Science.gov

Sample records for activities tumor necrosis

  1. Endothelial cell activation induced by tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Cavender, D. E.; Edelbaum, D.; Ziff, M.

    1989-01-01

    Alterations in the morphology and histochemistry of vascular endothelial cells (EC) have been repeatedly observed at sites of chronic inflammation and immune reactions. These changes, which are most prominent in the EC postcapillary venules present in areas with large lymphocytic infiltrates, include the acquisition of a columnar or cuboidal morphology, the development of ribonuclease-sensitive metachromasia, and an increase in intracellular organelles. Thus, EC at sites of inflammation appear to be activated and to demonstrate increased metabolic activity. This study reports that both tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and lymphotoxin (LT) can activate cultured human umbilical vein EC, as measured by: 1) increased adhesiveness for lymphocytes, 2) increased cell metabolism, as measured by RNA and protein synthesis, and 3) increased cell volume. Although gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) have been shown previously to stimulate EC adhesiveness for lymphocytes, these two cytokines had only marginal effects on EC RNA and protein synthesis, and both caused a decrease in EC volume. These findings suggest that TNF and LT play a role in the type of activation of EC in vivo that leads to the development of tall endothelium and increased lymphocyte emigration. PMID:2466402

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-inducing activities of Cryptococcus neoformans components.

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, D; Cianci, L; Migliardo, M; Mancuso, G; Cusumano, V; Corradini, C; Teti, G

    1996-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production may lead to increased human immunodeficiency virus replication in patients with AIDS. In order to identify cryptococcal components that are predominantly responsible for stimulating TNF production, various concentrations of glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), galactoxylomannan (GalXM), mannoproteins (MP), and alpha(1-3) [corrected] glucan were added to whole-blood cultures. All of the cryptococcal components tested, as well as whole heat-killed cryptococci, were capable of inducing TNF-alpha release in a dose-dependent manner. MP were significantly more potent than any of the other cryptococcal components tested or heat-killed cryptococci in stimulating TNF-alpha production (P < 0.05). GXM, in contrast, was significantly less potent in this activity than either GalXM or MP (P < 0.05). As little as 0.5 microg of MP per ml was sufficient to produce moderate but significant elevations of TNF-alpha release. Maximal MP-induced TNF-alpha levels were similar to those induced by Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide, our positive control. Further experiments using isolated leukocytes suggested that monocytes were the cell population mainly responsible for TNF-alpha production, although the participation of other cell types could not be excluded. The presence of complement-sufficient plasma was a necessary requirement for TNF-alpha induction by GXM, GalXM, and low doses of MP. High MP concentrations (100 microg/ml) were also capable of stimulating TNF-alpha production in the absence of plasma. These data indicate that soluble products released by C. neoformans are capable of inducing TNF-alpha secretion in human leukocytes. This may be clinically relevant, since high concentrations of such products are frequently found in the body fluids of AIDS patients infected with C. neoformans. PMID:8945566

  3. Shedding of tumor necrosis factor receptors by activated human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The capacity of human neutrophils (PMN) to bind tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was rapidly lost when the cells were incubated in suspension with agents that can stimulate their migratory and secretory responses. Both physiological (poly)peptides (FMLP, C5a, CSF-GM) and pharmacologic agonists (PMN, calcium ionophore A23187) induced the loss of TNF receptors (TNF-R) from the cell surface. Half-maximal loss in TNF-R ensued after only approximately 2 min with 10(-7) M FMLP at 37 degrees C, and required only 10(-9) M FMLP during a 30-min exposure. However, there were no such changes even with prolonged exposure of PMN to FMLP at 4 degrees or 16 degrees C. Scatchard analysis revealed loss of TNF- binding sites without change in their affinity (Kd approximately 0.4 nM) as measured at incompletely modulating concentrations of FMLP, C5a, PMA, or A23187. The binding of anti-TNF-R mAbs to PMN decreased in parallel, providing independent evidence for the loss of TNF-R from the cell surface. At the same time, soluble TNF-R appeared in the medium of stimulated PMN. This inference was based on the PMN- and FMLP-dependent generation of a nonsedimentable activity that could inhibit the binding of TNF to fresh human PMN or to mouse macrophages, and the ability of mAbs specific for human TNF-R to abolish inhibition by PMN-conditioned medium of binding of TNF to mouse macrophages. Soluble TNF-R activity was associated with a protein of Mr approximately 28,000 by ligand blot analysis of cell-free supernatants of FMLP-treated PMN. Thus, some portion of the FMLP-induced loss of TNF-R from human PMN is due to shedding of TNF-R. Shedding was unaffected by inhibitors of serine and thiol proteases and could not be induced with phosphatidylinositol- specific phospholipase C. Loss of TNF-R from PMN first stimulated by other agents may decrease their responsiveness to TNF. TNF-R shed by PMN may be one source of the TNF-binding proteins found in body fluids, and may blunt the actions of the

  4. Tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Ming

    2013-01-28

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a critical cytokine, which contributes to both physiological and pathological processes. This mini-review will briefly touch the history of TNF discovery, its family members and its biological and pathological functions. Then, it will focus on new findings on the molecular mechanisms of how TNF triggers activation of the NF-κB and AP-1 pathways, which are critical for expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as the MLKL cascade, which is critical for the generation of ROS in response to TNF. Finally, this review will briefly summarize recent advances in understanding TNF-induced cell survival, apoptosis and necrosis (also called necroptosis). Understanding new findings and emerging concepts will impact future research on the molecular mechanisms of TNF signaling in immune disorders and cancer-related inflammation.

  5. Activation of the neutrophil bactericidal activity for nontypable Haemophilus influenzae by tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin.

    PubMed

    Tan, A M; Ferrante, A; Goh, D H; Roberton, D M; Cripps, A W

    1995-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that, in vivo, activated T lymphocytes and neutrophils are important in immunity to nontypable Haemophilus influenzae. We now extend this work by showing that neutrophils pretreated with products of activated T lymphocytes or activated macrophages show significantly enhanced killing of nontypable H. influenzae. Lymphotoxin, a product of activated T lymphocytes, significantly enhanced the neutrophil-mediated killing of nontypable H. influenzae, and tumor necrosis factor, produced by activated T lymphocytes as well as macrophages stimulated by activated T lymphocytes, also significantly increased the bactericidal activity of neutrophils. These cytokine-induced effects were seen with short pretreatment times of neutrophils and were maximal by 30 min. The killing of H. influenzae by neutrophils required the presence of heat-labile opsonins. In the absence of these opsonins, both tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin were unable to promote the killing of the bacteria by neutrophils. Furthermore, the results showed that tumor necrosis factor-primed neutrophils displayed significantly increased expression of CR3 and CR4 that was associated with increased phagocytosis of complement-opsonized nontypable H. influenzae. These cytokines may play an important role in immunity toward nontypable H. influenzae by stimulating neutrophil bactericidal activity.

  6. Tumor necrosis factor: a potent effector molecule for tumor cell killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Urban, J L; Shepard, H M; Rothstein, J L; Sugarman, B J; Schreiber, H

    1986-01-01

    Activated macrophages (aM phi) destroy more effectively cancer cells than normal cells. The mechanism by which macrophages destroy cancer cells is not known. We report here that tumor cells susceptible to aM phi were killed by recombinant (r) tumor necrosis factor type alpha (TNF-alpha), whereas variant tumor cells resistant to aM phi after selection in vitro or in vivo were resistant to killing by rTNF-alpha. The converse selection for rTNF-alpha-resistant variants resulted in cells that were also resistant to killing by aM phi. The sensitivity of macrophage-resistant variants was not changed to other tumoricidal cells or soluble mediators, except that the macrophage-resistant variants were also resistant to the effects of another cytotoxic protein, B-cell lymphotoxin, which is structurally related to rTNF-alpha. Similar results were obtained regardless of whether short-term or long-term cytotoxic effects of aM phi were measured. Finally, it was shown that killing of tumor cells by murine aM phi was completely inhibited with a polyclonal antibody that neutralizes the effects of murine TNF-alpha. These results suggest a major role for TNF-alpha in tumor cell destruction by aM phi in vitro and in vivo. PMID:3487788

  7. Antitumor activity of tumor necrosis factor-alpha conjugated with polyvinylpyrrolidone on solid tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Kamada, H; Tsutsumi, Y; Yamamoto, Y; Kihira, T; Kaneda, Y; Mu, Y; Kodaira, H; Tsunoda, S I; Nakagawa, S; Mayumi, T

    2000-11-15

    We attempted the development of a novel polymer conjugation to further improve the therapeutic potency of antitumor cytokines compared with PEGylation for clinical application. Compared with native tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in vitro, specific bioactivities of polyvinyl-pyrrolidone (PVP)-modified TNF-alphas (PVP-TNF-alphas) were decreased by increasing the degree of PVP attachment. PVP-TNF-alpha fraction 3, Mr 101,000, had the most effective antitumor activity of the various PVP-TNF-alphas in vivo. PVP-TNF-alpha fraction 3 had >200-fold higher antitumor effect than native TNF-alpha, and the antitumor activity of PVP-TNF-alpha fraction 3 was >2-fold higher than that of MPEG-TNF-alpha (Mr 108,000), which had the highest antitumor activity among the polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated TNF-alphas. Additionally, a high dose of native TNF-alpha induced toxic side effects such as body weight reduction, piloerection. and tissue inflammation, whereas no side effects were observed after i.v. administration of PVP-TNF-alpha fraction 3. The plasma half-life of PVP-TNF-alpha fraction 3 (360 min) was about 80- and 3-fold longer than those of native TNF-alpha (4.6 mm) and MPEG-TNF-alpha (122 min), respectively. The mechanism of increased antitumor effect in vivo caused the prolongation of plasma half-life and increase in stability. These results suggested that PVP is a useful polymeric modifier for bioconjugation of TNF-alpha to increase its antitumor potency, and multifunctionally bioconjugated TNF-alpha may be a potentiated antitumor agent for clinical use.

  8. Monocyte Tumor Necrosis Factor-α–Converting Enzyme Catalytic Activity and Substrate Shedding in Sepsis and Noninfectious Systemic Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    O’Callaghan, David J. P.; O’Dea, Kieran P.; Scott, Alasdair J.; Takata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effect of severe sepsis on monocyte tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme baseline and inducible activity profiles. Design: Observational clinical study. Setting: Mixed surgical/medical teaching hospital ICU. Patients: Sixteen patients with severe sepsis, 15 healthy volunteers, and eight critically ill patients with noninfectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Monocyte expression of human leukocyte antigen-D-related peptide, sol-tumor necrosis factor production, tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme expression and catalytic activity, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2 expression, and shedding at 48-hour intervals from day 0 to day 4, as well as p38-mitogen activated protein kinase expression. Compared with healthy volunteers, both sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome patients’ monocytes expressed reduced levels of human leukocyte antigen-D-related peptide and released less sol-tumor necrosis factor on in vitro lipopolysaccharide stimulation, consistent with the term monocyte deactivation. However, patients with sepsis had substantially elevated levels of basal tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme activity that were refractory to lipopolysaccharide stimulation and this was accompanied by similar changes in p38-mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. In patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, monocyte basal tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme, and its induction by lipopolysaccharide, appeared similar to healthy controls. Changes in basal tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme activity at day 0 for sepsis patients correlated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score and the attenuated tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme response to lipopolysaccharide was associated with increased mortality. Similar changes in monocyte tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme activity could

  9. Kinetics of tumor necrosis factor production by photodynamic-therapy-activated macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pass, Harvey I.; Evans, Steven; Perry, Roger; Matthews, Wilbert

    1990-07-01

    The ability of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to activate macrophages and produce cytokines, specifically tumor necrosis factor (TNF), is unknown. Three day thioglycolate elicited macrophages were incubated with 25 ug/mi Photofrin II (P11) for 2 hour, after which they were subjected to 630 nm light with fluences of 0-1800 J/m. The amount of TNF produced in the system as well as macrophage viability was measured 1, 3, 6, and 18 hours after POT. The level of TNF produced by the macrophages was significantly elevated over control levels 6 hours after POT and the absolute level of tumor necrosis factor production was influenced by the treatment energy and the resulting macrophage cytotoxicity. These data suggest that POT therapy induced cytotoxicity in vivo may be amplified by macrophage stimulation to secrete cytokines and these cytokines may also participate in other direct/indirect photodynamic therapy effects, i.e. immunosuppression, vascular effects.

  10. Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha: evidence of an indirect mode of antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Manda, T; Shimomura, K; Mukumoto, S; Kobayashi, K; Mizota, T; Hirai, O; Matsumoto, S; Oku, T; Nishigaki, F; Mori, J

    1987-07-15

    The antitumor activity of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rTNF-alpha) was examined on murine tumors in mice and in cultured cells in vitro. Mice were implanted intradermally with Meth A fibrosarcoma (Meth A) on day 0. rTNF-alpha caused tumor necrosis and inhibited the tumor growth when given i.v. on day 7 or 10, but not when given on day 3. When rTNF-alpha was given i.v. in doses of 0.1-3.2 micrograms/mouse twice a week for 3 weeks beginning on day 7 or 11, the growth of solid Meth A, Colon 26 adenocarcinoma, Colon 38 carcinoma, Sarcoma-180, and M5076 reticulum cell sarcoma tumors implanted s.c. or intradermally was markedly inhibited, and the life of the mice bearing these tumors, except M5076 reticulum cell sarcoma, was prolonged. The growth of Meth A implanted i.m. was also markedly inhibited by rTNF-alpha given i.v. However, the life of mice bearing i.p. Colon 26 adenocarcinoma, MH134 hepatoma, Sarcoma-180, and Ehrlich carcinoma was not prolonged by rTNF-alpha given i.p. nine times (days 1-9) in doses up to 1.0 or 3.2 micrograms/mouse. Only in the case of mice bearing i.p. Meth A, the life was slightly prolonged by i.p. treatment with rTNF-alpha but not by i.v. treatment. In experiments against in vitro cultured cells, rTNF-alpha did not show any direct cytotoxicity against mouse tumor cells: Meth A, Colon 26 adenocarcinoma, Colon 38 carcinoma, and Sarcoma-180, but had a cytotoxic effect against L929 mouse fibroblast. The results suggest that rTNF-alpha is a unique antitumor drug with potent necrotizing activity against solid tumors in mice, and that this activity may derive from indirect mechanisms related to the growth of tumors and not to the direct cytotoxicity of the drug.

  11. Interferon and tumor necrosis factor as humoral mechanisms coupling hematopoietic activity to inflammation and injury.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced hematopoiesis accompanies systemic responses to injury and infection. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) produced by injured cells and interferons (IFNs) secreted by inflammatory cells is a co-product of the process of clearance of debris and removal of still viable but dysfunctional cells. Concomitantly, these cytokines induce hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) activity as an intrinsic component of the systemic response. The proposed scenario includes induction of HSPC activity by type I (IFNα/β) and II (IFNγ) receptors within the quiescent bone marrow niches rendering progenitors responsive to additional signals. TNFα converges as a non-selective stimulant of HSPC activity and both cytokines synergize with other growth factors in promoting differentiation. These physiological signaling pathways of stress hematopoiesis occur quite frequent and do not cause HSPC extinction. The proposed role of IFNs and TNFs in stress hematopoiesis commends revision of their alleged involvement in bone marrow failure syndromes.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression is mediated by protein kinase C following activation by ionizing radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D. E.; Virudachalam, S.; Sherman, M. L.; Huberman, E.; Kufe, D. W.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Univ. of Chicago; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Univ. of Chicago

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production following X-irradiation has been implicated in the biological response to ionizing radiation. Protein kinase C (PKC) is suggested to participate in TNF transcriptional induction and X-ray-mediated gene expression. We therefore studied radiation-mediated TNF expression in HL-60 cells with diminished PKC activity produced by either pretreatment with protein kinase inhibitors or prolonged 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment. Both treatments resulted in attenuation of radiation-mediated TNF induction. Consistent with these results, we found no detectable induction of TNF expression following X-irradiation in the HL-60 variant deficient in PKC-mediated signal transduction. The rapid activation of PKC following {gamma}-irradiation was established using an in vitro assay measuring phosphorylation of a PKC specific substrate. A 4.5-fold increase in PKC activity occurred 15 to 30 s following irradiation, which declined to baseline at 60 s. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of phosphoproteins extracted from irradiated cells demonstrated in vivo phosphorylation of the PKC specific substrate Mr 80,000 protein at 45 s following X-irradiation. These findings indicate that signal transduction via the PKC pathway is required for the induction of TNF gene expression by ionizing radiation.

  13. TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR α: ACTIVITY DEPENDENT EXPRESSION AND PROMOTION OF CORTICAL COLUMN SLEEP IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, L.; Rector, D.M.; Yasuda, K.; Fix, C.; Rojas, M.J.; Yasuda, T.; Krueger, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Cortical surface evoked potentials (SEPs) are larger during sleep and characterize a sleep-like state in cortical columns. Since tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) may be involved in sleep regulation and is produced as a consequence of waking activity, we tested the hypothesis that direct application of TNF to the cortex will induce a sleep-like state within cortical columns and enhance SEP amplitudes. We found that microinjection of TNF onto the surface of the somatosensory cortex enhanced whisker stimulation-induced SEP amplitude relative to a control heat-inactivated TNF microinjection. We also determined if whisker stimulation enhanced endogenous TNF expression. TNF immunoreactivity (IR) was visualized after 2 h of bilateral deflection of a single whisker bilaterally. The number of TNF-IR cells increased in layers II–IV of the activated somatosensory barrel column. In two separate studies, unilateral deflection of multiple whiskers for 2 h increased the number of TNF-IR cells in layers II–V in columns that also exhibited enhanced Fos-IR. TNF-IR also colocalized with NeuN-IR suggesting that TNF expression was in neurons. Collectively these data are consistent with the hypotheses that TNF is produced in response to neural activity and in turn enhances the probability of a local sleep-like state as determined by increases in SEP amplitudes. PMID:18694809

  14. Quantitative proteomics reveals the induction of mitophagy in tumor necrosis factor-α-activated (TNFα) macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christina; English, Luc; Boulais, Jonathan; Chemali, Magali; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Desjardins, Michel; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-09-01

    Macrophages play an important role in innate and adaptive immunity as professional phagocytes capable of internalizing and degrading pathogens to derive antigens for presentation to T cells. They also produce pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) that mediate local and systemic responses and direct the development of adaptive immunity. The present work describes the use of label-free quantitative proteomics to profile the dynamic changes of proteins from resting and TNF-α-activated mouse macrophages. These analyses revealed that TNF-α activation of macrophages led to the down-regulation of mitochondrial proteins and the differential regulation of several proteins involved in vesicle trafficking and immune response. Importantly, we found that the down-regulation of mitochondria proteins occurred through mitophagy and was specific to TNF-α, as other cytokines such as IL-1β and IFN-γ had no effect on mitochondria degradation. Furthermore, using a novel antigen presentation system, we observed that the induction of mitophagy by TNF-α enabled the processing and presentation of mitochondrial antigens at the cell surface by MHC class I molecules. These findings highlight an unsuspected role of TNF-α in mitophagy and expanded our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for MHC presentation of self-antigens.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-α mediates JNK activation response to intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; Zheng, Feng-Ping; Zhan, Ya-Shi; Tao, Jin; Tan, Si-Wei; Liu, Hui-Ling; Wu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mediates ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced intestinal mucosal injury through c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. METHODS: In this study, intestinal I/R was induced by 60-min occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery in rats followed by 60-min reperfusion, and the rats were pretreated with a TNF-α inhibitor, pentoxifylline, or the TNF-α antibody infliximab. After surgery, part of the intestine was collected for histological analysis. The mucosal layer was harvested for RNA and protein extraction, which were used for further real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting analyses. The TNF-α expression, intestinal mucosal injury, cell apoptosis, activation of apoptotic protein and JNK signaling pathway were analyzed. RESULTS: I/R significantly enhanced expression of mucosal TNF-α at both the mRNA and protein levels, induced severe mucosal injury and cell apoptosis, activated caspase-9/caspase-3, and activated the JNK signaling pathway. Pretreatment with pentoxifylline markedly downregulated TNF-α at both the mRNA and protein levels, whereas infliximab pretreatment did not affect the expression of TNF-α induced by I/R. However, pretreatment with pentoxifylline or infliximab dramatically suppressed I/R-induced mucosal injury and cell apoptosis and significantly inhibited the activation of caspase-9/3 and JNK signaling. CONCLUSION: The results indicate there was a TNF-α-mediated JNK activation response to intestinal I/R injury. PMID:23946597

  16. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced angiogenesis depends on in situ platelet-activating factor biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, a potent inhibitor of endothelial cell growth in vitro, is angiogenic in vivo. Therefore, it was suggested that the angiogenic properties of this agent might be consequent to the production of secondary mediators. Since TNF-alpha stimulates the synthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF) by monocytes and endothelial cells, we investigated the possible involvement of PAF in the angiogenic effect of TNF-alpha. Angiogenesis was studied in a murine model in which Matrigel was used as a vehicle for the delivery of mediators. In this model the angiogenesis induced by TNF-alpha was shown to be inhibited by WEB 2170, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. Moreover, in mice injected with TNF-alpha, PAF was detected within the Matrigel, 6 and 24 h after TNF-alpha injection. The synthesis of PAF within the Matrigel was concomitant with the early migration of endothelial cells and infiltration of monocytes. No infiltration of lymphocytes or polymorphonuclear leukocytes was observed. Synthetic PAF as well as PAF extracted and purified from mice challenged with TNF-alpha induced a rapid angiogenic response, inhibited by WEB 2170. These results suggest that the angiogenic effect of TNF-alpha is, at least in part, mediated by PAF synthesized from monocytes and/or endothelial cells infiltrating the Matrigel plug. PMID:7516414

  17. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 improves hypoxia-impaired energy production in cardiomyocytes through increasing activity of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Fei; Ma, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Dong-Xia; Zhang, Qiong; Huang, Yue-Sheng

    2016-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. In the present study, we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches to explore the effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II on energy production in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. Hypoxia repressed ATP production in cultured cardiomyocytes, whereas overexpression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 significantly improved ATP production. Conversely, knockdown of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 facilitated the hypoxia-induced decrease in ATP synthesis. Further investigation revealed that tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 induced the expression and activity of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II, a component of cytochrome c oxidase that is important in mitochondrial respiratory chain function. Moreover, lentiviral-mediated overexpression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II antagonized the decrease in ATP synthesis caused by knockdown of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1, whereas knockdown of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II attenuated the increase in ATP synthesis caused by overexpression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1. In addition, inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II by a specific inhibitor sodium azide suppressed the ATP sy nthesis induced by overexpressed tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1. Hence, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 protects cardiomyocytes from hypoxia at least partly via potentiation of energy generation, and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II is one of the downstream effectors that mediates the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1-mediated energy generation program.

  18. Epidermal Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Activation and Ultraviolet B Radiation Result in Synergistic Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Production

    PubMed Central

    Wolverton, Jay E.; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Yao, Yongxue; Zhang, Qiwei; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) is a potent stimulator of epidermal cytokine production which has been implicated in photoaggravated dermatoses. In addition to cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), UVB generates bioactive lipids including platelet-activating factor (PAF). Our previous studies have demonstrated that UVB-mediated production of keratinocyte TNF-α is in part due to PAF. The current studies use a human PAF-receptor (PAF-R) negative epithelial cell line transduced with PAF-Rs and PAF–R-deficient mice to demonstrate that activation of the epidermal PAF-R along with UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of TNF-α. It should be noted that PAF-R effects are mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) agonist phorbol myristic acetate, and are inhibited by pharmacological antagonists of the PKC gamma isoenzyme. These studies suggest that concomitant PAF-R activation and UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of the cytokine TNF-α which is mediated in part via PKC. These studies provide a novel potential mechanism for photosensitivity responses. PMID:19769579

  19. Blocking of tumor necrosis factor activity promotes natural repair of osteochondral defects in rabbit knee

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Osteochondral defects have a limited capacity for repair. We therefore investigated the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signal blockade by etanercept (human recombinant soluble TNF receptor) on the repair of osteochondral defects in rabbit knees. Material and methods Osteochondral defects (5 mm in diameter) were created in the femoral patellar groove in rabbits. Soon after the procedure, a first subcutaneous injection of etanercept was performed. This single injection or, alternatively, 4 injections in total (twice a week for 2 weeks) were given. Each of these 2 groups was divided further into 3 subgroups: a low-dose group (0.05 μg/kg), an intermediate-dose group (0.4 μ g/kg), and a high-dose group (1.6 μ g /kg) with 19 rabbits in each. As a control, 19 rabbits were injected with water alone. The rabbits in each subgroup were killed 4 weeks (6 rabbits), 8 weeks (6 rabbits), or 24 weeks (7 rabbits) after surgery and repair was assessed histologically. Results Histological examination revealed that the natural process of repair of the osteochondral defects was promoted by 4 subcutaneous injections of intermediate-dose etanercept and by 1 or 4 injections of high-dose etanercept at the various time points examined postoperatively (4, 8, and 24 weeks). Western blot showed that rabbit TNFα had a high affinity for etanercept. Interpretation Blocking of TNF by etanercept enabled repair of osteochondral defects in rabbit knee. Anti-TNF therapy could be a strategy for the use of tissue engineering for bone and cartilage repair. PMID:19916697

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Sensitizes Breast Cancer Cells to Natural Products with Proteasome-Inhibitory Activity Leading to Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Li; Shi, Wenli; Deshmukh, Rahul R.; Long, Jie; Cheng, Xiaoli; Ji, Weidong; Zeng, Guohua; Chen, Xianliang; Zhang, Yajie; Dou, Q. Ping

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory microenvironment plays an important role in the process of tumor development. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a key pro-inflammatory cytokine, has a significant role in this process. Natural medicinal products such as Withaferin A (WA) and Celastrol (Cel) have shown anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties that can be attributed to multiple mechanisms including, but not limited to, apoptosis induction due to the inhibition of proteasomal activities. This study aimed to investigate the effects of TNF-α in combination with WA or Cel in vitro in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. TNF-α, when combined with WA or Cel, activated caspase-3 and -9 and downregulated XIAP in a dose-dependent manner, leading to induction of apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The combination also caused accumulation of the proteasomal target protein IκBα, resulting in inhibition of the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Taken together, these results suggest that TNF-α could sensitize breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 to WA and Cel, at least in part, through inhibiting the activation of NF-κB signaling, leading to XIAP inhibition with subsequent upregulation of caspase-3 and -9 activities. Thus, the anti-cancer activities of TNF-α are enhanced when combined with the natural proteasome inhibitors, WA or Cel. PMID:25419573

  1. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-mediated inhibition of melanogenesis is dependent on nuclear factor kappa B activation.

    PubMed

    Englaro, W; Bahadoran, P; Bertolotto, C; Buscà, R; Dérijard, B; Livolsi, A; Peyron, J F; Ortonne, J P; Ballotti, R

    1999-02-25

    Melanogenesis is a physiological process resulting in the synthesis of melanin pigments which play a crucial protective role against skin photocarcinogenesis. In vivo, solar ultraviolet light triggers the secretion of numerous keratinocyte-derived factors that are implicated in the regulation of melanogenesis. Among these, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), a cytokine implicated in the pro-inflammatory response, down-regulates pigment synthesis in vitro. In this report, we aimed to determine the molecular mechanisms by which this cytokine inhibits melanogenesis in B16 melanoma cells. First, we show that TNFalpha inhibits the activity and protein expression of tyrosinase which is the key enzyme of melanogenesis. Further, we demonstrate that this effect is subsequent to a down-regulation of the tyrosinase promoter activity in both basal and cAMP-induced melanogenesis. Finally, we present evidence indicating that the inhibitory effect of TNFalpha on melanogenesis is dependent on nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) activation. Indeed, overexpression of this transcription factor in B16 cells is sufficient to inhibit tyrosinase promoter activity. Furthermore, a mutant of inhibitory kappa B (IkappaB), that prevents NFkappaB activation, is able to revert the effect of TNFalpha on the tyrosinase promoter activity. Taken together, our results clarify the mechanisms by which TNFalpha inhibits pigmentation and point out the key role of NFkappaB in the regulation of melanogenesis.

  2. Antiproliferative activity of shark cartilage with and without tumor necrosis factor-alpha in human umbilical vein endothelium.

    PubMed

    McGuire, T R; Kazakoff, P W; Hoie, E B; Fienhold, M A

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated the antiangiogenic activity of shark cartilage, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and a combination of the two using a human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation assay. Proliferation of endothelium is a hallmark of angiogenesis, and inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation indicates potential antiangiogenic activity. Shark cartilage produced a concentration-dependent decline in endothelial cell 3H-thymidine incorporation. This activity was heat stable and was found in molecular weight fractions of less than 10 kd. The antiproliferative effect of shark cartilage was specific for vascular endothelium and did not affect the proliferative rate of human astrocytoma cells or human skin fibroblasts. Shark cartilage at a concentration of 500 mu g/ml and TNF-alpha at a concentration of 10 ng/ml reduced endothelial cell proliferation by 32% and 29%, respectively. Treatment of endothelial cells with the combination of shark cartilage and TNF-alpha resulted in a 44% reduction in endothelial cell proliferation. The isolation and identification of the active components of shark cartilage is continuing.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor inhibits ligand-stimulated EGF receptor activation through a TNF receptor 1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Steven J.; Frey, Mark R.; Yan, Fang; Edelblum, Karen L.; Goettel, Jeremy A.; John, Sutha; Polk, D. Brent

    2008-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) are key regulators in the intricate balance maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Previous work from our laboratory shows that TNF attenuates ligand-driven EGF receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation in intestinal epithelial cells. To identify the mechanisms underlying this effect, we examined EGFR phosphorylation in cells lacking individual TNF receptors. TNF attenuated EGF-stimulated EGFR phosphorylation in wild-type and TNFR2−/−, but not TNFR1−/−, mouse colon epithelial (MCE) cells. Reexpression of wild-type TNFR1 in TNFR1−/− MCE cells rescued TNF-induced EGFR inhibition, but expression of TNFR1 deletion mutant constructs lacking the death domain (DD) of TNFR1 did not, implicating this domain in EGFR downregulation. Blockade of p38 MAPK, but not MEK, activation of ERK rescued EGF-stimulated phosphorylation in the presence of TNF, consistent with the ability of TNFR1 to stimulate p38 phosphorylation. TNF promoted p38-dependent EGFR internalization in MCE cells, suggesting that desensitization is achieved by reducing receptor accessible to ligand. Taken together, these data indicate that TNF activates TNFR1 by DD- and p38-dependent mechanisms to promote EGFR internalization, with potential impact on EGF-induced proliferation and migration key processes that promote healing in inflammatory intestinal diseases. PMID:18467504

  4. Nitric oxide mediates angiogenesis induced in vivo by platelet-activating factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Lupia, E.; de Martino, A.; Battaglia, E.; Arese, M.; Tizzani, A.; Bussolino, F.; Camussi, G.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the role of an endogenous production of nitric oxide (NO) in the in vitro migration of endothelial cells and in the in vivo angiogenic response elicited by platelet-activating factor (PAF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The NO synthase inhibitor, N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), but not its enantiomer D-NAME, prevented chemotaxis of endothelial cells induced in vitro by PAF and by TNF. The motogenic activity of TNF was also inhibited by WEB 2170, a specific PAF-receptor antagonist. In contrast, chemotaxis induced by bFGF was not prevented by L-NAME or by WEB 2170. Angiogenesis was studied in vivo in a murine model in which Matrigel was used as a vehicle for the delivery of mediators. In this model, the angiogenesis induced by PAF and TNF was inhibited by WEB 2170 and L-NAME but not by D-NAME. In contrast, angiogenesis induced by bFGF was not affected by L-NAME or by WEB 2170. TNF, but not bFGF, induced PAF synthesis within Matrigel. These results suggest that NO mediates the angiogenesis induced by PAF as well as that induced by TNF, which is dependent on the production of PAF. In contrast, the angiogenic effect of bFGF appears to be both PAF and NO independent. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9250168

  5. Growth hormone activation of human monocytes for superoxide production but not tumor necrosis factor production, cell adherence, or action against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Warwick-Davies, J; Lowrie, D B; Cole, P J

    1995-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that growth hormone (GH) is a human macrophage-activating factor which primes monocytes for enhanced production of H2O2 in vitro. This report extends our observations to other monocyte functions relevant to infection. We find that GH also primes monocytes for O2- production, to a degree similar to the effect of gamma interferon. Neither macrophage-activating factor alone stimulates monocytes to release bioactive tumor necrosis factor. However, GH, unlike gamma interferon, does not synergize with endotoxin for enhanced tumor necrosis factor production. In further contrast, GH does not alter monocyte adherence or morphology, while phagocytosis and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by GH-treated monocytes are also unaffected. Therefore, despite the multiplicity of the effects of GH on the immune system in vivo, its effects on human monocytes in vitro appear to be limited to priming for the release of reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:7591064

  6. Concurrent Intervention With Exercises and Stabilized Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy Reduced the Disease Activity in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hui; Li, Wen-Rong; Zhang, Hua; Tian, Xu; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Since the use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy is becoming wider, the effects of concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are different. The study aimed to objectively evaluate whether concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. A search from PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was electronically performed to collect studies which compared concurrent intervention with exercise and TNF inhibitor to conventional approach in terms of disease activity in patients with AS published from their inception to June 2015. Studies that measured the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), and chest expansion as outcomes were included. Two independent investigators screened the identified articles, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. Quantitative analysis was performed with Review Manager (RevMan) software (version 5.3.0). A total of 5 studies comprising 221 participants were included in the study. Meta-analyses showed that concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy significantly reduced the BASMI scores (MD, −0.99; 95% CI, −1.61 to −0.38) and BASDAI scores (MD, −0.58; 95% CI, −1.10 to −0.06), but the BASFI scores (MD, −0.31; 95% CI, −0.76 to 0.15) was not reduced, and chest expansion (MD, 0.80; 95% CI, −0.18 to 1.78) was not increased. Concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. More randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with high-quality, large-scale, and appropriate follow-up are warranted to further establish the benefit of concurrent intervention with

  7. Stimulation of neutrophils by tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanoff, S.J.; Vadas, M.A.; Harlan, J.M.; Sparks, L.H.; Gamble, J.R.; Agosti, J.M.; Waltersdorph, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was shown to be a weak direct stimulus of the neutrophil respiratory burst and degranulation. The stimulation, as measured by iodination, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production, and lysozyme release, was considerably increased by the presence of unopsonized zymosan in the reaction mixture, an effect which was associated with the increased ingestion of the zymosan. TNF does not act as an opsonin but, rather, reacts with the neutrophil to increase its phagocytic activity. TNF-dependent phagocytosis, as measured indirectly by iodination, is inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (Mab) 60.1 and 60.3, which recognize different epitopes on the C3bi receptor/adherence-promoting surface glycoprotein of neutrophils. Other neutrophil stimulants, namely N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristic acetate, also increase iodination in the presence of zymosan; as with TNF, the effect of these stimulants is inhibited by Mab 60.1 and 60.3, whereas, in contrast to that of TNF, their stimulation of iodination is unaffected by an Mab directed against TNF. TNF may be a natural stimulant of neutrophils which promotes adherence to endothelial cells and to particles, leading to increased phagocytosis, respiratory burst activity, and degranulation.

  8. Tumor necrosis factor interaction with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, De-Hao; Elzey, Sherrie; Delrio, Frank W.; Keene, Athena M.; Tyner, Katherine M.; Clogston, Jeffrey D.; Maccuspie, Robert I.; Guha, Suvajyoti; Zachariah, Michael R.; Hackley, Vincent A.

    2012-05-01

    We report on a systematic investigation of molecular conjugation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) protein onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and the subsequent binding behavior to its antibody (anti-TNF). We employ a combination of physical and spectroscopic characterization methods, including electrospray-differential mobility analysis, dynamic light scattering, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The native TNF used in this study exists in the active homotrimer configuration prior to conjugation. After binding to AuNPs, the maximum surface density of TNF is (0.09 +/- 0.02) nm-2 with a binding constant of 3 × 106 (mol L-1)-1. Dodecyl sulfate ions induce desorption of monomeric TNF from the AuNP surface, indicating a relatively weak intermolecular binding within the AuNP-bound TNF trimers. Anti-TNF binds to both TNF-conjugated and citrate-stabilized AuNPs, showing that non-specific binding is significant. Based on the number of anti-TNF molecules adsorbed, a substantially higher binding affinity was observed for the TNF-conjugated surface. The inclusion of thiolated polyethylene glycol (SH-PEG) on the AuNPs inhibits the binding of anti-TNF, and the amount of inhibition is related to the number ratio of surface bound SH-PEG to TNF and the way in which the ligands are introduced. This study highlights the challenges in quantitatively characterizing complex hybrid nanoscale conjugates, and provides insight on TNF-AuNP formation and activity.We report on a systematic investigation of molecular conjugation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) protein onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and the subsequent binding behavior to its antibody (anti-TNF). We employ a combination of physical and spectroscopic characterization methods, including electrospray-differential mobility analysis, dynamic light scattering, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

  9. Tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme: an encouraging target for various inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Bahia, Malkeet S; Silakari, Om

    2010-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha is one of the most common pro-inflammatory cytokines responsible for various inflammatory disorders. It plays an important role in the origin and progression of rheumatoid arthritis and also in other autoimmune disease conditions. Some anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies like Enbrel, Humira and Remicade have been successfully used in these disease conditions as antagonists of tumor necrosis factor alpha. Inhibition of generation of active form of tumor necrosis factor alpha is a promising therapy for various inflammatory disorders. Therefore, the inhibition of an enzyme (tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme), which is responsible for processing inactive form of tumor necrosis factor alpha into its active soluble form, is an encouraging target. Many tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme inhibitors have been the candidates of clinical trials but none of them have reached in to the market because of their broad spectrum inhibitory activity for other matrix metalloproteases. Selectivity of tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme inhibition over matrix metalloproteases is of utmost importance. If selectivity is achieved successfully, side-effects can be over-ruled and this approach may become a novel therapy for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. This cytokine not only plays a pivotal role in inflammatory conditions but also in some cancerous conditions. Thus, successful targeting of tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme may result in multifunctional therapy.

  10. Necrosis in DU145 prostate cancer spheroids induces COX-2/mPGES-1-derived PGE2 to promote tumor growth and to inhibit T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Sha, Weixiao; Olesch, Catherine; Hanaka, Hiromi; Rådmark, Olof; Weigert, Andreas; Brüne, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) supports the growth of a spectrum of cancers. The potential benefit of COX-2-inhibiting non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for cancer treatment is however limited by their well-known cardiovascular side-effects. Therefore, targeting microsomal PGE synthase 1 (mPGES-1), the downstream enzyme in the COX-2-dependent pathway of PGE2 production might be attractive, although conflicting data regarding a potential tumor-supporting function of mPGES-1 were reported. We determined the impact of mPGES-1 in human DU145 prostate cancer cell growth. Surprisingly, knockdown of mPGES-1 did not alter growth of DU145 monolayer cells, but efficiently inhibited the growth of DU145 multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS). Opposed to MCTS, monolayer cells did not secrete PGE2 due to a lack of COX-2 expression, which was induced during spheroid formation. Pharmacological inhibition of COX-2 and mPGES-1 supported the crucial role of PGE2 for growth of MCTS. The functionality of spheroid-derived PGE2 was demonstrated by its ability to inhibit cytotoxic T cell activation. When investigating mechanisms of spheroid-induced COX-2 induction, we observed that among microenvironmental factors neither glucose deprivation, hypoxia nor tumor cell apoptosis enhanced COX-2 expression. Interestingly, interfering with apoptosis in spheroids triggered a shift towards necrosis, thus augmenting COX-2 expression. We went on to demonstrate that necrotic cells induced COX-2 mRNA expression and PGE2 secretion from live tumor cells. In conclusion, necrosis-dependent COX-2 upregulation in MCTS promoted PGE2 -dependent tumor growth and inhibited activated cytotoxic T cells. Hence, blocking mPGES-1 as a therapeutic option may be considered for COX-2/mPGES-1-positive solid cancers.

  11. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated activation mediates tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced MMP-13 up-regulation and metastasis in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hong Qiong; Zhang, Di; Shi, Yuan Yuan; You, Xiang; Shi, Lei; Li, Qing; Gao, Feng Guang

    2016-01-01

    Despite that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is involved in IL-6 promoted lung cancer chemotherapeutic resistance and metastasis, the exact role of ATM in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) increasing tumor migration is still elusive. In the present study, we demonstrated that TNF-α promoted lung cancer cell migration by up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13). Notably, by gene silencing or kinase inhibition, we proposed for the first time that ATM is a key up-stream regulator of TNF-α activated ERK/p38-NF-κB pathway. The existence of TNF-α secreted in autocrine or paracrine manner by components of tumor microenvironment highlights the significance of TNF-α in inflammation-associated tumor metastasis. Importantly, in vivo lung cancer metastasis test showed that ATM depletion actually reduce the number of metastatic nodules and cancer nests in lung tissues, verifying the critical role of ATM in metastasis. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that ATM, which could be activated by lung cancer-associated TNF-α, up-regulate MMP-13 expression and thereby augment tumor metastasis. Therefore, ATM might be a promising target for prevention of inflammation-associated lung cancer metastasis. PMID:27556690

  12. C1q Tumor Necrosis Factor α-related Protein Isoform 5 Is Increased in Mitochondrial DNA-depleted Myocytes and Activates AMP-activated Protein Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung-Yoon; Choi, Jung Hyun; Ryu, Hyun Su; Pak, Youngmi Kim; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Hong Kyu; Lee, Wan

    2009-01-01

    Depletion of mtDNA in myocytes causes insulin resistance and alters nuclear gene expression that may be involved in rescuing processes against cellular stress. Here we show that the expression of C1q tumor necrosis factor α-related protein isoform 5 (C1QTNF5) is drastically increased following depletion of mtDNA in myocytes. C1QTNF5 is homologous to adiponectin in respect to domain structure, and its expression and secretion from myocytes correlated negatively with the cellular mtDNA content. Similar to adiponectin, C1QTNF5 induced the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to increased cell surface recruitment of GLUT4 and increased glucose uptake. Treatment of cells with purified recombinant C1QTNF5 increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and stimulated fatty acid oxidation. C1QTNF5-mediated phosphorylation of AMPK or acetyl-CoA carboxylase was unaffected by depletion of adiponectin receptors such as AdipoR1 or AdipoR2, which indicated that adiponectin receptors do not participate in C1QTNF5-induced activation of AMPK. Serum C1QTNF5 levels were significantly higher in obese/diabetic animals (OLETF rats, ob/ob mice, and db/db mice). These results highlight C1QTNF5 as a putative biomarker for mitochondrial dysfunction and a potent activator of AMPK. PMID:19651784

  13. C1q tumor necrosis factor alpha-related protein isoform 5 is increased in mitochondrial DNA-depleted myocytes and activates AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Yoon; Choi, Jung Hyun; Ryu, Hyun Su; Pak, Youngmi Kim; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Hong Kyu; Lee, Wan

    2009-10-09

    Depletion of mtDNA in myocytes causes insulin resistance and alters nuclear gene expression that may be involved in rescuing processes against cellular stress. Here we show that the expression of C1q tumor necrosis factor alpha-related protein isoform 5 (C1QTNF5) is drastically increased following depletion of mtDNA in myocytes. C1QTNF5 is homologous to adiponectin in respect to domain structure, and its expression and secretion from myocytes correlated negatively with the cellular mtDNA content. Similar to adiponectin, C1QTNF5 induced the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to increased cell surface recruitment of GLUT4 and increased glucose uptake. Treatment of cells with purified recombinant C1QTNF5 increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and stimulated fatty acid oxidation. C1QTNF5-mediated phosphorylation of AMPK or acetyl-CoA carboxylase was unaffected by depletion of adiponectin receptors such as AdipoR1 or AdipoR2, which indicated that adiponectin receptors do not participate in C1QTNF5-induced activation of AMPK. Serum C1QTNF5 levels were significantly higher in obese/diabetic animals (OLETF rats, ob/ob mice, and db/db mice). These results highlight C1QTNF5 as a putative biomarker for mitochondrial dysfunction and a potent activator of AMPK.

  14. A stimulus-specific role for CREB-binding protein (CBP) in T cell receptor-activated tumor necrosis factor gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falvo, James V.; Brinkman, Brigitta M. N.; Tsytsykova, Alla V.; Tsai, Eunice Y.; Yao, Tso-Pang; Kung, Andrew L.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2000-04-01

    The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300 family of coactivator proteins regulates gene transcription through the integration of multiple signal transduction pathways. Here, we show that induction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-) gene expression in T cells stimulated by engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR) or by virus infection requires CBP/p300. Strikingly, in mice lacking one copy of the CBP gene, TNF- gene induction by TCR activation is inhibited, whereas virus induction of the TNF- gene is not affected. Consistent with these findings, the transcriptional activity of CBP is strongly potentiated by TCR activation but not by virus infection of T cells. Thus, CBP gene dosage and transcriptional activity are critical in TCR-dependent TNF-α gene expression, demonstrating a stimulus-specific requirement for CBP in the regulation of a specific gene.

  15. Cordycepin inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production via activating amp-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Li; Xu, Ying; Shen, Jie

    2014-07-08

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is elevated during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease (KD), which damages vascular endothelial cells to cause systemic vasculitis. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of cordycepin on TNFα expression in both lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages and ex vivo cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of KD patients. We found that cordycepin significantly suppressed LPS-induced TNFα expression and production in mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs)). Meanwhile, cordycepin alleviated TNFα production in KD patients' PBMCs. PBMCs from healthy controls had a much lower level of basal TNF-α content than that of KD patients. LPS-induced TNF-α production in healthy controls' PBMCs was also inhibited by cordycepin. For the mechanism study, we discovered that cordycepin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling in both KD patients' PBMCs and LPS-stimulated macrophages, which mediated cordycepin-induced inhibition against TNFα production. AMPK inhibition by its inhibitor (compound C) or by siRNA depletion alleviated cordycepin's effect on TNFα production. Further, we found that cordycepin inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation in LPS-stimulate RAW 264.7 cells or healthy controls' PBMCs. PBMCs of KD patients showed higher basal level of ROS and NF-κB activation, which was also inhibited by cordycepin co-treatment. In conclusion, our data showed that cordycepin inhibited TNFα production, which was associated with AMPK activation as well as ROS and NF-κB inhibition. The results of this study should have significant translational relevance in managing this devastating disease.

  16. Proteolytic activation of proapoptotic kinase protein kinase Cδ by tumor necrosis factor α death receptor signaling in dopaminergic neurons during neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of progressive dopaminergic neuronal loss in Parkinson’s disease (PD) remain poorly understood, largely due to the complex etiology and multifactorial nature of disease pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence from human studies and experimental models over the last decade have identified neuroinflammation as a potential pathophysiological mechanism contributing to disease progression. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) has recently emerged as the primary neuroinflammatory mediator that can elicit dopaminergic cell death in PD. However, the signaling pathways by which TNF mediates dopaminergic cell death have not been completely elucidated. Methods In this study we used a dopaminergic neuronal cell model and recombinant TNF to characterize intracellular signaling pathways activated during TNF-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Etanercept and neutralizing antibodies to tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) were used to block TNF signaling. We confirmed the results from our mechanistic studies in primary embryonic mesencephalic cultures and in vivo using the stereotaxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) model of nigral dopaminergic degeneration. Results TNF signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells triggered the activation of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), an isoform of the novel PKC family, by caspase-3 and caspase-8 dependent proteolytic cleavage. Both TNFR1 neutralizing antibodies and the soluble TNF receptor Etanercept blocked TNF-induced PKCδ proteolytic activation. Proteolytic activation of PKCδ was accompanied by translocation of the kinase to the nucleus. Notably, inhibition of PKCδ signaling by small interfering (si)RNA or overexpression of a PKCδ cleavage-resistant mutant protected against TNF-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death. Further, primary dopaminergic neurons obtained from PKCδ knockout (−/−) mice were resistant to TNF toxicity. The proteolytic activation of PKCδ in the mouse substantia nigra in the neuroinflammatory LPS

  17. Early activation of splenic macrophages by tumor necrosis factor alpha is important in determining the outcome of experimental histoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wu-Hsieh, B A; Lee, G S; Franco, M; Hofman, F M

    1992-01-01

    Experimental infection of animals with Histoplasma capsulatum caused a massive macrophage infiltration into the spleen and induced the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) locally. The cytokine was also produced in vitro by peritoneal exudate macrophages exposed to a large inoculum of yeast cells. Depletion of the cytokine by injection of polyclonal sheep anti-TNF-alpha antibody was detrimental to sublethally infected mice. Fungous burdens in the spleens of TNF-alpha-depleted mice were higher than they were in the infected control mice at days 2, 7, and 9 after infection, and the antibody-treated animals succumbed to the infection. Histopathological study of spleen sections revealed that splenic macrophages were not able to control proliferation of intracellular yeasts as a result of TNF-alpha depletion. It seems that TNF-alpha plays a role in early activation of splenic macrophages which is important in controlling the outcome of an infection. Images PMID:1398934

  18. A role for protein phosphatase 2A in regulating p38 mitogen activated protein kinase activation and tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression during influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Law, Anna H Y; Tam, Alex H M; Lee, Davy C W; Lau, Allan S Y

    2013-04-02

    Influenza viruses of avian origin continue to pose pandemic threats to human health. Some of the H5N1 and H9N2 virus subtypes induce markedly elevated cytokine levels when compared with the seasonal H1N1 virus. We previously showed that H5N1/97 hyperinduces tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha through p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). However, the detailed mechanisms of p38MAPK activation and TNF-alpha hyperinduction following influenza virus infections are not known. Negative feedback regulations of cytokine expression play important roles in avoiding overwhelming production of proinflammatory cytokines. Here we hypothesize that protein phosphatases are involved in the regulation of cytokine expressions during influenza virus infection. We investigated the roles of protein phosphatases including MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) and protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) in modulating p38MAPK activation and downstream TNF-alpha expressions in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (PBMac) infected with H9N2/G1 or H1N1 influenza virus. We demonstrate that H9N2/G1 virus activated p38MAPK and hyperinduced TNF-alpha production in PBMac when compared with H1N1 virus. H9N2/G1 induced PP2A activity in PBMac and, with the treatment of a PP2A inhibitor, p38MAPK phosphorylation and TNF-alpha production were further increased in the virus-infected macrophages. However, H9N2/G1 did not induce the expression of PP2A indicating that the activation of PP2A is not mediated by p38MAPK in virus-infected PBMac. On the other hand, PP2A may not be the targets of H9N2/G1 in the upstream of p38MAPK signaling pathways since H1N1 also induced PP2A activation in primary macrophages. Our results may provide new insights into the control of cytokine dysregulation.

  19. T Cell Cancer Therapy Requires CD40-CD40L Activation of Tumor Necrosis Factor and Inducible Nitric-Oxide-Synthase-Producing Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Ilaria; Zilio, Serena; Desantis, Giacomo; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Ugel, Stefano; Sasso, Maria Stella; Qualls, Joseph E; Kratochvill, Franz; Zanovello, Paola; Molon, Barbara; Ries, Carola H; Runza, Valeria; Hoves, Sabine; Bilocq, Amélie M; Bindea, Gabriela; Mazza, Emilia M C; Bicciato, Silvio; Galon, Jérôme; Murray, Peter J; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-09-12

    Effective cancer immunotherapy requires overcoming immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments. We found that local nitric oxide (NO) production by tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells is important for adoptively transferred CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells to destroy tumors. These myeloid cells are phenotypically similar to inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2)- and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-producing dendritic cells (DC), or Tip-DCs. Depletion of immunosuppressive, colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R)-dependent arginase 1(+) myeloid cells enhanced NO-dependent tumor killing. Tumor elimination via NOS2 required the CD40-CD40L pathway. We also uncovered a strong correlation between survival of colorectal cancer patients and NOS2, CD40, and TNF expression in their tumors. Our results identify a network of pro-tumor factors that can be targeted to boost cancer immunotherapies.

  20. Suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced nuclear factor κB activation and aromatase activity by capsaicin and its analog capsazepine.

    PubMed

    Luqman, Suaib; Meena, Abha; Marler, Laura E; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Pezzuto, John M

    2011-11-01

    Target-specific drugs, including natural products, offer promise for the amelioration of cancer and other human ailments. Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient present in chilies (Capsicum annuum L.), and capsazepine, a synthetic analog of capsaicin (collectively referred to as vanilloids), are known to possess a variety of pharmacological and physiological properties. In our continuous effort to discover and characterize cancer chemopreventive agents from natural products, we investigated the effect of vanilloids on nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) activation using stably transfected 293/NFκB-Luc human embryonic kidney cells induced by treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and on aromatase activity. Capsaicin and capsazepine blocked TNFα-induced NFκB activation in a dose-dependent manner with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values of 0.68 and 4.2 μM, respectively. No significant cytotoxicity was observed at the highest concentrations tested (53.1 μM for capsazepine and 65.5 μM for capsaicin). In addition, these vanilloids inhibited aromatase activity with IC(50) values of 13.6 and 8.8 μM, respectively. Computer-aided molecular docking studies showed docking scores indicative of good binding affinity of vanilloids with aromatase and NFκB. The highly conserved residues for capsaicin and capsazepine binding with NFκB p50 were Ser299 and Ile278 (H-bond 2.81Å) and with NFκB p100 were Ser6, Arg82, Val86, Arg90 (H-bond 2.89Å), Gly4, and Ser2 (H-bond 2.81Å). The amino acids Trp224, Arg435, and Val373 (H-bond 2.80Å) were found to be important for the binding of capsaicin and capsazepine with aromatase. Based on these findings, aromatase and NFκB are suggested as valid targets for these compounds; additional investigation of chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potential is required.

  1. Molecular interactions between T cells and fibroblast-like synoviocytes: role of membrane tumor necrosis factor-alpha on cytokine-activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Chinh N; Lundy, Steven K; White, Peter T; Endres, Judith L; Motyl, Christopher D; Gupta, Raj; Wilke, Cailin M; Shelden, Eric A; Chung, Kevin C; Urquhart, Andrew G; Fox, David A

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of fibroblast-like synoviocyte (FLS) transformation into an inflammatory phenotype in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is not fully understood. FLS interactions with invading leukocytes, particularly T cells, are thought to be a critical component of this pathological process. Resting T cells and T cells activated through the T-cell receptor have previously been shown to induce inflammatory cytokine production by FLS. More recently, a distinct population of T cells has been identified in RA synovium that phenotypically resembles cytokine-activated T (Tck) cells. Using time lapse microscopy, the interactions of resting, superantigen-activated, and cytokine-activated T cells with FLS were visualized. Rapid and robust adhesion of Tck and superantigen-activated T cells to FLS was observed that resulted in flattening of the T cells and a crawling movement on the FLS surface. Tck also readily activated FLS to produce interleukin IL-6 and IL-8 in a cell contact-dependent manner that was enhanced by exogenous IL-17. Although LFA-1 and ICAM-1 co-localized at the Tck-FLS synapse, blocking the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction did not substantially inhibit Tck effector function. However, antibody blocking of membrane tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on the Tck surface did inhibit FLS cytokine production, thus illustrating a novel mechanism for involvement of TNF-alpha in cell-cell interactions in RA synovium and for the effectiveness of TNF-alpha blockade in the treatment of RA.

  2. Analysis and Quantitation of NF-[kappa]B Nuclear Translocation in Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF-[alpha]) Activated Vascular Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuseler, John W.; Merrill, Dana M.; Rogers, Jennifer A.; Grisham, Matthew B.; Wolf, Robert E.

    2006-07-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-[kappa]B) is a heterodimeric transcription factor typically composed of p50 and p65 subunits and is a pleiotropic regulator of various inflammatory and immune responses. In quiescent cells, p50/p65 dimers are sequestered in the cytoplasm bound to its inhibitors, the I-[kappa]Bs, which prevent entry into the nucleus. Following cellular stimulation, the I-[kappa]Bs are rapidly degraded, activating NF-[kappa]B. The active form of NF-[kappa]B rapidly translocates into the nucleus, binding to consensus sequences in the promoter/enhancer region of various genes, promoting their transcription. In human vascular endothelial cells activated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha, the activation and translocation of NF-[kappa]B is rapid, reaching maximal nuclear localization by 30 min. In this study, the appearance of NF-[kappa]B (p65 subunit, p65-NF-[kappa]B) in the nucleus visualized by immunofluorescence and quantified by morphometric image analysis (integrated optical density, IOD) is compared to the appearance of activated p65-NF-[kappa]B protein in the nucleus determined biochemically. The appearance of p65-NF-[kappa]B in the nucleus measured by fluorescence image analysis and biochemically express a linear correlation (R2 = 0.9477). These data suggest that localization and relative protein concentrations of NF-[kappa]B can be reliably determined from IOD measurements of the immunofluorescent labeled protein.

  3. The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1α and tumor necrosis factor α promote the expression and secretion of proteolytically active cathepsin S from human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Caglič, Dejan; Repnik, Urška; Jedeszko, Christopher; Kosec, Gregor; Miniejew, Catherine; Kindermann, Maik; Vasiljeva, Olga; Turk, Vito; Wendt, K Ulrich; Sloane, Bonnie F; Goldring, Mary B; Turk, Boris

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are destructive joint diseases that involve the loss of articular cartilage. Degradation of cartilage extracellular matrix is believed to occur due to imbalance between the catabolic and anabolic processes of resident chondrocytes. Previous work has suggested that various lysosomal cysteine cathepsins participate in cartilage degeneration; however, their exact roles in disease development and progression have not been elucidated. In order to study degradation processes under conditions resembling the in vivo milieu of the cartilage, we cultivated chondrocytes on a type II collagen-containing matrix. Stimulation of the cultivated chondrocytes with interleukin-1α and/or tumor necrosis factor α resulted in a time-dependent increase in cathepsin S expression and induced its secretion into the conditioned media. Using a novel bioluminescent activity-based probe, we were able to demonstrate a significant increase in proteolytic activity of cathepsin S in the conditioned media of proinflammatory cytokine-stimulated chondrocytes. For the first time, cathepsin S was demonstrated to be secreted from chondrocytes upon stimulation with the proinflammatory cytokines, and displayed proteolytic activity in culture supernatants. Its stability at neutral pH and potent proteolytic activity on extracellular matrix components mean that cathepsin S may contribute significantly to cartilage degradation and may thus be considered a potential drug target in joint diseases.

  4. Ginsenosides compound K and Rh(2) inhibit tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced activation of the NF-kappaB and JNK pathways in human astroglial cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyungsun; Kim, Myungsun; Ryu, Jeonghee; Choi, Chulhee

    2007-06-21

    Ginsenosides, the main component of Panax ginseng, have been known for the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of ginsenosides on activated astroglial cells. Among 13 different ginsenosides, intestinal bacterial metabolites Rh(2) and compound K (C-K) showed a significant inhibitory effect on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in human astroglial cells. Pretreatment with C-K or Rh(2) suppressed TNF-alpha-induced phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha kinase and the subsequent phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha. Additionally, the same treatment inhibited TNF-alpha-induced phosphorylation of MKK4 and the subsequent activation of the JNK-AP-1 pathway. The inhibitory effect of ginsenosides on TNF-alpha-induced activation of the NF-kappaB and JNK pathways was not observed in human monocytic U937 cells. These results collectively indicate that ginsenoside metabolites C-K and Rh(2) exert anti-inflammatory effects by the inhibition of both NF-kappaB and JNK pathways in a cell-specific manner.

  5. A pathogenic trace of Tannerella forsythia - shedding of soluble fully active tumor necrosis factor α from the macrophage surface by karilysin.

    PubMed

    Bryzek, D; Ksiazek, M; Bielecka, E; Karim, A Y; Potempa, B; Staniec, D; Koziel, J; Potempa, J

    2014-12-01

    Tannerella forsythia is implicated as a pathogen causing chronic and aggressive periodontitis. However, its virulence factors, including numerous putative proteases, are mostly uncharacterized. Karilysin is a newly described matrix metalloprotease-like enzyme of T. forsythia. Since pathogen-derived proteases may affect the host defense system via modulation of the cytokine network, the aim of this study was to determine the influence of karilysin on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The results showed that karilysin cleaved the membrane form of TNF-α on the surface of macrophages, and that this led to an increased concentration of soluble TNF-α in the conditioned medium. Importantly, despite partial degradation of soluble TNF-α by karilysin, the released cytokine retained its biological activity, inducing apoptosis and stimulating autocrine pathway of pro-inflammatory gene expression. Notably, the observed effect required proteolytic activity by karilysin, since a catalytically inactive mutant of the enzyme did not affect TNF-α secretion. The shedding was independent of the activity of ADAM17, a major endogenous TNF-α converting enzyme. Karilysin-dependent TNF-α release from the cell surface is likely to occur in vivo because human plasma, the main constituent of gingival crevicular fluid, only slightly affected the sheddase activity of karilysin. Taken together, these results indicate that karilysin modulates the host immune response through regulation of TNF-α secretion, and should therefore be considered as a new virulence factor of T. forsythia.

  6. Activated microglia provide a neuroprotective role by balancing glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor and tumor necrosis factor-α secretion after subacute cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianping; Yang, Zhitang; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Yuanzheng; Chen, Yibing

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are the major immune cells in the central nervous system and play a key role in brain injury pathology. However, the role of activated microglia after subacute cerebral ischemia (SCI) remains unknown. To address this issue, we established a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) rat model and treated pMCAO rats with N-(6-oxo-5,6-dihydro-phenanthridin-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylacetamide (PJ34) (an inhibitor of microglial activation), or with vehicle alone. Finally, we determined the differences between the PJ34-and vehicle-treated rats with respect to neurological deficits, infarct volume, neuronal loss and the expression of CD11b (a marker of microglial activation), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) at 1, 3 and 7 days after treatment. We found that the PJ34-treated rats had more severe neurological deficits and a larger infarct volume and exhibited a decreased CD11b expression, more neuronal loss, decreased expression of GDNF mRNA and protein but increased expression of TNF-α mRNA and protein compared with the vehicle-treated rats at 3 and 7 days after treatment. These results indicate that activated microglia provide a neuroprotective role through balancing GDNF and TNF-α expression following SCI.

  7. Purification of human immunoglobulin G autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor using affinity chromatography and magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Sennikov, S V; Golikova, E A; Kireev, F D; Lopatnikova, J A

    2013-04-30

    Autoantibodies to cytokines are important biological effector molecules that can regulate cytokine activities. The aim of the study was to develop a protocol to purify autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor from human serum, for use as a calibration material to determine the absolute content of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The proposed protocol includes a set of affinity chromatography methods, namely, Bio-Gel P6DG sorbent to remove albumin from serum, Protein G Sepharose 4 Fast Flow to obtain a total immunoglobulin G fraction of serum immunoglobulins, and Affi-Gel 15 to obtain specifically antibodies to tumor necrosis factor. The addition of a magnetic separation procedure to the protocol eliminated contaminant tumor necrosis factor from the fraction of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor. The protocol generated a pure fraction of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor, and enabled us to determine the absolute concentrations of different subclasses of immunoglobulin G autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor in apparently healthy donors.

  8. Immobilized alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone 10-13 (GKPV) inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulated NF-kappaB activity.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J M; Moir, A J G; Carlson, K; Yang, Y; MacNeil, S; Haycock, J W

    2006-02-01

    alpha-MSH is an anti-inflammatory peptide which signals by binding to the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) and elevating cyclic AMP in several different cells and tissues. The carboxyl terminal peptides of alpha-MSH (KPV/GKPV) are the smallest minimal sequences that prevent inflammation, but it is not known if they operate via MC1R or cyclic AMP. The aim of this study was to examine the intracellular signaling potential of the GKPV peptide sequence when immobilized to polystyrene beads via a polyethylene glycol moiety. Beads containing an immobilized GKPV peptide were investigated for their ability to inhibit proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) stimulated activation of NF-kappaB in HBL cells stably transfected with an NF-kappaB-luciferase reporter construct. Peptide functionalized beads were compared with the ability of soluble peptide alone (alpha-MSH or GKPV) or non-functionalized beads to inhibit TNF-alpha stimulated activation of NF-kappaB. GKPV peptide functionalized beads significantly inhibited NF-kappaB-luciferase activity in comparison to beads containing no peptide moiety in one of two growths conditions investigated. Soluble alpha-MSH and GKPV peptides were also confirmed to inhibit NF-kappaB-luciferase. The present study suggests that the carboxyl terminal MSH peptide acts via a cell receptor-based mechanism and furthermore may support the potential use of such immobilized ligands for anti-inflammatory therapeutic use.

  9. MIF-driven activation of macrophages induces killing of intracellular Trypanosoma cruzi dependent on endogenous production of tumor necrosis factor, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Cutrullis, Romina A; Petray, Patricia B; Corral, Ricardo S

    2017-02-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a key player in innate immunity. MIF has been considered critical for controlling acute infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Our study aimed to analyze whether MIF could favor microbicidal activity of the macrophage, a site where T. cruzi grows and the initial effector cell against this parasite. Using murine macrophages infected in vitro, we examined the effect of MIF on their parasiticidal ability and attempted to identify inflammatory agents involved in MIF-induced protection. Our findings show that MIF is readily secreted from peritoneal macrophages upon T. cruzi infection. MIF activates both primary and J774 phagocytes boosting the endogenous production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha via mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 signaling, as well as the release of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, leading to enhanced pathogen elimination. MIF can also potentiate the effect of interferon-gamma on T. cruzi killing by J774 and mouse peritoneal macrophages, rendering these cells more competent in reducing intracellular parasite burden. The present results unveil a novel innate immune pathway that contributes to host defense and broaden our understanding of the regulation of inflammatory mediators implicated in early parasite containment that is decisive for resistance to T. cruzi infection.

  10. Intermolecular Binding between TIFA-FHA and TIFA-pT Mediates Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Stimulation and NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chia-Chi Flora; Weng, Jui-Hung; Wei, Tong-You Wade; Wu, Pei-Yu Gabriel; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Chen, Yu-Hou; Wang, Shun-Chang; Qin, Dongyan; Hung, Chin-Chun; Chen, Shui-Tsung; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Shyy, John Y.-J.

    2012-01-01

    The forkhead-associated (FHA) domain recognizes phosphothreonine (pT) with high specificity and functional diversity. TIFA (TRAF-interacting protein with an FHA domain) is the smallest FHA-containing human protein. Its overexpression was previously suggested to provoke NF-κB activation, yet its exact roles in this signaling pathway and the underlying molecular mechanism remain unclear. Here we identify a novel threonine phosphorylation site on TIFA and show that this phosphorylated threonine (pT) binds with the FHA domain of TIFA, leading to TIFA oligomerization and TIFA-mediated NF-κB activation. Detailed analysis indicated that unphosphorylated TIFA exists as an intrinsic dimer and that the FHA-pT9 binding occurs between different dimers of TIFA. In addition, silencing of endogenous TIFA resulted in attenuation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-mediated downstream signaling. We therefore propose that the TIFA FHA-pT9 binding provides a previously unidentified link between TNF-α stimulation and NF-κB activation. The intermolecular FHA-pT9 binding between dimers also represents a new mechanism for the FHA domain. PMID:22566686

  11. Intermolecular binding between TIFA-FHA and TIFA-pT mediates tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulation and NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chia-Chi Flora; Weng, Jui-Hung; Wei, Tong-You Wade; Wu, Pei-Yu Gabriel; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Chen, Yu-Hou; Wang, Shun-Chang; Qin, Dongyan; Hung, Chin-Chun; Chen, Shui-Tsung; Wang, Andrew H-J; Shyy, John Y-J; Tsai, Ming-Daw

    2012-07-01

    The forkhead-associated (FHA) domain recognizes phosphothreonine (pT) with high specificity and functional diversity. TIFA (TRAF-interacting protein with an FHA domain) is the smallest FHA-containing human protein. Its overexpression was previously suggested to provoke NF-κB activation, yet its exact roles in this signaling pathway and the underlying molecular mechanism remain unclear. Here we identify a novel threonine phosphorylation site on TIFA and show that this phosphorylated threonine (pT) binds with the FHA domain of TIFA, leading to TIFA oligomerization and TIFA-mediated NF-κB activation. Detailed analysis indicated that unphosphorylated TIFA exists as an intrinsic dimer and that the FHA-pT9 binding occurs between different dimers of TIFA. In addition, silencing of endogenous TIFA resulted in attenuation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-mediated downstream signaling. We therefore propose that the TIFA FHA-pT9 binding provides a previously unidentified link between TNF-α stimulation and NF-κB activation. The intermolecular FHA-pT9 binding between dimers also represents a new mechanism for the FHA domain.

  12. Matrix metalloprotein-9 activation under cell-to-cell interaction between endothelial cells and monocytes: possible role of hypoxia and tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuko; Osanai, Tomohiro; Nishizaki, Fumie; Sukekawa, Takanori; Izumiyama, Kei; Sagara, Shigeki; Okumura, Ken

    2012-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 plays an important role in cardiovascular events. However, the mechanisms underlying in vivo activation of MMP-9 are largely unknown. We investigated the secretion and activation of MMP-9 under a cell-to-cell interaction, and the effects of hypoxia and cytokine. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and THP-1 (human monocyte cell line) were cultured individually, or cocultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In a coculture of HUVEC and THP-1, proMMP-9 secretion was increased twofold compared with individual culture of HUVEC and THP-1, whereas MMP-2 secretion was unchanged. The increase in proMMP-9 secretion was suppressed by antiadhesion molecule antibodies and mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors, PD98059 (MAPK/ERK kinase1 inhibitor) and SP600125 (Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor). ProMMP-9 secretion was increased by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α at 50 ng/ml (P < 0.05) but was not activated under normoxic (20%) conditions. ProMMP-9 in coculture was activated under hypoxic (<1%) conditions, and was potentiated by TNF-α (both P < 0.05). To further investigate the mechanism of hypoxia-induced MMP-9 activation, heat shock protein (Hsp)90, which was suggested to be related to MMP-9 activation, was measured by Western blot analysis. The ratio of Hsp90 to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was increased in hypoxic (<1%) coculture conditions with TNF-α (P < 0.05). Treatment with geldanamycin and 17-DMAG (Hsp90 inhibitor) suppressed the active form of MMP-9. Cell-to-cell interaction between endothelial cells and monocytes promotes proMMP-9 synthesis and secretion. Hypoxia and inflammation are suggested to play an important role in activating proMMP-9, presumably via Hsp90.

  13. The immune adaptor molecule SARM modulates tumor necrosis factor alpha production and microglia activation in the brainstem and restricts West Nile Virus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Szretter, Kristy J; Samuel, Melanie A; Gilfillan, Susan; Fuchs, Anja; Colonna, Marco; Diamond, Michael S

    2009-09-01

    Sterile alpha and HEAT/Armadillo motif (SARM) is a highly conserved Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-containing adaptor protein that is believed to negatively regulate signaling of the pathogen recognition receptors Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TLR4. To test its physiological function in the context of a microbial infection, we generated SARM(-/-) mice and evaluated the impact of this deficiency on the pathogenesis of West Nile virus (WNV), a neurotropic flavivirus that requires TLR signaling to restrict infection. Although SARM was preferentially expressed in cells of the central nervous system (CNS), studies with primary macrophages, neurons, or astrocytes showed no difference in viral growth kinetics. In contrast, viral replication was increased specifically in the brainstem of SARM(-/-) mice, and this was associated with enhanced mortality after inoculation with a virulent WNV strain. A deficiency of SARM was also linked to reduced levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), decreased microglia activation, and increased neuronal death in the brainstem after WNV infection. Thus, SARM appears to be unique among the TIR adaptor molecules, since it functions to restrict viral infection and neuronal injury in a brain region-specific manner, possibly by modulating the activation of resident CNS inflammatory cells.

  14. Salvianolic Acid B Down-regulates Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Activity and Expression in Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Le; Guan, Yun-Qian; Du, Zhong-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is a bioactive water-soluble compound of Salviae miltiorrhizae, a traditional herbal medicine that has been used clinically for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This study sought to evaluate the effect of Sal B on matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and on the underlying mechanisms in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-activated human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs), a cell model of Kawasaki disease. Methods: HCAECs were pretreated with 1–10 μmol/L of Sal B, and then stimulated by TNF-α at different time points. The protein expression and activity of MMP-9 were determined by Western blot assay and gelatin zymogram assay, respectively. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation was detected with immunofluorescence, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and Western blot assay. Protein expression levels of mitogen-activated protein kinase (c-Jun N-terminal kinase [JNK], extra-cellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK], and p38) were determined by Western blot assay. Results: After HCAECs were exposed to TNF-α, 1–10 μmol/L Sal B significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced MMP-9 expression and activity. Furthermore, Sal B significantly decreased IκBα phosphorylation and p65 nuclear translocation in HCAECs stimulated with TNF-α for 30 min. In addition, Sal B decreased the phosphorylation of JNK and ERK1/2 proteins in cells treated with TNF-α for 10 min. Conclusions: The data suggested that Sal B suppressed TNF-α-induced MMP-9 expression and activity by blocking the activation of NF-κB, JNK, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. PMID:26415806

  15. Phytochemicals of Aristolochia tagala and Curcuma caesia exert anticancer effect by tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated decrease in nuclear factor kappaB binding activity

    PubMed Central

    Hadem, Khetbadei Lysinia Hynniewta; Sharan, Rajeshwar Nath; Kma, Lakhan

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The active compounds or metabolites of herbal plants exert a definite physiological action on the human body and thus are widely used in human therapy for various diseases including cancer. Previous studies by our group have reported the anticarcinogenic properties of the two herbal plants extracts (HPE) of Aristolochia tagala (AT) Cham. and Curcuma caesia (CC) Roxb. in diethylnitrosamine-induced mouse liver cancer in vivo. The anticarcinogenic properties of these extracts may be due to the active compounds present in them. Objectives: Our objective was to analyze the phytochemical constituents present in AT and CC, to assay their antioxidant properties and to determine their role in a possible intervention on tumor progression. Materials and Methods: Qualitative and quantitative analysis of constituent with anticancer properties present in the crude methanol extract of the two plants CC and AT was carried out following standard methods. Separation of the phytochemical compounds was done by open column chromatography. The extracts were eluted out with gradients of chloroform-methanol solvents. Ultraviolet-visible spectra of individual fractions were recorded, and the fractions were combined based on their λmax. The free radical scavenging activity of crude extracts and fractions obtained was also determined; the radical scavenging activity was expressed as IC50. High-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) analysis of fractionated compounds was carried out to identify partially the phytochemical compounds. The anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity of AT and CC extracts was studied in DEN induced BALB/c mice by analyzing the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in serum and the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) binding activity in nuclear extracts of the liver. Results: It was observed that both AT and CC contained compounds such as phenolics, tannins, flavonoids, terpenoids, etc., and both extracts exhibited antioxidant capacity. HPTLC

  16. Borage oil reduction of rheumatoid arthritis activity may be mediated by increased cAMP that suppresses tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Kast, R E

    2001-11-01

    Recent double blind studies have shown some benefit of borage oil in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha has been shown to be a central mediator of inflammatory and joint destructive processes in rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, evidence from published research is reviewed that indicates gamma linolenic acid component of borage oil increases prostaglandin E levels that increase cAMP levels that in turn suppress tumor necrosis factor-alpha synthesis. If this biochemical path of borage oil is correct then (1) concomitant non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use would tend to undermine borage oil effects, and (2) borage oil would be contraindicated in pregnancy given the teratogenic and labor inducing effects of prostaglandin E agonists.

  17. Aloe emodin inhibits the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Harhaji, Ljubica; Mijatovic, Sanja; Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Popadic, Dusan; Isakovic, Aleksandra; Todorovic-Markovic, Biljana; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2007-07-30

    We demonstrate the capacity of an herbal anthraquinone aloe emodin to reduce the cytotoxicity of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) towards L929 mouse fibrosarcoma and U251 human glioma cell lines. Aloe emodin inhibited both TNF-induced cell necrosis and apoptosis, but it did not reduce cell death induced by UV radiation or hydrogen peroxide. Aloe emodin inhibited both basal and TNF-triggered activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and a selective blockade of ERK activation mimicked the cytoprotective action of the drug. On the other hand, aloe emodin did not affect TNF-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or generation of reactive oxygen species. The combination of aloe emodin and TNF caused an intracellular appearance of acidified autophagic vesicles, and the inhibition of autophagy with bafilomycin or 3-methyladenine efficiently blocked the cytoprotective action of aloe emodin. These data indicate that aloe emodin could prevent TNF-triggered cell death through mechanisms involving induction of autophagy and blockade of ERK activation.

  18. A poly(dA-dT) upstream activating sequence binds high-mobility group I protein and contributes to lymphotoxin (tumor necrosis factor-beta) gene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Fashena, S J; Reeves, R; Ruddle, N H

    1992-01-01

    Lymphotoxin (LT; also known as tumor necrosis factor-beta) is a pleiotropic cytokine whose expression is tightly regulated in most cells and is repressed prior to activation signals. In some early B cells and Abelson murine leukemia virus-transformed pre-B-cell lines, LT mRNA is constitutively expressed. To examine the molecular regulation of the LT gene in a constitutively expressing cell line, we studied the Abelson murine leukemia virus-transformed lines PD and PD31. As demonstrated by primer extension analysis, constitutively expressed pre-B-cell-derived and inducibly expressed T-cell-derived LT mRNA were initiated at the same cap sites and predominant cap site utilization was conserved. Furthermore, we delineated an upstream activating sequence that was an important functional component of lymphotoxin transcriptional activation in PD and PD31 cells. The upstream activating sequence was localized to an essentially homopolymeric A + T-rich region (LT-612/-580), which was bound specifically by recombinant human high-mobility group I protein (HMG-I) and a PD/PD31 nuclear extract HMG-I (HMG-I-like) protein. The nuclear extract-derived HMG-I-like protein was recognized by anti-HMG-I antibody and bound to LT DNA to effect an electrophoretic mobility shift identical to that of bound recombinant human HMG-I. These findings implicate HMG-I in the regulation of constitutive lymphotoxin gene expression in PD and PD31 cells. HMG-I and HMG-I-like proteins could facilitate the formation of active initiation complexes by altering chromatin structure and/or by creating recognition sites for other activator DNA-binding proteins, some of which may be unique to or uniquely modified in these constitutive LT mRNA producers. Images PMID:1732752

  19. Tumor necrosis factor alpha activates transcription of the NADPH oxidase organizer 1 (NOXO1) gene and upregulates superoxide production in colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kuwano, Yuki; Tominaga, Kumiko; Kawahara, Tsukasa; Sasaki, Hidekazu; Takeo, Keiko; Nishida, Kensei; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Tomoko; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2008-12-15

    NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) is a multicomponent enzyme consisting of p22(phox), Nox organizer 1 (NOXO1), Nox1 activator 1, and Rac1. Interleukin-1beta, flagellin, interferon-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) similarly induced Nox1 in a colon cancer cell line (T84), whereas only TNF-alpha fully induced NOXO1 and upregulated superoxide-producing activity by ninefold. This upregulation was canceled by knockdown of NOXO1 with small interfering RNAs. TNF-alpha rapidly phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2, followed by phosphorylation of c-Jun and c-Fos and appearance of an AP-1 binding activity within 30 min. We cloned the 5' flank of the human NOXO1 gene (-3888 to +263 bp), and found that the region between -585 and -452 bp, which contains consensus elements of YY-1, AP-1, and Ets, and the GC-rich region encoding three putative binding sites for SP-1, was crucial for TNF-alpha-dependent promoter activity. Serial mutation analysis of the elements identified an AP-1 binding site (from -561 to -551 bp, agtAAGtcatg) as a crucial element for TNF-alpha-stimulated transcription of the human NOXO1 gene, which was also confirmed by the AP-1 decoy experiments. Thus, TNF-alpha acts as a potent activator of Nox1-based oxidase in colon epithelial cells, suggesting a potential role of this oxidase in inflammation of the colon.

  20. Apolipoprotein A-I inhibits the production of interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha by blocking contact-mediated activation of monocytes by T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hyka, N; Dayer, J M; Modoux, C; Kohno, T; Edwards, C K; Roux-Lombard, P; Burger, D

    2001-04-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), essential components in the pathogenesis of immunoinflammatory diseases, are strongly induced in monocytes by direct contact with stimulated T lymphocytes. This study demonstrates that adult human serum (HS) but not fetal calf or cord blood serum displays inhibitory activity toward the contact-mediated activation of monocytes by stimulated T cells, decreasing the production of both TNF-alpha and IL-1beta. Fractionation of HS and N-terminal microsequencing as well as electroelution of material subjected to preparative electrophoresis revealed that apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I), a "negative" acute-phase protein, was the inhibitory factor. Functional assays and flow cytometry analyses show that high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated apo A-I inhibits contact-mediated activation of monocytes by binding to stimulated T cells, thus inhibiting TNF-alpha and IL-1beta production at both protein and messenger RNA levels. Furthermore, apo A-I inhibits monocyte inflammatory functions in peripheral blood mononuclear cells activated by either specific antigens or lectins without affecting cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a new anti-inflammatory activity of HDL-associated apo A-I that might have modulating functions in nonseptic conditions. Therefore, because HDL has been shown to bind and neutralize lipopolysaccharide, HDL appears to play an important part in modulating both acute and chronic inflammation. The novel anti-inflammatory function of apo A-I reported here might lead to new therapeutic approaches in inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and atherosclerosis.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor expressed by primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells is regulated by alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Renauld, A E; Spengler, R N

    2002-01-15

    Neuron expression of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and the regulation of the levels of TNF by alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation were investigated. Adult rat hippocampal neurons and phorbol ester (PMA)-differentiated SH-SY5Y cells were examined. Intracellular levels of TNF mRNA accumulation, as well as TNF protein and that released into the supernatant were quantified by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry and bioanalysis, respectively. Both neuron cultures demonstrated constitutive production of TNF. Activation of the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor increased intracellular levels of TNF mRNA and protein in SH-SY5Y cells after addition of graded concentrations of the selective agonist, Brimonidine (UK-14304) to parallel cultures. Intracellular levels of mRNA were increased in a concentration-dependent fashion within 15 min of UK-14304 addition and were sustained during 24 hr of receptor activation. In addition, the levels of TNF in the supernatant were increased in both types of neuron cultures within 15 min of alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation. Furthermore, levels of TNF significantly increased in the supernatants of both neuron cultures after potassium-induced depolarization. A reduction in this depolarization-induced release occurred in hippocampal neuron cultures after exposure to the sympathomimetic tyramine with media replacement to deplete endogenous catecholamines. This finding reveals a role for endogenous catecholamines in the regulation of TNF production. Potassium-induced depolarization resulted in the release of TNF in hippocampal neuron cultures within 15 min but not until 24 hr in SH-SY5Y cultures demonstrating a temporally mediated event dependent upon cell type. Neuron expression of TNF, regulated by alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation demonstrates not only how a neuron controls its own production of this pleiotropic cytokine, but also displays a normal role for neurons in directing the many functions of TNF.

  2. Activation, Impaired Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Production, and Deficiency of Circulating Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells in Patients with Scrub Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Won, Eun Jeong; Cho, Young-Nan; Jung, Hyun-Ju; Kwon, Yong-Soo; Kee, Hae Jin; Ju, Jae Kyun; Kim, Jung-Chul; Kim, Uh Jin; Jang, Hee-Chang; Jung, Sook-In; Kee, Seung-Jung; Park, Yong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Background Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells contribute to protection against certain microorganism infections. However, little is known about the role of MAIT cells in Orientia tsutsugamushi infection. Hence, the aims of this study were to examine the level and function of MAIT cells in patients with scrub typhus and to evaluate the clinical relevance of MAIT cell levels. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirty-eight patients with scrub typhus and 53 health control subjects were enrolled in the study. The patients were further divided into subgroups according to disease severity. MAIT cell level and function in the peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry. Circulating MAIT cell levels were found to be significantly reduced in scrub typhus patients. MAIT cell deficiency reflects a variety of clinical conditions. In particular, MAT cell levels reflect disease severity. MAIT cells in scrub typhus patients displayed impaired tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production, which was restored during the remission phase. In addition, the impaired production of TNF-α by MAIT cells was associated with elevated CD69 expression. Conclusions This study shows that circulating MAIT cells are activated, numerically deficient, and functionally impaired in TNF-α production in patients with scrub typhus. These abnormalities possibly contribute to immune system dysregulation in scrub typhus infection. PMID:27463223

  3. Effects of doxepin on brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha, mitogen-activated protein kinase 14, and AKT1 genes expression in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Eidelkhani, Nastaran; Radahmadi, Maryam; Kazemi, Mohammad; Rafiee, Laleh; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Reisi, Parham

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that doxepin in addition to enhancement of noradrenaline and serotonin levels may have neuroprotective effects. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of doxepin on gene expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), mitogen-activated protein kinase 14 (MAPK14), and serine-threonine protein kinase AKT1 in rat hippocampus. Materials and Methods: Male rats were divided randomly into three groups: Control, doxepin 1 mg/kg, and doxepin 5 mg/kg. Rats received an i.p injection of doxepin for 21 days. Then the hippocampi were dissected for the measurement of the expression of BDNF, TNF-α, MAPK14, and AKT1 genes. Results: Our results showed no significant effects of doxepin on gene expression of BDNF, TNF-α, MAPK14, and AKT1 genes in the hippocampus. Conclusions: These results did not show significant effects of doxepin on the genes that affect the neuronal survival in intact animals. However, more studies need to be done, especially in models associated with neuronal damage. PMID:26601091

  4. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and lymphotoxin production in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, C; Jones, D B; Morrison, K; Schlüter, C; Feist, W; Ulmer, A J; Arnoldi, J; Matthes, J; Diamantstein, T; Flad, H D

    1990-08-01

    It is likely that the characteristic histologic features of Hodgkin's disease reflect cytokine production by the tumor cell population. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and lymphotoxin (tumor necrosis factor beta [TNF-beta]) are important inflammatory mediators with wide-ranging effects within the lymphoreticular system. The aim of the present study was to investigate TNF-alpha and lymphotoxin production in the Hodgkin's disease-derived cell lines L428 and L540. At the product level, both cytokines could be demonstrated by immunostaining with specific monoclonal antibodies. TNF-alpha could be demonstrated by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in culture supernatants from both cell lines as well as in cell lysates of L428 and L540 cells. Cytotoxic activity could be achieved only in L428 supernatants. This cytotoxic activity could not be blocked by the addition of a polyclonal antibody against TNF-alpha, but was partially inhibited with the monoclonal antibody against lymphotoxin. Synthesis of TNF-alpha and lymphotoxin in both L428 and L540 was confirmed by demonstrating the intracellular-specific messenger RNA (mRNA) using specific cDNA clones in Northern blot analysis. In situ hybridization studies with the TNF-alpha cDNA probe gave positive hybridization signals in L428 and in L540. These results demonstrate the transcription, translation, and export of TNF-alpha and lymphotoxin in cultured Hodgkin's disease-derived cell lines. In addition, results of preliminary experiments are presented in which we demonstrate Reed-Sternberg cells positive for TNF-alpha protein and mRNA in different Hodgkin's disease tissue biopsies, indicating that, at least for TNF-alpha, our cell line data are relevant to the neoplastic population present in Hodgkin's disease tissue.

  5. Andrographolide Inhibits Nuclear Factor-κB Activation through JNK-Akt-p65 Signaling Cascade in Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Stimulated Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Ying; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Lee, Lin-Wen; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Critical vascular inflammation leads to vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases, including abdominal aortic aneurysms, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Andrographolide is the most active and critical constituent isolated from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata, a herbal medicine widely used for treating anti-inflammation in Asia. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of andrographolide in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) exposed to a proinflammatory stimulus, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Treating TNF-α-stimulated VSMCs with andrographolide suppressed the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in a concentration-dependent manner. A reduction in TNF-α-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Akt, and p65 phosphorylation was observed in andrographolide-treated VSMCs. However, andrographolide affected neither IκBα degradation nor p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation under these conditions. Both treatment with LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt inhibitor, and treatment with SP600125, a JNK inhibitor, markedly reversed the andrographolide-mediated inhibition of p65 phosphorylation. In addition, LY294002 and SP600125 both diminished Akt phosphorylation, whereas LY294002 had no effects on JNK phosphorylation. These results collectively suggest that therapeutic interventions using andrographolide can benefit the treatment of vascular inflammatory diseases, and andrographolide-mediated inhibition of NF-κB activity in TNF-α-stimulated VSMCs occurs through the JNK-Akt-p65 signaling cascade, an IκBα-independent mechanism. PMID:25114952

  6. Tumor necrosis factor-α -308G/A polymorphism is associated with active vitiligo vulgaris in a northeastern Mexican population

    PubMed Central

    SALINAS-SANTANDER, MAURICIO; DÍAZ-GARCÍA, DANIEL; ROJAS-MARTÍNEZ, AUGUSTO; CANTÚ-SALINAS, CRISTINA; SÁNCHEZ-DOMÍNGUEZ, CELIA; REYES-LÓPEZ, MIGUEL; CERDA-FLORES, RICARDO M.; OCAMPO-CANDIANI, JORGE; ORTIZ-LÓPEZ, ROCÍO

    2012-01-01

    Vitiligo is a skin disease characterized by depigmentation. Its etiopathogenesis is unclear, but it has been associated with autoimmune processes. Gene polymorphisms in the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) have been associated with several imflammatory diseases. In particular, the -308G/A polymorphism in the gene promoter region has been reported to be associated with increased plasma levels of TNF-α and with an increased risk to develop autoimmune diseases. To date, this polymorphism has not been associated with vitiligo. To assess a possible association between the TNF-α -308G/A and vitiligo vulgaris (VV), 198 vitiligo patients and 395 control subjects were recruited for the study. A complete demographic and clinical profile of each case was registered to analyze the possible risk factors of vitiligo. Genomic DNA isolated from peri pheral blood was subjected to PCR-RFLP for genotyping of the TNF-α -308G/A polymorphism. Causal associations were determined by χ2 test and their respective OR was assessed in a 2×2 contingency table. When population variables of type of vitiligo, gender, age of disease onset, and active disease status were considered, an association between active VV and the TNF-α GA genotype was found (P=0.0295, OR=2.0; 95% CI 1.01-3.93). All other variables were irrelevant to vitiligo. Our data suggest a possible association between the TNF-α -308 GA genotype and the active form of VV in a Mexican population. PMID:22969989

  7. Induction of sensitivity to the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor alpha by adenovirus E1A is independent of transformation and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Ames, R S; Holskin, B; Mitcho, M; Shalloway, D; Chen, M J

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that expression of the adenovirus E1A 12S or 13S products in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts induces susceptibility to the cytotoxic actions of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). A large number of studies have mapped the multiple biological functions of the 12S and 13S products to three highly conserved regions (CR) within the E1A sequence. Here we used plasmids coding for E1A deletion and point mutants in these regions to generate target cell lines for TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays to determine which regions and functions are necessary for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. Expression of CR1 was required for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. This finding did not reflect a requirement for transforming or transcriptional repression activity, since some mutants that were defective in both of these properties were able to induce TNF alpha sensitivity. CR2 transformation-defective point mutants, but not a CR2/3 region deletion mutant, were also able to induce sensitivity. In addition, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the retroviral transcription activators tat from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and tax from human T-lymphotropic virus type I were not sensitive to TNF alpha. However, the possibility that E1A-mediated transcriptional activation can augment the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity is not excluded. Comparison of data from previous biological studies with the TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays presented here suggested that the mechanism by which E1A induces sensitivity to TNF alpha in NIH 3T3 cells is independent of many of the known E1A biological functions, including transformation in cooperation with ras, immortalization, induction of DNA synthesis in quiescent cells, and transcriptional repression. A novel E1A-mediated effect may be involved, although our data do not exclude the possibility that sensitization to TNF alpha is mediated through E1A binding to cellular proteins. Images PMID:2143540

  8. Recombinant tumor necrosis factor induces procoagulant activity in cultured human vascular endothelium: characterization and comparison with the actions of interleukin 1.

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, M P; Pober, J S; Majeau, G R; Fiers, W; Cotran, R S; Gimbrone, M A

    1986-01-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (rTNF) was found to act directly on cultured human vascular endothelium to induce a tissue factor-like procoagulant activity (PCA). After a 4-hr incubation in rTNF (100 units/ml), serially passaged endothelial cells isolated from umbilical veins, saphenous veins, iliac arteries, and thoracic aortae demonstrated a dramatic increase (4- to 15-fold, 21 experiments) in total cellular PCA as measured with a one-stage clotting assay. rTNF-induced PCA was also expressed at the surface of intact viable endothelial monolayers. Induction of PCA by rTNF was concentration dependent (maximum, 500 units/ml), time dependent, reversible, and blocked by cycloheximide and actinomycin D, and it occurred without detectable endothelial cell damage. Actions of rTNF were compared with those of natural human interleukin 1 (IL-1) derived from stimulated monocytes and two distinct species of recombinant IL-1, each of which also induced endothelial PCA. The use of recombinant polypeptides and specific neutralizing antisera established the distinct natures of the mediators. The kinetics of the endothelial PCA responses to TNF and IL-1 were similar, demonstrating a rapid rise to peak activity at approximately equal to 4 hr, and a decline toward basal levels by 24 hr. This characteristic decline in PCA after prolonged incubation with TNF or IL-1 was accompanied by selective endothelial hyporesponsiveness to the initially stimulating monokine. Interestingly, the effects of TNF and IL-1 were found to be additive even at apparent maximal doses of the individual monokines. Endothelial-directed actions of TNF, alone or in combination with other monokines, may be important in the initiation of coagulation and inflammatory responses in vivo. PMID:3487091

  9. Disruption of Early Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Signaling Prevents Classical Activation of Dendritic Cells in Lung-Associated Lymph Nodes and Development of Protective Immunity against Cryptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jintao; Eastman, Alison J.; Flaczyk, Adam; Neal, Lori M.; Zhao, Guolei; Carolan, Jacob; Malachowski, Antoni N.; Stolberg, Valerie R.; Yosri, Mohammed; Chensue, Stephen W.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Osterholzer, John J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α) therapies have been increasingly used to treat inflammatory diseases and are associated with increased risk of invasive fungal infections, including Cryptococcus neoformans infection. Using a mouse model of cryptococcal infection, we investigated the mechanism by which disruption of early TNF-α signaling results in the development of nonprotective immunity against C. neoformans. We found that transient depletion of TNF-α inhibited pulmonary fungal clearance and enhanced extrapulmonary dissemination of C. neoformans during the adaptive phase of the immune response. Higher fungal burdens in TNF-α-depleted mice were accompanied by markedly impaired Th1 and Th17 responses in the infected lungs. Furthermore, early TNF-α depletion also resulted in disrupted transcriptional initiation of the Th17 polarization program and subsequent upregulation of Th1 genes in CD4+ T cells in the lung-associated lymph nodes (LALN) of C. neoformans-infected mice. These defects in LALN T cell responses were preceded by a dramatic shift from a classical toward an alternative activation of dendritic cells (DC) in the LALN of TNF-α-depleted mice. Taken together, our results indicate that early TNF-α signaling is required for optimal DC activation, and the initial Th17 response followed by Th1 transcriptional prepolarization of T cells in the LALN, which further drives the development of protective immunity against cryptococcal infection in the lungs. Thus, administration of anti-TNF-α may introduce a particularly greater risk for newly acquired fungal infections that require generation of protective Th1/Th17 responses for their containment and clearance. PMID:27406560

  10. Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide stimulates release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha through mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jo; Choi, Eun-Young; Kim, Eun Gyung; Shin, Su-Hwa; Lee, Ju-Youn; Choi, Jeom-Il; Choi, In-Soon

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of lipopolysaccharide from Prevotella intermedia, a major cause of inflammatory periodontal disease, on the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and the expression of TNF-alpha mRNA in differentiated THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line. The potential involvement of the three main mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in the induction of TNF-alpha production was also investigated. Lipopolysaccharide from P. intermedia ATCC 25611 was prepared by the standard hot phenol-water method. THP-1 cells were incubated in the medium supplemented with phorbol myristate acetate to induce differentiation into macrophage-like cells. It was found that P. intermedia lipopolysaccharide can induce TNF-alpha mRNA expression and stimulate the release of TNF-alpha in differentiated THP-1 cells without additional stimuli. Treatment of the cells with P. intermedia lipopolysaccharide resulted in a simultaneous activation of three MAPKs [extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) and p38]. Pretreatment of the cells with MAPK inhibitors effectively suppressed P. intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha production without affecting the expression of TNF-alpha mRNA. These data thus provided good evidence that the MAPK signaling pathways are required for the regulation of P. intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha synthesis at the level of translation more than at the transcriptional level.

  11. Interleukin-2 enhances the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in activated B-type chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) cells.

    PubMed

    Larsson, L G; Carlsson, M; Schena, M; Lantz, M; Caligaris-Cappio, F; Nilsson, K

    1993-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) has recently been implicated as a regulator growth and differentiation of normal and malignant B cells. We utilized a selected clone (I-83) of primary resting B-type chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) cells, inducible to activation, growth and differentiation in vitro, as a model system to study the possible role of TNF-alpha as an autocrine growth factor for such cells. Our results show that unstimulated I-83 B-CLL cells produced a low level of TNF-alpha mRNA, as shown by Northern blot analysis, and cytoplasmic TNF-alpha, determined in individual cells by immunocytochemistry. Secreted TNF-alpha could, however, not be detected in the medium by ELISA. TNF-alpha synthesis and secretion was, however, induced to high levels by stimulation of the B-CLL cells with interleukin-2 (IL-2) after activation by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or Staphylococcus aureus Cowan strain I (SAC) and B-cell stimulatory factor-MP6 (thioredoxin). A moderate increase in TNF-alpha secretion was also induced by TPA or IL-2 alone. IL-4 did not have any major effects on the production of TNF-alpha in activated cells, but inhibited the IL-2-induced production of TNF-alpha in SAC-activated cells. The cell surface expression of TNF-alpha receptors (TNF-R), as determined by binding assay using 125I-labelled recombinant TNF-alpha (rTNF-alpha), was also induced after SAC or TPA activation, but shed receptors (TNF-binding proteins) were only observed after TPA activation. Exogenously added rTNF-alpha in combination with TPA or SAC induced a high level of DNA synthesis in I-83 B-CLL cells. The increased endogenous production and secretion of TNF-alpha during induced growth stimulation, the induced expression of TNF-R, and the mitogenic effect of TNF-alpha on activated B-CLL cells raise the question whether TNF-alpha may function as an autocrine co-stimulator of B-CLL cell growth as recently suggested. anti-TNF-alpha and anti-TNF-R antibodies

  12. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Neuroinflammation and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Sandip; Lal, Girdhari

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) molecules play an important role in the activation, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS). Several TNF superfamily molecules are known to control alloimmunity, autoimmunity, and immunity. Development of transgenic and gene knockout animals, and monoclonal antibodies against TNFSF molecules have increased our understanding of individual receptor-ligand interactions, and their intracellular signaling during homeostasis and neuroinflammation. A strong clinical association has been observed between TNFSF members and CNS autoimmunity such as multiple sclerosis and also in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Therefore, they are promising targets for alternative therapeutic options to control autoimmunity. Although, TNFSF ligands are widely distributed and have diverse functions, we have restricted the discussions in this review to TNFSF receptor-ligand interactions and their role in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation and CNS autoimmunity.

  13. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Neuroinflammation and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Sonar, Sandip; Lal, Girdhari

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) molecules play an important role in the activation, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS). Several TNF superfamily molecules are known to control alloimmunity, autoimmunity, and immunity. Development of transgenic and gene knockout animals, and monoclonal antibodies against TNFSF molecules have increased our understanding of individual receptor–ligand interactions, and their intracellular signaling during homeostasis and neuroinflammation. A strong clinical association has been observed between TNFSF members and CNS autoimmunity such as multiple sclerosis and also in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Therefore, they are promising targets for alternative therapeutic options to control autoimmunity. Although, TNFSF ligands are widely distributed and have diverse functions, we have restricted the discussions in this review to TNFSF receptor–ligand interactions and their role in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation and CNS autoimmunity. PMID:26257732

  14. Inhibitory activity of the white wine compounds, tyrosol and caffeic acid, on lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, L; Migliori, M; Filippi, C; Origlia, N; Panichi, V; Falchi, M; Bertelli, A A E; Bertelli, A

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether tyrosol and caffeic acid are able to inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release. TNF is one of the most important cytokines involved in inflammatory reactions. The results show that both tyrosol and caffeic acid are able to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-alpha release from human monocytes, even at low doses. Their mechanisms of action are discussed and we conclude that high doses of the two compounds are not required to achieve effective inhibition of inflammatory reactions due to TNF-alpha release.

  15. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Mediates Lipopolysaccharide and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Induction of Shiga Toxin 2 Sensitivity in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Matthew K.; Kolling, Glynis L.; Lindner, Matthew H.; Obrig, Tom G.

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2), one of the causative agents of hemolytic-uremic syndrome, is toxic to endothelial cells, including primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). This sensitivity of cells to Stx2 can be increased with either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The goal of the present study was to identify the intracellular signaling pathway(s) by which LPS and TNF-α sensitize HUVEC to the cytotoxic effects of Stx2. To identify these pathways, specific pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs were tested with cell viability endpoints. A time course and dose response experiment for HUVEC exposure to LPS and TNF-α showed that a relatively short exposure to either agonist was sufficient to sensitize the cells to Stx2 and that both agonists stimulated intracellular signaling pathways within a short time. Cell viability assays indicated that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors SB202190 and SB203580 and the general protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide inhibited both the LPS and TNF-α sensitization of HUVEC to Stx2, while all other inhibitors tested did not inhibit this sensitization. Additionally, SB202190 reduced the cellular globotriaosylceramide content under LPS- and TNF-α-induced conditions. In conclusion, our results show that LPS and TNF-α induction of Stx2 sensitivity in HUVEC is mediated through a pathway that includes p38 MAPK. These results indicate that inhibition of p38 MAPK in endothelial cells may protect a host from the deleterious effects of Stx2. PMID:18086809

  16. Peripheral administration of the selective inhibitor of soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) XPro®1595 attenuates nigral cell loss and glial activation in 6-OHDA hemiparkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Christopher J.; Chen, Xi; Chung, Jaegwon; Chang, Jianjun; Williams, Martha; Grigoryan, Nelly; Tesi, Raymond J.; Tansey, Malú G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex multi-system age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Targeting the ongoing neuroinflammation in PD patients is one strategy postulated to slow down or halt disease progression. Proof-of-concept studies from our group demonstrated that selective inhibition of soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor (solTNF) by intranigral delivery of dominant negative TNF (DN-TNF) inhibitors reduced neuroinflammation and nigral dopamine (DA) neuron loss in endotoxin and neurotoxin rat models of nigral degeneration. OBJECTIVE As a next step toward human clinical trials, we aimed to determine the extent to which peripherally administered DN-TNF inhibitor XPro®1595 could: i) cross the blood-brain-barrier in therapeutically relevant concentrations, ii) attenuate neuroinflammation (microglia and astrocyte), and iii) mitigate loss of nigral DA neurons in rats receiving a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) striatal lesion. METHODS Rats received unilateral 6-OHDA (20 μg into the right striatum). Three or 14 days after lesion, rats were dosed with XPro®1595 (10 mg/kg in saline, subcutaneous) every third day for 35 days. Forelimb asymmetry was used to assess motor deficits after the lesion; brains were harvested 35 days after the lesion for analysis of XPro®1595 levels, glial activation, and nigral DA neuron number. RESULTS Peripheral subcutaneous dosing of XPro®1595 achieved plasma levels of 1–8 μg/mL and CSF levels of 1–6 ng/mL depending on the time the rats were killed after final XPro®1595 injection. Irrespective of start date, XPro®1595 significantly reduced microglia and astrocyte number in SNpc whereas loss of nigral DA neurons was attenuated when drug was started 3, but not 14 days after the 6-OHDA lesion. CONCLUSIONS Our data suggest that systemically administered XPro®1595 may have disease-modifying potential in PD patients where inflammation is part of their pathology. PMID:25061061

  17. Brain necrosis after radiotherapy for primary intracerebral tumor.

    PubMed

    Hohwieler, M L; Lo, T C; Silverman, M L; Freidberg, S R

    1986-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a standard postoperative treatment for cerebral glioma. We have observed the onset of symptoms related to brain necrosis, as opposed to recurrent tumor, in surviving patients. This has been manifest as dementia with a computed tomographic pattern of low density in the frontal lobe uninvolved with tumor, but within the field of radiotherapy. Two patients presented with mass lesions also unrelated to recurrent tumor. We question the necessity of full brain irradiation and suggest that radiotherapy techniques be altered to target the tumor and not encompass the entire brain.

  18. miR-29a suppresses MCF-7 cell growth by downregulating tumor necrosis factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yiling; Yang, Fenghua; Li, Wenyuan; Xu, Chunyan; Li, Li; Chen, Lifei; Liu, Yancui; Sun, Ping

    2017-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 is the main receptor mediating many tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced cellular events. Some studies have shown that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 promotes tumorigenesis by activating nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway, while other studies have confirmed that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 plays an inhibitory role in tumors growth by inducing apoptosis in breast cancer. Therefore, the function of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in breast cancer requires clarification. In this study, we first found that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 was significantly increased in human breast cancer tissues and cell lines, and knockdown of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 by small interfering RNA inhibited cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. In addition, miR-29a was predicted as a regulator of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 by TargetScan and was shown to be inversely correlated with tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression in human breast cancer tissues and cell lines. Luciferase reporter assay further confirmed that miR-29a negatively regulated tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression by binding to the 3' untranslated region. In our functional study, miR-29a overexpression remarkably suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation, arrested the cell cycle, and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cell. Furthermore, in combination with tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 transfection, miR-29a significantly reversed the oncogenic role caused by tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in MCF-7 cell. In addition, we demonstrated that miR-29a suppressed MCF-7 cell growth by inactivating the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway and by decreasing cyclinD1 and Bcl-2/Bax protein levels. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-29a is an important regulator of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression in breast cancer and functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 to

  19. TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis as a novel approach to eliminate tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The cytokine TRAIL represents one of the most promising candidates for the apoptotic elimination of tumor cells, either alone or in combination therapies. However, its efficacy is often limited by intrinsic or acquired resistance of tumor cells to apoptosis. Programmed necrosis is an alternative, molecularly distinct mode of programmed cell death that is elicited by TRAIL under conditions when the classical apoptosis machinery fails or is actively inhibited. The potential of TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis in tumor therapy is, however, almost completely uncharacterized. We therefore investigated its impact on a panel of tumor cell lines of wide-ranging origin. Methods Cell death/viability was measured by flow cytometry/determination of intracellular ATP levels/crystal violet staining. Cell surface expression of TRAIL receptors was detected by flow cytometry, expression of proteins by Western blot. Ceramide levels were quantified by high-performance thin layer chromatography and densitometric analysis, clonogenic survival of cells was determined by crystal violet staining or by soft agarose cloning. Results TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis killed eight out of 14 tumor cell lines. Clonogenic survival was reduced in all sensitive and even one resistant cell lines tested. TRAIL synergized with chemotherapeutics in killing tumor cell lines by programmed necrosis, enhancing their effect in eight out of 10 tested tumor cell lines and in 41 out of 80 chemotherapeutic/TRAIL combinations. Susceptibility/resistance of the investigated tumor cell lines to programmed necrosis seems to primarily depend on expression of the pro-necrotic kinase RIPK3 rather than the related kinase RIPK1 or cell surface expression of TRAIL receptors. Furthermore, interference with production of the lipid ceramide protected all tested tumor cell lines. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis represents a feasible approach for the elimination of

  20. In vitro simulation of immunosuppression caused by Trypanosoma brucei: active involvement of gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor in the pathway of suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Darji, A; Beschin, A; Sileghem, M; Heremans, H; Brys, L; De Baetselier, P

    1996-01-01

    Experimental infections of mice with the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei lead to a profound state of T-cell unresponsiveness in the lymph node cell (LNC) compartment. This suppression is mediated by macrophage-like cells which inhibit interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion and down-regulate IL-2 receptor expression (M. Sileghem, A. Darji, R. Hamers, M. Van de Winkel, and P. De Baetselier, Eur. J. Immunol. 19:829-835, 1989). Similar suppressive cells can be generated in vitro by pulsing 2C11-12 macrophage hybridoma cells with opsonized T. brucei parasites (2C11-12P cells). Cocultures of 2C11-12P cells and LNCs secrete higher levels of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), and the hyperproduction of IFN-gamma was found to be confined to CD8+ lymphoid cells. Elimination of CD8+ cells from cocultures of 2C11-12P cells and LNCs restores the T-cell proliferative response. Furthermore, addition of neutralizing anti-IFN-gamma antibodies to the cocultures reduces the level of suppression and concomitantly restores the level of IL-2 receptor expression. Hence, IFN-gamma plays a cardinal role in this in vitro model for T. brucei-elicited immunosuppression. Cocultures of LNCs and 2C11-12P cells in a two-chamber culture system further demonstrated that cell-cell contact is required for hyperproduction of IFN-gamma and, moreover, that IFN-gamma cooperates with a 2C11-12P-derived diffusible factor to exert its suppressive activity. Finally, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha produced by 2C11-12P cells was found to be implicated in the hyperproduction of IFN-gamma, since addition of neutralizing anti-TNF-alpha antibodies to cocultures reduced the level of suppression and concomitantly abrogated the hyperproduction of IFN-gamma. Collectively, our findings indicate that T. brucei-elicited suppressive 2C11-12 macrophage cells differentially influence T-cell subpopulations: (i) CD8+ cells are signaled via cell-cell contact to produce IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha is implicated in this process

  1. Evidence for ovarian tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Roby, K.F.

    1989-01-01

    Ovarian folliculogenesis and luteal formation occur concomitantly with the development of new blood vessels that function in nutritional support of the developing follicles. As follicles undergo atresia and the corpus luteum regresses, blood vessels supplying these tissues degenerate. The first study determined if the ovary contained factors that might regulate ovarian angiogenesis. The bovine ovary was subjected to ammonium sulfate (AS) precipitation and the precipitates (ppt.) were assayed in vitro for effects on endothelial cell (CPAE) and fibroblast (3T3 and L929) incorporation of {sup 3}H-thymidine. Heparin sepharose (HS) chromatography of the 80% AS ppt. revealed the inhibitory activity on CPAE and L929 cells did not bind to HS but was found in the HS column breakthrough (80% BT). Sizing chromatography of the 80% BT indicated thymidine incorporation inhibitory activity exhibited a molecular weight of 30,000-50,000 Daltons. TNF was immunohistochemically localized in the human, bovine and rat ovary. Frozen sections were incubated with polyclonal antibody to human recombinant TNF. Antigen-antibody binding was visualized using a Biotin-StreptAvidin peroxidase technique. Immunoreactive TNF (I-TNF) was localized in corpora lutea and the more antral layers of granulosa cells in antral follicles. Incubation of sections with anti-TNF in the presence of excess TNF resulted in lose of immunostaining. Cell blotting and ELISA further indicated I-TNF was present in granulosa cells. In order to determine whether TNF had an effect on follicular steroidogenesis, preovulatory follicles from cyclic proestrus rats were incubated in vitro for up to 24 hours with various doses of human recombinant TNF. Stepwise increases in progesterone (P) accumulation in the incubation media were observed with 30-300 pM TNF.

  2. Capacity of tumor necrosis factor to augment lymphocyte-mediated tumor cell lysis of malignant mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, R.V.; Manning, L.S.; Davis, M.R.; Robinson, B.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rHuTNF) was evaluated both for direct anti-tumor action against human malignant mesothelioma and for its capacity to augment the generation and lytic phases of lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity against this tumor. rHuTNF was directly toxic by MTT assay to one of two mesothelioma cell lines evaluated, but had no effect on susceptibility to subsequent lymphocyte-mediated lysis of either line. TNF alone was incapable of generating anti-mesothelioma lymphokine-activated killer cell (LAK) activity. Furthermore, it did not augment the degree or LAK activity produced by submaximal interleukin-2 (IL-2) concentrations nor did it augment lysis of mesothelioma cells by natural killer (NK) or LAK effector cells during the 4-hr 51chromium release cytolytic reaction. The studies also suggest that mesothelioma targets are less responsive to TNF plus submaximal IL-2 concentrations than the standard LAK sensitive target Daudi, raising the possibility that intermediate LAK sensitive tumors such as mesothelioma may require separate and specific evaluation in immunomodulation studies. This in vitro study indicates that use of low-dose rHuTNF and IL-2 is unlikely to be an effective substitute for high-dose IL-2 in generation and maintenance of LAK activity in adoptive immunotherapy for mesothelioma.

  3. MRI Brain Tumor Segmentation and Necrosis Detection Using Adaptive Sobolev Snakes

    PubMed Central

    Nakhmani, Arie; Kikinis, Ron; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumor segmentation in brain MRI volumes is used in neurosurgical planning and illness staging. It is important to explore the tumor shape and necrosis regions at different points of time to evaluate the disease progression. We propose an algorithm for semi-automatic tumor segmentation and necrosis detection. Our algorithm consists of three parts: conversion of MRI volume to a probability space based on the on-line learned model, tumor probability density estimation, and adaptive segmentation in the probability space. We use manually selected acceptance and rejection classes on a single MRI slice to learn the background and foreground statistical models. Then, we propagate this model to all MRI slices to compute the most probable regions of the tumor. Anisotropic 3D diffusion is used to estimate the probability density. Finally, the estimated density is segmented by the Sobolev active contour (snake) algorithm to select smoothed regions of the maximum tumor probability. The segmentation approach is robust to noise and not very sensitive to the manual initialization in the volumes tested. Also, it is appropriate for low contrast imagery. The irregular necrosis regions are detected by using the outliers of the probability distribution inside the segmented region. The necrosis regions of small width are removed due to a high probability of noisy measurements. The MRI volume segmentation results obtained by our algorithm are very similar to expert manual segmentation. PMID:25302005

  4. Production of polyclonal antibodies to feline tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Otto, C M; Niagro, F; McGraw, R A; Rawlings, C A

    1997-01-01

    Two 13-amino-acid peptides were synthesized based on the putative feline tumor necrosis factor (FeTNF) sequence. The synthesized peptides were conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant, and injected into rabbits. The gene for FeTNF was cloned into the FLAG (International Biotechnologies Inc. [IBI], Kodak, New Haven, Conn.) fusion protein expression vector. The expressed fusion protein was purified by using the M-1 anti-FLAG octapeptide monoclonal antibody (IBI, Kodak). The fusion protein was emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant and injected into chickens. The immune sera generated to the synthetic peptides and the fusion protein recognized the recombinant FeTNF fusion protein on Western or dot blot assay. The preimmune and immune sera were incubated with naturally occurring FeTNF (supernatants from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cultured feline peritoneal exudate or peripheral mononuclear cells). The antibody raised to the recombinant FeTNF fusion protein and N-terminal synthetic peptide neutralized bioactivity of native FeTNF and recombinant human TNF. Preimmune sera did not have any neutralizing activity. The polyclonal antibodies were not specific for FeTNF, since both porcine and human recombinant TNF were neutralized by the fusion protein antibodies. The synthetic peptide antibodies recognized recombinant feline and equine TNF on a Western blot. PMID:9220170

  5. Until Death Do Us Part: Necrosis and Oxidation Promote the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Ramin; Kaltenmeier, Christof; Lotze, Michael T.; Bergmann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tumor proliferation is concomitant with autophagy, limited apoptosis, and resultant necrosis. Necrosis is associated with the release of damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs), which act as ‘danger signals’, recruiting inflammatory cells, inducing immune responses, and promoting wound healing. Most of the current treatment strategies for cancer (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy) promote DAMP release following therapy-induced tumor death by necroptosis and necrosis. Myeloid cells (monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and granulocytes), as well as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) belong to the early immigrants in response to unscheduled cell death, initiating and modulating the subsequent inflammatory response. Responding to DAMPs, MSCs, and DCs promote an immunosuppressive milieu, while eosinophils induce oxidative conditions limiting the biologic activity of DAMPs over time and distance. Regulatory T cells are strongly affected by pattern recognition receptor signaling in the tumor microenvironment and limit immune reactivity coordinately with myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Means to ‘aerobically’ oxidize DAMPs provide a novel strategy for limiting tumor progression. The present article summarizes our current understanding of the impact of necrosis on the tumor microenvironment and the influence of oxidative conditions found within this setting. PMID:27226794

  6. Tumor necrosis is associated with increased alphavbeta3 integrin expression and poor prognosis in nodular cutaneous melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Ingeborg M; Ladstein, Rita G; Straume, Oddbjørn; Naumov, George N; Akslen, Lars A

    2008-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis and apoptotic activity are considered important in cancer progression, but these features have not been much studied in melanomas. Our hypothesis was that rapid growth in cutaneous melanomas of the vertical growth phase might lead to tissue hypoxia, alterations in apoptotic activity and tumor necrosis. We proposed that these tumor characteristics might be associated with changes in expression of cell adhesion proteins leading to increased invasive capacity and reduced patient survival. Methods A well characterized series of nodular melanoma (originally 202 cases) and other benign and malignant melanocytic tumors (109 cases) were examined for the presence of necrosis, apoptotic activity (TUNEL assay), immunohistochemical expression of hypoxia markers (HIF-1 α, CAIX, TNF-α, Apaf-1) and cell adhesion proteins (αvβ3 integrin, CD44/HCAM and osteopontin). We hypothesized that tumor hypoxia and necrosis might be associated with increased invasiveness in melanoma through alterations of tumor cell adhesion proteins. Results Necrosis was present in 29% of nodular melanomas and was associated with increased tumor thickness, tumor ulceration, vascular invasion, higher tumor proliferation and apoptotic index, increased expression of αvβ3 integrin and poor patient outcome by multivariate analysis. Tumor cell apoptosis did also correlate with reduced patient survival. Expression of TNF-α and Apaf-1 was significantly associated with tumor thickness, and osteopontin expression correlated with increased tumor cell proliferation (Ki-67). Conclusion Tumor necrosis and apoptotic activity are important features of melanoma progression and prognosis, at least partly through alterations in cell adhesion molecules such as increased αvβ3 integrin expression, revealing potentially important targets for new therapeutic approaches to be further explored. PMID:19061491

  7. Binding Mode Analysis of Zerumbone to Key Signal Proteins in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Ayesha; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam Hj.; Abdullah, Rasedee; Karjiban, Roghayeh Abedi; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Several signaling pathways have been implicated as causative and progression agents. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α protein plays a dual role in promoting and inhibiting cancer depending largely on the pathway initiated by the binding of the protein to its receptor. Zerumbone, an active constituent of Zingiber zerumbet, Smith, is known to act on the tumor necrosis factor pathway upregulating tumour necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptors and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. Zerumbone is a sesquiterpene that is able to penetrate into the hydrophobic pockets of proteins to exert its inhibiting activity with several proteins. We found a good binding with the tumor necrosis factor, kinase κB (IKKβ) and the Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) component proteins along the TNF pathway. Our results suggest that zerumbone can exert its apoptotic activities by inhibiting the cytoplasmic proteins. It inhibits the IKKβ kinase that activates the NF-κB and also binds to the NF-κB complex in the TNF pathway. Blocking both proteins can lead to inhibition of cell proliferating proteins to be downregulated and possibly ultimate induction of apoptosis. PMID:25629232

  8. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors – state of knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Krzysztof; Kuzawińska, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is considered a major proinflammatory cytokine, affecting various aspects of the immune reaction. All five TNF inhibitors currently available on the market (i.e., etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab and golimumab) are top sellers, although indicated only in autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease and psoriasis. This article briefly discusses the background and place for TNF inhibitors in modern therapy. The main safety aspects of TNF inhibitor administration are described in particular, with special consideration of the available meta-analyses. Finally, perspectives on the next-generation TNF inhibitors and their use in the clinic are given. PMID:25624856

  9. A third distinct tumor necrosis factor receptor of orthopoxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Loparev, Vladimir N.; Parsons, Joseph M.; Knight, Janice C.; Panus, Joanne Fanelli; Ray, Caroline A.; Buller, R. Mark L.; Pickup, David J.; Esposito, Joseph J.

    1998-01-01

    Cowpox virus Brighton red strain (CPV) contains a gene, crmD, which encodes a 320-aa tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) of 44% and 22% identity, respectively, to the CPV TNFR-like proteins, cytokine response modifiers (crm) CrmB and CrmC. The crmD gene was interrupted in three other cowpox strains examined and absent in various other orthopoxviruses; however, four strains of ectromelia virus (ECT) examined contained an intact crmD (97% identity to CPV crmD) and lacked cognates of crmB and crmC. The protein, CrmD, contains a transport signal; a 151-aa cysteine-rich region with 21 cysteines that align with human TNFRII ligand-binding region cysteines; and C-terminal region sequences that are highly diverged from cellular TNFR C-terminal region sequences involved in signal transduction. Bacterial maltose-binding proteins containing the CPV or ECT CrmD cysteine-rich region bound TNF and lymphotoxin-α (LTα) and blocked their in vitro cytolytic activity. Secreted viral CrmD bound TNF and LTα and was detectable after the early stage of replication, using nonreducing conditions, as 60- to 70-kDa predominant and 90- to 250-kDa minor disulfide-linked complexes that were able to be reduced to a 46-kDa form and deglycosylated to a 38-kDa protein. Cells infected with CPV produced extremely low amounts of CrmD compared with ECT. Possessing up to three TNFRs, including CrmD, which is secreted as disulfide-linked complexes in varied amounts by CPV and ECT, likely enhances the dynamics of the immune modulating mechanisms of orthopoxviruses. PMID:9520445

  10. Sequence dependence of administration of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-2 in murine tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R J; Gauny, S; Chan, A; Landre, P; Winkelhake, J L

    1989-02-01

    Simultaneous administration of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rhTNF) and interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) has been shown to block tumor take in murine models. We investigated the effects of sequence and schedule of administration as a function of tumor burden with two tumor models (B16 and Meth A). rhTNF followed by rhIL-2 had extraordinary antitumor efficacy, but rhIL-2 followed by rhTNF was much less effective. Sequential rhTNF/rhIL-2 therapy resulted in complete tumor regression, whereas simultaneous therapy resulted in complete tumor regression, whereas simultaneous therapy resulted in only reduced growth rate. Experiments with genetically immunodeficient mice suggested that T cell factors may be required for synergistic antitumor activity.

  11. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors: March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFalpha therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn s complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk/benefit assessment.

  12. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors - March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFα therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFα therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFα therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn's complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions, ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNF-α therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk / benefit assessment. Rev Port Pneumol 2007; XIV (2): 271-283.

  13. Therapeutic inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Srinivasan; Travis, Simon P L; Ahmad, Tariq; Jazrawi, Riadh

    2002-09-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with refractory ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease have recently been augmented by the introduction of biological therapies. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha is present in elevated concentrations in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and inhibitors of TNF alpha have proved effective as treatment. Strategies aimed at reducing TNF in patients with Crohn's disease, include the mouse/human chimeric monoclonal antibody, infliximab (Centocor Inc), the humanized monoclonal antibody, CDP-571 (Celltech Group plc), the human recombinant TNF receptor fusion protein, etanercept (Immunex Corp), and thalidomide. New approaches, including the use of soluble TNF receptors, appear promising. This article reviews the evidence of therapeutic inhibition of TNF.

  14. Berberine inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α-induced expression of inflammatory molecules and activation of nuclear factor-κB via the activation of AMPK in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su-Jian; Yin, Cai-Xia; Ding, Ming-Chao; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Berberine, which is a well‑known drug used in traditional medicine, has been demonstrated to exert diverse pharmacological effects, including anti‑inflammatory effects. However, whether berberine can affect the production of inflammatory molecules in vascular endothelial cells remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the effects of berberine, and the underlying molecular mechanisms of these effects. The effect of berberine on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α‑induced inflammatory molecule expression was examined in cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). The HAECs were stimulated with TNF‑α and incubated with or without berberine. The activation of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB and adenosine monophosphate‑activated protein kinase (AMPK) were analyzed using western blotting, and the protein secretion of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)‑1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)‑1 was measured using ELISA kits. The mRNA expression levels of ICAM‑1 and MCP‑1 were analyzed using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study demonstrated that berberine significantly inhibited the TNF‑α‑induced expression of ICAM‑1 and MCP‑1, as well as the activation of NF‑κB in the HAECs. These effects were attenuated following co‑treatment with AMPK inhibitor compound C, or specific small interfering RNAs. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that berberine inhibits the TNF‑α‑induced expression of ICAM‑1 and MCP‑1, and the activation of NF‑κB in HAECs in vitro, possibly through the AMPK‑dependent pathway.

  15. Molecular design of conjugated tumor necrosis factor-alpha: synthesis and characteristics of polyvinyl pyrrolidone modified tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Kamada, H; Tsutsumi, Y; Tsunoda, S; Kihira, T; Kaneda, Y; Yamamoto, Y; Nakagawa, S; Horisawa, Y; Mayumi, T

    1999-04-13

    We conjugated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) with the synthetic polymeric modifier polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) to facilitate its clinical use for anti-tumor therapy. TNF-alpha was chemically conjugated with the terminal carboxyl-bearing PVP at one end of its main chain, which was radically polymerized via the formation of an amide bond between the lysine amino groups of TNF-alpha and carboxyl group of PVP. In vitro specific bioactivity of PVP-conjugated TNF-alpha (PVP-TNF-alpha) relative to that of native TNF-alpha gradually decreased with increases in the degree of PVP attachment. In contrast, PVP-TNF-alpha in which 40% of TNF-alpha lysine residues were coupled with PVP (MPVP-TNF-alpha) exhibited the highest anti-tumor activity among the conjugated derivatives examined. MPVP-TNF-alpha had more than 200-fold higher anti-tumor efficacy than native TNF-alpha, and the anti-tumor activity of MPVP- TNF-alpha was more than 5-fold stronger than that MPEG- TNF-alpha which had the highest anti-tumor activity among PEG-conjugated TNF-alphas examined. Additionally, a high dose of native TNF-alpha induced toxic side-effects such as body weight reduction, piloerection and tissue inflammation, while no side effects were observed following i.v. administration of MPVP-TNF-alpha. The plasma half-life of MPVP-TNF-alpha (360 min) was about 80 and 3-fold longer than those of native TNF-alpha (4.6 min) and MPEG-TNF-alpha (122 min), respectively. These results suggested that PVP is a useful polymeric modifier for increasing the anti-tumor activity of PVP.

  16. Targeted Cancer Therapy with Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weibo; Kerner, Zachary J.; Hong, Hao; Sun, Jiangtao

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), a member of the TNF superfamily, was the first cytokine to be evaluated for cancer biotherapy. However, the clinical use of TNF-α is severely limited by its toxicity. Currently, TNF-α is administered only through locoregional drug delivery systems such as isolated limb perfusion and isolated hepatic perfusion. To reduce the systemic toxicity of TNF-α, various strategies have been explored over the last several decades. This review summarizes current state-of-the-art targeted cancer therapy using TNF-α. Passive targeting, cell-based therapy, gene therapy with inducible or tissue-specific promoters, targeted polymer-DNA complexes, tumor pre-targeting, antibody-TNF-α conjugate, scFv/TNF-α fusion proteins, and peptide/TNF-α fusion proteins have all been investigated to combat cancer. Many of these agents are already in advanced clinical trials. Molecular imaging, which can significantly speed up the drug development process, and nanomedicine, which can integrate both imaging and therapeutic components, has the potential to revolutionize future cancer patient management. Cooperative efforts from scientists within multiple disciplines, as well as close partnerships among many organizations/entities, are needed to quickly translate novel TNF-α-based therapeutics into clinical investigation. PMID:24115841

  17. Purification and characterization of an inhibitor (soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor) for tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin obtained from the serum ultrafiltrates of human cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gatanaga, Tetsuya; Whang, Chenduen; Cappuccini, F.; Lucci, J.A. III; Jeffes, E.W.B. ); Kohr, W. ); Lentz, R. ); Tomich, J. ); Yamamoto, R.S. ); Granger, G.A. Memorial Cancer Inst., Long Beach, CA )

    1990-11-01

    Serum ultrafiltrates (SUF) from human patients with different types of cancer contain a blocking factor (BF) that inhibits the cytolytic activity of human tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) in vitro. BF is a protein with a molecular mass of 28kDa on reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE). The active material was purified to homogeneity by a combination of affinity chromatography, PAGE, and high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that BF is derived from the membrane TNF receptor. Purified BF blocks the lytic activity of recombinant human and mouse TNF-{alpha} and recombinant human lymphotoxin activity of TNF-{alpha} and recombinant human lymphotoxin on murine L929 cells in vitro. However, BF inhibits the lytic activity of TNF-{alpha} more effectively than it does that of lymphotoxin. The BF also inhibits the necrotizing activity of recombinant human TNF-{alpha} when coinjected into established cutaneous Meth A tumors in BALB/c mice. The BF may have an important role in (i) the regulation and control of TNF-{alpha} and lymphotoxin activity in cancer patients, (ii) interaction between the tumor and the host antitumor mechanisms, and (iii) use of systemically administered TNF-{alpha} in clinical trials with human cancer patients.

  18. The tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3, A20) imposes a brake on antitumor activity of CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Marilyn; Roncagalli, Romain; Bourdely, Pierre; Chasson, Lionel; Buferne, Michel; Yamasaki, Sho; Beyaert, Rudi; van Loo, Geert; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie; Schmitt-Verhulst, Anne-Marie; Verdeil, Grégory

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-κB is central to inflammatory signaling and activation of innate and adaptive immune responses. Activation of the NF-κB pathway is tightly controlled by several negative feedback mechanisms, including A20, an ubiquitin-modifying enzyme encoded by the tnfaip3 gene. Mice with selective deletion of A20 in myeloid, dendritic, or B cells recapitulate some human inflammatory pathology. As we observed high expression of A20 transcripts in dysfunctional CD8 T cells in an autochthonous melanoma, we analyzed the role of A20 in regulation of CD8 T-cell functions, using mice in which A20 was selectively deleted in mature conventional T cells. These mice developed lymphadenopathy and some organ infiltration by T cells but no splenomegaly and no detectable pathology. A20-deleted CD8 T cells had increased sensitivity to antigen stimulation with production of large amounts of IL-2 and IFNγ, correlated with sustained nuclear expression of NF-κB components reticuloendotheliosis oncogene c-Rel and p65. Overexpression of A20 by retroviral transduction of CD8 T cells dampened their intratumor accumulation and antitumor activity. In contrast, relief from the A20 brake in NF-κB activation in adoptively transferred antitumor CD8 T cells led to improved control of melanoma growth. Tumor-infiltrating A20-deleted CD8 T cells had enhanced production of IFNγ and TNFα and reduced expression of the inhibitory receptor programmed cell death 1. As manipulation of A20 expression in CD8 T cells did not result in pathologic manifestations in the mice, we propose it as a candidate to be targeted to increase antitumor efficiency of adoptive T-cell immunotherapy. PMID:25024217

  19. Ketamine inhibits tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interleukin-6 gene expressions in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages through suppression of toll-like receptor 4-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation and activator protein-1 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G.-J.; Chen, T.-L.; Ueng, Y.-F.; Chen, R.-M.

    2008-04-01

    Our previous study showed that ketamine, an intravenous anesthetic agent, has anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we further evaluated the effects of ketamine on the regulation of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) gene expressions and its possible signal-transducing mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. Exposure of macrophages to 1, 10, and 100 {mu}M ketamine, 100 ng/ml LPS, or a combination of ketamine and LPS for 1, 6, and 24 h was not cytotoxic to macrophages. A concentration of 1000 {mu}M of ketamine alone or in combined treatment with LPS caused significant cell death. Administration of LPS increased cellular TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 protein levels in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Meanwhile, treatment with ketamine concentration- and time-dependently alleviated the enhanced effects. LPS induced TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 mRNA syntheses. Administration of ketamine at a therapeutic concentration (100 {mu}M) significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 mRNA expressions. Application of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) small interfering (si)RNA into macrophages decreased cellular TLR4 levels. Co-treatment of macrophages with ketamine and TLR4 siRNA decreased the LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 productions more than alone administration of TLR4 siRNA. LPS stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos from the cytoplasm to nuclei. However, administration of ketamine significantly decreased LPS-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos. LPS increased the binding of nuclear extracts to activator protein-1 consensus DNA oligonucleotides. Administration of ketamine significantly ameliorated LPS-induced DNA binding activity of activator protein-1. Therefore, a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine can inhibit TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 gene expressions in LPS-activated macrophages. The suppressive mechanisms

  20. Ketamine inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 gene expressions in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages through suppression of toll-like receptor 4-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation and activator protein-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gone-Jhe; Chen, Ta-Liang; Ueng, Yune-Fang; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2008-04-01

    Our previous study showed that ketamine, an intravenous anesthetic agent, has anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we further evaluated the effects of ketamine on the regulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) gene expressions and its possible signal-transducing mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. Exposure of macrophages to 1, 10, and 100 microM ketamine, 100 ng/ml LPS, or a combination of ketamine and LPS for 1, 6, and 24 h was not cytotoxic to macrophages. A concentration of 1000 microM of ketamine alone or in combined treatment with LPS caused significant cell death. Administration of LPS increased cellular TNF-alpha and IL-6 protein levels in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Meanwhile, treatment with ketamine concentration- and time-dependently alleviated the enhanced effects. LPS induced TNF-alpha and IL-6 mRNA syntheses. Administration of ketamine at a therapeutic concentration (100 microM) significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-alpha and IL-6 mRNA expressions. Application of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) small interfering (si)RNA into macrophages decreased cellular TLR4 levels. Co-treatment of macrophages with ketamine and TLR4 siRNA decreased the LPS-induced TNF-alpha and IL-6 productions more than alone administration of TLR4 siRNA. LPS stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos from the cytoplasm to nuclei. However, administration of ketamine significantly decreased LPS-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos. LPS increased the binding of nuclear extracts to activator protein-1 consensus DNA oligonucleotides. Administration of ketamine significantly ameliorated LPS-induced DNA binding activity of activator protein-1. Therefore, a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine can inhibit TNF-alpha and IL-6 gene expressions in LPS-activated macrophages. The suppressive mechanisms occur through

  1. Purification and characterization of an inhibitor (soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor) for tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin obtained from the serum ultrafiltrates of human cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Gatanaga, T; Hwang, C D; Kohr, W; Cappuccini, F; Lucci, J A; Jeffes, E W; Lentz, R; Tomich, J; Yamamoto, R S; Granger, G A

    1990-01-01

    Serum ultrafiltrates (SUF) from human patients with different types of cancer contain a blocking factor (BF) that inhibits the cytolytic activity of human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in vitro. BF is a protein with a molecular mass of 28 kDa on reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE). The active material was purified to homogeneity by a combination of affinity chromatography, PAGE, and high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that BF is derived from the membrane TNF receptor. Purified BF blocks the lytic activity of recombinant human and mouse TNF-alpha and recombinant human lymphotoxin on murine L929 cells in vitro. However, BF inhibits the lytic activity of TNF-alpha more effectively than it does that of lymphotoxin. The BF also inhibits the necrotizing activity of recombinant human TNF-alpha when coinjected into established cutaneous Meth A tumors in BALB/c mice. The BF may have an important role in (i) the regulation and control of TNF-alpha and lymphotoxin activity in cancer patients, (ii) interaction between the tumor and the host antitumor mechanisms, and (iii) use of systemically administered TNF-alpha in clinical trials with human cancer patients. Images PMID:2174164

  2. Inhibitory effect of butein on tumor necrosis factor-α-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in human lung epithelial cells via inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation, NF-κB activation and Akt phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji Hoon; Yang, Eun Sun; Min, Kyoung-Jin; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2012-12-01

    Cell adhesion molecules play an important role in inflammatory response, angiogenesis and tumor progression. Butein (tetrahydroxychalcone) is a small molecule from natural sources, known to be a potential therapeutic drug with anti-inflammatory, anticancer and antioxidant activities. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of butein on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced adhesion molecule expression and its molecular mechanism of action. Butein significantly decreased TNF-α-induced monocyte (U937) cell adhesion to lung epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Butein also inhibited the protein and mRNA expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in TNF-α-stimulated A549 human lung epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Butein inhibited TNF-α-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation in A549 cells; it also inhibited the phosphorylation of MAPKs and Akt, suggesting that the MAPK/Akt signaling pathway may be involved in the butein-mediated inhibition of TNF-α-induced leukocyte adhesion to A549 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that butein affects cell adhesion through the inhibition of TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression by inhibiting the NF-κB/MAPK/Akt signaling pathway and ROS generation, thereby, elucidating the role of butein in the anti-inflammatory response.

  3. Immunological effects of a tumor necrosis factor alpha-armed oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Hirvinen, Mari; Rajecki, Maria; Kapanen, Mika; Parviainen, Suvi; Rouvinen-Lagerström, Noora; Diaconu, Iulia; Nokisalmi, Petri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Hemminki, Akseli; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    For long it has been recognized that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) has anticancer characteristics, and its use as a cancer therapeutic was proposed already in the 1980s. However, its systemic toxicity has limited its usability. Oncolytic viruses, selectively cancer-killing viruses, have shown great potency, and one of their most useful aspects is their ability to produce high amounts of transgene products locally, resulting in high local versus systemic concentrations. Therefore, the overall magnitude of tumor cell killing results from the combination of oncolysis, transgene-mediated direct effect such as TNFa-mediated apoptosis, and, perhaps most significantly, from activation of the host immune system against the tumor. We generated a novel chimeric oncolytic adenovirus expressing human TNFa, Ad5/3-D24-hTNFa, whose efficacy and immunogenicity were tested in vitro and in vivo. The hTNFa-expressing adenovirus showed increased cancer-eradicating potency, which was shown to be because of elevated apoptosis and necrosis rates and induction of various immune responses. Interestingly, we saw increase in immunogenic cell death markers in Ad5/3-d24-hTNFa-treated cells. Moreover, tumors treated with Ad5/3-D24-hTNFa displayed enhanced presence of OVA-specific cytotoxic T cells. We thus can conclude that tumor eradication and antitumor immune responses mediated by Ad5/3-d24-hTNFa offer a new potential drug candidate for cancer therapy.

  4. Tumor Necrosis Factor–α Overexpression in Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lundblad, Lennart K. A.; Thompson-Figueroa, John; Leclair, Timothy; Sullivan, Michael J.; Poynter, Matthew E.; Irvin, Charles G.; Bates, Jason H. T.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) has been implicated as a key cytokine in many inflammatory lung diseases. These effects are currently unclear, because a transgenic mouse overexpressing TNF-α in the lung has been shown in separate studies to produce elements of both emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis. Objectives: We sought to elucidate the phenotypic effects of TNF-α overexpression in a mouse model. Measurements: We established the phenotype by measuring lung impedance and thoracic gas volume, and using micro–computed tomography and histology. Main Results: We found that airways resistance in this mouse was not different to control mice, but that lung tissue dampening, elastance, and hysteresivity were significantly elevated. Major heterogeneous abnormalities of the parenchyma were also apparent in histologic sections and in micro–computed tomography images of the lung. These changes included airspace enlargement, loss of small airspaces, increased collagen, and thickened pleural septa. We also found significant increases in lung and chest cavity volumes in the TNF-α–overexpressing mice. Conclusions: We conclude that TNF-α overexpression causes pathologic changes consistent with both emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis combined with a general lung inflammation, and consequently does not model any single human disease. Our study thus confirms the pleiotropic effects of TNF-α, which has been implicated in multiple inflammatory disorders, and underscores the necessity of using a wide range of investigative techniques to link gene expression and phenotype in animal models of disease. PMID:15805183

  5. Murine tumor necrosis-inducing factor: purification and effects on myelomonocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Green, S; Dobrjansky, A; Chiasson, M A

    1982-06-01

    The tumor necrosis-inducing factor (TNF) found in sera of Corynebacterium parvum-treated, endotoxin-stressed BALB/C and outbred albino CD-1 mice has been purified to a single band of protein by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after identification and removal of contaminating albumin and transferrin. This purified TNF has a molecular weight of 140,000, is glycoprotein in nature, and migrates on free electrophoresis as an alpha 2-globulin. TNF activity was continuously monitored during purification by bioassay in vitro (tumor cell lysis) and was confirmed by demonstration of induction of tumor necrosis in vivo. A single target tumor cell line, murine myelomonocytic leukemia (WEHI/3), was used in both assays. In the in vivo assay, controls were heat-inactivated samples of TNF. As additional controls, a line of TNF-resistant WEHI/3 cells was used in the in vitro assay. Results from in vivo radiolabeling of TNF-sensitive and TNF-resistant cells indicated a difference between their cytoplasmic peptide profiles. Optimal TNF production was not altered in C. parvum-endotoxin-treated mice by treatment with silica, a substance that is specifically toxic for macrophages. Exposure of mice to 650 rad whole-body radiation, which is not markedly damaging to macrophage elements in the reticuloendothelial system, completely abrogated the ability of the mice to produce TNF after C. parvum-endotoxin treatment. These findings suggest that in the sera of C. parvum-endotoxin-treated mice the protein that induces necrosis in tumors may not be of macrophage origin.

  6. Effects of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on macrophage enzyme levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierangeli, Silvia S.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    Murine peritoneal macrophages were treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). Measurements of changes in acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase levels were made as an indication of activation by cytokine treatment. IFN-gamma or TNF-gamma treatment resulted in a significant increase in the activities of both enzymes measured in the cell lysates. This increase was observable after 6 h of incubation, but reached its maximum level after 24 h of incubation. The effect of the treatment of the cell with both cytokines together was additive. No synergistic effect of addition of both cytokines on the enzyme levels was observed.

  7. Irciniastatin A induces potent and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and thereby promotes ectodomain shedding of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in human lung carcinoma A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Quach, Hue Tu; Hirano, Seiya; Fukuhara, Sayuri; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Kanoh, Naoki; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Usui, Takeo; Kataoka, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Irciniastatin A is a pederin-type marine product that potently inhibits translation. We have recently shown that irciniastatin A induces ectodomain shedding of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 with slower kinetics than other translation inhibitors. In human lung carcinoma A549 cells, irciniastatin A induced a marked and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and induced little activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Moreover, the TNF receptor 1 shedding induced by irciniastatin A was blocked by the MAP kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor U0126, but not by the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 or the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Thus unlike other translation inhibitors that trigger ribotoxic stress response, our results show that irciniastatin A is a unique translation inhibitor that induces a potent and sustained activation of the ERK pathway, and thereby promotes the ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 in A549 cells.

  8. Percentage tumor necrosis following chemotherapy in neuroblastoma correlates with MYCN status but not survival.

    PubMed

    Bomken, Simon; Davies, Beverley; Chong, Leeai; Cole, Michael; Wood, Katrina M; McDermott, Michael; Tweddle, Deborah A

    2011-03-01

    The percentage of chemotherapy-induced necrosis in primary tumors corresponds with outcome in several childhood malignancies, including high-risk metastatic diseases. In this retrospective pilot study, the authors assessed the importance of postchemotherapy necrosis in high-risk neuroblastoma with a histological and case notes review of surgically resected specimens. The authors reviewed all available histology of 31 high-risk neuroblastoma cases treated with COJEC (dose intensive etoposide and vincristine with either cyclophosphamide, cisplatin or carboplatin) or OPEC/OJEC (etoposide, vincristine and cyclophosphamide with alternating cisplatin [OPEC] or carboplatin [OJEC]) induction chemotherapy in 2 Children's Cancer & Leukaemia Group (CCLG) pediatric oncology centers. The percentage of postchemotherapy necrosis was assessed and compared with MYCN amplification status and overall survival. The median percentage of postchemotherapy tumor necrosis was 60%. MYCN status was available for 28 cases, of which 12 were amplified (43%). Survival in cases with ≥ 60% necrosis or ≥ 90% necrosis was not better than those with less necrosis, nor was percentage necrosis associated with survival using Cox regression. However, MYCN-amplified tumors showed a higher percentage of necrosis than non-MYCN-amplified tumors, 71.3% versus 37.2% (P = .006). This effect was not related to prechemotherapy necrosis and did not confer improved overall survival. Postchemotherapy tumor necrosis is higher in patients with MYCN amplification. In this study, postchemotherapy necrosis did not correlate with overall survival and should not lead to modification of postoperative treatment. However, these findings need to be confirmed in a larger prospective study of children with high-risk neuroblastoma.

  9. Antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid inhibits osteoclast differentiation by reducing nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding and prevents in vivo bone resorption induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyon Jong; Chang, Eun-Ju; Kim, Hyun-Man; Lee, Seung Bok; Kim, Hyun-Duck; Su Kim, Ghi; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2006-05-01

    The relationship between oxidative stress and bone mineral density or osteoporosis has recently been reported. As bone loss occurring in osteoporosis and inflammatory diseases is primarily due to increases in osteoclast number, reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be relevant to osteoclast differentiation, which requires receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) frequently present in inflammatory conditions has a profound synergy with RANKL in osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (alpha-LA), a strong antioxidant clinically used for some time, on osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. At concentrations showing no growth inhibition, alpha-LA potently suppressed osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow-derived precursor cells driven either by a high-dose RANKL alone or by a low-dose RANKL plus TNF-alpha (RANKL/TNF-alpha). alpha-LA abolished ROS elevation by RANKL or RANKL/TNF-alpha and inhibited NF-kappaB activation in osteoclast precursor cells. Specifically, alpha-LA reduced DNA binding of NF-kappaB but did not inhibit IKK activation. Furthermore, alpha-LA greatly suppressed in vivo bone loss induced by RANKL or TNF-alpha in a calvarial remodeling model. Therefore, our data provide evidence that ROS plays an important role in osteoclast differentiation through NF-kappaB regulation and the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid has a therapeutic potential for bone erosive diseases.

  10. Regulation of bitter taste responses by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Kim, Agnes; Chai, Jinghua; Simon, Nirvine; Zhou, Minliang; Bachmanov, Alexander A; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important regulators of metabolism and food intake. Over production of inflammatory cytokines during bacterial and viral infections leads to anorexia and reduced food intake. However, it remains unclear whether any inflammatory cytokines are involved in the regulation of taste reception, the sensory mechanism governing food intake. Previously, we showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is preferentially expressed in a subset of taste bud cells. The level of TNF in taste cells can be further induced by inflammatory stimuli. To investigate whether TNF plays a role in regulating taste responses, in this study, we performed taste behavioral tests and gustatory nerve recordings in TNF knockout mice. Behavioral tests showed that TNF-deficient mice are significantly less sensitive to the bitter compound quinine than wild-type mice, while their responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are comparable to those of wild-type controls. Furthermore, nerve recording experiments showed that the chorda tympani nerve in TNF knockout mice is much less responsive to bitter compounds than that in wild-type mice. Chorda tympani nerve responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are similar between TNF knockout and wild-type mice, consistent with the results from behavioral tests. We further showed that taste bud cells express the two known TNF receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 and, therefore, are potential targets of TNF. Together, our results suggest that TNF signaling preferentially modulates bitter taste responses. This mechanism may contribute to taste dysfunction, particularly taste distortion, associated with infections and some chronic inflammatory diseases.

  11. Regulation of bitter taste responses by tumor necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Pu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Kim, Agnes; Chai, Jinghua; Simon, Nirvine; Zhou, Minliang; Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important regulators of metabolism and food intake. Over production of inflammatory cytokines during bacterial and viral infections leads to anorexia and reduced food intake. However, it remains unclear whether any inflammatory cytokines are involved in the regulation of taste reception, the sensory mechanism governing food intake. Previously, we showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is preferentially expressed in a subset of taste bud cells. The level of TNF in taste cells can be further induced by inflammatory stimuli. To investigate whether TNF plays a role in regulating taste responses, in this study, we performed taste behavioral tests and gustatory nerve recordings in TNF knockout mice. Behavioral tests showed that TNF-deficient mice are significantly less sensitive to the bitter compound quinine than wild-type mice, while their responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are comparable to those of wild-type controls. Furthermore, nerve recording experiments showed that the chorda tympani nerve in TNF knockout mice is much less responsive to bitter compounds than that in wild-type mice. Chorda tympani nerve responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are similar between TNF knockout and wild-type mice, consistent with the results from behavioral tests. We further showed that taste bud cells express the two known TNF receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 and, therefore, are potential targets of TNF. Together, our results suggest that TNF signaling preferentially modulates bitter taste responses. This mechanism may contribute to taste dysfunction, particularly taste distortion, associated with infections and some chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25911043

  12. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor-associated Factor 7 Is Required for TNFα-induced Jun NH2-terminal Kinase Activation and Promotes Cell Death by Regulating Polyubiquitination and Lysosomal Degradation of c-FLIP Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Scudiero, Ivan; Zotti, Tiziana; Ferravante, Angela; Vessichelli, Mariangela; Reale, Carla; Masone, Maria C.; Leonardi, Antonio; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2012-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α signals both cell survival and death. The biological outcome of TNFα treatment is determined by the balance between survival factors and Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, which promotes cell death. Here, we show that TRAF7, the most recently identified member of the TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) family of proteins, is essential for activation of JNK following TNFα stimulation. We also show that TRAF6 and TRAF7 promote unconventional polyubiquitination of the anti-apoptotic protein c-FLIPL and demonstrate that degradation of c-FLIPL also occurs through a lysosomal pathway. RNA interference-mediated depletion of TRAF7 correlates with increased c-FLIPL expression level, which, in turn, results in resistance to TNFα cytotoxicity. Collectively, our results indicate an important role for TRAF7 in the activation of JNK following TNFα stimulation and clearly point to an involvement of this protein in regulating the turnover of c-FLIP and, consequently, cell death. PMID:22219201

  13. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 7 is required for TNFα-induced Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation and promotes cell death by regulating polyubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of c-FLIP protein.

    PubMed

    Scudiero, Ivan; Zotti, Tiziana; Ferravante, Angela; Vessichelli, Mariangela; Reale, Carla; Masone, Maria C; Leonardi, Antonio; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2012-02-17

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α signals both cell survival and death. The biological outcome of TNFα treatment is determined by the balance between survival factors and Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, which promotes cell death. Here, we show that TRAF7, the most recently identified member of the TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) family of proteins, is essential for activation of JNK following TNFα stimulation. We also show that TRAF6 and TRAF7 promote unconventional polyubiquitination of the anti-apoptotic protein c-FLIP(L) and demonstrate that degradation of c-FLIP(L) also occurs through a lysosomal pathway. RNA interference-mediated depletion of TRAF7 correlates with increased c-FLIP(L) expression level, which, in turn, results in resistance to TNFα cytotoxicity. Collectively, our results indicate an important role for TRAF7 in the activation of JNK following TNFα stimulation and clearly point to an involvement of this protein in regulating the turnover of c-FLIP and, consequently, cell death.

  14. Brucella abortus Invasion of Osteocytes Modulates Connexin 43 and Integrin Expression and Induces Osteoclastogenesis via Receptor Activator of NF-κB Ligand and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Gentilini, María Virginia; Velásquez, Lis Noelia; Fossati, Carlos Alberto; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarticular brucellosis is the most common localization of human active disease. Osteocytes are the most abundant cells of bone. They secrete factors that regulate the differentiation of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts during bone remodeling. The aim of this study is to determine if Brucella abortus infection modifies osteocyte function. Our results indicate that B. abortus infection induced matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), receptor activator for NF-κB ligand (RANKL), proinflammatory cytokines, and keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) secretion by osteocytes. In addition, supernatants from B. abortus-infected osteocytes induced bone marrow-derived monocytes (BMM) to undergo osteoclastogenesis. Using neutralizing antibodies against tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or osteoprotegerin (OPG), RANKL's decoy receptor, we determined that TNF-α and RANKL are involved in osteoclastogenesis induced by supernatants from B. abortus-infected osteocytes. Connexin 43 (Cx43) and the integrins E11/gp38, integrin-α, integrin-β, and CD44 are involved in cell-cell interactions necessary for osteocyte survival. B. abortus infection inhibited the expression of Cx43 but did not modify the expression of integrins. Yet the expression of both Cx43 and integrins was inhibited by supernatants from B. abortus-infected macrophages. B. abortus infection was not capable of inducing osteocyte apoptosis. However, supernatants from B. abortus-infected macrophages induced osteocyte apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, our results indicate that B. abortus infection could alter osteocyte function, contributing to bone damage. PMID:26459511

  15. Butrin, Isobutrin, and Butein from Medicinal Plant Butea monosperma Selectively Inhibit Nuclear Factor-κB in Activated Human Mast Cells: Suppression of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, Interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Zafar; Akhtar, Nahid; Khan, Abubakar; Khan, Khursheed A.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of mast cells in rheumatoid synovial tissue has often been associated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8 production and disease pathogenesis by adjacent cell types. Butea monosperma (BM) is a well known medicinal plant in India and the tropics. The aim of this study was to examine whether a standardized extract of BM flower (BME) could inhibit inflammatory reactions in human mast cells (HMC) using activated HMC-1 cells as a model. Four previously characterized polyphenols—butrin, isobutrin, isocoreopsin, and butein—were isolated from BME by preparative thin layer chromatography, and their purity and molecular weights were determined by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. Our results showed that butrin, isobutrin, and butein significantly reduced the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and calcium ionophore A23187-induced inflammatory gene expression and production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 in HMC-1 cells by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB. In addition, isobutrin was most potent in suppressing the NF-κB p65 activation by inhibiting IκBα degradation, whereas butrin and butein were relatively less effective. In vitro kinase activity assay revealed that isobutrin was a potent inhibitor of IκB kinase complex activity. This is the first report identifying the molecular basis of the reported anti-inflammatory effects of BME and its constituents butrin, isobutrin, and butein. The novel pharmacological actions of these polyphenolic compounds indicate potential therapeutic value for the treatment of inflammatory and other diseases in which activated mast cells play a role. PMID:20164300

  16. Structure/Function analysis of p55 tumor necrosis factor receptor and fas-associated death domain. Effect on necrosis in L929sA cells.

    PubMed

    Boone, E; Vanden Berghe, T; Van Loo, G; De Wilde, G; De Wael, N; Vercammen, D; Fiers, W; Haegeman, G; Vandenabeele, P

    2000-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) induces a typical apoptotic cell death program in various cell lines by interacting with the p55 tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R55). In contrast, triggering of the fibrosarcoma cell line L929sA gives rise to characteristic cellular changes resulting in necrosis. The intracellular domain of TNF-R55 can be subdivided into two parts: a membrane-proximal domain (amino acids 202-325) and a C-terminal death domain (DD) (amino acids 326-413), which has been shown to be necessary and sufficient for apoptosis. Structure/function analysis of TNF-R55-mediated necrosis in L929sA cells demonstrated that initiation of necrotic cell death, as defined by swelling of the cells, rapid membrane permeabilization, absence of nuclear condensation, absence of DNA hypoploidy, and generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen intermediates, is also confined to the DD. The striking synergistic effect of the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone on TNF-induced necrosis was also observed with receptors solely containing the DD. TNF-R55-mediated necrosis is not affected by the dominant negative deletion mutant of the Fas-associated death domain (FADD-(80-205)) that lacks the N-terminal death effector domain. Moreover, overexpression of FADD-(80-205) in L929sA is cytotoxic and insensitive to CrmA, while the cytotoxicity due to overexpression of the deletion mutant FADD-(1-111) lacking the DD is prevented by CrmA. These results demonstrate that the death domain of FADD can elicit an active necrotic cell death pathway.

  17. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced interleukin-6 expression by telmisartan through cross-talk of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma with nuclear factor kappaB and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-beta.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qingping; Miyazaki, Ryohei; Ichiki, Toshihiro; Imayama, Ikuyo; Inanaga, Keita; Ohtsubo, Hideki; Yano, Kotaro; Takeda, Kotaro; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2009-05-01

    Telmisartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, was reported to be a partial agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma. Although peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activators have been shown to have an anti-inflammatory effect, such as inhibition of cytokine production, it has not been determined whether telmisartan has such effects. We examined whether telmisartan inhibits expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a proinflammatory cytokine, in vascular smooth muscle cells. Telmisartan, but not valsartan, attenuated IL-6 mRNA expression induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Telmisartan decreased TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 mRNA and protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. Because suppression of IL-6 mRNA expression was prevented by pretreatment with GW9662, a specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma antagonist, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma may be involved in the process. Telmisartan suppressed IL-6 gene promoter activity induced by TNF-alpha. Deletion analysis suggested that the DNA segment between -150 bp and -27 bp of the IL-6 gene promoter that contains nuclear factor kappaB and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-beta sites was responsible for telmisartan suppression. Telmisartan attenuated TNF-alpha-induced nuclear factor kappaB- and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-beta-dependent gene transcription and DNA binding. Telmisartan also attenuated serum IL-6 level in TNF-alpha-infused mice and IL-6 production from rat aorta stimulated with TNF-alpha ex vivo. These data suggest that telmisartan may attenuate inflammatory process induced by TNF-alpha in addition to the blockade of angiotensin II type 1 receptor. Because both TNF-alpha and angiotensin II play important roles in atherogenesis through enhancement of vascular inflammation, telmisartan may be beneficial for treatment of not only hypertension but also vascular inflammatory change.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 link) University College London: National Amyloidosis Center (UK) General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ... of Hereditary Periodic Fever Syndromes NHS Foundation Trust (UK) Orphanet: Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 associated periodic ...

  19. TTRAP, a novel protein that associates with CD40, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-75 and TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs), and that inhibits nuclear factor-kappa B activation.

    PubMed

    Pype, S; Declercq, W; Ibrahimi, A; Michiels, C; Van Rietschoten, J G; Dewulf, N; de Boer, M; Vandenabeele, P; Huylebroeck, D; Remacle, J E

    2000-06-16

    CD40 belongs to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family. CD40 signaling involves the recruitment of TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) to its cytoplasmic domain. We have identified a novel intracellular CD40-binding protein termed TRAF and TNF receptor-associated protein (TTRAP) that also interacts with TNF-R75 and CD30. The region of the CD40 cytoplasmic domain that is required for TTRAP association overlaps with the TRAF6 recognition motif. Association of TTRAP with CD40 increases profoundly in response to treatment of cells with CD40L. Interestingly, TTRAP also associates with TRAFs, with the highest affinity for TRAF6. In transfected cells, TTRAP inhibits in a dose-dependent manner the transcriptional activation of a nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB)-dependent reporter mediated by CD40, TNF-R75 or Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and to a lesser extent by TRAF2, TRAF6, TNF-alpha, or interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). TTRAP does not affect stimulation of NF-kappaB induced by overexpression of the NF-kappaB-inducing kinase (NIK), the IkappaB kinase alpha (IKKalpha), or the NF-kappaB subunit P65/RelA, suggesting it acts upstream of the latter proteins. Our results indicate that we have isolated a novel regulatory factor that is involved in signal transduction by distinct members of the TNF receptor family.

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Associated Factors (TRAFs) 2 and 3 Form a Transcriptional Complex with Phosho-RNA Polymerase II and p65 in CD40 Ligand Activated Neuro2a Cells.

    PubMed

    El Hokayem, Jimmy; Brittain, George C; Nawaz, Zafar; Bethea, John R

    2017-03-01

    The tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) have been classically described as adaptor proteins that function as solely cytosolic signaling intermediates for the TNF receptor superfamily, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), NOD, like receptors (NLRs), cytokine receptors, and others. In this study, we show for the first time that TRAFs are present within the cytoplasm and nucleus of Neuro2a cells and primary cortical neurons, and that TRAF2 and TRAF3 translocate into the nucleus within minutes of CD40L stimulation. Analysis of the transcriptional regulatory potential of TRAFs by luciferase assay revealed that each of the TRAFs differentially functions as a transcriptional activator or repressor in a cell-specific manner. Interestingly, ChIP-qPCR data demonstrate that TRAFs 2/3, p65, and pRNAPol II form part of a transcriptional complex on the Icam-1 gene promoter upon CD40L stimulation. We further determined that TRAF2 recruitment to the nucleus is critical for the ubiquitination of H2b, a transcription permissive epigenetic modification. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that TRAFs 2/3 participate in the formation of a CD40L-induced transcriptional complex in neuronal cells.

  1. Interleukin 1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibit Cardiac Myocyte β -adrenergic Responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Tod; Chung, Mina K.; Pieper, Stephen J.; Lange, Louis G.; Schreiner, George F.

    1989-09-01

    Reversible congestive heart failure can accompany cardiac allograft rejection and inflammatory myocarditis, conditions associated with an immune cell infiltrate of the myocardium. To determine whether immune cell secretory products alter cardiac muscle metabolism without cytotoxicity, we cultured cardiac myocytes in the presence of culture supernatants from activated immune cells. We observed that these culture supernatants inhibit β -adrenergic agonist-mediated increases in cultured cardiac myocyte contractility and intracellular cAMP accumulation. The myocyte contractile response to increased extracellular Ca2+ concentration is unaltered by prior exposure to these culture supernatants, as is the increase in myocyte intracellular cAMP concentration in response to stimulation with forskolin, a direct adenyl cyclase activator. Inhibition occurs in the absence of alteration in β -adrenergic receptor density or ligand binding affinity. Suppressive activity is attributable to the macrophage-derived cytokines interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor. Thus, these observations describe a role for defined cytokines in regulating the hormonal responsiveness and function of contractile cells. The effects of interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor on intracellular cAMP accumulation may be a model for immune modulation of other cellular functions dependent upon cyclic nucleotide metabolism. The uncoupling of agonist-occupied receptors from adenyl cyclase suggests that β -receptor or guanine nucleotide binding protein function is altered by the direct or indirect action of cytokines on cardiac muscle cells.

  2. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2 (TNFR2)·Interleukin-17 Receptor D (IL-17RD) Heteromerization Reveals a Novel Mechanism for NF-κB Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shigao; Wang, Yinyin; Mei, Kunrong; Zhang, Sen; Sun, Xiaojun; Ren, Fangli; Liu, Sihan; Yang, Zi; Wang, Xinquan; Qin, Zhihai; Chang, Zhijie

    2015-01-01

    TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) exerts diverse roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Here, we report that TNFR2 but not TNFR1 forms a heteromer with interleukin-17 receptor D (IL-17RD), also named Sef, to activate NF-κB signaling. TNFR2 associates with IL-17RD, leading to mutual receptor aggregation and TRAF2 recruitment, which further activate the downstream cascade of NF-κB signaling. Depletion of IL-17RD impaired TNFR2-mediated activation of NF-κB signaling. Importantly, IL-17RD was markedly increased in renal tubular epithelial cells in nephritis rats, and a strong interaction of TNFR2 and IL-17RD was observed in the renal epithelia. The IL-17RD·TNFR2 complex in activation of NF-κB may explain the role of TNFR2 in inflammatory diseases including nephritis. PMID:25378394

  3. Potentiation of tumor necrosis factor-induced NF-kappa B activation by deacetylase inhibitors is associated with a delayed cytoplasmic reappearance of I kappa B alpha.

    PubMed

    Adam, Emmanuelle; Quivy, Vincent; Bex, Françoise; Chariot, Alain; Collette, Yves; Vanhulle, Caroline; Schoonbroodt, Sonia; Goffin, Véronique; Nguyên, Thi Liên-Anh; Gloire, Geoffrey; Carrard, Géraldine; Friguet, Bertrand; De Launoit, Yvan; Burny, Arsène; Bours, Vincent; Piette, Jacques; Van Lint, Carine

    2003-09-01

    Previous studies have implicated acetylases and deacetylases in regulating the transcriptional activity of NF-kappa B. Here, we show that inhibitors of deacetylases such as trichostatin A (TSA) and sodium butyrate (NaBut) potentiated TNF-induced expression of several natural NF-kappa B-driven promoters. This transcriptional synergism observed between TNF and TSA (or NaBut) required intact kappa B sites in all promoters tested and was biologically relevant as demonstrated by RNase protection on two instances of endogenous NF-kappa B-regulated gene transcription. Importantly, TSA prolonged both TNF-induced DNA-binding activity and the presence of NF-kappa B in the nucleus. We showed that the p65 subunit of NF-kappa B was acetylated in vivo. However, this acetylation was weak, suggesting that other mechanisms could be implicated in the potentiated binding and transactivation activities of NF-kappa B after TNF plus TSA versus TNF treatment. Western blot and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy experiments revealed a delay in the cytoplasmic reappearance of the I kappa B alpha inhibitor that correlated temporally with the prolonged intranuclear binding and presence of NF-kappa B. This delay was due neither to a defect in I kappa B alpha mRNA production nor to a nuclear retention of I kappa B alpha but was rather due to a persistent proteasome-mediated degradation of I kappa B alpha. A prolongation of I kappa B kinase activity could explain, at least partially, the delayed I kappa B alpha cytoplasmic reappearance observed in presence of TNF plus TSA.

  4. Alpha-Tocopherol Alters Transcription Activities that Modulates Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF-α) Induced Inflammatory Response in Bovine Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W; Kahl, Stanislaw; Elsasser, Theodore H

    2012-01-01

    To further investigate the potential role of α-tocopherol in maintaining immuno-homeostasis in bovine cells (Madin-Darby bovine kidney epithelial cell line), we undertook in vitro experiments using recombinant TNF-α as an immuno-stimulant to simulate inflammation response in cells with or without α-tocopherol pre-treatment. Using microarray global-profiling and IPA (Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, Ingenuity(®) Systems, http://www.ingenuity.com) data analysis on TNF-α-induced gene perturbation in those cells, we focused on determining whether α-tocopherol treatment of normal bovine cells in a standard cell culture condition can modify cell's immune response induced by TNF-α challenge. When three datasets were filtered and compared using IPA, there were a total of 1750 genes in all three datasets for comparison, 97 genes were common in all three sets; 615 genes were common in at least two datasets; there were 261 genes unique in TNF-α challenge, 399 genes were unique in α-tocopherol treatment, and 378 genes were unique in the α-tocopherol plus TNF-α treatment. TNF-α challenge induced significant change in gene expression. Many of those genes induced by TNF-α are related to the cells immune and inflammatory responses. The results of IPA data analysis showed that α-tocopherol-pretreatment of cells modulated cell's response to TNF-α challenge. In most of the canonical pathways, α-tocopherol pretreatment showed the antagonistic effect against the TNF-α-induced pro-inflammatory responses. We concluded that α-tocopherol pre-treatment has a significant antagonistic effect that modulates the cell's response to the TNF-α challenge by altering the gene expression activities of some important signaling molecules.

  5. Toll-like receptor 2- and 6-mediated stimulation by macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 induces lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cross tolerance in mice, which results in protection from tumor necrosis factor alpha but in only partial protection from lethal LPS doses.

    PubMed

    Deiters, Ursula; Gumenscheimer, Marina; Galanos, Chris; Mühlradt, Peter F

    2003-08-01

    Patients or experimental animals previously exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) become tolerant to further LPS challenge. We investigated the potential of the macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2) to induce in vivo cross tolerance to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and LPS. MALP-2-induced tolerance could be of practical interest, as MALP-2 proved much less pyrogenic in rabbits than LPS. Whereas LPS signals via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), MALP-2 uses TLR2 and TLR6. LPS-mediated cytokine release was studied in mice pretreated with intraperitoneal injections of MALP-2. No biologically active TNF-alpha could be detected in the serum of MALP-2-treated animals when challenged with LPS 24 or 72 h later, whereas suppression of LPS-dependent interleukin (IL)-6 lasted for only 24 h. Protection from lethal TNF-alpha shock was studied in galactosamine-treated mice. Dose dependently, MALP-2 prevented death from lethal TNF-alpha doses in TLR4(-/-) but not in TLR2(-/-) mice, with protection lasting from 5 to 24 h. To assay protection from LPS, mice were pretreated with MALP-2 doses of up to 10 micro g. Five and 24 h later, the animals were simultaneously sensitized and challenged by intravenous coinjection of galactosamine and a lethal dose of 50 ng of LPS. There was only limited protection (four of seven mice survived) when mice were challenged 5 h after MALP-2 pretreatment, and no protection when mice were challenged at later times. The high effectiveness of MALP-2 in suppressing TNF-alpha, the known ways of biological inactivation, and low pyrogenicity make MALP-2 a potential candidate for clinical use.

  6. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 is a positive regulator of pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi; Deng, Ke-Qiong; Luo, Yuxuan; Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Gao, Lu; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Guang-Nian; Zhu, Xueyong; Li, Hongliang

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy, a common early symptom of heart failure, is regulated by numerous signaling pathways. Here, we identified tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3), an adaptor protein in tumor necrosis factor-related signaling cascades, as a key regulator of cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload. TRAF3 expression was upregulated in hypertrophied mice hearts and failing human hearts. Four weeks after aortic banding, cardiac-specific conditional TRAF3-knockout mice exhibited significantly reduced cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction. Conversely, transgenic mice overexpressing TRAF3 in the heart developed exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload. TRAF3 also promoted an angiotensin II- or phenylephrine-induced hypertrophic response in isolated cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, TRAF3 directly bound to TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), causing increased TBK1 phosphorylation in response to hypertrophic stimuli. This interaction between TRAF3 and TBK1 further activated AKT signaling, which ultimately promoted the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Our findings not only reveal a key role of TRAF3 in regulating the hypertrophic response but also uncover TRAF3-TBK1-AKT as a novel signaling pathway in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. This pathway may represent a potential therapeutic target for this pathological process.

  7. Radiation necrosis in the brain: imaging features and differentiation from tumor recurrence.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ritu; Vattoth, Surjith; Jacob, Rojymon; Manzil, Fathima Fijula Palot; O'Malley, Janis P; Borghei, Peyman; Patel, Bhavik N; Curé, Joel K

    2012-01-01

    Radiation necrosis in the brain commonly occurs in three distinct clinical scenarios, namely, radiation therapy for head and neck malignancy or intracranial extraaxial tumor, stereotactic radiation therapy (including radiosurgery) for brain metastasis, and radiation therapy for primary brain tumors. Knowledge of the radiation treatment plan, amount of brain tissue included in the radiation port, type of radiation, location of the primary malignancy, and amount of time elapsed since radiation therapy is extremely important in determining whether the imaging abnormality represents radiation necrosis or recurrent tumor. Conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of these two entities overlap considerably, and even at histopathologic analysis, tumor mixed with radiation necrosis is a common finding. Advanced imaging modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion MR imaging (with calculation of certain specific parameters such as apparent diffusion coefficient ratios, relative peak height, and percentage of signal recovery), MR spectroscopy, and positron emission tomography can be useful in differentiating between recurrent tumor and radiation necrosis. In everyday practice, the visual assessment of diffusion-weighted and perfusion images may also be helpful by favoring one diagnosis over the other, with restricted diffusion and an elevated relative cerebral blood volume being seen much more frequently in recurrent tumor than in radiation necrosis.

  8. Dehydrocostus lactone enhances tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced apoptosis of human leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, G S; Pae, H O; Chung, H T; Kwon, J W; Lee, J H; Kwon, T O; Kwon, S Y; Chon, B H; Yun, Young Gab

    2004-05-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones have raised considerable interest because of their ability to block the activation of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). NF-kappaB plays an important role in the resistance of cancer cells to the induction of apoptosis by anticancer drugs and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Pharmacological inhibition of NF-kappaB offers the promise of enhancing the efficacy of anticancer therapies. Here, we demonstrate that dehydrocostus lactone (DL), the major sesquiterpene lactone isolated from the roots of Saussurea lappa, inhibits NF-kappaB activation by preventing TNF-alpha-induced degradation and phosphorylation of its inhibitory protein I-kappaB alpha in human leukemia HL-60 cells and that DL renders HL-60 cells susceptible to TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis by enhancing caspase-8 and caspase-3 activities.

  9. Tumor necrosis factor-α impairs oligodendroglial differentiation through a mitochondria-dependent process

    PubMed Central

    Bonora, M; De Marchi, E; Patergnani, S; Suski, J M; Celsi, F; Bononi, A; Giorgi, C; Marchi, S; Rimessi, A; Duszyński, J; Pozzan, T; Wieckowski, M R; Pinton, P

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial defects, affecting parameters such as mitochondrial number and shape, levels of respiratory chain complex components and markers of oxidative stress, have been associated with the appearance and progression of multiple sclerosis. Nevertheless, mitochondrial physiology has never been monitored during oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) differentiation, especially in OPCs challenged with proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we show that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibits OPC differentiation, accompanied by altered mitochondrial calcium uptake, mitochondrial membrane potential, and respiratory complex I activity as well as increased reactive oxygen species production. Treatment with a mitochondrial uncoupler (FCCP) to mimic mitochondrial impairment also causes cells to accumulate at the progenitor stage. Interestingly, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) levels increase during TNF-α exposure and inhibit OPC differentiation. Overall, our data indicate that TNF-α induces metabolic changes, driven by mitochondrial impairment and AMPK activation, leading to the inhibition of OPC differentiation. PMID:24658399

  10. A novel grading system for clear cell renal cell carcinoma incorporating tumor necrosis.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Brett; McKenney, Jesse K; Lohse, Christine M; Leibovich, Bradley C; Thompson, Robert Houston; Boorjian, Stephen A; Cheville, John C

    2013-03-01

    Grading of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has prognostic significance, and there is recent consensus by the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) that for clear cell and papillary RCC, grading should primarily be based on nucleolar prominence. Microscopic tumor necrosis also predicts outcome independent of tumor grading. This study was undertaken to assess whether the incorporation of microscopic tumor necrosis into the ISUP grading system provides survival information superior to ISUP grading alone. Data on 3017 patients treated surgically for clear cell RCC, 556 for papillary RCC, and 180 for chromophobe RCC were retrieved from the Mayo Clinic Registry. Median follow-up periods were 8.9, 9.7, and 8.5 years, respectively. Four proposed grades were defined: grade 1: ISUP grade 1+ISUP grade 2 without necrosis; grade 2: ISUP grade 2 with necrosis+ISUP grade 3 without necrosis; grade 3: ISUP grade 3 with necrosis+ISUP grade 4 without necrosis; grade 4: ISUP grade 4 with necrosis or sarcomatoid/rhabdoid tumors. There was a significant difference in survival between each of the grades for clear cell RCC, and the concordance index was superior to that of ISUP grading. The proposed grading system also outperformed the ISUP grading system when cases were stratified according to the TNM stage. Similar results were not obtained for papillary RCC or chromophobe RCC. We conclude that grading for clear cell RCC should be based on nucleolar prominence and necrosis, that ISUP grading should be used for papillary RCC, and that chromophobe RCC should not be graded.

  11. The development of novel inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha production based on substituted [5,5]-bicyclic pyrozolones

    SciTech Connect

    Laufersweiler, Matthew; Brugel, Todd; Clark, Michael; Golebiowski, Adam; Bookland, Roger; Laughlin, Steven; Sabat, Mark; Townes, Jennifer; VanRens, John; De, Biswanath; Hsieh, Lily; Heitmeyer, Sandra; Juergens, Karen; Brown, Kimberly; Mekel, Marlene; Walter, Richard; Janusz, Michael

    2010-11-16

    Novel substituted [5,5]-bicyclic pyrzazolones are presented as inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) production. Many of these compounds show low nanomolar activity against lipopolysaccaride (LPS)-induced TNF-{alpha} production in THP-1 cells. This class of molecules was co-crystallized with mutated p38, and several analogs showed good oral bioavailability in the rat. Oral activity of these compounds in the rat iodoacetate model for osteoarthritis is discussed.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promotes the proliferation of human nucleus pulposus cells via nuclear factor-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Hu; Hong, Xin; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Yun-Tao; Bao, Jun-Ping; Liu, Lei; Wang, Feng; Wu, Xiao-Tao

    2015-04-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is known to play a critical role in intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, the effect of TNF-α on nucleus pulposus (NP) cells has not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of TNF-α on proliferation of human NP cells. NP cells were treated with different concentrations of TNF-α. Cell proliferation was determined by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) analysis and Ki67 immunofluorescence staining, and expression of cyclin B1 was studied by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell cycle was measured by flow cytometry and cell apoptosis was analyzed using an Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) & propidium iodide (PI) apoptosis detection kit. To identify the mechanism by which TNF-α induced proliferation of NP cells, selective inhibitors of major signaling pathways were used and Western blotting was carried out. Treatment with TNF-α increased cell viability (as determined by CCK-8 analysis) and expression of cyclin B1 and the number of Ki67-positive and S-phase NP cells, indicating enhancement of proliferation. Consistent with this, NP cell apoptosis was suppressed by TNF-α treatment. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) blocked TNF-α-stimulated proliferation of NP cells. In conclusion, the current findings suggest that the effect of TNF-α on IVD degeneration involves promotion of the proliferation of human NP cells via the NF-κB, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathways.

  13. 4G/5G plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and -308 A/G tumor necrosis factor-α promoter gene polymorphisms in Argentinean lupus patients: focus on lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Sebastián Andrés; Aranda, Federico; Allievi, Alberto; Orden, Alberto Omar; Perés Wingeyer, Silvia; Trobo, Rosana; Alvarez, Analía; Eimon, Alicia; Barreira, Juan Carlos; Schneeberger, Emilce; Dal Pra, Fernando; Sarano, Judith; Hofman, Julio; Chamorro, Julián; de Larrañaga, Gabriela

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the relationship between the 4G/5G plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) and -308 A/G tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) polymorphisms and the clinical and biochemical features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in an Argentinean patient cohort. A total of 402 patients were studied, including 179 SLE patients and 223 healthy individuals. PCR-RLFP was used to determine the genotypes of the 4G/5G PAI-1 and -308 A/G TNF-α polymorphisms. SLE patients with lupus nephritis (LN) (n = 86) were compared with patients without LN (n = 93). Additionally, LN patients were divided into proliferative LN and non-proliferative LN groups according to the results of the renal biopsies. No significant differences were noted in the genotype distributions or allele frequencies of these TNF-α and PAI-1 polymorphisms between SLE patients and controls. There were higher numbers of criteria for SLE, more lupus flares and higher damage scores in LN patients, but there were similar frequencies of anti-phospholipid antibody (APA) positivity and anti-phospholipid syndrome. No significant difference was noted for any studied variable between the proliferative LN and non-proliferative LN groups except for the presence of APA. We found no significant differences in the TNF-α and PAI-1 genotype distributions or allele frequencies between groups. We found that the -308 A/G TNF-α and 4G/5G PAI-1 polymorphisms are not associated with susceptibility to SLE in an Argentinean population. We also did not find any association between the presence of any specific allele or genotype and the development of LN in SLE patients. Finally, no association was noted between either of the two polymorphisms and the severity of renal disease.

  14. Safety of Resuming Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients Concomitant with the Treatment of Active Tuberculosis: A Retrospective Nationwide Registry of the Korean Society of Spondyloarthritis Research

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Won; Kwon, Seong Ryul; Jung, Kyong-Hee; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Baek, Han Joo; Seo, Mi Ryung; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Suh, Chang-Hee; Jung, Ju Yang; Son, Chang-Nam; Shim, Seung Cheol; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Geun; Lee, Yeon-Ah; Lee, Eun Young; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds Patients who develop an active tuberculosis infection during tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor treatment typically discontinue TNF inhibitor and receive standard anti-tuberculosis treatment. However, there is currently insufficient information on patient outcomes following resumption of TNF inhibitor treatment during ongoing anti- tuberculosis treatment. Our study was designed to investigate the safety of resuming TNF inhibitors in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients who developed tuberculosis as a complication of the use of TNF inhibitors. Methods Through the nationwide registry of the Korean Society of Spondyloarthritis Research, 3929 AS patients who were prescribed TNF inhibitors were recruited between June 2003 and June 2014 at fourteen referral hospitals. Clinical information was analyzed about the patients who experienced tuberculosis after exposure to TNF inhibitors. The clinical features of resumers and non-resumers of TNF inhibitors were compared and the outcomes of tuberculosis were surveyed individually. Findings Fifty-six AS patients were treated for tuberculosis associated with TNF inhibitors. Among them, 23 patients resumed TNF inhibitors, and these patients were found to be exposed to TNF inhibitors for a longer period of time and experienced more frequent disease flare-up after discontinuation of TNF inhibitors compared with those who did not resume. Fifteen patients resumed TNF inhibitors during anti-tuberculosis treatment (early resumers) and 8 after completion of anti-tuberculosis treatment (late resumers). Median time to resuming TNF inhibitor from tuberculosis was 3.3 and 9.0 months in the early and late resumers, respectively. Tuberculosis was treated successfully in all resumers and did not relapse in any of them during follow-up (median 33.8 [IQR; 20.8–66.7] months). Conclusions Instances of tuberculosis were treated successfully in our AS patients, even when given concomitantly with TNF inhibitors. We suggest that early

  15. Formation of Ion-Permeable Channels by Tumor Necrosis Factor-α

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Bruce L.; Baldwin, Rae Lynn; Munoz, David; Wisnieski, Bernadine J.

    1992-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF, cachectin), a protein secreted by activated macrophages, participates in inflammatory responses and in infectious and neoplastic disease states. The mechanisms by which TNF exerts cytotoxic, hormonal, and other specific effects are obscure. Structural studies of the TNF trimer have revealed a central pore-like region. Although several amino acid side chains appear to preclude an open channel, the ability of TNF to insert into lipid vesicles raised the possibility that opening might occur in a bilayer milieu. Acidification of TNF promoted conformational changes concordant with increased surface hydrophobicity and membrane insertion. Furthermore, TNF formed pH-dependent, voltage-dependent, ion-permeable channels in planar lipid bilayer membranes and increased the sodium permeability of human U937 histiocytic lymphoma cells. Thus, some of the physiological effects of TNF may be elicited through its intrinsic ion channel-forming activity.

  16. Mechanism of inhibition of HSV-1 replication by tumor necrosis factor and interferon gamma.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1991-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) synergizes with interferon (IFN gamma) in the blockade of HSV-1 replication. Antibodies against IFN beta block this synergism, implying a role of IFN beta in the antiviral activity of TNF plus IFN gamma. IFN beta 1 added exogenously to Hep-2 cells shows antiviral activity against HSV-1 only at high concentrations, whereas IFN beta 2 (also known as IL-6) alone has no effect on the replication of VSV or HSV-1 even when 1,000 U/ml are present. Our results are in accordance with the idea that TNF induces IFN beta 1 and that both cytokines must be present in the culture medium to synergize with IFN gamma in order to inhibit HSV-1 replication.

  17. Enhancement of glioblastoma radioresponse by a selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib: Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis with extensive tumor necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Khong Bee . E-mail: dmskkb@nccs.com.sg; Wang, Ting Ting; Woon, Chow Thai; Cheah, Elizabeth S.; Moore, Xiao Lei; Zhu Congju; Wong, Meng Cheong

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Toward improved glioblastoma multiforme treatment, we determined whether celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, could enhance glioblastoma radiosensitivity by inducing tumor necrosis and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. Methods and Materials: U-87MG cells treated with celecoxib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival and angiogenic factor protein analysis (angiopoietin-1, angiopoietin-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]). In vivo, survival of mice intracranially implanted with U-87MG cells and treated with celecoxib and/or irradiation was monitored. Isolated tumors were assessed for tumor necrosis and tumor microvascular density by von Williebrand's factor (vWF) immunohistochemical staining. Results: Celecoxib (4 and 30 {mu}M; 24, 48, and 72 h) enhanced U-87MG cell radiosensitivity by significantly reducing clonogenic survival of irradiated cells. Angiopoietin-1 and VEGF proteins were decreased, whereas angiopoietin-2 expression increased after 72 h of celecoxib alone and when combined with irradiation. In vivo, median survival of control mice intracranially implanted with U-87MG cells was 18 days. Celecoxib (100 mg/kg/day, 2 weeks) significantly extended median survival of irradiated mice (24 Gy total) from 34 to 41 days, with extensive tumor necrosis [24.5 {+-} 8.6% of tumor region, compared with irradiation alone (2.7 {+-} 1.8%)]. Tumor microvascular density was significantly reduced in combined celecoxib and irradiated tumors (52.5 {+-} 2.9 microvessels per mm{sup 2} tumor region), compared with irradiated tumors alone (65.4 {+-} 4.0 microvessels per mm{sup 2}). Conclusion: Celecoxib significantly enhanced glioblastoma radiosensitivity, reduced clonogenic survival, and prolonged survival of glioblastoma-implanted mice by inhibition of tumor angiogenesis with extensive tumor necr0010os.

  18. Evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms of Pro12Ala in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and Gly308Ala in tumor necrosis factor-α genes in obese Asian Indians: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Namita; Agrawal, Mukta; Luthra, Kalpana; Vikram, Naval K; Misra, Anoop; Gupta, Rajeev

    2010-01-01

    Background A population-based case control study was performed to determine the associations of Pro12Ala polymorphism in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARG) and Gly308Ala polymorphism in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFA) genes in obese subjects. Patients and methods Of 1,400 eligible subjects, ≧20 years, we recruited only 1,127. For extreme phenotype case-control design, we evaluated 201 subjects with body mass index (BMI) ≧30 kg/m2 (Group 1) and 143 with BMI <20 kg/m2 (Group 2). Clinical, anthropometric, biochemical, and nutritional details and polymorphisms were estimated. Results In Group 1, the dietary intake of calories and fats was higher, physical activity was lower, and prevalence of truncal obesity, hypertension, high total cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and diabetes was greater than in Group 2. There were no homozygous polymorphisms of either gene. Heterozygous Pro12Ala polymorphism in PPARG was found in 15 (7.5%) subjects in Group 1 and 3 (2.1%) subjects in Group 2 (P = 0.028), and heterozygous Gly308Ala polymorphism in TNFA was found in 19 (9.5%) in Group 1 and 7 (4.9%) in Group 2 (P = 0.115). Presence of heterozygous polymorphism in PPARG and TNFA-predicted obesity with univariate odds ratio ([OR], 95% confidence intervals) of 2.25 (1.32–3.84, P = 0.003) and 1.48 (1.10–1.99, P = 0.009) and with multivariate OR 1.74 (1.03–2.93, P = 0.038) and 1.46 (1.05–2.03, P = 0.024), respectively. The addition of dietary and physical activity variables did not result in significant change. Conclusion Obese Asian Indians have greater prevalence of heterozygous polymorphisms of Pro12Ala in PPARG and Gly308Ala in TNFA genes. PMID:21437104

  19. Role of tissue factor in the antitumor effect of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mice.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, F; Miyayasu, K; Tsujimoto, S; Manda, T; Shimomura, K

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rTNF-alpha) inhibited tumor growth of Meth A fibrosarcoma (Meth A) solid tumor in mice, and the antitumor effect of rTNF-alpha was significantly decreased by pretreatment with small doses or rTNF-alpha in mice. In in vitro experiments, incubation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with rTNF-alpha enhanced procoagulant activity (PCA), which was drastically augmented after an addition of the conditioned medium of Meth A tumor cells. Furthermore, rTNF-alpha-induced PCA was decreased by pretreatment with rTNF-alpha in endothelial cells. This PCA was completely blocked after the addition of anti-human tissue factor (TF) murine monoclonal antibody. These results imply that in vivo antitumor effects of rTNF-alpha are mediated by expression of TF in endothelial cells, which is augmented by tumor released factor(s).

  20. Binding and regulation of cellular functions by monoclonal antibodies against human tumor necrosis factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to further characterize the interaction of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors with different targets, and to assess their ability to influence TNF effects on U937 and human endothelial cell (HEC) functions. Actions of recombinant TNF-alpha on U937 and HEC were effectively inhibited by Htr-5 and Utr-1, and to a greater extent by a combination of both mAbs. These observations indicate that TNF interaction with antigenically different components of membrane receptors (p55 and p75) represents a crucial step in transduction of signals for TNF toxicity against U937 and TNF activation of HEC functions. PMID:2172437

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-α: regulation of renal function and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a pleiotropic cytokine that becomes elevated in chronic inflammatory states such as hypertension and diabetes and has been found to mediate both increases and decreases in blood pressure. High levels of TNF-α decrease blood pressure, whereas moderate increases in TNF-α have been associated with increased NaCl retention and hypertension. The explanation for these disparate effects is not clear but could simply be due to different concentrations of TNF-α within the kidney, the physiological status of the subject, or the type of stimulus initiating the inflammatory response. TNF-α alters renal hemodynamics and nephron transport, affecting both activity and expression of transporters. It also mediates organ damage by stimulating immune cell infiltration and cell death. Here we will summarize the available findings and attempt to provide plausible explanations for such discrepancies. PMID:23515717

  2. Stable Escherichia coli-Clostridium acetobutylicum shuttle vector for secretion of murine tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Theys, J; Nuyts, S; Landuyt, W; Van Mellaert, L; Dillen, C; Böhringer, M; Dürre, P; Lambin, P; Anné, J

    1999-10-01

    Recombinant plasmids were constructed to secrete mouse tumor necrosis factor alpha (mTNF-alpha) from Clostridium acetobutylicum. The shuttle plasmids contained the clostridial endo-beta1, 4-glucanase (eglA) promoter and signal sequence that was fused in frame to the mTNF-alpha cDNA. The construction was first tested in Escherichia coli and then introduced in C. acetobutylicum DSM792 by electroporation. Controls confirmed the presence and stability of the recombinant plasmids in this organism. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and an in vitro cytotoxic assay were used to monitor expression and secretion of mTNF-alpha during growth. Significant levels of biologically active mTNF-alpha were measured in both lysates and supernatants. The present report deals with investigations on the elaboration of a gene transfer system for cancer treatment using anaerobic bacteria.

  3. Cell Death Mechanisms in Tumoral and Non-Tumoral Human Cell Lines Triggered by Photodynamic Treatments: Apoptosis, Necrosis and Parthanatos.

    PubMed

    Soriano, J; Mora-Espí, I; Alea-Reyes, M E; Pérez-García, L; Barrios, L; Ibáñez, E; Nogués, C

    2017-01-23

    Cell death triggered by photodynamic therapy can occur through different mechanisms: apoptosis, necrosis or autophagy. However, recent studies have demonstrated the existence of other mechanisms with characteristics of both necrosis and apoptosis. These new cell death pathways, collectively termed regulated necrosis, include a variety of processes triggered by different stimuli. In this study, we evaluated the cell death mechanism induced by photodynamic treatments with two photosensitizers, meso-tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin sodium salt (Na-H2TCPP) and its zinc derivative Na-ZnTCPP, in two human breast epithelial cell lines, a non-tumoral (MCF-10A) and a tumoral one (SKBR-3). Viability assays showed that photodynamic treatments with both photosensitizers induced a reduction in cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner and no dark toxicity was observed. The cell death mechanisms triggered were evaluated by several assays and cell line-dependent results were found. Most SKBR-3 cells died by either necrosis or apoptosis. By contrast, in MCF-10A cells, necrotic cells and another cell population with characteristics of both necrosis and apoptosis were predominant. In this latter population, cell death was PARP-dependent and translocation of AIF to the nucleus was observed in some cells. These characteristics are related with parthanatos, being the first evidence of this type of regulated necrosis in the field of photodynamic therapy.

  4. Cell Death Mechanisms in Tumoral and Non-Tumoral Human Cell Lines Triggered by Photodynamic Treatments: Apoptosis, Necrosis and Parthanatos

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, J.; Mora-Espí, I.; Alea-Reyes, M. E.; Pérez-García, L.; Barrios, L.; Ibáñez, E.; Nogués, C.

    2017-01-01

    Cell death triggered by photodynamic therapy can occur through different mechanisms: apoptosis, necrosis or autophagy. However, recent studies have demonstrated the existence of other mechanisms with characteristics of both necrosis and apoptosis. These new cell death pathways, collectively termed regulated necrosis, include a variety of processes triggered by different stimuli. In this study, we evaluated the cell death mechanism induced by photodynamic treatments with two photosensitizers, meso-tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin sodium salt (Na-H2TCPP) and its zinc derivative Na-ZnTCPP, in two human breast epithelial cell lines, a non-tumoral (MCF-10A) and a tumoral one (SKBR-3). Viability assays showed that photodynamic treatments with both photosensitizers induced a reduction in cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner and no dark toxicity was observed. The cell death mechanisms triggered were evaluated by several assays and cell line-dependent results were found. Most SKBR-3 cells died by either necrosis or apoptosis. By contrast, in MCF-10A cells, necrotic cells and another cell population with characteristics of both necrosis and apoptosis were predominant. In this latter population, cell death was PARP-dependent and translocation of AIF to the nucleus was observed in some cells. These characteristics are related with parthanatos, being the first evidence of this type of regulated necrosis in the field of photodynamic therapy. PMID:28112275

  5. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced enhancement of cryosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Raghav; Paciotti, Guilio F.; Bischof, John C.

    2008-02-01

    Local recurrence of cancer after cryosurgery is related to the inability to monitor and predict destruction of cancer (temperatures > -40°C) within an iceball. We previously reported that a cytokine adjuvant TNF-α could be used to achieve complete cancer destruction at the periphery of an iceball (0 to -40°C). This study is a further development of that work in which cryosurgery was performed using cryoprobes operating at temperatures > -40°C. LNCaP Pro 5 tumor grown in a dorsal skin fold chamber (DSFC) was frozen at -6°C after TNF-α incubation for 4 or 24 hours. Tumors grown in the hind limb were frozen with a probe tip temperature of -40°C, 4 or 24 hours after systemic injection with TNF-α. Both cryosurgery alone or TNF-α treatment alone caused only a minimal damage to the tumor tissue at the conditions used in the study. The combination of TNF-α and cryosurgery produced a significant damage to the tumor tissue in both the DSFC and the hind limb model system. This augmentation in cryoinjury was found to be time-dependent with 4-hour time period between the two treatments being more effective than 24-hour. These results suggests the possibility of cryotreatment at temperatures > -40°C with the administration of TNF-α.

  6. Necrosis avid near infrared fluorescent cyanines for imaging cell death and their use to monitor therapeutic efficacy in mouse tumor models.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bangwen; Stammes, Marieke A; van Driel, Pieter B A A; Cruz, Luis J; Knol-Blankevoort, Vicky T; Löwik, Martijn A M; Mezzanotte, Laura; Que, Ivo; Chan, Alan; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M; Siebes, Maria; Gottschalk, Sven; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Keereweer, Stijn; Horobin, Richard W; Hoehn, Mathias; Kaijzel, Eric L; van Beek, Ermond R; Snoeks, Thomas J A; Löwik, Clemens W G M

    2015-11-17

    Quantification of tumor necrosis in cancer patients is of diagnostic value as the amount of necrosis is correlated with disease prognosis and it could also be used to predict early efficacy of anti-cancer treatments. In the present study, we identified two near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) carboxylated cyanines, HQ5 and IRDye 800CW (800CW), which possess strong necrosis avidity. In vitro studies showed that both dyes selectively bind to cytoplasmic proteins of dead cells that have lost membrane integrity. Affinity for cytoplasmic proteins was confirmed using quantitative structure activity relations modeling. In vivo results, using NIRF and optoacoustic imaging, confirmed the necrosis avid properties of HQ5 and 800CW in a mouse 4T1 breast cancer tumor model of spontaneous necrosis. Finally, in a mouse EL4 lymphoma tumor model, already 24 h post chemotherapy, a significant increase in 800CW fluorescence intensity was observed in treated compared to untreated tumors. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, that the NIRF carboxylated cyanines HQ5 and 800CW possess strong necrosis avid properties in vitro and in vivo. When translated to the clinic, these dyes may be used for diagnostic or prognostic purposes and for monitoring in vivo tumor response early after the start of treatment.

  7. Necrosis avid near infrared fluorescent cyanines for imaging cell death and their use to monitor therapeutic efficacy in mouse tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bangwen; Stammes, Marieke A.; van Driel, Pieter B.A.A.; Cruz, Luis J.; Knol-Blankevoort, Vicky T.; Löwik, Martijn A.M.; Mezzanotte, Laura; Que, Ivo; Chan, Alan; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P.H.M.; Siebes, Maria; Gottschalk, Sven; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Keereweer, Stijn; Horobin, Richard W.; Hoehn, Mathias; Kaijzel, Eric L.; van Beek, Ermond R.; Snoeks, Thomas J.A.; Löwik, Clemens W.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of tumor necrosis in cancer patients is of diagnostic value as the amount of necrosis is correlated with disease prognosis and it could also be used to predict early efficacy of anti-cancer treatments. In the present study, we identified two near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) carboxylated cyanines, HQ5 and IRDye 800CW (800CW), which possess strong necrosis avidity. In vitro studies showed that both dyes selectively bind to cytoplasmic proteins of dead cells that have lost membrane integrity. Affinity for cytoplasmic proteins was confirmed using quantitative structure activity relations modeling. In vivo results, using NIRF and optoacoustic imaging, confirmed the necrosis avid properties of HQ5 and 800CW in a mouse 4T1 breast cancer tumor model of spontaneous necrosis. Finally, in a mouse EL4 lymphoma tumor model, already 24 h post chemotherapy, a significant increase in 800CW fluorescence intensity was observed in treated compared to untreated tumors. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, that the NIRF carboxylated cyanines HQ5 and 800CW possess strong necrosis avid properties in vitro and in vivo. When translated to the clinic, these dyes may be used for diagnostic or prognostic purposes and for monitoring in vivo tumor response early after the start of treatment. PMID:26472022

  8. Roles of tumor necrosis factor alpha, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, platelet-activating factor, and arachidonic acid metabolites in interleukin-1-induced resistance to infection in neutropenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Vogels, M T; Hermsen, C C; Huys, H L; Eling, W M; van der Meer, J W

    1994-01-01

    Treatment with a single low dose (80 to 800 ng) of interleukin-1 (IL-1) 24 h before a lethal bacterial challenge in granulocytopenic and in normal mice enhances nonspecific resistance. The mechanism behind this protection has only partially been elucidated. Since IL-1 induces production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), platelet-activating factor (PAF), and arachidonic acid metabolites, we investigated the potential role of these substances in IL-1-induced protection. Low doses of murine TNF-alpha but not of human TNF-alpha enhanced survival, suggesting an effect via the type II TNF receptor rather than the type I TNF receptor, which has little species specificity. In line with this TNF-alpha-induced protection from infection, pretreatment with a low dose of a rat anti-murine TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody tended to inhibit IL-1-induced protection, suggesting a role of TNF-alpha as a mediator of IL-1-induced enhanced resistance to infection. Pretreatment with higher doses of anti-TNF-alpha, however, showed a dose-related protective effect per se, which could be further enhanced by a suboptimal dose of IL-1. A combination of optimal doses of anti-TNF-alpha and IL-1 produced an increase in survival similar to that produced by separate pretreatments. This lack of further enhancement of survival by combined optimal pretreatments suggests a similar mechanism of protection, most likely attenuation of deleterious effects of overproduced proinflammatory cytokines like TNF-alpha during lethal infection. Pretreatment with different doses of GM-CSF before a lethal Pseudomonas aeruginosa challenge in neutropenic mice did not enhance survival. Different doses of WEB 2170, a selective PAF receptor antagonist, of MK-886, a selective inhibitor of leukotriene biosynthesis, or of several cyclooxygenase inhibitors did not reduce the protective effect of IL-1 pretreatment. We conclude that IL-1-induced nonspecific

  9. (E)-2(R)-[1(S)-(Hydroxycarbamoyl)-4-phenyl-3-butenyl]-2'-isobutyl-2'-(methanesulfonyl)-4-methylvalerohydrazide (Ro 32-7315), a selective and orally active inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor-alpha convertase.

    PubMed

    Beck, G; Bottomley, G; Bradshaw, D; Brewster, M; Broadhurst, M; Devos, R; Hill, C; Johnson, W; Kim, H-J; Kirtland, S; Kneer, J; Lad, N; Mackenzie, R; Martin, R; Nixon, J; Price, G; Rodwell, A; Rose, F; Tang, J-P; Walter, D S; Wilson, K; Worth, E

    2002-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a cytokine secreted by inflammatory cells, has been implicated in several inflammatory disease states. (E)-2(R)-[1(S)-(Hydroxycarbamoyl)-4-phenyl-3-butenyl]-2'-isobutyl-2'-(methanesulfonyl)-4-methylvalerohydrazide (Ro 32-7315), is a potent, orally active inhibitor of the TNF-alpha convertase (TACE), an enzyme responsible for proteolytic cleavage of the membrane bound precursor, pro-TNF-alpha. Ro 32-7315 inhibited a recombinant form of TACE (IC(50) = 5.2 nM) with selectivity over related matrix metalloproteinases. In a cellular assay system, THP-1 cell line, and in human and rat whole blood, Ro 32-7315 significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNF-alpha release with IC(50) values of 350 +/- 14 nM (n = 5), 2.4 +/- 0.5 microM (n = 5), and 110 +/- 18 nM (n = 5), respectively. Oral administration of Ro 32-7315 to Wistar rats caused a dose-dependent inhibition of LPS-induced release of systemic TNF-alpha with an ED(50) of 25 mg/kg. Treatment (days 0-14) of Allen and Hamburys hooded rats with Ro 32-7315 (2.5, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, i.p., twice daily) significantly reduced adjuvant-induced secondary paw swelling (42, 71, 83, and 93%, respectively) as compared with the vehicle group. In the Ro 32-7315-treated group, the reduced paw swelling was associated with improved lesion score and joint mobility. Furthermore, in a placebo-controlled, single-dose study, Ro 32-7315 given orally (450 mg) significantly suppressed ex vivo, LPS-induced TNF-alpha release in the whole-blood samples taken from healthy male and female volunteers (mean inhibition of 42% over a 4-h duration, n = 6). These data collectively support the potential use of such a compound for the oral treatment of inflammatory disorders.

  10. Bone necrosis and tumor induction following experimental intraoperative irradiation.

    PubMed

    Powers, B E; Gillette, E L; McChesney, S L; LeCouteur, R A; Withrow, S J

    1989-09-01

    The bone of the lumbar vertebrae of 153 dogs was examined 2 and 5 years after intraoperative irradiation (IORT), fractionated external beam irradiation (EBRT), or the combination. Groups of dogs received 15 to 55 Gy IORT only, 10 to 47.5 Gy IORT combined with 50 Gy EBRT in 2 Gy fractions or 60 to 80 Gy EBRT in 30 fractions. Six MeV electrons were used for IORT, and EBRT was done using photons from a 6 MV linear accelerator. The paraaortic region was irradiated and the ventral part of the lumbar vertebrae was in the 90% isodose level. Two years after irradiation, the dose causing significant bone necrosis as determined by at least 50% empty lacunae in the vertebral cortex was 38.2 Gy IORT alone and 32.5 Gy IORT combined with EBRT. Five years after irradiation, the dose causing 50% empty lacunae was 28.5 Gy IORT only and 14.4 Gy IORT combined with EBRT. The ED50 for lesions of the ventral vertebral artery was 21.7 Gy IORT only and 20.1 Gy IORT combined with 50 Gy EBRT 2 years after irradiation and 27.0 Gy IORT only and 20.0 Gy IORT combined with 50 Gy EBRT 5 years after irradiation. All lesions after EBRT only were mild. Eight dogs developed osteosarcomas 4 to 5 years after irradiation, one at 47.5 Gy IORT only and the remainder at 25.0 Gy IORT and above combined with 50 Gy EBRT. In conclusion, the extent of empty lacunae, indicating bone necrosis, was more severe 5 years after irradiation than after 2 years. The effect of 50 Gy EBRT in 2 Gy fractions was equivalent to about 6 Gy IORT 2 years after irradiation and to about 14 Gy 5 years after irradiation. Based on these estimates, IORT doses of 10 to 15 Gy have an effect 5 times or greater than the amount given in 2 Gy fractions. Osteosarcomas occurred in 21% of dogs which received doses greater than 25 Gy IORT. Doses of 15 to 20 Gy IORT in combination with 50 Gy EBRT in 2 Gy fractions may be near the tolerance level for late developing bone injury.

  11. Mitochondria mediate tumor necrosis factor-alpha/NF-kappaB signaling in skeletal muscle myotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Y. P.; Atkins, C. M.; Sweatt, J. D.; Reid, M. B.; Hamilton, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is implicated in muscle atrophy and weakness associated with a variety of chronic diseases. Recently, we reported that TNF-alpha directly induces muscle protein degradation in differentiated skeletal muscle myotubes, where it rapidly activates nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). We also have found that protein loss induced by TNF-alpha is NF-kappaB dependent. In the present study, we analyzed the signaling pathway by which TNF-alpha activates NF-kappaB in myotubes differentiated from C2C12 and rat primary myoblasts. We found that activation of NF-kappaB by TNF-alpha was blocked by rotenone or amytal, inhibitors of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. On the other hand, antimycin A, an inhibitor of complex III, enhanced TNF-alpha activation of NK-kappaB. These results suggest a key role of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating NF-kappaB activation in muscle. In addition, we found that TNF-alpha stimulated protein kinase C (PKC) activity. However, other signal transduction mediators including ceramide, Ca2+, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), and nitric oxide (NO) do not appear to be involved in the activation of NF-kappaB.

  12. Selective regulation of axonal growth from developing hippocampal neurons by tumor necrosis factor superfamily member APRIL☆

    PubMed Central

    Osório, Catarina; Chacón, Pedro J.; White, Matthew; Kisiswa, Lilian; Wyatt, Sean; Rodríguez-Tébar, Alfredo; Davies, Alun M.

    2014-01-01

    APRIL (A Proliferation-Inducing Ligand, TNFSF13) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that regulates lymphocyte survival and activation and has been implicated in tumorigenesis and autoimmune diseases. Here we report the expression and first known activity of APRIL in the nervous system. APRIL and one of its receptors, BCMA (B-Cell Maturation Antigen, TNFRSF17), are expressed by hippocampal pyramidal cells of fetal and postnatal mice. In culture, these neurons secreted APRIL, and function-blocking antibodies to either APRIL or BCMA reduced axonal elongation. Recombinant APRIL enhanced axonal elongation, but did not influence dendrite elongation. The effect of APRIL on axon elongation was inhibited by anti-BCMA and the expression of a signaling-defective BCMA mutant in these neurons, suggesting that the axon growth-promoting effect of APRIL is mediated by BCMA. APRIL promoted phosphorylation and activation of ERK1, ERK2 and Akt and serine phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3β in cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells. Inhibition of MEK1/MEK2 (activators of ERK1/ERK2), PI3-kinase (activator of Akt) or Akt inhibited the axon growth-promoting action of APRIL, as did pharmacological activation of GSK-3β and the expression of a constitutively active form of GSK-3β. These findings suggest that APRIL promotes axon elongation by a mechanism that depends both on ERK signaling and PI3-kinase/Akt/GSK-3β signaling. PMID:24444792

  13. Mechanisms of tumor necrosis in photodynamic therapy with a chlorine photosensitizer: experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Bigbov, Elmir N.

    2011-02-01

    A photodynamic therapy experiment on 118 inbred white mice with transplanted Ehrlich's tumor (mouse mammary gland adenocarcinoma) is performed to reveal mechanisms of necrosis formation. In 7-10 days the tumor of 1-1.5 cm diameter is formed under skin at the injection point, and PDT procedure is applied. There were used a chlorine type photosensitizer RadachlorineTM and 662 nm wavelength diode laser. The drug is injected by intravenously at the dose of 40 mg/kg; the irradiation is executed in 2-2.5 hours at the surface dose of about 200 J/cm2. Each of the mice had a photochemical reaction in form of destructive changes at the irradiation region with subsequent development of dry coagulation necrosis. After rejection of the necrosis there occurred epithelization of defect tissues in a tumor place. Histological investigations were conducted in different follow-up periods, in 5 and 30 min, 1, 3, 6, and 12 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days after irradiation. They included optical microscopy, immune marker analysis, morphometry with measurements of volume density of epithelium, tumor stroma and necroses, vascular bed. The investigations showed that an important role in damaging mechanisms of photodynamic action belongs to hypoxic injuries of tumor mediated by micro vascular disorders and blood circulatory disturbances. The injuries are formed in a few stages: microcirculation angiospasm causing vessel paresis, irreversible stases in capillaries, diapedetic hemorrhages, thromboses, and thrombovasculitis. It is marked mucoid swelling and fibrinoid necrosis of vascular tissue. Progressive vasculitises result in total vessel obliteration and tumor necrosis.

  14. An ent-kaurene diterpene enhances apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ikue; Kondoh, Masuo; Harada, Motoki; Koizumi, Naoya; Fujii, Makiko; Nagashima, Fumihiro; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yoshiteru

    2004-08-01

    Some antitumor agents, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and camptothecin (CPT), often cause resistance of tumor cells to antitumor agents through activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) pathway that leads to up-regulation of anti-apoptotic proteins. Therefore, co-treatment of an inhibitor of the NF-kappa B pathway with antitumor agents is a useful strategy for chemotherapy. Here we report that ent-11 alpha-hydroxy-16-kauren-15-one (KD) selectively inhibits NF-kappa B-dependent gene expression due to treatment with TNF-alpha. KD in combination with TNF-alpha caused a dramatic increase in apoptosis in human leukemia cells accompanied by activation of caspases. A broad-spectrum inhibitor of caspases decreased the apoptosis induced by treatment with KD and TNF-alpha. KD in combination with CPT also caused an increase in apoptosis. These results suggest that the apoptotic potency of co-treatment of KD with TNF-alpha or CPT is elicited through selective inhibition of NF-kappa B-dependent anti-apoptotic proteins and thus may provide a basis for the development of useful approaches to the treatment of leukemia.

  15. Leishmaniasis, Autoimmune Rheumatic Disease, and Anti–Tumor Necrosis Factor Therapy, Europe

    PubMed Central

    Xynos, Ioannis D.; Tektonidou, Maria G.; Pikazis, Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    We report 2 cases of leishmaniasis in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases in Greece. To assess trends in leishmaniasis reporting in this patient population, we searched the literature for similar reports from Europe. Reports increased during 2004–2008, especially for patients treated with anti–tumor necrosis factor agents. PMID:19523302

  16. Structural Biology of Tumor Necrosis Factor Demonstrated for Undergraduates Instruction by Computer Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Urmi

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a three-dimensional (3D) modeling exercise for undergraduate students in chemistry and health sciences disciplines, focusing on a protein-group linked to immune system regulation. Specifically, the exercise involves molecular modeling and structural analysis of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) proteins, both wild type and mutant. The…

  17. Roles of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor in lipopolysaccharide-induced hypoglycemia.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, S N; Henricson, B E; Neta, R

    1991-01-01

    In this study, hypoglycemia induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the recombinant cytokine interleukin-1 alpha or tumor necrosis factor alpha (administered alone or in combination) was compared. LPS-induced hypoglycemia was reversed significantly by recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. PMID:1828792

  18. PPARγ regulates the mitochondrial dysfunction in human neural stem cells with tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Chiang, M-C; Cheng, Y-C; Lin, K-H; Yen, C-H

    2013-01-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) belongs to a family of ligand-activated transcription factors, and its ligands are known to control many physiological and pathological conditions. The hypothesis of our study was that the PPARγ agonist (rosiglitazone) could mediate tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) related to the regulation of human neural stem cells (hNSCs), by which TNFα possibly fulfills important roles in neuronal impairment. The results show that PPARγ mediates the cell viability of hNSCs via the downregulation of the activity of caspase 3, indicating that this rescue effect of PPARγ could improve the reduced levels of two mitochondrial regulators, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in the hNSCs with TNFα. The stimulation of mitochondrial function by PPARγ was associated with activation of the PPAR coactivator1 alpha (PGC1α) pathway by up-regulation of oxidative defense and mitochondrial systems. The above protective effects appeared to be exerted by a direct activation of the rosiglitazone, because it protected hNSCs from TNFα-evoked oxidative stress and mitochondrial deficiency. Here we show that the rosiglitazone protects hNSCs against Aβ-induced apoptosis and promotes cell survival. These findings extend our understanding of the central role of PPARγ in TNFα-related neuronal impairment, which probably increases risks of neurodegenerative diseases. The anti-inflammatory effects of PPARγ in the hNSCs with TNFα, and the involved mechanisms were also characterized.

  19. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhances neutrophil adhesiveness: induction of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 via activation of Akt and CaM kinase II and modifications of histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase 4 in human tracheal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lin, Chih-Chung; Luo, Shue-Fen; Lee, Hui-Chun; Lee, I-Ta; Aird, William C; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2008-05-01

    Up-regulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) involves adhesions between both circulating and resident leukocytes and the human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) during airway inflammatory reaction. We have demonstrated previously that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced VCAM-1 expression is regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinases, nuclear factor-kappaB, and p300 activation in HTSMCs. In addition to this pathway, phosphorylation of Akt and CaM kinase II has been implicated in histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) activation. Here, we investigated whether these different mechanisms participated in TNF-alpha-induced VCAM-1 expression and enhanced neutrophil adhesion. TNF-alpha significantly increased HTSMC-neutrophil adhesions, and this effect was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1 on the HTSMCs and was blocked by the selective inhibitors of Src [4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine (PP1)], epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR; 4-(3'-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxy-quinazoline, (AG1478)], phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) [2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-1(4H)-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride(LY294002) and wortmannin],calcium[1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester; BAPTA-AM], phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PLC) [1-[6-[[17beta-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U73122)], protein kinase C (PKC) [12-(2-cyanoethyl)-6,7,12, 13-tetrahydro-13-methyl-5-oxo-5H-indolo(2,3-a)pyrrolo(3,4-c)-carbazole (Gö6976), rottlerin, and 3-1-[3-(amidinothio)propyl-1H-indol-3-yl]-3-(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl) maleimide (bisindolylmaleimide IX) (Ro 31-8220)], CaM (calmidazolium chloride), CaM kinase II [(8R(*),9S(*),11S(*))-(-)-9-hydroxy-9-methoxycarbonyl-8-methyl-14-n-propoxy-2,3,9, 10-tetrahydro-8,11-epoxy, 1H,8H, 11H-2,7b,11a-triazadibenzo[a,g]cycloocta[cde]trinden-1-one (KT5926) and 1-[N,O-bis(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl

  20. Involvement of Mst1 in tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced apoptosis of endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsubo, Hideki; Ichiki, Toshihiro Imayama, Ikuyo; Ono, Hiroki; Fukuyama, Kae; Hashiguchi, Yasuko; Sadoshima, Junichi; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2008-03-07

    Mammalian sterile 20-kinase 1 (Mst1), a member of the sterile-20 family protein kinase, plays an important role in the induction of apoptosis. However, little is know about the physiological activator of Mst1 and the role of Mst1 in endothelial cells (ECs). We examined whether Mst1 is involved in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-induced apoptosis of ECs. Western blot analysis revealed that TNF-{alpha} induced activation of caspase 3 and Mst1 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. TNF-{alpha}-induced Mst1 activation is almost completely prevented by pretreatment with Z-DEVD-FMK, a caspase 3 inhibitor. Nuclear staining with Hoechst 33258 and fluorescence-activated cell sorting of propidium iodide-stained cells showed that TNF-{alpha} induced apoptosis of EC. Diphenyleneiodonium, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, and N-acetylcysteine, a potent antioxidant, also inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced activation of Mst1 and caspase 3, as well as apoptosis. Knockdown of Mst1 expression by short interfering RNA attenuated TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis but not cleavage of caspase 3. These results suggest that Mst1 plays an important role in the induction of TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis of EC. However, positive feedback mechanism between Mst1 and caspase 3, which was shown in the previous studies, was not observed. Inhibition of Mst1 function may be beneficial for maintaining the endothelial integrity and inhibition of atherogenesis.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits pre-osteoblast differentiation through its type-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Sabiha; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Clohisy, John C; Abu-Amer, Yousef

    2003-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine with a profound role in many skeletal diseases. The cytokine has been described as a mediator of bone loss in osteolysis and other inflammatory bone diseases. In addition to its known bone resorptive action, TNF reduces bone formation by inhibiting osteoblast differentiation. Using primary and transformed osteoblastic cells, we first document that TNF inhibits expression of alkaline phosphatase and matrix deposition, both considered markers of osteoblast differentiation. The effects are dose- and time-dependent. Core-binding factor A1 (cbfa1) is a transcription factor critical for osteoblast differentiation, and we show here that it is activated by the osteoblast differentiation agent, beta-glycerophosphate. Therefore, we investigated whether the inhibitory effects of TNF were associated with altered activity of this transcription factor. Using retardation assays, we show that TNF significantly inhibits cbfal activation by beta-glycerophosphate, manifested by reduced DNA-binding activity. Next, we turned to determine the signaling pathway by which TNF inhibits osteoblast differentiation. Utilizing animals lacking individual TNF receptors, we document that TNFr1 is required for transmitting the cytokine's inhibitory effect. In the absence of this receptor, TNF failed to impact all osteoblast differentiation markers tested. In summary, TNF blocks expression of osteoblast differentiation markers and inhibits beta-glycerophosphate-induced activation of the osteoblast differentiation factor cbfa1. Importantly, these effects are mediated via a mechanism requiring the TNF type-1 receptor.

  2. The tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 family in immune homeostasis and inflammatory cancer diseases.

    PubMed

    Luan, Y Y; Yao, Y M; Sheng, Z Y

    2013-01-01

    Within the immune system homeostasis is maintained by a myriad of mechanisms that include the regulation of immune cell activation and programmed cell death. The breakdown of immune homeostasis may lead to fatal inflammatory diseases. We set out to identify genes of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8) family that has a functional role in the process of immune homeostasis. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8), which functions as an oncogenic molecule, is also associated with enhanced cell survival and inhibition of apoptosis. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2) governs immune homeostasis in both the innate and adaptive immune system and prevents hyper-responsiveness by negatively regulating signaling via T cell receptors and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). There also exist two highly homologous but uncharacterized proteins, TIPE1 and TIPE3. This review is an attempt to provide a summary of TNFAIP8 family associated with immune homeostasis and inflammatory cancer diseases.

  3. Essential protective role of tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yun; Fischer, Roman; Naudé, Petrus J. W.; Maier, Olaf; Nyakas, Csaba; Duffey, Maëlle; Van der Zee, Eddy A.; Dekens, Doortje; Douwenga, Wanda; Herrmann, Andreas; Guenzi, Eric; Kontermann, Roland E.; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Eisel, Ulrich L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recognized role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in inflammation and neuronal degeneration, anti-TNF therapeutics failed to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Animal disease models had revealed the antithetic effects of the two TNF receptors (TNFR) in the central nervous system, whereby TNFR1 has been associated with inflammatory degeneration and TNFR2 with neuroprotection. We here show the therapeutic potential of selective inhibition of TNFR1 and activation of TNFR2 by ATROSAB, a TNFR1-selective antagonistic antibody, and EHD2-scTNFR2, an agonistic TNFR2-selective TNF, respectively, in a mouse model of NMDA-induced acute neurodegeneration. Coadministration of either ATROSAB or EHD2-scTNFR2 into the magnocellular nucleus basalis significantly protected cholinergic neurons and their cortical projections against cell death, and reverted the neurodegeneration-associated memory impairment in a passive avoidance paradigm. Simultaneous blocking of TNFR1 and TNFR2 signaling, however, abrogated the therapeutic effect. Our results uncover an essential role of TNFR2 in neuroprotection. Accordingly, the therapeutic activity of ATROSAB is mediated by shifting the balance of the antithetic activity of endogenous TNF toward TNFR2, which appears essential for neuroprotection. Our data also explain earlier results showing that complete blocking of TNF activity by anti-TNF drugs was detrimental rather than protective and argue for the use of next-generation TNFR-selective TNF therapeutics as an effective approach in treating neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27791020

  4. Transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation modulates cardiac vagal tone and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Brock, C; Brock, B; Aziz, Q; Møller, H J; Pfeiffer Jensen, M; Drewes, A M; Farmer, A D

    2016-12-12

    The vagus nerve is a central component of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways. We sought to evaluate the effect of bilateral transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation (t-VNS) on validated parameters of autonomic tone and cytokines in 20 healthy subjects. 24 hours after t-VNS, there was an increase in cardiac vagal tone and a reduction in tumor necrosis factor-α in comparison to baseline. No change was seen in blood pressure, cardiac sympathetic index or other cytokines. These preliminary data suggest that t-VNS exerts an autonomic and a subtle antitumor necrosis factor-α effect, which warrants further evaluation in larger controlled studies.

  5. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy on Osteoclasts Precursors in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Ponte, Cristina; Canhão, Helena; Ainola, Mari

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) increases circulating osteoclast (OC) precursors numbers by promoting their proliferation and differentiation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNF inhibitors (TNFi) on the differentiation and activity of OC in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Methods. Seventeen RA patients treated with TNFi were analyzed at baseline and after a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. Blood samples were collected to assess receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) surface expression on circulating leukocytes and frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations. Quantification of serum levels of bone turnover markers, in vitro OC differentiation assays, and qRT-PCR for OC specific genes was performed. Results. After TNFi therapy, patients had reduced RANKL surface expression in B-lymphocytes and the frequency of circulating classical CD14brightCD16− monocytes was decreased. Serum levels of sRANKL, sRANKL/OPG ratio, and CTX-I were reduced in RA patients after TNFi treatment. Moreover, after exposure to TNFi, osteoclast differentiation and activity were decreased, as well as the expression of TRAF6 and cathepsin K. Conclusion. We propose that TNFi arrests bone loss and erosion, through two pathways: direct reduction of osteoclast precursor numbers and inhibition of intracellular signaling pathways acting through TRAF6. PMID:28286757

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Hepatocellular Apoptosis Induced by Trovafloxacin-Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) continues to be a significant human health problem. IDILI is characterized as occurring in a minority of individuals exposed to a drug, yet it accounts for as much as 17% of all cases of acute liver failure. Despite these concerns, the mechanisms underlying IDILI remain unknown. Trovafloxacin (TVX), which causes IDILI in humans, also causes hepatocellular death in vitro when combined with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) treatment. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this toxicity are not fully characterized. The purpose of this study was to identify mechanisms by which TVX and TNF interact to cause hepatocellular death, with a focus on a human hepatocyte cell line. TVX and TNF interacted to cause cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells at drug concentrations similar to those in people undergoing TVX therapy. TVX/TNF treatment caused apoptosis and DNA damage in HepG2 cells that depended on caspase activation. Prolonged activation of JNK occurred in TVX/TNF-induced cytotoxicity, and treatment with the JNK selective inhibitor SP600125 attenuated cytotoxicity. TVX/TNF cotreatment also caused cytotoxicity in isolated primary murine hepatocytes that was dependent on caspase activation. These results increase understanding of molecular signaling pathways involved in hepatocellular death caused by a drug with idiosyncratic liability in the presence of TNF. PMID:24097668

  7. Signaling by the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily in B-cell biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Robert C; Jellusova, Julia; Miletic, Ana V

    2011-11-01

    Members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) participate prominently in B-cell maturation and function. In particular, B-cell activating factor belonging to the TNF family receptor (BAFF-R), B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), and transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) play critical roles in promoting B-cell survival at distinct stages of development by engaging a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) and/or BAFF. CD40 is also essential for directing the humoral response to T-cell-dependent antigens. Signaling by the TNFRSF is mediated primarily, albeit not exclusively, via the TNFR-associated factor (TRAF) proteins and activation of the canonical and/or non-canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways. Dysregulated signaling by TNFRSF members can promote B-cell survival and proliferation, causing autoimmunity and neoplasia. In this review, we present a current understanding of the functions of and distinctions between APRIL/BAFF signaling by their respective receptors expressed on particular B-cell subsets. These findings are compared and contrasted with CD40 signaling, which employs similar signaling conduits to achieve distinct cellular outcomes in the context of the germinal center response. We also underscore how new findings and conceptual insights into TNFRSF signaling are facilitating the understanding of B-cell malignancies and autoimmune diseases.

  8. Erythropoietin protects myocardin-expressing cardiac stem cells against cytotoxicity of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Shelat, Harnath; Xue, Qun; Willerson, James T.; De Caterina, Raffaele; Geng, Yong-Jian

    2009-10-15

    Cardiac stem cells are vulnerable to inflammation caused by infarction or ischemic injury. The growth factor, erythropoietin (Epo), ameliorates the inflammatory response of the myocardium to ischemic injury. This study was designed to assess the role of Epo in regulation of expression and activation of the cell death-associated intracellular signaling components in cardiac myoblasts stimulated with the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}. Cardiac myoblasts isolated from canine embryonic hearts characterized by expression of myocardin A, a promyogenic transcription factor for cardiovascular muscle development were pretreated with Epo and then exposed to TNF-{alpha}. Compared to untreated cells, the Epo-treated cardiac myoblasts exhibited better morphology and viability. Immunoblotting revealed lower levels of active caspase-3 and reductions in iNOS expression and NO production in Epo-treated cells. Furthermore, Epo pretreatment reduced nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B and inhibited phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B (I{kappa}B) in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated cardiac myoblasts. Thus, Epo protects cardiac myocyte progenitors or myoblasts against the cytotoxic effects of TNF-{alpha} by inhibiting NF-{kappa}B-mediated iNOS expression and NO production and by preventing caspase-3 activation.

  9. Regulation of Tumor Necrosis Factor Gene Expression in Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: In vivo Analysis by in situ Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beissert, Stefan; Bergholz, Michael; Waase, Inge; Lepsien, Gerd; Schauer, Alfred; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Kronke, Martin

    1989-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) produced by macrophages is thought to contribute to the host defense against development of cancer. However, since tumor cells themselves are able to produce TNF, it is conceivable that TNF may also play an adverse pathological role in carcinogenesis. To better understand the functional significance of TNF in neoplastic disease, we have determined the cellular source of TNF activity produced in 10 patients with colorectal cancer. Northern blot analysis of RNAs extracted from fresh biopsy specimens revealed detectable TNF mRNA levels in all instances. By using in situ hybridization of frozen sections, scattered cells expressing TNF mRNA could be discerned. Based on morphological criteria, these TNF-positive cells most likely belong to the macrophage lineage. Macrophages in normal tissue surrounding the tumor did not express TNF mRNA, suggesting that macrophage activation occurs locally at the site of neoplastic transformation. Immunohistochemistry using anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies revealed that less than 1% of tumor-infiltrating macrophages synthesize TNF protein. Thus we present evidence that in colorectal cancer only a small proportion of tumor-infiltrating macrophages produces TNF, indicating that the microenvironment of the tumor provides adequate, yet suboptimal, conditions for macrophage activation.

  10. Multiorgan chronic inflammatory hepatobiliary pancreatic murine model deficient in tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Helieh S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To provoke persistent/chronic multiorgan inflammatory response and to contribute to stones formation followed by fibrosis in hepatobiliary and pancreatic tissues. METHODS: Tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (TNFR1/R2) deficient mice reared in-house were given dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) twice within 10 d by oral gavage delivery. Sham control animals received vehicle treatment and naïve animals remained untreated throughout the study. Animals were monitored daily for symptoms of pain and discomfort. The abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity were assessed with von Frey microfilaments. Exploratory behaviors were recorded at the baseline, after initiation of treatment, and before study termination. Histopathological changes were examined postmortem in tissues. Collagen accumulation and fibrosis were confirmed with Sirius Red staining. RESULTS: Animals lost weight after oral administration of DBTC and developed persistent inflammatory abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity compared to sham-treated controls (P < 0.0001). These pain related secondary mechanical hypersensitivity responses increased more than 2-fold in DBTC-treated animals. The drastically diminished rearing and grooming rates persisted after DBTC administration throughout the study. Gross as well as micropathology at one month confirmed that animals treated with DBTC developed chronic hepatobiliary injuries evidenced with activation of stellate cells, multifocal necrosis, fatty degeneration of hepatocytes, periportal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and prominent biliary ductal dilation. The severity of hepatitis was scored 3.7 ± 0.2 (severe) in DBTC-treated animals vs score 0 (normal) in sham-treated animals. Fibrotic thickening was extensive around portal ducts, in hepatic parenchyma as well as in lobular pancreatic structures and confirmed with Sirius Red histopathology. In addition, pancreatic microarchitecture was presented with distortion of islets, and parenchyma, infiltration of

  11. Cardiotrophin-1 induces tumor necrosis factor alpha synthesis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fritzenwanger, Michael; Meusel, Katharina; Jung, Christian; Franz, Marcus; Wang, Zhenhua; Foerster, Martin; Figulla, Hans-R

    2009-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with elevated concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha and cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) and altered peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) function. Therefore, we tested whether CT-1 induces TNFalpha in PBMC of healthy volunteers. CT-1 induced in PBMC TNFalpha protein in the supernatant and TNFalpha mRNA in a concentration- and time-dependent manner determined by ELISA and real-time PCR, respectively. Maximal TNFalpha protein was achieved with 100 ng/mL CT-1 after 3-6 hours and maximal TNFalpha mRNA induction after 1 hour. ELISA data were confirmed using immunofluorescent flow cytometry. Inhibitor studies with actinomycin D and brefeldin A showed that both protein synthesis and intracellular transport are essential for CT-1 induced TNFalpha expression. CT-1 caused a dose dependent nuclear factor (NF) kappaB translocation. Parthenolide inhibited both NFkappaB translocation and TNFalpha protein expression indicating that NFkappaB seems to be necessary. We revealed a new mechanism for elevated serum TNFalpha concentrations and PBMC activation in CHF besides the hypothesis of PBMC activation by bacterial translocation from the gut.

  12. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF.

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-mediated release of platelet-derived growth factor from cultured endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a 30,000-Mr glycoprotein that is chemotactic and mitogenic for vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). It is also a potent vasoconstrictor. In the present study, we found that the macrophage-derived polypeptide, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), releases a factor from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) that is mitogenic for SMC. Postculture medium from TNF-stimulated EC induced a 90% increase in mitogenesis is compared with controls. This effect was half-maximal at a TNF dose of 114 pM, reflected a 2.5-fold increase in PDGF-specific mRNA synthesis, and peaked at 15 h of TNF stimulation. Mitogenic activity was completely abrogated by preincubation of postculture medium with antibody to platelet PDGF. Stimulation of EC with IL-1 (60-240 pM) led to the release of similar mitogenic activity. Thus, in addition to its effects on the hemostatic and adhesive properties of EC, TNF also promotes release of PDGF, which may serve to modulate proliferation of vascular SMC during wound healing, inflammation, and atherogenesis. PMID:3598461

  14. Effects of Combined Tristetraprolin/Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Deficiency on the Splenic Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Patial, Sonika; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Young, W. Scott; Ward, James M.; Flake, Gordon P.

    2016-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) acts by binding to AU-rich elements in certain mRNAs, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mRNA, and increasing their decay rates. TTP knockout mice exhibit a profound inflammatory syndrome that is largely due to increased TNF levels. Although TTP's effects on gene expression have been well studied in cultured cells, little is known about its functions in intact tissues. We performed deep RNA sequencing on spleens from TTP knockout mice that were also deficient in both TNF receptors (“triple knockout” mice) to remove the secondary effects of excess TNF activity. To help identify posttranscriptionally regulated transcripts, we also compared changes in mature mRNA levels to levels of transiently expressed pre-mRNA. In the triple knockout spleens, levels of 3,014 transcripts were significantly affected by 1.5-fold or more, but only a small fraction exhibited differential mRNA/pre-mRNA changes suggestive of increased mRNA stability. Transferrin receptor mRNA, which contains two highly conserved potential TTP binding sites, was significantly upregulated relative to its pre-mRNA. This was reflected in increased transferrin receptor expression and increased splenic iron/hemosiderin deposition. Our results suggest that TTP deficiency has profound effects on the splenic transcriptome, even in the absence of secondary increases in TNF activity. PMID:26976640

  15. Dehydroepiandrosterone protects mice from endotoxin toxicity and reduces tumor necrosis factor production.

    PubMed Central

    Danenberg, H D; Alpert, G; Lustig, S; Ben-Nathan, D

    1992-01-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated an immunomodulating activity of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) different from that described for glucocorticoids. The present study was designed to test DHEA's activity in endotoxic shock and to investigate its effect on endotoxin-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Mortality of CD-1 mice exposed to a lethal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 800 micrograms per mouse) was reduced from 95 to 24% by treatment with a single dose of DHEA, given 5 min before LPS. LPS administration resulted in high levels of TNF, a response that was significantly blocked by DHEA, both in vivo and in vitro. DHEA treatment also reduced LPS-induced increments in serum corticosterone levels, a parameter considered not to be mediated by TNF. In another experimental model, mice sensitized with D-galactosamine, followed by administration of recombinant human TNF, were subjected to 89% mortality rate, which was reduced to 55% in DHEA-treated mice. These data show that DHEA protects mice from endotoxin lethality. The protective effect is probably mediated by reduction of TNF production as well as by effecting both TNF-induced and non-TNF-induced phenomena. PMID:1444309

  16. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} enhances IL-15-induced natural killer cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jiwon; Lee, Suk Hyung; Shin, Nara; Jeong, Mira; Kim, Mi Sun; Kim, Mi Jeong; Yoon, Suk Ran; Chung, Jin Woong; Kim, Tae-Don; Choi, Inpyo

    2009-09-04

    The differentiation of natural killer (NK) cells is regulated by various factors including soluble growth factors and transcription factors. Here, we have demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) is a positive regulator of NK cell differentiation. TNF-{alpha} augmented the IL-15-induced expression of NK1.1 and CD122 in mature NK cells, and TNF-{alpha} alone also induced NK cell maturation as well as IL-15. TNF-{alpha} also increased IFN-{gamma} production in NK cells in the presence of IL-15. Meanwhile, mRNA expression of several transcription factors, including T-bet and GATA-3, was increased by the addition of TNF-{alpha} and IL-15. In addition, TNF-{alpha} increased nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity in NK cells and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B impeded TNF-{alpha}-enhanced NK cell maturation. Overall, these data suggest that TNF-{alpha} significantly increased IL-15-driven NK cell differentiation by increasing the expression of transcription factors that play crucial roles in NK cell maturation and inducing the NF-{kappa}B activity.

  18. Novel biomarker identification using metabolomic profiling to differentiate radiation necrosis and recurrent tumor following Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Alex Y; Turban, Jack L; Damisah, Eyiyemisi C; Li, Jie; Alomari, Ahmed K; Eid, Tore; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Chiang, Veronica L

    2016-11-25

    OBJECTIVE Following an initial response of brain metastases to Gamma Knife radiosurgery, regrowth of the enhancing lesion as detected on MRI may represent either radiation necrosis (a treatment-related inflammatory change) or recurrent tumor. Differentiation of radiation necrosis from tumor is vital for management decision making but remains difficult by imaging alone. In this study, gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF) was used to identify differential metabolite profiles of the 2 tissue types obtained by surgical biopsy to find potential targets for noninvasive imaging. METHODS Specimens of pure radiation necrosis and pure tumor obtained from patient brain biopsies were flash-frozen and validated histologically. These formalin-free tissue samples were then analyzed using GC-TOF. The metabolite profiles of radiation necrosis and tumor samples were compared using multivariate and univariate statistical analysis. Statistical significance was defined as p ≤ 0.05. RESULTS For the metabolic profiling, GC-TOF was performed on 7 samples of radiation necrosis and 7 samples of tumor. Of the 141 metabolites identified, 17 (12.1%) were found to be statistically significantly different between comparison groups. Of these metabolites, 6 were increased in tumor, and 11 were increased in radiation necrosis. An unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis found that tumor had elevated levels of metabolites associated with energy metabolism, whereas radiation necrosis had elevated levels of metabolites that were fatty acids and antioxidants/cofactors. CONCLUSIONS To the authors' knowledge, this is the first tissue-based metabolomics study of radiation necrosis and tumor. Radiation necrosis and recurrent tumor following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for brain metastases have unique metabolite profiles that may be targeted in the future to develop noninvasive metabolic imaging techniques.

  19. Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells exposed to beryllium.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, G M; Pandey, J P; Schmidt, M G; Arnaud, P; Goust, J M

    1996-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease, which results from occupational exposure to particulate beryllium, is characterized by the development of lung granulomas and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. Increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta) by pulmonary alveolar macrophages occurs in many chronic fibrotic lung diseases and is thought to contribute to the disease process. The purpose of the present study was to investigate cytokine production by human monocytic cells exposed to beryllium in vitro. The results indicated that such cells respond to beryllium ions in the presence of fluoride by accumulation of messenger ribonucleic acid for both tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta. These findings suggest that inhaled beryllium may directly stimulate the production of these cytokines by alveolar macrophages in vitro.

  20. The Diagnosis and Treatment of Pseudoprogression, Radiation Necrosis and Brain Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Parvez, Kashif; Parvez, Aatif; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important modality used in the treatment of patients with brain metastatic disease and malignant gliomas. Post-treatment surveillance often involves serial magnetic resonance imaging. A challenge faced by clinicians is in the diagnosis and management of a suspicious gadolinium-enhancing lesion found on imaging. The suspicious lesion may represent post-treatment radiation effects (PTRE) such as pseudoprogression, radiation necrosis or tumor recurrence. Significant progress has been made in diagnostic imaging modalities to assist in differentiating these entities. Surgical and medical interventions have also been developed to treat PTRE. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic imaging modalities and provide an algorithm for the management of pseudoprogression, radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence. PMID:24995696

  1. Historical perspectives on tumor necrosis factor and its superfamily: 25 years later, a golden journey

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Subash C.; Kim, Ji Hye

    2012-01-01

    Although activity that induced tumor regression was observed and termed tumor necrosis factor (TNF) as early as the 1960s, the true identity of TNF was not clear until 1984, when Aggarwal and coworkers reported, for the first time, the isolation of 2 cytotoxic factors: one, derived from macrophages (molecular mass 17 kDa), was named TNF, and the second, derived from lymphocytes (20 kDa), was named lymphotoxin. Because the 2 cytotoxic factors exhibited 50% amino acid sequence homology and bound to the same receptor, they came to be called TNF-α and TNF-β. Identification of the protein sequences led to cloning of their cDNA. Based on sequence homology to TNF-α, now a total of 19 members of the TNF superfamily have been identified, along with 29 interacting receptors, and several molecules that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of these receptors. The roles of the TNF superfamily in inflammation, apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, and morphogenesis have been documented. Their roles in immunologic, cardiovascular, neurologic, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases are becoming apparent. TNF superfamily members are active targets for drug development, as indicated by the recent approval and expanding market of TNF blockers used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Crohns disease, and osteoporosis, with a total market of more than US $20 billion. As we learn more about this family, more therapeutics will probably emerge. In this review, we summarize the initial discovery of TNF-α, and the insights gained regarding the roles of this molecule and its related family members in normal physiology and disease. PMID:22053109

  2. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of tumor-bearing mice treated with human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Aicher, K P; Dupon, J W; White, D L; Aukerman, S L; Moseley, M E; Juster, R; Rosenau, W; Winkelhake, J L; Brasch, R C

    1990-11-15

    Pharmacological effects of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) were studied in a mouse fibrosarcoma model using magnetic resonance imaging enhanced with a macromolecular contrast agent, albumin(gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid)35. TNF was administered i.v. in a dose of 150 micrograms/kg, 60 to 80 min prior to imaging. Contrast-enhanced and nonenhanced magnetic resonance images of TNF-treated (n = 10) and untreated (n = 8) Meth A fibrosarcomas were obtained at 2.0 Tesla using T1-weighted spin-echo pulse sequences. Serial images spanning an interval of 60 to 120 min after TNF administration showed that the TNF-treated tumors enhanced significantly more overall than did untreated tumors (43% versus 31%). The most marked differential tumor enhancement was observed in the tumor rim (59% versus 40%). Nontumorous tissue, including muscle and brain, revealed no significant enhancement differences between TNF-treated animals and controls. The observed tumor enhancement corresponded strongly with Evans blue staining; the TNF-treated tumors stained deep blue, while untreated tumors and normal tissues observed did not stain. The different enhancement and Evans blue staining patterns between TNF-treated tumors and untreated tumors are attributed to TNF-induced changes in tumor capillary integrity. The data indicate that TNF effects on tumors include an increased capillary permeability for macromolecules at early times after administration. The ability to detect changes in capillary permeability in vivo using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging may prove to be clinically useful to monitor tumor response to TNF.

  3. Hemoglobin stimulates mononuclear leukocytes to release interleukin-8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    McFaul, S J; Bowman, P D; Villa, V M; Gutierrez-Ibanez, M J; Johnson, M; Smith, D

    1994-11-01

    Incubation of human mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) with human stroma-free hemolysate (SFH), purified adult hemoglobin Ao (HbAo), and oxidized HbAo (METHb) caused MNL to release compounds into the supernate that mediated neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN) chemotaxis and PMN adherence to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Chemotaxis and PMN adherence to HUVEC were reduced significantly when supernates were preincubated with neutralizing antibodies to interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), respectively, suggesting that IL-8 and TNF-alpha played significant roles in mediating these activities. Greatest chemotactic activity was observed in supernates of MNL treated with HbAo; while greatest PMN/endothelial cell (EC) adherence activity was observed in supernates of MNL treated with METHb. Furthermore, PMN/EC adherence activity was a function of METHb content in each hemoglobin solution. PMN chemotaxis, PMN adherence to HUVEC, and cytokine release increased as a function of increasing incubation time. Chemotactic activity was detected in HbAo-treated and METHb-treated MNL supernates after incubation for 6 hours and was maximal by 10 hours. IL-8 was detected in both HbAo and METHb-MNL supernates by 4 hours. PMN/EC adherence activity was detected in HbAo-MNL supernates at 10 hours and in METHb-MNL supernates at 4 hours. TNF-alpha was detected in METHb and HbAo-MNL supernates at 4 and 12 hours, respectively. These results suggest that hemoglobin solutions stimulate MNL to release IL-8 and TNF-alpha in quantities sufficient to induce PMN chemotaxis and PMN adherence to HUVEC. This is a US government work. There are no restrictions on its use.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 promotes growth of colorectal cancer via the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tao; Li, Huihui; Liu, Zifeng

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) is the receptor for tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). TNFR2 differs from tumor necrosis factor 1 (TNFR1) in various ways and is mainly expressed in hematopoietic and endothelial cells. However, studies about its functions in tumors are limited. The contributions of TNFR2 in colorectal cancer (CRC) remain unknown. In the present study, it was found that TNFR2 was positively associated with Ki67 expression in CRC tissues using immunohistochemistry (IHC), and western blot analysis found that Ki67 was upregulated by overexpressing TNFR2 in SW1116 cells and inhibited by silencing TNFR2 in HT29 cells. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay found that growth of SW1116 cells overexpressing TNFR2 was significantly increased compared with the control group and that the growth of HT29 cells subsequent to silencing TNFR2 was significantly decreased compared with the control group. Clone formation assay found that more clones were formed in SW1116 cells overexpressing TNFR2 than the control group, and less clones formed in HT29 cells subsequent to silencing TNFR2 than the control group. In addition, western blot analysis found that phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) was activated subsequent to overexpressing TNFR2 in SW1116 cells, and inhibited following silencing of TNFR2 in HT29 cells. Additionally, treatment using LY294002 significantly abrogated the promotion of Ki67 expression, growth and clone formation abilities induced by TNFR2 overexpression in SW1116 cells. All the results suggest that TNFR2 can significantly promote CRC growth via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway; this provides evidential support for taking TNFR2 as a new target for CRC treatment. PMID:28123565

  5. Does the Degree of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Tumor Necrosis following Transarterial Chemoembolization Impact Patient Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Nathan; Gennaro, Kyle; Obert, John; Sauer, Paul F.; Redden, David T.; Zarzour, Jessica; Smith, J. Kevin; Bolus, David; Saddekni, Souheil; Aal, Ahmed Kamel Abdel; Gray, Stephen; White, Jared; Eckhoff, Devin E.; DuBay, Derek A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The association between transarterial chemoembolization- (TACE-) induced HCC tumor necrosis measured by the modified Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (mRECIST) and patient survival is poorly defined. We hypothesize that survival will be superior in HCC patients with increased TACE-induced tumor necrosis. Materials and Methods. TACE interventions were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor response was quantified via dichotomized (responders and nonresponders) and the four defined mRECIST categories. Results. Median survival following TACE was significantly greater in responders compared to nonresponders (20.8 months versus 14.9 months, p = 0.011). Survival outcomes also significantly varied among the four mRECIST categories (p = 0.0003): complete, 21.4 months; partial, 20.8; stable, 16.8; and progressive, 7.73. Only progressive disease demonstrated significantly worse survival when compared to complete response. Multivariable analysis showed that progressive disease, increasing total tumor diameter, and non-Child-Pugh class A were independent predictors of post-TACE mortality. Conclusions. Both dichotomized (responders and nonresponders) and the four defined mRECIST responses to TACE in patients with HCC were predictive of survival. The main driver of the survival analysis was poor survival in the progressive disease group. Surprisingly, there was small nonsignificant survival benefit between complete, partial, and stable disease groups. These findings may inform HCC treatment decisions following first TACE. PMID:26949394

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and tumor necrosis factor-alpha attenuate Clara cell secretory protein promoter function.

    PubMed

    Harrod, Kevin S; Jaramillo, Richard J

    2002-02-01

    The Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP, also CC-10/uterglobin) is a 16-kD homodimeric protein abundantly expressed in the airways of mammals. Although the molecular function is unknown, gene-targeting studies indicate CCSP as a regulator of lung inflammation following acute respiratory infection or injury. CCSP is decreased in the lungs of mice following acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.a.) infection. In the present study, the role of decreased promoter function in the regulation of CCSP by P.a. was assessed using an in vitro co-culture system and in vivo studies of transgenic mice. CCSP promoter activity in lung epithelial cells was markedly decreased by P.a. or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in a dose-dependent manner. Regulation of CCSP promoter function by either P.a. or TNF-alpha was localized to the proximal 166 bp flanking region of the CCSP promoter activity. Decreased regulation of the CCSP promoter by P.a. or TNF-alpha was specific to CCSP, as human surfactant protein D (SP-D) promoter activity was unaffected or increased by P.a. or TNF-alpha, respectively. A neutralizing antibody against human TNF-alpha was able to reverse both the TNF-alpha- mediated as well as P.a.-mediated decrease in CCSP promoter function in lung epithelial cells. TNF-alpha secretion by lung epithelial cells coincided with the decrease in CCSP promoter function following P.a. administration. Using a transgenic mouse model, P.a. administration to the lung markedly attenuated CCSP promoter-conferred gene expression in vivo. The attenuation of CCSP promoter activity in lung epithelial cells by P.a. involves, in part, autocrine/paracrine secretion of TNF-alpha, which in turn regulates CCSP transcription through cis-active elements in the proximal promoter region.

  7. Effects of a Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antagonist on Experimentally Induced Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Jeon, Eun-ju; Park, Shi-Nae; Park, Kyung-Ho; Park, Yong-Soo; Yeo, Sang Won

    2011-01-01

    This prospective, randomized, and controlled study examined the effects of tumor necrosis factor soluble receptor type I (sTNFRI, a TNF-α antagonist) on experimentally induced rhinosinusitis in rats. The experimental groups received an instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus an intramuscular injection of amoxicillin/clavulanate (antibiotic group), an instillation of sTNFRI (sTNFRI group), an instillation of sTNFRI and an injection of amoxicillin/clavulanate (sTNFRI/antibiotic group), or no additional treatment (LPS group). Histopathological changes were determined using hematoxylin-eosin and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining. Leakage of exudate was determined using fluorescence microscopy. Vascular permeability was measured using the Evans blue dye technique. Expression of MUC5AC was measured using reverse transcriptase PCR. The sTNFRI, antibiotic, and sTNFRI/antibiotic groups had significantly less capillary permeability, mucosal edema, PAS staining, and expression of MUC5AC than the LPS group. There were no differences in capillary permeability, mucosal edema, PAS staining, and MUC5AC expression between the sTNFRI and sTNFRI/antibiotic groups. The antibiotic group had PAS staining similar to that of the sTNFRI and sTNFRI/antibiotic groups but had a greater increase in capillary permeability, mucosal edema, and MUC5AC expression. This study shows that sTNFRI reduces inflammatory activity and mucus hypersecretion in LPS-induced rhinosinusitis in rats. PMID:21772791

  8. Protective effects of tanshinone IIA on endothelial progenitor cells injured by tumor necrosis factor-α

    PubMed Central

    WANG, XING-XIANG; YANG, JIN-XIU; PAN, YAN-YUN; ZHANG, YE-FEI

    2015-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) is a Traditional Chinese Medicine commonly used in Asian and Western countries for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders, such as atherosclerosis. Endothelial dysfunction and associated inflammatory processes have a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been demonstrated to be involved in certain aspects of the endothelial repair process. The present study aimed to investigate the putative protective effects of Tan IIA on EPCs injured by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The potential effects of Tan IIA on TNF-α-stimulated EPC proliferation, migration, adhesion, in vitro tube formation ability and paracrine activity were investigated in the current study. The results indicated that TNF-α impaired EPC proliferation, migration, adhesion capacity and vasculogenesis ability in vitro as well as promoted EPC secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L). However, Tan IIA was able to reverse these effects. In conclusion, these findings demonstrated that Tan IIA may have the potential to protect EPCs against damage induced by TNF-α. Therefore, these results may provide evidence for the pharmacological basis of Tan IIA and its potential use in the prevention and treatment of early atherosclerosis associated with EPC and endothelial damage. PMID:26095681

  9. A chemokine-binding domain in the tumor necrosis factor receptor from variola (smallpox) virus.

    PubMed

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M Begoña; Ho, Yin; Smith, Vincent P; Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2006-04-11

    Variola virus (VaV) is the causative agent of smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases encountered by man, that was eradicated in 1980. The deliberate release of VaV would have catastrophic consequences on global public health. However, the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis are poorly understood at the molecular level. The ability of viruses to evade the host defense mechanisms is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Here we show that the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue CrmB encoded by VaV functions not only as a soluble decoy TNFR but also as a highly specific binding protein for several chemokines that mediate recruitment of immune cells to mucosal surfaces and the skin, sites of virus entry and viral replication at late stages of smallpox. CrmB binds chemokines through its C-terminal domain, which is unrelated to TNFRs, was named smallpox virus-encoded chemokine receptor (SECRET) domain and uncovers a family of poxvirus chemokine inhibitors. An active SECRET domain was found in another viral TNFR (CrmD) and three secreted proteins encoded by orthopoxviruses. These findings identify a previously undescribed chemokine-binding and inhibitory domain unrelated to host chemokine receptors and a mechanism of immune modulation in VaV that may influence smallpox pathogenesis.

  10. Wound healing potential of pterospermum acerifolium wild. With induction of tumor necrosis factor - α

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Aswini Kumar; Giri, Ranjan Kumar; Panda, Dibya Sundar; Satyanarayan, Sremantula

    2011-01-01

    Pterospermum acerifolium, a well-known plant in Indian medicine possesses various therapeutic properties including healing properties and cytokine induction. Wound healing activity of ethanolic extract of P. acerifolium flower along with its effect on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was assessed using excision model of wound repair in Wistar albino rats. After application of the P. acerifolium extract, rate of epithelization with an increase in wound contraction was observed. Animals tropically treated with 10% P. acerifolium extract in petroleum jelly, the wound healing process was observed faster as compared to control group which were treated with petroleum jelly alone. A significant accelerated healing was noticed in animals which were additionally prefed with 250mg/kg body weight of ethanolic P. acerifolium extract daily for 20 consecutive days along with the topical application 10% P. acerifolium extract. During wound healing phase TNF-α level was found to be up regulated by P. acerifolium treatment. Early wound healing may be pronounced due to P. acerifolium extract elevating TNF−α production PMID:24826024

  11. Personalized medicine: theranostics (therapeutics diagnostics) essential for rational use of tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    With the discovery of the central pathogenic role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in many immunoinflammatory diseases, specific inhibition of this pleiotropic cytokine has revolutionized the treatment of patients with several non-infectious inflammatory disorders. As a result, genetically engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety can be severely impaired by immunogenicity, i.e., the ability of a drug to induce anti-drug antibodies (ADA). Assessment of ADA is therefore an important component of the evaluation of drug safety in both pre-clinical and clinical studies and in the process of developing less immunogenic and safer biopharmaceuticals. Therapeutics diagnostics, also called theranostics, i.e., monitoring functional drug levels and neutralizing ADA in the circulation, is central to more effective use of biopharmaceuticals. Hence, testing-based strategies rather than empirical dose-escalation may provide more cost-effective use of TNF antagonists as this allows therapies tailored according to individual requirements rather than the current universal approach to diagnosis. The objective of the present review is to discuss the reasons for recommending theranostics to implement an individualized use of TNF antagonists and to highlight some of the methodological obstacles that have obscured cost-effective ways of using these therapies.

  12. Involvement of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the pathogenesis of autoimmune orchitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Suescun, María O; Rival, Claudia; Theas, María S; Calandra, Ricardo S; Lustig, Livia

    2003-06-01

    We studied the testicular macrophages of rats with experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) and analyzed whether the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) is involved in germ cell apoptosis and in Leydig cell steroidogenesis. The EAO was induced in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by active immunization with testicular homogenate and adjuvants. In the experimental group, a severe orchitis was observed 80 days after the first immunization. ED1- and ED2-positive macrophages were quantified by immunohistochemistry. The TNFalpha concentration of conditioned media from testicular macrophages (TMCM) was determined by ELISA. The number of apoptotic TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1)-positive germ cells was identified by combining in situ end labeling of apoptotic DNA and immunohistochemical techniques. The effect of TNFalpha on Leydig cell testosterone production was determined by RIA. In rats with EAO, we observed a significant increase in the number of TNFalpha-positive testicular macrophages, the TNFalpha concentration in TMCM, and the number of TNFR1-positive germ cells. Sixty percent of TNFR1-positive germ cells were apoptotic. These results suggest that TNFalpha could be involved in the pathogenesis of EAO. Acting together with other local factors such as Fas-FasL, TNFalpha could trigger germ cell apoptosis. We also demonstrated that TNFalpha inhibited in vitro testosterone production in basal and hCG-stimulated Leydig cells from rats with orchitis.

  13. Regulation of interleukin 10 release by tumor necrosis factor in humans and chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin 10 (IL-10) has been shown to inhibit endotoxin-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production. To assess the role of TNF in the induction of IL-10 in endotoxemia, four healthy men were studied after a bolus intravenous injection of recombinant human TNF (50 micrograms/m2). In addition, 13 healthy chimpanzees were investigated after a bolus intravenous injection of Escherichia coli endotoxin (4 ng/kg), 6 animals received endotoxin only, 4 animals received a simultaneous intravenous injection of a monoclonal anti-TNF antibody, whereas 3 chimpanzees were treated with an anti-TNF F(ab')2 fragment 30 min after the administration of endotoxin. TNF induced a modest rise in IL-10 concentrations peaking after 45 min (47 +/- 32 pg/ml; p < 0.05). IL-10 peaked 2 h after injection of endotoxin (202 +/- 61 pg/ml; p < 0.005). In both anti-TNF-treated groups, the early endotoxin-induced TNF activity was completely neutralized. Simultaneous anti-TNF treatment attenuated endotoxin-induced IL-10 release (73 +/- 13 pg/ml; p < 0.01 versus endotoxin alone), whereas postponed anti-TNF treatment did not significantly affect this response (p = 0.21). These results indicate that TNF, in part, mediates the induction of IL-10 in endotoxemia, resulting in an autoregulatory feedback loop. PMID:7964475

  14. Accelerated wound healing in tumor necrosis factor receptor p55-deficient mice with reduced leukocyte infiltration.

    PubMed

    Mori, Ryoichi; Kondo, Toshikazu; Ohshima, Tohru; Ishida, Yuko; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2002-07-01

    To clarify biological roles of tumor necrosis factor receptor p55 (TNF-Rp55) -mediated signals in wound healing, skin excisions were prepared in BALB/c (WT) and TNF-Rp55-deficient (KO) mice. In WT mice, the wound area was reduced to 50% of the original area 6 days after injury, with angiogenesis and collagen accumulation. Histopathologically, reepithelialization rate was approximately 80% 6 days. Myeloperoxidase activity and macrophage recruitment were the most evident 1 and 6 days after injury, respectively. Gene expression of adhesion molecules, interleukin 1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha (MIP-1alpha), MIP-2, transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Flt-1, and Flk-1 was enhanced at the wound site. In KO mice, an enhancement in angiogenesis, collagen content, and reepithelialization was accelerated with the increased gene expression of TGF-beta1, CTGF, VEGF, Flt-1, and Flk-1 at the wound sites, resulting in accelerated wound healing compared with WT mice. In contrast, leukocyte infiltration, mRNA expression of adhesion molecules, and cytokines were significantly reduced in KO mice. These observations suggest that TNF-Rp55-mediated signals have some role in promoting leukocyte infiltration at the wound site and negatively affect wound healing, probably by reducing angiogenesis and collagen accumulation.

  15. Cellular localization of interleukin-8 and its inducer, tumor necrosis factor-alpha in psoriasis.

    PubMed Central

    Nickoloff, B. J.; Karabin, G. D.; Barker, J. N.; Griffiths, C. E.; Sarma, V.; Mitra, R. S.; Elder, J. T.; Kunkel, S. L.; Dixit, V. M.

    1991-01-01

    The importance of immunologic mechanisms in psoriasis has been deduced from the ability of immunosuppressive therapies to ameliorate this common and chronic skin disease. Certainly the histology of psoriatic lesions suggests a dialogue between the hyperplastic keratinocytes and infiltrating T lymphocytes and macrophages. To begin dissecting the cytokine network involved in the pathophysiology of psoriasis, the location, in both epidermal and dermal compartments, of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-8, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and transforming growth factor-alpha at the protein and/or mRNA levels were identified. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha was selected as a potentially key regulatory cytokine, first because it induces cultured keratinocyte interleukin-8, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and transforming growth factor-alpha production, and second because intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression by keratinocytes in psoriatic epidermis had been identified previously. Using immunohistochemical localization, tumor necrosis factor-alpha was identified in 12 psoriatic lesions as intense and diffuse expression by dermal dendrocytes (macrophages) in the papillary dermis (without significant staining of endothelial cells, mast cells, or dermal Langerhans cells), and focally by keratinocytes and intraepidermal Langerhans cells. Functional interaction between the dermal dendrocytes and keratinocytes was suggested by the presence of interleukin-8 expression of suprabasal keratinocytes immediately above the tumor necrosis factor-alpha-positive dermal dendrocytes. Interleukin-8 mRNA and transforming growth factor-alpha mRNA were detectable in the epidermal roof of psoriatic lesions, but neither was detectable at the protein or mRNA levels in any normal skin specimens. Treatment of cultured human keratinocytes with phorbol ester (which experimentally produces psoriasiform changes on mouse skin) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha also increased interleukin-8 and

  16. Brefeldin A-Inhibited Guanine Nucleotide-Exchange Factor 1 (BIG1) Governs the Recruitment of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factor 2 (TRAF2) to Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1) Signaling Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takuya; Tsuchida, Mei; Kogue, Yosuke; Spadini, Christian; Hirata, Yusuke; Matsuzawa, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is a critical mediator of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) signaling. However, the regulatory mechanisms of TRAF2 are not fully understood. Here we show evidence that TRAF2 requires brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange factor 1 (BIG1) to be recruited into TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) signaling complexes. In BIG1 knockdown cells, TNF-α-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was attenuated and the sensitivity to TNF-α-induced apoptosis was increased. Since these trends correlated well with those of TRAF2 deficient cells as previously demonstrated, we tested whether BIG1 functions as an upstream regulator of TRAF2 in TNFR1 signaling. As expected, we found that knockdown of BIG1 suppressed TNF-α-dependent ubiquitination of TRAF2 that is required for JNK activation, and impaired the recruitment of TRAF2 to the TNFR1 signaling complex (complex I). Moreover, we found that the recruitment of TRAF2 to the death-inducing signaling complex termed complex II was also impaired in BIG1 knockdown cells. These results suggest that BIG1 is a key component of the machinery that drives TRAF2 to the signaling complexes formed after TNFR1 activation. Thus, our data demonstrate a novel and unexpected function of BIG1 that regulates TNFR1 signaling by targeting TRAF2. PMID:27834853

  17. Arg972 insulin receptor substrate-1 enhances tumor necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    You, Yunhui; Liu, Shiqing; Peng, Lijuan; Long, Mei; Deng, Hongxiang; Zhao, Hongjun

    2015-07-01

    The presence of Arg972 insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) is associated with impaired insulin/IRS-1 signaling to activate phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K). Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), an inflammatory cytokine with a central role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), induces apoptosis in osteoblasts, which are the principal cell type responsible for bone loss in RA. In our previous study, an association between Arg972 IRS-1 and a high risk and severity of RA was identified. In the present study, the effects of Arg972 IRS-1 and IRS-1 on TNF-α-induced apoptosis in human osteoblasts were examined. Normal and RA osteoblasts were stably transfected with Arg972 IRS-1 and IRS-1. In addition, cells were stably transduced with IRS-1-shRNA to knock down IRS1. Following stimulation with 10 nM insulin for 30 min, the stable overexpression of Arg972 IRS-1 and knock down of IRS-1 significantly decreased IRS-1-associated PI3K activity and Akt activation/phosphorylation at serine 473 (ser473) and enhanced TNF-α-induced apoptosis in normal and in RA osteoblasts. By contrast, the stable overexpression of IRS-1 significantly increased the levels of IRS-1-associated PI3K activity and Akt phosphorylation (ser473) and inhibited TNF-α-induced apoptosis, which was eliminated by pretreatment with 50 µn BJM120, a selective PI3K inhibitor, for 30 min. In conclusion, the present study provided the first evidence, to the best of our knowledge, that insulin stimulation of Arg972 IRS-1 and IRS-1 enhanced and inhibited TNF-α-induced apoptosis, respectively in normal and RA osteoblasts by a PI3K‑dependent mechanism. These findings suggest that insulin/IRS-1 signaling is important in the pathogenesis of RA.

  18. Transfection of influenza A virus nuclear export protein induces the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Lara-Sampablo, Alejandra; Flores-Alonso, Juan Carlos; De Jesús-Ortega, Nereyda; Santos-López, Gerardo; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora; Reyes-Carmona, Sandra; Herrera-Camacho, Irma; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2014-06-24

    Influenza A virus genomic segments eight codes for non-structural 1 (NS1) protein that is involved in evasion of innate antiviral response, and nuclear export protein (NEP) that participates in the export of viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes, transcription and replication. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is highly expressed during influenza virus infections and is considered an anti-infective cytokine. NS1 and NEP proteins were overexpressed and their role on TNF-α expression was evaluated. Both TNF-α mRNA and protein increased in cells transfected with NEP but not with NS1. We further investigate if NS1 or NEP regulates the activity of TNF-α promoter. In the presence of NEP the activity of TNF-α promoter increased significantly compared with the control (83.5±2.9 vs. 30.9±2.8, respectively; p=0.001). This effect decreased 15-fold when the TNF-α promoter distal region was deleted, suggesting the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and NF-kB response elements. This was corroborated by testing the effect produced on TNF-α promoter by the treatment with Raf/MEK/ERK (U0126), NF-kB (Bay-11-7082) and PI3K (Ly294-002) cell signaling inhibitors. Treatment with U0126 and Bay-117082 reduced the activity of TNF-α promoter mediated by NEP (41.5±3.2, 70% inhibition; and 80.6±7.4, 35% inhibition, respectively) compared to mock-treated control. The results suggest a new role for NEP protein that participates in the transcriptional regulation of human TNF-α expression.

  19. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy on Osteoclasts Precursors in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Lopes, Joana; Vieira-Sousa, Elsa; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Ponte, Cristina; Canhão, Helena; Ainola, Mari; Fonseca, João E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is characterized by excessive local bone formation and concomitant systemic bone loss. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in the inflammation of axial skeleton and enthesis of AS patients. Despite reduction of inflammation and systemic bone loss, AS patients treated with TNF inhibitors (TNFi) have ongoing local bone formation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNFi in the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts (OC) in AS patients. Methods 13 AS patients treated with TNFi were analyzed at baseline and after a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. 25 healthy donors were recruited as controls. Blood samples were collected to assess receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) surface expression on circulating leukocytes and frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations. Quantification of serum levels of bone turnover markers and cytokines, in vitro OC differentiation assay and qRT-PCR for OC specific genes were performed. Results RANKL+ circulating lymphocytes (B and T cells) and IL-17A, IL-23 and TGF-β levels were decreased after TNFi treatment. We found no differences in the frequency of the different monocyte subpopulations, however, we found decreased expression of CCR2 and increased expression of CD62L after TNFi treatment. OC number was reduced in patients at baseline when compared to controls. OC specific gene expression was reduced in circulating OC precursors after TNFi treatment. However, when cultured in OC differentiating conditions, OC precursors from AS TNFi-treated patients showed increased activity as compared to baseline. Conclusion In AS patients, TNFi treatment reduces systemic pro osteoclastogenic stimuli. However, OC precursors from AS patients exposed to TNFi therapy have increased in vitro activity in response to osteoclastogenic stimuli. PMID:26674064

  20. Role for Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in Murine Cytomegalovirus Transcriptional Reactivation in Latently Infected Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Christian O.; Seckert, Christof K.; Dreis, Doris; Reddehase, Matthias J.; Grzimek, Natascha K. A.

    2005-01-01

    Interstitial pneumonia is a major clinical manifestation of primary or recurrent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in immunocompromised recipients of a bone marrow transplant. In a murine model, lungs were identified as a prominent site of CMV latency and recurrence. Pulmonary latency of murine CMV is characterized by high viral genome burden and a low incidence of variegated immediate-early (IE) gene expression, reflecting a sporadic activity of the major IE promoters (MIEPs) and enhancer. The enhancer-flanking promoters MIEP1/3 and MIEP2 are switched on and off during latency in a ratio of ∼2:1. MIEP1/3 latency-associated activity generates the IE1 transcript of the ie1/3 transcription unit but not the alternative splicing product IE3 that encodes the essential transactivator of early gene expression. Splicing thus appeared to be an important checkpoint for maintenance of latency. In accordance with previous work of others, we show here that signaling by the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) activates IE1/3 transcription in vivo. As an addition to current knowledge, Poisson distribution analysis revealed an increased incidence of IE1/3 transcriptional events as well as a higher amount of transcripts per event. Notably, TNF-α promoted the splicing to IE3 transcripts, but transcription did not proceed to the M55/gB early gene. Moreover, the activated transcriptional state induced by TNF-α did not predispose latently infected mice to a higher incidence of virus recurrence after hematoablative treatment. In conclusion, TNF-α is an important inductor of IE gene transcriptional reactivation, whereas early genes downstream in the viral replicative cycle appear to be the rate-limiting checkpoint(s) for virus recurrence. PMID:15596827

  1. Requirement of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor–Associated Factor (Traf)6 in Interleukin 17 Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Schwandner, Ralf; Yamaguchi, Kyoko; Cao, Zhaodan

    2000-01-01

    Signaling through its widely distributed cell surface receptor, interleukin (IL)-17 enhances the transcription of genes encoding proinflammatory molecules. Although it has been well documented that IL-17 activates the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), the upstream signaling events are largely unknown. Here we report the requirement of tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor (TRAF)6 in IL-17–induced NF-κB and JNK activation. In embryonic fibroblasts (EFs) derived from TRAF6 knockout mice, IL-17 failed to activate the IκB kinases (IKKs) and JNK. Consequently, IL-17–induced IL-6 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression in the TRAF6-deficient cells was abolished. Lack of TRAF6 appeared to be the sole defect responsible for the observed failure to respond to IL-17, because transient transfection of TRAF6 expression plasmid into the TRAF6-deficient cells restored IL-17–induced NF-κB activation in a luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, the levels of IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) on the TRAF6-deficient EFs were comparable to those on the wild-type control cells. Defect in IL-17 response was not observed in TRAF2-deficient EFs. Moreover, when TRAF6 and IL-17R were coexpressed in 293 cells, TRAF6 coimmunoprecipitated with IL-17R. Together, these results indicate that TRAF6, but not TRAF2, is a crucial component in the IL-17 signaling pathway leading to proinflammatory responses. PMID:10748240

  2. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 2. Induction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) on human leucocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Paulesu, L.; Luzzi, E.; Bocci, V. )

    1991-10-01

    The effect of ozone as a probable inducer of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) has been investigated on human blood and on Ficoll-purified blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Samples were exposed at different ozone concentrations ranging from 2.2 to 108 micrograms/ml and incubated at 37 degrees C in an 95% air-5% CO2 atmosphere. At predetermined times, all cell supernatants were tested for TNF activity and some PBMC cultures were examined for DNA synthesis. The authors have shown that ozone concentration is critical in terms of TNF production and of cell mitogenesis and that, owing to the presence of erythrocytes, higher ozone concentrations are required to be effective in blood than in PBMC. Because ozonization of blood is a procedure followed in several European countries for the treatment of viral diseases and tumors, the release of factors with antiviral and immunomodulatory activities by leukocytes may explain the mechanism of action of ozone and of autohemotherapy.

  3. Human tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis through inhibiting Rac1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor invasion and metastasis are the major reasons for leading death of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Therefore, to identify molecules that can suppress invasion and metastasis of tumor will provide novel targets for HCC therapies. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2, TIPE2, is a novel immune negative molecule and an inhibitor of the oncogenic Ras in mice but its function in human is unclear. Our previous research has shown that TIPE2 is downregulated in human primary HCC compared with the paired adjacent non-tumor tissues. Results In present study, we provide evidence that TIPE2 inhibits effectively human hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis. The forced expression of TIPE2 in HCC-derived cell lines markedly inhibits tumor cell growth, migration and invasion in vitro and suppresses growth and metastasis of HCC in vivo. Clinical information from a cohort of 112 patients reveals that loss or reduced expression of TIPE2 in primary HCC tissues is significantly associated with tumor metastasis. Mechanically, TIPE2 inhibits the migration and invasion through targeting Rac1 and then reduces F-actin polymerization and expression of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). Conclusion Our results indicate that human TIPE2 is endogenous inhibitor of Rac1 in HCC by which it attenuates invasion and metastasis of HCC. The data suggest that TIPE2 will be a new target for HCC therapy. PMID:24274578

  4. Induction of hypoxia and necrosis in multicellular tumor spheroids is associated with resistance to chemotherapy treatment

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Diego; Ivanek, Robert; Turrini, Eleonora; Droeser, Raoul A.; Zajac, Paul; Fimognari, Carmela; Spagnoli, Giulio C.; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Mele, Valentina; Muraro, Manuele G.

    2017-01-01

    Culture of cancerous cells in standard monolayer conditions poorly mirrors growth in three-dimensional architectures typically observed in a wide majority of cancers of different histological origin. Multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) culture models were developed to mimic these features. However, in vivo tumor growth is also characterized by the presence of ischemic and necrotic areas generated by oxygenation gradients and differential access to nutrients. Hypoxia and necrosis play key roles in tumor progression and resistance to treatment. To provide in vitro models recapitulating these events in highly controlled and standardized conditions, we have generated colorectal cancer (CRC) cell spheroids of different sizes and analyzed their gene expression profiles and sensitivity to treatment with 5FU, currently used in therapeutic protocols. Here we identify three MCTS stages, corresponding to defined spheroid sizes, characterized by normoxia, hypoxia, and hypoxia plus necrosis, respectively. Importantly, we show that MCTS including both hypoxic and necrotic areas most closely mimic gene expression profiles of in vivo-developing tumors and display the highest resistance to 5FU. Taken together, our data indicate that MCTS may mimic in vitro generation of ischemic and necrotic areas in highly standardized and controlled conditions, thereby qualifying as relevant models for drug screening purposes. PMID:27965457

  5. Glia-pinealocyte network: the paracrine modulation of melatonin synthesis by tumor necrosis factor (TNF).

    PubMed

    da Silveira Cruz-Machado, Sanseray; Pinato, Luciana; Tamura, Eduardo Koji; Carvalho-Sousa, Cláudia Emanuele; Markus, Regina P

    2012-01-01

    The pineal gland, a circumventricular organ, plays an integrative role in defense responses. The injury-induced suppression of the pineal gland hormone, melatonin, which is triggered by darkness, allows the mounting of innate immune responses. We have previously shown that cultured pineal glands, which express toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), produce TNF when challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here our aim was to evaluate which cells present in the pineal gland, astrocytes, microglia or pinealocytes produced TNF, in order to understand the interaction between pineal activity, melatonin production and immune function. Cultured pineal glands or pinealocytes were stimulated with LPS. TNF content was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TLR4 and TNFR1 expression were analyzed by confocal microscopy. Microglial morphology was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. In the present study, we show that although the main cell types of the pineal gland (pinealocytes, astrocytes and microglia) express TLR4, the production of TNF induced by LPS is mediated by microglia. This effect is due to activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) pathway. In addition, we observed that LPS activates microglia and modulates the expression of TNFR1 in pinealocytes. As TNF has been shown to amplify and prolong inflammatory responses, its production by pineal microglia suggests a glia-pinealocyte network that regulates melatonin output. The current study demonstrates the molecular and cellular basis for understanding how melatonin synthesis is regulated during an innate immune response, thus our results reinforce the role of the pineal gland as sensor of immune status.

  6. Selective up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor receptor I in tumor-bearing rats with cancer-related cachexia.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Maria G; Fortunati, Nicoletta; Arena, Katia; Costelli, Paola; Aragno, Manuela; Danni, Oliviero; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe

    2003-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) are important mediators in cancer cachexia; however, the expression of these cytokines and their receptors in tumor-bearing animals is poorly characterized. We analyzed expression of TNF-alpha, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-RI, TNF-RII) and interleukin 6 (IL-6R) receptors in the brain, kidney, spleen, liver, muscle, ascite tumors and serum, from Yoshida AH-130 hepatoma-bearing rats. TNF-alpha increased in the brain, spleen, liver, and muscle of cachectic animals; IL-6 increased in the liver and muscle. AH-130 cells expressed a good level of TNF-alpha; on the contrary, no TNF-alpha or IL-6 protein was detected in the serum of either tumor-bearing or control animals. TNF-RI mRNA was up-regulated in the spleen, liver and muscle of tumor-bearing rats. TNF-RI protein levels confirmed up-regulation in the spleen and liver, but failed to detect any increase in the muscle. Western blotting against TNF-RI revealed two bands of lower molecular weight in cachectic muscle, suggesting proteolysis involving TNF-RI. No significant increase of either TNF-RII or IL-6R was observed. This is the first demonstration of a selective up-regulation of TNF-RI in cancer cachexia and suggests that local production of TNF-alpha and IL-6 is a corner-stone in the induction/maintenance of this syndrome.

  7. CD8+ T Cells Specific to Apoptosis-Associated Antigens Predict the Response to Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Citro, Alessandra; Scrivo, Rossana; Martini, Helene; Martire, Carmela; De Marzio, Paolo; Vestri, Anna Rita; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Valesini, Guido

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cells specific to caspase-cleaved antigens derived from apoptotic T cells (apoptotic epitopes) represent a principal player in chronic immune activation, which is known to amplify immunopathology in various inflammatory diseases. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship involving these autoreactive T cells, the rheumatoid arthritis immunopathology, and the response to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy. The frequency of autoreactive CD8+ T cells specific to various apoptotic epitopes, as detected by both enzyme-linked immunospot assay and dextramers of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules complexed with relevant apoptotic epitopes, was longitudinally analyzed in the peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis patients who were submitted to etanercept treatment (or other tumor necrosis factor inhibitors as a control). The percentage of apoptotic epitope-specific CD8+ T cells was significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis patients than in healthy donors, and correlated with the disease activity. More important, it was significantly more elevated in responders to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy than in non-responders before the start of therapy; it significantly dropped only in the former following therapy. These data indicate that apoptotic epitope-specific CD8+ T cells may be involved in rheumatoid arthritis immunopathology through the production of inflammatory cytokines and that they may potentially represent a predictive biomarker of response to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy to validate in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:26061065

  8. An Essential Role for Tumor Necrosis Factor in Natural Killer Cell–mediated Tumor Rejection in the Peritoneum

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Mark J.; Kelly, Janice M.; Baxter, Alan G.; Körner, Heinrich; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.

    1998-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are thought to provide the first line of defence against tumors, particularly major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I− variants. We have confirmed in C57BL/6 (B6) mice lacking perforin that peritoneal growth of MHC class I− RMA-S tumor cells in unprimed mice is controlled by perforin-dependent cytotoxicity mediated by CD3− NK1.1+ cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that B6 mice lacking tumor necrosis factor (TNF) are also significantly defective in their rejection of RMA-S, despite the fact that RMA-S is insensitive to TNF in vitro and that spleen NK cells from B6 and TNF-deficient mice are equally lytic towards RMA-S. NK cell recruitment into the peritoneum was abrogated in TNF-deficient mice challenged with RMA-S or RM-1, a B6 MHC class I− prostate carcinoma, compared with B6 or perforin-deficient mice. The reduced NK cell migration to the peritoneum of TNF-deficient mice correlated with the defective NK cell response to tumor in these mice. By contrast, a lack of TNF did not affect peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte–mediated rejection of tumor from the peritoneum of preimmunized mice. Overall, these data show that NK cells delivering perforin are the major effectors of class I− tumor rejection in the peritoneum, and that TNF is specifically critical for their recruitment to the peritoneum. PMID:9802973

  9. Tumor necrosis factor-α produced in the kidney contributes to angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiandong; Patel, Mehul B; Griffiths, Robert; Mao, Alice; Song, Young-soo; Karlovich, Norah S; Sparks, Matthew A; Jin, Huixia; Wu, Min; Lin, Eugene E; Crowley, Steven D

    2014-12-01

    Immune system activation contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and the resulting progression of chronic kidney disease. In this regard, we recently identified a role for proinflammatory Th1 T-lymphocyte responses in hypertensive kidney injury. Because Th1 cells generate interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), we hypothesized that interferon-γ and TNF-α propagate renal damage during hypertension induced by activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Therefore, after confirming that mice genetically deficient of Th1 immunity were protected from kidney glomerular injury despite a preserved hypertensive response, we subjected mice lacking interferon-γ or TNF-α to our model of hypertensive chronic kidney disease. Interferon deficiency had no impact on blood pressure elevation or urinary albumin excretion during chronic angiotensin II infusion. By contrast, TNF-deficient (knockout) mice had blunted hypertensive responses and reduced end-organ damage in our model. As angiotensin II-infused TNF knockout mice had exaggerated endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in the kidney and enhanced nitric oxide bioavailability, we examined the actions of TNF-α generated from renal parenchymal cells in hypertension by transplanting wild-type or TNF knockout kidneys into wild-type recipients before the induction of hypertension. Transplant recipients lacking TNF solely in the kidney had blunted hypertensive responses to angiotensin II and augmented renal endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression, confirming a role for kidney-derived TNF-α to promote angiotensin II-induced blood pressure elevation by limiting renal nitric oxide generation.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors suppress CCL2 chemokine in monocytes via epigenetic modification.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Ching; Lin, Yu-Chih; Huang, Ming-Yii; Kuo, Po-Lin; Wu, Cheng-Chin; Lee, Min-Sheng; Hsieh, Chong-Chao; Kuo, Hsuan-Fu; Kuo, Chang-Hung; Tsai, Wen-Chan; Hung, Chih-Hsing

    2017-03-01

    The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors could lead to adverse effects. Therefore, the identification of downstream therapeutic targets is important. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, also called CCL2) is related to RA disease activity, and epigenetic modifications are hypothesized to regulate gene expression in RA pathogenesis. We studied the effects of two TNF-α inhibitors, etanercept and adalimumab, on CCL2 expression and the potentially associated intracellular mechanisms, including epigenetic regulation. Etanercept and adalimumab decreased CCL2 production in THP-1 cells and human primary monocytes, as detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and these changes in the CCL2 levels were independent of the TNF-α levels. Etanercept and adalimumab suppressed mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phospho-p38, phospho-JNK, phospho-ERK and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) phospho-p65, as demonstrated using western blot analyses. The investigation of epigenetic modifications using chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that etanercept and adalimumab down-regulated acetylation of histone (H)3 and H4 in the CCL2 promoter region by decreasing the recruitment of the NF-κB associated acetyltransferases p300, CBP and PCAF. Etanercept and adalimumab also down-regulated trimethylation of H3K4, H3K27, H3K36 and H3K79 in the CCL2 promoter region by decreasing the expression of the related methyltransferases WDR5 and Smyd2. We demonstrated that TNF-α inhibitors exert immunomodulatory effects on CCL2 expression in human monocytes via MAPKs, NF-κB and epigenetic modifications. These findings broaden the mechanistic knowledge related to TNF-α inhibitors and provide novel therapeutic targets for RA.

  11. Attenuation of tumor necrosis factor-induced endothelial cell cytotoxicity and neutrophil chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, H.; Crowley, J.J.; Chan, J.C.; Hoffmann, H.; Hatherill, J.R.; Ishizaka, A.; Raffin, T.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Our laboratory has previously shown that the administration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a cytokine produced by activated mononuclear cells, to guinea pigs produces a syndrome similar to gram-negative sepsis or ARDS. Pentoxifylline (PTX), a methylxanthine, protects against TNF-induced and sepsis-induced acute lung injury in vivo. We now report on in vitro cellular studies of PMN-mediated cellular injury and its attenuation. We studied TNF-induced bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell (EC) cytotoxicity both with and without PMN. A 51Cr release assay was used to measure EC damage. Further, we investigated PMN function in response to TNF by measuring chemiluminescence. Agents that attenuate EC damage and PMN activation were evaluated in the above assays. Results revealed that TNF causes EC injury (p less than 0.05) and PMN increase TNF-induced EC injury. Furthermore, PTX, aminophylline (AMPH), caffeine, and forskolin attenuate TNF-induced EC cytotoxicity only in the presence of PMN (p less than 0.05). Of interest, dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) protects EC from TNF-induced injury both with and without PMN. Agents that may increase cAMP levels in PMN (PTX, DBcAMP, forskolin, isobutyl methylxanthine, and terbutaline) significantly attenuate TNF-induced PMN chemiluminescence (p less than 0.05). We conclude that TNF causes EC damage and PMN increase this damage. Furthermore, PTX, AMPH, caffeine, and forskolin can attenuate TNF-induced EC injury in the presence of PMN, whereas DBcAMP attenuates TNF-induced EC injury with and without PMN. In addition, agents that may increase intracellular cAMP levels in PMN can attenuate TNF-induced PMN chemiluminescence. Thus, these agents likely attenuate TNF-induced PMN-mediated EC injury through their inhibitory effects on PMN.

  12. Effects of botulinum toxin type D on secretion of tumor necrosis factor from human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, K.; Spriggs, D.; Ohno, T.; Kufe, D.

    1989-05-01

    Botulinum toxins are potent neurotoxins which block the release of neurotransmitters. The effects of these toxins on hematopoietic cells, however, are unknown. Monocytes secrete a variety of polypeptide growth factors, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In the study reported here, the effects of botulinum toxin type D on the secretion of TNF from human monocytes were examined. The results demonstrate that biotulinum toxin type D inhibits the release of TNF from monocytes activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Botulinum toxin type D had no detectable effect on intracellular TNF levels in LPS-treated monocytes, indicating that the effects of this toxin involve the secretory process. This inhibitory effect of botulinum toxin type D on TNF secretion from LPS-treated monocytes was partially reversed by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate or introduction of guanosine 5'-(/gamma/-thio)t-riphosphate into these cells. The results demonstrate that TNF secretion is regulated by at least two distinct guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, one responsible for the activation of phospholiphase C and another which acts as a substrate for botulinum toxin type D. ADP-ribosylation of monocyte membranes by botulinum toxin type D demonstrated the presence of three substrates with M/sub r/s of 45,000, 21,000, and 17,000. While the role of these substrates in exocytosis is unknown, the results suggest that the M/sub r/ 21,000 substrate is involved in a process other than TNF secretion.

  13. The role of tumor necrosis factor-α in the pathogenesis of vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Camara-Lemarroy, Carlos R; Salas-Alanis, Julio C

    2013-10-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired immune disorder of the skin characterized by the presence of white depigmented macules. Its immunopathogenesis is not completely understood, but inflammatory alterations in the skin microenvironment, and particularly increased expression of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), are thought to be essential regulators of melanocyte dysfunction and death. In this article we review the evidence that implicates TNFα in the pathogenesis of vitiligo, including studies on serum and tissue levels of TNFα, TNFα gene polymorphisms, in vitro studies, and therapeutic trials using TNFα inhibitors. TNFα emerges as a complex mediator with apparently conflicting roles in vitiligo.

  14. High Serum Interleukin-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Levels in Chronic Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Fornari, M. C.; Bava, A. J.; Guereño, M. T.; Berardi, V. E.; Silaf, M. R.; Negroni, R.; Diez, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    In patients with chronic paracoccidioidomycosis (n = 10), levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-10, and interleukin-2 in serum, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (in picograms per milliliter, as mean ± standard error of the mean), were higher than in normal controls (n = 8): 186 ± 40 versus 40 ± 7 (P < 0.05), 203 ± 95 versus 20 ± 8 (P = 0.001), and 96.3 ± 78.57 versus 1.19 ± 1.19 (P = 0.045), respectively. Gamma interferon and interleukin-4 levels were similar in patients and controls. PMID:11527826

  15. Raised serum levels of cachectin/tumor necrosis factor alpha in renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay was used for monitoring serum levels of endogenous cachectin/tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) in 10 renal transplant recipients. Acute allograft rejections were associated with marked elevations of circulating TNF. The peak levels of TNF (median 140 pg/ml) were in the same concentration range as previously reported in parasitic infections. The results show that the release of TNF into circulation is an early event in renal allograft rejection and that raised levels of TNF in man can also be induced by noninfectious stimuli. PMID:3309124

  16. Grepafloxacin inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced interleukin-8 expression in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, S; Matsumoto, K; Gon, Y; Maruoka, S; Hayashi, S; Asai, Y; Machino, T; Horie, T

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effect of grepafloxacin (GPFX), a new fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent, on interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-stimulated human airway epithelial cells (AEC). GPFX inhibited IL-8 protein production as well as mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner (2.5 - 25 micro g/ml), but the inhibition of IL-8 expression by corresponding concentrations of GPFX to serum and airway lining fluids was not complete. We discuss the modulatory effect of GPFX on IL-8 production in the context of its efficacy on controlling chronic airway inflammatory diseases.

  17. Neutrophil Recruitment by Tumor Necrosis Factor from Mast Cells in Immune Complex Peritonitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Ramos, Bernard F.; Jakschik, Barbara A.

    1992-12-01

    During generalized immune complex-induced inflammation of the peritoneal cavity, two peaks of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were observed in the peritoneal exudate of normal mice. In mast cell-deficient mice, the first peak was undetected, and the second peak of TNF and neutrophil influx were significantly reduced. Antibody to TNF significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration in normal but not in mast cell-deficient mice. Mast cell repletion of the latter normalized TNF, neutrophil mobilization, and the effect of the antibody to TNF. Thus, in vivo, mast cells produce the TNF that augments neutrophil emigration.

  18. Effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha on Sin Nombre Virus Infection In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Khaiboullina, Svetlana F.; Netski, Dale M.; Krumpe, Peter; St. Jeor, Stephen C.

    2000-01-01

    Previous data indicate that immune mechanisms may be involved in developing capillary leakage during Sin Nombre virus (SNV) infection. Therefore, we investigated production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) by human alveolar macrophages and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) after infection with SNV. In addition, we examined the effect of TNF-α on HUVEC monolayer leakage. Our results reveal that although TNF-α decreases accumulation of viral nucleoproteins, TNF-α levels do not change in SNV-infected cells. In addition, supernatants from SNV-infected human alveolar macrophages did not cause a significant increase in endothelial monolayer permeability. PMID:11090198

  19. Adipose Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α: Direct Role in Obesity-Linked Insulin Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotamisligil, Gokhan S.; Shargill, Narinder S.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    1993-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has been shown to have certain catabolic effects on fat cells and whole animals. An induction of TNF-α messenger RNA expression was observed in adipose tissue from four different rodent models of obesity and diabetes. TNF-α protein was also elevated locally and systemically. Neutralization of TNF-α in obese fa/fa rats caused a significant increase in the peripheral uptake of glucose in response to insulin. These results indicate a role for TNF-α in obesity and particularly in the insulin resistance and diabetes that often accompany obesity.

  20. Development of a mouse-feline chimeric antibody against feline tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    PubMed Central

    DOKI, Tomoyoshi; TAKANO, Tomomi; HOHDATSU, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal inflammatory disease caused by FIP virus infection. Feline tumor necrosis factor (fTNF)-alpha is closely involved in the aggravation of FIP pathology. We previously described the preparation of neutralizing mouse anti-fTNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb 2–4) and clarified its role in the clinical condition of cats with FIP using in vitro systems. However, administration of mouse mAb 2–4 to cat may lead to a production of feline anti-mouse antibodies. In the present study, we prepared a mouse-feline chimeric mAb (chimeric mAb 2–4) by fusing the variable region of mouse mAb 2–4 to the constant region of feline antibody. The chimeric mAb 2–4 was confirmed to have fTNF-alpha neutralization activity. Purified mouse mAb 2–4 and chimeric mAb 2–4 were repeatedly administered to cats, and the changes in the ability to induce feline anti-mouse antibody response were investigated. In the serum of cats treated with mouse mAb 2–4, feline anti-mouse antibody production was induced, and the fTNF-alpha neutralization effect of mouse mAb 2–4 was reduced. In contrast, in cats treated with chimeric mAb 2–4, the feline anti-mouse antibody response was decreased compared to that of mouse mAb 2–4-treated cats. PMID:27264736

  1. Tumor necrosis factor receptors support murine hematopoietic progenitor function in the early stages of engraftment.

    PubMed

    Pearl-Yafe, Michal; Mizrahi, Keren; Stein, Jerry; Yolcu, Esma S; Kaplan, Ofer; Shirwan, Haval; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2010-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family receptors/ligands are important participants in hematopoietic homeostasis, in particular as essential negative expansion regulators of differentiated clones. As a prominent injury cytokine, TNF-alpha has been traditionally considered to suppress donor hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function after transplantation. We monitored the involvement of TNF receptors (TNF-R) 1 and 2 in murine hematopoietic cell engraftment and their inter-relationship with Fas. Transplantation of lineage-negative (lin(-)) bone marrow cells (BMC) from TNF receptor-deficient mice into wild-type recipients showed defective early engraftment and loss of durable hematopoietic contribution upon recovery of host hematopoiesis. Consistently, cells deficient in TNF receptors had reduced competitive capacity as compared to wild-type progenitors. The TNF receptors were acutely upregulated in bone marrow (BM)-homed donor cells (wild-type) early after transplantation, being expressed in 60%-75% of the donor cells after 6 days. Both TNF receptors were detected in fast cycling, early differentiating progenitors, and were ubiquitously expressed in the most primitive progenitors with long-term reconstituting potential (lin(-)c-kit(+) stem cell antigen (SCA)-1(+)). BM-homed donor cells were insensitive to apoptosis induced by TNF-alpha and Fas-ligand and their combination, despite reciprocal inductive cross talk between the TNF and Fas receptors. The engraftment supporting effect of TNF-alpha is attributed to stimulation of progenitors through TNF-R1, which involves activation of the caspase cascade. This stimulatory effect was not observed for TNF-R2, and this receptor did not assume redundant stimulatory function in TNFR1-deficient cells. It is concluded that TNF-alpha plays a tropic role early after transplantation, which is essential to successful progenitor engraftment.

  2. Altered pattern of tumor necrosis factor-alpha production in peripheral blood monocytes from Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Loganes, Claudia; Pin, Alessia; Naviglio, Samuele; Girardelli, Martina; Bianco, Anna Monica; Martelossi, Stefano; Tommasini, Alberto; Piscianz, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the inflammatory state in Crohn’s disease (CD) patients and correlate it with genetic background and microbial spreading. METHODS By means of flow cytometry, production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) was measured in peripheral blood monocytes from patients suffering from CD, ulcerative colitis (UC) and in healthy subjects after stimulation of the NOD2 and TLR pathways. CD patients were genotyped for the three most common NOD2 variants (R702W, G908R and L1007Pfs*2) and basal production of TNF-α was correlated to NOD2 genotype. Also, production of TNF-α was correlated to plasmatic levels of LPS Binding Protein (LBP), soluble (s) CD14 and to the activity state of the disease. RESULTS The patients with CD were characterized by a significantly higher monocyte basal expression of TNF-α compared with healthy subjects and UC patients, and after stimulation with Pam3CSK4 (ligand of TLR2/1) and MDP-L18 (ligand of NOD2) this difference was maintained, while other microbial stimuli (LPS, ligand of TLR4 and PolyI:C, ligand of TLR3) induced massive activation in CD monocytes as well as in UC and in healthy control cells. There was no significant difference in the production of TNF-α between patients who carried CD-associated heterozygous or homozygous variants in NOD2 and patients with wild type NOD2 genotype. Although serum LBP levels have been shown to correlate positively with the state of activity of the disease, TNF-α production did not show a clear correlation with either LBP or sCD14 levels in plasma. Moreover, no clear correlation was seen between TNF-α production and activity indices in either CD or UC. CONCLUSION Peripheral monocytes from CD express higher basal and stimulated TNF-α than controls, regardless of NOD2 genotype and without a clear correlation with disease activity. PMID:27895399

  3. Interferon-gamma and transforming growth factor-beta modulate the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production induced by Fc gamma-receptor stimulation in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rose, D M; Winston, B W; Chan, E D; Riches, D W; Henson, P M

    1997-09-08

    Engagement of receptors for the Fc region of IgG (Fc gamma R) can activate a variety of biological responses in macrophages, and these responses can be modulated either positively or negatively by co-stimulation with a variety of agents including cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). We have previously demonstrated that Fc gamma R crosslinking activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members p42MAPK, p38, and JNK. Herein, we examined the modulatory effect of IFN-gamma, TGF-beta, and platelet-activating factor (PAF) on Fc gamma R-induced MAPK activation in murine macrophages. Fc gamma R-induced activation of p42MAPK and JNK was augmented nearly two-fold by pretreatment with IFN-gamma. Conversely, TGF-beta pretreatment suppressed Fc gamma R-induced activation of p42MAPK, JNK, and p38. These modulatory effects of IFN-gamma and TGF-beta on MAPK activation correlated with changes in Fc gamma R-stimulated TNF-alpha production by these two cytokines.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonism by the murine tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor 2-Fc fusion protein exacerbates histoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Deepe, George S

    2007-06-01

    Treatment of some inflammatory conditions with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) antagonists is efficacious, but such treatments are associated with infections with intracellular pathogens, including Histoplasma capsulatum. We explored protective immunity to H. capsulatum in mice given a fusion protein consisting of TNF-alpha receptor 2 (TNFR2) bound to the Fc portion of mouse IgG1. Intraperitoneal administration of this inhibitor exacerbated primary or secondary pulmonary infection at dosages ranging from 1 to 5 mg/kg. All mice with primary infection given the inhibitor succumbed to infection within 10-21 days of treatment. In secondary histoplasmosis, mice receiving 1, but not 5, mg/kg survived treatment. Fungal burden was increased even if treatment with the inhibitor was initiated after the onset of infection. The inflammatory response of the lungs of mice given the inhibitor did not differ from that of mice given control vehicle. Susceptibility was not associated with major alterations in cytokines known to protect or exacerbate infection. However, expression of nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) was depressed early in primary infection. These results demonstrate that antagonism of endogenous TNF-alpha by this fusion protein modulates susceptibility. Impaired immunity is not a result of altered cytokine responses or changes in the inflammation and may not be demonstrable in other murine strains.

  5. Computational modeling of tuberculous meningitis reveals an important role for tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    El-Kebir, M; van der Kuip, M; van Furth, A M; Kirschner, D E

    2013-07-07

    Tuberculosis is a global health issue with annually about 1.5 million deaths and 2 billion infected people worldwide. Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis comprises 13% of all cases of which tuberculous meningitis is the most severe. It has a high mortality and is often diagnosed once irreversible neurological damage has already occurred. Development of diagnostic and treatment strategies requires a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis of tuberculous meningitis. This disease is characterized by the formation of a cerebral granuloma, which is a collection of immune cells that attempt to immunologically restrain, and physically contain bacteria. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α is known for its important role in granuloma formation. Because traditional experimental animal studies exploring tuberculous meningitis are difficult and expensive, another approach is needed to begin to address this important and significant disease outcome. Here, we present an in silico model capturing the unique immunological environment of the brain that allows us to study the key mechanisms driving granuloma formation in time. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis reveals a dose-dependent effect of tumor necrosis factor-α on bacterial load and immune cell numbers thereby influencing the onset of tuberculous meningitis. Insufficient levels result in bacterial overgrowth, whereas high levels lead to uncontrolled inflammation being detrimental to the host. These findings have important implications for the development of immuno-modulating treatment strategies for tuberculous meningitis.

  6. In vivo role of tumor necrosis-like factor in Eimeria tenella infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Lillehoj, H S; Ruff, M D

    1995-01-01

    The effect of tumor necrosis-like factor (TNLF) on the pathogenesis of coccidiosis was investigated. Injection of crude chicken TNLF enhanced the weight loss caused by Eimeria tenella infection. Rabbit polyclonal antibody against recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rhTNF) partially restored E. tenella-induced weight loss in SC chickens, but not in TK chickens. However, injection of chickens with chicken TNLF, rhTNF, and rabbit serum against rhTNF had no significant effect on cecal lesions. Both SC and TK chickens produced circulating TNLF following primary, but not secondary infection, and SC chickens showed higher level of TNLF production than TK chickens. Peripheral blood leukocyte-derived macrophages from SC and TK chickens produced a significant amount of TNLF compared to the preinfection condition when cocultured with sporozoites. In general, macrophages from SC chickens produced higher levels of TNLF than those from TK chickens. No significant difference was observed between primary and secondary infection. These results suggest that the excessive TNF production may be involved in weight loss caused by E. tenella infection in SC chickens.

  7. Tumor necrosis factor and the pathogenesis of Pichinde virus infection in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Aronson, J F; Herzog, N K; Jerrells, T R

    1995-03-01

    Pichinde virus (PIC) is a reticuloendothelial arenavirus of the New World tropics. A guinea pig passage-adapted strain of this virus (adPIC) is uniformly lethal for inbred guinea pigs, while the related, prototype strain (PIC3739) has attenuated virulence. The abilities of adPIC and PIC3739 to induce tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in vivo and in cultured macrophages were compared. Infection with adPIC, but not PIC3739, was associated with detectable serum TNF that peaked in week 2 of infection. Tumor necrosis factor was found in the spleens of adPIC- and PIC3739-infected animals in week 1 of infection; TNF alpha mRNA levels in spleens and livers of adPIC infected animals increased and remained high throughout infection, whereas PIC3739-infected organs showed down regulation of TNF alpha mRNA late in infection. Peritoneal macrophages explanted from adPIC-infected animals showed enhanced lipopolysaccharide-inducible TNF production. Altered regulation of TNF production may play a role in the pathogenesis of guinea pig arenavirus disease.

  8. Tumor Necrosis Factor and the Pathogenesis of Pichinde Virus Infection in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Judith F.; Herzog, Norbert K.; Jerrells, Thomas R.

    1995-01-01

    Pichinde virus (PIC) is a reticuloendothelial arenavirus of the New World tropics. A guinea pig passage–adapted strain of this virus (adPIC) is uniformly lethal for inbred guinea pigs, while the related, prototype strain (PIC3739) has attenuated virulence. The abilities of adPIC and PIC3739 to induce tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in vivo and in cultured macrophages were compared. Infection with adPIC, but not PIC3739, was associated with detectable serum TNF that peaked in week 2 of infection. Tumor necrosis factor was found in the spleens of adPIC- and PIC3739-infected animals in week 1 of infection ; TNFα mRNA levels in spleens and livers of adPIC infected animals increased and remained high throughout infection, whereas PIC3739-infected organs showed down regulation of TNFα mRNA late in infection. Peritoneal macrophages explanted from adPIC-infected animals showed enhanced lipopolysaccharide-inducible TNF production. Altered regulation of TNF production may play a role in the pathogenesis of guinea pig arenavirus disease. PMID:7694969

  9. Computational modeling of tuberculous meningitis reveals an important role for tumor necrosis factor-α

    PubMed Central

    El-Kebir, M.; van der Kuip, M.; van Furth, A.M.; Kirschner, D.E.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a global health issue with annually about 1.5 million deaths and 2 billion infected people worldwide. Extra pulmonary tuberculosis comprises 13% of all cases of which tuberculous meningitis is the most severe. It has a high mortality and is often diagnosed once irreversible neurological damage has already occurred. Development of diagnostic and treatment strategies requires a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis of tuberculous meningitis. This disease is characterized by the formation of a cerebral granuloma, which is a collection of immune cells that attempt to immunologically restrain, and physically contain bacteria. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α is known for its important role in granuloma formation. Because traditional experimental animal studies exploring tuberculous meningitis are difficult and expensive, another approach is needed to begin to address this important and significant disease outcome. Here, we present an in silico model capturing the unique immunological environment of the brain that allows us to study the key mechanisms driving granuloma formation in time. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis reveal a dose-dependent effect of tumor necrosis factor-α on bacterial load and immune cell numbers thereby influencing the onset of tuberculous meningitis. Insufficient levels result in bacterial overgrowth, whereas high levels lead to uncontrolled inflammation being detrimental to the host. These findings have important implications for the development of immuno-modulating treatment strategies for tuberculous meningitis. PMID:23542051

  10. Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 as mediators of endotoxin-induced beneficial effects

    SciTech Connect

    Urbaschek, R.; Urbaschek, B.

    1987-09-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides or endotoxins are known to induce tumor necrosis; enhanced nonspecific resistance to bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections and to radiation sickness; and tolerance to lethal doses of endotoxin. These beneficial effects are achieved by pretreatment with minute amounts of endotoxin. Recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 1 (IL-1) are among the mediators capable of invoking radioprotection or resistance to the consequences of cecal ligation and puncture. Both cytokines are potent inducers of serum colony-stimulating factor (CSF) in C3H/HeJ mice (low responders to endotoxin). The number of splenic granulocyte-macrophage precursors was found to increase 5 days after injection of TNF in these mice. Although with IL-1 no increase in the number of granulocyte-macrophage colonies occurred in culture in the presence of serum CSF, a marked stimulation was observed when TNF was added. This stimulation of myelopoiesis observed in vivo and in vitro may be related to the radioprotective effect of TNF. The data presented suggest that TNF and IL-1 released after injection of endotoxin participate in the mediation of endotoxin-induced enhancement of nonspecific resistance and stimulation of hematopoiesis. 76 references.

  11. Dysregulation of innate immunity in ulcerative colitis patients who fail anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Angela C; Mallon, Dominic; Radford-Smith, Graham; Boyer, Julien; Piche, Thierry; Prescott, Susan L; Lawrance, Ian C; Tulic, Meri K

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study the innate immune function in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients who fail to respond to anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. METHODS Effects of anti-TNF therapy, inflammation and medications on innate immune function were assessed by measuring peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine expression from 18 inflammatory bowel disease patients pre- and 3 mo post-anti-TNF therapy. Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression and cytokine production post TLR stimulation was assessed in UC “responders” (n = 12) and “non-responders” (n = 12) and compared to healthy controls (n = 12). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured in blood to assess disease severity/activity and inflammation. Pro-inflammatory (TNF, IL-1β, IL-6), immuno-regulatory (IL-10), Th1 (IL-12, IFNγ) and Th2 (IL-9, IL-13, IL-17A) cytokine expression was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay while TLR cellular composition and intracellular signalling was assessed with FACS. RESULTS Prior to anti-TNF therapy, responders and non-responders had similar level of disease severity and activity. PBMC’s ability to respond to TLR stimulation was not affected by TNF therapy, patient’s severity of the disease and inflammation or their medication use. At baseline, non-responders had elevated innate but not adaptive immune responses compared to responders (P < 0.05). Following TLR stimulation, non-responders had consistently reduced innate cytokine responses to all TLRs compared to healthy controls (P < 0.01) and diminished TNF (P < 0.001) and IL-1β (P < 0.01) production compared to responders. This innate immune dysfunction was associated with reduced number of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) (P < 0.01) but increased number of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) (P = 0.03) as well as intracellular accumulation of IRAK4 in non-responders following TLR-2, -4 and -7 activation (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Reduced innate immunity in

  12. Tumor necrosis factor receptor- associated factor 6 (TRAF6) regulation of development, function, and homeostasis of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Matthew C; Lee, JangEun; Choi, Yongwon

    2015-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is an adapter protein that mediates a wide array of protein-protein interactions via its TRAF domain and a RING finger domain that possesses non-conventional E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. First identified nearly two decades ago as a mediator of interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R)-mediated activation of NFκB, TRAF6 has since been identified as an actor downstream of multiple receptor families with immunoregulatory functions, including members of the TNFR superfamily, the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, tumor growth factor-β receptors (TGFβR), and T-cell receptor (TCR). In addition to NFκB, TRAF6 may also direct activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and interferon regulatory factor pathways. In the context of the immune system, TRAF6-mediated signals have proven critical for the development, homeostasis, and/or activation of B cells, T cells, and myeloid cells, including macrophages, dendritic cells, and osteoclasts, as well as for organogenesis of thymic and secondary lymphoid tissues. In multiple cellular contexts, TRAF6 function is essential not only for proper activation of the immune system but also for maintaining immune tolerance, and more recent work has begun to identify mechanisms of contextual specificity for TRAF6, involving both regulatory protein interactions, and messenger RNA regulation by microRNAs.

  13. Avascular Necrosis of the Hips With Increased Activity on 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2017-03-01

    Prolonged exposure to cortisol is one of the major causes of avascular bone necrosis (AVN). We report on a case of a woman with Cushing syndrome attributed to ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting tumor who was evaluated with whole-body PET/CT study using Ga-DOTATATE. The scan showed increased activity by both femoral heads, corresponding to the margins of bilateral AVN seen on MRI. The presented data suggests AVN-induced reactive inflammatory alterations adjacent to the necrotic segment of the bone, which can be effectively targeted using radiolabeled somatostatin (SST) analogs.

  14. Semiquantitative Analysis Using Thallium-201 SPECT for Differential Diagnosis Between Tumor Recurrence and Radiation Necrosis After Gamma Knife Surgery for Malignant Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Shigeo; Shuto, Takashi; Takase, Hajime; Ohtake, Makoto; Tomura, Nagatsuki; Tanaka, Takahiro; Sonoda, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Semiquantitative analysis of thallium-201 chloride single photon emission computed tomography ({sup 201}Tl SPECT) was evaluated for the discrimination between recurrent brain tumor and delayed radiation necrosis after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The medical records were reviewed of 75 patients, including 48 patients with metastatic brain tumor and 27 patients with high-grade glioma who underwent GKS in our institution, and had suspected tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis on follow-up neuroimaging and deteriorating clinical status after GKS. Analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT data used the early ratio (ER) and the delayed ratio (DR) calculated as tumor/normal average counts on the early and delayed images, and the retention index (RI) as the ratio of DR to ER. Results: A total of 107 tumors were analyzed with {sup 201}Tl SPECT. Nineteen lesions were removed surgically and histological diagnoses established, and the other lesions were evaluated with follow-up clinical and neuroimaging examinations after GKS. The final diagnosis was considered to be recurrent tumor in 65 lesions and radiation necrosis in 42 lesions. Semiquantitative analysis demonstrated significant differences in DR (P=.002) and RI (P<.0001), but not in ER (P=.372), between the tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis groups, and no significant differences between metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas in all indices (P=.926 for ER, P=.263 for DR, and P=.826 for RI). Receiver operating characteristics analysis indicated that RI was the most informative index with the optimum threshold of 0.775, which provided 82.8% sensitivity, 83.7% specificity, and 82.8% accuracy. Conclusions: Semiquantitative analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT provides useful information for the differentiation between tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis in metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas after GKS, and the RI may be the most

  15. Use of the tumor necrosis factor-blockers for Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Gupta, Milli; Freeman, Hugh J

    2012-01-01

    The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy for inflammatory bowel disease represents the most important advance in the care of these patients since the publication of the National Co-operative Crohn’s disease study thirty years ago. The recommendations of numerous consensus groups worldwide are now supported by a wealth of clinical trials and several meta-analyses. In general, it is suggested that tumor necrosis factor-α blockers (TNFBs) are indicated (1) for persons with moderately-severe Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis (UC) who have failed two or more causes of glucocorticosteroids and an acceptably long cause (8 wk to 12 wk) of an immune modulator such as azathioprine or methotrexate; (2) non-responsive perianal disease; and (3) severe UC not responding to a 3-d to 5-d course of steroids. Once TNFBs have been introduced and the patient is responsive, therapy given by the IV and SC rate must be continued. It remains open to definitive evidence if concomitant immune modulators are required with TNFB maintenance therapy, and when or if TNFB may be weaned and discontinued. The supportive evidence from a single study on the role of early versus later introduction of TNFB in the course of a patient’s illness needs to be confirmed. The risk/benefit profile of TNFB appears to be acceptable as long as the patient is immunized and tested for tuberculosis and viral hepatitis before the initiation of TNFB, and as long as the long-term adverse effects on the development of lymphoma and other tumors do not prone to be problematic. Because the rates of benefits to TNFB are modest from a population perspective and the cost of therapy is very high, the ultimate application of use of TNFBs will likely be established by cost/benefit studies. PMID:23002356

  16. Regulation of human lung fibroblast glycosaminoglycan production by recombinant interferons, tumor necrosis factor, and lymphotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Elias, J A; Krol, R C; Freundlich, B; Sampson, P M

    1988-01-01

    Mononuclear cells may be important regulators of fibroblast glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis. However, the soluble factors mediating these effects, the importance of intercytokine interactions in this regulation and the mechanisms of these alterations remain poorly understood. We analyzed the effect of recombinant (r) tumor necrosis factor (TNF), lymphotoxin (LT), and gamma, alpha, and beta 1 interferons (INF-gamma, -alpha and -beta 1), alone and in combination, on GAG production by normal human lung fibroblasts. rTNF, rLT, and rINF-gamma each stimulated fibroblast GAG production. In addition, rIFN-gamma synergized with rTNF and rLT to further augment GAG biosynthesis. In contrast, IFN-alpha A, -alpha D, and -beta 1 neither stimulated fibroblast GAG production nor interacted with rTNF or rLT to regulate GAG biosynthesis. The effects of the stimulatory cytokines and cytokine combinations were dose dependent and were abrogated by the respective monoclonal antibodies. In addition, these cytokines did not cause an alteration in the distribution of GAG between the fibroblast cell layer and supernatant. However, the stimulation was at least partially specific for particular GAG moieties with hyaluronic acid biosynthesis being markedly augmented without a comparable increase in the production of sulfated GAGs. Fibroblast prostaglandin production did not mediate these alterations since indomethacin did not decrease the stimulatory effects of the cytokines. In contrast, protein and mRNA synthesis appeared to play a role since the stimulatory effects of the cytokines were abrogated by cyclohexamide and actinomycin D, respectively. In addition, the cytokines and cytokine combinations increased cellular hyaluronate synthetase activity in proportion to their effects on hyaluronic acid suggesting that induction of this enzyme(s) is important in this stimulatory process. These studies demonstrate that IFN-gamma, TNF, and LT are important stimulators of fibroblast GAG

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibits effects of aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands on cell death in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ghatrehsamani, Mahdi; Soleimani, Masoud; Esfahani, Behjat A Moayedi; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Hakemi, Mazdak G; Mossahebimohammadi, Majid; Eskandari, Nahid; Adib, Minoo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to diverse outcome in various kinds of cells. AhR activation may induce apoptosis or prevent of apoptosis and cell death. Recent studies suggest that apoptosis effects of AhR can be modulated by inflammatory cytokine like tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In this study, we try to investigate the possible interaction of TNF-α with the 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a ligand of AhR, on peripheral lymphocytes. Materials and Methods: Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from peripheral blood by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation on ficoll. Isolated PBMCs were divided into four groups: Control group, TNF-α administered group, TCDD administered group, co-administered group with TCDD and TNF-α. Cells were maintained for a week in lymphocyte culture condition. Then, TNF-α was added to group 2 and 4. Finally, apoptosis and necrosis were analyzed in all samples using flowcytometry. Result: In group 4, the mean percent of necrosis and apoptosis in TCDD treatment groups was significantly larger than other groups; (P < 0.05). Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the mean percent of cell death in TNF-α administered group and TCDD administered group (P > 0.05). However, the mean percent of cell death in co-administered group with TCDD and TNF-α was significantly lower than other groups; (P < 0.05). Conclusion: TNF-α could significantly inhibit effects of TCDD on lymphocytes apoptosis. Combination effects of TNF-α and TCDD on lymphocyte increase cell survival. PMID:26605245

  18. Activation of the adenosine A3 receptor in RAW 264.7 cells inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha release by reducing calcium-dependent activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lynn; Pingle, Sandeep C; Hallam, Daniel M; Rybak, Leonard P; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates the immune system and promotes inflammation via Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, which regulates the synthesis and release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and other inflammatory cytokines. Previous studies have shown that the nucleoside adenosine suppresses LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha release in human UB939 macrophages by activating an adenosine A(3) receptor (A(3)AR) subtype on these cells. In this study, we examined the mechanism(s) underlying A(3)AR-dependent inhibition of TNF-alpha release in a mouse (RAW 264.7) cell line. Treatment of RAW 264.7 cells with LPS (3 mug/ml) increased TNF-alpha release, which was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by adenosine analogs N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)-adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) and R-phenylisopropyladenosine and reversed by selective A(3)AR blockade. The increase in TNF-alpha release was preceded by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) release by IB-MECA, a selective agonist of the A(3)AR, or with BAPTA-AM, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, reduced LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha release. Activation of the A(3)AR or inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) release also reduced LPS-stimulated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Similar inhibition by A(3)AR was observed for LPS-stimulated inducible nitric-oxide synthase. These data support the contention that inhibition of LPS-stimulated release of inflammatory molecules, such as TNF-alpha and NO via the A(3)AR, involves suppression of intracellular Ca(2+)signaling, leading to suppression of NF-kappaB and ERK1/2 pathways.

  19. Mediation of mouse natural cytotoxic activity by tumour necrosis factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortaldo, John R.; Mason, Llewellyn H.; Mathieson, Bonnie J.; Liang, Shu-Mei; Flick, David A.; Herberman, Ronald B.

    1986-06-01

    Natural cell-mediated cytotoxic activity in the mouse has been associated with two types of effector cells, the natural killer (NK) cell and the natural cytotoxic (NC) cell, which seem to differ with regard to their patterns of target selectivity, cell surface characteristics and susceptibility to regulatory factors1. During studies on the mechanism of action of cytotoxic molecules, it became evident that WEHI-164, the prototype NC target cell, was highly susceptible to direct lysis by both human and mouse recombinant tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Here we show that NC, but not NK activity mediated by normal splenocytes, is abrogated by rabbit antibodies to recombinant and natural TNF, respectively. Thus, the cell-mediated activity defined as NC is due to release of TNF by normal spleen cells and does not represent a unique natural effector mechanism.

  20. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha/interleukin-10 balance in normal and cystic fibrosis children.

    PubMed Central

    Shmarina, G V; Pukhalsky, A L; Kokarovtseva, S N; Pukhalskaya, D A; Shabalova, L A; Kapranov, N I; Kashirskaja, N J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The balance between tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) is important for immune homeostasis maintenance. Exuberant production of TNF-alpha contributes to overwhelming inflammatory response and tissue damage. But, commonly, increase in TNF-alpha is counterbalanced by simultaneous synthesis of an anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, which suppresses production of many activating and regulatory mediators. AIMS: In the present study, the relationships between TNF-alpha and IL-10 in the plasma of healthy school-children and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have been investigated. METHODS: Blood samples were obtained from 12 CF patients with chronic pulmonary disease and 18 healthy schoolchildren vaccinated with live attenuated rubella vaccine. IL-10 and TNF-alpha were determined in the plasma samples using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. RESULTS: Before vaccination, most healthy children (13 of 18) demonstrated superiority of pro-inflammatory TNF-alpha over anti-inflammatory IL-10 (TNF-alpha/IL-10 > 1). In these subjects, a significant positive linear association between the cytokine values has been found. Vaccine challenge resulted in a marked reduction of TNF-alpha/IL-10 ratios. In addition, a disappearance of correlation between the cytokine values was observed. Such disturbance was related to exuberant elevation of the IL-10 levels after inoculation. On the contrary, in CF individuals, plasma cytokine values remained in strong linear association independently of TNF-alpha or IL-10 predominance. No spikes in the plasma levels of IL-10 in CF patients during a 6-month observation period have been revealed. CONCLUSIONS: There were no fundamental differences between CF and healthy children in the regulation of TNF-alpha and IL-10 secretion. Thus, immune quiescence seemed to be associated with the predominance of TNF-alpha, whereas immune disturbance was characterized by IL-10 superiority. The only

  1. Sepsis-induced suppression of skeletal muscle translation initiation mediated by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Lang, Charles H; Frost, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Inhibition of translational efficiency is responsible at least in part for the sepsis-induced decrease in protein synthesis observed in skeletal muscle. Moreover, infusion of the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) into naive rats produces a comparable decrement. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to determine whether inhibition of TNF action under in vivo conditions could prevent the sepsis-induced decrease in translation initiation observed in the postabsorptive state. To address this aim, sepsis was produced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and rats were studied in the fasted condition 20 to 24 hours thereafter. Both septic and time-matched nonseptic control rats were pretreated with TNF-binding protein (TNF(BP)) before CLP or sham surgery to neutralize endogenously produced TNF. Sepsis altered the distribution of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in the gastrocnemius by increasing the amount associated with 4E-BP1 (inactive complex) and decreasing the amount bound to eIF4G (active complex). This change in eIF4E availability was associated with a decreased phosphorylation of 4E-BP1. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was also decreased in the gastrocnemius from septic rats. Pretreatment of septic rats with TNF(BP) largely ameliorated the altered distribution of eIF4E as well as the reduced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1, S6, and mTOR. In contrast, sepsis did not change either the total amount or the phosphorylation state of eIF2alpha or eIF2Bepsilon. Furthermore, no sepsis-induced change in eIFs was detected in the slow-twitch soleus muscle. The ability of TNF(BP) to prevent the sepsis-induced alterations in translation initiation was independent of change in plasma insulin and proportional to the insulinlike growth factor I content in blood and muscle but was associated with a reduction in plasma corticosterone. Hence, the decreased constitutive protein

  2. Human Dermal Mast Cells Contain and Release Tumor Necrosis Factor α, which Induces Endothelial Leukocyte Adhesion Molecule 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Laurence J.; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Waldorf, Heidi A.; Whitaker, Diana; Murphy, George F.

    1991-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is a proinflammatory cytokine that mediates endothelial leukocyte interactions by inducing expression of adhesion molecules. In this report, we demonstrate that human dermal mast cells contain sizeable stores of immunoreactive and biologically active TNF-α within granules, which can be released rapidly into the extracellular space upon degranulation. Among normal human dermal cells, mast cells are the predominant cell type that expresses both TNF-α protein and TNF-α mRNA. Moreover, induction of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 expression is a direct consequence of release of mast cell-derived TNF-α. These findings establish a role for human mast cells as "gatekeepers" of the dermal microvasculature and indicate that mast cell products other than vasoactive amines influence endothelium in a proinflammatory fashion.

  3. Non-tumor necrosis factor-based biologic therapies for rheumatoid arthritis: present, future, and insights into pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Paula, Filipe Seguro; Alves, José Delgado

    2014-01-01

    The way rheumatoid arthritis is treated has changed dramatically with the introduction of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) biologics. Nevertheless, many patients still have less than adequate control of their disease activity even with these therapeutic regimens, and current knowledge fails to explain all the data already gathered. There is now a wide range of drugs from different classes of biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs available (and soon this number will increase significantly), that provides the opportunity to address each patient as a particular case and thereby optimize medical intervention. Currently available biologics for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis apart from anti-TNF-based therapies are reviewed, along with an analysis of the new insights they provide into the pathogenesis of the disease and a discussion of future prospects in the area. PMID:24353404

  4. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha modulates survival, proliferation, and neuronal differentiation in neonatal subventricular zone cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Bernardino, Liliana; Agasse, Fabienne; Silva, Bruno; Ferreira, Raquel; Grade, Sofia; Malva, João O

    2008-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha has been reported to modulate brain injury, but remarkably, little is known about its effects on neurogenesis. We report that TNF-alpha strongly influences survival, proliferation, and neuronal differentiation in cultured subventricular zone (SVZ) neural stem/progenitor cells derived from the neonatal P1-3 C57BL/6 mice. By using single-cell calcium imaging, we developed a method, based on cellular response to KCl and/or histamine, that allows the functional evaluation of neuronal differentiation. Exposure of SVZ cultures to 1 and 10 ng/ml mouse or 1 ng/ml human recombinant TNF-alpha resulted in increased differentiation of cells displaying a neuronal-like profile of [Ca2+](i) responses, compared with the predominant profile of immature cells observed in control, nontreated cultures. Moreover, by using neutralizing antibodies for each TNF-alpha receptor, we found that the proneurogenic effect of 1 ng/ml TNF-alpha is mediated via tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 activation. Accordingly, the percentage of neuronal nuclear protein-positive neurons was increased following exposure to mouse TNF-alpha. Interestingly, exposure of SVZ cultures to 1 ng/ml TNF-alpha induced cell proliferation, whereas 10 and 100 ng/ml TNF-alpha induced apoptotic cell death. Moreover, we found that exposure of SVZ cells to TNF-alpha for 15 minutes or 6 hours caused an increase in the phospho-stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase immunoreactivity initially in the nucleus and then in growing axons, colocalizing with tau, consistent with axonogenesis. Taken together, these results show that TNF-alpha induces neurogenesis in neonatal SVZ cell cultures of mice. TNF-alpha, a proinflammatory cytokine and a proneurogenic factor, may play a central role in promoting neurogenesis and brain repair in response to brain injury and infection.

  5. Use of anti tumor necrosis factor-alpha monoclonal antibody for ulcerative jejunoileitis

    PubMed Central

    Seven, Gulseren; Assaad, Adel; Biehl, Thomas; Kozarek, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative jejunoileitis is an uncommon clinical syndrome consisting of abdominal pain, weight loss associated with diarrhea, and multiple inflammatory ulcerations and strictures of the small bowel. Ulcerative jejunoileitis can complicate established celiac disease or develop in patients de novo. Increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the small intestine of patients with untreated celiac disease are associated with a role in the immune pathogenesis of this disorder. No specific therapy has been shown to change the course of ulcerative jejunoileitis. We report a case of severe ulcerative jejunoileitis previously unresponsive to traditional therapies, including high dose corticosteroids and cyclosporine. The patient had a dramatic resolution of symptoms and a complete normalization of endoscopic findings after anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody, infliximab (Remicade®). PMID:23049226

  6. Fatigue mechanisms in patients with cancer: effects of tumor necrosis factor and exercise on skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St Pierre, B. A.; Kasper, C. E.; Lindsey, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue is a common adverse effect of cancer and its therapy. However, the specific mechanisms underlying cancer fatigue are unclear. One physiologic mechanism may involve changes in skeletal muscle protein stores or metabolite concentration. A reduction in skeletal muscle protein stores may result from endogenous tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or from TNF administered as antineoplastic therapy. This muscle wasting would require patients to exert an unusually high amount of effort to generate adequate contractile force during exercise performance or during extended periods of sitting or standing. This additional effort could result in the onset of fatigue. Additionally, cancer fatigue may develop or become exacerbated during exercise as a consequence of changes in the concentration of skeletal muscle metabolites. These biochemical alterations may interfere with force that is produced by the muscle contractile proteins. These physiologic changes may play a role in the decision to include exercise in the rehabilitation plans of patients with cancer. They also may affect ideas about fatigue.

  7. The role of tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily members in mammalian brain development, function and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Twohig, Jason P; Cuff, Simone M; Yong, Audrey A; Wang, Eddie C Y

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members were initially identified as immunological mediators, and are still commonly perceived as immunological molecules. However, our understanding of the diversity of TNFRSF members' roles in mammalian physiology has grown significantly since the first discovery of TNFRp55 (TNFRSF1) in 1975. In particular, the last decade has provided evidence for important roles in brain development, function and the emergent field of neuronal homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that TNFRSF members are expressed in an overlapping regulated pattern during neuronal development, participating in the regulation of neuronal expansion, growth, differentiation and regional pattern development. This review examines evidence for non-immunological roles of TNFRSF members in brain development, function and maintenance under normal physiological conditions. In addition, several aspects of brain function during inflammation will also be described, when illuminating and relevant to the non-immunological role of TNFRSF members. Finally, key questions in the field will be outlined.

  8. Progress with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Carlos; Allocca, Mariangela; Danese, Silvio; Fiorino, Gionata

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy is a valid, effective and increasingly used option in inflammatory bowel disease management. Nevertheless, further knowledge and therapeutic indications regarding these drugs are still evolving. Anti-TNF therapy may be essential to achieve recently proposed end points, namely mucosal healing, prevention of bowel damage and prevention of patient's disability. Anti-TNF drugs are also suggested to be more effective in early disease, particularly in early Crohn's disease. Moreover, its efficacy for prevention of postoperative recurrence in Crohn's disease is still debated. Costs and adverse effects, the relevance of drug monitoring and the possibility of anti-TNF therapy withdrawal in selected patients are still debated issues. This review aimed to describe and discuss the most relevant data about the progress with anti-TNF therapy for the management of inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. [Tumor necrosis factor alfa in cardiovascular diseases: molecular biology and genetics].

    PubMed

    Fragoso Lona, José Manuel; Sierra Martínez, Mónica; Vargas Alarcón, Gilberto; Barrios Rodas, Angélica; Ramírez Bello, Julián

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major public health problem globally. In 1997, cardiovascular disease caused 41% of deaths in the United States. It has been reported that about 60 million people in the United States have some form of cardiovascular disease. These entities are chronic conditions initiated by a dysregulation of the immune response. One gene and its protein product -tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-α)- a powerful pleiotropic cytokine with multiple cellular functions, plays a role in the inflammation, initiation, development, susceptibility, severity, and response to treatment, etc. of coronary artery disease (CAD). The focus of the present review is to summarize recent evidence showing the biological role of TNF-α in the initiation and progression of endothelial dysfunction and complications of atherosclerosis, and as a genetic variation of TNF-α confer susceptibility, severity, and treatment response in CAD: ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and coronary restenosis.

  10. Role of Eosinophils and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in Interleukin-25-Mediated Protection from Amebic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Zannatun; Watanabe, Koji; Abhyankar, Mayuresh M.; Burgess, Stacey L.; Buonomo, Erica L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The parasite Entamoeba histolytica is a cause of diarrhea in infants in low-income countries. Previously, it was shown that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production was associated with increased risk of E. histolytica diarrhea in children. Interleukin-25 (IL-25) is a cytokine that is produced by intestinal epithelial cells that has a role in maintenance of gut barrier function and inhibition of TNF-α production. IL-25 expression was decreased in humans and in the mouse model of amebic colitis. Repletion of IL-25 blocked E. histolytica infection and barrier disruption in mice, increased gut eosinophils, and suppressed colonic TNF-α. Depletion of eosinophils with anti-Siglec-F antibody prevented IL-25-mediated protection. In contrast, depletion of TNF-α resulted in resistance to amebic infection. We concluded that IL-25 provides protection from amebiasis, which is dependent upon intestinal eosinophils and suppression of TNF-α. PMID:28246365

  11. Passive Immunization against Cachectin/Tumor Necrosis Factor Protects Mice from Lethal Effect of Endotoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutler, B.; Milsark, I. W.; Cerami, A. C.

    1985-08-01

    A highly specific polyclonal rabbit antiserum directed against murine cachectin/tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was prepared. When BALB/c mice were passively immunized with the antiserum or with purified immune globulin, they were protected against the lethal effect of the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide produced by Escherichia coli. The prophylactic effect was dose-dependent and was most effective when the antiserum was administered prior to the injection of the endotoxin. Antiserum to cachectin/TNF did not mitigate the febrile response of endotoxin-treated animals, and very high doses of endotoxin could overcome the protective effect. The median lethal dose of endotoxin in mice pretreated with 50 microliters of the specific antiserum was approximately 2.5 times greater the median lethal dose for controls given nonimmune serum. The data suggest that cachectin/TNF is one of the principal mediators of the lethal effect of endotoxin.

  12. Insulitis in transgenic mice expressing tumor necrosis factor beta (lymphotoxin) in the pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Picarella, D E; Kratz, A; Li, C B; Ruddle, N H; Flavell, R A

    1992-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor beta (TNF-beta) (lymphotoxin) may play an important role in the immune response and pathologic inflammatory diseases. Insulitis is an important early step in the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. To understand better the role of TNF-beta in the regulation of inflammation and type 1 diabetes, we produced transgenic mice in which the murine TNF-beta gene was regulated by the rat insulin II promoter. The transgene was expressed in the pancreas, kidney, and skin of transgenic mice. The expression of TNF-beta in the pancreas of transgenic mice resulted in a leukocytic inflammatory infiltrate consisting primarily of B220+ IgM+ B cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The insulitis is reminiscent of the early stages of diabetes, though the mice did not progress to diabetes. Images PMID:1279667

  13. Alopecia secondary to anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Lara Beatriz Prata; Rego, Juliana Carlos Gonçalves; Estrada, Bruna Duque; Bastos, Paula Raso; Piñeiro Maceira, Juan Manuel; Sodré, Celso Tavares

    2015-01-01

    Biologic drugs represent a substantial progress in the treatment of chronic inflammatory immunologic diseases. However, its crescent use has revealed seldom reported or unknown adverse reactions, mainly associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF). Psoriasiform cutaneous reactions and few cases of alopecia can occur in some patients while taking these drugs. Two cases of alopecia were reported after anti-TNF therapy. Both also developed psoriasiform lesions on the body. This is the second report about a new entity described as 'anti-TNF therapy-related alopecia', which combines clinical and histopathological features of both alopecia areata and psoriatic alopecia. The recognition of these effects by specialists is essential for the proper management and guidance of these patients.

  14. Tumor necrosis factor links chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and K-ras mutant lung cancer through induction of an immunosuppressive pro-tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lei; da Silva Caetano, Mauricio; Cumpian, Amber M; Daliri, Soudabeh; Garza Flores, Alejandra; Chang, Seon Hee; Ochoa, Cesar E; Evans, Christopher M; Yu, Zhentao; Moghaddam, Seyed Javad

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is known as an important regulator of tumor microenvironment and inflammation. TNF levels are markedly elevated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is an independent risk factor for lung cancer. We have previously shown that COPD-like airway inflammation promotes lung cancer in a K-ras mutant mouse model (CC-LR mouse). This was associated with a significant increase of neutrophils in BALF, accompanied by a marked increase in TNF level, suggesting a link between COPD, TNF, and lung cancer promotion. Therefore, we first overexpressed TNF in the airway epithelium of CC-LR mice, which promoted lung cancer by ∼2-fold. This was associated with increased numbers of Ki67 and CD31 positive cells in lung tumors of CC-LR/TNF-Tg mice. We also found a robust increase in NF-κB activation, and numbers of neutrophils and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in lung. Accordingly, we depleted MDSCs in CC-LR/TNF-Tg mice, which lead to significant tumor suppression emphasizing on the role of TNF-induced MDSCs in K-ras induced lung tumorigenesis. Finally, we targeted TNF expression by crossing CC-LR mice with TNF knock-out mice (CC-LR/TNF-KO), which resulted in a significant decrease in lung tumor burden in the absence or presence of COPD-like airway inflammation. Interestingly, there were less MDSCs and lower Ki67 and CD31 expression in the lung of the CC-LR/TNF-KO mice. We conclude that TNF links COPD to lung cancer promotion by induction of an immunosuppressive MDSC response, and subsequent amplification of proliferation and angiogenesis in tumors.

  15. Differences and Similarities in TRAIL- and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Necroptotic Signaling in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Philipp, Stephan; Fuchslocher Chico, Johaiber; Saggau, Carina; Fritsch, Jürgen; Föll, Alexandra; Plenge, Johannes; Arenz, Christoph; Pinkert, Thomas; Kalthoff, Holger; Trauzold, Anna; Schmitz, Ingo; Schütze, Stefan; Adam, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a type of regulated necrosis (RN) called necroptosis was identified to be involved in many pathophysiological processes and emerged as an alternative method to eliminate cancer cells. However, only a few studies have elucidated components of TRAIL-mediated necroptosis useful for anticancer therapy. Therefore, we have compared this type of cell death to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated necroptosis and found similar signaling through acid and neutral sphingomyelinases, the mitochondrial serine protease HtrA2/Omi, Atg5, and vacuolar H+-ATPase. Notably, executive mechanisms of both TRAIL- and TNF-mediated necroptosis are independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), and depletion of p38α increases the levels of both types of cell death. Moreover, we found differences in signaling between TNF- and TRAIL-mediated necroptosis, e.g., a lack of involvement of ubiquitin carboxyl hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) and Atg16L1 in executive mechanisms of TRAIL-mediated necroptosis. Furthermore, we discovered indications of an altered involvement of mitochondrial components, since overexpression of the mitochondrial protein Bcl-2 protected Jurkat cells from TRAIL- and TNF-mediated necroptosis, and overexpression of Bcl-XL diminished only TRAIL-induced necroptosis in Colo357 cells. Furthermore, TRAIL does not require receptor internalization and endosome-lysosome acidification to mediate necroptosis. Taken together, pathways described for TRAIL-mediated necroptosis and differences from those for TNF-mediated necroptosis might be unique targets to increase or modify necroptotic signaling and eliminate tumor cells more specifically in future anticancer approaches. PMID:27528614

  16. Cisplatin-induced renal toxicity via tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, tumor suppressor P53, DNA damage, xanthine oxidase, histological changes, oxidative stress and nitric oxide in rats: protective effect of ginseng.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Mokhtar I; Hussien, Hend M

    2015-04-01

    Cisplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent successfully used in the treatment of a wide range of solid tumors, while its usage is limited due to its nephrotoxicity. The present study was undertaken to examine the effectiveness of ginseng to ameliorate the renal nephrotoxicity, damage in kidney genomic DNA, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, tumor suppressor P53, histological changes and oxidative stress induced by cisplatin in rats. Cisplatin caused renal damage, including DNA fragmentation, upregulates gene expression of tumor suppressor protein p53 and tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6. Cisplatin increased the levels of kidney TBARS, xanthine oxidase, nitric oxide, serum urea and creatinine. Cisplatin decreased the activities of antioxidant enzymes (GST, GPX, CAT and SOD), ATPase and the levels of GSH. A microscopic examination showed that cisplatin caused kidney damage including vacuolization, severe necrosis and degenerative changes. Ginseng co-treatment with cisplatin reduced its renal damage, oxidative stress, DNA fragmentation and induced DNA repair processes. Also, ginseng diminished p53 activation and improved renal cell apoptosis and nephrotoxicity. It can be concluded that, the protective effects of ginseng against cisplatin induced-renal damage was associated with the attenuation of oxidative stress and the preservation of antioxidant enzymes.

  17. RXFP1 is Targeted by Complement C1q Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Factor 8 in Brain Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Glogowska, Aleksandra; Burg, Maxwell; Wong, G. William; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Klonisch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The relaxin-like RXFP1 ligand–receptor system has important functions in tumor growth and tissue invasion. Recently, we have identified the secreted protein, CTRP8, a member of the C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein (CTRP) family, as a novel ligand of the relaxin receptor, RXFP1, with functions in brain cancer. Here, we review the role of CTRP members in cancers cells with particular emphasis on CTRP8 in glioblastoma. PMID:26322020

  18. Effect of low-dose tumor necrosis factor-alpha in combination with STEALTH liposomal cisplatin (SPI-077) on soft-tissue- and osteosarcoma-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Hoving, Saske; van Tiel, Sandra T; Eggermont, Alexander M M; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2005-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used agent for treatment of solid tumors, but its clinical utility is limited by toxicity. Preclinical studies have shown less acute toxicity when STEALTH liposomal cisplatin (SPI-077) is used, with antitumor effects equivalent to those of intravenously administered free cisplatin. We previously reported that systemic treatment with low-dose tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) augments the activity of STEALTH liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil). In this study, we examined the effect of repeated systemic applications of low-dose TNF on the antitumor activity of SPI-077 in rats with soft-tissue sarcoma or osteosarcoma. Addition of TNF to SPI-077 treatment showed an improved tumor growth delay of the soft-tissue sarcoma. The combined SPI-077/TNF treatment resulted in a more prolonged antitumor activity, whereas free cisplatin showed a better tumor response, however with a rapid outgrowth a few days after the end of therapy. In the osteosarcoma, free cisplatin did not have an antitumor effect, but addition of TNF caused a clear tumor growth delay. SPI-077 alone resulted in a tumor growth delay, but combination with TNF had no additive effect. SPI-077 yielded less systemic toxicity than cisplatin. Depending on the type of tumor, the addition of TNF to SPI-077 results in a better tumor growth delay with a prolonged antitumor effect and, in combination with the reduced toxicity of SPI-077, this combination may be preferable to cisplatin.

  19. Functional characterization of tumor necrosis factor superfamily 15 (TNFSF15) induced by lipopolysaccharides and Eimeria infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Soon S; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Hong, Yeong Ho; Lee, Sung Hyen

    2007-01-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding chicken tumor necrosis factor superfamily 15 (TNFSF15) was isolated and its functional role was investigated. TNFSF15 transcripts were primarily expressed in spleen, liver, intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL), peripheral blood lymphocytes and bursa. In vitro infection of HTC macrophages with three species of Eimeria sporozoites induced TNFSF15 gene expression. In vivo experiments revealed that TNFSF15 gene was highly increased following primary infections with Eimeria acervulina or Eimeria maxima. In contrast, no consistent changes in transcript levels were seen following primary infection with Eimeria tenella, or following secondary infection with any of the three Eimeria species. Following infection with E. acervulina and E. maxima, TNFSF15 transcripts were primarily expressed in intestinal CD4(+) and TCR2(+) IEL, respectively. A dose-dependent cytotoxic effect of recombinant TNFSF15 protein was observed on HTC and LSCC-RP9 tumor cells. These results indicate that TNFSF15 plays an important role in local inflammatory response to Eimeria.

  20. Automated ensemble segmentation of epithelial proliferation, necrosis, and fibrosis using scatter tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Allende, P. Beatriz; Conde, Olga M.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pogue, Brian W.; Mirapeix, Jesus; Lopez-Higuera, Jose M.

    2010-04-01

    Conventional imaging systems used today in surgical settings rely on contrast enhancement based on color and intensity and they are not sensitive to morphology changes at the microscopic level. Elastic light scattering spectroscopy has been shown to distinguish ultra-structural changes in tissue. Therefore, it could provide this intrinsic contrast being enormously useful in guiding complex surgical interventions. Scatter parameters associated with epithelial proliferation, necrosis and fibrosis in pancreatic tumors were previously estimated in a quantitative manner. Subtle variations were encountered across the distinct diagnostic categories. This work proposes an automated methodology to correlate these variations with their corresponding tumor morphologies. A new approach based on the aggregation of the predictions of K-nearest neighbors (kNN) algorithm and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) has been developed. The major benefit obtained from the combination of the distinct classifiers is a significant increase in the number of pixel localizations whose corresponding tissue type is reliably assured. Pseudo-color diagnosis images are provided showing a strong correlation with sample segmentations performed by a veterinary pathologist.

  1. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Stimulates the Overproduction of Intestinal Apolipoprotein B48-containing Very Low Density Lipoproproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha(a)(TNFa), a proinflammatory cytokine, is involved in obesity-associated pathologies including type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. TNFa enhanced postprandial apoB48-VLDL1 overproduction by about 89% compared with the control after 90 min olive oil loading; TNFa did not si...

  2. Prognostic and Therapeutic Values of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongmei; Liu, Jianmin; Hu, Xuemei; Liu, Shanshan; He, Baojun

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) causes many deaths worldwide every year, especially in Asia. It is characterized by high malignancy, recurrence, and short survival time. Inflammation is closely related to the initiation and development of HCC. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), an essential inflammatory mediator, has been studied as a potential therapy target in many cancers. However, its potential role in HCC diagnosis and therapy is still unclear. Material/Methods In our study, we detected the TNF-α expression in both human HCC tumor tissue and HCC cell lines HepG2 and HuH7. Then, we detected the effect of anti-TNF-α treatment and it synergistic function with 5-FU in an HCC xenograft mouse model and in HCC cell lines. Results Survival analysis and Cox regression analysis based on 97 HCC patients indicated that a high level of TNF-α is an independent predictor of poor survival in HCC patients. Anti-TNF-α treatment by infliximab synergizes with Fluorouracil (5-FU) by promoting apoptosis of HCC tumor cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) effects. Conclusions Based on these data, we conclude that anti-TNF-α treatment could be a good way to increase the effect of classic chemotherapy of HCC patients, especially for the patients who have modest response to classic chemotherapy, such as 5-FU. TNF-α could also be used as a biomarker to help in early diagnosis of HCC. PMID:27739418

  3. Analysis of Tumor Necrosis Factor Function Using the Resonant Recognition Model.

    PubMed

    Cosic, Irena; Cosic, Drasko; Lazar, Katarina

    2016-06-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a complex protein that plays a very important role in a number of biological functions including apoptotic cell death, tumor regression, cachexia, inflammation inhibition of tumorigenesis and viral replication. Its most interesting function is that it is an inhibitor of tumorigenesis and inductor of apoptosis. Thus, the TNF could be a good candidate for cancer therapy. However, the TNF has also inflammatory and toxic effects. Therefore, it would be very important to understand complex functions of the TNF and consequently be able to predict mutations or even design the new TNF-related proteins that will have only a tumor inhibition function, but not other side effects. This can be achieved by applying the resonant recognition model (RRM), a unique computational model of analysing macromolecular sequences of proteins, DNA and RNA. The RRM is based on finding that certain periodicities in distribution of free electron energies along protein, DNA and RNA are strongly correlated to the biological function of these macromolecules. Thus, based on these findings, the RRM has capabilities of protein function identification, prediction of bioactive amino acids and protein design with desired biological function. Using the RRM, we separate different functions of TNF as different periodicities (frequencies) within the distribution of free energy electrons along TNF protein. Interestingly, these characteristic TNF frequencies are related to previously identified characteristics of proto-oncogene and oncogene proteins describing TNF involvement in oncogenesis. Consequently, we identify the key amino acids related to the crucial TNF function, i.e. receptor recognition. We have also designed the peptide which will have the ability to recognise the receptor without side effects.

  4. Comparative proteome analysis of Tumor necrosis factor α-stimulated human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in response to melittin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bee venom has been used to relieve pain and to treat inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, in humans. To better understand the mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerosis effect of bee venom, gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify proteins whose expression was altered in human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (hVSMCs) stimulated by tumor necrosis factor alpha after 12 h in the presence of melittin. Results To obtain valuable insights into the anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerosis mechanisms of melittin, two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF were used. The proteome study, we showed 33 significant proteins that were differentially expressed in the cells treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha and melittin. Thirteen proteins were significantly increased in the cells treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha, and those proteins were reduced in the cells treated with melittin. Five of the proteins that showed increased expression in the cells treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha are involved in cell migration, including calreticulin, an essential factor of development that plays a role in transcription regulation. The proteins involved in cell migration were reduced in the melittin treated cells. The observed changes in the expression of GRP75, prohibitin, and a select group of other proteins were validated with reverse transcribed-PCR. It was confirmed that the observed change in the protein levels reflected a change in the genes level. In addition, the phosphorylation of EGFR and ERK was validated by analyzing the protein pathway. Conclusion Taken together, these data established that the expression of some proteins was significantly changed by melittin treatment in tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulated the cells and provided insights into the mechanism of the melittin function for its potential use as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:23651618

  5. A Disaccharide that Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor α is Formed from the Extracellular Matrix by the Enzyme Heparanase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lider, Ofer; Cahalon, Liora; Gilat, Dalia; Hershkoviz, Rami; Siegel, Daniel; Margalit, Raanan; Shoseyov, Oded; Cohen, Irun R.

    1995-05-01

    The activation of T cells by antigens or mitogens leads to the secretion of cytokines and enzymes that shape the inflammatory response. Among these molecular mediators of inflammation is a heparanase enzyme that degrades the heparan sulfate scaffold of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Activated T cells use heparanase to penetrate the ECM and gain access to the tissues. We now report that among the breakdown products of the ECM generated by heparanase is a trisulfated disaccharide that can inhibit delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) in mice. This inhibition of T-cell mediated inflammation in vivo was associated with an inhibitory effect of the disaccharide on the production of biologically active tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) by activated T cells in vitro; the trisulfated disaccharide did not affect T-cell viability or responsiveness generally. Both the in vivo and in vitro effects of the disaccharide manifested a bell-shaped dose-response curve. The inhibitory effects of the trisulfated disaccharide were lost if the sulfate groups were removed. Thus, the disaccharide, which may be a natural product of inflammation, can regulate the functional nature of the response by the T cell to activation. Such a feedback control mechanism could enable the T cell to assess the extent of tissue degradation and adjust its behavior accordingly.

  6. Interleukin-6 enhances whereas tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferons inhibit integrin expression and adhesion of human mast cells to extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Schoeler, Dagmar; Grützkau, Andreas; Henz, Beate M; Küchler, Jens; Krüger-Krasagakis, Sabine

    2003-05-01

    Integrins are expressed on mast cells and constitute an essential prerequisite for the accumulation of the cells at sites of inflammation. In order to clarify a potential contribution of inflammatory cytokines to this process, we have studied the modulation of integrin expression and adhesion of immature human mast cells (HMC-1) to extracellular matrix proteins by interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interferon-alpha and interferon-gamma. Corticosteroids were used for comparison. On fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis, preincubation of cells for 48 h with different concentrations of interleukin-6 induced a significant, up to 40%, increase of alpha v alpha 5, CD49b (alpha 2), CD49e (alpha 5), CD49f (alpha 6), and CD51 (alpha v). In contrast, different concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interferon-alpha, interferon-gamma, and dexamethasone (10-8-10-10 M) inhibited expression of adhesion receptors by up to 60%, reaching significance for some but not all integrins. On semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis, interleukin-6, the other cytokines, and corticosteroids significantly modulated expression of alpha1, alpha v and alpha 5 integrin chains at mRNA level. Functional significance of these findings was proven in adhesion assays using fibronectin, laminin, and vitronectin, with interleukin-6 causing significant enhancement of adhesion in all cases, tumor necrosis factor alpha and dexamethasone inducing significant reduction of adhesion to fibronectin and laminin, and interferon-gamma significantly inhibiting adhesion to fibronectin only. Specificity of interleukin-6-induced changes was demonstrated using antibodies against alpha1 and alpha 5 integrins in unstimulated and interleukin-6-prestimulated cells. These data show that interleukin-6 stimulates mast cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and thus allows for the accumulation of the cells at tissue sites by enhancing integrin expression, whereas tumor necrosis factor alpha

  7. Amiodarone exposure during modest inflammation induces idiosyncrasy-like liver injury in rats: role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingtao; Jones, A Daniel; Harkema, Jack R; Roth, Robert A; Ganey, Patricia E

    2012-01-01

    Amiodarone [2-butyl-3-(3',5'-diiodo-4'α-diethylaminoethoxybenzoyl)-benzofuran] (AMD), a class III antiarrhythmic drug, is known to cause idiosyncratic hepatotoxic reactions in human patients. One hypothesis for the etiology of idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions is that a concurrent inflammatory stress results in decreased threshold for drug toxicity. To explore this hypothesis in an animal model, male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with nonhepatotoxic doses of AMD or its vehicle and with saline vehicle or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce low-level inflammation. Elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase activities as well as increased total bile acid concentrations in serum and midzonal hepatocellular necrosis were observed only in AMD/LPS-cotreated rats. The time interval between AMD and LPS administration was critical: AMD injected 16 h before LPS led to liver injury, whereas AMD injected 2-12 h before LPS failed to cause this response. The increase in ALT activity in AMD/LPS cotreatment showed a clear dose-response relationship with AMD as well as LPS. The metabolism and hepatic accumulation of AMD were not affected by LPS coexposure. Serum concentration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) was significantly increased by LPS and was slightly prolonged by AMD. In Hepac1c7 cells, addition of TNF potentiated the cytotoxicity of both AMD and its primary metabolite, mono-N-desethylamiodarone. In vivo inhibition of TNF signaling by etanercept attenuated the AMD/LPS-induced liver injury in rats. In summary, AMD treatment during modest inflammation induced severe hepatotoxicity in rats, and TNF contributed to the induction of liver injury in this animal model of idiosyncratic AMD-induced liver injury.

  8. Discriminating healthy from tumor and necrosis tissue in rat brain tissue samples by Raman spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Amharref, Nadia; Beljebbar, Abdelilah; Dukic, Sylvain; Venteo, Lydie; Schneider, Laurence; Pluot, Michel; Manfait, Michel

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate molecular changes associated with glioma tissues by Raman microspectroscopy in order to develop its use in clinical practice. Spectroscopic markers obtained from C6 glioma tissues were compared to conventional histological and histochemical techniques. Cholesterol and phospholipid contents were highest in corpus callosum and decreased gradually towards the cortex surface as well as in the tumor. Two different necrotic areas have been identified: a fully necrotic zone characterized by the presence of plasma proteins and a peri-necrotic area with a high lipid content. This result was confirmed by Nile Red staining. Additionally, one structure was detected in the periphery of the tumor. Invisible with histopathological hematoxylin and eosin staining, it was revealed by immunohistochemical Ki-67 and MT1-MMP staining used to visualize the proliferative and invasive activities of glioma, respectively. Hierarchical cluster analysis on the only cluster averaged spectra showed a clear distinction between normal, tumoral, necrotic and edematous tissues. Raman microspectroscopy can discriminate between healthy and tumoral brain tissue and yield spectroscopic markers associated with the proliferative and invasive properties of glioblastoma. Development of in vivo Raman spectroscopy could thus accurately define tumor margins, identify tumor remnants, and help in the development of novel therapies for glioblastoma.

  9. Daidzein suppresses tumor necrosis factor-α induced migration and invasion by inhibiting hedgehog/Gli1 signaling in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bao, Cheng; Namgung, Hyeju; Lee, Jaehoo; Park, Hyun-Chang; Ko, Jiwon; Moon, Heejung; Ko, Hyuk Wan; Lee, Hong Jin

    2014-04-30

    In breast cancer, the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induces cell invasion, although the molecular basis of it has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of daidzein in regulating TNF-α induced cell invasion and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Daidzein inhibited TNF-α induced cellular migration and invasion in estrogen receptor (ER) negative MCF10DCIS.com human breast cancer cells. TNF-α activated Hedgehog (Hh) signaling by enhancing Gli1 nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity, which resulted in increased invasiveness; these effects were blocked by daidzein and the Hh signaling inhibitors, cyclopamine and vismodegib. Moreover, these compounds suppressed TNF-α induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 mRNA expression and activity. Taken together, mammary tumor cell invasiveness was stimulated by TNF-α induced activation of Hh signaling; these effects were abrogated by daidzein, which suppressed Gli1 activation, thereby inhibiting migration and invasion.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha mediates changes in tissue protein turnover in a rat cancer cachexia model.

    PubMed Central

    Costelli, P; Carbó, N; Tessitore, L; Bagby, G J; Lopez-Soriano, F J; Argilés, J M; Baccino, F M

    1993-01-01

    Rats bearing the Yoshida AH-130 ascites hepatoma showed enhanced fractional rates of protein degradation in gastrocnemius muscle, heart, and liver, while fractional synthesis rates were similar to those in non-tumor bearing rats. This hypercatabolic pattern was associated with marked perturbations of the hormonal homeostasis and presence of tumor necrosis factor in the circulation. The daily administration of a goat anti-murine TNF IgG to tumor-bearing rats decreased protein degradation rates in skeletal muscle, heart, and liver as compared with tumor-bearing rats receiving a nonimmune goat IgG. The anti-TNF treatment was also effective in attenuating early perturbations in insulin and corticosterone homeostasis. Although these results suggest that tumor necrosis factor plays a significant role in mediating the changes in protein turnover and hormone levels elicited by tumor growth, the inability of such treatment to prevent a reduction in body weight implies that other mediators or tumor-related events were also involved. PMID:8254032

  11. Specific Uptake of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Is Involved in Growth Control of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Magez, Stefan; Geuskens, Maurice; Beschin, Alain; Favero, Herwig del; Verschueren, Hendrik; Lucas, Ralf; Pays, Etienne; Baetselier, Patrick de

    1997-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is lysed by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in a dose-dependent way, involving specific binding of the cytokine to a trypanosomal glycoprotein present in the flagellar pocket of the parasite. TNF-α–gold particles are endocytosed via coated pits and vesicles and are directed towards lysosome-like digestive organelles. The specific uptake of the cytokine by the parasite results in a developmentally regulated loss of osmoregulatory capacity. TNF-α specific lysis is prevented when lysis assays are performed at a temperature <26°C, despite uptake of the cytokine. Inhibition of lysis is also observed when a lysosomotropic agent is added during the first 2 h of incubation. Both monomorphic and pleomorphic trypanosomes are lysed but only when isolated during the peak of parasitaemia. Lysis is not observed with early infection stage parasites or procyclic (insect-specific) forms. Anti– TNF-α treatment of T. brucei-infected mice reveals a dramatic increase in parasitaemia in the blood circulation, the spleen, the lymph nodes, and the peritoneal cavity. These data suggest that in the mammalian host, TNF-α is involved in the growth control of T. brucei. PMID:9151676

  12. Polymorphisms in tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin A in tuberculosis without and with response to treatment.

    PubMed

    García-Elorriaga, Guadalupe; Carrillo-Montes, Guadalupe; Mendoza-Aguilar, Melby; González-Bonilla, César

    2010-08-01

    This study compared the frequency of the genetic polymorphisms of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in pulmonary tuberculosis without and with response to treatment. We carried out an observational, prospective, comparative study. Three groups were studied: healthy subjects, responders, and non-responders to directly observed treatment short-course. We took a peripheral blood sample for identification of polymorphic genotypes TNF -308G/A and lymphotoxin A (LTA) +252G/A by polymerase chain reaction, and their later digestion with the Nco1 restriction enzyme. We studied a total of 138 subjects: 42 (non-responders) and 48 in each of the remaining groups. Healthy subjects had significantly high frequency of the LTA +252A allele compared to groups of patients and could be related with protection from the disease. Patients had higher frequency of the non-polymorphic allele LTA +252G than healthy subjects. With regard to LTA +252G/A genotype, we did find a significant difference with a greater frequency in the group of patients. The LTA +252G/A genotype was associated with impaired response to treatment.

  13. Selection of a Novel and Highly Specific Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα) Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Byla, Povilas; Andersen, Mikkel H.; Holtet, Thor L.; Jacobsen, Helle; Munch, Mette; Gad, Hans Henrik; Thøgersen, Hans Christian; Hartmann, Rune

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) is a favorable way of treating several important diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn disease, and psoriasis. Therefore, an extensive range of TNFα inhibitory proteins, most of them based upon an antibody scaffold, has been developed and used with variable success as therapeutics. We have developed a novel technology platform using C-type lectins as a vehicle for the creation of novel trimeric therapeutic proteins with increased avidity and unique properties as compared with current protein therapeutics. We chose human TNFα as a test target to validate this new technology because of the extensive experience available with protein-based TNFα antagonists. Here, we present a novel and highly specific TNFα antagonist developed using this technology. Furthermore, we have solved the three-dimensional structure of the antagonist-TNFα complex by x-ray crystallography, and this structure is presented here. The structure has given us a unique insight into how the selection procedure works at a molecular level. Surprisingly little change is observed in the C-type lectin-like domain structure outside of the randomized regions, whereas a substantial change is observed within the randomized loops. Thus, the overall integrity of the C-type lectin-like domain is maintained, whereas specificity and binding affinity are changed by the introduction of a number of specific contacts with TNFα. PMID:20179326

  14. In vivo imaging using fluorescent antibodies to tumor necrosis factor predicts therapeutic response in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Raja; Neumann, Helmut; Neufert, Clemens; Waldner, Maximilian J; Billmeier, Ulrike; Zopf, Yurdagül; Willma, Marcus; App, Christine; Münster, Tino; Kessler, Hermann; Maas, Stefanie; Gebhardt, Bernd; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Reuter, Eva; Dörje, Frank; Rau, Tilman T; Uter, Wolfgang; Wang, Thomas D; Kiesslich, Ralf; Vieth, Michael; Hannappel, Ewald; Neurath, Markus F

    2014-03-01

    As antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) suppress immune responses in Crohn's disease by binding to membrane-bound TNF (mTNF), we created a fluorescent antibody for molecular mTNF imaging in this disease. Topical antibody administration in 25 patients with Crohn's disease led to detection of intestinal mTNF(+) immune cells during confocal laser endomicroscopy. Patients with high numbers of mTNF(+) cells showed significantly higher short-term response rates (92%) at week 12 upon subsequent anti-TNF therapy as compared to patients with low amounts of mTNF(+) cells (15%). This clinical response in the former patients was sustained over a follow-up period of 1 year and was associated with mucosal healing observed in follow-up endoscopy. These data indicate that molecular imaging with fluorescent antibodies has the potential to predict therapeutic responses to biological treatment and can be used for personalized medicine in Crohn's disease and autoimmune or inflammatory disorders.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is expressed by glomerular visceral epithelial cells in human membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Neale, T. J.; Rüger, B. M.; Macaulay, H.; Dunbar, P. R.; Hasan, Q.; Bourke, A.; Murray-McIntosh, R. P.; Kitching, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was examined in biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, immunogold electron microscopy, immunoassay in serum and urine, and urinary immunoblot. Striking glomerular capillary wall and visceral glomerular epithelial cell TNF-alpha protein staining was observed in all cases of membranous nephropathy and membranous lupus nephropathy. Staining was less frequently observed in crescentic glomerulonephritis and in isolated cases of other histological subtypes of glomerulonephritis, usually in association with glomerular macrophages. By immunogold electron microscopy TNF-alpha was localized in membranous nephropathy within the visceral glomerular epithelial cells, and also in the glomerular basement membrane, especially in relation to immune deposits. In situ hybridization localized TNF-alpha mRNA exclusively to glomerular epithelial cells in all biopsies with membranous morphology but not in other histological subtypes. Concentrations of TNF-alpha were significantly increased compared with normal controls in the urine of patients with membranous nephropathy and with crescentic glomerulonephritis. The expression of TNF-alpha by glomerular epithelial cells exclusively and universally in biopsies showing a membranous morphology strongly suggests this cytokine has a role in the pathogenesis of membranous nephropathy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7778683

  16. Tumor necrosis factor mediates lung antibacterial host defense in murine Klebsiella pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Laichalk, L L; Kunkel, S L; Strieter, R M; Danforth, J M; Bailie, M B; Standiford, T J

    1996-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a proinflammatory cytokine which has recently been shown to have beneficial effects in the setting of acquired host immunity. However, the role of TNF in innate immune responses, as in the setting of bacterial pneumonia, has been incompletely characterized. To determine the role of TNF in gram-negative bacterial pneumonia, CBA/J mice were challenged with 10(2) CFU of Klebsiella pneumoniae intratracheally, resulting in the time-dependent expression of TNF MRNA and protein within the lung. Passive immunization of animals with a soluble TNF receptor-immunoglobulin (Ig) construct (sTNFR:Fc) intraperitoneally 2 h prior to K. pneumoniae inoculation resulted in a significant reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophils, but not macrophages, at 48 h, as compared with animals receiving control IgG1. Furthermore, treatment with sTNFR:Fc resulted in 19.6- and 13.5-fold increases in K. pneumoniae CFU in lung homogenates and plasma, respectively, as compared with animals receiving control IgG1. Finally, treatment of Klebsiella-infected mice with sTNFR:Fc markedly decreased both short- and long-term survival of these animals. In conclusion, our studies indicate that endogenous TNF is a critical component of antibacterial host defense in murine Klebsiella pneumonia. PMID:8945568

  17. Safety of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy during pregnancy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Androulakis, Ioannis; Zavos, Christos; Christopoulos, Panagiotis; Mastorakos, George; Gazouli, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease has significantly improved since the introduction of biological agents, such as infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, and golimumab. The Food and Drug Administration has classified these factors in category B, which means that they do not demonstrate a fetal risk. However, during pregnancy fetuses are exposed to high anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels that are measurable in their plasma after birth. Since antibodies can transfer through the placenta at the end of the second and during the third trimesters, it is important to know the safety profile of these drugs, particularly for the fetus, and whether maintaining relapse of the disease compensates for the potential risks of fetal exposure. The limited data available for the anti-TNF drugs to date have not demonstrated any significant adverse outcomes in the pregnant women who continued their therapy from conception to the first trimester of gestation. However, data suggest that anti-TNFs should be discontinued during the third trimester, as they may affect the immunological system of the newborn baby. Each decision should be individualized, based on the distinct characteristics of the patient and her disease. Considering all the above, there is a need for more clinical studies regarding the effect of anti-TNF therapeutic agents on pregnancy outcomes. PMID:26715803

  18. Interleukin 10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in Pregnancy: Aspects of Interest in Clinical Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Brogin Moreli, Jusciele; Cirino Ruocco, Ana Maria; Vernini, Joice Monaliza; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the literature regarding the action of the cytokines interleukin 10 (IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in pregnancy and to emphasize the factors that are of interest to clinical obstetrics. The literature highlights several actions of IL-10 and TNF-α during pregnancy. The actions of these cytokines seem to be antagonistic and dependent on the balance between them, which is orchestrated by the specific immunosuppressive action of IL-10. TNF-α has a characteristic inflammatory action, and it is an additional diabetogenic factor in pregnancy. The loss of the control of the production of these cytokines, with increase of TNF-α, is related to the risk for developing obstetric complications, particularly recurrent fetal loss, gestational diabetes mellitus, hypertensive syndromes, and fetal growth restriction. However, study results are controversial and are not clearly defined. These issues are attributed to the heterogeneity of the studies, particularly regarding their sample sizes and sources, the evaluation methods, and the multiplicity of factors and conditions that influence cytokine production. These questions are fundamental and should be addressed in future investigations to obtain more consistent results that can be applied to obstetric practice. PMID:22462002

  19. Interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha values in elk neonates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber-Meyer, S. M.; Johnson, C.R.; Murtaugh, M.P.; Mech, L.D.; White, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Serological indicators of general condition would be helpful for monitoring or assessing ungulate wildlife. Toward that end, we report the 1st reference values for 2 cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-??), in neonatal elk (Cervus elaphus). We obtained blood samples from 140 calves ??? 6 days old in Yellowstone National Park during summer 2003-2005. TL-6 values ranged from 0 to 1.21 pg/ml with a median of 0.03 pg/ml. TNF-?? values ranged from 0 to 225.43 pg/ml with a median of 1.85 pg/ml. IL-6 and TNF-?? concentrations were not significant predictors of elk calf survival through 21 days. Development of ungulate-based IL-6 and TNF-?? assays that provide greater sensitivity than cross-reacting human-based assays could be helpful in monitoring ungulate condition and health status comparisons among herds. Such information could provide indirect assessments of range quality or environmental influences among herds. ?? 2007 American Society of Mammalogists.

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor Gene Polymorphisms in Advanced Non-exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bonyadi, Mohammad Hossein Jabbarpoor; Bonyadi, Morteza; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Fotuhi, Nikoo; Shoeibi, Nasser; Saadat, Saeed; Yagubi, Zakieh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α gene polymorphisms in advanced dry-type age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a population from Northeastern Iran. Methods: In this case-control study, 50 patients with geographic macular atrophy and 73 gender-matched controls were enrolled. Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was extracted from the peripheral blood. Polymerase chain reaction was performed to analyze 2 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in the TNF-α gene, namely −1031 thymine (T)/cytosine (C) and −308 guanine (G)/adenine (A). Results: The distribution of the - 1031 T/C genotype was TT, 62%; TC, 36%; CC, 2% in the patients and TT, 60%; TC, 36%; CC, 4% in the controls (P = 0.94). Genotype analysis of TNF-α −308 also revealed no significant difference in distribution between patients (G, 78%; GA, 22%; AA, 0%) and controls (GG, 74%; GA, 23%; AA, 3%) (P = 0.51). None of the haplotypes nor alleles of studied TNF-α polymorphisms were significantly associated with advanced dry-type AMD. Conclusion: The findings of this study show that polymorphisms in the TNF-α gene, do not play an important role in dry-type AMD in the studied population. PMID:26425318

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy and fetal risk: A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Marchioni, Renée M; Lichtenstein, Gary R

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors (anti-TNFs) are effective in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) recalcitrant to conventional medical therapy. As the peak incidence of IBD overlaps with the prime reproductive years, it is crucial to establish pharmacologic regimens for women of childbearing age that achieve effective disease control without posing significant fetal harm. A systematic literature review was performed to identify all human studies with birth outcomes data after maternal exposure to infliximab, adalimumab, or certolizumab pegol within 3 mo of conception or during any trimester of pregnancy. Live births, spontaneous abortions or stillbirths, preterm or premature births, low birth weight or small for gestational age infants, and congenital abnormalities were recorded. Fifty selected references identified 472 pregnancy exposures. The subsequent review includes general information regarding anti-TNF therapy in pregnancy followed by a summary of our findings. The benefits of biologic modalities in optimizing disease control during pregnancy must be weighed against the potential toxicity of drug exposure on the developing fetus. Although promising overall, there is insufficient evidence to prove absolute safety for use of anti-TNFs during pregnancy given the limitations of available data and lack of controlled trials. PMID:23674866

  2. Induction of release of tumor necrosis factor from human monocytes by staphylococci and staphylococcal peptidoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, C P; Mattsson, E; Martinez-Martinez, L; De Graaf, L; Van Strijp, J A; Verbrugh, H A; Verhoef, J; Fleer, A

    1993-01-01

    The role of cytokines in gram-positive infections is still relatively poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to establish whether or not intact staphylococci and purified peptidoglycans and peptidoglycan components derived from staphylococci are capable of stimulating the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by human monocytes. We show here that intact staphylococci and purified peptidoglycans, isolated from three Staphylococcus epidermidis and three S. aureus strains, were indeed able to induce secretion of TNF by human monocytes in a concentration-dependent fashion. TNF release was detected by both enzyme immunoassay and the L929 fibroblast bioassay. In the enzyme immunoassay, a minimal concentration of peptidoglycan of 1 micrograms/ml was required to detect TNF release by monocytes, whereas in the bioassay a peptidoglycan concentration of 10 micrograms/ml was needed to detect a similar amount of TNF release. Peptidoglycan components such as the stem peptide, tetra- and pentaglycine, and muramyl dipeptide were unable to induce TNF release from human monocytes. PMID:8406805

  3. Inhibition of human erythroid colony-forming units by tumor necrosis factor requires beta interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Means, R T; Krantz, S B

    1993-01-01

    We have previously reported that inhibition of human CFU-erythroid (E) colony formation by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an indirect effect mediated by a soluble factor released from a fraction of marrow accessory cells which are predominantly stromal elements (Means, R. T., Jr., E. N. Dessypris, and S. B. Krantz. 1990. J. Clin. Invest. 86:538-541). Further studies reported here identify a mediator of this effect. The inhibitory effect of recombinant TNF on marrow CFU-E is ablated by neutralizing antibodies to human beta IFN, but not by antibodies to gamma IFN or IL-1. Anti-beta IFN also neutralizes the inhibitory effect of conditioned medium prepared from marrow cells exposed to TNF. Human beta IFN inhibits colony formation by unpurified marrow CFU-E as well as highly purified CFU-E generated from peripheral blood progenitors, and limiting dilution analysis shows that this is a direct inhibitory effect. TNF has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the anemia of chronic diseases since blood TNF levels are elevated in many patients with this syndrome, and since exposure to TNF produces a similar anemia in either humans or mice. The present study demonstrates that beta IFN is a required mediator of this inhibitory effect on erythropoiesis. PMID:8432849

  4. Plasma Levels of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha and Interleukin-6 in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Konuk, N.; Tekın, I. O.; Ozturk, U.; Atik, L.; Atasoy, N.; Bektas, S.; Erdogan, A.

    2007-01-01

    Aim. Recent research implicated place of an immune mechanism in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Despite increasing evidence involvement of cytokine release in OCD, results of the studies are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the plasma levels of the cytokines; tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in OCD patients. Methods. Plasma concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 were measured in 31 drug-free outpatients with OCD, and 31-year age and sex-matched healthy controls. TNF-α and IL-6 concentrations in blood were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results. Both TNF-α and IL-6 levels showed statistically significant increases in OCD patients compared to controls (P < .000, P < .001, resp.). In addition, the age of onset was negatively correlated with TNF-α level (r = −.402, P = .025) and duration of illness was weakly correlated with IL-6 levels (r : .357; P : .048) in patients group. Conclusion. OCD patients showed increases in TNF-α and IL-6 levels compared to the healthy controls. This study provides evidence for alterations in the proinflamatory cytokines which suggest the involvement of the immune system in the pathophysiology of OCD. PMID:17497035

  5. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Superfamily 15 Gene Expression in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Özçimen, Ahmet Ata; Ünal, Selma; Canacankatan, Necmiye; Antmen, Şerife Efsun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between tumor necrosis factor-superfamily 15 (TNFSF15) gene expression and clinical findings in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Materials and Methods: Forty-nine patients with SCD and 38 healthy controls were included in this study. TNFSF15 gene expression and plasma levels were analyzed. TNFSF15 gene expression was compared in subgroups considering the frequency of painful crises and acute chest syndrome (ACS). Results: It was found that TNFSF15 gene expression was significantly higher in patients with SCD than the controls (p=0.001), whereas there was no significant difference between the patients with SCD and the control groups considering plasma levels of TNFSF15. TNFSF15 gene expression was also significantly higher in SCD patients with ACS (p=0.008). Conclusion: These findings suggest that TNFSF15 may have a role in the pathogenesis of SCD presenting with ACS. Further studies on larger groups are needed to determine the function of TNFSF15 in SCD patients with ACS and pulmonary hypertension. Analysis of TNFSF15 expression may also serve as a promising approach in ACS therapy. PMID:25330517

  6. Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha for retinal diseases: current knowledge and future concepts.

    PubMed

    Mirshahi, Alireza; Hoehn, René; Lorenz, Katrin; Kramann, Christina; Baatz, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine produced by macrophages and T-cells. It plays an important role both in inflammation and apoptosis. In the eye, TNF-α appears to have a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory, edematous, neovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. Several TNF-blocking drugs have been developed and approved, and are in clinical use for inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and ankylosing spondylitis. TNF-α blockers are widely used in ophthalmology as an off-label alternative to "traditional" immunosuppressive and immune-modulatory treatments in noninfectious uveitis. Preliminary studies suggest a positive effect of intravenously administered TNF-α blockers, mainly infliximab, for treating refractory diabetic macular edema and neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Unfortunately, much of the current data raises considerable safety concerns for intravitreal use of TNF-α inhibitors, in particular, intraocular inflammatory responses have been reported after intravitreal injection of infliximab. Results of dose-finding studies and humanized antibody or antibody fragments (e.g. adalimumab) are anticipated in the coming years; these will shed light on potential benefits and risks of local and systemic TNF-α blockers used for treatment of diseases of the retina and choroid.

  7. Imbalance of tumor necrosis factor receptors during progression in bovine leukemia virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Konnai, Satoru . E-mail: konnai@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp; Usui, Tatsufumi; Ikeda, Manabu; Kohara, Junko; Hirata, Toh-ichi; Okada, Kosuke; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; Onuma, Misao

    2005-09-01

    Previously, we found an up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-{alpha} and an imbalance of TNF receptors in sheep experimentally infected with bovine leukemia virus (BLV). In order to investigate the different TNF-{alpha}-induced responses, in this study we examined the TNF-{alpha}-induced proliferative response and the expression levels of two distinct TNF receptors on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) derived from BLV-uninfected cattle and BLV-infected cattle that were aleukemic (AL) or had persistent lymphocytosis (PL). The proliferative response of PBMC isolated from those cattle with PL in the presence of recombinant bovine TNF-{alpha} (rTNF-{alpha}) was significantly higher than those from AL cattle and uninfected cattle and the cells from PL cattle expressed significantly higher mRNA levels of TNF receptor type II (TNF-RII) than those from AL and BLV-uninfected cattle. No difference was found in TNF-RI mRNA levels. Most cells expressing TNF-RII in PL cattle were CD5{sup +} or sIgM{sup +} cells and these cells showed resistance to TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis. Additionally, there were significant positive correlations between the changes in provirus load and TNF-RII mRNA levels, and TNF-{alpha}-induced proliferation and TNF-RII mRNA levels. These data suggest that imbalance in the expression of TNF receptors could at least in part contribute to the progression of lymphocytosis in BLV infection.

  8. Retrospective cohort study of anti-tumor necrosis factor agent use in a veteran population.

    PubMed

    Bounthavong, Mark; Madkour, Nermeen; Kazerooni, Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are effective for several immunologic conditions (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn's disease (CD), and psoriasis). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents via chart review. Methods. Single-site, retrospective cohort study that evaluated the efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents in veterans initiated between 2010 and 2011. Primary aim evaluated response at 12 months post-index date. Secondary aims evaluated initial response prior to 12 months post-index date and infection events. Results. A majority of patients were prescribed anti-TNF agents for CD (27%) and RA (24%). Patients were initiated on etanercept (41%), adalimumab (40%), and infliximab (18%) between 2010 and 2011. No differences in patient demographics were reported. Response rates were high overall. Sixty-five percent of etanercept patients, 82% of adalimumab patients, and 59% of infliximab patients were either partial or full responders, respectively. Approximately 16%, 11%, and 12% of etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab were non-responders, respectively. Infections between the groups were non-significant. Etanercept and adalimumab patients had higher but non-significant odds of being a responder relative to infliximab. Conclusions. Most patients initiated with anti-TNF agent were responders at 12 months follow-up for all indications in a veteran population.

  9. Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Ameliorates Joint Disease in Murine Collagen- Induced Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Richard O.; Feldmann, Marc; Maini, Ravinder N.

    1992-10-01

    There is considerable evidence implicating tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This evidence is based not only on the universal presence of TNF-α in arthritic joints accompanied by the upregulation of TNF-α receptors but also on the effects of neutralizing TNF-α in joint cell cultures. Thus, neutralization of TNF-α in vitro results in inhibition of the production of interleukin 1, which like TNF-α, is believed to contribute to joint inflammation and erosion. To determine the validity of this concept in vivo, the effect of administering TNF-neutralizing antibodies to mice with collagen-induced arthritis has been studied. This disease model was chosen because of its many immunological and pathological similarities to human rheumatoid arthritis. TN3-19.12, a hamster IgG1 monoclonal antibody to murine TNF-α/β, was injected i.p. into mice either before the onset of arthritis or after the establishment of clinical disease. Anti-TNF administered prior to disease onset significantly reduced paw swelling and histological severity of arthritis without reducing the incidence of arthritis or the level of circulating anti-type II collagen IgG. More relevant to human disease was the capacity of the antibody to reduce the clinical score, paw swelling, and the histological severity of disease even when injected after the onset of clinical arthritis. These results have implications for possible modes of therapy of human arthritis.

  10. Critical role of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masaki; Ouchi, Hiroshi; Ikegame, Satoshi; Harada, Eiji; Matsumoto, Takemasa; Uchino, Junji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    COPD is a major cause of chronic morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Although tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has a critical role in the development of COPD, the role of different TNF receptors (TNFRs) in pulmonary emphysema has not been resolved. We aimed to clarify the role of TNFRs in the development of pulmonary emphysema. TNF-α transgenic mice, a murine model of COPD in which the mice spontaneously develop emphysema with a large increase in lung volume and pulmonary hypertension, were crossed with either TNFR1-deficient mice or TNFR2-deficient mice. After 6 months, the gross appearance of the lung, lung histology, and pulmonary and cardiac physiology were determined. In addition, the relationship between apoptosis and emphysema was investigated. Pulmonary emphysema-like changes disappeared with deletion of TNFR1. However, slight improvements were attained with deletion of TNFR2. Apoptotic cells in the interstitium of the lung were observed in TNF-α transgenic mice. The apoptotic signals through TNFR1 appear critical for the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. In contrast, the inflammatory process has a less important role for the development of emphysema.

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of tumor necrosis factor-alpha assay for tuberculous pleurisy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Luo, Zhuang; Zhu, Wenye; Khan, Rana Sami Ullah; Ummair, Saeed Ummai; Shi, Shaoqing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy is difficult and traditional methods are not always helpful. Many studies have focused on the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) assay in pleural effusion for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy, but the results remain controversial. This meta-analysis was conducted to determine the overall diagnostic accuracy of TNF-α. Methods: Relevant studies were searched from PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Wangfang, and Weipu. We pooled the published results and computed the accuracy measures, including sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR). Receiver operating characteristic curves (SROC) and the area under the curve (AUC) were used to summarize the overall test performance. Results: Twelve studies with 1022 patients met the inclusion criteria. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.85 (95%CI, 0.81–0.89) and 0.80 (95% CI, 0.77–0.83) respectively. The area under the SROC curve was 0.89. Conclusions: The results of meta-analysis suggested that the TNF-α assay plays a vital role in the diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy, whereas other test results or clinical findings should be interpreted together with the TNF-α assay to improve the overall diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27902616

  12. Molecular mechanism of action of anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies in inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Billmeier, Ulrike; Dieterich, Walburga; Neurath, Markus F; Atreya, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies are successfully used in the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the molecular mechanism of action of these agents is still a matter of debate. Apart from neutralization of TNF, influence on the intestinal barrier function, induction of apoptosis in mucosal immune cells, formation of regulatory macrophages as well as other immune modulating properties have been discussed as central features. Nevertheless, clinically effective anti-TNF antibodies were shown to differ in their mode-of-action in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, the anti-TNF agent etanercept is effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis but failed to induce clinical response in Crohn’s disease patients, suggesting different contributions of TNF in the pathogenesis of these inflammatory diseases. In the following, we will review different aspects regarding the mechanism of action of anti-TNF agents in general and analyze comparatively different effects of each anti-TNF agent such as TNF neutralization, modulation of the immune system, reverse signaling and induction of apoptosis. We discuss the relevance of the membrane-bound form of TNF compared to the soluble form for the immunopathogenesis of IBD. Furthermore, we review reports that could lead to personalized medicine approaches regarding treatment with anti-TNF antibodies in chronic intestinal inflammation, by predicting response to therapy. PMID:27895418

  13. Molecular mechanism of action of anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Billmeier, Ulrike; Dieterich, Walburga; Neurath, Markus F; Atreya, Raja

    2016-11-14

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies are successfully used in the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the molecular mechanism of action of these agents is still a matter of debate. Apart from neutralization of TNF, influence on the intestinal barrier function, induction of apoptosis in mucosal immune cells, formation of regulatory macrophages as well as other immune modulating properties have been discussed as central features. Nevertheless, clinically effective anti-TNF antibodies were shown to differ in their mode-of-action in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, the anti-TNF agent etanercept is effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis but failed to induce clinical response in Crohn's disease patients, suggesting different contributions of TNF in the pathogenesis of these inflammatory diseases. In the following, we will review different aspects regarding the mechanism of action of anti-TNF agents in general and analyze comparatively different effects of each anti-TNF agent such as TNF neutralization, modulation of the immune system, reverse signaling and induction of apoptosis. We discuss the relevance of the membrane-bound form of TNF compared to the soluble form for the immunopathogenesis of IBD. Furthermore, we review reports that could lead to personalized medicine approaches regarding treatment with anti-TNF antibodies in chronic intestinal inflammation, by predicting response to therapy.

  14. Effect of tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors on ambulatory 24-h blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Chagai; Bornstein, Gil; Leibowitz, Avshalom; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Grossman, Ehud

    2017-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors are increasingly being used in inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRD). The risk of cardiovascular disease is elevated in patients with IRD and TNF-α inhibitors reduce this risk. We assessed whether the beneficial effect of TNF-α inhibitors on cardiovascular risk is mediated by blood pressure reduction. We measured blood pressure levels with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurements device in patients with IRD before and 3 months after treatment with TNF-α inhibitors. The study population consisted of 15 subjects (6 men; mean age 45.9 ± 14.1 years). Most patients had either rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis and adalimumab was the most common TNF-α inhibitor used. Mean 24-h systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels remained the same after treatment (121 ± 12/66 ± 7 before and 123 ± 11/67 ± 10 mm Hg after; p = 0.88 and 0.66, respectively). The study demonstrates that TNF-α inhibitors have no effect on blood pressure levels.

  15. Human tumor necrosis factor alpha gene regulation by virus and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Goldfeld, A E; Doyle, C; Maniatis, T

    1990-12-01

    We have identified a region of the human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene promoter that is necessary for maximal constitutive, virus-induced, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced transcription. This region contains three sites that match an NF-kappa B binding-site consensus sequence. We show that these three sites specifically bind NF-kappa B in vitro, yet each of these sites can be deleted from the TNF-alpha promoter with little effect on the induction of the gene by virus or LPS. Moreover, when multimers of these three sites are placed upstream from a truncated TNF-alpha promoter, or a heterologous promoter, an increase in the basal level of transcription is observed that is influenced by sequence context and cell type. However, these multimers are not sufficient for virus or LPS induction of either promoter. Thus, unlike other virus- and LPS-inducible promoters that contain NF-kappa B binding sites, these sites from the TNF-alpha promoter are neither required nor sufficient for virus or LPS induction. Comparison of the sequence requirements of virus induction of the human TNF-alpha gene in mouse L929 and P388D1 cells reveals significant differences, indicating that the sequence requirements for virus induction of the gene are cell type-specific. However, the sequences required for virus and LPS induction of the gene in a single cell type, P388D1, overlap.

  16. Retrospective cohort study of anti-tumor necrosis factor agent use in a veteran population

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Nermeen; Kazerooni, Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are effective for several immunologic conditions (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn’s disease (CD), and psoriasis). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents via chart review. Methods. Single-site, retrospective cohort study that evaluated the efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents in veterans initiated between 2010 and 2011. Primary aim evaluated response at 12 months post-index date. Secondary aims evaluated initial response prior to 12 months post-index date and infection events. Results. A majority of patients were prescribed anti-TNF agents for CD (27%) and RA (24%). Patients were initiated on etanercept (41%), adalimumab (40%), and infliximab (18%) between 2010 and 2011. No differences in patient demographics were reported. Response rates were high overall. Sixty-five percent of etanercept patients, 82% of adalimumab patients, and 59% of infliximab patients were either partial or full responders, respectively. Approximately 16%, 11%, and 12% of etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab were non-responders, respectively. Infections between the groups were non-significant. Etanercept and adalimumab patients had higher but non-significant odds of being a responder relative to infliximab. Conclusions. Most patients initiated with anti-TNF agent were responders at 12 months follow-up for all indications in a veteran population. PMID:24883246

  17. Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} regulates interleukin-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} mRNA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eric; Jakinovich, Paul; Bae, Aekyung; Rebecchi, Mario

    2012-10-01

    Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} (PLC{delta}{sub 1}) is a widely expressed highly active PLC isoform, modulated by Ca{sup 2+} that appears to operate downstream from receptor signaling and has been linked to regulation of cytokine production. Here we investigated whether PLC{delta}{sub 1} modulated expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in rat C6 glioma cells. Expression of PLC{delta}{sub 1} was specifically suppressed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the effects on cytokine mRNA expression, stimulated by the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were examined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results showed that PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown enhanced expression IL-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) mRNA by at least 100 fold after 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA treatment. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knock down caused persistently high Nf{kappa}b levels at 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA-treated cells. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown was also associated with elevated nuclear levels of c-Jun after 30 min of LPS stimulation, but did not affect LPS-stimulated p38 or p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, normally associated with TLR activation of cytokine gene expression; rather, enhanced protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of cellular proteins was observed in the absence of LPS stimulation. An inhibitor of PKC, bisindolylmaleimide II (BIM), reversed phosphorylation, prevented elevation of nuclear c-Jun levels, and inhibited LPS-induced increases of IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} mRNA's induced by PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown. Our results show that loss of PLC{delta}{sub 1} enhances PKC/c-Jun signaling and up-modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcription in concert with the TLR-stimulated p38MAPK/Nf{kappa}b pathway. Our findings are consistent with the idea that PLC{delta}{sub 1} is a

  18. Enterocyte-specific A20 deficiency sensitizes to tumor necrosis factor–induced toxicity and experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Vereecke, Lars; Sze, Mozes; Guire, Conor Mc; Rogiers, Brecht; Chu, Yuanyuan; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Pasparakis, Manolis

    2010-01-01

    A20 is a nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) target gene that encodes a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that is essential for the termination of NF-κB activation after tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or microbial product stimulation and for the prevention of TNF-induced apoptosis. Mice lacking A20 succumb to inflammation in several organs, including the intestine, and A20 mutations have been associated with Crohn’s disease. However, ablation of NF-κB activity, specifically in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), promotes intestinal inflammation. As A20 deficiency sensitizes cells to TNF-induced apoptosis yet also promotes NF-κB activity, it is not clear if A20 deficiency in IECs would exacerbate or ameliorate intestinal inflammation. We generated mice lacking A20 specifically in IECs. These mice did not show spontaneous intestinal inflammation but exhibited increased susceptibility to experimental colitis, and their IECs were hypersensitive to TNF-induced apoptosis. The resulting TNF-driven breakdown of the intestinal barrier permitted commensal bacterial infiltration and led to systemic inflammation. These studies define A20 as a major antiapoptotic protein in the intestinal epithelium and further indicate that defects in A20 might contribute to inflammatory bowel disease in humans. PMID:20530205

  19. Identification of a novel cyclosporin-sensitive element in the human tumor necrosis factor alpha gene promoter

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), a cytokine with pleiotropic biological effects, is produced by a variety of cell types in response to induction by diverse stimuli. In this paper, TNF-alpha mRNA is shown to be highly induced in a murine T cell clone by stimulation with T cell receptor (TCR) ligands or by calcium ionophores alone. Induction is rapid, does not require de novo protein synthesis, and is completely blocked by the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA). We have identified a human TNF-alpha promoter element, kappa 3, which plays a key role in the calcium-mediated inducibility and CsA sensitivity of the gene. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, an oligonucleotide containing kappa 3 forms two DNA protein complexes with proteins that are present in extracts from unstimulated T cells. These complexes appear in nuclear extracts only after T cell stimulation. Induction of the inducible nuclear complexes is rapid, independent of protein synthesis, and blocked by CsA, and thus, exactly parallels the induction of TNF-alpha mRNA by TCR ligands or by calcium ionophore. Our studies indicate that the kappa 3 binding factor resembles the preexisting component of nuclear factor of activated T cells. Thus, the TNF-alpha gene is an immediate early gene in activated T cells and provides a new model system in which to study CsA-sensitive gene induction in activated T cells. PMID:8376940

  20. Electrical remodeling of cardiac myocytes from mice with heart failure due to the overexpression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Petkova-Kirova, Polina S; Gursoy, Erdal; Mehdi, Haider; McTiernan, Charles F; London, Barry; Salama, Guy

    2006-05-01

    Mice that overexpress the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the heart (TNF mice) develop heart failure characterized by atrial and ventricular dilatation, decreased ejection fraction, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, and increased mortality (males > females). Abnormalities in Ca2+ handling, prolonged action potential duration (APD), calcium alternans, and reentrant atrial and ventricular arrhythmias were previously observed with the use of optical mapping of perfused hearts from TNF mice. We therefore tested whether altered voltage-gated outward K+ and/or inward Ca2+ currents contribute to the altered action potential characteristics and the increased vulnerability to arrhythmias. Whole cell voltage-clamp recordings of K+ currents from left ventricular myocytes of TNF mice revealed an approximately 50% decrease in the rapidly activating, rapidly inactivating transient outward K+ current Ito and in the rapidly activating, slowly inactivating delayed rectifier current IK,slow1, an approximately 25% decrease in the rapidly activating, slowly inactivating delayed rectifier current IK,slow2, and no significant change in the steady-state current Iss compared with controls. Peak amplitudes and inactivation kinetics of the L-type Ca2+ current ICa,L were not altered. Western blot analyses revealed a reduction in the proteins underlying Kv4.2, Kv4.3, and Kv1.5. Thus decreased K+ channel expression is largely responsible for the prolonged APD in the TNF mice and may, along with abnormalities in Ca2+ handling, contribute to arrhythmias.

  1. Induction by toxic-shock-syndrome toxin-1 of a circulating tumor necrosis factor-like substance in rabbits and of immunoreactive tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 from human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ikejima, T; Okusawa, S; van der Meer, J W; Dinarello, C A

    1988-11-01

    A shock-like syndrome was induced in rabbits by administering toxic-shock-syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1); tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like activity was detected in sera of rabbits 3.5 h after injection, as measured by cytotoxic effects on the tumorigenic L929 murine fibroblast cell line. Appearance of this activity in sera coincided with onset of significant shock-related hemodynamic changes. TSST-1 stimulated release of TNF-like material from rabbit mononuclear cells in culture. Human mononuclear cells also secreted a cytotoxic substance shown to be TNF by radioimmunoassay. Maximal TNF secretion was higher in human mononuclear cells stimulated with TSST-1 than in those stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Lipopolysaccharide, however, was a more potent inducer of interleukin-1 alpha and interleukin-1 beta from the same cells than was TSST-1. Because TNF and interleukin-1 act synergistically during induction of a shock-like state, these results suggest that part of the TSST-1-induced shock is due to production of interleukin-1 and TNF.

  2. Human C1q Induces Apoptosis in an Ovarian Cancer Cell Line via Tumor Necrosis Factor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Anuvinder; Sultan, Sami H. A.; Murugaiah, Valarmathy; Pathan, Ansar A.; Alhamlan, Fatimah S.; Karteris, Emmanouil; Kishore, Uday

    2016-01-01

    Complement protein C1q is the first recognition subcomponent of the complement classical pathway that plays a vital role in the clearance of immune complexes, pathogens, and apoptotic cells. C1q also has a homeostatic role involving immune and non-immune cells; these functions not necessarily involve complement activation. Recently, C1q has been shown to be expressed locally in the microenvironment of a range of human malignant tumors, where it can promote cancer cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation, without involving complement activation. C1q has been shown to be present in the ascitic fluid formed during ovarian cancers. In this study, we have examined the effects of human C1q and its globular domain on an ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV3. We show that C1q and the recombinant globular head modules induce apoptosis in SKOV3 cells in a time-dependent manner. C1q expression was not detectable in the SKOV3 cells. Exogenous treatment with C1q and globular head modules at the concentration of 10 µg/ml induced apoptosis in approximately 55% cells, as revealed by immunofluorescence microscopy and FACS. The qPCR and caspase analysis suggested that C1q and globular head modules activated tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and upregulated Fas. The genes of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), RICTOR, and RAPTOR survival pathways, which are often overexpressed in majority of the cancers, were significantly downregulated within few hours of the treatment of SKOV3 cells with C1q and globular head modules. In conclusion, C1q, via its globular domain, induced apoptosis in an ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3 via TNF-α induced apoptosis pathway involving upregulation of Bax and Fas. This study highlights a potentially protective role of C1q in certain cancers. PMID:28066412

  3. Isolated rat stomach ECL cells generate prostaglandin E(2) in response to interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and bradykinin.

    PubMed

    Lindström, E; Lerner, U H; Håkanson, R

    2001-03-30

    The ECL cells control parietal cells by releasing histamine in their immediate vicinity. Gastrin and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) stimulate histamine secretion from isolated ECL cells, while somatostatin and galanin inhibit stimulated secretion. Prostaglandin E2 and related prostaglandins likewise suppress ECL-cell histamine secretion. Conceivably, that is how they inhibit acid secretion. In the present study, we examined if prostaglandin E2 can be generated by isolated ECL cells. Rat stomach ECL cells were purified (>90% purity) by counterflow elutriation and gradient centrifugation and cultured for 48 h. ECL cell stimulants (gastrin and PACAP) and inflammatory agents (interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and bradykinin) were tested for their ability to induce prostaglandin E2 accumulation (24-h incubation), measured by radioimmunoassay. Gastrin and PACAP did not affect prostaglandin E2 accumulation but interleukin-1 beta (300 pg/ml), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (10 ng/ml) and bradykinin (1 microM) induced a 2- to 3-fold increase in the amount of prostaglandin E2 accumulated. While the combination of interleukin-1 beta and bradykinin induced a 9-fold increase, the combination interleukin-1 beta+tumor necrosis factor-alpha and bradykinin + tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced additive effects only. The combination of interleukin-1 beta + tumor necrosis factor-alpha + bradykinin did not induce a greater effect than interleukin-1 beta + bradykinin. The effect of interleukin-1 beta + bradykinin was abolished by adding 10 nM hydrocortisone (suppressing phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenase) or 1 microM indomethacin (inhibiting cyclooxygenase). Incubating ECL cells in the presence of interleukin-1 beta+bradykinin for 24 h reduced their ability to secrete histamine in response to gastrin. The inhibitory effect was reversed by 1 microM indomethacin. Also, increasing the concentrations of hydrocortisone in the medium resulted in an

  4. Glutathione regulation of redox-sensitive signals in tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Tsui-Chun; Yeh, Szu Ching; Tsai, Feng-Yuan; Chen, Jein-Wen; Chiang, Huai-Chih

    2007-06-01

    We investigated the regulatory role of glutathione in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction as evaluated by using vascular endothelial adhesion molecule expression and monocyte-endothelial monolayer binding. Since TNF-alpha induces various biological effects on vascular cells, TNF-alpha dosage could be a determinant factor directing vascular cells into different biological fates. Based on the adhesion molecule expression patterns responding to different TNF-alpha concentrations, we adopted the lower TNF-alpha (0.2 ng/ml) to rule out the possible involvement of other TNF-alpha-induced biological effects. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis by l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) resulted in down-regulations of the TNF-alpha-induced adhesion molecule expression and monocyte-endothelial monolayer binding. BSO attenuated the TNF-alpha-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation, however, with no detectable effect on AP-1 and its related mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Deletion of an AP-1 binding site in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) promoter totally abolished its constitutive promoter activity and its responsiveness to TNF-alpha. Inhibition of ERK, JNK, or NF-kappaB attenuates TNF-alpha-induced ICAM-1 promoter activation and monocyte-endothelial monolayer binding. Our study indicates that TNF-alpha induces adhesion molecule expression and monocyte-endothelial monolayer binding mainly via activation of NF-kappaB in a glutathione-sensitive manner. We also demonstrated that intracellular glutathione does not modulate the activation of MAPKs and/or their downstream AP-1 induced by lower TNF-alpha. Although AP-1 activation by the lower TNF-alpha was not detected in our systems, we could not rule out the possible involvement of transiently activated MAPKs/AP-1 in the regulation of TNF-alpha-induced adhesion molecule expression.

  5. Necrosis After Craniospinal Irradiation: Results From a Prospective Series of Children With Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Erin S.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Wu Shengjie; Xiong Xiaoping; Lukose, Renin; Wright, Karen D.; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Broniscer, Alberto; Gajjar, Amar

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Necrosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is a known complication of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in children with medulloblastoma and similar tumors. We reviewed the incidence of necrosis in our prospective treatment series. Patients and Methods: Between 1996 and 2009, 236 children with medulloblastoma (n = 185) or other CNS embryonal tumors (n = 51) received postoperative CSI followed by dose-intense cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and cisplatin. Average risk cases (n = 148) received 23.4 Gy CSI, 36 Gy to the posterior fossa, and 55.8 Gy to the primary; after 2003, the treatment was 23.4 Gy CSI and 55.8 Gy to the primary. All high-risk cases (n = 88) received 36-39.6 Gy CSI and 55.8 Gy primary. The primary site clinical target volume margin was 2 cm (pre-2003) or 1 cm (post-2003). With competing risk of death by any cause, we determined the cumulative incidence of necrosis. Results: With a median follow-up of 52 months (range, 4-163 months), eight cases of necrosis were documented. One death was attributed. The median time to the imaging evidence was 4.8 months and to symptoms 6.0 months. The cumulative incidence at 5 years was 3.7% {+-} 1.3% (n = 236) for the entire cohort and 4.4% {+-} 1.5% (n = 196) for infratentorial tumor location. The mean relative volume of infratentorial brain receiving high-dose irradiation was significantly greater for patients with necrosis than for those without: {>=}50 Gy (92.12% {+-} 4.58% vs 72.89% {+-} 1.96%; P=.0337), {>=}52 Gy (88.95% {+-} 5.50% vs 69.16% {+-} 1.97%; P=.0275), and {>=}54 Gy (82.28% {+-} 7.06% vs 63.37% {+-} 1.96%; P=.0488), respectively. Conclusions: Necrosis in patients with CNS embryonal tumors is uncommon. When competing risks are considered, the incidence is 3.7% at 5 years. The volume of infratentorial brain receiving greater than 50, 52, and 54 Gy, respectively, is predictive for necrosis.

  6. Autophagosomal IkappaB alpha degradation plays a role in the long term control of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activity.

    PubMed

    Colleran, Amy; Ryan, Aideen; O'Gorman, Angela; Mureau, Coralie; Liptrot, Catherine; Dockery, Peter; Fearnhead, Howard; Egan, Laurence J

    2011-07-01

    Transcription factor NF-κB is persistently activated in many chronic inflammatory diseases and cancers. The short term regulation of NF-κB is well understood, but little is known about the mechanisms of its long term activation. We studied the effect of a single application of TNF-α on NF-κB activity for up to 48 h in intestinal epithelial cells. Results show that NF-κB remained persistently activated up to 48 h after TNF-α and that the long term activation of NF-κB was accompanied by a biphasic degradation of IκBα. The first phase of IκBα degradation was proteasome-dependent, but the second was not. Further investigation showed that TNF-α stimulated formation of autophagosomes in intestinal epithelial cells and that IκBα co-localized with autophagosomal vesicles. Pharmacological or genetic blockade of autophagosome formation or the inhibition of lysosomal proteases decreased TNF-α-induced degradation of IκBα and lowered NF-κB target gene expression. Together, these findings indicate a role of autophagy in the control of long term NF-κB activity. Because abnormalities in autophagy have been linked to ineffective innate immunity, we propose that alterations in NF-κB may mediate this effect.

  7. Autophagosomal IκBα Degradation Plays a Role in the Long Term Control of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Colleran, Amy; Ryan, Aideen; O'Gorman, Angela; Mureau, Coralie; Liptrot, Catherine; Dockery, Peter; Fearnhead, Howard; Egan, Laurence J.

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factor NF-κB is persistently activated in many chronic inflammatory diseases and cancers. The short term regulation of NF-κB is well understood, but little is known about the mechanisms of its long term activation. We studied the effect of a single application of TNF-α on NF-κB activity for up to 48 h in intestinal epithelial cells. Results show that NF-κB remained persistently activated up to 48 h after TNF-α and that the long term activation of NF-κB was accompanied by a biphasic degradation of IκBα. The first phase of IκBα degradation was proteasome-dependent, but the second was not. Further investigation showed that TNF-α stimulated formation of autophagosomes in intestinal epithelial cells and that IκBα co-localized with autophagosomal vesicles. Pharmacological or genetic blockade of autophagosome formation or the inhibition of lysosomal proteases decreased TNF-α-induced degradation of IκBα and lowered NF-κB target gene expression. Together, these findings indicate a role of autophagy in the control of long term NF-κB activity. Because abnormalities in autophagy have been linked to ineffective innate immunity, we propose that alterations in NF-κB may mediate this effect. PMID:21454695

  8. Reduction of NO Synthase Expression and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Production in Macrophages by Amphotericin B Lipid Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Larabi, Malika; Legrand, Philippe; Appel, Martine; Gil, Sophie; Lepoivre, Michel; Devissaguet, Jean-Philippe; Puisieux, Francis; Barratt, Gillian

    2001-01-01

    The present study compared the abilities of different lipid carriers of amphotericin B (AMB) to activate murine peritoneal macrophages, as assessed by their capacities to produce nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Although AMB alone did not induce NO production, synergy was observed with gamma interferon but not with lipopolysaccharide. This synergy could not be explained by the mobilization of the nuclear activation factor NF-κB by AMB. On the other hand, AMB induced TNF-α production without a costimulator and no synergy was observed. Anti-TNF-α antibodies did not influence NO production, and an inhibitor of NO synthase did not affect TNF-α production, indicating that the production of one of these effector molecules was independent of that of the other. The incorporation of AMB into lipid carriers reduced NO and TNF-α production with all formulations but more so with liposomes than with lipid complexes. NO production was correlated with the induction of NO synthase II, revealed by Western blotting. The extent of association of AMB with macrophages depended on the formulation, especially on the AMB/lipids ratio: the higher the ratio was, the greater the AMB association with macrophages. However, there was no clear correlation between AMB association with macrophages, whether internalized or bound to the membrane, and immunostimulating effects. These results may explain the reduced toxicities of lipid-based formulations of AMB. PMID:11158754

  9. Effects of leptin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on degranulation and superoxide production of polymorphonuclear neutrophils from Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Soliman, Mohamed; Yamaji, Daisuke; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko; Makondo, Kennedy; Inanami, Osamu; Saito, Masayuki

    2007-02-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic hormone regulating food intake and energy expenditure, has been shown to directly modulate human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) functions or indirectly through the action of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Bovine PMN have considerable different characteristics from human PMN. For example, it does not respond to N-formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-phenylalanine, a well known human PMN activator. In the present study, we tested the effects of leptin and TNF-alpha on superoxide production and degranulation of bovine peripheral PMN, in which both long isoform of leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) and TNF receptor 1 were expressed. Human leptin, human TNF-alpha, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonized zymosan particles (OZP) did not stimulate degranulation responses, while zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) did. Neither leptin nor TNF-alpha enhanced the ZAS-induced degranulation responses. TNF-alpha, PMA, OZP and ZAS increased superoxide production in different magnitudes, whereas leptin did not. TNF-alpha, but not leptin, enhanced OZP- and ZAS-induced superoxide production, possibly, in part due to facilitating translocation of p47(phox), a component of NADPH oxidase. These results indicate that, unlike in human PMN, leptin does not have any direct effect on degranulation and superoxide production in bovine PMN, although TNF-alpha influences superoxide production.

  10. Lysophosphatidic Acid Triggers Apoptosis in HeLa Cells through the Upregulation of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily Member 21

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a naturally occurring bioactive phospholipid, activates G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), leading to regulation of diverse cellular events including cell survival and apoptosis. Despite extensive studies of the signaling pathways that mediate LPA-regulated cell growth and survival, the mechanisms underlying the apoptotic effect of LPA remain largely unclear. In this study, we investigated this issue in HeLa cells. Our data demonstrate that LPA induces apoptosis in HeLa cells at pathologic concentrations with a concomitant upregulation of the expression of TNFRSF21 (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 21), also known as death receptor number 6 (DR6) involved in inflammation. Moreover, treatment of cells with LPA receptor (LPAR) antagonist abolished the DR6 upregulation by LPA. LPA-induced DR6 expression was also abrogated by pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of GPCRs, and by inhibitors of PI3K, PKC, MEK, and ERK. Intriguingly, LPA-induced DR6 expression was specifically blocked by dominant-negative form of PKCδ (PKCδ-DN). LPA-induced DR6 expression was also dramatically inhibited by knockdown of ERK or CREB. These results suggest that activation of the MEK/ERK pathway and the transcription factor CREB mediate LPA-induced DR6 expression. More interestingly, knockdown of DR6 using siRNA approach remarkably attenuated LPA-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our results suggest that LPA-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells is mediated by the upregulation of DR6 expression. PMID:28348459

  11. Stimulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha production in human monocytes by inhibitors of protein phosphatase 1 and 2A

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, has been shown to stimulate many cellular functions by increasing the phosphorylation state of phosphoproteins. In human monocytes, okadaic acid by itself stimulates tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA accumulation and TNF-alpha synthesis. Calyculin A, a more potent inhibitor of phosphatase 1, has similar effects. TNF-alpha mRNA accumulation in okadaic acid-treated monocytes is due to increased TNF- alpha mRNA stability and transcription rate. The increase in TNF-alpha mRNA stability is more remarkable in okadaic acid-treated monocytes than the mRNA stability of other cytokines, such as interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, and IL-6. Gel retardation studies show the stimulation of AP-1, AP-2, and NF-kappa B binding activities in okadaic acid-stimulated monocytes. This increase may correlate with the increase in TNF-alpha mRNA transcription rate. In addition to the stimulation of TNF-alpha secretion by monocytes, okadaic acid appears to modulate TNF-alpha precursor processing, as indicated by a marked increase in the cell-associated 26-kD precursor. These results suggest that active basal phosphorylation/dephosphorylation occurs in monocytes, and that protein phosphatase 1 or 2A is important in regulating TNF-alpha gene transcription, translation, and posttranslational modification. PMID:1324971

  12. Different presentations in patients with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome mutations: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Celebi-Tayfur, Aslı; Bilginer, Yelda; Finetti, Martina; Gattorno, Marco; Ozen, Seza

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder caused by mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene encoding the 55-kDa receptor for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. It is characterized by recurrent prolonged episodes of fever accompanied by abdominal pain, pleuritis, migratory skin rashes, fasciitis, headache, conjunctivitis, and periorbital edema. We report two children, one with a severe mutation in the TNFRSF1A gene causing the typical phenotype. The second patient had a homozygous R92Q-type mutation and displayed a periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome-like phenotype. In the eastern Mediterranean region, TRAPS is probably underdiagnosed because of the overwhelming frequency of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). However, TRAPS should be sought for in patients with atypical symptoms for FMF.

  13. Lavage of Leukotriene B4 Induces Lung Generation of Tumor Necrosis Factor-A and Neutrophil Diapedesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    iTlHIMTiTi METHODS Animal Preparation Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats ( Charles River Lab, Wilmington, MA) (n=114) weighing approximately 500 g were...airways. Rabbit Serum: Sterile normal rabbit preimmune serum (IP:001 Genzyme) was diluted and given in the same volume as IP:400. Endotoxin content of IP...interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-a of endotoxin versus leukoctye chemoat- tractants. Am J Pathol 1989; 135:227-237. 23. Carlos TM, Harlan JM

  14. Protective Effect of Infliximab, a Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alfa Inhibitor, on Bleomycin-Induced Lung Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Nejat; Erboga, Mustafa; Aktas, Cevat; Bilir, Bulent; Aydin, Murat; Sengul, Aysun; Ates, Zehra; Topcu, Birol; Gurel, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to investigate the preventive effect of Infliximab (IFX), a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitor, on bleomycin (BLC)-induced lung fibrosis in rats. Rats were assigned into four groups as follows: I-BLC group, a single intra-tracheal BLC (2.5 mg/kg) was installed; II-control group, a single intra-tracheal saline was installed; III-IFX + BLC group, a single-dose IFX (7 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), 72 h before the intra-tracheal BLC installation; IV-IFX group, IFX (7 mg/kg) was administered alone i.p. on the same day with IFX + BLC group. All animals were sacrificed on the 14th day of BLC installation. Levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, interleukin (IL)-6, periostin, YKL-40, nitric oxide (NO) in rat serum were measured, as well as, myeloperoxidase (MPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, and reduced glutathione (GSH), hydroxyproline, malondialdehyde (MDA) content in lung homogenates. Lung tissues were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) for quantitative histological evaluation. The inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and cell apoptosis in the lung tissues were determined quantitatively by immunohistochemical staining (INOS) and by TUNNEL staining, respectively. BLC installation worsened antioxidant status (such as SOD, CAT, GPx, GSH, MPO), while it increased the serum TNF-α, TGF-β, IL-6, periostin, YKL-40, and lipid peroxidation, and collagen deposition, measured by MDA and hydroxyproline, respectively. IFX pretreatment improved antioxidant status as well as BLC-induced lung pathological changes, while it decreased the TNF-α, TGF-β, IL-6, periostin, YKL-40, lipid peroxidation and collagen deposition. Finally, histological, immunohistochemical, and TUNNEL evidence also supported the ability of IFX to prevent BLC-induced lung fibrosis. The results of the present study indicate that IFX pretreatment can attenuate

  15. Association of tumor necrosis factor-α gene G-308A polymorphism with dilated cardiomyopathy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rong; Li, Xiaoping; Fan, Xiongwei; Yuan, Wuzhou; Wu, Xiushan

    2013-03-01

    Published data on the association between tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) G-308A gene polymorphism and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) risk are inconclusive. To clarify the association of TNF-α G-308A gene polymorphism and DCM, a meta-analysis of case-control studies was performed. Some databases, such as PubMed and Embase, were searched to indentify related studies. Search terms included dilated cardiomyopathy, tumor necrosis factor-alpha or TNF-α or TNF alpha or tumor necrosis factor alpha, and polymorphism or mutation. Eight case-control studies involving 1487 DCM cases and 1734 normal controls were included in the meta-analysis to assess the purported association between the TNF-α G-308A gene polymorphism and the risk of DCM. A dominant genetic model was used and the comparison of GA/AA genotype versus GG genotype was performed in the present meta-analysis. The odds ratio was 1.42 (95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.93, P=0.02), manifesting frequency of the TNF-α-308 GA/AA genotype was higher in DCM patients than the control group. TNF-α G-308A nucleotide transition might be associated with the risk of DCM.

  16. Genetic variability in the tumor necrosis factor-lymphotoxin region influences susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, B.; Waldron-Lynch, F.; Adams, C.; O`Gara, F.

    1996-09-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class H1 tumor necrosis factor-tymphotoxin (TNF-LT) region (6p21.3) was investigated as a possible susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Inheritance of five TNF microsatellite markers was determined in 50 multiplex families. Overall, 47 different haplotypes were observed. One of these, the TNF a6, b5, c1, d3, e3 (H1) haplotype, was present in 35.3% of affected, but in only 20.5% of unaffected, individuals (P < .005). This haplotype accounted for 21.5% of the parental haplotypes transmitted to affected offspring and only 7.3 % not transmitted to affected offspring (P = .0003). The TNF a6 and TNF c1 alleles were individually associated with RA (P = .0005 and .0008, respectively), as were the HLA-DRB1 {open_quotes}shared epitope{close_quotes} (SE) (P = .0001) and HLA-DRB1*0401 (P = .0018). Both univariate and bivariate conditional logistic regression analysis showed significant effects of TNF c1 and SE in increasing risk to RA (P < .001). Stratification by the presence of SE indicated an independent effect of the TNFc1 allele (P = .0003) and the HLA A1, BS, DR3 extended haplotype (always TNFa2, b3, c1, d1, e3) (P = .0027) in SE heterozygotes, while the H1 haplotype was associated with RA in SE homozygotes (P = .0018). The TNF-LT region appears to influence susceptibility to RA, distinct from HLA-DR. 50 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in zebrafish retinal neurogenesis and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xu-Dan; Sun, Yan; Cai, Shi-Jiao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Cui, Jian-Lin; Li, Yu-Hao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in zebrafish retinal development and myelination. METHODS Morpholino oligonucleotides (MO), which are complementary to the translation start site of the wild-type embryonic zebrafish TNF-α mRNA sequence, were synthesized and injected into one- to four-cell embryos. The translation blocking specificity was verified by Western blotting using an anti-TNF-α antibody, whole-mount in situ hybridization using a hepatocyte-specific mRNA probe ceruloplasmin (cp), and co-injection of TNF-α MO and TNF-α mRNA. An atonal homolog 7 (atoh7) mRNA probe was used to detect neurogenesis onset. The retinal neurodifferentiation was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using antibodies Zn12, Zpr1, and Zpr3 to label ganglion cells, cones, and rods, respectively. Myelin basic protein (mbp) was used as a marker to track and observe the myelination using whole-mount in situ hybridization. RESULTS Targeted knockdown of TNF-α resulted in specific suppression of TNF-α expression and a severely underdeveloped liver. The co-injection of TNF-α MO and mRNA rescued the liver development. Retinal neurogenesis in TNF-α morphants was initiated on time. The retina was fully laminated, while ganglion cells, cones, and rods were well differentiated at 72 hours post-fertilization (hpf). mbp was expressed in Schwann cells in the lateral line nerves and cranial nerves from 3 days post-fertilization (dpf) as well as in oligodendrocytes linearly along the hindbrain bundles and the spinal cord from 4 dpf, which closely resembled its endogenous profile. CONCLUSION TNF-α is not an essential regulator for retinal neurogenesis and optic myelination. PMID:27366683

  18. Regulatory mechanisms underlying sepsis progression in patients with tumor necrosis factor-α genetic variations

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YANGZHOU; HAN, NING; LI, QINCHUAN; LI, ZENGCHUN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the regulatory mechanisms underlying sepsis progression in patients with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α genetic variations. The GSE5760 expression profile data, which was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, contained 30 wild-type (WT) and 28 mutation (MUT) samples. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two types of samples were identified using the Student's t-test, and the corresponding microRNAs (miRNAs) were screened using WebGestalt software. An integrated miRNA-DEG network was constructed using the Cytoscape software, based on the interactions between the DEGs, as identified using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins database, and the correlation between miRNAs and their target genes. Furthermore, Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses were conducted for the DEGs using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery and the KEGG Orthology Based Annotation System, respectively. A total of 390 DEGS between the WT and MUT samples, along with 11 -associated miRNAs, were identified. The integrated miRNA-DEG network consisted of 38 DEGs and 11 miRNAs. Within this network, COPS2 was found to be associated with transcriptional functions, while FUS was found to be involved in mRNA metabolic processes. Other DEGs, including FBXW7 and CUL3, were enriched in the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway. In addition, miR-15 was predicted to target COPS2 and CUL3. The results of the present study suggested that COPS2, FUS, FBXW7 and CUL3 may be associated with sepsis in patients with TNF-α genetic variations. In the progression of sepsis, FBXW7 and CUL3 may participate in the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway, whereas COPS2 may regulate the phosphorylation and ubiquitination of the FUS protein. Furthermore, COPS2 and CUL3 may be novel targets of miR-15. PMID:27347057

  19. Comparison of drug survival rates for tumor necrosis factor antagonists in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Santana, Virginia; González-Sarmiento, E; Calleja-Hernández, MA; Sánchez-Sánchez, T

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistence of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an overall marker of treatment success. Objective To assess the survival of anti-TNF treatment and to define the potential predictors of drug discontinuation in RA, in order to verify the adequacy of current practices. Design An observational, descriptive, longitudinal, retrospective study. Setting The Hospital Clínico Universitario de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain. Patients RA patients treated with anti-TNF therapy between January 2011 and January 2012. Measurements Demographic information and therapy assessments were gathered from medical and pharmaceutical records. Data is expressed as means (standard deviations) for quantitative variables and frequency distribution for qualitative variables. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis was used to assess persistence, and Cox multivariate regression models were used to assess potential predictors of treatment discontinuation. Results In total, 126 treatment series with infliximab (n = 53), etanercept (n = 51) or adalimumab (n = 22) were administered to 91 patients. Infliximab has mostly been used as a first-line treatment, but it was the drug with the shortest time until a change of treatment. Significant predictors of drug survival were: age; the anti-TNF agent; and the previous response to an anti-TNF drug. Limitation The small sample size. Conclusion The overall efficacy of anti-TNF drugs diminishes with time, with infliximab having the shortest time until a change of treatment. The management of biologic therapy in patients with RA should be reconsidered in order to achieve disease control with a reduction in costs. PMID:24023512

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α is Inversely Related to Free Thyroxine in Euthyroid Subjects Without Diabetes.

    PubMed

    van Tienhoven-Wind, L J N; Dullaart, R P F

    2017-02-01

    Lower thyroid functional status within the euthyroid range may confer increased atherosclerosis susceptibility, as evidenced by increased intima media thickness and coronary artery calcification. Associations of lower thyroid functional status with pro-atherogenic (inflammatory) biomarkers may also extend into the euthyroid range. Here we established relationships of plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (free T4) in euthyroid subjects with and without Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Fasting TSH, free T4, and TNF-α were measured in 81 nondiabetic subjects and in 73 T2DM subjects with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; insulin using subjects were excluded) with TSH and free T4 levels each within the institutional reference ranges. TSH was similar and free T4 was slightly higher in T2DM (p<0.016). Plasma TNF-α was increased in T2DM (p=0.007). In nondiabetic subjects, TNF-α was correlated inversely with free T4 (r=-0.254, p=0.022), whereas such a relationship was absent in T2DM subjects (r=0.058, p=0.63). Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that in nondiabetic subjects TNF-α remained inversely associated with free T4 after adjustment for age and sex (β=-0.243, p=0.032) and additionally for thyroid autoantibodies (β=-0.251, p=0.027), contrasting the lack of relationship in T2DM subjects (interaction: p=0.053). In T2DM subjects, TNF-α was also unrelated to free T4 taking account of possible confounders, as well as after exclusion of subjects using metformin or antihypertensive medication. In conclusion, higher levels of TNF-α relate to lower free T4. Low-normal thyroid function could influence pro-inflammatory pathways. This relationship appears to be disturbed in T2DM.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha release during systemic reaction in cold urticaria.

    PubMed

    Tillie-Leblond, I; Gosset, P; Janin, A; Dalenne, R; Joseph, M; Wallaert, B; Tonnel, A B

    1994-02-01

    Primary cold urticaria (PCU) characterized by the association of urticaria, angioedema, and sometimes a shock-like reaction after cold exposure, is usually considered to be linked with histamine and prostaglandin D2 release by mast cells. To determine the involvement of cytokines, we studied the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in the blood of the efferent vein after immersion of the hand in chilled water. Five patients with PCU were compared with a control population (three patients with nonphysical urticaria and three healthy subjects). Among patients with PCU who underwent the cold immersion test, two exhibited a shock-like reaction with a large urticarial plaque (patients 1 and 2), one had only a mild cutaneous reaction, and two had no reaction. Patient 1 was reevaluated after 6 months of treatment with H1 and H2 antihistamines: he did not respond to this challenge. All controls were strictly negative. Histamine was released within the first minute after the challenge in the three patients with PCU, but at a higher level for the two patients who had a systemic reaction. TNF-alpha was undetectable in the blood of the patient with only a mild cutaneous reaction, whereas TNF-alpha release was observed for the two patients with a systemic reaction, 2 and 6 minutes after the end of the cold immersion test. The two other patients and the control subjects released neither histamine nor TNF-alpha. In parallel, pathologic and immunohistochemical (with a rabbit anti-TNF-alpha antibody) studies were performed on skin biopsy specimens collected 10 minutes after ice-cube test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. The effect of diet on tumor necrosis factor stimulation of hepatic lipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, K.R.; Soued, M.; Serio, M.K.; Adi, S.; Moser, A.H.; Grunfeld, C. )

    1990-06-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) on serum lipid levels and hepatic lipid synthesis in animals whose diets and feeding conditions were varied to induce changes in baseline serum lipid levels and/or rates of hepatic lipid synthesis. In animals studied at both the nadir and peak of the diurnal cycle of hepatic lipid synthesis, TNF acutely increases serum triglyceride levels, stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids found in the serum. Similarly, in animals ingesting either high-sucrose or cholesterol-enriched diets, TNF induces the characteristic rapid increase in serum triglyceride levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. In animals fed a diet high in triglycerides, using either corn oil or lard, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids in the serum, but serum triglyceride levels do not change. However, TNF inhibits gastric emptying, which results in a marked decrease in fat absorption in TNF-treated animals. It is likely that a decrease in the dietary contribution to serum triglyceride levels during high-triglyceride feeding counterbalances the increased hepatic contribution induced by TNF treatment. In animals fasted before TNF administration there was no acute change in either serum lipid levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, or the quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. Thus, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases serum triglyceride levels under many diverse dietary conditions, suggesting that there is a strong linkage between the immune system and lipid metabolism that is independent of most dietary manipulations and may be of fundamental importance in the body's response to infection.

  3. Impact of Dose Tapering of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor on Radiographic Progression in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Won; Kwon, Hyun Mi; Park, Jin Kyun; Choi, Ja-Young; Lee, Eun Bong; Song, Yeong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of dose reduction of tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) on radiographic progression in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods One hundred and sixty-five patients treated with etanercept or adalimumab were selected from a consecutive single-center observational cohort based on the availability of radiographs at baseline and after two- and/or four-years of follow up. Radiographs were assessed by two blinded readers using the modified Stokes AS Spinal Score (mSASSS). Radiographic progression in patients treated with standard-dose TNFi (standard-dose group, n = 49) was compared with patients whose dosage was tapered during the treatment (tapering group, n = 116) using linear mixed models. Results Baseline characteristics between two groups were comparable except for higher BASDAI (7.1 vs. 6.3, p = 0.003) in the standard-dose group. At two years after the treatment, mean dose quotient (S.D.) of the tapering group was 0.59 (0.17). During follow up, rate of radiographic progression in overall patients was 0.90 mSASSS units/year. Radiographic progression over time between the two groups was similar at the entire group level. However, in the subgroup of patients with baseline syndesmophytes, progression occurred significantly faster in the tapering group after the adjustment for baseline status (1.23 vs. 1.72 mSASSS units/year, p = 0.023). Results were consistent when radiographic progression was assessed by the number of newly developed syndesmophytes (0.52 vs. 0.73/year, p = 0.047). Sensitivity analysis after multiple imputation of missing radiographs also showed similar results. Conclusion A dose tapering strategy of TNFi is associated with more rapid radiographic progression in AS patients who have syndesmophytes at baseline. PMID:28033420

  4. Tumor necrosis factor beta and ultraviolet radiation are potent regulators of human keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Krutmann, J.; Koeck, A.S.; Schauer, E.; Parlow, F.; Moeller, A.K.; Kapp, A.; Foerster, E.S.; Schoepf, E.L.; Luger, T.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions as a ligand of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), as well as a receptor for human picorna virus, and its regulation thus affects various immunologic and inflammatory reactions. The weak, constitutive ICAM-1 expression on human keratinocytes (KC) can be up-regulated by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In order to further examine the regulation of KC ICAM-1 expression, normal human KC or epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB) were incubated with different cytokines and/or exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Subsequently, ICAM-1 expression was monitored cytofluorometrically using a monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Stimulation of cells with recombinant human (rh) interleukin (IL) 1 alpha, rhIL-4, rhIL-5, rhIL-6, rh granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rh interferon alpha (rhIFN alpha), and rh transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) did not increase ICAM-1 surface expression. In contrast, rhTNF beta significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the combination of rhTNF beta with rhIFN gamma increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive KC synergistically. This stimulatory effect of rhTNF beta was further confirmed by the demonstration that rhTNF beta was capable of markedly enhancing ICAM-1 mRNA expression in KC. Finally, exposure of KC in vitro to sublethal doses of UV radiation (0-100 J/m2) prior to cytokine (rhIFN tau, rhTNF alpha, rhTNF beta) stimulation inhibited ICAM-1 up-regulation in a dose-dependent fashion. These studies identify TNF beta and UV light as potent regulators of KC ICAM-1 expression, which may influence both attachment and detachment of leukocytes and possibly viruses to KC.

  5. Polymer-functionalized silica nanosphere labels for ultrasensitive detection of tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liang; Hua, Xin; Wu, Yafeng; Pan, Xiaohu; Liu, Songqin

    2011-09-01

    A signal amplification strategy for sensitive detection of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) using quantum dots (QDs)-polymer-functionalized silica nanosphere as the label was proposed. In this approach, silica nanospheres with good monodispersity and uniform structure were employed as carriers for surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate, which is readily available functional monomer that possessing easily transformable epoxy groups for subsequent CdTe QDs binding through ring-open reaction. Then, human anti rabbit TNF-α antibody (anti-TNF-α, Ab2, served as a model protein) was bonded to CdTe QDs-modified silica nanospheres coated with polymer to obtain QDs-polymer-functionalized silica nanosphere labels (Si/PGMA/QD/Ab2). The Si/PGMA/QD/Ab2 labels were attached onto a gold electrode surface through a subsequent "sandwich" immunoreaction. This reaction was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopic images. Enhanced sensitivity could be achieved by an increase of CdTe QD loading per immunoassay event, because of a large number of surface functional epoxy groups offered by the PGMA. As a result, the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) and square-wave voltammetry (SWV) measurements showed 10.0- and 5.5-fold increases in detection signals, respectively, in comparison with the unamplified method. The detection limits of 7.0 pg mL(-1) and 3.0 pg mL(-1) for TNF-α antibodies by ECL and SWV measurements, respectively, were achieved. The proposed strategy successfully demonstrated a simple, reproducible, specific, and potent method that can be expanded to detect other proteins and DNA.

  6. Complicated Whipple’s disease and endocarditis following tumor necrosis factor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To test whether treatment with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFI) is associated with complications of Tropheryma whipplei (T. whipplei) infection. METHODS: Because unexplained arthritis is often the first Whipple’s disease (WD) symptom, patients may undergo treatment with TNFI before diagnosis. This may influence the course of infection with T. whipplei, which causes WD, because host immune defects contribute to the pathogenesis of WD. A literature search and cross referencing identified 19 reports of TNFI treatment prior to WD diagnosis. This case-control study compared clinical data in patients receiving TNFI therapy (group I, n = 41) with patients not receiving TNFI therapy (group II, n = 61). Patients from large reviews served as controls (group III, n = 1059). RESULTS: The rate of endocarditis in patient group I was significantly higher than in patient group II (12.2% in group I vs 1.6% in group II, P < 0.05), and group III (12.2% in group I vs 0.16% in group III, P < 0.01). Other, severe systemic or local WD complications such as pericarditis, fever or specific organ manifestations were increased also in group I as compared to the other patient groups. However, diarrhea and weight loss were somewhat less frequent in patient group I. WD is typically diagnosed with duodenal biopsy and periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining. PAS-stain as standard diagnostic test had a very high percentage of false negative results (diagnostic failure in 63.6% of cases) in group I. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for T. whipplei was more accurate than PAS-stainings (diagnostic accuracy, rate of true positive tests 90.9% for PCR vs 36.4% for PAS, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: TNFI trigger severe WD complications, particularly endocarditis, and lead to false-negative PAS-tests. In case of TNFI treatment failure, infection with T. whipplei should be considered. PMID:25548618

  7. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  8. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina C; Tavares, Luciana P; Vago, Juliana P; Batista, Nathália V; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Vieira, Angelica T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Sousa, Lirlândia P; van de Loo, Fons A J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Amaral, Flávio A; Ferreira, Adaliene V M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines.

  9. Dynamic equilibrium unfolding pathway of human tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced by guanidine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y R; Hahn, J S; Hong, H; Jeong, W; Song, N W; Shin, H C; Kim, D

    1999-01-11

    The dynamic equilibrium unfolding pathway of human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) during denaturation at different guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) concentrations (0-4.2 M) was investigated by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, potassium iodide (KI) fluorescence quenching, far-UV circular dichroism (CD), picosecond time-resolved fluorescence lifetime, and anisotropy decay measurements. We utilized the intrinsic fluorescence of Trp-28 and Trp-114 to characterize the conformational changes involved in the equilibrium unfolding pathway. The detailed unfolding pathway under equilibrium conditions was discussed with respect to motional dynamics and partially folded structures. At 0-0.9 M [GdnHCl], the rotational correlation times of 22-25 ns were obtained from fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements and assigned to those of trimeric states by hydrodynamic calculation. In this range, the solvent accessibility of Trp residues increased with increasing [GdnHCl], suggesting the slight expansion of the trimeric structure. At 1.2-2.1 M [GdnHCl], the enhanced solvent accessibility and the rotational degree of freedom of Trp residues were observed, implying the loosening of the internal structure. In this [GdnHCl] region, TNF-alpha was thought to be in soluble aggregates having distinct conformational characteristics from a native (N) or fully unfolded state (U). At 4.2 M [GdnHCl], TNF-alpha unfolded to a U-state. From these results, the equilibrium unfolding pathway of TNF-alpha, trimeric and all beta-sheet protein, could not be viewed from the simple two state model (N-->U).

  10. Skin manifestations in tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS).

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, Rebecca; Vogt, Thomas; Reichrath, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disease that belongs to the group of hereditary fever syndromes, that are also named hereditary auto-inflammatory syndromes. TRAPS is characterized by a variety of naturally occurring mutations in a TNF receptor (TNFR), that affect the soluble TNFRSF1A gene in the 12p13 region. In some patients, the pathogenesis of TRAPS involves defective TNFRSF1A shedding from cell membranes in response to varying stimuli. TRAPS is characterized by the periodic occurrence of a broad variety of different clinical symptoms that represent an acute-phase response, including fever and pain in the joints, abdomen, muscles, skin or eyes, with broad variations across patients. In many cases, skin involvement is present that may include migratory patches, skin rashes, erysepela-like erythema, edematous plaques, urticaria, periorbital edema and/or conjunctivitis. The histology of skin lesions in TRAPS is nonspecific, in general a perivascular dermal infiltrate of lymphocytes and monocytes can be found. Cutaneous findings are of particular importance in TRAPS: they have been shown to give direction to the diagnosis of TRAPS and in most cases their treatment is challenging. As the incidence of TRAPS is very low, no prospective randomized controlled trials and only a few studies with case numbers up to twenty-five patients have been published. No guidelines for TRAPS treatment have been established so far. This review summarizes our present knowledge about pathogenesis, clinical outcome and treatment options of skin manifestations in TRAPS.

  11. A point mutation in NEMO associated with anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency pathology results in destabilization of the oligomer and reduces lipopolysaccharide- and tumor necrosis factor-mediated NF-kappa B activation.

    PubMed

    Vinolo, Emilie; Sebban, Hélène; Chaffotte, Alain; Israël, Alain; Courtois, Gilles; Véron, Michel; Agou, Fabrice

    2006-03-10

    The NEMO (NF-kappaB essential modulator) protein plays a crucial role in the canonical NF-kappaB pathway as the regulatory component of the IKK (IkappaB kinase) complex. The human disease anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency (EDA-ID) has been recently linked to mutations in NEMO. We investigated the effect of an alanine to glycine substitution found in the NEMO polypeptide of an EDA-ID patient. This pathogenic mutation is located within the minimal oligomerization domain of the protein, which is required for the IKK activation in response to diverse stimuli. The mutation does not dramatically change the native-like state of the trimer, but temperature-induced unfolding studied by circular dichroism showed that it leads to an important loss in the oligomer stability. Furthermore, fluorescence studies showed that the tyrosine located in the adjacent zinc finger domain, which is possibly required for NEMO ubiquitination, exhibits an alteration in its spectral properties. This is probably due to a conformational change of this domain, providing evidence for a close interaction between the oligomerization domain and the zinc finger. In addition, functional complementation assays using NEMO-deficient pre-B and T lymphocytes showed that the pathogenic mutation reduced TNF-alpha and LPS-induced NF-kappaB activation by altering the assembly of the IKK complex. Altogether, our findings provide understanding as to how a single point mutation in NEMO leads to the observed EDA-ID phenotype in relation to the NEMO-dependent mechanism of IKK activation.

  12. Palmitate induces tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells by a mechanism involving protein kinase C and nuclear factor-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mireia; Planavila, Anna; Sánchez, Rosa M; Merlos, Manuel; Laguna, Juan Carlos; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for increased expression of TNF-alpha in skeletal muscle cells in diabetic states are not well understood. We examined the effects of the saturated acid palmitate on TNF-alpha expression. Exposure of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells to 0.75 mm palmitate enhanced mRNA (25-fold induction, P < 0.001) and protein (2.5-fold induction) expression of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha. This induction was inversely correlated with a fall in GLUT4 mRNA levels (57% reduction, P < 0.001) and glucose uptake (34% reduction, P < 0.001). PD98059 and U0126, inhibitors of the ERK-MAPK cascade, partially prevented the palmitate-induced TNF-alpha expression. Palmitate increased nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation and incubation of the cells with the NF-kappaB inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and parthenolide partially prevented TNF-alpha expression. Incubation of palmitate-treated cells with calphostin C, a strong and specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), abolished palmitate-induced TNF-alpha expression, and restored GLUT4 mRNA levels. Palmitate treatment enhanced the expression of phospho-PKCtheta, suggesting that this PKC isoform was involved in the changes reported, and coincubation of palmitate-treated cells with the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine prevented the palmitate-induced reduction in the expression of IkappaBalpha and insulin-stimulated Akt activation. These findings suggest that enhanced TNF-alpha expression and GLUT4 down-regulation caused by palmitate are mediated through the PKC activation, confirming that this enzyme may be a target for either the prevention or the treatment of fatty acid-induced insulin resistance.

  13. Cinnamaldehyde inhibits the tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in endothelial cells by suppressing NF-kappaB activation: effects upon IkappaB and Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Liao, Being-Chyuan; Hsieh, Chia-Wen; Liu, Yen-Chin; Tzeng, Tsai-Teng; Sun, Yung-Wei; Wung, Being-Sun

    2008-06-01

    The production of adhesion molecules and subsequent attachment of leukocytes to endothelial cells (ECs) are critical early events in atherogenesis. These adhesion molecules thus play an important role in the development of this disease. Recent studies have highlighted the chemoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of cinnamaldehyde, a Cinnamomum cassia Presl-specific diterpene. In our current study, we have examined the effects of both cinnamaldehyde and extracts of C. cassia on cytokine-induced monocyte/human endothelial cell interactions. We find that these compounds inhibit the adhesion of TNFalpha-induced monocytes to endothelial cells and suppress the expression of the cell adhesion molecules, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, at the transcriptional level. Moreover, in TNFalpha-treated ECs, the principal downstream signal of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, NF-kappaB, was also found to be abolished in a time-dependent manner. Interestingly, cinnamaldehyde exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by blocking the degradation of the inhibitory protein IkappaB-alpha, but only in short term pretreatments, whereas it does so via the induction of Nrf2-related genes, including heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1), over long term pretreatments. Treating ECs with zinc protoporphyrin, a HO-1 inhibitor, partially blocks the anti-inflammatory effects of cinnamaldehyde. Elevated HO-1 protein levels were associated with the inhibition of TNFalpha-induced ICAM-1 expression. In addition to HO-1, we also found that cinnamaldehyde can upregulate Nrf2 in nuclear extracts, and can increase ARE-luciferase activity and upregulate thioredoxin reductase-1, another Nrf2-related gene. Moreover, cinnamaldehyde exposure rapidly reduces the cellular GSH levels in ECs over short term treatments but increases these levels after 9 h exposure. Hence, our present findings indicate that cinnamaldehyde suppresses TNF-induced singling pathways via two distinct mechanisms that are activated by different pretreatment periods.

  14. Cloning of Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor cDNA and Expression of Recombinant Soluble TNF-Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Patrick W.; Barrett, Kathy; Chantry, David; Turner, Martin; Feldmann, Marc

    1990-10-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extra-cellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10-9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ).

  15. Protective effects of tanshinone ⅡA on endothelial progenitor cells injured by tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-Xiang; Yang, Jin-Xiu; Pan, Yan-Yun; Zhang, Ye-Fei

    2015-09-01

    Tanshinone ⅡA (Tan ⅡA) is a Traditional Chinese Medicine commonly used in Asian and Western countries for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders, such as atherosclerosis. Endothelial dysfunction and associated inflammatory processes have a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been demonstrated to be involved in certain aspects of the endothelial repair process. The present study aimed to investigate the putative protective effects of Tan ⅡA on EPCs injured by tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α). The potential effects of Tan ⅡA on TNF-α-stimulated EPC proliferation, migration, adhesion, in vitro tube formation ability and paracrine activity were investigated in the current study. The results indicated that TNF‑α impaired EPC proliferation, migration, adhesion capacity and vasculogenesis ability in vitro as well as promoted EPC secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including monocyte chemoattractant protein‑1 (MCP‑1), interleukin‑6 (IL‑6) and soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L). However, Tan ⅡA was able to reverse these effects. In conclusion, these findings demonstrated that Tan ⅡA may have the potential to protect EPCs against damage induced by TNF‑α. Therefore, these results may provide evidence for the pharmacological basis of Tan ⅡA and its potential use in the prevention and treatment of early atherosclerosis associated with EPC and endothelial damage.

  16. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Modulates the Dynamics of the Plasminogen-Mediated Early Interaction between Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and Human Enterocytes

    PubMed Central

    Centanni, Manuela; Bergmann, Simone; Turroni, Silvia; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Chhatwal, Gursharan Singh; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    The capacity to intervene with the host plasminogen system has recently been considered an important component in the interaction process between Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and the human host. However, its significance in the bifidobacterial microecology within the human gastrointestinal tract is still an open question. Here we demonstrate that human plasminogen favors the B. animalis subsp. lactis BI07 adhesion to HT29 cells. Prompting the HT29 cell capacity to activate plasminogen, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) modulated the plasminogen-mediated bacterium-enterocyte interaction, reducing the bacterial adhesion to the enterocytes and enhancing migration to the luminal compartment. PMID:22287006

  17. Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides lipid A derivatives block in vitro induction of tumor necrosis factor and endotoxin tolerance by smooth lipopolysaccharide and monophosphoryl lipid A.

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, B E; Perera, P Y; Qureshi, N; Takayama, K; Vogel, S N

    1992-01-01

    Rhodopseudomonas (Rhodobacter) sphaeroides diphosphoryl lipid A is a relatively inert species of lipid A but has been shown to antagonize the effects of toxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) both in vivo and in vitro. The antagonist and its monophosphoryl derivative were examined for the ability to block tumor necrosis factor synthesis and reverse tolerance induction in vitro in macrophage cultures stimulated with bioactive preparations of smooth LPS, rough LPS, diphosphoryl lipid A, and monophosphoryl lipid A. Inhibition of agonist activity and reversal of tolerance by these novel penta-acylated lipid A antagonists provides new insight into macrophage-LPS interactions. PMID:1398939

  18. Citrate and celecoxib induce apoptosis and decrease necrosis in synergistic manner in canine mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Vahidi, R; Safi, S; Farsinejad, A; Panahi, N

    2015-10-16

    Celecoxib and citrate have been shown to possess antitumor activity in a variety of cancer cells. However, the antitumor activities of these agents in canine mammary tumors have not been well demonstrated. The aim of our study was to investigate the apoptotic and antiproliferative effects of citrate and celecoxib, individually and in combination, on canine mammary tumor cell line CF41—Mg. MTT assay was performed to determine cell viability, and Annexin—PI test was performed to evaluate apoptosis induction. MTT assay results revealed that compared with the control groups, treatment groups, as both single and combined treatments, showed significant inhibition of tumor growth in a dose—dependent manner. IC50 concentrations of citrate and celecoxib were defined 26mM and 22μM, respectively. In another set of experiment, significant increase in cell apoptosis was observed at IC50 concentrations of citrate and celecoxib after 48h incubation. In spite of that, simultaneous treatment of cells with citrate and celecoxib eventuated with meaningful toxicity augmentation and induction of apoptosis at lower concentrations. Also necrotic cells were decreased by coadministration of the two agents. In conclusion, the present study indicates significant cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of citrate and celecoxib coadministration on CF41—Mg cells, and proposes new strategies for counteracting cancer cells proliferation and overcoming chemo resistance.

  19. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Associated Factor 2 Signaling Provokes Adverse Cardiac Remodeling in the Adult Mammalian Heart

    PubMed Central

    Divakaran, Vijay G.; Evans, Sarah; Topkara, Veli K.; Diwan, Abhinav; Burchfield, Jana; Gao, Feng; Dong, Jianwen; Tzeng, Huei-Ping; Sivasubramanian, Natarajan; Barger, Philip M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily ligands that provoke a dilated cardiac phenotype signal through a common scaffolding protein termed TNF receptor associated factor 2 (TRAF2); however, virtually nothing is known with regard to TRAF2 signaling in the adult mammalian heart. Methods and Results We generated multiple founder lines of mice with cardiac restricted overexpression of TRAF2 and characterized the phenotype of mice with higher expression levels of TRAF2 (MHC-TRAF2HC). MHC-TRAF2HC transgenic mice developed a time-dependent increase in cardiac hypertrophy, LV dilation and adverse LV remodeling, and a significant decrease in LV +dP/dt and −dP/dt when compared to littermate (LM) controls (p < 0.05 compared to LM). During the early phases of LV remodeling there was a significant increase in total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity that corresponded with a decrease in total myocardial fibrillar collagen content. As the MHC-TRAF2HC mice aged, there was a significant decrease in total MMP activity accompanied by an increase in total fibrillar collagen content and an increase in myocardial tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 levels. There was a significant increase in NF-κB activation at 4 – 12 weeks and JNK activation at 4 weeks in the MHCs TRAF2HC mice. Transciptional profiling revealed that > 95% of the hypertrophic/dilated cardiomyopathy-related genes that were significantly upregulated genes in the MHC-TRAF2HC hearts contained κB elements in their promoters. Conclusions These results show for the first time that targeted overexpression of TRAF2 is sufficient to mediate adverse cardiac remodeling in the heart. PMID:23493088

  20. The reduction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha release and tissue damage by pentobarbital in the experimental endotoxemia model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fwu Lin; Li, Chi Han; Hsu, Bang Gee; Tsai, Nu-Man; Lin, Shinn Zong; Harn, Horng Jyh; Chen, Hsing I; Liao, Kuang Wen; Lee, Ru Ping

    2007-09-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death for intensive care patients. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration to animals under anesthesia is a strategy for the study of uncontrolled release of proinflammatory cytokines. Anesthetics have been indicated that they can specially affect immune responses, such as the inflammatory response. Pentobarbital is an anesthetic used mainly in animal studies. Thus, the effect of pentobarbital on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) release was determined. The results revealed that pentobarbital suppressed the expression of TNF-alpha mRNA and its proteins, which may result from the decrease in the activities of nuclear factor-kappaB and activator protein 1 and the reduction of the expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase by pentobarbital. After the inhibitory activity of the pentobarbital for TNF-alpha release was proven in vivo, the cytotoxic effects of LPS were examined in vivo with or without pentobarbital treatments. In vivo results indicated that plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactic dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, serum urea nitrogen, and amylase decreased dramatically in the anesthetic group with pentobarbital administration. Finally, the effect of pentobarbital on TNF-alpha-related cell death was monitored in vitro, and the results indicated the pentobarbital could directly enhance the viabilities of cells under the treatment of TNF-alpha and protected cells from apoptosis induced by deferoxamine mesylate-induced hypoxia. These results suggest that pentobarbital significantly influences the LPS-induced inflammatory response and protects cells from death directly and indirectly induced by TNF-alpha. The information provides a perspective to re-evaluate the results of the experiments in which animals were anesthetized with pentobarbital. The anti-inflammatory effects of the drugs may have been caused by the synergistic effect of pentobarbital.

  1. Trametinib, a novel MEK kinase inhibitor, suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production and endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Du, Shi-lin; Yuan, Xue; Zhan, Sun; Tang, Luo-jia; Tong, Chao-yang

    2015-03-13

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), one of the most prominent pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), activates macrophages, causing release of toxic cytokines (i.e. tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α) that may provoke inflammation and endotoxin shock. Here, we tested the potential role of trametinib, a novel and highly potent MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor, against LPS-induced TNF-α response in monocytes, and analyzed the underlying mechanisms. We showed that trametinib, at nM concentrations, dramatically inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α mRNA expression and protein secretion in transformed (RAW 264.7 cells) and primary murine macrophages. In ex-vivo cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), this MEK inhibitor similarly suppressed TNF-α production by LPS. For the mechanism study, we found that trametinib blocked LPS-induced MEK-ERK activation in above monocytes, which accounted for the defective TNF-α response. Macrophages or PBMCs treated with a traditional MEK inhibitor PD98059 or infected with MEK1/2-shRNA lentivirus exhibited a similar defect as trametinib, and nullified the activity of trametinib. On the other hand, introducing a constitutively-active (CA) ERK1 restored TNF-α production by LPS in the presence of trametinib. In vivo, mice administrated with trametinib produced low levels of TNF-α after LPS stimulation, and these mice were protected from LPS-induced endotoxin shock. Together, these results show that trametinib inhibits LPS-induced TNF-α expression and endotoxin shock probably through blocking MEK-ERK signaling.

  2. In vitro acute effects of tobacco smoke on tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 production by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dubar, V; Gosset, P; Aerts, C; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B; Tonnel, A B

    1993-01-01

    Tobacco smoke is a usual form of oxidant aggression present in the domestic environment. In the present study, the in vitro acute effects of a 2-cigarette smoke gas phase were evaluated on cell viability and cytokine secretion by alveolar macrophages (AM) from guinea pigs and human healthy subjects. Cell injury was estimated immediately after smoke exposure by evaluation of ATP cell content (measured by bioluminescence) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release in the culture medium. LDH release was also measured when the interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) activities were evaluated. No cytotoxic effect was found: The ATP cell content of both guinea pig AM and human AM did not significantly change after tobacco smoke exposure. Similarly, the LDH release in the culture medium was unchanged both immediately after tobacco smoke exposure and at the time of the cytokine evaluation (18-20 h later) compared to cells cultured in the air. The total protein synthesis by the guinea pig AM evaluated by 35S-L-methionine labeling was unaffected by tobacco smoke exposure. The production of IL-6 and TNF activities was evaluated 18-20 h after smoke exposure. The IL-6 activity was measured by the proliferation test of 7TD1 hybridoma cell line; the TNF activity was evaluated by the L929 mouse fibroblast cytotoxic test and by an immunoradiometric assay (for human AM). A 2-cigarette smoke exposure decreased both activities significantly. The exposure of the guinea pig AM reduced IL-6 activity by 24.3 +/- 6.7%, 42.4 +/- 7.8%, and 39.7 +/- 9.6% and TNF activity by 33.8 +/- 10.4%, 35.1 +/- 10.7%, and 38.8 +/- 9.9% (respectively unstimulated cells and AM activated by 0.1 and 10 micrograms LPS/mL). The decrease in monokine production by the human AM was, respectively, 57.8 +/- 8.8%, 59.7 +/- 11.4%, and 49.9 +/- 10.5% of IL-6 activity and 37.4 +/- 14.6%, 17.6 +/- 9.6%, and 37.2 +/- 6.3% of TNF activity. The possible release of cytokine inhibitors was also investigated

  3. Abnormal production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -- alpha and clinical efficacy of the TNF inhibitor etanercept in a patient with PAPA syndrome [corrected].

    PubMed

    Cortis, Elisabetta; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Insalaco, Antonella; Cioschi, Stefania; Muratori, Flaminia; D'Urbano, Leila E; Ugazio, Alberto G

    2004-12-01

    We report a family with pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderna and acne syndrome (PAPA). The proband presented several episodes of sterile pyogenic arthritis and became unresponsive to glucocorticoids. After treatment with the tumor necrosis factor inhibitor etanercept, the disease underwent rapid and sustained clinical remission. Production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by mononuclear cells of the proband and of the affected relatives was abnormally elevated.

  4. OSTEOPONTIN BINDING TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE LOWERS TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-α AND PREVENTS EARLY ALCOHOL-INDUCED LIVER INJURY IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiaodong; Leung, Tung-Ming; Arriazu, Elena; Lu, Yongke; Urtasun, Raquel; Christensen, Brian; Fiel, Maria Isabel; Mochida, Satoshi; Sørensen, Esben S.; Nieto, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Although osteopontin (OPN) is induced in alcoholic patients, its role in the pathophysiology of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) remains unclear. Increased translocation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the gut is key for the onset of ALD since it promotes macrophage infiltration and activation, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) production and liver injury. Since OPN is protective for the intestinal mucosa, we postulated that enhancing OPN expression in the liver and consequently in the blood and/or in the gut could protect from early alcohol-induced liver injury. Results: Wild-type (WT), OPN knockout (Opn−/−) and transgenic mice overexpressing OPN in hepatocytes (OpnHEP Tg) were chronically fed either the control or the ethanol Lieber-DeCarli diet. Ethanol increased hepatic, plasma, biliary and fecal OPN more in OpnHEP Tg than in WT mice. Steatosis was lesser in ethanol-treated OpnHEP Tg mice as shown by decreased liver-to-body weight ratio, hepatic triglycerides, the steatosis score, oil red-O staining and lipid peroxidation. There was also less inflammation and liver injury as demonstrated by lower ALT activity, hepatocyte ballooning degeneration, LPS levels, the inflammation score and the number of macrophages and TNFα+ cells. To establish if OPN could limit LPS availability and its noxious effects in the liver, binding studies were performed. OPN showed affinity for LPS and the binding prevented macrophage activation, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation and TNFα production. Treatment with milk OPN (m-OPN) blocked LPS translocation in vivo and protected from early alcohol-induced liver injury. Conclusion: Natural induction plus forced overexpression of OPN in the liver and treatment with m-OPN protect from early alcohol-induced liver injury by blocking the gut-derived LPS and TNFα effects in the liver. PMID:24214181

  5. In vivo regulation of replicative Legionella pneumophila lung infection by endogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha and nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Brieland, J K; Remick, D G; Freeman, P T; Hurley, M C; Fantone, J C; Engleberg, N C

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo role of endogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) in modulation of growth of Legionella pneumophila in the lung was assessed using a murine model of replicative L. pneumophila lung infection. Intratracheal inoculation of mice with L. pneumophila resulted in induction of endogenous TNF-alpha, which preceded clearance of L. pneumophila from the lung. Inhibition of endogenous TNF-alpha activity, via in vivo administration of TNF-alpha neutralizing antibody, or inhibition of endogenous RNIs, via administration of the nitric oxide (NO) synthetase inhibitor N-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA), resulted in enhanced growth of L. pneumophila in the lung at > or = 3 days postinfection (when compared with untreated L. pneumophila-infected mice). Because of the similar kinetics of enhanced pulmonary growth of L. pneumophila in mice treated in vivo with either anti-TNF-alpha antibody or NMMA, the immunomodulatory effect of NO on endogenous TNF-alpha activity in the lung was assessed. Administration of NMMA to L. pneumophila-infected mice resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous TNF-alpha activity in the lung during replicative L. pneumophila infections in vivo. However, administration of exogenous TNF-alpha to NMMA-treated mice failed to significantly enhance clearance of L. pneumophila from the lung. Results of these studies indicate that both endogenous NO and TNF-alpha facilitate resolution of replicative L. pneumophila lung infections and that regulation of L. pneumophila replication by TNF-alpha is mediated, at least in part, by NO. PMID:7642253

  6. Interferon-γ differentially modulates the impact of tumor necrosis factor-α on human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Spratte, Julia; Oemus, Anne; Zygmunt, Marek; Fluhr, Herbert

    2015-09-01

    The pro-inflammatory T helper (Th)-1 cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), are immunological factors relevant at the feto-maternal interface and involved in the pathophysiology of implantation disorders. The synergistic action of the two cytokines has been described with regard to apoptotic cell death and inflammatory responses in different cell types, but little is known regarding the human endometrium. Therefore, we examined the interaction of TNF-α and IFN-γ in human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs). ESCs were isolated from specimens obtained during hysterectomy and decidualized in vitro. Cells were incubated with TNF-α, IFN-γ or signaling-inhibitor. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-1, prolactin (PRL), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted protein (RANTES) and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 were measured using ELISA and real-time RT-PCR. Nuclear factor of transcription (NF)-κB and its inhibitor (IκBα) were analyzed by in-cell western assay and transcription factor assay. TNF-α inhibited and IFN-γ did not affect the decidualization of ESCs. In contrast, IFN-gamma differentially modulated the stimulating effect of TNF-alpha on cytokines by enhancing IL-6, RANTES and MCP-1 and attenuating LIF mRNA expression. These effects were time- and dose-dependent. IFN-γ had no impact on the initial activation of NF-κB signaling. Histone-deacetylase activity was involved in the modulating effect of IFN-γ on RANTES secretion. These observations showed a distinct pattern of interaction of the Th-1 cytokines, TNF-α and IFN-γ in the human endometrium, which could play an important role in the pathophysiology of implantation disorders.

  7. Ribozyme modulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by peritoneal cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sioud, M

    1996-05-01

    We have utilized synthetic ribozymes to modulate the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) by peritoneal cells. Two hammerhead ribozymes (mRz1 and mRz2) were prepared by transcription in vitro and their activities in vitro and in vivo were investigated. Both ribozymes cleaved their RNA target with an apparent turnover number (kcat) of 2 min(-1), and inhibited TNF-alpha gene expression in vitro by 50% and 70%, respectively. When mRz1 and mRz2, entrapped in liposomes, were delivered into mice by intraperitoneal injection, they inhibited LPS-induced TNF-alpha gene expression in vivo with mRz2 being the most effective. This enhanced activity could result from the facilitation of catalysis by cellular endogenous proteins, since they specifically bind to mRz2 as compared to mRz1. Furthermore, a significant mRz2 activity can be recovered from peritoneal cells 2 days post-administration in vivo. The anti-TNF-alpha ribozyme treatment in vivo resulted in a more significant reduction of LPS-induced IFN-gamma protein secretion compared to IL-10. In contrast to this pleiotropic effect, the anti-TNF-alpha ribozyme treatment did not affect the heterogenous expression of Fas ligand by peritoneal cells, indicating the specificity of the treatment. Taken together, the present data indicate that the biological effects of TNF-alpha can be modulated by ribozymes. In addition, the data suggest that ribozymes can be administered in a drug-like manner, and therefore indicate their potential in clinical applications.

  8. Chrysin sensitizes tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced apoptosis in human tumor cells via suppression of nuclear factor-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Huang, Qing; Ong, Choon-Nam; Yang, Xing-Fen; Shen, Han-Ming

    2010-07-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) is a natural flavonoid commonly found in many plants. The anti-cancer property of chrysin has been demonstrated although the molecular mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. In the present study, we found that, pretreatment with chrysin greatly sensitized various human cancer cells to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha)-induced apoptosis. In the search of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the sensitization effect of chrysin, we discovered that such sensitization is closely associated with the inhibitory effect of chrysin on TNFalpha-mediated nuclear transcription factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation. Pretreatment with chrysin inhibited TNFalpha-induced degradation of Inhibitor of kappaB (IkappaB) protein and subsequent nuclear translocation of p65. As a result, chrysin suppressed the expression of NF-kappaB-targeted anti-apoptotic gene, c-FLIP-L. The role of c-FLIP-L was further confirmed by its ectopic expression, which significantly protected cell death induced by combined treatment with chrysin and TNFalpha. Data from this study thus reveal a novel function of chrysin and enhance the value of chrysin as an anti-cancer agent.

  9. Association Between Ischemic Stroke and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Audrey S. L.; Lunt, Mark; Mercer, Louise K.; Watson, Kath D.; Dixon, William G.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) may influence risk and mortality after ischemic stroke by reducing inflammation. This study was undertaken to examine the association of TNFi with the risk of incident ischemic stroke and with 30‐day and 1‐year mortality after ischemic stroke. Methods Patients with RA starting therapy with TNFi and a biologics‐naive comparator group treated with synthetic disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) only were recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis from 2001 to 2009. Patients were followed up via clinical and patient questionnaires as well as the national death register. Incident strokes were classified as ischemic if brain imaging reports suggested ischemia or if ischemic stroke was reported as the underlying cause of death on a death certificate. Patients with a previous stroke were excluded. Risk of ischemic stroke was compared between patients receiving synthetic DMARDs only and those ever‐exposed to TNFi using a Cox proportional hazards regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Mortality after ischemic stroke was compared between synthetic DMARD–treated patients and TNFi‐treated patients using logistic regression, adjusted for age and sex. Results To April 2010, 127 verified incident ischemic strokes (21 in 3,271 synthetic DMARD–treated patients and 106 in 11,642 TNFi‐treated patients) occurred during 11,973 and 61,226 person‐years of observation, respectively (incidence rate 175 versus 173 per 100,000 person‐years). After adjustment for confounders, there was no association between ever‐exposure to TNFi and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.54–1.81]). Mortality 30 days or 1 year after ischemic stroke was not associated with concurrent TNFi exposure (odds ratio 0.18 [95% CI 0.03–1.21] and 0.60 [95

  10. Three polymorphisms of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and hepatitis B virus related hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qi; Fu, BiQi; Chen, Ping; Liu, Zhong Zhong; Wang, Wei; Ye, QiFa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: To assess the association between tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) G308A, G238A and C863T polymorphisms and hepatitis B virus related hepatocellular carcinoma (HBV-HCC) susceptibility. Methods: We interrogated the databases of Pubmed, Sciencedirect and Viley online library up to March 8, 2016. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) were calculated in a fixed-effects model or a random-effects model when appropriate. Results: In total, 12 case–control studies which containing 1580 HBV-HCC cases, 2033 HBV carrier controls, 395 HBV spontaneously recovered (SR) controls and 1116 healthy controls were included. Compared with GG genotype, the genotypes GA/AA of G308A were associated with a significantly increased HBV-HCC risk when the controls were all healthy individuals (AA vs. GG, OR 2.483, 95%CI 1.243 to 4.959; GA vs. GG, OR 1.383, 95%CI 1.028 to 1.860; GA/AA vs. GG, OR 1.381, 95%CI 1.048 to 1.820). Meanwhile, only the AA vs. GG model of G238A and HBV-HCC showed a statistic significance when the controls were healthy individuals (OR 4.776, 95%CI 1.280 to 17.819). CT genotype of TNF-α C863T could increase HBV-HCC risk whenever the controls were healthy individuals, HBV carriers or HBV recovers. Conclusion: This meta-analysis shows that AA genotype in TNF-α G308A and TNF-α G238A and CT genotype in TNF-α C863T may increase HBV-HCC risk. Therefore, HBV infection seemed to be a more important factor for tumorigenesis of HCC than genetic predisposition in G308A of TNF-α, and interaction between TNF-α C863T polymorphisms and HBV infection might be associated with increased HCC risk. PMID:27977601

  11. Endogenous gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-6 in Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Nakane, A; Okamoto, M; Asano, M; Kohanawa, M; Minagawa, T

    1995-01-01

    The production and roles of endogenous gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in both lethal and nonlethal infections of Staphylococcus aureus were investigated in mice. In the case of nonlethal infection, although no bacteria were detected in the bloodstreams, bacteria that colonized and proliferated persistently for 3 weeks were found in the kidneys. All mice given lethal injections died within 7 days, and large numbers of bacteria were detected in the bloodstreams, spleens, and kidneys. The first peaks of IFN-gamma, TNF, and IL-6 were observed in the bloodstreams and spleens of the mice with nonlethal and lethal infections within 24 h. Thereafter, in the nonlethal cases, IFN-gamma, TNF, and IL-6 peaked again in the spleens and kidneys during the period of maximum growth of bacteria in the kidneys, although only IL-6 was detected in the sera. In contrast, in the case of lethal infection, the titers of IFN-gamma and IL-6 in the sera and TNF in the kidneys peaked before death. Effects of in vivo administration of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against IFN-gamma and TNF on the fates of S. aureus-infected mice were studied. In the nonlethal infections, anti-TNF alpha (anti-TNF-alpha) MAb-treated mice, but not anti-IFN-gamma MAb-treated mice, died as a result of worsening infection, suggesting that endogenous TNF plays a protective role in host resistance to S. aureus infection. In the mice that received lethal doses, injection of anti-TNF-alpha MAb accelerated death. However, although injection of anti-IFN-gamma MAb inhibited host resistance of the infected mice early in infection, most of the animals survived the lethal infection by injection of anti-IFN-gamma MAb, suggesting that endogenous IFN-gamma plays a detrimental role in S. aureus infection. Thus, this study demonstrated that IFN-gamma and TNF play different roles in S. aureus infection. PMID:7890367

  12. Influence of Interleukin-1α and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Production on Corneal Graft Survival

    PubMed Central

    Bosnar, Damir; Dekaris, Iva; Gabrić, Nikica; Markotić, Alemka; Lazić, Ratimir; Špoljarić, Ninoslav

    2006-01-01

    Aim To determine pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from human corneas with different pathology and to establish whether cytokine profile influences corneal graft outcome. Method Secretion of both proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1α and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was measured after cultivation of 47 corneas collected from corneal graft recipients suffering from different corneal diseases. Non-inflammatory corneal diseases were keratoconus (n = 8), keratoglobus (n = 2), bullous keratopathy (n = 11), and Groenouw stromal dystrophy type II (n = 2), whereas inflammatory included vascularized corneal scar (n = 14), rejected graft (n = 6), and corneal ulcer (n = 4). Corneas were cultivated at 37°C for 24 hours and frozen until cytokine detection was measured by immunoassay. Donor corneas unsuitable for transplantation were used as controls (n = 7). Corneal graft recipients were followed at least 18 months and rejection rate was calculated for each group. Results The median concentration of IL-1α secreted from corneas of recipients with non-inflammatory diseases was 2.47 pg/mm3 (range, 0.13-9.95). In inflammatory corneal diseases, IL-1α concentration was significantly higher (median, 5.92 pg/mm3; range, 0.48-12.68; P = 0.005). IL-1α production in controls (median, 0.63 pg/mm3; range, 0.36-1.29 pg/mm3) was significantly lower than in inflammatory corneal diseases (P<0.001) and non-inflammatory diseases (P = 0.008). Low level of TNF-α was detected only in 5 cases of vascularized corneal scars, 3 cases of bullous keratopathy, and 3 cases of graft rejection. Rejection rate was significantly higher in inflammatory than in non-inflammatory group (46% vs <10%, respectively, P = 0.008). IL-1α and TNF-α were absent from all patient’s sera, confirming its local intra-ocular production. Conclusion Increased production of IL-1α in corneal recipients with inflammatory diseases suggests its role in corneal graft

  13. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Natural Killer Cells in Uterine Artery Function and Pregnancy Outcome in the Stroke-Prone Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat

    PubMed Central

    Nosalski, Ryszard; Morgan, Hannah; Beattie, Elisabeth; Guzik, Tomasz J.; Graham, Delyth; Delles, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Women with chronic hypertension are at increased risk of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. We have previously characterized the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP) as a model of deficient uterine artery function and adverse pregnancy outcome compared with the control Wistar–Kyoto. The activation of the immune system plays a role in hypertension and adverse pregnancy outcome. Therefore, we investigated the role of tumor necrosis factor-α in the SHRSP phenotype in an intervention study using etanercept (0.8 mg/kg SC) at gestational days 0, 6, 12, and 18 in pregnant SHRSP compared with vehicle-treated controls (n=6). Etanercept treatment significantly lowered systolic blood pressure after gestational day 12 and increased litter size in SHRSP. At gestational day 18, etanercept improved the function of uterine arteries from pregnant SHRSP normalizing the contractile response and increasing endothelium-dependent relaxation, resulting in increased pregnancy-dependent diastolic blood flow in the uterine arteries. We identified that the source of excess tumor necrosis factor-α in the SHRSP was a pregnancy-dependent increase in peripheral and placental CD3– CD161+ natural killer cells. Etanercept treatment also had effects on placental CD161+ cells by reducing the expression of CD161 receptor, which was associated with a decrease in cytotoxic granzyme B expression. Etanercept treatment improves maternal blood pressure, pregnancy outcome, and uterine artery function in SHRSP by antagonizing signaling from excess tumor necrosis factor-α production and the reduction of granzyme B expression in CD161+ natural killer cells in SHRSP. PMID:27733586

  14. Quantification of active infliximab in human serum with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using a tumor necrosis factor alpha -based pre-analytical sample purification and a stable isotopic labeled infliximab bio-similar as internal standard: A target-based, sensitive and cost-effective method.

    PubMed

    El Amrani, Mohsin; van den Broek, Marcel P H; Göbel, Camiel; van Maarseveen, Erik M

    2016-07-08

    The therapeutic monoclonal antibody Infliximab (IFX) is a widely used drug for the treatment of several inflammatory autoimmune diseases. However, approximately 10% of patients develop anti-infliximab antibodies (ATIs) rendering the treatment ineffective. Early detection of underexposure to unbound IFX would result in a timely switch of therapy which could aid in the treatment of this disease. Streptavidin coated 96 well plates were used to capture biotinylated-tumor necrosis factor -alpha (b-TNF-α), which in turn was used to selectively extract the active form of IFX in human serum. After elution, IFX was digested using trypsin and one signature peptide was selected for subsequent analysis on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The internal standard used was a stable isotopic labeled IFX bio-similar. The assay was successfully validated according to European Medicines Agency (EMA) guidelines and was found to be linear in a range of 0.5-20μg/mL (r(2)=0.994). Lower limit of quantification for the assay (<20% CV) was 0.5μg/mL, requiring only 2μL of sample. Cross-validation against enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) resulted in a high correlation between methods (r(2)=0.95 with a ρc=0.83) and the accuracy was in line with previously published results. In conclusion, a sensitive, robust and cost-effective method was developed for the bio-analysis of IFX with LC-MS/MS by means of a target-based pre-analytical sample purification. Moreover, low volume and costs of consumables per sample promote its feasibility in (pre)clinical studies and in therapeutic drug monitoring. This method should be considered as first choice due to its accuracy and multiple degree of selectivity.

  15. Predisposing Factors of Liver Necrosis after Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization in Liver Metastases from Neuroendocrine Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Joskin, Julien Baere, Thierry de; Auperin, Anne; Tselikas, Lambros Guiu, Boris Farouil, Geoffroy; Boige, Valérie Malka, David; Leboulleux, Sophie; Ducreux, Michel; Baudin, Eric; Deschamps, Frédéric

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTo investigate predictive factors for liver necrosis after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) of neuroendocrine liver metastases.MethodsA total of 164 patients receiving 374 TACE were reviewed retrospectively to analyze predictive factors of liver necrosis. We analyzed patient age and sex; metastasis number and location; percentage of liver involvement; baseline liver function test; and pretreatment imaging abnormalities such as bile duct dilatation (BDD), portal vein narrowing (PVN), and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). We analyzed TACE technique such as Lipiodol or drug-eluting beads (DEB) as the drug’s vector; dose of chemotherapy; diameter of DEB; and number, frequency, and selectivity of TACE.ResultsLiver necrosis developed after 23 (6.1 %) of 374 TACE. In multivariate analysis, DEB > 300 μm in size induced more liver necrosis compared to Lipiodol (odds ratio [OR] 35.20; p < 0.0001) or with DEB < 300 μm in size (OR 19.95; p < 0.010). Pretreatment BDD (OR 119.64; p < 0.0001) and PVT (OR 9.83; p = 0.030) were predictive of liver necrosis. BDD or PVT responsible for liver necrosis were present before TACE in 59 % (13 of 22) and were induced by a previous TACE in 41 % (9 of 22) of cases.ConclusionDEB > 300 μm in size, BDD, and PVT are responsible for increased rate of liver necrosis after TACE. Careful analysis of BDD or PVT on pretreatment images as well as images taken between two courses can help avoid TACE complications.

  16. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8 in stage III gastric cancer and the correlation with DcR3 and ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruyi; Liu, Wenming; Qiu, Xingfeng; Lin, Zhenghe; Xie, Yan; Hong, Xingya; Paerhati, Reyila; Qi, Zhongquan; Zhuang, Guohong; Liu, Zhongchen

    2016-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced protein 8 (TIPE) is a recently identified protein that is considered to be associated with various malignancies, including esophageal, breast and pancreatic cancer; however, the importance of TIPE in gastric cancer (GC) remains unknown. Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily that is expressed in digestive system neoplasms. The expression of DcR3 is regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/MAPK kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression of TIPE, ERK and DcR3 in the pathological and tumor-adjacent normal gastric tissues of 30 patients that demonstrated stage III gastric adenocarcinoma. The expression and distribution of the TIPE protein was examined using immunohistochemistry, and the clinical significance and expression levels of DcR3 and ERK1/2 were evaluated. The expression of TIPE, ERK1/2 and DcR3 in the tumor tissues of GC was significantly increased compared with paracarcinoma tissues (P<0.05). In addition, TIPE expression positively correlated with DcR3 and ERK1 levels (r=0.538 and r=0.462, respectively; P<0.05). There was no statistical difference between tumor tissues from patients with varying age, gender, differentiation or lymph node metastasis (P>0.05). TIPE may be vital in the progression of GC. TIPE may be associated with the expression of DcR3 and ERK1/2, which may be involved in the cell apoptosis of GC. The present study elucidates the potential function of TIPE as a novel marker and therapeutic target for GC.

  17. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8 in stage III gastric cancer and the correlation with DcR3 and ERK1/2

    PubMed Central

    HU, RUYI; LIU, WENMING; QIU, XINGFENG; LIN, ZHENGHE; XIE, YAN; HONG, XINGYA; PAERHATI, REYILA; QI, ZHONGQUAN; ZHUANG, GUOHONG; LIU, ZHONGCHEN

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced protein 8 (TIPE) is a recently identified protein that is considered to be associated with various malignancies, including esophageal, breast and pancreatic cancer; however, the importance of TIPE in gastric cancer (GC) remains unknown. Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily that is expressed in digestive system neoplasms. The expression of DcR3 is regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/MAPK kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression of TIPE, ERK and DcR3 in the pathological and tumor-adjacent normal gastric tissues of 30 patients that demonstrated stage III gastric adenocarcinoma. The expression and distribution of the TIPE protein was examined using immunohistochemistry, and the clinical significance and expression levels of DcR3 and ERK1/2 were evaluated. The expression of TIPE, ERK1/2 and DcR3 in the tumor tissues of GC was significantly increased compared with paracarcinoma tissues (P<0.05). In addition, TIPE expression positively correlated with DcR3 and ERK1 levels (r=0.538 and r=0.462, respectively; P<0.05). There was no statistical difference between tumor tissues from patients with varying age, gender, differentiation or lymph node metastasis (P>0.05). TIPE may be vital in the progression of GC. TIPE may be associated with the expression of DcR3 and ERK1/2, which may be involved in the cell apoptosis of GC. The present study elucidates the potential function of TIPE as a novel marker and therapeutic target for GC. PMID:26998086

  18. Tumor Necrosis Adds Prognostically Significant Information to Grade in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Study of 842 Consecutive Cases From a Single Institution.

    PubMed

    Khor, Li-Yan; Dhakal, Hari P; Jia, Xuefei; Reynolds, Jordan P; McKenney, Jesse K; Rini, Brian I; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Przybycin, Christopher G

    2016-09-01

    Tumor necrosis has been shown to be an independent predictor of adverse outcome in renal cell carcinoma. A modification of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading system for renal cell carcinomas has recently been proposed, which incorporates the presence of tumor necrosis into grade. The investigators proposing this system found that necrosis added significant prognostic information to ISUP grade. We attempted to describe our experience with the effect of tumor necrosis in relationship to nuclear grade by reviewing the slides from a large consecutive series of localized clear cell renal cell carcinomas from our institution and obtaining long-term clinical follow-up information (overall survival). Of the 842 clear cell renal cell carcinomas reviewed, 265 (31.5%) were ISUP grade 1 or 2, 437 (51.9%) were ISUP grade 3, and 140 (16.6%) were ISUP grade 4. Tumor necrosis was present in 177 (21%) cases. Five hundred and forty-seven (64.9%) cases were stage pT1, 83 (9.9%) were stage pT2, 193 (22.9%) were stage pT3a, and 19 (2.3%) were pT3b or higher. Median follow-up was 73.2 months (range 0.12 to 273.6), and 310 (36.8%) patients died. On univariable analysis, there was no significant difference in outcome for tumors of ISUP grades 1 to 3. After adjustment for age, tumor stage, and tumor size, ISUP grade 4 and necrosis were significant predictors of overall survival on multivariable analysis. When the recently proposed modified grading system incorporating tumor necrosis was applied to our data, there was no significant difference in overall survival between patients with modified grade 1 tumors and those with modified grade 2 tumors (P=0.31); however, there was a statistically significant difference between patients with modified grade 1 or 2 tumors and those with modified grade 3 tumors (P=0.04),and a substantial difference in outcome between those with modified grade 3 and modified grade 4 tumors (P<0.001). When a recursive partitioning approach

  19. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha regulation of the Id gene family in astrocytes and microglia during CNS inflammatory injury.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, S F; Kahn, M; Liva, S; De Vellis, J

    1999-04-01

    The inhibitors of DNA binding (Id) gene family is highly expressed during embryogenesis and throughout adulthood in the rat central nervous system (CNS). In vitro studies suggest that the Id gene family is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. Recently, Id gene expression was shown to be expressed in immature and mature astrocytes during development and upregulated in reactive astrocytes after spinal cord injury. These results suggest that the Id gene family may play an important role in regulating astrocyte development and reactivity; however, the factors regulating Id expression in astrocytes remain undefined. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), a proinflammatory cytokine, is thought to play a crucial role in astrocyte/microglia activation after injury to the CNS. To determine if TNF alpha plays a role in Id gene expression, we exogenously administered TNF alpha into developing postnatal rats. We report that TNF alpha injections resulted in a rapid and transient increase in both cell number and mRNA expression for Id2 and Id3 when compared to levels observed in noninjected or control-injected animals. Id1 mRNA levels were also upregulated after TNF alpha treatment, but to a lesser degree. Significant increases in TNF alpha-induced Id2 and Id3 mRNA were observed in the ventricular/subventricular zone, cingulum and corpus callosum. TNF alpha also increased Id2 mRNA expression in the caudate putamen and hippocampus at the injection site. Id2 and Id3 mRNA+ cells were identified as GFAP+ and S100 alpha + astrocytes as well as ED1+ microglia. This is the first report to show TNF-alpha-induced modulation of the Id gene family and suggests that Id may be involved in the formation of reactive astrocytes and activated microglia in the rodent brain. These results suggest a putative role for the Id family in the molecular mechanisms regulating cellular responsiveness to TNF alpha and CNS inflammation.

  20. Glycyrrhizin Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Injury via Alleviating Tumor Necrosis Factor α–Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tingting; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Min; Yagai, Tomoki; Chai, Yingying; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Xie, Cen; Cheng, Xuefang; Zhang, Jun; Che, Yuan; Li, Feiyan; Wu, Yuzheng; Brocker, Chad N.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in Western countries. Glycyrrhizin (GL), a potent hepatoprotective constituent extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine liquorice, has potential clinical use in treating APAP-induced liver failure. The present study determined the hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanisms of action of GL and its active metabolite glycyrrhetinic acid (GA). Various administration routes and pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics analyses were used to differentiate the effects of GL and GA on APAP toxicity in mice. Mice deficient in cytochrome P450 2E1 enzyme (CYP2E1) or receptor interacting protein 3 (RIPK3) and their relative wild-type littermates were subjected to histologic and biochemical analyses to determine the potential mechanisms. Hepatocyte death mediated by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)/caspase was analyzed by use of human liver-derived LO2 cells. The pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics analysis using various administration routes revealed that GL but not GA potently attenuated APAP-induced liver injury. The protective effect of GL was found only with intraperitoneal and intravenous administration and not with gastric administration. CYP2E1-mediated metabolic activation and RIPK3-mediated necroptosis were unrelated to GL’s protective effect. However, GL inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis via interference with TNFα-induced apoptotic hepatocyte death. These results demonstrate that GL rapidly attenuates APAP-induced liver injury by directly inhibiting TNFα-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. The protective effect against APAP-induced liver toxicity by GL in mice suggests the therapeutic potential of GL for the treatment of APAP overdose. PMID:26965985

  1. Virus-cell interactions regulating induction of tumor necrosis factor alpha production in macrophages infected with herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Paludan, S R; Mogensen, S C

    2001-11-01

    Macrophages respond to virus infections by rapidly secreting proinflammatory cytokines, which play an important role in the first line of defense. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the major macrophage-produced cytokines. In this study we have investigated the virus-cell interactions responsible for induction of TNF-alpha expression in herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected macrophages. Both HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 induced TNF-alpha expression in macrophages activated with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). This induction was to some extent sensitive to UV treatment of the virus. Virus particles unable to enter the cells displayed reduced capacity to stimulate TNF-alpha expression but retained a significant portion which was abolished by HSV-specific antibodies. Recombinant HSV-1 glycoprotein D was able to trigger TNF-alpha secretion in concert with IFN-gamma. Sugar moieties of HSV glycoproteins have been reported to be involved in induction of IFN-alpha but did not contribute to TNF-alpha expression in macrophages. Moreover, the entry-dependent portion of the TNF-alpha induction was investigated with HSV-1 mutants and found to be independent of the tegument proteins VP16 and UL13 and partly dependent on nuclear translocation of the viral DNA. Finally, we found that macrophages expressing an inactive mutant of the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) produced less TNF-alpha in response to infectious HSV infection than the empty-vector control cell line but displayed the same responsiveness to UV-inactivated virus. These results indicate that HSV induces TNF-alpha expression in macrophages through mechanisms involving (i) viral glycoproteins, (ii) early postentry events occurring prior to nuclear translocation of viral DNA, and (iii) viral dsRNA-PKR.

  2. Growth and Adult Height in Patients with Crohn's Disease Treated with Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor α Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Damir; Viala, Jérôme; Carel, Jean-Claude; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Simon, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation contributes to growth failure associated with inflammatory bowel diseases. Anti-TNFα therapy induces sustained remission and short-term improvements in height velocity and/or height standard deviation score (H-SDS) patients with Crohn’s disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate growth and adult height in patients with Crohn’s disease taking maintenance infliximab or adalimumab therapy.This university-hospital based retrospective study included 61 patients, with a median follow-up of 2.6 years (2.0; 3.3). 38 patients (62%) reached their adult height. H-SDS was collected at diagnosis and together with disease activity markers (Harvey-Bradshaw Index, albumin, and C-reactive protein) at treatment initiation (baseline), and follow-up completion. Wilcoxon’s signed-rank test was chosen for comparisons. Median H-SDS decreased from diagnosis to baseline (-0.08 [-0.73; +0.77] to -0.94 [-1.44; +0.11], p<0.0001) and then increased to follow-up completion (-0.63 [-1.08; 0.49], p = 0.003 versus baseline), concomitantly with an improvement in disease activity. Median adult H-SDS was within the normal range (-0.72 [-1.25; +0.42]) but did not differ from baseline H-SDS and was significantly lower than the target H-SDS (-0.09 [-0.67; +0.42], p = 0.01). Only 2 (6%) males had adult heights significantly below their target heights (10.5 and -13.5 cm [-1.75 and -2.25 SD]). In conclusion, anti-tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) therapy prevented loss of height without fully restoring the genetic growth potential in this group of patients with CD. Earlier treatment initiation might improve growth outcomes in these patients. PMID:27636201

  3. Identification of tumor necrosis factor as a transcriptional regulator of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene following endotoxin treatment of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, M R; McCallum, R E

    1992-01-01

    The decreased synthesis of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), the rate-limiting enzyme of gluconeogenesis, that occurs during endotoxemia was shown previously in rats to occur at the transcriptional level. In the current study, the exogenous administration of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a proximal mediator of endotoxic shock, reduced the PEPCK transcription rate, mRNAPEPCK levels, and PEPCK enzyme activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner in CD-1 mice. Comparable amounts of circulating TNF were measured in mice 2 h after injection of human recombinant TNF (10(5) U) or a 50% lethal dose of Escherichia coli endotoxin (20 mg/kg). Direct action of TNF to decrease the PEPCK transcription rate was confirmed in vitro with H-4-II-E Reuber hepatoma cells, in which a dose-dependent inhibition of PEPCK transcription was observed with 1 to 100 U of TNF per ml. A role for TNF-elicited changes in PEPCK gene expression during endotoxemia was confirmed by the protective effect of rabbit polyclonal antibodies to recombinant murine TNF. C57BL/6 mice passively immunized with anti-TNF 4 h prior to endotoxin challenge exhibited normal PEPCK enzyme activity. Neutralization of circulating TNF with anti-TNF failed, however, to prevent the hypoglycemia commonly observed during endotoxemia, suggesting the participation of other mediators. Anti-TNF treatment reduced circulating interleukins 1 and 6 at 3 and 6 h after endotoxin treatment, respectively. These results suggest that during endotoxemia, the development of hypoglycemia is multifaceted and that several cytokines are most likely involved. The findings from the Reuber hepatoma cell model afford an opportunity in future work to map putative cytokine response elements in the PEPCK promoter responsible for perturbed hormonal regulation of the gene during endotoxemia. PMID:1398916

  4. Blockade of the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand death receptor DR5 prevents beta-amyloid neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Uberti, Daniela; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Bonini, Sara Anna; Sarnico, Ilenia; Benarese, Marina; Pizzi, Marina; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Binetti, Giuliano; Spano, PierFranco; Facchetti, Fabio; Memo, Maurizio

    2007-04-01

    We originally suggested that inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) death pathway could be taken into consideration as a potential therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, because the critical role of TRAIL in immune surveillance, the neutralization of TRAIL protein by an antibody to prevent its binding to death receptors is definitely a risky approach. Here, we demonstrated that the blockade of the TRAIL death receptor DR5 with a specific antibody completely prevented amyloid beta peptide (A beta) neurotoxicity in both neuronal cell line and primary cortical neurons. DR5 was demonstrated to be a key factor in TRAIL death pathway. In fact, whereas TRAIL expression was enhanced dose-dependently by concentrations of beta amyloid ranging from 10 nM to 1 microM, only the highest toxic dose of A beta (25 microM) induced the increased expression of DR5 and neuronal cell death. In addition, the increased expression of DR5 receptor after beta amyloid treatment was sustained by p53 transcriptional activity, as demonstrated by the data showing that the p53 inhibitor Pifithrin alpha prevented both beta amyloid-induced DR5 induction and cell death. These data suggest a sequential activation of p53 and DR5 upon beta amyloid exposure. Further insight into the key role of DR5 in AD was suggested by data showing a significant increase of DR5 receptor in cortical slices of AD brain. Thus, these findings may give intracellular TRAIL pathway a role in AD pathophysiology, making DR5 receptor a possible candidate as a pharmacological target.

  5. RNAseq Analyses Identify Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Inflammation as a Major Abnormality in ALS Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Brohawn, David G; O'Brien, Laura C; Bennett, James P

    2016-01-01

    ALS is a rapidly progressive, devastating neurodegenerative illness of adults that produces disabling weakness and spasticity arising from death of lower and upper motor neurons. No meaningful therapies exist to slow ALS progression, and molecular insights into pathogenesis and progression are sorely needed. In that context, we used high-depth, next generation RNA sequencing (RNAseq, Illumina) to define gene network abnormalities in RNA samples depleted of rRNA and isolated from cervical spinal cord sections of 7 ALS and 8 CTL samples. We aligned >50 million 2X150 bp paired-end sequences/sample to the hg19 human genome and applied three different algorithms (Cuffdiff2, DEseq2, EdgeR) for identification of differentially expressed genes (DEG's). Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) and Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) identified inflammatory processes as significantly elevated in our ALS samples, with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) found to be a major pathway regulator (IPA) and TNFα-induced protein 2 (TNFAIP2) as a major network "hub" gene (WGCNA). Using the oPOSSUM algorithm, we analyzed transcription factors (TF) controlling expression of the nine DEG/hub genes in the ALS samples and identified TF's involved in inflammation (NFkB, REL, NFkB1) and macrophage function (NR1H2::RXRA heterodimer). Transient expression in human iPSC-derived motor neurons of TNFAIP2 (also a DEG identified by all three algorithms) reduced cell viability and induced caspase 3/7 activation. Using high-density RNAseq, multiple algorithms for DEG identification, and an unsupervised gene co-expression network approach, we identified significant elevation of inflammatory processes in ALS spinal cord with TNF as a major regulatory molecule. Overexpression of the DEG TNFAIP2 in human motor neurons, the population most vulnerable to die in ALS, increased cell death and caspase 3/7 activation. We propose that therapies targeted to reduce inflammatory TNFα signaling may be helpful

  6. Irradiation enhances the tumor tropism and therapeutic potential of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-secreting human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Muk; Oh, Ji Hyeon; Park, Soon A; Ryu, Chung Heon; Lim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Dal-Soo; Chang, Jong Wook; Oh, Wonil; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2010-12-01

    Irradiation is a standard therapy for gliomas and many other cancers. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is one of the most promising candidates for cancer gene therapy. Here, we show that tumor irradiation enhances the tumor tropism of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) and the therapeutic effect of TRAIL delivered by UCB-MSCs. The sequential treatment with irradiation followed by TRAIL-secreting UCB-MSCs (MSC-TRAIL) synergistically enhanced apoptosis in either TRAIL-sensitive or TRAIL-resistant glioma cells by upregulating the death receptor 5 and by inducing caspase activation. Migration assays showed greater MSC migration toward irradiated glioma cells and the tumor site in glioma-bearing mice compared with unirradiated tumors. Irradiated glioma cells had increased expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8), which leads to the upregulation of the IL-8 receptor on MSCs. This upregulation, which is involved in the migratory capacity of UCB-MSCs, was confirmed by siRNA inhibition and an antibody-neutralizing assay. In vivo survival experiments in orthotopic xenografted mice showed that MSC-based TRAIL gene delivery to irradiated tumors had greater therapeutic efficacy than a single treatment. These results suggest that clinically relevant tumor irradiation increases the therapeutic efficacy of MSC-TRAIL by increasing tropism of MSCs and TRAIL-induced apoptosis, which may be a more useful strategy for cancer gene therapy.

  7. Distinct role of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 in oval cell- mediated liver regeneration and inflammation-associated hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie; Li, Xi; Lin, Hui; Cai, Xiujun; Cang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and TNF receptor-1(TNFR1) have been shown to involve in oval cell proliferation and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. However, their role in these processes is still unclear. In the present study, by using hepatocytes-specific DDB1 deletion mouse models, we explored the role and mechanism of IL6, TNFα and TNFR1 in oval cell proliferation and HCC development in the context of inflammation, which is the common features of HCC pathogenesis in humans. Our results showed that IL6 promotes oval cell proliferation and liver regeneration, while TNFα/TNFR1 does not affect this process. Deletion of IL6 accelerates HCC development and increases tumor burden. The number of natural killer(NK) cells is significantly decreased in tumors without IL6, implying that IL6 suppresses HCC by NK cells. In contrast to IL6, TNFR1-mediated signaling pathway promotes HCC development, and deletion of TNFR1 reduced tumor incidence. Increased apoptosis, compensatory proliferation and activation of MAPK/MEK/ERK cascade contribute to the oncogenic function of TNFR1-mediated signaling pathway. Intriguingly, deletion of TNFα accelerates tumor development, which shows divergent roles of TNFα and TNFR1 in hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27556180

  8. Primary Tumor Necrosis Predicts Distant Control in Locally Advanced Soft-Tissue Sarcomas After Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    MacDermed, Dhara M.; Miller, Luke L.; Peabody, Terrance D.; Simon, Michael A.; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; Montag, Anthony G.; Undevia, Samir D.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Various neoadjuvant approaches have been evaluated for the treatment of locally advanced soft-tissue sarcomas. This retrospective study describes a uniquely modified version of the Eilber regimen developed at the University of Chicago. Methods and Materials: We treated 34 patients (28 Stage III and 6 Stage IV) with locally advanced soft-tissue sarcomas of an extremity between 1995 and 2008. All patients received preoperative therapy including ifosfamide (2.5 g/m2 per day for 5 days) with concurrent radiation (28 Gy in 3.5-Gy daily fractions), sandwiched between various chemotherapy regimens. Postoperatively, 47% received further adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Most tumors (94%) were Grade 3, and all were T2b, with a median size of 10.3 cm. Wide excision was performed in 29 patients (85%), and 5 required amputation. Of the resected tumor specimens, 50% exhibited high (>=90%) treatment-induced necrosis and 11.8% had a complete pathologic response. Surgical margins were negative in all patients. The 5-year survival rate was 42.3% for all patients and 45.2% for Stage III patients. For limb-preservation patients, the 5-year local control rate was 89.0% and reoperation was required for wound complications in 17.2%. The 5-year freedom-from-distant metastasis rate was 53.4% (Stage IV patients excluded), and freedom from distant metastasis was superior if treatment-induced tumor necrosis was 90% or greater (84.6% vs. 19.9%, p = 0.02). Conclusions: This well-tolerated concurrent chemoradiotherapy approach yields excellent rates of limb preservation and local control. The resulting treatment-induced necrosis rates are predictive of subsequent metastatic risk, and this information may provide an opportunity to guide postoperative systemic therapies.

  9. Effects of tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors extend beyond psoriasis: insulin sensitivity in psoriasis patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Al-Mutairi, Nawaf; Shabaan, Dalia

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease that has been associated with an increased incidence of insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus (DM). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α inhibitors and IL-6 blockers, which are routinely used for the treatment of psoriasis, have been positively associated with insulin sensitivity. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of treatment with TNF-α inhibitors on insulin sensitivity in psoriatic patients with type 2 DM. This study confirms a beneficial effect of anti-TNF-α agents on insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity in psoriasis patients with type 2 DM.

  10. The first scintigraphic detection of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Bernateck, Michael; Karst, Matthias; Gratz, Klaus F; Meyer, Geerd J; Fischer, Michael J; Knapp, Wolfram H; Koppert, Wolfgang; Brunkhorst, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha has been identified as a pathogenic factor in many immunologically based diseases and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In this case series, we used radiolabeled technetium anti-TNF-alpha antibody to scintigraphically image TNF-alpha in 3 patients with type 1 CRPS. The results show that TNF-alpha was localized only in affected hands of patients with early-stage CRPS. No uptake was seen in clinically unaffected hands and late-stage CRPS. Our findings support the growing evidence for neuroimmune disturbance in patients with CRPS and may have important further implications for specific anticytokine treatment in patients with CRPS.

  11. Pyoderma gangrenosum, acne conglobata, suppurative hidradenitis, and axial spondyloarthritis: efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor α therapy.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, Vincenzo

    2012-12-01

    We report the case of a patient with a simultaneous presence of pyoderma gangrenosum, acne conglobata, suppurative hidradenitis, and axial spondyloarthritis. This condition differs from both the PASH (pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and suppurative hidradenitis) syndrome, in which arthritis is absent, and the PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome, in which suppurative hidradenitis is lacking. Our patient failed to respond to etanercept therapy, whereas all dermatologic and rheumatic manifestations completely regressed following infliximab infusion. We therefore propose that simultaneous presence of pyoderma gangrenosum, acne conglobata, suppurative hidradenitis, and seronegative spondyloarthritis might represent a distinct syndrome that could be termed the PASS syndrome. Tumor necrosis factor α therapies seem to play selective roles.

  12. (+)-Nootkatone inhibits tumor necrosis factor α/interferon γ-induced production of chemokines in HaCaT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyeon-Jae; Lee, Jin-Hwee; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression in HaCaT cells. • PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB mediate TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression. • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB. • (+)-Nootkatone suppresses chemokine expression by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 pathways. - Abstract: Chemokines are important mediators of cell migration, and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22) are well-known typical inflammatory chemokines involved in atopic dermatitis (AD). (+)-Nootkatone is the major component of Cyperus rotundus. (+)-Nootkatone has antiallergic, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of (+)-nootkatone on tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)/interferon γ (IFN-γ)-induced expression of Th2 chemokines in HaCaT cells. We found that (+)-nootkatone inhibited the TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 mRNA in HaCaT cells. It also significantly inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ). Furthermore, we showed that PKCζ and p38 MAPK contributed to the inhibition of TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression by blocking IκBα degradation in HaCaT cells. Taken together, these results suggest that (+)-nootkatone may suppress TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression in HaCaT cells by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 MAPK signaling pathways that lead to activation of NF-κB. We propose that (+)-nootkatone may be a useful therapeutic candidate for inflammatory skin diseases such as AD.

  13. Tumor necrosis factor and its targets in the inflammatory cytokine pathway are identified as putative transcriptomic biomarkers for escitalopram response.

    PubMed

    Powell, Timothy R; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Heffernan, Andrew L; Breen, Gerome; Lawrence, Timothy; Price, Tom; Farmer, Anne E; Aitchison, Katherine J; Craig, Ian W; Danese, Andrea; Lewis, Cathryn; McGuffin, Peter; Uher, Rudolf; Tansey, Katherine E; D'Souza, Ursula M

    2013-09-01

    Converging evidence suggests that the activation of the inflammatory cytokine pathway is important in the pathophysiology of unipolar depression. Antidepressants have anti-inflammatory properties and evidence suggests that inter-individual variability in response to antidepressants may reflect genetic differences in the inflammatory cytokine pathway. In particular, protein levels of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) and the SNPs rs1126757 in interleukin-11 (IL11), and rs7801617 in interleukin-6 (IL6), have previously been implicated in the clinical response to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant escitalopram. This study investigated the transcription of TNF, IL11 and IL6 as well as genes in the wider inflammatory cytokine pathway both at baseline and after escitalopram treatment in depressed patients who were either clinical "responders" (n=25) or "non-responders" (n=21). Samples were obtained as a subset of the Genome-Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) project and response status is based on changes in the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scores over a 12 wk treatment period. Binary logistic regressions revealed significant expression differences at baseline between responders and non-responders in TNF, and after escitalopram treatment in TNF and IL11. Differences in IL11 after treatment were found to be driven by drug-induced allele-specific expression differences relating to rs1126757. Top hits in the wider inflammatory cytokine pathway at both baseline and after escitalopram treatment were found to be targets of TNF. The current study adds substantial support for the role of the inflammatory cytokine pathway in mediating response to the SSRI escitalopram, and is the first to identify TNF and its targets as putative transcriptomic predictors of clinical response.

  14. Overexpression of tumor necrosis factor-α in the lungs alters immune response, matrix remodeling, and repair and maintenance pathways.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Errol M; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole L; Vincent, Renaud

    2012-04-01

    Increased production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is a feature of inflammatory lung diseases, including emphysema and fibrosis, but the divergent pathological characteristics that result indicate involvement of other processes in disease pathogenesis. Transgenic mice overexpressing TNF-α in type II alveolar epithelial cells under the control of the surfactant protein (SP)-C promoter develop pulmonary inflammation and emphysema but are resistant to induction of fibrosis by administration of bleomycin or transforming growth factor-β. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of this phenotype, we used a microarray approach to characterize the pulmonary transcriptome of SP-C/TNF-α mice and wild-type littermates. Four-month-old SP-C/TNF-α mice displayed pronounced pulmonary inflammation, airspace enlargement, increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels, and altered expression of 2332 probes. The functional assessment of genes with increased expression revealed enrichment of inflammatory/immune responses and proteases, whereas genes involved in protease inhibition, angiogenesis, cross-linking of basement membrane proteins, and myofibroblast differentiation were predominantly decreased. Comparison with multiple lung disease models identified a set of genes unique to the SP-C/TNF-α model and revealed that lack of extracellular matrix production distinguished SP-C/TNF-α mice from fibrosis models. Activation of inflammatory and proteolytic pathways and disruption of maintenance and repair processes are central features of emphysema in this TNF-overexpression model. Impairment of myofibroblast differentiation and extracellular matrix production may underlie resistance to induction of fibrosis.

  15. Targeted Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90 Suppresses Tumor Necrosis Factor–α and Ameliorates Murine Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Colm B.; Strassheim, Derek; Aherne, Carol M.; Yeckes, Alyson R.; Jedlicka, Paul; de Zoeten, Edwin F.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases thought to reflect a dysregulated immune response. Although antibody-based inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has provided relief to many inflammatory bowel diseases patients, these therapies are either ineffective in a patient subset or lose their efficacy over time, leaving an unmet need for alternatives. Given the critical role of the heat shock response in regulating inflammation, this study proposed to define the impact of selective inhibition of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) on intestinal inflammation. Using multiple preclinical mouse models of inflammatory bowel diseases, we demonstrate a potent anti-inflammatory effect of selective inhibition of the HSP90 C-terminal ATPase using the compound novobiocin. Novobiocin-attenuated dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis and CD45RBhigh adoptive-transfer colitis through the suppression of inflammatory cytokine secretion, including TNF-α. In vitro assays demonstrate that CD4+ T cells treated with novobiocin produced significantly less TNF-α measured by intracellular cytokine staining and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This corresponded to significantly decreased nuclear p65 translocation by Western blot and a decrease in nuclear factor-κB luciferase activity in Jurkat T cells. Finally, to verify the anti-TNF action of novobiocin, 20-week-old TNFΔARE mice were treated for 2 weeks with subcutaneous administration of novobiocin. This model has high levels of circulating TNF-α and exhibits spontaneous transmural segmental ileitis. Novobiocin treatment significantly reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate in the ileal lamina propria. HSP90 inhibition with novobiocin offers a novel method of inflammatory cytokine suppression without potential for the development of tolerance that limits current antibody-based methods. PMID:24552830

  16. The clinical significance of tumor necrosis factor-alpha plasma level in patients having chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael J; Manshouri, Taghi; Giles, Francis J; Dey, Amanda; Estrov, Zeev; Koller, Charles A; Kurzrock, Razelle; Thomas, Deborah A; Faderl, Stefan; Lerner, Susan; O'Brien, Susan; Albitar, Maher

    2002-08-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a cytokine possessing pleiotropic biological activities, is produced by leukemic lymphocytes in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and acts as an autocrine and paracrine growth factor in this disease. In this study, TNF-alpha levels were determined in 150 patients with CLL and correlated with disease characteristics, prognostic factors, and survival. The mean TNF-alpha plasma concentration in the patients with CLL was significantly higher than in the healthy control population (16.4 versus 8.7 pg/mL; P <.0001). Patients having an elevated TNF-alpha level had more advanced Rai and Binet stage disease, higher serum beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)M) levels, a greater percentage of cells expressing CD38, and lower hemoglobin and platelet levels. Patients having chromosomal abnormalities such as 11q deletion, trisomy 12, and chromosome 17 aberrations had a higher mean TNF-alpha level (27.5 pg/mL) than patients having a diploid karyotype or other miscellaneous cytogenetic abnormalities (14.2 pg/mL; P <.001). The TNF-alpha level was a predictor of survival when the Cox proportional hazards model was used with TNF-alpha entered as a continuous variable (P =.0001). Also, patients having a TNF-alpha level above the mean value of 14 pg/mL had significantly shorter survival duration (P =.00001). The TNF-alpha level remained predictive of survival in Cox multivariate analysis independent of Rai staging and beta(2)M, hemoglobin, prior therapy, white cell count, and platelet level (P =.005). We conclude that the TNF-alpha level serves as a prognostic factor in patients with CLL and that inhibition of TNF-alpha in these patients could have therapeutic importance.

  17. Anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment in cherubism--clinical, radiological and histological findings in two children.

    PubMed

    Hero, M; Suomalainen, A; Hagström, J; Stoor, P; Kontio, R; Alapulli, H; Arte, S; Toiviainen-Salo, S; Lahdenne, P; Mäkitie, O

    2013-01-01

    Cherubism is a rare and disfiguring genetic disorder with excessive bone resorption and multilocular lesions in the mandible and/or maxilla. The disease-causing gain-of-function mutations in the SH3-binding protein 2 (SH3BP2) gene result in increased myeloid cell responses to macrophage colony stimulating factor and RANK ligand, formation of hyperactive osteoclasts (giant cells), and hyper-reactive macrophages that produce excessive amounts of the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Recent findings in the cherubism mouse model suggest that TNF-α plays a major role in disease pathogenesis and that removal of TNF-α prevents development of the bone phenotype. We treated two children with cherubism with the TNF-α antagonist adalimumab for approximately 2.5 years and collected extensive clinical, radiological and histological follow-up data during the treatment. Histologically the treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the number of multinucleated giant cells and TNF-α staining positivity in both patients. As evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the lesions in Patient 1 showed either moderate enlargement (mandibular symphysis) or remained stable (mandibular rami and body, the maxilla). In Patient 2, the lesions in mandibular symphysis showed enlargement during the first 8 months of treatment, and thereafter the lesions remained unchanged. Bone formation and resorption markers remained unaffected. The treatment was well tolerated. Based on our findings, TNF-α antagonist may decrease the formation of pathogenic giant cells, but does not result in lesion regression or prevent lesion expansion in active cherubism. TNF-α modulator treatment thus does not appear to provide sufficient amelioration for patients suffering from cherubism.

  18. Differential induction of tumor necrosis factor alpha in murine and human leukocytes by Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived superantigen.

    PubMed Central

    Rink, L; Nicklas, W; Alvarez-Ossorio, L; Koester, M; Kirchner, H

    1994-01-01

    Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived superantigen (MAS) is exclusively produced by M. arthritidis, which is the only known mycoplasma to produce a superantigen. As a superantigen, MAS shows properties similar to those of the staphylococcal enterotoxins and related substances, such as binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and V beta-specific stimulation of T cells. In this series of experiments, we demonstrate some differences between MAS and other superantigens. MAS induced the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA in human as well as in murine leukocytes. However, only in murine leukocytes was the mRNA adequately translated into the protein. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we found only small amounts of TNF, whereas in murine spleen cells we detected levels more than three times higher. The proliferative response to MAS has been shown to be restricted to I-E alpha in the murine MHC. Furthermore, TNF was induced in I-E alpha+ bone marrow-derived macrophages by MAS. In these cells, MAS rapidly induced very high levels of TNF and the amounts of mRNA detected correlated to the amount of protein produced. In comparison with other superantigens, including the staphylococcal enterotoxins, toxic shock syndrome toxin 1, and exfoliative toxin A, the failure of MAS to induce TNF-alpha in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells is specific for MAS and not common to all superantigens. The direct activation of bone marrow-derived macrophages also seems to be specific for MAS. These data suggest that the induction of TNF-alpha by MAS is dependent on the strength of binding to the MHC class II molecule. Images PMID:8300207

  19. Tumor necrosis factor-α antagonist therapy for concomitant rheumatoid arthritis and hepatitis C virus infection: a case series study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ko-Ming; Cheng, Tien-Tsai; Lin, Jing-Chi; Chen, Chung-Jen

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate treatment response and hepatic safety of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy among patients with concomitant rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We reviewed the charts of 101 consecutive RA patients who were eligible for anti-TNF-α therapy in the Chiayi Branch of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Group A patients were sero-positive for anti-HCV antibodies and had HCV RNA but were negative for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Group B (the control group) patients were sero-negative for both anti-HCV antibodies and HBsAg. Response to anti-TNF-α treatment was assessed by calculating disease activity score at 28 joints (DAS28) at baseline and 5, 8, and 11 months after the start of TNF-α antagonist therapy. Percentage change in DAS28 from baseline to month 5 was 21.36 ± 8.01 % in group A and 26.98 ± 10.43 % in group B (p = 0.011). However, there was no obvious difference in treatment response between groups at other time points. Anti-TNF-α therapy was discontinued within 1 year of starting treatment in two subjects in group A and 4 in group B. Response to anti-TNF-α was better in group B than in group A at 5 months, but there was no substantial difference in response at the 1-year evaluation. Although the study sample was small, our results suggest that the safety of anti-TNF-α therapy is similar in RA patients with and without concomitant HCV infection.

  20. Functional characterization of viral tumor necrosis factor receptors encoded by cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV3) genome.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yang; Qi, Hemei; Yuan, Jimin; Wang, Rui; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo; Dong, Chuanfu

    2015-08-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV3) is a large double-stranded DNA virus of Alloherpesviridae family in the order Herpesvirales. It causes significant morbidity and mortality in common carp and its ornamental koi variety, and threatens the aquaculture industries worldwide. Mimicry of cytokines and cytokine receptors is a particular strategy for large DNA viruses in modulating the host immune response. Here, we report the identification and characterization of two novel viral homologues of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) encoded by CyHV3-ORF4 and -ORF12, respectively. CyHV3-ORF4 was identified as a homologue of HVEM and CyHV3-ORF12 as a homologue of TNFRSF1. Overexpression of ORF4 and ORF12 in zebrafish embryos results in embryonic lethality, morphological defects and increased apoptosis. Although we failed to identify any interaction between the two vTNFRs and their potential ligands in zebrafish TNF superfamily by yeast two-hybrid system, the expression of some genes in TNF superfamily or TNFR superfamily were mis-regulated in ORF4 or ORF12-overexpressing embryos, especially the death receptor zHDR and its cognate ligand DL1b. Further studies showed that the apoptosis induced by the both CyHV3 vTNFRs is mainly activated through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and requires the crosstalk between the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Additionally, using RT-qPCR and Western blot assays, the expression patterns of the both vTNFRs were also analyzed during CyHV3 productive infection. Collectively, this is the first functional study of two unique vTNFRs encoded by a herpesvirus infecting non-mammalian vertebrates, which may provide novel insights into viral immune regulation mechanism and the pathogenesis of CyHV3 infection.

  1. NG-methyl-L-arginine inhibits tumor necrosis factor-induced hypotension: implications for the involvement of nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Kilbourn, R G; Gross, S S; Jubran, A; Adams, J; Griffith, O W; Levi, R; Lodato, R F

    1990-01-01

    Clinical assessment of the activity of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) against human cancer has been limited by a dose-dependent cardiovascular toxicity, most frequently hypotension. TNF is also thought to mediate the vascular collapse resulting from bacterial endotoxin. The present studies address the mechanism by which TNF causes hypotension and provide evidence for elevated production of nitric oxide, a potent vasodilator initially characterized as endothelium-derived relaxing factor. Nitric oxide is synthesized by several cell types, including endothelial cells and macrophages, from the guanidino nitrogen of L-arginine; the enzymatic pathway is competitively inhibited by NG-methyl-L-arginine. We found that hypotension induced in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs by TNF (10 micrograms/kg, i.v., resulting in a fall in mean systemic arterial pressure from 124.7 +/- 7 to 62.0 +/- 22.9 mmHg; 1 mmHg = 133 Pa) was completely reversed within 2 min following administration of NG-methyl-L-arginine (4.4 mg/kg, i.v.). In contrast, NG-methyl-L-arginine failed to reverse the hypotensive response to an equivalent depressor dose of nitroglycerin, a compound that acts by forming nitric oxide by a nonenzymatic, arginine-independent mechanism. The effect of NG-methyl-L-arginine on TNF-induced hypotension was antagonized, and the hypotension restored, by administration of excess L-arginine (100 mg/kg, i.v.). Our findings suggest that excessive nitric oxide production mediates the hypotensive effect of TNF. PMID:2333306

  2. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-neuropeptide Y (NPY) crosstalk regulates inflammation, epithelial barrier functions and colonic motility

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Bindu; Jeppsson, Sabrina; Pienkowski, Stefan; Belsham, Denise D; Sitaraman, Shanthi V.; Merlin, Didier; Kokkotou, Efi; Nusrat, Asma; Tansey, Malu G.; Srinivasan, Shanthi

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuro-immune interactions play a significant role in regulating the severity of inflammation. Our previous work demonstrated that neuropeptide Y (NPY) is up regulated in the enteric nervous system (ENS) during murine colitis, and that NPY knockout mice exhibit reduced inflammation. Here we investigated if NPY expression during inflammation is induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF), the main pro-inflammatory cytokine. Methods Utilizing primary enteric neurons and colon explant cultures from WT and NPY knockout (NPY−/−) mice, we determined if NPY knockdown modulates TNF release and epithelial permeability. Further we assessed if NPY expression is inducible by TNF in enteric neuronal cells and mouse model of experimental colitis, utilizing the TNF inhibitors-etanercept (blocks transmembrane and soluble TNF) and XPro1595 (blocks soluble TNF only). Results We found that enteric neurons express TNF receptors (TNFR1 and R2). Primary enteric neurons from NPY−/− mice produced less TNF compared to WT. Further, TNF activated NPY promoter in enteric neurons via phospho-c-jun. NPY−/− mice had decreased intestinal permeability. In vitro, NPY increased epithelial permeability via phosphatidyl inositol-3-kinase (PI3-K)-induced pore-forming claudin-2. TNF inhibitors attenuated NPY expression in vitro and in vivo. TNF-inhibitor-treated colitic mice exhibited reduced NPY expression and inflammation, reduced oxidative stress, enhanced neuronal survival and improved colonic motility. XPro1595 had more protective effects on neuronal survival and motility compared to etanercept. Conclusions We demonstrate a novel TNF-NPY cross talk that modulates inflammation, barrier functions and colonic motility during inflammation. It is also suggested that selective blocking of soluble TNF maybe a better therapeutic option than using anti-TNF antibodies. PMID:24108115

  3. Spontaneous development of psoriasis in a new animal model shows an essential role for resident T cells and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Boyman, Onur; Hefti, Hans Peter; Conrad, Curdin; Nickoloff, Brian J; Suter, Mark; Nestle, Frank O

    2004-03-01

    Psoriasis is a common T cell-mediated autoimmune disorder where primary onset of skin lesions is followed by chronic relapses. Progress in defining the mechanism for initiation of pathological events has been hampered by the lack of a relevant experimental model in which psoriasis develops spontaneously. We present a new animal model in which skin lesions spontaneously developed when symptomless prepsoriatic human skin was engrafted onto AGR129 mice, deficient in type I and type II interferon receptors and for the recombination activating gene 2. Upon engraftment, resident human T cells in prepsoriatic skin underwent local proliferation. T cell proliferation was crucial for development of a psoriatic phenotype because blocking of T cells led to inhibition of psoriasis development. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha was a key regulator of local T cell proliferation and subsequent disease development. Our observations highlight the importance of resident T cells in the context of lesional tumor necrosis factor-alpha production during development of a psoriatic lesion. These findings underline the importance of resident immune cells in psoriasis and will have implications for new therapeutic strategies for psoriasis and other T cell-mediated diseases.

  4. Treatment Planning and Volumetric Response Assessment for Yttrium-90 Radioembolization: Semiautomated Determination of Liver Volume and Volume of Tumor Necrosis in Patients with Hepatic Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Monsky, Wayne L.; Garza, Armando S.; Kim, Isaac; Loh, Shaun; Lin, Tzu-Chun; Li Chinshang; Fisher, Jerron; Sandhu, Parmbir; Sidhar, Vishal; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Lin, Frank; Deutsch, Larry-Stuart; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to demonstrate intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility for novel semiautomated measurements of hepatic volume used for Yttrium-90 dose calculations as well as whole-liver and necrotic-liver (hypodense/nonenhancing) tumor volume after radioembolization. The secondary aim was to provide initial comparisons of tumor volumetric measurements with linear measurements, as defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, and survival outcomes. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, 23 consecutive radioembolization procedures were performed for 14 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 cases of hepatic metastases. Baseline and follow-up computed tomography obtained 1 month after treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Three observers measured liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volumes twice using semiautomated software. Results: Good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility was demonstrated (intraclass correlation [ICC] > 0.9) for tumor and liver volumes. Semiautomated measurements of liver volumes were statistically similar to those obtained with manual tracing (ICC = 0.868), but they required significantly less time to perform (p < 0.0001, ICC = 0.088). There was a positive association between change in linear tumor measurements and whole-tumor volume (p < 0.0001). However, linear measurements did not correlate with volume of necrosis (p > 0.05). Dose, change in tumor diameters, tumor volume, and necrotic volume did not correlate with survival (p > 0.05 in all instances). However, Kaplan-Meier curves suggest that a >10% increase in necrotic volume correlated with survival (p = 0.0472). Conclusion: Semiautomated volumetric analysis of liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volume can be performed with good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility. In this small retrospective study, measurements of tumor necrosis were suggested to correlate with survival.

  5. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) infected with Epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prachi; Stallknech, David E; Quist, Charlotte F; Howerth, Elizabeth W

    2016-09-30

    Epizootic haemorrhagic disease (EHD) is the most important infectious disease of white‑tailed deer (WTD), however little is known about the role of inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis. We characterized the expression of tumor necrosis factor‑alpha (TNF-α) ex vivo in tissues of WTD experimentally or naturally infected with EHD virus serotype 2 and in WTD peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) infected with EHD virus serotype 2 in vitro. Circulating levels of TNF-α were evaluated in serum from experimentally infected deer via cytotoxicity assay. The expression of TNF-α in tissues was evaluated via immunohistochemistry (IHC) in both experimentally and naturally infected deer. Semi‑quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to assess the level of TNF-α mRNA in tissues from experimentally infected deer and WTD's PBMC. Circulating levels of TNF-α were not increased in infected animals and TNF-α was not detected in tissues of infected deer. Increased transcription of TNF-α was detected neither in infected WTD nor in the PBMC. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha may not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of EHD virus infection in WTD.

  6. A novel TNFRSF1A gene mutation in a patient with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khabazi, Alireza; Maralani, Mahafarin; Andalib, Sasan; Sakhinia, Ebrahim

    2016-10-19

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a periodic fever syndrome inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. It stems from mutations in the TNFRSF1A (accession number: NM_001065) gene expressing the receptor for tumor necrosis factor α. A patient with TRAPS may present with prolonged episodes of fever attacks, abdominal pain, severe myalgia, and painful erythema on the trunk or extremities. Here, we report an 8-year-old boy with febrile attacks occurring every 1-2months and continuing for 3-4days. The patient experienced 40°C-fever attacks without chills. Approximately 80% of fever attacks were accompanied by abdominal manifestations. Direct sequencing analysis was used to assess the genomic DNA of the patient, and a heterozygous R426L mutation in exon 10 of the TNFRSF1A gene in an autosomal dominant inheritance fashion was identified. Further genetic analyses were also carried out on his parents. Due to the fact that the mutation was not inherited from the parents, it was likely that R426L was a de novo and novel mutation in the TNFRSF1A gene, which can trigger TRAPS or TRAPS-like symptoms.

  7. Phase I trial of ISIS 104838, a 2'-methoxyethyl modified antisense oligonucleotide targeting tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Sewell, K Lea; Geary, Richard S; Baker, Brenda F; Glover, Josephine M; Mant, Timothy G K; Yu, Rosie Z; Tami, Joseph A; Dorr, F Andrew

    2002-12-01

    ISIS 104838 is a 20-mer phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) that binds tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA. It carries a 2'-methoxyethyl modification on the five 3' and 5' nucleotide sugars, with 10 central unmodified deoxynucleotides. ISIS 104838 was identified from a 264 ASO screen in phorbol myristate acetate-activated keratinocytes, and the dose response was assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated monocytes. Healthy males received multiple intravenous (i.v.) ISIS 104838 infusions in a placebo-controlled dose escalation trial (0.1-6 mg/kg). Additional volunteers received single or multiple subcutaneous (s.c.) injections. ISIS 104838 suppressed TNF-alpha protein by 85% in stimulated keratinocytes. The IC50 for TNF-alpha mRNA inhibition in stimulated monocytes was <1 microM. For i.v., C(max) occurred at the end of infusion. The effective plasma half-life was 15 to 45 min at 0.1 to 0.5 mg/kg and 1 to 1.8 h for higher doses. The apparent terminal plasma elimination half-life approximated 25 days. Obese subjects had higher plasma levels following equivalent mg/kg doses. For s.c. injections, C(max) occurred at 2 to 4 h and was lower than with equivalent i.v. dosing. Plasma bioavailability compared with i.v. was 82% following a 200 mg/ml s.c. injection. Transient activated partial thromboplastin time prolongation occurred after i.v. infusions and minimally after s.c. injections. Two subjects experienced rash, one a reversible platelet decrease, and mild injection site tenderness was noted. TNF-alpha production by peripheral blood leukocytes, induced ex vivo by LPS, was decreased by ISIS 104838 (p < 0.01). ISIS 104838, a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide, was generally well tolerated intravenously and subcutaneously. The pharmacokinetics support an infrequent dosing interval. Inhibition of TNF-alpha production ex vivo was demonstrated.

  8. Evaluation of a novel subtilisin inhibitor gene and mutant derivatives for the expression and secretion of mouse tumor necrosis factor alpha by Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Lammertyn, E; Van Mellaert, L; Schacht, S; Dillen, C; Sablon, E; Van Broekhoven, A; Anné, J

    1997-01-01

    In order to evaluate the expression and secretion signals of the highly secreted subtilisin inhibitor of Streptomyces venezuelae CBS762.70 (VSI) for the production of heterologous proteins by Streptomyces lividans, mouse tumor necrosis factor alpha (mTNF) was chosen as a model protein. The mTNF cDNA was fused to the vsi signal sequence. The analysis of secretion by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and biological activity measurements revealed an efficient translocation of mTNF. Up to 300 mg of secreted biologically active mTNF per liter could be obtained in shaken-flask cultures. By analyzing the effects of mutations in the N region of the VSI signal peptide on secretion, we found that decreasing the +3 charge of the wild-type protein to +2 resulted in a 3- to 10-fold increase in secretion. PMID:9143114

  9. Changes of energy metabolism, nutritional status and serum cytokine levels in patients with Crohn’s disease after anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Nao; Sasaki, Masaya; Kurihara, Mika; Ichimaru, Satomi; Wakita, Maki; Bamba, Shigeki; Andoh, Akira; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Amagai, Teruyoshi

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of treatment with antibodies against tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α on energy metabolism, nutritional status, serum cytokine levels in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD). Twelve patients were enrolled. Resting energy expenditure (REE) levels were measured by indirect calorimetry. Crohn’s disease activity index (CDAI) significantly decreased after treatment with anti-TNF-α therapy. Anti-TNF-α therapy did not affect REE, but respiratory quotient (RQ) significantly increased after treatment. Serum interleukin-6 levels were significantly decreased and RQ were significantly increased in high REE (≥25 kcal/kg/day) group as compared to low REE (<25 kcal/kg/day) group. In conclusion, high REE value on admission is a predictive factor for good response to treatment with anti-TNF-α antibodies in active CD patients. PMID:24062610

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Allele PTPRC Is Also Associated With Response to Anti–Tumor Necrosis Factor α Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jing; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Thomson, Brian; Padyukov, Leonid; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; Nititham, Joanne; Hughes, Laura B.; de Vries, Niek; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Alfredsson, Lars; Askling, Johan; Wedrén, Sara; Ding, Bo; Guiducci, Candace; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Crusius, J. Bart A.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; Herenius, Marieke; Weinblatt, Michael E.; Shadick, Nancy A.; Worthington, Jane; Batliwalla, Franak; Kern, Marlena; Morgan, Ann W.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Isaacs, John D.; Hyrich, Kimme; Seldin, Michael F.; Moreland, Larry W.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Tak, Paul P.; Bridges, S. Louis; Toes, Rene E. M.; Barton, Anne; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Anti–tumor necrosis factor α (anti-TNF) therapy is a mainstay of treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to test established RA genetic risk factors to determine whether the same alleles also influence the response to anti-TNF therapy. Methods A total of 1,283 RA patients receiving etanercept, infliximab, or adalimumab therapy were studied from among an international collaborative consortium of 9 different RA cohorts. The primary end point compared RA patients with a good treatment response according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria (n = 505) with RA patients considered to be nonresponders (n = 316). The secondary end point was the change from baseline in the level of disease activity according to the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (ΔDAS28). Clinical factors such as age, sex, and concomitant medications were tested as possible correlates of treatment response. Thirty-one single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of RA were genotyped and tested for any association with treatment response, using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Results Of the 31 RA-associated risk alleles, a SNP at the PTPRC (also known as CD45) gene locus (rs10919563) was associated with the primary end point, a EULAR good response versus no response (odds ratio [OR] 0.55, P = 0.0001 in the multivariate model). Similar results were obtained using the secondary end point, the ΔDAS28 (P = 0.0002). There was suggestive evidence of a stronger association in autoantibody-positive patients with RA (OR 0.55, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.39–0.76) as compared with autoantibody-negative patients (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.41–1.99). Conclusion Statistically significant associations were observed between the response to anti-TNF therapy and an RA risk allele at the PTPRC gene locus. Additional studies will be required to replicate this finding in additional patient collections

  11. Differential effect of isotype on efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha chimeric antibodies in experimental septic shock

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Immune complexes containing human gamma (g)1 or murine g2a antibodies generate secondary effector mechanisms via Fc receptor binding or complement activation, whereas those containing human g4 or murine g1 antibodies generally do not. Therefore, isotype selection of therapeutic antibodies may have important clinical consequences. In a rabbit model of human tumor necrosis factor (rhuTNF)-induced pyrexia, a murine/human chimeric g4 anti-human TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb) (cCB0011) showed a dose-dependent inhibition of pyrexia, whereas a g1 isotype variant of the same mAb gave a marked pyrexia that was seen at all doses indicative of an immune complex-mediated response. To investigate whether isotype difference could influence mAb efficacy in pathological disease states, hamster/murine chimeric g1 and g2a anti- murine TNF-alpha mAbs (TN3g1, TN3g2a) were studied in experimental shock in mice and rats. In lipopolysaccharide-induced shock in mice, treatment with TN3g1 mAb at 30 and 3 mg/kg resulted in 90% survival by 72 h (p < or = 0.004), and prolonged survival to 45 h (p < or = 0.05), respectively, compared with 100% mortality by 27 h in controls. In contrast, a g2a isotype variant of the same mAb (30 mg/kg) resulted in only 10% survival by 72 h (p < or = 0.05). In a neutropenic sepsis model in rats there was greater survival in animals receiving the g1 isotype of TN3 compared with g2a isotype variant (70 vs. 27%; p < or = 0.005) with 100% mortality in the controls. These differences were not due to the pharmacokinetic profiles of the mAbs. In models of experimental shock antibody isotype can affect outcome with inactive isotypes (human g4 and murine g1) being more efficacious than active isotypes (human g1 and murine g2a). PMID:8113678

  12. Marine Drugs Regulating Apoptosis Induced by Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL)

    PubMed Central

    Elmallah, Mohammed I. Y.; Micheau, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Marine biomass diversity is a tremendous source of potential anticancer compounds. Several natural marine products have been described to restore tumor cell sensitivity to TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced cell death. TRAIL is involved during tumor immune surveillance. Its selectivity for cancer cells has attracted much attention in oncology. This review aims at discussing the main mechanisms by which TRAIL signaling is regulated and presenting how marine bioactive compounds have been found, so far, to overcome TRAIL resistance in tumor cells. PMID:26580630

  13. Combined effects of X rays, Ro 03-8799, and hyperthermia on growth, necrosis, and cell proliferation in a mouse tumor

    SciTech Connect

    George, K.C.; Streffer, C.; Pelzer, T.

    1989-04-01

    A mouse adenocarcinoma was treated with 20 Gy X rays, hyperthermia (30 minutes at 43 degrees C), Ro-03-8799, or a combination of two or three of these agents. Combined treatments increase growth delay in the tumor and this was greatest with the combination of all three modalities. Extensive amounts of necrosis were observed after the combined treatments. This effect was most pronounced after treatment modalities including hyperthermia. On the other hand, the radiation-induced micronucleus formation was more enhanced by the sensitizer than by hyperthermia. After X irradiation and combined treatments with X rays a G2-block was observed in DNA-histograms. Tetraploid cells appeared in large amounts that started DNA synthesis followed by necrosis. From these tumors it was impossible to obtain regular DNA-histograms. Tumor regression is a combined result of reduced cell renewal, increased cytogenetic damage, and development of necrosis.

  14. Dietary zinc deficiency induces oxidative stress and promotes tumor necrosis factor-α- and interleukin-1β-induced RANKL expression in rat bone.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takako; Katsumata, Shin-Ichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kazuharu

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the effects of dietary zinc deficiency on oxidative stress and bone metabolism. Four-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of three groups for 4 weeks: a zinc-adequate group (30 ppm); a zinc-deficient group (1 ppm); and a pair-fed group (30 ppm) that was pair-fed to the zinc-deficient group. The iron content and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance level in bone were higher in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. The mRNA expression level of osteoblastogenesis-related genes such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 and runt-related transcription factor 2 was lower in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. In contrast, the mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and osteoclastogenesis-related genes such as receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 were higher in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. These findings suggested that dietary zinc deficiency reduced osteoblastogenesis via a decrease in the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 and increased osteoclastogenesis via enhancement of the expression of receptor for activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand induced by oxidative stress-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β.

  15. DNA Alkylating Therapy Induces Tumor Regression through an HMGB1-Mediated Activation of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Jennifer L.; Ditsworth, Dara; Catanzaro, Joseph M.; Sabino, Gregory; Furie, Martha B.; Kew, Richard R.; Crawford, Howard C.; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of apoptosis is associated with the development of human cancer and resistance to anticancer therapy. We have previously shown in tumor xenografts that DNA alkylating agents induce sporadic cell necrosis and regression of apoptosis-deficient tumors. Sporadic tumor cell necrosis is associated with extracellular release of cellular content such as the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein and subsequent recruitment of innate immune cells into the tumor tissue. It remained unclear whether HMGB1 and the activation of innate immunity played a role in tumor response to chemotherapy. In this study, we show that whereas DNA alkylating therapy leads to a complete tumor regression in an athymic mouse tumor xenograft model, it fails to do so in tumors deficient in HMGB1. The HMGB1-deficient tumors have an impaired ability to recruit innate immune cells including macrophages, neutrophils, and NK cells into the treated tumor tissue. Cytokine array analysis reveals that whereas DNA alkylating treatment leads to suppression of protumor cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13, loss of HMGB1 leads to elevated levels of these cytokines upon treatment. Suppression of innate immunity and HMGB1 using depleting Abs leads to a failure in tumor regression. Taken together, these results indicate that HMGB1 plays an essential role in activation of innate immunity and tumor clearance in response to DNA alkylating agents. PMID:21300822

  16. Selective cytotoxicity of transformed cells but not normal cells by a sialoglycopeptide growth regulator in the presence of tumor necrosis factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, K. M.; Fattaey, H.; Johnson, T. C.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)-resistant, SV40-transformed, murine fibroblast cell lines, F5b and F5m, became sensitive to TNF-mediated cytolysis after treatment with a biologically active 18 kDa peptide fragment (SGP) derived from a 66-kDa parental cell surface sialoglycoprotein. Neither TNF nor the SGP alone exhibited cytotoxicity to the two SV40-transformed cell lines. However, Balb/c 3T3 cells, incubated with SGP alone or with SGP and TNF, were not killed. Therefore, SGP can selectively sensitize cells for TNF alpha-mediated cytotoxicity. This selective sensitization may be due to the previously documented ability of the SGP to selectively mediate cell cycle arrest.

  17. Monocyte-conditioned medium, interleukin-1, and tumor necrosis factor stimulate the acute phase response in human hepatoma cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Human hepatoma cells mimic the acute phase response after treatment with monocyte-conditioned medium. Levels of secreted fibrinogen, alpha- 1 acid glycoprotein, C-reactive protein, haptoglobin, and the third component of complement were elevated compared with control levels after 48 h of incubation with conditioned supernatant medium from an enriched fraction of normal peripheral monocytes. Albumin levels declined and alpha-1 antitrypsin remained unchanged. Levels of specific mRNA were measured by hybridization to slot blots and Northern blots and changed in correspondence with protein alterations. Interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor stimulated the third component of complement, but did not elevate any other member of the acute phase group and were therefore only partially active in this system. The identification of an in vitro model of the human acute phase response will permit analysis of the molecular basis for coordinate regulation of this group of facultative genes. PMID:3017995

  18. Differentiation factor/leukemia inhibitory factor protection against lethal endotoxemia in mice: synergistic effect with interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Differentiation factor (D factor), also called leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), is a glycoprotein that has been increasingly recognized to possess a wide range of physiological activities. We examined the possibility that the administration of D factor may confer beneficial effects and enhance host resistance against lethal endotoxemia. A single intravenous dose of recombinant human D factor completely protected C57/Bl6 mice from the lethal effect of Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]). The protective effects were dose dependent and observed when administered 2-24 h before LPS. Previous work has shown that interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) also protect against a subsequent LPS challenge in a dose- dependent manner. When human D factor was combined with sub-protective doses of IL-1 beta or TNF-alpha, there was dramatic synergistic protection against a subsequent lethal LPS challenge. PMID:1552284

  19. Infection of murine macrophages with Toxoplasma gondii is associated with release of transforming growth factor beta and downregulation of expression of tumor necrosis factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, L E; Covaro, G; Remington, J

    1993-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is capable of invading and multiplying within murine peritoneal macrophages. Previous studies have shown that treatment of macrophage monolayers with recombinant gamma interferon but not tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is associated with intracellular killing of T. gondii by macrophages. Furthermore, infection of macrophages with T. gondii prevents their stimulation for mycobactericidal activity by TNF. Since transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is known to suppress a number of functions in macrophages, we investigated the influence of infection with T. gondii on macrophage TNF receptors and on production of TGF-beta. Infection with T. gondii was associated with increased production of TGF-beta and downregulation of TNF receptors. This effect was observed early after infection and was partially inhibited by anti-TGF-beta 1 antibody. PMID:8406801

  20. Screening bicyclic peptide libraries for protein-protein interaction inhibitors: discovery of a tumor necrosis factor-α antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lian, Wenlong; Upadhyaya, Punit; Rhodes, Curran A; Liu, Yusen; Pei, Dehua

    2013-08-14

    Protein-protein interactions represent a new class of exciting but challenging drug targets, because their large, flat binding sites lack well-defined pockets for small molecules to bind. We report here a methodology for chemical synthesis and screening of large combinatorial libraries of bicyclic peptides displayed on rigid small-molecule scaffolds. With planar trimesic acid as the scaffold, the resulting bicyclic peptides are effective for binding to protein surfaces such as the interfaces of protein-protein interactions. Screening of a bicyclic peptide library against tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) identified a potent antagonist that inhibits the TNFα-TNFα receptor interaction and protects cells from TNFα-induced cell death. Bicyclic peptides of this type may provide a general solution for inhibition of protein-protein interactions.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily costimulation couples T cell receptor signal strength to thymic regulatory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Manlove, Luke S.; Schmitz, Heather M.; Xing, Yan; Wang, Yanyan; Owen, David L.; Schenkel, Jason M.; Boomer, Jonathan S.; Green, Jonathan M.; Yagita, Hideo; Chi, Hongbo; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells express tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members, but their role in thymic Treg development is undefined. We demonstrate that Treg progenitors highly express the TNFRSF members GITR, OX40, and TNFR2. Expression of these receptors correlates directly with T cell receptor (TCR) signal strength, and requires CD28 and the kinase TAK1. Neutralizing TNFSF ligands markedly reduced Treg development. Conversely, TNFRSF agonists enhanced Treg differentiation by augmenting IL-2R/STAT5 responsiveness. GITR-ligand costimulation elicited a dose-dependent enrichment of lower-affinity cells within the Treg repertoire. In vivo, combined inhibition of GITR, OX40 and TNFR2 abrogated Treg development. Thus TNFRSF expression on Treg progenitors translates strong TCR signals into molecular parameters that specifically promote Treg differentiation and shape the Treg repertoire. PMID:24633226

  2. Media effects in modulating the conformational equilibrium of a model compound for tumor necrosis factor converting enzyme inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banchelli, Martina; Guardiani, Carlo; Sandberg, Robert B.; Menichetti, Stefano; Procacci, Piero; Caminati, Gabriella

    2015-07-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of Tumor Necrosis Factor α Converting Enzyme (TACE) are a promising therapeutic tool for Rheumatoid Arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. Here we report on an extensive chemical-physical analysis of the media effects in modulating the conformational landscape of MBET306, the common scaffold and a synthetic precursor of a family of recently discovered tartrate-based TACE inhibitors. The structural features of this molecule with potential pharmaceutical applications have been disclosed by interpreting extensive photophysical measurements in various solvents with the aid of enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations and time dependent density functional calculations. Using a combination of experimental and computational techniques, the paper provides a general protocol for studying the structure in solution of molecular systems characterized by the existence of conformational metastable states.

  3. Redeeming an old foe: protective as well as pathophysiological roles for tumor necrosis factor in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Philip E.; Punit, Shivesh

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 are major therapeutic targets for inflammatory bowel disease. Research advances have demonstrated that TNF produces pleiotropic responses in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Although in excess TNF can contribute to GI pathology, TNF is also a critical protective factor to promote GI homeostasis following injury and inflammation. Genetic studies using candidate and genome-wide association study approaches have identified variants in TNF or its receptors that are associated with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis in multiple populations, although the basis for these associations remains unclear. This review considers the efficacy and mechanism of anti-TNF therapies for inflammatory bowel disease to reconcile the many disparate aspects of TNF research and to consider the potential protective effects of TNF signaling in GI health. PMID:25477373

  4. Increased liver apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor expression in Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) reared in the northern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Corriero, Aldo; Zupa, Rosa; Pousis, Chrysovalentinos; Santamaria, Nicoletta; Bello, Giambattista; Jirillo, Emilio; Carrassi, Michele; De Giorgi, Carla; Passantino, Letizia

    2013-06-15

    The Atlantic bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus (ABFT) is intensely fished in the Mediterranean Sea to supply a prosperous capture-based mariculture industry. Liver apoptotic structures and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) gene expression were determined in: wild ABFT caught in the eastern Atlantic; juvenile ABFT reared in the central Adriatic Sea; juvenile ABFT reared in the northern Adriatic Sea; adult ABFT reared in the western Mediterranean. The highest density of liver apoptotic structures was found in the juveniles from the northern Adriatic. Two partial TNF cDNAs (TNF1 and TNF2) were cloned and sequenced. TNF1 gene expression was higher in juveniles than in adults. The highest expression of TNF2 was found in the juveniles from the northern Adriatic. These findings might be related to the juvenile exposure to environmental pollutants.

  5. Acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex encephalitis in a patient treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Kinda; Hernandez, Antonio; Andrei, Graciela; Gillemot, Sarah; Fiten, Pierre; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Bier, Jean-Christophe; David, Philippe; Delforge, Marie-Luce; Jacobs, Frédérique; Snoeck, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is the most common cause of severe sporadic encephalitis. We report a case of herpes simplex type 1-encephalitis in a 50-year-old woman receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibodies adalimumab. Although she was an acyclovir naïve patient, a mixed viral population (wild-type and acyclovir-resistant bearing a thymidine-kinase mutation) was identified in the cerebrospinal fluid. The virus in cerebrospinal fluid evolved and a second thymidine-kinase mutant virus emerged. Combined foscavir and acyclovir treatment resolved the herpes simplex encephalitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex encephalitis in a patient treated with adalimumab.

  6. Different tumor necrosis factor α antagonists have different effects on host susceptibility to disseminated and oropharyngeal candidiasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyunsook; Solis, Norma V; Louie, James S; Spellberg, Brad; Rodriguez, Natalie; Filler, Scott G

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α is important for the host defense against intracellular pathogens. We tested the effect of mouse analogs of human TNF-α antagonists, the rat anti-mouse TNF-α monoclonal antibody (XT22) and the soluble mouse 75 kDa TNF-α receptor fused to the Fc portion of mouse IgG1 (p75-Fc), on the susceptibility of mice to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis (HDC) and oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC). Both XT22 and p75-Fc significantly reduced mice survival, increased kidney fungal burden, and reduced leukocyte recruitment during HDC. However, only XT22 significantly increased the oral fungal burden and reduced leukocyte recruitment during OPC. This result suggests that XT22 and p75-Fc affect host susceptibility to different types of Candida albicans infections by different inhibitory mechanisms. PMID:25007095

  7. A novel tumor necrosis factor-responsive transcription factor which recognizes a regulatory element in hemopoietic growth factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, M.F.; Pell, L.M.; Kuczek, E.S.; Occhiodoro, F.S.; Dunn, S.M.; Vadas, M.A. ); Lenardo, M.J. )

    1990-06-01

    A conserved DNA sequence element, termed cytokine 1 (CK-1), is found in the promoter regions of many hemopoietic growth factor (HGF) genes. Mutational analyses and modification interference experiments show that this sequence specifically binds a nuclear transcription factor, NF-GMa, which is a protein with a molecular mass of 43 kilodaltons. It interacts with different affinities with the CK-1-like sequence from a number of HGF genes, including granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), granulocyte (G)-CSF, interleukin 3 (IL-3), and IL-5. The authors show that the level of NF-GMa binding is induced in embryonic fibroblasts by tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) treatment and that the CK-1 sequence from the G-CSF gene is a TNF-{alpha}-responsive enhancer in these cells.

  8. Intestinal microsporidiosis: a hidden risk in rheumatic disease patients undergoing anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy combined with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs?

    PubMed Central

    Aikawa, Nadia Emi; de Oliveira Twardowsky, Aline; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Silva, Clovis A; Silva, Ivan Leonardo Avelino França e; de Medeiros Ribeiro, Ana Cristina; Saad, Carla Gonçalves Schain; Moraes, Julio César Bertacini; de Toledo, Roberto Acayaba; Bonfá, Eloísa

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Immunosuppressed patients are at risk of microsporidiosis, and this parasitosis has an increased rate of dissemination in this population. Our objective was to evaluate the presence of microsporidiosis and other intestinal parasites in rheumatic disease patients undergoing anti-tumor necrosis factor/disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment. METHODS: Ninety-eight patients (47 with rheumatoid arthritis, 31 with ankylosing spondylitis and 11 with psoriatic arthritis) and 92 healthy control patients were enrolled in the study. Three stool samples and cultures were collected from each subject. RESULTS: The frequency of microsporidia was significantly higher in rheumatic disease patients than in control subjects (36 vs. 4%, respectively; p<0.0001), as well as in those with rheumatic diseases (32 vs. 4%, respectively; p<0.0001), ankylosing spondylitis (45 vs. 4%, respectively; p<0.0001) and psoriatic arthritis (40 vs. 4%, respectively; p<0.0001), despite a similar social-economic class distribution in both the patient and control groups (p = 0.1153). Of note, concomitant fecal leukocytes were observed in the majority of the microsporidia-positive patients (79.5%). Approximately 80% of the patients had gastrointestinal symptoms, such as diarrhea (26%), abdominal pain (31%) and weight loss (5%), although the frequencies of these symptoms were comparable in patients with and without this infection (p>0.05). Rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis disease activity parameters were comparable in both groups (p>0.05). The duration of anti-tumor necrosis factor/disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and glucocorticoid use were also similar in both groups. CONCLUSION: We have documented that microsporidiosis with intestinal mucosa disruption is frequent in patients undergoing concomitant anti-tumor necrosis factor/disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug therapy. Impaired host defenses due to the combination of the underlying disease

  9. Evolution of Ciona intestinalis Tumor necrosis factor alpha (CiTNFα): Polymorphism, tissues expression, and 3D modeling.

    PubMed

    Vizzini, Aiti; Giovanna, Parisi Maria; Cardinale, Laura; Testasecca, Lelia; Cammarata, Matteo

    2017-02-01

    Although the Tumor necrosis factor gene superfamily seems to be very conserved in vertebrates, phylogeny, tissue expression, genomic and gene organization, protein domains and polymorphism analyses showed that a strong change has happened mostly in invertebrates in which protochordates were a constraint during the immune-molecules history and evolution. RT PCR was used to investigate differential gene expression in different tissues. The expression shown was greater in the pharynx. Single-nucleotide polymorphism has been investigated in Ciona intestinalis Tumor necrosis factor alpha (CiTNFα) mRNA isolated from the pharynx of 30 ascidians collected from Licata, Sicily (Italy), by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). For this analysis, CiTNFα nucleotide sequence was separated into two fragments, TNF-1 and -2, respectively, of 630 and 540 bp. We defined 23 individual DGGE patterns (named 1 to 10 for TNF-1 and 1 to 13 for TNF-2). Five patterns for TNF-1 accounted for <10% of the individuals, whereas the pattern 13 of TNF-2 accounted for >20% of the individuals. All the patterns were verified by direct sequencing. Single base-pair mutations were observed mainly within COOH-terminus, leading to 30 nucleotide sequence variants and 30 different coding sequences segregating in two main different clusters. Although most of the base mutations were silent, four propeptide variants were detected and six amino acid replacements occurred within COOH-terminus. Statistical tests for neutrality indicated negative selection pressure on signal and mature peptide domains, but possible positive selection pressure on COOH-terminus domain. Lastly we displayed the in silico 3D structure analysis including the CiTNFα variable region.

  10. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography of Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Chemoembolisation Using Drug-Eluting Beads: A Pilot Study Focused on Sustained Tumor Necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Moschouris, Hippocrates; Malagari, Katerina; Papadaki, Marina Georgiou; Kornezos, Ioannis Matsaidonis, Dimitrios

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and the sustained antitumor effect of drug-eluting beads used for transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Ten patients with solitary, unresectable HCC underwent CEUS before, 2 days after, and 35 to 40 days after TACE using a standard dose (4 ml) of drug-eluting beads (DC Beads; Biocompatibles, Surrey, UK) preloaded with doxorubicin (25 mg doxorubicin/ml hydrated beads). For CEUS, a second-generation contrast agent (SonoVue, Bracco, Milan, Italy) and a low mechanical-index technique were used. A part of the tumor was characterized as necrotic if it showed complete lack of enhancement. The percentage of necrosis was calculated at the sonographic section that depicted the largest diameter of the tumor. Differences in the extent of early (2 days after TACE) and delayed (35 to 40 days after TACE) necrosis were quantitatively and subjectively assessed. Early post-TACE tumor necrosis ranged from 21% to 70% (mean 43.5% {+-} 19%). There was a statistically significant (p = 0.0012, paired Student t test) higher percentage of delayed tumor necrosis, which ranged from 24% to 88% (mean 52.3% {+-} 20.3%). Subjective evaluation showed a delayed obvious increase of the necrotic areas in 5 patients. In 2 patients, tumor vessels that initially remained patent disappeared on the delayed follow-up. A part of tumor necrosis after chemoembolisation of HCC with DEB seems to take place later than 2 days after TACE. CEUS may provide evidence for the sustained antitumor effect of DEB-TACE. Nevertheless, the ideal time for the imaging evaluation of tumor response remains to be defined.

  11. A Parallel 2D Numerical Simulation of Tumor Cells Necrosis by Local Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, R. F.; Loureiro, F. S.; Lobosco, M.

    2014-03-01

    Hyperthermia has been widely used in cancer treatment to destroy tumors. The main idea of the hyperthermia is to heat a specific region like a tumor so that above a threshold temperature the tumor cells are destroyed. This can be accomplished by many heat supply techniques and the use of magnetic nanoparticles that generate heat when an alternating magnetic field is applied has emerged as a promise technique. In the present paper, the Pennes bioheat transfer equation is adopted to model the thermal tumor ablation in the context of magnetic nanoparticles. Numerical simulations are carried out considering different injection sites for the nanoparticles in an attempt to achieve better hyperthermia conditions. Explicit finite difference method is employed to solve the equations. However, a large amount of computation is required for this purpose. Therefore, this work also presents an initial attempt to improve performance using OpenMP, a parallel programming API. Experimental results were quite encouraging: speedups around 35 were obtained on a 64-core machine.

  12. Monitoring glioma growth and tumor necrosis with the U-SPECT-II/CT scanner by targeting integrin αvβ3.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guoqiang; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shuang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) as an imaging tool to monitor α(v)β(3) expression and tumor necrosis. The animal model was established by subcutaneous injection of 5 × 10(6) U87MG cells into the shoulder flank of each mouse. Imaging was performed using the U-SPECT-II/CT scanner (Milabs, Utrecht, the Netherlands). Tumor volumes were determined, and the tumor uptake of (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) was calculated on the basis of SPECT/CT and compared to that from biodistribution. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine CD31 and α(v)β(3) expression levels. We found that the tumor detection limit was ≈ 0.5 mm(3) by (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) SPECT/CT. The tumor uptake of (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) from SPECT/CT was almost identical to that from biodistribution. The α(v)β(3) was expressed mainly on blood vessels for the tumors of 0.2 to 0.5 cm(3). In larger tumors, tumor α(v)β(3) expression increased due to more contribution from glioma cells. When tumors were > 0.5 cm(3), the %ID/cm(3) uptake of (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) decreased because of necrosis. The overall relationship between the tumor size and %ID of (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) was modeled as a quadratic polynomial fitting curve, with R(2) being > .95. (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) SPECT/CT is excellent for monitoring α(v)β(3) expression and tumor necrosis during tumor growth and may become a screening tool for patient selection before anti-α(v)β(3) therapy.

  13. Interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor stimulate two novel protein kinases that phosphorylate the heat shock protein hsp27 and beta-casein.

    PubMed

    Guesdon, F; Freshney, N; Waller, R J; Rawlinson, L; Saklatvala, J

    1993-02-25

    We have partially purified and characterized two protein kinases that were strongly activated by interleukin-1 (IL-1) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in MRC-5 fibroblasts. The kinases were separated by anion exchange chromatography of cytosolic fractions. They phosphorylated in vitro the small heat shock protein (hsp27) or beta-casein and were stimulated 3- and 4.5-fold, respectively, in cells that had been exposed to IL-1 or TNF for 10 min. They were distinct from the mitogen-activated protein kinases, whose activation by IL-1 or TNF has been reported recently. The hsp27 kinase phosphorylated its substrate on serine residues. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 45-kDa by gel filtration. It is probably involved in the increase in hsp27 phosphorylation seen in intact cells. The beta-casein kinase behaved as a 65-kDa protein. It phosphorylated its substrate on serine and threonine residues and had little activity on alpha-casein. The hsp27 and beta-casein kinases were not activated after stimulation of the cells with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). In contrast, the MAP kinases were activated to a similar extent (2-3-fold) by the cytokines and by PMA. The hsp27- and beta-casein kinases probably correspond to novel enzymes whose mechanisms of activation may be independent of protein kinase C or MAP kinases.

  14. Histoplasmosis in Patients With Cell-Mediated Immunodeficiency: Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, Organ Transplantation, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Luckett, Keith; Dummer, J Stephen; Miller, Geraldine; Hester, Sydney; Thomas, Lora

    2015-01-01

    Background.  Histoplasmosis causes severe disease in patients with defects of cell-mediated immunity. It is not known whether outcomes vary related to the type of immunodeficiency or class of antifungal treatment. Methods.  We reviewed cases of active histoplasmosis that occurred at Vanderbilt University Medical Center from July 1999 to June 2012 in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, a history of transplantation, or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitor use. These groups were compared for differences in clinical presentation and outcomes. In addition, outcomes were related to the initial choice of treatment. Results.  Ninety cases were identified (56 HIV, 23 transplant, 11 TNF-α inhibitor). Tumor necrosis factor-α patients had milder disease, shorter courses of therapy, and fewer relapses than HIV patients. Histoplasma antigenuria was highly prevalent in all groups (HIV 88%, transplant 95%, TNF-α 91%). Organ transplant recipients received amphotericin B formulation as initial therapy less often than other groups (22% vs 57% HIV vs 55% TNF-α; P = .006). Treatment failures only occurred in patients with severe disease. The failure rate was similar whether patients received initial amphotericin or triazole therapy. Ninety-day histoplasmosis-related mortality was 9% for all groups and did not vary significantly with choice of initial treatment. Conclusions.  Histoplasmosis caused milder disease in patients receiving TNF-α inhibitors than patients with HIV or solid organ transplantation. Treatment failures and mortality only occurred in patients with severe disease and did not vary based on type of immunosuppression or choice of initial therapy.

  15. Effects of intra-articularly administered endotoxin on clinical signs of disease and synovial fluid tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 6, and prostaglandin E2 values in horses.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, D L; MacKay, R J; Gum, G G; Colahan, P T; Meyer, J C

    1993-03-01

    In each of 4 horses, sterile synovitis was induced by intra-articular injection of 3 micrograms of Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) into one antebrachiocarpal joint; an equal volume (2 ml) of phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBSS) was injected into the opposite, control carpus. Blood and 1.5 ml of synovial fluid were obtained at postinjection hours (PIH) 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, 42, 66, and 144. Synovial fluid sample collection was accomplished by use of an indwelling, intra-articular catheter through PIH 12, and by arthrocentesis subsequently. Joint fluid samples were analyzed for cell counts, protein concentration, cytologic variables, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) values. Tumor necrosis factor and IL-6 activities and WBC count were also measured in blood. To monitor local inflammation, skin temperature of each carpus was imaged, using a thermographic scanner prior to each sample collection time. Horses had minimal systemic effects. Mean (+/- SEM) rectal temperature increased significantly to 39.02 +/- 0.15 C only at PIH 18 after intra-articular injection of LPS. One horse had signs of mild depression from PIH 7 to 18, but its vital signs did not change appreciably. Each horse had mild signs of discomfort in the LPS-injected limb from PIH 1 to 3 until PIH 8 to 10. Mean peak surface temperature of the LPS-injected carpi was significantly higher than that of control carpi from PIH 8 to 144 (P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Effect of Melilotus extract on lung injury via the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein-8-like 2 in septic mice

    PubMed Central

    LIU, MING-WEI; SU, MEI-XIAN; WANG, YUN-HUI; QIAN, CHUAN-YUN

    2015-01-01

    As a Traditional Chinese Medicine, Melilotus extracts have been reported to function as an anti-inflammatory agent, antioxidant and inhibitor of capillary permeability. The present study aimed to identify the mechanisms by which Melilotus interferes with inflammation-associated and oxidative stress pathways during sepsis. An animal model of cecal ligation-perforation (CLP)-induced sepsis was established. Two hours prior to surgery, animals in the treatment group were administered 25 mg/kg Melilotus extract tablets and subsequently every 8 h. At 24 h post-administration, pathological modifications in lung tissue and expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein-8-like 2 (TIPE2) expression, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), inhibitor of κB kinase (IκB), pro-inflammatory mediators (interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α), myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), were examined. The results showed that Melilotus extract had a marked effect on the pathological manifestation of lung tissue and lung inflammatory response, the upregulation of TIPE2, HO-1 and IκB expression, and the inhibition of TLR4 and NF-κB activities. In addition, following treatment with Melilotus extract, the model animals demonstrated decreased levels of MPO and MDA as well as increased levels of SOD. In conclusion, these results indicated that Melilotus extract may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of CLP-induced lung injury, the mechanism of which proceeded via inflammation- and oxidation-associated pathways by increasing TIPE2 expression. PMID:25405912

  17. Down-regulation of protein kinase Ceta potentiates the cytotoxic effects of exogenous tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand in PC-3 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sonnemann, Jürgen; Gekeler, Volker; Sagrauske, Antje; Müller, Cornelia; Hofmann, Hans-Peter; Beck, James F

    2004-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a highly promising candidate for the treatment of cancer because it elicits cell death in the majority of tumor cells while sparing most normal cells. Some cancers, however, display resistance to TRAIL, suggesting that treatment with TRAIL alone may be insufficient for cancer therapy. In the present study, we explored whether the apoptotic responsiveness of PC-3 prostate cancer cells to TRAIL could be enhanced by targeting the novel protein kinase C (PKC) isoform eta. Transfection of PC-3 cells with second-generation chimeric antisense oligonucleotides against PKCeta caused a time- and dose-dependent knockdown of PKCeta, as revealed by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Knockdown of PKCeta resulted in a marked amplification of TRAIL's cytotoxic activity. Cell killing could be substantially prevented by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. In addition, PKCeta knockdown and administration of TRAIL significantly synergized in activation of caspase-3 and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Knockdown of PKCeta augmented TRAIL-induced dissipation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol, indicating that PKCeta acts upstream of mitochondria. We conclude that PKCeta represents a considerable resistance factor with respect to TRAIL and a promising target to exploit the therapeutic potential of TRAIL.

  18. Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha does not potentiate cell killing after photodynamic therapy with a silicon phthalocyanine in A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Azizuddin, K; Kalka, K; Chiu, S M; Ahmad, N; Mukhtar, H; Separovic, D

    2001-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel cancer treatment utilizing a photosensitizer, visible light and oxygen. PDT with the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4, a new photosensitizer, is highly effective in cancer cell destruction and tumor ablation. The mechanisms underlying cancer cell killing by PDT are not fully understood. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) is a multifunctional cytokine that has been implicated in photocytotoxicity. We asked whether recombinant human TNF (rhTNF) affects Pc 4-PDT cytotoxicity in A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Co-treatment of A431 cells with various doses of Pc 4-PDT and a sub-lethal rhTNF dose led to a sub-additive reduction in cell survival. In addition, in the presence of Pc 4-PDT or rhTNF, caspase-3 activity and apoptosis were induced. The combined treatment, however, did not potentiate either caspase-3 activity or apoptosis. Similar to previous findings we observed that Pc 4-PDT initiated a time-dependent extracellular TNF accumulation. The data suggest that: a) PDT and rhTNF induce cancer cell killing through different mechanisms; and b) Pc 4-PDT-induced TNF production is a stress response that may not directly affect photocytotoxicity.

  19. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α T-857C (rs1799724) Polymorphism and Risk of Cancers: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, June

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the potential association of tumor necrosis factor-α T-857C polymorphism with susceptibility to the five common malignant tumors. Materials and Methods. A comprehensive search of PubMed/Medline, Embase, and Web of Science databases was performed up to November 2015. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated to assess the strength of the association. Subgroup analysis, heterogeneity analyses, and publication bias were also texted in the meta-analysis. Results. A total of twenty-two publications involving 5215 cases and 6755 controls were recruited. Overall, the meta-analysis revealed an increased risk between the TNF-α T-857C polymorphism and gastric cancer susceptibility in T versus C model, heterozygote genetic model, and dominant genetic model. An increased risk between the TNF-α T-857C polymorphism and hepatocellular cancer susceptibility in homozygote genetic model and recessive genetic model was also found. No significant association was found between the TNF-α T-857C polymorphism and colorectal cancer, cervical cancer, and prostate cancer. Conclusions. Our meta-analyses suggest that TNF-α T-857C polymorphism may be associated with increased risk of gastric cancer and hepatocellular cancer development. Therefore, the TNF-α T-857C polymorphism could be considered as one possible risk factor of gastric cancer and hepatocellular cancer according to our study. PMID:28115787

  20. Radiocurability by Targeting Tumor Necrosis Factor-{alpha} Using a Bispecific Antibody in Carcinoembryonic Antigen Transgenic Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Larbouret, Christel; Robert, Bruno; Linard, Christine; Teulon, Isabelle; Gourgou, Sophie M.Sc.; Bibeau, Frederic; Martineau, Pierre; Santoro, Lore; Pouget, Jean-Pierre; Pelegrin, Andre; Azria, David

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) enhances radiotherapy (RT) killing of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. To overcome systemic side effects, we used a bispecific antibody (BsAb) directed against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and TNF-{alpha} to target this cytokine in a CEA-expressing colon carcinoma. We report the evaluation of this strategy in immunocompetent CEA-transgenic mice. Methods and Materials: The murine CEA-transfected colon carcinoma MC-38 was used for all experiments. In vitro, clonogenic assays were performed after RT alone, TNF-{alpha} alone, and RT plus TNF-{alpha}. In vivo, the mice were randomly assigned to treatment groups: control, TNF-{alpha}, BsAb, BsAb plus TNF-{alpha}, RT, RT plus TNF-{alpha}, and RT plus BsAb plus TNF-{alpha}. Measurements of endogenous TNF-{alpha} mRNA levels and evaluation of necrosis (histologic evaluation) were assessed per treatment group. Results: In vitro, combined RT plus TNF-{alpha} resulted in a significant decrease in the survival fraction at 2 Gy compared with RT alone (p < 0.00001). In vivo, we observed a complete response in 5 (50%) of 10, 2 (20%) of 10, 2 (18.2%) of 11, and 0 (0%) of 12 treated mice in the RT plus BsAb plus TNF-{alpha}, RT plus TNF-{alpha}, RT alone, and control groups, respectively. This difference was statistically significant when TNF-{alpha} was targeted with the BsAb (p = 0.03). The addition of exogenous TNF-{alpha} to RT significantly increased the endogenous TNF-{alpha} mRNA level, particularly when TNF-{alpha} was targeted with BsAb (p < 0.01). The percentages of necrotic area were significantly augmented in the RT plus BsAb plus TNF-{alpha} group. Conclusion: These results suggest that targeting TNF-{alpha} with the BsAb provokes RT curability in a CEA-expressing digestive tumor syngenic model and could be considered as a solid rationale for clinical trials.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha impairs hepatic insulin signaling and stimulates the overproduction of hepatic apolipoprotein B100-containing very low density lipoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanisms underlying hepatic overproduction of apolipoprotein B (apoB) 100-containing very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in insulin resistance induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a were investigated. In the present study, we examined the potential role of TNF-a in insulin signaling and lipopro...

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha impairs hepatic insulin signaling and stumlates the overproduction of hepatic apolipoprotein B100-containing very low density lipoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanisms underlying hepatic overproduction of apolipoprotein B (apoB) 100-containing very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in insulin resistance induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a were investigated. In the present study, we examined the potential role of TNF-a in insulin signaling and lipopro...

  3. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha directly stimulates the overproduction of hepatic apolipoprotein B100-containing VLDL via impairment of hepatic insulin signaling.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin resistant states are commonly associated with both increased circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-a) and hepatic overproduction of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). In the present study, we examined the potential mechanistic link between TNF-a and hepatic overproduction of ap...

  4. Icaritin activates JNK-dependent mPTP necrosis pathway in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunxian; Chen, Zhengrong; Lu, Xingsheng; Wu, Hao; Yang, Qunying; Xu, Dongfeng

    2016-03-01

    The colorectal cancer (CRC) is one leading contributor of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The search for effective anti-CRC agents is valuable. In the current study, we showed that icaritin (ICT), an active natural ingredient from the Chinese plant Epimedium, potently inhibited proliferation and survival of established (HT-29, HCT-116, DLD-1, and SW-620) and primary (patient-derived) CRC cells. Significantly, ICT mainly induced necrosis, but not apoptosis, in CRC cells. The necrosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 attenuated ICT-mediated cytotoxicity in CRC cells. We showed that ICT treatment in CRC cells induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening, which was evidenced by mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) decrease and mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator-1 (ANT-1)-cyclophilin-D (CyPD) association. On the other hand, mPTP blockers, including sanglifehrin A, cyclosporin A, and bongkrekic acid, as well as siRNA-mediated knockdown of mPTP component (CyPD or ANT-1), significantly alleviated ICT-mediated cytotoxicity against CRC cells. We suggested that Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation by ICT mediated mPTP opening and subsequent CRC cell necrosis. JNK pharmacological inhibition, dominant negative mutation, or shRNA downregulation suppressed ICT-induced MMP reduction and subsequent HT-29 cell necrosis. In vivo, oral gavage of ICT dramatically inhibited HT-29 xenograft growth in nude mice. The in vivo activity by ICT was largely attenuated by co-administration with the mPTP blocker CsA. Collectively, our results showed that ICT exerts potent inhibitory effect against CRC cells in vitro and in vivo. JNK-dependent mPTP necrosis pathway could be key mechanism responsible for ICT's actions.

  5. Anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activities of an exopolysaccharide from Rhizopus nigricans on CT26 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Cao, Jianfeng; Chen, Guochuang; Xu, Yanghui; Lu, Jingbo; Fang, Fang; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-07-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activities of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) from Rhizopus nigricans. Our results showed EPS could significantly inhibit the tumor growth and increase the immune organs index of CT26 tumor-bearing mice. EPS treatment increased the productions of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in serum. The increase of percentage of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells among total spleen T lymphocyte was also observed. Furthermore, EPS remarkably stimulate spleen lymphocytes proliferation in the absence or presence of mitogens. In addition, we found that EPS had synergistic effect with chemotherapy and improved immunosuppressive effect induced by 5-Fu. In summary, these findings indicated that the antitumor effects of EPS might be partly due to immune function activation and it might have potential to be used in the treatment for colorectal cancer.

  6. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in Gnotobiotic Mice Infected with an Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Isogai, Emiko; Isogai, Hiroshi; Kimura, Koichi; Hayashi, Shunji; Kubota, Toru; Fujii, Nobuhiro; Takeshi, Koichi

    1998-01-01

    Gnotobiotic mice inoculated with an enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 strain developed a flaccid paresis, usually culminating in death. The bacteria colonized feces at 109 to 1010 CFU per g (inoculum size: 2.0 × 109 CFU/mouse), and Shiga-like toxins (SLTs) were detected in the feces. A microscopic examination of colons showed mild inflammatory cell infiltration, thinning of the intestinal wall, or necrotic foci. Necrosis of tubular cells was noted in these symptomatic mice. Microhemorrhage, thrombosis, and edematous changes of the brain were also seen. Inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1α (IL-1α), and IL-6, were detected in the kidney after EHEC infection, but not in the serum. In the brain, only TNF-α was detected. When 2.0 × 102 CFU of EHEC O157:H7 was fed to germ-free mice, the number of bacteria began to rise rapidly on day 1 and was maintained at 108 to 109 CFU/g of feces. SLTs were detected in the feces of the mice. However, the mice showed no histological changes and no cytokine responses, similar to what was found for controls. Treatment with TNF-α modified the clinical neural signs, histopathological changes, and cytokine responses; mice treated with TNF-α developed severe neurotoxic symptoms and had higher frequencies of systemic symptoms and glomerular pathology. Strong cytokine responses were seen in the kidney and brain. Serum cytokines were also detected in this group. In contrast, a TNF-α inhibitor (protease inhibitor) inhibited these responses, especially in the brain. However, local synthesis of the cytokines was observed in the kidney. Thus, TNF-α and the other proinflammatory cytokines could be important in modifying the disease caused by EHEC. PMID:9423858

  7. Piceatannol inhibits MMP-9-dependent invasion of tumor necrosis factor-α-stimulated DU145 cells by suppressing the Akt-mediated nuclear factor-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    JAYASOORIYA, RAJAPAKSHA GENDARA PRASAD THARANGA; LEE, YONG-GAB; KANG, CHANG-HEE; LEE, KYOUNG-TAE; CHOI, YUNG HYUN; PARK, SUNG-YONG; HWANG, JAE-KWAN; KIM, GI-YOUNG

    2013-01-01

    Piceatannol has potent anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anticancer and antiproliferative effects. However, little is known about the mechanism by which piceatannol inhibits invasion and metastasis. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of piceatannol on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in DU145 human prostate cancer cells. The results revealed that MMP-9 activity was significantly increased in response to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). However, treatment with piceatannol reversed TNF-α- and MMP-9-induced gelatin zymography and its gene expression. In addition, a Matrigel invasion assay determined that piceatannol reduces the TNF-α-induced invasion of DU145 cells. Nuclear factor-κ B (NF-κB) is a significant transcription factor that regulates numerous genes involved in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Therefore, whether piceatannol acts on NF-κB to regulate MMP-9 gene expression was analyzed. The results revealed that piceatannol attenuates MMP-9 gene expression via the suppression of NF-κB activity. Using a specific NF-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, it was confirmed that TNF-α-induced MMP-9 gene expression is primarily regulated by NF-κB activation. Piceatannol inhibited NF-κB activity by suppressing nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 and p50 subunits. Furthermore, TNF-α-induced Akt phosphorylation was significantly downregulated in the presence of piceatannol. The Akt inhibitor LY294002 caused a significant decrease in TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity and MMP-9 gene expression. Overall, these data suggest that piceatannol inhibits TNF-α-induced invasion by suppression of MMP-9 activation via the Akt-mediated NF-κB pathway in DU145 prostate cancer cells. PMID:23255946

  8. Correlations between skin lesions induced by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α and selected cytokines in Crohn's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Włodarczyk, Marcin; Sobolewska, Aleksandra; Wójcik, Bartosz; Loga, Karolina; Fichna, Jakub; Wiśniewska-Jarosińska, Maria

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation between the appearance of skin lesions and concentration of interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-23 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in Crohn’s disease (CD) patients during anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) therapy METHODS: A prospective study included 30 adult patients with CD of Caucasian origin (19 men and 11 women; mean age ± SD 32.0 ± 8.6 years) during biological therapy with anti-TNF-α antibodies from January 2012 to March 2013. Eighteen patients were treated with infliximab, seven with adalimumab and five with certolizumab. Inclusion criteria were exacerbation of the underlying disease, Crohn’s Disease Activity Index over 300 and the ineffectiveness of previously used non-biological therapies. Patients with a history of psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and other autoimmune skin lesions were excluded from the study. The control group consisted of 12 healthy subjects. A diagnostic survey was carried out, blood tests and careful skin examination were performed, and the serum levels of IL-17, IL-23 and IFN-γ were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays technique. Dermatoses that have developed in the course of biological therapy in patients who had no pre-existing skin lesions of similar character were qualified as skin lesions induced by anti-TNF-α therapy. RESULTS: Skin manifestations occurred in 18 of CD patients during the anti-TNF-α therapy (60%), in the average time of 10.16 ± 3.42 mo following the beginning of the 52-wk treatment cycle. Skin lesions observed in CD patients during biological therapy included psoriasiform lesions (44.4%), and eczema forms lesions (22.2%). In CD patients with drug induced skin lesions significantly higher levels of hemoglobin (13.3 ± 1.5 g/dL vs 10.8 ± 1.9 g/dL, P = 0.018) and hematocrit (39.9% ± 4.5% vs 34.3% ± 5.4%, P = 0.01), as well as a significantly lower level of platelets (268 ± 62 × 103/μL vs 408 ± 239 × 103/μL, P = 0.046) was observed compared with CD patients

  9. Myosin Light Chain Kinase Expression Induced via Tumor Necrosis Fac