulted in a duration of exposure-dependent hyperlipidemia as shown by significant increases in concentrations of blood cholesterol, low-density lipoproteins, and triglycerides and decrease in high-density lipoprotein concomitant with increased oxidative stress as indicated by decrease in hepatic antioxidant enzyme activities and increase in lipid peroxidation in the liver, kidney, and heart. These alterations were accompanied by development of fibrous layer, formation of foam cells, reduction in elastic fibers, and accumulation of Oil-Red-O-positive lipid droplets in the intima of thoracic aorta following 24 weeks of stress exposure, but not after 4 weeks. The study demonstrates for the first time that (i) chronic stress-induced hyperlipidemia and oxidative damage are coupled with atherosclerotic development in rats fed with normal diet and (ii) chronic stress effects prevail even after the cessation of stress exposure as indicated by high concentration of blood cholesterol and reduced hepatic superoxide dismutase activity 20 weeks after 2 or 4 weeks of stress. This study exemplifies long-term allostatic regulation leading to a pathological state, with long-term hyperlipidemia and oxidative damage from chronic stress resulting in atherosclerosis. PMID:22894170

  4. Earthquake activity and crustal stresses in stable plate interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camelbeeck, Thierry; Calais, Eric; Mazzotti, Stéphane; Stein, Seth

    2016-04-01

    Unlike plate-boundary earthquakes that are explained by plate motions and their recurrence interval inferred from the rate at which these motions are released seismically, we have a limited understanding on the triggering causes of earthquakes in stable plate interiors as well as on the mechanisms explaining their apparent episodic, clustered, and migrating nature. An alternative model explaining those characteristics of the seismic activity in those regions where no discernable strain is building up today is that earthquakes result from the release of strain from a long-term pre-stressed lithosphere, triggered by processes weakening fault zones, like fluid circulation, or modifying applied normal stress on well oriented faults, like regional or more local erosion, water or ice loadings. In this talk, we present examples of three complementary approaches that should permit better understanding the mechanisms of this intraplate earthquake activity. They rely on studying their possible triggering factors and regional stresses controlling their mechanism, and also on modelling the possible strain rates of geological domains in relationship to their geological history and their fabrics. Among other things, we question whether the spatial variations of the short wavelengths gravitational potential energy associated to lateral variations of surface topography and crustal density can induce local stress perturbations explaining the complexity of the present-day tectonics in Western Europe and its possible relationship to earthquake activity.

  5. Development of a bionanodevice for detecting stress levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, S.; Handri, S.; Honda, H.

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in molecular analysis techniques have enabled scientists to assess the tiny amounts of biochemical substances secreted in our bodies. This has revealed that the levels of various secretory hormones and immune substances vary sensitively with the mental state of a person. Such hormones and immune substances exhibit transient increases with various psychological stressors. They thus have the potential to be used as a novel biometric for monitoring stress. Biomarkers that occur in saliva can be monitored non-invasively and are thus potentially useful as practical indicators of mental stress. Stress biomarkers are considered to be released into the blood stream or other secretory fluids by physiological stress reactions. Stress biomarkers are expected to be detectable in sweat and other humoral fluids that are exuded from the skin surface. Based on this, we have developed a bionanodevice for detecting stress by capturing stress biomarkers on the skin surface in a non-invasive manner. A prototype bionanodevice is described in which a motor protein is introduced for molecular handling.

  6. A Fluorescent Reporter of AMPK activity and Cellular Energy Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Peiling; Zheng, Bin; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Sasaki, Atsuo T; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated when the AMP/ATP ratio in cells is elevated due to energy stress. Here we describe a biosensor, AMPKAR, which exhibits enhanced fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in response to phosphorylation by AMPK, allowing spatio-temporal monitoring of AMPK activity in single cells. We show that this reporter responds to a variety of stimuli that are known to induce energy stress and that the response is dependent on AMPK α1 & α2 and on the upstream kinase, LKB1. Interestingly we found that AMPK activation is confined to the cytosol in response to energy stress but can be observed in both the cytosol and nucleus in response to calcium elevation. Finally, using this probe with U2OS cells in a microfluidics device, we observed a very high cell-to-cell variability in the amplitude and time course of AMPK activation and recovery in response to pulses of glucose deprivation. PMID:21459332

  7. Adaptive and Pathogenic Responses to Stress by Stem Cells during Development

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Ladan; Xie, Yufen; Rappolee, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Cellular stress is the basis of a dose-dependent continuum of responses leading to adaptive health or pathogenesis. For all cells, stress leads to reduction in macromolecular synthesis by shared pathways and tissue and stress-specific homeostatic mechanisms. For stem cells during embryonic, fetal, and placental development, higher exposures of stress lead to decreased anabolism, macromolecular synthesis and cell proliferation. Coupled with diminished stem cell proliferation is a stress-induced differentiation which generates minimal necessary function by producing more differentiated product/cell. This compensatory differentiation is accompanied by a second strategy to insure organismal survival as multipotent and pluripotent stem cells differentiate into the lineages in their repertoire. During stressed differentiation, the first lineage in the repertoire is increased and later lineages are suppressed, thus prioritized differentiation occurs. Compensatory and prioritized differentiation is regulated by at least two types of stress enzymes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) which mediates loss of nuclear potency factors and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) that does not. SAPK mediates an increase in the first essential lineage and decreases in later lineages in placental stem cells. The clinical significance of compensatory and prioritized differentiation is that stem cell pools are depleted and imbalanced differentiation leads to gestational diseases and long term postnatal pathologies. PMID:24710551

  8. Perceived Stress in Young Carers: Development of a Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Early, Louise; Cushway, Delia; Cassidy, Tony

    2006-01-01

    We report the development of a 5-factor, 31-item, "Young Carers Perceived Stress Scale" (YCPSS) from an initial 50-item pool. The scale was developed and tested on 108 young carers aged between 12-18 years, and acceptable Cronbach Alpha values were obtained for the individual factors and the overall scale. In addition, both the overall scale and…

  9. Social stress in mice induces urinary bladder overactivity and increases TRPV1 channel-dependent afferent nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Mingin, Gerald C; Heppner, Thomas J; Tykocki, Nathan R; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Vizzard, Margaret A; Nelson, Mark T

    2015-09-15

    Social stress has been implicated as a cause of urinary bladder hypertrophy and dysfunction in humans. Using a murine model of social stress, we and others have shown that social stress leads to bladder overactivity. Here, we show that social stress leads to bladder overactivity, increased bladder compliance, and increased afferent nerve activity. In the social stress paradigm, 6-wk-old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed for a total of 2 wk, via barrier cage, to a C57BL/6 retired breeder aggressor mouse. We performed conscious cystometry with and without intravesical infusion of the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine, and measured pressure-volume relationships and afferent nerve activity during bladder filling using an ex vivo bladder model. Stress leads to a decrease in intermicturition interval and void volume in vivo, which was restored by capsazepine. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that at low pressures, bladder compliance and afferent activity were elevated in stressed bladders compared with unstressed bladders. Capsazepine did not significantly change afferent activity in unstressed mice, but significantly decreased afferent activity at all pressures in stressed bladders. Immunohistochemistry revealed that TRPV1 colocalizes with CGRP to stain nerve fibers in unstressed bladders. Colocalization significantly increased along the same nerve fibers in the stressed bladders. Our results support the concept that social stress induces TRPV1-dependent afferent nerve activity, ultimately leading to the development of overactive bladder symptoms. PMID:26224686

  10. Connecting Local Yield Stresses with Plastic Activity in Amorphous Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patinet, Sylvain; Vandembroucq, Damien; Falk, Michael L.

    2016-07-01

    In model amorphous solids produced via differing quench protocols, a strong correlation is established between local yield stress measured by direct local probing of shear stress thresholds and the plastic rearrangements observed during remote loading in shear. This purely local measure shows a higher predictive power for identifying sites of plastic activity when compared with more conventional structural properties. Most importantly, the sites of low local yield stress, thus defined, are shown to be persistent, remaining predictive of deformation events even after fifty or more such plastic rearrangements. This direct and nonperturbative approach gives access to relevant transition pathways that control the stability of amorphous solids. Our results reinforce the relevance of modeling plasticity in amorphous solids based on a gradually evolving population of discrete and local zones preexisting in the structure.

  11. Stress, active coping, and problem behaviors among Chinese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hsing-Fang; Zimmerman, Marc A; Xue, Yange; Bauermeister, Jose A; Caldwell, Cleopatra H; Wang, Zhenhong; Hou, Yubo

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about the stress and coping mechanisms on problem behaviors among Chinese adolescents, which might be quite different from their counterparts in Western cultures. We examined risk process of stress for internalizing outcomes (i.e., psychological distress, self-acceptance) and externalizing outcomes (i.e., substance use, delinquency, violent behavior) among Chinese adolescents. We also examined John Henryism Active Coping as a protective factor in a test of resilience from the negative effects of stress. A cross-sectional survey using self-reported questionnaires was conducted in 2 urban cities in China: Beijing and Xian. Participants included 1,356 students in Grades 7 to 12 (48% male, 52% female). Structural equation modeling analyses were conducted to test the conceptual model. The modifying (protective) effects of John Henryism were tested in multiple-group analysis. After controlling for demographics, we found that stress was associated with decreased self-acceptance and increased psychological distress among adolescents. Higher degree of psychological distress was then associated with increased delinquent behaviors and substance use. The results also indicated that individuals who scored higher in John Henryism reported more substance use as a result of psychological distress. Overall, our results support previous research with Western samples. Although John Henryism did not serve as a protective factor between stress and its negative outcomes, the findings underscore the relevance of addressing stress and possible coping strategies among Chinese adolescents. Further research that refines the active coping tailored for Chinese adolescents is necessary to more precisely test its protective effects. PMID:24999522

  12. Maternal Stress and Affect Influence Fetal Neurobehavioral Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Hilton, Sterling C.; Hawkins, Melissa; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Pressman, Eva K.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated associations between maternal psychological and fetal neurobehavioral functioning with data provided at 24, 30, and 36 weeks gestation. Found that fetuses of women who were more affectively intense, appraised their lives as more stressful, and reported more pregnancy-specific hassles were more active across gestation. Fetuses of women…

  13. Impact of prenatal environmental stress on cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Seiji; Hashimoto-Torii, Kazue

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal exposure of the developing brain to various types of environmental stress increases susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. Given that even subtle perturbations by prenatal environmental stress in the cerebral cortex impair the cognitive and memory functions, this review focuses on underlying molecular mechanisms of pathological cortical development. We especially highlight recent works that utilized animal exposure models, human specimens or/and induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells to demonstrate: (1) molecular mechanisms shared by various types of environmental stressors, (2) the mechanisms by which the affected extracortical tissues indirectly impact the cortical development and function, and (3) interaction between prenatal environmental stress and the genetic predisposition of neuropsychiatric disorders. Finally, we discuss current challenges for achieving a comprehensive understanding of the role of environmentally disturbed molecular expressions in cortical maldevelopment, knowledge of which may eventually facilitate discovery of interventions for prenatal environment-linked neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26074774

  14. 78 FR 1250 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed New Collection; Comments Requested; Stress...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Information Collection Activities: Proposed New Collection; Comments Requested; Stress Resiliency Study... Form/Collection: Stress Resiliency Study Questionnaires for Milwaukee Police Department. (3) Agency... MPD. These surveys will be used to collect data on MPD officers' perceived stress, responses...

  15. Plastid Osmotic Stress Activates Cellular Stress Responses in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Margaret E.; Basu, Meera R.; Bhaskara, Govinal Badiger; Verslues, Paul E.; Haswell, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about cytoplasmic osmoregulatory mechanisms in plants, and even less is understood about how the osmotic properties of the cytoplasm and organelles are coordinately regulated. We have previously shown that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants lacking functional versions of the plastid-localized mechanosensitive ion channels Mechanosensitive Channel of Small Conductance-Like2 (MSL2) and MSL3 contain leaf epidermal plastids under hypoosmotic stress, even during normal growth and development. Here, we use the msl2 msl3 mutant as a model to investigate the cellular response to constitutive plastid osmotic stress. Under unstressed conditions, msl2 msl3 seedlings exhibited several hallmarks of drought or environmental osmotic stress, including solute accumulation, elevated levels of the compatible osmolyte proline (Pro), and accumulation of the stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA). Furthermore, msl2 msl3 mutants expressed Pro and ABA metabolism genes in a pattern normally seen under drought or osmotic stress. Pro accumulation in the msl2 msl3 mutant was suppressed by conditions that reduce plastid osmotic stress or inhibition of ABA biosynthesis. Finally, treatment of unstressed msl2 msl3 plants with exogenous ABA elicited a much greater Pro accumulation response than in the wild type, similar to that observed in plants under drought or osmotic stress. These results suggest that osmotic imbalance across the plastid envelope can elicit a response similar to that elicited by osmotic imbalance across the plasma membrane and provide evidence for the integration of the osmotic state of an organelle into that of the cell in which it resides. PMID:24676856

  16. Reduced Activity Restriction Buffers the Relations Between Chronic Stress and Sympathetic Nervous System Activation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Caregivers of dementia patients are at risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), and this risk increases the longer they provide care. Greater perceptions that caregiving restricts social/recreational activities (i.e., activity restriction [AR]) has been associated with poorer health, and AR may exacerbate the relations between stress and health outcomes. The current study examined the interactive role of greater exposure to stress and increased AR on plasma catecholamine (CAT) levels: norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI). Method. A total of 84 dementia caregivers completed a standard assessment battery, and a nurse collected blood, which was assayed for NE and EPI. Separate regressions for NE and EPI were used to determine whether the relations between years caregiving and CATs were greater in those with high versus low AR. Results. A significant interaction was found between years caregiving and AR in predicting resting EPI (p = .032) but not resting NE (p = .103). Post hoc analyses indicated that years caregiving was significantly associated with EPI when AR was high (p = .008) but not when AR was low (p = .799). Additionally, years caregiving was not significantly associated with NE when AR was high or low. Discussion. The subjective experience of AR can play an important role in determining risk for detrimental physical health outcomes, particularly CVD risk. PMID:23685924

  17. TRPV4-Mediated Detection of Hyposmotic Stress by Skin Keratinocytes Activates Developmental Immunity.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Villegas, Jorge; Montalban-Arques, Ana; Liarte, Sergio; de Oliveira, Sofia; Pardo-Pastor, Carlos; Rubio-Moscardo, Fanny; Meseguer, José; Valverde, Miguel A; Mulero, Victoriano

    2016-01-15

    As an organism is exposed to pathogens during very early development, specific defense mechanisms must take effect. In this study, we used a germ-free zebrafish embryo model to show that osmotic stress regulates the activation of immunity and host protection in newly hatched embryos. Mechanistically, skin keratinocytes were responsible for both sensing the hyposmolarity of the aquatic environment and mediating immune effector mechanisms. This occurred through a transient potential receptor vanilloid 4/Ca(2+)/TGF-β-activated kinase 1/NF-κB signaling pathway. Surprisingly, the genes encoding antimicrobial effectors, which do not have the potential to cause tissue damage, are constitutively expressed during development, independently of both commensal microbes and osmotic stress. Our results reveal that osmotic stress is associated with the induction of developmental immunity in the absence of tissue damage and point out to the embryo skin as the first organ with full capacities to mount an innate immune response. PMID:26673139

  18. Beller Lectureship Talk: Active response of biological cells to mechanical stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, Samuel

    2009-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. We present a simple and generic theoretical model for the active response of biological cells to mechanical stress. The theory includes cell activity and mechanical forces as well as random forces as factors that determine the polarizability that relates cell orientation to stress. This allows us to explain the puzzling observation of parallel (or sometimes random) alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency and compare the theory with recent experiments. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material distinguishes cells whose activity is controlled by stress from those controlled by strain. We have extended the theory to generalize the treatment of elastic inclusions in solids to ''living'' inclusions (cells) whose active polarizability, analogous to the polarizability of non-living matter, results in the feedback of cellular forces that develop in response to matrix stresses. We use this to explain recent observations of the non-monotonic dependence of stress-fiber polarization in stem cells on matrix rigidity. These findings provide a mechanical correlate for the existence of an optimal substrate elasticity for cell differentiation and function. [3pt] *In collaboration with R. De (Brown University), Y. Biton (Weizmann Institute), and A. Zemel (Hebrew University) and the experimental groups: Max Planck Institute, Stuttgart: S. Jungbauer, R. Kemkemer, J. Spatz; University of Pennsylvania: A. Brown, D. Discher, F. Rehfeldt.

  19. Development of ultrasonic tomography for residual stress mapping. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boland, A.J.; Davis, T.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Harrington, T.P.; Hildebrand, B.P.; Lemon, D.K.; Posakony, G.J.; Skorpik, J.R.

    1980-05-01

    The volumetric stress distribution in nuclear reactor piping and pressure vessels is becoming an increasingly important parameter in nondestructive evaluation. This report describes research and development of instrumentation leading toward a means of measuring subsurface stress distributions in metals. Based on the principles of Computerized Tomography (CT), an ultrasonic tomographic instrument system has been developed. The microprocessor-based system uses an ultrasonic linear array to acquire time-of-flight data to an accuracy of 0.5 to 1.0 ns. The data is processed using a modified ART (Algebraic Reconstruction Technique) program. A two-dimensional map of the velocity distribution is displayed on a monitor. The velocity distribution is interpreted or calibrated in terms of stress through the acousto-elastic coefficients.

  20. Lysyl oxidase activity regulates oncogenic stress response and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Wiel, C; Augert, A; Vincent, D F; Gitenay, D; Vindrieux, D; Le Calvé, B; Arfi, V; Lallet-Daher, H; Reynaud, C; Treilleux, I; Bartholin, L; Lelievre, E; Bernard, D

    2013-01-01

    Cellular senescence, a stable proliferation arrest, is induced in response to various stresses. Oncogenic stress-induced senescence (OIS) results in blocked proliferation and constitutes a fail-safe program counteracting tumorigenesis. The events that enable a tumor in a benign senescent state to escape from OIS and become malignant are largely unknown. We show that lysyl oxidase activity contributes to the decision to maintain senescence. Indeed, in human epithelial cell the constitutive expression of the LOX or LOXL2 protein favored OIS escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize OIS. The relevance of these in vitro observations is supported by in vivo findings: in a transgenic mouse model of aggressive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), increasing lysyl oxidase activity accelerates senescence escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize senescence, delay tumorigenesis, and increase survival. Mechanistically, we show that lysyl oxidase activity favors the escape of senescence by regulating the focal-adhesion kinase. Altogether, our results demonstrate that lysyl oxidase activity participates in primary tumor growth by directly impacting the senescence stability. PMID:24113189

  1. A novel mathematical model of activation and sensitization of platelets subjected to dynamic stress histories

    PubMed Central

    Soares, João S.; Sheriff, Jawaad

    2013-01-01

    Blood recirculating devices, such as ventricular assist devices and prosthetic heart valves, are burdened by thromboembolic complications requiring complex and lifelong anticoagulant therapy with its inherent hemorrhagic risks. Pathologic flow patterns occurring in such devices chronically activate platelets, and the optimization of their thrombogenic performance requires the development of flow-induced platelet activation models. However, existing models are based on empirical correlations using the well-established power law paradigm of constant levels of shear stress during certain exposure times as factors for mechanical platelet activation. These models are limited by their range of application and do not account for other relevant phenomena, such as loading rate dependence and platelet sensitization to high stress conditions, which characterize the dynamic flow conditions in devices. These limitations were addressed by developing a new class of phenomenological stress-induced platelet activation models that specifies the rate of platelet activation as a function of the entire stress history and results in a differential equation that can be directly integrated to calculate the cumulative levels of activation. The proposed model reverts to the power law under constant shear stress conditions and is able to describe experimental results in response to a diverse range of highly dynamic stress conditions found in blood recirculating devices. The model was tested in vitro under emulated device flow conditions and correlates well with experimental results. This new model provides a reliable and robust mathematical tool that can be incorporated into computational fluid dynamic studies in order to optimize design, with the goal of improving the thrombogenic performance of blood recirculating devices. PMID:23359062

  2. Adolescent Social Stress Produces an Enduring Activation of the Rat Locus Coeruleus and Alters its Coherence with the Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zitnik, Gerard A; Curtis, Andrè L; Wood, Susan K; Arner, Jay; Valentino, Rita J

    2016-04-01

    Early life stress is associated with the development of psychiatric disorders. Because the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE) system is a major stress-response system that is implicated in psychopathology, developmental differences in the response of this system to stress may contribute to increased vulnerability. Here LC single unit and network activity were compared between adult and adolescent rats during resident-intruder stress. In some rats, LC and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) coherence was quantified. The initial stress tonically activated LC neurons and induced theta oscillations, while simultaneously decreasing LC auditory-evoked responses in both age groups. Stress increased LC-mPFC coherence within the theta range. With repeated exposures, adolescent LC neuronal and network activity remained elevated even in the absence of the stressor and were unresponsive to stressor presentation. In contrast, LC neurons of adult rats exposed to repeated social stress were relatively inhibited in the absence of the stressor and mounted robust responses upon stressor presentation. LC sensory-evoked responses were selectively blunted in adolescent rats exposed to repeated social stress. Finally, repeated stress decreased LC-mPFC coherence in the high frequency range (beta and gamma) while maintaining strong coherence in the theta range, selectively in adolescents. Together, these results suggest that adaptive mechanisms that promote stress recovery and maintain basal activity of the brain norepinephrine system in the absence of stress are not fully developed or are vulnerable stress-induced impairments in adolescence. The resulting sustained activation of the LC-NE system after repeated social stress may adversely impact cognition and future social behavior of adolescents. PMID:26361057

  3. Embryo as an active granular fluid: stress-coordinated cellular constriction chains.

    PubMed

    Jason Gao, Guo-Jie; Holcomb, Michael C; Thomas, Jeffrey H; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2016-10-19

    Mechanical stress plays an intricate role in gene expression in individual cells and sculpting of developing tissues. However, systematic methods of studying how mechanical stress and feedback help to harmonize cellular activities within a tissue have yet to be developed. Motivated by our observation of the cellular constriction chains (CCCs) during the initial phase of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, we propose an active granular fluid (AGF) model that provides valuable insights into cellular coordination in the apical constriction process. In our model, cells are treated as circular particles connected by a predefined force network, and they undergo a random constriction process in which the particle constriction probability P is a function of the stress exerted on the particle by its neighbors. We find that when P favors tensile stress, constricted particles tend to form chain-like structures. In contrast, constricted particles tend to form compact clusters when P favors compression. A remarkable similarity of constricted-particle chains and CCCs observed in vivo provides indirect evidence that tensile-stress feedback coordinates the apical constriction activity. Our particle-based AGF model will be useful in analyzing mechanical feedback effects in a wide variety of morphogenesis and organogenesis phenomena. PMID:27545101

  4. Sympathetic activity during passive heat stress in healthy aged humans

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Daniel; Schlader, Zachary J; Crandall, Craig G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular adjustments during heat stress are generally attenuated in healthy aged humans, which could be due to lower increases in sympathetic activity compared to the young. We compared muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) between 11 young (Y: 28 ± 4 years) and 10 aged (A: 70 ± 5 years) subjects prior to and during passive heating. Furthermore, MSNA responses were compared when a cold pressor test (CPT) and lower body negative pressure (LBNP) were superimposed upon heating. Baseline MSNA burst frequency (Y: 15 ± 4 vs. A: 31 ± 3 bursts min−1, P ≤ 0.01) and burst incidence (Y: 26 ± 8 vs. A: 50 ± 7 bursts (100 cardiac cycles (CC))−1, P ≤ 0.01) were greater in the aged. Heat stress increased core temperature to a similar extent in both groups (Y: +1.2 ± 0.1 vs. A: +1.2 ± 0.0°C, P = 0.99). Absolute levels of MSNA remained greater in the aged during heat stress (burst frequency: Y: 47 ± 6 vs. A: 63 ± 11 bursts min−1, P ≤ 0.01; burst incidence: Y: 48 ± 8 vs. A: 67 ± 9 bursts (100 CC)−1, P ≤ 0.01); however, the increase in both variables was similar between groups (both P ≥ 0.1). The CPT and LBNP further increased MSNA burst frequency and burst incidence, although the magnitude of increase was similar between groups (both P ≥ 0.07). These results suggest that increases in sympathetic activity during heat stress are not attenuated in healthy aged humans. Key points Cardiovascular adjustments to heat stress are attenuated in healthy aged individuals, which could contribute to their greater prevalence of heat-related illnesses and deaths during heat waves. The attenuated cardiovascular adjustments in the aged could be due to lower increases in sympathetic nerve activity during heat stress. We examined muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and plasma catecholamine concentrations in healthy young and aged individuals during whole-body passive heat stress. The main finding

  5. Multiple Traumatic Experiences and the Development of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Sheryn T.

    2007-01-01

    This study assesses the differential and combined impacts of multiple lifetime stressors in the development and severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. One hundred and four clinical and 64 nonclinical participants were assessed for their exposure to four types of interpersonal trauma: physical and sexual abuse in childhood,…

  6. Replication stress activates DNA repair synthesis in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Ying, Songmin; Bjerregaard, Victoria A; Bursomanno, Sara; Aleliunaite, Aiste; Wu, Wei; Mankouri, Hocine W; Shen, Huahao; Liu, Ying; Hickson, Ian D

    2015-12-10

    Oncogene-induced DNA replication stress has been implicated as a driver of tumorigenesis. Many chromosomal rearrangements characteristic of human cancers originate from specific regions of the genome called common fragile sites (CFSs). CFSs are difficult-to-replicate loci that manifest as gaps or breaks on metaphase chromosomes (termed CFS 'expression'), particularly when cells have been exposed to replicative stress. The MUS81-EME1 structure-specific endonuclease promotes the appearance of chromosome gaps or breaks at CFSs following replicative stress. Here we show that entry of cells into mitotic prophase triggers the recruitment of MUS81 to CFSs. The nuclease activity of MUS81 then promotes POLD3-dependent DNA synthesis at CFSs, which serves to minimize chromosome mis-segregation and non-disjunction. We propose that the attempted condensation of incompletely duplicated loci in early mitosis serves as the trigger for completion of DNA replication at CFS loci in human cells. Given that this POLD3-dependent mitotic DNA synthesis is enhanced in aneuploid cancer cells that exhibit intrinsically high levels of chromosomal instability (CIN(+)) and replicative stress, we suggest that targeting this pathway could represent a new therapeutic approach. PMID:26633632

  7. Psychosocial versus physiological stress - Meta-analyses on deactivations and activations of the neural correlates of stress reactions.

    PubMed

    Kogler, Lydia; Müller, Veronika I; Chang, Amy; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fox, Peter T; Gur, Ruben C; Derntl, Birgit

    2015-10-01

    Stress is present in everyday life in various forms and situations. Two stressors frequently investigated are physiological and psychosocial stress. Besides similar subjective and hormonal responses, it has been suggested that they also share common neural substrates. The current study used activation-likelihood-estimation meta-analysis to test this assumption by integrating results of previous neuroimaging studies on stress processing. Reported results are cluster-level FWE corrected. The inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the anterior insula (AI) were the only regions that demonstrated overlapping activation for both stressors. Analysis of physiological stress showed consistent activation of cognitive and affective components of pain processing such as the insula, striatum, or the middle cingulate cortex. Contrarily, analysis across psychosocial stress revealed consistent activation of the right superior temporal gyrus and deactivation of the striatum. Notably, parts of the striatum appeared to be functionally specified: the dorsal striatum was activated in physiological stress, whereas the ventral striatum was deactivated in psychosocial stress. Additional functional connectivity and decoding analyses further characterized this functional heterogeneity and revealed higher associations of the dorsal striatum with motor regions and of the ventral striatum with reward processing. Based on our meta-analytic approach, activation of the IFG and the AI seems to indicate a global neural stress reaction. While physiological stress activates a motoric fight-or-flight reaction, during psychosocial stress attention is shifted towards emotion regulation and goal-directed behavior, and reward processing is reduced. Our results show the significance of differentiating physiological and psychosocial stress in neural engagement. Furthermore, the assessment of deactivations in addition to activations in stress research is highly recommended. PMID:26123376

  8. Lower Electrodermal Activity to Acute Stress in Caregivers of People with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Adaptive Habituation to Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz-Robledillo, Nicolás; Moya-Albiol, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Caring for a relative with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) entails being under chronic stress that could alter body homeostasis. Electrodermal activity (EDA) is an index of the sympathetic activity of the autonomic nervous system related to emotionality and homeostasis. This study compares EDA in response to acute stress in the laboratory between…

  9. Resveratrol-loaded Nanoparticles Induce Antioxidant Activity against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Park, Eun-Young; Ha, Ho-Kyung; Jo, Chan-Mi; Lee, Won-Jae; Lee, Sung Sill; Kim, Jin Wook

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol acts as a free radical scavenger and a potent antioxidant in the inhibition of numerous reactive oxygen species (ROS). The function of resveratrol and resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles in protecting human lung cancer cells (A549) against hydrogen peroxide was investigated in this study. The 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) assay was performed to evaluate the antioxidant properties. Resveratrol had substantially high antioxidant capacity (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity value) compared to trolox and vitamin E since the concentration of resveratrol was more than 50 μM. Nanoparticles prepared from β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) were successfully developed. The β-lg nanoparticle showed 60 to 146 nm diameter in size with negatively charged surface. Non-cytotoxicity was observed in Caco-2 cells treated with β-lg nanoparticles. Fluorescein isothiocynate-conjugated β-lg nanoparticles were identified into the cell membrane of Caco-2 cells, indicating that nanoparticles can be used as a delivery system. Hydrogen peroxide caused accumulation of ROS in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles restored H2O2-induced ROS levels by induction of cellular uptake of resveratrol in A549 cells. Furthermore, resveratrol activated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2-Kelch ECH associating protein 1 (Nrf2-Keap1) signaling in A549 cells, thereby accumulation of Nrf2 abundance, as demonstrated by western blotting approach. Overall, these results may have implications for improvement of oxidative stress in treatment with nanoparticles as a biodegradable and non-toxic delivery carrier of bioactive compounds. PMID:26732454

  10. The Role of Daily Activities in Youths’ Stress Physiology

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Susan M.; Blocklin, Michelle K.; Walter, Kimberly N.; Davis, Kelly D.; Almeida, David M.; Klein, Laura Cousino

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study examined links between diurnal patterns of the stress hormone, cortisol, and adolescents’ time in nine common daily activities. Method During eight consecutive nightly telephone interviews, 28 youths (n = 12 girls), 10-18 years of age, reported their day’s activities. On four days, four saliva samples also were collected and assayed for cortisol. Multilevel models assessed within- and between-person associations between time in each activity and cortisol Area Under the Curve (AUC), cortisol awakening response (CAR), morning peak (30 minutes after wake up) and daily decline (morning peak to bedtime). Results Links with AUC were found for most activities; significant associations with cortisol rhythms suggested that most effects were due to anticipation of the day’s activities. Specifically, on days when youths spent more time than usual on videogames and TV they had lower AUCs, with lower morning peaks. Youths who spent more time reading (within-person) and in computer activities (between-person) had higher AUCs, with stronger CARs (within-person). Youths who slept more had lower AUCs, with lower morning peaks on both the between- and within-person levels. Amounts of time spent in clubs, and for older adolescents, sports, were also linked to lower AUCs. Finally, youths who spent more time in school/schoolwork had lower AUCs, but on days when youths spent more time than usual in school, they had higher AUCs, stronger CARs, and steeper daily declines. Conclusion Beyond their known implications for psychological adjustment, youths’ everyday activities are linked to stress physiology. PMID:23174474

  11. Activation and regulation of the Spc1 stress-activated protein kinase in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Degols, G; Shiozaki, K; Russell, P

    1996-06-01

    Spc1, an osmotic-stress-stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) homolog in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, is required for the induction of mitosis and survival in high-osmolarity conditions. Spc1, also known as Sty1, is activated by Wis1 MAPK kinase and inhibited by Pyp1 tyrosine phosphatase. Spc1 is most closely related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hog1 and mammalian p38 kinases. Whereas Hog1 is specifically responsive to osmotic stress, we report here that Spc1 is activated by multiple forms of stress, including high temperature and oxidative stress. In this regard Spc1 is more similar to mammalian p38. Activation of Spc1 is crucial for survival of various forms of stress. Spc1 regulates expression of genes encoding stress-related proteins such as glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd1+) and trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (tps1+). Spc1 also promotes expression of pyp2+, which encodes a tyrosine phosphatase postulated as a negative regulator of Spc1. This proposal is supported by the finding that Spc1 associates with Pyp2 in vivo and that the amount of Spc1 tyrosine phosphorylation is lower in a Pyp2-overproducing strain than in the wild type. Moreover, the level of stress-stimulated gpd1+ expression is higher in delta pyp2 mutants than in the wild type. These findings demonstrate that Spc1 promotes expression of genes involved in stress survival and that of regulation may be commonly employed to modulate MAPK signal transduction pathways in eukaryotic species. PMID:8649397

  12. A potential role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in development of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nozomi; Harada, Miyuki; Hirota, Yasushi; Zhao, Lin; Yoshino, Osamu; Urata, Yoko; Izumi, Gentaro; Takamura, Masashi; Hirata, Tetsuya; Koga, Kaori; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Osuga, Yutaka

    2016-06-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) is crucial for ovarian angiogenesis, but its excess production induces ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). The aim of this study was to determine whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress regulates VEGFA expression in granulosa cells, and whether its activation is involved in OHSS development. The expression of the spliced form of X-box-binding protein 1 [XBP1(S)], induced by ER stress, in cumulus cells from OHSS patients was higher than that in cumulus cells from non-OHSS patients. The ER stress inducer tunicamycin increased human chorionic gonadotropin-induced VEGFA production in human granulosa cells through the induction of XBP1(S), and pretreatment with the ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) abrogated the effect of tunicamycin. In OHSS model rats, TUDCA administration prevented the OHSS development, reducing ovarian VEGFA production. Our findings suggest ER stress upregulates hCG-induced VEGFA production in granulosa cells, indicating that ER stress might be involved in OHSS development. PMID:27032713

  13. Nucleolus-derived mediators in oncogenic stress response and activation of p53-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Stępiński, Dariusz

    2016-08-01

    Rapid growth and division of cells, including tumor ones, is correlated with intensive protein biosynthesis. The output of nucleoli, organelles where translational machineries are formed, depends on a rate of particular stages of ribosome production and on accessibility of elements crucial for their effective functioning, including substrates, enzymes as well as energy resources. Different factors that induce cellular stress also often lead to nucleolar dysfunction which results in ribosome biogenesis impairment. Such nucleolar disorders, called nucleolar or ribosomal stress, usually affect cellular functioning which in fact is a result of p53-dependent pathway activation, elicited as a response to stress. These pathways direct cells to new destinations such as cell cycle arrest, damage repair, differentiation, autophagy, programmed cell death or aging. In the case of impaired nucleolar functioning, nucleolar and ribosomal proteins mediate activation of the p53 pathways. They are also triggered as a response to oncogenic factor overexpression to protect tissues and organs against extensive proliferation of abnormal cells. Intentional impairment of any step of ribosome biosynthesis which would direct the cells to these destinations could be a strategy used in anticancer therapy. This review presents current knowledge on a nucleolus, mainly in relation to cancer biology, which is an important and extremely sensitive element of the mechanism participating in cellular stress reaction mediating activation of the p53 pathways in order to counteract stress effects, especially cancer development. PMID:27142852

  14. Relevant shaking stress conditions for antibody preformulation development.

    PubMed

    Eppler, Annette; Weigandt, Markus; Hanefeld, Andrea; Bunjes, Heike

    2010-02-01

    In protein formulation development, shaking stress is often employed to assess the physical stability of antibody formulations against aggregation. Since there are currently no guidelines describing suitable test conditions, very different shaking stress designs are used. These different designs may influence the resulting stability data. The aim of this study was to establish a shaking stress design within the protein range of 2-5mg/ml which can rapidly distinguish between antibody formulations of poor stability and those with potential for further development. Small scale shaking stress experiments were performed with different monoclonal IgG antibodies (as buffered solutions or marketed formulations). Variables were the filling degree of the sample containers, the container type and size and the shaking intensity. The stability of the samples was assessed by visual inspection, UV-VIS spectrophotometric turbidity measurements and size exclusion chromatography. All tested parameters had a strong influence on the stability results. The most discriminating conditions were obtained when shaking of the formulations was performed at 200rpm in a 2ml injection vial filled with 1ml protein solution. This experimental setup led to clearly different stability results for buffered solutions and marketed products. Moreover, this setup required only relatively small amounts of protein solution which is advantageous in prefomulation studies. PMID:19922795

  15. Yielding to Stress: Recent Developments in Viscoplastic Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmforth, Neil J.; Frigaard, Ian A.; Ovarlez, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    The archetypal feature of a viscoplastic fluid is its yield stress: If the material is not sufficiently stressed, it behaves like a solid, but once the yield stress is exceeded, the material flows like a fluid. Such behavior characterizes materials common in industries such as petroleum and chemical processing, cosmetics, and food processing and in geophysical fluid dynamics. The most common idealization of a viscoplastic fluid is the Bingham model, which has been widely used to rationalize experimental data, even though it is a crude oversimplification of true rheological behavior. The popularity of the model is in its apparent simplicity. Despite this, the sudden transition between solid-like behavior and flow introduces significant complications into the dynamics, which, as a result, has resisted much analysis. Over recent decades, theoretical developments, both analytical and computational, have provided a better understanding of the effect of the yield stress. Simultaneously, greater insight into the material behavior of real fluids has been afforded by advances in rheometry. These developments have primed us for a better understanding of the various applications in the natural and engineering sciences.

  16. Shrinkage stress development in dental composites—An analytical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fok, Alex S.L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this paper is to develop a comprehensive mathematical model for shrinkage stress development in dental composites that can account for the combined effect of material properties, specimen geometry and external constraints. Methods A viscoelastic model that includes the composite’s elastic, creep and shrinkage strains, and their interaction with the sample’s dimensions and the external constraint is developed. The model contains two dimensionless parameters. The first one represents the compliance of the external constraint relative to that of the composite sample, and the second controls the rate of shrinkage stress decay through creep. The resulting differential equation is solved for two special cases: zero compliance and zero creep. Predictions for shrinkage stress measurements are then made using the analytical solutions for instruments with different compliances, samples with different thicknesses and composites with different filler fractions. Results The model correctly predicts how shrinkage stress increases with time, its dependence on the interaction between the entire system’s compliance and the material properties, and the effect of the filler fraction on its maximum value. Comparisons with reported shrinkage stress measurements have provided very good agreement between theory and experiments. Significance The results provided by the model can help to resolve most, if not all, of the seemingly conflicting experimental observations reported in the literature. They can also provide some useful guidelines for optimizing the mechanical performance of dental composite restorations. The compliance ratio, a new parameter derived from the model, represents a fuller description of the constraints of the system. PMID:24029101

  17. TMT predator odor activated neural circuit in C57BL/6J mice indicates TMT-stress as a suitable model for uncontrollable intense stress.

    PubMed

    Janitzky, K; D'Hanis, W; Kröber, A; Schwegler, H

    2015-03-01

    Intense stressful events can result in chronic disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In vulnerable individuals, a single aversive experience can be sufficient to cause long-lasting behavioral changes. Candidate brain regions implicated in stress-related psychopathology are the amygdala, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), and the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. In rodents exposure to 2,5-dihydro-2,4,5-trimethylthiazoline (TMT), an ethologically relevant stressor, has been shown to induce intense stress and innate anxiety responses. To study dispositions for the development of maladaptive stress responses, mice models are required. Therefore C57BL/6J mice were exposed to TMT and Fos expression was studied in key brain regions implicated in stress responses and anxiety-like behavior. Our results show TMT-induced activation of a distinct neural circuit involving the BNST, the lateral septum (LS), the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), the periaqueductal gray (PAG) and the locus coeruleus (LC). Anatomical interconnection of the BNST with all these regions could point to an important modulatory role of this nucleus. Since, the BNST gets direct input from the olfactory bulbs and projects to the PVN and PAG and is therefore well positioned to modulate behavioral and endocrine stress responses to TMT. Hence, we suggest that TMT exposure is suitable to investigate uncontrollable stress responses in mice which exhibit similarities to maladaptive stress responses underlying PTSD in humans. PMID:25532494

  18. Developing Photo Activated Localization Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Harald

    2015-03-01

    Photo Activated Localization Microscopy, PALM, acquires super-resolution images by activating a subset of activatable fluorescent labels and estimating the center of the each molecular label to sub-diffractive accuracy. When this process is repeated thousands of times for different subsets of molecules, then an image can be rendered from all the center coordinates of the molecules. I will describe the circuitous story of its development that began with another super-resolution technique, NSOM, developed by my colleague Eric Betzig, who imaged single molecules at room temperature, and later we spectrally resolved individual luminescent centers of quantum wells. These two observations inspired a generalized path to localization microscopy, but that path was abandoned because no really useful fluorescent labels were available. After a decade of nonacademic industrial pursuits and the subsequent freedom of unemployment, we came across a class of genetically expressible fluorescent proteins that were switchable or convertible that enabled the concept to be implemented and be biologically promising. The past ten years have been very active with many groups exploring applications and enhancements of this concept. Demonstrating significant biological relevance will be the metric if its success.

  19. Paraoxonases 1, 2, and 3, oxidative stress, and macrophage foam cell formation during atherosclerosis development.

    PubMed

    Aviram, Michael; Rosenblat, Mira

    2004-11-01

    Paraoxonases PON1 and PON3, which are both associated in serum with HDL, protect the serum lipids from oxidation, probably as a result of their ability to hydrolyze specific oxidized lipids. The activity of HDL-associated PON1 seems to involve an activity (phospholipase A2-like activity, peroxidase-like activity, lactonase activity) which produces LPC. To study the possible role of PON1 in macrophage foam cell formation and atherogenesis we used macrophages from control mice, from PON1 knockout mice, and from PON1 transgenic mice. Furthermore, we analyzed PON1-treated macrophages and PON1-transfected cells to demonstrate the contribution of PON1 to the attenuation of macrophage cholesterol and oxidized lipid accumulation and foam cell formation. PON1 was shown to inhibit cholesterol influx [by reducing the formation of oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), increasing the breakdown of specific oxidized lipids in Ox-LDL, and decreasing macrophage uptake of Ox-LDL]. PON1 also inhibits cholesterol biosynthesis and stimulates HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages. PON2 and PON3 protect against oxidative stress, with PON2 acting mainly at the cellular level. Whereas serum PON1 and PON3 were inactivated under oxidative stress, macrophage PON2 expression and activity were increased under oxidative stress, probably as a compensatory mechanism against oxidative stress. Intervention to increase the paraoxonases (cellular and humoral) by dietary or pharmacological means can reduce macrophage foam cell formation and attenuate atherosclerosis development. PMID:15454271

  20. Developing Fiber Specific Promoter-Reporter Transgenic Lines to Study the Effect of Abiotic Stresses on Fiber Development in Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junping; Burke, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Cotton is one of the most important cash crops in US agricultural industry. Environmental stresses, such as drought, high temperature and combination of both, not only reduce the overall growth of cotton plants, but also greatly decrease cotton lint yield and fiber quality. The impact of environmental stresses on fiber development is poorly understood due to technical difficulties associated with the study of developing fiber tissues and lack of genetic materials to study fiber development. To address this important question and provide the need for scientific community, we have generated transgenic cotton lines harboring cotton fiber specific promoter (CFSP)-reporter constructs from six cotton fiber specific genes (Expansin, E6, Rac13, CelA1, LTP, and Fb late), representing genes that are expressed at different stages of fiber development. Individual CFSP::GUS or CFSP::GFP construct was introduced into Coker 312 via Agrobacterium mediated transformation. Transgenic cotton lines were evaluated phenotypically and screened for the presence of selectable marker, reporter gene expression, and insertion numbers. Quantitative analysis showed that the patterns of GUS reporter gene activity during fiber development in transgenic cotton lines were similar to those of the native genes. Greenhouse drought and heat stress study showed a correlation between the decrease in promoter activities and decrease in fiber length, increase in micronaire and changes in other fiber quality traits in transgenic lines grown under stressed condition. These newly developed materials provide new molecular tools for studying the effects of abiotic stresses on fiber development and may be used in study of cotton fiber development genes and eventually in the genetic manipulation of fiber quality. PMID:26030401

  1. Prenatal stress is a vulnerability factor for altered morphology and biological activity of microglia cells.

    PubMed

    Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Trojan, Ewa; Głombik, Katarzyna; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Kubera, Marta; Lasoń, Władysław; Popiołek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Mika, Joanna; Wędzony, Krzysztof; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the dysregulation of the immune system is an important factor in the development of depression. Microglia are the resident macrophages of the central nervous system and a key player in innate immunity of the brain. We hypothesized that prenatal stress (an animal model of depression) as a priming factor could affect microglial cells and might lead to depressive-like disturbances in adult male rat offspring. We investigated the behavioral changes (sucrose preference test, Porsolt test), the expression of C1q and CD40 mRNA and the level of microglia (Iba1 positive) in 3-month-old control and prenatally stressed male offspring rats. In addition, we characterized the morphological and biochemical parameters of potentially harmful (NO, iNOS, IL-1β, IL-18, IL-6, TNF-α, CCL2, CXCL12, CCR2, CXCR4) and beneficial (insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)) phenotypes in cultures of microglia obtained from the cortices of 1-2 days old control and prenatally stressed pups. The adult prenatally stressed rats showed behavioral (anhedonic- and depression-like) disturbances, enhanced expression of microglial activation markers and an increased number of Iba1-immunopositive cells in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. The morphology of glia was altered in cultures from prenatally stressed rats, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Moreover, in these cultures, we observed enhanced expression of CD40 and MHC II and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-18, TNF-α and IL-6. Prenatal stress significantly up-regulated levels of the chemokines CCL2, CXCL12 and altered expression of their receptors, CCR2 and CXCR4 while IGF-1 production was suppressed in cultures of microglia from prenatally stressed rats. Our results suggest that prenatal stress may lead to excessive microglia activation and contribute to the behavioral changes observed in depression in adulthood. PMID

  2. The Stress Response Regulator AflSkn7 Influences Morphological Development, Stress Response, and Pathogenicity in the Fungus Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Xu, Gaopo; Geng, Longpo; Lu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Kunlong; Yuan, Jun; Nie, Xinyi; Zhuang, Zhenhong; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on AflSkn7, which is a stress response regulator in the aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus flavus. The ΔAflSkn7 mutants exhibited partially defective conidial formation and a complete inability to generate sclerotia, indicating AflSkn7 affects A. flavus asexual and sexual development. The mutants tolerated osmotic stress but were partially susceptible to the effects of cell wall stress. Additionally, the ΔAflSkn7 mutants were especially sensitive to oxidative stress. These observations confirmed that AflSkn7 influences oxidative stress responses rather than osmotic stress responses. Additionally, AflSkn7 was observed to increase aflatoxin biosynthesis and seed infection rates. These results indicate AflSkn7 affects A. flavus morphological development, stress response, aflatoxin production, and pathogenicity. The results of this study may facilitate the development of new methods to manage A. flavus infections. PMID:27399770

  3. The Stress Response Regulator AflSkn7 Influences Morphological Development, Stress Response, and Pathogenicity in the Fungus Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Xu, Gaopo; Geng, Longpo; Lu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Kunlong; Yuan, Jun; Nie, Xinyi; Zhuang, Zhenhong; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on AflSkn7, which is a stress response regulator in the aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus flavus. The ΔAflSkn7 mutants exhibited partially defective conidial formation and a complete inability to generate sclerotia, indicating AflSkn7 affects A. flavus asexual and sexual development. The mutants tolerated osmotic stress but were partially susceptible to the effects of cell wall stress. Additionally, the ΔAflSkn7 mutants were especially sensitive to oxidative stress. These observations confirmed that AflSkn7 influences oxidative stress responses rather than osmotic stress responses. Additionally, AflSkn7 was observed to increase aflatoxin biosynthesis and seed infection rates. These results indicate AflSkn7 affects A. flavus morphological development, stress response, aflatoxin production, and pathogenicity. The results of this study may facilitate the development of new methods to manage A. flavus infections. PMID:27399770

  4. The behavioral and endocrinological development of stress response in dogs.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Miho; Shibata, Yoh; Yonezawa, Akiko; Morita, Tomoko; Kanai, Masanori; Mogi, Kazutaka; Kikusui, Takefumi

    2014-05-01

    Endocrinological stress response has been shown to be absent in a specific period of the early life of rodents; this is named the stress-hyporesponsive period (SHRP). The SHRP is a significant period for the appropriate development of infants. In this study, the presence of SHRP in dogs was identified by conducting a 5-min separation test in 142 Labrador retriever puppies in their early socialization period and measuring the changes in urinary cortisol levels. An increase in cortisol after separation was found after 5 weeks of age, suggesting that the SHRP persists until 4 weeks of age in dogs. The distress vocalization during separation changed and the lactating behavior decreased rapidly around 5 weeks of age, suggesting that the endocrinological and emotional aspects of development change at approximately 5 weeks of age and maternal inhibition of cortisol might occur in dogs as well as rodents. PMID:24019027

  5. Development of "active correlation" technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2016-01-01

    With reaching to extremely high intensities of heavy-ion beams new requirements for the detection system of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) will definitely be set. One of the challenges is how to apply the "active correlations" method to suppress beam associated background products without significant losses in the whole long-term experiment efficiency value. Different scenarios and equations to develop the method according this requirement are under consideration in the present paper. The execution time to estimate the dead time parameter associated with the optimal choice of the life-time parameter is presented.

  6. Daily activity level buffers stress-glycemia associations in older sedentary NIDDM patients.

    PubMed

    Aikens, K S; Aikens, J E; Wallander, J L; Hunt, S

    1997-08-01

    Examined glycemic associations with medical variables, activity, daily stress, and mood state in 72 older patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). On three occasions over a 2-week observation period, subjects provided measures of everyday life stress, negative mood state, and daily activities. At the end of this period, fructosamine was assayed to measure glycemic control throughout the assessment period. After controlling for medical variables (age, illness duration, body mass index, caloric intake, and activity) and the main effects of psychological factors (stress; anxious, angry, and depressed mood states), stress interacted with activity such that glycemic elevation was positively associated with stress for subjects below the activity median but not for those above the median. This was unattributable to any overall activity-related differences in fructosamine, stress, or mood. None of the mood states interacted with activity. The findings suggest that extremely low levels of activity may strengthen life stress-glycemia associations in NIDDM. PMID:9298436

  7. Early stages in the development of stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Simonen, E.P.

    1993-12-01

    Processes in growth of short cracks and stage I of long stress corrosion cracks were identified and evaluated. There is evidence that electrochemical effects can cause short stress corrosion cracks to grow at rates faster or slower than long cracks. Short cracks can grow at faster rates than long cracks for a salt film dissolution growth mechanism or from reduced oxygen inhibition of hydrolytic acidification. An increasing crack growth rate with increasing crack length could result from a process of increasing crack tip concentration of a critical anion, such as Cl{sup {minus}}, with increasing crack length in a system where the crack velocity is dependent on the Cl{sup {minus}} or some other anion concentration. An increasing potential drop between crack tip and mouth would result in an increased anion concentration at the crack tip and hence an increasing crack velocity. Stage I behavior of long cracks is another early development stage in the life of a stress corrosion crack which is poorly understood. This stage can be described by da/dt = AK{sup m} where da/dt is crack velocity, A is a constant, K is stress intensity and m ranges from 2 to 24 for a variety of materials and environments. Only the salt film dissolution model was found to quantitatively describe this stage; however, the model was only tested on one material and its general applicability is unknown.

  8. Microglia activation regulates GluR1 phosphorylation in chronic unpredictable stress-induced cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingchao; Li, Juan; Dai, Peng; Zhao, Fang; Zheng, Gang; Jing, Jinfei; Wang, Jiye; Luo, Wenjing; Chen, Jingyuan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress is considered to be a major risk factor in the development of psychopathological syndromes in humans. Cognitive impairments and long-term potentiation (LTP) impairments are increasingly recognized as major components of depression, anxiety disorders and other stress-related chronic psychological illnesses. It seems timely to systematically study the potentially underlying neurobiological mechanisms of altered cognitive and synaptic plasticity in the course of chronic stress. In the present study, a rat model of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) induced a cognitive impairment in spatial memory in the Morris water maze (MWM) test and a hippocampal LTP impairment. CUS also induced hippocampal microglial activation and attenuated phosphorylation of glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1 or GluA1). Moreover, chronic treatment with the selective microglial activation blocker, minocycline (120 mg/kg per day), beginning 3 d before CUS treatment and continuing through the behavioral testing period, prevented the CUS-induced impairments of spatial memory and LTP induction. Additional studies showed that minocycline-induced inhibition of microglia activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of GluR1. These results suggest that hippocampal microglial activation modulates the level of GluR1 phosphorylation and might play a causal role in CUS-induced cognitive and LTP disturbances. PMID:25472821

  9. Synergistic effect of osmotic and oxidative stress in slow-developing cataract formation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alfred W H; Ho, Ye-shih; Chung, Sookja K; Chung, Stephen S M

    2008-11-01

    Diabetes is a major contributing factor in cataract development. In animal models where cataracts develop within days or weeks of diabetes it is well established that osmotic stress from the accumulation of sorbitol leads to cataract development. This mechanism might explain the rare cases of acute cataract sometimes found in patients with uncontrolled sustained hyperglycemia but cannot account for the vast majority of cataracts that developed after years of diabetes. Thus, a model that can simulate diabetic slow-developing cataract is needed. The contribution of osmotic and oxidative stress in cataract development in sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) deficient mice, a model for slow-developing cataract in diabetic patients was determined. Contribution of osmotic stress was assessed by HPLC measurement of sorbitol and by observing the effect of blocking sorbitol accumulation by aldose reductase (AR) null mutation in the SDH deficient mice. Contribution of oxidative stress was assessed by observing the effect of vitamin E treatment and the effect of null mutation of glutathione peroxidase-1 (Gpx-1) on cataract development in these mice. Lenticular sorbitol level was significantly increased in the SDH deficient mice, and blocking sorbitol accumulation by the AR null mutation prevented cataract development, demonstrating the contribution of osmotic stress in cataract development. SDH deficiency did not affect lens oxidative stress status. However, treatment with vitamin E significantly reduced the incidence of cataract, and Gpx-1 deficiency exacerbated cataract development in these mice. Our findings suggest that chronic oxidative stress impaired the osmoregulatory mechanism of the lens. This was not evident until modest increases in lens sorbitol increased the demand of its osmoregulatory function. This osmoregulatory dysfunction model is supported by the fact that the activity of Na+/K+-ATPase, the key regulator of cellular ions and water balance, was dramatically

  10. Swim stress, motion, and deformation of active matter: effect of an external field.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Sho C; Brady, John F

    2014-12-21

    We analyze the stress, dispersion, and average swimming speed of self-propelled particles subjected to an external field that affects their orientation and speed. The swimming trajectory is governed by a competition between the orienting influence (i.e., taxis) associated with the external (e.g., magnetic, gravitational, thermal, nutrient concentration) field versus the effects that randomize the particle orientations (e.g., rotary Brownian motion and/or an intrinsic tumbling mechanism like the flagella of bacteria). The swimmers' motion is characterized by a mean drift velocity and an effective translational diffusivity that becomes anisotropic in the presence of the orienting field. Since the diffusivity yields information about the micromechanical stress, the anisotropy generated by the external field creates a normal stress difference in the recently developed "swim stress" tensor [Takatori, Yan, and Brady, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014]. This property can be exploited in the design of soft, compressible materials in which their size, shape, and motion can be manipulated and tuned by loading the material with active swimmers. Since the swimmers exert different normal stresses in different directions, the material can compress/expand, elongate, and translate depending on the external field strength. Such an active system can be used as nano/micromechanical devices and motors. Analytical solutions are corroborated by Brownian dynamics simulations. PMID:25330273

  11. Stress development in heterogenetic lithosphere: Insights into earthquake processes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Y.; Gregg, P. M.; Hou, G.

    2015-12-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) in the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) is the site of several major M 6.8-8 earthquakes in 1811-1812, and remains seismically active. Although extensive investigations have been carried out, the ultimate controls on earthquake initiation and the duration of the seismicity remains unclear. Especially ambiguous is the role of a heterogenetic lithosphere in the development and propagation of stress throughout the crust in intraplate settings. In this study, we develop a finite element model to conduct a series of numerical experiments, the goal of which is to determine the impact of heterogeneity in the Upper Crust, the Lower Crust, and the Mantle on earthquake nucleation and rupture processes. Results indicate that when the differential stresses are built up from boundary displacements, similar to tectonic loading, the stresses below the Reelfoot Rift in the NMSZ are highly concentrated, whereas the stresses below the geologically similar Midcontinent Rift System are low, corresponding with the earthquakes distribution. By comparing the results with three reference models, we argue that the extensive Mantle Low Velocity Zone (MLVZ) beneath the NMSZ produces differential stress localization in the layers above. Furthermore, the relatively strong crust in this region, exhibited by high seismic velocity, enables the elevated stress to extend to the bottom of the ancient rift system, reactivating fossil rifting faults and therefore triggering earthquakes. Although our numerical models focus on loading by a far-field stress source, they explain why the New Madrid inevitably became the most earthquake susceptible region in the CEUS since a heterogeneous lithosphere. Specifically, the presence of the MLVZ will further concentrate stresses resulting from other unloading process, such as melting of the ice sheets or sudden river incision.

  12. Developing a methodology for imaging stress transients at seismogenic depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valette-Silver, N.; Silver, P. G.; Niu, F.; Daley, T.; Majer, E. L.

    2003-12-01

    It is well known that the crust contains cracks down to a depth of several kilometers. The dependence of crustal seismic velocities on crack properties, and in turn, the dependence of crack properties on stress, means that seismic velocity exhibits stress dependence. This dependence constitutes a powerful instrument for studying subsurface transient changes in stress. While these relationships have been known for several decades, time-dependent seismic imaging has not, as of yet, become a reliable means of measuring subsurface seismogenic stress changes. There are two primary reasons for this: 1) lack of sufficient delay-time precision necessary to detect small changes in stress, and 2) the difficulty in establishing a reliable calibration between stress and seismic velocity. The best sources of calibration are the solid-earth tides and barometric pressure, both of which produce weak stress perturbations of order 102-103 Pa. Detecting these sources of stress requires precision in the measurement of fractional velocity changes δ v/v of order 10-5-10-6, based on laboratory experiments. Preliminary field experiments and the analysis of uncertainty from known sources of error suggest that the above precision is now in fact achievable with an active source. Since the most common way of measuring δ v/v is by measuring the fractional change in travel time along the path, δ T/T = -δ v/v, one of the dominant issues in measuring temporal changes in velocity between source and receiver is how precisely we can measure travel time. Analysis based on the Cramer-Rao Lower Bound in signal processing provides a means of identifying optimal choices of parameters in designing the experimental setup, the geometry, and source characteristics so as to maximize precision. For example, the optimal frequency for measuring δ T/T is found to be proportional to the Q of the medium. As an illustration, given a Q of 60 and source-receiver distances of 3 m, 30 m, 100 m and 2000 m the

  13. Early life stress affects limited regional brain activity in depression

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lian; Wang, Jingjie; Meng, Ben; Yong, Na; Yang, Xiangying; Huang, Qingling; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lingling; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Fajin; Hu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) can alter brain function and increases the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD) in later life. This study investigated whether ELS contributes to differences in regional brain activity between MDD patients and healthy controls (HC), as measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)/fractional (f)ALFF. Eighteen first-episode, treatment-naïve MDD patients and HC were assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. We compared ALFF/fALFF between MDD patients and HC, with or without controlling for ELS, and determined whether ELS level was correlated with regional brain activity in each group. After regressing out ELS, we found that ALFF increased in bilateral amygdala and left orbital/cerebellum, while fALFF decreased in left inferior temporal and right middle frontal gyri in MDD patients relative to controls. ELS positively correlated with regional activity in the left cerebellum in MDD and in the right post-central/inferior temporal/superior frontal cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral cerebellum in HC. Our findings indicate that there is only very limited region showing correlation between ELS and brain activity in MDD, while diverse areas in HC, suggesting ELS has few impacts on MDD patients. PMID:27138376

  14. How does stress exert its effects--smoking, diet and obesity, physical activity?

    PubMed Central

    Kornitzer, M.; Kittel, F.

    1986-01-01

    Using a job stress questionnaire a negative correlation was found between job stress and physical fitness and a positive one with Type A behaviour. No correlation was found between job stress and obesity, nutritional patterns or physical activity. Subjects with angina had higher scores on the job stress questionnaire than normal controls. The job stress score was not predictive of future coronary heart disease. PMID:3748939

  15. Peripheral and Central Effects of Repeated Social Defeat Stress: Monocyte Trafficking, Microglial Activation, and Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Reader, Brenda F.; Jarrett, Brant L.; McKim, Daniel B.; Wohleb, Eric S.; Godbout, Jonathan P.; Sheridan, John F.

    2015-01-01

    The development and exacerbation of depression and anxiety are associated with exposure to repeated psychosocial stress. Stress is known to affect the bidirectional communication between the nervous and immune systems leading to elevated levels of stress mediators including glucocorticoids (GCs) and catecholamines and increased trafficking of proinflammatory immune cells. Animal models, like the repeated social defeat (RSD) paradigm, were developed to explore this connection between stress and affective disorders. RSD induces activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and hypothalamic-pituitary (HPA) axis activation, increases bone marrow production and egress of primed, GC-insensitive monocytes, and stimulates the trafficking of these cells to tissues including the spleen, lung, and brain. Recently, the observation that these monocytes have the ability to traffic to the brain perivascular spaces and parenchyma have provided mechanisms by which these peripheral cells may contribute to the prolonged anxiety-like behavior associated with RSD. The data that have been amassed from the RSD paradigm and others recapitulate many of the behavioral and immunological phenotypes associated with human anxiety disorders and may serve to elucidate potential avenues of treatment for these disorders. Here, we will discuss novel and key data that will present an overview of the neuroendocrine, immunological and behavioral responses to social stressors. PMID:25596319

  16. A Measurable Activation of the bZIP Transcription Factor Atf1 in a Fission Yeast Strain Devoid of Stress-activated and Cell Integrity Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Ma, Yan; Kato, Toshiaki; Kuno, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the stress-activated Sty1 MAPK pathway is essential for cell survival under stress conditions. The Sty1 MAPK regulates Atf1 transcription factor to elicit stress responses in extreme conditions of osmolarity and reactive oxygen species-generating agents such as hydrogen peroxide, heat, low glucose, and heavy metal. Herein, using a newly developed Renilla luciferase reporter assay with enhanced detection sensitivity and accuracy, we show that distinct signaling pathways respond to cadmium and other reactive oxygen species-generating agents for the activation of Atf1. Also, surprisingly, a measurable activation of Atf1 transcription factor was still observed devoid of Sty1 MAPK activity. Further genetic and biological analyses revealed that the residual activation is caused by the activation of the cell wall integrity Pmk1 MAPK pathway and a redox-mediated activation of Atf1. PMID:22661707

  17. Poverty and Language Development: Roles of Parenting and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Suzanne C.; Finegood, Eric D.

    2013-01-01

    Socioeconomic status affects a variety of mental and physical health outcomes, such as language development. Indeed, with poverty, disparities in the development of language processing are arguably among the most consistently found— with decreases in vocabulary, phonological awareness, and syntax at many different developmental stages. In this review, after considering basic brain systems affected by low socioeconomic status that are important for language development and related peripartum issues, we focus on two theoretical models that link poverty with the brain systems affected in language problems. The family stress model connects poverty with parental emotional distress that affects parenting, whereas the parental investment model involves a focus on basic needs that affects children’s language. Understanding the mechanisms through which poverty affects the brain, parenting behaviors and language development may have implications for identification and treatment of individuals as well as social policy. PMID:23696954

  18. Poverty and language development: roles of parenting and stress.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Suzanne C; Finegood, Eric D; Swain, James E

    2013-04-01

    Socioeconomic status affects a variety of mental and physical health outcomes, such as language development. Indeed, with poverty, disparities in the development of language processing are arguably among the most consistently found- with decreases in vocabulary, phonological awareness, and syntax at many different developmental stages. In this review, after considering basic brain systems affected by low socioeconomic status that are important for language development and related peripartum issues, we focus on two theoretical models that link poverty with the brain systems affected in language problems. The family stress model connects poverty with parental emotional distress that affects parenting, whereas the parental investment model involves a focus on basic needs that affects children's language. Understanding the mechanisms through which poverty affects the brain, parenting behaviors and language development may have implications for identification and treatment of individuals as well as social policy. PMID:23696954

  19. Effects of Active Mastication on Chronic Stress-Induced Bone Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Kagaku; Furuzawa, Manabu; Fujiwara, Shu; Yamada, Kumiko; Kubo, Kin-ya

    2015-01-01

    Chronic psychologic stress increases corticosterone levels, which decreases bone density. Active mastication or chewing attenuates stress-induced increases in corticosterone. We evaluated whether active mastication attenuates chronic stress-induced bone loss in mice. Male C57BL/6 (B6) mice were randomly divided into control, stress, and stress/chewing groups. Stress was induced by placing mice in a ventilated restraint tube (60 min, 2x/day, 4 weeks). The stress/chewing group was given a wooden stick to chew during the experimental period. Quantitative micro-computed tomography, histologic analysis, and biochemical markers were used to evaluate the bone response. The stress/chewing group exhibited significantly attenuated stress-induced increases in serum corticosterone levels, suppressed bone formation, enhanced bone resorption, and decreased trabecular bone mass in the vertebrae and distal femurs, compared with mice in the stress group. Active mastication during exposure to chronic stress alleviated chronic stress-induced bone density loss in B6 mice. Active mastication during chronic psychologic stress may thus be an effective strategy to prevent and/or treat chronic stress-related osteopenia. PMID:26664256

  20. Stress factors in the development of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Dorian, B; Taylor, C B

    1984-10-01

    The epidemiologic evidence that stress contributes to cardiovascular disease is reviewed. No one characterization of stress has been associated with all manifestations of cardiovascular disease, yet specific characterizations have been associated with particular manifestations of disease. Type A behavior pattern is a risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) and is correlated with the severity and progression of atherosclerosis demonstrated angiographically. Work overload with job dissatisfaction also predisposes to CAD. Socioeconomic disadvantage in a society of urbanization and industrialization increases the risk of hypertension and CAD, while chronic states of anxiety, depression, and helplessness are associated with angina and sudden death. Traumatic life events, especially involving loss of or threat to self-esteem, may precipitate sudden death in patients with preexisting CAD. There is evidence that the mechanism linking the experience of stress and the development of acute coronary events is exposure to sympathetic hyperarousal and a deficit in soothing. Research is needed to determine if work environments can be designed to minimize hyperarousal and provide protective outlets for individuals experiencing such arousal. PMID:6387069

  1. Heat stress activates the yeast high-osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, and protein tyrosine phosphatases are essential under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Astrid; Arkind, Christopher; Mattison, Christopher P; Burkholder, Anne; Knoche, Kathryn; Ota, Irene

    2002-04-01

    The yeast high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been characterized as being activated solely by osmotic stress. In this work, we show that the Hog1 MAPK is also activated by heat stress and that Sho1, previously identified as a membrane-bound osmosensor, is required for heat stress activation of Hog1. The two-component signaling protein, Sln1, the second osmosensor in the HOG pathway, was not involved in heat stress activation of Hog1, suggesting that the Sho1 and Sln1 sensors discriminate between stresses. The possible function of Hog1 activation during heat stress was examined, and it was found that the hog1 delta strain does not recover as rapidly from heat stress as well as the wild type. It was also found that protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) Ptp2 and Ptp3, which inactivate Hog1, have two functions during heat stress. First, they are essential for survival at elevated temperatures, preventing lethality due to Hog1 hyperactivation. Second, they block inappropriate cross talk between the HOG and the cell wall integrity MAPK pathways, suggesting that PTPs are important for maintaining specificity in MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:12455951

  2. Heat Stress Activates the Yeast High-Osmolarity Glycerol Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway, and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Are Essential under Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Astrid; Arkind, Christopher; Mattison, Christopher P.; Burkholder, Anne; Knoche, Kathryn; Ota, Irene

    2002-01-01

    The yeast high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been characterized as being activated solely by osmotic stress. In this work, we show that the Hog1 MAPK is also activated by heat stress and that Sho1, previously identified as a membrane-bound osmosensor, is required for heat stress activation of Hog1. The two-component signaling protein, Sln1, the second osmosensor in the HOG pathway, was not involved in heat stress activation of Hog1, suggesting that the Sho1 and Sln1 sensors discriminate between stresses. The possible function of Hog1 activation during heat stress was examined, and it was found that the hog1Δ strain does not recover as rapidly from heat stress as well as the wild type. It was also found that protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) Ptp2 and Ptp3, which inactivate Hog1, have two functions during heat stress. First, they are essential for survival at elevated temperatures, preventing lethality due to Hog1 hyperactivation. Second, they block inappropriate cross talk between the HOG and the cell wall integrity MAPK pathways, suggesting that PTPs are important for maintaining specificity in MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:12455951

  3. Resveratrol protects rabbit ventricular myocytes against oxidative stress-induced arrhythmogenic activity and Ca2+ overload

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Wang, Yue-peng; Gao, Ling; Zhang, Peng-pai; Zhou, Qing; Xu, Quan-fu; Zhou, Zhi-wen; Guo, Kai; Chen, Ren-hua; Yang, Huang-tian; Li, Yi-gang

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether resveratrol suppressed oxidative stress-induced arrhythmogenic activity and Ca2+ overload in ventricular myocytes and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 200 μmol/L)) was used to induce oxidative stress in rabbit ventricular myocytes. Cell shortening and calcium transients were simultaneously recorded to detect arrhythmogenic activity and to measure intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases II (CaMKII) activity was measured using a CaMKII kit or Western blotting analysis. Voltage-activated Na+ and Ca2+ currents were examined using whole-cell recording in myocytes. Results: H2O2 markedly prolonged Ca2+ transient duration (CaTD), and induced early afterdepolarization (EAD)-like and delayed afterdepolarization (DAD)-like arrhythmogenic activity in myocytes paced at 0.16 Hz or 0.5 Hz. Application of resveratrol (30 or 50 μmol/L) dose-dependently suppressed H2O2-induced EAD-like arrhythmogenic activity and attenuated CaTD prolongation. Co-treatment with resveratrol (50 μmol/L) effectively prevented both EAD-like and DAD-like arrhythmogenic activity induced by H2O2. In addition, resveratrol markedly blunted H2O2-induced diastolic [Ca2+]i accumulation and prevented the myocytes from developing hypercontracture. In whole-cell recording studies, H2O2 significantly enhanced the late Na+ current (INa,L) and L-type Ca2+ current (ICa,L) in myocytes, which were dramatically suppressed or prevented by resveratrol. Furthermore, H2O2-induced ROS production and CaMKII activation were significantly prevented by resveratrol. Conclusion: Resveratrol protects ventricular myocytes against oxidative stress-induced arrhythmogenic activity and Ca2+ overload through inhibition of INa,L/ICa,L, reduction of ROS generation, and prevention of CaMKII activation. PMID:23912472

  4. Auxin redistribution modulates plastic development of root system architecture under salt stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youning; Li, Kexue; Li, Xia

    2009-10-15

    Auxin plays an important role in the modulation of root system architecture. The effect of salinity on primary root growth has been extensively studied. However, how salinity affects lateral root development and its underlying molecular mechanisms is still unclear. Here, we report that high salt exposure suppresses lateral root initiation and organogenesis, resulting in the abortion of lateral root development. In contrast, salt stress markedly promotes lateral root elongation. Histochemical staining showed that the quantity of auxin and its patterning in roots were both greatly altered by exposure to high concentrations of salt, as compared with those found in the untreated control. Physiological experiments using transport inhibitors and genetic analysis revealed that the auxin transport pathway is important for salt-induced root development. These results demonstrate that auxin transport activities are required for remodeling lateral root formation and elongation and for adaptive root system development under salt stress. PMID:19457582

  5. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F.; Weiger, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences. PMID:26287261

  6. Differential Activation and Inhibition of RhoA by Fluid Flow Induced Shear Stress in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Kim, Seung joon; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-01-01

    Physical force environment is a major factor that influences cellular homeostasis and remodeling. It is not well understood, however, as a potential role of force intensities in the induction of cellular mechanotransduction. Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based approach, we asked whether activities of GTPase RhoA in chondrocytes are dependent on intensities of flow induced shear stress. We hypothesized that RhoA activities can be either elevated or reduced by selecting different levels of shear stress intensities. The result indicate that C28/I2 chondrocytes have increased RhoA activities in response to high shear stress (10 or 20 dyn/cm2), whereas a decrease in activity was seen with an intermediate shear stress of 5 dyn/cm2. No changes were seen under low shear stress (2 dyn/cm2). The observed 2-level switch of RhoA activities is closely linked to the shear stress-induced alterations in actin cytoskeleton and traction forces. In the presence of constitutively active RhoA (RhoA-V14), intermediate shear stress suppressed RhoA activities, while high shear stress failed to activate them. In chondrocytes, expression of various metalloproteinases is, in part, regulated by shear and normal stresses through a network of GTPases. Collectively, the data suggest that intensities of shear stress are critical in differential activation and inhibition of RhoA activities in chondrocytes. PMID:23408748

  7. Developing of Regional Tectonic Stress Map for Two Oil Fields in Western part of Persian Gulf, Acquisition and Preparation of the General Structure of Stress Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghi, A.; Heidbach, O.; Kharrat, R.; Asef, M.

    2011-12-01

    Recently, application of stress field data in petroleum industry has significantly increased. Field stress databases are prerequisite data to study reservoir compaction and deformations, wellbore stability, reservoir stimulation, CO2 sequestration and the like. This has convinced petroleum industries and many sponsors to allocate investment for acquiring accurate stress field data and developing stress maps. In southern part of Iran, large scale sedimentation from different geological periods and intense tectonic activities create huge petroleum fields. Persian Gulf located in south to south-west of Iran, contains a great number of the most giant offshore oil and gas reservoirs in the world. The objective of this research is development of a regional tectonic stress map for two fields in western part of the Persian Gulf. For this purpose, standard stress indicators including earthquake focal mechanism solutions, well-bore breakouts and drilling-induced fractures, in-situ stress measurements (LOT, hydraulic fracturing), young geologic data (fault-slip analysis) and core tests (ASR, DSCA, Petal Centerline Fractures) were used to collect and rearrange field stress data. The data are quality ranked according to World Stress Map quality ranking scheme 2008 based on their standard deviation and a tectonic regime is assigned where possible. In these fields some stress indicators like hydraulic fracturing and core tests was not employed before. Primary stress data gathered from focal mechanism confirmed a TF regime in the area mainly with the quality C. WSM database only provides around 14 SH measurement from the northern border of our area. All these data gathered from FMS with quality C. In our study we will add several new stress measurements from other standard stress indicators including LOT, well-bore breakout, drilling induced fractures and core tests with higher quality than C. Almost SH orientation varied between 0 to 90°N based on primary information. On the

  8. Oxidative stress, activity behaviour and body mass in captive parrots.

    PubMed

    Larcombe, S D; Tregaskes, C A; Coffey, J; Stevenson, A E; Alexander, L G; Arnold, K E

    2015-01-01

    Many parrot species are kept in captivity for conservation, but often show poor reproduction, health and survival. These traits are known to be influenced by oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability of antioxidant defences to ameliorate ROS damage. In humans, oxidative stress is linked with obesity, lack of exercise and poor nutrition, all of which are common in captive animals. Here, we tested whether small parrots (budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus) maintained in typical pet cages and on ad libitum food varied in oxidative profile, behaviour and body mass. Importantly, as with many birds held in captivity, they did not have enough space to engage in extensive free flight. Four types of oxidative damage, single-stranded DNA breaks (low-pH comet assay), alkali-labile sites in DNA (high-pH comet assay), sensitivity of DNA to ROS (H2O2-treated comet assay) and malondialdehyde (a byproduct of lipid peroxidation), were uncorrelated with each other and with plasma concentrations of dietary antioxidants. Without strenuous exercise over 28 days in a relatively small cage, more naturally 'active' individuals had more single-stranded DNA breaks than sedentary birds. High body mass at the start or end of the experiment, coupled with substantial mass gain, were all associated with raised sensitivity of DNA to ROS. Thus, high body mass in these captive birds was associated with oxidative damage. These birds were not lacking dietary antioxidants, because final body mass was positively related to plasma levels of retinol, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol. Individuals varied widely in activity levels, feeding behaviour, mass gain and oxidative profile despite standardized living conditions. DNA damage is often associated with poor immunocompetence, low fertility and faster ageing. Thus, we have candidate mechanisms for the limited lifespan and fecundity common to many birds kept for conservation purposes. PMID:27293729

  9. Selenite cataracts: Activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress and loss of Nrf2/Keap1-dependent stress protection

    PubMed Central

    Palsamy, Periyasamy; Bidasee, Keshore R.; Shinohara, Toshimichi

    2014-01-01

    Cataract-induced by sodium selenite in suckling rats is one of the suitable animal models to study the basic mechanism of human cataracts formation. The aim of this present investigation is to study the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated activation of unfolded protein response (UPR), overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and suppression of Nrf2/Keap1-dependent antioxidant protection through endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway and Keap1 promoter DNA demethylation in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) treated with sodium selenite. Lenses enucleated from sodium selenite injected rats generated overproduction of ROS in lens epithelial cells and newly formed lens fiber cells resulting in massive lens epithelial cells death after 1–5 days. All these lenses developed nuclear cataracts after 4–5 days. Sodium selenite treated HLECs induced ER stress and activated the UPR leading to release of Ca2+ from ER, ROS overproduction and finally HLECs death. Sodium selenite also activated the mRNA expressions of passive DNA demethylation pathway enzymes such as Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and Dnmt3b, and active DNA demethylation pathway enzyme, Tet1 leading to DNA demethylation in the Keap1 promoter of HLECs. This demethylated Keap1 promoter results in overexpression of Keap1 mRNA and protein. Overexpression Keap1 protein suppresses the Nrf2 protein through ERAD leading to suppression of Nrf2/Keap1 dependent antioxidant protection in the HLECs treated with sodium selenite. As an outcome, the cellular redox status is altered towards lens oxidation and results in cataract formation. PMID:24997453

  10. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Promote the Development and Progression of Liver Metastases after Surgical Stress.

    PubMed

    Tohme, Samer; Yazdani, Hamza O; Al-Khafaji, Ahmed B; Chidi, Alexis P; Loughran, Patricia; Mowen, Kerri; Wang, Yanming; Simmons, Richard L; Huang, Hai; Tsung, Allan

    2016-03-15

    Risks of tumor recurrence after surgical resection have been known for decades, but the mechanisms underlying treatment failures remain poorly understood. Neutrophils, first-line responders after surgical stress, may play an important role in linking inflammation to cancer progression. In response to stress, neutrophils can expel their protein-studded chromatin to form local snares known as neutrophil extracellular traps (NET). In this study, we asked whether, as a result of its ability to ensnare moving cells, NET formation might promote metastasis after surgical stress. Consistent with this hypothesis, in a cohort of patients undergoing attempted curative liver resection for metastatic colorectal cancer, we observed that increased postoperative NET formation was associated with a >4-fold reduction in disease-free survival. In like manner, in a murine model of surgical stress employing liver ischemia-reperfusion, we observed an increase in NET formation that correlated with an accelerated development and progression of metastatic disease. These effects were abrogated by inhibiting NET formation in mice through either local treatment with DNAse or inhibition of the enzyme peptidylarginine deaminase, which is essential for NET formation. In growing metastatic tumors, we found that intratumoral hypoxia accentuated NET formation. Mechanistic investigations in vitro indicated that mouse neutrophil-derived NET triggered HMGB1 release and activated TLR9-dependent pathways in cancer cells to promote their adhesion, proliferation, migration, and invasion. Taken together, our findings implicate NET in the development of liver metastases after surgical stress, suggesting that their elimination may reduce risks of tumor relapse. PMID:26759232

  11. Apoplastic barrier development and water transport in Zea mays seedling roots under salt and osmotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Xu, Guoxin; Zheng, Hui Qiong

    2015-01-01

    The development of apoplastic barriers was studied in Zea mays seedling roots grown in hydroculture solution supplemented with 0-200 mM NaCl or 20% polyethylene glycol (PEG). Casparian bands in the endodermis of both NaCl- and PEG-treated roots were observed closer to the root tip in comparison with those of control roots, but the cell wall modifications in the endodermis and exodermis induced by salt and osmotic stresses differed. High salinity induced the formation of a multiseriate exodermis, which ranged from several cell layers to the entire cortex tissue but did not noticeably influence cell wall suberization in the endodermis. In contrast, osmotic stress accelerated suberization in both the endodermis and exodermis, but the exodermis induced by osmotic stress was limited to several cell layers in the outer cortex adjacent to the epidermis. The hydrostatic hydraulic conductivity (Lp) had decreased significantly after 1 day of PEG treatment, whereas in NaCl-treated roots, Lp decreased to a similar level after 5 days of treatment. Peroxidase activity in the roots increased significantly in response to NaCl and PEG treatments. These data indicate that salt stress and osmotic stress have different effects on the development of apoplastic barriers and water transport in Z. mays seedling roots. PMID:24965373

  12. Development and Validation of Students' Stress Rating Scale (SSRS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balamurugan, M.; Kumaran, D.

    2008-01-01

    Each and every person is under the grip of stress. Starting from a two-year infant to an adult, stress takes an entry in different forms but it alters the normal functioning of a person. One cannot eliminate stress but can reduce stress in their life. The stressors are normative demands and critical life events. Normative stressors include…

  13. Pathway connectivity and signaling coordination in the yeast stress-activated signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Chasman, Deborah; Ho, Yi-Hsuan; Berry, David B; Nemec, Corey M; MacGilvray, Matthew E; Hose, James; Merrill, Anna E; Lee, M Violet; Will, Jessica L; Coon, Joshua J; Ansari, Aseem Z; Craven, Mark; Gasch, Audrey P

    2014-01-01

    Stressed cells coordinate a multi-faceted response spanning many levels of physiology. Yet knowledge of the complete stress-activated regulatory network as well as design principles for signal integration remains incomplete. We developed an experimental and computational approach to integrate available protein interaction data with gene fitness contributions, mutant transcriptome profiles, and phospho-proteome changes in cells responding to salt stress, to infer the salt-responsive signaling network in yeast. The inferred subnetwork presented many novel predictions by implicating new regulators, uncovering unrecognized crosstalk between known pathways, and pointing to previously unknown ‘hubs’ of signal integration. We exploited these predictions to show that Cdc14 phosphatase is a central hub in the network and that modification of RNA polymerase II coordinates induction of stress-defense genes with reduction of growth-related transcripts. We find that the orthologous human network is enriched for cancer-causing genes, underscoring the importance of the subnetwork's predictions in understanding stress biology. PMID:25411400

  14. North Sea development activity surges

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-10

    This paper reports that operators in the North Sea have reported a burst of upstream activity. Off the U.K.: Amoco (U.K.) Exploration Co. installed three jackets in its North Everest and Lomond fields. It also completed laying the Central Area Transmission System (CATS) pipeline, which will carry the fields' gas to shore. BP Exploration Operating Co. Ltd. installed the jacket for it Unity riser platform 5 {1/2} km from its Forties Charlie platform. Conoco (U.K.) Ltd. tested a successful appraisal well in Britannia field in Block 15/30, about 130 miles northeast of Aberdeen. In the Norwegian North Sea, Saga Petroleum AS placed Snorre oil and gas field on production 6 weeks ahead of schedule and 1.5 billion kroner under budget at a cost of 16.6 billion kroner; and downstream off the U.K., Phillips Petroleum Co. (U.K.) Ltd. awarded Allseas Marine Contractors SA, Essen, Belgium, a pipelay and trenching contract for its Ann field development project in Block 49/6a.

  15. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Prevents the Development of Preeclampsia Through Suppression of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yaling; Xu, Jianjuan; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Rong; Liu, Nin; Wu, Yanqun; Yuan, Hua; Che, Haisha

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) and its complications have become the leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality in the world. And the development of PE is still barely predictable and thus challenging to prevent and manage clinically. Oxidative stress contributes to the development of the disease. Our previous study demonstrated that exogenous Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) played a cytoprotective role in vascular endothelial cell by suppressing oxidative stress. In this study, we aim to investigate whether AAT contributes to the development of PE, and to identify the mechanism behind these effects. We found that AAT levels were significantly decreased in placenta tissues from women with PE compared that of healthy women. Notably, we demonstrate that AAT injection is able to relieve the high blood pressure and reduce urine protein levels in a dose-dependent manner in PE mice. In addition, our results showed that AAT injection exhibited an anti-oxidative stress role by significantly reducing PE mediated-upregulation of ROS, MMP9 and MDA, and increasing the levels of SOD, eNOS, and GPx with increased dosage of AAT. Furthermore, we found that AAT injection inactivated PE mediated activation of PAK/STAT1/p38 signaling. These findings were confirmed in human samples. In conclusion, our study suggests that exogenous AAT injection increases the antioxidants and suppresses oxidative stress, and subsequent prevention of PE development through inactivation of STAT1/p38 signaling. Thus, AAT would become a potential strategy for PE therapy. PMID:27303303

  16. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Prevents the Development of Preeclampsia Through Suppression of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yaling; Xu, Jianjuan; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Rong; Liu, Nin; Wu, Yanqun; Yuan, Hua; Che, Haisha

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) and its complications have become the leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality in the world. And the development of PE is still barely predictable and thus challenging to prevent and manage clinically. Oxidative stress contributes to the development of the disease. Our previous study demonstrated that exogenous Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) played a cytoprotective role in vascular endothelial cell by suppressing oxidative stress. In this study, we aim to investigate whether AAT contributes to the development of PE, and to identify the mechanism behind these effects. We found that AAT levels were significantly decreased in placenta tissues from women with PE compared that of healthy women. Notably, we demonstrate that AAT injection is able to relieve the high blood pressure and reduce urine protein levels in a dose-dependent manner in PE mice. In addition, our results showed that AAT injection exhibited an anti-oxidative stress role by significantly reducing PE mediated-upregulation of ROS, MMP9 and MDA, and increasing the levels of SOD, eNOS, and GPx with increased dosage of AAT. Furthermore, we found that AAT injection inactivated PE mediated activation of PAK/STAT1/p38 signaling. These findings were confirmed in human samples. In conclusion, our study suggests that exogenous AAT injection increases the antioxidants and suppresses oxidative stress, and subsequent prevention of PE development through inactivation of STAT1/p38 signaling. Thus, AAT would become a potential strategy for PE therapy. PMID:27303303

  17. Improving Health by Reducing Stress: An Experiential Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largo-Wight, Erin; Moore, Michele J.; Barr, Elissa M.

    2011-01-01

    Stress is a leading health issue among college students. Managing stress involves enhancing resources necessary to cope with life's demands. Relaxation techniques are especially critical coping strategies when stress is chronic and coping resources are overused and fatigued. Methods: This article describes a research-based relaxation technique…

  18. Redox metabolites signal polymicrobial biofilm development via the NapA oxidative stress cascade in Aspergillus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He; Kim, Jaekuk; Liew, Mathew; Yan, John K.; Herrera, Oscar; Bok, JinWoo; Kelleher, Neil L.; Keller, Nancy P.; Wang, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Filamentous fungi and bacteria form mixed-species biofilms in nature and diverse clinical contexts. They secrete a wealth of redox-active small molecule secondary metabolites, which are traditionally viewed as toxins that inhibit growth of competing microbes. Results Here we report that these “toxins” can act as interspecies signals, affecting filamentous fungal development via oxidative stress regulation. Specifically, in co-culture biofilms, Pseudomonas aeruginosa phenazine-derived metabolites differentially modulated Aspergillus fumigatus development, shifting from weak vegetative growth to induced asexual sporulation (conidiation) along a decreasing phenazine gradient. The A. fumigatus morphological shift correlated with the production of phenazine radicals and concomitant reactive oxygen species (ROS) production generated by phenazine redox cycling. Phenazine conidiation signaling was conserved in the genetic model A. nidulans, and mediated by NapA, a homolog of AP-1-like bZIP transcription factor, which is essential for the response to oxidative stress in humans, yeast, and filamentous fungi. Expression profiling showed phenazine treatment induced a NapA-dependent response of the global oxidative stress metabolome including the thioredoxin, glutathione and NADPH-oxidase systems. Conidiation induction in A. nidulans by another microbial redox-active secondary metabolite, gliotoxin, also required NapA. Conclusions This work highlights that microbial redox metabolites are key signals for sporulation in filamentous fungi, which are communicated through an evolutionarily conserved eukaryotic stress response pathway. It provides a foundation for interspecies signaling in environmental and clinical biofilms involving bacteria and filamentous fungi. PMID:25532893

  19. Distinct Skeletal Muscle Gene Regulation from Active Contraction, Passive Vibration, and Whole Body Heat Stress in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Michael A.; Kimball, Amy L.; McHenry, Colleen L.; Suneja, Manish; Yen, Chu-Ling; Sharma, Arpit; Shields, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle exercise regulates several important metabolic genes in humans. We know little about the effects of environmental stress (heat) and mechanical stress (vibration) on skeletal muscle. Passive mechanical stress or systemic heat stress are often used in combination with many active exercise programs. We designed a method to deliver a vibration stress and systemic heat stress to compare the effects with active skeletal muscle contraction. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine whether active mechanical stress (muscle contraction), passive mechanical stress (vibration), or systemic whole body heat stress regulates key gene signatures associated with muscle metabolism, hypertrophy/atrophy, and inflammation/repair. Methods: Eleven subjects, six able-bodied and five with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) participated in the study. The six able-bodied subjects sat in a heat stress chamber for 30 minutes. Five subjects with SCI received a single dose of limb-segment vibration or a dose of repetitive electrically induced muscle contractions. Three hours after the completion of each stress, we performed a muscle biopsy (vastus lateralis or soleus) to analyze mRNA gene expression. Results: We discovered repetitive active muscle contractions up regulated metabolic transcription factors NR4A3 (12.45 fold), PGC-1α (5.46 fold), and ABRA (5.98 fold); and repressed MSTN (0.56 fold). Heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05); while vibration induced FOXK2 (2.36 fold change; p < 0.05). Vibration similarly caused a down regulation of MSTN (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05), but to a lesser extent than active muscle contraction. Vibration induced FOXK2 (p < 0.05) while heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold) and ANKRD1 genes (0.51 fold; p < 0.05). Conclusion: These findings support a distinct gene regulation in response to heat stress, vibration, and muscle contractions. Understanding these responses may assist in developing regenerative

  20. Failure to upregulate Agrp and Orexin in response to activity based anorexia in weight loss vulnerable rats characterized by passive stress coping and prenatal stress experience.

    PubMed

    Boersma, Gretha J; Liang, Nu-Chu; Lee, Richard S; Albertz, Jennifer D; Kastelein, Anneke; Moody, Laura A; Aryal, Shivani; Moran, Timothy H; Tamashiro, Kellie L

    2016-05-01

    We hypothesize that anorexia nervosa (AN) poses a physiological stress. Therefore, the way an individual copes with stress may affect AN vulnerability. Since prenatal stress (PNS) exposure alters stress responsivity in offspring this may increase their risk of developing AN. We tested this hypothesis using the activity based anorexia (ABA) rat model in control and PNS rats that were characterized by either proactive or passive stress-coping behavior. We found that PNS passively coping rats ate less and lost more weight during the ABA paradigm. Exposure to ABA resulted in higher baseline corticosterone and lower insulin levels in all groups. However, leptin levels were only decreased in rats with a proactive stress-coping style. Similarly, ghrelin levels were increased only in proactively coping ABA rats. Neuropeptide Y (Npy) expression was increased and proopiomelanocortin (Pomc) expression was decreased in all rats exposed to ABA. In contrast, agouti-related peptide (Agrp) and orexin (Hctr) expression were increased in all but the PNS passively coping ABA rats. Furthermore, DNA methylation of the orexin gene was increased after ABA in proactive coping rats and not in passive coping rats. Overall our study suggests that passive PNS rats have innate impairments in leptin and ghrelin in responses to starvation combined with prenatal stress associated impairments in Agrp and orexin expression in response to starvation. These impairments may underlie decreased food intake and associated heightened body weight loss during ABA in the passively coping PNS rats. PMID:26907996

  1. Redox Active Thiol Sensors of Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The reactivity of the thiol in the side chain of cysteines is exploited by bacterial regulatory proteins that sense and respond to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Recent Advances: Charged residues and helix dipoles diminish the pKa of redox active cysteines, resulting in a thiolate that is stabilized by neighboring polar amino acids. The reaction of peroxides with thiolates generates a sulfenic acid (–SOH) intermediate that often gives rise to a reversible disulfide bond. Peroxide-induced intramolecular and intermolecular disulfides and intermolecular mixed disulfides modulate the signaling activity of members of the LysR/OxyR, MarR/OhrR, and RsrA family of transcriptional regulators. Thiol-dependent regulators also help bacteria resist the nitrosative and nitroxidative stress. −SOHs, mixed disulfides, and S-nitrosothiols are some of the post-translational modifications induced by nitrogen oxides in the thiol groups of OxyR and SsrB bacterial regulatory proteins. Sulfenylation, disulfide bond formation, S-thiolation, and S-nitrosylation are reversible modifications amenable to feedback regulation by antioxidant and antinitrosative repair systems. The structural and functional changes engaged in the thiol-dependent sensing of reactive species have been adopted by several regulators to foster bacterial virulence during exposure to products of NADPH phagocyte oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Critical Issues: Investigations with LysR/OxyR, MarR/OhrR, and RsrA family members have helped in an understanding of the mechanisms by which thiols in regulatory proteins react with reactive species, thereby activating antioxidant and antinitrosative gene expression. Future Directions: To define the determinants that provide selectivity of redox active thiolates for some reactive species but not others is an important challenge for future investigations. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1201–1214. PMID:22257022

  2. [Scale development of job stress for home care nurses].

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeong-Sook; Lee, Ga-Eon

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a job stress scale for hospital-based home care nurses in Korea. The process was construction of the conceptual framework, development of the preliminary items, verification of the content validity, item analysis and test of the reliability. The preliminary items were based on literature review and in-depth interviews with home care nurses. As a result, eight categories and sixty items were selected. These were reviewed by seven specialists for content validity and finally fifty one items were chosen. Data was collected from 180 home care nurses who were engaged in 87 hospitals from August to September 2003. The result of item analysis one was excepted. The final item count was 50. Categories were as follows: overload work (8 items), lack of specialized knowledge and technique (5 items), ethical dilemma (4 items), role conflict (5 items), interpersonal relationships (6 items), visiting home environment (9 items), driving conditions (4 items) and lack of administrative support (9 items), The reliability of the scale by Cronbach's alpha was .948 and the domain's reliability ranged from .649 to .841. The result of this study could be used to measure the job stress of home care nurses. However, for further validity and reliability, repeated studies will be necessary. PMID:15613845

  3. Trapezius activity of fibromyalgia patients is enhanced in stressful situations, but is similar to healthy controls in a quiet naturalistic setting: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Muscle activity and pain development of fibromyalgia (FM) patients in response to mental stress show inconsistent results, when compared to healthy controls (HCs). A possible reason for the inconsistent results is the large variation in stress exposures in different studies. This study compares muscle responses of FM patients and HCs for different modes and levels of imposed stress, to elucidate features in stress exposures that distinguish stress responses of FM patients from HCs. Methods Upper trapezius (clavicular and acromial fibers), deltoid, and biceps surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity was recorded in FM patients (n=26) and HCs (n=25). Heart rate (HR) was recorded and used as indicator of autonomic activation. Tests included inspiratory breath holding (sympathetic activation procedure), mental stress tests (color-word test and backward counting; 28 min), instructed rest prior to stress test (30 min TV watching), and controlled arm movement. sEMG and HR was also recorded during an unrestrained evening stay at a patient hotel. The 5-min period with lowest trapezius muscle activity was determined. Pain (shoulder/neck, low back pain) and perceived tension were scored on VAS scales at the start and the end of the stress test and at bedtime. Results Trapezius sEMG responses of FM patients were significantly higher than HCs during sympathetic activation, mental stress, and instructed rest, but similar during arm movement and unrestrained evening activity. HR of FM patients and HCs was similar during mental stress and in the evening, including the 5-min period with lowest trapezius activity. Muscle activity of FM patients during the stress test (with shoulder/neck pain development) and the evening stay (no pain development) was similar. Conclusions FM patients show elevated muscle activity (in particular trapezius activity) in situations with imposed stress, including sympathetic activation, and putative anticipatory stress. Muscle activity and

  4. Behavioral Activity and Some Markers of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Serotoninergic System Indicators and Glucocorticoid Metabolizing Enzymes in Rats with Different Duration of Hexenal Sleep.

    PubMed

    Tseylikman, O B; Lapshin, M S; Kozochkin, D A; Komel'kova, M V; Kuzina, O V; Golodniy, S V; Lazuko, S S; Tseylikman, V E

    2016-08-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder was imitated in rats with long and short hexenal sleep by exposure to cat odor. Rats with long hexenal sleep demonstrated the highest sensitivity to posttraumatic stress disorders and developed anxiety and depressive disorders. The duration of hexenal sleep correlated with changes in markers of post-traumatic stress disorder, e.g. activity of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 in the liver of non-stressed animals and serotonin and monoamine oxidase A activity in the brain of stressed animals. PMID:27597057

  5. Oxidative stress, activity behaviour and body mass in captive parrots

    PubMed Central

    Larcombe, S. D.; Tregaskes, C. A.; Coffey, J.; Stevenson, A. E.; Alexander, L. G.; Arnold, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Many parrot species are kept in captivity for conservation, but often show poor reproduction, health and survival. These traits are known to be influenced by oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability of antioxidant defences to ameliorate ROS damage. In humans, oxidative stress is linked with obesity, lack of exercise and poor nutrition, all of which are common in captive animals. Here, we tested whether small parrots (budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus) maintained in typical pet cages and on ad libitum food varied in oxidative profile, behaviour and body mass. Importantly, as with many birds held in captivity, they did not have enough space to engage in extensive free flight. Four types of oxidative damage, single-stranded DNA breaks (low-pH comet assay), alkali-labile sites in DNA (high-pH comet assay), sensitivity of DNA to ROS (H2O2-treated comet assay) and malondialdehyde (a byproduct of lipid peroxidation), were uncorrelated with each other and with plasma concentrations of dietary antioxidants. Without strenuous exercise over 28 days in a relatively small cage, more naturally ‘active’ individuals had more single-stranded DNA breaks than sedentary birds. High body mass at the start or end of the experiment, coupled with substantial mass gain, were all associated with raised sensitivity of DNA to ROS. Thus, high body mass in these captive birds was associated with oxidative damage. These birds were not lacking dietary antioxidants, because final body mass was positively related to plasma levels of retinol, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol. Individuals varied widely in activity levels, feeding behaviour, mass gain and oxidative profile despite standardized living conditions. DNA damage is often associated with poor immunocompetence, low fertility and faster ageing. Thus, we have candidate mechanisms for the limited lifespan and fecundity common to many birds kept for conservation purposes. PMID

  6. Multiple traumatic experiences and the development of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Scott, Sheryn T

    2007-07-01

    This study assesses the differential and combined impacts of multiple lifetime stressors in the development and severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. One hundred and four clinical and 64 nonclinical participants were assessed for their exposure to four types of interpersonal trauma: physical and sexual abuse in childhood, lifetime community violence, and domestic violence in adulthood. PTSD symptomatology was assessed using the Los Angeles Symptom Checklist (LASC). Results indicated that exposure to lifetime multiple traumatic experiences was positively correlated with severity of PTSD symptoms. Clinical participants had experienced significantly more multiple traumas and had a higher rate of PTSD than the nonclinical participants. Results also suggested that adults who had experienced childhood sexual abuse were at higher risk for the development of PTSD related to interpersonal violence than adults who were not sexually abused as children. PMID:17575070

  7. Effects of early life stress on amygdala and striatal development.

    PubMed

    Fareri, Dominic S; Tottenham, Nim

    2016-06-01

    Species-expected caregiving early in life is critical for the normative development and regulation of emotional behavior, the ability to effectively evaluate affective stimuli in the environment, and the ability to sustain social relationships. Severe psychosocial stressors early in life (early life stress; ELS) in the form of the absence of species expected caregiving (i.e., caregiver deprivation), can drastically impact one's social and emotional success, leading to the onset of internalizing illness later in life. Development of the amygdala and striatum, two key regions supporting affective valuation and learning, is significantly affected by ELS, and their altered developmental trajectories have important implications for cognitive, behavioral and socioemotional development. However, an understanding of the impact of ELS on the development of functional interactions between these regions and subsequent behavioral effects is lacking. In this review, we highlight the roles of the amygdala and striatum in affective valuation and learning in maturity and across development. We discuss their function separately as well as their interaction. We highlight evidence across species characterizing how ELS induced changes in the development of the amygdala and striatum mediate subsequent behavioral changes associated with internalizing illness, positing a particular import of the effect of ELS on their interaction. PMID:27174149

  8. Heat stress control in the TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) defueling and decontamination activities

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, J.S.; Parfitt, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the initial stages of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling and decontamination activities for the reactor building, it was realized that the high levels of loose radioactive contamination would require the use of extensive protective clothing by entry personnel. While there was no doubt that layered protective clothing protects workers from becoming contaminated, it was recognized that these same layers of clothing would impose a very significant heat stress burden. To prevent the potentially serious consequences of a severe reaction to heat stress by workers in the hostile environment of the TMI-2 reactor building and yet maintain the reasonable work productivity necessary to perform the recovery adequately, an effective program of controlling worker exposure to heat stress had to be developed. Body-cooling devices produce a flow of cool air, which is introduced close to the skin to remove body heat through convection and increased sweat evaporation. The cooling effect produced by the Vortex tube successfully protected the workers from heat stress, however, there were several logistical and operational problems that hindered extensive use of these devices. The last type of cooling garment examined was the frozen water garment (FWG) developed by Elizier Kamon at the Pennsylvania State University as part of an Electric Power Research Institute research grant. Personal protection, i.e., body cooling, engineering controls, and administrative controls, have been implemented successfully.

  9. Wisconsin College for Kids Stresses Active, Independent Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notar, Ellen Elms; Deutsch, Robin

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the second year of an award-winning summer enrichment program aimed at developing independent learning skills and encouraging lifelong learning in gifted elementary students. The program featured contact with university scholars actively involved in problem solving, introduction to general bodies of knowledge, and in-depth…

  10. The Role of Musculoskeletal Dynamics and Neuromuscular Control in Stress Development in Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWoody, Yssa

    1996-01-01

    The role of forces produced by the musculotendon units in the stress development of the long bones during gait has not been fully analyzed. It is well known that the musculotendons act as actuators producing the joint torques which drive the body. Although the joint torques required to perform certain motor tasks can be recovered through a kinematic analysis, it remains a difficult problem to determine the actual forces produced by each muscle that resulted in these torques. As a consequence, few studies have focused on the role of individual muscles in the development of stress in the bone. This study takes a control theoretic approach to the problem. A seven-link, eight degrees of freedom model of the body is controlled by various muscle groups on each leg to simulate gait. The simulations incorporate Hill-type models of muscles with activation and contraction dynamics controlled through neural inputs. This direct approach allows one to know the exact muscle forces exerted by each musculotendon throughout the gait cycle as well the joint torques and reaction forces at the ankle and knee. Stress and strain computed by finite element analysis on skeletal members will be related to these derived loading conditions. Thus the role of musculoskeletal dynamics and neuromuscular control in the stress development of the tibia during gait can be analyzed.

  11. Developing Internal Controls through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, F. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Life events can include the Tuesday afternoon cooking class with the group worker or the Saturday afternoon football game, but in the sense that Fritz Redl thought of them, these activities are only threads in a fabric of living that includes all the elements of daily life: playing, working, school-based learning, learning through activities,…

  12. Vulnerability-Stress Factors in Development of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, Heidi S.; And Others

    Log-linear chi-square analyses were conducted to examine potential interactions between presence of pre-crime Axis I psychiatric diagnoses and differential levels of crime stress in association with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a community sample of 295 female crime victims. High crime stress was defined as crime that included either…

  13. Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress Corrupts Coronary Collateral Growth by Activating Adenosine Monophosphate Activated Kinase-α Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pung, Yuh Fen; Sam, Wai Johnn; Stevanov, Kelly; Enrick, Molly; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Kolz, Christopher; Thakker, Prashanth; Hardwick, James P.; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Dyck, Jason R.B.; Yin, Liya; Chilian, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our goal was to determine the mechanism by which mitochondrial oxidative stress impairs collateral growth in the heart. Approach and Results Rats were treated with rotenone (mitochondrial complex I inhibitor that increases reactive oxygen species production) or sham-treated with vehicle and subjected to repetitive ischemia protocol for 10 days to induce coronary collateral growth. In control rats, repetitive ischemia increased flow to the collateral-dependent zone; however, rotenone treatment prevented this increase suggesting that mitochondrial oxidative stress compromises coronary collateral growth. In addition, rotenone also attenuated mitochondrial complex I activity and led to excessive mitochondrial aggregation. To further understand the mechanistic pathway(s) involved, human coronary artery endothelial cells were treated with 50 ng/ mL vascular endothelial growth factor, 1 µmol/L rotenone, and rotenone/vascular endothelial growth factor for 48 hours. Vascular endothelial growth factor induced robust tube formation; however, rotenone completely inhibited this effect (P<0.05 rotenone versus vascular endothelial growth factor treatment). Inhibition of tube formation by rotenone was also associated with significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation. Immunoblot analyses of human coronary artery endothelial cells with rotenone treatment showed significant activation of adenosine monophosphate activated kinase (AMPK)-α and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase. Activation of AMPK-α suggested impairments in energy production, which was reflected by decrease in O2 consumption and bioenergetic reserve capacity of cultured cells. Knockdown of AMPK-α (siRNA) also preserved tube formation during rotenone, suggesting the negative effects were mediated by the activation of AMPK-α. Conversely, expression of a constitutively active AMPK-α blocked tube formation. Conclusions We conclude that activation of AMPK

  14. The relationships between residual stress relaxation and texture development in AZ31 Mg alloys via the vibratory stress relief technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jia-Siang; Hsieh, Chih-Chun; Lai, Hsuan-Han; Kuo, Che-Wei; Wu, Paxon Ti-Yuan; Wu, Weite

    2015-01-15

    A systematic study of residual stress relaxation and the texture evolution of cold-rolled AZ31 Mg alloys using the vibratory stress relief technique with a simple cantilever beam vibration system was performed using a high-resolution X-ray diffractometer and a portable X-ray residual stress analyzer. The effects of vibrational stress excitation on the surface residual stress distribution and on the texture of pole figures (0002) occurring during the vibratory stress relief were examined. Compared with the effects corresponding to the same alloy under non-vibration condition, it can be observed that the uniform surface residual stress distribution and relaxation of the compressive residual stress in the stress concentration zone were observed rather than all of the residual stresses being eliminated. Furthermore, with an increase in the vibrational aging time, the compressive residual stress, texture density, and (0002) preferred orientation increased first and then decreased. It should be underlined that the vibratory stress relief process for the vibrational aging time of more than 10 min is able to weaken the strong basal textures of AZ31 Mg alloys, which is valuable for enhancement of their formability and is responsible for an almost perfect 3D-Debye–Scherrer ring. - Highlights: • 3D-Debye ring about VSR technique is not discussed in the existing literature. • A newly developed VSR method is suitable for small or thin workpieces. • The cosα method accurately and effectively determines the residual stresses. • The VSR technique is valuable for enhancement of their formability. • The texture and preferred orientation change with the vibrational aging time.

  15. Hyperosmotic stress activates Rho: differential involvement in Rho kinase-dependent MLC phosphorylation and NKCC activation.

    PubMed

    Di Ciano-Oliveira, Caterina; Sirokmány, Gábor; Szászi, Katalin; Arthur, William T; Masszi, András; Peterson, Mark; Rotstein, Ori D; Kapus, András

    2003-09-01

    Hyperosmotic stress initiates adaptive responses, including phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) and concomitant activation of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC). Because the small GTPase Rho is a key regulator of MLC phosphorylation, we investigated 1) whether Rho is activated by hyperosmotic stress, and if so, what the triggering factors are, and 2) whether the Rho/Rho kinase (ROK) pathway is involved in MLC phosphorylation and NKCC activation. Rho activity was measured in tubular epithelial cells by affinity pulldown assay. Hyperosmolarity induced rapid (<1 min) and sustained (>20 min) Rho activation that was proportional to the osmotic concentration and reversed within minutes upon restoration of isotonicity. Both decreased cell volume at constant ionic strength and elevated total ionic strength at constant cell volume were capable of activating Rho. Changes in [Na+] and [K+] at normal total salinity failed to activate Rho, and Cl- depletion did not affect the hyperosmotic response. Thus alterations in cellular volume and ionic strength but not individual ion concentrations seem to be the critical triggering factors. Hyperosmolarity induced mono- and diphosphorylation of MLC, which was abrogated by the Rho-family blocker Clostridium toxin B. ROK inhibitor Y-27632 suppressed MLC phosphorylation under isotonic conditions and prevented its rise over isotonic levels in hypertonically stimulated cells. ML-7 had a smaller inhibitory effect. In contrast, it abolished the hypertonic activation of NKCC, whereas Y-27632 failed to inhibit this response. Thus hyperosmolarity activates Rho, and Rho/ROK pathway contributes to basal and hyperosmotic MLC phosphorylation. However, the hypertonic activation of NKCC is ROK independent, implying that the ROK-dependent component of MLC phosphorylation can be uncoupled from NKCC activation. PMID:12748065

  16. Mechanical stress activates neurites and somata of myenteric neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Eva M.; Michel, Klaus; Zeller, Florian; Demir, Ihsan E.; Ceyhan, Güralp O.; Schemann, Michael; Mazzuoli-Weber, Gemma

    2015-01-01

    The particular location of myenteric neurons, sandwiched between the 2 muscle layers of the gut, implies that their somata and neurites undergo mechanical stress during gastrointestinal motility. Existence of mechanosensitive enteric neurons (MEN) is undoubted but many of their basic features remain to be studied. In this study, we used ultra-fast neuroimaging to record activity of primary cultured myenteric neurons of guinea pig and human intestine after von Frey hair evoked deformation of neurites and somata. Independent component analysis was applied to reconstruct neuronal morphology and follow neuronal signals. Of the cultured neurons 45% (114 out of 256, 30 guinea pigs) responded to neurite probing with a burst spike frequency of 13.4 Hz. Action potentials generated at the stimulation site invaded the soma and other neurites. Mechanosensitive sites were expressed across large areas of neurites. Many mechanosensitive neurites appeared to have afferent and efferent functions as those that responded to deformation also conducted spikes coming from the soma. Mechanosensitive neurites were also activated by nicotine application. This supported the concept of multifunctional MEN. 14% of the neurons (13 out of 96, 18 guinea pigs) responded to soma deformation with burst spike discharge of 17.9 Hz. Firing of MEN adapted rapidly (RAMEN), slowly (SAMEN), or ultra-slowly (USAMEN). The majority of MEN showed SAMEN behavior although significantly more RAMEN occurred after neurite probing. Cultured myenteric neurons from human intestine had similar properties. Compared to MEN, dorsal root ganglion neurons were activated by neurite but not by soma deformation with slow adaptation of firing. We demonstrated that MEN exhibit specific features very likely reflecting adaptation to their specialized functions in the gut. PMID:26441520

  17. Mechanical stress activates neurites and somata of myenteric neurons.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Eva M; Michel, Klaus; Zeller, Florian; Demir, Ihsan E; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Schemann, Michael; Mazzuoli-Weber, Gemma

    2015-01-01

    The particular location of myenteric neurons, sandwiched between the 2 muscle layers of the gut, implies that their somata and neurites undergo mechanical stress during gastrointestinal motility. Existence of mechanosensitive enteric neurons (MEN) is undoubted but many of their basic features remain to be studied. In this study, we used ultra-fast neuroimaging to record activity of primary cultured myenteric neurons of guinea pig and human intestine after von Frey hair evoked deformation of neurites and somata. Independent component analysis was applied to reconstruct neuronal morphology and follow neuronal signals. Of the cultured neurons 45% (114 out of 256, 30 guinea pigs) responded to neurite probing with a burst spike frequency of 13.4 Hz. Action potentials generated at the stimulation site invaded the soma and other neurites. Mechanosensitive sites were expressed across large areas of neurites. Many mechanosensitive neurites appeared to have afferent and efferent functions as those that responded to deformation also conducted spikes coming from the soma. Mechanosensitive neurites were also activated by nicotine application. This supported the concept of multifunctional MEN. 14% of the neurons (13 out of 96, 18 guinea pigs) responded to soma deformation with burst spike discharge of 17.9 Hz. Firing of MEN adapted rapidly (RAMEN), slowly (SAMEN), or ultra-slowly (USAMEN). The majority of MEN showed SAMEN behavior although significantly more RAMEN occurred after neurite probing. Cultured myenteric neurons from human intestine had similar properties. Compared to MEN, dorsal root ganglion neurons were activated by neurite but not by soma deformation with slow adaptation of firing. We demonstrated that MEN exhibit specific features very likely reflecting adaptation to their specialized functions in the gut. PMID:26441520

  18. Stress.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2008-01-01

    We all experience stress as a regular, and sometimes damaging and sometimes useful, part of our daily lives. In our normal ups and downs, we have our share of exhaustion, despondency, and outrage--matched with their corresponding positive moods. But burnout and workaholism are different. They are chronic, dysfunctional, self-reinforcing, life-shortening habits. Dentists, nurses, teachers, ministers, social workers, and entertainers are especially susceptible to burnout; not because they are hard-working professionals (they tend to be), but because they are caring perfectionists who share control for the success of what they do with others and perform under the scrutiny of their colleagues (they tend to). Workaholics are also trapped in self-sealing cycles, but the elements are ever-receding visions of control and using constant activity as a barrier against facing reality. This essay explores the symptoms, mechanisms, causes, and successful coping strategies for burnout and workaholism. It also takes a look at the general stress response on the physiological level and at some of the damage American society inflicts on itself. PMID:18846841

  19. Monitoring eruption activity using temporal stress changes at Mount Ontake volcano.

    PubMed

    Terakawa, Toshiko; Kato, Aitaro; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yuta; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Matsuhiro, Kenjiro; Okuda, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic activity is often accompanied by many small earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms represent the fault orientation and slip direction, which are influenced by the stress field. Focal mechanisms of volcano-tectonic earthquakes provide information on the state of volcanoes via stresses. Here we demonstrate that quantitative evaluation of temporal stress changes beneath Mt. Ontake, Japan, using the misfit angles of focal mechanism solutions to the regional stress field, is effective for eruption monitoring. The moving average of misfit angles indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was deviated from the regional stress field, presumably by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids, which was removed immediately after the expulsion of volcanic ejecta. The deviation of the local stress field can be an indicator of increases in volcanic activity. The proposed method may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards. PMID:26892716

  20. Monitoring eruption activity using temporal stress changes at Mount Ontake volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakawa, Toshiko; Kato, Aitaro; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yuta; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Matsuhiro, Kenjiro; Okuda, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Volcanic activity is often accompanied by many small earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms represent the fault orientation and slip direction, which are influenced by the stress field. Focal mechanisms of volcano-tectonic earthquakes provide information on the state of volcanoes via stresses. Here we demonstrate that quantitative evaluation of temporal stress changes beneath Mt. Ontake, Japan, using the misfit angles of focal mechanism solutions to the regional stress field, is effective for eruption monitoring. The moving average of misfit angles indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was deviated from the regional stress field, presumably by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids, which was removed immediately after the expulsion of volcanic ejecta. The deviation of the local stress field can be an indicator of increases in volcanic activity. The proposed method may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards.

  1. Monitoring eruption activity using temporal stress changes at Mount Ontake volcano

    PubMed Central

    Terakawa, Toshiko; Kato, Aitaro; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yuta; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Matsuhiro, Kenjiro; Okuda, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic activity is often accompanied by many small earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms represent the fault orientation and slip direction, which are influenced by the stress field. Focal mechanisms of volcano-tectonic earthquakes provide information on the state of volcanoes via stresses. Here we demonstrate that quantitative evaluation of temporal stress changes beneath Mt. Ontake, Japan, using the misfit angles of focal mechanism solutions to the regional stress field, is effective for eruption monitoring. The moving average of misfit angles indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was deviated from the regional stress field, presumably by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids, which was removed immediately after the expulsion of volcanic ejecta. The deviation of the local stress field can be an indicator of increases in volcanic activity. The proposed method may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards. PMID:26892716

  2. An Action Research Inquiry into the Relationship Among Aerobic Activities, Memory, and Stress with Students Identified as Gifted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Denise Marie

    benefits for greater memory retention and reduction in stress. Student-driven action research can be a powerful educational tool. Movement activities are a positive factor in student learning and should be incorporated into the school routine. Students developed an increased awareness of the short term benefits of exercise which could catalyze aerobic activity as a regular part of the school day.

  3. Development of a relationship between external measurements and reinforcement stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brault, Andre; Hoult, Neil A.; Lees, Janet M.

    2015-03-01

    As many countries around the world face an aging infrastructure crisis, there is an increasing need to develop more accurate monitoring and assessment techniques for reinforced concrete structures. One of the challenges associated with assessing existing infrastructure is correlating externally measured parameters such as crack widths and surface strains with reinforcement stresses as this is dependent on a number of variables. The current research investigates how the use of distributed fiber optic sensors to measure reinforcement strain can be correlated with digital image correlation measurements of crack widths to relate external crack width measurements to reinforcement stresses. An initial set of experiments was undertaken involving a series of small-scale beam specimens tested in three-point bending with variable reinforcement properties. Relationships between crack widths and internal reinforcement strains were observed including that both the diameter and number of bars affected the measured maximum strain and crack width. A model that uses measured crack width to estimate reinforcement strain was presented and compared to the experimental results. The model was found to provide accurate estimates of load carrying capacity for a given crack width, however, the model was potentially less accurate when crack widths were used to estimate the experimental reinforcement strains. The need for more experimental data to validate the conclusions of this research was also highlighted.

  4. Development and initial validation of the Response to Stressful Experiences Scale.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Douglas C; Polusny, Melissa A; Erbes, Christopher R; King, Daniel; King, Lynda; Litz, Brett T; Schnurr, Paula P; Friedman, Matthew; Pietrzak, Robert H; Southwick, Steven M

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the development and initial validation of the Response to Stressful Experiences Scale (RSES), a measure of individual differences in cognitive, emotional, and behavioral responses to stressful life events. We validated this instrument with active-duty and reserve components of military and veterans samples (N = 1,014). The resulting 22-item scale demonstrated sound internal consistency (alpha = 0.91-0.93) and good test-retest reliability (r = 0.87). Factor analysis suggested 5 protective factors: (a) meaning-making and restoration, (b) active coping, (c) cognitive flexibility, (d) spirituality, and (e) self-efficacy. Associations with other measures supported convergent, discriminant, and concurrent validity. In separate military samples, the RSES accounted for unique variance in posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms above and beyond existing scales measuring resilience-related constructs, thereby demonstrating incremental validity. The RSES provides a brief, reliable, and valid measure of individual differences in cognitive, emotional, and behavioral responses to life's most stressful events. PMID:21366078

  5. Inhibition of TGFbeta1 Signaling Attenutates ATM Activity inResponse to Genotoxic Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kirshner, Julia; Jobling, Michael F.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Glick, Adam B.; Lavin, Martin J.; Koslov, Sergei; Shiloh, Yosef; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2006-09-15

    Ionizing radiation causes DNA damage that elicits a cellular program of damage control coordinated by the kinase activity of ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM). Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}), which is activated by radiation, is a potent and pleiotropic mediator of physiological and pathological processes. Here we show that TGF{beta} inhibition impedes the canonical cellular DNA damage stress response. Irradiated Tgf{beta}1 null murine epithelial cells or human epithelial cells treated with a small molecule inhibitor of TGF{beta} type I receptor kinase exhibit decreased phosphorylation of Chk2, Rad17 and p53, reduced {gamma}H2AX radiation-induced foci, and increased radiosensitivity compared to TGF{beta} competent cells. We determined that loss of TGF{beta} signaling in epithelial cells truncated ATM autophosphorylation and significantly reduced its kinase activity, without affecting protein abundance. Addition of TGF{beta} restored functional ATM and downstream DNA damage responses. These data reveal a heretofore undetected critical link between the microenvironment and ATM that directs epithelial cell stress responses, cell fate and tissue integrity. Thus, TGF{beta}1, in addition to its role in homoeostatic growth control, plays a complex role in regulating responses to genotoxic stress, the failure of which would contribute to the development of cancer; conversely, inhibiting TGF{beta} may be used to advantage in cancer therapy.

  6. Oxidative Stress and Therapeutic Development in Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Leah; Stidham, Timothy; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has many implications in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species and antioxidants, how they relate to normal physiological function and the pathophysiology of different lung diseases, and therapeutic strategies. The production of ROS/RNS from endogenous and exogenous sources is first discussed, followed by antioxidant systems that restore oxidative balance and cellular homeostasis. The contribution of oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in lung disease pathogenesis is also discussed. An overview of therapeutic strategies is provided, such as augmenting NO bioactivity, blocking the production of ROS/RNS and replacement of deficient antioxidants. The limitations of current strategies and failures of clinical trials are then addressed, followed by discussion of novel experimental approaches for the development of improved antioxidant therapies. PMID:27019769

  7. Stress Damage in Borehole and Rock Cores; Developing New Tools to Update the Stress Map of Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Q.; Schmitt, D. R.; Moeck, I. S.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of in situ stress enables us to determine the optimum borehole trajectory, predict fluid migration, and plan appropriately for geothermal and hydrocarbon production. Consequently, it is necessary to evaluate the state of stress in the Earth in order to design and efficiently operate engineered geothermal systems. This need motivates us to develop a new 3D model of stress for Alberta. This project mainly consists of three categories: investigating the impacts of in situ stress on borehole stability, fracture trajectory modelling and determining the stress state over an area in the northern part of Alberta. To date, we have created a MATLAB based program to calculate the stress concentrations for an arbitrarily oriented borehole in an isotropic or an arbitrarily oriented anisotropic medium subject to stress. The input to this model comes from static rock properties provided by measurements on a shale sample in the laboratory of our group. The result helps us to study the effects of rock material anisotropy on stress distribution, and it also shows the direction in which borehole failure is likely to grow. However, as the in situ stress is almost impossible to measure directly, we studied how fracture orientations identified from the borehole image log helps us to constrain in situ stress magnitudes and orientations. Moreover, based on the Mohr-Column criteria, we further assessed the tendency for both borehole tensile failure and compressive failure to occur in an isotropic formation as a function of the upper bound of rock strength and borehole fluid pressure limitations under a variety of stress states. For a given stress state and borehole orientation, tensile fracture can be tracked in the MATLAB program based on the assumption that tensile fractures are formed under pure tension. (This project is part of the Helmholtz-Alberta Initiative (HAI), which is a research collaboration between scientists in Germany and Canada on energy projects for cleaner

  8. Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness Traumatic stress, which happens when you ... stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  9. Smoke Exposure Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Lipid Accumulation in Retinal Pigment Epithelium through Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease caused by genetic and environmental factors, including genetic variants in complement components and smoking. Smoke exposure leads to oxidative stress, complement activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lipid dysregulation, which have all been proposed to be associated with AMD pathogenesis. Here we examine the effects of smoke exposure on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or filtered air for 6 months. RPE cells grown as stable monolayers were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Effects of smoke were determined by biochemical, molecular, and histological measures. Effects of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement and complement C3a anaphylatoxin receptor signaling were analyzed using knock-out mice or specific inhibitors. ER stress markers were elevated after smoke exposure in RPE of intact mice, which was eliminated in AP-deficient mice. To examine this relationship further, RPE monolayers were exposed to CSE. Short term smoke exposure resulted in production and release of complement C3, the generation of C3a, oxidative stress, complement activation on the cell membrane, and ER stress. Long term exposure to CSE resulted in lipid accumulation, and secretion. All measures were reversed by blocking C3a complement receptor (C3aR), alternative complement pathway signaling, and antioxidant therapy. Taken together, our results provide clear evidence that smoke exposure results in oxidative stress and complement activation via the AP, resulting in ER stress-mediated lipid accumulation, and further suggesting that oxidative stress and complement act synergistically in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:24711457

  10. Activities to Encourage Speech and Language Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Swallowing / Development Activities to Encourage Speech and Language Development Birth to 2 Years Encourage your baby ... or light) of the packages. Typical Speech and Language Development Learning More Than One Language Adult Speech ...

  11. The importance of physical activity and sleep for affect on stressful days: Two intensive longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Flueckiger, Lavinia; Lieb, Roselind; Meyer, Andrea H; Witthauer, Cornelia; Mata, Jutta

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the potential stress-buffering effect of 3 health behaviors-physical activity, sleep quality, and snacking-on affect in the context of everyday life in young adults. In 2 intensive longitudinal studies with up to 65 assessment days over an entire academic year, students (Study 1, N = 292; Study 2, N = 304) reported stress intensity, sleep quality, physical activity, snacking, and positive and negative affect. Data were analyzed using multilevel regression analyses. Stress and positive affect were negatively associated; stress and negative affect were positively associated. The more physically active than usual a person was on a given day, the weaker the association between stress and positive affect (Study 1) and negative affect (Studies 1 and 2). The better than usual a person's sleep quality had been during the previous night, the weaker the association between stress and positive affect (Studies 1 and 2) and negative affect (Study 2). The association between daily stress and positive or negative affect did not differ as a function of daily snacking (Studies 1 and 2). On stressful days, increasing physical activity or ensuring high sleep quality may buffer adverse effects of stress on affect in young adults. These findings suggest potential targets for health-promotion and stress-prevention programs, which could help reduce the negative impact of stress in young adults. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26709860

  12. Inhibition of Target of Rapamycin Signaling and Stress Activate Autophagy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[W

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Florencio, Francisco J.; Crespo, José L.

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic membrane-trafficking process whereby cells recycle cytosolic proteins and organelles under stress conditions or during development. This degradative process is mediated by autophagy-related (ATG) proteins that have been described in yeast, animals, and more recently in plants. In this study, we report the molecular characterization of autophagy in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that the ATG8 protein from Chlamydomonas (CrATG8) is functionally conserved and may be used as a molecular autophagy marker. Like yeast ATG8, CrATG8 is cleaved at the carboxyl-terminal conserved glycine and is associated with membranes in Chlamydomonas. Cell aging or different stresses such as nutrient limitation, oxidative stress, or the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum caused an increase in CrATG8 abundance as well as the detection of modified forms of this protein, both landmarks of autophagy activation. Furthermore, rapamycin-mediated inhibition of the Target of Rapamycin signaling pathway, a major regulator of autophagy in eukaryotes, results in identical effects on CrATG8 and a relocalization of this protein in Chlamydomonas cells similar to the one observed upon nutrient limitation. Thus, our findings indicate that Chlamydomonas cells may respond to stress conditions by inducing autophagy via Target of Rapamycin signaling modulation. PMID:20107021

  13. Classroom Activities to Develop Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornish, Robert L., Ed.

    A vitally important objective for the classroom teacher is to foster children's creative thinking. In this activity book for teachers of young children, the need for independence and creativity in modern society is discussed as an antidote for the conformity and depersonalization characteristic of our culture. Teacher flexibility and acceptance of…

  14. The contribution of activated processes to Q. [stress corrosion cracking in seismic wave attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spetzler, H. A.; Getting, I. C.; Swanson, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible role of activated processes in seismic attenuation is investigated. In this study, a solid is modeled by a parallel and series configuration of dashpots and springs. The contribution of stress and temperature activated processes to the long term dissipative behavior of this system is analyzed. Data from brittle rock deformation experiments suggest that one such process, stress corrosion cracking, may make a significant contribution to the attenuation factor, Q, especially for long period oscillations under significant tectonic stress.

  15. Diurnal cortisol amplitude and fronto-limbic activity in response to stressful stimuli.

    PubMed

    Cunningham-Bussel, Amy C; Root, James C; Butler, Tracy; Tuescher, Oliver; Pan, Hong; Epstein, Jane; Weisholtz, Daniel S; Pavony, Michelle; Silverman, Michael E; Goldstein, Martin S; Altemus, Margaret; Cloitre, Marylene; Ledoux, Joseph; McEwen, Bruce; Stern, Emily; Silbersweig, David

    2009-06-01

    The development and exacerbation of many psychiatric and neurologic conditions are associated with dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis as measured by aberrant levels of cortisol secretion. Here we report on the relationship between the amplitude of diurnal cortisol secretion, measured across 3 typical days in 18 healthy individuals, and blood oxygen level dependant (BOLD) response in limbic fear/stress circuits, elicited by in-scanner presentation of emotionally negative stimuli, specifically, images of the World Trade Center (WTC) attack. Results indicate that subjects who secrete a greater amplitude of cortisol diurnally demonstrate less brain activation in limbic regions, including the amygdala and hippocampus/parahippocampus, and hypothalamus during exposure to traumatic WTC-related images. Such initial findings can begin to link our understanding, in humans, of the relationship between the diurnal amplitude of a hormone integral to the stress response, and those neuroanatomical regions that are implicated as both modulating and being modulated by that response. PMID:19135805

  16. RSS1 regulates the cell cycle and maintains meristematic activity under stress conditions in rice

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Daisuke; Abe, Kiyomi; Miyao, Akio; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Mizutani, Megumi; Morita, Haruka; Toda, Yosuke; Hobo, Tokunori; Sato, Yutaka; Hattori, Tsukaho; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takeda, Shin

    2011-01-01

    Plant growth and development are sustained by continuous cell division in the meristems, which is perturbed by various environmental stresses. For the maintenance of meristematic functions, it is essential that cell division be coordinated with cell differentiation. However, it is unknown how the proliferative activities of the meristems and the coordination between cell division and differentiation are maintained under stressful conditions. Here we show that a rice protein, RSS1, whose stability is controlled by cell cycle phases, contributes to the vigour of meristematic cells and viability under salinity conditions. These effects of RSS1 are exerted by regulating the G1–S transition, possibly through an interaction of RSS1 with protein phosphatase 1, and are mediated by the phytohormone, cytokinin. RSS1 is conserved widely in plant lineages, except eudicots, suggesting that RSS1-dependent mechanisms might have been adopted in specific lineages during the evolutionary radiation of angiosperms. PMID:21505434

  17. Development of vascular tissue and stress inducible hybrid-synthetic promoters through dof-1 motifs rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Rajiv; Dey, Nrisingha

    2012-07-01

    A Caulimovirus-based hybrid-promoter, EFCFS, was derived by fusing the distal region (-227 to -54, FUAS) of Figwort mosaic virus full-length transcript promoter (F20) with the core promoter (-151 to +12, FS3CP) domain of Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript promoter (FS3). The hybrid-promoter (EFCFS) showed enhanced activity compared to the CaMV35S, F20 and FS3 promoters; while it showed equivalent activity with that of the CAMV35S(2) promoter in both transient protoplast (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi Brad) and transgenic plants (Nicotiana tabacum; Samsun NN). Further, we have engineered the EFCFS promoter sequence by inserting additional copies of the stress-inducible 'AAAG' cis-motif (Dof-1) to generate a set of three hybrid-synthetic promoters namely; EFCFS-HS-1, EFCFS-HS-2 and EFCFS-HS-3-containing 10, 11 and 13 'AAAG' motif, respectively. Transgenic plants expressing these hybrid synthetic promoters coupled to the GUS reporter were developed and their transcriptional activities were compared with F20, FS3, 35S and 35S(2) promoters, respectively. The relative levels of uidA-mRNA accumulation in transgenic plants driven by above promoters individually were compared by qRT-PCR. Localization of GUS reporter activity in plant tissue was assayed by histochemical approach. CLSM-based study revealed that hybrid-synthetic promoters namely; EFCFS-HS-1, EFCFS-HS-2 and EFCFS-HS-3 showed enhanced activity in vascular tissue compared to the CaMV35S promoter. In the presence of abiotic stress elicitors, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, the EFCFS-HS-1 promoters showed enhanced activity compared to the 35S promoter. Newly derived hybrid-synthetic promoter/s with enhanced activity and stress inducibility could become efficient tools for advancement of plant biotechnology. PMID:22610660

  18. Oxidative stress: implications for the development of diabetic retinopathy and antioxidant therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Tang, Luosheng; Chen, Baihua

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, localized tissue oxidative stress has been implicated as a key component in the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Increasing evidence shows that oxidative stress caused by diabetes-induced metabolic abnormalities is the most common mechanism associated with the pathogenesis of DR for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations results in the activation of several mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of DR. In particular, damage or dysfunction caused by oxidative stress still persists even after glycemia has been normalized. Despite considerable evidence showing the beneficial effects of antioxidants in preventing the development of retinopathy, results from large-scale clinical trials on classic antioxidants are somewhat ambiguous. Scavenging reactive radicals may not be the most ideal antioxidant strategy in DR. Advances in understanding the function of ROS in the development of DR can lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies based on the mechanisms of ROS generation and scavenging. Increasing amounts of data have demonstrated the promising prospect of antioxidant therapy and its beneficial effects in vision protection. Therefore, new strategies that utilize antioxidants as additive therapy should be implemented in the treatment of DR. PMID:25180070

  19. Oxidative Stress: Implications for the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy and Antioxidant Therapeutic Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Luosheng; Chen, Baihua

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, localized tissue oxidative stress has been implicated as a key component in the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Increasing evidence shows that oxidative stress caused by diabetes-induced metabolic abnormalities is the most common mechanism associated with the pathogenesis of DR for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations results in the activation of several mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of DR. In particular, damage or dysfunction caused by oxidative stress still persists even after glycemia has been normalized. Despite considerable evidence showing the beneficial effects of antioxidants in preventing the development of retinopathy, results from large-scale clinical trials on classic antioxidants are somewhat ambiguous. Scavenging reactive radicals may not be the most ideal antioxidant strategy in DR. Advances in understanding the function of ROS in the development of DR can lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies based on the mechanisms of ROS generation and scavenging. Increasing amounts of data have demonstrated the promising prospect of antioxidant therapy and its beneficial effects in vision protection. Therefore, new strategies that utilize antioxidants as additive therapy should be implemented in the treatment of DR. PMID:25180070

  20. Lens ER-stress response during cataract development in Mip-mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuefang; Bennett, Thomas M; Shiels, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Major intrinsic protein (MIP) is a functional water-channel (AQP0) that also plays a key role in establishing lens fiber cell architecture. Genetic variants of MIP have been associated with inherited and age-related forms of cataract; however, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. Here we have used lens transcriptome profiling by microarray-hybridization and qPCR to identify pathogenic changes during cataract development in Mip-mutant (Lop/+) mice. In postnatal Lop/+ lenses (P7) 99 genes were up-regulated and 75 were down-regulated (>2-fold, p=<0.05) when compared with wild-type. A pathway analysis of up-regulated genes in the Lop/+ lens (P7) was consistent with endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The most up-regulated UPR genes (>4-fold) in the Lop/+ lens included Chac1>Ddit3>Atf3>Trib3>Xbp1 and the most down-regulated genes (>5-fold) included two anti-oxidant genes, Hspb1 and Hmox1. Lop/+ lenses were further characterized by abundant TUNEL-positive nuclei within central degenerating fiber cells, glutathione depletion, free-radical overproduction, and calpain hyper-activation. These data suggest that Lop/+ lenses undergo proteotoxic ER-stress induced cell-death resulting from prolonged activation of the Eif2ak3/Perk-Atf4-Ddit3-Chac1 branch of the UPR coupled with severe oxidative-stress. PMID:27155571

  1. Impacts of oxidative stress on acetylcholinesterase transcription, and activity in embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) following Chlorpyrifos exposure.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Fuentes, Gabriela; Rubio-Escalante, Fernando J; Noreña-Barroso, Elsa; Escalante-Herrera, Karla S; Schlenk, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate pesticides cause irreversible inhibition of AChE which leads to neuronal overstimulation and death. Thus, dogma indicates that the target of OP pesticides is AChE, but many authors postulate that these compounds also disturb cellular redox processes, and change the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Interestingly, it has also been reported that oxidative stress plays also a role in the regulation and activity of AChE. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of the antioxidant, vitamin C (VC), the oxidant, t-butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH) and the organophosphate Chlorpyrifos (CPF), on AChE gene transcription and activity in zebrafish embryos after 72h exposure. In addition, oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring antioxidant enzymes activities and transcription, and quantification of total glutathione. Apical effects on the development of zebrafish embryos were also measured. With the exception of AChE inhibition and enhanced gene expression, limited effects of CPF on oxidative stress and apical endpoints were found at this developmental stage. Addition of VC had little effect on oxidative stress or AChE, but increased pericardial area and heartbeat rate through an unknown mechanism. TBOOH diminished AChE gene expression and activity, and caused oxidative stress when administered alone. However, in combination with CPF, only reductions in AChE activity were observed with no significant changes in oxidative stress suggesting the adverse apical endpoints in the embryos may have been due to AChE inhibition by CPF rather than oxidative stress. These results give additional evidence to support the role of prooxidants in AChE activity and expression. PMID:25937383

  2. Stress development in heterogenetic lithosphere: Insights into earthquake processes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yan; Hou, Guiting; Kusky, Timothy; Gregg, Patricia M.

    2016-03-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) in the Midwestern United States was the site of several major M 6.8-8 earthquakes in 1811-1812, and remains seismically active. Although this region has been investigated extensively, the ultimate controls on earthquake initiation and the duration of the seismicity remain unclear. In this study, we develop a finite element model for the Central United States to conduct a series of numerical experiments with the goal of determining the impact of heterogeneity in the upper crust, the lower crust, and the mantle on earthquake nucleation and rupture processes. Regional seismic tomography data (CITE) are utilized to infer the viscosity structure of the lithosphere which provide an important input to the numerical models. Results indicate that when differential stresses build in the Central United States, the stresses accumulating beneath the Reelfoot Rift in the NMSZ are highly concentrated, whereas the stresses below the geologically similar Midcontinent Rift System are comparatively low. The numerical observations coincide with the observed distribution of seismicity throughout the region. By comparing the numerical results with three reference models, we argue that an extensive mantle low velocity zone beneath the NMSZ produces differential stress localization in the layers above. Furthermore, the relatively strong crust in this region, exhibited by high seismic velocities, enables the elevated stress to extend to the base of the ancient rift system, reactivating fossil rifting faults and therefore triggering earthquakes. These results show that, if boundary displacements are significant, the NMSZ is able to localize tectonic stresses, which may be released when faults close to failure are triggered by external processes such as melting of the Laurentide ice sheet or rapid river incision.

  3. Finite element simulations of the active stress in the imaginal disc of the Drosophila Melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Pettinati, V; Ambrosi, D; Ciarletta, P; Pezzuto, S

    2016-09-01

    During the larval stages of development, the imaginal disc of Drosphila Melanogaster is composed by a monolayer of epithelial cells, which undergo a strain actively produced by the cells themselves. The well-organized collective contraction produces a stress field that seemingly has a double morphogenetic role: it orchestrates the cellular organization towards the macroscopic shape emergence while simultaneously providing a local information on the organ size. Here we perform numerical simulations of such a mechanical control on morphogenesis at a continuum level, using a three-dimensional finite model that accounts for the active cell contraction. The numerical model is able to reproduce the (few) known qualitative characteristics of the tensional patterns within the imaginal disc of the fruit fly. The computed stress components slightly deviate from planarity, thus confirming the previous theoretical assumptions of a nonlinear elastic analytical model, and enforcing the hypothesis that the spatial variation of the mechanical stress may act as a size regulating signal that locally scales with the global dimension of the domain. PMID:26765274

  4. The Relationship between Cortisol Activity during Cognitive Task and Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Hongxia; Wang, Li; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Kan; Wu, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Background The latest development in the dimensional structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a novel 6-factor model, which builds on the newly released DSM-5. One notable gap in the literature is that little is known about how distinct symptom clusters of PTSD are related to hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activity when people perform a relatively less stressful cognitive task. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cortisol activity when individuals perform cognitive tasks in the laboratory and a contemporary phenotypic model of posttraumatic stress symptomatology in earthquake survivors. Methods Salivary cortisol while performing cognitive tasks was collected and analyzed in 89 adult earthquake survivors. The PTSD Checklist for the DSM-5 (PCL-5) was used to assess the severity of total PTSD as well as six distinct symptom clusters. Regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations between the six distinct PTSD symptom clusters and cortisol profiles. Results The results showed that the score of the negative affect symptom cluster, but not anhedonia or other clusters, was positively associated with cortisol levels before and during the cognitive tasks. Conclusion The results showed that higher cortisol levels before and during cognitive tasks might be specifically linked to a distinct symptom cluster of PTSD—negative affect symptomatology. This suggests that a distinction should be made between negative affect and anhedonia symptom clusters, as the 6-factor model proposed. PMID:26630485

  5. Stress and vibration. Recent developments in industrial measurement and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, P.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the following topics. New Methods - Stress analysis, Thermoelastic methods I, Thermoelastic methods II, Vibration measurement - Single point, Vibration measurement - Full field, New Methods - Vibration analysis.

  6. Profiles of Adolescent Stress: The Development of the Adolescent Stress Questionnaire (ASQ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, D. G.; Davenport, S. C.; Mazanov, J.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of stress in the understanding of adolescent health and well-being is widely documented. The measurement of adolescent stress has however been subjected to sufficient methodological and conceptual criticism in recent times to warrant a concerted re-evaluation of the exercise. This study sought information on the nature of adolescent…

  7. Children's coping after psychological stress. Choices among food, physical activity, and television.

    PubMed

    Balantekin, Katherine N; Roemmich, James N

    2012-10-01

    Children's stress-coping behaviors and their determinants have not been widely studied. Some children eat more after stress and dietary restraint moderates stress eating in youth, but eating has been studied in isolation of other coping behaviors. Children may not choose to eat when stressed if other behavioral alternatives are available. The purpose was to determine individual difference factors that moderate the duration of stress coping choices and to determine if stress-induced eating in youth persists when other stress coping behaviors are available. Thirty children (8-12 years) completed a speech stressor on one day and read magazines on another day. They completed a free-choice period with access to food, TV, and physical activity on both days. Dietary restraint moderated changes in time spent eating and energy consumed from the control to stress day. Children high in restraint increased their energy intake on the stress day. Changes in the time spent watching TV were moderated by usual TV time, as children higher in usual TV increased their TV time after stress. Thus, dietary restrained children eat more when stressed when other common stress coping behaviors are freely available. These results extend the external validity of laboratory studies of stress-induced eating. PMID:22634198

  8. Posttraumatic stress disorder: The development of effective psychological treatments

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Anke; Clark, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has only relatively recently been introduced into the diagnostic classification of mental disorders. Building on advances in the treatment of other anxiety disorders, a range of effective psychological treatments for PTSD has been developed. The most effective of these treatments focus on the patient’s memory for the traumatic event and its meaning. This paper briefly reviews the currently available evidence for these treatments. It then illustrates the process of developing effective psychological treatments by discussing how a combination of phenomenological, experimental and treatment development studies and theoretical considerations was used to develop a trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral treatment, Cognitive Therapy (CT) for PTSD. This treatment program builds on Ehlers and Clark’s (2000) model of PTSD, which specifies two core cognitive abnormalities in PTSD. First, people with chronic PTSD show idiosyncratic personal meanings (appraisals) of the trauma and/or its sequelae that lead to a sense of serious current threat. Second, the nature of the trauma memory explains the occurrence of reexperiencing symptoms. It is further proposed that the idiosyncratic appraisals motivate a series of dysfunctional behaviors (such as safety-seeking behaviors) and cognitive strategies (such as thought suppression and rumination) that are intended to reduce the sense of current threat, but maintain the problem by preventing change in the appraisals and trauma memory, and/or lead to increases in symptoms. CT addresses the cognitive abnormalities and maintaining behaviors in an individualized, but focused, way. Four randomized controlled trials and two dissemination studies showed that CT for PTSD is acceptable and effective. PMID:18752113

  9. Navy GTE seal development activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grala, Carl P.

    1993-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology Initiative, the Naval Air Warfare Center conducts advanced development programs for demonstration in the next generation of air-breathing propulsion systems. Among the target technologies are gas path and lube oil seals. Two development efforts currently being managed by NAWCAD are the High Performance Compressor Discharge Film-Riding Face Seal and the Subsonic Core High Speed Air/Oil Seal. The High Performance Compressor Discharge Film-Riding Face Seal Program aims at reducing parasitic leakage through application of a film-riding face sea concept to the compressor discharge location of a Phase 2 IHPTET engine. An order-of-magnitude leakage reduction relative to current labyrinth seal configurations is expected. Performance goals for these seals are (1) 1200 F air temperature, (2) 800 feet-per-second surface velocity, and (3) 600 SPI differential pressure. The two designs chosen for fabrication and rig test are a spiral groove and a Rayleigh step seal. Rig testing is currently underway. The Subsonic Core High Speed Air/Oil Seal Program is developing shaft-to-ground seals for next-generation propulsion systems that will minimize leakage and provide full life. Significantly higher rotor speeds and temperatures will be experienced. Technologies being exploited include, hydrodynamic lift assist features, ultra light weight designs, and improved cooling schemes. Parametric testing has been completed; a final seal design is entering the endurance test phase.

  10. Navy GTE seal development activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grala, Carl P.

    1993-10-01

    Under the auspices of the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology Initiative, the Naval Air Warfare Center conducts advanced development programs for demonstration in the next generation of air-breathing propulsion systems. Among the target technologies are gas path and lube oil seals. Two development efforts currently being managed by NAWCAD are the High Performance Compressor Discharge Film-Riding Face Seal and the Subsonic Core High Speed Air/Oil Seal. The High Performance Compressor Discharge Film-Riding Face Seal Program aims at reducing parasitic leakage through application of a film-riding face sea concept to the compressor discharge location of a Phase 2 IHPTET engine. An order-of-magnitude leakage reduction relative to current labyrinth seal configurations is expected. Performance goals for these seals are (1) 1200 F air temperature, (2) 800 feet-per-second surface velocity, and (3) 600 SPI differential pressure. The two designs chosen for fabrication and rig test are a spiral groove and a Rayleigh step seal. Rig testing is currently underway. The Subsonic Core High Speed Air/Oil Seal Program is developing shaft-to-ground seals for next-generation propulsion systems that will minimize leakage and provide full life. Significantly higher rotor speeds and temperatures will be experienced. Technologies being exploited include, hydrodynamic lift assist features, ultra light weight designs, and improved cooling schemes. Parametric testing has been completed; a final seal design is entering the endurance test phase.

  11. Regulation of Pancreatic β Cell Mass by Cross-Interaction between CCAAT Enhancer Binding Protein β Induced by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Mieda, Yusuke; Shimizu, Shinobu; Kawamoto, Takeshi; Matsuura, Yuki; Takai, Tomoko; Suzuki, Emi; Kanno, Ayumi; Koyanagi-Kimura, Maki; Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Bartolome, Alberto; Yokoi, Norihide; Inoue, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Wataru; Seino, Susumu; Kido, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    During the development of type 2 diabetes, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress leads to not only insulin resistance but also to pancreatic beta cell failure. Conversely, cell function under various stressed conditions can be restored by reducing ER stress by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). However, the details of this mechanism are still obscure. Therefore, the current study aims to elucidate the role of AMPK activity during ER stress-associated pancreatic beta cell failure. MIN6 cells were loaded with 5-amino-1-β-D-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR) and metformin to assess the relationship between AMPK activity and CCAAT enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) expression levels. The effect of C/EBPβ phosphorylation on expression levels was also investigated. Vildagliptin and metformin were administered to pancreatic beta cell-specific C/EBPβ transgenic mice to investigate the relationship between C/EBPβ expression levels and AMPK activity in the pancreatic islets. When pancreatic beta cells are exposed to ER stress, the accumulation of the transcription factor C/EBPβ lowers the AMP/ATP ratio, thereby decreasing AMPK activity. In an opposite manner, incubation of MIN6 cells with AICAR or metformin activated AMPK, which suppressed C/EBPβ expression. In addition, administration of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin and metformin to pancreatic beta cell-specific C/EBPβ transgenic mice decreased C/EBPβ expression levels and enhanced pancreatic beta cell mass in proportion to the recovery of AMPK activity. Enhanced C/EBPβ expression and decreased AMPK activity act synergistically to induce ER stress-associated pancreatic beta cell failure. PMID:26091000

  12. NO, ROS, and cell death associated with caspase-like activity increase in stress-induced microspore embryogenesis of barley

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Serrano, María; Bárány, Ivett; Prem, Deepak; Coronado, María-José; Risueño, María C.; Testillano, Pilar S.

    2012-01-01

    Under specific stress treatments (cold, starvation), in vitro microspores can be induced to deviate from their gametophytic development and switch to embryogenesis, forming haploid embryos and homozygous breeding lines in a short period of time. The inductive stress produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO), signalling molecules mediating cellular responses, and cell death, modifying the embryogenic microspore response and therefore, the efficiency of the process. This work analysed cell death, caspase 3-like activity, and ROS and NO production (using fluorescence probes and confocal analysis) after inductive stress in barley microspore cultures and embryogenic suspension cultures, as an in vitro system which permitted easy handling for comparison. There was an increase in caspase 3-like activity and cell death after stress treatment in microspore and suspension cultures, while ROS increased in non-induced microspores and suspension cultures. Treatments of the cultures with a caspase 3 inhibitor, DEVD-CHO, significantly reduced the cell death percentages. Stress-treated embryogenic suspension cultures exhibited high NO signals and cell death, while treatment with S-nitrosoglutathione (NO donor) in control suspension cultures resulted in even higher cell death. In contrast, in microspore cultures, NO production was detected after stress, and, in the case of 4-day microspore cultures, in embryogenic microspores accompanying the initiation of cell divisions. Subsequent treatments of stress-treated microspore cultures with ROS and NO scavengers resulted in a decreasing cell death during the early stages, but later they produced a delay in embryo development as well as a decrease in the percentage of embryogenesis in microspores. Results showed that the ROS increase was involved in the stress-induced programmed cell death occurring at early stages in both non-induced microspores and embryogenic suspension cultures; whereas NO played a dual role after

  13. Investigation of Stressful Experiences, Self-Evaluations, and Self-Standards as Predictors of Sexual Activity During Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Erika M.; DuBois, David L.

    2004-01-01

    Stressful experiences, self-evaluations, and self-standards associated with multiple contexts of development (i.e., school, family, sports/athletics) were investigated as predictors of initiation of sexual activity during the transition to adolescence. A sample of 134 seventh and eighth graders was followed as part of a 4-wave, 2-year longitudinal…

  14. Schizophrenia and reelin: a model based on prenatal stress to study epigenetics, brain development and behavior.

    PubMed

    Negrón-Oyarzo, Ignacio; Lara-Vásquez, Ariel; Palacios-García, Ismael; Fuentealba, Pablo; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder that results in a significant disability for the patient. The disorder is characterized by impairment of the adaptive orchestration of actions, a cognitive function that is mainly dependent on the prefrontal cortex. This behavioral deficit, together with cellular and neurophysiological alterations in the prefrontal cortex, as well as reduced density of GABAergic cells and aberrant oscillatory activity, all indicate structural and functional deficits of the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia. Among the several risk factors for the development of schizophrenia, stress during the prenatal period has been identified as crucial. Thus, it is proposed that prenatal stress induces neurodevelopmental alterations in the prefrontal cortex that are expressed as cognitive impairment observed in schizophrenia. However, the precise mechanisms that link prenatal stress with the impairment of prefrontal cortex function is largely unknown. Reelin is an extracellular matrix protein involved in the development of cortical neural connectivity at embryonic stages, and in synaptic plasticity at postnatal stages. Interestingly, down-regulation of reelin expression has been associated with epigenetic changes in the reelin gene of the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenic patients. We recently showed that, similar to schizophrenic patients, prenatal stress induces down-expression of reelin associated with the methylation of its promoter in the rodent prefrontal cortex. These alterations were paralleled with altered prefrontal cortex functional connectivity and impairment in prefrontal cortex-dependent behavioral tasks. Therefore, considering molecular, cellular, physiological and behavioral evidence, we propose a unifying framework that links prenatal stress and prefrontal malfunction through epigenetic alterations of the reelin gene. PMID:26968981

  15. The clpB gene is involved in the stress response of Myxococcus xanthus during vegetative growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hongwei; Luan, Jia; He, Xuesong; Lux, Renate

    2012-01-01

    The Clp/HSP100 family of molecular chaperones is ubiquitous in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These proteins play important roles in refolding, disaggregating and degrading proteins damaged by stress. As a subclass of the Clp/HSP100 family, ClpB has been shown to be involved in various stress responses as well as other functions in bacteria. In the present study, we investigated the role of a predicted ClpB-encoding gene, MXAN5092, in the stress response during vegetative growth and development of Myxococcus xanthus. Transcriptional analysis confirmed induction of this clpB homologue under different stress conditions, and further phenotypic analysis revealed that an in-frame deletion mutant of MXAN5092 was more sensitive to various stress treatments than the wild-type strain during vegetative growth. Moreover, the absence of the MXAN5092 gene resulted in decreased heat tolerance of myxospores, indicating the involvement of this clpB homologue in the stress response during the development of myxospores. The M. xanthus recombinant ClpB (MXAN5092) protein also showed a general chaperone activity in vitro. Overall, our genetic and phenotypic analysis of the predicted ATP-dependent chaperone protein ClpB (MXAN5092) demonstrated that it functions as a chaperone protein and plays an important role in cellular stress tolerance during both vegetative growth and development of M. xanthus. PMID:22790397

  16. Early life stress perturbs the maturation of microglia in the developing hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Delpech, Jean-Christophe; Wei, Lan; Hao, Jin; Yu, Xiaoqing; Madore, Charlotte; Butovsky, Oleg; Kaffman, Arie

    2016-10-01

    Children exposed to abuse or neglect show abnormal hippocampal development and similar findings have been reported in rodent models. Using brief daily separation (BDS), a mouse model of early life stress, we previously showed that exposure to BDS impairs hippocampal function in adulthood and perturbs synaptic maturation, synaptic pruning, axonal growth and myelination in the developing hippocampus. Given that microglia are involved in these developmental processes, we tested whether BDS impairs microglial activity in the hippocampus of 14 (during BDS) and 28-day old mice (one week after BDS). We found that BDS increased the density and altered the morphology of microglia in the hippocampus of 14-day old pups, effects that were no longer present on postnatal day (PND) 28. Despite the normal cell number and morphology seen at PND28, the molecular signature of hippocampal microglia, assessed using the NanoString immune panel, was altered at both ages. We showed that during normal hippocampal development, microglia undergo significant changes between PND14 and PND28, including reduced cell density, decreased ex vivo phagocytic activity, and an increase in the expression of genes involved in inflammation and cell migration. However, microglia harvested from the hippocampus of 28-day old BDS mice showed an increase in phagocytic activity and reduced expression of genes that normally increase across development. Promoter analysis indicated that alteration in the transcriptional activity of PU.1, Creb1, Sp1, and RelA accounted for most of the transcriptional changes seen during normal microglia development and for most of the BDS-induced changes at PND14 and PND28. These findings are the first to demonstrate that early life stress dysregulates microglial function in the developing hippocampus and to identify key transcription factors that are likely to mediate these changes. PMID:27301858

  17. Spontaneous network activity and synaptic development

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Throughout development, the nervous system produces patterned spontaneous activity. Research over the last two decades has revealed a core group of mechanisms that mediate spontaneous activity in diverse circuits. Many circuits engage several of these mechanisms sequentially to accommodate developmental changes in connectivity. In addition to shared mechanisms, activity propagates through developing circuits and neuronal pathways (i.e. linked circuits in different brain areas) in stereotypic patterns. Increasing evidence suggests that spontaneous network activity shapes synaptic development in vivo. Variations in activity-dependent plasticity may explain how similar mechanisms and patterns of activity can be employed to establish diverse circuits. Here, I will review common mechanisms and patterns of spontaneous activity in emerging neural networks and discuss recent insights into their contribution to synaptic development. PMID:24280071

  18. Preconditioning of the Eibsee rock avalanche by deglaciation and development of critical bedrock stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, Kerry; Hofmayer, Felix; Kessler, Barbara; Krautblatter, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The impact of glacier retreat on rock slope instability since the Last Glacial Maximum is the subject of ongoing debate. Rock slope activity since ice retreat is typically attributed to increased kinematic freedom as a result of erosion during glaciation, debuttressing of valley walls which may have been supported by glacier ice, specific patterns of Holocene seismicity, or an exposure of rock slopes to increased chemical and biological weathering during the present interglacial. Here, rather than looking for a particular driver or trigger for rock slope instability, we evaluate the potential for rock mass degradation in response to an increase in tensile stress or micro-cracking in critically stressed near-surface bedrock (0 - 2 km depth). Instead of focusing on a specific driver, this allows us to identify regions in which fracture development is likely to be ongoing, and slope stability is therefore decreasing with time. Combining two orthogonal cross-sections, we evaluate stress changes and fracture development in the Zugspitze region of the Wetterstein Mountains (southern Germany) using an elasto-plastic 2-D FEM model (Phase2 from Rocscience). Based on geological evidence, we reconstruct the 3-D topography of the former Zugspitze peak, prior to what we estimate to be a 165 Mm3 collapse (previously dated at 3700 B.P.). We then impose initial stress conditions consistent with the tectonic and exhumation history of the region, as well as rock mechanical attributes derived from a fracture survey of the Zugspitzplatt and results of standard laboratory testing of Wettersteinkalk, the dominant lithology in the region. By imposing ice loading through a series of glacial-interglacial cycles, we are able to generate, and maintain critical stresses and low levels of fracture propagation beneath the Zugspitzplatt and at the location of the rock avalanche release throughout deglaciation, supporting our field observations. We then simulate weathering near the model surface

  19. Variability in emotional responsiveness and coping style during active avoidance as a window onto psychological vulnerability to stress.

    PubMed

    Gorka, Adam X; LaBar, Kevin S; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2016-05-01

    Individual differences in coping styles are associated with psychological vulnerability to stress. Recent animal research suggests that coping styles reflect trade-offs between proactive and reactive threat responses during active avoidance paradigms, with proactive responses associated with better stress tolerance. Based on these preclinical findings, we developed a novel instructed active avoidance paradigm to characterize patterns of proactive and reactive responses using behavioral, motoric, and autonomic measures in humans. Analyses revealed significant inter-individual variability not only in the magnitude of general emotional responsiveness but also the likelihood to specifically express proactive or reactive responses. In men but not women, individual differences in general emotional responsiveness were linked to increased trait anxiety while proactive coping style was linked to increased trait aggression. These patterns are consistent with preclinical findings and suggest that instructed active avoidance paradigms may be useful in assessing psychological vulnerability to stress using objective behavioral measures. PMID:26922874

  20. Distinct activation of primary human BDCA1(+) dendritic cells upon interaction with stressed or infected β cells.

    PubMed

    Schulte, B M; Kers-Rebel, E D; Bottino, R; Piganelli, J D; Galama, J M D; Engelse, M A; de Koning, E J P; Adema, G J

    2016-06-01

    Derailment of immune responses can lead to autoimmune type 1 diabetes, and this can be accelerated or even induced by local stress caused by inflammation or infection. Dendritic cells (DCs) shape both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we report on the responses of naturally occurring human myeloid BDCA1(+) DCs towards differentially stressed pancreatic β cells. Our data show that BDCA1(+) DCs in human pancreas-draining lymph node (pdLN) suspensions and blood-derived BDCA1(+) DCs both effectively engulf β cells, thus mimicking physiological conditions. Upon uptake of enterovirus-infected, but not mock-infected cells, BDCA1(+) DCs induced interferon (IFN)-α/β responses, co-stimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Notably, induction of stress in β cells by ultraviolet irradiation, culture in serum-free medium or cytokine-induced stress did not provoke strong DC activation, despite efficient phagocytosis. DC activation correlated with the amount of virus used to infect β cells and required RNA within virally infected cells. DCs encountering enterovirus-infected β cells, but not those incubated with mock-infected or stressed β cells, suppressed T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines and variably induced IFN-γ in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Thus, stressed β cells have little effect on human BDCA1(+) DC activation and function, while enterovirus-infected β cells impact these cells significantly, which could help to explain their role in development of autoimmune diabetes in individuals at risk. PMID:26888163

  1. The Development, Evaluation, and Validation of a Financial Stress Scale for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern, Jebediah J.; O'Brien, William H.; Goetz, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Financial stress is commonly experienced among college students and is associated with adverse academic, mental health, and physical health outcomes. Surprisingly, no validated measures of financial stress have been developed for undergraduate populations. The present study was conducted to generate and evaluate a measure of financial stress for…

  2. Assessing College Student-Athletes' Life Stress: Initial Measurement Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Frank Jing-Horng; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Chan, Yuan-Shuo; Cheen, Jang-Rong; Kao, Kuei-Tsu

    2012-01-01

    College student-athletes have unique life stress that warrants close attention. The purpose of this study was to develop a reliable and valid measurement assessing college student-athletes' life stress. In Study 1, a focus group discussion and Delphi method produced a questionnaire draft, termed the College Student-Athletes' Life Stress Scale. In…

  3. Activation of the σE-Dependent Stress Pathway by Conjugative TraR May Anticipate Conjugational Stress

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Elicia D.; Gopalkrishnan, Saumya; Girard, Mary E.; Blankschien, Matthew D.; Ross, Wilma

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer by conjugation plays a major role in bacterial evolution, allowing the acquisition of new traits, such as virulence and resistance to antibacterial agents. With the increased antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens, a better understanding of how bacteria modulate conjugation under changing environments and the genetic factors involved is needed. Despite the evolutionary advantages conjugation may confer, the process can be quite stressful for the donor cell. Here, we characterize the ability of TraR, encoded on the episomal F′ plasmid, to upregulate the σE extracytoplasmic stress pathway in Escherichia coli. TraR, a DksA homolog, modulates transcription initiation through the secondary channel of RNA polymerase. We show here that TraR activates transcription directly; however, unlike DksA, it does so without using ppGpp as a cofactor. TraR expression can stimulate the σE extracytoplasmic stress response independently of the DegS/RseA signal transduction cascade. In the absence of TraR, bacteria carrying conjugative plasmids become more susceptible to external stress. We propose that TraR increases the concentrations of periplasmic chaperones and proteases by directly activating the transcription of σE-dependent promoters; this increased protein folding capacity may prepare the bacterium to endure the periplasmic stress of sex pilus biosynthesis during mating. PMID:25535270

  4. Drought stress delays endosperm development and misregulates genes associated with cytoskeleton organization and grain quality proteins in developing wheat seeds.

    PubMed

    Begcy, Kevin; Walia, Harkamal

    2015-11-01

    Drought stress is a major yield-limiting factor for wheat. Wheat yields are particularly sensitive to drought stress during reproductive development. Early seed development stage is an important determinant of seed size, one of the yield components. We specifically examined the impact of drought stress imposed during postzygotic early seed development in wheat. We imposed a short-term drought stress on plants with day-old seeds and observed that even a short-duration drought stress significantly reduced the size of developing seeds as well as mature seeds. Drought stress delayed the developmental transition from syncytial to cellularized stage of endosperm. Coincident with reduced seed size and delayed endosperm development, a subset of genes associated with cytoskeleton organization was misregulated in developing seeds under drought-stressed. Several genes linked to hormone pathways were also differentially regulated in response to drought stress in early seeds. Notably, drought stress strongly repressed the expression of wheat storage protein genes such as gliadins, glutenins and avenins as early as 3 days after pollination. Our results provide new insights on how some of the early seed developmental events are impacted by water stress, and the underlying molecular pathways that can possibly impact both grain size and quality in wheat. PMID:26475192

  5. Transitory activation of the central and ovarian norepinephrine systems during cold stress-induced polycystic ovary in rats.

    PubMed

    Bernuci, M P; Leite, C M; Barros, P; Kalil, B; Leoni, G B; Del Bianco-Borges, B; Franci, C R; Szawka, R E; Lara, H E; Anselmo-Franci, J A

    2013-01-01

    Cold stress-induced ovarian sympathetic activation is associated with the development of ovarian cysts in rats. Although we have hypothesised that polycystic ovary (PCO) features induced by cold stress, as prevented by lesion of the noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus (LC), were a result of the increased activity of the ovarian norepinephrine (NE) system, this was not evident after 8 weeks of stress. In the present study, we investigated the temporal changes in LC and ovarian NE activities and steroid secretion in rats exposed to single (SS) or repeated (RS) cold stress. SS and 4 week (4W)-RS but not 8 week (8W)-RS increased c-Fos expression in the LC and ovarian NE release. Plasma oestradiol, testosterone and progesterone levels tended to increase in 4W-RS and were elevated in 8W-RS rats, which displayed PCO morphology. β-adrenergic receptor agonist increased steroid hormone release from the ovary of unstressed (US) but not from 8W-RS rats. To determine whether increased activity of noradrenergic system during the initial 4 weeks of RS would be sufficient to promote PCO, rats were exposed to 4 weeks of cold stress and kept in ambient temperature for the next 4 weeks (4W-RS/4W-US). Accordingly, PCO morphology, increased steroid secretion and decreased ovulation rate were found in 4W-RS/4W-US rats, strengthening the hypothesis that the initial increase in NE release triggers the development of PCO. The correlated activity of LC neurones and ovarian noradrenergic terminals and the induction of PCO in 4W-RS/4W-US rats provide functional evidence for a major role of NE in disrupting follicular development and causing the long-lasting endocrine abnormalities found in stress-induced PCO. PMID:22882492

  6. Dynamics of locomotor activity and heat production in rats after acute stress.

    PubMed

    Pertsov, S S; Alekseeva, I V; Koplik, E V; Sharanova, N E; Kirbaeva, N V; Gapparov, M M G

    2014-05-01

    The dynamics of locomotor activity and heat production were studied in rats demonstrating passive and active behavior in the open field test at different time after exposure to acute emotional stress caused by 12-h immobilization during dark hours. The most pronounced changes in behavior and heat production followed by disturbances in circadian rhythms of these parameters were detected within the first 2 days after stress. In contrast to behaviorally active rats, the most significant decrease in locomotor activity and heat production of passive animals subjected to emotional stress was observed during dark hours. Circadian rhythms of behavior and heat production in rats tended to recover on day 3 after immobilization stress. These data illustrate the specificity of metabolic and behavioral changes reflecting the shift of endogenous biological rhythms in individuals with different prognostic resistance to stress at different terms after exposure to negative emotiogenic stimuli. PMID:24906959

  7. Markers of oxidative stress and erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity in older men and women with differing physical activity.

    PubMed

    Rowiński, Rafał; Kozakiewicz, Mariusz; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Hübner-Woźniak, Elżbieta; Kędziora, Józef

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between markers of oxidative stress and erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity and physical activity in older men and women. The present study included 481 participants (233 men and 248 women) in the age group 65-69 years (127 men and 125 women) and in the age group 90 years and over (106 men and 123 women). The classification of respondents by physical activity was based on answers to the question if, in the past 12 months, they engaged in any pastimes which require physical activity. The systemic oxidative stress status was assessed by measuring plasma iso-PGF2α and protein carbonyl concentration as well as erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes activity, i.e., superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR). The concentration of plasma iso-PGF2α and protein carbonyls (CP) was lower in groups of younger men and women compared to the respective older groups. In all examined groups, physical activity resulted in decrease of these oxidative stress markers and simultaneously caused adaptive increase in the erythrocyte SOD activity. Additionally, in active younger men CAT, GPx, and GR activities were higher than in sedentary ones. In conclusion, oxidative stress increase is age-related, but physical activity can reduce oxidative stress markers and induce adaptive increase in the erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity, especially SOD, even in old and very old men and women. PMID:23911531

  8. Sensitivity to stress-induced reproductive dysfunction is associated with a selective but not a generalized increase in activity of the adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Herod, S M; Dettmer, A M; Novak, M A; Meyer, J S; Cameron, J L

    2011-01-01

    Stress-induced reproductive dysfunction is a relatively common cause of infertility in women. In response to everyday life stress, some individuals readily develop reproductive dysfunction (i.e., they are stress sensitive), whereas others are more stress resilient. Female cynomolgus monkeys, when exposed to mild combined psychosocial and metabolic stress (change in social environment + 20% reduced calorie diet), can be categorized as stress sensitive (SS; they rapidly become anovulatory in response to stress), medium stress resilient (MSR; they slowly become anovulatory in response to prolonged stress), or highly stress resilient (HSR; they maintain normal menstrual cycles in response to stress). In this study, we examined whether increased sensitivity to stress-induced reproductive dysfunction is associated with elevated adrenal axis activity by measuring 1) the diurnal release of ACTH and cortisol, 2) ACTH and cortisol in response to an acute psychological stress, 3) the percent suppression of cortisol in response to dexamethasone negative feedback, 4) the diurnal release of ACTH and cortisol following exposure to mild psychosocial and metabolic stress, 5) the concentration of cortisol in hair, and 6) adrenal weight. SS monkeys (n = 5) did not differ from MSR (n = 5) or HSR (n = 7) monkeys in any measurement of baseline HPA axis activity or the integrated measurements of chronic HPA axis activity. However, MSR + SS monkeys (n = 10) did secrete more cortisol than HSR monkeys during the daytime hours (1000-1800) following exposure to a novel social environment and reduced diet. We conclude that increased activity of the HPA axis is unlikely to be the primary mechanism causing increased sensitivity to stress-induced reproductive dysfunction. PMID:20959528

  9. From Global Stresses to Local Cell Packing During Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubensky, David

    2011-03-01

    To perform their functions, cells in epithelial tissues must often adopt highly regular packings. It is still not fully understood how these ordered arrangements of cells arise from disordered, proliferative epithelia during development. I will use experimental and theoretical studies on an attractive model system, the cone cell mosaic in fish retina, to illustrate some ways that mechanical forces and cell signaling can interact to produce this transformation. Experiments examining the response to surgical lesions suggest that the correct mechanical environment at the tissue scale is essential to induce cone cells to rearrange into a rectangular lattice. Starting from this observation, I will argue that large-scale mechanical stresses naturally couple to and orient cell polarization and that this coupling can lead cells to line up in regular rows, as observed in the fish retina. This model predicts that cells in the rows will adopt characteristic trapezoidal shapes and that fragments of rows will persist even in tissue where the mosaic pattern is disrupted by lesions; these predictions are borne out by an analysis of cell packings at the level of the zonula occludens in wildtype and lesioned retinas. Supported by NSF grant IOS-0952873.

  10. Development of orthotropic birefringent materials for photoelastic stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Niiro, T.; Koller, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Materials were selected and fabrication procedures developed for orthotropic birefringent materials. An epoxy resin (Maraset 658/558 system) was selected as the matrix material. Fibers obtained from style 3733 glass cloth and type 1062 glass roving were used as reinforcement. Two different fabrication procedures were used. In the first one, layers of unidirectional fibers removed from the glass cloth were stacked, impregnated with resin, bagged and cured in the autoclave at an elevated temperature. In the second procedure, the glass roving was drywound over metal frames, impregnated with resin and cured at room temperature under pressure and vacuum in an autoclave. Unidirectional, angle-ply and quasi-isotropic laminates of two thicknesses and with embedded flaws were fabricated. The matrix and the unidirectional glass/epoxy material were fully characterized. The density, fiber volume ratio, mechanical, and optical properties were determined. The fiber volume ratio was over 0.50. Birefringent properties were in good agreement with predictions based on a stress proportioning concept and also, with one exception, with properties predicted by a finite element analysis.

  11. Parenting Stress After Deployment in Navy Active Duty Fathers.

    PubMed

    Yablonsky, Abigail M; Yan, Guofen; Bullock, Linda

    2016-08-01

    Military fathers are being deployed, and leaving their families, for greater lengths of time and more frequently than ever before. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of recent deployment on parenting stress in U.S. Navy fathers with young children. Of the 111 participants who completed the one-time study questionnaire at a large military outpatient clinic on the Eastern seaboard, 67.6% had returned from a ship-based deployment. Regression analyses were performed, using the Parenting Stress Index as the outcome variable, deployment elements (such as time away from home in the past 5 years) as predictors, and adjusting for other factors such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Higher perceived threat and greater warfare exposure were both associated with increased parenting stress (p < 0.05) in the unadjusted model. These associations were greatly attenuated and no longer significant after adjustment for depression. In addition, rates of positive screens for PTSD and depression (17.1%) in this sample were higher than in other recent studies. In summary, these data indicate that various deployment factors are associated with increased parenting stress in Navy fathers back from deployment within the past year; these relationships are largely explained by depressive symptoms. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:27483524

  12. Nature of stress: differential effects on brain acetylcholinesterase activity and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Amitava; Rai, Deepak; Dikshit, Madhu; Palit, Gautam; Nath, Chandishwar

    2005-09-16

    Effect of acute, chronic-predictable and chronic-unpredictable stress on memory and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was investigated in rats. The animals were subjected to 3 type of stressors--(1) acute immobilization stress, (2) chronic-predictable stress i.e., immobilization daily for 5 consecutive days and (3) chronic-unpredictable stress that included reversal of light/dark cycle, over-night fasting, forced-swimming, immobilization and forced exercise in random unpredictable manner daily for 5 consecutive days. Learning and memory function was studied by single trial Passive avoidance test. AChE activity was assayed spectrophotometrically in the detergent (DS) and salt (SS) soluble fractions in different brain regions. Learning was obtained in acute and chronic-predictable stress groups but not in chronic-unpredictable group. Acute, chronic-predictable and chronic-unpredictable stress caused significant decrease in AChE activity in the DS fraction of cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus as compared to control. Results indicate that AChE in DS fraction is predominantly affected in stressed and stressed-trained group but cognition is affected only by chronic-unpredictable stress. In acute and chronic-predictable groups the decreased AChE activity in the hippocampal DS fraction during learning may be responsible to maintain cognitive function by enhancing the cholinergic activity. PMID:16098992

  13. Human Development Program: Level VI Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Geraldine

    The curriculum guide presents the activities component of the Human Development Program for grade 6. The Human Development Program (HDP) is an affective curricular approach developed by psychologists to aid teachers in instilling responsibility and self-confidence in children. The nucleus of the Human Development Program is a circle session…

  14. Selective downregulation of mitochondrial electron transport chain activity and increased oxidative stress in human atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Emelyanova, Larisa; Ashary, Zain; Cosic, Milanka; Negmadjanov, Ulugbek; Ross, Gracious; Rizvi, Farhan; Olet, Susan; Kress, David; Sra, Jasbir; Tajik, A Jamil; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Shi, Yang; Jahangir, Arshad

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria are critical for maintaining normal cardiac function, and a deficit in mitochondrial energetics can lead to the development of the substrate that promotes atrial fibrillation (AF) and its progression. However, the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and AF in humans is still not fully defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate differences in the functional activity of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes and oxidative stress in right atrial tissue from patients without (non-AF) and with AF (AF) who were undergoing open-heart surgery and were not significantly different for age, sex, major comorbidities, and medications. The overall functional activity of the electron transport chain (ETC), NADH:O2 oxidoreductase activity, was reduced by 30% in atrial tissue from AF compared with non-AF patients. This was predominantly due to a selective reduction in complex I (0.06 ± 0.007 vs. 0.09 ± 0.006 nmol·min(-1)·citrate synthase activity(-1), P = 0.02) and II (0.11 ± 0.012 vs. 0.16 ± 0.012 nmol·min(-1)·citrate synthase activity(-1), P = 0.003) functional activity in AF patients. Conversely, complex V activity was significantly increased in AF patients (0.21 ± 0.027 vs. 0.12 ± 0.01 nmol·min(-1)·citrate synthase activity(-1), P = 0.005). In addition, AF patients exhibited a higher oxidative stress with increased production of mitochondrial superoxide (73 ± 17 vs. 11 ± 2 arbitrary units, P = 0.03) and 4-hydroxynonenal level (77.64 ± 30.2 vs. 9.83 ± 2.83 ng·mg(-1) protein, P = 0.048). Our findings suggest that AF is associated with selective downregulation of ETC activity and increased oxidative stress that can contribute to the progression of the substrate for AF. PMID:27199126

  15. Computer Game Development as a Literacy Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owston, Ron; Wideman, Herb; Ronda, Natalia Sinitskaya; Brown, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This study examined computer game development as a pedagogical activity to motivate and engage students in curriculum-related literacy activities. We hypothesized that as a consequence, students would improve their traditional reading and writing skills as well as develop new digital literacy skills. Eighteen classes of grade 4 students were…

  16. Shear stress activation of SREBP1 in endothelial cells is mediated by integrins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Chen, Benjamin P-C; Lu, Min; Zhu, Yi; Stemerman, Michael B; Chien, Shu; Shyy, John Y-J

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of shear stress on the sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1) in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and the mechanotransduction mechanism involved. Application of a shear stress (12 dyn/cm(2)) caused the proteolytic cleavage of SREBP1 and the ensuing translocation of its transcription factor domain into the nucleus. As a result, shear stress increased the mRNAs encoding the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), as well as the binding of (125)I-LDL. Using a step flow channel, we showed that SREBP1 activation in ECs under laminar flow is transient, but disturbed flow causes sustained activation. In studying the shear stress-elicited molecular signaling that activates SREBP1, we found that blocking the beta(1)-integrin with the AIIB2 blocking-type monoclonal antibody inhibited SREBP1 activation induced by shear stress. EC attachment to fibronectin or the activation of beta(1)-integrin in the suspended ECs by the TS2/16 monoclonal antibody was sufficient for SREBP1 activation. Furthermore, transient transfection assays showed that dominant-negative mutants of focal adhesion kinase and c-Src attenuated the shear stress-increased LDLR promoter activity. These results demonstrate that integrin signaling plays a critical role in the modulation of SREBP in ECs in response to shear stress. PMID:11788464

  17. Implementation and Assessment of a School Staff Development Model for Changing School Climate and Teacher Stress. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gress, James R.; Inglis, Joan D.

    A Teachers Corps staff development project involved the collaboration of a school district, the community, and a college of education in a variety of activities designed to improve school climate and to reduce teacher stress. Descriptions are given of the needs assessments conducted among school staff, students, and community members from the…

  18. Acute stress-induced cortisol elevations mediate reward system activity during subconscious processing of sexual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Oei, Nicole Y L; Both, Stephanie; van Heemst, Diana; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Stress is thought to alter motivational processes by increasing dopamine (DA) secretion in the brain's "reward system", and its key region, the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). However, stress studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), mainly found evidence for stress-induced decreases in NAcc responsiveness toward reward cues. Results from both animal and human PET studies indicate that the stress hormone cortisol may be crucial in the interaction between stress and dopaminergic actions. In the present study we therefore investigated whether cortisol mediated the effect of stress on DA-related responses to -subliminal-presentation of reward cues using the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), which is known to reliably enhance cortisol levels. Young healthy males (n = 37) were randomly assigned to the TSST or control condition. After stress induction, brain activation was assessed using fMRI during a backward-masking paradigm in which potentially rewarding (sexual), emotionally negative and neutral stimuli were presented subliminally, masked by pictures of inanimate objects. A region of interest analysis showed that stress decreased activation in the NAcc in response to masked sexual cues (voxel-corrected, p<05). Furthermore, with mediation analysis it was found that high cortisol levels were related to stronger NAcc activation, showing that cortisol acted as a suppressor variable in the negative relation between stress and NAcc activation. The present findings indicate that cortisol is crucially involved in the relation between stress and the responsiveness of the reward system. Although generally stress decreases activation in the NAcc in response to rewarding stimuli, high stress-induced cortisol levels suppress this relation, and are associated with stronger NAcc activation. Individuals with a high cortisol response to stress might on one hand be protected against reductions in reward sensitivity, which has been linked to anhedonia and depression, but

  19. Estradiol levels modulate brain activity and negative responses to psychosocial stress across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Albert, Kimberly; Pruessner, Jens; Newhouse, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Although ovarian hormones are thought to have a potential role in the well-known sex difference in mood and anxiety disorders, the mechanisms through which ovarian hormone changes contribute to stress regulation are not well understood. One mechanism by which ovarian hormones might impact mood regulation is by mediating the effect of psychosocial stress, which often precedes depressive episodes and may have mood consequences that are particularly relevant in women. In the current study, brain activity and mood response to psychosocial stress was examined in healthy, normally cycling women at either the high or low estradiol phase of the menstrual cycle. Twenty eight women were exposed to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST), with brain activity determined through functional magnetic resonance imaging, and behavioral response assessed with subjective mood and stress measures. Brain activity responses to psychosocial stress differed between women in the low versus high estrogen phase of the menstrual cycle: women with high estradiol levels showed significantly less deactivation in limbic regions during psychosocial stress compared to women with low estradiol levels. Additionally, women with higher estradiol levels also had less subjective distress in response to the MIST than women with lower estradiol levels. The results of this study suggest that, in normally cycling premenopausal women, high estradiol levels attenuate the brain activation changes and negative mood response to psychosocial stress. Normal ovarian hormone fluctuations may alter the impact of psychosocially stressful events by presenting periods of increased vulnerability to psychosocial stress during low estradiol phases of the menstrual cycle. This menstrual cycle-related fluctuation in stress vulnerability may be relevant to the greater risk for affective disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder in women. PMID:26123902

  20. Development of a stress scale for pregnant women in the South Asian context: the A-Z Stress Scale.

    PubMed

    Kazi, A; Fatmi, Z; Hatcher, J; Niaz, U; Aziz, A

    2009-01-01

    Stress in pregnancy can lead to low-birth-weight and preterm babies and to psychological consequences such as anxiety and depression during pregnancy and the puerperium. Previous scales to measure stress contain items that overlap with the symptoms of pregnancy. A stress scale was developed based on in-depth interviews with pregnant women in Pakistan. Construct validity, test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability were carried out. Cronbach alpha was 0.82 for the 30 short-listed items, with item-total correlations of 0.2-0.8. Multidimensional scaling determined 2 dimensions: socioenvironmental hassles and chronic illnesses. This was the first scale developed for pregnant women based on stressors in a developing country in South Asia. PMID:19554982

  1. Evidence for a Role of Adolescent Endocannabinoid Signaling in Regulating HPA Axis Stress Responsivity and Emotional Behavior Development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tiffany T-Y; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a period characterized by many distinct physical, behavioral, and neural changes during the transition from child- to adulthood. In particular, adolescent neural changes often confer greater plasticity and flexibility, yet with this comes the potential for heightened vulnerability to external perturbations such as stress exposure or recreational drug use. There is substantial evidence to suggest that factors such as adolescent stress exposure have longer lasting and sometimes more deleterious effects on an organism than stress exposure during adulthood. Moreover, the adolescent neuroendocrine response to stress exposure is different from that of adults, suggesting that further maturation of the adolescent hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is required. The endocannabinoid (eCB) system is a potential candidate underlying these age-dependent differences given that it is an important regulator of the adult HPA axis and neuronal development. Therefore, this review will focus on (1) the functionality of the adolescent HPA axis, (2) eCB regulation of the adult HPA axis, (3) dynamic changes in eCB signaling during the adolescent period, (4) the effects of adolescent stress exposure on the eCB system, and (5) modulation of HPA axis activity and emotional behavior by adolescent cannabinoid treatment. Collectively, the emerging picture suggests that the eCB system mediates interactions between HPA axis stress responsivity, emotionality, and maturational stage. These findings may be particularly relevant to our understanding of the development of affective disorders and the risks of adolescent cannabis consumption on emotional health and stress responsivity. PMID:26638764

  2. Regulatory Networks in Pollen Development under Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kamal D.; Nayyar, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Cold stress modifies anthers’ metabolic pathways to induce pollen sterility. Cold-tolerant plants, unlike the susceptible ones, produce high proportion of viable pollen. Anthers in susceptible plants, when exposed to cold stress, increase abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism and reduce ABA catabolism. Increased ABA negatively regulates expression of tapetum cell wall bound invertase and monosaccharide transport genes resulting in distorted carbohydrate pool in anther. Cold-stress also reduces endogenous levels of the bioactive gibberellins (GAs), GA4 and GA7, in susceptible anthers by repression of the GA biosynthesis genes. Here, we discuss recent findings on mechanisms of cold susceptibility in anthers which determine pollen sterility. We also discuss differences in regulatory pathways between cold-stressed anthers of susceptible and tolerant plants that decide pollen sterility or viability. PMID:27066044

  3. Phosducin influences sympathetic activity and prevents stress-induced hypertension in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Beetz, Nadine; Harrison, Michael D; Brede, Marc; Zong, Xiangang; Urbanski, Michal J; Sietmann, Anika; Kaufling, Jennifer; Lorkowski, Stefan; Barrot, Michel; Seeliger, Mathias W; Vieira-Coelho, Maria Augusta; Hamet, Pavel; Gaudet, Daniel; Seda, Ondrej; Tremblay, Johanne; Kotchen, Theodore A; Kaldunski, Mary; Nüsing, Rolf; Szabo, Bela; Jacob, Howard J; Cowley, Allen W; Biel, Martin; Stoll, Monika; Lohse, Martin J; Broeckel, Ulrich; Hein, Lutz

    2009-12-01

    Hypertension and its complications represent leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Although the cause of hypertension is unknown in most patients, genetic factors are recognized as contributing significantly to an individual's lifetime risk of developing the condition. Here, we investigated the role of the G protein regulator phosducin (Pdc) in hypertension. Mice with a targeted deletion of the gene encoding Pdc (Pdc-/- mice) had increased blood pressure despite normal cardiac function and vascular reactivity, and displayed elevated catecholamine turnover in the peripheral sympathetic system. Isolated postganglionic sympathetic neurons from Pdc-/- mice showed prolonged action potential firing after stimulation with acetylcholine and increased firing frequencies during membrane depolarization. Furthermore, Pdc-/- mice displayed exaggerated increases in blood pressure in response to post-operative stress. Candidate gene-based association studies in 2 different human populations revealed several SNPs in the PDC gene to be associated with stress-dependent blood pressure phenotypes. Individuals homozygous for the G allele of an intronic PDC SNP (rs12402521) had 12-15 mmHg higher blood pressure than those carrying the A allele. These findings demonstrate that PDC is an important modulator of sympathetic activity and blood pressure and may thus represent a promising target for treatment of stress-dependent hypertension. PMID:19959875

  4. Diazepam blocks striatal lipid peroxidation and improves stereotyped activity in a rat model of acute stress.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Cuesta, Luis A; Márquez-Valadez, Berenice; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Escobar-Briones, Carolina; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Alvarez-Ruiz, Yarummy; Maldonado, Perla D; Santana, Ricardo A; Santamaría, Abel; Carrillo-Mora, Paul

    2011-11-01

    In this work, the effect of a single dose of diazepam was tested on different markers of oxidative damage in the striatum of rats in an acute model of immobilization (restraint) stress. In addition, the locomotor activity was measured at the end of the restraint period. Immobilization was induced to animals for 24 hr, and then, lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase activity and content, and mitochondrial function were all estimated in striatal tissue samples. Corticosterone levels were measured in serum. Diazepam was given to rats as a pre-treatment (1 mg/kg, i.p.) 20 min. before the initiation of stress. Our results indicate that acute stress produced enhanced striatal levels of lipid peroxidation (73% above the control), decreased superoxide dismutase activity (54% below the control), reduced levels of mitochondrial function (35% below the control) and increased corticosterone serum levels (86% above the control). Pre-treatment of stressed rats with diazepam decreased the striatal lipid peroxidation levels (68% below the stress group) and improved mitochondrial function (18% above the stress group), but only mild preservation of superoxide dismutase activity was detected (17% above the stress group). In regard to the motor assessment, only the stereotyped activity was increased in the stress group with respect to control (46% above the control), and this effect was prevented by diazepam administration (30% below the stress group). The preventive actions of diazepam in this acute model of stress suggest that drugs exhibiting anxiolytic and antioxidant properties might be useful for the design of therapies against early acute phases of physic stress. PMID:21645264

  5. Mitochondrial oxidant stress in locus coeruleus is regulated by activity and nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Padilla, Javier; Guzman, Jaime N; Ilijic, Ema; Kondapalli, Jyothisri; Galtieri, Daniel J; Yang, Ben; Schieber, Simon; Oertel, Wolfgang; Wokosin, David; Schumacker, Paul T; Surmeier, D James

    2014-06-01

    Loss of noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) neurons is a prominent feature of aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). The basis of this vulnerability is not understood. To explore possible physiological determinants, we studied LC neurons using electrophysiological and optical approaches in ex vivo mouse brain slices. We found that autonomous activity in LC neurons was accompanied by oscillations in dendritic Ca(2+) concentration that were attributable to the opening of L-type Ca(2+) channels. This oscillation elevated mitochondrial oxidant stress and was attenuated by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. The relationship between activity and stress was malleable, as arousal and carbon dioxide increased the spike rate but differentially affected mitochondrial oxidant stress. Oxidant stress was also increased in an animal model of PD. Thus, our results point to activity-dependent Ca(2+) entry and a resulting mitochondrial oxidant stress as factors contributing to the vulnerability of LC neurons. PMID:24816140

  6. Voluntary locomotor activity mitigates oxidative damage associated with isolation stress in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster)

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Kelsey L.; Whitley, Brittany N.; Treidel, Lisa A.; Thompson, David; Williams, Annie; Noguera, Jose C.; Stevenson, Jennie R.; Haussmann, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    Organismal performance directly depends on an individual's ability to cope with a wide array of physiological challenges. For social animals, social isolation is a stressor that has been shown to increase oxidative stress. Another physiological challenge, routine locomotor activity, has been found to decrease oxidative stress levels. Because we currently do not have a good understanding of how diverse physiological systems like stress and locomotion interact to affect oxidative balance, we studied this interaction in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). Voles were either pair housed or isolated and within the isolation group, voles either had access to a moving wheel or a stationary wheel. We found that chronic periodic isolation caused increased levels of oxidative stress. However, within the vole group that was able to run voluntarily, longer durations of locomotor activity were associated with less oxidative stress. Our work suggests that individuals who demonstrate increased locomotor activity may be better able to cope with the social stressor of isolation. PMID:26179798

  7. Voluntary locomotor activity mitigates oxidative damage associated with isolation stress in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster).

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Kelsey L; Whitley, Brittany N; Treidel, Lisa A; Thompson, David; Williams, Annie; Noguera, Jose C; Stevenson, Jennie R; Haussmann, Mark F

    2015-07-01

    Organismal performance directly depends on an individual's ability to cope with a wide array of physiological challenges. For social animals, social isolation is a stressor that has been shown to increase oxidative stress. Another physiological challenge, routine locomotor activity, has been found to decrease oxidative stress levels. Because we currently do not have a good understanding of how diverse physiological systems like stress and locomotion interact to affect oxidative balance, we studied this interaction in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). Voles were either pair housed or isolated and within the isolation group, voles either had access to a moving wheel or a stationary wheel. We found that chronic periodic isolation caused increased levels of oxidative stress. However, within the vole group that was able to run voluntarily, longer durations of locomotor activity were associated with less oxidative stress. Our work suggests that individuals who demonstrate increased locomotor activity may be better able to cope with the social stressor of isolation. PMID:26179798

  8. Complement activation-related pseudoallergy: a stress reaction in blood triggered by nanomedicines and biologicals.

    PubMed

    Szebeni, Janos

    2014-10-01

    Intravenous injection of a variety of nanotechnology enhanced (liposomal, micellar, polymer-conjugated) and protein-based (antibodies, enzymes) drugs can lead to hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), also known as infusion, or anaphylactoid reactions. The molecular mechanism of mild to severe allergy symptoms may differ from case to case and is mostly not known, however, in many cases a major cause, or contributing factor is activation of the complement (C) system. The clinical relevance of C activation-related HSRs, a non-IgE-mediated pseudoallergy (CARPA), lies in its unpredictability and occasional lethal outcome. Accordingly, there is an unmet medical need to develop laboratory assays and animal models that quantitate CARPA. This review provides basic information on CARPA; a short history, issues of nomenclature, incidence, classification of reactogenic drugs and symptoms, and the mechanisms of C activation via different pathways. It is pointed out that anaphylatoxin-induced mast cell release may not entirely explain the severe reactions; a "second hit" on allergy mediating cells may also contribute. In addressing the increasing requirements for CARPA testing, the review evaluates the available assays and animal models, and proposes a possible algorithm for the screening of reactogenic drugs and hypersensitive patients. Finally, an analogy is proposed between CARPA and the classic stress reaction, suggesting that CARPA represents a "blood stress" reaction, a systemic fight of the body against harmful biological and chemical agents via the anaphylatoxin/mast-cell/circulatory system axis, in analogy to the body's fight of physical and emotional stress via the hypothalamo/pituitary/adrenal axis. In both cases the response to a broad variety of noxious effects are funneled into a uniform pattern of physiological changes. PMID:25124145

  9. Endothelial cell activation by hemodynamic shear stress derived from arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis access.

    PubMed

    Franzoni, Marco; Cattaneo, Irene; Longaretti, Lorena; Figliuzzi, Marina; Ene-Iordache, Bogdan; Remuzzi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Intimal hyperplasia (IH) is the first cause of failure of an arteriovenous fistula (AVF). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects on endothelial cells (ECs) of shear stress waveforms derived from AVF areas prone to develop IH. We used a cone-and-plate device to obtain real-time control of shear stress acting on EC cultures. We exposed human umbilical vein ECs for 48 h to different shear stimulations calculated in a side-to-end AVF model. Pulsatile unidirectional flow, representative of low-risk stenosis areas, induced alignment of ECs and actin fiber orientation with flow. Shear stress patterns of reciprocating flow, derived from high-risk stenosis areas, did not affect EC shape or cytoskeleton organization, which remained similar to static cultures. We also evaluated flow-induced EC expression of genes known to be involved in cytoskeletal remodeling and expression of cell adhesion molecules. Unidirectional flow induced a significant increase in Kruppel-like factor 2 mRNA expression, whereas it significantly reduced phospholipase D1, α4-integrin, and Ras p21 protein activator 1 mRNA expression. Reciprocating flow did not increase Kruppel-like factor 2 mRNA expression compared with static controls but significantly increased mRNA expression of phospholipase D1, α4-integrin, and Ras p21 protein activator 1. Reciprocating flow selectively increased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and IL-8 production. Furthermore, culture medium conditioned by ECs exposed to reciprocating flows selectively increased smooth muscle cell proliferation compared with unidirectional flow. Our results indicate that protective vascular effects induced in ECs by unidirectional pulsatile flow are not induced by reciprocating shear forces, suggesting a mechanism by which oscillating flow conditions may induce the development of IH in AVF and vascular access dysfunction. PMID:26497959

  10. Why are there lasting effects from exposure to stress during development? An analysis of current models of early stress.

    PubMed

    Chaby, Lauren E

    2016-10-01

    The potential for stressful experiences in early life to cause lasting changes in phenotype is well documented, but the functional and evolutionary context of these changes is not well understood. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the role of lasting effects of stress exposure during gestation and early development; the purpose of this review is to discuss these hypotheses in the context of human and non-human animal research in the last three decades in order to (i) further dialogues between those approaching early stress from biomedical and evolutionary/ecological perspectives, (ii) outline strengths and limitations of current hypotheses, with respect to species and context-specific effects of exposure to stress in early development, and (iii) address recent evidence suggesting that stress in early development can have beneficial effects in adulthood. It is suggested that the hypotheses discussed are not mutually exclusive, but the applicability of each hypothesis will depend upon the environmental conditions and stability a species, or perhaps even an individual, experiences in their lifetime. Potential investigations to clarify applications of the current hypotheses are discussed, including longitudinal studies that span multiple developmental stages and investigations of species where measures of fitness are possible. PMID:27208829

  11. Effect of Mechanical Stress on Cotton Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Sufang; Xin, Wanwan; Tang, Juxiang; Wang, Qinglian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Agricultural crops experience diverse mechanical stimuli, which may affect their growth and development. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of mechanical stresses caused by hanging labels from the flower petioles (HLFP) on plant shape and cotton yields in four cotton varieties: CCRI 41, DP 99B, CCRC 21, and BAI 1. HLFP significantly reduced plant height by between 7.8% and 36.5% in all four lines and also significantly reduced the number of fruiting positions per plant in the CCRI 41, DP 99B and CCRC 21 lines. However, the number of fruiting positions in BAI 1 was unaffected. HLFP also significantly reduced the boll weight for all four cultivars and the seed cotton yields for CCRI 41, DP 99B and BAI 1. Conversely, it significantly increased the seed cotton yield for CCRC 21 by 11.2%. HLFP treatment did not significantly affect the boll count in the fruiting branches of the 1st and 2nd layers in any variety, but did significantly reduce those on the 3rd and 4th fruiting branch layers for CCRI 41 and DP 99B. Similar trends were observed for the number of bolls per FP. In general, HLFP reduced plant height and boll weight. However, the lines responded differently to HLFP treatment in terms of their total numbers of fruiting positions, boll numbers, seed cotton yields, etc. Our results also suggested that HFLP responses might be delayed for some agronomy traits of some cotton genotypes, and that hanging labels from early-opening flowers might influence the properties related with those that opened later on. PMID:24363813

  12. An initial phase of JNK activation inhibits cell death early in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    PubMed

    Brown, Max; Strudwick, Natalie; Suwara, Monika; Sutcliffe, Louise K; Mihai, Adina D; Ali, Ahmed A; Watson, Jamie N; Schröder, Martin

    2016-06-15

    Accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). In mammalian cells, UPR signals generated by several ER-membrane-resident proteins, including the bifunctional protein kinase endoribonuclease IRE1α, control cell survival and the decision to execute apoptosis. Processing of XBP1 mRNA by the RNase domain of IRE1α promotes survival of ER stress, whereas activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase JNK family by IRE1α late in the ER stress response promotes apoptosis. Here, we show that activation of JNK in the ER stress response precedes activation of XBP1. This activation of JNK is dependent on IRE1α and TRAF2 and coincides with JNK-dependent induction of expression of several antiapoptotic genes, including cIap1 (also known as Birc2), cIap2 (also known as Birc3), Xiap and Birc6 ER-stressed Jnk1(-/-) Jnk2(-/-) (Mapk8(-/-) Mapk9(-/-)) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) display more pronounced mitochondrial permeability transition and increased caspase 3/7 activity compared to wild-type MEFs. Caspase 3/7 activity is also elevated in ER-stressed cIap1(-/-) cIap2(-/-) and Xiap(-/-) MEFs. These observations suggest that JNK-dependent transcriptional induction of several inhibitors of apoptosis contributes to inhibiting apoptosis early in the ER stress response. PMID:27122189

  13. Abiotic stresses activate a MAPkinase in the model grass species Lolium temulentum L.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forage and turf grasses are utilized in diverse environments which exposes them to a variety of abiotic stresses, however very little is known concerning the perception or molecular responses to these various stresses. In the model grass species Lolium temulentum (Lt), a 46 kDa mitogen-activated pro...

  14. Sustained Oxidative Stress Inhibits NF-kB Activation Partially via Inactivating the Proteasome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NF-kB is a family of important transcription factors involved in many cellular functions, such as cell survival, proliferation and stress responses. Many studies indicate that NF-kB is a stress sensitive transcription factor and its activation is regulated by reactive oxygen species. In previous s...

  15. Salidroside Suppresses HUVECs Cell Injury Induced by Oxidative Stress through Activating the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yao; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Liu, Wei-Wei; Shi, Ai-Wu; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Salidroside (SAL), one of the main effective constituents of Rhodiola rosea, has been reported to suppress oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte injury and necrosis by promoting transcription of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated genes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone1) (NQO1). However, it has not been indicated whether SAL might ameliorate endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress. Here, our study demonstrated that SAL might suppress HUVEC cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. The results of our study indicated that SAL decreased the levels of intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA), and improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), resulting in protective effects against oxidative stress-induced cell damage in HUVECs. It suppressed oxidative stress damage by inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and activating the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme genes such as HO-1 and NQO1 in HUVECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA abolished the cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress, decreased the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and NQO1, and inhibited the nucleus translocation of Nrf2 in HUVECs. This study is the first to demonstrate that SAL suppresses HUVECs cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. PMID:27517893

  16. Stress, Coping Methods, and Physical Activity among Community College Student Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tichy, Anna Mae; Means, Susan I.

    1990-01-01

    Presents findings from a survey of 236 graduates of eight community college nursing programs in Oregon, concerning graduates' perceptions of the level of stress they felt and their personal health status as students in the program, their responses to stress, and positive methods of coping (e.g., physical activity). (DMM)

  17. The Role of Active Fractures on Borehole Breakout Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahara, D.; Kohl, T.; Schoenball, M.; Müller, B.

    2013-12-01

    The properties of georeservoirs are strongly related to the stress field and their interpretation is a major target in geotechnical management. Borehole breakouts are direct indicators of the stress field as they develop due to the concentration of the highest compressional stress toward the minimum horizontal stress direction. However, the interaction with fractures might create local perturbations. Such weakened zones are often observed by localized anomalies of the borehole breakout orientation. We examined high-quality acoustic borehole televiewer (UBI) logs run in the entire granite sections at the deep well GPK4 at Soultz-sous-Forêts, France. The borehole is moderately inclined (15° - 35°) in its middle section. Detailed analysis of 1221 borehole elongation pairs in the vicinity of 1871 natural fractures observed in GPK4 well is used to infer the role of fractures on the borehole breakouts shape and orientation. Patterns of borehole breakout orientation in the vicinity of active fractures suggest that the wavelength of the borehole breakout orientation anomalies in this granite rock depend on the scale of the fracture while the rotation amplitude and direction is strongly influenced by the fracture orientation. In the upper and middle part of the well even a linear trend between fracture and breakout orientations could be established. In addition to the rotation, breakouts typically are found to be asymmetrically formed in zones of high fracture density. We find that major faults tend to create a systematic rotation of borehole breakout orientation with long spatial wavelength while abrupt changes are often observed around small fractures. The finding suggest that the borehole breakout heterogeneities are not merely governed by the principal stress heterogeneities, but that the effect of mechanical heterogeneities like elastic moduli changes, rock strength anisotropy and fracturing must be taken into account. Thus, one has to be careful to infer the

  18. The effect of microstructure on residual-stress development in short-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Eduljee, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was the identification of the key processing and microstructural parameters that affect thermal residual stresses through a series of parametric analyses on an infinite-plate geometry. In these analyses polycarbonate was chosen as a representative amorphous resin while polyetheretherketone (PEEK) was used as an example of a semicrystalline resin. The residual stress model of Indenbom was used to investigate residual stresses in amorphous polymers. Due to the inapplicability of this model to semicrystalline polymers and composites where the material properties varied through the thickness of the specimen, a residual stress model based on incremental stress analysis was developed. The parametric analyses on the neat polymers showed that the thermal history and the thermoelastic properties played major roles in the residual stress development in both amorphous and semicrystalline polymers. Crystallization increased the level of residual stresses. The mechanisms for this increase are discussed.

  19. [Illinois Career Development Month Ideas and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This document is intended to help practitioners plan and implement activities for observance of Career Development Month in Illinois. Part 1 examines the following topics: the definitions of career development and education-to-careers; the rationale for devoting a month to career development; a career framework; and suggested Career Development…

  20. Human Development Program: Level III Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessell, Harold

    The curriculum guide presents the activities component of the Human Development Program for the third grade. The Human Development Program (HDP) is an affective curricular approach developed by psychologists to help teachers instill responsibility and self-confidence in children. Following a brief overview of the HDP and explanation of the Magic…

  1. [The role of psychosocial stress in childhood for structural and functional brain development:neurobiological basis of developmental psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, A; Hüther, G

    1997-11-01

    This review summarizes some important principles of human brain development. Special emphasis is placed on the role of psychosocial stress during childhood on the developing brain. Depending on the degree of cognitive, behavioral and socio-emotional maturation, previous experiences and actual context, psychosocial stressors may be perceived by children as being either controllable (challenge) or uncontrollable (disaster). Controllable stress experiences are associated with a preferential activation of the central and peripheral noradrenergic system, i.e., of a system endowed with the gating of cortical information processing and the facilitation and stabilization of neuronal pathways and synaptic connections involved in behavioral responding. Uncontrollable stress responses are elicited if all previously acquired behavioral or cognitive strategies are inadequate or fail to overcome the stressor. The resulting severe and long-lasting activation of the central stress responsive systems will finally lead to a full activation of the HPA system, accompanied by adrenocortical cortisol release. The major central effect of this response is the destabilization of previously established neuronal circuits and synaptic connections. Thus, severe uncontrollable psychosocial stress may act as an important trigger of and a prerequisite for the reorganization of neuronal connectivity. It may, above a certain threshold, threaten the mental and affective stability, integrity, and the future development of a child. The long-term consequences of psychosocial stress on the structural and functional maturation of the brain are documented by findings from animal research and by results in the field of developmental psychopathology in children. The role of risk and protective factors during different phases of child development is briefly summarized and the need for a biopsychosocial model concerning the relationship between human brain development and behavior is emphasized. PMID:9478077

  2. Cdc42-Dependent Activation of NADPH Oxidase Is Involved in Ethanol-Induced Neuronal Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Ke, Zunji; Chen, Gang; Xu, Mei; Bower, Kimberly A.; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress play an important role in ethanol-induced damage to both the developing and mature central nervous system (CNS). The mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced neuronal ROS, however, remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of NADPH oxidase (NOX) in ethanol-induced ROS generation. We demonstrated that ethanol activated NOX and inhibition of NOX reduced ethanol-promoted ROS generation. Ethanol significantly increased the expression of p47phox and p67phox, the essential subunits for NOX activation in cultured neuronal cells and the cerebral cortex of infant mice. Ethanol caused serine phosphorylation and membrane translocation of p47phox and p67phox, which were prerequisites for NOX assembly and activation. Knocking down p47phox with the small interfering RNA was sufficient to attenuate ethanol-induced ROS production and ameliorate ethanol-mediated oxidative damage, which is indicated by a decrease in protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. Ethanol activated cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) and overexpression of a dominant negative (DN) Cdc42 abrogate ethanol-induced NOX activation and ROS generation. These results suggest that Cdc42-dependent NOX activation mediates ethanol-induced oxidative damages to neurons. PMID:22662267

  3. Monitoring eruption activity from temporal stress changes at Mt. Ontake volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakawa, T.; Kato, A.; Yamanaka, Y.; Maeda, Y.; Horikawa, S.; Matsuhiro, K.; Okuda, T.

    2015-12-01

    On 27 September 2014, Mt. Ontake in Japan produced a phreatic (steam type) eruption with a Volcanic Explosivity Index value of 2 after being dormant for seven years. The local stress field around volcanoes is the superposition of the regional stress field and stress perturbations related to volcanic activity. Temporal stress changes over periods of weeks to months are generally attributed to volcanic processes. Here we show that monitoring temporal changes in the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake, using focal mechanism solutions of volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes, is an effective tool for assessing the state of volcanic activity. We estimated focal mechanism solutions of 157 VT earthquakes beneath Mt. Ontake from August 2014 to March 2015, assuming that the source was double-couple. Pre-eruption seismicity was dominated by normal faulting with east-west tension, whereas most post-eruption events were reverse faulting with east-west compression. The misfit angle between observed slip vectors and those derived theoretically from the regional (i.e., background) stress pattern is used to evaluate the deviation of the local stress field, or the stress perturbation related to volcanic activity. The moving average of misfit angles tended to exceed 90° before the eruption, and showed a marked decrease immediately after the eruption. This indicates that during the precursory period the local stress field beneath Mt. Ontake was rotated by stress perturbations caused by the inflation of magmatic/hydrothermal fluids. Post-eruption events of reverse faulting acted to shrink the volcanic edifice after expulsion of volcanic ejecta, controlled by the regional stress field. The misfit angle is a good indicator of the state of volcanic activity. The monitoring method by using this indicator is applicable to other volcanoes and may contribute to the mitigation of volcanic hazards.

  4. Docosahexaenoic acid and palmitic acid reciprocally modulate monocyte activation in part through endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, Ryan G; Huang, Shurong; Namgaladze, Dmitry; Jandali, Ola; Shao, Tiffany; Sama, Spandana; Brüne, Bernhard; Hwang, Daniel H

    2016-06-01

    Palmitic acid (C16:0) and TLR2 ligand induce, but docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) inhibits monocyte activation. C16:0 and TLR2 or TLR4 ligand induce certain ER stress markers; thus, we determined whether ER stress induced by these agonists is sufficient to induce monocyte activation, and whether the ER stress is inhibited by DHA which is known to inhibit C16:0- or ligand-induced TLR activation. Monocyte activation and ER stress were assessed by TLR/inflammasome-induced IL-1β production, and phosphorylation of IRE-1 and eIF2 and expression of CHOP, respectively in THP-1 cells. TLR2 ligand Pam3CSK4 induced phosphorylation of eIF2, but not phosphorylation of IRE-1 and CHOP expression. LPS also induced phosphorylation of both IRE-1 and eIF2 but not CHOP expression suggesting that TLR2 or TLR4 ligand, or C16:0 induces different ER stress responses. C16:0-, Pam3CSK4-, or LPS-induced IL-1β production was inhibited by 4-phenylbutyric acid, an inhibitor of ER stress suggesting that IL-1β production induced by these agonists is partly mediated through ER stress. Among two ER stress-inducing molecules, thapsigargin but not tunicamycin led to the expression of pro-IL-1β and secretion of IL-1β. Thus, not all types of ER stress are sufficient to induce inflammasome-mediated IL-1β secretion in monocytes. Although both C16:0 and thapsigargin-induced IL-1β secretion was inhibited by DHA, only C16:0-mediated ER stress was responsive to DHA. These findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of DHA are at least in part mediated through modulating ER homeostasis and that the propensity of ER stress can be differentially modulated by the types of dietary fat we consume. PMID:27142735

  5. Harsh Parenting, Parasympathetic Activity, and Development of Delinquency and Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Hinnant, J. Benjamin; Erath, Stephen; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Stress response systems are thought to play an important role in the development of psychopathology. Additionally, family stress may have a significant influence on the development of stress response systems. One potential avenue of change is through alterations to thresholds for the activation of stress responses: Decreased threshold for responding may mark increased stress sensitivity. Our first aim was to evaluate the interaction between thresholds for parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) responding, operationalized as resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), and harsh parenting in the prediction of development of delinquency and adolescent substance use (resting RSA as a biomarker of risk). The second aim was to evaluate if resting RSA changes over time as a function of harsh parenting and stress reactivity indexed by RSA withdrawal (altered threshold for stress responding). Our third aim was to evaluate the moderating role of sex in these relations. We used longitudinal data from 251 children ages 8 to 16. Mother-reports of child delinquency and RSA were acquired at all ages. Adolescents self-reported substance use at age 16. Family stress was assessed with child-reported harsh parenting. Controlling for marital conflict and change over time in harsh parenting, lower resting RSA predicted increases in delinquency and increased likelihood of drug use in contexts of harsh parenting, especially for boys. Harsh parenting was associated with declining resting RSA for children who exhibited greater RSA withdrawal to stress. Findings support resting PNS activity as a moderator of developmental risk that can be altered over time. PMID:25688440

  6. PPAR-pan activation induces hepatic oxidative stress and lipidomic remodelling.

    PubMed

    Ament, Zsuzsanna; West, James A; Stanley, Elizabeth; Ashmore, Tom; Roberts, Lee D; Wright, Jayne; Nicholls, Andrew W; Griffin, Julian L

    2016-06-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand activated nuclear receptors that regulate cellular homoeostasis and metabolism. PPARs control the expression of genes involved in fatty-acid and lipid metabolism. Despite evidence showing beneficial effects of their activation in the treatment of metabolic diseases, particularly dyslipidaemias and type 2 diabetes, PPAR agonists have also been associated with a variety of side effects and adverse pathological changes. Agonists have been developed that simultaneously activate the three PPAR receptors (PPARα, γ and δ) in the hope that the beneficial effects can be harnessed while avoiding some of the negative side effects. In this study, the hepatic effects of a discontinued PPAR-pan agonist (a triple agonist of PPAR-α, -γ, and -δ), was investigated after dietary treatment of male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The agonist induced liver enlargement in conjunction with metabolomic and lipidomic remodelling. Increased concentrations of several metabolites related to processes of oxidation, such as oxo-methionine, methyl-cytosine and adenosyl-methionine indicated increased stress and immune status. These changes are reflected in lipidomic changes, and increased energy demands as determined by free fatty acid (decreased 18:3 n-3, 20:5 n-3 and increased ratios of n-6/n-3 fatty acids) triacylglycerol, phospholipid (decreased and increased bulk changes respectively) and eicosanoid content (increases in PGB2 and 15-deoxy PGJ2). We conclude that the investigated PPAR agonist, GW625019, induces liver enlargement, accompanied by lipidomic remodelling, oxidative stress and increases in several pro-inflammatory eicosanoids. This suggests that such pathways should be monitored in the drug development process and also outline how PPAR agonists induce liver proliferation. PMID:26654758

  7. Finite element stress analysis of the human left ventricle whose irregular shape is developed from single plane cineangiocardiogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, D. N.; Hamid, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    The three-dimensional left ventricular chamber geometrical model is developed from single plane cineangiocardiogram. This left ventricular model is loaded by an internal pressure monitored by cardiac catheterization. The resulting stresses in the left ventricular model chamber's wall are determined by computerized finite element procedure. For the discretization of this left ventricular model structure, a 20-node, isoparametric finite element is employed. The analysis and formulation of the computerised procedure is presented in the paper, along with the detailed algorithms and computer programs. The procedure is applied to determine the stresses in a left ventricle at an instant, during systole. Next, a portion (represented by a finite element) of this left ventricular chamber is simulated as being infarcted by making its active-state modulus value equal to its passive-state value; the neighbouring elements are shown to relieve the 'infarcted' element of stress by themselves taking on more stress.

  8. Advanced Technology Development for Active Acoustic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark; Cattafesta, Louis N., III; Nishida, Toshikazu; Kurdila, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives include: (1) Develop electro-mechanical/acoustic models of a Helmholtz resonator possessing a compliant diaphragm coupled to a piezoelectric device; (2) Design and fabricate the energy reclamation module and active Helmholtz resonator; (3) Develop and build appropriate energy reclamation/storage circuit; (4) Develop and fabricate appropriate piezoelectric shunt circuit to tune the compliance of the active Helmholtz resonator via a variable capacitor; (5) Quantify energy reclamation module efficiency in a grazing-flow plane wave tube possessing known acoustic energy input; and (6) Quantify actively tuned Helmholtz resonator performance in grazing-flow plane wave tube for a white-noise input

  9. Development of a Package for Modeling Stress in the Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. A.

    2006-05-01

    One of the primary difficulties when modeling stresses in the Earth's lithosphere is finding a numerical code with the necessary capabilities. The lithosphere represents a unique challenge due to structural complexity, the presence of faults, complex materials with large spatial variations in their properties, a wide range of pertinent spatial and temporal scales, and interactions with other processes (such as mantle convection), leading to complex boundary conditions. To address such problems, a modeling package should have a number of features that are not generally found in combination. The code should be able to use a number of different element types, allowing the geometry to be represented using any desired meshing package. The code should be able to accurately represent fault behavior, allowing both kinematic specification of fault slip as well as fault behavior defined by a constitutive relationship. The code should include a number of different material models (various combinations of elastic, viscous, and plastic behavior) and should also provide an easy mechanism for adding new material models. The code should be parallel and scalable, allowing the simulation of problems over a wide range of spatial scales and resolutions. The code should also be able to easily interact with other modeling codes, which could address some of the issues related to representing multiple time scales, as well as aiding in the determination of appropriate boundary conditions. Finally, the code should be easy to use, modular, and easily adaptable to different needs. We describe the current status, development plans and example usage of a finite element code with the above features as design goals. The current quasi-static finite element code (LithoMop) is being merged with the EqSim dynamic rupture code to form a new modeling package to be named PyLith. The code makes use of the Pyre simulation framework, with top-level code written in Python. This provides a number of useful

  10. [Effect of stress on the development of deafferentation pain syndrome in rats after sciatic nerve transection].

    PubMed

    Osipov, A V; Kukushkin, M L

    1993-05-01

    Effect of immobilization and painful stress on the development of deafferentation pain syndrome, appeared after sciatic nerve section, has been studied in Wistar rats. It has been determined that both immobilization and painful stress favour the appearance of pain syndrome in rats without clinical signs of pain syndrome up to the moment of stress influence. There has been made a conclusion that both immobilization and painful stress favour the appearance of pathologic algic system, which is the basis of pain syndrome. The fact that stress can cause analgesia in normal animals in contrast to those with potential pain syndrome is explained to different mechanisms of physiological and pathological pain. PMID:8043822

  11. Response of the nitrergic system to activation of the neuroendocrine stress axis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsiao-Jou Cortina; Spiers, Jereme G.; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to stressful stimuli causes activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which rapidly releases high concentrations of glucocorticoid stress hormones, resulting in increased cellular metabolism and spontaneous oxygen and nitrogen radical formation. High concentrations of nitrogen radicals, including nitric oxide, cause damage to cellular proteins in addition to inhibiting components of the mitochondrial transport chain, leading to cellular energy deficiency. During stress exposure, pharmacological inhibition of nitric oxide production reduces indicators of anxiety- and depressive-like behavior in animal models. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to present an overview of the current literature on stress-evoked changes in the nitrergic system, particularly within neural tissue. PMID:25653586

  12. Effects of Stress on Commensal Microbes and Immune System Activity.

    PubMed

    Gur, Tamar L; Bailey, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    The body harbors a vast array of microbes that are collectively known as the microbiota. Increasing attention is being paid to the role of the gut microbiota in the health of the host. Gut microbial communities are relatively resistant to change, though alterations in homeostasis can also significantly change gut microbial community structure. An important factor that has been demonstrated to alter the composition of the gut microbiota is exposure to psychological stressors. And, evidence indicates that the commensal microbiota are involved in stressor-induced immunomodulation. This chapter will discuss the impact of psychosocial stress on immunity, and present evidence that stressor-induced alterations in the composition of gut microbial communities contributes to stressor-induced immunomodulation and neurobiological sequelae. Finally, the role of the microbiota in the perinatal time period will be explored, and an integrative hypothesis of the role of the microbiome in health and stress response will be proposed. PMID:26589225

  13. SIRT1 activating compounds reduce oxidative stress and prevent cell death in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Reas S.; Fonseca-Kelly, Zoe; Callinan, Catherine; Zuo, Ling; Sachdeva, Mira M.; Shindler, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of SIRT1, an NAD+-dependent deacetylase, prevents retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss in optic neuritis, an inflammatory demyelinating optic nerve disease. While SIRT1 deacetylates numerous protein targets, downstream mechanisms of SIRT1 activation mediating this neuroprotective effect are unknown. SIRT1 increases mitochondrial function and reduces oxidative stress in muscle and other cells, and oxidative stress occurs in neuronal degeneration. We examined whether SIRT1 activators reduce oxidative stress and promote mitochondrial function in neuronal cells. Oxidative stress, marked by reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, was induced in RGC-5 cells by serum deprivation, or addition of doxorubicin or hydrogen peroxide, and resulted in significant cell loss. SIRT1 activators resveratrol (RSV) and SRTAW04 reduced ROS levels and promoted cell survival in RGC-5 cells as well as primary RGC cultures. Effects were blocked by SIRT1 siRNA. SIRT1 activators also increased expression of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), a mitochondrial enzyme, and promoted deacetylation of PGC-1α, a co-enzyme involved in mitochondrial function. Results show SIRT1 activators prevent cell loss by reducing oxidative stress and promoting mitochondrial function in a neuronal cell line. Results suggest SIRT1 activators can mediate neuroprotective effects during optic neuritis by these mechanisms, and they have the potential to preserve neurons in other neurodegenerative diseases that involve oxidative stress. PMID:23293585

  14. Total esterase activity in human saliva: Validation of an automated assay, characterization and behaviour after physical stress.

    PubMed

    Tecles, Fernando; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; De Torre, Carlos; Carrillo, José M; Rubio, Mónica; García, Montserrat; Cugat, Ramón; Cerón, José J

    2016-07-01

    Although saliva has esterase activity, this activity has not been characterized or studied in individuals subjected to physical stress. The aim of this report was to develop and validate an automated spectrophotometric assay for total esterase activity measurement in human saliva, as well as to study the contribution of different enzymes on this activity and its behaviour under physical stress in healthy subjects. The assay used 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate and was precise, accurate and provided low limits of detection and quantification. Inhibition with diisopropylfluorophosphate showed that cholinesterase, carboxylesterase and cholesterol esterase contributions not represented more than 20% of total esterase. Addition of standards of lipase and albumin to saliva samples showed that both proteins significantly contributed to esterase activity only when equal or higher than 11.6 IU/L and 250 μg/mL, respectively. Western blot analyses showed absence of paraoxonase-1 and high amount of carbonic anhydrase-VI. The high affinity of purified carbonic anhydrase-VI for the substrate supported a major contribution of this enzyme. Total esterase activity and alpha-amylase was measured in saliva samples from 12 healthy male students before and after participation in an indoor football match. The activity significantly increased after match and positively correlated with salivary alpha-amylase. This method could be used as a biomarker of physical stress in humans, with carbonic anhydrase-VI being the esterase that contributed more to the activity of the assay. PMID:27045801

  15. Multilayer stress from gravity and its tectonic implications in urban active fault zone: A case study in Shenzhen, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chuang; Wang, Hai-hong; Luo, Zhi-cai; Ning, Jin-sheng; Liu, Hua-liang

    2015-03-01

    It is significant to identify urban active faults for human life and social sustainable development. The ordinary methods to detect active faults, such as geological survey, artificial seismic exploration, and electromagnetic exploration, are not convenient to be carried out in urban area with dense buildings. It is also difficult to supply information about vertical extension of the deeper faults by these methods. Gravity, reflecting the mass distribution of the Earth's interior, provides an alternative way to detect faults, which is more efficient and convenient for urban active fault detection than the aforementioned techniques. Based on the multi-scale decomposition of gravity anomalies, a novel method to invert multilayer horizontal tectonic stresses is proposed. The inverted multilayer stress fields are further used to infer the distribution and stability of the main faults. In order to validate our method, the multilayer stress fields in the Shenzhen fault zone are calculated as a case study. The calculated stress fields show that their distribution is controlled significantly by the strike of the main faults and can be used to derive depths of the faults. The main faults in Shenzhen may range from 4 km to 20 km in the depth. Each layer of the crust is nearly equipressure since the horizontal tectonic stress has small amplitude. It indicates that the main faults in Shenzhen are relatively stable and have no serious impact on planning and construction of the city.

  16. Transketolase counteracts oxidative stress to drive cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Iris Ming-Jing; Lai, Robin Kit-Ho; Lin, Shu-Hai; Tse, Aki Pui-Wah; Chiu, David Kung-Chun; Koh, Hui-Yu; Law, Cheuk-Ting; Wong, Chun-Ming; Cai, Zongwei; Wong, Carmen Chak-Lui; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells experience an increase in oxidative stress. The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is a major biochemical pathway that generates antioxidant NADPH. Here, we show that transketolase (TKT), an enzyme in the PPP, is required for cancer growth because of its ability to affect the production of NAPDH to counteract oxidative stress. We show that TKT expression is tightly regulated by the Nuclear Factor, Erythroid 2-Like 2 (NRF2)/Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1 (KEAP1)/BTB and CNC Homolog 1 (BACH1) oxidative stress sensor pathway in cancers. Disturbing the redox homeostasis of cancer cells by genetic knockdown or pharmacologic inhibition of TKT sensitizes cancer cells to existing targeted therapy (Sorafenib). Our study strengthens the notion that antioxidants are beneficial to cancer growth and highlights the therapeutic benefits of targeting pathways that generate antioxidants. PMID:26811478

  17. Transketolase counteracts oxidative stress to drive cancer development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Iris Ming-Jing; Lai, Robin Kit-Ho; Lin, Shu-Hai; Tse, Aki Pui-Wah; Chiu, David Kung-Chun; Koh, Hui-Yu; Law, Cheuk-Ting; Wong, Chun-Ming; Cai, Zongwei; Wong, Carmen Chak-Lui; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin

    2016-02-01

    Cancer cells experience an increase in oxidative stress. The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is a major biochemical pathway that generates antioxidant NADPH. Here, we show that transketolase (TKT), an enzyme in the PPP, is required for cancer growth because of its ability to affect the production of NAPDH to counteract oxidative stress. We show that TKT expression is tightly regulated by the Nuclear Factor, Erythroid 2-Like 2 (NRF2)/Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1 (KEAP1)/BTB and CNC Homolog 1 (BACH1) oxidative stress sensor pathway in cancers. Disturbing the redox homeostasis of cancer cells by genetic knockdown or pharmacologic inhibition of TKT sensitizes cancer cells to existing targeted therapy (Sorafenib). Our study strengthens the notion that antioxidants are beneficial to cancer growth and highlights the therapeutic benefits of targeting pathways that generate antioxidants. PMID:26811478

  18. Survival Advantage of AMPK Activation to Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cells During Energy Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Wu, Yue; Mohler, James L.; Ip, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Androgen-independent prostate cancer usually develops as a relapse following androgen ablation therapy. Removing androgen systemically causes vascular degeneration and nutrient depletion of the prostate tumor tissue. The fact that the malignancy later evolves to androgen-independence suggests that some cancer cells are able to survive the challenge of energy/nutrient deprivation. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important manager of energy stress. The present study was designed to investigate the role of AMPK in contributing to the survival of the androgen-independent phenotype. Most of the experiments were carried out in the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells and the androgen-independent C4-2 cells. These two cell lines have the same genetic background, since the C4-2 line is derived from the LNCaP line. Glucose deprivation (GD) was instituted to model energy stress encountered by these cells. The key findings are as follows. First, the activation of AMPK by GD was much stronger in C4-2 cells than in LNCaP cells, and the robustness of AMPK activation was correlated favorably with cell viability. Second, the response of AMPK was specific to energy deficiency rather than to amino acid deficiency. The activation of AMPK by GD was functional, as demonstrated by appropriate phosphorylation changes of mTOR and mTOR downstream substrates. Third, blocking AMPK activation by chemical inhibitor or dominant negative AMPK led to increased apoptotic cell death. The observation that similar results were found in other androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines, including CW22Rv1 abd VCaP, provided further assurance that AMPK is a facilitator on the road to androgen-independence of prostate cancer cells. PMID:20570728

  19. Binge-Like Eating Attenuates Nisoxetine Feeding Suppression, Stress Activation, and Brain Norepinephrine Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Nicholas T.; Yeh, Chung-Yang; Verpeut, Jessica L.; Walters, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Stress is often associated with binge eating. A critical component of the control of stress is the central norepinephrine system. We investigated how dietary-induced binge eating alters central norepinephrine and related behaviors. Young male Sprague Dawley rats received calorie deprivation (24 h) and /or intermittent sweetened fat (vegetable shortening with sucrose; 30 min) twice a week for 10 weeks. The groups were Restrict Binge (calorie deprivation/sweetened fat), Binge (sweetened fat), Restrict (calorie deprivation), and Naive (no calorie deprivation/no sweetened fat). Dietary-induced binge eating was demonstrated by Restrict Binge and Binge, which showed an escalation in 30-min intake over time. Feeding suppression following nisoxetine (3 mg/kg; IP), a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, was not evident in Restrict Binge (Restrict Binge: 107±13, Binge: 52±9, Restrict: 80±8, Naive: 59±13% of saline injection at 1 h). In subsequent experiments with Restrict Binge and Naive, Restrict Binge had reduced corticosterone (Restrict Binge: 266±25; Naive: 494±36 ng/ml) and less feeding suppression (Restrict Binge: 81±12, Naive: 50±11% of non-restraint intake at 30 min) following restraint stress (1 h). Dietary-induced binge eating in Restrict Binge was not altered by a dorsal noradrenergic bundle lesion caused by N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4), but frontal cortex norepinephrine was positively correlated with the average 30-min intake post-lesion (0.69; p<0.01). In a separate set of animals, single-unit in vivo electrophysiological recording of locus coeruleus–norepinephrine neural activity demonstrated reduced sensory-evoked response as a consequence of the Restrict Binge schedule (Restrict Binge: 8.1±0.67, Naive: 11.9±1.09 Hz). These results, which suggest that a consequence of dietary-induced binge eating is to attenuate the responsiveness of the brain norepinephrine system, will further our understanding of how highly

  20. Active Ground Optical Remote Sensing for Improved Monitoring of Seedling Stress in Nurseries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Active ground optical remote sensing (AGORS) devices mounted on overhead irrigation booms could help to improve seedling quality by autonomously monitoring seedling stress. In contrast to traditionally used passive optical sensors, AGORS devices operate independently of ambient light conditions and ...

  1. Effects of stress and corticosterone on activity and plasticity in the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Kavushansky, Alexandra; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2006-11-15

    The basolateral amygdala (BLA) has been repeatedly shown to mediate the effects of stress on memory-related processes. However, the way in which stress influences BLA itself has not been fully explored. We studied the effects of stress and corticosterone (CORT) on activity and plasticity in the BLA in the rat, using the electrophysiological procedure of long-term potentiation (LTP) induction in vivo. Rats were exposed to an acute elevated-platform stress or administered vehicle or 5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, or 25 mg/kg of CORT systemically, after which they were anesthetized and prepared for field potential recording in the BLA, in response to stimulation of the entorhinal cortex. The elevated platform stress enhanced baseline responses in BLA and plasma CORT but inhibited amygdalar LTP. Systemic injections of CORT enhanced baseline responses in BLA in a dose-dependent manner but did not influence amygdalar LTP. Posttetanic potentiation (PTP) was similarly reduced in CORT- and vehicle-injected groups, possibly because of an additional stress from the injection, thus implying that PTP and LTP in the amygdala differentially react to stress. These results suggest that the increase in amygdalar baseline activity following the exposure to stress may be mediated by the concomitant increase in plasma CORT. However, the suppression of amygdalar LTP is not a result of elevated levels of CORT, suggesting that activity and plasticity in the amygdala might be mediated by different mechanisms. PMID:16998919

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Activates the Inflammasome via NLRP3- and Caspase-2-Driven Mitochondrial Damage.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Denise N; Abuaita, Basel H; Chen, Xiaoyun; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Nuñez, Gabriel; He, Yongqun; Yin, Xiao-Ming; O'Riordan, Mary X D

    2015-09-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is observed in many human diseases, often associated with inflammation. ER stress can trigger inflammation through nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing (NLRP3) inflammasome, which might stimulate inflammasome formation by association with damaged mitochondria. How ER stress triggers mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammasome activation is ill defined. Here we have used an infection model to show that the IRE1α ER stress sensor regulates regulated mitochondrial dysfunction through an NLRP3-mediated feed-forward loop, independently of ASC. IRE1α activation increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, promoting NLRP3 association with mitochondria. NLRP3 was required for ER stress-induced cleavage of caspase-2 and the pro-apoptotic factor, Bid, leading to subsequent release of mitochondrial contents. Caspase-2 and Bid were necessary for activation of the canonical inflammasome by infection-associated or general ER stress. These data identify an NLRP3-caspase-2-dependent mechanism that relays ER stress to the mitochondria to promote inflammation, integrating cellular stress and innate immunity. PMID:26341399

  3. Impact of heat stress during seed development on soybean seed metabolome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed development is a temperature-sensitive process that is much more vulnerable than vegetative tissues to abiotic stresses. Climate change is expected to increase the incidence and severity of summer heatwaves, and the impact of heat stress on seed development is expected to become more widespread...

  4. Value of monitoring Nrf2 activity for the detection of chemical and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Mutter, Fiona E.; Park, B. Kevin; Copple, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    Beyond specific limits of exposure, chemical entities can provoke deleterious effects in mammalian cells via direct interaction with critical macromolecules or by stimulating the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In particular, these chemical and oxidative stresses can underpin adverse reactions to therapeutic drugs, which pose an unnecessary burden in the clinic and pharmaceutical industry. Novel pre-clinical testing strategies are required to identify, at an earlier stage in the development pathway, chemicals and drugs that are likely to provoke toxicity in humans. Mammalian cells can adapt to chemical and oxidative stress via the action of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which up-regulates the expression of numerous cell defence genes and has been shown to protect against a variety of chemical toxicities. Here, we provide a brief overview of the Nrf2 pathway and summarize novel experimental models that can be used to monitor changes in Nrf2 pathway activity and thus understand the functional consequences of such perturbations in the context of chemical and drug toxicity. We also provide an outlook on the potential value of monitoring Nrf2 activity for improving the pre-clinical identification of chemicals and drugs with toxic liability in humans. PMID:26551708

  5. Mitochondrial oxidant stress in locus coeruleus is regulated by activity and nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez–Padilla, J.; Guzman, J.N.; Ilijic, E.; Kondapalli, J.; Galtieri, D.J.; Yang, B.; Schieber, S.; Oertel, W.; Wokosin, D.; Schumacker, P. T.; Surmeier, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Loss of noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) neurons is a prominent feature of aging–related neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson’s disease (PD). The basis of this vulnerability is not understood. To explore possible physiological determinants, LC neurons were studied using electrophysiological and optical approaches in ex vivo mouse brain slices. These studies revealed that autonomous activity in LC neurons was accompanied by oscillations in dendritic Ca2+ concentration attributable to opening of L–type Ca2+ channels. This oscillation elevated mitochondrial oxidant stress and was attenuated by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. The relationship between activity and stress was malleable, as arousal and carbon dioxide, each increased the spike rate, but differentially affected mitochondrial oxidant stress. Oxidant stress also was increased in an animal model of PD. Thus, our results point to activity–dependent Ca2+ entry and a resulting mitochondrial oxidant stress as factors contributing to the vulnerability of LC neurons. PMID:24816140

  6. Effects of increased temperature on metabolic activity and oxidative stress in the first life stages of marble trout (Salmo marmoratus).

    PubMed

    Simčič, Tatjana; Jesenšek, Dušan; Brancelj, Anton

    2015-08-01

    Climate change may result in future alterations in thermal regime which could markedly affect the early developmental stages of cold water fish due to their expected high sensitivity to increasing temperature. In the present study, the effect of temperature increase of 2, 4 and 6°C on the oxygen consumption rate (R), the activity of respiratory electron transport system (ETS) and oxidative stress have been studied in four developmental stages of the marble trout (Salmo marmoratus)-eyed eggs, yolk-sac larvae and juveniles of 1 and 3 months. Oxygen consumption rate and ETS activity increased with level of development and with temperature in all four stages. ETS/R ratios decreased during development and correlated with temperature in eyed eggs, larvae and juveniles of 1 month, but not in juveniles of 3 months. Low ETS/R ratios at higher temperatures indicate stress response in eyed eggs, the most temperature sensitive developmental stage. Catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities increased during development, but responded differently to elevated temperature in the different developmental stages. Stress in eyed eggs, caused by higher temperatures, resulted in increased oxygen consumption rate and increased activities of CAT and GR. Larvae were sensitive to increased temperature only at the highest experimental temperature of 16°C. Increased temperature did not stress the metabolism of the juveniles, since they were able to compensate their metabolic activity. The earlier developmental stages of marble trout are thus more sensitive to temperature increase than juveniles and therefore more endangered by higher water temperatures. This is the first report connecting oxygen consumption, ETS activity and ETS/R ratio with the activities of antioxidant enzymes in relation to increased temperature in salmonids. PMID:25935664

  7. Are Kids Too Busy? Early Adolescents' Perceptions of Discretionary Activities, Overscheduling, and Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Stephen L.; Nobiling, Brandye D.; Teufel, James; Birch, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The activity patterns of children, especially after-school patterns, are receiving more professional attention. However, evidence regarding the value of various activities in children's lives is contradictory. The purpose of this study was to assess perceptions of discretionary activities, overscheduling, and levels of stress from…

  8. Early weaning stress impairs development of mucosal barrier function in the porcine intestine

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Feli; Clark, Jessica E.; Overman, Beth L.; Tozel, Christena C.; Huang, Jennifer H.; Rivier, Jean E. F.; Blisklager, Anthony T.

    2010-01-01

    Early life stress is a predisposing factor for the development of chronic intestinal disorders in adult life. Here, we show that stress associated with early weaning in pigs leads to impaired mucosal barrier function. Early weaning (15- to 21-day weaning age) resulted in sustained impairment in intestinal barrier function, as indicated by reductions in jejunal transepithelial electrical resistance and elevations in mucosal-to-serosal flux of paracellular probes [3H]mannitol and [14C]inulin measured at 5 and 9 wk of age, compared with that shown in late-weaned pigs (23- to 28-day weaning age). Elevated baseline short-circuit current was observed in jejunum from early-weaned pigs and was shown to be mediated via enhanced Cl− secretion. Jejunal barrier dysfunction in early-weaned pigs coincided with increased lamina propria immune cell density particularly mucosal mast cells. The mast cell stabilizer drug sodium cromoglycolate ameliorated barrier dysfunction and hypersecretion in early-weaned pigs, demonstrating an important role of mast cells. Furthermore, activation of mast cells ex vivo with c48/80 and corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) in pig jejunum mounted in Ussing chambers induced barrier dysfunction and elevations in short-circuit current that were inhibited with mast cell protease inhibitors. Experiments in which selective CRF receptor antagonists were administered to early-weaned pigs revealed that CRF receptor 1 (CRFr1) activation mediates barrier dysfunction and hypersecretion, whereas CRFr2 activation may be responsible for novel protective properties in the porcine intestine in response to early life stress. PMID:19926814

  9. Clinical Correlates of Parenting Stress in Children with Tourette Syndrome and in Typically Developing Children

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Stephanie B.; Greene, Deanna J.; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N.; Church, Jessica A.; Schlaggar, Bradley L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of tic severity in children with Tourette syndrome on parenting stress and the impact of comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptomatology on parenting stress in both children with Tourett syndrome and typically developing children. Study design Children with diagnosed Tourett syndrome (n=74) and 48 tic-free typically developing controls were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Results Parenting stress was higher in the group with Tourette syndrome than the typically developing group. Higher levels of parenting stress were related to greater ADHD symptomatology in both children with Tourette syndrome and typically developing children. OCD symptomatology was correlated with parenting stress in Tourett syndrome. Parenting stress was independent of tic severity in patients with Tourette syndrome. Conclusions For parents of children with Tourett syndrome, parenting stress appears to be related to the child’s ADHD and OCD comorbidity and not to the child’s tic severity. Subthreshold ADHD symptomatology also appears to be related to parenting stress in parents of typically developing children. These findings demonstrate that ADHD symptomatology impacts parental stress both in children with and without a chronic tic disorder. PMID:25769235

  10. Active fault kinematics and crustal stresses along the Ionian margin of southeastern Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Reuther, C.-D.; Grasso, M.; Torelli, L.

    2000-11-01

    Since the late Cretaceous onset of plate convergence between Africa and Europe, the Malta Escarpment has been converted from a Mesozoic passive margin into a mega-hinge fault system with an additional sinistral strike-slip component. The modern tectonic stress regime with NW-SE-directed maximum horizontal stresses has been established since Late Messinian times. Since the Pleistocene, sinistral strike-slip deformation and contemporaneous normal faulting along the Malta Escarpment have induced the opening of oblique trending onshore grabens at the eastern margin of the Hyblean Plateau. In this study, we focus on the kinematics, the controlling state of stress, and the temporal variation of the neotectonic to active strike-slip and normal fault structures. The stress-tensor calculations reveals that the widespread map-scaled to meso-scaled normal fault structures are governed by the long-term extensional state of stress during the Quaternary. This long-term stress tensor is predominantly controlled by gravitational induced stresses due to vertical load ( σ1= SV) and lateral extension due to the topographic gradient of the Malta Escarpment ( σ3= Sh=NE-SW). In this case, the average tectonic stresses ( σ2= SH=NW-SE) transmitted by the regional to plate-tectonic stress field are significantly smaller than the gravitational induced stresses. In contrast, the clear localization of conjugate sets of meso-scaled strike-slip fault structures and shear zones without accompanying normal fault structures give strong indications for episodic seismotectonic strike-slip faulting under critical stress conditions. In this state, tectonically induced maximum horizontal stresses are successively increased by ongoing plate convergence from low-level stress magnitudes ( σ1= SV, σ2= SH=NW-SE) up to critical stress magnitudes ( σ1= SH=NW-SE, σ2= SV), which are significantly larger than gravitational stresses. At the critical state, seismotectonic stress release occurs by active

  11. Childhood Stress, Behavioural Symptoms and Mother-Daughter Pubertal Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kenneth; Smith, Peter K.

    1998-01-01

    Daughter's early childhood stress, conflict in the family environment, childhood behavioral symptoms, early puberty, and early dating behavior are related to mothers' early menarche and sexual involvement by a retrospective self-report survey (21 mothers; 28 daughters). Intended as a test of Belsky's theory, alternative explanations for findings…

  12. Early-life stress induces anxiety-like behaviors and activity imbalances in the medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Junko; Nishimura, Ryoichi; Ishikawa, Akinori

    2015-02-01

    Early-life stress increases the prevalence of psychiatric diseases associated with emotional dysregulation. Emotional regulation requires the inhibitory influence of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) on amygdalar activity, and dysfunction of this system is believed to induce anxiety. Because mPFC and amygdala have dense reciprocal connections and projections between them continue to develop until adolescence, early-life stress may impair the function of this circuit and cause emotional dysregulation. We examined the effects of stress during circuit development on anxiety-like behaviors, neural activities in the mPFC and amygdala, and impulse transmission in the mPFC-amygdala circuit in adult rats. Early-life stress, unpredictable stress twice a day for 12 days following early weaning, increased anxiety-like behaviors in the open-field and elevated plus-maze tests. In the open-field test, stress altered Fos expression in the mPFC and amygdala. Compared to non-stressed rats, which were exposed to neither unpredictable stress nor early weaning, stressed rats exhibited decreased Fos expression in the right superficial layers of the infralimbic cortex and increased Fos expression in the right basolateral amygdala and both sides of the central amygdala. Electrophysiological analysis revealed that excitatory latencies of mPFC neurons to amygdalar stimulation in stressed rats were significantly longer than control rats in the right, but not left, hemisphere. Stress had no effect on excitatory latencies of amygdalar neurons to mPFC stimulation in the mPFC-amygdala circuits in the both hemisphere. These data suggest that early-life stress impairs the mPFC-amygdala circuit development, resulting in imbalanced mPFC and amygdala activities and anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:25581710

  13. Physical activity intervention effects on perceived stress in working mothers: the role of self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Mailey, Emily L; McAuley, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Working mothers often report elevated stress, and efforts to improve their coping resources are needed to buffer the detrimental effects of stress on health. This study examined the impact of changes in physical activity, self-efficacy, and self-regulation across the course of a brief intervention on subsequent levels of stress in working mothers. Participants (N = 141) were randomly assigned to an intervention or control condition (2:1 ratio). The intervention was conducted in Illinois between March 2011 and January 2012 and consisted of two group-mediated workshop sessions with content based on social cognitive theory. Participants completed measures of physical activity, self-efficacy, self-regulation, and perceived stress at baseline, immediately postintervention, and 6-month follow-up. Stress levels declined across the 6-month period in both groups. Changes in stress were negatively associated with changes in self-efficacy and self-regulation among intervention participants only. Regression analyses revealed the intervention elicited short-term increases in physical activity, self-efficacy, and self-regulation, but only changes in self-efficacy predicted perceived stress at 6-month follow-up. These results suggest that enhancing self-efficacy is likely to improve working mothers' perceived capabilities to cope with stressors in their lives. Future interventions should continue to focus on increasing self-efficacy to promote improvements in physical activity and psychological well-being in this population. PMID:24964227

  14. Geothermal instrumentation development activities at Sandia

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, C.C.

    1985-03-01

    A major element of Sandia's Geothermal Technology Development Program is the effort directed toward development of instrumentation. This effort has two aspects, the development of high temperature components and prototype tools and the investigation of new concepts and capabilities. The focus of these activities is the acquisition of information to make geothermal drilling and resource development more efficient. Several projects of varying nature and scope make up the instrumentation development element, and this element will expand as the program emphasis on development of an advanced geothermal drilling system and the need for improved information grow. 13 refs.

  15. Cysteamine Modulates Oxidative Stress and Blocks Myofibroblast Activity in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Nadia M.; Ren, Shuyu; Pasichnyk, Katie; Williams, Juliana M.; Gangoiti, Jon A.; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus M.; Yamaguchi, Ikuyo; Barshop, Bruce A.; Duffield, Jeremy S.; Eddy, Allison A.

    2014-01-01

    Therapy to slow the relentless expansion of interstitial extracellular matrix that leads to renal functional decline in patients with CKD is currently lacking. Because chronic kidney injury increases tissue oxidative stress, we evaluated the antifibrotic efficacy of cysteamine bitartrate, an antioxidant therapy for patients with nephropathic cystinosis, in a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. Fresh cysteamine (600 mg/kg) was added to drinking water daily beginning on the day of surgery, and outcomes were assessed on days 7, 14, and 21 after surgery. Plasma cysteamine levels showed diurnal variation, with peak levels similar to those observed in patients with cystinosis. In cysteamine-treated mice, fibrosis severity decreased significantly at 14 and 21 days after unilateral ureteral obstruction, and renal oxidized protein levels decreased at each time point, suggesting reduced oxidative stress. Consistent with these results, treatment of cultured macrophages with cysteamine reduced cellular generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, treatment with cysteamine reduced α-smooth muscle actin–positive interstitial myofibroblast proliferation and mRNA levels of extracellular matrix proteins in mice and attenuated myofibroblast differentiation and proliferation in vitro, but did not augment TGF-β signaling. In a study of renal ischemia reperfusion, cysteamine therapy initiated 10 days after injury and continued for 14 days decreased renal fibrosis by 40%. Taken together, these data suggest previously unrecognized antifibrotic actions of cysteamine via TGF-β–independent mechanisms that include oxidative stress reduction and attenuation of the myofibroblast response to kidney injury and support further investigation into the potential benefit of cysteamine therapy in the treatment of CKD. PMID:24009239

  16. [On the mechanism of noopept action: decrease in activity of stress-induced kinases and increase in expression of neutrophines].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaia, R U; Vakhitova, Iu V; Salimgareeva, M Kh; Iamidanov, R S; Sadovnikov, S V; Kapitsa, I G; Seredenin, S B

    2010-12-01

    The influence of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester, GVS-111)--a drug combining the nootrope and neuroprotector properties--on the activity of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and the level of NGF and BDNF gene and protein expression in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus has been studied in rats. Under conditions of chronic administration (28 days, 0.5 mg/day, i.p.), noopept decreased the activity of stress-induced kinases (SAPK/JNK 46/54 and pERK1/2) in rat hippocampus and increases the level of mRNA of the BDNF gene in both hypothalamus and hippocampus. The content of BDNF protein in the hypothalamus was also somewhat increased. In the context of notions about the activation of stress-induced kinases, as an important factor of amyloidogenesis and tau-protein deposition in brain tissue, and the role of deficiency of the neurotrophic factors in the development of neurodegenerative processes, the observed decrease in the activity of stress-activated MAPKs and increased expression of BDNF as a result of noopept administration suggest thatthis drug hasaspecific activity withrespect to some pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the Alzheimer disease. PMID:21395007

  17. Modeling inflammation and oxidative stress in gastrointestinal disease development using novel organotypic culture systems.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Kira G; Bortner, James D; Falk, Gary W; Yu, Jian; Martín, Martín G; Rustgi, Anil K; Lynch, John P

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett's esophagus (BE), graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are common human gastrointestinal diseases that share inflammation as a key driver for their development. A general outcome resulting from these chronic inflammatory conditions is increased oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is caused by the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that are part of the normal inflammatory response, but are also capable of damaging cellular DNA, protein, and organelles. Damage to DNA can include DNA strand breaks, point mutations due to DNA adducts, as well as alterations in methylation patterns leading to activation of oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressors. There are a number of significant long-term consequences associated with chronic oxidative stress, most notably cancer. Infiltrating immune cells and stromal components of tissue including fibroblasts contribute to dynamic changes occurring in tissue related to disease development. Immune cells can potentiate oxidative stress, and fibroblasts have the capacity to contribute to advanced growth and proliferation of the epithelium and any resultant cancers. Disease models for GERD, BE, GVHD, and ulcerative colitis based on three-dimensional human cell and tissue culture systems that recapitulate in vivo growth and differentiation in inflammatory-associated microphysiological environments would enhance our understanding of disease progression and improve our ability to test for disease-prevention strategies. The development of physiologically relevant, human cell-based culture systems is therefore a major focus of our research. These novel models will be of enormous value, allowing us to test hypotheses and advance our understanding of these disorders, and will have a translational impact allowing us to more rapidly develop therapeutic and chemopreventive agents. In summary, this work to

  18. DOT1L Activity Promotes Proliferation and Protects Cortical Neural Stem Cells from Activation of ATF4-DDIT3-Mediated ER Stress In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Roidl, Deborah; Hellbach, Nicole; Bovio, Patrick P; Villarreal, Alejandro; Heidrich, Stefanie; Nestel, Sigrun; Grüning, Björn A; Boenisch, Ulrike; Vogel, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the lysine methyltransferase DOT1L/KMT4 has important roles in proliferation, survival, and differentiation of stem cells in development and in disease. We investigated the function of DOT1L in neural stem cells (NSCs) of the cerebral cortex. The pharmacological inhibition and shRNA-mediated knockdown of DOT1L impaired proliferation and survival of NSCs. DOT1L inhibition specifically induced genes that are activated during the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Chromatin-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that two genes encoding for central molecules involved in the ER stress response, Atf4 and Ddit3 (Chop), are marked with H3K79 methylation. Interference with DOT1L activity resulted in transcriptional activation of both genes accompanied by decreased levels of H3K79 dimethylation. Although downstream effectors of the UPR, such as Ppp1r15a/Gadd34, Atf3, and Tnfrsf10b/Dr5 were also transcriptionally activated, this most likely occurred in response to increased ATF4 expression rather than as a direct consequence of altered H3K79 methylation. While stem cells are particularly vulnerable to stress, the UPR and ER stress have not been extensively studied in these cells yet. Since activation of the ER stress program is also implicated in directing stem cells into differentiation or to maintain a proliferative status, the UPR must be tightly regulated. Our and published data suggest that histone modifications, including H3K4me3, H3K14ac, and H3K79me2, are implicated in the control of transcriptional activation of ER stress genes. In this context, the loss of H3K79me2 at the Atf4- and Ddit3-promoters appears to mark a point-of-no-return that activates the death program in NSCs. PMID:26299268

  19. Local blockade of glucocorticoid activation reverses stress- and glucocorticoid-induced delays in cutaneous wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Jong-Kyung; Park, Kyungho; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Chan, Aegean; Mauro, Theodora M.; Holleran, Walter M.; Elias, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Stress slows cutaneous wound healing (WH) in an endogenous glucocorticoid (GC)-dependent fashion. We investigated whether stress/GC-induced delays in WH require further intracutaneous activation of endogenous GC; and whether blockade or down-regulation of peripheral activation normalizes WH in the face of stress. Delayed WH in our motion-restricted murine model of stress could be attributed to elevated systemic GC, because blockade of GC production (using corticotropin-releasing factor inhibitor, antalarmin), or of peripheral binding to the GC receptor [GCr], with an antagonist, Ru-486, normalized WH. We next investigated whether local blockade or down-regulation of the peripheral GC-activating enzyme, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), accelerates cutaneous WH. Topical applications of nonspecific (carbenoxolone) as well as an isoform-specific 11β-HSD1 inhibitor overcame stress and exogenous GC-induced delays in WH. Moreover, two liver X receptor ligands, TO901317 and GW3695, down-regulated expression of 11β-HSD1, attenuating stress-induced delays in WH. Combined inhibitor and liver X receptor ligand applications accelerated WH in the face of stress/systemic GC. Thus: (1) intracutaneous conversion of inactive-to-active GC accounts for stress (GC)-induced delays in WH; and (2) blockade or down-regulation of 11β-HSD1 and/or GCr normalize cutaneous WH in the face of stress/GC. Local blockade or down-regulation of cutaneous GC activation could help enhance WH in various clinical settings. PMID:23927023

  20. Effect of Drought Stress on Total Phenolic, Lipid Peroxidation, and Antioxidant Activity of Achillea Species.

    PubMed

    Gharibi, Shima; Tabatabaei, Badraldin Ebrahim Sayed; Saeidi, Ghodratollah; Goli, Sayed Amir Hossein

    2016-02-01

    The changes in total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), proline, malondialdehyde (MDA), H2O2, and antioxidant activity were assessed based on three model systems in three Achillea species (Achillea millefolium, A. nobilis, and A. filipendulina) growing under four irrigation regimes, including 100% FC (field capacity as normal irrigation) 75% FC (low stress), 50% FC (moderate stress), and 25% FC (severe stress) conditions. The highest TPC (47.13 mg tannic acid/g DW) and TFC (20.86 mg quercetin/g W) were obtained in A. filipendulina under moderate and severe stress conditions. In 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, the highest and the lowest antioxidant activity was obtained for A. millefolium (70.28%) and A. filipendulina (53.21%), respectively, while in the FTC model system A. nobilis revealed the highest antioxidant activity (1.934) in severe drought condition. In the linoleic model system, the highest antioxidant activity was observed under low drought stress condition in A. nobilis. MDA and H2O2 content were increased due to both low (75% FC) and moderate (50% FC) drought stress, but they were decreased under severe stress condition (25% FC). Furthermore, A. millefolium revealed the lowest H2O2 (4.96 nm/g FW) and MDA content (176.32 μmol/g). Investigation of the relationship among different metabolites showed a strong positive correlation with TPC and TFC. Finally, the moderate drought stress treatment (50% FC) was introduced as the optimum condition to obtain appreciable TPC and TFC,, while the highest antioxidant activity was obtained in severe stress condition (25%FC). PMID:26541161

  1. A cortical folding model incorporating stress-dependent growth explains gyral wavelengths and stress patterns in the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Bayly, PV; Okamoto, RJ; Xu, G.; Shi, Y; Taber, LA

    2013-01-01

    In humans and many other mammals, the cortex (the outer layer of the brain) folds during development. The mechanics of folding are not well understood; leading explanations are either incomplete or at odds with physical measurements. We propose a mathematical model in which (i) folding is driven by tangential expansion of the cortex and (ii) deeper layers grow in response to the resulting stress. In this model the wavelength of cortical folds depends predictably on the rate of cortical growth relative to the rate of stress-induced growth. We show analytically and in simulations that faster cortical expansion leads to shorter gyral wavelengths; slower cortical expansion leads to long wavelengths or even smooth (lissencephalic) surfaces. No inner or outer (skull) constraint is needed to produce folding, but initial shape and mechanical heterogeneity influence the final shape. The proposed model predicts patterns of stress in the tissue that are consistent with experimental observations. PMID:23357794

  2. Stress optimization of leaf-spring crossed flexure pivots for an active Gurney flap mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire Gómez, Jon; Booker, Julian D.; Mellor, Phil H.

    2015-04-01

    The EU's Green Rotorcraft programme is pursuing the development of a functional and airworthy Active Gurney Flap (AGF) for a full-scale helicopter rotor blade. Interest in the development of this `smart adaptive rotor blade' technology lies in its potential to provide a number of aerodynamic benefits, which would in turn translate into a reduction in fuel consumption and noise levels. The AGF mechanism selected employs leaf-spring crossed flexure pivots. These provide important advantages over bearings as they are not susceptible to seizing and do not require maintenance (i.e. lubrication or cleaning). A baseline design of this mechanism was successfully tested both in a fatigue rig and in a 2D wind tunnel environment at flight-representative deployment schedules. For full validation, a flight test would also be required. However, the severity of the in-flight loading conditions would likely compromise the mechanical integrity of the pivots' leaf-springs in their current form. This paper investigates the scope for stress reduction through three-dimensional shape optimization of the leaf-springs of a generic crossed flexure pivot. To this end, a procedure combining a linear strain energy formulation, a parametric leaf-spring profile definition and a series of optimization algorithms is employed. The resulting optimized leaf-springs are proven to be not only independent of the angular rotation at which the pivot operates, but also linearly scalable to leaf-springs of any length, minimum thickness and width. Validated using non-linear finite element analysis, the results show very significant stress reductions relative to pivots with constant cross section leaf-springs, of up to as much as 30% for the specific pivot configuration employed in the AGF mechanism. It is concluded that shape optimization offers great potential for reducing stress in crossed flexure pivots and, consequently, for extending their fatigue life and/or rotational range.

  3. Laboratory Activities for Developing Process Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Services to Education, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This workbook contains laboratory exercises designed for use in a college introductory biology course. Each exercise helps the student develop a basic science skill. The exercises are arranged in a hierarchical sequence suggesting the scientific method. Each skill facilitates the development of succeeding ones. Activities include Use of the…

  4. Development through Participation in Sociocultural Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogoff, Barbara; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents the theoretical position that as people participate in sociocultural activities, they contribute to the development of community practices that simultaneously contribute to the individuals' own development. Illustrates this argument using observations of the developmental processes of individual Girl Scouts and of community traditions of…

  5. [Physiological responses of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) to drought stress during vegetative development period under drip irrigation].

    PubMed

    Li, Yang-yang; Geng, Qing-yun; Fei, Cong; Fan, Huai

    2016-01-01

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris cv. Beta 356) was subjected to drought stress during vegetative development by maintaining the soil water content in the 0-40 cm soil depth at 70%, 50% or 30% of field capacity to study the physiological traits of the leaves. Results showed that the compensation index was the highest in the 50% field capacity treatment. Malonaldehyde (MDA) content, relative conductivity, catalase (CAT) activity, and soluble sugar content began to increase 24 h after rehydration. Proline content began to increase 48 h after rehydration. In contrast, no compensation effect was observed in peroxidase (POD) activity after rehydration. Among the active oxygen scavenging enzymes, CAT was most sensitive to drought stress. Supplemental irrigation should be carried out promptly when the soil water content dropped to 50% of field capacity during vegetative development. Rehydration could promote self-repair functions in leaves, thus reducing the effects of drought on sugar beet yield and sugar content. PMID:27228610

  6. Oxidative stress-induced p53 activity is enhanced by a redox-sensitive TP53INP1 SUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    Peuget, S; Bonacci, T; Soubeyran, P; Iovanna, J; Dusetti, N J

    2014-01-01

    Tumor Protein p53-Induced Nuclear Protein 1 (TP53INP1) is a tumor suppressor that modulates the p53 response to stress. TP53INP1 is one of the key mediators of p53 antioxidant function by promoting the p53 transcriptional activity on its target genes. TP53INP1 expression is deregulated in many types of cancers including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in which its decrease occurs early during the preneoplastic development. In this work, we report that redox-dependent induction of p53 transcriptional activity is enhanced by the oxidative stress-induced SUMOylation of TP53INP1 at lysine 113. This SUMOylation is mediated by PIAS3 and CBX4, two SUMO ligases especially related to the p53 activation upon DNA damage. Importantly, this modification is reversed by three SUMO1-specific proteases SENP1, 2 and 6. Moreover, TP53INP1 SUMOylation induces its binding to p53 in the nucleus under oxidative stress conditions. TP53INP1 mutation at lysine 113 prevents the pro-apoptotic, antiproliferative and antioxidant effects of TP53INP1 by impairing the p53 response on its target genes p21, Bax and PUMA. We conclude that TP53INP1 SUMOylation is essential for the regulation of p53 activity induced by oxidative stress. PMID:24608790

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum and oxidant stress mediate nuclear factor-κB activation in the subfornical organ during angiotensin II hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Young, Colin N.; Li, Anfei; Dong, Frederick N.; Horwath, Julie A.; Clark, Catharine G.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the brain circumventricular subfornical organ (SFO) mediate the central hypertensive actions of Angiotensin II (ANG II). However, the downstream signaling events remain unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that angiotensin type 1a receptors (AT1aR), ER stress, and ROS induce activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) during ANG II-dependent hypertension. To spatiotemporally track NF-κB activity in the SFO throughout the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension, we used SFO-targeted adenoviral delivery and longitudinal bioluminescence imaging in mice. During low-dose infusion of ANG II, bioluminescence imaging revealed a prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO at a time point prior to a significant rise in arterial blood pressure. SFO-targeted ablation of AT1aR, inhibition of ER stress, or adenoviral scavenging of ROS in the SFO prevented the ANG II-induced increase in SFO NF-κB. These findings highlight the utility of bioluminescence imaging to longitudinally track transcription factor activation during the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension and reveal an AT1aR-, ER stress-, and ROS-dependent prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO. Furthermore, the increase in NF-κB activity before a rise in arterial blood pressure suggests a causal role for SFO NF-κB in the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension. PMID:25980014

  8. Design and development of a miniature column-based interface (MCBI) stress gage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickman, Denis D.

    1993-04-01

    Tests are routinely conducted to evaluate the survivability, under simulated battlefield conditions, of buried military structures subjected to high-explosive loadings. The survivability assessments require the measurement of dynamic normal stresses induced at soil/structure interfaces. Stresses in excess of 10,000 psi and accelerations greater than 100,000 g's may be applied at interface locations. Normal-incidence interface stress gages currently used in such tests are incapable of accurately measuring stresses above 5,000 psi, and are sensitive to lateral accelerations and structure-transmitted stresses which distort the measurement. This study explores the design, development, and testing of a miniature, column-based, interface (MCBI) stress gage. The MCBI gage is designed to measure normal stresses up to 35,000 psi. Laboratory tests indicate that the gage produces a linear output due to applied pressure and is virtually insensitive to lateral stresses. Explosive tests have shown the MCBI gage compares favorably to commonly-used interface stress gages at stresses up to 3,000 psi and is survivable at stresses up to 25,000 psi.

  9. Guanfacine effects on stress, drug craving and prefrontal activation in cocaine dependent individuals: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Fox, Helen C; Seo, Dongju; Tuit, Keri; Hansen, Julie; Kimmerling, Anne; Morgan, Peter T; Sinha, Rajita

    2012-07-01

    Cocaine dependence is associated with increased stress and drug cue-induced craving and physiological arousal but decreased prefrontal activity to emotional and cognitive challenge. As these changes are associated with relapse risk, we investigated the effects of α2 receptor agonist guanfacine on these processes. Twenty-nine early abstinent treatment-seeking cocaine dependent individuals were randomly assigned to either daily placebo or guanfacine (up to 3 mg) for four weeks. In a laboratory experiment, all patients were exposed to three 10-min guided imagery conditions (stress/stress, drug cue/drug cue, stress/drug cue), one per day, consecutively in a random, counterbalanced order. Subjective craving, anxiety and arousal as well as cardiovascular output were assessed repeatedly. Brain response to stress, drug cue and relaxing imagery was also assessed during a functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) imaging session. In the current study, guanfacine was found to be safe and well-tolerated. Lower basal heart rate and blood pressure was observed in the guanfacine versus placebo group. Guanfacine lowered stress and cue-induced nicotine craving and cue-induced cocaine craving, anxiety and arousal. The guanfacine group also showed increased medial and lateral prefrontal activity following stress and drug cue exposure compared with placebo. Data suggest further exploration of guanfacine is warranted in terms of its potential for reducing stress-induced and cue-induced drug craving and arousal. PMID:22234929

  10. Antioxidant enzymes expression and activity in liver of stressed wistar rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjević, J.; Nićiforović, A.; Radojčić, M. B.

    2009-09-01

    Altered activities of antioxidant defence system enzymes and the levels of free radicals scavengers have been found to correlate with various physiological or pathological conditions, including stress. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of chronic 21 day isolation stress on antioxidant enzymes (AOEs) expression and activity in Wistar rat liver tissue. The serum corticosterone (CORT) and glucose (GLU) levels were also measured, as one of the most important indicators of stress. Our data revealed that in chronic stress conditions, when both CORT and GLU were low, the AOEs expression was markedly induced. This increase in MnSOD, CuZnSOD, and catalase exhibited similar trend implying efficient detoxification of O_2^{ - .} and H2O2. However, this trend was not followed by the respective enzyme activity. While the total SOD activity was induced by the stress, catalase activity remained unaltered. This discrepancy led us to a conclusion that chronic isolation stress may cause oxidant-antioxidant imbalance in rat liver tissue, favoring H2O2 accumulation.

  11. Transposable Elements Contribute to Activation of Maize Genes in Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Makarevitch, Irina; Waters, Amanda J.; West, Patrick T.; Stitzer, Michelle; Hirsch, Candice N.; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Springer, Nathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) account for a large portion of the genome in many eukaryotic species. Despite their reputation as “junk” DNA or genomic parasites deleterious for the host, TEs have complex interactions with host genes and the potential to contribute to regulatory variation in gene expression. It has been hypothesized that TEs and genes they insert near may be transcriptionally activated in response to stress conditions. The maize genome, with many different types of TEs interspersed with genes, provides an ideal system to study the genome-wide influence of TEs on gene regulation. To analyze the magnitude of the TE effect on gene expression response to environmental changes, we profiled gene and TE transcript levels in maize seedlings exposed to a number of abiotic stresses. Many genes exhibit up- or down-regulation in response to these stress conditions. The analysis of TE families inserted within upstream regions of up-regulated genes revealed that between four and nine different TE families are associated with up-regulated gene expression in each of these stress conditions, affecting up to 20% of the genes up-regulated in response to abiotic stress, and as many as 33% of genes that are only expressed in response to stress. Expression of many of these same TE families also responds to the same stress conditions. The analysis of the stress-induced transcripts and proximity of the transposon to the gene suggests that these TEs may provide local enhancer activities that stimulate stress-responsive gene expression. Our data on allelic variation for insertions of several of these TEs show strong correlation between the presence of TE insertions and stress-responsive up-regulation of gene expression. Our findings suggest that TEs provide an important source of allelic regulatory variation in gene response to abiotic stress in maize. PMID:25569788

  12. Stress exposure during the preimplantation period affects blastocyst lineages and offspring development.

    PubMed

    Burkuš, Ján; Kačmarová, Martina; Kubandová, Janka; Kokošová, Natália; Fabianová, Kamila; Fabian, Dušan; Koppel, Juraj; Čikoš, Štefan

    2015-01-01

    We found retardation of preimplantation embryo growth after exposure to maternal restraint stress during the preimplantation period in our previous study. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of preimplantation maternal restraint stress on the distribution of inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) cells in mouse blastocysts, and its possible effect on physiological development of offspring. We exposed spontaneously ovulating female mice to restraint stress for 30 min three times a day during the preimplantation period, and this treatment caused a significant increase in blood serum corticosterone concentration. Microscopic evaluation of embryos showed that restraint stress significantly decreased cell counts per blastocyst. Comparing the effect of restraint stress on the two blastocyst cell lineages, we found that the reduction in TE cells was more substantial than the reduction in ICM cells, which resulted in an increased ICM/TE ratio in blastocysts isolated from stressed dams compared with controls. Restraint stress reduced the number of implantation sites in uteri, significantly delayed eye opening in delivered mice, and altered their behavior in terms of two parameters (scratching on the base of an open field test apparatus, time spent in central zone) as well. Moreover, prenatally stressed offspring had significantly lower body weights and in 5-week old females delivered from stressed dams, fat deposits were significantly lower. Our results indicate that exposure to stress during very early pregnancy can have a negative impact on embryonic development with consequences reaching into postnatal life. PMID:25985793

  13. Stress exposure during the preimplantation period affects blastocyst lineages and offspring development

    PubMed Central

    BURKUŠ, Ján; KAČMAROVÁ, Martina; KUBANDOVÁ, Janka; KOKOŠOVÁ, Natália; FABIANOVÁ, Kamila; FABIAN, Dušan; KOPPEL, Juraj; ČIKOŠ, Štefan

    2015-01-01

    We found retardation of preimplantation embryo growth after exposure to maternal restraint stress during the preimplantation period in our previous study. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of preimplantation maternal restraint stress on the distribution of inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) cells in mouse blastocysts, and its possible effect on physiological development of offspring. We exposed spontaneously ovulating female mice to restraint stress for 30 min three times a day during the preimplantation period, and this treatment caused a significant increase in blood serum corticosterone concentration. Microscopic evaluation of embryos showed that restraint stress significantly decreased cell counts per blastocyst. Comparing the effect of restraint stress on the two blastocyst cell lineages, we found that the reduction in TE cells was more substantial than the reduction in ICM cells, which resulted in an increased ICM/TE ratio in blastocysts isolated from stressed dams compared with controls. Restraint stress reduced the number of implantation sites in uteri, significantly delayed eye opening in delivered mice, and altered their behavior in terms of two parameters (scratching on the base of an open field test apparatus, time spent in central zone) as well. Moreover, prenatally stressed offspring had significantly lower body weights and in 5-week old females delivered from stressed dams, fat deposits were significantly lower. Our results indicate that exposure to stress during very early pregnancy can have a negative impact on embryonic development with consequences reaching into postnatal life. PMID:25985793

  14. The interplay of early-life stress, nutrition, and immune activation programs adult hippocampal structure and function.

    PubMed

    Hoeijmakers, Lianne; Lucassen, Paul J; Korosi, Aniko

    2014-01-01

    Early-life adversity increases the vulnerability to develop psychopathologies and cognitive decline later in life. This association is supported by clinical and preclinical studies. Remarkably, experiences of stress during this sensitive period, in the form of abuse or neglect but also early malnutrition or an early immune challenge elicit very similar long-term effects on brain structure and function. During early-life, both exogenous factors like nutrition and maternal care, as well as endogenous modulators, including stress hormones and mediator of immunological activity affect brain development. The interplay of these key elements and their underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. We discuss here the hypothesis that exposure to early-life adversity (specifically stress, under/malnutrition and infection) leads to life-long alterations in hippocampal-related cognitive functions, at least partly via changes in hippocampal neurogenesis. We further discuss how these different key elements of the early-life environment interact and affect one another and suggest that it is a synergistic action of these elements that shapes cognition throughout life. Finally, we consider different intervention studies aiming to prevent these early-life adversity induced consequences. The emerging evidence for the intriguing interplay of stress, nutrition, and immune activity in the early-life programming calls for a more in depth understanding of the interaction of these elements and the underlying mechanisms. This knowledge will help to develop intervention strategies that will converge on a more complete set of changes induced by early-life adversity. PMID:25620909

  15. The interplay of early-life stress, nutrition, and immune activation programs adult hippocampal structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Hoeijmakers, Lianne; Lucassen, Paul J.; Korosi, Aniko

    2015-01-01

    Early-life adversity increases the vulnerability to develop psychopathologies and cognitive decline later in life. This association is supported by clinical and preclinical studies. Remarkably, experiences of stress during this sensitive period, in the form of abuse or neglect but also early malnutrition or an early immune challenge elicit very similar long-term effects on brain structure and function. During early-life, both exogenous factors like nutrition and maternal care, as well as endogenous modulators, including stress hormones and mediator of immunological activity affect brain development. The interplay of these key elements and their underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. We discuss here the hypothesis that exposure to early-life adversity (specifically stress, under/malnutrition and infection) leads to life-long alterations in hippocampal-related cognitive functions, at least partly via changes in hippocampal neurogenesis. We further discuss how these different key elements of the early-life environment interact and affect one another and suggest that it is a synergistic action of these elements that shapes cognition throughout life. Finally, we consider different intervention studies aiming to prevent these early-life adversity induced consequences. The emerging evidence for the intriguing interplay of stress, nutrition, and immune activity in the early-life programming calls for a more in depth understanding of the interaction of these elements and the underlying mechanisms. This knowledge will help to develop intervention strategies that will converge on a more complete set of changes induced by early-life adversity. PMID:25620909

  16. Stress Domain Effects in French Phonology and Phonological Development*

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Yvan; dos Santos, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss two distinct data sets. The first relates to the so-called allophonic process of closed-syllable laxing in Québec French, which targets final (stressed) vowels even though these vowels are arguably syllabified in open syllables in lexical representations. The second is found in the forms produced by a first language learner of European French, who displays an asymmetry in her production of CVC versus CVCV target (adult) forms. The former display full preservation (with concomitant manner harmony) of both consonants. The latter undergoes deletion of the initial syllable if the consonants are not manner-harmonic in the input. We argue that both patterns can be explained through a phonological process of prosodic strengthening targeting the head of the prosodic domain which, in the contexts described above, yields the incorporation of final consonants into the coda of the stressed syllable. PMID:27227170

  17. Space stress and genome shock in developing plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    In the present paper I review symptoms of stress at the level of the nucleus in cells of plants grown in space under nonoptimized conditions. It remains to be disclosed to what extent gravity "unloading" in the space environment directly contributes to the low mitotic index and the chromosomal anomalies and damage that is frequently, but not invariably, demonstrable in space-grown plants. Evaluation of the available facts indicates that indirect effects play a major role and that there is a significant biological component to the susceptibility to stress damage equation as well. Much remains to be learned on how to provide strictly controlled, optimal environments for plant growth in space. Only after optimized controls become possible will one be able to attribute any observed space effects to lowered gravity or to other significant but more indirect effects of the space environment.

  18. Enhanced oxidative stress resistance through activation of a zinc deficiency transcription factor in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Glover-Cutter, Kira M; Alderman, Stephen; Dombrowski, James E; Martin, Ruth C

    2014-11-01

    Identification of viable strategies to increase stress resistance of crops will become increasingly important for the goal of global food security as our population increases and our climate changes. Considering that resistance to oxidative stress is oftentimes an indicator of health and longevity in animal systems, characterizing conserved pathways known to increase oxidative stress resistance could prove fruitful for crop improvement strategies. This report argues for the usefulness and practicality of the model organism Brachypodium distachyon for identifying and validating stress resistance factors. Specifically, we focus on a zinc deficiency B. distachyon basic leucine zipper transcription factor, BdbZIP10, and its role in oxidative stress in the model organism B. distachyon. When overexpressed, BdbZIP10 protects plants and callus tissue from oxidative stress insults, most likely through distinct and direct activation of protective oxidative stress genes. Increased oxidative stress resistance and cell viability through the overexpression of BdbZIP10 highlight the utility of investigating conserved stress responses between plant and animal systems. PMID:25228396

  19. HIV-2 genomic RNA accumulates in stress granules in the absence of active translation

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Valiente-Echeverria, Fernando; Rubilar, Paulina S.; Garcia-de-Gracia, Francisco; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Limousin, Taran; Décimo, Didier; Mouland, Andrew J.; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2014-01-01

    During the post-transcriptional events of the HIV-2 replication cycle, the full-length unspliced genomic RNA (gRNA) is first used as an mRNA to synthesize Gag and Gag-Pol proteins and then packaged into progeny virions. However, the mechanisms responsible for the coordinate usage of the gRNA during these two mutually exclusive events are poorly understood. Here, we present evidence showing that HIV-2 expression induces stress granule assembly in cultured cells. This contrasts with HIV-1, which interferes with stress granules assembly even upon induced cellular stress. Moreover, we observed that the RNA-binding protein and stress granules assembly factor TIAR associates with the gRNA to form a TIAR-HIV-2 ribonucleoprotein (TH2RNP) complex localizing diffuse in the cytoplasm or aggregated in stress granules. Although the assembly of TH2RNP in stress granules did not require the binding of the Gag protein to the gRNA, we observed that increased levels of Gag promoted both translational arrest and stress granule assembly. Moreover, HIV-2 Gag also localizes to stress granules in the absence of a ‘packageable’ gRNA. Our results indicate that the HIV-2 gRNA is compartmentalized in stress granules in the absence of active translation prior to being selected for packaging by the Gag polyprotein. PMID:25352557

  20. Stress-induced alterations of left-right electrodermal activity coupling indexed by pointwise transinformation.

    PubMed

    Světlák, M; Bob, P; Roman, R; Ježek, S; Damborská, A; Chládek, J; Shaw, D J; Kukleta, M

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that experimental stress induces a specific change of left-right electrodermal activity (EDA) coupling pattern, as indexed by pointwise transinformation (PTI). Further, we hypothesized that this change is associated with scores on psychometric measures of the chronic stress-related psychopathology. Ninety-nine university students underwent bilateral measurement of EDA during rest and stress-inducing Stroop test and completed a battery of self-report measures of chronic stress-related psychopathology. A significant decrease in the mean PTI value was the prevalent response to the stress conditions. No association between chronic stress and PTI was found. Raw scores of psychometric measures of stress-related psychopathology had no effect on either the resting levels of PTI or the amount of stress-induced PTI change. In summary, acute stress alters the level of coupling pattern of cortico-autonomic influences on the left and right sympathetic pathways to the palmar sweat glands. Different results obtained using the PTI, EDA laterality coefficient, and skin conductance level also show that the PTI algorithm represents a new analytical approach to EDA asymmetry description. PMID:24359433

  1. Mechanical Stress Regulation of Plant Growth and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Growth dynamics analysis was used to determine to what extent the seismic stress induced reduction in photosynthetic productivity in shaken soybeans was due to less photosynthetic surface, and to what extent to lower efficiency of assimulation. Seismic stress reduces shoot transpiration rate 17% and 15% during the first and second 45 minute periods following a given treatment. Shaken plants also had a 36% greater leaf water potential 30 minutes after treatment. Continuous measurement of whole plant photosynthetic rate shows that a decline in CO2 fixation began within seconds after the onset of shaking treatment and continued to decline to 16% less than that of controls 20 minutes after shaking, after which gradual recovery of photosynthesis begins. Photosynthetic assimilation recovered completely before the next treatment 5 hours later. The transitory decrease in photosynthetic rate was due entirely to a two fold increase in stomatal resistance to CO2 by the abaxial leaf surface. Mesophyll resistance was not significantly affected by periodic seismic treatment. Temporary stomatal aperture reduction and decreased CO2 fixation are responsible for the lower dry weight of seismic stressed plants growing in a controlled environment.

  2. Development of the Abbreviated Masculine Gender Role Stress Scale

    PubMed Central

    Swartout, Kevin M.; Parrott, Dominic J.; Cohn, Amy M.; Hagman, Brett T.; Gallagher, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Data gathered from six independent samples (n = 1,729) that assessed men’s masculine gender role stress in college and community males were aggregated used to determine the reliability and validity of an abbreviated version of the Masculine Gender Role Stress Scale (MGRS scale). The 15 items with the highest item-to-total scale correlations were used to create an abbreviated MGRS scale. Psychometric properties of each of the 15-items were examined with Item Response Theory (IRT) analysis, using the discrimination and threshold parameters. IRT results showed that the abbreviated scale may hold promise at capturing the same amount of information as the full 40-item scale. Relative to the 40-item scale, the total score of the abbreviated MGRS scale demonstrated comparable convergent validity using the measurement domains of masculine identity, hyper-masculinity, trait anger, anger expression, and alcohol involvement. An abbreviated MGRS scale may be recommended for use in clinical practice and research settings to reduce cost, time, and patient/participant burden. Additionally, IRT analyses identified items with higher discrimination and threshold parameters that may be used to screen for problematic gender role stress in men who may be seen in routine clinical or medical practice. PMID:25528163

  3. Effects of chronic stress and corticosterone on sialidase activity in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wielgat, Przemyslaw; Walesiuk, Anna; Braszko, Jan J

    2011-09-23

    Sialidases are acid exoglycosidases that catalyse the removal of sialic acid from non-reducing end of sialoglucoconjugated substrates. Synaptic plasticity depends on sialylation state of proteins and lipids mediated by sialic acid-metabolizing enzymes. Since chronic stress causes both, hippocampal atrophy and impairment of learning, it is reasonable to investigate whether sialidase is implicated in these processes. In this study, we tested effects of chronic stress (immobilization, 2h daily, 21 days) or chronic corticosterone administration (5 mg/kg, sc, daily) on sialidase activity and sialylated NCAMs expression in rat hippocampus. The results showed that chronic stress affects hippocampus-depended spatial learning in the Barnes maze. Both, stress (p > 0.05) and corticosterone (p < 0.001), increased latencies to enter the escape tunnel of the maze in comparison to control animals. Similar but not significant differences between control and other experimental groups were observed in the numbers of errors. Chronic stress (p > 0.05) and corticosterone (p < 0.05) decreased sialidase activity in the brain homogenates and synaptosomes (p < 0.05, both). In the stressed animals, these changes were related to significantly higher expression of polysialic acid. These results indicate that changes in sialidase activity caused by stress and chronic corticosterone administration reflect disturbances of polysialylated glycoconjugates known to be related to synaptic plasticity in hippocampus. PMID:21501633

  4. Comparative ability of dobutamine and exercise stress in inducing myocardial ischaemia in active patients.

    PubMed Central

    Marwick, T H; D'Hondt, A M; Mairesse, G H; Baudhuin, T; Wijns, W; Detry, J M; Melin, J A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the ability of dobutamine and exercise stress to induce myocardial ischaemia and perfusion heterogeneity under routine clinical circumstances. DESIGN--86 active patients without previous myocardial infarction were studied by dobutamine and exercise stress protocols and coronary angiography. During both tests patients underwent electrocardiography, digitised echocardiography, and perfusion scintigraphy using Tc-99m methoxybutylisonitrile (MIBI) single photon emission computed tomography. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Coronary disease defined as an ST segment depression of > or = 0.1 mV, a resting or stress induced perfusion defect, or a resting or stress induced wall motion abnormality on exercise and dobutamine stress testing. RESULTS--Dobutamine stress was submaximal in 51 patients because of ingestion of beta adrenoceptor blocking agents on the day of the test (n = 25) or failure to attain the peak dose owing to side effects (n = 28). Exercise was limited in 23 patients by non-cardiac symptoms. The peak heart rate with dobutamine was less than that attained with exercise (105 (25) v 132 (24) beats/min, P < 0.0001); the response to maximal dobutamine stress significantly exceeded that to submaximal stress. Peak blood pressure was greatest with exercise (206 (27) v 173 (25) mm Hg, P < 0.001), values at maximal and submaximal dobutamine stress being comparable. Electrocardiographic evidence of ischaemia was induced less frequently by dobutamine than exercise (32% v 77% of the 56 patients with significant coronary disease, P < 0.01), as was abnormal wall motion (54% v 88%, P < 0.001). Ischaemia was induced more readily with maximal stress of either type; thus the sensitivities of dobutamine and exercise echocardiography were comparable only in patients undergoing a maximal dobutamine testing (73% v 77%, NS). Perfusion heterogeneity was induced in 58% of patients with coronary disease at submaximal dobutamine stress, 73% at maximal dobutamine stress, and

  5. Prolonged effect of fluid flow stress on the proliferative activity of mesothelial cells after abrupt discontinuation of fluid streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Shigehisa; Ikeda, Satoshi; Takezawa, Toshiaki; Kishi, Tomoya; Makino, Junichi; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Matsunobu, Aki; Noguchi, Mitsuru; Sugihara, Hajime; Toda, Shuji

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Late-onset peritoneal fibrosis leading to EPS remains to be elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluid streaming is a potent factor for peritoneal fibrosis in PD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focused on the prolonged effect of fluid streaming on mesothelial cell kinetics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A history of fluid streaming exposure promoted mesothelial proliferative activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have thus identified a potent new factor for late-onset peritoneal fibrosis. -- Abstract: Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) often develops after transfer to hemodialysis and transplantation. Both termination of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and transplantation-related factors are risks implicated in post-PD development of EPS, but the precise mechanism of this late-onset peritoneal fibrosis remains to be elucidated. We previously demonstrated that fluid flow stress induced mesothelial proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Therefore, we speculated that the prolonged bioactive effect of fluid flow stress may affect mesothelial cell kinetics after cessation of fluid streaming. To investigate how long mesothelial cells stay under the bioactive effect brought on by fluid flow stress after removal of the stress, we initially cultured mesothelial cells under fluid flow stress and then cultured the cells under static conditions. Mesothelial cells exposed to fluid flow stress for a certain time showed significantly high proliferative activity compared with static conditions after stoppage of fluid streaming. The expression levels of protein phosphatase 2A, which dephosphorylates MAPK, in mesothelial cells changed with time and showed a biphasic pattern that was dependent on the duration of exposure to fluid flow stress. There were no differences in the fluid flow stress-related bioactive effects on mesothelial cells once a certain time had passed

  6. Different peroxidase activities and expression of abiotic stress-related peroxidases in apical root segments of wheat genotypes with different drought stress tolerance under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Csiszár, Jolán; Gallé, Agnes; Horváth, Edit; Dancsó, Piroska; Gombos, Magdolna; Váry, Zsolt; Erdei, László; Györgyey, János; Tari, Irma

    2012-03-01

    One-week-old seedlings of Triticum aestivum L. cv. Plainsman V, a drought tolerant; and Cappelle Desprez, a drought sensitive wheat cultivar were subjected gradually to osmotic stress using polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000) reaching 400 mOsm on the 11th day. Compared to controls cv. Plainsman V maintained the root growth and relative water content of root tissues, while these parameters were decreased in the drought sensitive cv. Cappelle Desprez under PEG-mediated osmotic stress. Simultaneously, H(2)O(2) content in 1-cm-long apical segment of roots comprising the proliferation and elongation zone, showed a transient increase in cv. Plainsman V and a permanent raise in cv. Cappelle Desprez. Measurements of the transcript levels of selected class III peroxidase (TaPrx) coding sequences revealed significant differences between the two cultivars on the 9th day, two days after applying 100 mOsm PEG. The abundance of TaPrx04 transcript was enhanced transitionally in the root apex of cv. Plainsman V but decreased in cv. Cappelle Desprez under osmotic stress while the expression of TaPrx01, TaPrx03, TaPrx19, TaPrx68, TaPrx107 and TaPrx109-C decreased to different extents in both cultivars. After a transient decrease, activities of soluble peroxidase fractions of crude protein extracts rose in both cultivars on day 11, but the activities of cell wall-bound fractions increased only in cv. Cappelle Desprez under osmotic stress. Parallel with high H(2)O(2) content of the tissues, certain isoenzymes of covalently bound fraction in cv. Cappelle Desprez showed increased activity suggesting that they may limit the extension of root cell walls in this cultivar. PMID:22305075

  7. The synergic effect of regular exercise and resveratrol on kainate-induced oxidative stress and seizure activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-jae; Kim, Il-Kon; Song, Wook; Lee, Jin; Park, Sok

    2013-01-01

    The synergic effect of regular exercise and resveratrol, a polyphenolic compound with potent antioxidant activity, was investigated against kainate-induced seizures and oxidative stress in mice. After 6 weeks of swimming training, the total body weight decreased and the blood concentration of lactate stabilized statistically in comparison with the sedentary mice, indicate that the training program increased the aerobic resistance of mice. Kainate (30 mg/kg) evoked seizure activity 5 min after injection, and seizure activity was measured seizure rating scores every 5 min up to 2 h. As previously well known experiments, regular exercise and resveratrol (40 mg/kg, daily supplementation for 6 weeks) have an inhibitory effect on kainate-induced seizure activity and oxidative stress. In particularly, a synergistic cooperation of regular exercise and resveratrol was observed in seizure activity, mortality and oxidative stress especially in SOD activity. These results suggest that regular exercise along with an anti-convulsant agent such as resveratrol could be a more efficient method for the prevention of seizure development than exercise alone. PMID:23054073

  8. Stress and Sucrose Intake Modulate Neuronal Activity in the Anterior Hypothalamic Area in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Arojit; Guèvremont, Geneviève; Timofeeva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The anterior hypothalamic area (AHA) is an important integrative relay structure for a variety of autonomic, endocrine, and behavioral responses including feeding behavior and response to stress. However, changes in the activity of the AHA neurons during stress and feeding in freely moving rats are not clear. The present study investigated the firing rate and burst activity of neurons in the central nucleus of the AHA (cAHA) during sucrose intake in non-stressful conditions and after acute stress in freely behaving rats. Rats were implanted with micro-electrodes into the cAHA, and extracellular multi-unit activity was recorded during 1-h access to 10% sucrose in non-stressful conditions or after acute foot shock stress. Acute stress significantly reduced sucrose intake, total sucrose lick number, and lick frequency in licking clusters, and increased inter-lick intervals. At the cluster start (CS) of sucrose licking, the cAHA neurons increased (CS-excited, 20% of the recorded neurons), decreased (CS-inhibited, 42% of the neurons) or did not change (CS-nonresponsive, 38% of the neurons) their firing rate. Stress resulted in a significant increase in the firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons by decreasing inter-spike intervals within the burst firing of these neurons. This increase in the stress-induced firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons was accompanied by a disruption of the correlation between the firing rate of CS-inhibited and CS-nonresponsive neurons that was observed in non-stressful conditions. Stress did not affect the firing rate of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons. However, stress changed the pattern of burst firing of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons by decreasing and increasing the burst number in the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons, respectively. These results suggest that the cAHA neurons integrate the signals related to stress and intake of palatable food and play a role in the stress- and eating-related circuitry

  9. Hyperglycemia induces iNOS gene expression and consequent nitrosative stress via JNK activation

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Peixin; CAO, Yuanning; LI, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Objective Maternal diabetes adversely impacts embryonic development. We test the hypothesis that hyperglycemia-induced JNK1/2 activation mediates iNOS induction. Study Design Levels of iNOS mRNA and nitrosylated protein were determined in cultured C57BL/6J conceptuses exposed to hyperglycemia (300 mg/dl glucose) and C57BL/6J embryos exposed to streptozotocin-induced diabetes. iNOS-luciferase activity and endogenous reactive nitrogen species were determined in transfected PYS-2 (mouse teratocarcinoma) cells exposed to hyperglycemia (450 mg/dl glucose). Results Hyperglycemia increased iNOS mRNA and SP600125, a potent JNK1/2 inhibitor, abolished this effect. Hyperglycemia increased iNOS-luciferase activities and SP600125 blocked this effect. Diabetes increased iNOS mRNA and jnk2 gene deletion abrogated this effect. Correlated with iNOS gene induction, both hyperglycemia in vitro and diabetes in vivo enhanced the production of reactive nitrogen species and increased protein nitrosylation. jnk2 gene deletion blocked diabetes-induced protein nitrosylation. Conclusion JNK1/2 activation mediates hyperglycemia-induced iNOS gene expression and consequent nitrosative stress in diabetic embryopathy. PMID:20541731

  10. BIOLOGICAL VARIABILITY AND THE INFLUENCE OF STRESS ON CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Normal activity of brain and plasma cholinesterase in higher vertebrates is known to be affected by age, genetics, circadian rhythms, sex, endocrine function, and reproductive status. arious stressors (e.g., nutritional plane, ambient temperature, disease) have also been demonstr...

  11. Identification of Chronic Stress Activated Regions Reveals a Potential Recruited Circuit in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Flak, Jonathan N.; Solomon, Matia B.; Jankord, Ryan; Krause, Eric G.; Herman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress induces pre-synaptic and post-synaptic modifications in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) that are consistent with enhanced excitatory hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis drive. The brain regions mediating these molecular modifications are not known. We hypothesized that chronic variable stress (CVS) tonically activates stress-excitatory regions that interact with the PVN, culminating in stress facilitation. In order to identify chronically activated brain regions, ΔFosB, a documented marker of tonic neuronal activation, was assessed in known stress regulatory limbic and brainstem sites. Four experimental groups were included: CVS, repeated restraint (RR) (control for HPA habituation), animals weight-matched (WM) to CVS animals (control for changes in circulating metabolic factors due to reduced weight gain), and non-handled controls. CVS, but not RR or WM, induced adrenal hypertrophy, indicating that sustained HPA axis drive only occurred in the CVS group. CVS (but not RR or WM) selectively increased the number of FosB/ΔFosB nuclei in the nucleus of the solitary tract, posterior hypothalamic nucleus, and both the infralimbic and prelimbic divisions of the medial prefrontal cortex, indicating an involvement of these regions in chronic drive of the HPA axis. Increases in FosB/ΔFosB-immunoreactive cells were observed following both RR and CVS in the other regions (e.g., the dorsomedial hypothalamus), suggesting activation by both habituating and non-habituating stress conditions. The data suggest that unpredictable stress uniquely activates interconnected cortical, hypothalamic, and brainstem nuclei, potentially revealing the existence of a recruited circuitry mediating chronic drive of brain stress effector systems. PMID:22789020

  12. Differential Effects of Stress on Microglial Cell Activation in Male and Female Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bollinger, Justin L.; Bergeon Burns, Christine M.; Wellman, Cara L.

    2016-01-01

    Susceptibility to stress-linked psychological disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder and depression, differs between men and women. Dysfunction of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been implicated in many of these disorders. Chronic stress affects mPFC in a sex-dependent manner, differentially remodeling dendritic morphology and disrupting prefrontally mediated behaviors in males and females. Chronic restraint stress induces microglial activation, reflected in altered microglial morphology and immune factor expression, in mPFC in male rats. Unstressed females exhibit increased microglial ramification in several brain regions compared to males, suggesting both heightened basal activation and a potential for sex-dependent effects of stress on microglial activation. Therefore, we assessed microglial density and ramification in the prelimbic region of mPFC, and immune-associated genes in dorsal mPFC in male and female rats following acute or chronic restraint stress. Control rats were left unstressed. On the final day of restraint, brains were collected for either qPCR or visualization of microglia using Iba-1 immunohistochemistry. Microglia in mPFC were classified as ramified, primed, reactive, or amoeboid, and counted stereologically. Expression of microglia-associated genes (MHCII, CD40, IL6, CX3CL1, and CX3CR1) was also assessed using qPCR. Unstressed females showed a greater proportion of primed to ramified microglia relative to males, alongside heightened CX3CL1-CX3CR1 expression. Acute and chronic restraint stress reduced the proportion of primed to ramified microglia and microglial CD40 expression in females, but did not significantly alter microglial activation in males. This sex difference in microglial activation could contribute to the differential effects of stress on mPFC structure and function in males versus females. PMID:26441134

  13. Nodule activity and allocation of photosynthate of soybean during recovery from water stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellows, R. J.; Patterson, R. P.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Harris, D.; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    Nodulated soybean plants (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Ransom) in a growth-chamber study were subjected to a leaf water potential (psi w) of -2.0 megapascal during vegetative growth. Changes in nonstructural carbohydrate contents of leaves, stems, roots, and nodules, allocation of dry matter among plant parts, in situ specific nodule activity, and in situ canopy apparent photosynthetic rate were measured in stressed and nonstressed plants during a 7-day period following rewatering. Leaf and nodule psi w also were determined. At the time of maximum stress, concentration of nonstructural carbohydrates had declined in leaves of stressed, relative to nonstressed, plants, and the concentration of nonstructural carbohydrates had increased in stems, roots, and nodules. Sucrose concentrations in roots and nodules of stressed plants were 1.5 and 3 times greater, respectively, than those of nonstressed plants. Within 12 hours after rewatering, leaf and nodule psi w of stressed plants had returned to values of nonstressed plants. Canopy apparent photosynthesis and specific nodule activity of stressed plants recovered to levels for nonstressed plants within 2 days after rewatering. The elevated sucrose concentrations in roots and nodules of stressed plants also declined rapidly upon rehydration. The increase in sucrose concentration in nodules, as well as the increase of carbohydrates in roots and stems, during water stress and the rapid disappearance upon rewatering indicates that inhibition of carbohydrate utilization within the nodule may be associated with loss of nodule activity. Availability of carbohydrates within the nodules and from photosynthetic activity following rehydration of nodules may mediate the rate of recovery of N2-fixation activity.

  14. Differential effects of stress on microglial cell activation in male and female medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Justin L; Bergeon Burns, Christine M; Wellman, Cara L

    2016-02-01

    Susceptibility to stress-linked psychological disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder and depression, differs between men and women. Dysfunction of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been implicated in many of these disorders. Chronic stress affects mPFC in a sex-dependent manner, differentially remodeling dendritic morphology and disrupting prefrontally mediated behaviors in males and females. Chronic restraint stress induces microglial activation, reflected in altered microglial morphology and immune factor expression, in mPFC in male rats. Unstressed females exhibit increased microglial ramification in several brain regions compared to males, suggesting both heightened basal activation and a potential for sex-dependent effects of stress on microglial activation. Therefore, we assessed microglial density and ramification in the prelimbic region of mPFC, and immune-associated genes in dorsal mPFC in male and female rats following acute or chronic restraint stress. Control rats were left unstressed. On the final day of restraint, brains were collected for either qPCR or visualization of microglia using Iba-1 immunohistochemistry. Microglia in mPFC were classified as ramified, primed, reactive, or amoeboid, and counted stereologically. Expression of microglia-associated genes (MHCII, CD40, IL6, CX3CL1, and CX3CR1) was also assessed using qPCR. Unstressed females showed a greater proportion of primed to ramified microglia relative to males, alongside heightened CX3CL1-CX3CR1 expression. Acute and chronic restraint stress reduced the proportion of primed to ramified microglia and microglial CD40 expression in females, but did not significantly alter microglial activation in males. This sex difference in microglial activation could contribute to the differential effects of stress on mPFC structure and function in males versus females. PMID:26441134

  15. Single and combined effects of prenatal immune activation and peripubertal stress on parvalbumin and reelin expression in the hippocampal formation.

    PubMed

    Giovanoli, Sandra; Weber, Liz; Meyer, Urs

    2014-08-01

    Exposure to prenatal infection and traumatizing experiences in peripubertal life are two environmental risk factors for developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. Modeling the cumulative neuronal impact of these factors in a translational animal model has led to the recent identification of pathological interactions between these environmental adversities in the development of adult brain dysfunctions. The present study explored the consequences of combined prenatal immune challenge and peripubertal stress on discrete cellular abnormalities in the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system of the hippocampus. Pregnant mice were treated with the viral mimetic poly(I:C) (=polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid) or control solution, and offspring born to poly(I:C)-exposed or control mothers were then left undisturbed or subjected to unpredictable sub-chronic stress during peripubertal development. Stereological estimations of parvalbumin-expressing cells revealed a significant reduction of these GABAergic interneurons in the ventral dentate gyrus of adult offspring exposed to combined immune activation and stress. Single exposure to either environmental factor was insufficient to cause similar neuropathology. We further found that peripubertal stress exerted opposite effects on reelin-immunoreactive cells in the dorsal cornu ammonis (CA) region of the hippocampus, with stress increasing and decreasing reelin expression in control offspring and prenatally immune challenged animals, respectively. The present data suggest that the combination of two environmental risk factors, which have each been implicated in the etiology of major neuropsychiatric disease, induces significant but restricted neuropathological effects on hippocampal GABAergic cell populations known to be affected in brain disorders with neurodevelopmental components. PMID:24859043

  16. Cognitive activation theory of stress (CATS): from fish brains to the Olympics.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Hege R; Murison, Robert; Pensgaard, Anne Marte; Ursin, Holger

    2005-11-01

    The Cognitive Activation Theory of Stress (CATS) offers formal and systematic definitions of the terms and concepts used in stress research. The stress response depends on acquired expectancies to the outcome of the stimulus and the available responses. The stress response itself is an alarm, an increase in arousal necessary for performance and adequate reactions to challenges. The response is healthy and necessary for survival. Only when sustained over time may potential health risks occur. The basic rules for when stress occurs are the same across cultures and species, from fish to Olympic performance in humans. The important dimensions for health are positive expectancies of outcome (coping), control, and safety, for all individuals in all species. PMID:15964143

  17. Stress-strain relationship of Ca(OH)2-activated Hwangtoh concrete.

    PubMed

    Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Mun, Ju-Hyun; Hwang, Hey-Zoo

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the stress-strain behavior of 10 calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2)-activated Hwangtoh concrete mixes. The volumetric ratio of the coarse aggregate (V agg) and the water-to-binder (W/B) ratio were selected as the main test variables. Two W/B ratios (25% and 40%) were used and the value of V agg varied between 0% and 40.0%, and 0% and 46.5% for W/B ratios of 25% and 40%, respectively. The test results demonstrated that the slope of the ascending branch of the stress-strain curve of Ca(OH)2-activated Hwangtoh concrete was smaller, and it displayed a steeper drop in stress in the descending branch, compared with those of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete with the same compressive strength. This trend was more pronounced with the increase in the W/B ratio and decrease in V agg. Based on the experimental observations, a simple and rational stress-strain model was established mathematically. Furthermore, the modulus of elasticity and strain at peak stress of the Ca(OH)2-activated Hwangtoh concrete were formulated as a function of its compressive strength and V agg. The proposed stress-strain model predicted the actual behavior accurately, whereas the previous models formulated using OPC concrete data were limited in their applicability to Ca(OH)2-activated Hwangtoh concrete. PMID:25147869

  18. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) treatment induces apoptosis in cultured rat mesangial cells via endoplasmic reticulum stress activation.

    PubMed

    Park, Min-Jung; Oh, Ki-Seok; Nho, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Gye-Yeop; Kim, Dong-Il

    2016-06-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a high risk factor for endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease (CVD), has been reported to promote cellular dysfunction via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activation in various cells. Additionally, increased serum ADMA levels have been observed in incipient kidney diseases. Previously, we reported that activated ER stress is associated with mesangial cell apoptosis, observed mainly in overt nephropathy or chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the effect of ADMA on mesangial cell apoptosis is unknown. Thus, we investigated the effects of ADMA on mesangial cell apoptosis and ER stress signaling. ADMA treatment increased caspase-3 activity and activated three branches of ER stress signaling (PERK, IRE1, and ATF6) that induce mesangial cell apoptosis. Pharmacological inhibitors of ER stress (inhibitors of PERK, IRE1, and S1P) attenuated ADMA-induced cleavage of caspase-3 and induced a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, these inhibitors diminished the number of apoptotic cells induced by ADMA treatment. Taken together, our results indicated that ADMA treatment induces mesangial cell apoptosis via ER stress signaling. These results suggest that ADMA-induced mesangial cell apoptosis could contribute to the progression of overt nephropathy and CKD. PMID:26992443

  19. Stress-Strain Relationship of Ca(OH)2-Activated Hwangtoh Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Ju-Hyun; Hwang, Hey-Zoo

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the stress-strain behavior of 10 calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2)-activated Hwangtoh concrete mixes. The volumetric ratio of the coarse aggregate (Vagg) and the water-to-binder (W/B) ratio were selected as the main test variables. Two W/B ratios (25% and 40%) were used and the value of Vagg varied between 0% and 40.0%, and 0% and 46.5% for W/B ratios of 25% and 40%, respectively. The test results demonstrated that the slope of the ascending branch of the stress-strain curve of Ca(OH)2-activated Hwangtoh concrete was smaller, and it displayed a steeper drop in stress in the descending branch, compared with those of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete with the same compressive strength. This trend was more pronounced with the increase in the W/B ratio and decrease in Vagg. Based on the experimental observations, a simple and rational stress-strain model was established mathematically. Furthermore, the modulus of elasticity and strain at peak stress of the Ca(OH)2-activated Hwangtoh concrete were formulated as a function of its compressive strength and Vagg. The proposed stress-strain model predicted the actual behavior accurately, whereas the previous models formulated using OPC concrete data were limited in their applicability to Ca(OH)2-activated Hwangtoh concrete. PMID:25147869

  20. Activation of the Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase in Keratinocytes Exposed to Hyperosmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cavalheiro, Renan P.; Machado, Daisy; Cruz, Bread L. G.; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J.; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria C. C.; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Vasques, Luciana; Nader, Helena B.; Souza, Ana Carolina S.; Justo, Giselle Z.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we provide new contribution to the mechanisms involved in keratinocytes response to hyperosmotic shock showing, for the first time, the participation of Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP) activity in this event. We reported that sorbitol-induced osmotic stress mediates alterations in the phosphorylation of pivotal cytoskeletal proteins, particularly Src and cofilin. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of the phosphorylated form of LMWPTP, which was followed by an augment in its catalytic activity, was observed. Of particular importance, these responses occurred in an intracellular milieu characterized by elevated levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased expression of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. Altogether, our results suggest that hyperosmostic stress provides a favorable cellular environment to the activation of LMWPTP, which is associated with increased expression of antioxidant enzymes, high levels of GSH and inhibition of Src kinase. Finally, the real contribution of LMWPTP in the hyperosmotic stress response of keratinocytes was demonstrated through analysis of the effects of ACP1 gene knockdown in stressed and non-stressed cells. LMWPTP knockdown attenuates the effects of sorbitol induced-stress in HaCaT cells, mainly in the status of Src kinase, Rac and STAT5 phosphorylation and activity. These results describe for the first time the participation of LMWPTP in the dynamics of cytoskeleton rearrangement during exposure of human keratinocytes to hyperosmotic shock, which may contribute to cell death. PMID:25781955

  1. Stress-induced OMA1 activation and autocatalytic turnover regulate OPA1-dependent mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Michael J; Lampe, Philipp A; Stojanovski, Diana; Korwitz, Anne; Anand, Ruchika; Tatsuta, Takashi; Langer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic network of mitochondria fragments under stress allowing the segregation of damaged mitochondria and, in case of persistent damage, their selective removal by mitophagy. Mitochondrial fragmentation upon depolarisation of mitochondria is brought about by the degradation of central components of the mitochondrial fusion machinery. The OMA1 peptidase mediates the degradation of long isoforms of the dynamin-like GTPase OPA1 in the inner membrane. Here, we demonstrate that OMA1-mediated degradation of OPA1 is a general cellular stress response. OMA1 is constitutively active but displays strongly enhanced activity in response to various stress insults. We identify an amino terminal stress-sensor domain of OMA1, which is only present in homologues of higher eukaryotes and which modulates OMA1 proteolysis and activation. OMA1 activation is associated with its autocatalyic degradation, which initiates from both termini of OMA1 and results in complete OMA1 turnover. Autocatalytic proteolysis of OMA1 ensures the reversibility of the response and allows OPA1-mediated mitochondrial fusion to resume upon alleviation of stress. This differentiated stress response maintains the functional integrity of mitochondria and contributes to cell survival. PMID:24550258

  2. Identification and expression profiling of DNA methyltransferases during development and stress conditions in Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Chauhan, Pankaj Kumar; Khurana, Ashima

    2016-09-01

    DNA methyltransferase (DMTase) enzymes contribute to plant development and stress responses by de novo establishment and subsequent maintenance of DNA methylation during replication. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this activity remains obscure, especially in crop species. Using DMTase homolog complement in six Solanaceae species, we demonstrated here that their number remained conserved in Solanum lineage, whereas it was expanded in both pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana. Non-synonymous vs synonymous (Ka/Ks) substitution ratio revealed that most of the Solanaceous DMTase homologs undergo purifying selection. The genomic sequences of tomato DMT homologs in its wild relative, Solanum pennellii, remained highly conserved in their exons and methyltransferase domains. Structure analysis further revealed highly similar folding of DMTase homologs and conservation in the residues participating in protein-protein interaction in Solanum lineage, whereas a considerable diversification was observed of pepper homologs. Transcript profiling of DMTases highlighted both similar and distinct expression patterns of tomato homologs in other species during fruit development and stress responses. Overall, our analysis provides a strong basis for in-depth exploration of both conserved as well as distinct functions of tomato DMTase homologs in other economically important Solanaceae species. PMID:27380018

  3. Risk and Resilience: Genetic and Environmental Influences on Development of the Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Charles F.; Phifer, Justine; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to stressful events during development has consistently been shown to produce long-lasting alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which may increase vulnerability to disease, including PTSD and other mood and anxiety disorders. Recently reported genetic association studies indicate that these effects may be mediated, in part, by gene x environment (GxE) interactions involving polymorphisms within two key genes, CRHR1 and FKBP5. Data suggest that these genes regulate HPA axis function in conjunction with exposure to child maltreatment or abuse. In addition, a large and growing body of preclinical research suggests that increased activity of the amygdala-HPA axis induced by experimental manipulation of the amygdala mimics several of the physiological and behavioral symptoms of stress-related psychiatric illness in humans. Notably, interactions between the developing amygdala and HPA axis underlie critical periods for emotional learning which are modulated by developmental support and maternal care. These translational findings lead to an integrated hypothesis: high levels of early life trauma lead to disease through the developmental interaction of genetic variants with neural circuits that regulate emotion, together mediating risk and resilience in adults. PMID:19750552

  4. Oxidative stress is required for mechanical ventilation-induced protease activation in the diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Smuder, Ashley J.; Wu, Min; Hudson, Matthew B.; Nelson, W. Bradley; Powers, Scott K.

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) results in diaphragmatic weakness due to fiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Recent work reveals that activation of the proteases calpain and caspase-3 is required for MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction. However, the mechanism(s) responsible for activation of these proteases remains unknown. To address this issue, we tested the hypothesis that oxidative stress is essential for the activation of calpain and caspase-3 in the diaphragm during MV. Cause-and-effect was established by prevention of MV-induced diaphragmatic oxidative stress using the antioxidant Trolox. Treatment of animals with Trolox prevented MV-induced protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation in the diaphragm. Importantly, the Trolox-mediated protection from MV-induced oxidative stress prevented the activation of calpain and caspase-3 in the diaphragm during MV. Furthermore, the avoidance of MV-induced oxidative stress not only averted the activation of these proteases but also rescued the diaphragm from MV-induced diaphragmatic myofiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Collectively, these findings support the prediction that oxidative stress is required for MV-induced activation of calpain and caspase-3 in the diaphragm and are consistent with the concept that antioxidant therapy can retard MV-induced diaphragmatic weakness. PMID:20203072

  5. Anti-stress Activity of Ocimum sanctum: Possible Effects on Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis.

    PubMed

    Jothie Richard, Edwin; Illuri, Ramanaiah; Bethapudi, Bharathi; Anandhakumar, Senthilkumar; Bhaskar, Anirban; Chinampudur Velusami, Chandrasekaran; Mundkinajeddu, Deepak; Agarwal, Amit

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigated anti-stress potential of Ocimum sanctum in chronic variable stress (CVS) paradigm. Further, the possible mechanism of anti-stress was explored in vitro using cell and cell-free assays. Rats were administered O. sanctum followed by CVS regimen for a period of 16 days. On days 4, 8, 12, and 16, body weight and immobility time in forced swim test were measured. In addition, the possible inhibitory effect of O. sanctum and ursolic acid on cortisol release and CRHR1 receptor activity were studied in cell-based assays, while inhibitory effects on 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) were studied in cell-free assays. CVS group demonstrated less body weight gain and higher immobility time than O. sanctum administered groups, while oral administration of O. sanctum significantly increased body weight gain and decreased the immobility time. Further, O. sanctum and its constituents inhibited cortisol release and exhibited a significant CRHR1 receptor antagonist activity. Also, they had specific inhibitory activity towards 11β-HSD1 and COMT activity. Thus, O. sanctum was found to be effective in the management of stress effects, and anti-stress activity could be due to inhibition of cortisol release, blocking CRHR1 receptor, and inhibiting 11β-HSD1 and COMT activities. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26899341

  6. The development and structural confirmation of the Rhode Island Stress and Coping Inventory.

    PubMed

    Fava, J L; Ruggiero, L; Grimley, D M

    1998-12-01

    A new measure, the Rhode Island Stress and Coping Inventory (RISCI), was developed to examine perceived stress and coping independent of specific stress situations. An adult sample (N = 466) was randomly divided into equal halves for developmental and confirmatory instrument development. Initial instrument development used principal components analysis, item analysis, and a measure of internal consistency (Coefficient alpha). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was employed on the confirmatory sample to examine the structure of the refined item set. Several CFA fit indices indicated excellent fit for a model that represents perceived stress and coping as two moderately correlated dimensions. Validity analyses found strong relationships in the expected directions for both RISCI subscales with the 5-item Mental Health Inventory. Further validity analyses supported the utility of the RISCI in applied research with smokers and confirmed past research findings that successful quitters experience less perceived stress and cope better than relapsers. PMID:9891257

  7. The effect of maternal stress activation on the offspring during lactation in light of vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Anna; Zelena, Dóra

    2014-01-01

    Although it is obvious that preconceptional effects as well as stressors during pregnancy profoundly influence the progeny, the lactation period seems to be at least as important. Here we summarize how maternal stressors during the lactation period affect the offspring. As vasopressin is one of the crucial components both for stress adaptation and social behavior, special emphasis was given to this neuropeptide. We can conclude that stressing the mother does not have the same acute effect on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (as the main target of stress adaptation) of the pups as stressing the pups, but later endocrine and behavioral consequences can be similar. Vasopressin plays a role in acute and later consequences of perinatal stressor applied either to the mother or to the offspring, thereby contributing to transmitting the mothers' stress to the progeny. This mother-infant interaction does not necessarily mean a direct transmission of molecules, but rather is the result of programming the brain development through changes in maternal behavior. Thus, there is a time lag between maternal stress and stress-related changes in the offspring. The interactions are bidirectional as not only stress in the dam but also stress in the progeny has an effect on nursing. PMID:24550698

  8. Educational Stress Scale for Adolescents: Development, Validity, and Reliability with Chinese Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Jiandong; Dunne, Michael P.; Hou, Xiang-yu; Xu, Ai-qiang

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and initial validation of a new instrument to measure academic stress--the Educational Stress Scale for Adolescents (ESSA). A series of cross-sectional questionnaire surveys were conducted with more than 2,000 Chinese adolescents to examine the psychometric properties. The final 16-item ESSA contains five…

  9. Parenting Stress and Closeness: Mothers of Typically Developing Children and Mothers of Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Charles D.; Sweeney, Dwight P.; Hodge, Danelle; Lopez-Wagner, Muriel C.; Looney, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Mothers of children diagnosed with autism (N = 104) reported higher levels of stress than mothers of typically developing children (N = 342) on 13 of 14 subscales of the "Parenting Stress Index." The only scores that did not differ were from the Attachment subscale, which indicates lack of emotional closeness and rather cold patterns of…

  10. Assessing and Managing Caregiver Stress: Development of a Teaching Tool for Medical Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Famakinwa, Abisola; Fabiny, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Forty medical residents from major teaching hospitals in Boston, Massachusetts, participated in small group teaching sessions about caregiver stress. A teaching tool was developed that included a teaching handout, interactive cases, standard instruments for assessing caregiver stress, peer-reviewed articles about caregiving, and a list of…

  11. Design and development of a new magnetic sensor for stress measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggelopoulos, S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the design and the development of a new magnetic sensor for stress measurements using the magnetic Barkhausen noise and the magnetic permeability techniques in ferromagnetic steels. Both techniques together, become an important nondestructive technique, due to its exceptional material and stress characterization capabilities. The correlation of the two methods was investigated. Conclusions were derived based on the experimental results.

  12. [The Effect of Social-Psychological Factors on the Development of Occupational Stress].

    PubMed

    Kalinina, S A; Yushkova, O I

    2015-01-01

    The article presents data on social-psychological factors which cause the occupational stress. The results showed that there is a link between the level of work motivation and the physiological cost of work. We observed a number of peculiarities of occupational stress development caused by psychoemotional tension depending on the class of intensity of intellectual labor; we also studied biological age of the subjects. The speed of ageing of the employees who work under conditions of emotional stress (direct or indirect responsibility for the safety of other people) was found to increase. The study suggested promising directions of occupational stress prevention. PMID:26485788

  13. Stress-related disorders. Recent developments in hospital treatment.

    PubMed

    Wakeman, R J; Mestayer, R F

    1985-05-01

    The stress treatment program at Ochsner, New Orleans, provides participants with knowledge of necessary skills and opportunities for rehearsal and practice within the setting. In addition, the modalities chosen reinforce what Lazarus and Opton described as "perceived control," which was found to be as instrumental as actual control in anxiety reduction. Upon return to day-to-day living, participants have the opportunity to use skills acquired and to receive reinforcement for doing so. The staff and patients found that traditional supportive and/or insight-oriented psychotherapy was as important as the vast array of behavioral training measures for inclusion in the patient's daily schedule. Individual therapy was provided to each patient up to 45 minutes daily, and one-hour group psychotherapy sessions were conducted three times a week. The belief that individual attention, social support, and insight into previous learning were critical ingredients to the appeal of individual psychotherapy was borne out in patient follow-up questionnaire data. Patients who were followed at the time of discharge and at six months in the Clark and Stiles study consistently ranked "individual session with their doctor" high within the ranking of some 14 treatment modalities or experiences. Collectively, the average of such rankings demonstrated "individual session" of equal benefit with the "stress management session," a purely behavioral/stress inoculation training experience. Such data therefore supported our initial belief that a marriage of the best of what traditional psychotherapy can offer with the best of behavioral medicine provides the optimal opportunity for growth and symptom improvement. PMID:3991380

  14. Orbital fluid shear stress promotes osteoblast metabolism, proliferation and alkaline phosphates activity in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Aisha, M.D.; Nor-Ashikin, M.N.K.; Sharaniza, A.B.R.; Nawawi, H.; Froemming, G.R.A.

    2015-09-10

    Prolonged disuse of the musculoskeletal system is associated with reduced mechanical loading and lack of anabolic stimulus. As a form of mechanical signal, the multidirectional orbital fluid shear stress transmits anabolic signal to bone forming cells in promoting cell differentiation, metabolism and proliferation. Signals are channeled through the cytoskeleton framework, directly modifying gene and protein expression. For that reason, we aimed to study the organization of Normal Human Osteoblast (NHOst) cytoskeleton with regards to orbital fluid shear (OFS) stress. Of special interest were the consequences of cytoskeletal reorganization on NHOst metabolism, proliferation, and osteogenic functional markers. Cells stimulated at 250 RPM in a shaking incubator resulted in the rearrangement of actin and tubulin fibers after 72 h. Orbital shear stress increased NHOst mitochondrial metabolism and proliferation, simultaneously preventing apoptosis. The ratio of RANKL/OPG was reduced, suggesting that orbital shear stress has the potential to inhibit osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity. Increase in ALP activity and OCN protein production suggests that stimulation retained osteoblast function. Shear stress possibly generated through actin seemed to hold an anabolic response as osteoblast metabolism and functional markers were enhanced. We hypothesize that by applying orbital shear stress with suitable magnitude and duration as a non-drug anabolic treatment can help improve bone regeneration in prolonged disuse cases. - Highlights: • OFS stress transmits anabolic signals to osteoblasts. • Actin and tubulin fibers are rearranged under OFS stress. • OFS stress increases mitochondrial metabolism and proliferation. • Reduced RANKL/OPG ratio in response to OFS inhibits osteoclastogenesis. • OFS stress prevents apoptosis and stimulates ALP and OCN.

  15. In Vivo Imaging of Retinal Oxidative Stress Using a Reactive Oxygen Species–Activated Fluorescent Probe

    PubMed Central

    Prunty, Megan C.; Aung, Moe H.; Hanif, Adam M.; Allen, Rachael S.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Thule, Peter M.; Kundu, Kousik; Murthy, Niren; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In vivo methods for detecting oxidative stress in the eye would improve screening and monitoring of the leading causes of blindness: diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. Methods To develop an in vivo biomarker for oxidative stress in the eye, we tested the efficacy of a reactive oxygen species (ROS)–activated, near-infrared hydrocyanine-800CW (H-800CW) fluorescent probe in light-induced retinal degeneration (LIRD) mouse models. After intravitreal delivery in LIRD rats, fluorescent microscopy was used to confirm that the oxidized H-800CW appeared in the same retinal layers as an established ROS marker (dichlorofluorescein). Results Dose–response curves of increasing concentrations of intravenously injected H-800CW demonstrated linear increases in both intensity and total area of fundus hyperfluorescence in LIRD mice, as detected by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Fundus hyperfluorescence also correlated with the duration of light damage and functional deficits in vision after LIRD. In LIRD rats with intravitreal injections of H-800CW, fluorescent labeling was localized to photoreceptor inner segments, similar to dichlorofluorescein. Conclusions Hydrocyanine-800CW detects retinal ROS in vivo and shows potential as a novel biomarker for ROS levels in ophthalmic diseases. PMID:26348635

  16. Increased oxidative stress in pemphigus vulgaris is related to disease activity and HLA-association.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit Aakash; Dey-Rao, Rama; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Sinha, Animesh A

    2016-06-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare blistering skin disorder characterized by the disadhesion of keratinocytes due to autoantibody attack against epidermal targets including desmoglein (Dsg) 3, Dsg 1 and possibly other adhesion and non-adhesion molecules. The mechanisms leading to immune-mediated pathology in PV are multifactorial and not fully understood. Recently, oxidative stress (antioxidant/oxidant disequilibrium) has been proposed as a contributory mechanism of autoimmune skin diseases, including PV. In this study, we directly assessed oxidative stress via measurement of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) using ELISA in 47 PV patients, 25 healthy controls and 18 bullous pemphigoid (BP) patients. We also performed microarray gene expression analysis on a separate set of 21 PV patients and 10 healthy controls to evaluate transcriptional dysregulation in oxidative stress-related pathways. Our data indicate that there is a significant reduction in TAC levels in PV patients compared with healthy controls, as well as BP patients. Furthermore, PV patients with active disease have significantly lower TAC levels than PV patients in remission. We also find that HLA allele status has a significant influence on oxidative stress. These findings are corroborated by microarray analysis showing differentially expressed genes involved in oxidative stress between the aforementioned groups. Collectively, our findings provide support for a role of oxidative stress in PV. Whether increased oxidative stress leads to disease manifestation and/or activity, or if disease activity leads to increased oxidative stress remains unknown. Future longitudinal studies may help to further elucidate the relationship between PV and oxidative stress. PMID:26911801

  17. Obesity and lipid stress inhibit carnitine acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Sarah E; Martin, Ola J; Noland, Robert C; Slentz, Dorothy H; DeBalsi, Karen L; Ilkayeva, Olga R; An, Jie; Newgard, Christopher B; Koves, Timothy R; Muoio, Deborah M

    2014-04-01

    Carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of acetyl-CoA and acetylcarnitine. Emerging evidence suggests that this enzyme functions as a positive regulator of total body glucose tolerance and muscle activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a mitochondrial enzyme complex that promotes glucose oxidation and is feedback inhibited by acetyl-CoA. Here, we used tandem mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling to identify a negative relationship between CrAT activity and muscle content of lipid intermediates. CrAT specific activity was diminished in muscles from obese and diabetic rodents despite increased protein abundance. This reduction in enzyme activity was accompanied by muscle accumulation of long-chain acylcarnitines (LCACs) and acyl-CoAs and a decline in the acetylcarnitine/acetyl-CoA ratio. In vitro assays demonstrated that palmitoyl-CoA acts as a direct mixed-model inhibitor of CrAT. Similarly, in primary human myocytes grown in culture, nutritional and genetic manipulations that promoted mitochondrial influx of fatty acids resulted in accumulation of LCACs but a pronounced decrease of CrAT-derived short-chain acylcarnitines. These results suggest that lipid-induced antagonism of CrAT might contribute to decreased PDH activity and glucose disposal in the context of obesity and diabetes. PMID:24395925

  18. Polyamines and plant stress - Activation of putrescine biosynthesis by osmotic shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, H. E.; Galston, A. W.

    1982-01-01

    The putrescine content of oat leaf cells and protoplasts increases up to 60-fold within 6 hours of exposure to osmotic stress (0.4 to 0.6 molar sorbitol). Barley, corn, wheat, and wild oat leaves show a similar response. Increased arginine decarboxylase activity parallels the rise in putrescine, whereas ornithine decarboxylase remains unchanged. DL-alpha-Difluoromethylarginine, a specific irreversible inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase, prevents the stress-induced rise in increase in arginine decarboxylase activity and putrescine synthesis, indicating the preferential activation of this pathway.

  19. The theory and prototype development of a stress-monitoring system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swolfs, H.S.; Walsh, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    A new approach has been developed by which changes in rock stress can be measured directly. The measurement of stress change depends on the reaction of a slender, compliant cavity to the transient variations of rock stress about the cavity. A liquid-filled pressurized cell, emplaced in the cavity, provides the means by which changes in pressure can be monitored. Earthquake-related variations in the stress field in a highly fractured quartz-monzonite stock have been observed to occur in a characteristic way prior to a microseismic event. The precursory stress change (decompression followed by compression) lasted about 5 hours and led directly to a stress drop of 15 ?? 10-3 bar. -from Authors

  20. A Stress-Activated Transposon in Arabidopsis Induces Transgenerational Abscisic Acid Insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidetaka; Kim, Jong-Myong; Matsunaga, Wataru; Saze, Hidetoshi; Matsui, Akihiro; Endo, Takaho A; Harukawa, Yoshiko; Takagi, Hiroki; Yaegashi, Hiroki; Masuta, Yukari; Masuda, Seiji; Ishida, Junko; Tanaka, Maho; Takahashi, Satoshi; Morosawa, Taeko; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Kakutani, Tetsuji; Kato, Atsushi; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs), or transposons, play an important role in adaptation. TE insertion can affect host gene function and provides a mechanism for rapid increases in genetic diversity, particularly because many TEs respond to environmental stress. In the current study, we show that the transposition of a heat-activated retrotransposon, ONSEN, generated a mutation in an abscisic acid (ABA) responsive gene, resulting in an ABA-insensitive phenotype in Arabidopsis, suggesting stress tolerance. Our results provide direct evidence that a transposon activated by environmental stress could alter the genome in a potentially positive manner. Furthermore, the ABA-insensitive phenotype was inherited when the transcription was disrupted by an ONSEN insertion, whereas ABA sensitivity was recovered when the effects of ONSEN were masked by IBM2. These results suggest that epigenetic mechanisms in host plants typically buffered the effect of a new insertion, but could selectively "turn on" TEs when stressed. PMID:26976262

  1. A Stress-Activated Transposon in Arabidopsis Induces Transgenerational Abscisic Acid Insensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hidetaka; Kim, Jong-Myong; Matsunaga, Wataru; Saze, Hidetoshi; Matsui, Akihiro; Endo, Takaho A.; Harukawa, Yoshiko; Takagi, Hiroki; Yaegashi, Hiroki; Masuta, Yukari; Masuda, Seiji; Ishida, Junko; Tanaka, Maho; Takahashi, Satoshi; Morosawa, Taeko; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Kakutani, Tetsuji; Kato, Atsushi; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs), or transposons, play an important role in adaptation. TE insertion can affect host gene function and provides a mechanism for rapid increases in genetic diversity, particularly because many TEs respond to environmental stress. In the current study, we show that the transposition of a heat-activated retrotransposon, ONSEN, generated a mutation in an abscisic acid (ABA) responsive gene, resulting in an ABA-insensitive phenotype in Arabidopsis, suggesting stress tolerance. Our results provide direct evidence that a transposon activated by environmental stress could alter the genome in a potentially positive manner. Furthermore, the ABA-insensitive phenotype was inherited when the transcription was disrupted by an ONSEN insertion, whereas ABA sensitivity was recovered when the effects of ONSEN were masked by IBM2. These results suggest that epigenetic mechanisms in host plants typically buffered the effect of a new insertion, but could selectively “turn on” TEs when stressed. PMID:26976262

  2. Coping with Fears and Stress. An Activity Guide: Grades K-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward H.; And Others

    This guide consists of a set of activities to help elementary school students cope with fears and stress. Each activity includes the curricular areas in which it would fit (i.e., language arts, social studies, etc.), the grade level and group size for which it is suitable, and the approximate time necessary for its completion. The guide is divided…

  3. Neurokinin-1 receptor antagonism attenuates neuronal activity triggered by stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking.

    PubMed

    Schank, J R; Nelson, B S; Damadzic, R; Tapocik, J D; Yao, M; King, C E; Rowe, K E; Cheng, K; Rice, K C; Heilig, M

    2015-12-01

    Substance P (SP) and its cognate neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) are involved in alcohol-related behaviors. We have previously reported that NK1R antagonism attenuates stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking and suppresses escalated alcohol self-administration, but does not affect primary reinforcement or cue-induced reinstatement. Here, we administered an NK1R antagonist or vehicle prior to footshock-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking, and mapped the resulting neuronal activation using Fos immunohistochemistry. As expected, vehicle treated animals exposed to footshock showed induction of Fos immunoreactivity in several regions of the brain stress circuitry, including the amygdala (AMG), nucleus accumbens (NAC), dorsal raphe nucleus (DR), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). NK1R antagonism selectively suppressed the stress-induced increase in Fos in the DR and NAC shell. In the DR, Fos-induction by stress largely overlapped with tryptophan hydroxylase (TrpH), indicating activation of serotonergic neurons. Of NAC shell neurons activated during stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking, about 30% co-expressed dynorphin (DYN), while 70% co-expressed enkephalin (ENK). Few (<1%) activated NAC shell neurons coexpressed choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), which labels the cholinergic interneurons of this region. Infusion of the NK1R antagonist L822429 into the NAC shell blocked stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking. In contrast, L822429 infusion into the DR had no effect, suggesting that the influence of NK1R signaling on neuronal activity in the DR is indirect. Taken together, our results outline a potential pathway through which endogenous NK1R activation mediates stress-induced alcohol seeking. PMID:26188146

  4. PIM1 destabilization activates a p53-dependent response to ribosomal stress in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Vinay; Caldarola, Sara; Aria, Valentina; Monteleone, Valentina; Fuoco, Claudia; Gargioli, Cesare; Cannata, Stefano; Loreni, Fabrizio

    2016-04-26

    Defects in ribosome biogenesis triggers a stress response (ribosomal stress) that can lead to growth arrest and apoptosis. Signaling pathways activated by ribosomal stress are specifically involved in the pathological mechanism of a group of disorders defined as ribosomopathies. However, more generally, the quality control of ribosome synthesis is part of the regulatory circuits that control cell metabolism. A number of studies identified tumor suppressor p53 as a central player in ribosomal stress. We have previously reported that the kinase PIM1 plays a role as a sensor for ribosome deficiency. In this report we address the relationship between PIM1 and p53 in cancer cell lines after depletion of a ribosomal protein. We identified a novel signaling pathway that includes the kinase AKT and the ubiquitin ligase MDM2. In fact, our results indicate that the lower level of PIM1, induced by ribosomal stress, causes inactivation of AKT, inhibition of MDM2 and a consequent p53 stabilization. Therefore, we propose that activation of p53 in response to ribosomal stress, is dependent on the pathway PIM1-AKT-MDM2. In addition, we report evidence that PIM1 level may be relevant to assess the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs that induce ribosomal stress. PMID:26993775

  5. Stress-induced enhancement of leukocyte trafficking into sites of surgery or immune activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Kavitha; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.

    2005-04-01

    Effective immunoprotection requires rapid recruitment of leukocytes into sites of surgery, wounding, infection, or vaccination. In contrast to immunosuppressive chronic stressors, short-term acute stressors have immunoenhancing effects. Here, we quantify leukocyte infiltration within a surgical sponge to elucidate the kinetics, magnitude, subpopulation, and chemoattractant specificity of an acute stress-induced increase in leukocyte trafficking to a site of immune activation. Mice acutely stressed before sponge implantation showed 200-300% higher neutrophil, macrophage, natural killer cell, and T cell infiltration than did nonstressed animals. We also quantified the effects of acute stress on lymphotactin- (LTN; a predominantly lymphocyte-specific chemokine), and TNF-- (a proinflammatory cytokine) stimulated leukocyte infiltration. An additional stress-induced increase in infiltration was observed for neutrophils, in response to TNF-, macrophages, in response to TNF- and LTN, and natural killer cells and T cells in response to LTN. These results show that acute stress initially increases trafficking of all major leukocyte subpopulations to a site of immune activation. Tissue damage-, antigen-, or pathogen-driven chemoattractants subsequently determine which subpopulations are recruited more vigorously. Such stress-induced increases in leukocyte trafficking may enhance immunoprotection during surgery, vaccination, or infection, but may also exacerbate immunopathology during inflammatory (cardiovascular disease or gingivitis) or autoimmune (psoriasis, arthritis, or multiple sclerosis) diseases. chemokine | psychophysiological stress | surgical sponge | wound healing | lymphotactin

  6. Acute restraint stress enhances hippocampal endocannabinoid function via glucocorticoid receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meina; Hill, Matthew N; Zhang, Longhua; Gorzalka, Boris B; Hillard, Cecilia J; Alger, Bradley E

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to behavioural stress normally triggers a complex, multilevel response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis that helps maintain homeostatic balance. Although the endocannabinoid (eCB) system (ECS) is sensitive to chronic stress, few studies have directly addressed its response to acute stress. Here we show that acute restraint stress enhances eCB-dependent modulation of GABA release measured by whole-cell voltage clamp of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in vitro. Both Ca(2+)-dependent, eCB-mediated depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI), and muscarinic cholinergic receptor (mAChR)-mediated eCB mobilization are enhanced following acute stress exposure. DSI enhancement is dependent on the activation of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) and is mimicked by both in vivo and in vitro corticosterone treatment. This effect does not appear to involve cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an enzyme that can degrade eCBs; however, treatment of hippocampal slices with the L-type calcium (Ca(2+)) channel inhibitor, nifedipine, reverses while an agonist of these channels mimics the effect of in vivo stress. Finally, we find that acute stress produces a delayed (by 30 min) increase in the hippocampal content of 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the eCB responsible for DSI. These results support the hypothesis that the ECS is a biochemical effector of glucocorticoids in the brain, linking stress with changes in synaptic strength. PMID:21890595

  7. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  8. 17β-estradiol differentially regulates stress circuitry activity in healthy and depressed women.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Emily G; Holsen, Laura M; Lancaster, Katie; Makris, Nikos; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Sue; Remington, Anne; Weiss, Blair; Buka, Stephen; Klibanski, Anne; Goldstein, Jill M

    2015-02-01

    Many regions within stress neurocircuitry, including the anterior hypothalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex, are densely populated with sex steroid receptors. Substantial evidence from animal studies indicates that the gonadal hormone 17β-estradiol (E₂) impacts the structure and function of these regions, but human studies are limited. Characterizing estradiol's role in stress circuitry in vivo in humans may have important clinical implications given the comorbidity between major depressive disorder (MDD), stress circuitry dysfunction and endocrine dysregulation. In this study, we determined estradiol's role in modulating activity within cortical and subcortical stress circuitry regions in healthy and MDD women. Subjects were part of a population-based birth cohort, the New England Family Study. Capitalizing on the endogenous fluctuation in E₂ during the menstrual cycle, we conducted a within-person repeated-measures functional neuroimaging study in which 15 women with recurrent MDD, in remission, and 15 healthy control women underwent hormonal evaluations, behavioral testing, and fMRI scanning on two occasions, under low and high E₂ conditions. Subjects completed an fMRI scan while undergoing a mild visual stress challenge that reliably activated stress neural circuitry. Results demonstrate that E₂ modulates activity across key stress circuitry regions, including bilateral amygdala, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. In healthy women, robust task-evoked BOLD signal changes observed under low E₂ conditions were attenuated under high E₂ conditions. This hormonal capacity to regulate activity in stress circuitry was not observed in MDD women, despite their remitted status, suggesting that dysregulation of gonadal hormone function may be a characteristic trait of the disease. These findings serve to deepen our understanding of estradiol's actions in the healthy brain and the neurobiological mechanisms that may underlie the pronounced

  9. 17β-Estradiol Differentially Regulates Stress Circuitry Activity in Healthy and Depressed Women

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Emily G; Holsen, Laura M; Lancaster, Katie; Makris, Nikos; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Sue; Remington, Anne; Weiss, Blair; Buka, Stephen; Klibanski, Anne; Goldstein, Jill M

    2015-01-01

    Many regions within stress neurocircuitry, including the anterior hypothalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex, are densely populated with sex steroid receptors. Substantial evidence from animal studies indicates that the gonadal hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) impacts the structure and function of these regions, but human studies are limited. Characterizing estradiol's role in stress circuitry in vivo in humans may have important clinical implications given the comorbidity between major depressive disorder (MDD), stress circuitry dysfunction and endocrine dysregulation. In this study, we determined estradiol's role in modulating activity within cortical and subcortical stress circuitry regions in healthy and MDD women. Subjects were part of a population-based birth cohort, the New England Family Study. Capitalizing on the endogenous fluctuation in E2 during the menstrual cycle, we conducted a within-person repeated-measures functional neuroimaging study in which 15 women with recurrent MDD, in remission, and 15 healthy control women underwent hormonal evaluations, behavioral testing, and fMRI scanning on two occasions, under low and high E2 conditions. Subjects completed an fMRI scan while undergoing a mild visual stress challenge that reliably activated stress neural circuitry. Results demonstrate that E2 modulates activity across key stress circuitry regions, including bilateral amygdala, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. In healthy women, robust task-evoked BOLD signal changes observed under low E2 conditions were attenuated under high E2 conditions. This hormonal capacity to regulate activity in stress circuitry was not observed in MDD women, despite their remitted status, suggesting that dysregulation of gonadal hormone function may be a characteristic trait of the disease. These findings serve to deepen our understanding of estradiol's actions in the healthy brain and the neurobiological mechanisms that may underlie the pronounced sex

  10. AMPK activation protects cells from oxidative stress-induced senescence via autophagic flux restoration and intracellular NAD(+) elevation.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaojuan; Tai, Haoran; Wang, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhe; Zhou, Jiao; Wei, Xiawei; Ding, Yi; Gong, Hui; Mo, Chunfen; Zhang, Jie; Qin, Jianqiong; Ma, Yuanji; Huang, Ning; Xiang, Rong; Xiao, Hengyi

    2016-06-01

    AMPK activation is beneficial for cellular homeostasis and senescence prevention. However, the molecular events involved in AMPK activation are not well defined. In this study, we addressed the mechanism underlying the protective effect of AMPK on oxidative stress-induced senescence. The results showed that AMPK was inactivated in senescent cells. However, pharmacological activation of AMPK by metformin and berberine significantly prevented the development of senescence and, accordingly, inhibition of AMPK by Compound C was accelerated. Importantly, AMPK activation prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced impairment of the autophagic flux in senescent cells, evidenced by the decreased p62 degradation, GFP-RFP-LC3 cancellation, and activity of lysosomal hydrolases. We also found that AMPK activation restored the NAD(+) levels in the senescent cells via a mechanism involving mostly the salvage pathway for NAD(+) synthesis. In addition, the mechanistic relationship of autophagic flux and NAD(+) synthesis and the involvement of mTOR and Sirt1 activities were assessed. In summary, our results suggest that AMPK prevents oxidative stress-induced senescence by improving autophagic flux and NAD(+) homeostasis. This study provides a new insight for exploring the mechanisms of aging, autophagy and NAD(+) homeostasis, and it is also valuable in the development of innovative strategies to combat aging. PMID:26890602

  11. Development of a shear stress sensor to analyse the influence of polymers on the turbulent wall shear stress.

    PubMed

    Nottebrock, Bernardo; Grosse, Sebastian; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2011-05-11

    The drag reducing effect of polymers in a channel flow is well known and it is assumed that the polymer filaments interfere with the turbulent structures in the very near-wall flow. To analyse their precise effect, a micro-pillar shear stress sensor (MPS³) measurement system is developed which allows the detection of wall shear stress at high spatial and temporal resolutions. Different manufacturing techniques for the required micro-pillars are discussed and their influence on the flow is investigated evidencing the non-intrusive character of the pillars. Subsequently, a complete calibration is presented to relate the recorded deflection to wall shear stress values and to assure the correct detection over the whole expected frequency spectrum. A feasibility study about the ability to visualize the two-dimensional wall shear stress distribution completes the discussion about the validity of MPS³. In the last step, the drag reduction of a polymer filament grafted on a micro-pillar compared to a plain pillar and the application of MPS³ in an ocean-type polymer solution are investigated. The results confirm the expected behaviour found in the literature. PMID:21508484

  12. Toward Preventing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: Development and Testing of a Pilot Predeployment Stress Inoculation Training Program.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Laurel; Tueller, Stephen; Kizakevich, Paul; Lewis, Gregory; Strange, Laura; Weimer, Belinda; Bryant, Stephanie; Bishop, Ellen; Hubal, Robert; Spira, James

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to design, develop, and evaluate a predeployment stress inoculation training (PRESIT) preventive intervention to enable deploying personnel to cope better with combat-related stressors and mitigate the negative effects of trauma exposure. The PRESIT program consisted of three predeployment training modules: (1) educational materials on combat and operational stress control, (2) coping skills training involving focused and relaxation breathing exercises with biofeedback, and (3) exposure to a video multimedia stressor environment to practice knowledge and skills learned in the first two modules. Heart rate variability assessed the degree to which a subset of participants learned the coping skills. With a cluster randomized design, data from 351 Marines randomized into PRESIT and control groups were collected at predeployment and from 259 of these who responded to surveys on return from deployment. Findings showed that the PRESIT group reduced their physiological arousal through increased respiratory sinus arrhythmia during and after breathing training relative to controls. Logistic regression, corrected for clustering at the platoon level, examined group effects on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as measured by the Post-traumatic Stress Checklist after controlling for relevant covariates. Results showed that PRESIT protected against PTSD among Marines without baseline mental health problems. Although limited by a small number of participants who screened positive for PTSD, this study supports the benefits of PRESIT as a potential preventive strategy in the U.S. military personnel. PMID:27612367

  13. Spontaneous activity in the developing auditory system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han Chin; Bergles, Dwight E

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous electrical activity is a common feature of sensory systems during early development. This sensory-independent neuronal activity has been implicated in promoting their survival and maturation, as well as growth and refinement of their projections to yield circuits that can rapidly extract information about the external world. Periodic bursts of action potentials occur in auditory neurons of mammals before hearing onset. This activity is induced by inner hair cells (IHCs) within the developing cochlea, which establish functional connections with spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) several weeks before they are capable of detecting external sounds. During this pre-hearing period, IHCs fire periodic bursts of Ca(2+) action potentials that excite SGNs, triggering brief but intense periods of activity that pass through auditory centers of the brain. Although spontaneous activity requires input from IHCs, there is ongoing debate about whether IHCs are intrinsically active and their firing periodically interrupted by external inhibitory input (IHC-inhibition model), or are intrinsically silent and their firing periodically promoted by an external excitatory stimulus (IHC-excitation model). There is accumulating evidence that inner supporting cells in Kölliker's organ spontaneously release ATP during this time, which can induce bursts of Ca(2+) spikes in IHCs that recapitulate many features of auditory neuron activity observed in vivo. Nevertheless, the role of supporting cells in this process remains to be established in vivo. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for generating IHC activity in the developing cochlea will help reveal how these events contribute to the maturation of nascent auditory circuits. PMID:25296716

  14. Evidence that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and caspase-4 activation occur in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Binet, Francois; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis can result from activation of three major pathways: the extrinsic, the intrinsic, and the most recently identified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated pathway. While the two former pathways are known to be operational in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), the existence of the ER stress-mediated pathway, generally involving caspase-4, has never been reported in these cells. Recently, we have documented that arsenic trioxide (ATO) induced apoptosis in human PMNs by a mechanism that needs to be further investigated. In this study, using immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we present evidence of ER alterations in PMNs activated by the ER stress inducer arsenic trioxide (ATO). Several key players of the unfolded protein response, including GRP78, GADD153, ATF6, XBP1 and eIF2{alpha} are expressed and activated in PMNs treated with ATO or other ER stress inducers. Although caspase-4 is expressed and activated in neutrophils, treatment with a caspase-4 inhibitor did not attenuate the pro-apoptotic effect of ATO at a concentration that reverses caspase-4 processing and activation. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway operates in human neutrophils.

  15. New origin firing is inhibited by APC/CCdh1 activation in S-phase after severe replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Ercilla, Amaia; Llopis, Alba; Feu, Sonia; Aranda, Sergi; Ernfors, Patrik; Freire, Raimundo; Agell, Neus

    2016-01-01

    Defects in DNA replication and repair are known to promote genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer cells. Thus, eukaryotic cells have developed complex mechanisms to ensure accurate duplication of their genomes. While DNA damage response has been extensively studied in tumour cells, the pathways implicated in the response to replication stress are less well understood especially in non-transformed cells. Here we show that in non-transformed cells, APC/CCdh1 is activated upon severe replication stress. Activation of APC/CCdh1 prevents new origin firing and induces permanent arrest in S-phase. Moreover, Rad51-mediated homologous recombination is also impaired under these conditions. APC/CCdh1 activation in S-phase occurs after replication forks have been processed into double strand breaks. Remarkably, this activation, which correlates with decreased Emi1 levels, is not prevented by ATR/ATM inhibition, but it is abrogated in cells depleted of p53 or p21. Importantly, we found that the lack of APC/CCdh1 activity correlated with an increase in genomic instability. Taken together, our results define a new APC/CCdh1 function that prevents cell cycle resumption after prolonged replication stress by inhibiting origin firing, which may act as an additional mechanism in safeguarding genome integrity. PMID:26939887

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Activated Transcription Factor ATF6α Requires the Disulfide Isomerase PDIA5 To Modulate Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Arisa; Taouji, Said; Lhomond, Stéphanie; Jensen, Devon; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.; Simpson, Jeremy C.; Pasquet, Jean-Max; Schekman, Randy

    2014-01-01

    ATF6α, a membrane-anchored transcription factor from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that modulates the cellular response to stress as an effector of the unfolded-protein response (UPR), is a key player in the development of tumors of different origin. ATF6α activation has been linked to oncogenic transformation and tumor maintenance; however, the mechanism(s) underlying this phenomenon remains elusive. Here, using a phenotypic small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening, we identified a novel role for ATF6α in chemoresistance and defined the protein disulfide isomerase A5 (PDIA5) as necessary for ATF6α activation upon ER stress. PDIA5 contributed to disulfide bond rearrangement in ATF6α under stress conditions, thereby leading to ATF6α export from the ER and activation of its target genes. Further analysis of the mechanism demonstrated that PDIA5 promotes ATF6α packaging into coat protein complex II (COPII) vesicles and that the PDIA5/ATF6α activation loop is essential to confer chemoresistance on cancer cells. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the PDIA5/ATF6α axis restored sensitivity to the drug treatment. This work defines the mechanisms underlying the role of ATF6α activation in carcinogenesis and chemoresistance; furthermore, it identifies PDIA5 as a key regulator ATF6α-mediated cellular functions in cancer. PMID:24636989

  17. New origin firing is inhibited by APC/CCdh1 activation in S-phase after severe replication stress.

    PubMed

    Ercilla, Amaia; Llopis, Alba; Feu, Sonia; Aranda, Sergi; Ernfors, Patrik; Freire, Raimundo; Agell, Neus

    2016-06-01

    Defects in DNA replication and repair are known to promote genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer cells. Thus, eukaryotic cells have developed complex mechanisms to ensure accurate duplication of their genomes. While DNA damage response has been extensively studied in tumour cells, the pathways implicated in the response to replication stress are less well understood especially in non-transformed cells. Here we show that in non-transformed cells, APC/C(Cdh1) is activated upon severe replication stress. Activation of APC/C(Cdh1) prevents new origin firing and induces permanent arrest in S-phase. Moreover, Rad51-mediated homologous recombination is also impaired under these conditions. APC/C(Cdh1) activation in S-phase occurs after replication forks have been processed into double strand breaks. Remarkably, this activation, which correlates with decreased Emi1 levels, is not prevented by ATR/ATM inhibition, but it is abrogated in cells depleted of p53 or p21. Importantly, we found that the lack of APC/C(Cdh1) activity correlated with an increase in genomic instability. Taken together, our results define a new APC/C(Cdh1) function that prevents cell cycle resumption after prolonged replication stress by inhibiting origin firing, which may act as an additional mechanism in safeguarding genome integrity. PMID:26939887

  18. The Role of the Glucocorticoids in Developing Resilience to Stress and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Subhashini; Shariff, Masroor; Bartlett, Selena E.

    2013-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that individuals have the capacity to learn to be resilient by developing protective mechanisms that prevent them from the maladaptive effects of stress that can contribute to addiction. The emerging field of the neuroscience of resilience is beginning to uncover the circuits and molecules that protect against stress-related neuropsychiatric diseases, such as addiction. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are important regulators of basal and stress-related homeostasis in all higher organisms and influence a wide array of genes in almost every organ and tissue. GCs, therefore, are ideally situated to either promote or prevent adaptation to stress. In this review, we will focus on the role of GCs in the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenocortical axis and extra-hypothalamic regions in regulating basal and chronic stress responses. GCs interact with a large number of neurotransmitter and neuropeptide systems that are associated with the development of addiction. Additionally, the review will focus on the orexinergic and cholinergic pathways and highlight their role in stress and addiction. GCs play a key role in promoting the development of resilience or susceptibility and represent important pharmacotherapeutic targets that can reduce the impact of a maladapted stress system for the treatment of stress-induced addiction. PMID:23914175

  19. Lung cancer: what are the links with oxidative stress, physical activity and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Filaire, Edith; Dupuis, Carmen; Galvaing, Géraud; Aubreton, Sylvie; Laurent, Hélène; Richard, Ruddy; Filaire, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Oxidative stress appears to play an essential role as a secondary messenger in the normal regulation of a variety of physiological processes, such as apoptosis, survival, and proliferative signaling pathways. Oxidative stress also plays important roles in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including aging, degenerative disease, and cancer. Among cancers, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer in the Western world. Lung cancer is the commonest fatal cancer whose risk is dependent on the number of cigarettes smoked per day as well as the number of years smoking, some components of cigarette smoke inducing oxidative stress by transmitting or generating oxidative stress. It can be subdivided into two broad categories, small cell lung cancer and non-small-cell lung cancer, the latter is the most common type. Distinct measures of primary and secondary prevention have been investigated to reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality caused by lung cancer. Among them, it seems that physical activity and nutrition have some beneficial effects. However, physical activity can have different influences on carcinogenesis, depending on energy supply, strength and frequency of exercise loads as well as the degree of exercise-mediated oxidative stress. Micronutrient supplementation seems to have a positive impact in lung surgery, particularly as an antioxidant, even if the role of micronutrients in lung cancer remains controversial. The purpose of this review is to examine lung cancer in relation to oxidative stress, physical activity, and nutrition. PMID:24161719

  20. Effects of high temperature stress at different development stages on soybean isoflavone and tocopherol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chennupati, Pratyusha; Seguin, Philippe; Liu, Wucheng

    2011-12-28

    Soybean contains a range of compounds with putative health benefits including isoflavones and tocopherols. A study was conducted to determine the effects on these compounds of high temperature stress imposed at specific development stages [i.e., none, pre-emergence, vegetative, early reproductive (R1-4), late-reproductive (R5-8), or all stages]. Two cultivars (AC Proteina and OAC Champion) were grown in growth chambers set at contrasting temperatures [i.e., stress conditions of 33/25 °C (day/night temperature) and control conditions of 23/15 °C] in order to generate these treatments. Isoflavone and tocopherol concentrations in mature seeds were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. In both cultivars isoflavone response was greatest when stress occurred during the R5-8 stages and during all development stages, these treatments reducing total isoflavone concentration by an average of 85% compared to the control. Stress imposed at other stages also affected isoflavone concentration although the response was smaller. For example, stress during the vegetative stages reduced total isoflavones by 33% in OAC Champion. Stress imposed pre-emergence had an opposite effect increasing daidzein concentration by 24% in AC Proteina. Tocopherol concentrations were affected the most when stress was imposed during all stages of development, followed by stress restricted to stages R5-8; response to stress during other stages was limited. The specific response of tocopherols differed, α-tocopherol being increased by high temperature by as much as 752%, the reverse being observed for δ-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol. The present study demonstrates that while isoflavone and tocopherol concentrations in soybeans are affected the most by stress occurring during seed formation, concentrations can also be affected by stress occurring at other stages including stages as early as pre-emergence. PMID:22098462

  1. The influence of body posture, arm movement, and work stress on trapezius activity during computer work.

    PubMed

    Mork, Paul Jarle; Westgaard, Rolf H

    2007-11-01

    The study aimed to determine the influence of arm posture and movement on trapezius activity of computer workers, considering the full workday. A second aim was to investigate if work periods perceived as stressful were associated with elevated or more sustained muscle activity pattern. Twenty-six computer workers performing call-center (n=11), help desk (n=7), or secretarial (n=8) work tasks participated. Bilateral trapezius surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity and heart rate was recorded throughout the workday. Simultaneous inclinometer recordings from left thigh and upper arms identified periods with sitting, standing, and walking, as well as arm posture and movement. Perceived work stress and tension were recorded on visual analog scales (VAS) every hour. Trapezius sEMG activity was low in seated posture [group median 1.8 and 0.9% of activity at maximal voluntary contraction (%EMGmax) for dominant and non-dominant side] and was elevated in standing (3.0 and 2.5% EMGmax) and walking (3.9 and 3.4% EMGmax). In seated posture (mean duration 79% of workday) arm movement consistently influenced trapezius activity, accounting for approximately 20% of intra-individual variation in trapezius activity. Arm elevation was on average not associated with trapezius activity when seated; however, considerable individual variation was observed. There was no indication of increase in trapezius activity or more sustained activity pattern, nor in heart rate, in high-stress versus low-stress periods, comparing periods with seated posture for the subjects reporting contrasts of at least two VAS units in stress (n=16) or tension (n=14) score. PMID:17653757

  2. Ubiquitination pathway as a target to develop abiotic stress tolerance in rice

    PubMed Central

    Dametto, Andressa; Buffon, Giseli; Dos Reis Blasi, Édina Aparecida; Sperotto, Raul Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses may result in significant losses in rice grain productivity. Protein regulation by the ubiquitin/proteasome system has been studied as a target mechanism to optimize adaptation and survival strategies of plants to different environmental stresses. This article aimed at highlighting recent discoveries about the roles ubiquitination may play in the exposure of rice plants to different abiotic stresses, enabling the development of modified plants tolerant to stress. Responses provided by the ubiquitination process include the regulation of the stomatal opening, phytohormones levels, protein stabilization, cell membrane integrity, meristematic cell maintenance, as well as the regulation of reactive oxygen species and heavy metals levels. It is noticeable that ubiquitination is a potential means for developing abiotic stress tolerant plants, being an excellent alternative to rice (and other cultures) improvement programs. PMID:26236935

  3. Development of Maladaptive Coping: A Functional Adaptation to Chronic, Uncontrollable Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wadsworth, Martha E.

    2015-01-01

    Health disparities are rooted in childhood and stem from adverse early environments that damage physiologic stress-response systems. Developmental psychobiological models of the effects of chronic stress account for both the negative effects of a stress-response system calibrated to a dangerous and unpredictable environment from a health perspective, and the positive effects of such an adaptively calibrated stress response from a functional perspective. Our research suggests that contexts that produce functionally adapted physiologic responses to stress also encourage a functionally adapted coping response—coping that can result in maladjustment in physical and mental health, but enables children to grow and develop within those contexts. In this article, I highlight the value of reframing maladaptive coping as functional adaptation to understand more completely the development of children’s coping in different contexts, and the value of such a conceptual shift for coping-based theory, research, and intervention. PMID:26019717

  4. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; P<0.05) at all examined time points (2 to 24 hours). mRNA half-life studies showed that this response was not due to increased mRNA instability. tPA mRNA expression was decreased (to 10% of stationary control; P<0.05) by low shear stress after 12 hours of exposure and was increased (to 250% of stationary control; P<0.05) after 24 hours at high shear stress. The same trends in PAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in rat smooth muscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  5. Vegetables’ juice influences polyol pathway by multiple mechanisms in favour of reducing development of oxidative stress and resultant diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Ashok K.; Kumar, D. Anand; Sweeya, Pisupati S.; Chauhan, H. Anusha; Lavanya, V.; Sireesha, K.; Pavithra, K.; Zehra, Amtul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hyperglycemia induced generation of free radicals and consequent development of oxidative stress by polyol pathway is one of the crucial mechanisms stirring up development of diabetic complications. We evaluated influence of ten vegetables’ juice on polyol pathway along with their antioxidant and antioxidative stress potentials. Materials and Methods: Aldose reductase activity was determined utilising goat lens and human erythrocytes. In goat lens, utilization of nicotinamine adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and aldose reductase inhibition was assayed. In human erythrocytes, sorbitol formation was measured as an index of aldose reductase activity under normoglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions. Ability of juices in inhibiting oxidative damage to deoxyribose sugar and calf thymus DNA and inhibitory activity against hydrogen peroxide induced hemolysis of erythrocytes was also analysed. Phytochemical contents like total polyphenol, total flavonoid and total protein were measured to find their influence on biological activities. Results: Vegetables’ juice displayed varying degrees of inhibitory potentials in mitigating NADPH dependent catalytic activity of aldose reductase in goat lens, accumulation of sorbitol in human erythrocytes under different glucose concentrations; Fenton-reaction induced oxidative damage to deoxyribose sugar, and calf thymus DNA. Substantial variations in vegetables phytochemicals content were also noticed in this study. Conclusions: Vegetables’ juice possesses potent activities in influencing polyol pathway by various mechanisms in favour of reducing development of oxidative stress independent of their inherent antioxidative properties. Juice of ivy gourd followed by green cucumber and ridge gourd were among the most potent for they displayed strong activities on various parameters analysed in this study. These vegetables’ juice may become part of mechanism-based complementary antioxidant therapy to prevent

  6. Moving toward Teamwork through Professional Development Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Meghan M.; Theilheimer, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study of three Head Start Centers analyzed surveys, interviews, and focus group data to determine how education coordinators, teachers, and teacher assistants believed professional development activities could support teamwork at their centers. The researchers sorted data related to teamwork into four categories: knowledge and…

  7. Active Learning through Toy Design and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirinterlikci, Arif; Zane, Linda; Sirinterlikci, Aleea L.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an initiative that is based on active learning pedagogy by engaging elementary and middle school students in the toy design and development field. The case study presented in this article is about student learning experiences during their participation in the TOYchallenge National Toy Design Competition. Students followed the…

  8. Child Development: An Active Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Laura E.; Munsch, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    Within each chapter of this innovative topical text, the authors engage students by demonstrating the wide range of real-world applications of psychological research connected to child development. In particular, the distinctive Active Learning features incorporated throughout the book foster a dynamic and personal learning process for students.…

  9. Developing Web Literacy in Collaborative Inquiry Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuiper, Els; Volman, Monique; Terwel, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Although many children are technically skilled in using the Web, their competences to use it in a critical and meaningful way are usually less well developed. In this article, we report on a multiple case study focusing on the possibilities and limitations of collaborative inquiry activities as an appropriate context to acquire Web literacy skills…

  10. SKILL DEVELOPMENT THROUGH GAMES AND RHYTHMIC ACTIVITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NAGEL, CHARLES; MOORE, FREDRICKA

    A DISCUSSION OF THE OVERALL OBJECTIVES OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, THE PURPOSES OF DEVELOPING MOVEMENT SKILLS IN GAMES AND RHYTHMS, AND THE ROLE OF THE TEACHER IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION COMPRISES THE INTRODUCTORY CHAPTER OF THIS TEXTBOOK FOR BEGINNING PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHERS. SUCCEEDING CHAPTERS ARE CONCERNED WITH FIVE…

  11. Interactive Video Training and Development Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troy State Univ., AL.

    The Interactive Video Training and Development Activity of Troy State University (Troy, Alabama) is described in this report. The project has trained more than 30 people in the production of interactive video programs since its inception in 1983. Since 1985, training programs have been offered twice a year to individuals within and outside the…

  12. Development of a space activity suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annis, J. F.; Webb, P.

    1971-01-01

    The development of a series of prototype space activity suit (SAS) assemblies is discussed. The SAS is a new type of pressure suit designed especially for extravehicular activity. It consists of a set of carefully tailored elastic fabric garments which have been engineered to supply sufficient counterpressure to the body to permit subjects to breath O2 at pressures up to 200 mm Hg without circulatory difficulty. A closed, positive pressure breathing system (PPBS) and a full bubble helmet were also developed to complete the system. The ultimate goal of the SAS is to improve the range of activity and decrease the energy cost of work associated with wearing conventional gas filled pressure suits. Results are presented from both laboratory (1 atmosphere) and altitude chamber tests with subjects wearing various SAS assemblies. In laboratory tests lasting up to three hours, the SAS was worn while subjects breathed O2 at pressures up to 170 mm Hg without developing physiological problems. The only physiological symptoms apparent were a moderate tachycardia related to breathing pressures above 130 mm Hg, and a small collection of edema fluid in the hands. Both problems were considered to be related to areas of under-pressurization by the garments. These problems, it is suggested, can ultimately be corrected by the development of new elastic fabrics and tailoring techniques. Energy cost of activity, and mobility and dexterity of subjects in the SAS, were found to be superior to those in comparable tests on subjects in full pressure suits.

  13. α-Mangostin Reduced ER Stress-mediated Tumor Growth through Autophagy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Hong, Eun-Hye; Lee, Bo-Ra; Park, Moon-Ho; Kim, Ji-Won; Pyun, A-Rim; Kim, Yeon-Jeong; Chang, Sun-Young; Chin, Young-Won

    2012-01-01

    α-Mangostin is a xanthon derivative contained in the fruit hull of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.), and the administration of α-Mangostin inhibited the growth of transplanted colon cancer, Her/CT26 cells which expressed Her-2/neu as tumor antigen. Although α-Mangostin was reported to have inhibitory activity against sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase like thapsigargin, it showed different activity for autophagy regulation. In the current study, we found that α-Mangostin induced autophagy activation in mouse intestinal epithelial cells, as GFP-LC3 transgenic mice were orally administered with 20 mg/kg of α-Mangostin daily for three days. However, the activation of autophagy by α-Mangostin did not significantly increase OVA-specific T cell proliferation. As we assessed ER stress by using XBP-1 reporter system and phosphorylation of eIF2α, thapsigargin-induced ER stress was significantly reduced by α-Mangostin. However, coadministration of thapsigargin with α-Mangostin completely blocked the antitumor activity of α-Mangostin, suggesting ER stress with autophagy blockade accelerated tumor growth in mouse colon cancer model. Thus the antitumor activity of α-Mangostin can be ascribable to the autophagy activation rather than ER stress induction. PMID:23396851

  14. Nature and the Sign of Stress-Activated Electronic Charge Carriers in Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, F.

    2013-12-01

    When rocks are subjected to increasing uniaxial stress, highly mobile charge carriers become activated, which have the remarkable ability to flow out of the stressed rock volume, spreading into and through adjacent less stressed or unstressed rocks. Two basic questions arise: (i) What is the nature - and the sign - of these charge carriers and (ii) How do they exist in the rocks before being activated by stress? A large body of evidence is available that points to a positive sign, consistent with defect electrons, which (in semiconductor parlance) are called 'holes'. Holes that reside in the oxygen anion sublattice, associated with O 2sp-type energy states at the upper edge of the valence band, are called 'positive holes'. The positive holes exist in rocks in form of dormant, electrically inactive peroxy defects. Ever so slight deformation, leading to grain-grain sliding, can break the peroxy bonds and activate positive holes. Electrons that are co-activated by the same process cannot flow out of the stressed rock volume into the unstressed rocks. This leads to charge separation and, hence, to a potential difference similar to a battery voltage. In order to experimentally confirm the positive sign of the positive hole charge carriers flowing out of a given stressed rock volume, certain rules have to be obeyed. If not, unreliable results may be obtained, even negative outflow currents, seemingly inconsistent with the postulated positive sign of the positive hole charge carriers. Such errors can be avoided by taking into account that the charge outflow occurs in response to a 'battery potential', V, rapidly evolving between stressed and unstressed or less stressed parts of the rock. The current I given by Ohm's Law, I=V/R, is then limited by the internal resistance R. A second complicating factor arises from the fact that, as the positive holes are stress-activated and begin to flow out, they simultaneously recombine, returning to the dormant state. The ensuing

  15. Time profile of oxidative stress and neutrophil activation in ovine acute lung injury and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Matthias; Szabo, Csaba; Traber, Daniel L; Horvath, Eszter; Hamahata, Atsumori; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Traber, Lillian D; Cox, Robert A; Schmalstieg, Frank C; Herndon, David N; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2012-05-01

    The formation of oxidative stress in the lung and activation of neutrophils are major determinants in the development of respiratory failure after acute lung injury and sepsis. However, the time changes of these pathogenic factors have not been sufficiently described. Twenty-four chronically instrumented sheep were subjected to cotton smoke inhalation injury and instillation of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa into both lungs. The sheep were euthanized at 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h after injury. Additional sheep received sham injury and were euthanized after 24 h. Pulmonary function was assessed by determination of oxygenation index and pulmonary shunt fraction. In addition, lung tissue was harvested at the respective time points for the measurement of malondialdehyde, interleukin 6, poly(ADP ribose), myeloperoxidase, and alveolar polymorphonuclear neutrophil score. The injury induced severe respiratory failure that was associated with an early increase in lipid peroxidation and interleukin 6 expression. The injury further led to an increase in poly(ADP ribose) activity that reached its peak at 12 h after injury and declined afterward. In addition, progressive increases in markers of neutrophil accumulation in the lung were observed. The peak of neutrophil accumulation in the lung was associated with a severe depletion of circulating neutrophils. The results from our model may enhance the understanding of the pathophysiological alterations after acute lung injury and sepsis and thus be useful in exploring therapeutic interventions directed at modifying the expression or activation of inflammatory mediators. PMID:22266977

  16. Activation and shedding of platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa under non-physiological shear stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zengsheng; Mondal, Nandan K; Ding, Jun; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of non-physiological high shear stress on activation and shedding of platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptors. The healthy donor blood was exposed to three levels of high shear stresses (25, 75, 125 Pa) from the physiological to non-physiological status with three short exposure time (0.05, 0.5, 1.5 s), created by a specific blood shearing system. The activation and shedding of the platelet GPIIb/IIIa were analyzed using flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, platelet P-selectin expression of sheared blood, which is a marker for activated platelets, was also analyzed. The results from the present study showed that the number of activated platelets, as indicated by the surface GPIIb/IIIa activation and P-selectin expression, increased with increasing the shear stress level and exposure time. However, the mean fluorescence of GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface, decreased with increasing the shear stress level and exposure time. The reduction of GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface was further proved by the reduction of further activated platelet GPIIb/IIIa surface expression induced by ADP and the increase in GPIIb/IIIa concentration in microparticle-free plasma with increasing the applied shear stress and exposure time. It is clear that non-physiological shear stress induce a paradoxical phenomenon, in which both activation and shedding of the GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface occur simultaneously. This study may offer a new perspective to explain the reason of both increased thrombosis and bleeding events in patients implanted with high shear blood-contacting medical devices. PMID:26160282

  17. Glycolytic enzyme activities and gene expression in Cicer arietinum exposed to water-deficit stress.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Suruchi M; Taxak, Pooja Choudhary; Jain, Pradeep K; Saini, Raman; Srinivasan, R

    2014-08-01

    The specific activities and transcript levels of glycolytic enzymes were examined in shoots of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) cultivars, Pusa362 (drought tolerant) and SBD377 (drought sensitive), subjected to water-deficit stress 30 days after sowing. Water-deficit stress resulted in decrease in relative water content, chlorophyll content, plant dry weight, and NADP/NADPH ratio and increase in NAD/NADH ratio in both the cultivars. A successive decline in the specific activities of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (aldolase), 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK), and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NADP-GAPDH) and elevation in the specific activities of phosphoglycerate mutase (PGM) and triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) was observed in both the cultivars under stress as compared to their respective control plants. The specific activities of hexokinase, fructose-6-phosphate kinase (PFK), and NAD-GAPDH were least affected. The transcript levels of PGK and NADP-GAPDH decreased and that of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), PGM, and PFK increased in response to water-deficit stress while water-deficit stress had no effect on the steady-state transcript levels of hexokinase, aldolase, TPI, and NAD-GAPDH. The results suggest that under water-deficit stress, the activities and transcript levels of most of the glycolytic enzymes are not significantly affected, except the increased activity and transcript level of PGM and decreased activities and transcript levels of PGK and NADP-GAPDH. Further, the glycolytic enzymes do not show much variation between the tolerant and sensitive cultivars under water deficit. PMID:25008554

  18. Activity of earthworm in Latosol under simulated acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-En; Yu, Jiayu; Ouyang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Acid rain is still an issue of environmental concerns. This study investigated the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon earthworm activity from the Latosol (acidic red soil). Laboratory experiment was performed by leaching the soil columns grown with earthworms (Eisenia fetida) at the SAR pH levels ranged from 2.0 to 6.5 over a 34-day period. Results showed that earthworms tended to escape from the soil and eventually died for the SAR at pH = 2.0 as a result of acid toxicity. The catalase activity in the earthworms decreased with the SAR pH levels, whereas the superoxide dismutases activity in the earthworms showed a fluctuate pattern: decreasing from pH 6.5 to 5.0 and increasing from pH 5.0 to 4.0. Results implied that the growth of earthworms was retarded at the SAR pH ≤ 3.0. PMID:25351717

  19. Moderate Thermal Stress Causes Active and Immediate Expulsion of Photosynthetically Damaged Zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium) from Corals

    PubMed Central

    Fujise, Lisa; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Go; Sasaki, Kengo; Liao, Lawrence M.; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The foundation of coral reef biology is the symbiosis between corals and zooxanthellae (dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium). Recently, coral bleaching, which often results in mass mortality of corals and the collapse of coral reef ecosystems, has become an important issue around the world as coral reefs decrease in number year after year. To understand the mechanisms underlying coral bleaching, we maintained two species of scleractinian corals (Acroporidae) in aquaria under non-thermal stress (27°C) and moderate thermal stress conditions (30°C), and we compared the numbers and conditions of the expelled Symbiodinium from these corals. Under non-thermal stress conditions corals actively expel a degraded form of Symbiodinium, which are thought to be digested by their host coral. This response was also observed at 30°C. However, while the expulsion rates of Symbiodinium cells remained constant, the proportion of degraded cells significantly increased at 30°C. This result indicates that corals more actively digest and expel damaged Symbiodinium under thermal stress conditions, likely as a mechanism for coping with environmental change. However, the increase in digested Symbiodinium expulsion under thermal stress may not fully keep up with accumulation of the damaged cells. There are more photosynthetically damaged Symbiodinium upon prolonged exposure to thermal stress, and corals release them without digestion to prevent their accumulation. This response may be an adaptive strategy to moderate stress to ensure survival, but the accumulation of damaged Symbiodinium, which causes subsequent coral deterioration, may occur when the response cannot cope with the magnitude or duration of environmental stress, and this might be a possible mechanism underlying coral bleaching during prolonged moderate thermal stress. PMID:25493938

  20. High temperature solid oxide fuel development activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, E.R.

    1993-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse tubular SOFC development activities and current program status. Goal is to develop a cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 h. Test results are presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 40,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Two 25-kW SOFC customer tests units were delivered in 1992; a 20-kW SOFC system is bein manufactured and will be operated by Southern California Edison in 1995. Megawatt class generators are being developed.

  1. HIV Protease Inhibitors Sensitize Human Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cells to Radiation by Activating Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runping; Zhang, Luyong; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoxuan; Mikkelsen, Ross; Song, Shiyu; Zhou, Huiping

    2015-01-01

    Background Human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most malignant cancer worldwide. Despite significant advances in the delivery of treatment and surgical reconstruction, there is no significant improvement of mortality rates for this disease in the past decades. Radiotherapy is the core component of the clinical combinational therapies for HNSCC. However, the tumor cells have a tendency to develop radiation resistance, which is a major barrier to effective treatment. HIV protease inhibitors (HIV PIs) have been reported with radiosensitizing activities in HNSCC cells, but the underlying cellular/molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Our previous study has shown that HIV PIs induce cell apoptosis via activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The aim of this study was to examine the role of ER stress in HIV PI-induced radiosensitivity in human HNSCC. Methodology and Principal Findings HNSCC cell lines, SQ20B and FaDu, and the most commonly used HIV PIs, lopinavir and ritonavir (L/R), were used in this study. Clonogenic assay was used to assess the radiosensitivity. Cell viability, apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed using Cellometer Vision CBA. The mRNA and protein levels of ER stress-related genes (eIF2α, CHOP, ATF-4, and XBP-1), as well as cell cycle related protein, cyclin D1, were detected by real time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The results demonstrated that L/R dose-dependently sensitized HNSCC cells to irradiation and inhibited cell growth. L/R-induced activation of ER stress was correlated to down-regulation of cyclin D1 expression and cell cycle arrest under G0/G1 phase. Conclusion and Significance HIV PIs sensitize HNSCC cells to radiotherapy by activation of ER stress and induction of cell cycle arrest. Our results provided evidence that HIV PIs can be potentially used in combination with radiation in the treatment of HNSCC. PMID:25933118

  2. Pedunculopontine Gamma Band Activity and Development

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; Mahaffey, Susan; MacNicol, Melanie; Hyde, James R.; D’Onofrio, Stasia M.; Phillips, Cristy

    2015-01-01

    This review highlights the most important discovery in the reticular activating system in the last 10 years, the manifestation of gamma band activity in cells of the reticular activating system (RAS), especially in the pedunculopontine nucleus, which is in charge of waking and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The identification of different cell groups manifesting P/Q-type Ca2+ channels that control waking vs. those that manifest N-type channels that control REM sleep provides novel avenues for the differential control of waking vs. REM sleep. Recent discoveries on the development of this system can help explain the developmental decrease in REM sleep and the basic rest-activity cycle. PMID:26633526

  3. Pedunculopontine Gamma Band Activity and Development.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; Mahaffey, Susan; MacNicol, Melanie; Hyde, James R; D'Onofrio, Stasia M; Phillips, Cristy

    2015-01-01

    This review highlights the most important discovery in the reticular activating system in the last 10 years, the manifestation of gamma band activity in cells of the reticular activating system (RAS), especially in the pedunculopontine nucleus, which is in charge of waking and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The identification of different cell groups manifesting P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels that control waking vs. those that manifest N-type channels that control REM sleep provides novel avenues for the differential control of waking vs. REM sleep. Recent discoveries on the development of this system can help explain the developmental decrease in REM sleep and the basic rest-activity cycle. PMID:26633526

  4. Development of an active structure flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, R. A.; Wyse, R. E.; Schubert, S. R.

    1993-02-01

    The design and development of the Air Force and TRW's Advanced Control Technology Experiment (ACTEX) flight experiment is described in this paper. The overall objective of ACTEX is to provide an active structure trailblazer which will demonstrate the compatibility of active structures with operational spacecraft performance and lifetime measures. At the heart of the experiment is an active tripod driven by a digitally-programmable analog control electronics subsystem. Piezoceramic sensors and actuators embedded in a graphite epoxy host material provide the sensing and actuation mechanism for the active tripod. Low noise ground-programmable electronics provide a virtually unlimited number of control schemes that can be implemented in the space environment. The flight experiment program provides the opportunity to gather performance, reliability, adaptability, and lifetime performance data on vibration suppression hardware for the next generation of DoD and NASA spacecraft.

  5. Composite Stress Rupture NDE Research and Development Project (Kevlar[R] and Carbon)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to develop and demonstrate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques capable of assessing stress rupture related strength degradation for carbon composite pressure vessels, either in a structural health monitoring (SHM) or periodic inspection mode.

  6. 25-Hydroxycholesterol Activates the Integrated Stress Response to Reprogram Transcription and Translation in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Norihito; Carlin, Aaron F.; Spann, Nathanael J.; Saijo, Kaoru; Morello, Christopher S.; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Romanoski, Casey E.; Maurya, Mano R.; Kaikkonen, Minna U.; Lam, Michael T.; Crotti, Andrea; Reichart, Donna; Fox, Jesse N.; Quehenberger, Oswald; Raetz, Christian R. H.; Sullards, M. Cameron; Murphy, Robert C.; Merrill, Alfred H.; Brown, H. Alex; Dennis, Edward A.; Fahy, Eoin; Subramaniam, Shankar; Cavener, Douglas R.; Spector, Deborah H.; Russell, David W.; Glass, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    25-Hydroxycholesterol (25OHC) is an enzymatically derived oxidation product of cholesterol that modulates lipid metabolism and immunity. 25OHC is synthesized in response to interferons and exerts broad antiviral activity by as yet poorly characterized mechanisms. To gain further insights into the basis for antiviral activity, we evaluated time-dependent responses of the macrophage lipidome and transcriptome to 25OHC treatment. In addition to altering specific aspects of cholesterol and sphingolipid metabolism, we found that 25OHC activates integrated stress response (ISR) genes and reprograms protein translation. Effects of 25OHC on ISR gene expression were independent of liver X receptors and sterol-response element-binding proteins and instead primarily resulted from activation of the GCN2/eIF2α/ATF4 branch of the ISR pathway. These studies reveal that 25OHC activates the integrated stress response, which may contribute to its antiviral activity. PMID:24189069

  7. Differential changes of metabolic brain activity and interregional functional coupling in prefronto-limbic pathways during different stress conditions: functional imaging in freely behaving rodent pups

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Jörg; Riedel, Anett; Braun, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The trumpet-tailed rat or degu (Octodon degus) is an established model to investigate the consequences of early stress on the development of emotional brain circuits and behavior. The aim of this study was to identify brain circuits, that respond to different stress conditions and to test if acute stress alters functional coupling of brain activity among prefrontal and limbic regions. Using functional imaging (2-Fluoro-deoxyglucose method) in 8-day-old male degu pups the following stress conditions were compared: (A) pups together with parents and siblings (control), (B) separation of the litter from the parents, (C) individual separation from parents and siblings, and (D) individual separation and presentation of maternal calls. Condition (B) significantly downregulated brain activity in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens (NAcc), and sensory areas compared to controls. Activity decrease was even more pronounced during condition (C), where, in contrast to all other regions, activity in the PAG was increased. Interestingly, brain activity in stress-associated brain regions such as the amygdala and habenula was not affected. In condition (D) maternal vocalizations “reactivated” brain activity in the cingulate and precentral medial cortex, NAcc, and striatum and in sensory areas. In contrast, reduced activity was measured in the prelimbic and infralimbic cortex (IL) and in the hippocampus and amygdala. Correlation analysis revealed complex, region- and situation-specific changes of interregional functional coupling among prefrontal and limbic brain regions during stress exposure. We show here for the first time that early life stress results in a widespread reduction of brain activity in the infant brain and changes interregional functional coupling. Moreover, maternal vocalizations can partly buffer stress-induced decrease in brain activity in some regions and evoked very different functional coupling patterns compared to the three other

  8. Peer stress-related coping activities in young adolescents' asthma management.

    PubMed

    Yang, TienYu Owen; Lunt, Ingrid; Sylva, Kathy

    2009-08-01

    Managing asthma around peers can be stressful for young adolescents (age 9-14). However, the contexualised coping activities under asthma management-related peer stress is under-investigated. The study aims to explore the peer stress-related coping strategies young adolescents adopt in asthma management. Thirty-four young adolescents were interviewed with semi-structured storytelling protocols. Young adolescents expressed their opinions about four scenarios where the characters had difficulties managing asthma among peers. Interviews were transcribed, and qualitative data were analysed with analytical induction and constant comparison to generate themes that described the coping activities young adolescents adopted in four asthma management scenarios. Young adolescents' responses in each scenario were summarised. The coping activities adolescents adopted were cognitive justifying, explaining, outsourcing and undisclosing. Despite the limitations in a scenario-based qualitative study, the results may be useful for teachers and health professionals in social skill interventions for asthma management in early adolescence. PMID:19657905

  9. Extracurricular activities associated with stress and burnout in preclinical medical students.

    PubMed

    Fares, Jawad; Saadeddin, Zein; Al Tabosh, Hayat; Aridi, Hussam; El Mouhayyar, Christopher; Koleilat, Mohamad Karim; Chaaya, Monique; El Asmar, Khalil

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to assess the prevalence of stress and burnout among preclinical medical students in a private university in Beirut, Lebanon, and evaluate the association between extracurricular involvement and stress and burnout relief in preclinical medical students. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on a random sample of 165 preclinical medical students. Distress level was measured using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) while that of burnout was measured through the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey (MBI-SS). The MBI-SS assesses three interrelated dimensions: emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and academic efficacy. Extracurricular activities were divided into four categories: physical exercise, music, reading, and social activities. All selected participants responded. A substantial proportion of preclinical medical students suffered from stress (62%) and burnout (75%). Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses revealed that being a female or a 1st year medical student correlated with higher stress and burnout. Music-related activities were correlated with lower burnout. Social activities or living with parents were associated with lower academic efficacy. The high stress and burnout levels call for action. Addressing the studying conditions and attending to the psychological wellbeing of preclinical medical students are recommendations made in the study. PMID:26644345

  10. Assessing Sources of Stress to Aquatic Ecosystems: Using Biomarkers and Bioindicators to Characterize Exodure-Response Profiles of Anthropogenic Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.

    1999-03-29

    Establishing causal relationships between sources of environmental stressors and aquatic ecosystem health if difficult because of the many biotic and abiotic factors which can influence or modify responses of biological systems to stress, the orders of magnitude involved in extrapolation over both spatial and temporal scales, and compensatory mechanisms such as density-dependent responses that operate in populations. To address the problem of establishing causality between stressors and effects on aquatic systems, a diagnostic approach, based on exposure-response profiles for various anthropogenic activities, was developed to help identify sources of stress responsible for effects on aquatic systems at ecological significant levels of biological organization (individual, population, community). To generate these exposure-effects profiles, biomarkers of exposure were plotted against bioindicators of corresponding effects for several major anthropogenic activities including petrochemical , pulp and paper, domestic sewage, mining operations, land-development activities, and agricultural activities. Biomarkers of exposure to environmental stressors varied depending on the type of anthropogenic activity involved. Bioindicator effects, however, including histopathological lesions, bioenergetic status, individual growth, reproductive impairment, and community-level responses were similar among many of the major anthropogenic activities. This approach is valuable to help identify and diagnose sources of stressors in environments impacted by multiple stressors. By identifying the types and sources of environmental stressors, aquatic ecosystems can be more effectively protected and managed to maintain acceptable levels of environmental quality and ecosystem fitness.

  11. Cocaine induces astrocytosis through ER stress-mediated activation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Periyasamy, Palsamy; Guo, Ming-Lei; Buch, Shilpa

    2016-08-01

    Cocaine is known to induce inflammation, thereby contributing in part, to the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. A recent study from our lab has revealed a link between macroautophagy/autophagy and microglial activation. The current study was aimed at investigating whether cocaine could also mediate activation of astrocytes and, whether this process involved induction of autophagy. Our findings demonstrated that cocaine mediated the activation of astrocytes by altering the levels of autophagy markers, such as BECN1, ATG5, MAP1LC3B-II, and SQSTM1 in both human A172 astrocytoma cells and primary human astrocytes. Furthermore, cocaine treatment resulted in increased formation of endogenous MAP1LC3B puncta in human astrocytes. Additionally, astrocytes transfected with the GFP-MAP1LC3B plasmid also demonstrated cocaine-mediated upregulation of the green fluorescent MAP1LC3B puncta. Cocaine-mediated induction of autophagy involved upstream activation of ER stress proteins such as EIF2AK3, ERN1, ATF6 since blockage of autophagy using either pharmacological or gene-silencing approaches, had no effect on cocaine-mediated induction of ER stress. Using both pharmacological and gene-silencing approaches to block either ER stress or autophagy, our findings demonstrated that cocaine-induced activation of astrocytes (measured by increased levels of GFAP) involved sequential activation of ER stress and autophagy. Cocaine-mediated-increased upregulation of GFAP correlated with increased expression of proinflammatory mediators such as TNF, IL1B, and IL6. In conclusion, these findings reveal an association between ER stress-mediated autophagy and astrogliosis in cocaine-treated astrocytes. Intervention of ER stress and/or autophagy signaling would thus be promising therapeutic targets for abrogating cocaine-mediated neuroinflammation. PMID:27337297

  12. The Adaptogens Rhodiola and Schizandra Modify the Response to Immobilization Stress in Rabbits by Suppressing the Increase of Phosphorylated Stress-activated Protein Kinase, Nitric Oxide and Cortisol

    PubMed Central

    Panossian, Alexander; Hambardzumyan, Marina; Hovhanissyan, Areg; Wikman, Georg

    2007-01-01

    Adaptogens possess anti-fatigue and anti-stress activities that can increase mental and physical working performance against a background of fatigue or stress. The aim of the present study was to ascertain which mediators of stress response are significantly involved in the mechanisms of action of adaptogens, and to determine their relevance as biochemical markers for evaluating anti-stress effects in rabbits subjected to restraint stress. Blood levels of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK), the phosphorylated kinase p-SAPK/p-JNK, nitric oxide (NO), cortisol, testosterone, prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4 and thromboxane B2 were determined in groups of animals prior to daily oral administration of placebo, rhodioloside or extracts of Eleutherococcus senticosus, Schizandra chinensis, Rhodiola rosea, Bryonia alba and Panax ginseng over a 7 day period. Ten minutes after the final treatment, animals were immobilized for 2 hours and blood levels of the markers re-determined. In the placebo group, only p-SAPK/p-JNK, NO and cortisol were increased significantly (by 200–300% cf basal levels) following restraint stress, whilst in animals that had received multiple doses of adaptogens/stress-protectors, the levels of NO and cortisol remained practically unchanged after acute stress. Rhodioloside and extracts of S. chinensis and R. rosea were the most active inhibitors of stress-induced p-SAPK/p-JNK. E. senticosus, B. alba and P. ginseng exerted little effect on p-SAPK/p-JNK levels. It is suggested that the inhibitory effects of R. rosea and S. chinensis on p-SAPK/p-JNK activation may be associated with their antidepressant activity as well as their positive effects on mental performance under stress. PMID:21901061

  13. The stressed female brain: neuronal activity in the prelimbic but not infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex suppresses learning after acute stress.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Lisa Y; Shors, Tracey J

    2013-01-01

    Women are nearly twice as likely as men to suffer from anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), indicating that many females are especially vulnerable to stressful life experience. A profound sex difference in the response to stress is also observed in laboratory animals. Acute exposure to an uncontrollable stressful event disrupts associative learning during classical eyeblink conditioning in female rats but enhances this same type of learning process in males. These sex differences in response to stress are dependent on neuronal activity in similar but also different brain regions. Neuronal activity in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) is necessary in both males and females. However, neuronal activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during the stressor is necessary to modify learning in females but not in males. The mPFC is often divided into its prelimbic (PL) and infralimbic (IL) subregions, which differ both in structure and function. Through its connections to the BLA, we hypothesized that neuronal activity within the PL, but not IL, during the stressor is necessary to suppress learning in females. To test this hypothesis, either the PL or IL of adult female rats was bilaterally inactivated with GABAA agonist muscimol during acute inescapable swim stress. About 24 h later, all subjects were trained with classical eyeblink conditioning. Though stressed, females without neuronal activity in the PL learned well. In contrast, females with IL inactivation during the stressor did not learn well, behaving similarly to stressed vehicle-treated females. These data suggest that exposure to a stressful event critically engages the PL, but not IL, to disrupt associative learning in females. Together with previous studies, these data indicate that the PL communicates with the BLA to suppress learning after a stressful experience in females. This circuit may be similarly engaged in women who become cognitively impaired after stressful life

  14. Streetscape greenery and health: stress, social cohesion and physical activity as mediators.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Sjerp; van Dillen, Sonja M E; Groenewegen, Peter P; Spreeuwenberg, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Several studies have shown a positive relationship between local greenspace availability and residents' health, which may offer opportunities for health improvement. This study focuses on three mechanisms through which greenery might exert its positive effect on health: stress reduction, stimulating physical activity and facilitating social cohesion. Knowledge on mechanisms helps to identify which type of greenspace is most effective in generating health benefits. In eighty neighbourhoods in four Dutch cities data on quantity and quality of streetscape greenery were collected by observations. Data on self-reported health and proposed mediators were obtained for adults by mail questionnaires (N = 1641). Multilevel regression analyses, controlling for socio-demographic characteristics, revealed that both quantity and quality of streetscape greenery were related to perceived general health, acute health-related complaints, and mental health. Relationships were generally stronger for quality than for quantity. Stress and social cohesion were the strongest mediators. Total physical activity was not a mediator. Physical activity that could be undertaken in the public space (green activity) was, but less so than stress and social cohesion. With all three mediators included in the analysis, complete mediation could statistically be proven in five out of six cases. In these analyses the contribution of green activity was often not significant. The possibility that the effect of green activity is mediated by stress and social cohesion, rather than that it has a direct health effect, is discussed. PMID:23931942

  15. Social stress, coping strategies and tumor development in male mice: behavioral, neuroendocrine and immunological implications.

    PubMed

    Vegas, Oscar; Fano, Eduardo; Brain, Paul Fredric; Alonso, Ana; Azpiroz, Arantza

    2006-01-01

    The relationships between acute social stress, immunological alterations and the development of pulmonary metastases of B16F10 melanoma were analyzed. In particular, the effects of different behavioral coping strategies on the development of the metastases were studied. Tumor bearing and tumor non-bearing mice were subjected for 24h to a sensory contact social stress model. This included two 5 min sessions of direct social interaction with their resident cagemates (which had been selected for consistent levels of aggression). The subjects' behavior was videotaped and assessed. Corticosterone, IL-2, IL-12 and splenic cell proliferation responses to Con-A were determined 1h and 3 days post-stress. Lung metastatic foci numbers were determined 21 days after inoculation (15 days post-stress). Social stress increased the number of pulmonary metastases and the serum level of corticosterone but decreased the splenic proliferative capacity. No direct relationship could be established between the development of the metastases and the assayed interleukin response. A combination of cluster and discriminant analyses established that there were three types of coping strategies. Subjects engaging in a strategy characterized by an absence of attack, low non-social exploration levels and high levels of defense, subordination and avoidance, developed most pulmonary metastases. Social stress effects on tumor development appear to depend on the subject's coping strategy in such situations (although one cannot rule out the possibility that differences in the development of the disease per se are responsible for the different behavioral patterns observed). PMID:16046077

  16. A pleasant familiar odor influences perceived stress and peripheral nervous system activity during normal aging

    PubMed Central

    Joussain, Pauline; Rouby, Catherine; Bensafi, Moustafa

    2014-01-01

    Effects of smells on stress have been demonstrated in animals and humans, suggesting that inhaling certain odorants may counteract the negative effects of stress. Because stress plays a key role in cerebral aging, the present study set out to examine whether positive odor effects on perceived stress can be achieved in elderly individuals. To this end, two groups of aged individuals (n = 36 women, aged from 55 to 65 years), were tested. The first group was exposed for 5 days to a pleasant and, by end of exposure, familiar odor (“exposure odor”), whereas the other was exposed to a non-scented control stimulus. Stress and mood states were assessed before and after the 5-day odor exposure period. Psychophysiological markers were also assessed at the end of exposure, in response to the “exposure odor” and to a “new odor.” Results revealed that stress on this second exposure was decreased and zygomatic electromyogram activity was increased specifically in the group previously exposed to the odor (p < 0.05). Taken as a whole, these findings offer a new look at the relationship between perceived stress, olfaction and normal aging, opening up new research perspectives on the effect of olfaction on quality of life and well-being in aged individuals. PMID:24596564

  17. Chronic stress enhances microglia activation and exacerbates death of nigral dopaminergic neurons under conditions of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease linked to progressive movement disorders and is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction that is believed to contribute to its pathogenesis. Since sensitivity to inflammation is not the same in all brain structures, the aim of this work was to test whether physiological conditions as stress could enhance susceptibility to inflammation in the substantia nigra, where death of dopaminergic neurons takes place in Parkinson’s disease. Methods To achieve our aim, we induced an inflammatory process in nonstressed and stressed rats (subject to a chronic variate stress) by a single intranigral injection of lipopolysaccharide, a potent proinflammogen. The effect of this treatment was evaluated on inflammatory markers as well as on neuronal and glial populations. Results Data showed a synergistic effect between inflammation and stress, thus resulting in higher microglial activation and expression of proinflammatory markers. More important, the higher inflammatory response seen in stressed animals was associated with a higher rate of death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, the most characteristic feature seen in Parkinson’s disease. This effect was dependent on glucocorticoids. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that stress sensitises midbrain microglia to further inflammatory stimulus. This suggests that stress may be an important risk factor in the degenerative processes and symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24565378

  18. Development of novel active transport membrande devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-11-01

    Air Products has undertaken a research program to fabricate and evaluate gas separation membranes based upon promising ``active-transport`` (AT) materials recently developed in our laboratories. Active Transport materials are ionic polymers and molten salts which undergo reversible interaction or reaction with ammonia and carbon dioxide. The materials are useful for separating these gases from mixtures with hydrogen. Moreover, AT membranes have the unique property of possessing high permeability towards ammnonia and carbon dioxide but low permeability towards hydrogen and can thus be used to permeate these components from a gas stream while retaining hydrogen at high pressure.

  19. Activation of sensory nerves participates in stress-induced histamine release from mast cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z L; Mochizuki, T; Watanabe, H; Maeyama, K

    1999-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism by which stress induces rapid histamine release from mast cells, Wistar rats, pretreated as neonates with capsaicin, were subjected to immobilization stress for 2 h, and histamine release was measured in paws of anesthetized rats by using in vivo microdialysis after activation of sensory nerves by electrical or chemical stimulation. Immobilization stress studies indicated that in control rats stress induced a 2.7-fold increase in the level of plasma histamine compared to that in freely moving rats. Whereas pretreatment with capsaicin significantly decreased stress-induced elevation of plasma histamine. Microdialysis studies showed that electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve resulted in a 4-fold increase of histamine release in rat paws. However, this increase was significantly inhibited in rats pretreated with capsaicin. Furthermore, injection of capsaicin into rat paw significantly increased histamine release in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that activation of sensory nerves participates in stress-induced histamine release from mast cells. PMID:10462124

  20. Orbital fluid shear stress promotes osteoblast metabolism, proliferation and alkaline phosphates activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Aisha, M D; Nor-Ashikin, M N K; Sharaniza, A B R; Nawawi, H; Froemming, G R A

    2015-09-10

    Prolonged disuse of the musculoskeletal system is associated with reduced mechanical loading and lack of anabolic stimulus. As a form of mechanical signal, the multidirectional orbital fluid shear stress transmits anabolic signal to bone forming cells in promoting cell differentiation, metabolism and proliferation. Signals are channeled through the cytoskeleton framework, directly modifying gene and protein expression. For that reason, we aimed to study the organization of Normal Human Osteoblast (NHOst) cytoskeleton with regards to orbital fluid shear (OFS) stress. Of special interest were the consequences of cytoskeletal reorganization on NHOst metabolism, proliferation, and osteogenic functional markers. Cells stimulated at 250 RPM in a shaking incubator resulted in the rearrangement of actin and tubulin fibers after 72 h. Orbital shear stress increased NHOst mitochondrial metabolism and proliferation, simultaneously preventing apoptosis. The ratio of RANKL/OPG was reduced, suggesting that orbital shear stress has the potential to inhibit osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity. Increase in ALP activity and OCN protein production suggests that stimulation retained osteoblast function. Shear stress possibly generated through actin seemed to hold an anabolic response as osteoblast metabolism and functional markers were enhanced. We hypothesize that by applying orbital shear stress with suitable magnitude and duration as a non-drug anabolic treatment can help improve bone regeneration in prolonged disuse cases. PMID:26163894

  1. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Judith Esi; de Vente, Wieke; Huizink, Anja C; Bögels, Susan M; de Bruin, Esther I

    2015-12-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing stress and its related symptoms. We randomly allocated 126 participants to PA, MM, or HRV-BF upon enrollment, of whom 76 agreed to participate. The interventions consisted of psycho-education and an introduction to the specific intervention techniques and 5 weeks of daily exercises at home. The PA exercises consisted of a vigorous-intensity activity of free choice. The MM exercises consisted of guided mindfulness meditation. The HRV-BF exercises consisted of slow breathing with a heart rate variability biofeedback device. Participants received daily reminders for their exercises and were contacted weekly to monitor their progress. They completed questionnaires prior to, directly after, and 6 weeks after the intervention. Results indicated an overall beneficial effect consisting of reduced stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and improved psychological well-being and sleep quality. No significant between-intervention effect was found, suggesting that PA, MM, and HRV-BF are equally effective in reducing stress and its related symptoms. These self-help interventions provide easily accessible help for people with stress complaints. PMID:26111942

  2. Chronic mild stress inhibits BDNF protein expression and CREB activation in the dentate gyrus but not in the hippocampus proper.

    PubMed

    Grønli, Janne; Bramham, Clive; Murison, Robert; Kanhema, Tambudzai; Fiske, Eldbjørg; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Ursin, Reidun; Portas, Chiara M

    2006-12-01

    Chronic stress is linked to development of depression and may trigger neurobiological changes underlying the disease. Downregulation of the secretory peptide brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the transcriptional regulator calcium/cyclic-AMP responsive binding protein (CREB) have been implicated in stress and depression-related pathology in animal studies. When animals are exposed to the chronic mild stress (CMS) protocol, multiple depression-like symptoms are observed. Here we investigated the effect of CMS on BDNF protein expression and CREB activation in the dentate gyrus and hippocampus proper. Rats exposed for 5 weeks to repeated, unpredictable, mild stressors showed reduced BDNF expression and inhibited phosphorylation of CREB (Ser-133) in the dentate gyrus (-25.0%+/-3.5% and -29.7+/-7.3%, respectively), whereas no significant effects were observed in the hippocampus proper. CMS-treated rats consumed less sucrose compared to control rats, indicating a state of anhedonia. Moreover, phospho-CREB levels in the dentate gyrus were positively correlated with the animals' sucrose intake at the end of the CMS protocol. These results couple chronic mild stress to a downregulation of CREB activity and BDNF protein expression specifically within the dentate gyrus and support the possibility that the BDNF-CREB system plays an important role in the response to environmental challenges. PMID:17204313

  3. Rank, job stress, psychological distress and physical activity among military personnel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical fitness is one of the most important qualities in armed forces personnel. However, little is known about the association between the military environment and the occupational and leisure-time dimensions of the physical activity practiced there. This study assessed the association of rank, job stress and psychological distress with physical activity levels (overall and by dimensions). Methods This a cross-sectional study among 506 military service personnel of the Brazilian Army examined the association of rank, job stress and psychological distress with physical activity through multiple linear regression using a generalized linear model. Results The adjusted models showed that the rank of lieutenant was associated with most occupational physical activity (β = 0.324; CI 95% 0.167; 0.481); “high effort and low reward” was associated with more occupational physical activity (β = 0.224; CI 95% 0.098; 0.351) and with less physical activity in sports/physical exercise in leisure (β = −0.198; CI 95% −0.384; −0.011); and psychological distress was asso