Science.gov

Sample records for activities suggested materials

  1. Studies and Suggestions on Prewriting Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Shigao; Dai, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies and suggests the need for writing instruction by which students can experience writing as a creative process in exploring and communicating meaning. The prewriting activities generate ideas which can encourage a free flow of thoughts and help students discover both what they want to say and how to say it on paper. Through the…

  2. Suggested Calendar of Yearly School Board Activities 1977-1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, George B.

    The materials contained in this school board calendar are intended to help local boards take the appropriate actions required by the state of Oregon at the appropriate times. Many of these board actions involve budget preparation and approval, collective bargaining, and personnel procedures. The calendar suggests activities based on the timeline…

  3. Suggestions for Using Supplementary Materials in the Individualization of Intensive Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busse, Bonnie B.

    Suggestions for preparing supplementary materials for use in an individualized second language reading program are made. Newspaper sources can be used as a basis for constructing a learning activity packet with three phases. The prereading phase contains sound-symbol correspondence and vocabulary exercises, structure analysis and/or structure…

  4. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  5. Cosmogenic activation of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaré, J.; Beltrán, B.; Capelli, S.; Capozzi, F.; Carmona, J. M.; Cebrián, S.; Cremonesi, O.; García, E.; Irastorza, I. G.; Gómez, H.; Luzón, G.; Martínez, M.; Morales, J.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Pavan, M.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Rodríguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Torres, L.; Villar, J. A.

    2005-09-01

    The problem of cosmogenic activation produced at sea level in materials typically used in underground experiments looking for rare events is being studied. Several nuclear data libraries have been screened looking for relevant isotope production cross-sections and different codes which can be applied to activation studies have been reviewed. The excitation functions for some problems of interest like production of 60Co and 68Ge in germanium and production of 60Co in tellurium have been obtained taking into account both measurements and calculations and a preliminary estimate of the corresponding rates of production at sea level has been performed.

  6. Think Texas! Suggested Activities to Help Celebrate Our Sesquicentennial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    A packet of teaching activities helps elementary and secondary teachers commemorate the sesquicentennial of Texas' independence. Activities include listening to stories about the mockingbird, bluebonnet, and pecan tree, drawing interpretations of these stories, and using a graphics tablet, light pen, or graphics software to illustrate a Texas folk…

  7. Chemistry: Experiments, Demonstrations and Other Activities Suggested for Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This publication is a handbook used in conjunction with the course of study in chemistry developed through the New York State Education Department and The University of the State of New York. It contains experiments, demonstrations, and other activities for a chemistry course. Areas covered include the science of chemistry, the atomic structure of…

  8. Suggestions, Resources and Activities for Teaching about Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Paul F.

    This teacher resource packet contains a total of 28 modules for teaching about Japan at the elementary and secondary level. Activities on the Japanese family appropriate for grade 1 focus on similarities and differences, family size, family needs, and family roles. Grade 2 lessons look at the school, neighborhood, roles of children in the…

  9. Mechanically Active Electrospun Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Jaimee M.

    Electrospinning, a technique used to fabricate small diameter polymer fibers, has been employed to develop unique, active materials falling under two categories: (1) shape memory elastomeric composites (SMECs) and (2) water responsive fiber mats. (1) Previous work has characterized in detail the properties and behavior of traditional SMECs with isotropic fibers embedded in an elastomer matrix. The current work has two goals: (i) characterize laminated anisotropic SMECs and (ii) develop a fabrication process that is scalable for commercial SMEC manufacturing. The former ((i)) requires electrospinning aligned polymer fibers. The aligned fibers are similarly embedded in an elastomer matrix and stacked at various fiber orientations. The resulting laminated composite has a unique response to tensile deformation: after stretching and releasing, the composite curls. This curling response was characterized based on fiber orientation. The latter goal ((ii)) required use of a dual-electrospinning process to simultaneously electrospin two polymers. This fabrication approach incorporated only industrially relevant processing techniques, enabling the possibility of commercial application of a shape memory rubber. Furthermore, the approach had the added benefit of increased control over composition and material properties. (2) The strong elongational forces experienced by polymer chains during the electrospinning process induce molecular alignment along the length of electrospun fibers. Such orientation is maintained in the fibers as the polymer vitrifies. Consequently, residual stress is stored in electrospun fiber mats and can be recovered by heating through the polymer's glass transition temperature. Alternatively, the glass transition temperature can be depressed by introducing a plasticizing agent. Poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) is plasticized by water, and its glass transition temperature is lowered below room temperature. Therefore, the residual stress can be relaxed at room

  10. Suggested Activities to Use With Children Who Present Symptoms of Visual Perception Problems, Elementary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington County Public Schools, Washington, PA.

    Symptoms displayed by primary age children with learning disabilities are listed; perceptual handicaps are explained. Activities are suggested for developing visual perception and perception involving motor activities. Also suggested are activities to develop body concept, visual discrimination and attentiveness, visual memory, and figure ground…

  11. Suggested Activities to Initiate Consumer Education in the Elementary Classroom. Centering On.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainor, Nancy

    This booklet of teacher-developed and teacher-tested activities and strategies draws upon the curriculum areas of language arts, mathematics and social studies. Though prepared for fourth, fifth and sixth grade students, the material is adaptable for primary grades and can be used for group activities or as individual task cards. Activity sheets…

  12. Competence-Based System Self-Study System for Suggesting Study Materials Links

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitchot, Athitaya; Gilbert, Lester; Wills, Gary B.

    2014-01-01

    The article proposes a self-study system which suggests web links to learners. The suggestions depend upon the learner's chosen competences selected from a competence structure for a particular knowledge domain. Three experiments were conducted, where the first compared the perceived usefulness and value of the links generated by different…

  13. Mechanics of soft active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuanhe

    Soft active materials, mostly elastomers and polymeric gels, are being developed to mimic a salient feature of life: movement in response to stimuli. For example, when an electric voltage is applied across a layer of a dielectric elastomer, the layer reduces in thickness and expands in area, giving a strain greater than 100%. As another example, in response to a small change of pH or temperature, a hydrogel may absorb a large amount of water and increase its volume over 100 times. The mechanics involved in these processes is important, interesting, and not well understood. This thesis studies large deformations and instabilities in dielectric elastomers and polymeric gels. The thesis first presents a nonlinear field theory for deformable dielectrics. The theory uses measurable quantities to define field variables. The definitions lead to decoupled field equations, and electromechanical coupling enters the theory through material laws. We use the theory to study electromechanical instability and coexistent states in dielectric elastomers. A computational method is also developed to analyze inhomogeneous deformations in complicated structures of dielectric elastomers. The second part of the thesis discusses large deformation and mass transportation in polymeric gels. A gel can undergo large deformation of two modes: local rearrangement and long-range migration. We assume that the local rearrangement is instantaneous, and model the long-range migration by assuming that the solvent molecules diffuse inside the gel. We further study inhomogeneous and anisotropic deformations and instabilities in gels constrained by rigid materials.

  14. Nuclear Technology Series. Nuclear Materials Processing Technician. A Suggested Program Planning Guide. Revised June 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This program planning guide for a two-year postsecondary nuclear materials processing technician program is designed for use with courses 23-25 of thirty-five in the Nuclear Technology Series. The purpose of the guide is to describe the nuclear power field and its job categories for specialists, technicians and operators; and to assist planners,…

  15. Suggestions for Dealing with Censorship of Media Center Materials in Schools: A Wisconsin Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Div. of Library Services.

    Procedures for developing selection standards for media center materials and for handling complaints that may arise are identified. To aid the librarian or school media specialist who needs assistance in censorship matters, a list of appropriate Wisconsin area agencies and associations is given, including their purposes, services, addresses, and…

  16. Values in School Science: Some Practical Materials and Suggestions. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinckerhoff, Richard F.

    The collection of vignettes in this book provide science teachers with a multitude of source materials and useful alternatives for incorporation into their curricula and teaching. Teachers may select topics as brief issues for casual reflection or as a means for promoting deeper investigation and analysis. Most of the vignettes can be extended and…

  17. Acquisition of Mathematical Language: Suggestions and Activities for English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirillo, Michelle; Bruna, Katherine Richardson; Herbel-Eisenmann, Beth

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we describe aspects of mathematical language that could be problematic to English-language learners, provide recommendations for teaching English-language learners, and suggest activities intended to foster language development in mathematics. (Contains 1 figure.)

  18. Bringing in the target audience in bystander social marketing materials for communities: suggestions for practitioners.

    PubMed

    Potter, Sharyn J; Stapleton, Jane G

    2011-06-01

    The Know Your Power™ social marketing campaign images model active bystander behaviors that target audience members can use in situations where sexual and relationship violence and stalking are occurring, have occurred, or have the potential to occur. In this practitioner note, we describe strategies that we have used to engage target audience members in the development of the social marketing campaign that we hope can be used by practitioners. We give examples from the development and evaluation of the Know Your Power(TM) social marketing campaign that used focus group and other types of feedback from the target audience to inform the direction of the campaign.

  19. Induction of rotational behaviour by intranigral baclofen suggests possible GABA-agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Waddington, J L

    1977-10-15

    In rats, unilateral injections of the GABA-derivative baclofen into the zona reticulata of the substantia nigra produced a contralateral rotation that was translated to ipsilateral rotation under the influence of amphetamine. These results mimic those following unilateral elevation of GABA levels in the substantia nigra and suggest that baclofen may have some GABA agonist activity following intracerebral injection.

  20. Tractography Activation Patterns in Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Suggest Better Clinical Responses in OCD DBS

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Christian J.; Lujan, J. Luis; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Goodman, Wayne K.; Okun, Michael S.; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Haq, Ihtsham U.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Medication resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients can be successfully treated with Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) which targets the anterior limb of the internal capsule (ALIC) and the nucleus accumbens (NA). Growing evidence suggests that in patients who respond to DBS, axonal fiber bundles surrounding the electrode are activated, but it is currently unknown which discrete pathways are critical for optimal benefit. Our aim was to identify axonal pathways mediating clinical effects of ALIC-NA DBS. Methods: We created computational models of ALIC-NA DBS to simulate the activation of fiber tracts and to identify connected cerebral regions. The pattern of activated axons and their cortical targets was investigated in six OCD patients who underwent ALIC-NA DBS. Results: Modulation of the right anterior middle frontal gyrus (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) was associated with an excellent response. In contrast, non-responders showed high activation in the orbital part of the right inferior frontal gyrus (lateral orbitofrontal cortex/anterior ventrolateral prefrontal cortex). Factor analysis followed by step-wise linear regression indicated that YBOCS improvement was inversely associated with factors that were predominantly determined by gray matter activation results. Discussion: Our findings support the hypothesis that optimal therapeutic results are associated with the activation of distinct fiber pathways. This suggests that in DBS for OCD, focused stimulation of specific fiber pathways, which would allow for stimulation with lower amplitudes, may be superior to activation of a wide array of pathways, typically associated with higher stimulation amplitudes. PMID:26834544

  1. Advertising Content in Physical Activity Print Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the advertising content contained in physical activity print materials. Analysis of print materials obtained from 80 sources (e.g., physicians' offices and fitness events) indicated that most materials contained some form of advertising. Materials coming from commercial product vendors generally contained more advertising than materials…

  2. Organic active materials for batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Abouimrane, Ali; Weng, Wei; Amine, Khalil

    2016-08-16

    A rechargeable battery includes a compound having at least two active sites, R.sup.1 and R.sup.2; wherein the at least two active sites are interconnected by one or more conjugated moieties; each active site is coordinated to one or more metal ions M.sup.a+ or each active site is configured to coordinate to one or more metal ions; and "a" is 1, 2, or 3.

  3. Metabolic brain activity suggestive of persistent pain in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Scott J; Millecamps, Magali; Aliaga, Antonio; Seminowicz, David A; Low, Lucie A; Bedell, Barry J; Stone, Laura S; Schweinhardt, Petra; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pain is a central characteristic of neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Knowing whether rodent models of neuropathic pain produce persistent pain is therefore crucial to their translational applicability. We investigated the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain and the formalin pain model in rats using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with the metabolic tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to determine if there is ongoing brain activity suggestive of persistent pain. For the formalin model, under brief anesthesia we injected one hindpaw with 5% formalin and the FDG tracer into a tail vein. We then allowed the animals to awaken and observed pain behavior for 30 min during the FDG uptake period. The rat was then anesthetized and placed in the scanner for static image acquisition, which took place between minutes 45 and 75 post-tracer injection. A single reference rat brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) was used to align the PET images with the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. Increased glucose metabolism was observed in the somatosensory region associated with the injection site (S1 hindlimb contralateral), S1 jaw/upper lip and cingulate cortex. Decreases were observed in the prelimbic cortex and hippocampus. Second, SNI rats were scanned 3 weeks post-surgery using the same scanning paradigm, and region-of-interest analyses revealed increased metabolic activity in the contralateral S1 hindlimb. Finally, a second cohort of SNI rats were scanned while anesthetized during the tracer uptake period, and the S1 hindlimb increase was not observed. Increased brain activity in the somatosensory cortex of SNI rats resembled the activity produced with the injection of formalin, suggesting that the SNI model may produce persistent pain. The lack of increased activity in S1 hindlimb with general anesthetic demonstrates that this effect can be blocked, as well as highlights the importance of investigating brain activity in awake and behaving

  4. Metabolic brain activity suggestive of persistent pain in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Scott J; Millecamps, Magali; Aliaga, Antonio; Seminowicz, David A; Low, Lucie A; Bedell, Barry J; Stone, Laura S; Schweinhardt, Petra; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Persistent pain is a central characteristic of neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Knowing whether rodent models of neuropathic pain produce persistent pain is therefore crucial to their translational applicability. We investigated the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain and the formalin pain model in rats using positron emission tomography (PET) with the metabolic tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to determine if there is ongoing brain activity suggestive of persistent pain. For the formalin model, under brief anesthesia we injected one hindpaw with 5% formalin and the FDG tracer into a tail vein. We then allowed the animals to awaken and observed pain behavior for 30min during the FDG uptake period. The rat was then anesthetized and placed in the scanner for static image acquisition, which took place between minutes 45 and 75 post-tracer injection. A single reference rat brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) was used to align the PET images with the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. Increased glucose metabolism was observed in the somatosensory region associated with the injection site (S1 hindlimb contralateral), S1 jaw/upper lip and cingulate cortex. Decreases were observed in the prelimbic cortex and hippocampus. Second, SNI rats were scanned 3weeks post-surgery using the same scanning paradigm, and region-of-interest analyses revealed increased metabolic activity in the contralateral S1 hindlimb. Finally, a second cohort of SNI rats was scanned while anesthetized during the tracer uptake period, and the S1 hindlimb increase was not observed. Increased brain activity in the somatosensory cortex of SNI rats resembled the activity produced with the injection of formalin, suggesting that the SNI model may produce persistent pain. The lack of increased activity in S1 hindlimb with general anesthetic demonstrates that this effect can be blocked, as well as highlights the importance of investigating brain activity in awake and behaving rodents.

  5. Sporicidal activity of an improved iodide formulation and suggestions regarding the biological safety cabinet.

    PubMed

    Kida, Nori

    2009-06-01

    The sporicidal activity of an improved iodide formulation based on a previously reported agent (Kida et al., 2004, tentatively designated as the KMT reagent) which is composed of 50 mM EDTA-2Na, 50 mM ferric chloride hexahydrate (FeCl3.6H2O), 50 mM potassium iodide (KI) and 50% ethanol in 0.85% NaCl solution at pH 0.3 with hydrochloric acid, was examined in the liquid and vapor phases. The improved iodide formulation subject to distillation (tentatively designated as the distilled KMT reagent: pH around 3) showed comparable sporicidal activity with the KMT reagent. As for the dilution effect, dilution at 1:2 showed more potent sporicidal activity than the undiluted one. It achieved complete disinfection with a treatment for 5 min at 20 degrees C and for 60 min at 5 degrees C. Even at a ratio of 1:100, the dilutions showed significant sporicidal activities at 37 degrees C. The experiment on the disinfection of the biological safety cabinet (Class II type A) as a practical possibility showed that pretreatment with 400 ml of water vapor treatment, and a mixture of 300 ml of this reagent and 150 ml of water in vapor phase achieved complete disinfection after a 24 h-decontamination process. The distilled KMT reagent may be useful for disinfecting against various contaminated materials and sites in both the liquid phase and vapor phase.

  6. Activation of porous MOF materials

    DOEpatents

    Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2014-04-01

    A method for the treatment of solvent-containing MOF material to increase its internal surface area involves introducing a liquid into the MOF in which liquid the solvent is miscible, subjecting the MOF to supercritical conditions for a time to form supercritical fluid, and releasing the supercritical conditions to remove the supercritcal fluid from the MOF. Prior to introducing the liquid into the MOF, occluded reaction solvent, such as DEF or DMF, in the MOF can be exchanged for the miscible solvent.

  7. Activation of porous MOF materials

    DOEpatents

    Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2013-04-23

    A method for the treatment of solvent-containing MOF material to increase its internal surface area involves introducing a liquid into the MOF in which liquid the solvent is miscible, subjecting the MOF to supercritical conditions for a time to form supercritical fluid, and releasing the supercritical conditions to remove the supercritical fluid from the MOF. Prior to introducing the liquid into the MOF, occluded reaction solvent, such as DEF or DMF, in the MOF can be exchanged for the miscible solvent.

  8. Computational Investigations of Trichoderma Reesei Cel7A Suggest New Routes for Enzyme Activity Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Beckham, G. T.; Payne, C. M.; Bu, L.; Taylor, C. B.; McCabe, C.; Chu, J. W.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    The Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellulase (Cel7A) is a key industrial enzyme in the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. It is a multi-modular enzyme with a Family 1 carbohydrate-binding module, a flexible O-glycosylated linker, and a large catalytic domain. We have used simulation to elucidate new functions for the 3 sub-domains, which suggests new routes to increase the activity of this central enzyme. These findings include new roles for glycosylation, which we have shown can be used to tune the binding affinity. We have also examined the structures of the catalytically-active complex of Cel7A and its non-processive counterpart, Cel7B, engaged on cellulose, which suggests allosteric mechanisms involved in chain binding when these cellulases are complexed on cellulose. Our computational results also suggest that product inhibition varies significantly between Cel7A and Cel7B, and we offer a molecular-level explanation for this observation. Finally, we discuss simulations of the absolute and relative binding free energy of cellulose ligands and various mutations along the CD tunnel, which will affect processivity and the ability of Cel7A (and related enzymes) to digest cellulose. These results highlight new considerations in protein engineering for processive and non-processive cellulases for production of lignocellulosic biofuels.

  9. The structure of the PERK kinase domain suggests the mechanism for its activation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wenjun; Li, Jingzhi; Ron, David; Sha, Bingdong

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR) is comprised of several intracellular signaling pathways that alleviate ER stress. The ER-localized transmembrane kinase PERK is one of three major ER stress transducers. Oligomerization of PERK’s N-terminal ER luminal domain by ER stress promotes PERK trans-autophosphorylation of the C-terminal cytoplasmic kinase domain at multiple residues including Thr980 on the kinase activation loop. Activated PERK phosphorylates Ser51 of the α-subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α), which inhibits initiation of protein synthesis and reduces the load of unfolded proteins entering the ER. The crystal structure of PERK’s kinase domain has been determined to 2.8 Å resolution. The structure resembles the back-to-back dimer observed in the related eIF2α kinase PKR. Phosphorylation of Thr980 stabilizes both the activation loop and helix αG in the C-terminal lobe, preparing the latter for eIF2α binding. The structure suggests conservation in the mode of activation of eIF2α kinases and is consistent with a ‘line-up’ model for PERK activation triggered by oligomerization of its luminal domain. PMID:21543844

  10. Surface changes on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko suggest a more active past.

    PubMed

    El-Maarry, M Ramy; Groussin, O; Thomas, N; Pajola, M; Auger, A-T; Davidsson, B; Hu, X; Hviid, S F; Knollenberg, J; Güttler, C; Tubiana, C; Fornasier, S; Feller, C; Hasselmann, P; Vincent, J-B; Sierks, H; Barbieri, C; Lamy, P; Rodrigo, R; Koschny, D; Keller, H U; Rickman, H; A'Hearn, M F; Barucci, M A; Bertaux, J-L; Bertini, I; Besse, S; Bodewits, D; Cremonese, G; Da Deppo, V; Debei, S; De Cecco, M; Deller, J; Deshapriya, J D P; Fulle, M; Gutierrez, P J; Hofmann, M; Ip, W-H; Jorda, L; Kovacs, G; Kramm, J-R; Kührt, E; Küppers, M; Lara, L M; Lazzarin, M; Lin, Z-Yi; Lopez Moreno, J J; Marchi, S; Marzari, F; Mottola, S; Naletto, G; Oklay, N; Pommerol, A; Preusker, F; Scholten, F; Shi, X

    2017-03-31

    The Rosetta spacecraft spent ~2 years orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, most of it at distances that allowed surface characterization and monitoring at submeter scales. From December 2014 to June 2016, numerous localized changes were observed, which we attribute to cometary-specific weathering, erosion, and transient events driven by exposure to sunlight and other processes. While the localized changes suggest compositional or physical heterogeneity, their scale has not resulted in substantial alterations to the comet's landscape. This suggests that most of the major landforms were created early in the comet's current orbital configuration. They may even date from earlier if the comet had a larger volatile inventory, particularly of CO or CO2 ices, or contained amorphous ice, which could have triggered activity at greater distances from the Sun.

  11. Surface changes on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko suggest a more active past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Maarry, M. Ramy; Groussin, O.; Thomas, N.; Pajola, M.; Auger, A.-T.; Davidsson, B.; Hu, X.; Hviid, S. F.; Knollenberg, J.; Güttler, C.; Tubiana, C.; Fornasier, S.; Feller, C.; Hasselmann, P.; Vincent, J.-B.; Sierks, H.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Keller, H. U.; Rickman, H.; A’Hearn, M. F.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Bertini, I.; Besse, S.; Bodewits, D.; Cremonese, G.; Da Deppo, V.; Debei, S.; De Cecco, M.; Deller, J.; Deshapriya, J. D. P.; Fulle, M.; Gutierrez, P. J.; Hofmann, M.; Ip, W.-H.; Jorda, L.; Kovacs, G.; Kramm, J.-R.; Kührt, E.; Küppers, M.; Lara, L. M.; Lazzarin, M.; Lin, Z.-Yi; Lopez Moreno, J. J.; Marchi, S.; Marzari, F.; Mottola, S.; Naletto, G.; Oklay, N.; Pommerol, A.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Shi, X.

    2017-03-01

    The Rosetta spacecraft spent ~2 years orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, most of it at distances that allowed surface characterization and monitoring at submeter scales. From December 2014 to June 2016, numerous localized changes were observed, which we attribute to cometary-specific weathering, erosion, and transient events driven by exposure to sunlight and other processes. While the localized changes suggest compositional or physical heterogeneity, their scale has not resulted in substantial alterations to the comet’s landscape. This suggests that most of the major landforms were created early in the comet’s current orbital configuration. They may even date from earlier if the comet had a larger volatile inventory, particularly of CO or CO2 ices, or contained amorphous ice, which could have triggered activity at greater distances from the Sun.

  12. Suggested improvements to the standard filter paper assay used to measure cellulase activity.

    PubMed

    Coward-Kelly, Guillermo; Aiello-Mazzari, Cateryna; Kim, Sehoon; Granda, Cesar; Holtzapple, Mark

    2003-06-20

    Two suggestions can be found in the literature to improve the reproducibility of the Mandels' filter paper assay: add supplemental cellobiase and increase the boiling time for color development. Here we provide data that strongly supports adding supplemental cellobiase. Adding supplemental cellobiase increased assay response by 56%. Cellulases from different sources have different cellobiase activities, which would cause significant variation in the assay response. There is no need for additional boiling time-5 minutes is sufficient. For maximum reproducibility, it is essential that the water bath vigorously boil so that temperature excursions are minimized.

  13. Space Resources for Teachers: Chemistry; Including Suggestions for Classroom Activities and Laboratory Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Richard M.

    This publication is composed of 10 units, each based on an area of space science and technology in which chemistry plays an important role. Each resource unit can be used independently of the others and materials can be selected from within a unit. The materials range in difficulty from the junior high level of understanding to those that will…

  14. Characterization and modeling of compliant active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, S. P.; Ramesh, K. T.; Douglas, A. S.

    2003-09-01

    Active materials respond mechanically to changes in environmental conditions. One example of a compliant active material is a polymer gel. Active polymer gels expand and contract in response to certain environmental stimuli, such as the application of an electric field or a change in the pH level of the surroundings. This ability to achieve large, reversible deformations with no external mechanical loading has generated much interest in the use of these gels as actuators and "artificial muscles". While much work has been done to study the behavior and properties of these gels, little information is available regarding the full constitutive description of the mechanical and actuation properties. This work focuses on developing a means of characterizing the mechanical properties of compliant active materials. A thermodynamically consistent finite-elastic constitutive model was developed to describe the mechanical and actuation behaviors of these kinds of materials. The mechanical properties of compliant active materials are characterized by a free-energy function, and the model utilizes an evolving internal variable to describe the actuation state. A biaxial testing system has been developed which can measure stresses and deformations of polymer gel films in a variety of liquid environments. This testing system is used to determine the form and parameters of the free-energy function for a specific active polymer gel, poly(vinyl alcohol)-poly(acrylic acid) gel.

  15. Protein-Protein Interactions Suggest Novel Activities of Human Cytomegalovirus Tegument Protein pUL103

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Daniel A.; Glassbrook, James E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an enveloped double-stranded DNA virus that causes severe disease in newborns and immunocompromised patients. During infection, the host cell endosecretory system is remodeled to form the cytoplasmic virion assembly complex (cVAC). We and others previously identified the conserved, multifunctional HCMV virion tegument protein pUL103 as important for cVAC biogenesis and efficient secondary envelopment. To help define its mechanisms of action and predict additional functions, we used two complementary methods, coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP) and proximity biotinylation (BioID), to identify viral and cellular proteins that interact with pUL103. By using the two methods in parallel and applying stringent selection criteria, we identified potentially high-value interactions of pUL103 with 13 HCMV and 18 cellular proteins. Detection of the previously identified pUL103-pUL71 interaction, as well as verification of several interactions by reverse co-IP, supports the specificity of our screening process. As might be expected for a tegument protein, interactions were identified that suggest distinct roles for pUL103 across the arc of lytic infection, including interactions with proteins involved in cellular antiviral responses, nuclear activities, and biogenesis and transport of cytoplasmic vesicles. Further analysis of some of these interactions expands our understanding of the multifunctional repertoire of pUL103: we detected HCMV pUL103 in nuclei of infected cells and identified an ALIX-binding domain within the pUL103 sequence. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is able to reconfigure the host cell machinery to establish a virion production factory, the cytoplasmic virion assembly complex (cVAC). cVAC biogenesis and operation represent targets for development of novel HCMV antivirals. We previously showed that the HCMV tegument protein pUL103 is required for cVAC biogenesis. Using pUL103 as bait, we investigated viral and

  16. A Posthypnotic Amnesia: Suggestions of an Active Process in Dissociative Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, William C.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    A retroactive inhibition design was used to examine the process of posthypnotic amnesia. The results supported the notion that "forgotten" material is as available to amnesic subjects at some level as it is to nonamnesic subjects. (Editor)

  17. Activated carbon briquettes from biomass materials.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Alejandro; Medero, Natalia; Tancredi, Néstor; Silva, Hugo; Deiana, Cristina

    2007-05-01

    Disposal of biomass wastes, produced in different agricultural activities, is frequently an environmental problem. A solution for such situation is the recycling of these residues for the production of activated carbon, an adsorbent which has several applications, for instance in the elimination of contaminants. For some uses, high mechanical strength and good adsorption characteristics are required. To achieve this, carbonaceous materials are conformed as pellets or briquettes, in a process that involves mixing and pressing of char with adhesive materials prior to activation. In this work, the influence of the operation conditions on the mechanical and surface properties of briquettes was studied. Eucalyptus wood and rice husk from Uruguay were used as lignocellulosic raw materials, and concentrated grape must from Cuyo Region-Argentina, as a binder. Different wood:rice and solid:binder ratios were used to prepare briquettes in order to study their influence on mechanical and surface properties of the final products.

  18. The Changing Surface of Saturn's Titan: Cassini Observations Suggest Active Cryovolcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    conclude that the VIMS instrument has found two instances in which selected regions on Titan's surface became unusually reflective and remained reflective on time scales of days to months. In both cases the area of reflectance variability is large (~100000 sq km), larger than either Loki or the Big Island of Hawaii. This is a strong evidence for currently active surface processes on Titan. Pre-Cassini, Titan was thought of as a pre-biotic earth that was frozen in time. Cassini VIMS and SAR observations combined suggest that Titan is the present day is not frozen solid, and is instead an episodically changing or evolving world. References: [1] Nelson R. M. et al, LPSC 2007 , Europlanets 2007, AGU 2007, EGU 2008, Accepted in Icarus 2008. [2] Lopes et al (this meeting), Stofan et al. Icarus 185, 443-456, 2007. Lopes et al. Icarus 186, 395- 412, 2007. Kirk et al., DPS 2007. Acknowledgement: This work done at JPL under contract with NASA

  19. Choosing optimal exposure times for XRF core-scanning: Suggestions based on the analysis of geological reference materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jyh-Jaan; Löwemark, Ludvig; Chang, Queenie; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Chen, Huei-Fen; Song, Sheng-Rong; Wei, Kuo-Yen

    2016-04-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) core-scanning is a fast and nondestructive technique to assess elemental variations of unprocessed sediments. However, although the exposure time of XRF-scanning directly affects the scanning counts and total measurement time, only a few studies have considered the influence of exposure time during the scan. How to select an optimal exposure time to achieve reliable results and reduce the total measurement time is an important issue. To address this question, six geological reference materials from the Geological Survey of Japan (JLK-1, JMS-1, JMS-2, JSD-1, JSD-2, and JSD-3) were scanned by the Itrax-XRF core scanner using the Mo- and the Cr-tube with different exposure times to allow a comparison of scanning counts with absolute concentrations. The regression lines and correlation coefficients of elements that are generally used in paleoenvironmental studies were examined for the different exposure times and X-ray tubes. The results show that for those elements with relatively high concentrations or high detectability, the correlation coefficients are higher than 0.90 for all exposure times. In contrast, for the low detectability or low concentration elements, the correlation coefficients are relatively low, and improve little with increased exposure time. Therefore, we suggest that the influence of different exposure times is insignificant for the accuracy of the measurements. Thus, caution must be taken when interpreting the results of elements with low detectability, even when the exposure times are long and scanning counts are reasonably high.

  20. Have Hatchet--Will Survive: Suggested Activities for Decision-Making Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressler, Jean; Howell, Helen

    1991-01-01

    Describes oral activities that help middle and junior high school students develop decision-making skills. The activities, based on Gary Paulsen's novel "Hatchet," focus on struggling for survival. Recommends "Hatchet" as a vehicle for observing the maturing process and for teaching skills that students can apply to their own…

  1. Theatre Techniques for Language Learning: Assumptions and Suggested Progression of Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Martha L.

    A discussion of the use of drama activities in Second Language instruction looks at the rationale for using such techniques in the language classroom, describes a progression of drama activities used for an intensive course in intermediate English as a Second Language, and examines other considerations in the use of drama in language teaching.…

  2. Keep Fit. Suggested Fitness Activities for Forms 1-4 Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinataci, S.

    This booklet is designed for teachers who conduct physical education programs and who coach sports in schools where modern training equipment is not available. Most of the equipment described or shown in this booklet can be improvised. The activities are designed for girls in grades seven through ten. The following activities are covered in the…

  3. Greater Intermanual Transfer in the Elderly Suggests Age-Related Bilateral Motor Cortex Activation Is Compensatory

    PubMed Central

    Graziadio, Sara; Nazarpour, Kianoush; Gretenkord, Sabine; Jackson, Andrew; Eyre, Janet A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Hemispheric lateralization of movement control diminishes with age; whether this is compensatory or maladaptive is debated. The authors hypothesized that if compensatory, bilateral activation would lead to greater intermanual transfer in older subjects learning tasks that activate the cortex unilaterally in young adults. They studied 10 young and 14 older subjects, learning a unimanual visuomotor task comprising a feedforward phase, where there is unilateral cortical activation in young adults, and a feedback phase, which activates the cortex bilaterally in both age groups. Increased intermanual transfer was demonstrated in older subjects during feedforward learning, with no difference between groups during feedback learning. This finding is consistent with bilateral cortical activation being compensatory to maintain performance despite declining computational efficiency in neural networks. PMID:25575222

  4. Active Materials for Photonic Systems (AMPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    market . Overall Program Summary The overall objective of the Active Materials for Photonic Systems (AMPS) program was to develop and demonstrate...mode fiber, with alignment tolerances of several microns functions well for data communications , single mode fiber is required for several significant...in the laser/optics community . Boeing and MCNC have signed a memorandum of agreement for commercialization and are actively seeking partners for

  5. Geopolymers and Related Alkali-Activated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provis, John L.; Bernal, Susan A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of new, sustainable, low-CO2 construction materials is essential if the global construction industry is to reduce the environmental footprint of its activities, which is incurred particularly through the production of Portland cement. One type of non-Portland cement that is attracting particular attention is based on alkali-aluminosilicate chemistry, including the class of binders that have become known as geopolymers. These materials offer technical properties comparable to those of Portland cement, but with a much lower CO2 footprint and with the potential for performance advantages over traditional cements in certain niche applications. This review discusses the synthesis of alkali-activated binders from blast furnace slag, calcined clay (metakaolin), and fly ash, including analysis of the chemical reaction mechanisms and binder phase assemblages that control the early-age and hardened properties of these materials, in particular initial setting and long-term durability. Perspectives for future research developments are also explored.

  6. Career Education: Learning with a Purpose. Secondary Guide-Vol. 5. Mathematics and Career Clusters, Mathematics Related Activity Suggestions, Field Trip Sites and Guest Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Marilyn; And Others

    The guide offers a compilation of teacher-developed career education materials which may be integrated with secondary level curriculum in mathematics. Suggested activities and ideas present the following units based on career clusters as they relate to mathematics: construction, communications and media, hospitality and recreation, public service,…

  7. Comment on Birgegard and Sohlberg's (1999) suggestions for research in subliminal psychodynamic activation.

    PubMed

    Fudin, R

    2000-06-01

    Methodological changes in subliminal psychodynamic activation experiments based on the assumption that multiletter messages can be encoded automatically (Birgegard & Sohlberg, 1999) are questioned. Their contention that partial experimental messages and appropriate nonsense anagram controls (Fudin, 1986) need not be presented in every experiment is supported, with a reservation. If the difference between responses to the complete message and its control is significant in the predicted direction, then Fudin's procedure should be used. A nonsignificant difference between the response to each partial message and its control is needed to support the assumption of proponents of subliminal psychodynamic activation that successful outcomes are effected by the encoding of the meaning of a complete message. Experiments in subliminal psychodynamic activation can be improved if their methodologies take into account variables that may operate when subliminal stimuli are presented and encoded.

  8. Hazardous Waste Environmental Education Resource Kit for Manitoba Teachers: Suggested Activities K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey-Franchuk, Andrea J.

    Society has become increasingly aware of the harmful effects that the disposal of chemical waste products have on the environment and human health. Public information is central to the development of a responsible waste management plan. The activities contained in this guide are organized in sequence from kindergarten to grade 12, and provide…

  9. Effect of cimetidine on catalase activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a suggested mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Masoudeh; Ebrahimi, Farnoosh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is an important enzyme for the degradation of hydrogen peroxide in cells. Bacteria have potent catalase to deal with H2O2 in their medium culture. Any chemicals that inhibit catalase activity can be harmful for cells. Histamine H2 antagonist drugs such as cimetidine and ranitidine are used for the treatment of gastrointestinal tract disorders. The present results showed that cimetidine could inhibit the catalase activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a competitive inhibition. The determination of IC50 value and Ki (6.5 μM) of cimetidine demonstrated that the enzyme binds to the drug with high affinity. Binding of the drug to the enzyme was pH-dependent and no binding was observed at basic pH (>9) and acidic pH (<6). Moreover, the imidazole ring and cyanoguanidine group of cimetidine may play an important role in inhibition by binding to Fe in heme group and glutamic acid 51 residue on the enzyme, respectively. Ranitidine had no effect on the catalase activity.

  10. Structures of human Bruton's tyrosine kinase in active and inactive conformations suggest a mechanism of activation for TEC family kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, Douglas J.; Liu, Yu-Ting; Arduini, Robert M.; Hession, Catherine A.; Miatkowski, Konrad; Wildes, Craig P.; Cullen, Patrick F.; Hong, Victor; Hopkins, Brian T.; Mertsching, Elisabeth; Jenkins, Tracy J.; Romanowski, Michael J.; Baker, Darren P.; Silvian, Laura F.

    2010-11-15

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a member of the TEC family of kinases, plays a crucial role in B-cell maturation and mast cell activation. Although the structures of the unphosphorylated mouse BTK kinase domain and the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated kinase domains of human ITK are known, understanding the kinase selectivity profiles of BTK inhibitors has been hampered by the lack of availability of a high resolution, ligand-bound BTK structure. Here, we report the crystal structures of the human BTK kinase domain bound to either Dasatinib (BMS-354825) at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution or to 4-amino-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolospyrimidin- 7-yl-cyclopentane at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. This data provides information relevant to the development of small molecule inhibitors targeting BTK and the TEC family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Analysis of the structural differences between the TEC and Src families of kinases near the Trp-Glu-Ile motif in the N-terminal region of the kinase domain suggests a mechanism of regulation of the TEC family members.

  11. Active materials for integrated optic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Joseph S.; Funk, David S.; Veasey, David L.; Peters, Philip M.; Sanford, Norman A.

    1999-11-01

    The ability to engineer glass properties through the selection and adjustment of chemical composition continues to make glass a leading material in both active and passive applications. The development of optimal glass compositions for integrated optical applications requires a number of considerations that are often at variance with one another. Of critical importance is that the glass offers compatibility with standard ion exchange technologies, allowing fabrication of guided wave structures. In addition, for application as an active material, the resultant structures must be characterized by absence of inclusions and low absorption at the lasing wavelength, putting demands on both the selection and identity of the raw materials used to prepare the glass. We report on the development of an optimized glass composition for integrated optic applications that combines good laser properties with good chemical durability allowing for a wide range of chemical processing steps to be employed without substrate deterioration. In addition, care was taken during the development of this glass to insure that the selected composition was consistent with manufacturing technology for producing high optical quality glass. We present the properties of the resultant glasses, including results of detailed chemical and laser properties, for use in the design and modeling of active waveguides prepared with these glasses.

  12. Immunohistochemical evidence suggests intrinsic regulatory activity of human eccrine sweat glands

    PubMed Central

    ZANCANARO, CARLO; MERIGO, FLAVIA; CRESCIMANNO, CATERINA; ORLANDINI, SIMONETTA; OSCULATI, ANTONIO

    1999-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry of normal eccrine sweat glands was performed on paraffin sections of human skin. Immunoreactivity (ir) for neuron specific enolase, S100 protein (S100), regulatory peptides, nitric oxide synthase type I (NOS-I) and choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) was found in small nerve bundles close to sweat glands. In the glands, secretory cells were labelled with anticytokeratin antibody. Using antibodies to S100, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) a specific distribution pattern was found in secretory cells. Granulated (dark) and parietal (clear) cells were immunopositive for CGRP, and S100 and SP, respectively. Immunoreactivity was diffuse in the cytoplasm for CGRP and S100, and peripheral for SP. Myoepithelial cells were not labelled. Electron microscopy revealed electron dense granules, probably containing peptide, in granulated cells. Using antibodies to NOS-I and ChAT, ir was exclusively found in myoepithelial cells. Immunoreactivity for the atrial natriuretic peptide was absent in sweat glands. These results provide evidence for the presence of both regulatory peptides involved in vasodilation and key enzymes for the synthesis of nitric oxide and acetylcholine in the secretory coil of human sweat glands. It is suggested that human sweat glands are capable of some intrinsic regulation in addition to that carried out by their nerve supply. PMID:10386780

  13. Active Surfaces and Interfaces of Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming

    A variety of intriguing surface patterns have been observed on developing natural systems, ranging from corrugated surface of white blood cells at nanometer scales to wrinkled dog skins at millimeter scales. To mimetically harness functionalities of natural morphologies, artificial transformative skin systems by using soft active materials have been rationally designed to generate versatile patterns for a variety of engineering applications. The study of the mechanics and design of these dynamic surface patterns on soft active materials are both physically interesting and technologically important. This dissertation starts with studying abundant surface patterns in Nature by constructing a unified phase diagram of surface instabilities on soft materials with minimum numbers of physical parameters. Guided by this integrated phase diagram, an electroactive system is designed to investigate a variety of electrically-induced surface instabilities of elastomers, including electro-creasing, electro-cratering, electro-wrinkling and electro-cavitation. Combing experimental, theoretical and computational methods, the initiation, evolution and transition of these instabilities are analyzed. To apply these dynamic surface instabilities to serving engineering and biology, new techniques of Dynamic Electrostatic Lithography and electroactive anti-biofouling are demonstrated.

  14. Active vibration damping using smart material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baras, John S.; Yan, Zhuang

    1994-01-01

    We consider the modeling and active damping of an elastic beam using distributed actuators and sensors. The piezoelectric ceramic material (PZT) is used to build the actuator. The sensor is made of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). These materials are glued on both sides of the beam. For the simple clamped beam, the closed loop controller has been shown to be able to extract energy from the beam. The shape of the actuator and its influence on the closed loop system performance are discussed. It is shown that it is possible to suppress the selected mode by choosing the appropriate actuator layout. It is also shown that by properly installing the sensor and determining the sensor shape we can further extract and manipulate the sensor signal for our control need.

  15. Design of electro-active polymer gels as actuator materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Suzana

    Smart materials, alternatively called active or adaptive, differ from passive materials in their sensing and activation capability. These materials can sense changes in environment such as: electric field, magnetic field, UV light, pH, temperature. They are capable of responding in numerous ways. Some change their stiffness properties (electro-rheological fluids), other deform (piezos, shape memory alloys, electrostrictive materials) or change optic properties (electrochromic polymers). Polymer gels are one of such materials which can change the shape, volume and even optical properties upon different applied stimuli. Due to their low stiffness property they are capable of having up to 100% of strain in a short time, order of seconds. Their motion resembles the one of biosystems, and they are often seen as possible artificial muscle materials. Despite their delicate nature, appropriate design can make them being used as actuator materials which can form controllable surfaces and mechanical switches. In this study several different groups of polymer gel material were investigated: (a) acrylamide based gels are sensitive to pH and electric field and respond in volume change, (b) polyacrylonitrile (PAN) gel is sensitive to pH and electric field and responds in axial strain and bending, (c) polyvinylalcohol (PVA) gel is sensitive to electric field and responds in axial strain and bending and (d) perfluorinated sulfonic acid membrane, Nafion RTM, is sensitive to electric field and responds in bending. Electro-mechanical and chemo-mechanical behavior of these materials is a function of a variety of phenomena: polymer structure, affinity of polymer to the solvent, charge distribution within material, type of solvent, elasticity of polymer matrix, etc. Modeling of this behavior is a task aimed to identify what is driving mechanism for activation and express it in a quantitative way in terms of deformation of material. In this work behavior of the most promising material as

  16. Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

  17. Plasmonic Biofoam: A Versatile Optically Active Material.

    PubMed

    Tian, Limei; Luan, Jingyi; Liu, Keng-Ku; Jiang, Qisheng; Tadepalli, Sirimuvva; Gupta, Maneesh K; Naik, Rajesh R; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2016-01-13

    Owing to their ability to confine and manipulate light at the nanoscale, plasmonic nanostructures are highly attractive for a broad range of applications. While tremendous progress has been made in the synthesis of size- and shape-controlled plasmonic nanostructures, their integration with other materials and application in solid-state is primarily through their assembly on rigid two-dimensional (2D) substrates, which limits the plasmonically active space to a few nanometers above the substrate. In this work, we demonstrate a simple method to create plasmonically active three-dimensional biofoams by integrating plasmonic nanostructures with highly porous biomaterial aerogels. We demonstrate that plasmonic biofoam is a versatile optically active platform that can be harnessed for numerous applications including (i) ultrasensitive chemical detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering; (ii) highly efficient energy harvesting and steam generation through plasmonic photothermal heating; and (iii) optical control of enzymatic activity by triggered release of biomolecules encapsulated within the aerogel. Our results demonstrate that 3D plasmonic biofoam exhibits significantly higher sensing, photothermal, and loading efficiency compared to conventional 2D counterparts. The design principles and processing methodology of plasmonic aerogels demonstrated here can be broadly applied in the fabrication of other functional foams.

  18. Anticorrelation between Local Photoluminescence and Photocurrent Suggests Variability in Contact to Active Layer in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Eperon, Giles E; Moerman, David; Ginger, David S

    2016-11-22

    We use high-resolution, spatially resolved, laser beam induced current, confocal photoluminescence, and photoconductive atomic force microscopy (pcAFM) measurements to correlate local solar cell performance with spatially heterogeneous local material properties in methylammonium lead triiodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskite solar cells. We find that, for this material and device architecture, the photocurrent heterogeneity measured via pcAFM on devices missing a top selective contact with traditional Au-coated tips is significantly larger than the photocurrent heterogeneity observed in full devices with both electron- and hole-selective extraction layers, indicating that extraction barriers at the Au/perovskite interface are ameliorated by deposition of the organic charge extraction layer. Nevertheless, in completed, efficient device structures (PCE ≈ 16%) with state-of-the-art nickel oxide and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid (PCBM) methyl ester contacts, we observe that the local photoluminescence (PL) is weakly anticorrelated with local photocurrent at both short-circuit and open-circuit conditions. We determine that the contact materials are fairly homogeneous; thus the heterogeneity stems from the perovskite itself. We suggest a cause for the anticorrelation as being related to local carrier extraction heterogeneity. However, we find that the contacts are still the dominating source of losses in these devices, which minimizes the impact of the material heterogeneity on device performance at present. These results suggest that further steps to prevent recombination losses at the interfaces are needed to help perovskite-based cells approach theoretical efficiency limits; only at this point will material heterogeneity become crucial.

  19. Neutron activation analysis of some building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salagean, M. N.; Pantelica, A. I.; Georgescu, I. I.; Muntean, M. I.

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Mo, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, U. Yb, W and Zn in seven Romanian building materials were determined by the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) method using the VVR-S Reactor of NIPNE- Bucharest. Raw matarials used in cement obtaining ≈ 75% of limestone and ≈ 25% of clay, cement samples from three different factories, furnace slag, phosphogypsum, and a type of brick have been analyzed. The brick was compacted from furnace slay, fly coal ash, phosphogypsum, lime and cement. The U, Th and K concentrations determined in the brick are in agreement with the natural radioactivity measurements of226Ra,232Th and40K. These specific activities were found about twice and 1.5 higher than the accepted levels in the case of226Ra and232Th, as well as40K, respectively. By consequence, the investigated brick is considered a radioactive waste. The rather high content of Co, Cr, K, Th, and Zh in the brick is especially due to the slag and fly ash, the main componets. The presence of U, Th and K in slag is mainly correlated with the limestone and dolomite as fluxes in matallurgy.

  20. Structural data suggest that the active and inactive forms of the RecA filament are not simply interconvertible.

    PubMed

    Yu, X; Egelman, E H

    1992-09-05

    We have used electron microscopy to examine the two major conformational states of the helical filament formed by the RecA protein of Escherichia coli. The compressed filament, formed in the absence of a nucleotide cofactor either as a self-polymer or on a single-stranded DNA molecule, is characterized in solution by about 6.1 subunits per turn of a 76 A pitch helix, and appears to be inactive with respect to all RecA activity. The active state of the filament, formed with ATP or an ATP analog on either a single or double-stranded DNA substrate, has about 6.2 subunits per turn of a 94 A pitch helix. Measurements of the contour length of RecA-covered single-stranded DNA circles in ice, formed in the absence of nucleotide cofactor, indicate that each RecA subunit binds five bases, in contrast to the three bases or base-pairs per subunit in the active state. The different stoichiometries of DNA binding suggests that the two polymeric forms are not interconvertible, as has been suggested on biochemical grounds. A three-dimensional reconstruction of the inactive state shows the same general features as the 83 A pitch filament present in the RecA crystal. This structural similarity and the fact that the crystal does not contain ATP or DNA suggests that the crystal structure is more similar to the compressed filament than the active, extended filament.

  1. How a Small Change in Retinal Leads to G-Protein Activation: Initial Events Suggested by Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Crozier, Paul S.; Stevens, Mark J.; Woolf, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the prototypical G-protein coupled receptor, coupling light activation with high efficiency to signaling molecules. The dark-state X-ray structures of the protein provide a starting point for consideration of the relaxation from initial light activation to conformational changes that may lead to signaling. In this study we create an energetically unstable retinal in the light activated state and then use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the types of compensation, relaxation, and conformational changes that occur following the cis–trans light activation. The results suggest that changes occur throughout the protein, with changes in the orientation of Helices 5 and 6, a closer interaction between Ala 169 on Helix 4 and retinal, and a shift in the Schiff base counterion that also reflects changes in sidechain interactions with the retinal. Taken together, the simulation is suggestive of the types of changes that lead from local conformational change to light-activated signaling in this prototypical system. PMID:17109408

  2. Activation of Vago by interferon regulatory factor (IRF) suggests an interferon system-like antiviral mechanism in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaozheng; Li, Haoyang; Chen, Yixiao; Chen, Yonggui; Wang, Sheng; Weng, Shao-Ping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2015-10-13

    There is a debate on whether invertebrates possess an antiviral immunity similar to the interferon (IFN) system of vertebrates. The Vago gene from arthropods encodes a viral-activated secreted peptide that restricts virus infection through activating the JAK-STAT pathway and is considered to be a cytokine functionally similar to IFN. In this study, the first crustacean IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-like gene was identified in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The L. vannamei IRF showed similar protein nature to mammalian IRFs and could be activated during virus infection. As a transcriptional regulatory factor, L. vannamei IRF could activate the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-containing promoter to regulate the expression of mammalian type I IFNs and initiate an antiviral state in mammalian cells. More importantly, IRF could bind the 5'-untranslated region of L. vannamei Vago4 gene and activate its transcription, suggesting that shrimp Vago may be induced in a similar manner to that of IFNs and supporting the opinion that Vago might function as an IFN-like molecule in invertebrates. These suggested that shrimp might possess an IRF-Vago-JAK/STAT regulatory axis, which is similar to the IRF-IFN-JAK/STAT axis of vertebrates, indicating that invertebrates might possess an IFN system-like antiviral mechanism.

  3. Activation of Vago by interferon regulatory factor (IRF) suggests an interferon system-like antiviral mechanism in shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaozheng; Li, Haoyang; Chen, Yixiao; Chen, Yonggui; Wang, Sheng; Weng, Shao-Ping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    There is a debate on whether invertebrates possess an antiviral immunity similar to the interferon (IFN) system of vertebrates. The Vago gene from arthropods encodes a viral-activated secreted peptide that restricts virus infection through activating the JAK-STAT pathway and is considered to be a cytokine functionally similar to IFN. In this study, the first crustacean IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-like gene was identified in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The L. vannamei IRF showed similar protein nature to mammalian IRFs and could be activated during virus infection. As a transcriptional regulatory factor, L. vannamei IRF could activate the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-containing promoter to regulate the expression of mammalian type I IFNs and initiate an antiviral state in mammalian cells. More importantly, IRF could bind the 5′-untranslated region of L. vannamei Vago4 gene and activate its transcription, suggesting that shrimp Vago may be induced in a similar manner to that of IFNs and supporting the opinion that Vago might function as an IFN-like molecule in invertebrates. These suggested that shrimp might possess an IRF-Vago-JAK/STAT regulatory axis, which is similar to the IRF-IFN-JAK/STAT axis of vertebrates, indicating that invertebrates might possess an IFN system-like antiviral mechanism. PMID:26459861

  4. Light activated nitric oxide releasing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muizzi Casanas, Dayana Andreina

    The ability to control the location and dosage of biologically active molecules inside the human body can be critical to maximizing effective treatment of cardiovascular diseases like angina. The current standard of treatment relies on the metabolism of organonitrate drugs into nitric oxide (NO), which are not specific, and also show problems with densitization with long-term use. There is a need then to create a treatment method that gives targeted release of NO. Metal-nitrosyl (M-NO) complexes can be used for delivery of NO since the release of NO can be controlled with light. However, the NO-releasing drug must be activated with red light to ensure maximum penetration of light through tissue. However, the release of NO from M-NO complexes with red-light activation is a significant challenge since the energy required to break the metal-NO bond is usually larger than the energy provided by red light. The goal of this project was to create red- sensitive, NO-releasing materials based on Ru-salen-nitrosyl compounds. Our approach was to first modify Ru salen complexes to sensitize the photochemistry for release of NO after red light irradiation. Next, we pursued polymerization of the Ru-salen complexes. We report the synthesis and quantitative photochemical characterization of a series of ruthenium salen nitrosyl complexes. These complexes were modified by incorporating electron donating groups in the salen ligand structure at key locations to increase electron density on the Ru. Complexes with either an --OH or --OCH3 substituent showed an improvement in the quantum yield of release of NO upon blue light irradiation compared to the unmodified salen. These --OH and --OCH3 complexes were also sensitized for NO release after red light activation, however the red-sensitive complexes were unstable and showed ligand substitution on the order of minutes. The substituted complexes remained sensitive for NO release, but only after blue light irradiation. The Ru

  5. Reconstitution of Torso signaling in cultured cells suggests a role for both Trunk and Torso-like in receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Amarnath, Smita; Stevens, Leslie M; Stein, David S

    2017-02-15

    Formation of the Drosophila embryonic termini is controlled by the localized activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase Torso. Both Torso and Torso's presumed ligand, Trunk, are expressed uniformly in the early embryo. Polar activation of Torso requires Torso-like, which is expressed by follicle cells adjacent to the ends of the developing oocyte. We find that Torso expressed at high levels in cultured Drosophila cells is activated by individual application of Trunk, Torso-like or another known Torso ligand, Prothoracicotropic Hormone. In addition to assays of downstream signaling activity, Torso dimerization was detected using bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Trunk and Torso-like were active when co-transfected with Torso and when presented to Torso-expressing cells in conditioned medium. Trunk and Torso-like were also taken up from conditioned medium specifically by cells expressing Torso. At low levels of Torso, similar to those present in the embryo, Trunk and Torso-like alone were ineffective but acted synergistically to stimulate Torso signaling. Our results suggest that Torso interacts with both Trunk and Torso-like, which cooperate to mediate dimerization and activation of Torso at the ends of the Drosophila embryo.

  6. Magnesium Based Materials and their Antimicrobial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Duane Allan

    The overall goals of this body of work were to characterize the antimicrobial properties of magnesium (Mg) metal and nano-magnesium oxide (nMgO) in vitro, to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity of Mg metal, and to incorporate MgO nanoparticles into a polymeric implant coating and evaluate its in vitro antimicrobial properties. In the course of this work it was found that Mg metal, Mg-mesh, and nMgO have in vitro antimicrobial properties that are similar to a bactericidal antibiotic. For Mg metal, the mechanism of this activity appears to be related to an increase in pH (i.e. a more alkaline environment) and not an increase in Mg2+. Given that Mg-mesh is a Mg metal powder, the assumption is that it has the same mechanism of activity as Mg metal. The mechanism of activity for nMgO remains to be elucidated and may be related to a combination of interaction of the nanoparticles with the bacteria and the alkaline pH. It was further demonstrated that supernatants from suspensions of Mg-mesh and nMgO had the same antimicrobial effect as was noted when the particles were used. The supernatant from Mg-mesh and nMgO was also noted to prevent biofilm formation for two Staphylococcus strains. Finally, poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) composites of Mg-mesh (PCL+Mg-mesh) and nMgO (PCL+nMgO) were produced. Coatings applied to screws inhibited growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in thin disc format inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus in addition to the E. coli and P. aeruginosa. Pure Mg metal was noted to have some cytotoxic effect on murine fibroblast and osteoblast cell lines, although this effect needs to be characterized further. To address the need for an in vivo model for evaluating implant associated infections, a new closed fracture osteomyelitis model in the femur of the rat was developed. Magnesium, a readily available and inexpensive metal was shown to have antimicrobial properties that appear to be related to its corrosion products and

  7. Interleukin-1-like activity in capsular material from Haemophilus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, W; Kamin, S; Meghji, S; Wilson, M

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the activity of a bacterial surface component (capsular material, CM) in biological assays for interleukin-1 (IL-1). CM from the periodontal pathogen Haemophilus actinomycetemcomitans was tested in the following in vitro assays: mouse thymocyte proliferation (LAF assay), stimulation of collagenase and prostaglandin (PG) E2 synthesis by articular chondrocytes, and stimulation of PGE2 synthesis by fibroblasts. In all these assays, CM gave a response similar to an IL-1 preparation. This ability to mimic IL-1 suggests an important role for CM in both cell-mediated immunity and connective tissue destruction in localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). PMID:3032779

  8. Comparative Analysis of the Flax Immune Receptors L6 and L7 Suggests an Equilibrium-Based Switch Activation Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunhong; Newell, Kim; Lawrence, Gregory J.; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Anderson, Peter A.; Dodds, Peter N.

    2016-01-01

    NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are central components of the plant immune system. L6 is a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing NLR from flax (Linum usitatissimum) conferring immunity to the flax rust fungus. Comparison of L6 to the weaker allele L7 identified two polymorphic regions in the TIR and the nucleotide binding (NB) domains that regulate both effector ligand-dependent and -independent cell death signaling as well as nucleotide binding to the receptor. This suggests that a negative functional interaction between the TIR and NB domains holds L7 in an inactive/ADP-bound state more tightly than L6, hence decreasing its capacity to adopt the active/ATP-bound state and explaining its weaker activity in planta. L6 and L7 variants with a more stable ADP-bound state failed to bind to AvrL567 in yeast two-hybrid assays, while binding was detected to the signaling active variants. This contrasts with current models predicting that effectors bind to inactive receptors to trigger activation. Based on the correlation between nucleotide binding, effector interaction, and immune signaling properties of L6/L7 variants, we propose that NLRs exist in an equilibrium between ON and OFF states and that effector binding to the ON state stabilizes this conformation, thereby shifting the equilibrium toward the active form of the receptor to trigger defense signaling. PMID:26744216

  9. Advertising content in physical activity print materials.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Bradley J

    2002-01-01

    Copies of 80 sets of print materials available free of charge to the general public were analyzed to determine the relationship between the developer and advertising-related material. Almost all of the materials had some form of advertising content. Materials from commercial product vendors were most likely to have product logos, references to specific brands, and had the greatest number of logos, and the greatest number of references to specific brands. They were the second most likely to have advertising slogans, and had the second greatest number of advertising slogans.

  10. High adenylyl cyclase activity and in vivo cAMP fluctuations in corals suggest central physiological role.

    PubMed

    Barott, K L; Helman, Y; Haramaty, L; Barron, M E; Hess, K C; Buck, J; Levin, L R; Tresguerres, M

    2013-01-01

    Corals are an ecologically and evolutionarily significant group, providing the framework for coral reef biodiversity while representing one of the most basal of metazoan phyla. However, little is known about fundamental signaling pathways in corals. Here we investigate the dynamics of cAMP, a conserved signaling molecule that can regulate virtually every physiological process. Bioinformatics revealed corals have both transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclases (AC). Endogenous cAMP levels in live corals followed a potential diel cycle, as they were higher during the day compared to the middle of the night. Coral homogenates exhibited some of the highest cAMP production rates ever to be recorded in any organism; this activity was inhibited by calcium ions and stimulated by bicarbonate. In contrast, zooxanthellae or mucus had >1000-fold lower AC activity. These results suggest that cAMP is an important regulator of coral physiology, especially in response to light, acid/base disturbances and inorganic carbon levels.

  11. High adenylyl cyclase activity and in vivo cAMP fluctuations in corals suggest central physiological role

    PubMed Central

    Barott, K. L.; Helman, Y.; Haramaty, L.; Barron, M. E.; Hess, K. C.; Buck, J.; Levin, L. R.; Tresguerres, M.

    2013-01-01

    Corals are an ecologically and evolutionarily significant group, providing the framework for coral reef biodiversity while representing one of the most basal of metazoan phyla. However, little is known about fundamental signaling pathways in corals. Here we investigate the dynamics of cAMP, a conserved signaling molecule that can regulate virtually every physiological process. Bioinformatics revealed corals have both transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclases (AC). Endogenous cAMP levels in live corals followed a potential diel cycle, as they were higher during the day compared to the middle of the night. Coral homogenates exhibited some of the highest cAMP production rates ever to be recorded in any organism; this activity was inhibited by calcium ions and stimulated by bicarbonate. In contrast, zooxanthellae or mucus had >1000-fold lower AC activity. These results suggest that cAMP is an important regulator of coral physiology, especially in response to light, acid/base disturbances and inorganic carbon levels. PMID:23459251

  12. Activation of HER3 Interferes with Antitumor Effects of Axl Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: Suggestion of Combination Therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Torka, Robert; Pénzes, Kinga; Gusenbauer, Simone; Baumann, Christine; Szabadkai, István; Őrfi, Lászlȯ; Kéri, György; Ullrich, Axel

    2014-01-01

    The Axl receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) has been established as a strong candidate for targeted therapy of cancer. However, the benefits of targeted therapies are limited due to acquired resistance and activation of alternative RTKs. Therefore, we asked if cancer cells are able to overcome targeted Axl therapies. Here, we demonstrate that inhibition of Axl by short interfering RNA or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) BMS777607 induces the expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) and the neuregulin 1(NRG1)–dependent phosphorylation of HER3 in MDA-MB231 and Ovcar8 cells. Moreover, analysis of 20 Axl-expressing cancer cell lines of different tissue origin indicates a low basal phosphorylation of RAC-α serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT) as a general requirement for HER3 activation on Axl inhibition. Consequently, phosphorylation of AKT arises as an independent biomarker for Axl treatment. Additionally, we introduce phosphorylation of HER3 as an independent pharmacodynamic biomarker for monitoring of anti-Axl therapy response. Inhibition of cell viability by BMS777607 could be rescued by NRG1-dependent activation of HER3, suggesting an escape mechanism by tumor microenvironment. The Axl-TKI MPCD84111 simultaneously blocked Axl and HER2/3 signaling and thereby prohibited HER3 feedback activation. Furthermore, dual inhibition of Axl and HER2/3 using BMS777607 and lapatinib led to a significant inhibition of cell viability in Axl-expressing MDA-MB231 and Ovcar8 cells. Therefore, we conclude that, in patient cohorts with expression of Axl and low basal activity of AKT, a combined inhibition of Axl and HER2/3 kinase would be beneficial to overcome acquired resistance to Axl-targeted therapies. PMID:24862757

  13. Structure of the unliganded form of the proprotein convertase furin suggests activation by a substrate-induced mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Dahms, Sven O.; Arciniega, Marcelino; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Huber, Robert; Than, Manuel E.

    2016-01-01

    Proprotein convertases (PCs) are highly specific proteases required for the proteolytic modification of many secreted proteins. An unbalanced activity of these enzymes is connected to pathologies like cancer, atherosclerosis, hypercholesterolaemia, and infectious diseases. Novel protein crystallographic structures of the prototypical PC family member furin in different functional states were determined to 1.8–2.0 Å. These, together with biochemical data and modeling by molecular dynamics calculations, suggest essential elements underlying its unusually high substrate specificity. Furin shows a complex activation mechanism and exists in at least four defined states: (i) the “off state,” incompatible with substrate binding as seen in the unliganded enzyme; (ii) the active “on state” seen in inhibitor-bound furin; and the respective (iii) calcium-free and (iv) calcium-bound forms. The transition from the off to the on state is triggered by ligand binding at subsites S1 to S4 and appears to underlie the preferential recognition of the four-residue sequence motif of furin. The molecular dynamics simulations of the four structural states reflect the experimental observations in general and provide approximations of the respective stabilities. Ligation by calcium at the PC-specific binding site II influences the active-site geometry and determines the rotamer state of the oxyanion hole-forming Asn295, and thus adds a second level of the activity modulation of furin. The described crystal forms and the observations of different defined functional states may foster the development of new tools and strategies for pharmacological intervention targeting furin. PMID:27647913

  14. Unbalanced Activation of Glutathione Metabolic Pathways Suggests Potential Involvement in Plant Defense against the Gall Midge Mayetiola destructor in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuming; Zhang, Shize; Whitworth, R. Jeff; Stuart, Jeffrey J.; Chen, Ming-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, γ-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. We found that the abundance of total glutathione increased up to 60% in resistant wheat plants within 72 hours following attack by the gall midge Mayetiola destructor, the Hessian fly. The increase in total glutathione abundance, however, is coupled with an unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways. The activity and transcript abundance of glutathione peroxidases, which convert reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG), increased in infested resistant plants. However, the enzymatic activity and transcript abundance of glutathione reductases, which convert GSSG back to GSH, did not change. This unbalanced regulation of the glutathione oxidation/reduction cycle indicates the existence of an alternative pathway to regenerate GSH from GSSG to maintain a stable GSSG/GSH ratio. Our data suggest the possibility that GSSG is transported from cytosol to apoplast to serve as an oxidant for class III peroxidases to generate reactive oxygen species for plant defense against Hessian fly larvae. Our results provide a foundation for elucidating the molecular processes involved in glutathione-mediated plant resistance to Hessian fly and potentially other pests as well. PMID:25627558

  15. Allele-Specific Phenotype Suggests a Possible Stimulatory Activity of RCAN-1 on Calcineurin in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weixun; Choi, Tae-Woo; Ahnn, Joohong; Lee, Sun-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) binds to calcineurin through the PxIxIT motif, which is evolutionarily conserved. SP repeat phosphorylation in RCAN1 is required for its complete function. The specific interaction between RCAN1 and calcineurin is critical for calcium/calmodulin-dependent regulation of calcineurin serine/threonine phosphatase activity. In this study, we investigated two available deletion rcan-1 mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans, which proceed differently for transcription and translation. We found that rcan-1 may be required for calcineurin activity and possess calcineurin-independent function in body growth and egg-laying behavior. In the genetic background of enhanced calcineurin activity, the rcan-1 mutant expressing a truncated RCAN-1 which retains the calcineurin-binding PxIxIT motif but misses SP repeats stimulated growth, while rcan-1 lack mutant resulted in hyperactive egg-laying suppression. These data suggest rcan-1 has unknown functions independent of calcineurin, and may be a stimulatory calcineurin regulator under certain circumstances. PMID:27871170

  16. A novel fMRI paradigm suggests that pedaling-related brain activation is altered after stroke.

    PubMed

    Promjunyakul, Nutta-On; Schmit, Brian D; Schindler-Ivens, Sheila M

    2015-01-01

    were examined separately, reduced brain activation volume reached statistical significance in BA6 [p = 0.04; 4,350 (2,347) μL stroke; 6,938 (3,134) μL control] and cerebellum [p = 0.001; 4,591 (1,757) μL stroke; 8,381 (2,835) μL control]. Regardless of whether activated regions were examined together or separately, there were no significant between-group differences in brain activation intensity [p = 0.17; 1.30 (0.25)% stroke; 1.16 (0.20)% control]. Reduced volume in the stroke group was not observed during lower limb tapping and could not be fully attributed to differences in head motion or movement rate. There was a tendency for pedaling-related brain activation volume to increase with increasing work performed by the paretic limb during pedaling (p = 0.08, r = 0.525). Hence, the results of this study provide two original and important contributions. First, we demonstrated that pedaling can be used with fMRI to examine brain activation associated with lower limb movement in people with stroke. Unlike previous lower limb movements examined with fMRI, pedaling involves continuous, reciprocal, multijoint movement of both limbs. In this respect, pedaling has many characteristics of functional lower limb movements, such as walking. Thus, the importance of our contribution lies in the establishment of a novel paradigm that can be used to understand how the brain adapts to stroke to produce functional lower limb movements. Second, preliminary observations suggest that brain activation volume is reduced during pedaling post-stroke. Reduced brain activation volume may be due to anatomic, physiology, and/or behavioral differences between groups, but methodological issues cannot be excluded. Importantly, brain action volume post-stroke was both task-dependent and mutable, which suggests that it could be modified through rehabilitation. Future work will explore these possibilities.

  17. A novel fMRI paradigm suggests that pedaling-related brain activation is altered after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Promjunyakul, Nutta-on; Schmit, Brian D.; Schindler-Ivens, Sheila M.

    2015-01-01

    regions were examined separately, reduced brain activation volume reached statistical significance in BA6 [p = 0.04; 4,350 (2,347) μL stroke; 6,938 (3,134) μL control] and cerebellum [p = 0.001; 4,591 (1,757) μL stroke; 8,381 (2,835) μL control]. Regardless of whether activated regions were examined together or separately, there were no significant between-group differences in brain activation intensity [p = 0.17; 1.30 (0.25)% stroke; 1.16 (0.20)% control]. Reduced volume in the stroke group was not observed during lower limb tapping and could not be fully attributed to differences in head motion or movement rate. There was a tendency for pedaling-related brain activation volume to increase with increasing work performed by the paretic limb during pedaling (p = 0.08, r = 0.525). Hence, the results of this study provide two original and important contributions. First, we demonstrated that pedaling can be used with fMRI to examine brain activation associated with lower limb movement in people with stroke. Unlike previous lower limb movements examined with fMRI, pedaling involves continuous, reciprocal, multijoint movement of both limbs. In this respect, pedaling has many characteristics of functional lower limb movements, such as walking. Thus, the importance of our contribution lies in the establishment of a novel paradigm that can be used to understand how the brain adapts to stroke to produce functional lower limb movements. Second, preliminary observations suggest that brain activation volume is reduced during pedaling post-stroke. Reduced brain activation volume may be due to anatomic, physiology, and/or behavioral differences between groups, but methodological issues cannot be excluded. Importantly, brain action volume post-stroke was both task-dependent and mutable, which suggests that it could be modified through rehabilitation. Future work will explore these possibilities. PMID:26089789

  18. Activity-dependent depression of excitability and calcium transients in the neurohypophysis suggests a model of "stuttering conduction".

    PubMed

    Muschol, Martin; Kosterin, Paul; Ichikawa, Michinori; Salzberg, B M

    2003-12-10

    Using millisecond time-resolved optical recordings of transmembrane voltage and intraterminal calcium, we have determined how activity-dependent changes in the population action potential are related to a concurrent modulation of calcium transients in the neurohypophysis. We find that repetitive stimulation dramatically alters the amplitude of the population action potential and significantly increases its temporal dispersion. The population action potentials and the calcium transients exhibit well correlated frequency-dependent amplitude depression, with broadening of the action potential playing only a limited role. High-speed camera recordings indicate that the magnitude of the spike modulation is uniform throughout the neurohypophysis, thereby excluding propagation failure as the underlying mechanism. In contrast, temporal dispersion and latency of the population spike do increase with distance from the stimulation site. This increase is enhanced during repeated stimulation and by raising the stimulation frequency. Changes in Ca influx directly affect the decline in population spike amplitude, consistent with electrophysiological measurements of the local loss of excitability in nerve terminals and varicosities, mediated by a Ca-activated K conductance. Our observations suggest a model of "stuttering conduction": repeated action potential stimulation causes excitability failures limited to nerve terminals and varicosities, which account for the rapid decline in the population spike amplitude. These failures, however, do not block action potential propagation but generate the cumulative increases in spike latency.

  19. Comparison of the White-Nose Syndrome Agent Pseudogymnoascus destructans to Cave-Dwelling Relatives Suggests Reduced Saprotrophic Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Hannah T.; Barton, Hazel A.

    2014-01-01

    White-nose Syndrome (WNS) is an emerging infectious mycosis that has impacted multiple species of North American bats since its initial discovery in 2006, yet the physiology of the causal agent, the psychrophilic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans ( = Geomyces destructans), is not well understood. We investigated the ability of P. destructans to secrete enzymes that could permit environmental growth or affect pathogenesis and compared enzyme activity across several Pseudogymnoascus species isolated from both hibernating bats and cave sediments. We found that P. destructans produced enzymes that could be beneficial in either a pathogenic or saprotrophic context, such as lipases, hemolysins, and urease, as well as chitinase and cellulases, which could aid in saprotrophic growth. The WNS pathogen showed significantly lower activity for urease and endoglucanase compared to con-generic species (Pseudogymnoascus), which may indicate a shift in selective pressure to the detriment of P. destructans’ saprotrophic ability. Based on the positive function of multiple saprotrophic enzymes, the causal agent of White-nose Syndrome shows potential for environmental growth on a variety of substrates found in caves, albeit at a reduced level compared to environmental strains. Our data suggest that if P. destructans emerged as an opportunistic infection from an environmental source, co-evolution with its host may have led to a reduced capacity for saprotrophic growth. PMID:24466096

  20. Active Structural Fibers for Multifunctional Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-06

    1. Lin, Y., Zhi, Z. and Sodano, 2012, “Barium Titanate and Barium Strontium Titanate Coated Carbon Fibers for Multifunctional Structural Capacitors...Multifunctional Structural Capacitors Consisting of Barium Titanate and Barium Strontium Titanate Coated Carbon Fibers, 18 th International Conference on... Strontium Titanate Coated SiC Fibers,” Electronic Materials and Applications 2011, Jan. 19 th –21 st Orlando, FL (Invited). 9. Lin, Y., Shaffer

  1. Neutron Activation Analysis, A Titanium Material Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresser, Charles

    2011-04-01

    In order to obtain faster and more accurate measurements of radioactive contaminates within a sample of titanium we expose it to a neutron flux. This flux will activate the stable and quasi stable (those with extremely long half lives) isotopes into resultant daughter cells that are unstable which will result in shorter half lives on the order of minutes to days. We measured the resulting decays in the Germanium Crystal Detector and obtained a complex gamma spectrum. A mathematical model was used to recreate the production of the measured isotopes in the neutron flux and the resultant decays. Using this model we calculated the mass percent of the contaminate isotopes inside our titanium sample. Our mathematical model accounted for two types of neutron activation, fast or thermal activation, since this would determine which contaminate was the source of our signals. By looking at the percent abundances, neutron absorption cross-sections and the resulting mass percents of each contaminate we are able to determine the exact source of our measured signals. Additionally we implemented a unique ratio method to cross check the mathematical model. Our results have verified that for fast neutron activation and thermal neutron activation the method is accurate.

  2. Subcaste differences in neural activation suggest a prosocial role for oxytocin in eusocial naked mole-rats.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, Georgia A; Faykoo-Martinez, Mariela; Peragine, Deane E; Mooney, Skyler J; Holmes, Melissa M

    2016-03-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) influences prosocial behavior(s), aggression, and stress responsiveness, and these diverse effects are regulated in a species- and context-specific manner. The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is a unique species with which to study context-dependent effects of OT, exhibiting a strict social hierarchy with behavioral specialization within the subordinate caste: soldiers are aggressive and defend colonies against unfamiliar conspecifics while workers are prosocial and contribute to in-colony behaviors such as pup care. To determine if OT is involved in subcaste-specific behaviors, we compared behavioral responses between workers and soldiers of both sexes during a modified resident/intruder paradigm, and quantified activation of OT neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and supraoptic nucleus (SON) using the immediate-early-gene marker c-fos co-localized with OT neurons. Resident workers and soldiers were age-matched with unfamiliar worker stimulus animals as intruders, and encounters were videorecorded and scored for aggressive behaviors. Colony-matched controls were left in their home colony for the duration of the encounters. Brains were extracted and cell counts were conducted for OT immunoreactive (ir), c-fos-ir, and percentage of OT-c-fos double-labeled cells. Results indicate that resident workers were less aggressive but showed greater OT neural activity than soldiers. Furthermore, a linear model including social treatment, cortisol, and subcaste revealed that subcaste was the only significant predictor of OT-c-fos double-labeled cells in the PVN. These data suggest that in naked mole-rats OT promotes prosocial behaviors rather than aggression and that even within subordinates status exerts robust effects on brain and behavior.

  3. In vitro antibacterial activity of different pulp capping materials

    PubMed Central

    Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Ceci, Matteo; Dagna, Alberto; Chiesa, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background Direct pulp capping involves the application of a dental material to seal communications between the exposed pulp and the oral cavity (mechanical and carious pulp exposures) in an attempt to act as a barrier, protect the dental pulp complex and preserve its vitality. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare, by the agar disc diffusion test, the antimicrobial activity of six different pulp-capping materials: Dycal (Dentsply), Calcicur (Voco), Calcimol LC (Voco), TheraCal LC (Bisco), MTA Angelus (Angelus), Biodentine (Septodont). Material and Methods Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mutans strains were selected to evaluate the antimicrobial activity by the agar disc diffusion test of different pulp capping materials. Paper disks were impregnated whit each pulp capping materials and placed onto culture agar-plates pre-adsorbed with bacterial cells and further incubated for 24 h at 37°C. The growth inhibition zones around each pulp capping materials were recorded and compared for each bacterial strain. Results For the investigation of the antibacterial properties the ANOVA showed the presence of significant differences among the various materials. Tukey test showed that MTA-based materials induced lower growth inhibition zones. Conclusions MTA-based products show a discrete antibacterial activity varying from calcium hydroxide-based materials which present an higher antibacterial activity. Key words:Agar disc diffusion test, antimicrobial activity, calcium hydroxide, MTA, pulp capping materials. PMID:26644833

  4. Simulation suggests that rapid activation of social distancing can arrest epidemic development due to a novel strain of influenza

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, Joel K; Milne, George J; Kelly, Heath

    2009-01-01

    Background Social distancing interventions such as school closure and prohibition of public gatherings are present in pandemic influenza preparedness plans. Predicting the effectiveness of intervention strategies in a pandemic is difficult. In the absence of other evidence, computer simulation can be used to help policy makers plan for a potential future influenza pandemic. We conducted simulations of a small community to determine the magnitude and timing of activation that would be necessary for social distancing interventions to arrest a future pandemic. Methods We used a detailed, individual-based model of a real community with a population of approximately 30,000. We simulated the effect of four social distancing interventions: school closure, increased isolation of symptomatic individuals in their household, workplace nonattendance, and reduction of contact in the wider community. We simulated each of the intervention measures in isolation and in several combinations; and examined the effect of delays in the activation of interventions on the final and daily attack rates. Results For an epidemic with an R0 value of 1.5, a combination of all four social distancing measures could reduce the final attack rate from 33% to below 10% if introduced within 6 weeks from the introduction of the first case. In contrast, for an R0 of 2.5 these measures must be introduced within 2 weeks of the first case to achieve a similar reduction; delays of 2, 3 and 4 weeks resulted in final attack rates of 7%, 21% and 45% respectively. For an R0 of 3.5 the combination of all four measures could reduce the final attack rate from 73% to 16%, but only if introduced without delay; delays of 1, 2 or 3 weeks resulted in final attack rates of 19%, 35% or 63% respectively. For the higher R0 values no single measure has a significant impact on attack rates. Conclusion Our results suggest a critical role of social distancing in the potential control of a future pandemic and indicate that such

  5. Microcomputer Activities of the Special Materials Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novick, Leonard

    1983-01-01

    FILMSHARE, an interdepository loan system of educational captioned films for hearing impaired students, and BICS, a booking and inventory control system, are described. Use of these two microcomputer activities is explained to have increased the use of educational films and to have helped expand the collection as well. (CL)

  6. Secondary Social Studies Curriculum, Activities, and Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, James L.

    Tested in secondary schools and college classrooms, these social studies activities illustrate an integrated social studies curriculum as advocated by "The Social Studies Curriculum Guidelines" of the National Council for the Social Studies. There are four major chapters dealing with (1) civics and U.S. government, (2) global and international…

  7. Brassica juncea nitric oxide synthase like activity is stimulated by PKC activators and calcium suggesting modulation by PKC-like kinase.

    PubMed

    Talwar, Pooja Saigal; Gupta, Ravi; Maurya, Arun Kumar; Deswal, Renu

    2012-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule having varied physiological and regulatory roles in biological systems. The fact that nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is responsible for NO generation in animals, prompted major search for a similar enzyme in plants. Arginine dependent NOS like activity (BjNOSla) was detected in Brassica juncea seedlings using oxyhemoglobin and citrulline assays. BjNOSla showed 25% activation by NADPH (0.4 mM) and 40% by calcium (0.4 mM) but the activity was flavin mononucleotide (FMN), flavin dinucleotide (FAD) and calmodulin (CaM) independent. Pharmacological approach using mammalian NOS inhibitors, NBT (300 μM) and l-NAME (5 mM), showed significant inhibition (100% and 67% respectively) supporting that the BjNOSla operates via the oxidative pathway. Most of the BjNOSla activity (80%) was confined to shoot while root showed only 20% activity. Localization studies by NADPH-diaphorase and DAF-2DA staining showed the presence of BjNOSla in guard cells. Kinetic analysis showed positive cooperativity with calcium as reflected by a decreased K(m) (∼13%) and almost two fold increase in V(max). PMA (438 nM), a kinase activator, activated BjNOSla ∼1.9 fold while its inactive analog 4αPDD was ineffective. Calcium and PMA activated the enzyme to ∼3 folds. Interestingly, 1,2-DG6 (2.5 μM) and PS (1 μM) with calcium activated the enzyme activity to ∼7 fold. A significant inhibition of BjNOSla by PKC inhibitors-staurosporine (∼90%) and calphostin-C (∼40%), further supports involvement of PKC-like kinase. The activity was also enhanced by abiotic stress conditions (7-46%). All these findings suggest that BjNOSla generates NO via oxidative pathway and is probably regulated by phosphorylation.

  8. Microscale damping using thin film active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrigan, Catherine A.; Ho, Ken K.; Mohanchandra, K. P.; Carman, Gregory P.

    2007-04-01

    This paper focuses on understanding and developing a new approach to dampen MEMS structures using both experiments and analytical techniques. Thin film Nitinol and thin film Terfenol-D are evaluated as a damping solution to the micro scale damping problem. Stress induced twin boundary motion in Nitinol is used to passively dampen potentially damaging vibrations. Magnetic domain wall motion is used to passively dampen vibration in Terfenol-D. The thin films of Nitinol, Nitinol/Silicon laminates and Nitinol/Terfenol-D/Nickel laminates have been produced using a sputter deposition process and damping properties have been evaluated. Dynamic testing shows substantial damping (tan δ) measurable in each case. Nitinol film samples were tested in the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) to determine phase transformation temperatures. The twin boundary mechanism by which energy absorption occurs is present at all points below the Austenite start temperature (approximately 69°C in our film) and therefore allows damping at cold temperatures where traditional materials fail. Thin film in the NiTi/Si laminate was found to produce substantially higher damping (tan δ = 0.28) due to the change in loading condition. The NiTi/Si laminate sample was tested in bending allowing the twin boundaries to be reset by cyclic tensile and compressive loads. The thin film Terfenol-D in the Nitinol/Terfenol-D/Nickel laminate was shown to produce large damping (tan δ = 0.2). In addition to fabricating and testing, an analytical model of a heterogeneous layered thin film damping material was developed and compared to experimental work.

  9. Crystal Structures of the Response Regulator DosR From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Suggest a Helix Rearrangement Mechanism for Phosphorylation Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wisedchaisri, G.; Wu, M.; Sherman, D.R.; Hol, W.G.J.

    2009-05-26

    The response regulator DosR is essential for promoting long-term survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under low oxygen conditions in a dormant state and may be responsible for latent tuberculosis in one-third of the world's population. Here, we report crystal structures of full-length unphosphorylated DosR at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution and its C-terminal DNA-binding domain at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. The full-length DosR structure reveals several features never seen before in other response regulators. The N-terminal domain of the full-length DosR structure has an unexpected ({beta}{alpha}){sub 4} topology instead of the canonical ({beta}{alpha}){sub 5} fold observed in other response regulators. The linker region adopts a unique conformation that contains two helices forming a four-helix bundle with two helices from another subunit, resulting in dimer formation. The C-terminal domain in the full-length DosR structure displays a novel location of helix {alpha}10, which allows Gln199 to interact with the catalytic Asp54 residue of the N-terminal domain. In contrast, the structure of the DosR C-terminal domain alone displays a remarkable unstructured conformation for helix {alpha}10 residues, different from the well-defined helical conformations in all other known structures, indicating considerable flexibility within the C-terminal domain. Our structures suggest a mode of DosR activation by phosphorylation via a helix rearrangement mechanism.

  10. Active infrared materials for beam steering.

    SciTech Connect

    Brener, Igal; Reno, John Louis; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Gin, Aaron V.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Miao, Xiaoyu; Barrick, Todd A.

    2010-10-01

    The mid-infrared (mid-IR, 3 {micro}m -12 {micro}m) is a highly desirable spectral range for imaging and environmental sensing. We propose to develop a new class of mid-IR devices, based on plasmonic and metamaterial concepts, that are dynamically controlled by tunable semiconductor plasma resonances. It is well known that any material resonance (phonons, excitons, electron plasma) impacts dielectric properties; our primary challenge is to implement the tuning of a semiconductor plasma resonance with a voltage bias. We have demonstrated passive tuning of both plasmonic and metamaterial structures in the mid-IR using semiconductors plasmas. In the mid-IR, semiconductor carrier densities on the order of 5E17cm{sup -3} to 2E18cm{sup -3} are desirable for tuning effects. Gate control of carrier densities at the high end of this range is at or near the limit of what has been demonstrated in literature for transistor style devices. Combined with the fact that we are exploiting the optical properties of the device layers, rather than electrical, we are entering into interesting territory that has not been significantly explored to date.

  11. Activation of a photosensitive pharmaceutical agent by a triboluminescent material

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, Stacey; Schreyer, Magdalena; Finlay, W.H.; Loebenberg, R.; Moussa, W.

    2006-03-20

    Given the recent emphasis on applications of triboluminescent materials, we investigate the ability of a triboluminescent material to activate a photosensitive pharmaceutical agent. Using compressed sucrose doped with wintergreen, which luminesces when fractured, we demonstrate the activation of riboflavin (vitamin B2), a photosensitizer. A product of activation is the highly reactive singlet oxygen. We add ascorbic acid (vitamin C), an antioxidant, and measure the amount of ascorbic acid oxidation to correlate with the amount of riboflavin activation. Up to 17% ascorbic acid oxidation is observed, indicating triboluminescence is worth exploring as a mechanism for activation of photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy.

  12. Application of low activation materials for near-term machines

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains viewgraphs on low activation materials used in thermonuclear reactors. Safety, economic and environmental factors are discussed. In particular waste disposal, shielding, and stress properties are included. (LSP)

  13. Isothermal drop calorimeter provides measurements for alpha active, pyrophoric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, H.

    1969-01-01

    Isothermal drop calorimeter measures the heat content of intensely alpha active and pyrophoric materials in inert atmospheres. It consists of a furnace, calorimeter, and aluminum isothermal jacket contained within an inert-atmosphere glove box, which permits the use of unencapsulated materials without exposing personnel to alpha contamination.

  14. Calcium alloy as active material in secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Roche, Michael F.; Preto, Sandra K.; Martin, Allan E.

    1976-01-01

    Calcium alloys such as calcium-aluminum and calcium-silicon, are employed as active material within a rechargeable negative electrode of an electrochemical cell. Such cells can use a molten salt electrolyte including calcium ions and a positive electrode having sulfur, sulfides, or oxides as active material. The calcium alloy is selected to prevent formation of molten calcium alloys resulting from reaction with the selected molten electrolytic salt at the cell operating temperatures.

  15. A new electrode-active material for polymer batteries: Polyvinylferrocene

    SciTech Connect

    Iwakura, C.; Kawai, T.; Nojima, M.; Yoneyama, H.

    1987-04-01

    The electrochemical characteristics of polyvinylferrocene (PVF) was investigated for use as an electrode-active material rechargeable batteries. Charge-discharge curves of the PVF electrodes showed excellent potential flatness and very high coulombic efficiencies in both nonaqueous and aqueous solutions. The dispersion of graphite powder in PVF was very useful for increasing the discharge rate and PVF utilization. The self-discharge rates were found to be as low as 1% in the first day. It is concluded that PVF is a promising material as an electrode-active material in rechargeable batteries.

  16. Fusion activation by a headless parainfluenza virus 5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase stalk suggests a modular mechanism for triggering.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sayantan; Zokarkar, Aarohi; Welch, Brett D; Leser, George P; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Lamb, Robert A

    2012-09-25

    The Paramyxoviridae family of enveloped viruses enters cells through the concerted action of two viral glycoproteins. The receptor-binding protein, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), H, or G, binds its cellular receptor and activates the fusion protein, F, which, through an extensive refolding event, brings viral and cellular membranes together, mediating virus-cell fusion. However, the underlying mechanism of F activation on receptor engagement remains unclear. Current hypotheses propose conformational changes in HN, H, or G propagating from the receptor-binding site in the HN, H, or G globular head to the F-interacting stalk region. We provide evidence that the receptor-binding globular head domain of the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 HN protein is entirely dispensable for F activation. Considering together the crystal structures of HN from different paramyxoviruses, varying energy requirements for fusion activation, F activation involving the parainfluenza virus 5 HN stalk domain, and properties of a chimeric paramyxovirus HN protein, we propose a simple model for the activation of paramyxovirus fusion.

  17. Mutations in the linker domain affect phospho-STAT3 function and suggest targets for interrupting STAT3 activity.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Claudia; Haripal, Bhagwattie; Klinge, Sebastian; Darnell, James E

    2015-12-01

    Crystallography of the cores of phosphotyrosine-activated dimers of STAT1 (132-713) and STAT3 (127-722) bound to a similar double-stranded deoxyoligonucleotide established the domain structure of the STATs and the structural basis for activation through tyrosine phosphorylation and dimerization. We reported earlier that mutants in the linker domain of STAT1 that connect the DNA-binding domain and SH2 domain can prevent transcriptional activation. Because of the pervasive importance of persistently activated STAT3 in many human cancers and the difficulty of finding useful drug candidates aimed at disrupting the pY interchange in active STAT3 dimers, we have examined effects of an array of mutants in the STAT3 linker domain. We have found several STAT3 linker domain mutants to have profound effects of inhibiting STAT3 transcriptional activation. From these results, we propose (i) there is definite functional interaction of the linker both with the DNA binding domain and with the SH2 domain, and (ii) these putative contacts provide potential new targets for small molecule-induced pSTAT3 inhibition.

  18. Mutations in the linker domain affect phospho-STAT3 function and suggest targets for interrupting STAT3 activity

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Claudia; Haripal, Bhagwattie; Klinge, Sebastian; Darnell, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Crystallography of the cores of phosphotyrosine-activated dimers of STAT1 (132–713) and STAT3 (127–722) bound to a similar double-stranded deoxyoligonucleotide established the domain structure of the STATs and the structural basis for activation through tyrosine phosphorylation and dimerization. We reported earlier that mutants in the linker domain of STAT1 that connect the DNA-binding domain and SH2 domain can prevent transcriptional activation. Because of the pervasive importance of persistently activated STAT3 in many human cancers and the difficulty of finding useful drug candidates aimed at disrupting the pY interchange in active STAT3 dimers, we have examined effects of an array of mutants in the STAT3 linker domain. We have found several STAT3 linker domain mutants to have profound effects of inhibiting STAT3 transcriptional activation. From these results, we propose (i) there is definite functional interaction of the linker both with the DNA binding domain and with the SH2 domain, and (ii) these putative contacts provide potential new targets for small molecule-induced pSTAT3 inhibition. PMID:26553978

  19. Nicotinic Activity of Arecoline, the Psychoactive Element of "Betel Nuts", Suggests a Basis for Habitual Use and Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Papke, Roger L.; Horenstein, Nicole A.; Stokes, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Habitual chewing of "betel nut" preparations constitutes the fourth most common human self-administration of a psychoactive substance after alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine. The primary active ingredient in these preparations is arecoline, which comes from the areca nut, the key component of all such preparations. Arecoline is known to be a relatively non-selective muscarinic partial agonist, accounting for many of the overt peripheral and central nervous system effects, but not likely to account for the addictive properties of the drug. We report that arecoline has activity on select nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes, including the two classes of nAChR most related to the addictive properties of nicotine: receptors containing α4 and β2 subunits and those which also contain α6 and β3 subunits. Arecoline is a partial agonist with about 6–10% efficacy for the α4* and α6* receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Additionally, arecoline is a silent agonist of α7 nAChR; while it does not activate α7 receptors when applied alone, it produces substantial activation when co-applied with the positive allosteric modulator PNU-120696. Some α7 silent agonists are effective inhibitors of inflammation, which might account for anti-inflammatory effects of arecoline. Arecoline's activity on nAChR associated with addiction may account for the habitual use of areca nut preparations in spite of the well-documented risk to personal health associated with oral diseases and cancer. The common link between betel and tobacco suggests that partial agonist therapies with cytisine or the related compound varenicline may also be used to aid betel cessation attempts. PMID:26488401

  20. Nicotinic Activity of Arecoline, the Psychoactive Element of "Betel Nuts", Suggests a Basis for Habitual Use and Anti-Inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Papke, Roger L; Horenstein, Nicole A; Stokes, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Habitual chewing of "betel nut" preparations constitutes the fourth most common human self-administration of a psychoactive substance after alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine. The primary active ingredient in these preparations is arecoline, which comes from the areca nut, the key component of all such preparations. Arecoline is known to be a relatively non-selective muscarinic partial agonist, accounting for many of the overt peripheral and central nervous system effects, but not likely to account for the addictive properties of the drug. We report that arecoline has activity on select nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes, including the two classes of nAChR most related to the addictive properties of nicotine: receptors containing α4 and β2 subunits and those which also contain α6 and β3 subunits. Arecoline is a partial agonist with about 6-10% efficacy for the α4* and α6* receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Additionally, arecoline is a silent agonist of α7 nAChR; while it does not activate α7 receptors when applied alone, it produces substantial activation when co-applied with the positive allosteric modulator PNU-120696. Some α7 silent agonists are effective inhibitors of inflammation, which might account for anti-inflammatory effects of arecoline. Arecoline's activity on nAChR associated with addiction may account for the habitual use of areca nut preparations in spite of the well-documented risk to personal health associated with oral diseases and cancer. The common link between betel and tobacco suggests that partial agonist therapies with cytisine or the related compound varenicline may also be used to aid betel cessation attempts.

  1. Extraclass Activities in Aviation, Photography, Radio for Secondary School Pupils: Suggestions for School Administrators and Sponsors. Bulletin, 1956, No. 11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Willis C.

    1956-01-01

    One of the outstanding characteristics of American secondary education is the emphasis that it places upon individual and social needs. Most educators endorse student extraclass activities as an important way to obtain program flexibility, meet individual needs, and attain desirable education objectives. Among the purposes of this publication are…

  2. Barriers to and Suggestions for a Healthful, Active Lifestyle as Perceived by Rural and Urban Costa Rican Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monge-Rojas, Rafael; Garita-Arce, Carlos; Sanchez-Lopez, Marta; Colon-Ramos, Uriyoan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the perceptions of rural and urban Costa Rican adolescents regarding which barriers and motivators affect their adoption of an active lifestyle. Design: Data were collected in focus group discussions. Participants: 108 male and female adolescents aged 12 to 18 from the 7th to 11th grades. Setting: Two urban and 1 rural high…

  3. Simulation of active skeletal muscle tissue with a transversely isotropic viscohyperelastic continuum material model.

    PubMed

    Khodaei, Hamid; Mostofizadeh, Salar; Brolin, Karin; Johansson, Håkan; Osth, Jonas

    2013-05-01

    Human body models with biofidelic kinematics in vehicle pre-crash and crash simulations require a constitutive model of muscle tissue with both passive and active properties. Therefore, a transversely isotropic viscohyperelastic continuum material model with element-local fiber definition and activation capability is suggested for use with explicit finite element codes. Simulations of experiments with New Zealand rabbit's tibialis anterior muscle at three different strain rates were performed. Three different active force-length relations were used, where a robust performance of the material model was observed. The results were compared with the experimental data and the simulation results from a previous study, where the muscle tissue was modeled with a combination of discrete and continuum elements. The proposed material model compared favorably, and integrating the active properties of the muscle into a continuum material model opens for applications with complex muscle geometries.

  4. New Ulvan-Degrading Polysaccharide Lyase Family: Structure and Catalytic Mechanism Suggests Convergent Evolution of Active Site Architecture.

    PubMed

    Ulaganathan, ThirumalaiSelvi; Boniecki, Michal T; Foran, Elizabeth; Buravenkov, Vitaliy; Mizrachi, Naama; Banin, Ehud; Helbert, William; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2017-03-23

    Ulvan is a complex sulfated polysaccharide biosynthesized by green seaweed and contains predominantly rhamnose, xylose, and uronic acid sugars. Ulvan-degrading enzymes have only recently been identified and added to the CAZy ( www.cazy.org ) database as family PL24, but neither their structure nor catalytic mechanism(s) are yet known. Several homologous, new ulvan lyases, have been discovered in Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain PLSV, Alteromonas LOR, and Nonlabens ulvanivorans, defining a new family PL25, with the lyase encoded by the gene PLSV_3936 being one of them. This enzyme cleaves the glycosidic bond between 3-sulfated rhamnose (R3S) and glucuronic acid (GlcA) or iduronic acid (IdoA) via a β-elimination mechanism. We report the crystal structure of PLSV_3936 and its complex with a tetrasaccharide substrate. PLSV_3936 folds into a seven-bladed β-propeller, with each blade consisting of four antiparallel β-strands. Sequence conservation analysis identified a highly conserved region lining at one end of a deep crevice on the protein surface. The putative active site was identified by mutagenesis and activity measurements. Crystal structure of the enzyme with a bound tetrasaccharide substrate confirmed the identity of base and acid residues and allowed determination of the catalytic mechanism and also the identification of residues neutralizing the uronic acid carboxylic group. The PLSV_3936 structure provides an example of a convergent evolution among polysaccharide lyases toward a common active site architecture embedded in distinct folds.

  5. Effects of transcription elongation rate and Xrn2 exonuclease activity on RNA polymerase II termination suggest widespread kinetic competition

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Nova; Brannan, Kristopher; Erickson, Benjamin; Kim, Hyunmin; Cortazar, Michael; Sheridan, Ryan M.; Nguyen, Tram; Karp, Shai; Bentley, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The torpedo model of transcription termination asserts that the exonuclease Xrn2 attacks the 5′PO4-end exposed by nascent RNA cleavage and chases down the RNA polymerase. We tested this mechanism using a dominant-negative human Xrn2 mutant and found that it delayed termination genome-wide. Xrn2 nuclease inactivation caused strong termination defects downstream of most poly(A) sites and modest delays at some histone and U snRNA genes suggesting that the torpedo mechanism is not limited to poly(A) site-dependent termination. A central untested feature of the torpedo model is that there is kinetic competition between the exonuclease and the pol II elongation complex. Using pol II rate mutants, we found that slow transcription robustly shifts termination upstream, and fast elongation extends the zone of termination further downstream. These results suggest that kinetic competition between elongating pol II and the Xrn2 exonuclease is integral to termination of transcription on most human genes. PMID:26474067

  6. Soft Active Materials for Actuation, Sensing, and Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Rebecca Krone

    Future generations of robots, electronics, and assistive medical devices will include systems that are soft and elastically deformable, allowing them to adapt their morphology in unstructured environments. This will require soft active materials for actuation, circuitry, and sensing of deformation and contact pressure. The emerging field of soft robotics utilizes these soft active materials to mimic the inherent compliance of natural soft-bodied systems. As the elasticity of robot components increases, the challenges for functionality revert to basic questions of fabrication, materials, and design - whereas such aspects are far more developed for traditional rigid-bodied systems. This thesis will highlight preliminary materials and designs that address the need for soft actuators and sensors, as well as emerging fabrication techniques for manufacturing stretchable circuits and devices based on liquid-embedded elastomers.

  7. Active Neutron Interrogation of Non-Radiological Materials with NMIS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Mark E; Mihalczo, John T

    2012-02-01

    The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), although primarily designed for analyzing special nuclear material, is capable of identifying nonradiological materials with a wide range of measurement techniques. This report demonstrates four different measurement methods, complementary to fast-neutron imaging, which can be used for material identification: DT transmission, DT scattering, californium transmission, and active time-tagged gamma spectroscopy. Each of the four techniques was used to evaluate how these methods can be used to identify four materials: aluminum, polyethylene, graphite, and G-10 epoxy. While such measurements have been performed individually in the past, in this project, all four measurements were performed on the same set of materials. The results of these measurements agree well with predicted results. In particular, the results of the active gamma spectroscopy measurements demonstrate the technique's applicability in a future version of NMIS which will incorporate passive and active gamma-ray spectroscopy. This system, designated as a fieldable NMIS (FNMIS), is under development by the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Verification.

  8. Active thermography in qualitative evaluation of protective materials.

    PubMed

    Gralewicz, Grzegorz; Wiecek, Bogusław

    2009-01-01

    This is a study of the possibilities of a qualitative evaluation of protective materials with active thermography. It presents a simulation of a periodic excitation of a multilayer composite material. Tests were conducted with lock-in thermography on Kevlar composite consisting of 16 layers of Kevlar fabric reinforced with formaldehyde resin with implanted delamination defects. Lock-in thermography is a versatile tool for nondestructive evaluation. It is a fast, remote and nondestructive procedure. Hence, it was used to detect delaminations in the composite structure of materials used in the production of components designed for personal protection. This method directly contributes to an improvement in safety.

  9. Early-light embryonic stimulation suggests a second route, via gene activation, to cerebral lateralization in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Chiandetti, Cinzia; Galliussi, Jessica; Andrew, Richard J.; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors determine the asymmetrical position of vertebrate embryos allowing asymmetric environmental stimulation to shape cerebral lateralization. In birds, late-light stimulation, just before hatching, on the right optic nerve triggers anatomical and functional cerebral asymmetries. However, some brain asymmetries develop in absence of embryonic light stimulation. Furthermore, early-light action affects lateralization in the transparent zebrafish embryos before their visual system is functional. Here we investigated whether another pathway intervenes in establishing brain specialization. We exposed chicks' embryos to light before their visual system was formed. We observed that such early stimulation modulates cerebral lateralization in a comparable vein of late-light stimulation on active retinal cells. Our results show that, in a higher vertebrate brain, a second route, likely affecting the genetic expression of photosensitive regions, acts before the development of a functional visual system. More than one sensitive period seems thus available to light stimulation to trigger brain lateralization. PMID:24048072

  10. An interactive activation and competition model of person knowledge, suggested by proactive interference by traits spontaneously inferred from behaviours.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanbo E; Higgins, Nancy C; Uleman, James S; Michaux, Aaron; Vipond, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    People unconsciously and unintentionally make inferences about others' personality traits based on their behaviours. In this study, a classic memory phenomenon--proactive interference (PI)--is for the first time used to detect spontaneous trait inferences. PI should occur when lists of behaviour descriptions, all implying the same trait, are to be remembered. Switching to a new trait should produce 'release' from proactive interference (or RPI). Results from two experiments supported these predictions. PI and RPI effects are consistent with an interactive activation and competition model of person perception (e.g., McNeill & Burton, 2002, J. Exp. Psychol., 55A, 1141), which predicts categorical organization of social behaviours based on personality traits. Advantages of this model are discussed.

  11. Early-light embryonic stimulation suggests a second route, via gene activation, to cerebral lateralization in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Chiandetti, Cinzia; Galliussi, Jessica; Andrew, Richard J; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors determine the asymmetrical position of vertebrate embryos allowing asymmetric environmental stimulation to shape cerebral lateralization. In birds, late-light stimulation, just before hatching, on the right optic nerve triggers anatomical and functional cerebral asymmetries. However, some brain asymmetries develop in absence of embryonic light stimulation. Furthermore, early-light action affects lateralization in the transparent zebrafish embryos before their visual system is functional. Here we investigated whether another pathway intervenes in establishing brain specialization. We exposed chicks' embryos to light before their visual system was formed. We observed that such early stimulation modulates cerebral lateralization in a comparable vein of late-light stimulation on active retinal cells. Our results show that, in a higher vertebrate brain, a second route, likely affecting the genetic expression of photosensitive regions, acts before the development of a functional visual system. More than one sensitive period seems thus available to light stimulation to trigger brain lateralization.

  12. Structure of Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein 42 Suggests a Mechanism for Triggering Receptor-Activated Virus Entry

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, Austin N.; Sorem, Jessica; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2009-05-26

    Epstein-Barr virus requires glycoproteins gH/gL, gB, and gp42 to fuse its lipid envelope with B cells. Gp42 is a type II membrane protein consisting of a flexible N-terminal region, which binds gH/gL, and a C-terminal lectin-like domain that binds to the B-cell entry receptor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II. Gp42 triggers membrane fusion after HLA binding, a process that requires simultaneous binding to gH/gL and a functional hydrophobic pocket in the lectin domain adjacent to the HLA binding site. Here we present the structure of gp42 in its unbound form. Comparisons to the previously determined structure of a gp42:HLA complex reveals additional N-terminal residues forming part of the gH/gL binding site and structural changes in the receptor binding domain. Although the core of the lectin domain remains similar, significant shifts in two loops and an {alpha} helix bordering the essential hydrophobic pocket suggest a structural mechanism for triggering fusion.

  13. Material Flows in an Active Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decamp, Stephen; Redner, Gabriel; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael; Dogic, Zvonimir

    Active matter systems are composed of energy consuming constituent components which drive far-from-equilibrium dynamics. As such, active materials exhibit energetic states which would be unfavorable in passive, equilibrium materials. We study one such material; an active nematic liquid crystal which exists in a dynamical steady state where +/-1/2 defects are continuously generated and annihilated at a constant rate. The active nematic is composed of micron-sized microtubule filaments which are highly concentrated into a quasi-2D film that resides on an oil-water interface. Kinesin motor proteins drive inter-filament sliding which results in net extensile motion of the microtubule film. Notably, we find a mesophase in which motile +1/2 defects, acquire system-spanning orientational order. Currently, we are tracking material flows generated by the active stresses in the system to measure length scales at which energy is dissipated, and to measure the relation between internally generated flows and bend in the nematic field.

  14. Mechanical Activation of Construction Binder Materials by Various Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediuk, R. S.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with the mechanical grinding down to the nano powder of construction materials. During mechanical activation a composite binder active molecules cement minerals occur in the destruction of the molecular defects in the areas of packaging and breaking metastable phase decompensation intermolecular forces. The process is accompanied by a change in the kinetics of hardening of portland cement. Mechanical processes during grinding mineral materials cause, along with the increase in their surface energy, increase the Gibbs energy of powders and, respectively, their chemical activity, which also contributes to the high adhesion strength when contacting them with binders. Thus, the set of measures for mechanical activation makes better use of the weight of components filled with cement systems and adjust their properties. At relatively low cost is possible to provide a spectacular and, importantly, easily repeatable results in a production environment.

  15. Suggestions to Reduce Clinical Fibromyalgia Pain and Experimentally Induced Pain Produce Parallel Effects on Perceived Pain but Divergent Functional MRI–Based Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Derbyshire, Stuart W.G.; Whalley, Matthew G.; Seah, Stanley T.H.; Oakley, David A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Hypnotic suggestion is an empirically validated form of pain control; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Methods Thirteen fibromyalgia patients received suggestions to alter their clinical pain, and 15 healthy controls received suggestions to alter experimental heat pain. Suggestions were delivered before and after hypnotic induction with blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) activity measured concurrently. Results Across groups, suggestion produced substantial changes in pain report (main effect of suggestion, F2, 312 = 585.8; p < .0001), with marginally larger changes after induction (main effect of induction, F1, 312 = 3.6; p = .060). In patients, BOLD response increased with pain report in regions previously associated with pain, including thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex. In controls, BOLD response decreased with pain report. All changes were greater after induction. Region-of-interest analysis revealed largely linear patient responses with increasing pain report. Control responses, however, were higher after suggestion to increase or decrease pain from baseline. Conclusions Based on behavioral report alone, the mechanism of suggestion could be interpreted as largely similar regardless of the induction or type of pain experience. The functional magnetic resonance imaging data, however, demonstrated larger changes in brain activity after induction and a radically different pattern of brain activity for clinical pain compared with experimental pain. These findings imply that induction has an important effect on underlying neural activity mediating the effects of suggestion, and the mechanism of suggestion in patients altering clinical pain differs from that in controls altering experimental pain. Patient responses imply that suggestions altered pain experience via corresponding changes in pain-related brain regions, whereas control responses imply suggestion engaged cognitive control. PMID:27490850

  16. Molecular multiproxy analysis of ancient root systems suggests strong alteration of deep subsoil organic matter by rhizomicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gocke, Martina; Huguet, Arnaud; Derenne, Sylvie; Kolb, Steffen; Wiesenberg, Guido L. B.

    2013-04-01

    decreasing contents of archeal GDGTs from rhizolith via rhizosphere towards root-free loess. Furthermore, the bacterial fingerprint revealed - similar to modern root systems - higher taxonomic diversity in rhizosphere compared to rhizoliths and reference loess. This argues for microorganisms benefiting from root deposits and exudates. Highest concentrations of branched GDGTs in rhizoliths suggest that their source organisms feed on root remains. Incorporation of rhizomicrobial remains as represented by RNA and GDGTs usually affected the sediment at maximum to a distance of 2-3 cm from the former root. FA contents in rhizosphere showed strong scatter and were in part depleted compared to reference loess or, especially in deeper transects, enriched. This indicates the presence of degradation products originating from former rhizosphere processes. Especially at larger depth not affected by modern pedogenic processes, portions of mainly microbial derived C16 homologues were higher in rhizosphere loess up to distances of 10 cm, revealing that the possible extension of the rhizosphere was underestimated so far. In Corg poor subsoil, the occurence of diverse rhizosphere microorganisms and degradation processes even in several centimeters distant from roots point to a strong alteration of OM, possibly contributing to carbon mineralisation.

  17. People* Working . . . *Especially Women . . . A Book of Materials, Activities, and Ideas for the Classroom Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valiant, Sharon

    This bibliography lists publications and other media, historical facts, and suggestions for activities that show women as working and accomplishing people. Materials are from all grade levels (K-12) and many subject areas. Arrangement is in three sections. Part I deals with women who have worked but not for wages, the pioneer, the homemaker, and…

  18. PIXE and neutron activation methods in human hair material analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bǎdicǎ, T.; Ciortea, C.; Cojocaru, V.; Ivaşcu, M.; Petrovici, A.; Popa, A.; Popescu, I.; Sǎlǎgean, M.; Spiridon, S.

    1984-04-01

    In order to compare some of the nuclear methods in human hair material analysis, proton induced X-ray excitation and variant techniques of neutron activation analysis have been used. The elemental concentrations are compared with the IAEA-Vienna certified values. The efficiency and reliability of the methods used are briefly discussed.

  19. Getting Started: Materials and Equipment for Active Learning Preschools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Nancy

    This book provides information to guide the development of an active learning early childhood program by assisting in the selection of materials and equipment to support children's cognitive, physical and social development. The guide considers the arrangement of classroom areas, and elements of the daily routine. The following classroom interest…

  20. Spontaneous Motion in Hierarchically Assembled Active Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    With exquisite precision and reproducibility, cells orchestrate the cooperative action of thousands of nanometer-sized molecular motors to carry out mechanical tasks at much larger length scales, such as cell motility, division and replication. Besides their biological importance, such inherently far-from-equilibrium processes are an inspiration for the development of soft materials with highly sought after biomimetic properties such as autonomous motility and self-healing. I will describe our exploration of such a class of biologically inspired soft active materials. Starting from extensile bundles comprised of microtubules and kinesin, we hierarchically assemble active analogs of polymeric gels, liquid crystals and emulsions. At high enough concentration, microtubule bundles form an active gel network capable of generating internally driven chaotic flows that enhance transport and fluid mixing. When confined to emulsion droplets, these 3D networks buckle onto the water-oil interface forming a dense thin film of bundles exhibiting cascades of collective buckling, fracture, and self-healing driven by internally generated stresses from the kinesin clusters. When compressed against surfaces, this active nematic cortex exerts traction stresses that propel the locomotion of the droplet. Taken together, these observations exemplify how assemblies of animate microscopic objects exhibit collective biomimetic properties that are fundamentally distinct from those found in materials assembled from inanimate building blocks. These assemblies, in turn, enable the generation of a new class of materials that exhibit macroscale flow phenomena emerging from nanoscale components.

  1. Surface-active materials from Athabasca oil sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschopedis, S. E.; Schulz, K. F.; Speight, J. G.; Morrison, D. N.

    1980-01-01

    Surface-active derivatives can be separated, or chemically-derived, from Athabasca bitumen. These materials have the ability to lower the surface tensions of aqueous solutions as well as substantially reduce the interfacial tensions of aqueous-organic systems. As such, they do appear to have a beneficial effect on bitumen recovery processes.

  2. Characterization of surface active materials derived from farm products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface active materials obtained by chemical modification of plant protein isolates (lupin, barley, oat), corn starches (dextrin, normal, high amylose, and waxy) and soybean oil (soybean oil based polysoaps, SOPS) were investigated for their surface and interfacial properties using axisymmetric dro...

  3. Magneto-optical activity in organic thin film materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vleugels, Rick; de Vega, Laura; Brullot, Ward; Verbiest, Thierry; Gómez-Lor, Berta; Gutierrez-Puebla, Enrique; Hennrich, Gunther

    2016-12-01

    A series of CF3-capped phenylacetylenes with varying symmetry is obtained by a conventional palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling protocol. The phenylacetylene targets form thin films both, liquid crystalline (LC) and crystalline in nature depending on their molecular structure. The magneto-optical activity of the resulting organic material is extraordinarily high as proved by Faraday rotation spectroscopy on thin film devices.

  4. Comparison of activation effects in {gamma}-ray detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Truscott, P.R.; Evans, H.E.; Dyer, C.S.; Peerless, C.L.; Flatman, J.C.; Cosby, M.; Knight, P.; Moss, C.E.

    1996-06-01

    Activation induced by cosmic and trapped radiation in {gamma}-ray detector materials represents a significant source of background for space-based detector systems. Selection of detector materials should therefore include consideration of this background source. Results are presented from measurements of induced radioactivity in different scintillators activated either as a result of irradiation by mono-energetic protons at accelerator facilities, or flight on board the Space Shuttle. Radiation transport computer codes are used to help compare the effects observed from the scintillators, by identifying and quantifying the influence on the background spectra from more than one hundred of the radionuclides produced by spallation. For the space experiment data, the simulation results also permit determination of the contributions to detector activation from the different sources of radiation in the Shuttle cabin.

  5. Activation of a Ca-bentonite as buffer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Hsing; Chen, Wen-Chuan

    2016-04-01

    Swelling behavior is an important criterion in achieving the low-permeability sealing function of buffer material. A potential buffer material may be used for radioactive waste repository in Taiwan is a locally available clayey material known as Zhisin clay, which has been identified as a Ca-bentonite. Due to its Ca-based origin, Zhisin was found to exhibit swelling capacity much lower than that of Na-bentonite. To enhance the swelling potential of Zhisin clay, a cation exchange process by addition of Na2CO3 powder was introduced in this paper. The addition of Na2CO3 reagent to Zhisin clay, in a liquid phase, caused the precipitation of CaCO3 and thereby induced a replacement of Ca2+ ions by Na+ ions on the surface of bentonite. Characterization test conducted on Zhisin clay includes chemical analysis, cation exchange capacity, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetry (TG). Free-swelling test apparatus was developed according to International Society of Rock Mechanics recommendations. A series of free-swelling tests were conducted on untreated and activated specimens to characterize the effect of activation on the swelling capacity of Zhisin clay. Efforts were made to determine an optimum dosage for the activation, and to evaluate the aging effect. Also, the activated material was evaluated for its stability in various hydrothermal conditions for potential applications as buffer material in a repository. Experimental results show that Na2CO3-activated Zhisin clay is superior in swelling potential to untreated Zhisin clay. Also, there exists an optimum amount of activator in terms of improvements in the swelling capacity. A distinct time-swell relationship was discovered for activated Zhisin clay. The corresponding mechanism refers to exchange of cations and breakdown of quasi-crystal, which results in ion exchange hysteresis of Ca-bentonite. Due to the ion exchange hysteresis, activated bentonite shows a post-rise time-swell relationship different than the sigmoid

  6. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials towards the breakthrough of organoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ye; Yuan, Kai; Chen, Ting; Xu, Peng; Li, Huanhuan; Chen, Runfeng; Zheng, Chao; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Wei

    2014-12-17

    The design and characterization of thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials for optoelectronic applications represents an active area of recent research in organoelectronics. Noble metal-free TADF molecules offer unique optical and electronic properties arising from the efficient transition and interconversion between the lowest singlet (S1 ) and triplet (T1 ) excited states. Their ability to harvest triplet excitons for fluorescence through facilitated reverse intersystem crossing (T1 →S1 ) could directly impact their properties and performances, which is attractive for a wide variety of low-cost optoelectronic devices. TADF-based organic light-emitting diodes, oxygen, and temperature sensors show significantly upgraded device performances that are comparable to the ones of traditional rare-metal complexes. Here we present an overview of the quick development in TADF mechanisms, materials, and applications. Fundamental principles on design strategies of TADF materials and the common relationship between the molecular structures and optoelectronic properties for diverse research topics and a survey of recent progress in the development of TADF materials, with a particular emphasis on their different types of metal-organic complexes, D-A molecules, and fullerenes, are highlighted. The success in the breakthrough of the theoretical and technical challenges that arise in developing high-performance TADF materials may pave the way to shape the future of organoelectronics.

  7. Passive and active thermal nondestructive imaging of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdelidis, Nicolas P.; Moropoulou, Antonia; Almond, Darryl P.

    2004-12-01

    Thermal non-destructive approaches, passive and active, are widely used due to the outstanding advantages that offer in a number of applications and particularly for the assessment of materials and structures. In this work, different applications, employing either MWIR or LWIR thermographic testing, as well as passive and/or active approaches, depending on the application, concerning the assessment of various materials are presented. In a few instances, thermal modelling is also discussed and compared with the outcome of experimental testing. The following applications are reviewed: × Emissivity measurements. × Moisture impact assessment in porous materials. × Evaluation of conservation interventions, concerning: - Consolidation interventions on porous stone. - Cleaning of architectural surfaces. × Assessment of airport pavements. × Investigation of repaired aircraft panels. × Through skin sensing assessment on aircraft composite structures. Real time monitoring of all features was obtained using passive imaging or transient thermographic analysis (active imaging). However, in the composite repairs and through skin imaging cases thermal modelling was also used with the intention of providing supplementary results, as well as to demonstrate the importance of thermal contact resistance between two surfaces (skin and strut in through skin sensing). Finally, in order to obtain useful information from the surveys, various properties (thermal, optical, physical) of the examined materials were taken into account.

  8. Activation of accelerator construction materials by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrík, P.; Mustafin, E.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Pavlovič, M.; Strašík, I.

    2015-12-01

    Activation data for an aluminum target irradiated by 200 MeV/u 238U ion beam are presented in the paper. The target was irradiated in the stacked-foil geometry and analyzed using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The purpose of the experiment was to study the role of primary particles, projectile fragments, and target fragments in the activation process using the depth profiling of residual activity. The study brought information on which particles contribute dominantly to the target activation. The experimental data were compared with the Monte Carlo simulations by the FLUKA 2011.2c.0 code. This study is a part of a research program devoted to activation of accelerator construction materials by high-energy (⩾200 MeV/u) heavy ions at GSI Darmstadt. The experimental data are needed to validate the computer codes used for simulation of interaction of swift heavy ions with matter.

  9. Engineering hybrid nanostructures of active materials: Applications as electrode materials in lithium ion rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huan

    Aiming to significantly improve the electrochemical properties of electroactive materials for lithium ion batteries, three novel hybrid nanostructures were developed in this thesis. These include nanostructure A: V2O 5 coated on polymer electrolyte-grafted carbon black, nanostructure B: electrode materials incorporated into an electronically conductive carbon web, and nanostructure C: electrode materials dispersed in a conductive porous carbon matrix. Nanocomposites possessing nanostructure A are fast electronic and ionic transport materials. The improved kinetic properties are due to the incorporated carbon core and the grafted polymer electrolyte in the unique structure. The V2O5 xerogel coated polymer electrolyte-grafted carbon blacks, or V2O5/C-PEG, can reach a capacity as high as 320 mAh/g, and exhibit outstanding rate sustainability (e.g. 190 mAh/g at 14C). This class of nanostructured composites is promising for high power/current applications. Nanostructure B was extremely successful when applied to very poorly conductive active materials, such as LiFePO4 and Li3V 2(PO4)3. In this nanostructure, the web-like carbon framework not only supplies a facile electron transport path, but also provides excellent electronic contact between carbon and the insulating active materials. At room temperature, the LiFePO4/C nanocomposite successfully reaches almost full capacity, along with greatly improved rate sustainability and excellent cycling stability. At elevated temperatures (e.g. 40°C and 60°C), the full capacity is readily accessible over a wide rate range, even at a very fast rate of 2C or 5C. The Li3V2(PO4) 3/C nanocomposite can extract all three lithium in the formula at a rate of 1C, resulting in a high capacity of 200 mAh/g. Therefore, through designing hybrid nanostructures with nanostructure B, we can make insulating active materials into good cathode materials. Nanostructure C was employed for Sn-based anode materials, in order to improve their cycling

  10. Module Design, Materials, and Packaging Research Team: Activities and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T. J.; del Cueto, J.; Glick, S.; Jorgensen, G.; Kempe, M.; Kennedy, C.; Pern, J.; Terwilliger, K

    2005-01-01

    Our team activities are directed at improving PV module reliability by incorporating new, more effective, and less expensive packaging materials and techniques. New and existing materials or designs are evaluated before and during accelerated environmental exposure for the following properties: (1) Adhesion and cohesion: peel strength and lap shear. (2) Electrical conductivity: surface, bulk, interface and transients. (3) Water vapor transmission: solubility and diffusivity. (4) Accelerated weathering: ultraviolet, temperature, and damp heat tests. (5) Module and cell failure diagnostics: infrared imaging, individual cell shunt characterization, coring. (6) Fabrication improvements: SiOxNy barrier coatings and enhanced wet adhesion. (7) Numerical modeling: Moisture ingress/egress, module and cell performance, and cell-to-frame leakage current. (8) Rheological properties of polymer encapsulant and sheeting materials. Specific examples will be described.

  11. Exploring Electro-active Functionality of Transparent Oxide Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Hideo

    2013-09-01

    Ceramics, one of the earliest materials used by humans, have been used since the Stone Age and are also one of the core materials supporting modern society. In this article, I will review the features of transparent oxides, the main components of ceramics, and the progress of research on their electro-active functionalities from the viewpoint of material design. Specifically, the emergence of the functionality of the cement component 12CaO.7Al2O3, the application of transparent oxide semiconductors to thin-film transistors for flat panel displays, and the design of wide-gap p-type semiconductors are introduced along with the progress in their research. In addition, oxide semiconductors are comprehensively discussed on the basis of the band lineup.

  12. Recent advances in organic thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Mao, Zhu; Xie, Zongliang; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Siwei; Zhao, Juan; Xu, Jiarui; Chi, Zhenguo; Aldred, Matthew P

    2017-02-06

    Organic materials that exhibit thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) are an attractive class of functional materials that have witnessed a booming development in recent years. Since Adachi et al. reported high-performance TADF-OLED devices in 2012, there have been many reports regarding the design and synthesis of new TADF luminogens, which have various molecular structures and are used for different applications. In this review, we summarize and discuss the latest progress concerning this rapidly developing research field, in which the majority of the reported TADF systems are discussed, along with their derived structure-property relationships, TADF mechanisms and applications. We hope that such a review provides a clear outlook of these novel functional materials for a broad range of scientists within different disciplinary areas and attracts more researchers to devote themselves to this interesting research field.

  13. Synchronization of oscillations in hybrid gel-piezoelectric active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashin, Victor V.; Levitan, Steven P.; Balazs, Anna C.

    We model the hybrid gel-piezoelectric active material that could perform oscillator based unconventional computing tasks (``materials that compute''). The material is assumed to have a cellular structure, where each cell contains a polymer gel, which undergoes cyclic swelling and deswelling due to the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, and is coupled to a piezoelectric (PZ) film. Upon electrical connection, oscillations in the BZ-PZ units get synchronized, and the mode of synchronization is shown to depend on the number of units in the system, type of circuit connection, etc. Introduction of capacitors into the circuits allows us to further manipulate the synchronization modes, i.e., the distinctive patterns in phase of oscillations. The results indicate the BZ-PZ systems could be used for spatio-temporal pattern recognition.

  14. Geothermal materials development: FY 1990 accomplishments and current activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in the development of hydrothermally stable materials, the commercial availabilities of which are considered essential for the attainment of the Geothermal Division's (GD) Hydrothermal Category Objectives, continue to be made. Fiscal year 1990 R D was focused on reducing well drilling and completion costs, energy conversion costs, and on mitigating corrosion in well casing. Activities on lost circulation control materials, CO{sub 2}-resistant lightweight cements and thermally conductive corrosion and scale-resistant linear systems have reached the final development stages. In addition, field tests to determine the feasibility for the use of polymer cement liners to mitigate HCl-induced corrosion at the Geysers were performed. Technology transfer efforts on high temperature elastomers for use in drilling tools such as drillpipe protectors and rotating head seals were continued under Geothermal Drilling Organization sponsorship. Recent accomplishments and ongoing work on each of these activities are described in the paper. 8 refs.

  15. Materials for Active Engagement in Nuclear and Particle Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loats, Jeff; Schwarz, Cindy; Krane, Ken

    2013-04-01

    Physics education researchers have developed a rich variety of research-based instructional strategies that now permeate many introductory courses. Carrying these active-engagement techniques to upper-division courses requires effort and is bolstered by experience. Instructors interested in these methods thus face a large investment of time to start from scratch. This NSF-TUES grant, aims to develop, test and disseminate active-engagement materials for nuclear and particle physics topics. We will present examples of these materials, including: a) Conceptual discussion questions for use with Peer Instruction; b) warm-up questions for use with Just in Time Teaching, c) ``Back of the Envelope'' estimation questions and small-group case studies that will incorporate use of nuclear and particle databases, as well as d) conceptual exam questions.

  16. Final Report: Imaging of Buried Nanoscale Optically Active Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2011-07-05

    This is a final report covering work done at University of Maryland to develop a Ballistic Electron Emission Luminescence (BEEL) microscope. This technique was intended to examine the carrier transport and photon emission in deeply buried optically-active layers and thereby provide a means for materials science to unmask the detailed consequences of experimentally controllable growth parameters, such as quantum dot size, statistics and orientation, and defect density and charge recombination pathways.

  17. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

    2006-05-01

    Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

  18. Positive Active Material For Alkaline Electrolyte Storage Battert Nickel Electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Bernard, Patrick; Baudry, Michelle

    2000-12-05

    A method of manufacturing a positive active material for nickel electrodes of alkaline storage batteries which consists of particles of hydroxide containing mainly nickel and covered with a layer of a hydroxide phase based on nickel and yttrium is disclosed. The proportion of the hydroxide phase is in the range 0.15% to 3% by weight of yttrium expressed as yttrium hydroxide relative to the total weight of particles.

  19. Using DFT Methods to Study Activators in Optical Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-08-17

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of various activators (ranging from transition metal ions, rare-earth ions, ns2 ions, to self-trapped and dopant-bound excitons) in phosphors and scintillators are reviewed. As a single-particle ground-state theory, DFT calculations cannot reproduce the experimentally observed optical spectra, which involve transitions between multi-electronic states. However, DFT calculations can generally provide sufficiently accurate structural relaxation and distinguish different hybridization strengths between an activator and its ligands in different host compounds. This is important because the activator-ligand interaction often governs the trends in luminescence properties in phosphors and scintillators, and can be used to search for new materials.more » DFT calculations of the electronic structure of the host compound and the positions of the activator levels relative to the host band edges in scintillators are also important for finding optimal host-activator combinations for high light yields and fast scintillation response. Mn4+ activated red phosphors, scintillators activated by Ce3+, Eu2+, Tl+, and excitons are shown as examples of using DFT calculations in phosphor and scintillator research.« less

  20. Using DFT Methods to Study Activators in Optical Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-08-17

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of various activators (ranging from transition metal ions, rare-earth ions, ns2 ions, to self-trapped and dopant-bound excitons) in phosphors and scintillators are reviewed. As a single-particle ground-state theory, DFT calculations cannot reproduce the experimentally observed optical spectra, which involve transitions between multi-electronic states. However, DFT calculations can generally provide sufficiently accurate structural relaxation and distinguish different hybridization strengths between an activator and its ligands in different host compounds. This is important because the activator-ligand interaction often governs the trends in luminescence properties in phosphors and scintillators, and can be used to search for new materials. DFT calculations of the electronic structure of the host compound and the positions of the activator levels relative to the host band edges in scintillators are also important for finding optimal host-activator combinations for high light yields and fast scintillation response. Mn4+ activated red phosphors, scintillators activated by Ce3+, Eu2+, Tl+, and excitons are shown as examples of using DFT calculations in phosphor and scintillator research.

  1. Chitinous materials inhibit nitric oxide production by activated RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hwang, S M; Chen, C Y; Chen, S S; Chen, J C

    2000-04-29

    Chitinous materials have been studied in wound healing and artificial skin substitutes for many years. Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to contribute to cytotoxicity in cell proliferation during inflammation of wound healing. In this study, we examined the effect of chitin and its derivatives on NO production by activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Chitin and chitosan showed a significantly inhibitory effect on NO production by the activated macrophages. Hexa-N-acetylchitohexaose and penta-N-acetylchitopentaose also inhibited NO production but with less potency. However, N-acetylchitotetraose, -triose, -biose, and monomer of chitin, N-acetylglucosamine and glucosamine had little effect on NO production by the activated cells. These results suggest that the promotive effect of chitinous material on wound healing be related, at least partly, to inhibit NO production by the activated macrophages.

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Filling Materials Used in Primary Teeth Pulpotomy

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, Hévelin Couto; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Neves, Ana Thereza Sabóia; Fontes, Rodrigo Gusmão; da Silva, Priscila Vieira; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fábio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of pulp capping materials used in primary teeth (formocresol [FC], zinc oxide and eugenol cement [ZOE], ZOE mixed with FC [ZOEFC], mineral trioxide aggregate [MTA] and calcium hydroxide [CH]) against cariogenic bacteria. The agar plate diffusion test was used for the cultures, including saline solution as a negative control. A base layer of 15 mL of brain heart infusion agar was inoculated with 300 mL of each inoculum. Twelve wells were made and completely filled with one of the testing materials for each bacteria strain. The plates were incubated at 37°C for 48 h. Zones of microbial inhibition and material diffusion were measured and photographed. The results obtained were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney non-parametric tests. Respectively, the medium zones of bacteria inhibition of FC, ZOE, ZOEFC, MTA and CH against Streptococcus mutans growth were 28.5, 15.2, 20.8, 9.3 and 11.6; against Lactobacillus acidophilus growth were 28.7, 14.8, 15.3, 15.2 and 20.0, and against Actinomyces viscosus growth were 13.6, 13.5, 14.7, 10.0 and 13.6. We might confirmed the high antibacterial activity of FC solution, especially against S. mutans and L. acidophilus, as wells as, the low inhibitory effect of MTA cement on the cariogenic bacteria studied. PMID:25954072

  3. Antimicrobial activity of filling materials used in primary teeth pulpotomy.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Hévelin Couto; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Neves, Ana Thereza Sabóia; Fontes, Rodrigo Gusmão; da Silva, Priscila Vieira; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fábio

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of pulp capping materials used in primary teeth (formocresol [FC], zinc oxide and eugenol cement [ZOE], ZOE mixed with FC [ZOEFC], mineral trioxide aggregate [MTA] and calcium hydroxide [CH]) against cariogenic bacteria. The agar plate diffusion test was used for the cultures, including saline solution as a negative control. A base layer of 15 mL of brain heart infusion agar was inoculated with 300 mL of each inoculum. Twelve wells were made and completely filled with one of the testing materials for each bacteria strain. The plates were incubated at 37°C for 48 h. Zones of microbial inhibition and material diffusion were measured and photographed. The results obtained were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney non-parametric tests. Respectively, the medium zones of bacteria inhibition of FC, ZOE, ZOEFC, MTA and CH against Streptococcus mutans growth were 28.5, 15.2, 20.8, 9.3 and 11.6; against Lactobacillus acidophilus growth were 28.7, 14.8, 15.3, 15.2 and 20.0, and against Actinomyces viscosus growth were 13.6, 13.5, 14.7, 10.0 and 13.6. We might confirmed the high antibacterial activity of FC solution, especially against S. mutans and L. acidophilus, as wells as, the low inhibitory effect of MTA cement on the cariogenic bacteria studied.

  4. Design of Responsive and Active (Soft) Materials Using Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Bukusoglu, Emre; Bedolla Pantoja, Marco; Mushenheim, Peter C; Wang, Xiaoguang; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2016-06-07

    Liquid crystals (LCs) are widely known for their use in liquid crystal displays (LCDs). Indeed, LCDs represent one of the most successful technologies developed to date using a responsive soft material: An electric field is used to induce a change in ordering of the LC and thus a change in optical appearance. Over the past decade, however, research has revealed the fundamental underpinnings of potentially far broader and more pervasive uses of LCs for the design of responsive soft material systems. These systems involve a delicate interplay of the effects of surface-induced ordering, elastic strain of LCs, and formation of topological defects and are characterized by a chemical complexity and diversity of nano- and micrometer-scale geometry that goes well beyond that previously investigated. As a reflection of this evolution, the community investigating LC-based materials now relies heavily on concepts from colloid and interface science. In this context, this review describes recent advances in colloidal and interfacial phenomena involving LCs that are enabling the design of new classes of soft matter that respond to stimuli as broad as light, airborne pollutants, bacterial toxins in water, mechanical interactions with living cells, molecular chirality, and more. Ongoing efforts hint also that the collective properties of LCs (e.g., LC-dispersed colloids) will, over the coming decade, yield exciting new classes of driven or active soft material systems in which organization (and useful properties) emerges during the dissipation of energy.

  5. DIFFERENTIAL AND AGE-DEPENDENT EXPRESSION OF HYPERPOLARIZATION-ACTIVATED, CYCLIC NUCLEOTIDE-GATED CATION CHANNEL ISOFORMS 1–4 SUGGESTS EVOLVING ROLES IN THE DEVELOPING RAT HIPPOCAMPUS

    PubMed Central

    BENDER, R. A.; BREWSTER, A.; SANTORO, B.; LUDWIG, A.; HOFMANN, F.; BIEL, M.; BARAM, T. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cation currents (Ih) are found in several brain regions including thalamus and hippocampus. Important functions of these currents in promoting synchronized network activity and in determining neuronal membrane properties have been progressively recognized, but the molecular underpinnings of these currents are only emerging. Ih currents are generated by hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels (HCNs). These channel proteins are encoded by at least four HCN genes, that govern the kinetic and functional properties of the resulting channels. Because of the potential impact of Ih-mediated coordinated neuronal activity on the maturation of the functional hippocampal network, this study focused on determining the expression of the four members of the HCN gene family throughout postnatal hippocampal development at both the regional and single cell level. The results of these experiments demonstrated that HCNs 1, 2 and 4 are differentially expressed in interneuronal and principal cell populations of the rat hippocampal formation. Expression profiles of each HCN isoform evolve during postnatal development, and patterns observed during early postnatal ages differ significantly from those in mature hippocampus. The onset of HCN expression in interneurons of the hippocampus proper precedes that in the dentate gyrus, suggesting that HCN-mediated pacing activity may be generated in hippocampal interneurons prior to those in the hilus. Taken together, these findings indicate an age-dependent spatiotemporal evolution of specific HCN expression in distinct hippocampal cell populations, and suggest that these channels serve differing and evolving functions in the maturation of coordinated hippocampal activity. PMID:11682156

  6. Vibration attenuation of aircraft structures utilizing active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnes, Gregory S.; Whitehouse, Stephen R.; Mackaman, John R.

    1993-09-01

    The need for active vibration control for airborne laser systems was demonstrated during the late 1970s by the Airborne Laser Laboratory. Other possible applications include sonic fatigue alleviation, reduction of buffet induced fatigue, vibration control for embedded antennae, and active aeroelastic control. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of active vibration control technology and its application to aircraft. Classification of classic aircraft vibration problems and currently available solutions are used to provide a framework for the study. Current solutions are classified as being either passive or active and by the methodology (modal modification or addition) used to reduce vibration. Possible applications for this technology in aircraft vibration control are presented within this framework to demonstrate the increased versatility active materials technologies provide the designer. An in- depth study of an active pylon to reduce wing/store vibration is presented as an example. Finally, perceived gaps in the existing technology base are identified and both on-going and future research plans in these areas are discussed.

  7. Induction of leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) like activity with wounding and methyl jasmonate in pigeonpea (Cajanas cajan) suggests the role of these enzymes in plant defense in leguminosae.

    PubMed

    Lomate, Purushottam R; Hivrale, Vandana K

    2011-06-01

    Aminopeptidases are ubiquitous in nature and their activities have been identified in several plant species. Leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) are predominantly studied in solanaceous plants and are induced in response to wounding, herbivory and methyl jasmonate (MeJA). The functions of plant aminopeptidases are still under discussion and it is likely that the different classes play various roles. In the present study we report the local and systemic induction of LAP-like activity upon mechanical wounding and MeJA treatment. Two proteins with LAP-like activity were detected in pigeonpea leaves. They were designated as AP1 and AP2. AP1 activity was significantly induced upon wounding and application of MeJA. The estimated molecular masses of AP1 and AP2 were ∼ 60 and 41 kDa respectively in SDS-PAGE. The pH optimum for LAP-like activity in control leaf extracts was found to be neutral (pH 7.0) however the enzymes showed highest activity at alkaline pH (pH 9.0) in the leaf extracts of treated plants. The temperature optimum for LAP-like activity was around 40-50 °C. The enzymes were strongly inhibited by 1, 10 phenanthroline and bestatin. Heavy metal ions and EDTA inhibited LAP-like activities, whereas Mn(+2) and Mg(+2) activated the enzyme activities. Beside LpNA (33.5 U/mg/min) pigeonpea LAP-like enzymes also cleaved ApNA (15 U/mg/min) but were unable to cleave VpNA. Total proteolytic activity was also observed to be induced in treated plants. LAP-like activity was increased upto 19.5 fold after gel filtration chromatography. Results suggest that these enzymes may have functional defensive role in pigeonpea.

  8. Thermally activated creep and fluidization in flowing disordered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merabia, Samy; Detcheverry, François

    2016-11-01

    When submitted to a constant mechanical load, many materials display power law creep followed by fluidization. A fundamental understanding of these processes is still far from being achieved. Here, we characterize creep and fluidization on the basis of a mesoscopic viscoplastic model that includes thermally activated yielding events and a broad distribution of energy barriers, which may be lowered under the effect of a local deformation. We relate the creep exponent observed before fluidization to the width of barrier distribution and to the specific form of stress redistribution following yielding events. We show that Andrade creep is accompanied by local strain hardening driven by stress redistribution and find that the fluidization time depends exponentially on the applied stress. The simulation results are interpreted in the light of a mean-field analysis, and should help in rationalizing the creep phenomenology in disordered materials.

  9. Active Neutron Interrogation to Detect Shielded Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2009-05-01

    Portable electronic neutron generators (ENGs) may be used to interrogate suspicious items to detect, characterize, and quantify the presence fissionable material based upon the measurement of prompt and/or delayed emissions of neutrons and/or photons resulting from fission. The small size (<0.2 m3), light weight (<12 kg), and low power consumption (<50 W) of modern ENGs makes them ideally suited for use in field situations, incorporated into systems carried by 2-3 individuals under rugged conditions. At Idaho National Laboratory we are investigating techniques and portable equipment for performing active neutron interrogation of moderate sized objects less than ~2-4 m3 to detect shielded fissionable material. Our research in this area relies upon the use of pulsed deuterium-tritium ENGs and the measurement of die-away prompt fission neutrons and other neutron signatures in-between neutron pulses from the ENG and after the ENG is turned off.

  10. Active Printed Materials for Complex Self-Evolving Deformations

    PubMed Central

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus. PMID:25522053

  11. Active printed materials for complex self-evolving deformations.

    PubMed

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-12-18

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus.

  12. Anti-inflammation activities of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) in response to UV radiation suggest potential anti-skin aging activity.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sung-Suk; Hwang, Jinik; Park, Mirye; Seo, Hyo Hyun; Kim, Hyoung-Shik; Lee, Jeong Hun; Moh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2014-10-14

    Certain photosynthetic marine organisms have evolved mechanisms to counteract UV-radiation by synthesizing UV-absorbing compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs). In this study, MAAs were separated from the extracts of marine green alga Chlamydomonas hedleyi using HPLC and were identified as porphyra-334, shinorine, and mycosporine-glycine (mycosporine-Gly), based on their retention times and maximum absorption wavelengths. Furthermore, their structures were confirmed by triple quadrupole MS/MS. Their roles as UV-absorbing compounds were investigated in the human fibroblast cell line HaCaT by analyzing the expression levels of genes associated with antioxidant activity, inflammation, and skin aging in response to UV irradiation. The mycosporine-Gly extract, but not the other MAAs, had strong antioxidant activity in the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Furthermore, treatment with mycosporine-Gly resulted in a significant decrease in COX-2 mRNA levels, which are typically increased in response to inflammation in the skin, in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, in the presence of MAAs, the UV-suppressed genes, procollagen C proteinase enhancer (PCOLCE) and elastin, which are related to skin aging, had increased expression levels equal to those in UV-mock treated cells. Interestingly, the increased expression of involucrin after UV exposure was suppressed by treatment with the MAAs mycosporine-Gly and shinorine, but not porphyra-334. This is the first report investigating the biological activities of microalgae-derived MAAs in human cells.

  13. The effect of shear on in vitro platelet and leukocyte material-induced activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaojian; Gorbet, Maud

    2013-09-01

    The failure to understand the mechanisms of biomaterial-associated thrombosis prevents us from improving the blood compatibility of stents and mechanical heart valves. Blood-material interactions trigger a complex series of events and anticoagulant and anti-platelet therapies are needed to reduce the risks of thrombotic complications with most cardiovascular materials. While material interaction with platelets has been widely studied, little is currently known on material-induced leukocyte activation in the presence of shear. In vitro experiments were performed to assess the effect of flow on blood cell activation induced by medical grade metals, ST316L and TiAl6V4. Blood was circulated in flow chambers preloaded with or without metal wires at shear rates of 100, 500, and 1500 s⁻¹. Platelet and leukocyte activation, leukocyte-platelet aggregation, and tissue factor expression on monocytes were measured by flow cytometry. Metal surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Under physiological shear rates, no significant platelet microparticle formation was observed. However, significant CD11b up-regulation, leukocyte-platelet aggregates, and tissue factor expression were observed at 100 s⁻¹. As shear rate increased to 1500 s⁻¹, leukocyte activation reduced to control values. TiAl6V4-induced leukocyte activation was generally lower than that of ST316L. Adhesion significantly decreased with increasing shear rate to 1500 s⁻¹. In blood, increase within physiological shear rates led to a significant reduction in in vitro material-induced leukocyte activation, suggesting that difference between material biocompatibility may be better identified at low shear rates or under pathological shear conditions.

  14. Materials design data for reduced activation martensitic steel type EUROFER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Alamo, A.; Bedel, L.; Forest, L.; Gentzbittel, J.-M.; Rensman, J.-W.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Schirra, M.; Schmitt, R.; Schneider, H. C.; Petersen, C.; Lancha, A.-M.; Fernandez, P.; Filacchioni, G.; Maday, M. F.; Mergia, K.; Boukos, N.; Baluc; Spätig, P.; Alves, E.; Lucon, E.

    2004-08-01

    Materials design limits derived so far from the data generated in Europe for the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel type Eurofer are presented. These data address the short-term needs of the ITER Test Blanket Modules and a DEMOnstration fusion reactor. Products tested include plates, bars, tubes, TIG and EB welds, as well as powder consolidated blocks and solid-solid HIP joints. Effects of thermal ageing and low dose neutron irradiation are also included. Results are sorted and screened according to design code requirements before being introduced in reference databases. From the physical properties databases, variations of magnetic properties, modulus of elasticity, density, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, mean and instantaneous linear coefficients of thermal expansion versus temperature are derived. From the tensile and creep properties databases design allowable stresses are derived. From the instrumented Charpy impact and fracture toughness databases, ductile to brittle transition temperature, toughness and behavior of materials in different fracture modes are evaluated. From the fatigue database, total strain range versus number of cycles to failure curves are plotted and used to derive fatigue design curves. Cyclic curves are also derived and compared with monotonic hardening curves. Finally, irradiated and aged materials data are compared to ensure that the safety margins incorporated in unirradiated design limits are not exceeded.

  15. Potential active materials for photo-supercapacitor: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. H.; Lim, H. N.; Hayase, S.; Harrison, I.; Pandikumar, A.; Huang, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    The need for an endless renewable energy supply, typically through the utilization of solar energy in most applications and systems, has driven the expansion, versatility, and diversification of marketed energy storage devices. Energy storage devices such as hybridized dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC)-capacitors and DSSC-supercapacitors have been invented for energy reservation. The evolution and vast improvement of these devices in terms of their efficiencies and flexibilities have further sparked the invention of the photo-supercapacitor. The idea of coupling a DSSC and supercapacitor as a complete energy conversion and storage device arose because the solar energy absorbed by dye molecules can be efficiently transferred and converted to electrical energy by adopting a supercapacitor as the energy delivery system. The conversion efficiency of a photo-supercapacitor is mainly dependent on the use of active materials during its fabrication. The performances of the dye, photoactive metal oxide, counter electrode, redox electrolyte, and conducting polymer are the primary factors contributing to high-energy-efficient conversion, which enhances the performance and shelf-life of a photo-supercapacitor. Moreover, the introduction of compact layer as a primary adherent film has been earmarked as an effort in enhancing power conversion efficiency of solar cell. Additionally, the development of electrolyte-free solar cell such as the invention of hole-conductor or perovskite solar cell is currently being explored extensively. This paper reviews and analyzes the potential active materials for a photo-supercapacitor to enhance the conversion and storage efficiencies.

  16. Materials and Process Activities for NASA's Composite Crew Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polis, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator and Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to design, build, and test a full-scale Composite Crew Module (CCM). The overall goal of the CCM project was to develop a team from the NASA family with hands-on experience in composite design, manufacturing, and testing in anticipation of future space exploration systems being made of composite materials. The CCM project was planned to run concurrently with the Orion project s baseline metallic design within the Constellation Program so that features could be compared and discussed without inducing risk to the overall Program. The materials and process activities were prioritized based on a rapid prototype approach. This approach focused developmental activities on design details with greater risk and uncertainty, such as out-of-autoclave joining, over some of the more traditional lamina and laminate building block levels. While process development and associated building block testing were performed, several anomalies were still observed at the full-scale level due to interactions between process robustness and manufacturing scale-up. This paper describes the process anomalies that were encountered during the CCM development and the subsequent root cause investigations that led to the final design solutions. These investigations highlight the importance of full-scale developmental work early in the schedule of a complex composite design/build project.

  17. Kinetic Structure of Large-Conductance Ca2+-activated K+ Channels Suggests that the Gating Includes Transitions through Intermediate or Secondary States

    PubMed Central

    Rothberg, Brad S.; Magleby, Karl L.

    1998-01-01

    Mechanisms for the Ca2+-dependent gating of single large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels from cultured rat skeletal muscle were developed using two-dimensional analysis of single-channel currents recorded with the patch clamp technique. To extract and display the essential kinetic information, the kinetic structure, from the single channel currents, adjacent open and closed intervals were binned as pairs and plotted as two-dimensional dwell-time distributions, and the excesses and deficits of the interval pairs over that expected for independent pairing were plotted as dependency plots. The basic features of the kinetic structure were generally the same among single large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, but channel-specific differences were readily apparent, suggesting heterogeneities in the gating. Simple gating schemes drawn from the Monod- Wyman-Changeux (MWC) model for allosteric proteins could approximate the basic features of the Ca2+ dependence of the kinetic structure. However, consistent differences between the observed and predicted dependency plots suggested that additional brief lifetime closed states not included in MWC-type models were involved in the gating. Adding these additional brief closed states to the MWC-type models, either beyond the activation pathway (secondary closed states) or within the activation pathway (intermediate closed states), improved the description of the Ca2+ dependence of the kinetic structure. Secondary closed states are consistent with the closing of secondary gates or channel block. Intermediate closed states are consistent with mechanisms in which the channel activates by passing through a series of intermediate conformations between the more stable open and closed states. It is the added secondary or intermediate closed states that give rise to the majority of the brief closings (flickers) in the gating. PMID:9607935

  18. The pH-dependence of the Escherichia coli RNase HII-catalysed reaction suggests that an active site carboxylate group participates directly in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bastock, James A; Webb, Michelle; Grasby, Jane A

    2007-04-27

    RNase HII specifically catalyses the hydrolysis of phosphate diester linkages contained within the RNA portion of DNA/RNA hybrids. The catalytic parameters of the enzyme derived from Escherichia coli BL21 have been measured using 5'-fluorescent oligodeoxynucleotide substrates containing embedded ribonucleotides. The products of the reaction and the chemistry of phosphate diester hydrolysis were assigned unequivocally using mass spectrometry. The pH-dependence of the catalytic parameters was measured under conditions of optimal magnesium ion concentration. The logarithm of the turnover number of the enzyme increases steeply with pH until a pH-independent region is reached close to neutrality. The slope of the pH-dependent region is 2, indicating that the catalytically proficient form of RNase HII is di-anionic. The pH-dependence of log 1/K(M) is a sigmoidal curve reaching a maximal value at higher pH, suggesting deprotonation of a residue stabilises substrate binding. Possible mechanisms for the RNase HII-catalysed reaction consistent with the pH-dependent behaviour of the enzyme are discussed. The active sites of RNase H enzymes contain a cluster of four strictly conserved carboxylate groups. Together, the data suggest a requirement for ionisation of an active site carboxylic acid for metal ion binding or correct positioning of metal ion(s) in the enzyme-substrate complex and a role for a second active site carboxylate in general base catalysis.

  19. Addressing Different Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures from Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2009-10-01

    In a continuing effort to examine portable methods for implementing active neutron interrogation for detecting shielded fissionable material research is underway to investigate the utility of analyzing multiple time-correlated signatures. Time correlation refers here to the existence of unique characteristics of the fission interrogation signature related to the start and end of an irradiation, as well as signatures present in between individual pulses of an irradiating source. Traditional measurement approaches in this area have typically worked to detect die-away neutrons after the end of each pulse, neutrons in between pulses related to the decay of neutron emitting fission products, or neutrons or gamma rays related to the decay of neutron emitting fission products after the end of an irradiation exposure. In this paper we discus the potential weaknesses of assessing only one signature versus multiple signatures and make the assertion that multiple complimentary and orthogonal measurements should be used to bolster the performance of active interrogation systems, helping to minimize susceptibility to the weaknesses of individual signatures on their own. Recognizing that the problem of detection is a problem of low count rates, we are exploring methods to integrate commonly used signatures with rarely used signatures to improve detection capabilities for these measurements. In this paper we will discuss initial activity in this area with this approach together with observations of some of the strengths and weaknesses of using these different signatures.

  20. Neutron activation analysis of biological materials by the monostandard method.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Shinogi, M

    1979-12-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis by the monostandard method has been applied to the analyses of biological NBS standard reference materials; 1571 Orchard Leaves and 1577 Bovine Liver. Aluminum foils containing 0.100% gold or 2.00% cobalt were used as the monostandards. The gamma-ray spectral data were recorded on punched paper tape and were analyzed by a computer assisted data processing. The following 25 elements were determined: Al, Ca, Cl Cu, Mg, Mn, V (by short period irradiation), As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hg, K, La, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm and Zn (by long period irradiation). The results were compared with the certified values by NBS and the reported values in literatures to prove the reliability and accuracy of the monostandard method.

  1. Surface modification of active material structures in battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Michael; Tikhonov, Konstantin

    2016-02-02

    Provided herein are methods of processing electrode active material structures for use in electrochemical cells or, more specifically, methods of forming surface layers on these structures. The structures are combined with a liquid to form a mixture. The mixture includes a surface reagent that chemically reacts and forms a surface layer covalently bound to the structures. The surface reagent may be a part of the initial liquid or added to the mixture after the liquid is combined with the structures. In some embodiments, the mixture may be processed to form a powder containing the structures with the surface layer thereon. Alternatively, the mixture may be deposited onto a current collecting substrate and dried to form an electrode layer. Furthermore, the liquid may be an electrolyte containing the surface reagent and a salt. The liquid soaks the previously arranged electrodes in order to contact the structures with the surface reagent.

  2. Enhancement of Buckling Load with the Use of Active Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, active buckling control of a beam using piezoelectric materials is investigated. Under small deformation, mathematical models are developed to describe the behavior of the beams subjected to an axial compressive load with geometric imperfections and load eccentricities under piezoelectric force. Two types of supports, simply supported and clamped, of the beam with a partially bonded piezoelectric actuator are used to illustrate the concept. For the beam with load eccentricities and initial geometric imperfections, the load- carrying capacity can be significantly enhanced by counteracting moments from the piezoelectric actuator. For the single piezoelectric actuator, using static feedback closed-loop control, the first buckling load can be eliminated. In the case of initially straight beams, analytical solutions of the enhanced first critical buckling load due to the increase of bending stiffness by piezoelectric actuators are derived based on linearized buckling analysis.

  3. 77 FR 38395 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Advertising, Sales, and Enrollment Materials, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activities (Advertising, Sales, and Enrollment Materials, and... ``OMB Control No. 2900-0682.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Advertising, Sales, and Enrollment... advertising, sales materials, enrollment materials, or candidate handbooks that educational institutions...

  4. Analysis of methane monooxygenase genes in mono lake suggests that increased methane oxidation activity may correlate with a change in methanotroph community structure.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ju-Ling; Joye, Samantha B; Scholten, Johannes C M; Schäfer, Hendrik; McDonald, Ian R; Murrell, J Colin

    2005-10-01

    Mono Lake is an alkaline hypersaline lake that supports high methane oxidation rates. Retrieved pmoA sequences showed a broad diversity of aerobic methane oxidizers including the type I methanotrophs Methylobacter (the dominant genus), Methylomicrobium, and Methylothermus, and the type II methanotroph Methylocystis. Stratification of Mono Lake resulted in variation of aerobic methane oxidation rates with depth. Methanotroph diversity as determined by analysis of pmoA using new denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis primers suggested that variations in methane oxidation activity may correlate with changes in methanotroph community composition.

  5. Sterol content analysis suggests altered eburicol 14alpha-demethylase (CYP51) activity in isolates of Mycosphaerella graminicola adapted to azole fungicides.

    PubMed

    Bean, Tim P; Cools, Hans J; Lucas, John A; Hawkins, Nathaniel D; Ward, Jane L; Shaw, Michael W; Fraaije, Bart A

    2009-06-01

    The recent decline in the effectiveness of some azole fungicides in controlling the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola has been associated with mutations in the CYP51 gene encoding the azole target, the eburicol 14alpha-demethylase (CYP51), an essential enzyme of the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. In this study, analysis of the sterol content of M. graminicola isolates carrying different variants of the CYP51 gene has revealed quantitative differences in sterol intermediates, particularly the CYP51 substrate eburicol. Together with CYP51 gene expression studies, these data suggest that mutations in the CYP51 gene impact on the activity of the CYP51 protein.

  6. Short communication: Effect of active food packaging materials on fluid milk quality and shelf life.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dana E; Goddard, Julie M

    2014-01-01

    Active packaging, in which active agents are embedded into or on the surface of food packaging materials, can enhance the nutritive value, economics, and stability of food, as well as enable in-package processing. In one embodiment of active food packaging, lactase was covalently immobilized onto packaging films for in-package lactose hydrolysis. In prior work, lactase was covalently bound to low-density polyethylene using polyethyleneimine and glutaraldehyde cross-linkers to form the packaging film. Because of the potential contaminants of proteases, lipases, and spoilage organisms in typical enzyme preparations, the goal of the current work was to determine the effect of immobilized-lactase active packaging technology on unanticipated side effects, such as shortened shelf-life and reduced product quality. Results suggested no evidence of lipase or protease activity on the active packaging films, indicating that such active packaging films could enable in-package lactose hydrolysis without adversely affecting product quality in terms of dairy protein or lipid stability. Storage stability studies indicated that lactase did not migrate from the film over a 49-d period, and that dry storage resulted in 13.41% retained activity, whereas wet storage conditions enabled retention of 62.52% activity. Results of a standard plate count indicated that the film modification reagents introduced minor microbial contamination; however, the microbial population remained under the 20,000 cfu/mL limit through the manufacturer's suggested 14-d storage period for all film samples. This suggests that commercially produced immobilized lactase active packaging should use purified cross-linkers and enzymes. Characterization of unanticipated effects of active packaging on food quality reported here is important in demonstrating the commercial potential of such technologies.

  7. Overview of Indian activities on fusion reactor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Srikumar

    2014-12-01

    This paper on overview of Indian activities on fusion reactor materials describes in brief the efforts India has made to develop materials for the first wall of a tokamak, its blanket and superconducting magnet coils. Through a systematic and scientific approach, India has developed and commercially produced reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel that is comparable to Eurofer 97. Powder of low activation ferritic/martensitic oxide dispersion strengthened steel with characteristics desired for its application in the first wall of a tokamak has been produced on the laboratory scale. V-4Cr-4Ti alloy was also prepared in the laboratory, and kinetics of hydrogen absorption in this was investigated. Cu-1 wt%Cr-0.1 wt%Zr - an alloy meant for use as heat transfer elements for hypervapotrons and heat sink for the first wall - was developed and characterized in detail for its aging behavior. The role of addition of a small quantity of Zr in its improved fatigue performance was delineated, and its diffusion bonding with both W and stainless steel was achieved using Ni as an interlayer. The alloy was produced in large quantities and used for manufacturing both the heat transfer elements and components for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). India has proposed to install and test a lead-lithium cooled ceramic breeder test blanket module (LLCB-TBM) at ITER. To meet this objective, efforts have been made to produce and characterize Li2TiO3 pebbles, and also improve the thermal conductivity of packed beds of these pebbles. Liquid metal loops have been set up and corrosion behavior of RAFM steel in flowing Pb-Li eutectic has been studied in the presence as well as absence of magnetic fields. To prevent permeation of tritium and reduce the magneto-hydro-dynamic drag, processes have been developed for coating alumina on RAFM steel. Apart from these activities, different approaches being attempted to make the U-shaped first wall of the TBM box

  8. Individual sequence variability and functional activities of fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs) in the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) suggest ancient and complex immune recognition models in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Romero, Alejandro; Dios, Sonia; Poisa-Beiro, Laura; Costa, Maria M; Posada, David; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we describe sequences of fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs) in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis (MuFREPs) with the fibrinogen domain probably involved in the antigen recognition, but without the additional collagen-like domain of ficolins, molecules responsible for complement activation by the lectin pathway. Although they do not seem to be true or primive ficolins since the phylogenetic analysis are not conclusive enough, their expression is increased after bacterial infection or PAMPs treatment and they present opsonic activities similar to mammalian ficolins. The most remarkable aspect of these sequences was the existence of a very diverse set of FREP sequences among and within individuals (different mussels do not share any identical sequence) which parallels the extraordinary complexity of the immune system, suggesting the existence of a primitive system with a potential capacity to recognize and eliminate different kind of pathogens.

  9. Canada's Physical Activity Guide: examining print-based material for motivating physical activity in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Todosijczuk, Ivan; Johnson, Steven T; Karunamuni, Nandini

    2012-01-01

    The authors conducted a secondary analysis on 202 adults from the Physical Activity Workplace Study. The aim of this analysis was to examine demographic characteristics associated with reading Canada's Physical Activity Guide (CPAG), being motivated by the guide, and whether participants in the Physical Activity Workplace Study who read the CPAG increased their physical activity levels over 1 year. Results revealed that less than 50% of participants read the full version of CPAG, and less than 10% were motivated by it. The CPAG also appears to be more appealing to and effective for women than for men. Although the CPAG had some influence in increasing mild physical activity levels in a workplace sample, there was also a decrease in physical activity levels among some members of the group. Overall, the effectiveness of CPAG was not substantial, and the findings of this analysis could help guide future targeted intervention materials and programs.

  10. Stage-Specific Binding Profiles of Cohesin in Resting and Activated B Lymphocytes Suggest a Role for Cohesin in Immunoglobulin Class Switching and Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Günal-Sadık, Gamze; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Singaravelu, Kalaimathy; Beyer, Andreas; Buchholz, Frank; Jessberger, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus (Igh) features higher-order chromosomal interactions to facilitate stage-specific assembly of the Ig molecule. Cohesin, a ring-like protein complex required for sister chromatid cohesion, shapes chromosome architecture and chromatin interactions important for transcriptional regulation and often acts together with CTCF. Cohesin is likely involved in B cell activation and Ig class switch recombination. Hence, binding profiles of cohesin in resting mature murine splenic B lymphocytes and at two stages after cell activation were elucidated by chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing. Comparative genomic analysis revealed cohesin extensively changes its binding to transcriptional control elements after 48 h of stimulation with LPS/IL-4. Cohesin was clearly underrepresented at switch regions regardless of their activation status, suggesting that switch regions need to be cohesin-poor. Specific binding changes of cohesin at B-cell specific gene loci Pax5 and Blimp-1 indicate new cohesin-dependent regulatory pathways. Together with conserved cohesin/CTCF sites at the Igh 3′RR, a prominent cohesin/CTCF binding site was revealed near the 3′ end of Cα where PolII localizes to 3′ enhancers. Our study shows that cohesin likely regulates B cell activation and maturation, including Ig class switching. PMID:25375358

  11. Hypnosis, suggestion, and suggestibility: an integrative model.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Steven Jay; Laurence, Jean-Roch; Kirsch, Irving

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates an integrative model of hypnosis that integrates social, cultural, cognitive, and neurophysiological variables at play both in and out of hypnosis and considers their dynamic interaction as determinants of the multifaceted experience of hypnosis. The roles of these variables are examined in the induction and suggestion stages of hypnosis, including how they are related to the experience of involuntariness, one of the hallmarks of hypnosis. It is suggested that studies of the modification of hypnotic suggestibility; cognitive flexibility; response sets and expectancies; the default-mode network; and the search for the neurophysiological correlates of hypnosis, more broadly, in conjunction with research on social psychological variables, hold much promise to further understanding of hypnosis.

  12. IMPACT OF TARGET MATERIAL ACTIVATION ON PERSONNEL EXPOSURE AND RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Khater, H; Epperson, P; Thacker, R; Beale, R; Kohut, T; Brereton, S

    2009-06-30

    Detailed activation analyses are performed for the different materials under consideration for use in the target capsules and hohlraums used during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility. Results of the target material activation were additionally used to estimate the levels of contamination within the NIF target chamber and the workplace controls necessary for safe operation. The analysis examined the impact of using Be-Cu and Ge-doped CH capsules on the external dose received by workers during maintenance activities. Five days following a 20 MJ shot, dose rates inside the Target Chamber (TC) due to the two proposed capsule materials are small ({approx} 1 {micro}rem/h). Gold and depleted-uranium (DU) are considered as potential hohlraum materials. Following a shot, gold will most probably get deposited on the TC first wall. On the other hand, while noble-gas precursors from the DU are expected to stay in the TC, most of the noble gases are pumped out of the chamber and end up on the cryopumps. The dose rates inside the TC due to activated gold or DU, at 5 days following a 20 MJ shot, are about 1 mrem/h. Dose rates in the vicinity of the cryo-pumps (containing noble 'fission' gases) drop-off to about 1 mrem/h during the first 12 hours following the shot. Contamination from activation of NIF targets will result in the NIF target chamber exceeding DOE surface contamination limits. Objects removed from the TC will need to be managed as radioactive material. However, the results suggest that airborne contamination from resuspension of surface contamination will not be significant and is at levels that can be managed by negative ventilation when accessing the TC attachments.

  13. Activities for Teaching about Hazardous Materials in the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Robert W.; And Others

    Materials containing hazardous substances present serious problems to human health and to the health of the environment. There are many potential problems related to the site of a house or apartment, the construction materials used in the house or the apartment, products and materials used in and around the home, and disposal of materials.…

  14. Suggested Involvement of PP1/PP2A Activity and De Novo Gene Expression in Anhydrobiotic Survival in a Tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini, by Chemical Genetic Approach.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Koyuki; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Upon desiccation, some tardigrades enter an ametabolic dehydrated state called anhydrobiosis and can survive a desiccated environment in this state. For successful transition to anhydrobiosis, some anhydrobiotic tardigrades require pre-incubation under high humidity conditions, a process called preconditioning, prior to exposure to severe desiccation. Although tardigrades are thought to prepare for transition to anhydrobiosis during preconditioning, the molecular mechanisms governing such processes remain unknown. In this study, we used chemical genetic approaches to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of anhydrobiosis in the anhydrobiotic tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini. We first demonstrated that inhibition of transcription or translation drastically impaired anhydrobiotic survival, suggesting that de novo gene expression is required for successful transition to anhydrobiosis in this tardigrade. We then screened 81 chemicals and identified 5 chemicals that significantly impaired anhydrobiotic survival after severe desiccation, in contrast to little or no effect on survival after high humidity exposure only. In particular, cantharidic acid, a selective inhibitor of protein phosphatase (PP) 1 and PP2A, exhibited the most profound inhibitory effects. Another PP1/PP2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, also significantly and specifically impaired anhydrobiotic survival, suggesting that PP1/PP2A activity plays an important role for anhydrobiosis in this species. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of the required activities of signaling molecules for desiccation tolerance in tardigrades. The identified inhibitory chemicals could provide novel clues to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms underlying anhydrobiosis in tardigrades.

  15. Suggested Involvement of PP1/PP2A Activity and De Novo Gene Expression in Anhydrobiotic Survival in a Tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini, by Chemical Genetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Koyuki; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Upon desiccation, some tardigrades enter an ametabolic dehydrated state called anhydrobiosis and can survive a desiccated environment in this state. For successful transition to anhydrobiosis, some anhydrobiotic tardigrades require pre-incubation under high humidity conditions, a process called preconditioning, prior to exposure to severe desiccation. Although tardigrades are thought to prepare for transition to anhydrobiosis during preconditioning, the molecular mechanisms governing such processes remain unknown. In this study, we used chemical genetic approaches to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of anhydrobiosis in the anhydrobiotic tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini. We first demonstrated that inhibition of transcription or translation drastically impaired anhydrobiotic survival, suggesting that de novo gene expression is required for successful transition to anhydrobiosis in this tardigrade. We then screened 81 chemicals and identified 5 chemicals that significantly impaired anhydrobiotic survival after severe desiccation, in contrast to little or no effect on survival after high humidity exposure only. In particular, cantharidic acid, a selective inhibitor of protein phosphatase (PP) 1 and PP2A, exhibited the most profound inhibitory effects. Another PP1/PP2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, also significantly and specifically impaired anhydrobiotic survival, suggesting that PP1/PP2A activity plays an important role for anhydrobiosis in this species. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of the required activities of signaling molecules for desiccation tolerance in tardigrades. The identified inhibitory chemicals could provide novel clues to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms underlying anhydrobiosis in tardigrades. PMID:26690982

  16. Material Supply and Magnetic Configuration of an Active Region Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, P.; Fang, C.; Chen, P. F.; Yang, K.; Hao, Q.; Cao, Wenda

    2016-11-01

    It is important to study the fine structures of solar filaments with high-resolution observations, since it can help us understand the magnetic and thermal structures of the filaments and their dynamics. In this paper, we study a newly formed filament located inside the active region NOAA 11762, which was observed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory from 16:40:19 UT to 17:07:58 UT on 2013 June 5. As revealed by the Hα filtergrams, cool material is seen to be injected into the filament spine with a speed of 5-10 km s-1. At the source of the injection, brightenings are identified in the chromosphere, which are accompanied by magnetic cancellation in the photosphere, implying the importance of magnetic reconnection in replenishing the filament with plasmas from the lower atmosphere. Counter-streamings are detected near one endpoint of the filament, with the plane-of-the-sky speed being 7-9 km s-1 in the Hα red-wing filtergrams and 9-25 km s-1 in the blue-wing filtergrams. The observations are indicative that this active region filament is supported by a sheared arcade without magnetic dips, and the counter-streamings are due to unidirectional flows with alternative directions, rather than due to the longitudinal oscillations of filament threads as in many other filaments.

  17. Clonality Analysis of Immunoglobulin Gene Rearrangement by Next-Generation Sequencing in Endemic Burkitt Lymphoma Suggests Antigen Drive Activation of BCR as Opposed to Sporadic Burkitt Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Teresa; Abate, Francesco; Piccaluga, Pierpaolo; Iacono, Michele; Fallerini, Chiara; Renieri, Alessandra; De Falco, Giulia; Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Mourmouras, Vaselious; Ogwang, Martin; Calbi, Valeria; Rabadan, Roul; Hummel, Michael; Pileri, Stefano; Bellan, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Recent studies using next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis disclosed the importance of the intrinsic activation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway in the pathogenesis of sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (sBL) due to mutations of TCF3/ID3 genes. Since no definitive data are available on the genetic landscape of endemic Burkitt (eBL), we first assessed the mutation frequency of TCF3/ID3 in eBL compared with sBL and subsequently the somatic hypermutation status of the BCR to answer whether an extrinsic activation of BCR signaling could also be demonstrated in Burkitt lymphoma. Methods: We assessed the mutations of TCF3/ID3 by RNAseq and the BCR status by NGS analysis of the immunoglobulin genes (IGs). Results: We detected mutations of TCF3/ID3 in about 30% of the eBL cases. This rate is significantly lower than that detected in sBL (64%). The NGS analysis of IGs revealed intraclonal diversity, suggesting an active targeted somatic hypermutation process in eBL compared with sBL. Conclusions: These findings support the view that the antigenic pressure plays a key role in the pathogenetic pathways of eBL, which may be partially distinct from those driving sBL development. PMID:26712879

  18. Evaluation of cytotoxicity, antimicrobial activity and physicochemical properties of a calcium aluminate-based endodontic material

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; HERRERA, Daniel Rodrigo; ROSA, Tiago Pereira; DUQUE, Thais Mageste; JACINTO, Rogério Castilho; GOMES, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida; ZAIA, Alexandre Augusto

    2014-01-01

    A calcium aluminate-based endodontic material, EndoBinder, has been developed in order to reduce MTA negative characteristics, preserving its biological properties and clinical applications. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity, antimicrobial activity, pH, solubility and water sorption of EndoBinder and to compare them with those of white MTA (WMTA). Material and Methods Cytotoxicity was assessed through a multiparametric analysis employing 3T3 cells. Antimicrobial activity against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212), Staphylococcus aureus. (ATCC 25923) and Candida albicans (ATCC 10556) was determined by the agar diffusion method. pH was measured at periods of 3, 24, 72 and 168 hours. Solubility and water sorption evaluation were performed following ISO requirements. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey`s test with a significance level of 5%. Results EndoBinder and WMTA were non-cytotoxic in all tested periods and with the different cell viability parameters. There was no statistical differences between both materials (P>.05). All tested materials were inhibitory by direct contact against all microbial strains tested. EndoBinder and WMTA presented alkaline pH in all tested times with higher values of pH for WMTA (P<.05). Both materials showed values complying with the solubility minimum requirements. However, EndoBinder showed lower solubility than WMTA (P<.05). No statistical differences were observed regarding water sorption (P>.05). Conclusion Under these experimental conditions, we concluded that the calcium aluminate-based endodontic material EndoBinder demonstrated suitable biological and physicochemical properties, so it can be suggested as a material of choice in root resorption, perforations and root-end filling. PMID:24626250

  19. Engineering Ferroic and Multiferroic Materials for Active Cooling Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-11

    spontaneous polarization and large dielectric, piezoelectric, and pyroelectric susceptibilities. [ 3 , 4 ] In bulk versions of these materials (i.e., single... materials requires that one can independently enhance the pyroelectric coefficient (which describes the change in polarization of these materials with an...gradients in the polarization within the material . The measured vertical offsets, however, were found to be explicitly dependent on the measurement circuit

  20. Comparison of human monocytes isolated by elutriation and adherence suggests that heterogeneity may reflect a continuum of maturation/activation states.

    PubMed Central

    Dransfield, I; Corcoran, D; Partridge, L J; Hogg, N; Burton, D R

    1988-01-01

    Monocytes are heterogeneous both in terms of physical properties and in their functional capacity. Isolation of monocytes from peripheral blood may perturb the observed heterogeneity for purified cell preparations. To explore this possibility we examined monocytes prepared by two techniques, counter-flow centrifugation elutriation (CCE) and fibronectin adherence, in terms of cell-surface molecule expression and several physical properties. Although such cells would be expected to represent dissimilar cross-sections of the total monocyte population, they were found to have similar cell-surface antigenic profiles. Observed differences in levels of expression of several molecules (CR1, CR3 and the antigen recognized by LP9 antibody) were found to be a temperature-related phenomenon. These results indicate that monocytes are not divisible into 'subpopulations' on the basis of cell-surface molecule expression and suggest that heterogeneity of monocytes may reflect the presence in the circulation of a continuum of maturational/activation states. PMID:3350583

  1. Investigation of the Fusarium virguliforme Transcriptomes Induced during Infection of Soybean Roots Suggests that Enzymes with Hydrolytic Activities Could Play a Major Role in Root Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Binod B.; Baumbach, Jordan L.; Singh, Prashant; Srivastava, Subodh K.; Yi, Xiaoping

    2017-01-01

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is caused by the fungal pathogen, Fusarium virguliforme, and is a major threat to soybean production in North America. There are two major components of this disease: (i) root necrosis and (ii) foliar SDS. Root symptoms consist of root necrosis with vascular discoloration. Foliar SDS is characterized by interveinal chlorosis and leaf necrosis, and in severe cases by flower and pod abscission. A major toxin involved in initiating foliar SDS has been identified. Nothing is known about how root necrosis develops. In order to unravel the mechanisms used by the pathogen to cause root necrosis, the transcriptome of the pathogen in infected soybean root tissues of a susceptible cultivar, ‘Essex’, was investigated. The transcriptomes of the germinating conidia and mycelia were also examined. Of the 14,845 predicted F. virguliforme genes, we observed that 12,017 (81%) were expressed in germinating conidia and 12,208 (82%) in mycelia and 10,626 (72%) in infected soybean roots. Of the 10,626 genes induced in infected roots, 224 were transcribed only following infection. Expression of several infection-induced genes encoding enzymes with oxidation-reduction properties suggests that degradation of antimicrobial compounds such as the phytoalexin, glyceollin, could be important in early stages of the root tissue infection. Enzymes with hydrolytic and catalytic activities could play an important role in establishing the necrotrophic phase. The expression of a large number of genes encoding enzymes with catalytic and hydrolytic activities during the late infection stages suggests that cell wall degradation could be involved in root necrosis and the establishment of the necrotrophic phase in this pathogen. PMID:28095498

  2. (Bio)hybrid materials based on optically active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitzig, Manuela; Härtling, Thomas; Opitz, Jörg

    2014-03-01

    In this contribution we provide an overview of current investigations on optically active particles (nanodiamonds, upconversion phospors) for biohybrid and sensing applications. Due to their outstanding properties nanodiamonds gain attention in various application elds such as microelectronics, optical monitoring, medicine, and biotechnology. Beyond the typical diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity and extreme hardness, the carbon surface and its various functional groups enable diverse chemical and biological surface functionalization. At Fraunhofer IKTS-MD we develop a customization of material surfaces via integration of chemically modi ed nanodiamonds at variable surfaces, e.g bone implants and pipelines. For the rst purpose, nanodiamonds are covalently modi ed at their surface with amino or phosphate functionalities that are known to increase adhesion to bone or titanium alloys. The second type of surface is approached via mechanical implementation into coatings. Besides nanodiamonds, we also investigate the properties of upconversion phosphors. In our contribution we show how upconversion phosphors are used to verify sterilization processes via a change of optical properties due to sterilizing electron beam exposure.

  3. Structural materials for fusion power reactors—the RF R&D activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. M.; Leonteva-Smirnova, M. V.; Potapenko, M. M.; Budylkin, N. I.; Devyatko, Yu. N.; Ioltoukhovskiy, A. G.; Mironova, E. G.; Shikov, A. K.; Sivak, A. B.; Yermolaev, G. N.; Kalashnikov, A. N.; Kuteev, B. V.; Blokhin, A. I.; Loginov, N. I.; Romanov, V. A.; Belyakov, V. A.; Kirillov, I. R.; Bulanova, T. M.; Golovanov, V. N.; Shamardin, V. K.; Strebkov, Yu. S.; Tyumentsev, A. N.; Kardashev, B. K.; Mishin, O. V.; Vasiliev, B. A.

    2007-08-01

    Recent progress in the RF low activation structural materials R&D road map towards DEMO via the FBR tests (BOR-60, BN-600, BN-800) and the TBM tests in ITER is overviewed. The properties of the RAFMS RUSFER-EK-181 (Fe-12Cr-2W-Ta-V-B-C) and the V-4Ti-4Cr alloys are presented. The next important steps include further studies on the influence of high dose and high-temperature irradiation on the properties of base structural materials and joints. Activation, transmutation and radiation damage of the materials in BN-600 and DEMO-RF (Kurchatov Institute project) neutron spectra are calculated. The results of the application of the internal friction (ultrasonic) non-destructive method to research the DBTT are in good agreement with the results of the destructive impact method. The important influence of boron on the heat resistance of materials and the He concentration level under irradiation are calculated. The new special regimes of the heat treatments of the alloys are suggested to widen the temperature windows of the applications. The results of the BOR-60 examinations of RUSFER-EK-181 (irradiation temperature 320-340 °C and doses up to 15 dpa) are presented. The BN-600 projects for the high dose and high-temperature irradiation tests of manufactured alloys are presented.

  4. RNA-Based Stable Isotope Probing Suggests Allobaculum spp. as Particularly Active Glucose Assimilators in a Complex Murine Microbiota Cultured In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Elena; Young, Wayne; Rosendale, Douglas; Reichert-Grimm, Verena; Riedel, Christian U; Conrad, Ralf; Egert, Markus

    2017-01-01

    RNA-based stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) and metabolic profiling were used to detect actively glucose-consuming bacteria in a complex microbial community obtained from a murine model system. A faeces-derived microbiota was incubated under anaerobic conditions for 0, 2, and 4 h with 40 mM [U(13)C]glucose. Isopycnic density gradient ultracentrifugation and fractionation of isolated RNA into labeled and unlabeled fractions followed by 16S rRNA sequencing showed a quick adaptation of the bacterial community in response to the added sugar, which was dominated by unclassified Lachnospiraceae species. Inspection of distinct fractions of isotope-labeled RNA revealed Allobaculum spp. as particularly active glucose utilizers in the system, as the corresponding RNA showed significantly higher proportions among the labeled RNA. With time, the labeled sugar was used by a wider spectrum of faecal bacteria. Metabolic profiling indicated rapid fermentation of [U(13)C]glucose, with lactate, acetate, and propionate being the principal (13)C-labeled fermentation products, and suggested that "cross-feeding" occurred in the system. RNA-SIP combined with metabolic profiling of (13)C-labeled products allowed insights into the microbial assimilation of a general model substrate, demonstrating the appropriateness of this technology to study assimilation processes of nutritionally more relevant substrates, for example, prebiotic carbohydrates, in the gut microbiota of mice as a model system.

  5. RNA-Based Stable Isotope Probing Suggests Allobaculum spp. as Particularly Active Glucose Assimilators in a Complex Murine Microbiota Cultured In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Elena; Young, Wayne; Rosendale, Douglas; Reichert-Grimm, Verena; Conrad, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    RNA-based stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) and metabolic profiling were used to detect actively glucose-consuming bacteria in a complex microbial community obtained from a murine model system. A faeces-derived microbiota was incubated under anaerobic conditions for 0, 2, and 4 h with 40 mM [U13C]glucose. Isopycnic density gradient ultracentrifugation and fractionation of isolated RNA into labeled and unlabeled fractions followed by 16S rRNA sequencing showed a quick adaptation of the bacterial community in response to the added sugar, which was dominated by unclassified Lachnospiraceae species. Inspection of distinct fractions of isotope-labeled RNA revealed Allobaculum spp. as particularly active glucose utilizers in the system, as the corresponding RNA showed significantly higher proportions among the labeled RNA. With time, the labeled sugar was used by a wider spectrum of faecal bacteria. Metabolic profiling indicated rapid fermentation of [U13C]glucose, with lactate, acetate, and propionate being the principal 13C-labeled fermentation products, and suggested that “cross-feeding” occurred in the system. RNA-SIP combined with metabolic profiling of 13C-labeled products allowed insights into the microbial assimilation of a general model substrate, demonstrating the appropriateness of this technology to study assimilation processes of nutritionally more relevant substrates, for example, prebiotic carbohydrates, in the gut microbiota of mice as a model system. PMID:28299315

  6. Activated microporous materials through polymerization of microemulsion precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, Arunkumar

    Microemulsions have been well studied for their unique characteristics. They are isotropic, thermodynamically stable and microstructured mixtures of oil and water stabilized by one or more surfactant species. They are formed spontaneously and are thermodynamically stable. Microemulsion precursors can be polymerized to make microporous solids with controlled pore structure and sizes. These polymeric solids have been studied extensively in the past. Although the fundamental properties of the microporous solids have been studied in depth, the development of specific applications that will utilize the unique properties of these solids has not been exhaustively researched. The current work establishes the feasibility of making activated microporous solids from microemulsion precursors, by the use of a ligand that chelates metals and also attaches itself to the polymer monolith. It also uses a novel 'in-situ' incorporation by combining the formulation and incorporation steps into one. The research objectives are, to formulate a microemulsion system that can yield useful microporous solids upon polymerization and activation, to characterize these solids using existing techniques available for analysis of similar microporous solids, to identify and understand the effect of the variables in the system and to study the influence of these variables on the performance characteristics of this material. Characterization techniques like Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Thermogravimetric Analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used. A hydroxyethylmethylmethacrylate/methylmethacrylate/aqueous phase containing 10% SDS' system was chosen as the precursor microemulsion and the corresponding microporous solids were made. A metal chelating ligand, Congo Red, was incorporated onto the microporous polymer using NaOH as a binding agent. The ability of the resultant 'activated' microporous solid to remove metal ions from solution, was evaluated. The metal ion chosen was chromium

  7. Evaluation of functional stability of quercetin as a raw material and in different topical formulations by its antilipoperoxidative activity.

    PubMed

    Casagrande, Rúbia; Georgetti, Sandra R; Verri, Waldiceu A; Jabor, José R; Santos, Antonio C; Fonseca, Maria J V

    2006-03-01

    The present study evaluates the antioxidant activity of the flavonol quercetin, and its functional stability as a raw material and when added in formulations. The iron-chelating activity was determined using the bathophenanthroline assay, and the functional stability was evaluated with the antilipoperoxidative assay. Raw material presented concentration-dependent antilipoperoxidative and iron-chelating activities. The initial antilipoperoxidative activity of the raw material, cream and gel-cream were 63%, 78%, and 69%, respectively. There was no detectable loss of activity during 182 days (6 months) of storage at all tested temperatures (4°C, room temperature [RT], 37°C, and 45°C) for the raw material. Considering the method variability of 10%, activity loss greater than 10% for nonionic cream was detected after 126 days at 4°C (20.1%), decreasing thereafter to 22.2% after 182 days. At 45°C, the loss of activity started after 182 days (13.2%). For the anionic gel-cream, activity loss started after 84 days (28.4%, 45°C), decreasing after 182 days to 40.3% at 45°C. At 37°C, activity loss was detected after 182 days (12%). In conclusion, the results suggest that the activity of quercetin depends on iron chelation, and its posible usefulness as a topical antioxidant to prevent oxidative stress-induced skin damage depends on maintaining its antilipoperoxidative activity stored at RT, which avoids special storage conditions.

  8. Active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons using a phase transition material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun-Je; Yun, Hansik; Park, Kyungsoo; Hong, Jongwoo; Yun, Jeong-Geun; Lee, Kyookeun; Kim, Joonsoo; Jeong, Sun Jae; Mun, Sang-Eun; Sung, Jangwoon; Lee, Yong Wook; Lee, Byoungho

    2017-03-01

    Active switching of near-field directivity, which is an essential functionality for compact integrated photonics and small optoelectronic elements, has been challenging due to small modulation depth and complicated fabrication methods for devices including active optical materials. Here, we theoretically and experimentally realize a nanoscale active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using a phase transition material for the first time. The SPP switching device with noticeable distinction is demonstrated based on the phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2) at the telecom wavelength. As the insulator-to-metal phase transition (IMT) of VO2 induces the large change of VO2 permittivity at telecom wavelengths, the plasmonic response of a nanoantenna made of VO2 can be largely tuned by external thermal stimuli. The VO2-insulator-metal (VIM) nanoantenna and its periodic array, the VIM metagrating, are suggested as optical switches. The directional power distinction ratio is designed to change from 8.13:1 to 1:10.56 by the IMT and it is experimentally verified that the ratio changes from 3.725:1 to 1:3.132 as the VIM metagratings are heated up to 90 °C. With an electro-thermally controllable configuration and an optimized resonant design, we expect potential applications of the active switching mechanism for integrable active plasmonic elements and reconfigurable imaging.

  9. Active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons using a phase transition material

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Je; Yun, Hansik; Park, Kyungsoo; Hong, Jongwoo; Yun, Jeong-Geun; Lee, Kyookeun; Kim, Joonsoo; Jeong, Sun Jae; Mun, Sang-Eun; Sung, Jangwoon; Lee, Yong Wook; Lee, Byoungho

    2017-01-01

    Active switching of near-field directivity, which is an essential functionality for compact integrated photonics and small optoelectronic elements, has been challenging due to small modulation depth and complicated fabrication methods for devices including active optical materials. Here, we theoretically and experimentally realize a nanoscale active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using a phase transition material for the first time. The SPP switching device with noticeable distinction is demonstrated based on the phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2) at the telecom wavelength. As the insulator-to-metal phase transition (IMT) of VO2 induces the large change of VO2 permittivity at telecom wavelengths, the plasmonic response of a nanoantenna made of VO2 can be largely tuned by external thermal stimuli. The VO2-insulator-metal (VIM) nanoantenna and its periodic array, the VIM metagrating, are suggested as optical switches. The directional power distinction ratio is designed to change from 8.13:1 to 1:10.56 by the IMT and it is experimentally verified that the ratio changes from 3.725:1 to 1:3.132 as the VIM metagratings are heated up to 90 °C. With an electro-thermally controllable configuration and an optimized resonant design, we expect potential applications of the active switching mechanism for integrable active plasmonic elements and reconfigurable imaging. PMID:28262702

  10. Active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons using a phase transition material.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Je; Yun, Hansik; Park, Kyungsoo; Hong, Jongwoo; Yun, Jeong-Geun; Lee, Kyookeun; Kim, Joonsoo; Jeong, Sun Jae; Mun, Sang-Eun; Sung, Jangwoon; Lee, Yong Wook; Lee, Byoungho

    2017-03-06

    Active switching of near-field directivity, which is an essential functionality for compact integrated photonics and small optoelectronic elements, has been challenging due to small modulation depth and complicated fabrication methods for devices including active optical materials. Here, we theoretically and experimentally realize a nanoscale active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using a phase transition material for the first time. The SPP switching device with noticeable distinction is demonstrated based on the phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2) at the telecom wavelength. As the insulator-to-metal phase transition (IMT) of VO2 induces the large change of VO2 permittivity at telecom wavelengths, the plasmonic response of a nanoantenna made of VO2 can be largely tuned by external thermal stimuli. The VO2-insulator-metal (VIM) nanoantenna and its periodic array, the VIM metagrating, are suggested as optical switches. The directional power distinction ratio is designed to change from 8.13:1 to 1:10.56 by the IMT and it is experimentally verified that the ratio changes from 3.725:1 to 1:3.132 as the VIM metagratings are heated up to 90 °C. With an electro-thermally controllable configuration and an optimized resonant design, we expect potential applications of the active switching mechanism for integrable active plasmonic elements and reconfigurable imaging.

  11. Age-related changes in the bimanual advantage and in brain oscillatory activity during tapping movements suggest a decline in processing sensory reafference.

    PubMed

    Sallard, Etienne; Spierer, Lucas; Ludwig, Catherine; Deiber, Marie-Pierre; Barral, Jérôme

    2014-02-01

    Deficits in the processing of sensory reafferences have been suggested as accounting for age-related decline in motor coordination. Whether sensory reafferences are accurately processed can be assessed based on the bimanual advantage in tapping: because of tapping with an additional hand increases kinesthetic reafferences, bimanual tapping is characterized by a reduced inter-tap interval variability than unimanual tapping. A suppression of the bimanual advantage would thus indicate a deficit in sensory reafference. We tested whether elderly indeed show a reduced bimanual advantage by measuring unimanual (UM) and bimanual (BM) self-paced tapping performance in groups of young (n = 29) and old (n = 27) healthy adults. Electroencephalogram was recorded to assess the underlying patterns of oscillatory activity, a neurophysiological mechanism advanced to support the integration of sensory reafferences. Behaviorally, there was a significant interaction between the factors tapping condition and age group at the level of the inter-tap interval variability, driven by a lower variability in BM than UM tapping in the young, but not in the elderly group. This result indicates that in self-paced tapping, the bimanual advantage is absent in elderly. Electrophysiological results revealed an interaction between tapping condition and age group on low beta band (14-20 Hz) activity. Beta activity varied depending on the tapping condition in the elderly but not in the young group. Source estimations localized this effect within left superior parietal and left occipital areas. We interpret our results in terms of engagement of different mechanisms in the elderly depending on the tapping mode: a 'kinesthetic' mechanism for UM and a 'visual imagery' mechanism for BM tapping movement.

  12. Open to Suggestion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Reading, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Offers (1) suggestions for improving college students' study skills; (2) a system for keeping track of parent, teacher, and community contacts; (3) suggestions for motivating students using tic tac toe; (4) suggestions for using etymology to improve word retention; (5) a word search grid; and (6) suggestions for using postcards in remedial reading…

  13. Single-agent lenalidomide in relapsed/refractory mantle cell lymphoma: results from a UK phase II study suggest activity and possible gender differences.

    PubMed

    Eve, Heather E; Carey, Sean; Richardson, Sarah J; Heise, Carla C; Mamidipudi, Vidya; Shi, Tao; Radford, John A; Auer, Rebecca L; Bullard, Sheila H; Rule, Simon A J

    2012-10-01

    We present data from a phase II study investigating a novel treatment strategy for relapsed/refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Twenty-six patients received lenalidomide 25 mg/d (days 1-21 of a 28-d cycle) for up to 6 cycles followed by low-dose maintenance lenalidomide (15 mg) in responding patients. Eight patients achieved complete or partial response to give an overall response rate of 31% with median response duration of 22·2 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·0-53·6] and median progression-free survival (PFS) of 3·9 months (95% CI 0·0-11·1). An additional six patients (23%) achieved stable disease. Eleven patients received maintenance with median PFS of 14·6 months (95% CI 7·3-21·9). Correlative studies showed that peripheral T and Natural Killer (NK) cells increased in responding patients by 40-60% over the first 6 cycles with an initial dip in NK cells suggestive of tumour infiltration. Peripheral regulatory T cells were increased in MCL patients (P = 0·001) and expanded further following lenalidomide. Sequential plasma analysis showed increased IL12 p40 and IL7 alongside decreased MMP9, IL10, and adiponectin. Finally, a significant correlation (P = 0·02) between gender and response suggested that female MCL patients were more sensitive to lenalidomide than males. In summary, we confirm the activity, safety and immunomodulatory properties of lenalidomide in MCL and highlight its potential as a low-dose maintenance agent.

  14. Exosomes secreted by human placenta carry functional Fas ligand and TRAIL molecules and convey apoptosis in activated immune cells, suggesting exosome-mediated immune privilege of the fetus.

    PubMed

    Stenqvist, Ann-Christin; Nagaeva, Olga; Baranov, Vladimir; Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia

    2013-12-01

    Apoptosis is crucially important in mediating immune privilege of the fetus during pregnancy. We investigated the expression and in vitro apoptotic activity of two physiologically relevant death messengers, the TNF family members Fas ligand (FasL) and TRAIL in human early and term placentas. Both molecules were intracellularly expressed, confined to the late endosomal compartment of the syncytiotrophoblast, and tightly associated to the generation and secretion of placental exosomes. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we show that FasL and TRAIL are expressed on the limiting membrane of multivesicular bodies where, by membrane invagination, intraluminal microvesicles carrying membranal bioactive FasL and TRAIL are formed and released in the extracellular space as exosomes. Analyzing exosomes secreted from placental explant cultures, to our knowledge, we demonstrate for the first time that FasL and TRAIL are clustered on the exosomal membrane as oligomerized aggregates ready to form death-inducing signaling complex. Consistently, placental FasL- and TRAIL-carrying exosomes triggered apoptosis in Jurkat T cells and activated PBMC in a dose-dependent manner. Limiting the expression of functional FasL and TRAIL to exosomes comprise a dual benefit: 1) storage of exosomal FasL and TRAIL in multivesicular bodies is protected from proteolytic cleavage and 2) upon secretion, delivery of preformed membranal death molecules by exosomes rapidly triggers apoptosis. Our results suggest that bioactive FasL- and TRAIL-carrying exosomes, able to convey apoptosis, are secreted by the placenta and tie up the immunomodulatory and protective role of human placenta to its exosome-secreting ability.

  15. Suicidality and interrogative suggestibility.

    PubMed

    Pritchard-Boone, Lea; Range, Lillian M

    2005-01-01

    All people are subject to memory suggestibility, but suicidal individuals may be especially so. The link between suicidality and suggestibility is unclear given mixed findings and methodological weaknesses of past research. To test the link between suicidality and interrogative suggestibility, 149 undergraduates answered questions about suicidal thoughts and reasons for living, and participated in a direct suggestibility procedure. As expected, suggestibility correlated with suicidality but accounted for little overall variance (4%). Mental health professionals might be able to take advantage of client suggestibility by directly telling suicidal persons to refrain from suicidal thoughts or actions.

  16. Anthropogenic activities have contributed moderately to increased inputs of organic materials in marginal seas off China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang-Ying; Wei, Gao-Ling; Wang, Ji-Zhong; Guan, Yu-Feng; Wong, Charles S; Wu, Feng-Chang; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2013-10-15

    Sediment has been recognized as a gigantic sink of organic materials and therefore can record temporal input trends. To examine the impact of anthropogenic activities on the marginal seas off China, sediment cores were collected from the Yellow Sea, the inner shelf of the East China Sea (ECS), and the South China Sea (SCS) to investigate the sources and spatial and temporal variations of organic materials, i.e., total organic carbon (TOC) and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The concentration ranges of TOC were 0.5-1.29, 0.63-0.83, and 0.33-0.85%, while those of Σn-C14-35 (sum of n-alkanes with carbon numbers of 14-35) were 0.08-1.5, 0.13-1.97, and 0.35-0.96 μg/g dry weight in sediment cores from the Yellow Sea, ECS inner shelf, and the SCS, respectively. Terrestrial higher plants were an important source of aliphatic hydrocarbons in marine sediments off China. The spatial distribution of Σn-C14-35 concentrations and source diagnostic ratios suggested a greater load of terrestrial organic materials in the Yellow Sea than in the ECS and SCS. Temporally, TOC and Σn-C14-35 concentrations increased with time and peaked at either the surface or immediate subsurface layers. This increase was probably reflective of elevated inputs of organic materials to marginal seas off China in recent years, and attributed partly to the impacts of intensified anthropogenic activities in mainland China. Source diagnostics also suggested that aliphatic hydrocarbons were mainly derived from biogenic sources, with a minority in surface sediment layers from petroleum sources, consistent with the above-mentioned postulation.

  17. Adaptive, Active and Multifunctional Composite and Hybrid Materials Program: Composite and Hybrid Materials ERA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    were exposed to a spray of polar solvent or polar solvent/ water absorbing polymer . When compared to the control, the doped yarns doubled in... Polymer Nanocomposite Synthesis ................................25 4.6.2 Polymeric Nanocomposite Battery Materials...merged into the ERA bridge program: in-house polymer synthesis and processing projects of graded preceramic polymeric hybrid materials, a laser

  18. The Life of Suggestions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Cathie

    2010-01-01

    Using the notion of a suggestion, or rather charting the life of suggestions, this article considers the happenings of chance and embodiment as the "problems that got away." The life of suggestions helps us to ask how connectivities are made, how desire functions, and how "immanence" rather than "transcendence" can open up the politics and ethics…

  19. Estimating discharged plutonium using measurements of structural material activation products

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, W. S.; Lumley-Woodyear, A. de; Budlong-Sylvester, K. W.

    2002-01-01

    As the US and Russia move to lower numbers of deployed nuclear weapons, transparency regarding the quantity of weapons usable fissile material available in each country may become more important. In some cases detailed historical information regarding material production at individual facilities may be incomplete or not readily available, e.g., at decommissioned facilities. In such cases tools may be needed to produce estimates of aggregate material production as part of a bilateral agreement. Such measurement techniques could also provide increased confidence in declared production quantities.

  20. 77 FR 24269 - Proposed Information Collection (Description of Materials) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Description of Materials) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY... information needed to determine if proposed construction material meets regulatory requirements and if the property is suitable for mortgage insurance. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the...

  1. Photoluminescence Mechanism and Photocatalytic Activity of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Materials Formed by Sequential Vapor Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Akyildiz, Halil I; Stano, Kelly L; Roberts, Adam T; Everitt, Henry O; Jur, Jesse S

    2016-05-03

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials formed by sequential vapor infiltration (SVI) of trimethylaluminum into polyester fibers are demonstrated, and the photoluminescence of the fibers is evaluated using a combined UV-vis and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy approach. The optical activity of the modified fibers depends on infiltration thermal processing conditions and is attributed to the reaction mechanisms taking place at different temperatures. At low temperatures a single excitation band and dual emission bands are observed, while, at high temperatures, two distinct absorption bands and one emission band are observed, suggesting that the physical and chemical structure of the resulting hybrid material depends on the SVI temperature. Along with enhancing the photoluminescence intensity of the PET fibers, the internal quantum efficiency also increased to 5-fold from ∼4-5% to ∼24%. SVI processing also improved the photocatalytic activity of the fibers, as demonstrated by photodeposition of Ag and Au metal particles out of an aqueous metal salt solution onto fiber surfaces via UVA light exposure. Toward applications in flexible electronics, well-defined patterning of the metallic materials is achieved by using light masking and focused laser rastering approaches.

  2. Electron-beam activated thermal sputtering of thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jinsong; Dravid, Vinayak P.; He Jiaqing; Han, Mi-Kyung; Sootsman, Joseph R.; Girard, Steven; Arachchige, Indika U.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2011-08-15

    Thermoelectricity and Seebeck effect have long been observed and validated in bulk materials. With the development of advanced tools of materials characterization, here we report the first observation of such an effect in the nanometer scale: in situ directional sputtering of several thermoelectric materials inside electron microscopes. The temperature gradient introduced by the electron beam creates a voltage-drop across the samples, which enhances spontaneous sputtering of specimen ions. The sputtering occurs along a preferential direction determined by the direction of the temperature gradient. A large number of nanoparticles form and accumulate away from the beam location as a result. The sputtering and re-crystallization are found to occur at temperatures far below the melting points of bulk materials. The sputtering occurs even when a liquid nitrogen cooling holder is used to keep the overall temperature at -170 deg. C. This unique phenomenon that occurred in the nanometer scale may provide useful clues to understanding the mechanism of thermoelectric effect.

  3. Electron-beam activated thermal sputtering of thermoelectric materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; He, J.; Han, M-K.; Sootsman, J. R.; Girard, S.; Arachchige, I. U.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Dravid, V. P.

    2011-08-01

    Thermoelectricity and Seebeck effect have long been observed and validated in bulk materials. With the development of advanced tools of materials characterization, here we report the first observation of such an effect in the nanometer scale: in situ directional sputtering of several thermoelectric materials inside electron microscopes. The temperature gradient introduced by the electron beam creates a voltage-drop across the samples, which enhances spontaneous sputtering of specimen ions. The sputtering occurs along a preferential direction determined by the direction of the temperature gradient. A large number of nanoparticles form and accumulate away from the beam location as a result. The sputtering and re-crystallization are found to occur at temperatures far below the melting points of bulk materials. The sputtering occurs even when a liquid nitrogen cooling holder is used to keep the overall temperature at -170 C. This unique phenomenon that occurred in the nanometer scale may provide useful clues to understanding the mechanism of thermoelectric effect.

  4. Open to Suggestion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Reading, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Contributors offer teaching ideas, including: using Sherlock Holmes mysteries to teach character and plot development, using materials supplied by the athletic coaches in the reading laboratory, and using individualized reading in the content areas. (AEA)

  5. The phenotype and activation status of T and NK cells in porcine colostrum suggest these are central/effector memory cells.

    PubMed

    Hlavova, Karolina; Stepanova, Hana; Faldyna, Martin

    2014-12-01

    In pigs, the epitheliochorial placenta does not allow transfer of maternally derived antibodies or immune cells to the fetus. Thus, piglets are dependent on intake of colostrum for acquisition of passive immunity during the neonatal period. As well as immunoglobulin G (IgG), cellular components of colostrum, mainly lymphocytes, can enter the systemic circulation and secondary lymphoid organs of the neonate. In order to understand the function and immunological role of these cells, a flow cytometric study was undertaken to characterise the cellular profile and phenotype of T cells and NK cells present in porcine colostrum. The results indicated that the greatest numbers of lymphocytes were found on the first day of lactation. The predominant cell types in colostrum were CD8(+) single positive T cells (53.6%), followed by CD4(+)CD8(+) double positive T cells (21.1%), CD2(+)CD8(+) γδ T cells (15.0%) and NK cells (13.5%). CD4(+) single positive T cells (4.4%) and other γδ T cell subpopulations (1.8% CD2(-)CD8(-) and 0.4% CD2(+)CD8(-)) were present in colostrum at low levels. Although the profile of the T cell subpopulations during the first 3 days of lactation remained constant, the absolute numbers of T and NK cells decreased significantly in the first few hours of lactation. Expression of CCR7, CD11b, CD25, CD45RA and MHC class II was used to assess the activation status of T and NK cells in colostrum. T cell subpopulations expressed markers consistent with an effector memory phenotype, indicating that these were antigen-experienced cells. The phenotype of colostral T and NK cells suggests a role in mucosal immunity and potentially in transfer of passive immunity from sow to piglet.

  6. Characteristics and antimicrobial activity of copper-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bowen

    In this study, copper vermiculite was synthesized, and the characteristics, antimicrobial effects, and chemical stability of copper vermiculite were investigated. Two types of copper vermiculite materials, micron-sized copper vermiculite (MCV) and exfoliated copper vermiculite (MECV), are selected for this research. Since most of the functional fillers used in industry products, such as plastics, paints, rubbers, papers, and textiles prefer micron-scaled particles, micron-sized copper vermiculite was prepared by jet-milling vermiculite. Meanwhile, since the exfoliated vermiculite has very unique properties, such as high porosity, specific surface area, high aspect ratio of laminates, and low density, and has been extensively utilized as a functional additives, exfoliated copper vermiculite also was synthesized and investigated. The antibacterial efficiency of copper vermiculite was qualitatively evaluated by the diffusion methods (both liquid diffusion and solid diffusion) against the most common pathogenic species: Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae). The result showed that the release velocity of copper from copper vermiculite is very slow. However, copper vermiculite clearly has excellent antibacterial efficiency to S. aureus, K. pneumoniae and E. coli. The strongest antibacterial ability of copper vermiculite is its action on S. aureus. The antibacterial efficiency of copper vermiculite was also quantitatively evaluated by determining the reduction rate (death rate) of E. coli versus various levels of copper vermiculite. 10 ppm of copper vermiculite in solution is sufficient to reduce the cell population of E. coli, while the untreated vermiculite had no antibacterial activity. The slow release of copper revealed that the antimicrobial effect of copper vermiculite was due to the strong interactions between copper ions and bacteria cells. Exfoliated copper vermiculite has even stronger

  7. Enhancing activated-peroxide formulations for porous materials: Test methods and results

    SciTech Connect

    Krauter, Paula; Tucker, Mark D.; Tezak, Matthew S.; Boucher, Raymond

    2012-12-01

    During an urban wide-area incident involving the release of a biological warfare agent, the recovery/restoration effort will require extensive resources and will tax the current capabilities of the government and private contractors. In fact, resources may be so limited that decontamination by facility owners/occupants may become necessary and a simple decontamination process and material should be available for this use. One potential process for use by facility owners/occupants would be a liquid sporicidal decontaminant, such as pHamended bleach or activated-peroxide, and simple application devices. While pH-amended bleach is currently the recommended low-tech decontamination solution, a less corrosive and toxic decontaminant is desirable. The objective of this project is to provide an operational assessment of an alternative to chlorine bleach for low-tech decontamination applications activated hydrogen peroxide. This report provides the methods and results for activatedperoxide evaluation experiments. The results suggest that the efficacy of an activated-peroxide decontaminant is similar to pH-amended bleach on many common materials.

  8. Transfer having a coupling coefficient higher than its active material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesieutre, George A. (Inventor); Davis, Christopher L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A coupling coefficient is a measure of the effectiveness with which a shape-changing material (or a device employing such a material) converts the energy in an imposed signal to useful mechanical energy. Device coupling coefficients are properties of the device and, although related to the material coupling coefficients, are generally different from them. This invention describes a class of devices wherein the apparent coupling coefficient can, in principle, approach 1.0, corresponding to perfect electromechanical energy conversion. The key feature of this class of devices is the use of destabilizing mechanical pre-loads to counter inherent stiffness. The approach is illustrated for piezoelectric and thermoelectrically actuated devices. The invention provides a way to simultaneously increase both displacement and force, distinguishing it from alternatives such as motion amplification, and allows transducer designers to achieve substantial performance gains for actuator and sensor devices.

  9. NASA's activities in the conservation of strategic aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The United States imports 50-100 percent of certain metals critical to the aerospace industry, namely, cobalt, columbium, chromium, and tantalum. In an effort to reduce this dependence on foreign sources, NASA is planning a program called Conservation of Strategic Aerospace Materials (COSAM), which will provide technology minimizing strategic metal content in the components of aerospace structures such as aircraft engines. With a proposed starting date of October 1981, the program will consist of strategic element substitution, process technology development, and alternate materials research. NASA's two-fold pre-COSAM studies center on, first, substitution research involving nickel-base and cobalt-base superalloys (Waspaloy, Udimet-700, MAE-M247, Rene 150, HA-188) used in turbine disks, low-pressure blades, turbine blades, and combustors; and, second, alternate materials research devoted initially to investigating possible structural applications of the intermetallic alloys nickel aluminide and iron aluminide.

  10. Chemistry Curricula. Course Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    Listings of suggested topics aimed at helping university and college faculties plan courses in the main areas of the chemistry curricula are provided. The suggestions were originally offered as appendices to the American Chemical Society's (ACS) Committee on Professional Training's 1983 guidelines for ACS-approved schools. The course data included…

  11. Review of activities in USA on HTS materials

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    Rapid progress in attaining practical applications of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) has been made since the discovery of these new materials. Many critical parameters influencing HTS powder synthesis and wire processing have been identified through a combination of fundamental exploration and applied research. The complexity of these novel materials with regard to phase behavior and physical properties has become evident as a result of these careful studies. Achieving optimal mechanical and superconducting properties in wires and tapes will require further understanding and synergy among several different technical disciplines. Highlights of efforts towards producing practical superconductors for electric power applications based on rare earth-, bismuth-, and thallium-based systems are reviewed.

  12. Optimal placement of active material actuators using genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Terrence; Frecker, Mary I.

    2004-07-01

    Actuators based on smart materials generally exhibit a tradeoff between force and stroke. Researchers have surrounded piezoelectric materials (PZT"s) with complaint structures to magnify either their geometric or mechanical advantage. Most of these designs are literally built around a particular piezoelectric device, so the design space consists of only the compliant mechanism. Materials scientists researchers have demonstrated the ability to pole a PZT in an arbitrary direction, and some engineers have taken advantage of this to build "shear mode" actuators. The goal of this work is to determine if the performance of compliant mechanisms improves by the inclusion of the piezoelectric polarization as a design variable. The polarization vector is varied via transformation matrixes, and the compliant actuator is modeled using the SIMP (Solid Isotropic Material with Penalization) or "power-law method." The concept of mutual potential energy is used to form an objective function to measure the piezoelectric actuator"s performance. The optimal topology of the compliant mechanism and orientation of the polarization method are determined using a sequential linear programming algorithm. This paper presents a demonstration problem that shows small changes in the polarization vector have a marginal effect on the optimum topology of the mechanism, but improves actuation.

  13. Analysis of Immune Response Markers in Jorge Lobo's Disease Lesions Suggests the Occurrence of Mixed T Helper Responses with the Dominance of Regulatory T Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Michelle de C. S.; Rosa, Patricia S.; Soares, Cleverson T.; Fachin, Luciana R. V.; Baptista, Ida Maria F. D.; Woods, William J.; Garlet, Gustavo P.

    2015-01-01

    Jorge Lobo’s disease (JLD) is a chronic infection that affects the skin and subcutaneous tissues. Its etiologic agent is the fungus Lacazia loboi. Lesions are classified as localized, multifocal, or disseminated, depending on their location. Early diagnosis and the surgical removal of lesions are the best therapeutic options currently available for JLD. The few studies that evaluate the immunological response of JLD patients show a predominance of Th2 response, as well as a high frequency of TGF-β and IL-10 positive cells in the lesions; however, the overall immunological status of the lesions in terms of their T cell phenotype has yet to be determined. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the pattern of Th1, Th2, Th17 and regulatory T cell (Treg) markers mRNA in JLD patients by means of real-time PCR. Biopsies of JLD lesions (N = 102) were classified according to their clinical and histopathological features and then analyzed using real-time PCR in order to determine the expression levels of TGF-β1, FoxP3, CTLA4, IKZF2, IL-10, T-bet, IFN-γ, GATA3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-33, RORC, IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 and to compare these levels to those of healthy control skin (N = 12). The results showed an increased expression of FoxP3, CTLA4, TGF-β1, IL-10, T-bet, IL-17F, and IL-17A in lesions, while GATA3 and IL-4 levels were found to be lower in diseased skin than in the control group. When the clinical forms were compared, TGF-β1 was found to be highly expressed in patients with a single localized lesion while IL-5 and IL-17A levels were higher in patients with multiple/disseminated lesions. These results demonstrate the occurrence of mixed T helper responses and suggest the dominance of regulatory T cell activity, which could inhibit Th-dependent protective responses to intracellular fungi such as L. loboi. Therefore, Tregs may play a key role in JLD pathogenesis. PMID:26700881

  14. Neutron activation for semiconductor materials characterization at Eastman Kodak Company

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, T.Z.

    1988-01-01

    Several neutron activation analysis (NAA) procedures have been used to establish process parameters in the manufacture of semiconductor devices. In addition to instrumental NAA (INAA), techniques such as neutron depth profiling and neutron-activated accelerator mass spectrometry have been used to obtain depth distribution of elements of interest.

  15. Characterization of environmentally-friendly alkali activated slag cements and ancient building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakulich, Aaron Richard

    Alternative cement technologies are an area of increasing interest due to growing environmental concerns and the relatively large carbon footprint of the cement industry. Many new cements have been developed, but one of the most promising is that made from granulated, ground blast furnace slag activated by a high-pH solution. Another is related to the discovery that some of the pyramid limestone blocks may have been cast using a combination of diatomaceous earth activated by lime which provides the high pH needed to dissolve the diatomaceous earth and bind the limestone aggregate together. The emphasis of this thesis is not on the latter---which was explored elsewhere---but on the results supplying further evidence that some of the pyramid blocks were indeed reconstituted limestone. The goal of this work is to chemically and mechanically characterize both alkali-activated slag cements as well as a number of historic materials, which may be ancient analogues to cement. Alkali activated slag cements were produced with a number of additives; concretes were made with the addition of a fine limestone aggregate. These materials were characterized mechanically and by XRD, FTIR, SEM, and TGA. Samples from several Egyptian pyramids, an 'ancient floor' in Colorado, and the 'Bosnian Pyramids' were investigated. In the cements, it has been unequivocally shown that C-S-H, the same binding phase that is produced in ordinary portland cement, has been produced, as well as a variety of mineral side products. Significant recarbonation occurs during the first 20 months, but only for the Na2CO3-activated formulae. Radiocarbon dating proves that the 'Bosnian Pyramids' and 'ancient floors' are not made from any type of recarbonated lime; however, Egyptian pyramid limestones were finite, thus suggesting that they are of a synthetic nature. XRD and FTIR results were inconclusive, while TGA results indicate the limestones are identical to naturally occurring limestones, and SEM

  16. Spatiotemporal order and emergent edge currents in active spinner materials

    PubMed Central

    van Zuiden, Benjamin C.; Paulose, Jayson; Irvine, William T. M.; Bartolo, Denis; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Collections of interacting, self-propelled particles have been extensively studied as minimal models of many living and synthetic systems from bird flocks to active colloids. However, the influence of active rotations in the absence of self-propulsion (i.e., spinning without walking) remains less explored. Here, we numerically and theoretically investigate the behavior of ensembles of self-spinning dimers. We find that geometric frustration of dimer rotation by interactions yields spatiotemporal order and active melting with no equilibrium counterparts. At low density, the spinning dimers self-assemble into a triangular lattice with their orientations phase-locked into spatially periodic phases. The phase-locked patterns form dynamical analogs of the ground states of various spin models, transitioning from the three-state Potts antiferromagnet at low densities to the striped herringbone phase of planar quadrupoles at higher densities. As the density is raised further, the competition between active rotations and interactions leads to melting of the active spinner crystal. Emergent edge currents, whose direction is set by the chirality of the active spinning, arise as a nonequilibrium signature of the transition to the active spinner liquid and vanish when the system eventually undergoes kinetic arrest at very high densities. Our findings may be realized in systems ranging from liquid crystal and colloidal experiments to tabletop realizations using macroscopic chiral grains. PMID:27803323

  17. NASA's activities in the conservation of strategic aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The primary objective of the Conservation of Strategic Aerospace Materials (COSAM) Program is to help reduce the dependence of the United States aerospace industry on strategic metals by providing the materials technology needed to minimize the strategic metal content of critical aerospace components with prime emphasis on components for gas turbine engines. Initial emphasis was placed in the area of strategic element substinction. Specifically, the role of cobalt in nickel base and cobalt base superalloys vital to the aerospace industry is being examined in great detail by means of cooperative university-industry-government research efforts. Investigations are underway in the area of "new classes" of alloys. Specifically, a study was undertaken to investigate the mechanical and physical properties of intermetallics that contain a minimum of the strategic metals. Current plans for the much larger COSAM Program are also presented.

  18. Novel Nanocomposite Structures as Active and Passive Barrier Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    LaFrate, A. L.; Carlisle, T. K.; Noble, R. D.; Gin, D. L. Development of Barrier Film Materials Using Imidazolium Polymers, Poster Presented at CBD...D. L. Diol-Functionalized Imidazolium -Based Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids with Bis(trifluoromethanesulfonimide) Anions that Exhibit Variable Water...Membranes Based on Novel Diol- Imidazolium Polymers. Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research, 2010, in press. 4 Bara, J. E.; Hatakeyama, E. S.; Gin

  19. Bio-inspired Murray materials for mass transfer and activity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xianfeng; Shen, Guofang; Wang, Chao; Li, Yu; Dunphy, Darren; Hasan, Tawfique; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Su, Bao-Lian

    2017-04-06

    Both plants and animals possess analogous tissues containing hierarchical networks of pores, with pore size ratios that have evolved to maximize mass transport and rates of reactions. The underlying physical principles of this optimized hierarchical design are embodied in Murray's law. However, we are yet to realize the benefit of mimicking nature's Murray networks in synthetic materials due to the challenges in fabricating vascularized structures. Here we emulate optimum natural systems following Murray's law using a bottom-up approach. Such bio-inspired materials, whose pore sizes decrease across multiple scales and finally terminate in size-invariant units like plant stems, leaf veins and vascular and respiratory systems provide hierarchical branching and precise diameter ratios for connecting multi-scale pores from macro to micro levels. Our Murray material mimics enable highly enhanced mass exchange and transfer in liquid-solid, gas-solid and electrochemical reactions and exhibit enhanced performance in photocatalysis, gas sensing and as Li-ion battery electrodes.

  20. Research activity with different types of scintillation materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, K.-T.; Borisevich, A.; Diehl, S.; Dormenev, V.; Houzvicka, J.; Korjik, M.; Novotny, R. W.; Zaunick, H.-G.; Zimmermann, S.

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays there is a growing interest and demand in the development of new types of scintillation materials for experimental high energy physics. Future detector developments will focus on cheap, fast, and radiation hard materials, especially for application in collider experiments. The most recent results obtained by the Giessen group in close cooperation with colleagues from different institutes will be presented. The new start of the mass production of high quality lead tungstate crystals (PbWO4, PWO) for electromagnetic calorimetry was started by the company CRYTUR (Turnov, Czech Republic). We will present a detailed progress report on the research program of lead tungstate performed in the last two years. The latest results in the development of LuAG:Ce, YAG:Ce and LYSO:Ce inorganic fibers, grown by the micro pulling down method and cut with the heated wire technique as well as new glass ceramics material BaO*2SiO2 (DSB) doped by Ce and Gd will be presented. In addition, different samples of the organic plastic scintillator EJ-260 produced by the company Eljen Technology (Sweetwater, USA) have been characterized. The study has focused on the change of performance after irradiation with 150 MeV protons up to an integral fluence of 5-1013 protons/cm2 as well as with a strong 60Co gamma-source accumulating an integral dose of 100 Gy.

  1. Materials for Consideration in Standardized Canister Design Activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Charles R.; Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Enos, David George; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01

    This document identifies materials and material mitigation processes that might be used in new designs for standardized canisters for storage, transportation, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. It also addresses potential corrosion issues with existing dual-purpose canisters (DPCs) that could be addressed in new canister designs. The major potential corrosion risk during storage is stress corrosion cracking of the weld regions on the 304 SS/316 SS canister shell due to deliquescence of chloride salts on the surface. Two approaches are proposed to alleviate this potential risk. First, the existing canister materials (304 and 316 SS) could be used, but the welds mitigated to relieve residual stresses and/or sensitization. Alternatively, more corrosion-resistant steels such as super-austenitic or duplex stainless steels, could be used. Experimental testing is needed to verify that these alternatives would successfully reduce the risk of stress corrosion cracking during fuel storage. For disposal in a geologic repository, the canister will be enclosed in a corrosion-resistant or corrosion-allowance overpack that will provide barrier capability and mechanical strength. The canister shell will no longer have a barrier function and its containment integrity can be ignored. The basket and neutron absorbers within the canister have the important role of limiting the possibility of post-closure criticality. The time period for corrosion is much longer in the post-closure period, and one major unanswered question is whether the basket materials will corrode slowly enough to maintain structural integrity for at least 10,000 years. Whereas there is extensive literature on stainless steels, this evaluation recommends testing of 304 and 316 SS, and more corrosion-resistant steels such as super-austenitic, duplex, and super-duplex stainless steels, at repository-relevant physical and chemical conditions. Both general and localized corrosion testing methods would be used to

  2. Electrospun curcumin-loaded cellulose acetate/polyvinylpyrrolidone fibrous materials with complex architecture and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Tsekova, Petya B; Spasova, Mariya G; Manolova, Nevena E; Markova, Nadya D; Rashkov, Iliya B

    2017-04-01

    Novel fibrous materials from cellulose acetate (CA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) containing curcumin (Curc) with original design were prepared by one-pot electrospinning or dual spinneret electrospinning. The electrospun materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescence microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), water contact angle measurements, and microbiological tests. It was found that the incorporation of Curc into the CA and PVP solutions resulted in an increase of the solution viscosity and obtaining fibers with larger diameters (ca. 1.5μm) compared to the neat CA (ca. 800nm) and PVP fibers (ca. 500nm). The incorporation of PVP resulted in increased hydrophilicity of the fibers and in faster Curc release. Curc was found in the amorphous state in the Curc-containing fibers and these mats exhibited antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The results suggest that, due to their complex architecture, the obtained new antibacterial materials are suitable for wound dressing applications, which necessitate diverse release behaviors of the bioactive compound.

  3. The Impact of Handling and Storage of Human Fecal Material on Bacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Karatza, Eleni; Vertzoni, Maria; Muenster, Uwe; Reppas, Christos

    2016-11-01

    Fecal material prepared from human stools is frequently used for the assessment of bacterial degradation of active pharmaceutical ingredients as relevant data are useful for evaluating the potential for colonic drug delivery. The impact of handling and storage of human fecal material on bacterial activity was assessed by evaluating the degradation characteristics of metronidazole and olsalazine. Multiple freeze (-70°C)-thaw cycles should be avoided. Incubation of frozen material for about 2 h in the anaerobic workstation ensures regeneration of the highest possible bacterial activity. Material could be stored at -70°C for at least 12 months.

  4. A new biomimetic route to engineer enzymatically active mechano-responsive materials.

    PubMed

    Rios, César; Longo, Johan; Zahouani, Sarah; Garnier, Tony; Vogt, Cédric; Reisch, Andreas; Senger, Bernard; Boulmedais, Fouzia; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Benmlih, Karim; Frisch, Benoît; Schaaf, Pierre; Jierry, Loïc; Lavalle, Philippe

    2015-04-04

    Using modified β-galactosidase covalently linked to cross-linked polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM), catalytically active materials have been designed. Their enzymatic activity can be modulated, partially in a reversible way, simply by stretching. This strategy, based on enzyme conformational changes, constitutes a new tool for the development of biocatalytic mechano-responsive materials.

  5. Structure of the Ni(II) complex of Escherichia coli peptide deformylase and suggestions on deformylase activities depending on different metal(II) centres.

    PubMed

    Yen, Ngo Thi Hai; Bogdanović, Xenia; Palm, Gottfried J; Kühl, Olaf; Hinrichs, Winfried

    2010-02-01

    Crystal structures of polypeptide deformylase (PDF) of Escherichia coli with nickel(II) replacing the native iron(II) have been solved with chloride and formate as metal ligands. The chloro complex is a model for the correct protonation state of the hydrolytic hydroxo ligand and the protonated status of the Glu133 side chain as part of the hydrolytic mechanism. The ambiguity that recently some PDFs have been identified with Zn(2+) ion as the active-site centre whereas others are only active with Fe(2+) (or Co(2+), Ni(2+) is discussed with respect to Lewis acid criteria of the metal ion and substrate activation by the CD loop.

  6. Polyoxometalate active charge-transfer material for mediated redox flow battery

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Travis Mark; Hudak, Nicholas; Staiger, Chad; Pratt, Harry

    2017-01-17

    Redox flow batteries including a half-cell electrode chamber coupled to a current collecting electrode are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, a separator is coupled to the half-cell electrode chamber. The half-cell electrode chamber comprises a first redox-active mediator and a second redox-active mediator. The first redox-active mediator and the second redox-active mediator are circulated through the half-cell electrode chamber into an external container. The container includes an active charge-transfer material. The active charge-transfer material has a redox potential between a redox potential of the first redox-active mediator and a redox potential of the second redox-active mediator. The active charge-transfer material is a polyoxometalate or derivative thereof. The redox flow battery may be particularly useful in energy storage solutions for renewable energy sources and for providing sustained power to an electrical grid.

  7. Using luminescent materials as the active element for radiation sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollerman, William A.; Fontenot, Ross S.; Williams, Stephen; Miller, John

    2016-05-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a significant challenge for Earth-based defense applications as well as human and/or robotic space missions. Practical sensors based on luminescence will depend heavily upon research investigating the resistance of these materials to ionizing radiation and the ability to anneal or self-heal from damage caused by such radiation. In 1951, Birks and Black showed experimentally that the luminescent efficiency of anthracene bombarded by alphas varies with total fluence (N) as (I/I0) = 1/(1 + AN), where I is the luminescence yield, I0 is the initial yield, and A is a constant. The half brightness (N1/2) is defined as the fluence that reduce the emission light yield to half and is equal to is the inverse of A. Broser and Kallmann developed a similar relationship to the Birks and Black equation for inorganic phosphors irradiated using alpha particles. From 1990 to the present, we found that the Birks and Black relation describes the reduction in light emission yield for every tested luminescent material except lead phosphate glass due to proton irradiation. These results indicate that radiation produced quenching centers compete with emission for absorbed energy. The purpose of this paper is to present results from research completed in this area over the last few years. Particular emphasis will be placed on recent measurements made on new materials such as europium tetrakis dibenzoylmethide triethylammonium (EuD4TEA). Results have shown that EuD4TEA with its relatively small N1/2 might be a good candidate for use as a personal proton fluence sensor.

  8. Locomotion in fluids using shape-changing active materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Michael; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter; Comacho-Lopez, Miguel; Malacarne, Luis; Finkelmann, Heino

    2004-11-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) are rubbers made up of liquid crystal molecules, and can exhibit large and fast shape deformations when exposed to external fields. We discuss recent experiments in which an LCE sample floating on water is illuminated by a laser. Upon illumination the sample simultaneously changes both its shape and position, ``swimming'' away from the laser light. In this system, energy from the light is used to effect momentum transfer between the LCE body and the surrounding fluid. We discuss the origins of the shape change, the resulting LCE/fluid interaction, and the modeling of such fluid/materials systems.

  9. The environmental applications of activated carbon/zeolite composite materials.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2011-02-17

    Over the past couple of years, the resurgence of placing an effective and sustainable amendment to combat against the auxiliary industrial entities, remains a highly contested agenda from a global point. With the renaissance of activated carbon, there has been a steadily growing interest in the research field. Recently, the adoption of zeolite composite, a prestigious advanced catalyst which formulates the enhancement of adsorption rate and hydrogen storage capability, has fore fronted to be a new growing branch in the scientific community. Confirming the assertion, this paper presents a state of art review of activated carbon/zeolite composite technology, its fundamental background studies, and environmental implications. Moreover, its major challenges together with the future expectation are summarized and discussed. Conclusively, the expanding of activated carbon/zeolite composite represents a potentially viable and powerful tool, leading to the plausible improvement of environmental preservation.

  10. Activated Charcoal—A Potential Material in Glucoamylase Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Kareem, S. O.; Akpan, I.; Popoola, T. O. S.; Sanni, L. O.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of activated charcoal in the purification of fungal glucoamylase was investigated. Various concentrations of activated charcoal (1–4% w/v) were used to concentrate crude glucoamylase from Rhizopus oligosporus at different temperature values (30–50°C). Effects of pH (3.0–6.0) and contact time (0–60 min) on enzyme purification were also monitored. Activated charcoal (3% w/v) gave a 16-fold purification in a single-step purification at 50°C for 20 min and pH 5.5. The result of SDS-PAGE analysis of purified glucoamylase showed two major protein bands with corresponding molecular weight of 36 kDa and 50 kDa. The method is inexpensive, rapid, and simple which could facilitate downstream processing of industrial enzyme. PMID:22235364

  11. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  12. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  13. Design of Redox-Active Peptides: Towards Functional Materials.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Dayn Joseph; Alcala-Torano, Rafael; Dizicheh, Zahra Bahrami; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    In nature, the majority of processes that occur in the cell involve the cycling of electrons and protons, changing the reduction and oxidation state of substrates to alter their chemical reactivity and usefulness in vivo. One of the most relevant examples of these processes is the electron transport chain, a series of oxidoreductase proteins that shuttle electrons through well-defined pathways, concurrently moving protons across the cell membrane. Inspired by these processes, researchers have sought to develop materials to mimic natural systems for a number of applications, including fuel production. The most common cofactors found in proteins to carry out electron transfer are iron sulfur clusters and porphyrin-like molecules. Both types have been studied within natural proteins, such as in photosynthetic machinery or soluble electron carriers; in parallel, an extensive literature has developed over recent years attempting to model and study these cofactors within peptide-based materials. This chapter will focus on major designs that have significantly advanced the field.

  14. Turkish EFL Academicians' Problems Concerning Translation Activities and Practices, Attitudes towards the Use of Online and Printed Translation Tools, and Suggestions for Quality Translation Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zengin, Bugra; Kacar, Isil Gunseli

    2011-01-01

    This mixed method research study aimed to highlight the problems of EFL academicians concerning their current translation practices, their attitudes towards the use of various translation tools, and offer suggestions for more quality translation practices. Seventy-three EFL academicians from three Turkish universities participated in the study.…

  15. Digital active material processing platform effort (DAMPER), SBIR phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, John; Smith, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    Applied Technology Associates, Inc., (ATA) has demonstrated that inertial actuation can be employed effectively in digital, active vibration isolation systems. Inertial actuation involves the use of momentum exchange to produce corrective forces which act directly on the payload being actively isolated. In a typical active vibration isolation system, accelerometers are used to measure the inertial motion of the payload. The signals from the accelerometers are then used to calculate the corrective forces required to counteract, or 'cancel out' the payload motion. Active vibration isolation is common technology, but the use of inertial actuation in such systems is novel, and is the focus of the DAMPER project. A May 1991 report was completed which documented the successful demonstration of inertial actuation, employed in the control of vibration in a single axis. In the 1 degree-of-freedom (1DOF) experiment a set of air bearing rails was used to suspend the payload, simulating a microgravity environment in a single horizontal axis. Digital Signal Processor (DSP) technology was used to calculate in real time, the control law between the accelerometer signals and the inertial actuators. The data obtained from this experiment verified that as much as 20 dB of rejection could be realized by this type of system. A discussion is included of recent tests performed in which vibrations were actively controlled in three axes simultaneously. In the three degree-of-freedom (3DOF) system, the air bearings were designed in such a way that the payload is free to rotate about the azimuth axis, as well as translate in the two horizontal directions. The actuator developed for the DAMPER project has applications beyond payload isolation, including structural damping and source vibration isolation. This report includes a brief discussion of these applications, as well as a commercialization plan for the actuator.

  16. Exploratory research on mutagenic activity of coal-related materials

    SciTech Connect

    Warshawsky, D.; Schoeny, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    The following samples were found to be mutagenic for strains TA1538, TA98 and TA100 Salmonella typhimurium: ETTM-10, ETTM-11, ETTM-15, ETTM-16, and ETTM-17. ETTM-13 was marginally mutagenic for TA1537. ETTM-14 was slightly mutagenic for TA1537, TA1538, and TA98. Mutagenicity by all samples was demonstrated only in the presence of hepatic enzyme extracts (S9) which provided metabolic activation. ETTM-11 was shown to be the most mutagenic sample assayed thus far; specific activity was 2.79 x 10/sup 4/ TA98 revertants/mg sample. Fractionation by serial extractions with increasingly polar organic solvents was done at least 2 x with ETTM-10, ETTM-11, ETTM-15, ETTM-16 and ETTM-17. For some samples highly mutagenic fractions were observed.

  17. Work Loop and Ashby Charts of Active Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-17

    including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215...were lubricated by a low viscosity machine oil (ν = 9.6 m2/s)  to minimize  friction . Different  actuation modes were obtained by  setting  appropriate... Ionic Polymer Metal Composites LCEs Magnet- Polymer Dielectric Elastomers SMAs ability of Magpol to undergo repeated damage and healing cycles was

  18. Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin-1 by Insoluble Particulate Material and Association with Asthma.

    PubMed

    Deering-Rice, Cassandra E; Shapiro, Darien; Romero, Erin G; Stockmann, Chris; Bevans, Tatjana S; Phan, Quang M; Stone, Bryan L; Fassl, Bernhard; Nkoy, Flory; Uchida, Derek A; Ward, Robert M; Veranth, John M; Reilly, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    Inhaled irritants activate transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), resulting in cough, bronchoconstriction, and inflammation/edema. TRPA1 is also implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. Our hypothesis was that particulate materials activate TRPA1 via a mechanism distinct from chemical agonists and that, in a cohort of children with asthma living in a location prone to high levels of air pollution, expression of uniquely sensitive forms of TRPA1 may correlate with reduced asthma control. Variant forms of TRPA1 were constructed by mutating residues in known functional elements and corresponding to single-nucleotide polymorphisms in functional domains. TRPA1 activity was studied in transfected HEK-293 cells using allyl-isothiocynate, a model soluble electrophilic agonist; 3,5-ditert butylphenol, a soluble nonelectrophilic agonist and a component of diesel exhaust particles; and insoluble coal fly ash (CFA) particles. The N-terminal variants R3C and R58T exhibited greater, but not additive, activity with all three agonists. The ankyrin repeat domain-4 single nucleotide polymorphisms E179K and K186N exhibited decreased response to CFA. The predicted N-linked glycosylation site residues N747A and N753A exhibited decreased responses to CFA, which were not attributable to differences in cellular localization. The pore-loop residue R919Q was comparable to wild-type, whereas N954T was inactive to soluble agonists but not CFA. These data identify roles for ankyrin domain-4, cell surface N-linked glycans, and selected pore-loop domain residues in the activation of TRPA1 by insoluble particles. Furthermore, the R3C and R58T polymorphisms correlated with reduced asthma control for some children, which suggest that TRPA1 activity may modulate asthma, particularly among individuals living in locations prone to high levels of air pollution.

  19. The Crystal Structure of a Quercetin 2,3-Dioxygenase from Bacillus subtilis Suggests Modulation of Enzyme Activity by a Change in the Metal Ion at the Active Site(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, B.; Madan, Lalima L.; Betz, Stephen F.; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.

    2010-11-10

    Common structural motifs, such as the cupin domains, are found in enzymes performing different biochemical functions while retaining a similar active site configuration and structural scaffold. The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis has 20 cupin genes (0.5% of the total genome) with up to 14% of its genes in the form of doublets, thus making it an attractive system for studying the effects of gene duplication. There are four bicupins in B. subtilis encoded by the genes yvrK, yoaN, yxaG, and ywfC. The gene products of yvrK and yoaN function as oxalate decarboxylases with a manganese ion at the active site(s), whereas YwfC is a bacitracin synthetase. Here we present the crystal structure of YxaG, a novel iron-containing quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase with one active site in each cupin domain. Yxag is a dimer, both in solution and in the crystal. The crystal structure shows that the coordination geometry of the Fe ion is different in the two active sites of YxaG. Replacement of the iron at the active site with other metal ions suggests modulation of enzymatic activity in accordance with the Irving-Williams observation on the stability of metal ion complexes. This observation, along with a comparison with the crystal structure of YvrK determined recently, has allowed for a detailed structure-function analysis of the active site, providing clues to the diversification of function in the bicupin family of proteins.

  20. Innovative active control of gun barrels using smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattice, Michael S.; LaVigna, Chris

    1997-06-01

    The accuracy of stabilized, turreted gun systems like the 120mm gun on the M1A2 Abrams tank and the 30mm gun on the Apache helicopter are limited by, among other things, structural flexure of the gun barrel and support structure. An advanced actuation system based on piezoelectric translators and an optical fiber strain sensing system are described in conjunction with a rapid prototyping workstation for the design of distributed parameter control systems to actively minimize the effects of vibrations caused by traversing rough terrain or weapon firing.

  1. Activation analysis of admixtures in certain semiconductive materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artyukhin, P. I.; Gilbert, E. P.; Pronin, V. A.

    1978-01-01

    The use of extractions and chromatographic operations to separate macrobases, and to divide elements into groups convenient for gamma-spectrometric analysis is discussed. Methods are described for the activation detection of some impurities in silicon, arsenic, thallium, and trichloromethylsilane, on the basis of the extraction properties of bis(2-chlorethyl ether) and dimethylbenzylalkylammonium chloride. A schematic diagram of the extraction separation of elements-admixture is presented showing the aqueous and organic phases. The content percentage of the various elements are given in tables.

  2. Application of neutron-activation analysis to geological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Wogman, N.A.

    1980-12-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is an extremely sensitive, selective, and precise method, which yields a wealth of elemental information from even a small-sized sample. By varying neutron fluxes, irradiation times, decay and counting intervals in instrumental NAA, it is possible to accurately determine about 35 elements in a geological aliquot. When INAA is coupled with coincidence-noncoincidence Ge(Li)-Na(Tl) counting, it enhances the sensitivities of various elements by order of magnitude. The attractive features of INAA are that it is fast, nondestructive and economical.

  3. Structure of membrane-active toxin from crab spider Heriaeus melloteei suggests parallel evolution of sodium channel gating modifiers in Araneomorphae and Mygalomorphae.

    PubMed

    Berkut, Antonina A; Peigneur, Steve; Myshkin, Mikhail Yu; Paramonov, Alexander S; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Arseniev, Alexander S; Grishin, Eugene V; Tytgat, Jan; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2015-01-02

    We present a structural and functional study of a sodium channel activation inhibitor from crab spider venom. Hm-3 is an insecticidal peptide toxin consisting of 35 amino acid residues from the spider Heriaeus melloteei (Thomisidae). We produced Hm-3 recombinantly in Escherichia coli and determined its structure by NMR spectroscopy. Typical for spider toxins, Hm-3 was found to adopt the so-called "inhibitor cystine knot" or "knottin" fold stabilized by three disulfide bonds. Its molecule is amphiphilic with a hydrophobic ridge on the surface enriched in aromatic residues and surrounded by positive charges. Correspondingly, Hm-3 binds to both neutral and negatively charged lipid vesicles. Electrophysiological studies showed that at a concentration of 1 μm Hm-3 effectively inhibited a number of mammalian and insect sodium channels. Importantly, Hm-3 shifted the dependence of channel activation to more positive voltages. Moreover, the inhibition was voltage-dependent, and strong depolarizing prepulses attenuated Hm-3 activity. The toxin is therefore concluded to represent the first sodium channel gating modifier from an araneomorph spider and features a "membrane access" mechanism of action. Its amino acid sequence and position of the hydrophobic cluster are notably different from other known gating modifiers from spider venom, all of which are described from mygalomorph species. We hypothesize parallel evolution of inhibitor cystine knot toxins from Araneomorphae and Mygalomorphae suborders.

  4. Active nanocharacterization of nanofunctional materials by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Daisuke; Sagisaka, Keisuke

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in the application of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to nanofabrication and nanocharacterization are reviewed. The main focus of this paper is to outline techniques for depositing and manipulating nanometer-scale structures using STM tips. Firstly, the transfer of STM tip material through the application of voltage pulses is introduced. The highly reproducible fabrication of metallic silver nanodots and nanowires is discussed. The mechanism is thought to be spontaneous point-contact formation caused by field-enhanced diffusion to the apex of the tip. Transfer through the application of z-direction pulses is also introduced. Sub-nanometer displacement pulses along the z-direction form point contacts that can be used for reproducible nanodot deposition. Next, the discovery of the STM structural manipulation of surface phases is discussed. It has been demonstrated that superstructures on Si(001) surfaces can be reverse-manipulated by controlling the injected carriers. Finally, the fabrication of an atomic-scale one-dimensional quantum confinement system by single-atom deposition using a controlled point contact is presented. Because of its combined nanofabrication and nanocharacterization capabilities, STM is a powerful tool for exploring the nanotechnology and nanoscience fields.

  5. Active nanocharacterization of nanofunctional materials by scanning tunneling microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Daisuke; Sagisaka, Keisuke

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in the application of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to nanofabrication and nanocharacterization are reviewed. The main focus of this paper is to outline techniques for depositing and manipulating nanometer-scale structures using STM tips. Firstly, the transfer of STM tip material through the application of voltage pulses is introduced. The highly reproducible fabrication of metallic silver nanodots and nanowires is discussed. The mechanism is thought to be spontaneous point-contact formation caused by field-enhanced diffusion to the apex of the tip. Transfer through the application of z-direction pulses is also introduced. Sub-nanometer displacement pulses along the z-direction form point contacts that can be used for reproducible nanodot deposition. Next, the discovery of the STM structural manipulation of surface phases is discussed. It has been demonstrated that superstructures on Si(001) surfaces can be reverse-manipulated by controlling the injected carriers. Finally, the fabrication of an atomic-scale one-dimensional quantum confinement system by single-atom deposition using a controlled point contact is presented. Because of its combined nanofabrication and nanocharacterization capabilities, STM is a powerful tool for exploring the nanotechnology and nanoscience fields. PMID:27877921

  6. Photocatalytic degradation of sunscreen active ingredients mediated by nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Vazquez, Loraine

    Water scarcity and pollution are environmental issues with terrible consequences. In recent years several pharmaceutical and personal care products, such as sunscreen active ingredients, have been detected in different water matrices. Its recalcitrant behavior in the environment has caused controversies and generated countless questions about its safety. During this research, we employed an advanced oxidation process (photocatalysis) to degrade sunscreen active ingredients. For this study, we used a 3x3 system, evaluating three photocatalysts and three different contaminants. From the three catalysts employed, two of them were synthesized. ZnO nanoparticles were obtained using zinc acetate dihydrated as the precursor, and TiO2 nanowires were synthesized from titanium tetrachloride precursor. The third catalyst employed (namely, P25) was obtained commercially. The synthesized photocatalysts were characterized in terms of the morphology, elemental composition, crystalline structure, elemental oxidation states, vibrational modes and surface area, using SEM-EDS, XRD, XPS, Raman spectroscopy and BET measurements, respectively. The photocatalysts were employed during the study of the degradation of p-aminobenzoic acid, phenylbenzimidazole sulfonic acid, and benzophenone-4. In all the cases, at least 50% degradation was achieved. P25 showed degradation efficiencies above 90%, and from the nine systems, 7 of them degraded at least 86%.

  7. Suggestion can help.

    PubMed

    Benson, P E

    2000-10-01

    One cannot practise dentistry without realising that for the patient, the control of pain and fear is extremely important. Modern technical advances have made painless dentistry a reality and yet research has shown that more people avoid dental treatment through fear of pain than all other factors combined. Dental surgeons and psychologists agree that patients frequently magnify their unpleasant dental experiences. There are deep-seated psychological reasons for this exaggerated fear; the mouth being a highly charged erotogenic region, is a primary zone of interaction with the environment and can have important far-reaching emotional significance. To many people the anticipation of dental treatment is sufficient to arouse extreme anxiety. Dental schools lay great emphasis on basic medical sciences and the technical excellence of students, the psychosomatic approach to the alleviation of apprehension, fear and pain is meanwhile often sadly neglected. The use of controlled suggestion and hypnosis can be shown to play a very important role in clinical dentistry.

  8. Analysis of biosurfactants from industrially viable Pseudomonas strain isolated from crude oil suggests how rhamnolipids congeners affect emulsification property and antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Das, Palashpriya; Yang, Xin-Ping; Ma, Luyan Z.

    2014-01-01

    Rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced mainly by Pseudomonas sp. had been reported to possess a wide range of potential industrial application. These biosurfactants are produced as monorhamnolipid (MRL) and di-rhamnolipid (DRL) congeners. The present study deals with rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced by three bacterial isolates from crude oil. Biosurfactants produced by one of the strains (named as IMP67) was found to be very efficacious based on its critical micelle concentration value and hydrocarbon emulsification property. Strikingly, antimicrobial, and anti-biofilm potential of this biosurfactant were higher than biosurfactants produced by other two strains. Thin layer chromatography analysis and rhamnose quantification showed that the rhamnolipids of IMP67 had more MRL congeners than biosurfactants of the other two strains. Emulsification and antimicrobial actions were affected by manual change of MRL and DRL congener proportions. Increase of MRL proportion enhanced emulsification index and antimicrobial property to Gram negative bacteria. This result indicated that the ratio of MRL and DRL affected the emulsification potentials of rhamnolipids, and suggested that high emulsification potentials might enhance rhamnolipids to penetrate the cell wall of Gram negative bacteria. In line with this finding, rhamnolipids of IMP67 also reduced the MIC of some antibiotics against bacteria, suggesting their synergistic role with the antibiotics. PMID:25566212

  9. Secretion of Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae Proteins into Infected Cells Suggests an Active Role of Microsporidia in the Control of Host Programs and Metabolic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Senderskiy, Igor V.; Timofeev, Sergey A.; Seliverstova, Elena V.; Pavlova, Olga A.; Dolgikh, Viacheslav V.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular tools of the intracellular protozoan pathogens Apicomplexa and Kinetoplastida for manipulation of host cell machinery have been the focus of investigation for approximately two decades. Microsporidia, fungi-related microorganisms forming another large group of obligate intracellular parasites, are characterized by development in direct contact with host cytoplasm (the majority of species), strong minimization of cell machinery, and acquisition of unique transporters to exploit host metabolic system. All the aforementioned features are suggestive of the ability of microsporidia to modify host metabolic and regulatory pathways. Seven proteins of the microsporidium Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae with predicted signal peptides but without transmembrane domains were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Western-blot analysis with antibodies against recombinant products showed secretion of parasite proteins from different functional categories into the infected host cell. Secretion of parasite hexokinase and α/β-hydrolase was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, this method showed specific accumulation of A. locustae hexokinase in host nuclei. Expression of hexokinase, trehalase, and two leucine-rich repeat proteins without any exogenous signal peptide led to their secretion in the yeast Pichia pastoris. In contrast, α/β-hydrolase was not found in the culture medium, though a significant amount of this enzyme accumulated in the yeast membrane fraction. These results suggest that microsporidia possess a broad set of enzymes and regulatory proteins secreted into infected cells to control host metabolic processes and molecular programs. PMID:24705470

  10. Analysis of biosurfactants from industrially viable Pseudomonas strain isolated from crude oil suggests how rhamnolipids congeners affect emulsification property and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Das, Palashpriya; Yang, Xin-Ping; Ma, Luyan Z

    2014-01-01

    Rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced mainly by Pseudomonas sp. had been reported to possess a wide range of potential industrial application. These biosurfactants are produced as monorhamnolipid (MRL) and di-rhamnolipid (DRL) congeners. The present study deals with rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced by three bacterial isolates from crude oil. Biosurfactants produced by one of the strains (named as IMP67) was found to be very efficacious based on its critical micelle concentration value and hydrocarbon emulsification property. Strikingly, antimicrobial, and anti-biofilm potential of this biosurfactant were higher than biosurfactants produced by other two strains. Thin layer chromatography analysis and rhamnose quantification showed that the rhamnolipids of IMP67 had more MRL congeners than biosurfactants of the other two strains. Emulsification and antimicrobial actions were affected by manual change of MRL and DRL congener proportions. Increase of MRL proportion enhanced emulsification index and antimicrobial property to Gram negative bacteria. This result indicated that the ratio of MRL and DRL affected the emulsification potentials of rhamnolipids, and suggested that high emulsification potentials might enhance rhamnolipids to penetrate the cell wall of Gram negative bacteria. In line with this finding, rhamnolipids of IMP67 also reduced the MIC of some antibiotics against bacteria, suggesting their synergistic role with the antibiotics.

  11. Secretion of Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae proteins into infected cells suggests an active role of microsporidia in the control of host programs and metabolic processes.

    PubMed

    Senderskiy, Igor V; Timofeev, Sergey A; Seliverstova, Elena V; Pavlova, Olga A; Dolgikh, Viacheslav V

    2014-01-01

    Molecular tools of the intracellular protozoan pathogens Apicomplexa and Kinetoplastida for manipulation of host cell machinery have been the focus of investigation for approximately two decades. Microsporidia, fungi-related microorganisms forming another large group of obligate intracellular parasites, are characterized by development in direct contact with host cytoplasm (the majority of species), strong minimization of cell machinery, and acquisition of unique transporters to exploit host metabolic system. All the aforementioned features are suggestive of the ability of microsporidia to modify host metabolic and regulatory pathways. Seven proteins of the microsporidium Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae with predicted signal peptides but without transmembrane domains were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Western-blot analysis with antibodies against recombinant products showed secretion of parasite proteins from different functional categories into the infected host cell. Secretion of parasite hexokinase and α/β-hydrolase was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, this method showed specific accumulation of A. locustae hexokinase in host nuclei. Expression of hexokinase, trehalase, and two leucine-rich repeat proteins without any exogenous signal peptide led to their secretion in the yeast Pichia pastoris. In contrast, α/β-hydrolase was not found in the culture medium, though a significant amount of this enzyme accumulated in the yeast membrane fraction. These results suggest that microsporidia possess a broad set of enzymes and regulatory proteins secreted into infected cells to control host metabolic processes and molecular programs.

  12. The Campania-Lucania Extensional Fault System, southern Italy: A suggestion for a uniform model of active extension in the Italian Apennines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozzetti, F.

    2011-10-01

    By integrating new field data, seismic lines interpretation and a critical review of the literature, this work highlights a regional array of normal faults in the southern Apennines of Italy, which have been active during the Quaternary and are referred to as the "Campania-Lucania Extensional Fault System" (CLEFS). The CLEFS consists of three main NW-SE striking alignments of normal faults, which for the first time are considered genetically linked and methodically described in their geometry, kinematics and displacement. The CROP04 seismic profile, crossing the central part of the CLEFS, was strictly constrained by detailed geological surveys and reinterpreted to define the downdip trajectory of the major normal faults. These latter have been observed to splay from an east dipping low-angle detachment surface penetrating the upper crust to depths of 12-13 km. The time-space evolution of the faults and the associated basins was defined through a review of the stratigraphic data on the syntectonic deposits. As regards the overall geometry and the associate sense of shear (top-to-east), the CLEFS sensibly differs from the extensional features described previously in this region but shows surprising affinities with the "Etrurian Fault System," an extensional megastructure of the northern Apennines. Remarkable similarities concern the extent, the surface and subsurface geometry, the timing of activity and the amount of the associated deformation. These common characters recognized over a belt nearly 600 km long lead to formulation of a low-angle normal fault-driven extension geometrical-kinematic model, which is sound for the whole active extensional belt of Italy.

  13. Active nondestructive assay of nuclear materials: principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gozani, Tsahi

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to present, coherently and comprehensively, the wealth of available but scattered information on the principles and applications of active nondestructive analysis (ANDA). Chapters are devoted to the following: background and overview; interactions of neutrons with matter; interactions of ..gamma..-rays with matter; neutron production and sources; ..gamma..-ray production and sources; effects of neutron and ..gamma..-ray transport in bulk media; signatures of neutron- and photon-induced fissions; neutron and photon detection systems and electronics; representative ANDA systems; and instrument analysis, calibration, and measurement control for ANDA. Each chapter has an introductory section describing the relationship of the topic of that chapter to ANDA. Each chapter ends with a section that summarizes the main results and conclusions of the chapter, and a reference list.

  14. Improvement Characteristics of Bio-active Materials Coated Fabric on Rat Muscular Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghee; Kim, Young-Won; Kim, Jung-Ha; Yang, Misuk; Bae, Hyemi; Lim, Inja; Bang, Hyoweon; Go, Kyung-Chan; Yang, Gwang-Wung; Rho, Yong-Hwan; Park, Hyo-Suk; Park, Eun-Ho; Ko, Jae-Hong

    2015-05-01

    This study surveys the improvement characteristics in old-aged muscular mitochondria by bio-active materials coated fabric (BMCF). To observe the effects, the fabric (10 and 30%) was worn to old-aged rat then the oxygen consumption efficiency and copy numbers of mitochondria, and mRNA expression of apoptosis- and mitophagy-related genes were verified. By wearing the BMCF, the oxidative respiration significantly increased when using the 30% materials coated fabric. The mitochondrial DNA copy number significantly decreased and subsequently recovered in a dose-dependent manner. The respiratory control ratio to mitochondrial DNA copy number showed a dose-dependent increment. As times passed, Bax, caspase 9, PGC-1α and β-actin increased, and Bcl-2 decreased in a dose-dependent manner. However, the BMCF can be seen to have had no effect on Fas receptor. PINK1 expression did not change considerably and was inclined to decrease in control group, but the expression was down-regulated then subsequently increased with the use of the BMCF in a dose-dependent manner. Caspase 3 increased and subsequently decreased in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the BMCF invigorates mitophagy and improves mitochondrial oxidative respiration in skeletal muscle, and in early stage of apoptosis induced by the BMCF is not related to extrinsic death-receptor mediated but mitochondria-mediated signaling pathway.

  15. Deepening Sleep by Hypnotic Suggestion

    PubMed Central

    Cordi, Maren J.; Schlarb, Angelika A.; Rasch, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Slow wave sleep (SWS) plays a critical role in body restoration and promotes brain plasticity; however, it markedly declines across the lifespan. Despite its importance, effective tools to increase SWS are rare. Here we tested whether a hypnotic suggestion to “sleep deeper” extends the amount of SWS. Design: Within-subject, placebo-controlled crossover design. Setting: Sleep laboratory at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. Participants: Seventy healthy females 23.27 ± 3.17 y. Intervention: Participants listened to an auditory text with hypnotic suggestions or a control tape before napping for 90 min while high-density electroencephalography was recorded. Measurements and Results: After participants listened to the hypnotic suggestion to “sleep deeper” subsequent SWS was increased by 81% and time spent awake was reduced by 67% (with the amount of SWS or wake in the control condition set to 100%). Other sleep stages remained unaffected. Additionally, slow wave activity was significantly enhanced after hypnotic suggestions. During the hypnotic tape, parietal theta power increases predicted the hypnosis-induced extension of SWS. Additional experiments confirmed that the beneficial effect of hypnotic suggestions on SWS was specific to the hypnotic suggestion and did not occur in low suggestible participants. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of hypnotic suggestions to specifically increase the amount and duration of slow wave sleep (SWS) in a midday nap using objective measures of sleep in young, healthy, suggestible females. Hypnotic suggestions might be a successful tool with a lower risk of adverse side effects than pharmacological treatments to extend SWS also in clinical and elderly populations. Citation: Cordi MJ, Schlarb AA, Rasch B. Deepening sleep by hypnotic suggestion. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1143-1152. PMID:24882909

  16. Progress Report {number_sign}1 on the materials identification, characterization and evaluation activity: Acquisition of materials data from the Exploratory Studies Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Meike, A., LLNL

    1998-02-01

    This paper reports on the initial work within the Materials Identification, Characterization and Evaluation Sub-activity Integration Activity within the Introduced Materials Task (IMT) (WBS 1.2.3.12.5). The goals of this activity are twofold.: (1) to identify and characterize types and usage of materials that are most likely to be introduced into a potential High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a result of its construction and operation and (2) to provide tools for the Integration Activity to evaluate the chemical impact on the repository based on information gathered from sources external and internal to the Introduced Materials Task-by the Literature Survey Sub-activity (Integration Activity, IMT). Based on this information and assessment, the Integration Activity activates relevant activities within the Introduced Materials Task and provides information to other Tasks within the Yucca Mountain Project.

  17. Active control of acoustic pressure fields using smart material technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    An overview describing the use of piezoceramic patches in reducing noise in a structural acoustics setting is presented. The passive and active contributions due to patches which are bonded to an Euler-Bernoulli beam or thin shell are briefly discussed and the results are incorporated into a 2-D structural acoustics model. In this model, an exterior noise source causes structural vibrations which in turn lead to interior noise as a result of nonlinear fluid/structure coupling mechanism. Interior sound pressure levels are reduced via patches bonded to the flexible boundary (a beam in this case) which generate pure bending moments when an out-of-phase voltage is applied. Well-posedness results for the infinite dimensional system are discussed and a Galerkin scheme for approximating the system dynamics is outlined. Control is implemented by using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control theory to calculate gains for the linearized system and then feeding these gains back into the nonlinear system of interest. The effectiveness of this strategy for this problem is illustrated in an example.

  18. THERMAL IMAGING OF ACTIVE MAGNETIC REGERNERATOR MCE MATERIALS DURING OPERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Shassere, Benjamin; West, David L; Abdelaziz, Omar; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen

    2012-01-01

    An active magnetic regenerator (AMR) prototype was constructed that incorporates a Gd sheet into the regenerator wall to enable visualization of the system s thermal transients. In this experiment, the thermal conditions inside the AMR are observed under a variety of operating conditions. An infrared (IR) camera is employed to visualize the thermal transients within the AMR. The IR camera is used to visually and quantitatively evaluate the temperature difference and thus giving means to calculate the performance of the system under the various operating conditions. Thermal imaging results are presented for two differing experimental test runs. Real time imaging of the thermal state of the AMR has been conducted while operating the system over a range of conditions. A 1 Tesla twin-coil electromagnet (situated on a C frame base) is used for this experiment such that all components are stationary during testing. A modular, linear reciprocating system has been realized in which the effects of regenerator porosity and utilization factor can be investigated. To evaluate the performance variation in porosity and utilization factor the AMR housing was constructed such that the plate spacing of the Gd sheets may be varied. Each Gd sheet has dimensions of 38 mm wide and 66 mm long with a thickness of 1 mm and the regenerator can hold a maximum of 29 plates with a spacing of 0.25 mm. Quantitative and thermal imaging results are presented for several regenerator configurations.

  19. Plasma acylcarnitine profiles suggest incomplete long-chain fatty acid beta-oxidation and altered tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in type 2 diabetic African-American women.

    PubMed

    Adams, Sean H; Hoppel, Charles L; Lok, Kerry H; Zhao, Ling; Wong, Scott W; Minkler, Paul E; Hwang, Daniel H; Newman, John W; Garvey, W Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Inefficient muscle long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) combustion is associated with insulin resistance, but molecular links between mitochondrial fat catabolism and insulin action remain controversial. We hypothesized that plasma acylcarnitine profiling would identify distinct metabolite patterns reflective of muscle fat catabolism when comparing individuals bearing a missense G304A uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3 g/a) polymorphism to controls, because UCP3 is predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle and g/a individuals have reduced whole-body fat oxidation. MS analyses of 42 carnitine moieties in plasma samples from fasting type 2 diabetics (n = 44) and nondiabetics (n = 12) with or without the UCP3 g/a polymorphism (n = 28/genotype: 22 diabetic, 6 nondiabetic/genotype) were conducted. Contrary to our hypothesis, genotype had a negligible impact on plasma metabolite patterns. However, a comparison of nondiabetics vs. type 2 diabetics revealed a striking increase in the concentrations of fatty acylcarnitines reflective of incomplete LCFA beta-oxidation in the latter (i.e. summed C10- to C14-carnitine concentrations were approximately 300% of controls; P = 0.004). Across all volunteers (n = 56), acetylcarnitine rose and propionylcarnitine decreased with increasing hemoglobin A1c (r = 0.544, P < 0.0001; and r = -0.308, P < 0.05, respectively) and with increasing total plasma acylcarnitine concentration. In proof-of-concept studies, we made the novel observation that C12-C14 acylcarnitines significantly stimulated nuclear factor kappa-B activity (up to 200% of controls) in RAW264.7 cells. These results are consistent with the working hypothesis that inefficient tissue LCFA beta-oxidation, due in part to a relatively low tricarboxylic acid cycle capacity, increases tissue accumulation of acetyl-CoA and generates chain-shortened acylcarnitine molecules that activate proinflammatory pathways implicated in insulin resistance.

  20. Whole transcriptome profiling of the human hippocampus suggests an involvement of the KIBRA rs17070145 polymorphism in differential activation of the MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Piras, I S; Krate, J; Schrauwen, I; Corneveaux, J J; Serrano, G E; Sue, L; Beach, T G; Huentelman, M J

    2017-04-05

    The rs17070145-T variant of the WWC1 gene, coding for the KIBRA protein, has been associated with both increased episodic memory performance and lowered risk for late onset Alzheimer's disease, although the mechanism behind this protective effect has not been completely elucidated. To achieve a better understanding of the pathways modulated by rs17070145 and its associated functional variant(s), we used laser capture microdissection (LCM) and RNA-sequencing to investigate the effect of rs17070145 genotypes on whole transcriptome expression in the human hippocampus (HP) of 22 neuropathologically normal individuals, with a specific focus on the dentate gyrus (DG) and at the pyramidal cells (PC) of CA1 and CA3 sub-regions. Differential expression analysis of RNA-seq data within the HP based on the rs17070145 genotype revealed an overexpression of genes involved in the MAPK signaling pathway, potentially driven by the T/T genotype. The most important contribution comes from genes dysregulated within the DG region. Other genes significantly dysregulated, and not involved in the MAPK1 pathway (Adj P < 0.01 and Fold Change > |1.00|) were: RSPO4 (HP); ARC, DUSP5, DNAJB5, EGR4, PPP1R15A, WBP11P1, EGR1, GADD45B (DG); CH25H, HSPA1A, HSPA1B, TNFSF9 and NPAS4 (PC). Several evidences suggested that the MAPK signaling pathway is linked with memory and learning processes. In non-neuronal cells, the KIBRA protein is phosphorylated by ERK1/2 (involved in the MAPK signaling) in cells as well as in vitro. Several of the other dysregulated genes are involved in memory and learning processes, as well as in Alzheimer's Disease. In conclusion, our results suggest that the effect of the WWC1 rs17070145 polymorphism on memory performance and Alzheimer's disease might be due to a differential regulation of the MAPK signaling, a key pathway involved in memory and learning processes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Materialism.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  2. Dissociation of the trimeric gp41 ectodomain at the lipid-water interface suggests an active role in HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Roche, Julien; Louis, John M; Grishaev, Alexander; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Adriaan

    2014-03-04

    The envelope glycoprotein gp41 mediates the process of membrane fusion that enables entry of the HIV-1 virus into the host cell. The actual fusion process involves a switch from a homotrimeric prehairpin intermediate conformation, consisting of parallel coiled-coil helices, to a postfusion state where the ectodomains are arranged as a trimer of helical hairpins, adopting a six-helix bundle (6HB) state. Here, we show by solution NMR spectroscopy that a water-soluble 6HB gp41 ectodomain binds to zwitterionic detergents that contain phosphocholine or phosphatidylcholine head groups and phospholipid vesicles that mimic T-cell membrane composition. Binding results in the dissociation of the 6HB and the formation of a monomeric state, where its two α-helices, N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) and C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR), become embedded in the lipid-water interface of the virus and host cell. The atomic structure of the gp41 ectodomain monomer, based on NOE distance restraints and residual dipolar couplings, shows that the NHR and CHR helices remain mostly intact, but they completely lose interhelical contacts. The high affinity of the ectodomain helices for phospholipid surfaces suggests that unzippering of the prehairpin intermediate leads to a state where the NHR and CHR helices become embedded in the host cell and viral membranes, respectively, thereby providing a physical force for bringing these membranes into close juxtaposition before actual fusion.

  3. Micromechanics and constitutive models for soft active materials with phase evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binglian

    Soft active materials, such as shape memory polymers, liquid crystal elastomers, soft tissues, gels etc., are materials that can deform largely in response to external stimuli. Micromechanics analysis of heterogeneous materials based on finite element method is a typically numerical way to study the thermal-mechanical behaviors of soft active materials with phase evolution. While the constitutive models that can precisely describe the stress and strain fields of materials in the process of phase evolution can not be found in the databases of some commercial finite element analysis (FEA) tools such as ANSYS or Abaqus, even the specific constitutive behavior for each individual phase either the new formed one or the original one has already been well-known. So developing a computationally efficient and general three dimensional (3D) thermal-mechanical constitutive model for soft active materials with phase evolution which can be implemented into FEA is eagerly demanded. This paper first solved this problem theoretically by recording the deformation history of each individual phase in the phase evolution process, and adopted the idea of effectiveness by regarding all the new formed phase as an effective phase with an effective deformation to make this theory computationally efficient. A user material subroutine (UMAT) code based on this theoretical constitutive model has been finished in this work which can be added into the material database in Abaqus or ANSYS and can be easily used for most soft active materials with phase evolution. Model validation also has been done through comparison between micromechanical FEA and experiments on a particular composite material, shape memory elastomeric composite (SMEC) which consisted of an elastomeric matrix and the crystallizable fibre. Results show that the micromechanics and the constitutive models developed in this paper for soft active materials with phase evolution are completely relied on.

  4. Developing the intervention material to increase physical activity levels of European preschool children: the ToyBox-study.

    PubMed

    Duvinage, K; Ibrügger, S; Kreichauf, S; Wildgruber, A; De Craemer, M; De Decker, E; Androutsos, O; Lateva, M; Iotova, V; Socha, P; Zych, K; Mouratidou, T; Mesana Graffe, M I; Manios, Y; Koletzko, B

    2014-08-01

    Early childhood is an important period for adopting positive health-related behaviours. More than 95% of European preschool children attend kindergartens, making these settings ideal for the implementation of health promotion interventions. The ToyBox-intervention addressed preschool children, their parents/caregivers and teachers. The aim of the intervention was to improve four energy balance-related behaviours (i.e. healthy snacking, water consumption, physical activity and sedentary behaviour) by implementing a kindergarten-based, family-involved intervention in six European countries (Belgium, Bulgaria, Germany, Greece, Poland and Spain). The intervention material was developed following the intervention mapping protocol, taking into account local and cultural differences among the intervention countries. The present paper focuses on the development of the physical activity component of the intervention. Parental involvement was addressed by providing parents/caregivers with two newsletters, two tip cards and a poster. Teachers received a handbook with guidance on environmental changes in the classroom, 26 physical education sessions and suggestions for fun, interactive classroom activities aiming at total class participation to increase preschoolers' physical activity levels. The ToyBox-intervention material was distributed according to a standard time frame. Teachers received their material prior to the start of the intervention and parents/caregivers received their material during the intervention when each energy balance-related behaviour was implemented.

  5. Proof of Principle for Active Detection of Fissionable Material Using Intense, Pulsed-Bremsstrahlung-Induced Photofission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-07

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6770--14-9554 Proof of Principle for Active Detection of Fissionable Material Using...of Fissionable Material Using Intense, Pulsed-Bremsstrahlung-Induced Photofission R.J. Commisso, J.W. Schumer, R.J. Allen, D.D. Hinshelwood, S.L...induce photofission in fissile material . We are investigating the applicability of this mechanism, using photons from bremsstrahlung, for long-range

  6. Ideas Exchange: Physical Education as a Dynamic Content Area Should Motivate Students to Be Physically Active. What New Ideas Can You Suggest to Kick Off the New School Year and Get Everyone "Moving" in the Right Direction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Melissa A.; Wright, James; Magnotta, John; Goldberg, Mark; Muller, Barbara; Reitz, Adam; Zavatto, Laura; Christenson, Bob; Winiecki, Tom; Beardsley, Rita; Connors, Shelly; Robelee, Margaret E.; Gosset, Michael; Mavrek, Srecko

    2010-01-01

    Physical education as a dynamic content area should motivate students to be physically active. In this article, readers suggest new ideas to kick off the new school year and get everyone "moving" in the right direction.

  7. Oil-containing waste water treating material consisting of modified active carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, H.; Shigeta, S.; Takenaka, Y.

    1982-03-16

    An oil-containing waste water treating material comprises an active carbon upon whose surface is chemically bonded at least one nitrogenous compound which is an amine or a quaternarized derivative thereof.

  8. Outstanding visible photocatalytic activity of a new mixed bismuth titanatate material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrano, P.; Sayagués, M. J.; Navío, J. A.; Hidalgo, M. C.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a new photocatalyst based on bismuth titanates with outstanding visible photocatalytic activity was prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. The synthesised material showed visible activity as high as UV activity of commercial TiO2 P25 under the same experimental conditions for phenol degradation. A wide characterisation of the photocatalyst was performed. The material was composed of three phases; majority of Bi20TiO32 closely interconnected to Bi4Ti3O12 and amorphous TiO2. The high visible activity showed by this material could be ascribed to a combination of several features; i.e. low band gap energy value (2.1 eV), a structure allowing a good separation path for visible photogenerated electron-holes pairs and a relatively high surface area. This photocatalyst appeared as a promising material for solar and visible applications of photocatalysis.

  9. "Go Be a Writer": Intra-Activity with Materials, Time and Space in Literacy Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuby, Candace R.; Rucker, Tara Gutshall; Kirchhofer, Jessica M.

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on research in a United States second-grade classroom during a multimodal literacy workshop. Observing students working with tissue paper, foam board, string, pipe cleaners and other materials, we asked how is intra-activity with materials, time and space influencing literacy learning in Room 203? While the research…

  10. Quality and Knowledge Content in Music Activities in Preschool: The Impact of Human Materiality Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman Nilsson, Marie-Helene; Holmberg, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, pedagogical research has been child centered, where materialities often have been considered as objects and tools. However, in recent posthuman research, attempts have been made to consider human materiality combinations to have impact on pedagogical activities in preschool, but to a large extent music as an issue has been…

  11. Sequence Analysis of LRPPRC and Its SEC1 Domain Interaction Partners Suggests Roles in Cytoskeletal Organization, Vesicular Trafficking, Nucleocytosolic Shuttling and Chromosome Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Leyuan; McKeehan, Wallace L.

    2011-01-01

    LRPPRC (originally called LRP130) is an intracellular 130-kDa leucine-rich protein that co-purifies with the FGF receptor from liver cell extracts and has been detected in diverse multi-protein complexes from the cell membrane, cytoskeleton and nucleus. Here we report results of a sequence homology analysis of LRPPRC and its SEC1 domain interactive partners. Twenty-three copies of tandem repeats that are similar to PPR, TPR and HEAT repeats characterize the LRPPRC sequence. The N-terminus exhibits multiple copies of leucine-rich nuclear transport signals followed by ENTH, DUF28 and SEC1 homology domains. We used the SEC1 domain to trap interactive partners expressed from a human liver cDNA library. Interactive C19ORF5 (XP_038600) exhibited a strong homology to microtubule-associated proteins (MAP) and a potential arginine-rich mRNA binding motif. UXT (XP_033860) exhibited α-helical properties homologous to the actin-associated spectrin repeat and L/I heptad repeats in mobile transcription factors. C6ORF34 (XP_004305) was homologous to the non-DNA binding C-terminus of the E. coli Rob transcription factor. CECR2 (AAK15343) exhibited a transcription factor AT-hook motif next to two bromodomains and a homology to guanylate-binding protein 1. Taken together these features suggest a regulatory role of LRPPRC and its SEC1 domain-interactive partners in integration of cytoskeletal networks with vesicular trafficking, nucleocytosolic shuttling, chromosome remodeling and transcription. PMID:11827465

  12. Lack of megalin expression in adult human terminal ileum suggests megalin-independent cubilin/amnionless activity during vitamin B12 absorption.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Louise L; Andersen, Rikke K; Hager, Henrik; Madsen, Mette

    2014-07-01

    Cubilin plays an essential role in terminal ileum and renal proximal tubules during absorption of vitamin B12 and ligands from the glomerular ultrafiltrate. Cubilin is coexpressed with amnionless, and cubilin and amnionless are mutually dependent on each other for correct processing to the plasma membrane upon synthesis. Patients with defects in either protein suffer from vitamin B12-malabsorption and in some cases proteinuria. Cubilin lacks a transmembrane region and signals for endocytosis and is dependent on a transmembrane coreceptor during internalization. Amnionless has been shown to be able to mediate internalization of cubilin in a cell-based model system. Cubilin has additionally been suggested to function together with megalin, and a recent study of megalin-deficient patients indicates that uptake of cubilin ligands in the kidney is critically dependent on megalin. To further investigate the potential role of amnionless and megalin in relation to cubilin function in terminal ileum and vitamin B12 uptake, we initiated a study of CUBN/cubilin, AMN/amnionless, and LRP2/megalin expression in adult human terminal ileum. Our study is the first to reveal the expression pattern of cubilin, amnionless, and megalin in adult human terminal ileum, where cubilin and amnionless localize to the epithelial cells. Surprisingly, we did not detect any megalin protein in adult terminal ileum and consistently, only extremely low amounts of LRP2 mRNA. Our data therefore advocate that cubilin and amnionless act independently of megalin in adult terminal ileum and that the cubilin-megalin interdependency accordingly should be considered as tissue and ligand specific.

  13. Lack of megalin expression in adult human terminal ileum suggests megalin‐independent cubilin/amnionless activity during vitamin B12 absorption

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Louise L.; Andersen, Rikke K.; Hager, Henrik; Madsen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cubilin plays an essential role in terminal ileum and renal proximal tubules during absorption of vitamin B12 and ligands from the glomerular ultrafiltrate. Cubilin is coexpressed with amnionless, and cubilin and amnionless are mutually dependent on each other for correct processing to the plasma membrane upon synthesis. Patients with defects in either protein suffer from vitamin B12‐malabsorption and in some cases proteinuria. Cubilin lacks a transmembrane region and signals for endocytosis and is dependent on a transmembrane coreceptor during internalization. Amnionless has been shown to be able to mediate internalization of cubilin in a cell‐based model system. Cubilin has additionally been suggested to function together with megalin, and a recent study of megalin‐deficient patients indicates that uptake of cubilin ligands in the kidney is critically dependent on megalin. To further investigate the potential role of amnionless and megalin in relation to cubilin function in terminal ileum and vitamin B12 uptake, we initiated a study of CUBN/cubilin, AMN/amnionless, and LRP2/megalin expression in adult human terminal ileum. Our study is the first to reveal the expression pattern of cubilin, amnionless, and megalin in adult human terminal ileum, where cubilin and amnionless localize to the epithelial cells. Surprisingly, we did not detect any megalin protein in adult terminal ileum and consistently, only extremely low amounts of LRP2 mRNA. Our data therefore advocate that cubilin and amnionless act independently of megalin in adult terminal ileum and that the cubilin‐megalin interdependency accordingly should be considered as tissue and ligand specific. PMID:25052491

  14. Spanish-Hispanic Culture from A to V (Actualidades to Venezuela): 72 Spanish-Language Interdisciplinary Cultural Themes with Suggested Resource Materials and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Merriam M.

    This guidebook is intended for use by teachers of Spanish (FLES through college level) and by teachers in Spanish bilingual programs. It lists all of the Spanish-speaking countries and 72 Spanish-language cultural themes, such as "Actualidades" (Current Events), "Carreras y espanol comercial" (Careers and Commercial Spanish), "Deportes" (Sports),…

  15. Quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers: comparison to quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Stephan; Chow, Weng W.; Schneider, Hans Christian

    2016-03-01

    We review a microscopic laser theory for quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers, in which carrier collisions are treated at the level of quantum kinetic equations. The computed characteristics of such a quantum-dot active material are compared to a state-of-the-art quantum-well quantum cascade laser. We find that the current requirement to achieve a comparable gain-length product is reduced compared to that of the quantum-well quantum cascade laser.

  16. New biologically active composite materials on the basis of dialdehyde cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khashirov, Azamat A.; Zhansitov, Azamat A.; Zaikov, Genadiy E.; Khashirova, Svetlana Yu.

    2014-05-01

    In this work for the first time have been studied modification peculiarities of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and its oxidized form (dialdehyde cellulose DA!) guanidine-containing monomers and polymers of vinyl and diallyl series. Researched the structure of the composites by IR spectroscopy and SEM. The biological activity of the synthesized composite materials was investigated and shown that the composite synthesized materials are quite active and have a biocidal effect against Gram-positive (St.Aureus) and Gram (E.coli) microorganisms.

  17. Material screening metrics and optimal performance of an active magnetic regenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niknia, I.; Trevizoli, P. V.; Christiaanse, T. V.; Govindappa, P.; Teyber, R.; Rowe, A.

    2017-02-01

    A variety of metrics to rank the magnetocaloric materials can be found in the literature, but a quantitative assessment showing their efficacy has not been reported. A numerical model of an active magnetic regenerator cycle is used to assess the predictive ability of a set of material metrics. The performance of eight cases of known magnetocaloric material (including first order MnFeP1-xAsx and second order materials Gd, GdDy, Tb), and 15 cases of hypothetical materials are considered. Using a fixed regenerator matrix geometry, magnetic field, and flow waveforms, the maximum exergetic cooling power of each material is identified. Several material screening metrics such as relative cooling power (RCP) are tested and a linear correlation is found between maximum RCP and the maximum exergetic cooling power. The sensitivity of performance to variations in the hot side and cold side temperatures from the conditions giving maximum exergetic power are determined.

  18. Autophagy Defects Suggested by Low Levels of Autophagy Activator MAP1S and High Levels of Autophagy Inhibitor LRPPRC Predict Poor Prognosis of Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xianhan; Zhong, Weide; Huang, Hai; He, Huichan; Jiang, Funeng; Chen, Yanru; Yue, Fei; Zou, Jing; Li, Xun; He, Yongzhong; You, Pan; Yang, Weiqiang; Lai, Yiming; Wang, Fen; Liu, Leyuan

    2016-01-01

    MAP1S (originally named C19ORF5) is a widely distributed homolog of neuronal-specific MAP1A and MAP1B, and bridges autophagic components with microtubules and mitochondria to affect autophagosomal biogenesis and degradation. Mitochondrion-associated protein LRPPRC functions as an inhibitor for autophagy initiation to protect mitochondria from autophagy degradation. MAP1S and LRPPRC interact with each other and may collaboratively regulate autophagy although the underlying mechanism is yet unknown. Previously, we have reported that LRPPRC levels serve as a prognosis marker of patients with prostate adenocarcinomas (PCA), and that patients with high LRPPRC levels survive a shorter period after surgery than those with low levels of LRPPRC. MAP1S levels are elevated in diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocelular carcinomas in wildtype mice and the exposed MAP1S-deficient mice develop more malignant hepatocellular carcinomas. We performed immunochemical analysis to evaluate the co-relationship among the levels of MAP1S, LRPPRC, P62, and γ-H2AX. Samples were collected from wildtype and prostate-specific PTEN-deficient mice, 111 patients with PCA who had been followed up for 10 years and 38 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia enrolled in hospitals in Guangzhou, China. The levels of MAP1S were generally elevated so the MAP1S-mediated autophagy was activated in PCA developed in either PTEN-deficient mice or patients than their respective benign tumors. The MAP1S levels among patients with PCA vary dramatically, and patients with low MAP1S levels survive a shorter period than those with high MAP1S levels. Levels of MAP1S in collaboration with levels of LRPPRC can serve as markers for prognosis of prostate cancer patients. PMID:25043940

  19. Possible evidence for on-going volcanism on Mars as suggested by thin, elliptical sheets of low-albedo particulate material around pits and fissures close to Cerberus Fossae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Gerald Patrick; Crawford, Ian A.; Peacock, David; Vetterlein, Joyce; Parfitt, Elisabeth; Bishop, Louise

    2007-10-01

    We describe 100 200 metre-sized low-albedo haloes from Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images, located around sunken pits in the vicinity of Cerberus Fossae, Mars, a fissure-vent system that has been suggested to have been volcanically active within the last few million years. Two types of pit have been identified: (1) lenticular/elongate pits located on the floors of fissures/graben, some of which lead to the summit of a volcano; (2) sub-circular pits, lacking the raised rims expected of impact craters, located either within small lava flows, along fissures, or on flat, cratered plains. The low-albedo haloes encircle the pits, and are in places asymmetric in plan-view, exhibiting almost perfect elliptical outlines with low-aspect ratios, and lightening in appearance towards the margins of the ellipses. Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) images suggest the haloes are dark particulate deposits. These deposits bury impact craters to a depth of less than a few decimetres. We argue that the elliptical haloes may be mineral precipitates and/or particulate deposits from ballistic volcanic eruptions that have been disrupted by the wind. They are likely be extremely young because <1m thick, low-albedo sedimentary deposits elsewhere on Mars have been observed to disappear in a few tens of years due to deposition of high-albedo dust.

  20. Rattling Nucleons: New Developments in Active Interrogation of Special Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Runkle; David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson

    2012-01-01

    Active interrogation is a vigorous area of research and development due to its promise of offering detection and characterization capabilities of special nuclear material in environments where passive detection fails. The primary value added by active methods is the capability to penetrate shielding - special nuclear material itself, incidental materials, or intentional shielding - and advocates hope that active interrogation will provide a solution to the problem of detecting shielded uranium, which is at present the greatest obstacle to interdiction efforts. The technique also provides a unique benefit for quantifying nuclear material in high background-radiation environments, an area important for nuclear material safeguards and material accountancy. Progress has been made in the field of active interrogation on several fronts, most notably in the arenas of source development, systems integration, and the integration and exploitation of multiple fission and non-fission signatures. But penetration of interrogating radiation often comes at a cost, not only in terms of finance and dose but also in terms of induced backgrounds, system complexity, and extended measurement times (including set up and acquisition). These costs make the calculus for deciding to implement active interrogation more subtle than may be apparent. The purpose of this review is thus to examine existing interrogation methods, compare and contrast their attributes and limitations, and identify missions where active interrogation may hold the most promise.

  1. Regulation of Synaptic Vesicle Docking by Different Classes of Macromolecules in Active Zone Material

    PubMed Central

    Szule, Joseph A.; Harlow, Mark L.; Jung, Jae Hoon; De-Miguel, Francisco F.; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2012-01-01

    The docking of synaptic vesicles at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of axon terminals is essential for their fusion with the membrane and exocytosis of their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Dense networks of macromolecules, called active zone material, (AZM) are attached to the presynaptic membrane next to docked vesicles. Electron tomography has shown that some AZM macromolecules are connected to docked vesicles, leading to the suggestion that AZM is somehow involved in the docking process. We used electron tomography on the simply arranged active zones at frog neuromuscular junctions to characterize the connections of AZM to docked synaptic vesicles and to search for the establishment of such connections during vesicle docking. We show that each docked vesicle is connected to 10–15 AZM macromolecules, which fall into four classes based on several criteria including their position relative to the presynaptic membrane. In activated axon terminals fixed during replacement of docked vesicles by previously undocked vesicles, undocked vesicles near vacated docking sites on the presynaptic membrane have connections to the same classes of AZM macromolecules that are connected to docked vesicles in resting terminals. The number of classes and the total number of macromolecules to which the undocked vesicles are connected are inversely proportional to the vesicles’ distance from the presynaptic membrane. We conclude that vesicle movement toward and maintenance at docking sites on the presynaptic membrane are directed by an orderly succession of stable interactions between the vesicles and distinct classes of AZM macromolecules positioned at different distances from the membrane. Establishing the number, arrangement and sequence of association of AZM macromolecules involved in vesicle docking provides an anatomical basis for testing and extending concepts of docking mechanisms provided by biochemistry. PMID:22438915

  2. Electrode-active material for electrochemical batteries and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Ravi

    1987-01-01

    A battery electrode material comprising a non-stoichiometric electrode-active material which forms a redox pair with the battery electrolyte, an electrically conductive polymer present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 5% by weight of the electrode-active material, and a binder. The conductive polymer provides improved proton or ion conductivity and is a ligand resulting in metal ion or negative ion vacancies of less than about 0.1 atom percent. Specific electrodes of nickel and lead are disclosed.

  3. Determination of contamination in rare earth materials by promptgamma activation analysis (PGAA)

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.L.; English, G.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay,Zs.

    2004-11-09

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) has been used to detect and quantify impurities in the analyses of rare earth (RE) oxides. The analytical results are discussed with respect to the importance of having a thorough identification and understanding of contaminant elements in these compounds regarding the function of the materials in their various applications. Also, the importance of using PGAA to analyze materials in support of other physico-chemical studies of the materials is discussed, including the study of extremely low concentrations of ions such as the rare earth ions themselves in bulk material matrices.

  4. Review of Physics Related Research and Development Activities in Nondestructive Characterization of Solid Rocket Motor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Lee H.

    1998-10-01

    The perception that solid rocket motors (srm) are of relatively simple mechanical construction with a long history in private, military, and NASA applications may lead some to believe that little is left to be done in terms of basic and applied research and development in support of this technology. The fact is that srm?s are very complicated primarily because of the complexity of the materials from which they are built. The reliability and performance of srm?s are determined by the ballistic and mechanical properties of each individual material component, and by the manufacturing processes that conjoin these materials. In order to insure reliability and good performance, there are on-going materials research and development activities in the srm community. Included are activities involving the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods used for materials and processes characterization. Typical applications include: detection and characterization of defects in fiber reinforced composite materials, detection of weak bonds and debonds, verification of surface cleanliness prior to bonding, characterization of aging materials and bondlines, measurement of elastic properties in filled polymeric materials, monitoring of cure in polymeric materials, and measurement of film or coating thicknesses. NDE methods and physics principles upon which they are based will be described. Challenges and future research and development directions will be identified.

  5. IFMIF - International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility Conceptual Design Activity/Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rennich, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    Environmental acceptability, safety, and economic viability win ultimately be the keys to the widespread introduction of fusion power. This will entail the development of radiation- resistant and low- activation materials. These low-activation materials must also survive exposure to damage from neutrons having an energy spectrum peaked near 14 MeV with annual radiation doses in the range of 20 displacements per atom (dpa). Testing of candidate materials, therefore, requires a high-flux source of high energy neutrons. The problem is that there is currently no high-flux source of neutrons in the energy range above a few MeV. The goal, is therefore, to provide an irradiation facility for use by fusion material scientists in the search for low-activation and damage-resistant materials. An accellerator-based neutron source has been established through a number of international studies and workshops` as an essential step for materials development and testing. The mission of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is to provide an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium (D-Li) neutron source to produce high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials up to about a full lifetime of anticipated use in fusion energy reactors. would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator-based irradiation tests. It would generate material- specific activation and radiological properties data, and support the analysis of materials for use in safety, maintenance, recycling, decommissioning, and waste disposal systems.

  6. Active binary R Arae revisited: Bringing the secondary component to light and physical modelling of the circumstellar material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakış, H.; Bakış, V.; Eker, Z.; Demircan, O.

    2016-05-01

    The spectral lines of the secondary component of the active binary system R Ara were uncovered for the first time, which allowed directly to determine the parameters of the spectroscopic orbit. The mass ratio of the system is updated to a new observational value of M2/M1 = 0.305 ± 0.005 which is ˜20 per cent smaller than the literature value (M2/M1 = 0.39). Modelling the reconstructed component spectra yielded the equatorial rotational velocities of the components as vrot1 = 202 km s-1 and vrot2 = 73 km s-1 indicating a very fast rotation (˜5 times faster than the synchronous rotation velocity) for the primary and synchronous rotation for the secondary component. The circumstellar material in the system was investigated using the Hipparcossatellite data and the high-resolution (R ˜ 41 000) spectral data. According to our model, there is always material transferring from the secondary component on to the primary causing a hot region on its surface. The structural difference between the spectra taken at the same orbital phase but at different epochs proved that the density and the velocity of the transferring material are variable. There are three main trends in the light curve and spectral line variations suggesting the activity cycles for the system, namely quiescent, moderate and, active cycles. It was estimated that the circumstellar material around could be extended to large distances up to 40 R⊙ from the system.

  7. Performance of Nonmigratory Iron Chelating Active Packaging Materials in Viscous Model Food Systems.

    PubMed

    Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2015-09-01

    Many packaged food products undergo quality deterioration due to iron promoted oxidative reactions. Recently, we have developed a nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging material that represents a novel approach to inhibit oxidation of foods while addressing consumer demands for "cleanˮ labels. A challenge to the field of nonmigratory active packaging is ensuring that surface-immobilized active agents retain activity in a true food system despite diffusional limitations. Yet, the relationship between food viscosity and nonmigratory active packaging activity retention has never been characterized. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of food viscosity on iron chelation by a nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging material. Methyl cellulose was added to aqueous buffered iron solutions to yield model systems with viscosities ranging from ∼1 to ∼10(5)  mPa·s, representing viscosities ranging from beverage to mayonnaise. Iron chelation was quantified by material-bound iron content using colorimetry and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).  Maximum iron chelation was reached in solutions up to viscosity ∼10(2)  mPa·s. In more viscous solutions (up to ∼10(4)  mPa·s), there was a significant decrease in iron chelating capacity (P < 0.05). However, materials still retained at least 76% iron chelating capacity. Additionally, the influence of different food hydrocolloids on the performance of nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging was characterized. Methyl cellulose and carrageenan did not compete with the material for specific iron chelation (P > 0.05). Materials retained 32% to 45% chelating capacity when in contact with competitively chelating hydrocolloids guar gum, locust bean gum, and xanthan gum. This work demonstrates the potential application of nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging in liquid and semi-liquid foods to allow for the removal of synthetic chelators, while

  8. How Do Distance Learners Use Activities in Self-Instructional Materials?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Sanjaya; Gaba, Ashok Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Presents results of a study on the use of learning activities in self-instructional materials by distance learners of the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU). It shows that learners make use of the activities extensively as they have positive perceptions about benefits of Self-Assessment Questions and Terminal Questions given in the…

  9. Covalent attachment of lysozyme to cotton/cellulose materials: protein verses solid support activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Covalent attachment of enzymes to cellulosic materials like cotton is of interest where either release or loss of enzyme activity over time needs to be avoided. The covalent attachment of an enzyme to a cellulosic substrate requires either activation of a protein side chain or an organic functional ...

  10. Real space mapping of ionic diffusion and electrochemical activity in energy storage and conversion materials

    DOEpatents

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Balke, Nina; Kumar, Amit; Dudney, Nancy J; Jesse, Stephen

    2014-05-06

    A method and system for probing mobile ion diffusivity and electrochemical reactivity on a nanometer length scale of a free electrochemically active surface includes a control module that biases the surface of the material. An electrical excitation signal is applied to the material and induces the movement of mobile ions. An SPM probe in contact with the surface of the material detects the displacement of mobile ions at the surface of the material. A detector measures an electromechanical strain response at the surface of the material based on the movement and reactions of the mobile ions. The use of an SPM tip to detect local deformations allows highly reproducible measurements in an ambient environment without visible changes in surface structure. The measurements illustrate effective spatial resolution comparable with defect spacing and well below characteristic grain sizes of the material.

  11. Light-induced antibacterial activity of electrospun chitosan-based material containing photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Severyukhina, A N; Petrova, N V; Yashchenok, A M; Bratashov, D N; Smuda, K; Mamonova, I A; Yurasov, N A; Puchinyan, D M; Georgieva, R; Bäumler, H; Lapanje, A; Gorin, D A

    2017-01-01

    Increasing antimicrobial resistance requires the development of novel materials and approaches for treatment of various infections. Utilization of photodynamic therapy represents an advanced alternative to antibiotics and metal-based agents. Here, we report the fabrication of electrospun material that possesses benefits of both topical antimicrobial and photodynamic therapies. This material combines chitosan, as a biocompatible polymer, and a second generation photosensitizer. The incorporation of photosensitizer doesn't affect the material morphology and its nearly uniform distribution in fibers structure was observed by confocal Raman microscopy. Owing to photosensitizer the prepared material exhibits the light-induced and spatially limited antimicrobial activity that was demonstrated against Staphylococcus aureus, an important etiological infectious agent. Such material can be potentially used in antibacterial therapy of chronic wounds, infections of diabetic ulcers, and burns, as well as rapidly spreading and intractable soft-tissue infections caused by resistant bacteria.

  12. Purely Organic Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Materials for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael Y; Zysman-Colman, Eli

    2017-03-03

    The design of thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials both as emitters and as hosts is an exploding area of research. The replacement of phosphorescent metal complexes with inexpensive organic compounds in electroluminescent (EL) devices that demonstrate comparable performance metrics is paradigm shifting, as these new materials offer the possibility of developing low-cost lighting and displays. Here, a comprehensive review of TADF materials is presented, with a focus on linking their optoelectronic behavior with the performance of the organic light-emitting diode (OLED) and related EL devices. TADF emitters are cross-compared within specific color ranges, with a focus on blue, green-yellow, orange-red, and white OLEDs. Organic small-molecule, dendrimer, polymer, and exciplex emitters are all discussed within this review, as is their use as host materials. Correlations are provided between the structure of the TADF materials and their optoelectronic properties. The success of TADF materials has ushered in the next generation of OLEDs.

  13. Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) and short-lived neutron activation analysis (NAA) applied to the characterization of legacy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; English, G.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Perry, D.L.; Reijonen, J.P.; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Garabedian, G.F.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.

    2008-02-13

    Without quality historical records that provide the composition of legacy materials, the elemental and/or chemical characterization of such materials requires a manual analytical strategy that may expose the analyst to unknown toxicological hazards. In addition, much of the existing legacy inventory also incorporates radioactivity, and, although radiological composition may be determined by various nuclear-analytical methods, most importantly, gamma-spectroscopy, current methods of chemical characterization still require direct sample manipulation, thereby presenting special problems with broad implications for both the analyst and the environment. Alternately, prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) provides a'single-shot' in-situ, non-destructive method that provides a complete assay of all major entrained elemental constituents.1-3. Additionally, neutron activation analysis (NAA) using short-lived activation products complements PGAA and is especially useful when NAA activation surpasses the PGAA in elemental sensitivity.

  14. Material Activation Benchmark Experiments at the NuMI Hadron Absorber Hall in Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, H.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Toyoda, A.; Yashima, H.; Sekimoto, S.; Iwase, H.; Oishi, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Leveling, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Lauten, G.; Mokhov, N.; Vaziri, K.

    2014-06-15

    In our previous study, double and mirror symmetric activation peaks found for Al and Au arranged spatially on the back of the Hadron absorber of the NuMI beamline in Fermilab were considerably higher than those expected purely from muon-induced reactions. From material activation bench-mark experiments, we conclude that this activation is due to hadrons with energy greater than 3 GeV that had passed downstream through small gaps in the hadron absorber.

  15. The activity of nanocrystalline Fe-based alloys as electrode materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Christian Immanuel; Sellschopp, Kai; Tegel, Marcus; Rauscher, Thomas; Kieback, Bernd; Röntzsch, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In view of alkaline water electrolysis, the activities for the hydrogen evolution reaction of nanocrystalline Fe-based electrode materials were investigated and compared with the activities of polycrystalline Fe and Ni. Electrochemical methods were used to elucidate the overpotential value, the charge transfer resistance and the double layer capacity. Structural properties of the electrode surface were determined with SEM, XRD and XPS analyses. Thus, a correlation between electrochemical and structural parameters was found. In this context, we report on a cyclic voltammetric activation procedure which causes a significant increase of the surface area of Fe-based electrodes leading to a boost in effective activity of the activated electrodes. It was found that the intrinsic activity of activated Fe-based electrodes is very high due to the formation of a nanocrystalline surface layer. In contrast, the activation procedure influences only the intrinsic activity of the Ni electrodes without the formation of a porous surface layer.

  16. Materials Property Profiles for Actively Cooled Panels: An Illustration for Scramjet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaak, N.; Valdevit, L.; Evans, A. G.

    2009-04-01

    A scheme for identifying and visualizing the material properties that limit the performance of candidate materials for actively cooled aerospace propulsion components is presented and illustrated for combustor panels for Mach 7 hypersonic vehicles. The method provides a framework for exploring the nonlinear interactions between design and materials optimization. By probing the active constraints along the border of feasible design space, the limiting properties have been elucidated for a representative group of candidate materials. Property vectors that enhance design options have also been determined. For one of the promising candidate alloys (the Ni-based superalloy, INCONEL X-750), the possibilities of reclaiming design space and lowering optimal combustor panel weight by tailoring its strength properties are assessed.

  17. Use of silicon carbide sludge to form porous alkali-activated materials for insulating application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prud'homme, E.; Joussein, E.; Rossignol, S.

    2015-07-01

    One of the objectives in the field of alkali-activated materials is the development of materials having greater thermal performances than conventional construction materials such as aerated concrete. The aim of this paper is to present the possibility to obtain controlled porosity and controlled thermal properties with geopolymer materials including a waste like silicon carbide sludge. The porosity is created by the reaction of free silicon contains in silicon carbide sludge leading to the formation of hydrogen. Two possible ways are investigated to control the porosity: modification of mixture formulation and additives introduction. The first way is the most promising and allowed the formation of materials presenting the same density but various porosities, which shows that the material is adaptable to the application. The insulation properties are logically linked to the porosity and density of materials. A lower value of thermal conductivity of 0.075 W.m-1.K-1 can be reached for a material with a low density of 0.27 g.cm-3. These characteristics are really good for a mineral-based material which always displays non-negligible resistance to manipulation.

  18. Characterisation, in vitro release study, and antibacterial activity of montmorillonite-gentamicin complex material.

    PubMed

    Rapacz-Kmita, A; Bućko, M M; Stodolak-Zych, E; Mikołajczyk, M; Dudek, P; Trybus, M

    2017-01-01

    The present paper concerns the potential use of montmorillonite as a drug carrier and focusses on the intercalation of the studied clay with gentamicin (an aminoglycoside antibiotic) at various temperatures (20, 50 and 80°C). The experiments were performed to identify the temperature required for the optimum intercalation of gentamicin into the interlayer of montmorillonite. The structural and microstructural properties of gentamicin and the potential for introducing it between smectite clay layers were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques, and SEM with EDS analysis. Additionally, the in vitro drug release behaviour of the montmorillonite-gentamicin complex and its antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria was investigated. Based on these studies, the impact of temperature on the intercalation of the drug between layers of smectite was evaluated. It was found that an intercalation temperature of 50°C resulted in the highest shift in the position of principle peak d(001) as measured by XRD, suggesting, that the greatest amount of gentamicin had been introduced into the interlayer space of montmorillonite at this temperature. Subsequently, the montmorillonite-gentamicin complex material obtained at 50°C revealed the greatest capacity for killing E. coli bacteria during an in vitro test.

  19. Nanoporous silicon flakes as anode active material for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-You; Lee, Jeong-Hwa; Kim, Han-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Nanoporous-silicon (np-Si) flakes were prepared using a combination of an electrochemical etching process and an ultra-sonication treatment and the electrochemical properties were studied as an anode active material for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). This fabrication method is a simple, reproducible, and cost effective way to make high-performance Si-based anode active materials in LIBs. The anode based on np-Si flakes exhibited a higher performances (lower capacity fade rate, stability and excellent rate capability at high C-rate) than the anode based on Si nanowires. The excellent performance of the np-Si flake anode was attributed to the hollowness (nanoporous structure) of the anode active material, which allowed it to accommodate a large volume change during cycling.

  20. Electrode including porous particles with embedded active material for use in a secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Vissers, Donald R.; Nelson, Paul A.; Kaun, Thomas D.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    1978-04-25

    Particles of carbonaceous matrices containing embedded electrode active material are prepared for vibratory loading within a porous electrically conductive substrate. In preparing the particles, active materials such as metal chalcogenides, solid alloys of alkali or alkaline earth metals along with other metals and their oxides in powdered or particulate form are blended with a thermosetting resin and particles of a volatile to form a paste mixture. The paste is heated to a temperature at which the volatile transforms into vapor to impart porosity at about the same time as the resin begins to cure into a rigid, solid structure. The solid structure is then comminuted into porous, carbonaceous particles with the embedded active material.

  1. Method of preparing porous, active material for use in electrodes of secondary electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Vissers, Donald R.; Nelson, Paul A.; Kaun, Thomas D.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    1977-01-01

    Particles of carbonaceous matrices containing embedded electrode active material are prepared for vibratory loading within a porous electrically conductive substrate. In preparing the particles, active materials such as metal chalcogenides, solid alloys of alkali or alkaline earth metals along with other metals and their oxides in powdered or particulate form are blended with a thermosetting resin and particles of a volatile to form a paste mixture. The paste is heated to a temperature at which the volatile transforms into vapor to impart porosity at about the same time as the resin begins to cure into a rigid, solid structure.The solid structure is then comminuted into porous, carbonaceous particles with the embedded active material.

  2. KCP Activities Supporting the W76LEP Stress Cushions and LK3626 RTV Replacement Material Development

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Schneider

    2009-10-01

    The S-5370 RTV blown foam previously produced by Dow Corning is no longer commercially available. The S-5370 material has been used on all of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) programs to manufacture Stress Cushions up through the W88. The Kansas City Plant (KCP) did not have a sufficient supply of S-5370 material to cover the schedule requirements for the Program. This report provides information on the numerous activities conducted at KCP involving the development of the Program Stress Cushion and replacement RTV material.

  3. Activity concentration of natural radioactive nuclides in nonmetallic industrial raw materials in Japan.

    PubMed

    Iwaoka, Kazuki; Tabe, Hiroyuki; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2014-11-01

    Natural materials such as rock, ore, and clay, containing natural radioactive nuclides are widely used as industrial raw materials in Japan. If these are high concentrations, the workers who handle the material can be unknowingly exposed to radiation at a high level. In this study, about 80 nonmetallic natural materials frequently used as industrial raw materials in Japan were comprehensively collected from several industrial companies, and the activity concentrations of (238)U series, (232)Th series and (40)K in the materials was determined by ICP-MS (inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer) and gamma ray spectrum analyses. Effective doses to workers handling them were estimated by using methods for dose estimation given in the RP 122. We found the activity concentrations to be lower than the critical values defined by regulatory requirements as described in the IAEA Safety Guide. The maximum estimated effective dose to workers handling these materials was 0.16 mSv y(-1), which was lower than the reference level (1-20 mSv y(-1)) for existing situation given in the ICRP Publ.103.

  4. Solidification/stabilization of chromite ore processing residue using alkali-activated composite cementitious materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao; Zhuang, RanLiang; Muhammad, Faheem; Yu, Lin; Shiau, YanChyuan; Li, Dongwei

    2017-02-01

    Chromite Ore Processing Residue (COPR) produced in chromium salt production process causes a great health and environmental risk with Cr(VI) leaching. The solidification/stabilization (S/S) of COPR using alkali-activated blast furnace slag (BFS) and fly ash (FA) based cementitious material was investigated in this study. The optimum percentage of BFS and FA for preparing the alkali-activated BFS-FA binder had been studied. COPR was used to replace the amount of BFS-FA or ordinary Portland cement (OPC) for the preparation of the cementitious materials, respectively. The immobilization effect of the alkali-activated BFS-FA binder on COPR was much better than that of OPC based cementitious material. The potential for reusing the final treatment product as a readily available construction material was evaluated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) analysis indicated that COPR had been effectively immobilized. The solidification mechanism is the combined effect of reduction, ion exchange, precipitation, adsorption and physical fixation in the alkali-activated composite cementitious material.

  5. Glucocorticoids interact with noradrenergic activation at encoding to enhance long-term memory for emotional material in women.

    PubMed

    Segal, S K; Simon, R; McFarlin, S; Alkire, M; Desai, A; Cahill, L F

    2014-09-26

    Evidence from the animal literature suggests that post-training glucocorticoids (GCs) interact with noradrenergic activation at acquisition to enhance memory consolidation for emotional stimuli. While there is evidence that GCs enhance memory for emotional material in humans, the extent to which this depends on noradrenergic activation at encoding has not been explored. In this study, 20-mg hydrocortisone was administered to healthy young women (18-35 yrs old) in a double-blind fashion 10 min prior to viewing a series of emotional and neutral images. Saliva samples were taken at baseline, 10 min after drug or placebo administration, immediately after viewing the images, 10, 20, and 30 min after viewing the images. Participants returned 1 week later for a surprise recall test. Results suggest that, hydrocortisone administration resulted in emotional memory enhancement only in participants who displayed an increase in endogenous noradrenergic activation, measured via salivary alpha-amylase at encoding. These results support findings in the animal literature, and suggest that GC-induced memory enhancement relies on noradrenergic activation at encoding in women.

  6. Determination of elements in National Bureau of Standards' geological Standard Reference Materials by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.C.; Glascock, M.D.; Carni, J.J.; Vogt, J.R.; Spalding, T.G.

    1982-08-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) have been used to determine elemental concentrations in two recently issued National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Standard Reference Materials (SRM's). The results obtained are in good agreement with the certified and information values reported by NBS for those elements in each material for which comparisons are available. Average concentrations of 35 elements in SRM 278 obsidian rock and 32 elements in SRM 688 basalt rock are reported for comparison with results that may be obtained by other laboratories.

  7. Corrosion susceptibility study of candidate pin materials for ALTC (Active Lithium/Thionyl Chloride) batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovard, Francine S.; Cieslak, Wendy R.

    1987-09-01

    The corrosion susceptibilities of eight alternate battery pin material candidates for ALTC (Active Lithium/Thionyl Chloride) batteries in 1.5M LiAlCl4/SOCl2 electrolyte have been investigated using ampule exposure and electrochemical tests. The thermal expansion coefficients of these candidate materials are expected to match Sandia-developed Li-corrosion resistant glasses. The corrosion resistances of the candidate materials, which included three stainless steels (15-5 PH, 17-4 PH, and 446), three Fe-Ni glass sealing alloys (Kovar, Alloy 52, and Niromet 426), a Ni-based alloy (Hastelloy B-2) and a zirconium-based alloy (Zircaloy), were compared to the reference materials Ni and 316L SS. All of the candidate materials showed some evidence of corrosion and, therefore, did not perform as well as the reference materials. The Hastelloy B-2 and Zircaloy are clearly unacceptable materials for this application. Of the remaining alternate materials, the 446 SS and Alloy 52 are the most promising candidates.

  8. Evaluation of Light-Activated Provisional Resin Materials for Periodontal Soft Tissue Management

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine mechanical properties using a compressive test with cylinder specimen (h = 6 mm and ϕ = 4 mm) as well as cytotoxicity using elutes from disk specimen (ϕ = 10 mm and h = 2 mm) against human gingival fibroblasts and oral keratinocytes with light-activated provisional resin materials (Revotek LC and Luxatemp Solar) compared to chemically activated counterpart (Snap, Trim II, and Jet). Significantly increased compressive strength (210~280 MPa) was detected in light-activated products compared to chemically activated ones (20~65 MPa, P < 0.05) and similar compressive modulus was detected in both types (0.8~1.5 and 0.5~1.3 GPa). Simultaneously, the light-activated products showed less adverse effects on the periodontal soft tissue cells in any polymerization stage compared to the chemically activated products. Particularly, chemically activated products had significantly greater adverse effects during the “polymerizing” phase compared to those that were “already set” (P < 0.05), as shown in confocal microscopic images of live and dead cells. In conclusion, light-activated provisional resin materials have better mechanical properties as well as biocompatibility against two tested types of oral cells compared to the chemically activated counterpart, which are considered as more beneficial choice for periodontal soft tissue management. PMID:27672651

  9. Antimicrobial activity of transition metal acid MoO(3) prevents microbial growth on material surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zollfrank, Cordt; Gutbrod, Kai; Wechsler, Peter; Guggenbichler, Josef Peter

    2012-01-01

    Serious infectious complications of patients in healthcare settings are often transmitted by materials and devices colonised by microorganisms (nosocomial infections). Current strategies to generate material surfaces with an antimicrobial activity suffer from the consumption of the antimicrobial agent and emerging multidrug-resistant pathogens amongst others. Consequently, materials surfaces exhibiting a permanent antimicrobial activity without the risk of generating resistant microorganisms are desirable. This publication reports on the extraordinary efficient antimicrobial properties of transition metal acids such as molybdic acid (H(2)MoO(4)), which is based on molybdenum trioxide (MoO(3)). The modification of various materials (e.g. polymers, metals) with MoO(3) particles or sol-gel derived coatings showed that the modified materials surfaces were practically free of microorganisms six hours after contamination with infectious agents. The antimicrobial activity is based on the formation of an acidic surface deteriorating cell growth and proliferation. The application of transition metal acids as antimicrobial surface agents is an innovative approach to prevent the dissemination of microorganisms in healthcare units and public environments.

  10. Experimental Observations of Nuclear Activity in Deuterated Materials Subjected to a Low-Energy Photon Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Benyo, Theresa L.; Pines, Vladimir; Pines, Marianna; Forsley, Lawrence P.; Westmeyer, Paul A.; Chait, Arnon; Becks, Michael D.; Martin, Richard E.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Penney, Nicholas; Marsolais, Annette M.; Kamm, Tracy R.

    2017-01-01

    Exposure of highly deuterated materials to a low-energy (nom. 2 MeV) photon beam resulted in nuclear activity of both the parent metals of hafnium and erbium and a witness material (molybdenum) mixed with the reactants. Gamma spectral analysis of all deuterated materials, ErD2.8+C36D74+Mo and HfD2+C36D74+Mo, showed that nuclear processes had occurred as shown by unique gamma signatures. For the deuterated erbium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of erbium ((163)Er and (171)Er) and of molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo) and by beta decay, technetium (99mTc and 101Tc). For the deuterated hafnium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of hafnium (180mHf and 181Hf) and molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo), and by beta decay, technetium ((99m)Tc and (101)Tc). In contrast, when either the hydrogenated or non-gas-loaded erbium or hafnium materials were exposed to the gamma flux, the gamma spectra revealed no new isotopes. Neutron activation materials showed evidence of thermal and epithermal neutrons. CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors showed evidence of fast neutrons with energies between 1.4 and 2.5 MeV and several instances of triple tracks, indicating (is) greater than 10 MeV neutrons. Further study is required to determine the mechanism causing the nuclear activity.

  11. Comparison of dielectric materials for the activation of a macro-scale hinge configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordi, C.; Schmidt, A.; Kovacs, G.; Ermanni, Paolo

    2011-04-01

    While much of the research on dielectric elastomer actuators used to concentrate on VHB 4910 as dielectric material, lately many new, specifically developed materials have come into focus. The acrylic VHB has been thoroughly characterized in a macro-scale agonist-antagonist configuration on an active hinge. This was carried out with the aim of using it on an airship, which was activated, undulating body and a fin and thus propelled in a fish-like manner. The concept was proved in flight, but still lifetime and viscosity of the actuators and the time-costing fabrication due to the necessary large pre-stretches of the dielectric membrane caused severe inconveniences. In order to evaluate the usability of other materials for this specific purpose, two other materials, a corrugated silicone with silver electrodes (by PolyPower) and an acrylic with interpenetrating network (IPN) developed by Pei et al. were characterized under similar conditions. The influence of the material on performance and design of the actuators and the conclusions for the use of the materials on the airship (and on applications with similar performance requirements) are presented.

  12. Redox-Flow Batteries: From Metals to Organic Redox-Active Materials.

    PubMed

    Winsberg, Jan; Hagemann, Tino; Janoschka, Tobias; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2017-01-16

    Research on redox-flow batteries (RFBs) is currently experiencing a significant upturn, stimulated by the growing need to store increasing quantities of sustainably generated electrical energy. RFBs are promising candidates for the creation of smart grids, particularly when combined with photovoltaics and wind farms. To achieve the goal of "green", safe, and cost-efficient energy storage, research has shifted from metal-based materials to organic active materials in recent years. This Review presents an overview of various flow-battery systems. Relevant studies concerning their history are discussed as well as their development over the last few years from the classical inorganic, to organic/inorganic, to RFBs with organic redox-active cathode and anode materials. Available technologies are analyzed in terms of their technical, economic, and environmental aspects; the advantages and limitations of these systems are also discussed. Further technological challenges and prospective research possibilities are highlighted.

  13. Turning hydrophilic bacteria into biorenewable hydrophobic material with potential antimicrobial activity via interaction with chitosan.

    PubMed

    Hanpanich, Orakan; Wongkongkatep, Pravit; Pongtharangkul, Thunyarat; Wongkongkatep, Jirarut

    2017-04-01

    Alteration of a bacteriocin-producing hydrophilic bacterium, Lactococcus lactis IO-1, into a hydrophobic material with potential antimicrobial activity using chitosan was investigated and compared with five other bacterial species with industrial importance. The negatively charged bacterial cells were neutralized by positively charged chitosan, resulting in a significant increase in the hydrophobicity of the bacterial cell surface. The largest Gram-positive B. megaterium ATCC 14581 showed a moderate response to chitosan while the smaller E. coli DH5α, L. lactis IO-1 and P. putida F1 exhibited a significant response to an increase in chitosan concentration. Because L. lactis IO-1 is a good source for natural peptide lantibiotic that is highly effective against several strains of food spoilage organisms and pathogens, hydrophobic material derived from L. lactis IO-1 and chitosan is a promising novel material with antimicrobial activity for the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  14. Redox‐Flow Batteries: From Metals to Organic Redox‐Active Materials

    PubMed Central

    Winsberg, Jan; Hagemann, Tino; Janoschka, Tobias; Hager, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Research on redox‐flow batteries (RFBs) is currently experiencing a significant upturn, stimulated by the growing need to store increasing quantities of sustainably generated electrical energy. RFBs are promising candidates for the creation of smart grids, particularly when combined with photovoltaics and wind farms. To achieve the goal of “green”, safe, and cost‐efficient energy storage, research has shifted from metal‐based materials to organic active materials in recent years. This Review presents an overview of various flow‐battery systems. Relevant studies concerning their history are discussed as well as their development over the last few years from the classical inorganic, to organic/inorganic, to RFBs with organic redox‐active cathode and anode materials. Available technologies are analyzed in terms of their technical, economic, and environmental aspects; the advantages and limitations of these systems are also discussed. Further technological challenges and prospective research possibilities are highlighted. PMID:28070964

  15. Metabolic activity of moulds as a factor of building materials biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Gutarowska, Beata

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the effect of building materials on the growth and metabolic activity of moulds. In cultures of Aspergillus and Penicillium moulds grown on a model medium with the addition of building materials, the biomass of mycelium, its cellular components--glucan, chitin, ergosterol and the spectrum of enzymes and organic acids produced in the medium were investigated. It was found that on the medium with wallpaper moulds produced more biomass and extracellular enzymes, mainly glycolytic ones. On medium with mortar the growth of mycelium was impeded, production of biomass was 60% smaller, the quantity of chitin, glucan and ergosterol decreased 13-41%, and the activity of most enzymes was reduced; however the moulds intensively produced organic acids: malic, succinic and oxalic acid. The largest acid production activity was found in medium with addition of mortar; moulds produced the greatest variety of acids and in greater quantities than in the control medium. Metabolic activity of the moulds depends on the type of building material, and may lead to biodeterioration of these materials.

  16. Sorptive uptake of selenium with magnetite and its supported materials onto activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jae H; Wilson, Lee D; Sammynaiken, R

    2015-11-01

    Kinetic and equilibrium uptake studies of selenite in aqueous solution with synthetic magnetite (Mag-P), commercial magnetite (Mag-C), goethite, activated carbon (AC), and a composite material containing 19% magnetite supported on activated carbon (CM-19) were investigated. Kinetic uptake studies used a one-pot setup at pH 5.26 at variable temperature. Sampling of unbound selenite in-situ was achieved with analytical detection by atomic absorbance. The sorptive uptake at equilibrium and kinetic conditions are listed in descending order: goethite>Mag-P>Mag-C>CM-19. Kinetic uptake parameters reveal that Mag-P showed apparent negative values for the activation energy (E(a)) and the enthalpy of activation (ΔH(‡)), in agreement with a multi-step process for the kinetic uptake of selenite. By contrast, Mag-C, CM-19, and goethite showed positive values for E(a) and ΔH(‡). The uptake properties of the various sorbent materials with selenite are in accordance with the formation of inner- and out-sphere complexes. Leaching of iron from the composite material (CM-19) was attenuated due to the stabilizing effect of the magnetite within the pore sites and the surface of AC. Supported iron oxide nanomaterial composites represent a unique sorbent material with tunable uptake properties toward inorganic selenite in aqueous solution.

  17. Active Learning and Just-in-Time Teaching in a Material and Energy Balances Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberatore, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of a material and energy balances course is enhanced through a series of in-class and out-of-class exercises. An active learning classroom is achieved, even at class sizes over 150 students, using multiple instructors in a single classroom, problem solving in teams, problems based on YouTube videos, and just-in-time teaching. To avoid…

  18. NREL Develops Accelerated Sample Activation Process for Hydrogen Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in developing a new sample activation process that reduces the time to prepare samples for measurement of hydrogen storage from several days to five minutes and provides more uniform samples. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

  19. MOF@activated carbon: a new material for adsorption of aldicarb in biological systems.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Carlos Alberto Fernandes; da Silva, Fausthon Fred; Jimenez, George Chaves; Neto, José Ferreira da S; de Souza, Daniela Maria Bastos; de Souza, Ivone Antônia; Alves, Severino

    2013-07-25

    A new composite was synthesized by the hydrothermal method using a 3D coordination network [Ln2(C4H4O4)3(H2O)2]·H2O (Ln = Eu and Tb) and activated carbon. The coordination network is formed within the pores of the charcoal, allowing for the use of this material as a detoxifying agent.

  20. Active 2D and carbon-based materials: physics and devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorger, Volker J.

    2016-09-01

    In nanophotonics we create material-systems, which are structured at length scales smaller than the wavelength of light. When light propagates inside such effective materials numerous novel physics phenomena emerge including thresholdless lasing, atto-joule per bit efficient modulators, and exciton-polariton effects. However, in order to make use of these opportunities, synergistic device designs have to be applied to include materials, electric and photonic constrains - all at the nanoscale. In this talk, I present our recent progress in exploring 2D and TCO materials for active optoelectronics. I highlight nanoscale device demonstrations including their physical operation principle and performance benchmarks. Details include epsilon-bear-zero tuning of thin-film ITO, Graphene electro-static gating via Pauli-blocking, plasmonic electro-optic modulation, and hetero-integrated III-V and carbon-based plasmon lasers on Silicon photonics.

  1. Poly(exTTF): a novel redox-active polymer as active material for li-organic batteries.

    PubMed

    Häupler, Bernhard; Burges, René; Friebe, Christian; Janoschka, Tobias; Schmidt, Daniel; Wild, Andreas; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2014-08-01

    The first polymer bearing exTTF units intended for the use in electrical charge storage is presented. The polymer undergoes a redox reaction involving two electrons at -0.20 V vs Fc/Fc(+) and is applied as active cathode material in a Li-organic battery. The received coin cells feature a theoretical capacity of 132 mAh g(-1) , a cell potential of 3.5 V, and a lifetime exceeding more than 250 cycles.

  2. Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  3. Benchmark studies of induced radioactivity produced in LHC materials, Part I: Specific activities.

    PubMed

    Brugger, M; Khater, H; Mayer, S; Prinz, A; Roesler, S; Ulrici, L; Vincke, H

    2005-01-01

    Samples of materials which will be used in the LHC machine for shielding and construction components were irradiated in the stray radiation field of the CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility. After irradiation, the specific activities induced in the various samples were analysed with a high-precision gamma spectrometer at various cooling times, allowing identification of isotopes with a wide range of half-lives. Furthermore, the irradiation experiment was simulated in detail with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. A comparison of measured and calculated specific activities shows good agreement, supporting the use of FLUKA for estimating the level of induced activity in the LHC.

  4. Microstructure design of metal composite for active material in sodium nickel-iron chloride battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Mangi; Hahn, Byung-Dong; Hong, Inchul; Kim, Woosung; Moon, Goyoung; Lee, Heesoo; Jung, Keeyoung; Park, Yoon-Cheol; Choi, Joon-Hwan

    2016-10-01

    In this manuscript, it is reported how the microstructure of metal composites can be designed to obtain excellent cycle performance in Na-(Ni,Fe)Cl2 battery. The microstructure consists of an active material and a conducting material. The conducting material is an active material as well as a conducting chain (an electron path). In Na-(Ni,Fe)Cl2 cells, it is preferable that Ni is selected as the conducting material, since the nickel chloride is not formed on the surface of Ni particles during the electrochemical reaction of Fe particles. In addition, the particle size of Ni should be smaller than that of Fe, in order to ensure that the conducting chain is well-connected. Through this design, the cycle performance of a Na-(Ni,Fe)Cl2 cell was significantly improved, compared to that of a Na-NiCl2 cell. At the 100th cycle, the charge/discharge capacity of a Na-(Ni,Fe)Cl2 cell was much higher than that of a Na-NiCl2 cell, approximately 42%.

  5. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, M.M.; Peng, M.Y.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.C.

    1996-09-24

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M{sub x}Z{sub y}Mn{sub (1{minus}y)}O{sub 2}, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell. 11 figs.

  6. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, Marca M.; Peng, Marcus Y.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    1996-01-01

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M.sub.x Z.sub.y Mn.sub.(1-y) O.sub.2, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell.

  7. Carbon fibers: Thermochemical recovery from advanced composite materials and activation to an adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Todd Andrew

    This research addresses an expanding waste disposal problem brought about by the increasing use of advanced composite materials, and the lack of technically and environmentally viable recycling methods for these materials. A thermochemical treatment process was developed and optimized for the recycling of advanced composite materials. Counter-current gasification was employed for the treatment of carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy resin composite wastes. These materials were treated, allowing the reclamation of the material's valuable components. As expected in gasification, the organic portion of the waste was thermochemically converted to a combustible gas with small amounts of organic compounds that were identified by GC/MS. These compounds were expected based on data in the literature. The composites contain 70% fiber reinforcement, and gasification yielded approximately 70% recovered fibers, representing nearly complete recovery of fibers from the waste. Through SEM and mechanical testing, the recovered carbon fibers were found to be structurally and mechanically intact, and amenable to re-use in a variety of applications, some of which were identified and tested. In addition, an application was developed for the carbon fiber component of the waste, as an activated carbon fiber adsorbent for the treatment of wastewaters. This novel class of adsorbent was found to have adsorption rates, for various organic molecules, up to a factor of ten times those of commercial granular activated carbon, and adsorption capacities similar to conventional activated carbons. Overall, the research addresses an existing environmental waste problem, employing a thermochemical technique to recycle and reclaim the waste. Components of the reclaimed waste material are then employed, after further modification, to address other existing and potential environmental waste problems.

  8. Biopolymer-Activated Graphitic Carbon Nitride towards a Sustainable Photocathode Material

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanjian; Schnepp, Zoë; Cao, Junyu; Ouyang, Shuxin; Li, Ying; Ye, Jinhua; Liu, Songqin

    2013-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) conversion of solar light into chemical fuels is one of the most promising solutions to the challenge of sustainable energy. Graphitic carbon (IV) nitride polymer (g-CN) is an interesting sustainable photocathode material due to low-cost, visible-light sensitivity, and chemical stability up to 500°C in air. However, grain boundary effects and limited active sites greatly hamper g-CN activity. Here, we demonstrate biopolymer-activation of g-CN through simultaneous soft-templating of a sponge-like structure and incorporation of active carbon-dopant sites. This facile approach results in an almost 300% increase in the cathodic PEC activity of g-CN under simulated solar-irradiation. PMID:23831846

  9. Evaluation of homogeneity of a certified reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kratochvil, B.; Duke, M.J.M.; Ng, D.

    1986-01-01

    The homogeneity of the marine reference material TORT-1, a spray-dried and acetone-extracted hepatopancreatic material from the lobster, was tested for 26 elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Through a one-way analysis of variance based on six analyses on each of six bottles of TORT-1, it was concluded that the between-bottle heterogeneity is no greater than the within-bottle heterogeneity. The analytical results for those elements for which values were provided by NRC agree with the NRC values within 95% confidence limits. 8 references, 6 tables.

  10. Push for new materials, chemicals from biomass sparks active R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, S. )

    1990-09-01

    This paper discusses how a resurgence of interest in the production of new materials, chemicals, and fuels from biomass resources such as wood, cellulose, lignin, starch, and chitin is sparking active R and D efforts in these areas. Biobased materials and chemicals currently under development include composites of conventional plastics with lignocellulosics (chemicals from wood and other plant sources); lignocellulosic nonwoven mates that can be pressed into rigid shapes to form doors, walls, and even auto body parts; phenolic chemicals produced from wood waste and bark; membranes made from chitosan (a substance derived from crustacean shells); and biodegradable plastics containing starch.

  11. Losses, gain, and lasing in organic and perovskite active materials (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourdavoud, Neda; Riedl, Thomas J.

    2016-09-01

    Organic solid state lasers (OSLs) based on semiconducting polymers or small molecules have seen some significant progress over the past decade. Highly efficient organic gain materials combined with high-Q resonator geometries (distributed feedback (DFB), VCSEL, etc.) have enabled OSLs, optically pumped by simple inorganic laser diodes or even LEDs. However, some fundamental goals remain to be reached, like continuous wave (cw) operation and injection lasing. I will address various loss mechanisms related to accumulated triplet excitons or long-lived polarons that in combination with the particular photo-physics of organic gain media state the dominant road-blocks on the way to reach these goals. I will discuss the recent progress in fundamental understanding of these loss processes, which now provides a solid basis for modelling, e.g. of laser dynamics. Avenues to mitigate these fundamental loss mechanisms, e.g. by alternative materials will be presented. In this regard, a class of gain materials based on organo-lead halide perovskites re-entered the scene as light emitters, recently. Enjoying a tremendous lot of attention as active material for solution processed solar cells with a 20+% efficiency, they have recently unveiled their exciting photo-physics for lasing applications. Optically pumped lasing in these materials has been achieved. I will discuss some of the unique properties that render this class of materials a promising candidate to overcome some of the limitations of "classical" organic gain media.

  12. Evaluation of Activity Concentration Values and Doses due to the Transport of Low Level Radioactive Material

    SciTech Connect

    Rawl, Richard R; Scofield, Patricia A; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-04-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated an international Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to evaluate the safety of transport of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This report presents the United States contribution to that IAEA research program. The focus of this report is on the analysis of the potential doses resulting from the transport of low level radioactive material. Specific areas of research included: (1) an examination of the technical approach used in the derivation of exempt activity concentration values and a comparison of the doses associated with the transport of materials included or not included in the provisions of Paragraph 107(e) of the IAEA Safety Standards, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Requirements No. TS-R-1; (2) determination of the doses resulting from different treatment of progeny for exempt values versus the A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values; and (3) evaluation of the dose justifications for the provisions applicable to exempt materials and low specific activity materials (LSA-I). It was found that the 'previous or intended use' (PIU) provision in Paragraph 107(e) is not risk informed since doses to the most highly exposed persons (e.g., truck drivers) are comparable regardless of intended use of the transported material. The PIU clause can also have important economic implications for co-mined ores and products that are not intended for the fuel cycle but that have uranium extracted as part of their industrial processing. In examination of the footnotes in Table 2 of TS-R-1, which identifies the progeny included in the exempt or A1/A2 values, there is no explanation of how the progeny were selected. It is recommended that the progeny for both the exemption and A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values should be similar regardless of application, and that the same physical information should be used in deriving the limits. Based on the evaluation of doses due to the transport of low-level NORM

  13. Nanocrosses of lead sulphate as the negative active material of lead acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Gao, Pengran; Bu, Xianfu; Kuang, Guizhi; Liu, Wei; Lei, Lixu

    2014-10-01

    Lead sulphate transforms into PbO2 and Pb in the positive and negative electrodes, respectively, when a lead acid battery is charged, thus, it is an active material. It is also generally acknowledged that sulphation results in the failure of lead acid batteries; therefore, it is very interesting to find out how to make lead sulphate more electrochemically active. Here, we demonstrate that nanocrystalline lead sulphate can be used as excellent negative active material in lead acid batteries. The lead sulphate nanocrystals, which are prepared by a facile chemical precipitation of aqueous lead acetate and sodium sulphate in a few minutes, look like crosses with diameter of each arm being 100 nm to 3 μm. The electrode is effectively formed in much shorter time than traditional technique, yet it discharges a capacity of 103 mA h g-1 at the current density of 120 mA g-1, which is 24% higher than that discharged by the electrode made from leady oxide under the same condition. During 100% DOD cycles, more than 80% of that capacity remains in 550 cycles. These results show that lead sulphate can be a nice negative active material in lead acid batteries.

  14. Insights into microstructure and chemistry of active fiber core material produced by the granulated silica method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, H.; Etissa, D.; Romano, V.

    2014-05-01

    The production of special fibers relies on new methods and materials to incorporate new functionalities into optical fibers by virtues of dopants and structure. In particular, the granulated silica method allows to rapidly produce active fibers with high dopant content and with virtually any microstructure. The implementation of this production method requires a multitude of process steps at various temperatures and temperature gradients that can significantly influence the optical properties of the produced preforms and fibers. To better understand and optimize the processes of active material production and fiber drawing parameters we have done a thorough analysis of microstructure, phase development, crystallinity and chemical mapping of active fiber cores produced by a combination of sol-gel process and granulated silica method with and without employment of a CO2 laser treatment. The microstructure of fibers have been analyzed with a diverse suite of techniques in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), revealing formation of various silica polymorphs and distribution of active elements (i.e. Yb and P) into the core structure. Our results show the presence of another polymorph of silica with low crystallinity dispersed in the main amorphous polymorph (i.e. quartz). We conclude that in spite of importance of homogeneous distribution of Yb and P into the core, the formation of various silica polymorphs resulting from materials processing has to be considered.

  15. Suggestive techniques connected to medical interventions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The paper introduces a series of articles where several detailed clinical examples will be presented on the effectiveness of using suggestive techniques in various fields of interventional medicine. The aim of this series is to raise the attention to the patients heightened openness to suggestions. By recognizing the unavoidable nature of suggestive effects on one hand we can eliminate unfavourable, negative suggestions and on the other hand go on and consciously apply positive, helpful variations. Research materials, reviews and case study will describe the way suggestions can reduce anxiety and stress connected to medical intervention, improve subjective well-being and cooperation, and increase efficiency by reducing treatment costs. PMID:24265898

  16. Effect of different mulch materials on the soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) in an organic pepper crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Marta M.; Peco, Jesús; Campos, Juan; Villena, Jaime; González, Sara; Moreno, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    The use biodegradable materials (biopolymers of different composition and papers) as an alternative to conventional mulches has increased considerably during the last years mainly for environmental reason. In order to assess the effect of these materials on the soil microbial activity during the season of a pepper crop organically grown in Central Spain, the soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) was measured in laboratory. The mulch materials tested were: 1) black polyethylene (PE, 15 μm); black biopolymers (15 μm): 2) Mater-Bi® (corn starch based), 3) Sphere 4® (potato starch based), 4) Sphere 6® (potato starch based), 5) Bioflex® (polylactic acid based), 6) Ecovio® (polylactic acid based), 7) Mimgreen® (black paper, 85 g/m2). A randomized complete block design with four replications was adopted. The crop was drip irrigated following the water demand of each treatment. Soil samples (5-10 cm depth) under the different mulches were taken at different dates (at the beginning of the crop cycle and at different dates throughout the crop season). Additionally, samples of bare soil in a manual weeding and in an untreated control were taken. The results obtained show the negative effect of black PE on the DHA activity, mainly as result of the higher temperature reached under the mulch and the reduction in the gas interchange between the soil and the atmosphere. The values corresponding to the biodegradable materials were variable, although highlighting the low DHA activity observed under Bioflex®. In general, the uncovered treatments showed higher values than those reached under mulches, especially in the untreated control. Keywords: mulch, biodegradable, biopolymer, paper, dehydrogenase activity (DHA). Acknowledgements: the research was funded by Project RTA2011-00104-C04-03 from the INIA (Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness).

  17. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from a new raw lignocellulosic material: flamboyant (Delonix regia) pods.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Alexandro M M; Cazetta, André L; Garcia, Clarice A; Moraes, Juliana C G; Nogami, Eurica M; Lenzi, Ervim; Costa, Willian F; Almeida, Vitor C

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbons were prepared from flamboyant pods by NaOH activation at three different NaOH:char ratios: 1:1 (AC-1), 2:1 (AC-2), and 3:1 (AC-3). The properties of these carbons, including BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and pore diameter, were characterized from N(2) adsorption isotherms. The activated carbons obtained were essentially microporous and had BET surface area ranging from 303 to 2463 m(2) g(-1).(13)C (CP/MAS and MAS) solid-state NMR shows that the lignocellulosic structures were completely transformed into a polycyclic material after activation process, thermogravimetry shows a high thermal resistance, Boehm titration and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy allowed characterizing the presence of functional groups on the surface of activated carbons. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a high pore development. The experimental results indicated the potential use of flamboyant pods as a precursor material in the preparation of activated carbon.

  18. FACILE SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF CELLULOSE-CHITOSAN-HYDROXYAPATITE COMPOSITE MATERIAL, A POTENTIAL MATERIAL FOR BONE TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Mututuvari, Tamutsiwa M.; Harkins, April L.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is often used as a bone-implant material because it is biocompatible and osteoconductive. However, HAp possesses poor rheological properties and it is inactive against disease-causing microbes. To improve these properties, we developed a green method to synthesize multifunctional composites containing: (1) cellulose (CEL) to impart mechanical strength; (2) chitosan (CS) to induce antibacterial activity thereby maintaining a microbe-free wound site; and (3) HAp. In this method, CS and CEL were co-dissolved in an ionic liquid (IL) and then regenerated from water. HAp was subsequently formed in situ by alternately soaking [CEL+CS] composites in aqueous solutions of CaCl2 and Na2HPO4. At least 88% of IL used was recovered for reuse by distilling the aqueous washings of [CEL+CS]. The composites were characterized using FTIR, XRD and SEM. These composites retained the desirable properties of their constituents. For example, the tensile strength of the composites was enhanced 1.9X by increasing CEL loading from 20% to 80%. Incorporating CS in the composites resulted in composites which inhibited the growth of both Gram positive (MRSA, S. aureus and VRE) and Gram negative (E. coli and P. aeruginosa) bacteria. These findings highlight the potential use of [CEL+CS+HAp] composites as scaffolds in bone tissue engineering. PMID:23595871

  19. Plant material as bioaccumulator of arsenic in soils affected by mining activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-López, Salvadora; Martínez-Sánchez, Maria Jose; García-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination is an important environmental problem, since the metals are harmful to humans, animals and tend to bioaccumulate in the food chain. The aim of this study was to determine the total concentration of As, As (III) and As(V) in soil samples, leaves and roots of plant material, growing in a mining area in Spain (Murcia). Ditichia viscosa was used as the plant of reference. The concentrations of bioavailable As in plant samples were calculated by different soil chemical extraction methods; deionized water, 0.5N NaHCO3 (Olsen extraction), oxidizable medium, 0.5 HCl, 0.05M (NH4)2SO4, 0.005M DTPA and Mehra-Jackson extraction. For this study, fourteen samples were collected in the surrounding area of Sierra Minera and Portman Bay (Murcia, SE Spain). Samples were air dried and sieved to < 2mm for general analytical determinations. To determine the As content, soil samples were first ground to a fine powder using an agate ball mill. Fresh vegetable samples were separated into root and aboveground biomass and then lyophilized. Arsenic levels were obtained by using atomic fluorescence spectrometry with an automated continuous flow hydride generation (HG-AFS) spectrometer. Samples showed pH average values close to neutrality. Most samples showed a very low organic matter percentage. Electrical conductivity and calcium carbonate content were considerably low in most samples. The mineralogical analysis showed that the main minerals were quartz, muscovite, kaolinite and illite, while the minority minerals were alteration products derived of mining activities (iron oxides and hydroxides, siderite, jarosite and gypsum), calcite and feldspars. Although the plants do not absorb arsenic in the same proportion, the results suggest that a good relationship exists between the total content of As in soil and the total content in plant. The results showed that the arsenic content in roots was positively correlated with the oxidizable-organic matter and sulfides

  20. Classifying organic materials by oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio to predict the activation regime of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, M.; Shao, W.; Lebouteiller, R.; Martin, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    The governing highly soluble, slightly soluble, or insoluble activation regime of organic compounds as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) was examined as a function of oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio (O : C). New data were collected for adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic and pinonic acids. Secondary organic materials (SOMs) produced by α-pinene ozonolysis and isoprene photo-oxidation were also included in the analysis. The saturation concentrations C of the organic compounds in aqueous solutions served as the key parameter for delineating regimes of CCN activation, and the values of C were tightly correlated to the O : C ratios. The highly soluble, slightly soluble, and insoluble regimes of CCN activation were found to correspond to ranges of [O : C] > 0.6, 0.2 < [O : C] < 0.6, and [O : C] < 0.2, respectively. These classifications were evaluated against CCN activation data of isoprene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.69-0.72) and α-pinene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.38-0.48). Isoprene-derived SOM had highly soluble activation behavior, consistent with its high O : C ratio. For α-pinene-derived SOM, although CCN activation can be modeled as a highly soluble mechanism, this behavior was not predicted by the O : C ratio, for which a slightly soluble mechanism was anticipated. Complexity in chemical composition, resulting in continuous water uptake and the absence of a deliquescence transition that can thermodynamically limit CCN activation, might explain the differences of α-pinene-derived SOM compared to the behavior of pure organic compounds. The present results suggest that atmospheric particles dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic components do not activate (i.e. insoluble regime) whereas those dominated by oxygenated organic components activate (i.e. highly soluble regime).

  1. Classifying organic materials by oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio to predict the activation regime of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, M.; Shao, W.; Lebouteiller, R.; Martin, S. T.

    2013-05-01

    The governing highly soluble, slightly soluble, or insoluble activation regime of organic compounds as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) was examined as a function of oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio (O : C). New data were collected for adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic, and pinonic acids. Secondary organic materials (SOMs) produced by α-pinene ozonolysis and isoprene photo-oxidation were also included in the analysis. The saturation concentrations C of the organic compounds in aqueous solutions served as the key parameter for delineating regimes of CCN activation, and the values of C were tightly correlated to the O : C ratios. The highly soluble, slightly soluble, and insoluble regimes of CCN activation were found to correspond to ranges of [O : C] > 0.6, 0.2 < [O : C] < 0.6, and [O : C] < 0.2, respectively. These classifications were evaluated against CCN activation data of isoprene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.69-0.72) and α-pinene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.38-0.48). Isoprene-derived SOM had highly soluble activation behavior, consistent with its high O : C ratio. For α-pinene-derived SOM, although CCN activation can be modeled as a highly soluble mechanism, this behavior was not predicted by the O : C ratio, for which a slightly soluble mechanism was anticipated. Complexity in chemical composition, resulting in continuous water uptake and the absence of a deliquescence transition that can thermodynamically limit CCN activation, might explain the difference in the behavior of α-pinene-derived SOM compared to that of pure organic compounds. The present results suggest that atmospheric particles dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic components do not activate (i.e., insoluble regime) whereas those dominated by oxygenated organic components activate (i.e., highly soluble regime) for typical atmospheric cloud life cycles.

  2. Recognition of wall materials through active thermography coupled with numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Pietrarca, Francesca; Mameli, Mauro; Filippeschi, Sauro; Fantozzi, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of historical buildings, wall thickness as well as wall constituents are not often known a priori, and active IR thermography can be exploited as a nonintrusive method for detecting what kind of material lies beneath the external plaster layer. In the present work, the wall of a historical building is subjected to a heating stimulus, and the surface temperature temporal trend is recorded by an IR camera. A hybrid numerical model is developed in order to simulate the transient thermal response of a wall made of different known materials underneath the plaster layer. When the numerical thermal contrast and the appearance time match with the experimental thermal images, the material underneath the plaster can be qualitatively identified.

  3. Electrodes and electrochemical storage cells utilizing tin-modified active materials

    DOEpatents

    Anani, Anaba; Johnson, John; Lim, Hong S.; Reilly, James; Schwarz, Ricardo; Srinivasan, Supramaniam

    1995-01-01

    An electrode has a substrate and a finely divided active material on the substrate. The active material is ANi.sub.x-y-z Co.sub.y Sn.sub.z, wherein A is a mischmetal or La.sub.1-w M.sub.w, M is Ce, Nd, or Zr, w is from about 0.05 to about 1.0, x is from about 4.5 to about 5.5, y is from 0 to about 3.0, and z is from about 0.05 to about 0.5. An electrochemical storage cell utilizes such an electrode as the anode. The storage cell further has a cathode, a separator between the cathode and the anode, and an electrolyte.

  4. Overview of materials processing in space activity at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. R.; Chassay, R. P.; Moore, W. W.; Ruff, R. C.; Yates, I. C.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of activities involving the Space Transportation System (STS), now in the operational phase, and results of some of the current space experiments, as well as future research opportunities in microgravity environment, are presented. The experiments of the Materials Processing in Space Program flown on the STS, such as bioseparation processes, isoelectric focusing, solidification and crystal growth processes, containerless processes, and the Materials Experiment Assembly experiments are discussed. Special consideration is given to the experiments to be flown aboard the Spacelab 3 module, the Fluids Experiments System, and the Vapor Crystal Growth System. Ground-based test facilities and planned space research facilities, as well as the nature of the commercialization activities, are briefly explained.

  5. Verification of cardiac mechanics software: benchmark problems and solutions for testing active and passive material behaviour.

    PubMed

    Land, Sander; Gurev, Viatcheslav; Arens, Sander; Augustin, Christoph M; Baron, Lukas; Blake, Robert; Bradley, Chris; Castro, Sebastian; Crozier, Andrew; Favino, Marco; Fastl, Thomas E; Fritz, Thomas; Gao, Hao; Gizzi, Alessio; Griffith, Boyce E; Hurtado, Daniel E; Krause, Rolf; Luo, Xiaoyu; Nash, Martyn P; Pezzuto, Simone; Plank, Gernot; Rossi, Simone; Ruprecht, Daniel; Seemann, Gunnar; Smith, Nicolas P; Sundnes, Joakim; Rice, J Jeremy; Trayanova, Natalia; Wang, Dafang; Jenny Wang, Zhinuo; Niederer, Steven A

    2015-12-08

    Models of cardiac mechanics are increasingly used to investigate cardiac physiology. These models are characterized by a high level of complexity, including the particular anisotropic material properties of biological tissue and the actively contracting material. A large number of independent simulation codes have been developed, but a consistent way of verifying the accuracy and replicability of simulations is lacking. To aid in the verification of current and future cardiac mechanics solvers, this study provides three benchmark problems for cardiac mechanics. These benchmark problems test the ability to accurately simulate pressure-type forces that depend on the deformed objects geometry, anisotropic and spatially varying material properties similar to those seen in the left ventricle and active contractile forces. The benchmark was solved by 11 different groups to generate consensus solutions, with typical differences in higher-resolution solutions at approximately 0.5%, and consistent results between linear, quadratic and cubic finite elements as well as different approaches to simulating incompressible materials. Online tools and solutions are made available to allow these tests to be effectively used in verification of future cardiac mechanics software.

  6. Verification of cardiac mechanics software: benchmark problems and solutions for testing active and passive material behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Gurev, Viatcheslav; Arens, Sander; Augustin, Christoph M.; Baron, Lukas; Blake, Robert; Bradley, Chris; Castro, Sebastian; Crozier, Andrew; Favino, Marco; Fastl, Thomas E.; Fritz, Thomas; Gao, Hao; Gizzi, Alessio; Griffith, Boyce E.; Hurtado, Daniel E.; Krause, Rolf; Luo, Xiaoyu; Nash, Martyn P.; Pezzuto, Simone; Plank, Gernot; Rossi, Simone; Ruprecht, Daniel; Seemann, Gunnar; Smith, Nicolas P.; Sundnes, Joakim; Rice, J. Jeremy; Trayanova, Natalia; Wang, Dafang; Jenny Wang, Zhinuo; Niederer, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Models of cardiac mechanics are increasingly used to investigate cardiac physiology. These models are characterized by a high level of complexity, including the particular anisotropic material properties of biological tissue and the actively contracting material. A large number of independent simulation codes have been developed, but a consistent way of verifying the accuracy and replicability of simulations is lacking. To aid in the verification of current and future cardiac mechanics solvers, this study provides three benchmark problems for cardiac mechanics. These benchmark problems test the ability to accurately simulate pressure-type forces that depend on the deformed objects geometry, anisotropic and spatially varying material properties similar to those seen in the left ventricle and active contractile forces. The benchmark was solved by 11 different groups to generate consensus solutions, with typical differences in higher-resolution solutions at approximately 0.5%, and consistent results between linear, quadratic and cubic finite elements as well as different approaches to simulating incompressible materials. Online tools and solutions are made available to allow these tests to be effectively used in verification of future cardiac mechanics software. PMID:26807042

  7. Decontamination of textile wastewater via TiO2/activated carbon composite materials.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2010-09-15

    Water scarcity and pollution rank equal to climate change as the most urgent environmental turmoil for the 21st century. To date, the percolation of textile effluents into the waterways and aquifer systems, remain an intricate conundrum abroad the nations. With the renaissance of activated carbon, there has been a steadily growing interest in the research field. Recently, the adoption of titanium dioxide, a prestigious advanced photo-catalyst which formulates the new growing branch of activated carbon composites for enhancement of adsorption rate and discoloration capacity, has attracted stern consideration and supports worldwide. Confirming the assertion, this paper presents a state of art review of titanium dioxide/activated carbon composites technology, its fundamental background studies, and environmental implications. Moreover, its major challenges together with the future expectation are summarized and discussed. Conclusively, the expanding of activated carbons composites material represents a potentially viable and powerful tool, leading to the plausible improvement of environmental conservation.

  8. Assessment of alpha activity of building materials commonly used in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Dipak; Deb, Argha; Bera, Sukumar; Sengupta, Rosalima; Patra, Kanchan Kumar

    2008-02-01

    This paper, reports for the first time, an extensive study of alpha activity of all widely used building materials (plaster of Paris, stone chips, marble, white cement, mosaic stone, limestone, sand, granite, cement brick, asbestos, red brick, cement tile, ceramic tile and ceramics) in West Bengal, India. The alpha activities have been measured using Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD), a very sensitive detector for alpha particles. The samples were collected from local markets of Kolkata. The measured average alpha activities ranged from 22.7+/-2.5 to 590.6+/-16.8Bqkg(-1). The alpha activity of ceramic tiles was highest and provides additional data to estimate the effect of environmental radiation exposure on human health.

  9. Measuring polymerization shrinkage of photo-activated restorative materials by a water-filled dilatometer.

    PubMed

    Lai, J H; Johnson, A E

    1993-03-01

    A water-filled dilatometer specifically designed for determining the polymerization shrinkage of photo-activated composite restorative materials was used to measure the polymerization shrinkage of three visible light-activated composites. Polymerization shrinkage values ranged from 1.82% for P-50 to 2.15% and 2.19% for Herculite XRV and Prisma APH, respectively. Shrinkage data obtained in this investigation were compared with the published data, and the factors which affect shrinkage measurements were reviewed. It was concluded that maintaining a constant temperature environment (+ or - 0.02 degrees C) for the dilatometer during the shrinkage test was the most critical factor for successful application of the dilatometer.

  10. Broad spectrum antibacterial and antifungal polymeric paint materials: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and membrane-active mode of action.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Jiaul; Akkapeddi, Padma; Yadav, Vikas; Manjunath, Goutham B; Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-28

    Microbial attachment and subsequent colonization onto surfaces lead to the spread of deadly community-acquired and hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infections. Noncovalent immobilization of water insoluble and organo-soluble cationic polymers onto a surface is a facile approach to prevent microbial contamination. In the present study, we described the synthesis of water insoluble and organo-soluble polymeric materials and demonstrated their structure-activity relationship against various human pathogenic bacteria including drug-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and beta lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae as well as pathogenic fungi such as Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. The polymer coated surfaces completely inactivated both bacteria and fungi upon contact (5 log reduction with respect to control). Linear polymers were more active and found to have a higher killing rate than the branched polymers. The polymer coated surfaces also exhibited significant activity in various complex mammalian fluids such as serum, plasma, and blood and showed negligible hemolysis at an amount much higher than minimum inhibitory amounts (MIAs). These polymers were found to have excellent compatibility with other medically relevant polymers (polylactic acid, PLA) and commercial paint. The cationic hydrophobic polymer coatings disrupted the lipid membrane of both bacteria and fungi and thus showed a membrane-active mode of action. Further, bacteria did not develop resistance against these membrane-active polymers in sharp contrast to conventional antibiotics and lipopeptides, thus the polymers hold great promise to be used as coating materials for developing permanent antimicrobial paint.

  11. Determination of Cd and Cr in an ABS candidate reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwangwon; Kang, Namgoo; Cho, Kyunghaeng; Lee, Jounghae

    2008-12-01

    In order to practically better cope with technical barriers to trade (TBT) of a great number of resin goods, our research presents first-ever results for the determination of Cd and Cr in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) candidate reference material using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) recently recognized as a candidate primary ratio method with a particular attention to the estimation of involved measurement uncertainties.

  12. Energetic materials research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories supported under DP-10 programs

    SciTech Connect

    Ratzel, A.C. III

    1998-09-01

    This report provides summary descriptions of Energetic Materials (EM) Research and Development activities performed at Sandia National Laboratories and funded through the Department of Energy DP-10 Program Office in FY97 and FY98. The work falls under three major focus areas: EM Chemistry, EM Characterization, and EM Phenomenological Model Development. The research supports the Sandia component mission and also Sandia's overall role as safety steward for the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

  13. Studies on Supercapacitor Electrode Material from Activated Lignin-Derived Mesoporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Dipendu; Li, Yunchao; Bi, Zhonghe; Chen, Jihua; Keum, Jong Kahk; Hensley, Dale K; Grappe, Hippolyte A.; Meyer III, Harry M; Dai, Sheng; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Naskar, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized mesoporous carbon from pre-cross-linked lignin gel impregnated with a surfactant as the pore-forming agent, and then activated the carbon through physical and chemical methods to obtain activated mesoporous carbon. The activated mesoporous carbons exhibited 1.5- to 6-fold increases in porosity with a maximum BET specific surface area of 1148 m2/g and a pore volume of 1.0 cm3/g. Slow physical activation helped retain dominant mesoporosity; however, aggressive chemical activation caused some loss of the mesopore volume fraction. Plots of cyclic voltammetric data with the capacitor electrode made from these carbons showed an almost rectangular curve depicting the behavior of ideal double-layer capacitance. Although the pristine mesoporous carbon exhibited the same range of surface-area-based capacitance as that of other known carbon-based supercapacitors, activation decreased the surface-area-based specific capacitance and increased the gravimetric-specific capacitance of the mesoporous carbons. Surface activation lowered bulk density and electrical conductivity. Warburg impedance as a vertical tail in the lower frequency domain of Nyquist plots supported good supercapacitor behavior for the activated mesoporous carbons. Our work demonstrated that biomass-derived mesoporous carbon materials continue to show potential for use in specific electrochemical applications.

  14. Using Electronic Neutron Generators in Active Interrogation to Detect Shielded Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2008-10-01

    Experiments have been performed at Idaho National Laboratory to study methodology and instrumentation for performing neutron active interrogation die-away analyses for the purpose of detecting shielded fissionable material. Here we report initial work using a portable DT electronic neutron generator with a He-3 fast neutron detector to detect shielded fissionable material including >2 kg quantities of enriched uranium and plutonium. Measurements have been taken of bare material as well as of material hidden within a large plywood cube. Results from this work have demonstrated the efficacy of the die-away neutron measurement technique for quickly detecting the presence of special nuclear material hidden within plywood shields by analyzing the time dependent neutron signals in-between neutron generator pulses. Using a DT electronic neutron generator operating at 300 Hz with a yield of approximately 0.36 x 10**8 neutrons per second, 2.2 kg of enriched uranium hidden within a 0.60 m x 0.60 m x 0.70 m volume of plywood was positively detected with a measurement signal 2-sigma above the passive background within 1 second. Similarly, for a 500 second measurement period a lower detection limit of approaching the gram level could be expected with the same simple set-up.

  15. Alkali-Activated Aluminium-Silicate Composites as Insulation Materials for Industrial Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembovska, L.; Bajare, D.; Pundiene, I.; Bumanis, G.

    2015-11-01

    The article reports on the study of thermal stability of alkali-activated aluminium- silicate composites (ASC) at temperature 800-1100°C. ASC were prepared by using calcined kaolinite clay, aluminium scrap recycling waste, lead-silicate glass waste and quartz sand. As alkali activator, commercial sodium silicate solution modified with an addition of sodium hydroxide was used. The obtained alkali activation solution had silica modulus Ms=1.67. Components of aluminium scrap recycling waste (aluminium nitride (AlN) and iron sulphite (FeSO3)) react in the alkali media and create gases - ammonia and sulphur dioxide, which provide the porous structure of the material [1]. Changes in the chemical composition of ASC during heating were identified and quantitatively analysed by using DTA/TG, dimension changes during the heating process were determined by using HTOM, pore microstructure was examined by SEM, and mineralogical composition of ASC was determined by XRD. The density of ASC was measured in accordance with EN 1097-7. ASC with density around 560 kg/m3 and heat resistance up to 1100°C with shrinkage less than 5% were obtained. The intended use of this material is the application as an insulation material for industrial purposes at elevated temperatures.

  16. Critical Dimensions of Water-tamped Slabs and Spheres of Active Material

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Greuling, E.; Argo, H.: Chew, G.; Frankel, M. E.; Konopinski, E.J.; Marvin, C.; Teller, E.

    1946-08-06

    The magnitude and distribution of the fission rate per unit area produced by three energy groups of moderated neutrons reflected from a water tamper into one side of an infinite slab of active material is calculated approximately in section II. This rate is directly proportional to the current density of fast neutrons from the active material incident on the water tamper. The critical slab thickness is obtained in section III by solving an inhomogeneous transport integral equation for the fast-neutron current density into the tamper. Extensive use is made of the formulae derived in "The Mathematical Development of the End-Point Method" by Frankel and Goldberg. In section IV slight alterations in the theory outlined in sections II and III were made so that one could approximately compute the critical radius of a water-tamper sphere of active material. The derived formulae were applied to calculate the critical dimensions of water-tamped slabs and spheres of solid UF{sub 6} leaving various (25) isotope enrichment fractions. Decl. Dec. 16, 1955.

  17. Using Photon Activation Analysis To Determine Concentrations Of Unknown Components In Reference Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Jaromy; Sun, Zaijing; Wells, Doug; Maschner, Herb

    2011-06-01

    Using certified multi-element reference materials for instrumental analyses one frequently is confronted with the embarrassing fact that the concentration of some desired elements are not given in the respective certificate, nonetheless are detectable, e.g. by photon activation analysis (PAA). However, these elements might be determinable with sufficient quality of the results using scaling parameters and the well-known quantities of a reference element within the reference material itself. Scaling parameters include: activation threshold energy, Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) peak and endpoint energy of the bremsstrahlung continuum; integrated photo-nuclear cross sections for the isotopes of the reference element; bremsstrahlung continuum integral; target thickness; photon flux density. Photo-nuclear cross sections from the unreferenced elements must be known, too. With these quantities, the integral was obtained for both the known and unknown elements resulting in an inference of the concentration of the unreported element based upon the reported value, thus also the concentration of the unreferenced element in the reference material. A similar method to determine elements using the basic nuclear and experimental data has been developed for thermal neutron activation analysis some time ago (k{sub 0} Method).

  18. Mutagenicity studies in a tyre plant: in vitro activity of workers' urinary concentrates and raw materials.

    PubMed Central

    Crebelli, R; Paoletti, A; Falcone, E; Aquilina, G; Fabri, G; Carere, A

    1985-01-01

    The possible contribution to urinary mutagenicity of occupational exposures in the rubber industry was studied by assaying the urine concentrates of 72 workmen (44 smokers) employed in a tyre plant. Twenty three clerks (16 smokers) engaged in the administrative department of the same factory served as presumptive unexposed controls. XAD-2 resin concentrates of urine samples were assayed in the plate incorporation test and in the microtitre fluctuation assay with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA1535, TA98, and TA100. Furthermore, the in vitro mutagenicity of the major raw materials in use at the plant was determined in the plate incorporation assay with S typhimurium strains TA1535, TA1537, TA98, and TA100. The results obtained from the urinary mutagenicity study show that smoking habits, but not occupation, were statistically significantly related to the appearance of a urinary mutagenicity that was detectable with strain TA98. A possible synergistic effect of occupation with smoking was observed among tyre builders who were also smokers. The study of the raw materials showed that three technical grade materials were weakly active as mutagens in strain TA98 in the absence (poly-p-dinitrosobenzene) or in the presence of metabolic activation (mixed diaryl-p-phenylendiamines and tetramethyltiuram disulphide). The latter chemical was also weakly active in strain TA100. PMID:4015996

  19. AFA History: Some Bibliographical Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Gerald H.; Reid, Ronald F.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a brief bibliographical study in order (1) to provide future historians with some hints about where to locate materials, and (2) to encourage the American Forensic Association to continue its recent efforts to collect materials and deposit them in a well-maintained historical archive. (NH)

  20. 49 CFR 173.427 - Transport requirements for low specific activity (LSA) Class 7 (radioactive) materials and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (LSA) Class 7 (radioactive) materials and surface contaminated objects (SCO). 173.427 Section 173.427... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.427 Transport requirements for low specific activity (LSA) Class 7 (radioactive) materials and surface contaminated objects (SCO). (a) In addition...

  1. Expression and/or activity of the SVCT2 ascorbate transporter may be decreased in many aggressive cancers, suggesting potential utility for sodium bicarbonate and dehydroascorbic acid in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2013-10-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimer transcription factor whose elevated activity in many cancers helps them to survive under hypoxic conditions and enhances their capacity to grow invasively, establish metastases, and survive chemo- or radiotherapy. Optimal intracellular levels of ascorbate suppress the level and transcriptional activity of HIF-1under normoxic or mildly hypoxic conditions by supporting the activity of proly and asparagyl hydroxylases that target HIF-1alpha. High intracellular ascorbate can also work in various ways to down-regulate activation of NF-kappaB which, like HIF-1 is constitutively active in many cancers and promotes aggressive behavior - in part by promoting transcription of HIF-1alpha. Yet recent evidence suggests that, even in the context of adequate ascorbate nutrition, the intracellular ascorbate content of many aggressive cancers may be supoptimal for effective HIF-1 control. This likely reflects low expression or activity of the SVCT2 ascorbate transporter. The expression of SVCT2 in cancers has so far received little study; but the extracellular acidity characteristic of many tumors would be expected to reduce the activity of this transporter, which has a mildly alkaline pH optimum. Unfortunately, since SVCT2 has a high affinity for ascorbate, and its activity is nearly saturated at normal healthy serum levels of this vitamin, increased oral administration of ascorbate would be unlikely to have much impact on the intracellular ascorbate content of tumors. However, cancers in which HIF-1 is active express high levels of glucose transporters such as GLUT-1, and these transporters can promote influx of dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) via facilitated diffusion; once inside the cell, DHA is rapidly reduced to ascorbate, which effectively is "trapped" within the cell. Hence, episodic intravenous infusions of modest doses of DHA may have potential for optimizing the intracellular ascorbate content of cancers, potentially

  2. Development and application of rapid assessment diet and physical activity indexes, which suggest high consumption of energy-dense foods and inadequate exercise among adolescents from 6 Latin American cities: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Laura H; Holbert, Donald; Peña, Manuel

    2008-09-01

    This study describes the development and application of a rapid assessment diet quality index (RADQI) and a rapid assessment physical activity index (RAPAI) to characterize the energy intake and expenditure patterns of 1279 Latin American adolescents. Secondary aims were to describe the strength of the relationships of energy intakes and expenditures with sex, socioeconomic status, body mass index, and city of residence and to identify the students' reasons for undertaking physical activity and the types of activities they most enjoyed. Participants were eighth and ninth grade students from Buenos Aires, Argentina; Guatemala City, Guatemala; Havana, Cuba; Lima, Peru; Panama City, Panama; and Santiago, Chile. The RADQI and RAPAI scores were rescaled to T scores with a mean of 50 points (+/-10) for comparison. The RADQI scores ranged from 53.0 points (+/-10.5) in Panama City to 44.7 points (+/-8.3) in Santiago, and RAPAI scores ranged from 54.8 points (+/-9.2) in Panama City to 46.2 points (+/-8.6) in Santiago. The correlation between RADQI and RAPAI scores for the combined data set was weak but positive. The 2 reasons most often given for undertaking physical activity were to improve their physical health and to improve their psychological well-being, whereas the types of physical activities most enjoyed involved competitive sports. Results suggest frequent intakes of energy-dense diets and inadequate physical activity participation, prompting a need for learning opportunities targeted at adolescents and their families that teach healthy food choices and encourage greater physical activity participation.

  3. Contextual Suggestion from Wikitravel: Exploiting Community-based Suggestions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    in a spe- cific location, at a specific time, taking into ac- count their personal preferences. As a source for travel suggestions we use Wikitravel...which is a community-based travel guide for destinations all over the world. From pages dedicated to cities in the US we extract suggestions for...formation on user preferences is valuable for pro- viding appropriate suggestions. 1 Introduction Wikitravel1 is a collaboratively created site for travel

  4. Assessment of Uncertainty in the Determination of Activation Energy for Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darby, Stephania P.; Landrum, D. Brian; Coleman, Hugh W.

    1998-01-01

    An assessment of the experimental uncertainty in obtaining the kinetic activation energy from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data is presented. A neat phenolic resin, Borden SC1O08, was heated at three heating rates to obtain weight loss vs temperature data. Activation energy was calculated by two methods: the traditional Flynn and Wall method based on the slope of log(q) versus 1/T, and a modification of this method where the ordinate and abscissa are reversed in the linear regression. The modified method produced a more accurate curve fit of the data, was more sensitive to data nonlinearity, and gave a value of activation energy 75 percent greater than the original method. An uncertainty analysis using the modified method yielded a 60 percent uncertainty in the average activation energy. Based on this result, the activation energy for a carbon-phenolic material was doubled and used to calculate the ablation rate In a typical solid rocket environment. Doubling the activation energy increased surface recession by 3 percent. Current TGA data reduction techniques that use the traditional Flynn and Wall approach to calculate activation energy should be changed to the modified method.

  5. Development of an antimicrobial material based on a nanocomposite cellulose acetate film for active food packaging.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Francisco J; Torres, Alejandra; Peñaloza, Ángela; Sepúlveda, Hugo; Galotto, María J; Guarda, Abel; Bruna, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Nanocomposites based on biopolymers have been recognised as potential materials for the development of new ecofriendly food packaging. In addition, if these materials incorporate active substances in their structure, the potential applications are much higher. Therefore, this work was oriented to develop nanocomposites with antimicrobial activity based on cellulose acetate (CA), a commercial organoclay Cloisite30B (C30B), thymol (T) as natural antimicrobial component and tri-ethyl citrate (TEC) as plasticiser. Nanocomposites were prepared by a solvent casting method and consisted of 5% (w/w) of C30B, 5% (w/w) of TEC and variable content of T (0%, 0.5% and 2% w/w). To evaluate the effect of C30B into the CA matrix, CA films without this organoclay but with T were also prepared. All nanocomposites showed the intercalation of CA into the organoclay structure; furthermore this intercalation was favoured when 2% (w/w) of T was added to the nanocomposite. In spite of the observed intercalation, the presence of C30B inside the CA matrices increased the opacity of the films significantly. On the other hand, T showed a plasticiser effect on the thermal properties of CA nanocomposites decreasing glass transition, melting temperature and melting enthalpy. The presence of T in CA nanocomposites also allowed the control de Listeria innocua growth when these materials were placed in contact with this Gram-positive bacterium. Interestingly, antimicrobial activity was increased with the presence of C30B. Finally, studies on T release showed that the clay structure inside the CA matrix did not affect its release rate; however, this nanofiller affected the partition coefficient KP/FS which was higher to CA nanocomposites films than in CA films without organoclay. The results obtained in the present study are really promising to be applied in the manufacture of food packaging materials.

  6. Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide modified concrete materials - influence of utilizing recycled glass cullets as aggregates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2009-08-01

    Combining the use of photocatalysts with cementitious materials is an important development in the field of photocatalytic air pollution mitigation. This paper presents the results of a systematic study on assessing the effectiveness of pollutant degradation by concrete surface layers that incorporate a photocatalytic material - Titanium Dioxide. The photocatalytic activity of the concrete samples was determined by photocatalytic oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) in the laboratory. Recycled glass cullets, derived from crushed waste beverage bottles, were used to replace sand in preparing the concrete surface layers. Factors, which may affect the pollutant removal performance of the concrete layers including glass color, aggregate size and curing age, were investigated. The results show a significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity due to the use of glass cullets as aggregates in the concrete layers. The samples fabricated with clear glass cullets exhibited threefold NO removal efficiency compared to the samples fabricated with river sand. The light transmittance property of glass was postulated to account for the efficiency improvement, which was confirmed by a separate simulation study. But the influence of the size of glass cullets was not evident. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of concrete surface layers decreased with curing age, showing a loss of 20% photocatalytic activity after 56-day curing.

  7. Natural sisal fibers derived hierarchical porous activated carbon as capacitive material in lithium ion capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhewei; Guo, Huajun; Li, Xinhai; Wang, Zhixing; Yan, Zhiliang; Wang, Yansen

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-ion capacitor (LIC) is a novel advanced electrochemical energy storage (EES) system bridging gap between lithium ion battery (LIB) and electrochemical capacitor (ECC). In this work, we report that sisal fiber activated carbon (SFAC) was synthesized by hydrothermal treatment followed by KOH activation and served as capacitive material in LIC for the first time. Different particle structure, morphology, specific surface area and heteroatoms affected the electrochemical performance of as-prepared materials and corresponding LICs. When the mass ratio of KOH to char precursor was 2, hierarchical porous structured SFAC-2 was prepared and exhibited moderate specific capacitance (103 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1), superior rate capability and cyclic stability (88% capacity retention after 5000 cycles at 1 A g-1). The corresponding assembled LIC (LIC-SC2) with optimal comprehensive electrochemical performance, displayed the energy density of 83 Wh kg-1, the power density of 5718 W kg-1 and superior cyclic stability (92% energy density retention after 1000 cycles at 0.5 A g-1). It is worthwhile that the source for activated carbon is a natural and renewable one and the synthesis method is eco-friendly, which facilitate that hierarchical porous activated carbon has potential applications in the field of LIC and other energy storage systems.

  8. Development of Pupils' Transfer Skills by Means of Hands On Activities with Artisan Materials in Natural Sciences Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciascai, Liliana; Chicinas, Luminita

    2008-01-01

    Hands on activities with artisan materials used in order to realize different practical devices helpful in learning process are one of the most frequently used activity in science classes. Usually, the main strength of these activities are: a deeper learning, an increased motivation of pupils for actively learning and development of practical…

  9. Impedance spectroscopy study of a catechol-modified activated carbon electrode as active material in electrochemical capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cougnon, C.; Lebègue, E.; Pognon, G.

    2015-01-01

    Modified activated carbon (Norit S-50) electrodes with electrochemical double layer (EDL) capacitance and redox capacitance contributions to the electric charge storage were tested in 1 M H2SO4 to quantify the benefit and the limitation of the surface redox reactions on the electrochemical performances of the resulting pseudo-capacitive materials. The electrochemical performances of an electrochemically anodized carbon electrode and a catechol-modified carbon electrode, which make use both EDL capacitance of the porous structure of the carbon and redox capacitance, were compared to the performances obtained for the pristine carbon. Nitrogen gas adsorption measurements have been used for studying the impact of the grafting on the BET surface area, pore size distribution, pore volume and average pore diameter. The electrochemical behavior of carbon materials was studied by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The EIS data were discussed by using a complex capacitance model that allows defining the characteristic time constant, the global capacitance and the frequency at which the maximum charge stored is reached. The EIS measurements were achieved at different dc potential values where a redox activity occurs and the evolution of the capacitance and the capacitive relaxation time with the electrode potential are presented. Realistic galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements performed at different current rates corroborate the results obtained by impedance.

  10. Hypnotic suggestion: a musical mathaphor.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, I

    1997-04-01

    Conceptually, hypnotizability has always been associated with the increase in suggestibility produced by hypnosis. In practice, hypnotizability is measured as suggestibility following a hypnotic induction. Our understanding of hypnosis and suggestion has been hampered by this discordance between the conceptual and operational definitions of hypnotizability. For example, despite hundreds of studies purporting to use standardized scales to assess hypnotizability, we know next to nothing about that construct, as it has been defined conceptually. Neither the hypothesis that it is a stable trait nor the hypothesis that it is modifiable have been tested in any study, and correlations between hypnotizability and other psychological or physiological variables have not yet been assessed. Conversely, we have learned much about hypnosis, suggestion, and suggestibility. Suggestibility has been measured on reliable and valid instruments, and we have abundant data on its stability, modifiability, and correlates. Hypnosis enhances suggestibility to a modest degree and increases the effectiveness of psychotherapy.

  11. Alternative disposal for Investigation Derived Wastes (IDW) containing low activity source material

    SciTech Connect

    Downey, H.T.; Majer, T.

    2007-07-01

    As part of a Remedial Investigation (RI) at a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Site, approximately 77,111 kg (85 tons) I would use the actual tons of investigation derived wastes (IDW) were generated from exploratory soil borings and as part of removal activities at a former drum burial area. Characterization of these materials indicated elevated concentrations of metals including uranium and thorium (source material). Concentrations of uranium and thorium were at levels less than 0.05% by mass, which is the threshold for exempt source material under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. Disposal of this material was evaluated as low-level radioactive waste and as exempt radioactive waste. The NRC has established a process for evaluation and review of exempt source material transfer and direct disposal in a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) landfill. These requests are normally approved if the dose to a member of the general public is unlikely to exceed 0.25 mSv per year (25 milli-rem per year). The soil was evaluated for disposal as exempt radioactive waste at a RCRA landfill, which included dose modeling to workers during transportation and disposal as well as potential dose to members of the public after closure of the disposal facility. These evaluations determined that the potential dose was very small, and review by the agreement state regulatory agency indicated that this disposal process should not result in any undue hazard to public health and safety or property. The advantage of this approach is that disposal of 77,111 kg (85 tons) of IDW at a RCRA landfill is estimated to result in a savings of $80,000 as compared to disposal as low-level radioactive waste. Alternative waste disposal of exempt source material provides more disposal options and can lead to significant cost savings. (authors)

  12. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of acid-base bifunctional materials through protection of amino groups

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yanqiu; Liu, Heng; Yu, Xiaofang; Guan, Jingqi; Kan, Qiubin

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acid-base bifunctional material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized through protection of amino groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} catalyst containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties. -- Abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, transmission electron micrographs (TEM), back titration, {sup 13}C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and {sup 29}Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR were employed to characterize the synthesized materials. The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation reaction between acetone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. Compared with monofunctional catalysts of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15 and SBA-15-NH{sub 2}, the bifunctional sample of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity for the aldol condensation.

  13. Catechol-modified activated carbon prepared by the diazonium chemistry for application as active electrode material in electrochemical capacitor.

    PubMed

    Pognon, Grégory; Cougnon, Charles; Mayilukila, Dilungane; Bélanger, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Activated carbon (Black Pearls 2000) modified with electroactive catechol groups was evaluated for charge storage application as active composite electrode material in an aqueous electrochemical capacitor. High surface area Black Pearls 2000 carbon was functionalized by introduction of catechol groups by spontaneous reduction of catechol diazonium ions in situ prepared in aqueous solution from the corresponding amine. Change in the specific surface area and pore texture of the carbon following grafting was monitored by nitrogen gas adsorption measurements. The electrochemical properties and the chemical composition of the catechol-modified carbon electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Such carbon-modified electrode combines well the faradaic capacitance, originating from the redox activity of the surface immobilized catechol groups, to the electrochemical double layer capacitance of the high surface area Black Pearls carbon. Due to the faradaic contribution, the catechol-modified electrode exhibits a higher specific capacitance (250 F/g) than pristine carbon (150 F/g) over a potential range of -0.4 to 0.75 V in 1 M H(2)SO(4). The stability of the modified electrode evaluated by long-time charge/discharge cycling revealed a low decrease of the capacitance of the catechol-modified carbon due to the loss of the catechol redox activity. Nonetheless, it was demonstrated that the benefit of redox groups persists for 10, 000 constant current charge/discharge cycles.

  14. Impact of Modifying Activity-Based Instructional Materials for Special Needs Students in Middle School Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Julia K.; Slater, Timothy F.

    Middle school students who have special needs because they are learning disabled require targeted attention in our nation's pursuit of improved science achievement for all students. In early 2006, the Lawrence Hall of Science conducted a national field test of a newly developed GEMS (Great Explorations in Math and Science) space science curriculum package for middle school students. During this field testing, we modified a subset of the curriculum materials to reflect the principles of best practices in working with special needs students, specifically learning disabled students, in a subset of the field test classrooms to determine if these students scored differently on the assessments than students in the larger assessment database. Results suggest that many students, not just those with special needs, demonstrate achievement gains using instructional materials purposefully aligned with research- informed principles of best practices for special needs students.

  15. Evaluation of flow injection analysis for determination of cholinesterase activities in biological material.

    PubMed

    Cabal, Jiri; Bajgar, Jiri; Kassa, Jiri

    2010-09-06

    The method for automatic continual monitoring of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in biological material is described. It is based on flexible system of plastic pipes mixing samples of biological material with reagents for enzyme determination; reaction product penetrates through the semipermeable membrane and it is spectrophotometrically determined (Ellman's method). It consists of sampling (either in vitro or in vivo), adding the substrate and flowing to dialyzer; reaction product (thiocholine) is dialyzed and mixed with 5,5'-dithio-bis-2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB) transported to flow spectrophotometer. Flowing of all materials is realised using peristaltic pump. The method was validated: time for optimal hydratation of the cellophane membrane; type of the membrane; type of dialyzer; conditions for optimal permeation of reaction components; optimization of substrate and DTNB concentrations (linear dependence); efficacy of peristaltic pump; calibration of analytes after permeation through the membrane; excluding of the blood permeation through the membrane. Some examples of the evaluation of the effects of AChE inhibitors are described. It was demonstrated very good uniformity of peaks representing the enzyme activity (good reproducibility); time dependence of AChE inhibition caused by VX in vitro in the rat blood allowing to determine the half life of inhibition and thus, bimolecular rate constants of inhibition; reactivation of inhibited AChE by some reactivators, and continual monitoring of the activity in the whole blood in vivo in intact and VX-intoxicated rats. The method is simple and not expensive, allowing automatic determination of AChE activity in discrete or continual samples in vitro or in vivo. It will be evaluated for further research of cholinesterase inhibitors.

  16. Highly basic CaO nanoparticles in mesoporous carbon materials and their excellent catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Raja, Pradeep Kumar; Chokkalingam, Anand; Priya, Subramaniam V; Balasubramanian, Veerappan V; Benziger, Mercy R; Aldeyab, Salem S; Jayavell, Ramasamy; Ariga, Katsukiho; Vinu, Ajayan

    2012-06-01

    Highly basic CaO nanoparticles immobilized mesoporous carbon materials (CaO-CMK-3) with different pore diameters have been successfully prepared by using wet-impregnation method. The prepared materials were subjected to extensive characterization studies using sophisticated techniques such as XRD, nitrogen adsorption, HRSEM-EDX, HRTEM and temperature programmed desorption of CO2 (TPD of CO2). The physico-chemical characterization results revealed that these materials possess highly dispersed CaO nanoparticles, excellent nanopores with well-ordered structure, high specific surface area, large specific pore volume, pore diameter and very high basicity. We have also demonstrated that the basicity of the CaO-CMK-3 samples can be controlled by simply varying the amount of CaO loading and pore diameter of the carbon support. The basic catalytic performance of the samples was investigated in the base-catalyzed transesterification of ethylacetoacetate by aryl, aliphatic and cyclic primary alcohols. CMK-3 catalyst with higher CaO loading and larger pore diameter was found to be highly active with higher conversion within a very short reaction time. The activity of 30% CaO-CMK3-150 catalyst for transesterification of ethylacetoacetate using different alcohols increases in the following order: octanol > butanol > cyclohexanol > benzyl alcohol > furfuryl alcohol.

  17. Characterization and electrochemical activities of nanostructured transition metal nitrides as cathode materials for lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosavati, Negar; Salley, Steven O.; Ng, K. Y. Simon

    2017-02-01

    The Lithium Sulfur (Li-S) battery system is one of the most promising candidates for electric vehicle applications due to its higher energy density when compared to conventional lithium ion batteries. However, there are some challenges facing Li-S battery commercialization, such as: low active material utilization, high self-discharge rate, and high rate of capacity fade. In this work, a series of transition metal nitrides: Tungsten nitride (WN), Molybdenum Nitride (Mo2N), and Vanadium Nitride (VN) was investigated as cathode materials for lithium polysulfide conversion reactions. Capacities of 697, 569, and 264 mAh g-1 were observed for WN, Mo2N, VN, respectively, with 8 mg cm-2 loading, after 100 cycles at a 0.1 C rate. WN higher electrochemical performance may be attributed to a strong reversible reaction between nitrides and polysulfide, which retains the sulfur species on the electrode surface, and minimizes the active material and surface area loss. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was performed to gain a better understanding of the mechanism underlying each metal nitride redox reactions.

  18. Imparting Catalytic Activity to a Covalent Organic Framework Material by Nanoparticle Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaofei; Yao, Youjin; Xu, Yulong; Liu, Kun; Zhu, Guangshan; Chi, Lifeng; Lu, Guang

    2017-03-01

    Integrating covalent organic frameworks (COFs) with other functional materials is a useful route to enhancing their performances and extending their applications. We report herein a simple encapsulation method for incorporating catalytically active Au nanoparticles with different sizes, shapes, and contents in a two-dimensional (2D) COF material constructed by condensing 1,3,5-tris(4-aminophenyl)benzene (TAPB) with 2,5-dimethoxyterephthaldehyde (DMTP). The encapsulation is assisted by the surface functionalization of Au nanoparticles with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and follows a mechanism based on the adsorption of nanoparticles onto surfaces of the initially formed polymeric precursor of COF. The incorporation of nanoparticles does not alter obviously the crystallinity, thermal stability, and pore structures of the framework matrices. The obtained COF composites with embedded but accessible Au nanoparticles possess large surface areas and highly open mesopores and display recyclable catalytic performance for reduction of 4-nitrophenol, which cannot be catalyzed by the pure COF material, with activities relevant to contents and geometric structures of the incorporated nanoparticles.

  19. Kraft lignin/silica-AgNPs as a functional material with antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Klapiszewski, Łukasz; Rzemieniecki, Tomasz; Krawczyk, Magdalena; Malina, Dagmara; Norman, Małgorzata; Zdarta, Jakub; Majchrzak, Izabela; Dobrowolska, Anna; Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2015-10-01

    Advanced functional silica/lignin hybrid materials, modified with nanosilver, were obtained. The commercial silica Syloid 244 was used, modified with N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane to increase its chemical affinity to lignin. Similarly, kraft lignin was oxidized using a solution of sodium periodate to activate appropriate functional groups on its surface. Silver nanoparticles were grafted onto the resulting silica/lignin hybrids. The systems obtained were comprehensively tested using available techniques and methods, including transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, elemental analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. An evaluation was also made of the electrokinetic stability of the systems with and without silver nanoparticles. Conclusions were drawn concerning the chemical nature of the bonds between the precursors and the effectiveness of the method of binding nanosilver to the hybrid materials. The antimicrobial activity of the studied materials was tested against five species of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The addition of silver nanoparticles to the silica/lignin hybrids led to inhibition of the growth of the analyzed bacteria. The best results were obtained against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dangerous human pathogen.

  20. Anion exchange nanofiber materials activated by daylight with a dual antibacterial effect.

    PubMed

    Plíštil, L; Henke, P; Kubát, P; Mosinger, J

    2014-09-01

    Anion exchange polystyrene nanofiber materials (AE) were prepared by electrospinning followed by two-step functionalization of the nanofiber surface by chlorosulfonic acid and ethylendiamine. The photoactive character of these materials was introduced through adsorption of the tetra-anionic 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin photosensitizer (TPPS-AE) on the nanofiber surface or by encapsulation of the nonpolar 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin photosensitizer (AE(TPP)) into the nanofibers. Anion exchange nanofiber materials with porphyrins are characterized by a high ion-exchange capacity, photogeneration of singlet oxygen O2((1)Δg), and singlet oxygen-sensitized delayed fluorescence. Due to the photogeneration of cytotoxic O2((1)Δg), the nanofibers exhibited oxidation of the external substrates in aqueous solution and an efficient antibacterial effect when activated by simulated daylight. Adsorption of both TPPS and I(-) on the surface of AE led to the formation of more efficient I-TPPS-AE materials. Rapid photooxidation of I(-) by O2((1)Δg), and the formation of another cytotoxic species, I3(-), on the surface of the nanofibers were responsible for the increased antibacterial properties of I-TPPS-AE and the prolonged antibacterial effect in the dark.

  1. Active metal-matrix composites with embedded smart materials by ultrasonic additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahnlen, Ryan; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents the development of active aluminum-matrix composites manufactured by Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM), an emerging rapid prototyping process based on ultrasonic metal welding. Composites created through this process experience temperatures as low as 25 °C during fabrication, in contrast to current metal-matrix fabrication processes which require temperatures of 500 °C and above. UAM thus provides unprecedented opportunities to develop adaptive structures with seamlessly embedded smart materials and electronic components without degrading the properties that make these materials and components attractive. This research focuses on developing UAM composites with aluminum matrices and embedded shape memory NiTi, magnetostrictive Galfenol, and electroactive PVDF phases. The research on these composites will focus on: (i) electrical insulation between NiTi and Al phases for strain sensors, investigation and modeling of NiTi-Al composites as tunable stiffness materials and thermally invariant structures based on the shape memory effect; (ii) process development and composite testing for Galfenol-Al composites; and (iii) development of PVDF-Al composites for embedded sensing applications. We demonstrate a method to electrically insulate embedded materials from the UAM matrix, the ability create composites containing up to 22.3% NiTi, and their resulting dimensional stability and thermal actuation characteristics. Also demonstrated is Galfenol-Al composite magnetic actuation of up to 54 μ(see manuscript), and creation of a PVDF-Al composite sensor.

  2. Evaluation of precision and accuracy of selenium measurements in biological materials using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the accurate determination of selenium in biological materials has become increasingly important in view of the essential nature of this element for human nutrition and its possible role as a protective agent against cancer. Unfortunately, the accurate determination of selenium in biological materials is often difficult for most analytical techniques for a variety of reasons, including interferences, complicated selenium chemistry due to the presence of this element in multiple oxidation states and in a variety of different organic species, stability and resistance to destruction of some of these organo-selenium species during acid dissolution, volatility of some selenium compounds, and potential for contamination. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) can be one of the best analytical techniques for selenium determinations in biological materials for a number of reasons. Currently, precision at the 1% level (1s) and overall accuracy at the 1 to 2% level (95% confidence interval) can be attained at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS) for selenium determinations in biological materials when counting statistics are not limiting (using the {sup 75}Se isotope). An example of this level of precision and accuracy is summarized. Achieving this level of accuracy, however, requires strict attention to all sources of systematic error. Precise and accurate results can also be obtained after radiochemical separations.

  3. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase gene family from banana suggest involvement of specific members in different stages of fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Asif, Mehar Hasan; Lakhwani, Deepika; Pathak, Sumya; Bhambhani, Sweta; Bag, Sumit K; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are important components of the tripartite mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade and play an important role in plant growth and development. Although members of the MAPK gene family have been identified in model plants, little information is available regarding this gene family in fruit crops. In this study, we carried out a computational analysis using the Musa Genome database to identify members of the MAPK gene family in banana, an economically important crop and the most popular fruit worldwide. Our analysis identified 25 members of the MAP kinase (MAPK or MPK) gene family. Phylogenetic analyses of MPKs in Arabidopsis, Oryza, and Populus have classified these MPKs into four subgroups. The presence of conserved domains in the deduced amino acid sequences, phylogeny, and genomic organization strongly support their identity as members of the MPK gene family. Expression analysis during ethylene-induced banana fruit ripening suggests the involvement of several MPKs in the ethylene signal transduction pathway that are necessary for banana fruit ripening. Analysis of the cis-regulatory elements in the promoter regions and the involvement of the identified MPKs in various cellular processes, as analyzed using Pathway Studio, suggest a role for the banana MPK gene family in diverse functions related to growth, development, and the stress response. This report is the first concerning the identification of members of a gene family and the elucidation of their role in various processes using the Musa Genome database.

  4. Determination of boron in materials by cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Paul, Rick L

    2005-01-01

    An instrument for cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA), located at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR), has proven useful for the measurement of boron in a variety of materials. Neutrons, moderated by passage through liquid hydrogen at 20 K, pass through a (58)Ni coated guide to the PGAA station in the cold neutron guide hall of the NCNR. The thermal equivalent neutron fluence rate at the sample position is 9 x 10(8) cm(-2) s(-1). Prompt gamma rays are measured by a cadmium- and lead-shielded high-purity germanium detector. The instrument has been used to measure boron mass fractions in minerals, in NIST SRM 2175 (Refractory Alloy MP-35-N) for certification of boron, and most recently in semiconductor-grade silicon. The limit of detection for boron in many materials is <10 ng g(-1).

  5. Analysis of marine sediment and lobster hepatopancreas reference materials by instrumental photon activation

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, S.; Davidson, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    By use of instrumental photon activation analysis, twelve trace (As, Ba, Cr, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sr, U, Zn, and Zr) and eight minor (C, Na, Mg, Co, K, Ca, Tl, and Fe) elements were determined in a certified marine sediment standard reference material as well as eight trace (Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Cd, and Pb) and four minor (Na, Mg, Cl, and Ca) elements in a certified marine tissue (lobster hepatopancreas) standard reference material. The precision and accuracy of the present results when compared to the accepted values clearly demonstrate the reliability of this nondestructive technique and its applicability to marine environmental or marine geochemical studies. 24 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  6. A computational investigation on radiation damage and activation of structural material for C-ADS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Tairan; Shen, Fei; Yin, Wen; Yu, Quanzhi; Liang, Tianjiao

    2015-11-01

    The C-ADS (China Accelerator-Driven Subcritical System) project, which aims at transmuting high-level radiotoxic waste (HLW) and power generation, is now in the research and development stage. In this paper, a simplified ADS model is set up based on the IAEA Th-ADS benchmark calculation model, then the radiation damage as well as the residual radioactivity of the structural material are estimated using the Monte Carlo simulation method. The peak displacement production rate, gas productions, activity and residual dose rate of the structural components like beam window and outer casing of subcritical reactor core are calculated. The calculation methods and the corresponding results provide the basic reference for making reasonable predictions for the lifetime and maintenance operations of the structural material of C-ADS.

  7. Removal of Basic Violet 14 from aqueous solution using sulphuric acid activated materials.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S

    2016-01-01

    In this study the adsorption of Basic Violet, 14 from aqueous solution onto sulphuric acid activated materials prepared from Calophyllum inophyllum (CS) and Theobroma cacao (TS) shells were investigated. The experimental data were analysed by Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. The results showed that CS has a superior adsorption capacity compared to the TS. The adsorption capacity was found to be 1416.43 mg/g for CS and 980.39 mg/g for TS. The kinetic data results at different concentrations were analysed using pseudo first-order and pseudo-second order model. Boyd plot indicates that the dye adsorption onto CS and TS is controlled by film diffusion. The adsorbents were characterised by scanning electron microscopy. The materials used in this study were economical waste products and hence can be an attractive alternative to costlier adsorbents for dye removal in industrial wastewater treatment processes.

  8. Materials learning from life: concepts for active, adaptive and autonomous molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Merindol, Rémi; Walther, Andreas

    2017-01-30

    Bioinspired out-of-equilibrium systems will set the scene for the next generation of molecular materials with active, adaptive, autonomous, emergent and intelligent behavior. Indeed life provides the best demonstrations of complex and functional out-of-equilibrium systems: cells keep track of time, communicate, move, adapt, evolve and replicate continuously. Stirred by the understanding of biological principles, artificial out-of-equilibrium systems are emerging in many fields of soft matter science. Here we put in perspective the molecular mechanisms driving biological functions with the ones driving synthetic molecular systems. Focusing on principles that enable new levels of functionalities (temporal control, autonomous structures, motion and work generation, information processing) rather than on specific material classes, we outline key cross-disciplinary concepts that emerge in this challenging field. Ultimately, the goal is to inspire and support new generations of autonomous and adaptive molecular devices fueled by self-regulating chemistry.

  9. Use of electrochemically activated aqueous solutions in the manufacture of fur materials.

    PubMed

    Danylkovych, Anatoliy G; Lishchuk, Viktor I; Romaniuk, Oksana O

    2016-01-01

    The influence of characteristics of electrochemically activated aqueous processing mediums in the treatment of fur skins with different contents of fatty substances was investigated. The use of electroactive water, namely anolytes and catholytes, forgoing antiseptics or surface-active materials, helped to restore the hydration of fur skins and to remove from them soluble proteins, carbohydrates and fatty substances. The activating effect of anolyte and catholyte in solutions of water on the processes of treating raw furs is explained by their special physical and chemical properties, namely the presence of free radicals, ions and molecules of water which easily penetrate cells' membranes and into the structure of non-collagen components and microfiber structure of dermic collagen. The stage of lengthy acid and salt treatment is excluded from the technical treatment as a result of using electroactivated water with high oxidizing power. A low-cost technology of processing different kinds of fur with the use of electroactivated water provides for substantial economy of water and chemical reagents, a two to threefold acceleration of the soaking and tanning processes and creation of highly elastic fur materials with a specified set of physical and chemical properties. At the same time the technology of preparatory processes of fur treatment excludes the use of such toxic antiseptics as formalin and sodium silicofluoride, which gives grounds to regard it as ecologically safe.

  10. An active thermography approach for thermal and electrical characterization of thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streza, M.; Longuemart, S.; Guilmeau, E.; Strzalkowski, K.; Touati, K.; Depriester, M.; Maignan, A.; Sahraoui, A. Hadj

    2016-07-01

    The enhancement of figure of merit (ZT) of thermoelectrics is becoming extremely important for an efficient conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy. In this respect, reliable measurements of thermal and electrical parameters are of paramount importance in order to characterize thermoelectric materials in terms of their efficiency. In this work, a combined theoretical-experimental active thermography approach is presented. The method consists of selecting the right sequential interdependence between the excitation frequency and the sampling rate of the infrared camera, by computing a temporal Fourier analysis of each pixel of the recorded IR image. The method is validated by using a reference sample which is then applied to a recent synthesized titanium trisulphide thermoelectric material (TiS3). By combining AC and steady-state experiments, one can obtain information on both thermal and electrical parameters of TE materials (namely thermal diffusivity, Seebeck coefficient). The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of TiS3 are also measured using photothermal radiometry technique (PTR) and the resulting values of these parameters are α  =  9.7*10-7 m2 s-1 and k  =  2.2 W m-1 K, respectively. The results obtained with the two techniques are in good agreement. In the case of TE materials, the main benefit of the proposed method is related to its non-contact nature and the possibility of obtaining the electric potential and temperature at the same probes. The Seebeck coefficient obtained by active IR thermography (S  =  -554 μV K-1) is consistent with the one obtained using an ULVAC-ZEM3 system (S  =  -570 μV K-1). For a large number of users of thermographic cameras, which are not equipped with a lock-in thermography module, the present approach provides an affordable and cheaper solution.

  11. Optimizing vermistabilization of waste activated sludge using vermicompost as bulking material.

    PubMed

    Hait, Subrata; Tare, Vinod

    2011-03-01

    An integrated composting-vermicomposting system has been developed for stabilization of waste activated sludge (WAS) using matured vermicompost as bulking material and Eisenia fetida as earthworm species. Composting was considered as the main processing unit and vermicomposting as polishing unit. The integrated system was optimized by successive recycling and mixing of bulking material with WAS during composting and examining the effects of environmental condition (i.e. temperature: 10-30°C and relative humidity: 50 and 90%) and stocking density (0-5 kg/m(2)) on vermicomposting. The composting stage resulted in sufficient enrichment of bulking material with organic matter after 20 cycles of recycling and mixing with WAS and produced materials acceptable for vermicomposting. Vermicomposting of composted material caused significant reduction in pH, volatile solids (VS), specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR), total carbon (TC), total organic carbon (TOC), C/N ratio and pathogens and a substantial increase in electrical conductivity (EC), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorous (TP). The environmental conditions (i.e. temperature: 10-30°C and relative humidity: 50 and 90%) and stocking density (0-5 kg/m(2)) have profound effects on vermicomposting. Temperature of 20°C with high humidity is the best suited environmental condition for vermicomposting employing E. fetida. The favorable stocking density range for vermiculture is 0.5-2.0 kg/m(2) (optimum: 0.5 kg/m(2)) and for vermicomposting is 2.0-4.0 kg/m(2) (optimum: 3.0 kg/m(2)), respectively. The integrated composting-vermicomposting system potentially stabilizes and converts the hazardous WAS into quality organic manure for agronomic applications without any adverse effects.

  12. Present status of plasma-wall interactions research and materials development activities in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-08-01

    It is well known in the fusion engineering community that the plasma confinement performance in magnetic fusion devices is strongly affected by edge-plasma interactions with surface components. These plasma-material interactions (PMI) include fuel particle recycling and impurity generation both during normal and off-normal operation. To understand and then to control PMI effects, considerable effort has been made, particularly over the last decade in US, supported by Department of Energy, Division of Development and Technology. Also, because plasma-facing components are generally expected to receive significant amount of heat due to plasma bombardment and run-away electrons, materials must tolerate high-heat fluxes (HHF). The HHF-component research has been conducted in parallel with PMI research. One strong motivation for these research activities is that DT-burning experiments are currently planned in the Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor (TFTR) in early 1990s. Several different but mutually complementary approaches have been taken in the PMI+HHF research. The first approach is to conduct PMI experiments using toroidal fusion devices such as TFTR. The second one is to simulate elemental processes involved in PMI using ion beams and electron beams, etc. The last one but not least is to use non-tokamak plasma facilities. Along with these laboratory activities, new materials have been developed and evaluated from the PMI+HHF point of view. In this paper, several major PMI+HHF research facilities in US and their activities are briefly reviewed. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. The Astronomy Workshop: Computer Assisted Learning Tools with Instructor Support Materials and Student Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Grace; Hamilton, D.; Hayes-Gehrke, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive World Wide Web tools that were developed under the direction of Doug Hamilton for use in undergraduate classes, as supplementary materials appropriate for grades 9-12, and by the general public. The philosophy of the website is to foster student and public interest in astronomy by capitalizing on their fascination with computers and the internet. Many of the tools were developed by graduate and undergraduate students at UMD. This website contains over 20 tools on topics including scientific notation, giant impacts, extrasolar planets, astronomical distances, planets, moons, comets, and asteroids. Educators around the country at universities, colleges, and secondary schools have used the Astronomy Workshop’s tools and activities as homework assignments, in-class demos, or extra credit. Since 2005, Grace Deming has assessed several of the Astronomy Workshop’s tools for clarity and effectiveness by interviewing students as they used tools on the website. Based on these interviews, Deming wrote student activities and instructor support materials and posted them to the website. Over the next three years, we will continue to interview students, develop web materials, and field-test activities. We are targeting classes in introductory undergraduate astronomy courses and grades 11-12 for our Spring 2007 field tests. We are interested in hearing your ideas on how we can make the Astronomy Workshop more appealing to educators, museum directors, specialty programs, and professors. This research is funded by NASA EPO grants NNG04GM18G and NNG06GGF99G.

  14. Suggested Outline for Auditory Perception Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Clare A.

    Presented are suggestions for speech therapists to use in auditory perception training and screening of language handicapped children in kindergarten through grade 3. Directions are given for using the program, which is based on games. Each component is presented in terms of purpose, materials, a description of the game, and directions for…

  15. Active-Learning Assignments to Integrate Basic Science and Clinical Course Material

    PubMed Central

    Nykamp, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Objective To develop, implement, and evaluate active-learning exercises requiring the integration and application of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics knowledge of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis to formulate therapeutic recommendations for patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Design Two team-based case study exercises, one evaluating a patient with osteoarthritis and the second, a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, were developed, incorporating material and questions from pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics. The learning assignments were implemented in a required pharmacotherapy module. Assessment Student learning was evaluated using performance on the team-based case study exercises and on 2 examinations. A standard student course evaluation was used to assess students' impressions of the learning activity. The mean student grades for the osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis activities were 9.1 and 8.9, respectively, on a 10-point scale. The majority of students indicated that the learning exercises were more than adequate to excellent in helping students learn. Conclusion The addition of active-learning activities was successful in teaching pharmacy students the knowledge needed to formulate therapeutic recommendations for patients with musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:21088724

  16. Xanthine Dehydrogenase (XDH) cross-reacting material in mutants of Drosophila melanogaster deficient in XDH activity.

    PubMed

    Browder, L W; Tucker, L; Wilkes, J

    1982-02-01

    Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to estimate xanthine dehydrogenase cross-reacting material (XDH-CRM) in strains containing the cin and cin mutant genes, which are deficient in XDH enzymatic activity. CRM levels were determined as percentages of CRM in the Oregon-R wild-type strain. The mutant strains contain 72 and 76% of Oregon-R CRM, respectively. CRM levels in strains containing the XDH-deficient mutant genes lxd and mal are 93 and 105%, respectively. The high levels of CRM in these four mutant strains indicate that the primary effects of the mutant genes are on the function of XDH protein rather than its accumulation.

  17. Magnesium as Novel Material for Active Plasmonics in the Visible Wavelength Range.

    PubMed

    Sterl, Florian; Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Walter, Ramon; Griessen, Ronald; Tittl, Andreas; Giessen, Harald

    2015-12-09

    Investigating new materials plays an important role for advancing the field of nanoplasmonics. In this work, we fabricate nanodisks from magnesium and demonstrate tuning of their plasmon resonance throughout the whole visible wavelength range by changing the disk diameter. Furthermore, we employ a catalytic palladium cap layer to transform the metallic Mg particles into dielectric MgH2 particles when exposed to hydrogen gas. We prove that this transition can be reversed in the presence of oxygen. This yields plasmonic nanostructures with an extinction spectrum that can be repeatedly switched on or off or kept at any intermediate state, offering new perspectives for active plasmonic metamaterials.

  18. A history of semi-active laser dome and window materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Roger M.

    2014-05-01

    Semi-Active Laser (SAL) guidance systems were developed starting in the mid-1960's and today form an important class of precision guided weapons. The laser wavelengths generally fall in the short wave infrared region of the spectrum. Relative to passive, image based, infrared seekers the optical demands placed on the domes or windows of SAL seekers is very modest, allowing the use of low cost, easily manufactured materials, such as polycarbonate. This paper will examine the transition of SAL window and dome science and technology from the laboratory to battlefield, with special emphasis on the story of polycarbonate domes.

  19. Material composition assessment and discovering sublimation activity on asteroids 145 Adeona, 704 Interamnia, 779 Nina, and 1474 Beira

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busarev, V. V.; Barabanov, S. I.; Puzin, V. B.

    2016-07-01

    Spectrophotometric observations of 145 Adeona, 704 Interamnia, 779 Nina, and 1474 Beira—asteroids of close primitive types—allowed us to detect similar mineralogical absorption bands in their reflectance spectra centered in the range 0.35 to 0.92 μm; the bands are at 0.38, 0.44, and 0.67-0.71 μm. On the same asteroids, the spectral signs of simultaneous sublimation activity were found for the first time. Namely, there are maxima at ˜0.35-0.60 μm in the reflectance spectra of Adeona, Interamnia, and Nina and at ˜0.55-075 μm in the spectra of Beira. We connect this activity with small heliocentric distances of the asteroids and, consequently, with a high insolation at their surfaces. Examination of the samples of probable analogues allowed us to identify Fe3+ and Fe2+ in the material of these asteroids through the mentioned absorption bands. For analogues, we took powdered samples of carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil (CI), Mighei (CM2), Murchison (CM2), and Boriskino (CM2), as well as hydrosilicates of the serpentine group. Laboratory spectral reflectance study of the samples of low-iron Mg serpentines (<2 wt % FeO) showed that the equivalent width of the absorption band centered at 0.44-0.46 μm strongly correlates with the content of Fe3+ in octahedral and tetrahedral coordinations. Our conclusion is that this absorption band can be used as a qualitative indicator of Fe3+ in the surface matter of asteroids and other solid celestial bodies. The comparison of the listed analog samples and the asteroids by parameters of the spectral features suggests that the silicate component of the asteroids' surface material is a mixture of hydrated and oxidized compounds, including oxides and hydroxides of bivalent and trivalent iron and carbonaceous-chondritic material. At the same time, the sublimation activity of Adeona, Interamnia, Nina, and Beira at high surface temperatures points to a substantial content of water ice in their material. This contradicts the

  20. Quantitative structure-activity relationship modelling of oral acute toxicity and cytotoxic activity of fragrance materials in rodents.

    PubMed

    Papa, E; Luini, M; Gramatica, P

    2009-10-01

    Fragrance materials are used as ingredients in many consumer and personal care products. The wide and daily use of these substances, as well as their mainly uncontrolled discharge through domestic sewage, make fragrance materials both potential indoor and outdoor air pollutants which are also connected to possible toxic effects on humans (asthma, allergies, headaches). Unfortunately, little is known about the environmental fate and toxicity of these substances. However, the use of alternative, predictive approaches, such as quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs), can help in filling the data gap and in the characterization of the environmental and toxicological profile of these substances. In the proposed study, ordinary least squares regression-based QSAR models were developed for three toxicological endpoints: mouse oral LD(50), inhibition of NADH-oxidase (EC(50) NADH-Ox) and the effect on mitochondrial membrane potential (EC(50) DeltaPsim). Theoretical molecular descriptors were calculated by using DRAGON software, and the best QSAR models were developed according to the principles defined by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.

  1. Suggestions for a Beginning Videotaper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandel, Marjorie

    1983-01-01

    Discusses problems professional teachers had in producing videotape materials for an organic chemistry course. Indicates that the tape program is a valuable addition to the organic lab course--its projected long lifetime compensating for the considerable task of its preparation. (Author/JN)

  2. Suggestions for Developing Educational Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Public Instruction, Topeka.

    In the preparation of written educational specifications, the content, organization and method of presentation of materials are far from standardized with no one pattern being advocated. There are, however, certain standards or criteria which are desirable for guidance. The educational specifications should provide the architect with all of the…

  3. Berstein's anti-reductionistic materialism: On the road towards a biology of activity (1965).

    PubMed

    Bongaardt, R; Pickenhain, L; Meijer, O G

    2000-10-01

    Bernstein's paper, "On the Road Towards a Biology of Activity," appeared the year before his death.2 With this paper, Bernstein closed several lines of argument that he had been developing from the onset of his career in the early 1920s. The paper converges on the notion of activity. In accordance with his own shifting focus heuristic (cf. Bongaardt, 1996), Bernstein challenged future researchers of movement to integrate models of the movement functions that constitute activity. He suggested that these functions are: the coordination of movement, the planning of movement, and the exploration of better, optimal ways to move. In the 1920s, Bernstein had collaborated with his friend and colleague L.S. Vygotsky at the Moscow Institute of Experimental Psychology. Vygotsky (cf. 1926/1994) was the first to place activity at the core of Soviet psychology. According to Vygotsky, reflexology and behaviorism, then dominant approaches in psychology, were fundamentally wrong; they focus on building-blocks of behavior without addressing phenomena that stand out as typically human, most importantly, consciousness. Rather than starting with building blocks, psychology should start with the daily activity of human beings in their environment and show how this activity relates to consciousness. Forty years later, in his 1965 paper, Bernstein stressed a point that mirrors Vygotsky's: Reflexes are not building blocks of movement. The general characteristics of any movement precede the specificity of such units, whether reflexes or synergies, and this primacy pertains to the actual organization of movements as well as to the study of movement. The development and relevance of the activity concept in Bernstein's work in the period from 1925 to 1965 deserves a study of its own; here, a brief historical sketch of Bernstein's activity concept is offered, along with a few theoretical considerations concerning activity's constituent functions.

  4. Activated barrier for protection of special nuclear materials in vital areas

    SciTech Connect

    Timm, R.E.; Miranda, J.E.; Reigle, D.L.; Valente, A.D.

    1984-07-15

    The Argonne National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory have recently installed an activated barrier, the Access Denial System (ADS) for the upgrade of safeguards of special nuclear materials. The technology of this system was developed in the late 70's by Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque. The installation was the first for the Department of Energy. Subsequently, two additional installations have been completed. The Access Denial System, combined with physical restraints, provide the system delay. The principal advantages of the activated barrier are: (1) it provides an order of magnitude improvement in delay over that of a fixed barrier, (2) it can be added to existing vital areas with a minimum of renovations, (3) existing operations are minimally impacted, and (4) health and safety risks are virtually nonexistent. Hardening of the vital areas using the ADS was accomplished in a cost-effective manner. 3 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  5. Bio-active restorative materials with antibacterial effects: new dimension of innovation in restorative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Imazato, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Restorative materials in the new era should be "bio-active", and antibacterial effects are highlighted as one of the important properties. In order to achieve resin-based restoratives with antibacterial effects, an antibacterial monomer MDPB has been developed. The primer incorporating MDPB demonstrated cavity-disinfecting effects, and the world's first antibacterial adhesive system employing the MDPB-containing primer was successfully commercialized. MDPB is potentially applicable to various restoratives since immobilization of the antibacterial component by polymerization of MDPB enables no deterioration in mechanical properties of cured resins and exhibition of inhibitory effects against bacterial growth on their surfaces. For glass-ionomer cements used for atraumatic restorative treatment, the approach to provide antibacterial activity has been attempted by addition of chlorhexidine. Incorporation of 1% chlorhexidine diacetate was found to be optimal to give appropriate antibacterial and physical properties, being effective to reduce the bacteria in affected and infected dentin in vivo.

  6. Characterization of the norepinephrine-activation of adenylate cyclase suggests a role in memory affirmation pathways. Overexposure to epinephrine inactivates adenylate cyclase, a causal pathway for stress-pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bennun, Alfred

    2010-05-01

    Incubation with noradrenaline (norepinephrine) of isolated membranes of rat's brain corpus striatum and cortex, showed that ionic-magnesium (Mg(2+)) is required for the neurotransmitter activatory response of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing) (EC 4.6.1.1)], AC. An Mg(2+)-dependent response to the activatory effects of adrenaline, and subsequent inhibition by calcium, suggest capability for a turnover, associated with cyclic changes in membrane potential and participation in a short-term memory pathway. In the cell, the neurotransmitter by activating AC generates intracellular cyclic AMP. Calcium entrance in the cell inhibits the enzyme. The increment of cyclic AMP activates kinase A and their protein phosphorylating activity, allowing a long-term memory pathway. Hence, consolidating neuronal circuits, related to emotional learning and memory affirmation. The activatory effect relates to an enzyme-noradrenaline complex which may participate in the physiology of the fight or flight response, by prolonged exposure. However, the persistence of an unstable enzyme complex turns the enzyme inactive. Effect concordant, with the observation that prolonged exposure to adrenaline, participates in the etiology of stress triggered pathologies. At the cell physiological level AC responsiveness to hormones could be modulated by the concentration of chelating metabolites. These ones produce the release of free ATP(4-), a negative modulator of AC and the Mg(2+) activated insulin receptor tyrosine kinase (IRTK), thus, allowing an integration of the hormonal response of both enzymes by ionic controls. This effect could supersede the metabolic feedback control by energy charge. Accordingly, maximum hormonal response of both enzymes, to high Mg(2+) and low free ATP(4-), allows a correlation with the known effects of low caloric intake increasing average life expectancy.

  7. Characterizing proton-activated materials to develop PET-mediated proton range verification markers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Kerr, Matthew D; Amos, Richard A; Stingo, Francesco C; Marom, Edith M; Truong, Mylene T; Palacio, Diana M; Betancourt, Sonia L; Erasmus, Jeremy J; DeGroot, Patricia M; Carter, Brett W; Gladish, Gregory W; Sabloff, Bradley S; Benveniste, Marcelo F; Godoy, Myrna C; Patil, Shekhar; Sorensen, James; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2016-06-07

    Conventional proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) relies on tissue activation alone and therefore requires particle therapy PET whose installation can represent a large financial burden for many centers. Previously, we showed the feasibility of developing patient implantable markers using high proton cross-section materials ((18)O, Cu, and (68)Zn) for in vivo proton range verification using conventional PET scanners. In this technical note, we characterize those materials to test their usability in more clinically relevant conditions. Two phantoms made of low-density balsa wood (~0.1 g cm(-3)) and beef (~1.0 g cm(-3)) were embedded with Cu or (68)Zn foils of several volumes (10-50 mm(3)). The metal foils were positioned at several depths in the dose fall-off region, which had been determined from our previous study. The phantoms were then irradiated with different proton doses (1-5 Gy). After irradiation, the phantoms with the embedded foils were moved to a diagnostic PET scanner and imaged. The acquired data were reconstructed with 20-40 min of scan time using various delay times (30-150 min) to determine the maximum contrast-to-noise ratio. The resultant PET/computed tomography (CT) fusion images of the activated foils were then examined and the foils' PET signal strength/visibility was scored on a 5 point scale by 13 radiologists experienced in nuclear medicine. For both phantoms, the visibility of activated foils increased in proportion to the foil volume, dose, and PET scan time. A linear model was constructed with visibility scores as the response variable and all other factors (marker material, phantom material, dose, and PET scan time) as covariates. Using the linear model, volumes of foils that provided adequate visibility (score 3) were determined for each dose and PET scan time. The foil volumes that were determined will be used as a guideline in developing practical implantable markers.

  8. Characterizing proton-activated materials to develop PET-mediated proton range verification markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Kerr, Matthew D.; Amos, Richard A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Marom, Edith M.; Truong, Mylene T.; Palacio, Diana M.; Betancourt, Sonia L.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; DeGroot, Patricia M.; Carter, Brett W.; Gladish, Gregory W.; Sabloff, Bradley S.; Benveniste, Marcelo F.; Godoy, Myrna C.; Patil, Shekhar; Sorensen, James; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2016-06-01

    Conventional proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) relies on tissue activation alone and therefore requires particle therapy PET whose installation can represent a large financial burden for many centers. Previously, we showed the feasibility of developing patient implantable markers using high proton cross-section materials (18O, Cu, and 68Zn) for in vivo proton range verification using conventional PET scanners. In this technical note, we characterize those materials to test their usability in more clinically relevant conditions. Two phantoms made of low-density balsa wood (~0.1 g cm-3) and beef (~1.0 g cm-3) were embedded with Cu or 68Zn foils of several volumes (10-50 mm3). The metal foils were positioned at several depths in the dose fall-off region, which had been determined from our previous study. The phantoms were then irradiated with different proton doses (1-5 Gy). After irradiation, the phantoms with the embedded foils were moved to a diagnostic PET scanner and imaged. The acquired data were reconstructed with 20-40 min of scan time using various delay times (30-150 min) to determine the maximum contrast-to-noise ratio. The resultant PET/computed tomography (CT) fusion images of the activated foils were then examined and the foils’ PET signal strength/visibility was scored on a 5 point scale by 13 radiologists experienced in nuclear medicine. For both phantoms, the visibility of activated foils increased in proportion to the foil volume, dose, and PET scan time. A linear model was constructed with visibility scores as the response variable and all other factors (marker material, phantom material, dose, and PET scan time) as covariates. Using the linear model, volumes of foils that provided adequate visibility (score 3) were determined for each dose and PET scan time. The foil volumes that were determined will be used as a guideline in developing practical implantable markers.

  9. Special Form Testing of Sealed Source Encapsulation for High-Alpha-Activity Actinide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Oscar A

    2016-01-01

    In the United States all transportation of radioactive material is regulated by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Beginning in 2008 a new type of sealed-source encapsulation package was developed and tested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These packages contain high-alpha-activity actinides and are regulated and transported in accordance with the requirements for DOT Class 7 hazardous material. The DOT provides specific regulations pertaining to special form encapsulation designs. The special form designation indicates that the encapsulated radioactive contents have a very low probability of dispersion even when subjected to significant structural events. The special form designs have been shown to simplify the delivery, transport, acceptance, and receipt processes. It is intended for these sealed-source encapsulations to be shipped to various facilities making it very advantageous for them to be certified as special form. To this end, DOT Certificates of Competent Authority (CoCAs) have been sought for the design suitable for containing high-alpha-activity actinide materials. This design consists of the high-alpha-activity material encapsulated within a triangular zirconia canister, referred to as a ZipCan, tile that is then enclosed by a spherical shell. The spherical shell design, with ZipCan tile inside, was tested for compliance with the special form regulations found in 49 CFR 173.469. The spherical enclosure was subjected to 9-m impact, 1 m percussion, and 10-minute thermal tests at the Packaging Evaluation Facility located at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, TN USA and operated by ORNL. Before and after each test, the test units were subjected to a helium leak check and a bubble test. The ZipCan tiles and core were also subjected to the tests required for ISO 2919:2012(E), including a Class IV impact test and heat test and subsequently subjected to helium leakage rate tests [49 CFR 173.469(a)(4)(i)]. The impact

  10. A comparison of vanadate to a 2′–5′ linkage at the active site of a small ribozyme suggests a role for water in transition-state stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Torelli, Andrew T.; Krucinska, Jolanta; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for water to participate in RNA catalyzed reactions has been the topic of several recent studies. Here, we report crystals of a minimal, hinged hairpin ribozyme in complex with the transition-state analog vanadate at 2.05 Å resolution. Waters are present in the active site and are discussed in light of existing views of catalytic strategies employed by the hairpin ribozyme. A second structure harboring a 2′,5′-phosphodiester linkage at the site of cleavage was also solved at 2.35 Å resolution and corroborates the assignment of active site waters in the structure containing vanadate. A comparison of the two structures reveals that the 2′,5′ structure adopts a conformation that resembles the reaction intermediate in terms of (1) the positioning of its nonbridging oxygens and (2) the covalent attachment of the 2′-O nucleophile with the scissile G+1 phosphorus. The 2′,5′-linked structure was then overlaid with scissile bonds of other small ribozymes including the glmS metabolite-sensing riboswitch and the hammerhead ribozyme, and suggests the potential of the 2′,5′ linkage to elicit a reaction-intermediate conformation without the need to form metalloenzyme complexes. The hairpin ribozyme structures presented here also suggest how water molecules bound at each of the nonbridging oxygens of G+1 may electrostatically stabilize the transition state in a manner that supplements nucleobase functional groups. Such coordination has not been reported for small ribozymes, but is consistent with the structures of protein enzymes. Overall, this work establishes significant parallels between the RNA and protein enzyme worlds. PMID:17488874

  11. Biomimetic active emulsions capture cell dynamics and direct bio-inspired materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlicher, Allen; Amstad, Esther; Segmehl, Jana; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Stossel, Thomas; Pollak, Martin; Weitz, David

    2013-03-01

    The main biopolymers which make up the cellular cytoskeleton and provide cells with their shape are well understood, yet, how they organize into structures and set given cellular behavior remains unclear. We have reconstituted minimal networks of actin, a ubiquitous biopolymer, along with an associated motor protein myosin II to create biomimetic networks which replicate cell structure and actively contract when selectively provided with ATP. We emulsify these networks in 10-100 micron drops, provide a system to investigate strain-mediated protein interactions and network behavior in confined cell-similar volumes. These networks allow us to study strain-mediated protein-specific interactions in an actin network at a precision impossible in vivo. Using this system, we have identified strain-dependent behavior in actin cross linking proteins; mechanotransduction of signaling proteins in Filamin A, and unique catch-bond behavior in Alpha-actinin. This understanding of biopolymer self-organization to set cell mechanics, will help clarify how biology both generates and reacts to force; moreover this system provides a highly controlled platform for studying non-equilibrium materials, and creating microscopic building block for a entirely new class of active materials.

  12. Metal nanoparticle/ionic liquid/cellulose: new catalytically active membrane materials for hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Gelesky, Marcos A; Scheeren, Carla W; Foppa, Lucas; Pavan, Flavio A; Dias, Silvio L P; Dupont, Jairton

    2009-07-13

    Transition metal-containing membrane films of 10, 20, and 40 μm thickness were obtained by the combination of irregularly shaped nanoparticles with monomodal size distributions of 4.8 ± 1.1 nm (Rh(0)) and 3.0 ± 0.4 nm (Pt(0)) dispersed in the ionic liquid (IL) 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (BMI·(NTf)(2)) with a syrup of cellulose acetate (CA) in acetone. The Rh(0) and Pt(0) metal concentration increased proportionally with increases in film thickness up to 20 μm, and then the material became metal saturated. The presence of small and stable Rh(0) or Pt(0) nanoparticles induced an augmentation in the CA/IL film surface areas. The augmentation of the IL content resulted in an increase of elasticity and decrease in tenacity and toughness, whereas the stress at break was not influenced. The introduction of IL probably causes an increase in the separation between the cellulose macromolecules that results in a higher flexibility, lower viscosity, and better formability of the cellulose material. The nanoparticle/IL/CA combinations exhibit an excellent synergistic effect that enhances the activity and durability of the catalyst for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene. The nanoparticle/IL/cellulose acetate film membranes display higher catalytic activity (up to 7353 h(-1) for the 20 μm film of CA/IL/Pt(0)) and stability than the nanoparticles dispersed only in the IL.

  13. Formation of sensitive/active phases in metal and polymer-based structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Hiroshi

    2002-11-01

    This paper describes new concepts the author has proposed and demonstrated to realize metal and polymer based sensitive and/or active structural material systems suitable for smart structures. Most of the developments have been done by simple and innovative methods without using sophisticated and expensive sensors and actuators. The following topics are mainly examined: (1) embedding optical fiber in aluminum matrix to use as sensors; (2) forming optical interference and loss type strain sensors in epoxy matrix simply by embedding and breaking notched optical fiber in it; (3) forming a multifunctional sensor in aluminum matrix for temperature and strain monitoring by embedding an oxidized nickel fiber; (4) fabricating multifunctional composites by using conventional structural materials - i) an active laminate of CFRP/aluminum of which unidirectional actuation is realized by electrical resistance heating of carbon fiber in the CFRP layer and its curvature change can be monitored using optical fiber multiply fractured in the CFRP layer, and ii) a multifunctional aluminum-matrix composite where oxidized titanium fiber is embedded for sensing temperature and strain, generation of heat for actuation.

  14. Using Plasma-Activated High Performance Fibers with Nanocrystalline Structure in Producing New Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, V.; Korneeva, N.

    2008-08-01

    A wet-pull-out method for investigation of interaction between the high performance polyethylene (HPPE) fiber and polymer matrix is discussed. The paper concerns a cold plasma technique for improving the bond of the HPPE fibers to the matrices and the fibers impregnation with the matrix. Controlled parameters are pull-out force and the height of the matrix capillary lifting along the fiber both in air and in vacuum, in combination with plasma activation of the fibers. The method allows one to estimate the wetting and impregnation of multi-filament fiber with the matrix and simultaneously measure the joint strength. Coupled action of plasma treatment and vacuum impregnation of the fibers improves the joint strength by a factor of 3. Plasma activated HPPE fibers impregnated in air show the value of shear strength τ of 4 Kg/mm2. To understand the effect of treatment initial and plasma-activated fibers were used to fabricate composite materials (CM). The properties and failure modes were compared to those of CM reinforced with untreated fibers. The failure mode of CM reinforced with plasma-activated fibers points to a high strength of the bond between the fibers and the matrix.

  15. SEQUESTRATION OF METALS IN ACTIVE CAP MATERIALS: A LABORATORY AND NUMERICAL EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; Knox, A.

    2012-02-13

    Active capping involves the use of capping materials that react with sediment contaminants to reduce their toxicity or bioavailability. Although several amendments have been proposed for use in active capping systems, little is known about their long-term ability to sequester metals. Recent research has shown that the active amendment apatite has potential application for metals contaminated sediments. The focus of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of apatite in the sequestration of metal contaminants through the use of short-term laboratory column studies in conjunction with predictive, numerical modeling. A breakthrough column study was conducted using North Carolina apatite as the active amendment. Under saturated conditions, a spike solution containing elemental As, Cd, Co, Se, Pb, Zn, and a non-reactive tracer was injected into the column. A sand column was tested under similar conditions as a control. Effluent water samples were periodically collected from each column for chemical analysis. Relative to the non-reactive tracer, the breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite. Furthermore, breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite compared to the sand column. Finally, a simple 1-D, numerical model was created to qualitatively predict the long-term performance of apatite based on the findings from the column study. The results of the modeling showed that apatite could delay the breakthrough of some metals for hundreds of years under typical groundwater flow velocities.

  16. Enhanced photosynthetic activity in Spinacia oleracea by spectral modification with a photoluminescent light converting material.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qi; Batentschuk, Miroslaw; Osvet, Andres; Richter, Peter; Häder, Donat P; Schneider, Juergen; Brabec, Christoph J; Wondraczek, Lothar; Winnacker, Albrecht

    2013-11-04

    The spectral conversion of incident sunlight by appropriate photoluminescent materials has been a widely studied issue for improving the efficiency of photovoltaic solar energy harvesting. By using phosphors with suitable excitation/emission properties, also the light conditions for plants can be adjusted to match the absorption spectra of chlorophyll dyes, in this way increasing the photosynthetic activity of the plant. Here, we report on the application of this principle to a high plant, Spinacia oleracea. We employ a calcium strontium sulfide phosphor doped with divalent europium (Ca0.4Sr0.6S:Eu(2+), CSSE) on a backlight conversion foil in photosynthesis experiments. We show that this phosphor can be used to effectively convert green to red light, centering at a wavelength of ~650 nm which overlaps the absorption peaks of chlorophyll a/b pigments. A measurement system was developed to monitor the photosynthetic activity, expressed as the CO2 assimilation rate of spinach leaves under various controlled light conditions. Results show that under identical external light supply which is rich in green photons, the CO2 assimilation rate can be enhanced by more than 25% when the actinic light is modified by the CSSE conversion foil as compared to a purely reflecting reference foil. These results show that the phosphor could be potentially applied to modify the solar spectrum by converting the green photons into photosynthetically active red photons for improved photosynthetic activity.

  17. The expression pattern of the Distal-less homeobox-containing gene Dlx-5 in the developing chick limb bud suggests its involvement in apical ectodermal ridge activity, pattern formation, and cartilage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, D; Sumoy, L; Gannon, J; Sun, H; Brown, A M; Upholt, W B; Kosher, R A

    1995-08-01

    Here we report the isolation from a chick limb bud cDNA library of a cDNA that contains the full coding sequence of chicken Dlx-5, a member of the Distal-less (Dlx) family of homeobox-containing genes that encode homeodomains highly similar to that of the Drosophila Distal-less gene, a gene that is required for limb development in the Drosophila embryo. The expression pattern of Dlx-5 in the developing chick limb bud suggests that it may be involved in several aspects of limb morphogenesis. Dlx-5 is expressed in the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) which directs the outgrowth and patterning of underlying limb mesoderm. During early limb development Dlx-5 is also expressed in the mesoderm at the anterior margin of the limb bud and in a discrete group of mesodermal cells at the mid-proximal posterior margin that corresponds to the posterior necrotic zone. These mesodermal domains of Dlx-5 expression roughly correspond to the anterior and posterior boundaries of the progress zone, the group of highly proliferating undifferentiated mesodermal cells underneath the AER that will give rise to the skeletal elements of the limb and associated structures. The AER and anterior and posterior mesodermal domains of Dlx-5 expression are regions in which the homeobox-containing gene Msx-2 is also highly expressed, suggesting that Dlx-5 and Msx-2 might be involved in regulatory networks that control AER activity and demarcate the progress zone. In addition, Dlx-5 is expressed in high amounts by the differentiating cartilaginous skeletal elements of the limb, suggesting it may be involved in regulating the onset of limb cartilage differentiation.

  18. High-damping-performance magnetorheological material for passive or active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Taixiang; Yang, Ke; Yan, Hongwei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Xu, Yangguang

    2016-10-01

    Optical assembly and alignment system plays a crucial role for the construction of high-power or high-energy laser facility, which attempts to ignite fusion reaction and go further to make fusion energy usable. In the optical assembly and alignment system, the vibration control is a key problem needs to be well handled and a material with higher damping performance is much desirable. Recently, a new kind of smart magneto-sensitive polymeric composite material, named magnetorheological plastomer (MRP), was synthesized and reported as a high-performance magnetorheological material and this material has a magneto-enhanced high-damping performance. The MRP behaves usually in an intermediate state between fluid-like magnetorheological fluid and solid-like magnetorheological elastomer. The state of MRP, as well as the damping performance of MRP, can be tuned by adjusting the ratio of hard segments and soft segments, which are ingredients to synthesize the polymeric matrix. In this work, a series of MRP are prepared by dispersing micron-sized, magneto-sensitive carbonyl iron powders with related additives into polyurethane-based, magnetically insensitive matrix. It is found that the damping performance of MRP depends much on magnetic strength, shear rate, carbonyl iron content and shear strain amplitude. Especially, the damping capacity of MRP can be tuned in a large range by adjusting external magnetic field. It is promising that the MRP will have much application in passive and active vibration control, such as vibration reduction in optical assembly and alignment system, vibration isolation or absorption in vehicle suspension system, etc.

  19. Decanting of Neutralized H-Canyon Unirradiated Nuclear Material High Activity Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect

    BRONIKOWSKI, MICHAELG.

    2004-08-05

    An option to dispose of the High Activity Waste (HAW) stream from the processing of unirradiated materials directly to Saltstone is being evaluated to conserve High Level Waste (HLW) tank farm space and to reduce the future production of HLW glass logs. To meet the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), decanting the supernate from precipitated solids was proposed to reduce mercury and radionuclide levels in the waste. Only the caustic supernate will then be sent to Saltstone. Verification that the Saltstone WAC will be met has involved a series of laboratory studies using surrogate and actual HAW solutions from H-Canyon. The initial experiment involved addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to a surrogate HAW test solution and subsequent decanting of the supernate away from the precipitated solids. The chemical composition of the surrogate solution was based on a composition defined from analyses of actual HAW solutions generated during dissolution of unirradiated nuclear materials in H-Canyon [1]. Results from testing the surrogate HAW solution were reported in Reference [2]. Information obtained from the surrogate test solution study was used to define additional experiments on actual HAW solutions obtained from H-Canyon. These experiments were conducted with samples from three different batches of HAW solutions. The first and third HAW samples (HAW No.1 and HAW No.3 solutions) contained the centrifuge filter cake material from a gelatin strike that is periodically added to the waste stream. The second HAW sample (HAW No.2 solution) did not contain filter cake material. Monosodium titanate (MST) was added to the HAW No.2 and HAW No.3 solutions after addition of NaOH was complete and before the settling step. The addition of MST was to improve the decontamination of alpha and beta emitters (primarily plutonium and strontium) from the supernate. The addition of excess NaOH and the addition of MST were expected to result in sufficient alpha and beta

  20. Active millimeter-wave imaging system for material analysis and object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Christian; Hülsmann, Axel; Kallfass, Ingmar; Tessmann, Axel; Zink, Martin; Schlechtweg, Michael; Leuther, Arnulf; Ambacher, Oliver

    2011-11-01

    The use of millimeter-waves for imaging purposes is becoming increasingly important, as millimeter-waves can penetrate most clothing and packaging materials, so that the detector does not require physical contact with the object. This will offer a view to the hidden content of e.g. packets or bags without the need to open them, whereby packaging and content will not be damaged. Nowadays X-ray is used, but as the millimeter-wave quantum energy is far below the ionization energy, it is less harmful for the human health. In this paper we report an active millimeter-wave imaging tomograph for material analysis and concealed object detection purposes. The system is build using in-house W-band components. The object is illuminated with low-power millimeter-waves in the frequency range between 89 and 96GHz; mirrors are used to guide and focus the beam. The object is moved through the focus point to scan the object pixel by pixel. Depending on the actual material some parts of the waves are reflected, the other parts penetrate the object. A single-antenna transmit and receive module is used for illumination and measurement of the material-specific reflected power. A second receiver module is used to measure the transmitted wave. All information is processed for amplitude and phase images by a computer algorithm. The system can be used for security, such as detecting concealed weapons, explosives or contrabands at airports and other safety areas, but also quality assurance applications, e.g. during production to detect defects. Some imaging results will be presented in this paper.

  1. Coculture with intraocular lens material-activated macrophages induces an inflammatory phenotype in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pintwala, Robert; Postnikoff, Cameron; Molladavoodi, Sara; Gorbet, Maud

    2015-03-01

    Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide, requiring surgical implantation of an intraocular lens. Despite evidence of leukocyte ingress into the postoperative lens, few studies have investigated the leukocyte response to intraocular lens materials. A novel coculture model was developed to examine macrophage activation by hydrophilic acrylic (poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) and hydrophobic acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) commercial intraocular lens. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was differentiated into macrophages and cocultured with human lens epithelial cell line (HLE-B3) with or without an intraocular lens for one, two, four, or six days. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, expression of the macrophage activation marker CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and production of reactive oxygen species via the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate were examined in macrophages. α-Smooth muscle actin, a transdifferentiation marker, was characterized in lens epithelial cells. The poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) intraocular lens prevented adhesion but induced significant macrophage activation (p < 0.03) versus control (no intraocular lens), while the polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens enabled adhesion and multinucleated fusion, but induced no significant activation. Coculture with either intraocular lens increased reactive oxygen species production in macrophages after one day (p < 0.03) and increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin in HLE B-3 after six days, although only poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced a significant difference versus control (p < 0.01). Our results imply that-contrary to prior uveal biocompatibility understanding-macrophage adherence is not necessary for a strong inflammatory response to an intraocular lens, with hydrophilic surfaces inducing higher activation than hydrophobic surfaces. These findings provide a new method of inquiry into uveal

  2. Dehydrogenase activity and quality of leachates in Technosols with gossan and sulfide materials from the São Domingos mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Erika; Abreu, Manuela; Macías, Felipe; de Varennes, Amarílis

    2014-05-01

    Wastes produced by mining activity in São Domingos (Portuguese Iberian Pyrite Belt) were disposed over a large area. To speed up the ecological rehabilitation in this mine, an integrative strategy using different amendments+mine wastes was used to produce Technosols with enhanced soil functions. To evaluate the efficiency of these Technosols the dehydrogenase activity and chemical quality of leachates were monitored. Technosols were composed of different mine wastes (gossan and sulfide materials), collected at the São Domingos mine, and mixtures of amendments applied at 30 and 75 Mg/ha (rockwool+agriculture wastes+wastes from liquors distillation of strawberry tree fruits (Arbutus unedo L.) and/or carobs (Ceratonia siliqua L. fruits)). Three assays, under controlled conditions, were carried out: (1 and 2) Sulfide or gossan materials with/without amendments; (3) Sulfide wastes, with/without amendments, incubated during four months and then with application of an overlayer of gossan (~3 cm thick) with/without the same amendments. Dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and chemical characteristics of leachates (multielemental concentration, pH, and electric conductivity) were determined after four/seven/thirteen months of incubation. Sulfide wastes had more hazardous characteristics (pH~2 and total concentrations (g/kg) of Al (58.1), As (1.1), Cu (2.1), Fe (107.3), Pb (11.7), S (65.3) and Zn (1.1) than the gossan materials (pH=4.3; g/kg, Al: 24.8, As: 3.0, Cu: 0.2, Fe: 129, Pb: 9.2, S: 13.7, Zn: 0.04). Amendments application to gossan (assay 2) enhanced DHA in both sampling periods (µg TPF g dry weight 16 h-1, Control: 0,72-1,78; Amended treatments: 2.49-16.36 depending on mixture/application rate/sampling period). Greater application rates stimulated DHA (more than 1.5-fold with 75 Mg/ha). No differences were observed in DHA in the gossan layer with/without amendments (assay 3) suggesting a negative impact on gossan microrganisms from sulfide materials located below. In

  3. Interrogative suggestibility in opiate users.

    PubMed

    Murakami, A; Edelmann, R J; Davis, P E

    1996-09-01

    The present study investigated interrogative suggestibility in opiate users. A group of patients undergoing a methadone detoxification programme in an in-patient drug treatment unit (Detox group, n = 21), and a group of residents who had come off drugs and were no longer suffering from withdrawal syndrome (Rehab group, n = 19) were compared on interrogative suggestibility and various other psychological factors. Significant differences were found between the two groups, with the Detox group having more physical and psychological problems, and a higher total suggestibility score in comparison with the Rehab group. These findings are discussed in relation to the context of police interrogations and the reliability of confessions made by suspects and witnesses dependent on opiates.

  4. Cal Young Integration of Career Education into 9th Grade Classes: Suggestions for the Subject Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eugene School District 4J, OR.

    The curriculum guide contains suggested learning activities and resource materials designed to integrate career education concepts into subject areas for the ninth grade. The guide provides such things as goals, teacher activities, expected student competencies, vocabulary lists, sample occupations and related information, lists of resource…

  5. [Suggestion and hypnosis in hysteria].

    PubMed

    Berner, P

    1995-12-15

    Suggestive influences allow to resolve ambiguities. Normally they are only accepted if they correspond with the knowledge and believes of the subject. Under hypnosis or under the impact of serious psychic perturbations one may take up reality constructions which are not in conformity with these criteria. The restriction of consciousness and the ignoring of certain functions permitting this are the common basis of hypnosis and hysteria. But suggestions do not cause the later; they may only shape the symptomatology. Hypnosis can create a terrain facilitating the resolution of the problems underlying hysteria but it does not represent the treatment of hysteria.

  6. Removal of Pb, Cd, and Cr in a water purification system using modified mineral waste materials and activated carbon derived from waste materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. R.; Su, L. C.; Ruan, H. D.

    2016-08-01

    This study attempts to find out and optimize the removal efficiency of heavy metals in a water purification unit using a low-cost waste material and modified mineral waste materials (MMWM) accompanied with activated carbon (AC) derived from waste materials. The factors of the inner diameter of the purification unit (2.6-5cm), the height of the packing materials (5-20cm), the size of AC (200-20mesh), the size of MMWM (1-0.045mm), and the ratio between AC and MMWM in the packing materials (1:0 - 0:1) were examined based on a L18 (5) 3 orthogonal array design. In order to achieve an optimally maximum removal efficiency, the factors of the inner diameter of the purification unit (2.6-7.5cm), the height of the packing materials (10-30cm), and the ratio between AC and MMWM in the packing materials (1:4-4:1) were examined based on a L16 (4) 3 orthogonal array design. A height of 25cm, inner diameter of 5cm, ratio between AC and MMWM of 3:2 with size of 60-40mesh and 0.075-0.045mm, respectively, were the best conditions determined by the ICP-OES analysis to perform the adsorption of heavy metals in this study.

  7. Acaricidal activities of materials derived from Pyrus ussuriensis fruits against stored food mites.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ju-Hyun; Yang, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Hoi-Seon

    2012-07-01

    The acaricidal activities of materials derived from Pyrus ussuriensis fruits were evaluated against Tyrophagus putrescentiae and compared with that of commercial acaricide (benzyl benzoate). On the basis of the 50 % lethal dose (LD(50)) values, the ethyl acetate fraction of the fractions obtained from an aqueous extract of P. ussuriensis fruits had the highest acaricidal activity (16.32 μg/cm(2)) against T. putrescentiae. The acaricidal constituent of P. ussuriensis fruits was isolated by chromatographic techniques and identified as 1,4-benzoquinone. On the basis of the LD(50) values, 1,4-benzoquinone (1.98 μg/cm(2)) was 5.9 times more toxic than benzyl benzoate (11.69 μg/cm(2)), followed by 2-isopropyl-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (3.29 μg/cm(2)), and 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (5.03 μg/cm(2)) against T. putrescentiae in the fumigant bioassay. In a filter paper bioassay, the acaricidal activity of 1,4-benzoquinone (0.07 μg/cm(2)) was 120.1 times more effective than that of benzyl benzoate (8.41 μg/cm(2)), followed by 2-isopropyl-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (0.11 μg/cm(2)) and 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (0.30 μg/cm(2)) against T. putrescentiae. These results demonstrate that P. ussuriensis fruit-derived material and its derivatives have potential as new preventive agents for the control of stored food mites.

  8. The functional anatomy of suggested limb paralysis.

    PubMed

    Deeley, Quinton; Oakley, David A; Toone, Brian; Bell, Vaughan; Walsh, Eamonn; Marquand, Andre F; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael J; Williams, Steven C R; Mehta, Mitul A; Halligan, Peter W

    2013-02-01

    Suggestions of limb paralysis in highly hypnotically suggestible subjects have been employed to successfully model conversion disorders, revealing similar patterns of brain activation associated with attempted movement of the affected limb. However, previous studies differ with regard to the executive regions involved during involuntary inhibition of the affected limb. This difference may have arisen as previous studies did not control for differences in hypnosis depth between conditions and/or include subjective measures to explore the experience of suggested paralysis. In the current study we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the functional anatomy of left and right upper limb movements in eight healthy subjects selected for high hypnotic suggestibility during (i) hypnosis (NORMAL) and (ii) attempted movement following additional left upper limb paralysis suggestions (PARALYSIS). Contrast of left upper limb motor function during NORMAL relative to PARALYSIS conditions revealed greater activation of contralateral M1/S1 and ipsilateral cerebellum, consistent with the engagement of these regions in the completion of movements. By contrast, two significant observations were noted in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions. In conjunction with reports of attempts to move the paralysed limb, greater supplementary motor area (SMA) activation was observed, a finding consistent with the role of SMA in motor intention and planning. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, BA 24) was also significantly more active in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions - suggesting that ACC (BA 24) may be implicated in involuntary, as well as voluntary inhibition of prepotent motor responses.

  9. 10 Suggestions for Enhancing Lecturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzmann, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Criticism of the lecture method remains a staple of discussion and writing in academia--and most of the time it's deserved! Those interested in improving this aspect of their teaching might wish to consider some or all of the following suggestions for enhancing lectures. These include: (1) Lectures must start with a "grabber"; (2)…

  10. Suggestions for Library Network Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salton, Gerald

    1979-01-01

    Various approaches to the design of automatic library systems are described, suggestions for the design of rational and effective automated library processes are posed, and an attempt is made to assess the importance and effect of library network systems on library operations and library effectiveness. (Author/CWM)

  11. Online Training Sessions: Suggested Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabonell, Martha; And Others

    1981-01-01

    These planning and evaluative guidelines for online trainers utilize a sliding scale--from minimal to suggested to optimal--for five types of training sessions: (1) Search Service--Beginning; (2) Search Service--Advanced; (3) Search Service--Subject; (4) Database Producer; and (5) Independent Introductory Workshop. (RAA)

  12. Adsorption of chromium ions from aqueous solution by using activated carbo-aluminosilicate material from oil shale.

    PubMed

    Shawabkeh, Reyad Awwad

    2006-07-15

    A novel activated carbo-aluminosilicate material was prepared from oil shale by chemical activation. The chemicals used in the activation process were 95 wt% sulfuric and 5 wt% nitric acids. The produced material combines the sorption properties and the mechanical strength of both activated carbon and zeolite. An X-ray diffraction analysis shows the formation of zeolite Y, Na-X, and A-types, sodalite, sodium silicate, mullite, and cancrinite. FT-IR spectrum shows the presence of carboxylic, phenolic, and lactonic groups on the surface of this material. The zero point of charge estimated at different mass to solution ratio ranged from 7.9 to 8.3. Chromium removal by this material showed sorption capacity of 92 mg/g.

  13. 10 CFR 35.2060 - Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. 35.2060 Section 35.2060 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2060 Records of calibrations of instruments used to...

  14. 49 CFR 388.7 - Joint administrative activities related to enforcement of safety and hazardous materials laws and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... enforcement of safety and hazardous materials laws and regulations. 388.7 Section 388.7 Transportation Other... administrative activities related to enforcement of safety and hazardous materials laws and regulations. To... nature and extent of the authority and capabilities of the respective agencies to enforce the safety...

  15. 10 CFR 35.2060 - Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. 35.2060 Section 35.2060 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2060 Records of calibrations of instruments used to...

  16. 10 CFR 35.2060 - Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. 35.2060 Section 35.2060 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2060 Records of calibrations of instruments used to...

  17. Exploring the Geometry of Circumnuclear Material in Active Galactic Nuclei through X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, Elizabeth

    I have studied the X-ray spectral properties of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in order to gain a better understanding of the nature of the circumnuclear material surrounding the central black hole in these objects. From the RXTE archive I constructed two survey samples of broad band X-ray spectra. The first was a bright sample of 23 AGN that had high quality spectra up to at least 100 keV, which provided constraints on the high energy rollover expected by models of inverse Comptonization of low energy photons. The average lower limit to Eroll was ˜225 keV for the majority of objects, implying a coronal electron temperature of kB Te ≳ 75 keV for these models. The second sample was an expanded survey of ˜100 AGN for which spectral parameters could be well-determined. I compared Fe line equivalent widths with measured Compton reflection hump strengths and found that on average ˜40% of the Fe line emission comes from reflection off Compton-thick material, with the remainder likely arising in isotropic emission from Compton-thin gas. In the full sample, the distributions of photon indices for Seyfert 1's and 2's were consistent with the idea that Seyferts share a common central engine, however the distributions of Compton reflection hump strengths did not support the classical picture of absorption by a torus and reflection off a Compton-thick disk with type depending only on inclination angle. I have concluded that a more complex reflecting geometry such as a combined disk and torus or clumpy torus is likely a more accurate picture of the Compton-thick material. I have performed additional analyses of individual objects. An occultation event in Cen A, discovered through RXTE monitoring, revealed the clumpy nature of its torus and placed constraints on the amount of material in the vicinity of the black hole in this object. A Suzaku long-look observation of MCG-2-58-22 provided constraints on the location of Fe line emitting material to ≳ 1200RS, likely associated

  18. Gamma activity of stream sediment feldspars as ceramic raw materials and their environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Aboelkhair, Hatem; Ibrahim, Tarek; Saad, Ahmed

    2012-08-01

    In situ gamma spectrometric measurements have been performed to characterise the natural radiation that emitted from the stream sediment feldspars in Wadi El Missikat and Wadi Homret El Gergab, Eastern Desert, Egypt. The measurements of potassium (K, %), equivalent uranium (eU, ppm) and equivalent thorium (eTh, ppm) were converted into specific activities and equivalent dose rate. The average specific activities were 1402 Bq kg(-1) for K, 113 Bq kg(-1) for eU and 108 Bq kg(-1) for eTh in Wadi El Missikat, while they were 1240, 104 and 185 Bq kg(-1) in Wadi Homret El Gergab. The calculated outdoor average effective dose rates was 1.1 mSv y(-1) in wadi El Missikat and 1.3 mSv y(-1) in Wadi Homret El Gergab. The terrestrial-specific activities and effective dose rate levels of the natural radioactivity in the two areas lie within the international recommended limits for occupational feldspar quarry workers. On the other hand, these results indicated that irradiation is higher than the allowable level for members of the public. Therefore, quarrying the feldspar sediments from these locations as ceramic raw materials may yield an undesired impact on the environment, especially through the indoor applications.

  19. Investigation of Active Interrogation Techniques to Detect Special Nuclear Material in Maritime Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W

    2010-01-01

    The detection and interdiction of special nuclear material (SNM) is still a high-priority focus area for many organizations around the world. One method that is commonly considered a leading candidate in the detection of SNM is active interrogation (AI). AI is different from its close relative, passive interrogation, in that an active source is used to enhance or create a detectable signal (usually fission) from SNM, particularly in shielded scenarios or scenarios where the SNM has a low activity. The use of AI thus makes the detection of SNM easier or, in some scenarios, even enables previously impossible detection. In this work the signal from prompt neutrons and photons as well as delayed neutrons and photons will be combined, as is typically done in AI. In previous work AI has been evaluated experimentally and computationally. However, for the purposes of this work, past scenarios are considered lightly shielded and tightly coupled spatially. At most, the previous work interrogated the contents of one standard cargo container (2.44 x 2.60 x 6.10 m) and the source and detector were both within a few meters of the object being interrogated. A few examples of this type of previous work can be found in references 1 and 2. Obviously, more heavily shielded AI scenarios will require larger source intensities, larger detector surface areas (larger detectors or more detectors), greater detector efficiencies, longer count times, or some combination of these.

  20. Scintillator materials for calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    Requirements for fast, dense scintillator materials for calorimetry in high energy physics and approaches to satisfying these requirements are reviewed with respect to possible hosts and luminescent species. Special attention is given to cerium-activated crystals, core-valence luminescence, and glass scintillators. The present state of the art, limitations, and suggestions for possible new scintillator materials are presented.

  1. TAL effectors and activation of predicted host targets distinguish Asian from African strains of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola while strict conservation suggests universal importance of five TAL effectors.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Katherine E; Booher, Nicholas J; Wang, Li; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) causes the increasingly important disease bacterial leaf streak of rice (BLS) in part by type III delivery of repeat-rich transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors to upregulate host susceptibility genes. By pathogen whole genome, single molecule, real-time sequencing and host RNA sequencing, we compared TAL effector content and rice transcriptional responses across 10 geographically diverse Xoc strains. TAL effector content is surprisingly conserved overall, yet distinguishes Asian from African isolates. Five TAL effectors are conserved across all strains. In a prior laboratory assay in rice cv. Nipponbare, only two contributed to virulence in strain BLS256 but the strict conservation indicates all five may be important, in different rice genotypes or in the field. Concatenated and aligned, TAL effector content across strains largely reflects relationships based on housekeeping genes, suggesting predominantly vertical transmission. Rice transcriptional responses did not reflect these relationships, and on average, only 28% of genes upregulated and 22% of genes downregulated by a strain are up- and down- regulated (respectively) by all strains. However, when only known TAL effector targets were considered, the relationships resembled those of the TAL effectors. Toward identifying new targets, we used the TAL effector-DNA recognition code to predict effector binding elements in promoters of genes upregulated by each strain, but found that for every strain, all upregulated genes had at least one. Filtering with a classifier we developed previously decreases the number of predicted binding elements across the genome, suggesting that it may reduce false positives among upregulated genes. Applying this filter and eliminating genes for which upregulation did not strictly correlate with presence of the corresponding TAL effector, we generated testable numbers of candidate targets for four of the five strictly conserved TAL

  2. TAL effectors and activation of predicted host targets distinguish Asian from African strains of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola while strict conservation suggests universal importance of five TAL effectors

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Katherine E.; Booher, Nicholas J.; Wang, Li; Bogdanove, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) causes the increasingly important disease bacterial leaf streak of rice (BLS) in part by type III delivery of repeat-rich transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors to upregulate host susceptibility genes. By pathogen whole genome, single molecule, real-time sequencing and host RNA sequencing, we compared TAL effector content and rice transcriptional responses across 10 geographically diverse Xoc strains. TAL effector content is surprisingly conserved overall, yet distinguishes Asian from African isolates. Five TAL effectors are conserved across all strains. In a prior laboratory assay in rice cv. Nipponbare, only two contributed to virulence in strain BLS256 but the strict conservation indicates all five may be important, in different rice genotypes or in the field. Concatenated and aligned, TAL effector content across strains largely reflects relationships based on housekeeping genes, suggesting predominantly vertical transmission. Rice transcriptional responses did not reflect these relationships, and on average, only 28% of genes upregulated and 22% of genes downregulated by a strain are up- and down- regulated (respectively) by all strains. However, when only known TAL effector targets were considered, the relationships resembled those of the TAL effectors. Toward identifying new targets, we used the TAL effector-DNA recognition code to predict effector binding elements in promoters of genes upregulated by each strain, but found that for every strain, all upregulated genes had at least one. Filtering with a classifier we developed previously decreases the number of predicted binding elements across the genome, suggesting that it may reduce false positives among upregulated genes. Applying this filter and eliminating genes for which upregulation did not strictly correlate with presence of the corresponding TAL effector, we generated testable numbers of candidate targets for four of the five strictly conserved TAL

  3. Photocatalytic degradation of an azo-dye on TiO2/activated carbon composite material.

    PubMed

    Andriantsiferana, C; Mohamed, E F; Delmas, H

    2014-01-01

    A sequential adsorption/photocatalytic regeneration process to remove tartrazine, an azo-dye in aqueous solution, has been investigated. The aim ofthis work was to compare the effectiveness of an adsorbent/photocatalyst composite-TiO2 deposited onto activated carbon (AC) - and a simple mixture of powders of TiO2 and AC in same proportion. The composite was an innovative material as the photocatalyst, TiO2, was deposited on the porous surface ofa microporous-AC using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition in fluidized bed. The sequential process was composed of two-batch step cycles: every cycle alternated a step of adsorption and a step of photocatalytic oxidation under ultra-violet (365 nm), at 25 degreeC and atmospheric pressure. Both steps, adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation, have been investigated during four cycles. For both materials, the cumulated amounts adsorbed during four cycles corresponded to nearly twice the maximum adsorption capacities qmax proving the photocatalytic oxidation to regenerate the adsorbent. Concerning photocatalytic oxidation, the degree of mineralization was higher with the TiO2/AC composite: for each cycle, the value of the total organic carbon removal was 25% higher than that obtained with the mixture powder. These better photocatalytic performances involved better regeneration than higher adsorbed amounts for cycles 2, 3 and 4. Better performances with this promising material - TiO2 deposited onto AC - compared with TiO2 powder could be explained by the vicinity of photocatalytic and AC adsorption sites.

  4. [Application of biologically active suture materials in emergency surgery of abdominal cavity organs].

    PubMed

    Mokhov, E M; Chumakov, R Iu; Sergeev, A N

    2012-01-01

    An investigation of specific course of the wound process and near results of operations on 398 patients with emergency abdominal surgical pathology has revealed advantages of using new biologically active suture materials "Nikant" (with doxicyclin) and "Nikant-P" (with doxicyclin and stimulator of regeneration from the group of hermanium-containing organic compounds) in performing surgical interventions. Total number of patients with complications at the early postoperative period, operated using threads "Nikant" (38-29.9%) and "Nikant-P" (30-23.8%) proved to be reliably less than in patients of the control group (71-48.9%). The results of operations improved at the expense of considerable reduction of the number of postoperative local pyo-inflammatory processes.

  5. Processes for making dense, spherical active materials for lithium-ion cells

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Sun-Ho [Naperville, IL; Amine, Khalil [Downers Grove, IL

    2011-11-22

    Processes are provided for making dense, spherical mixed-metal carbonate or phosphate precursors that are particularly well suited for the production of active materials for electrochemical devices such as lithium ion secondary batteries. Exemplified methods include precipitating dense, spherical particles of metal carbonates or metal phosphates from a combined aqueous solution using a precipitating agent such as ammonium hydrogen carbonate, sodium hydrogen carbonate, or a mixture that includes sodium hydrogen carbonate. Other exemplified methods include precipitating dense, spherical particles of metal phosphates using a precipitating agent such as ammonium hydrogen phosphate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, sodium phosphate, sodium hydrogen phosphate, sodium dihydrogen phosphate, or a mixture of any two or more thereof. Further provided are compositions of and methods of making dense, spherical metal oxides and metal phosphates using the dense, spherical metal precursors. Still further provided are electrodes and batteries using the same.

  6. Triptycences as thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials: Effect of π-conjugation length and donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ying; Su, Tan; Wu, Yong; Geng, Yun; Zhang, Min; Su, Zhong-Min

    2016-12-01

    Based on a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) triptycene compound 1, compounds 2-7 were designed by varying electron-donating units (2-5) and increasing π-conjugation length (6 and 7). The results indicate that singlet-triplet energy splitting (ΔEST) of compounds 2-5 is reduced largely, but their improvement of radiative decay rate (kr) is slightly small. However, the compound 6 not only reduces the ΔEST but also enhances kr. For compound 7, the kr value is comparable with compound 6, but ΔEST value is quite large. Therefore, possessing an appropriate π-conjugation length might be helpful to improve TADF performances for the materials investigated here.

  7. Neutron Activation Analysis of the Rare Earth Elements (REE) - With Emphasis on Geological Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stosch, Heinz-Günter

    2016-08-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) has been the analytical method of choice for rare earth element (REE) analysis from the early 1960s through the 1980s. At that time, irradiation facilitieswere widely available and fairly easily accessible. The development of high-resolution gamma-ray detectors in the mid-1960s eliminated, formany applications, the need for chemical separation of the REE from the matrix material, making NAA a reliable and effective analytical tool. While not as precise as isotopedilution mass spectrometry, NAA was competitive by being sensitive for the analysis of about half of the rare earths (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb, Lu). The development of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry since the 1980s, together with decommissioning of research reactors and the lack of installation of new ones in Europe and North America has led to the rapid decline of NAA.

  8. Activated porous carbon wrapped sulfur sub-microparticles as cathode materials for lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Yan, Y. L.; Ren, B.; Yang, R.; Zhang, W.; Xu, Y. H.

    2017-03-01

    The lithium-sulfur batteries holds a high theoretical capacity and specific energy, which is 4-5 times larger than that of today’s lithium-ion batteries, yet the low sulfur loading and large particles in the cathode greatly offset its advantage in high energy density. In the present paper, a liquid phase deposition method was introduced to synthesize sub-micro sulfur particles, which utilized as cathode materials after composed with activated porous carbon. Compared with common sublimed sulfur cathodes, as-obtained composite cathode shows an enhanced initial discharge capacity from 840.7 mAh/g to 1093 mAh/g at C/10. The reversible specific capacity after 50 cycles increased from 383 mAh/g to 504 mAh/g. The developed method has the advantages of simple process, convenient operation and low cost, and is suitable for the industrial preparation of lithium/sulfur batteries.

  9. Comparing graphene, carbon nanotubes, and superfine powdered activated carbon as adsorptive coating materials for microfiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Ellerie, Jaclyn R; Apul, Onur G; Karanfil, Tanju; Ladner, David A

    2013-10-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), nano-graphene platelets (NGPs), and superfine powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) were comparatively evaluated for their applicability as adsorptive coatings on microfiltration membranes. The objective was to determine which materials were capable of contaminant removal while causing minimal flux reduction. Methylene blue and atrazine were the model contaminants. When applied as membrane coatings, MWCNTs had minimal retention capabilities for the model contaminants, and S-PAC had the fastest removal. The membrane coating approach was also compared with a stirred vessel configuration, in which the adsorbent was added to a stirred flask preceding the membrane cell. Direct application of the adsorbent to the membrane constituted a greater initial reduction in permeate concentrations of the model contaminants than with the stirred flask setup. All adsorbents except S-PAC showed flux reductions less than 5% after application as thin-layer membrane coatings, and flux recovery after membrane backwashing was greater than 90% for all materials and masses tested.

  10. Evaluation of radiochemical neutron activation analysis methods for determination of arsenic in biological materials.

    PubMed

    Paul, Rick L

    2011-01-01

    Radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) with retention on hydrated manganese dioxide (HMD) has played a key role in the certification of As in biological materials at NIST. Although this method provides very high and reproducible yields and detection limits at low microgram/kilogram levels, counting geometry uncertainties may arise from unequal distribution of As in the HMD, and arsenic detection limits may not be optimal due to significant retention of other elements. An alternate RNAA procedure with separation of arsenic by solvent extraction has been investigated. After digestion of samples in nitric and perchloric acids, As(III) is extracted from 2 M sulfuric acid solution into a solution of zinc diethyldithiocarbamate in chloroform. Counting of (76)As allows quantitation of arsenic. Addition of an (77)As tracer solution prior to dissolution allows correction for chemical yield and counting geometries, further improving reproducibility. The HMD and solvent extraction procedures for arsenic were compared through analysis of SRMs 1577c (bovine liver), 1547 (peach leaves), and 1575a (pine needles). Both methods gave As results in agreement with certified values with comparable reproducibility. However, the solvent extraction method yields a factor of 3 improvement in detection limits and is less time-consuming than the HMD method. The new method shows great promise for use in As certification in reference materials.

  11. Theoretical investigation of pillar[4]quinone as a cathode active material for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Huan, Long; Xie, Ju; Chen, Ming; Diao, Guowang; Zhao, Rongfang; Zuo, Tongfei

    2017-04-01

    The applicability of a novel macrocyclic multi-carbonyl compound, pillar[4]quinone (P4Q), as the cathode active material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) was assessed theoretically. The molecular geometry, electronic structure, Li-binding thermodynamic properties, and the redox potential of P4Q were obtained using density functional theory (DFT) at the M06-2X/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The results of the calculations indicated that P4Q interacts with Li atoms via three binding modes: Li-O ionic bonding, O-Li···O bridge bonding, and Li···phenyl noncovalent interactions. Calculations also indicated that, during the LIB discharging process, P4Q could yield a specific capacity of 446 mAh g(-1) through the utilization of its many carbonyl groups. Compared with pillar[5]quinone and pillar[6]quinone, the redox potential of P4Q is enhanced by its high structural stability as well as the effect of the solvent. These results should provide the theoretical foundations for the design, synthesis, and application of novel macrocyclic carbonyl compounds as electrode materials in LIBs in the future. Graphical Abstract Schematic representation of the proposed charge-discharge mechanism of Pillar[4]quinone as cathode for lithium-ion batteries.

  12. Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents three activities: (1) investigating succession in a schoolground; (2) investigating oak galls; and (3) making sun prints (photographs made without camera or darkroom). Each activity includes a list of materials needed and procedures used. (JN)

  13. Suggestions for Popularizing Civil Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    The public generally is taking very little interest in the progress of Civil Aviation, and the time has come to educate the public in aeronautics and to make them realize the far-reaching importance of air transport. Briefly, the whole problem resolves itself into discovering and applying means for bringing some of the many aspects and effects of civil aviation into the everyday lives of the public. The report suggests three principal groups of methods: (1) Bring aviation into daily contact with the public. (2) Bring the public into daily contact with aviation. (3) General publicity.

  14. Alkylator-Induced and Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms Model Clinical Disease and Suggest the Presence of Multiple Cell Subpopulations with Leukemia Stem Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carl; Gratzinger, Dita; Majeti, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive bone marrow cancers arising from transformed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Therapy-related AML and MDS (t-AML/MDS) comprise a subset of AML cases occurring after exposure to alkylating chemotherapy and/or radiation and are associated with a very poor prognosis. Less is known about the pathogenesis and disease-initiating/leukemia stem cell (LSC) subpopulations of t-AML/MDS compared to their de novo counterparts. Here, we report the development of mouse models of t-AML/MDS. First, we modeled alkylator-induced t-AML/MDS by exposing wild type adult mice to N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea (ENU), resulting in several models of AML and MDS that have clinical and pathologic characteristics consistent with human t-AML/MDS including cytopenia, myelodysplasia, and shortened overall survival. These models were limited by their inability to transplant clinically aggressive disease. Second, we established three patient-derived xenograft models of human t-AML. These models led to rapidly fatal disease in recipient immunodeficient xenografted mice. LSC activity was identified in multiple HSPC subpopulations suggesting there is no canonical LSC immunophenotype in human t-AML. Overall, we report several new t-AML/MDS mouse models that could potentially be used to further define disease pathogenesis and test novel therapeutics. PMID:27428079

  15. Active Interrogation using Photofission Technique for Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Haori

    2016-03-31

    Innovative systems with increased sensitivity and resolution are in great demand to detect diversion and to prevent misuse in support of nuclear materials management for the U.S. fuel cycle. Nuclear fission is the most important multiplicative process involved in non-destructive active interrogation. This process produces the most easily recognizable signature for nuclear materials. In addition to thermal or high-energy neutrons, high-energy gamma rays can also excite a nucleus and cause fission through a process known as photofission. Electron linear accelerators (linacs) are widely used as the interrogating photon sources for inspection methods involving photofission technique. After photofission reactions, prompt signals are much stronger than the delayed signals, but it is difficult to quantify them in practical measurements. Delayed signals are easily distinguishable from the interrogating radiation. Linac-based, advanced inspection techniques utilizing the delayed signals after photofission have been extensively studied for homeland security applications. Previous research also showed that a unique delayed gamma ray energy spectrum exists for each fissionable isotope. In this work, high-energy delayed γ-rays were demonstrated to be signatures for detection, identification, and quantification of special nuclear materials. Such γ-rays were measured in between linac pulses using independent data acquisition systems. A list-mode system was developed to measure low-energy delayed γ-rays after irradiation. Photofission product yields of 238U and 239Pu were determined based on the measured delayed γ-ray spectra. The differential yields of delayed γ-rays were also proven to be able to discriminate nuclear from non-nuclear materials. The measurement outcomes were compared with Monte Carlo simulation results. It was demonstrated that the current available codes have capabilities and limitations in the simulation of photofission process. A two

  16. Electric field responsive origami structures using electrostriction-based active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Saad; Arrojado, Erika; Sigamani, Nirmal; Ounaies, Zoubeida

    2015-04-01

    The objective of origami engineering is to combine origami principles with advanced materials to yield active origami shapes, which fold and unfold in response to external stimuli. We are investigating the use of P(VDF-TrFE-CTFE), a relaxor ferroelectric terpolymer, to realize origami-inspired folding and unfolding of structures and to actuate so-called action origami structures. To accomplish these two objectives, we have explored different approaches to the P(VDF-TrFECTFE) polymer actuator construction, ranging from unimorph to multilayered stacks. Electromechanical characterization of the terpolymer-based actuators is conducted with a focus on free strain, force-displacement and blocked force. Moreover dynamic thickness strains of P(VDF-TrFE-CTFE) terpolymer at different frequencies ranging from 0.1Hz to 10Hz is also measured. Quantifying the performance of terpolymer-based actuators is important to the design of action origami structures. Following these studies, action origami prototypes based on catapult, flapping butterfly wings and barking fox are actuated and characterization of these prototypes are conducted by studying impact of various parameters such as electric field magnitude and frequency, number of active layers, and actuator dimensions.

  17. Non-destructive Testing of Forged Metallic Materials by Active Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillard, S.; Cadith, J.; Bouteille, P.; Legros, G.; Bodnar, J. L.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Nowadays, infrared thermography is considered as the reference method in many applications such as safety, the inspection of electric installations, or the inspection of buildings' heat insulation. In recent years, the evolution of both material and data-processing tools also allows the development of thermography as a real non-destructive testing method. Thus, by subjecting the element to be inspected to an external excitation and by analyzing the propagation of heat in the examined zone, it is possible to highlight surface or subsurface defects such as cracks, delaminations, or corrosion. One speaks then about active infrared thermography. In this study, some results obtained during the collective studies carried out by CETIM and the University of Reims for the forging industry are presented. Various experimental possibilities offered by active thermography are presented and the interest in this method in comparison with the traditional non-destructive testing methods (penetrant testing and magnetic particle inspection) is discussed. For example, comparative results on a forged cracked hub, a steering joint, and a threaded rod are presented. They highlight the interest of infrared thermography stimulated by induction for forged parts.

  18. Neutron-activation analysis of several US Geological Survey and National Bureau of Standards reference materials

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, A.T.

    1981-01-01

    In this work, several US Geological Survey (U.S.G.S.) and National Bureau of Standards (N.B.S.) reference samples have been analyzed in an effort to improve the quality of elemental concentration data available on these materials, so they can be used in a program of verification of factor analysis source resolution procedures. The analyses of these samples were performed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The samples analyzed were: U.S.G.S. Green River Shale, N.B.S. 45b Homogeneous River Sediment, U.S.G.S. Analyzed Peridotite N.B.S. 1579 Powdered Lead-based Paint, U.S.G.S. Hawaian Basalt U.S.G.S. Marine Mud, U.S.G.S. Analyzed Cody Shale U.S.G.S. Glass Mountain Rhyolite, N.B.S. Argillaceous Limestone No. 1, and a sample of Spex ultrapure graphite. Neutron activation analysis was employed because of the high sensitivity that can be attained in determining elemental concentrations. Although INAA is a relatively simple method and the reproducibility of the data is good, the method shows some inaccuracies. The basic theory and technique are reviewed in an attempt to show where problems can arise and how they can be dealt with.

  19. Facile and green synthesis of palladium nanoparticles-graphene-carbon nanotube material with high catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tai; Zhang, Zheye; Xiao, Junwu; Chen, Chen; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Yunqi

    2013-01-01

    We report a facile and green method to synthesize a new type of catalyst by coating Pd nanoparticles (NPs) on reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposite. An rGO-CNT nanocomposite with three-dimensional microstructures was obtained by hydrothermal treatment of an aqueous dispersion of graphene oxide (GO) and CNTs. After the rGO-CNT composites have been dipped in K₂PdCl₄ solution, the spontaneous redox reaction between the GO-CNT and PdCl₄(2-) led to the formation of nanohybrid materials consisting rGO-CNT decorated with 4 nm Pd NPs, which exhibited excellent and stable catalytic activity: the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol using NaBH4 as a catalyst was completed in only 20 s at room temperature, even when the Pd content of the catalyst was 1.12 wt%. This method does not require rigorous conditions or toxic agents and thus is a rapid, efficient, and green approach to the fabrication of highly active catalysts.

  20. Effects of Cycling Conditions of Active Material From Discharged Ni Positive Plates Studied by Inelastic Neutron Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, Juergen; Varma, Ravi; Diebolt, Lisa; Reid, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of this presentation are: identify atomic-level signatures of electrochemical activity of the active material on the Ni positive plates of Ni-H2 batteries, relate finding to cycling conditions and histories, and develop INS spectroscopy as a non-destructive testing technique for the evaluation of Ni-positive plates of Ni-H2 batteries.

  1. An Active Smart Material Control System for F/A-18 Buffet Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheta, Essam F.; Moses, Robert W.; Huttsell, Lawrence J.; Harrand, Vincent J.

    2003-01-01

    The vertical tail buffet problem of fighter aircraft occurs at high angles of attack when the vortical flow breaks down ahead of the vertical tails resulting in unsteady and unbalanced pressure loads on the vertical tails. The buffet loads imposed upon the vertical tails resulted in a premature fatigue failure of the tails, and consequently limits the performance and super maneuverability of twin-tail fighter aircraft. An active smart material control system using distributed piezoelectric actuators has been developed for buffet alleviation and is presented. The inboard and outboard surfaces of the vertical tail are equipped with piezoelectric actuators to control the buffet responses in the first bending and torsion modes. The electrodynamics of the piezoelectric actuators are expressed with a three-dimensional finite-element model. A single-input-single-output controller is designed to drive the active piezoelectric actuators. High-fidelity multidisciplinary analysis modules for the fluid dynamics, structure dynamics, electrodynamics of the piezoelectric actuators, control law, fluid structure interfacing, and grid motion are integrated into a multidisciplinary computing environment that controls the temporal synchronization of the analysis modules. At 30 degree angle of attack, RMS values of tip acceleration are reduced by as much as 12%. The peak values of the power spectral density of tail-tip acceleration are reduced by as much as 22% in the first bending mode and by as much as 82% in the first torsion mode. The actively controlled piezoelectric actuators were also effective in adding damping at wide range of angles of attack.

  2. Alignment of Synaptic Vesicle Macromolecules with the Macromolecules in Active Zone Material that Direct Vesicle Docking

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron’s axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle’s luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly’s chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly’s shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for

  3. In situ fabricated smart material active sensors for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Lin, Bin

    2004-02-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is currently using piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) permanently attached to the structure with adhesives. This is often a burdensome and time-consuming task, especially for large structures such as aircraft, bridges, etc. In addition, there are critical applications where the rigid piezoceramic wafers cannot conform to curved surfaces. Another important issue is the long term durability of the bonded interface between the PWAS and the structure, which is often the durability weak link. An in-situ fabricated smart sensor may offer better durability. This paper considers the possibility of fabricating the PWAS directly to the substrate structure in order to alleviate these problems. The paper starts with a review of the state of the art in active composite fabrication. Then, two concepts are considered: the piezomagnetic composite sensor and the piezoelectric composite PWAS. The piezomagnetic composite was fabricated using Terfenol-D magnetostrictive powder in a fiber reinforced composite beam. The strain-induced magnetic field was detected with a Lakeshore gaussmeter. The piezoelectric composite sensor was prepared by mixing lead zirconate titanate (PZT) particles in an epoxy resin. The mixture was applied onto the structural surface using a mask. After curing, the piezo composite was sanded down to the desired thickness and poled under a high electric field. The resulting in-situ composite PWAS was utilized as a sensor for dynamic vibration and impact. Characterization of the in-situ composite PWAS on aluminum structure have been recorded and compared with ceramic PWAS before and after poling. To evaluate the performance of the in-situ composite PWAS, both vibration and impact tests were conducted. Both experiments indicated that in-situ fabrication of active materials composites poses itself as a good candidate for reliable low-cost option for SHM smart sensor fabrication.

  4. Physics Courses--Some Suggested Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    To communicate the relevance and excitement of science activity to students, the use of more imaginative, and even openly speculative, case studies in physics courses is suggested. Some useful examples are Magnetic Monopoles, Constants, Black Holes, Antimatter, Zero Mass Particles, Tachyons, and the Bootstrap Hypothesis. (DF)

  5. Reading Aloud--Suggestions for Classroom Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rews, Alun L. W.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an introductory summary in defense of "reading aloud" in the English as a foreign language classroom and a more substantial section offering practical suggestions for handling it. The defense centers on a clarification of the purpose of reading aloud. Descriptions of different reading activities are included along with methods of…

  6. Fabrication of a PANI/CPs composite material: a feasible method to enhance the photocatalytic activity of coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin-Xin; Cui, Zhong-Ping; Qi, Ji; Liu, Xiao-Xia

    2013-03-21

    To improve the photocatalytic activity of a coordination polymer in the visible light region, polyaniline (PANI) was loaded onto its surface through a facile in situ chemical oxidation polymerization process. The resulting PANI loaded coordination polymer composite materials with excellent stability exhibit significantly higher photocatalytic activities than the pure coordination polymer photocatalyst on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) under visible light irradiation. This enhancement can be ascribed to the introduction of PANI on the surface of the coordination polymer, which leads to efficient separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs as well as a significant expansion of the photoresponse region. Finally, we discussed the influence of acidity on the morphology and photocatalytic activity of the composite material. An optimal condition to obtain the PANI loaded coordination polymer composite material with excellent photocatalytic activity has been obtained.

  7. The use of portable equipment for the activity concentration index determination of building materials: method validation and survey of building materials on the Belgian market.

    PubMed

    Stals, M; Verhoeven, S; Bruggeman, M; Pellens, V; Schroeyers, W; Schreurs, S

    2014-01-01

    The Euratom BSS requires that in the near future (2015) the building materials for application in dwellings or buildings such as offices or workshops are screened for NORM nuclides. The screening tool is the activity concentration index (ACI). Therefore it is expected that a large number of building materials will be screened for NORM and thus require ACI determination. Nowadays, the proposed standard for determination of building material ACI is a laboratory analyses technique with high purity germanium spectrometry and 21 days equilibrium delay. In this paper, the B-NORM method for determination of building material ACI is assessed as a faster method that can be performed on-site, alternative to the aforementioned standard method. The B-NORM method utilizes a LaBr3(Ce) scintillation probe to obtain the spectral data. Commercially available software was applied to comprehensively take into account the factors determining the counting efficiency. The ACI was determined by interpreting the gamma spectrum from (226)Ra and its progeny; (232)Th progeny and (40)K. In order to assess the accuracy of the B-NORM method, a large selection of samples was analyzed by a certified laboratory and the results were compared with the B-NORM results. The results obtained with the B-NORM method were in good correlation with the results obtained by the certified laboratory, indicating that the B-NORM method is an appropriate screening method to assess building material ACI. The B-NORM method was applied to analyze more than 120 building materials on the Belgian market. No building materials that exceed the proposed reference level of 1 mSv/year were encountered.

  8. High-power, photofission-inducing bremsstrahlung source for intense pulsed active detection of fissile material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zier, J. C.; Mosher, D.; Allen, R. J.; Commisso, R. J.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Jackson, S. L.; Murphy, D. P.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.

    2014-06-01

    Intense pulsed active detection (IPAD) is a promising technique for detecting fissile material to prevent the proliferation of special nuclear materials. With IPAD, fissions are induced in a brief, intense radiation burst and the resulting gamma ray or neutron signals are acquired during a short period of elevated signal-to-noise ratio. The 8 MV, 200 kA Mercury pulsed-power generator at the Naval Research Laboratory coupled to a high-power vacuum diode produces an intense 30 ns bremsstrahlung beam to study this approach. The work presented here reports on Mercury experiments designed to maximize the photofission yield in a depleted-uranium (DU) object in the bremsstrahlung far field by varying the anode-cathode (AK) diode gap spacing and by adding an inner-diameter-reducing insert in the outer conductor wall. An extensive suite of diagnostics was fielded to measure the bremsstrahlung beam and DU fission yield as functions of diode geometry. Delayed fission neutrons from the DU proved to be a valuable diagnostic for measuring bremsstrahlung photons above 5 MeV. The measurements are in broad agreement with particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics and radiation transport. These show that with increasing AK gap, electron losses to the insert and outer conductor wall increase and that the electron angles impacting the bremsstrahlung converter approach normal incidence. The diode conditions for maximum fission yield occur when the gap is large enough to produce electron angles close to normal, yet small enough to limit electron losses.

  9. Sorption of mercury onto waste material derived low-cost activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhakta, Jatindra N.; Rana, Sukanta; Lahiri, Susmita; Munekage, Yukihiro

    2014-11-01

    The present study was performed to develop the low-cost activated carbon (AC) from some waste materials as potential mercury (Hg) sorbent to remove high amount of Hg from aqueous phase. The ACs were prepared from banana peel, orange peel, cotton fiber and paper wastes by pyrolysis and characterized by analyzing physico-chemical properties and Hg sorption capacity. The Brunauer Emmett and Teller surface areas (cotton 138 m2/g; paper 119 m2/g), micropore surface areas (cotton 65 m2/g; paper 54 m2/g) and major constituent carbon contents (cotton 95.04 %; paper 94.4 %) were higher in ACs of cotton fiber and paper wastes than the rest two ACs. The Hg sorption capacities and removal percentages were greater in cotton and paper wastes-derived ACs compared to those of the banana and orange peels. The results revealed that elevated Hg removal ability of cotton and paper wastes-derived ACs is largely regulated by their surface area, porosity and carbon content properties. Therefore, ACs of cotton and paper wastes were identified as potential sorbent among four developed ACs to remove high amount of Hg from aqueous phase. Furthermore, easily accessible precursor material, simple preparation process, favorable physico-chemical properties and high Hg sorption capacity indicated that cotton and paper wastes-derived ACs could be used as potential and low-cost sorbents of Hg for applying in practical field to control the severe effect of Hg contamination in the aquatic environment to avoid its human and environmental health risks.

  10. Gamma/neutron time-correlation for special nuclear material detection – Active stimulation of highly enriched uranium

    DOE PAGES

    Paff, Marc G.; Monterial, Mateusz; Marleau, Peter; ...

    2014-06-21

    A series of simulations and experiments were undertaken to explore and evaluate the potential for a novel new technique for fissile material detection and characterization, the timecorrelated pulse-height (TCPH) method, to be used concurrent with active stimulation of potential nuclear materials. In previous work TCPH has been established as a highly sensitive method for the detection and characterization of configurations of fissile material containing Plutonium in passive measurements. By actively stimulating fission with the introduction of an external radiation source, we have shown that TCPH is also an effective method of detecting and characterizing configurations of fissile material containing Highlymore » Enriched Uranium (HEU). The TCPH method is shown to be robust in the presence of the proper choice of external radiation source. An evaluation of potential interrogation sources is presented.« less

  11. Gamma/neutron time-correlation for special nuclear material detection – Active stimulation of highly enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Paff, Marc G.; Monterial, Mateusz; Marleau, Peter; Kiff, Scott; Nowack, Aaron; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-06-21

    A series of simulations and experiments were undertaken to explore and evaluate the potential for a novel new technique for fissile material detection and characterization, the timecorrelated pulse-height (TCPH) method, to be used concurrent with active stimulation of potential nuclear materials. In previous work TCPH has been established as a highly sensitive method for the detection and characterization of configurations of fissile material containing Plutonium in passive measurements. By actively stimulating fission with the introduction of an external radiation source, we have shown that TCPH is also an effective method of detecting and characterizing configurations of fissile material containing Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU). The TCPH method is shown to be robust in the presence of the proper choice of external radiation source. An evaluation of potential interrogation sources is presented.

  12. Study of multi-layer active magnetic regenerators using magnetocaloric materials with first and second order phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, T.; Engelbrecht, K.; Nielsen, K. K.; Neves Bez, H.; Bahl, C. R. H.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetocaloric materials (MCM) with a first order phase transition (FOPT) usually exhibit a large, although sharp, isothermal entropy change near their Curie temperature, compared to materials with a second order phase transition (SOPT). Experimental results of applying FOPT materials in recent magnetocaloric refrigerators (MCR) demonstrated the great potential for these materials, but a thorough study on the impact of the moderate adiabatic temperature change and strong temperature dependence of the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is lacking. Besides, comparing active magnetic regenerators (AMR) using FOPT and SOPT materials is also of fundamental interest. We present modeling results of multi-layer AMRs using FOPT and SOPT materials based on a 1D numerical model. First the impact of isothermal entropy change, adiabatic temperature change and shape factor describing the temperature dependence of the MCE are quantified and analyzed by using artificially built magnetocaloric properties. Then, based on measured magnetocaloric properties of La(Fe,Mn,Si)13H y and Gd, an investigation on how to layer typical FOPT and SOPT materials with different temperature spans is carried out. Moreover, the sensitivity of variation in Curie temperature distribution for both groups of AMRs is investigated. Finally, a concept of mixing FOPT and SOPT materials is studied for improving the stability of layered AMRs with existing materials.

  13. Effect of plate preparation on active-material utilization and cycleability of positive plates in automotive lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgun, H.; Lam, L. T.; Rand, D. A. J.; Bhargava, S. K.

    The power demands from automotive lead/acid batteries are rising steadily with the increasing number of electronic accessories that are being fitted to modern vehicles. In order to meet new levels of performance, automotive batteries have been redesigned to use low-ohmic microporous separators, as well as thinner plates (to increase the number of plates per cell) that are made with a low paste density. This approach, however, has led to a separate problem, namely, an appreciable reduction in battery service life. To redress this situation, a research programme has been implemented in our laboratories to examine, in detail, the effect of plate preparation on the active-material utilization and cycleability of automotive positive plates with grids made from low-antimony alloy. The cycleability is evaluated in terms of repetitive reserve-capacity. The results suggest that a paste formula with a combination of high density and low acid-to-oxide ratio is the most appropriate technology for the production of the thin positive plates that are required in advanced designs of automotive batteries.

  14. Unit with Fluidized Bed for Gas-Vapor Activation of Different Carbonaceous Materials for Various Purposes: Design, Computation, Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strativnov, Eugene

    2017-02-01

    We propose the technology of obtaining the promising material with wide specter of application-activated nanostructured carbon. In terms of technical indicators, it will stand next to the materials produced by complex regulations with the use of costly chemical operations. It can be used for the following needs: as a sorbent for hemosorption and enterosorption, for creation of the newest source of electric current (lithium and zinc air batteries, supercapacitors), and for processes of short-cycle adsorption gas separation.

  15. IFMIF, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity cost report

    SciTech Connect

    Rennich, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the cost estimate for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) at the completion of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). The estimate corresponds to the design documented in the Final IFMIF CDA Report. In order to effectively involve all the collaborating parties in the development of the estimate, a preparatory meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1996 to jointly establish guidelines to insure that the estimate was uniformly prepared while still permitting each country to use customary costing techniques. These guidelines are described in Section 4. A preliminary cost estimate was issued in July 1996 based on the results of the Second Design Integration Meeting, May 20--27, 1996 at JAERI, Tokai, Japan. This document served as the basis for the final costing and review efforts culminating in a final review during the Third IFMIF Design Integration Meeting, October 14--25, 1996, ENEA, Frascati, Italy. The present estimate is a baseline cost estimate which does not apply to a specific site. A revised cost estimate will be prepared following the assignment of both the site and all the facility responsibilities.

  16. A promising active anode material of Li-ion battery for hybrid electric vehicle use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Youh; Nagayama, Katsuhiro; Sato, Yuichi; Takamura, Tsutomu

    In an attempt to respond to the requirement to provide promising anode material of Li-ion battery for hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) we examined mesophase-pitch-based cokes. The coke was heat treated at several temperatures where turbostratic structure is formed. Cyclic voltammograms (CV) were measured in 1:2 (v/v) mixture of ethylene carbonate (EC) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) containing 1 M LiClO 4 for all the samples, and the peak height was plotted against the square root of the potential scanning rate. The slopes of the plotting differed depending on the heating temperature and 1800 °C heated sample gave the steepest slope implying the diffusion coefficient of Li is the highest. For activating the electrochemical reaction site of the prepared electrode we adopted a novel method to expose the coated electrode in the glow discharge field in the presence of small amount of oxygen. As the result the CV peak height was increased by about two times as compared with that before the treatment.

  17. Fouling-release and chemical activity effects of a siloxane-based material on tunicates.

    PubMed

    Filip, Natalia; Pustam, Amanda; Ells, Veronica; Grosicki, Kathleen M T; Yang, Jin; Oguejiofor, Ikenna; Bishop, Cory D; DeMont, M Edwin; Smith-Palmer, Truis; Wyeth, Russell C

    2016-05-01

    The antifouling performance of a siloxane-based elastomeric impression material (EIM) was compared to that of two silicone fouling-release coatings, Intersleek 757 and RTV-11. In field immersion trials, the EIM caused the greatest reduction in fouling by the solitary tunicate Ciona intestinalis and caused the longest delay in the progression of fouling by two species of colonial tunicate. However, in pseudobarnacle adhesion tests, the EIM had higher attachment strengths. Further laboratory analyses showed that the EIM leached alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs) that were toxic to C. intestinalis larvae. The EIM thus showed the longest duration of chemical activity measured to date for a siloxane-based coating (4 months), supporting investigations of fouling-release coatings that release targeted biocides. However, due to potential widespread effects of APEs, the current EIM formulation should not be considered as an environmentally-safe antifoulant. Thus, the data also emphasize consideration of both immediate and long-term effects of potentially toxic constituents released from fouling-release coatings.

  18. Electrospun conducting polymer nanofibers as the active material in sensors and diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Nicholas J.

    2013-03-01

    Polyaniline doped with camphorsulfonic acid (PANi-HCSA) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulfonic acid (PEDOT-PSSA) were electrospun separately to obtain individual nanofibers which were captured on Si/SiO2 substrates and electrically characterized. The fiber resistance was recorded as a function of time in the presence of vapours of aliphatic alcohols of varying sizes. Due to the large surface to volume ratio, uniform diameter and small quantity of active material used in the construction, these sensor responses are very quick. Sensors made from individual fibers also show true saturation upon exposure to and removal of the sensing gas. A Schottky diode was also fabricated using an n-doped Si/SiO2 substrate and a single PANi-HCSA fiber and tested in vacuum and in ammonia gas. The diode response was instantaneous upon exposure to ammonia with nearly complete recovery of the current upon pumping out the ammonia, thereby making it a reusable sensor with rectifying behaviour i.e. multifunctional.

  19. Postassembly Transformation of a Catalytically Active Composite Material, Pt@ZIF-8, via Solvent-Assisted Linker Exchange.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Casey J; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2016-02-15

    2-Methylimidazolate linkers of Pt@ZIF-8 are exchanged with imidazolate using solvent-assisted linker exchange (SALE) to expand the apertures of the parent material and create Pt@SALEM-2. Characterization of the material before and after SALE was performed. Both materials are active as catalysts for the hydrogenation of 1-octene, whereas the hydrogenation of cis-cyclohexene occurred only with Pt@SALEM-2, consistent with larger apertures for the daughter material. The largest substrate, β-pinene, proved to be unreactive with H2 when either material was employed as a candidate catalyst, supporting the contention that substrate molecules, for both composites, must traverse the metal-organic framework component in order to reach the catalytic nanoparticles.

  20. Introducing the potential of antimicrobial materials for human and robotic spaceflight activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Claudia; Reitz, Guenther; Moeller, Ralf; Rettberg, Petra; Hans, Michael; Muecklich, Frank

    their relative short reaction time, long efficiency and functionality, broad application to reduce (micro-)biological contamination, high inactivation rates, sustainability, and avoidance of microbial resistance. Methods like contact killing measurement are one of the reliable ways to examine the effect of metal surfaces on the inactivation of microorganisms. We conducted contact killing experiments, in which we exposed human-associated microorganisms like Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus sp. on copper and stainless steel to detect and evaluate the potential incorporation of those materials in future spacecraft components. In contrast to an exposure on stainless steel microorganisms exposed on copper died within a few hours and therefore do not have the ability to proliferate, build protecting biofilms or even survive. The application of different surfaces and antimicrobial substances such as copper and silver, as well as testing other model organisms are still under examination. The results of our experiments are also very promising to other research areas, e.g., clinical application. Here, we would like to present our first data and ideas on the utilization of antimicrobial metal-based surfaces for human and robotic spaceflight activities as a beneficial method to reduce microbial contamination. \\underline{References} Horneck G et al. (2010) Space microbiology. Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev. 74:121-156. Vaishampayan P et al. (2013) New perspectives on viable microbial communities in low-biomass cleanroom environments. ISME J. 7:312-324. van Houdt R et al. (2012) Microbial contamination monitoring and control during human space missions. Planet. Space Sci. 60:115-120.

  1. An overview of research activities on materials for nuclear applications at the INL Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility

    SciTech Connect

    P. Calderoni; P. Sharpe; M. Shimada

    2009-09-01

    The Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility at the Idaho National Laboratory is a US Department of Energy National User Facility engaged in various aspects of materials research for nuclear applications related to fusion and advanced fission systems. Research activities are mainly focused on the interaction of tritium with materials, in particular plasma facing components, liquid breeders, high temperature coolants, fuel cladding, cooling and blanket structures and heat exchangers. Other activities include validation and verification experiments in support of the Fusion Safety Program, such as beryllium dust reactivity and dust transport in vacuum vessels, and support of Advanced Test Reactor irradiation experiments. This paper presents an overview of the programs engaged in the activities, which include the US-Japan TITAN collaboration, the US ITER program, the Next Generation Power Plant program and the tritium production program, and a presentation of ongoing experiments as well as a summary of recent results with emphasis on fusion relevant materials.

  2. [On suggestion and its related problems].

    PubMed

    Oka, Kazutaro

    2013-01-01

    Recently, intensive discussions about dissociative disorders have led to the rediscovery of the psychology of P. Janet, that has been under the shadow of Freud's psychoanalysis. Nevertheless, psychiatry, "Schulpsychiatrie" in German, has still paid little attention to the suggestion with which Janet has occupied himself throughout his long career. In this paper, the author examined suggestion from another point of view other than psychodynamic. It is presented that Freud reduced suggestion to a specific relation between an active subject and a passive object, as his precursors, F.A. Mesmer and R. de Puységur did the same. In contrast, Janet's early studies influenced by the philosophy of M. de Biran seem to focus on another aspect of suggestion. From this aspect, suggestion is based on a spontaneous intersubjective process that should be expressed by the middle voice. Referring to H. Bergson, with whom Janet corresponded, the author pointed out that one is not always one's own self that reflects one's whole life history, regardless of the presence/absence of mental abnormality, as is the case with a person under suggestion. Taking into account these factors of suggestion, i. e., the middle voice and fragile selfhood that is not firmly rooted in one's own life history, the author investigated hysteria as a distinct phenomenon that has a particularly close relation with suggestion. Furthermore, depersonalization and schizophrenia were discussed concerning their relation with hysteria. In this approach, the author suggested that the unconscious could be topographically localized not only in a deep portion of the mental apparatus, but also in its most superficial portion, unlike in the case of Freud's psychoanalysis.

  3. Biomarkers of teratogenesis: suggestions from animal studies.

    PubMed

    Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena

    2012-09-01

    Biomarkers of effect are measurable biochemical, physiological or other alterations within an organism that can be recognized as causing an established or potential impairment of embryo-fetal development. They may be identified studying the mechanisms of action of teratogens. Hyperacetylation of histones, oxidative stress, cholesterol and retinoic acid unbalance are some of the identified mechanisms of action of some known teratogens. Nevertheless, their use is not currently applicable in human pregnancy because of the difficulty of the choice of biological material, the time when the material must be obtained, and the invasivity of methods. Furthermore, before using them in human pregnancy studies, biomarkers should be validated in experimental animals and in epidemiologic studies. On the contrary, some biomarkers could be useful in the screening of developmental toxicity of chemicals and drugs, comparing molecules of the same chemical class or with the similar pharmacologic activity, and using adequate in vitro tests, in order to reduce the use of experimental animals.

  4. Measuring of low activity materials resulted from decommissioning of NPP`s in low-background chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Kornitski, A.S.; Kazakov, V.A.; Lysenko, V.V.

    1993-12-31

    The decommissioning of power plants results in dismantled equipment of which some is not radioactive and could be used without restrictions. The IAEA has released recommendations for such materials useage. The definition of unrestricted useage is fulfiled by the organization of the radiation control procedure providing the principle of not exceeding the radioactive contamination level of this material set by criteria for unrestricted use. Gamma spectroscopic analysis must be performed on a great number of samples for which activity is less than or equal to background radiation. For this purpose, the low-background activity chambers can be utilized.

  5. Investigation of biological activity of fine fraction of lunar surface material returned to earth by the Luna 16 automatic station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kustov, V. V.; Ostapenko, O. F.; Petrukhin, V. G.

    1974-01-01

    The biological action of a sample of lunar surface material returned to earth by the Luna 16 automatic station from a new region of the mare surface on male white mice was studied. The condition and behavior of the animals were observed; the intensity of their oxygen consumption was recorded, and motor activity of the muscles, leucocyte and erythrocytes counts in the peripheral blood, and the activity of whole blood chloinesterase were determined. Experimental results showed that the tested doses of the fine fraction of the lunar surface material from the Sea of Fertility were virtually innocuous for white mice.

  6. A chamber study on the reactions of O3, NO, NO2 and selected VOCs with a photocatalytically active cementitious coating material.

    PubMed

    Mothes, F; Böge, O; Herrmann, H

    2016-08-01

    Chamber studies were performed to investigate the efficiency of a photocatalytically active cementitious coating material to depollute contaminated air. The results showed a photocatalytic effect on ozone (O3), proven by an increase of the geometric uptake coefficient from 5.2 × 10(-6) for the inactive to 7.7 × 10(-6) for the active material under irradiation. Measured first-order rate constants for nitrogen oxides (NOx) under irradiation are in the range of 2.6-5.9 × 10(-4) s(-1), which is significantly higher compared to the inactive material (7.3-9.7 × 10(-5) s(-1)) demonstrating the photocatalytic effect. However, no significant photocatalytic degradation was observed for the studied volatile organic compounds (VOCs) toluene and isoprene resulting in only an upper limit uptake coefficient of 5.0 × 10(-7) for both VOCs. In all experiments using the photocatalytically active material, a clear formation of small carbonyl (C1-C5) gas phase compounds was identified which is suggested to result from the photocatalytic degradation of organic additives. In contrast to the uptake observed for pure O3, during the experiments with NOx (≥50 % relative humidity), a clear photocatalytic formation of O3 was observed. For the material investigated, an empirically derived overall zero-order rate constant of k 0 (O3) ≈ 5 × 10(7) molecules cm(-3) s(-1) was determined. The results demonstrate the necessity of detailed studies of heterogeneous reactions on such surfaces under more complex simulated atmospheric conditions as enabled by simulation chambers.

  7. Phosphonium alkyl PEG sulfate ionic liquids as coating materials for activation of Burkholderia cepacia lipase.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Yui; Kadotani, Shiho; Nishihara, Takashi; Hikino, Yoshichika; Fukaya, Yukinobu; Nokami, Toshiki; Itoh, Toshiyuki

    2015-12-01

    Lipases are among the most widely used enzymes applicable for various substrates; however, the slow reactions or poor enantioselective reactions are sometimes obtained. To develop ionic liquid type activating agents for lipase, four types of phosphonium cetyl(PEG)10 sulfate ionic liquids have been synthesized and used as coating materials of Burkholderia cepacia lipase (Lipase PS) through the lyophilization process. Tributyl ([2-methoxy]ethoxymethyl)phosphonium cetyl(PEG)10 sulfate ([P444MEM ][C16 (PEG)10 SO4 ]) (PL1) worked best among them, and PL1-coated lipase PS displayed high reactivity in transesterification of broad types of secondary alcohols using vinyl acetate as an acylating reagent with perfect enantioselectivity (E > 200). The substrate preference of PL1-PS differs from that of commercial lipase PS or [bdmim] [C16 (PEG)10 SO4 ]-coated lipase (IL1-PS); PL1-PS displayed excellent enantioselectivity in the reaction of 2-chloro-1-phenylethanol with E > 200, though insufficient E values were recorded for lipase PS (E = 12) and IL1-PS (E = 123) for this alcohol. PL1-PS also showed perfect enantioselectivity (E > 200) for the reaction of 1-(pyridin-2-yl)ethanol, while IL1-PS showed E = 130 for this compound. We further succeeded in demonstrating the recyclable use of PL1-PS five times in tributyl(3-methoxypropyl)phosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([P444PM ][Tf2 N]) as a solvent. Since PL1-PS is easily applicable to 10-20 gram-scaled reactions, it is expected that the IL-coated enzyme might be useful for practical preparation of a wide variety of chiral secondary alcohols.

  8. Origin, persistence and biological activity of genetic material in prebiotic habitats.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Marco; Gallori, Enzo

    2004-02-01

    Molecules which store genetic information (i.e. RNA and DNA) are central to all life on Earth. The formation of these complex molecules, and ultimately life, required specific conditions, including the synthesis and concentration of precursors (nucleotides), the joining of these monomers into larger molecules (polynucleotides), their protection in critical conditions (like those probably existing in primeval habitats), and the expression of the biological potential of the informational molecule (its capacity to multiply and evolve). Determining how these steps occurred and how the earliest genetic molecules originated on Earth is a problem that is far from being resolved. Recent observations on the polymerization of nucleotides on clay surfaces and on the resistance of clay-adsorbed nucleic acids to environmental degradation suggest that clay minerals could have acted as a resting place for the formation and preservation of prebiotic genetic molecules, whatever they were, and for the self-organization of the first auto-replicating systems. In the present work, the molecular characteristics and biological activity of different nucleic acids (DNA, RNAs) adsorbed/bound on clay minerals are discussed in the light of their possible role in ancestral environments.

  9. Prevalence of human cell material: DNA and RNA profiling of public and private objects and after activity scenarios.

    PubMed

    van den Berge, M; Ozcanhan, G; Zijlstra, S; Lindenbergh, A; Sijen, T

    2016-03-01

    Especially when minute evidentiary traces are analysed, background cell material unrelated to the crime may contribute to detectable levels in the genetic analyses. To gain understanding on the composition of human cell material residing on surfaces contributing to background traces, we performed DNA and mRNA profiling on samplings of various items. Samples were selected by considering events contributing to cell material deposits in exemplary activities (e.g. dragging a person by the trouser ankles), and can be grouped as public objects, private samples, transfer-related samples and washing machine experiments. Results show that high DNA yields do not necessarily relate to an increased number of contributors or to the detection of other cell types than skin. Background cellular material may be found on any type of public or private item. When a major contributor can be deduced in DNA profiles from private items, this can be a different person than the owner of the item. Also when a specific activity is performed and the areas of physical contact are analysed, the "perpetrator" does not necessarily represent the major contributor in the STR profile. Washing machine experiments show that transfer and persistence during laundry is limited for DNA and cell type dependent for RNA. Skin conditions such as the presence of sebum or sweat can promote DNA transfer. Results of this study, which encompasses 549 samples, increase our understanding regarding the prevalence of human cell material in background and activity scenarios.

  10. Natural radioactivity in building material in the European Union: robustness of the activity concentration index I and comparison with a room model.

    PubMed

    Nuccetelli, C; Risica, S; D'Alessandro, M; Trevisi, R

    2012-09-01

    Using a wide database collected in the last 10 years, the authors have calculated the activity concentration index I for many building materials in the European Union. Suggested by a European technical guidance document, the index I has recently been adopted as a screening tool in the proposal for the new Euratom basic safety standards directive. The paper analyses the possible implications of the choice of different parameters for the computation of index I, i.e. background to be subtracted, dose criteria, etc. With the collected data an independent assessment of gamma doses was also made with an ISS room model, choosing reasonable hypotheses on the use of materials. The results of the two approaches, i.e. index I and a room model, were compared.

  11. Gasification characteristics of an activated carbon catalyst during the decomposition of hazardous waste material in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Yukihiko; Nuessle, F.W.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Recently, carbonaceous materials including activated carbon were proven to be effective catalysts for hazardous waste gasification in supercritical water. Using coconut shell activated carbon catalyst, complete decomposition of industrial organic wastes including methanol and acetic acid was achieved. During this process, the total mass of the activated carbon catalyst changes by two competing processes: a decrease in weight via gasification of the carbon by supercritical water, or an increase in weight by deposition of carbonaceous materials generated by incomplete gasification of the biomass feedstocks. The deposition of carbonaceous materials does not occur when complete gasification is realized. Gasification of the activated carbon in supercritical water is often favored, resulting in changes in the quality and quantity of the catalyst. To thoroughly understand the hazardous waste decomposition process, a more complete understanding of the behavior of activated carbon in pure supercritical water is needed. The gasification rate of carbon by water vapor at subcritical pressures was studied in relation to coal gasification and generating activated carbon.

  12. Audiovisual Materials and Techniques for Teaching Foreign Languages: Recent Trends and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Carolyn

    Recent experimentation with audio-visual (A-V) materials has provided insight into the language learning process. Researchers and teachers alike have recognized the importance of using A-V materials to achieve goals related to meaningful and relevant communication, retention and recall of language items, non-verbal aspects of communication, and…

  13. The Effects of Activity and Gain Based Virtual Material on Student's Success, Permanency and Attitudes towards Science Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tas, Erol

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to research the effects of a student gains and activity based virtual material on students' success, permanence and attitudes towards science lesson, developed for science and technology lesson 6th grade "Systems in our body" unit. The study, which had a quasi-experimental design, was conducted with…

  14. Hierarchical porous carbon materials prepared using nano-ZnO as a template and activation agent for ultrahigh power supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haoran; Yu, Shukai; Xu, Bin

    2016-09-20

    Hierarchical porous carbon materials with high surface areas and a localized graphitic structure were simply prepared from sucrose using nano-ZnO as a hard template, activation agent and graphitization catalyst simultaneously, which exhibit an outstanding high-rate performance and can endure an ultrafast scan rate of 20 V s(-1) and ultrahigh current density of 1000 A g(-1).

  15. Tuning the Stability of Organic Active Materials for Nonaqueous Redox Flow Batteries via Reversible, Electrochemically Mediated Li + Coordination

    SciTech Connect

    Carino, Emily V.; Staszak-Jirkovsky, Jakub; Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Markovic, Nenad M.; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-03-24

    We describe an electrochemically mediated interaction between Li+ and a promising active material for nonaqueous redox flow batteries (RFBs), 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6,7-dimethoxy-1,1,4,4-tetramethylnaphthalene (TDT), and the impact of this structural interaction on material stability during voltammetric cycling. TDT could be an advantageous organic positive electrolyte material for nonaqueous RFBs due to its high oxidation potential, 4.21 V vs Li/Li+, and solubility of at least 1.0 M in select electrolytes. Although results from voltammetry suggest TDT displays Nernstian reversibility in many nonaqueous electrolyte solutions, bulk electrolysis reveals significant degradation in all electrolytes studied, the extent of which depends on the electrolyte solution composition. Results of subtractively normalized in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (SNIFTIRS) confirm that TDT undergoes reversible structural changes during cyclic voltammetry in propylene carbonate and 1,2-dimethoxyethane solutions containing Li+ electrolytes, but irreversible degradation occurs when tetrabutylammonium (TBA+) replaces Li+ as the electrolyte cation in these solutions. By combining the results from SNIFTIRS experiments with calculations from density functional theory, solution-phase active species structure and potential-dependent interactions can be determined. We find that Li+ coordinates to the Lewis basic methoxy groups of neutral TDT and, upon electrochemical oxidation, this complex dissociates into the radical cation TDT•+ and Li+. The improved cycling stability in the presence of Li+ relative to TBA+ suggests that the structural interaction reported herein may be advantageous to the design of energy storage materials based on organic molecules.

  16. EDITORIAL: Adaptive and active materials: Selected papers from the ASME 2010 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems (SMASIS 10) (Philadelphia, PA, USA, 28 September-1 October 2010) Adaptive and active materials: Selected papers from the ASME 2010 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems (SMASIS 10) (Philadelphia, PA, USA, 28 September-1 October 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brei, Diann

    2011-09-01

    The third annual meeting of the AMSE/AIAA Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems Conference (SMASIS) took place in the heart of historic Philadelphia's cultural district, and included a pioneer banquet in the National Constitutional Center. The applications emphasis of the 2010 conference was reflected in keynote talks by Dr Alan Taub, vice president of General Motors global research and development, 'Smart materials in the automotive industry'; Dr Charles R Farrar, engineering institute leader at Los Alamos National Laboratory, 'Future directions for structural health monitoring of civil engineering infrastructure'; and Professor Christopher S Lynch of the University of California Los Angeles, 'Ferroelectric materials and their applications'. The SMASIS conference was divided into six technical symposia each of which included basic research, applied technological design and development, and industrial and governmental integrated system and application demonstrations. The six symposia were: SYMP 1 Multifunctional Materials; SYMP 2 Active Materials, Mechanics and Behavior; SYMP 3 Modeling, Simulation and Control; SYMP 4 Enabling Technologies and Integrated System Design; SYMP 5 Structural Health Monitoring/NDE; and SYMP 6 Bio-inspired Smart Materials and Structures. In addition, the conference introduced a new student and young professional development symposium. Authors of papers in the materials areas (symposia 1, 2 and 6) were invited to write a full journal article on their presentation topic for publication in this special issue of Smart Materials and Structures. This set of papers demonstrates the exceptional quality and originality of the conference presentations. We are appreciative of their efforts in producing this collection of highly relevant articles on smart materials.

  17. Investigation of cell proliferative activity on the surface of the nanocomposite material produced by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhurbina, N. N.; Kurilova, U. E.; Ickitidze, L. P.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Selishchev, S. V.; Suetina, I. A.; Mezentseva, M. V.; Eganova, E. M.; Pavlov, A. A.; Gerasimenko, A. Y.

    2016-04-01

    A new method for the formation of composite nanomaterials based on multi-walled and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) on a silicon substrate has been developed. Formation is carried out by ultrasound coating of a silicon substrate by homogenous dispersion of CNTs in the albumin matrix and further irradiation with the continuous laser beam with a wavelength of 810 nm and power of 5.5 watts. The high electrical conductivity of CNTs provides its structuring under the influence of the laser radiation electric field. The result is a scaffold that provides high mechanical strength of nanocomposite material (250 MPa). For in vitro studies of materials biocompatibility a method of cell growth microscopic analysis was developed. Human embryonic fibroblasts (EPP) were used as biological cells. Investigation of the interaction between nanocomposite material and cells was carried out by optical and atomic force microscopy depending on the time of cells incubation. The study showed that after 3 hours incubation EPP were fixed on the substrate surface, avoiding the surface of the composite material. However, after 24 hours of incubation EPP fix on the sample surface and then begin to grow and divide. After 72 hours of incubation, the cells completely fill the sample surface of nanocomposite material. Thus, a nanocomposite material based on CNTs in albumin matrix does not inhibit cell growth on its surface, and favours their growth. The nanocomposite material can be used for creating soft tissue implants

  18. Predictions of the nuclear activation of materials on LDEF produced by the space radiation environment and comparison with flight measurements.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, T W; Colborn, B L; Harmon, B A; Laird, C E

    1996-11-01

    Model calculations have been made to compare with the induced radioactivity measured for materials on the LDEF satellite. Predictions and data comparisons are made for aluminum spacecraft components and for vanadium and nickel samples placed at multiple locations on the spacecraft. The calculated vs observed activations provide an indication of present model uncertainties in predicting nuclear activation as well as the magnitude and directionality of the trapped proton environment for low-Earth orbit missions. Environment model uncertainties based on the activation measurements are consistent with the uncertainties evaluated using other LDEF radiation dosimetry data.

  19. Nano-sized Mn-doped activated carbon aerogel as electrode material for electrochemical capacitor: effect of activation conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon Jae; Park, Hai Woong; Park, Sunyoung; Song, In Kyu

    2012-07-01

    Carbon aerogel (CA) was prepared by a sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde, and a series of activated carbon aerogels (ACA-KOH-X, X = 0, 0.3, 0.7, 1, and 2) were then prepared by a chemical activation using different amount of potassium hydroxide (X represented weight ratio of KOH with respect to CA). Specific capacitances of activated carbon aerogels were measured by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge methods in 6 M KOH electrolyte. Among the samples prepared, ACA-KOH-0.7 showed the highest specific capacitance (149 F/g). In order to combine excellent electrochemical performance of activated carbon aerogel with pseudocapacitive property of manganese oxide, 7 wt% Mn was doped on activated carbon aerogel (Mn/ACA-KOH-0.7) by an incipient wetness impregnation method. For comparison, 7 wt% Mn was also impregnated on carbon aerogel (Mn/ACA-KOH-0) by the same method. It was revealed that 7 wt% Mn-doped activated carbon aerogel (Mn/ACA-KOH-0.7) showed higher specific capacitance than 7 wt% Mn-doped carbon aerogel (Mn/ACA-KOH-0) (178 F/g vs. 98 F/g). The enhanced capacitance of Mn/ACA-KOH-0.7 was attributed to the outstanding electric properties of activated carbon aerogel as well as the faradaic redox reactions of manganese oxide.

  20. Career Development Guidelines. A Handbook for Program Planning and Review--Five Phases Focusing on Individual Student Competencies with Suggested Activities and Counselor-Team Counseling and Placement Program Strategies, for All Students 9-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Community Coll. and Occupational Education System, Denver.

    This handbook is designed to help counselors take leadership in providing comprehensive career development activities for students in grades 9-12. The guidelines are intended as a tool for counselors to use in working with their colleagues to develop realistic and workable counseling and placement program strategies. A five-phase schema is…