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Sample records for activities turnover items

  1. The effect of item content overlap on organizational commitment questionnaire--turnover cognitions relationships.

    PubMed

    Bozeman, D P; Perrewé, P L

    2001-02-01

    This study examined the effect of overlapping scale content when certain items in the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ) are used to predict turnover cognition measures. Analyses of judgmental data collected from 25 subject matter experts suggested that 6 OCQ items reflected a desire or an intent to retain membership in one's organization. Confirmatory factor analyses of survey data from 172 master of business administration alumni showed that the 6 OCQ retention items shared overlapping content with turnover cognitions items. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses of survey data from 330 hotel managers showed that (a) removing the 6 OCQ retention items caused a significant decrease in the variance explained in a measure of turnover cognitions and (b) the size of this effect is larger than that suggested by previous work.

  2. Amyloid precursor protein controls cholesterol turnover needed for neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Pierrot, Nathalie; Tyteca, Donatienne; D'auria, Ludovic; Dewachter, Ilse; Gailly, Philippe; Hendrickx, Aurélie; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Haylani, Laetitia El; Muls, Nathalie; N'kuli, Francisca; Laquerrière, Annie; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Campion, Dominique; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Courtoy, Pierre J; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-Noël

    2013-04-01

    Perturbation of lipid metabolism favours progression of Alzheimer disease, in which processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) has important implications. APP cleavage is tightly regulated by cholesterol and APP fragments regulate lipid homeostasis. Here, we investigated whether up or down regulation of full-length APP expression affected neuronal lipid metabolism. Expression of APP decreased HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR)-mediated cholesterol biosynthesis and SREBP mRNA levels, while its down regulation had opposite effects. APP and SREBP1 co-immunoprecipitated and co-localized in the Golgi. This interaction prevented Site-2 protease-mediated processing of SREBP1, leading to inhibition of transcription of its target genes. A GXXXG motif in APP sequence was critical for regulation of HMGCR expression. In astrocytes, APP and SREBP1 did not interact nor did APP affect cholesterol biosynthesis. Neuronal expression of APP decreased both HMGCR and cholesterol 24-hydroxylase mRNA levels and consequently cholesterol turnover, leading to inhibition of neuronal activity, which was rescued by geranylgeraniol, generated in the mevalonate pathway, in both APP expressing and mevastatin treated neurons. We conclude that APP controls cholesterol turnover needed for neuronal activity.

  3. Factor- and Item-Level Analyses of the 38-Item Activities Scale for Kids-Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Anita M.; Gorton, George E.; Bjornson, Kristie; Bevans, Katherine; Stout, Jean L.; Narayanan, Unni; Tucker, Carole A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Children and adolescents highly value their ability to participate in relevant daily life and recreational activities. The Activities Scale for Kids-performance (ASKp) instrument measures the frequency of performance of 30 common childhood activities, and has been shown to be valid and reliable. A revised and expanded 38-item ASKp (ASKp38)…

  4. Statistical testing of the association between annual turnover and marketing activities in SMEs using χ2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pater, Liana; Miclea, Şerban; Izvercian, Monica

    2016-06-01

    This paper considers the impact of SMEs' annual turnover upon its marketing activities (in terms of marketing responsibility, strategic planning and budgeting). Empirical results and literature reviews unveil that SMEs managers incline to partake in planned and profitable marketing activities, depending on their turnover's level. Thus, using the collected data form 131 Romanian SMEs managers, we have applied the Chi-Square Test in order to validate or invalidate three research assumptions (hypotheses), created starting from the empirical and literature findings.

  5. Phosphatidylinositol turnover is associated with human natural killer cell activation by tumor target cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, T.A.; Brahmi, Z.

    1986-03-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cell activity has been shown to be a binding-dependent event leading to the destruction of various targets. This suggests a possible role for plasma membrane phospholipid turnover in coupling a receptor-mediated binding event with transduction of a intracellular signal to result in the activation of the effector cell. Currently, phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover is implicated in several immune cell systems. Therefore, in this study, the authors examined phospholipid turnover in human NK cells upon exposure to a sensitive (K562) and a resistant (YAC-1) target cell (TC). NK cell membrane phospholipids were labelled with Phosphorus-32 (/sup 32/P) and, following stimulation, were extracted and run on silica gel thin-layer chromatography. Labelled phospholipids were visualized by autoradiography then scraped and counted in a liquid scintillation counter. A 2.5 fold increase in label incorporation into PI relative to controls was shown to occur when NK cells were stimulated by K562 for 2 hours. In contrast, no increased labelling of PI relative to controls was noted when NK cells were stimulated by YAC-1 for the same period of time. No change in incorporation of /sup 32/P into phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine occurred in either set of conditions. These results suggest that PI turnover may be an early activation event in NK cells following binding of K562.

  6. Decrease in platelet activating factor stimulated phosphoinositide turnover during storage of human platelets in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.G.; Shukla, S.D. )

    1987-05-01

    Human platelet concentrate from the American Red Cross Blood Center was stored at 24{degree}C in a shaker and aliquots were taken out at time intervals aseptically. Platelet activating factor (PAF) stimulated turnover of phosphoinositide (PPI) was monitored by assaying {sup 32}P incorporation into phosphoinositides using platelet rich plasma (PRP). Platelets in PRP were incubated with 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M PAF at 37{degree}C with gentle shaking and after 5 min their lipids were extracted and analysed by TLC for {sup 32}P-phosphoinositides. The percent stimulation of {sup 32}P incorporation by PAF (over control) into PPI was approximately 250, 100, 60, 25 and 20 on days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6, respectively. This indicated a dramatic decrease in PAF responsive turnover of platelet PPI during storage. These findings have important implications in relation to PAF receptor activity and viability of platelets at different periods of storage.

  7. Differential Item Functioning Analysis of the 2003-04 NHANES Physical Activity Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Yong; Zhu, Weimo

    2011-01-01

    Using differential item functioning (DIF) analyses, this study examined whether there were any DIF items in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) physical activity (PA) questionnaire. A subset of adult data from the 2003-04 NHANES study (n = 3,083) was used. PA items related to respondents' occupational, transportation,…

  8. Protein turnover and proliferation. Turnover kinetics associated with the elevation of 3T3-cell acid-proteinase activity and cessation of net protein gain.

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, T D; Minassian, I A; Roux, L

    1982-01-01

    1. At least 95% of the total protein of A31-3T3 cell cultures undergoes turnover. 2. First-order exponential kinetics were used to provide a crude approximation of averaged protein synthesis, Ks, degradation, Kd, and net accumulation, Ka, as cells ceased growth at near-confluent density in unchanged Dulbecco's medium containing 10% serum. The values of the relationship Ka = Ks - Kd were : 5%/h = 6%/h - 1%/h in growing cells, and 0%/h = 3%/h - 3%/h in steady-state resting cells. 3. As determined by comparison of the progress of protein synthesis and net protein accumulation, the time course of increase in protein degradation coincided with the onset of an increase in lysosomal proteinase activity and decrease in thymidine incorporation after approx. 2 days of exponential growth. 4. After acute serum deprivation, rapid increases in protein degradation of less than 1%/h could be superimposed on the prevailing degradation rate in either growing or resting cells. The results indicate that two proteolytic mechanisms can be distinguished on the basis of the kinetics of their alterations. A slow mechanism changes in relation to proliferative status and lysosomal enzyme elevation. A prompt mechanism, previously described by others, changes before changes in cell-cycle distribution or lysosomal proteinase activity. 5. When the serum concentration of growing cultures was decreased to 1% or 0.25%, then cessation of growth was accompanied by a lower steady-state protein turnover rate of 2.0%/h or 1.5%/h respectively. When growth ceased under conditions of overcrowded cultures, or severe nutrient insufficiency, protein turnover did not attain a final steady state, but declined continually into the death of the culture. PMID:6756389

  9. Turnover of whole body proteins and myofibrillar proteins in middle-aged active men

    SciTech Connect

    Zackin, M.; Meredith, C.; Frontera, W.; Evans, W.

    1986-03-05

    Endurance-trained older men have a higher proportion of lean tissue and greater muscle cell oxidative capacity, reversing age-related trends and suggesting major changes in protein metabolism. In this study, protein turnover was determined in 6 middle-aged (52+/-1 yr) men who were well trained (VO/sub 2/ max 55.2+/-5.0 ml O/sub 2//kg.min) and lean (body fat 18.9+/-2.8%, muscle mass 36.6+/-0.6%). The maintained habitual exercise while consuming 0.6, 0.9 or 1.2 g protein/kg.day for 10-day periods. N flux was measured from /sup 15/N in urea after oral /sup 15/N-glycine administration. Myofibrillar protein breakdown was estimated from urinary 3-methyl-histidine. Dietary protein had no effect on turnover rates, even when N balance was negative. Whole body protein synthesis was 3.60+/-0.12 g/kg.day and breakdown was 3.40+/-0.14 g/kg.day for all N intakes. Whole body protein flux, synthesis and breakdown were similar to values reported for sedentary young (SY) or sedentary old (SO) men on comparable diets. 3-me-his (3.67+/-0.14 ..mu..mol/kg.day) was similar to values reported for SY but higher (p<0.01) than for SO. Myofibrillar protein breakdown per unit muscle mass (185+/-7 ..mu..mol 3-me-his/g creatinine) was higher (p<0.01) than for SY or SO. In active middle-aged men, myofibrillar proteins may account for a greater proportion of whole body protein turnover, despite an age-related reduction in muscle mass.

  10. Modulation of bladder function by luminal adenosine turnover and A1 receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Prakasam, H. Sandeep; Herrington, Heather; Roppolo, James R.; Jackson, Edwin K.

    2012-01-01

    The bladder uroepithelium transmits information to the underlying nervous and musculature systems, is under constant cyclical strain, expresses all four adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3), and is a site of adenosine production. Although adenosine has a well-described protective effect in several organs, there is a lack of information about adenosine turnover in the uroepithelium or whether altering luminal adenosine concentrations impacts bladder function or overactivity. We observed that the concentration of extracellular adenosine at the mucosal surface of the uroepithelium was regulated by ecto-adenosine deaminase and by equilibrative nucleoside transporters, whereas adenosine kinase and equilibrative nucleoside transporters modulated serosal levels. We further observed that enriching endogenous adenosine by blocking its routes of metabolism or direct activation of mucosal A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), a selective agonist, stimulated bladder activity by lowering the threshold pressure for voiding. Finally, CCPA did not quell bladder hyperactivity in animals with acute cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis but instead exacerbated their irritated bladder phenotype. In conclusion, we find that adenosine levels at both surfaces of the uroepithelium are modulated by turnover, that blocking these pathways or stimulating A1 receptors directly at the luminal surface promotes bladder contractions, and that adenosine further stimulates voiding in animals with cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis. PMID:22552934

  11. Deubiquitylating enzyme USP9x regulates hippo pathway activity by controlling angiomotin protein turnover

    PubMed Central

    Thanh Nguyen, Hung; Andrejeva, Diana; Gupta, Rajat; Choudhary, Chunaram; Hong, Xin; Eichhorn, Pieter J A; Loya, Anand C; Cohen, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway has been identified as a key barrier for tumorigenesis, acting through downregulation of YAP/TAZ activity. Elevated YAP/TAZ activity has been documented in many human cancers. Ubiquitylation has been shown to play a key role in regulating YAP/TAZ activity through downregulation of a number of Hippo pathway components. Several ubiquitin ligase complexes have been implicated in this process, however, little is known about the deubiquitylating enzymes that counteract these activities to regulate YAP/TAZ. Here we identify the deubiquitylating enzyme USP9x as a regulator of YAP/TAZ activity. We demonstrate that USPx regulates ubiquitin-mediated turnover of the YAP inhibitor, Angiomotin. USP9x acts to deubiquitylate Angiomotin at lysine 496, resulting in stabilization of Angiomotin and lower YAP/TAZ activity. USP9x mRNA levels were reduced in several cancers. Clinically, USP9x mRNA levels were reduced in several cancers with low USPx expression correlating with poor prognosis in renal clear cell carcinoma. Our data indicate that USP9x may be a useful biomarker for renal clear cell carcinoma. PMID:27462448

  12. Development of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: constructing an item pool

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Laura; Jenkinson, Crispin; Dummett, Sarah; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Morley, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire is a patient-reported outcome measure in development that is grounded on the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The study reported here aimed to inform and generate an item pool for the new measure, which is specifically designed for the assessment of participation and activity in patients experiencing a range of health conditions. Methods Items were informed through in-depth interviews conducted with 37 participants spanning a range of conditions. Interviews aimed to identify how their condition impacted their ability to participate in meaningful activities. Conditions included arthritis, cancer, chronic back pain, diabetes, motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and spinal cord injury. Transcripts were analyzed using the framework method. Statements relating to ICF themes were recast as questionnaire items and shown for review to an expert panel. Cognitive debrief interviews (n=13) were used to assess items for face and content validity. Results ICF themes relevant to activities and participation in everyday life were explored, and a total of 222 items formed the initial item pool. This item pool was refined by the research team and 28 generic items were mapped onto all nine chapters of the ICF construct, detailing activity and participation. Cognitive interviewing confirmed the questionnaire instructions, items, and response options were acceptable to participants. Conclusion Using a clear conceptual basis to inform item generation, 28 items have been identified as suitable to undergo further psychometric testing. A large-scale postal survey will follow in order to refine the instrument further and to assess its psychometric properties. The final instrument is intended for use in clinical trials and interventions targeted at maintaining or improving activity and participation. PMID:26056503

  13. Effects of Activating Mutations on EGFR Cellular Protein Turnover and Amino Acid Recycling Determined Using SILAC Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Greig, Michael J; Niessen, Sherry; Weinrich, Scott L; Feng, Jun Li; Shi, Manli; Johnson, Ted O

    2015-01-01

    Rapid mutations of proteins that are targeted in cancer therapy often lead to drug resistance. Often, the mutation directly affects a drug's binding site, effectively blocking binding of the drug, but these mutations can have other effects such as changing the protein turnover half-life. Utilizing SILAC MS, we measured the cellular turnover rates of an important non-small cell lung cancer target, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Wild-type (WT) EGFR, EGFR with a single activating mutant (Del 746-750 or L858R), and the drug-resistant double mutant (L858R/T790M) EGFR were analyzed. In non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, EGFR turnover rates ranged from 28 hours in A431 cells (WT) to 7.5 hours in the PC-9 cells (Del 746-750 mutant). The measurement of EGFR turnover rate in PC-9 cells dosed with irreversible inhibitors has additional complexity due to inhibitor effects on cell viability and results were reported as a range. Finally, essential amino acid recycling (K and R) was measured in different cell lines. The recycling was different in each cell line, but the overall inclusion of the effect of amino acid recycling on calculating EGFR turnover rates resulted in a 10-20% reduction in rates.

  14. Protein turnover, amino acid requirements and recommendations for athletes and active populations

    PubMed Central

    Poortmans, J.R.; Carpentier, A.; Pereira-Lancha, L.O.; Lancha, A.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major deposit of protein molecules. As for any cell or tissue, total muscle protein reflects a dynamic turnover between net protein synthesis and degradation. Noninvasive and invasive techniques have been applied to determine amino acid catabolism and muscle protein building at rest, during exercise and during the recovery period after a single experiment or training sessions. Stable isotopic tracers (13C-lysine, 15N-glycine, 2H5-phenylalanine) and arteriovenous differences have been used in studies of skeletal muscle and collagen tissues under resting and exercise conditions. There are different fractional synthesis rates in skeletal muscle and tendon tissues, but there is no major difference between collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis. Strenuous exercise provokes increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis, the opposite occurring during the recovery period. Individuals who exercise respond differently when resistance and endurance types of contractions are compared. Endurance exercise induces a greater oxidative capacity (enzymes) compared to resistance exercise, which induces fiber hypertrophy (myofibrils). Nitrogen balance (difference between protein intake and protein degradation) for athletes is usually balanced when the intake of protein reaches 1.2 g·kg−1·day−1 compared to 0.8 g·kg−1·day−1 in resting individuals. Muscular activities promote a cascade of signals leading to the stimulation of eukaryotic initiation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. As suggested in several publications, a bolus of 15-20 g protein (from skimmed milk or whey proteins) and carbohydrate (± 30 g maltodextrine) drinks is needed immediately after stopping exercise to stimulate muscle protein and tendon collagen turnover within 1 h. PMID:22666780

  15. Microbial production, enzyme activity, and carbon turnover in surface sediments of the Hudson River estuary.

    PubMed

    Sinsabaugh, R L; Findlay, S

    1995-09-01

    The detrital food web is a major nexus of energy flow in nearly all aquatic ecosystems. Energy enters this nexus by microbial assimilation of detrital carbon. To link microbiological variables with ecosystem process, it is necessary to understand the regulatory hierarchy that controls the distribution of microbial biomass and activity. Toward that goal, we investigated variability in microbial abundance and activities within the tidal freshwater estuary of the Hudson River. Surface sediments were collected from four contrasting sites: a mid-channel shoal, two types of wetlands, and a tributary confluence. These samples, collected in June to August 1992, were sorted into two to four size fractions, depending on the particle size distribution at each site. Each fraction was analyzed for bacterial biomass (by acridine orange direct counting), bacterial production (by (3)H-thymidine incorporation into DNA), fungal biomass (by ergosterol extraction), fungal production (by biomass accrual), and the potential activities of seven extracellular enzymes involved in the degradation of detrital structural molecules. Decomposition rates for particulate organic carbon (POC) were estimated from a statistical model relating mass loss rates to endocellulase activity. Within samples, bacterial biomass and productivity were negatively correlated with particle size: Standing stocks and rates in the <63-μm class were roughly twofold greater than in the >4-mm class. Conversely, fungal biomass was positively correlated with particle size, with standing stocks in the largest size class more than 1OX greater than in the smallest. Extracellular enzyme activities also differed significantly among size classes, with high carbohydrase activities associated with the largest particles, while oxidative activities predominated in the smallest size classes. Among sites, the mid-channel sediments had the lowest POC standing stock (2% of sediment dry mass) and longest turnover time (approximately 1

  16. Calcium mobilization and phosphoinositide turnover in fluoride-activated human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Strnad, C.F.; Wong, K.

    1986-05-01

    Fluoride ion, at concentrations above 10 mM, has been found to activate a superoxide production response in human neutrophils which is strongly dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium. In an attempt to further explore the calcium requirement of fluoride-induced neutrophil activation, intracellular calcium concentrations were monitored through use of the fluorescent calcium probe, Quin 2. Fluoride ion, at concentrations between 10 and 20 mM, was found to elicit a rise in intracellular calcium levels which was characterized by a lag period of 4 to 10 min and a prolonged duration of action (greater than 20 min). In contrast, the chemotactic peptide, formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), induced a rise in intracellular calcium concentration which peaked within 1 min. Preincubation of cells with 1 ..mu..g/ml pertussis toxin resulted in inhibition of the FMLP-induced response, but not that elicited by fluoride. Furthermore, anion exchange chromatography indicated that inositol phosphate accumulation occurred in fluoride-treated cells in association with calcium mobilization. Recent evidence suggests that the FMLP receptor is coupled to phospholipase C and phosphoinositide turnover through a guanine nucleotide binding protein susceptible to inhibition by pertussis toxin. Present results suggest that fluoride ion may serve to activate this protein in a manner resistant to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

  17. Linking Existing Instruments to Develop an Activity of Daily Living Item Bank.

    PubMed

    Li, Chih-Ying; Romero, Sergio; Bonilha, Heather S; Simpson, Kit N; Simpson, Annie N; Hong, Ickpyo; Velozo, Craig A

    2016-11-16

    This study examined dimensionality and item-level psychometric properties of an item bank measuring activities of daily living (ADL) across inpatient rehabilitation facilities and community living centers. Common person equating method was used in the retrospective veterans data set. This study examined dimensionality, model fit, local independence, and monotonicity using factor analyses and fit statistics, principal component analysis (PCA), and differential item functioning (DIF) using Rasch analysis. Following the elimination of invalid data, 371 veterans who completed both the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and minimum data set (MDS) within 6 days were retained. The FIM-MDS item bank demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = .98) and met three rating scale diagnostic criteria and three of the four model fit statistics (comparative fit index/Tucker-Lewis index = 0.98, root mean square error of approximation = 0.14, and standardized root mean residual = 0.07). PCA of Rasch residuals showed the item bank explained 94.2% variance. The item bank covered the range of θ from -1.50 to 1.26 (item), -3.57 to 4.21 (person) with person strata of 6.3. The findings indicated the ADL physical function item bank constructed from FIM and MDS measured a single latent trait with overall acceptable item-level psychometric properties, suggesting that it is an appropriate source for developing efficient test forms such as short forms and computerized adaptive tests.

  18. Preliminary reliability of the five item physical activity questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min-Haeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to design a physical activity questionnaire reflecting on the basic principles and recommendations of exercise and to examine its reliability. [Subjects and Methods] 342 males and 374 females from the community centers (senior center, residential culture center, sport center, and YWCA center) participated in this study. [Results] The test-retest reliability of the physical activity questionnaire, measured with an interval of three months, being between 0.61 and 0.91 signifies that the questionnaire was useful instrument for assessing physical activity levels. [Conclusion] This study found that the simple physical activity questionnaire containing the frequency, duration, intensity, overall length, and type of activities that the person performed during their leisure time was reliable. PMID:28174459

  19. Preliminary reliability of the five item physical activity questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min-Haeng

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to design a physical activity questionnaire reflecting on the basic principles and recommendations of exercise and to examine its reliability. [Subjects and Methods] 342 males and 374 females from the community centers (senior center, residential culture center, sport center, and YWCA center) participated in this study. [Results] The test-retest reliability of the physical activity questionnaire, measured with an interval of three months, being between 0.61 and 0.91 signifies that the questionnaire was useful instrument for assessing physical activity levels. [Conclusion] This study found that the simple physical activity questionnaire containing the frequency, duration, intensity, overall length, and type of activities that the person performed during their leisure time was reliable.

  20. Differential Effects of Encoding Instructions on Brain Activity Patterns of Item and Associative Memory.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nina; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Persson, Jonas; Laukka, Erika J; Brehmer, Yvonne

    2017-03-01

    Evidence from neuroimaging studies suggests a critical role of hippocampus and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) in associative relative to item encoding. Here, we investigated similarities and differences in functional brain correlates for associative and item memory as a function of encoding instruction. Participants received either incidental (animacy judgments) or intentional encoding instructions while fMRI was employed during the encoding of associations and items. In a subsequent recognition task, memory performance of participants receiving intentional encoding instructions was higher compared with those receiving incidental encoding instructions. Furthermore, participants remembered more items than associations, regardless of encoding instruction. Greater brain activation in the left anterior hippocampus was observed for intentionally compared with incidentally encoded associations, although activity in this region was not modulated by the type of instruction for encoded items. Furthermore, greater activity in the left anterior hippocampus and left IFG was observed during intentional associative compared with item encoding. The same regions were related to subsequent memory of intentionally encoded associations and were thus task relevant. Similarly, connectivity of the anterior hippocampus to the right superior temporal lobe and IFG was uniquely linked to subsequent memory of intentionally encoded associations. Our study demonstrates the differential involvement of anterior hippocampus in intentional relative to incidental associative encoding. This finding likely reflects that the intent to remember triggers a specific binding process accomplished by this region.

  1. 17 CFR 229.1206 - (Item 1206) Present activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975-REGULATION S-K Disclosure by Registrants Engaged in Oil and..., the registrant's present activities, such as the number of wells in the process of being drilled (including wells temporarily suspended), waterfloods in process of being installed, pressure...

  2. Reliability and Convergent Validity of the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey Physical Activity Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinger, Mary K.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey (NCHRBS) vigorous physical activity (VPA), moderate physical activity (MPA), flexibility (FLEX), and muscular strength and/or endurance (MSE) questions. Twenty college students completed the four items twice during the same day. During the next 7…

  3. Turnover Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems contain energy and materials such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water, and are open to their flow-through. Turnover time refers to the amount of time required for replacement by flow-through of the energy or substance of interest contained in the system, and is ...

  4. Effects of 3-O-methyldopa, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine metabolite, on locomotor activity and dopamine turnover in rats.

    PubMed

    Onzawa, Yoritaka; Kimura, Yasuhiro; Uzuhashi, Kengo; Shirasuna, Megumi; Hirosawa, Tasuku; Taogoshi, Takanori; Kihira, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    It has been well known that 3-O-methyldopa (3-OMD) is a metabolite of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) formed by catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT), and 3-OMD blood level often reaches higher than physiological level in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients receiving long term L-DOPA therapy. However, the physiological role of 3-OMD has not been well understood. Therefore, in order to clarify the effects of 3-OMD on physiological function, we examined the behavioral alteration in rats based on locomotor activity, and measured dopamine (DA) and its metabolites levels in rats at the same time after 3-OMD subchronic administration. The study results showed that repeated administrations of 3-OMD increased its blood and the striatum tissue levels in those rats, and decreased locomotor activity in a dose dependent manner. Although 3-OMD subchronic administration showed no significant change in DA level in the striatum, DA metabolite levels, such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), and homovanillic acid (HVA) were significantly decreased. After 3-OMD washout period (7 d), locomotor activity and DA turnover in those rats returned to normal levels. Furthermore, locomotor activity and DA turnover decreased by 3-OMD administration were recovered to normal level by acute L-DOPA administration. These results suggested that 3-OMD affect to locomotor activity via DA neuron system. In conclusion, 3-OMD itself may have a disadvantage in PD patients receiving L-DOPA therapy.

  5. Modeling of Word Translation: Activation Flow from Concepts to Lexical Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roelofs, Ardi; Dijkstra, Ton; Gerakaki, Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Whereas most theoretical and computational models assume a continuous flow of activation from concepts to lexical items in spoken word production, one prominent model assumes that the mapping of concepts onto words happens in a discrete fashion (Bloem & La Heij, 2003). Semantic facilitation of context pictures on word translation has been taken to…

  6. Turnover control of photosystem II: Use of redox-active herbicides to form the S[sub 3] state

    SciTech Connect

    Bocarsly, J.R.; Brudvig, G.W. )

    1992-12-02

    The O[sub 2]-evolving center of photosystem II, which contains an active-site tetramanganese-oxo cluster, catalyzes the four-electron oxidation of two water molecules to dioxygen, with the concomitant production of four H[sup +] and four electrons. During catalytic turnover, the manganese-oxo cluster steps through five intermediate oxidation states, which are known as the S[sub i] states (i = 0-4). While methods have been found to manipulate the system into S[sub 1] and S[sub 2] in high yields, efficient production of the S[sub 3] state in good yield at high concentration has not yet been achieved. Previous methods have suffered from the requirement of low protein concentration so that actinic flashes are saturating; the use of temperature to control S-state advancement under continuous illumination, which can lead to S-state scrambling; or the use of herbicides that bind to the Q[sub B] site and restrict the system to one turnover. The authors describe here a method for the high-yield production of the S[sub 3] state in highly-concentrated samples of photosystem II, through the use of electron-accepting herbicides which bind to the Q[sub B] site. Redox-active herbicides can be used, in principle, to limit S-state cycling to any desired number of turnovers, given the appropriate herbicide. This work has fundamental methodological implications not only for the study of photosystem II but also for other multistate redox protein systems.

  7. Role of turnover in active stress generation in a filament network

    PubMed Central

    Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of turnover of cross-linkers, motors, and filaments on the generation of a contractile stress in a network of filaments connected by passive cross-linkers and subjected to the forces exerted by molecular motors. We perform numerical simulations where filaments are treated as rigid rods and molecular motors move fast compared to the time scale of an exchange of cross-linkers. We show that molecular motors create a contractile stress above a critical number of cross-linkers. When passive cross-linkers are allowed to turn over, the stress exerted by the network vanishes due to the formation of clusters. When both filaments and passive cross-linkers turn over, clustering is prevented and the network reaches a dynamic contractile steady state. A maximum stress is reached for an optimum ratio of the filament and cross-linker turnover rates. Taken together, our work reveals conditions for stress generation by molecular motors in a fluid isotropic network of rearranging filaments. PMID:27203344

  8. Role of Turnover in Active Stress Generation in a Filament Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of turnover of cross-linkers, motors, and filaments on the generation of a contractile stress in a network of filaments connected by passive cross-linkers and subjected to the forces exerted by molecular motors. We perform numerical simulations where filaments are treated as rigid rods and molecular motors move fast compared to the time scale of an exchange of cross-linkers. We show that molecular motors create a contractile stress above a critical number of cross-linkers. When passive cross-linkers are allowed to turn over, the stress exerted by the network vanishes due to the formation of clusters. When both filaments and passive cross-linkers turn over, clustering is prevented and the network reaches a dynamic contractile steady state. A maximum stress is reached for an optimum ratio of the filament and cross-linker turnover rates. Taken together, our work reveals conditions for stress generation by molecular motors in a fluid isotropic network of rearranging filaments.

  9. Glucose and lactate are equally effective in energizing activity-dependent synaptic vesicle turnover in purified cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Morgenthaler, F D; Kraftsik, R; Catsicas, S; Magistretti, P J; Chatton, J-Y

    2006-08-11

    This study examines the role of glucose and lactate as energy substrates to sustain synaptic vesicle cycling. Synaptic vesicle turnover was assessed in a quantitative manner by fluorescence microscopy in primary cultures of mouse cortical neurons. An electrode-equipped perfusion chamber was used to stimulate cells both by electrical field and potassium depolarization during image acquisition. An image analysis procedure was elaborated to select in an unbiased manner synaptic boutons loaded with the fluorescent dye N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(4-(dibutylamino)styryl)pyridinium dibromide (FM1-43). Whereas a minority of the sites fully released their dye content following electrical stimulation, others needed subsequent K(+) depolarization to achieve full release. This functional heterogeneity was not significantly altered by the nature of metabolic substrates. Repetitive stimulation sequences of FM1-43 uptake and release were then performed in the absence of any metabolic substrate and showed that the number of active sites dramatically decreased after the first cycle of loading/unloading. The presence of 1 mM glucose or lactate was sufficient to sustain synaptic vesicle cycling under these conditions. Moreover, both substrates were equivalent for recovery of function after a phase of decreased metabolic substrate availability. Thus, lactate appears to be equivalent to glucose for sustaining synaptic vesicle turnover in cultured cortical neurons during activity.

  10. Construct Validity Evidence for Single-Response Items to Estimate Physical Activity Levels in Large Sample Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Allen W.; Morrow, James R., Jr.; Bowles, Heather R.; FitzGerald, Shannon J.; Blair, Steven N.

    2007-01-01

    Valid measurement of physical activity is important for studying the risks for morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to examine evidence of construct validity of two similar single-response items assessing physical activity via self-report. Both items are based on the stages of change model. The sample was 687 participants (men =…

  11. Hyaluronan and the hyaluronan receptor RHAMM promote focal adhesion turnover and transient tyrosine kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms whereby hyaluronan (HA) stimulates cell motility was investigated in a C-H-ras transformed 10T 1/2 fibroblast cell line (C3). A significant (p < 0.001) stimulation of C3 cell motility with HA (10 ng/ml) was accompanied by an increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation as detected by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies using immunoblot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of cells. Tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins was found to be both rapid and transient with phosphorylation occurring within 1 min of HA addition and dissipating below control levels 10-15 min later. These responses were also elicited by an antibody generated against a peptide sequence within the HA receptor RHAMM. Treatment of cells with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein, 10 micrograms/ml or herbimycin A, 0.5 micrograms/ml) or microinjection of anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies inhibited the transient protein tyrosine phosphorylation in response to HA as well as prevented HA stimulation of cell motility. To determine a link between HA-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation and the resulting cell locomotion, cytoskeletal reorganization was examined in C3 cells plated on fibronectin and treated with HA or anti-RHAMM antibody. These agents caused a rapid assembly and disassembly of focal adhesions as revealed by immunofluorescent localization of vinculin. The time course with which HA and antibody induced focal adhesion turnover exactly paralleled the induction of transient protein tyrosine phosphorylation. In addition, phosphotyrosine staining colocalized with vinculin within structures in the lamellapodia of these cells. Notably, the focal adhesion kinase, pp125FAK, was rapidly phosphorylated and dephosphorylated after HA stimulation. These results suggest that HA stimulates locomotion via a rapid and transient protein tyrosine kinase signaling event mediated by RHAMM. They also provide a possible molecular basis for focal adhesion turnover, a process that is

  12. Mitochondrial Respiratory Defect Causes Dysfunctional Lactate Turnover via AMP-activated Protein Kinase Activation in Human-induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Hepatocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Im, Ilkyun; Jang, Mi-jin; Park, Seung Ju; Lee, Sang-Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook; Kim, Seyun; Han, Yong-Mahn

    2015-01-01

    A defective mitochondrial respiratory chain complex (DMRC) causes various metabolic disorders in humans. However, the pathophysiology of DMRC in the liver remains unclear. To understand DMRC pathophysiology in vitro, DMRC-induced pluripotent stem cells were generated from dermal fibroblasts of a DMRC patient who had a homoplasmic mutation (m.3398T→C) in the mitochondrion-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (MTND1) gene and that differentiated into hepatocytes (DMRC hepatocytes) in vitro. DMRC hepatocytes showed abnormalities in mitochondrial characteristics, the NAD+/NADH ratio, the glycogen storage level, the lactate turnover rate, and AMPK activity. Intriguingly, low glycogen storage and transcription of lactate turnover-related genes in DMRC hepatocytes were recovered by inhibition of AMPK activity. Thus, AMPK activation led to metabolic changes in terms of glycogen storage and lactate turnover in DMRC hepatocytes. These data demonstrate for the first time that energy depletion may lead to lactic acidosis in the DMRC patient by reduction of lactate uptake via AMPK in liver. PMID:26491018

  13. HIV-1–specific CD4+ T lymphocyte turnover and activation increase upon viral rebound

    PubMed Central

    Scriba, Thomas J.; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Brown, Helen L.; Oxenius, Annette; Tamm, Norbert; Fidler, Sarah; Fox, Julie; Weber, Jonathan N.; Klenerman, Paul; Day, Cheryl L.; Lucas, Michaela; Phillips, Rodney E.

    2005-01-01

    HIV-specific CD4+ T helper lymphocytes are preferred targets for infection. Although complete interruption of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) can form part of therapeutic manipulations, there is grave concern that the resumption of viral replication might destroy, perhaps irreversibly, these T helper populations. High viremia blocks the proliferation capacity of HIV-specific helper cells. However, cytokine production assays imply that some antigen-specific effector function is retained. Despite this careful work, it remains unclear whether the return of HIV-1 replication physically destroys HIV-1–specific T helper cells in the peripheral blood. Difficulties in producing stable peptide-MHC class II complexes and the very low frequencies of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells have delayed the application of this powerful technique. Here we employ HLA class II tetramers and validate a sensitive, quantitative cell-enrichment technique to detect HIV-1 T helper cells. We studied patients with early-stage HIV infection who were given a short, fixed course of ART as part of a clinical study. We did not find significant deletion of these cells from the peripheral circulation when ART was stopped and unfettered HIV replication returned. The turnover of these virus-specific cells increased and they adopted an effector phenotype when viremia returned. PMID:15668739

  14. Inorganic Carbon Turnover caused by Digestion of Carbonate Sands and Metabolic Activity of Holothurians

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

    2013-11-20

    Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this study inorganic additional aspects of carbon turnover were determined in laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, H. leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni from One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 6.1 to 6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts as opposed to 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2kg and 80 ± 7kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual dissolution rates of H. atra and S. herrmanni of 6.5±1.9g and 9.6±1.4g, respectively, suggest that 0.05±0.02% and 0.1±0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During the incubations the CaCO3 dissolution was 0.07±0.01%, 0.04±0.01% and 0.21±0.05% of the fecal casts for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state for both aragonite and calcite minerals during laboratory incubations decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

  15. Inorganic carbon turnover caused by digestion of carbonate sands and metabolic activity of holothurians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Ben; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

    2013-11-01

    Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) may play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this report, we present estimates of inorganic carbon turnover rates determined from laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, Holothuria leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment compared with 6.1-6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements and the density and porosity of carbonate sediments of coral reefs, it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2 kg and 80 ± 7 kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual CaCO3 dissolution rates per H. atra and S. herrmanni individual are estimated to be 6.5 ± 1.9 g and 9.6 ± 1.4 g, respectively, suggesting that 0.05 ± 0.02% and 0.1 ± 0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During incubations the CaCO3 dissolution of the fecal casts was 0.07 ± 0.01%, 0.04 ± 0.01% and 0.21 ± 0.05% for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state in the incubation seawater decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

  16. FOXO/DAF-16 Activation Slows Down Turnover of the Majority of Proteins in C. elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Dhondt, Ineke; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Cai, Huaihan; Vandemeulebroucke, Lieselot; Vierstraete, Andy; Smith, Richard D.; Depuydt, Geert; Braeckman, Bart  P.

    2016-09-13

    Most aging hypotheses assume the accumulation of damage, resulting in gradual physiological decline and, ultimately, death. Avoiding protein damage accumulation by enhanced turnover should slow down the aging process and extend the lifespan. But, lowering translational efficiency extends rather than shortens the lifespan in C. elegans. We studied turnover of individual proteins in the long-lived daf-2 mutant by combining SILeNCe (stable isotope labeling by nitrogen in Caenorhabditiselegans) and mass spectrometry. Intriguingly, the majority of proteins displayed prolonged half-lives in daf-2, whereas others remained unchanged, signifying that longevity is not supported by high protein turnover. We found that this slowdown was most prominent for translation-related and mitochondrial proteins. Conversely, the high turnover of lysosomal hydrolases and very low turnover of cytoskeletal proteins remained largely unchanged. The slowdown of protein dynamics and decreased abundance of the translational machinery may point to the importance of anabolic attenuation in lifespan extension, as suggested by the hyperfunction theory.

  17. 3'uridylation controls mature microRNA turnover during CD4 T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Vazquez, Cristina; Enright, Anton J; Rodríguez-Galán, Ana; Perez-García, Arantxa; Collier, Paul; Jones, Matthew R; Benes, Vladimir; Mizgerd, Joseph P; Mittelbrunn, María; Ramiro, Almudena R; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2017-03-28

    Activation of T lymphocytes requires a tight regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) expression. Terminal uridyltransferases (TUTases) catalyze 3' non-templated nucleotide addition (3'NTA) to miRNAs which may influence miRNA stability and function. Here, we investigated 3'NTA to mature miRNA in CD4 T lymphocytes by deep sequencing. Upon T cell activation, miRNA sequences bearing terminal uridines are specifically decreased, concomitantly with downregulation of TUT4 and TUT7 enzymes. Analyzing TUT4 deficient T lymphocytes, we proved that this terminal uridyltransferase is essential for the maintenance of miRNA uridylation in steady state of T lymphocytes. Analysis of synthetic uridylated miRNAs shows that 3' addition of uridine promotes degradation of these uridylated miRNAs after T cell activation. Our data underline post-transcriptional uridylation as a mechanism to fine tune miRNA levels during T cell activation.

  18. Phosphatase activity and organic phosphorus turnover on a high Arctic glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stibal, M.; Anesio, A. M.; Blues, C. J. D.; Tranter, M.

    2009-05-01

    Arctic glacier surfaces harbour abundant microbial communities consisting mainly of heterotrophic and photoautotrophic bacteria. The microbes must cope with low concentrations of nutrients and with the fact that both the dissolved and debris-bound nutrient pools are dominated by organic phases. Here we provide evidence that phosphorus (P) is deficient in the supraglacial environment on a Svalbard glacier, we quantify the enzymatic activity of phosphatases in the system and we estimate the contribution of the microbes to the cycling of the dominant organic P in the supraglacial environment. Incubation of cryoconite debris revealed significant phosphatase activity in the samples (19-67 nmol MUP g-1 h-1). It was inhibited by inorganic P during incubations and had its optimum at around 30°C. The phosphatase activity measured at near-in situ temperature and substrate concentration suggests that the available dissolved organic P can be turned over by microbes within ~3-11 h on the glacier surface. By contrast, the amount of potentially bioavailable debris-bound organic P is sufficient for a whole ablation season. However, it is apparent that some of this potentially bioavailable debris-bound P is not accessible to the microbes.

  19. Mutations in Mtr4 Structural Domains Reveal Their Important Role in Regulating tRNAiMet Turnover in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Mtr4p Enzymatic Activities In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Burclaff, Joseph; Anderson, James T

    2016-01-01

    RNA processing and turnover play important roles in the maturation, metabolism and quality control of a large variety of RNAs thereby contributing to gene expression and cellular health. The TRAMP complex, composed of Air2p, Trf4p and Mtr4p, stimulates nuclear exosome-dependent RNA processing and degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mtr4 protein structure is composed of a helicase core and a novel so-called arch domain, which protrudes from the core. The helicase core contains highly conserved helicase domains RecA-1 and 2, and two structural domains of unclear functions, winged helix domain (WH) and ratchet domain. How the structural domains (arch, WH and ratchet domain) coordinate with the helicase domains and what roles they are playing in regulating Mtr4p helicase activity are unknown. We created a library of Mtr4p structural domain mutants for the first time and screened for those defective in the turnover of TRAMP and exosome substrate, hypomodified tRNAiMet. We found these domains regulate Mtr4p enzymatic activities differently through characterizing the arch domain mutants K700N and P731S, WH mutant K904N, and ratchet domain mutant R1030G. Arch domain mutants greatly reduced Mtr4p RNA binding, which surprisingly did not lead to significant defects on either in vivo tRNAiMet turnover, or in vitro unwinding activities. WH mutant K904N and Ratchet domain mutant R1030G showed decreased tRNAiMet turnover in vivo, as well as reduced RNA binding, ATPase and unwinding activities of Mtr4p in vitro. Particularly, K904 was found to be very important for steady protein levels in vivo. Overall, we conclude that arch domain plays a role in RNA binding but is largely dispensable for Mtr4p enzymatic activities, however the structural domains in the helicase core significantly contribute to Mtr4p ATPase and unwinding activities.

  20. FOXO/DAF-16 Activation Slows Down Turnover of the Majority of Proteins in C. elegans

    DOE PAGES

    Dhondt, Ineke; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Cai, Huaihan; ...

    2016-09-13

    Most aging hypotheses assume the accumulation of damage, resulting in gradual physiological decline and, ultimately, death. Avoiding protein damage accumulation by enhanced turnover should slow down the aging process and extend the lifespan. But, lowering translational efficiency extends rather than shortens the lifespan in C. elegans. We studied turnover of individual proteins in the long-lived daf-2 mutant by combining SILeNCe (stable isotope labeling by nitrogen in Caenorhabditiselegans) and mass spectrometry. Intriguingly, the majority of proteins displayed prolonged half-lives in daf-2, whereas others remained unchanged, signifying that longevity is not supported by high protein turnover. We found that this slowdown wasmore » most prominent for translation-related and mitochondrial proteins. Conversely, the high turnover of lysosomal hydrolases and very low turnover of cytoskeletal proteins remained largely unchanged. The slowdown of protein dynamics and decreased abundance of the translational machinery may point to the importance of anabolic attenuation in lifespan extension, as suggested by the hyperfunction theory.« less

  1. FOXO/DAF-16 Activation Slows Down Turnover of the Majority of Proteins in C. elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Dhondt, Ineke; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Cai, Huaihan; Vandemeulebroucke, Lieselot; Vierstraete, Andy; Smith, Richard D.; Depuydt, Geert; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2016-09-01

    Cellular protein quality can be maintained by proteolytic elimination of damaged proteins and replacing them with newly synthesized copies, a process called protein turnover (Ward, 2000). Protein turnover rates have been estimated using SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture) in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The last decade has witnessed a growing interest in the analysis of whole-organism proteome dynamics in metazoans using the same approach (Claydon and Beynon, 2012). In recent work, SILAC was applied to monitor protein synthesis throughout life in adult Caenorhabditis elegans (Vukoti et al., 2015) and to investigate food intake (Gomez-Amaro et al., 2015

  2. Development of new physical activity and sedentary behavior change self-efficacy questionnaires using item response modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theoretically, increased levels of physical activity self-efficacy (PASE) should lead to increased physical activity, but few studies have reported this effect among youth. This failure may be at least partially attributable to measurement limitations. In this study, Item Response Modeling (IRM) was...

  3. Guide to good practices for operations turnover

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Operations Turnover, Chapter XII of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing operations turnover programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Operations Turnover is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for a formal operations turnover program to promote safe and efficient operations.

  4. The role of daily physical activity and nutritional status on bone turnover in cystic fibrosis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Sergio; Cejudo, Pilar; Quintana-Gallego, E; Sañudo, Borja; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, A

    2016-03-18

    Background Nutritional status and daily physical activity (PA) may be an excellent tool for the maintenance of bone health in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Objective To evaluate the relationship between nutritional status, daily physical activity and bone turnover in cystic fibrosis patients. Method A cross-sectional study of adolescent and adult patients diagnosed with clinically stable cystic fibrosis was conducted. Total body, femoral neck, and lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) were determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and bone metabolism markers ALP, P1NP, PICP, and ß-CrossLaps. PA monitoring was assessed for 5 consecutive days using a portable device. Exercise capacity was also determined. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and vitamin K were also determined in all participants. Results Fifty patients (median age: 24.4 years; range: 16-46) were included. BMI had positive correlation with all BMD parameters, with Spearman's coefficients ranging from 0.31 to 0.47. Total hip bone mineral density and femoral neck BMD had positive correlation with the daily time spent on moderate PA (>4.8 metabolic equivalent-minutes/day; r=0.74, p<0.001 and r=0.72 p<0.001 respectively), daily time spent on vigorous PA (>7.2 metabolic equivalent-minutes/day; r=0.45 p<0.001), body mass index (r=0.44, p=0.001), and muscle mass in limbs (r=0.41, p=0.004). Levels of carboxy-terminal propeptide of type 1 collagen were positively associated with the daily time spent on moderate (r=0.33 p=0.023) and vigorous PA (r=0.53, p<0.001). Conclusions BMI and the daily time spent on moderate PA were found to be correlated with femoral neck BMD in CF patients. The association between daily PA and biochemical markers of bone formation suggests that the level of daily PA may be linked to bone health in this patient group. Further research is needed to confirm these findings.

  5. Using a Single-Item Physical Activity Measure to Describe and Validate Parents' Physical Activity Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kyra; White, Katherine M.; Cuddihy, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The accurate measurement of health-related physical activity (PA), often interpreted as either 150 min/week of at least moderate-intensity PA (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008) or at least 30 min of at least moderate-intensity PA on 5 or more days per week (Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing [AGDHA], 2005;…

  6. Effects of Delay and Number of Related List Items on Implicit Activation for DRM Critical Items in a Speeded Naming Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Michelle L.; Hutchison, Keith A.; Rand, Kristina M.

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments examined decay and additivity of semantic priming produced by DRM false memory lists on a naming task. Subjects were presented with study lists containing 14 DRM items that were either all 14 related, the first 7 related, the second 7 related, or all 14 unrelated to the non-presented critical item. Priming was measured on a naming…

  7. Response to platelet-activating factor in human platelets stored and aged in plasma. Decrease in aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.D.; Morrison, W.J.; Klachko, D.M.

    1989-07-01

    Human platelet concentrates were stored in polyolefin bags at 22 to 24 degrees C on a horizontal shaker for up to 8 days. At different intervals, aliquots of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were removed aseptically and five variables, i.e., platelet counts, morphology, platelet-activating factor (PAF)-stimulated aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and (3H)PAF binding to platelet receptors, were studied. The number of platelets did not change during the 8 days of storage. Scanning electron microscopy of the platelets revealed a gradual morphologic change from biconcave flat discs to irregular, crenated forms. The PAF-induced aggregation of platelets declined with time of storage. A decrease to 50 percent of the Day 1 aggregatory response to PAF was evident on Day 2, and there was a further decline to about 20 percent by Day 6. Similarly, PAF receptor-coupled phosphoinositide turnover, as monitored by 32P incorporation into individual phosphoinositides, decreased dramatically with storage. After 2 to 3 days of storage, the phosphoinositide turnover was reduced to 50 percent of the original response, and it continued to decline to about 25 percent of original response by Day 5 or 6. The binding of (3H)PAF to washed human platelets indicated subtle changes between Days 2 and 4, which became more noticeable by Day 6. These results have raised the possibility of changes in the number of the receptors and/or their affinity for the ligand during storage. We conclude that although the number of platelets was maintained during storage for 8 days, a general deterioration of their responses to PAF occurred at the levels of cell surface receptor, transmembrane signaling (phosphoinositide turnover), and response (aggregation).

  8. Mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Francisca; Moraes, Carlos T

    2008-07-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process involving the coordinated expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the import of the products of the latter into the organelle and turnover. The mechanisms associated with these events have been intensively studied in the last 20 years and our understanding of their details is much improved. Mitochondrial biogenesis requires the participation of calcium signaling that activates a series of calcium-dependent protein kinases that in turn activate transcription factors and coactivators such as PGC-1alpha that regulates the expression of genes coding for mitochondrial components. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis involves the balance of mitochondrial fission-fusion. Mitochondrial malfunction or defects in any of the many pathways involved in mitochondrial biogenesis can lead to degenerative diseases and possibly play an important part in aging.

  9. Phosphorylation by p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Promotes Estrogen Receptor α Turnover and Functional Activity via the SCFSkp2 Proteasomal Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Shweta; Xiao, Zhen; Meng, Zhaojing

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear hormone receptor estrogen receptor α (ERα) mediates the actions of estrogens in target cells and is a master regulator of the gene expression and proliferative programs of breast cancer cells. The presence of ERα in breast cancer cells is crucial for the effectiveness of endocrine therapies, and its loss is a hallmark of endocrine-insensitive breast tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of the cellular levels of ERα are not fully understood. Our findings reveal a unique cellular pathway involving the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK)-mediated phosphorylation of ERα at Ser-294 that specifies its turnover by the SCFSkp2 proteasome complex. Consistently, we observed an inverse relationship between ERα and Skp2 or active p38MAPK in breast cancer cell lines and human tumors. ERα regulation by Skp2 was cell cycle stage dependent and critical for promoting the mitogenic effects of estradiol via ERα. Interestingly, by the knockdown of Skp2 or the inhibition of p38MAPK, we restored functional ERα protein levels and the control of gene expression and proliferation by estrogen and antiestrogen in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. Our findings highlight a novel pathway with therapeutic potential for restoring ERα and the responsiveness to endocrine therapy in some endocrine-insensitive ERα-negative breast cancers. PMID:22431515

  10. A Meta-Analysis of the Antecedents of Voluntary Turnover in Studies Involving Active Duty Military Member Populations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    subordinate outcomes Brown III, G. B. DTIC 2008 Y N A Pending Major Crisis : An Analysis of the Critical Shortage of U.S. Army Officers in Year Groups 1991...States Army Reserve McConico, J. L. DTIC 2009 Y N Ethical Imbalance: How the U.S. Army Overcame its Manning Crisis McDonald, G. K. DTIC 2007 Y Y Work...Characteristics From Multiple Data Sources With Employee Affect, Absence, Turnover Intentions, and Helth Spector, P. E., Dwyer, D. J., & Jex, S. M. JoAP 1988 N N

  11. Item-Specific and Generalization Effects on Brain Activation when Learning Chinese Characters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Yuan; Booth, James R.; Chou, Tai-Li; Ding, Guo-Sheng; Peng, Dan-Ling

    2008-01-01

    Neural changes related to learning of the meaning of Chinese characters in English speakers were examined using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We examined item specific learning effects for trained characters, but also the generalization of semantic knowledge to novel transfer characters that shared a semantic radical (part of a…

  12. 17 CFR 229.1205 - (Item 1205) Drilling and other exploratory and development activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 AND ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975-REGULATION S-K Disclosure by..., disclose: (1) The number of net productive and dry exploratory wells drilled; and (2) The number of net productive and dry development wells drilled. (b) Definitions. For purposes of this Item 1205, the...

  13. Turnover of (/sup 14/C)thiamin and activities of thiamin pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes in tissues of mice with Ehrlich ascites carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Trebukhina, R.V.; Ostrovsky, Y.M.; Shapot, V.S.; Mikhaltsevich, G.N.; Tumanov, V.N.

    1984-01-01

    Turnover of (/sup 14/C)thiamin was studied in mice with Ehrlich ascites carcinoma fed a thiamin-deficient diet and injected with 5 or 2 micrograms/mouse of the labeled vitamin. The process of conversion of (/sup 14/C)thiamin to thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) was monitored by measuring the activities of transketolase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. The amount of coenzyme-unsaturated apotransketolase was assessed by measuring the TPP effect--determining transketolase activity with and without the addition of TPP in vitro. Tumor growth was accompanied by thiamin deficiency, manifested in an increase in (/sup 14/C)thiamin incorporation into the host tissues and the absence of saturation of the tissues with the labeled vitamin over 13 days. Increased values for the turnover coefficients, reduction of thiamin-dependent enzyme activities, elevation of the TPP effect, and a decrease in urinary excretion of the radioactive products also provided evidence for a disturbance in thiamin metabolism. The severity of the disturbance in thiamin metabolism during malignant tumor growth was directly related to the dose of the exogenous vitamin.

  14. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β dictates podocyte motility and focal adhesion turnover by modulating paxillin activity: implications for the protective effect of low-dose lithium in podocytopathy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiwei; Ge, Yan; Liu, Zhihong; Gong, Rujun

    2014-10-01

    Aberrant focal adhesion turnover is centrally involved in podocyte actin cytoskeleton disorganization and foot process effacement. The structural and dynamic integrity of focal adhesions is orchestrated by multiple cell signaling molecules, including glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a multitasking kinase lately identified as a mediator of kidney injury. However, the role of GSK3β in podocytopathy remains obscure. In doxorubicin (Adriamycin)-injured podocytes, lithium, a GSK3β inhibitor and neuroprotective mood stabilizer, obliterated the accelerated focal adhesion turnover, rectified podocyte hypermotility, and restored actin cytoskeleton integrity. Mechanistically, lithium counteracted the doxorubicin-elicited GSK3β overactivity and the hyperphosphorylation and overactivation of paxillin, a focal adhesion-associated adaptor protein. Moreover, forced expression of a dominant negative kinase dead mutant of GSK3β highly mimicked, whereas ectopic expression of a constitutively active GSK3β mutant abolished, the effect of lithium in doxorubicin-injured podocytes, suggesting that the effect of lithium is mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of GSK3β. Furthermore, paxillin interacted with GSK3β and served as its substrate. In mice with doxorubicin nephropathy, a single low dose of lithium ameliorated proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis. Consistently, lithium therapy abrogated GSK3β overactivity, blunted paxillin hyperphosphorylation, and reinstated actin cytoskeleton integrity in glomeruli associated with an early attenuation of podocyte foot process effacement. Thus, GSK3β-modulated focal adhesion dynamics might serve as a novel therapeutic target for podocytopathy.

  15. Total body water and water turnover rates in the estuarine diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) during the transition from dormancy to activity.

    PubMed

    Harden, Leigh Anne; Duernberger, Kimberly Anne; Jones, T Todd; Williard, Amanda Southwood

    2014-12-15

    Water and salt concentrations in an animal's body fluids can fluctuate with changing environmental conditions, posing osmoregulatory challenges that require behavioral and physiological adjustments. The purpose of this study was to investigate body water dynamics in the estuarine diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin), a species that undergoes seasonal dormancy in salt marsh habitats. We conducted a field study to determine the total body water (%TBW), water turnover rate (WTR) and daily water flux (DWF) of female terrapins in south eastern North Carolina pre- and post-emergence from winter dormancy. Terrapins were injected with [(2)H]deuterium on two occasions and washout of the isotope was monitored by taking successive blood samples during the period of transition from dormancy to activity. The WTR and DWF of dormant terrapins were significantly lower than those of active terrapins (WTR(dormant)=49.70±15.94 ml day(-1), WTR(active)=100.20±20.36 ml day(-1), DWF(dormant)=10.52±2.92%TBW day(-1), DWF(active)=21.84±7.30%TBW day(-1)). There was no significant difference in %TBW between dormant and active terrapins (75.05±6.19% and 74.54±4.36%, respectively). The results from this field study provide insight into the terrapin's ability to maintain osmotic homeostasis while experiencing shifts in behavioral and environmental conditions.

  16. MHC class I genes in a New World primate, the cotton-top tamarin (Saguinus oedipus), have evolved by an active process of loci turnover.

    PubMed

    Cadavid, L F; Mejía, B E; Watkins, D I

    1999-03-01

    Lymphocytes of a New World primate, the cotton-top tamarin (Saguinus oedipus), express classical G-related major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules with unusually limited polymorphism and variability. Three G-related loci, an F locus, an E locus, and two pseudogenes (So-N1 and So-N3) have been identified by cDNA library screening and extensive PCR analysis of both cDNA and genomic DNA from the cotton-top tamarin. Furthermore, each genus of the subfamily Callitrichinae (tamarins and marmosets) appears to express its own unique set of MHC class I genes, likely due to a rapid turnover of loci. The rapid emergence of unique MHC class I genes in the Callitrichinae genera, resulting from an active process of duplication and inactivation of loci, may account for the limited diversity of the MHC class I genes in the cotton-top tamarin. To determine the nature of the entire complement of MHC class I genes in the cotton-top tamarin, we synthesized a genomic DNA library and screened it with MHC class I-specific probes. We isolated nine new MHC class I pseudogenes from this library. These newly isolated tamarin G-related MHC class I pseudogenes are not closely related to any of their functional counterparts in the tamarin, suggesting that they do not share a recent common ancestral gene with the tamarin's currently expressed MHC class I loci. In addition, these tamarin sequences display a high rate of nonsynonymous substitutions in their putative peptide binding region. This indicates that the genes from which they have derived were likely subject to positive selection and, therefore, were once functional. Our data support the notion that an extremely high rate of loci turnover is largely responsible for the limited diversity of the MHC class I genes in the cotton-top tamarin.

  17. Action Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Mark; Keane, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Maximizing school resources and managing a shrinking budget--these are two important items affected when a building's roofing system does not perform properly. Rather than acting in haste, school and university administrators should do what every teacher tells a student prior to answering any question: think through the research and studies to…

  18. Avifauna: Turnover on Islands.

    PubMed

    Mayr, E

    1965-12-17

    The percentage of endemic species of birds on islands increases with island area at a double logarithmic rate. This relation is apparently due to extinction, which is more rapid the smaller the island. The turnover resulting from extinction and replacement appears to be far more rapid than hitherto suspected.

  19. Total Glutamine Synthetase Activity during Soybean Nodule Development Is Controlled at the Level of Transcription and Holoprotein Turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Temple, S. J.; Kunjibettu, S.; Roche, D.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C.

    1996-01-01

    Gln synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia with glutamate to yield Gln. In higher plants GS is an octameric enzyme and the subunits are encoded by members of a small multigene family. In soybeans (Glycine max), following the onset of N2 fixation there is a dramatic increase in GS activity in the root nodules. GS activity staining of native polyacrylamide gels containing nodule and root extracts showed a common band of activity (GSrs). The nodules also contained a slower-migrating, broad band of enzyme activity (GSns). The GSns activity band is a complex of many isozymes made up of different proportions of two kinds of GS subunits: GSr and GSn. Root nodules formed following inoculation with an Nif- strain of Bradyrhizobium japonicum showed the presence of GS isoenzymes (GSns1) with low enzyme activity, which migrated more slowly than GSns. Gsns1 is most likely made up predominantly of GSn subunits. Our data suggest that, whereas the class I GS genes encoding the GSr subunits are regulated by the availability of NH3, the class II GS genes coding for the GSn subunits are developmentally regulated. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the GSns1 isozymes in the Nif- nodules are relatively more labile. Our overall conclusion is that GSns activity in soybean nodules is regulated by N2 fixation both at the level of transcription and at the level of holoprotein stability. PMID:12226474

  20. OEA Instruction and Professional Development (IPD) Division Activities. Info-Item Educators Digest/No. 5080.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Education Association, Columbus. Instruction and Professional Development Div.

    This document presents the Instruction and Professional Development (IPD) division activities of the Ohio Education Association. First, the purpose of the IPD division is explained. Next, the IPD is discussed in terms of the help it lends to the local associations in its role of improving instruction in the areas of professional development. This…

  1. Disruption of BCATm in mice leads to increased energy expenditure associated with the activation of a futile protein turnover cycle

    PubMed Central

    She, Pengxiang; Reid, Tanya M.; Bronson, Sarah K.; Vary, Thomas C.; Hajnal, Andras; Lynch, Christopher J; Hutson, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Leucine is recognized as a nutrient signal, however the long-term in vivo consequences of leucine signaling and the role of branched chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism in this signaling remains unclear. To investigate these questions, the BCATm gene encoding the enzyme catalyzing the first step in peripheral BCAA metabolism was disrupted. BCATm−/− mice exhibited elevated plasma BCAAs, decreased adiposity and body weight, despite eating more food, along with increased energy expenditure, remarkable improvements in glucose and insulin tolerance, and protection from diet induced obesity. The increased energy expenditure did not seem to be due to altered locomotor activity, uncoupling proteins, sympathetic activity, and thyroid hormones but was strongly associated with food consumption and an active futile cycle of increased protein degradation and synthesis. These observations suggest that either elevated BCAAs and/or loss of BCAA catabolism in peripheral tissues play an important role in regulating insulin sensitivity and energy expenditure. PMID:17767905

  2. ADP Ribosylation Factor 6 (ARF6) Promotes Acrosomal Exocytosis by Modulating Lipid Turnover and Rab3A Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pelletán, Leonardo E.; Suhaiman, Laila; Vaquer, Cintia C.; Bustos, Matías A.; De Blas, Gerardo A.; Vitale, Nicolas; Mayorga, Luis S.; Belmonte, Silvia A.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated secretion is a central issue for the specific function of many cells; for instance, mammalian sperm acrosomal exocytosis is essential for egg fertilization. ARF6 (ADP-ribosylation factor 6) is a small GTPase implicated in exocytosis, but its downstream effectors remain elusive in this process. We combined biochemical, functional, and microscopy-based methods to show that ARF6 is present in human sperm, localizes to the acrosomal region, and is required for calcium and diacylglycerol-induced exocytosis. Results from pulldown assays show that ARF6 exchanges GDP for GTP in sperm challenged with different exocytic stimuli. Myristoylated and guanosine 5′-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPγS)-loaded ARF6 (active form) added to permeabilized sperm induces acrosome exocytosis even in the absence of extracellular calcium. We explore the ARF6 signaling cascade that promotes secretion. We demonstrate that ARF6 stimulates a sperm phospholipase D activity to produce phosphatidic acid and boosts the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. We present direct evidence showing that active ARF6 increases phospholipase C activity, causing phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent intra-acrosomal calcium release. We show that active ARF6 increases the exchange of GDP for GTP on Rab3A, a prerequisite for secretion. We propose that exocytic stimuli activate ARF6, which is required for acrosomal calcium efflux and the assembly of the membrane fusion machinery. This report highlights the physiological importance of ARF6 as a key factor for human sperm exocytosis and fertilization. PMID:25713146

  3. Enhanced motor activity and brain dopamine turnover in mice during long-term nicotine administration in the drinking water.

    PubMed

    Gäddnäs, H; Pietilä, K; Piepponen, T P; Ahtee, L

    2001-12-01

    Nicotine was administered chronically to NMRI mice in their drinking water in gradually increasing concentrations to measure gross motor activity and brain nicotine concentrations over 24 h on the 50th day of nicotine administration. Also, the striatal postmortem tissue concentrations and accumbal extracellular concentrations of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were measured to study the role of dopaminergic systems in nicotine-induced hyperactivity in mice. The cerebral nicotine concentration was at its highest at the end of the dark period. The activity of nicotine-treated mice and their striatal DA metabolism were parallelly increased at 2 to 3 h after midnight and in the forenoon. Microdialysis experiments carried out in the forenoon showed that the extracellular levels of DA and DOPAC were elevated in the nucleus accumbens of these mice. Nicotine did not alter the circadian rhythmicity of activity in the mice. Rather, our findings suggest that the mice consume more nicotine when active and this might lead to enhanced release and metabolism of DA and further, to enhanced motor behavior. These findings support the suggestions that nicotine's effects on limbic and striatal DA are critical for its stimulating effects.

  4. Radiocarbon Evidence for Active Turnover of Pore-Water Dissolved Organic Carbon in the Methanogenic and Sulfate-Methane-Transition Zones of Santa Barbara Basin Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komada, T.; Li, H. L.; Cada, A. K.; Burdige, D.; Magen, C.; Chanton, J.; Grose, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Diverse metabolic activities have been documented in the deep biosphere. However, how these activities affect carbon cycling in the subsurface, and how they in turn affect the marine and global cycles of carbon are still unclear. Here we present natural-abundance 14C and 13C data from the uppermost 4.5 m of the sediments of the Santa Barbara Basin, California Borderland, showing active turnover of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) within, and immediately below, the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ; ~1.25 m). DOC concentrations increased with depth throughout the core, indicating net production within the sediment column. Enhanced DOC production was observed near the sediment-water interface, and also at ~30 cm below the SMTZ (~1.55 m). ∆14C values of DOC increased across the sediment-water interface, then decreased with depth, consistent with net production of modern DOC near the sediment-water interface, and input of 14C-depleted DOC from deeper horizons. An isotope mixing plot constructed with these data shows that the DOC diffusing upward at the base of the core is devoid of 14C, yet the DOC diffusing into and out of the SMTZ is relatively enriched (-460‰ and -300‰, respectively). This difference in 14C content of the DOC flux can only be reconciled if the following two are occurring within, and immediately below, the SMTZ: (1) >90% of the 14C-dead basal DOC flux is removed from the pore water (by, e.g., oxidation, fermentation, methanogenesis, precipitation), and (2) this DOC is replaced by material produced in this region at a rate that exceeds the upward basal flux. The 14C and 13C signatures suggest sedimentary organic matter to be the dominant source of DOC in process (2). Our data provide a unique insight into the active transformation of DOC and sedimentary organic matter in the subsurface.

  5. Accelerated apoptotic death and in vivo turnover of erythrocytes in mice lacking functional mitogen- and stress-activated kinase MSK1/2

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Elisabeth; Bissinger, Rosi; Fajol, Abul; Salker, Madhuri S.; Singh, Yogesh; Zelenak, Christine; Ghashghaeinia, Mehrdad; Gu, Shuchen; Jilani, Kashif; Lupescu, Adrian; Reyskens, Kathleen M. S. E.; Ackermann, Teresa F.; Föller, Michael; Schleicher, Erwin; Sheffield, William P.; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Lang, Florian; Qadri, Syed M.

    2015-01-01

    The mitogen- and stress-activated kinase MSK1/2 plays a decisive role in apoptosis. In analogy to apoptosis of nucleated cells, suicidal erythrocyte death called eryptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling leading to phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization. Here, we explored whether MSK1/2 participates in the regulation of eryptosis. To this end, erythrocytes were isolated from mice lacking functional MSK1/2 (msk−/−) and corresponding wild-type mice (msk+/+). Blood count, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration and mean erythrocyte volume were similar in both msk−/− and msk+/+ mice, but reticulocyte count was significantly increased in msk−/− mice. Cell membrane PS exposure was similar in untreated msk−/− and msk+/+ erythrocytes, but was enhanced by pathophysiological cell stressors ex vivo such as hyperosmotic shock or energy depletion to significantly higher levels in msk−/− erythrocytes than in msk+/+ erythrocytes. Cell shrinkage following hyperosmotic shock and energy depletion, as well as hemolysis following decrease of extracellular osmolarity was more pronounced in msk−/− erythrocytes. The in vivo clearance of autologously-infused CFSE-labeled erythrocytes from circulating blood was faster in msk−/− mice. The spleens from msk−/− mice contained a significantly greater number of PS-exposing erythrocytes than spleens from msk+/+ mice. The present observations point to accelerated eryptosis and subsequent clearance of erythrocytes leading to enhanced erythrocyte turnover in MSK1/2-deficient mice. PMID:26611568

  6. Accelerated apoptotic death and in vivo turnover of erythrocytes in mice lacking functional mitogen- and stress-activated kinase MSK1/2.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elisabeth; Bissinger, Rosi; Fajol, Abul; Salker, Madhuri S; Singh, Yogesh; Zelenak, Christine; Ghashghaeinia, Mehrdad; Gu, Shuchen; Jilani, Kashif; Lupescu, Adrian; Reyskens, Kathleen M S E; Ackermann, Teresa F; Föller, Michael; Schleicher, Erwin; Sheffield, William P; Arthur, J Simon C; Lang, Florian; Qadri, Syed M

    2015-11-27

    The mitogen- and stress-activated kinase MSK1/2 plays a decisive role in apoptosis. In analogy to apoptosis of nucleated cells, suicidal erythrocyte death called eryptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling leading to phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization. Here, we explored whether MSK1/2 participates in the regulation of eryptosis. To this end, erythrocytes were isolated from mice lacking functional MSK1/2 (msk(-/-)) and corresponding wild-type mice (msk(+/+)). Blood count, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration and mean erythrocyte volume were similar in both msk(-/-) and msk(+/+) mice, but reticulocyte count was significantly increased in msk(-/-) mice. Cell membrane PS exposure was similar in untreated msk(-/-) and msk(+/+) erythrocytes, but was enhanced by pathophysiological cell stressors ex vivo such as hyperosmotic shock or energy depletion to significantly higher levels in msk(-/-) erythrocytes than in msk(+/+) erythrocytes. Cell shrinkage following hyperosmotic shock and energy depletion, as well as hemolysis following decrease of extracellular osmolarity was more pronounced in msk(-/-) erythrocytes. The in vivo clearance of autologously-infused CFSE-labeled erythrocytes from circulating blood was faster in msk(-/-) mice. The spleens from msk(-/-) mice contained a significantly greater number of PS-exposing erythrocytes than spleens from msk(+/+) mice. The present observations point to accelerated eryptosis and subsequent clearance of erythrocytes leading to enhanced erythrocyte turnover in MSK1/2-deficient mice.

  7. Platelet activation by bacterial phospholipase C involves phosphoinositide turnover and phosphorylation of 47,000 dalton but not 20,000 dalton protein

    SciTech Connect

    Huzoor-Akbar; Anwer, K.

    1986-05-01

    This study was conducted to examine the role of phosphoinositides (PIns) and phosphorylation of 47,000 dalton (P47) and 20,000 dalton (P20) proteins in platelet activation by bacterial phospholipase C (PLC). PLC induced serotonin secretion (SS) and platelet aggregation (PA) in a concentration dependent manner. PLC (0.02 U/ml) caused phosphorylation of P47 in a time dependent manner (27% at 0.5 min to 378% at 7 min). PLC did not induce more than 15% phosphorylation of P20 by 7 min. Aspirin (500 ..mu..M) blocked phosphorylation of P20 but did not inhibit SS, PA or phosphorylation of P47. PLC (0.04 U/ml) decreased radioactivity (cpm) in /sup 32/P labeled phosphatidylinositol (PI), PI-4,5-bis-PO4 (PIP2) and PI-4-PO4 (PIP) by 20%, 12% and 7.5% respectively at 15 sec. The level of PI but not that of PIP2 returned to base line in 3 min. PIP level increased above control values within one min. PLC increased phosphatidic acid level (75% at 0.5 min. to 1545% at 3 min). In other experiments PLC produced diacylglycerol (DAG) in a time and concentration dependent manner. However, no DAG was detectable in the first 60 sec. These data suggest that: (a) PIns turnover and phosphorylation of P47 but not that of P20 is involved in platelet activation by PLC; and (b) DAG production from outer membrane phospholipids is not a prerequisite for platelet activation by PLC.

  8. Phosphatidylinositol turnover (PI) during synaptic activation results from the release of a stimulatory and in inhibitory agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Bencherif, M.; Rubio, R.; Berne, R.M.

    1986-03-05

    PI has been implicated in the process of synaptic transmission and is increased by agonists. It has been suggested that PI is involved in cellular Ca/sup + +/ mobilization and the process represents a series of hydrolytic reactions with inositol as the final product. Hence, the rate of release of /sup 3/H-inositol (/sup 3/H-Ins) from prelabelled inositol phospholipids can be used as an index of PI. In the /sup 3/H-inositol prelabelled frog sympathetic ganglia, they studied the effect of synaptic activity on PI. PI did not change during orthodromic stimulation (20 Hz, 5 min). However, upon cessation of the stimulation, PI increased rapidly and remained elevated for at least 30 min. This increase in PI was reduced by suffusing the ganglia with either acetylcholine or adenosine. In the presence of atropine (5 ..mu..M), orthodromic stimulation increased PI. They hypothesized that synaptic activation releases a long-lasting stimulatory agonist and a short-lived inhibitory (Ach/adenosine) agonist(s) affecting PI. To test this idea, 2 sympathetic ganglia were used. One was prelabelled with /sup 3/H-inositol and the other was not. The two ganglia were placed together in a 5 ..mu..l drop of Ringers solution containing atropine. Orthodromic stimuli were applied to the non-labelled ganglion and elicited release of /sup 3/H-Ins from the non-stimulated ganglion.

  9. Mammary cell activity and turnover in dairy cows treated with the prolactin-release inhibitor quinagolide and milked once daily.

    PubMed

    Boutinaud, M; Lollivier, V; Finot, L; Bruckmaier, R M; Lacasse, P

    2012-01-01

    To assess the regulation of mammary cell activity, survival, and proliferation by prolactin (PRL), 5 Holstein cows in early lactation received daily i.m. injections of 1mg of quinagolide, a suppressor of PRL release, for 9 wk, whereas 4 control cows received the vehicle (water) only. During the last week of treatment, one udder half was milked once a day (1×) and the other twice a day (2×). Mammary biopsies were harvested 1 wk before and 4 and 8 wk after the start of quinagolide treatment. The quinagolide injections reduced milk yield and resulted in lower levels of κ-casein and α-lactalbumin mRNA in the mammary biopsies at wk 4 compared with the control cows. In the mammary tissue of the quinagolide-treated cows at wk 8 of treatment, cell proliferation (as determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling) was lower and apoptosis (as determined by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay) was higher than in the mammary tissue of the control cows. During differential milking, mammary epithelial cells (MEC) were extracted from the milk by centrifugation and purified by immunocytochemical binding to allow variations in the levels of mammary transcripts to be observed. After 9 wk of treatment, levels of α-lactalbumin and κ-casein mRNA were lower in the MEC isolated from milk of the quinagolide-treated cows. This effect was associated with lower PRL receptor mRNA levels and a tendency toward lower viability in the milk-isolated MEC from the 2×-milked glands. The decrease from 2× milking to 1× milking also downregulated α-lactalbumin and κ-casein transcripts in the milk-isolated MEC. Viability was higher for the MEC collected from the 1×-milked udder halves compared with the 2×-milked halves. In conclusion, the reduction in milk yield after chronic administration of the PRL-release inhibitor quinagolide is associated with a reduction in mammary cell activity, survival, and proliferation in lactating dairy cows

  10. Job Demand and Job Satisfaction in Latent Groups of Turnover Intention Among Licensed Nurses in Taiwan Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Hui; Brown, Roger; Bowers, Barbara J; Chang, Wen-Yin

    2015-10-01

    Nurses' turnover intention is not dichotomous; it may reflect intent to leave the profession, intent to leave a type of facility, or intent to leave a specific workplace. In a latent class analysis (LCA) of data from 186 licensed nurses (RNs and LPNs) recruited from 25 nursing homes (NHs) in Taiwan, we classified nurses into turnover intention subgroups based on seven questionnaire items and used a multilevel contrast analysis to characterize the subgroups according to demographic and facility factors, job demand, and job satisfaction. A multilevel probit model was used to examine how job demand and job satisfaction influenced subgroup membership. Three turnover subgroups were identified: high turnover intention (12%), middle turnover intention (57%), and low turnover intention (31%). The high turnover intention subgroup comprised the youngest nurses and had the lowest percentage of registered nurses (RNs); nurses in this subgroup had worked the longest at the current NH and had the greatest likelihood of working at a for-profit facility. Nurses in the middle turnover intention subgroup had the lowest likelihood of working at a for-profit facility. Nurses in the low turnover intention subgroup were primarily RNs and had the shortest work experience in the current facility. Nurses in the high and middle turnover intention subgroups reported lower intrinsic job satisfaction than those with low turnover intention. Extrinsic job satisfaction mediated the relationship between job demand and turnover intention subgroup assignment. The results of this LCA can help target interventions to address heterogeneity of turnover intention and ultimately lessen turnover.

  11. Effects of sulglycotide on inflammation and epithelial cell turnover in active Helicobacter pylori+ chronic gastritis. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bazuro, G E; Dezi, A; Pallotta, L; Masci, P; Teodori, L; Trinca, M L; Koch, M; Capurso, L

    1996-01-01

    The effects of Sulglycotide were evaluated in a pilot study of active H. pylori+ atrophic gastritis. Ten informed patients (mean age 51 +/- 13 years) entered a double-blind study. Five received Sulglycotide 400 mg three times a day for one year, the other 5, placebo. At 0, 30, 90, 270, and 360 days of treatment, patients underwent endoscopic examinations with multiple biopsies. Morphometric studies (number of inflammatory cells and percent gland volume), morphologic studies (according to the Sydney system), and flow cytofluorimetry were performed in all cases. Compared to findings in the placebo group, patients treated with Sulglycotide showed a reduced number of inflammatory cells and an increase in gland volume 120 days after treatment. While the difference was not statistically significant, the trend was confirmed by the morphologic patterns. Flow cytofluorimetry revealed an increase in the percentage of cells in the G2 phase (full maturation) and a parallel drop in the S phase (premitotic synthesis) in the Sulglycotide group only in the first three months. These data would appear to indicate an acceleration of gastric epithelial cell maturation and a decrease in the inflammatory infiltrate under the effect of Sulglycotide.

  12. Aldosterone regulates cellular turnover and mitogen-activated protein kinase family expression in the neonatal rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Yim, Hyung Eun; Yoo, Kee Hwan; Bae, In Sun; Jang, Gi Young; Hong, Young Sook; Lee, Joo Won

    2009-06-01

    Growing evidence indicates that aldosterone is a potent mitogenic signal regulating genes involved in antiapoptosis, cell proliferation and growth. We investigated the role of endogenous aldosterone in renal development, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family expression. Newborn rats were treated with either spironolactone (200 mg/kg/d) in olive oil or only olive oil for 7 days. TUNEL assay and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) stain were performed on kidney sections. Immunoblots, immunohistochemical (IHC) stain, and reverse transcriptase-PCR for MAPKs were performed. PCNA-positive proliferating cells decreased and apoptotic cells increased significantly with spironolactone (P < 0.05). In the spironolactone-treated group, c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-2 expression increased, whereas extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)-2 and p38 expressions decreased in immunoblots (P < 0.05) and IHC stain. ERK-2 and p38 mRNA expressions increased in the spironolactone-treated group (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates that aldosterone blockade in the developing kidney decreases cellular proliferation, increases apoptosis, and modulates the expressions of JNK-2, ERK-2, and p38. Aldosterone possibly participates in renal development and MAPK family may serve as, in part, the signaling intermediate through the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the developing kidney. J. Cell. Physiol. 219: 724-733, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Proteasome-mediated turnover of the transcriptional activator FIT is required for plant iron-deficiency responses.

    PubMed

    Sivitz, Alicia; Grinvalds, Claudia; Barberon, Marie; Curie, Catherine; Vert, Grégory

    2011-06-01

    Plants display a number of responses to low iron availability in order to increase iron uptake from the soil. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the ferric-chelate reductase FRO2 and the ferrous iron transporter IRT1 control iron entry from the soil into the root epidermis. To maintain iron homeostasis, the expression of FRO2 and IRT1 is tightly controlled by iron deficiency at the transcriptional level. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor FIT represents the most upstream actor known in the iron-deficiency signaling pathway, and directly regulates the expression of the root iron uptake machinery genes FRO2 and IRT1. However, how FIT is controlled by iron and acts to activate transcription of its targets remains obscure. Here we show that FIT mRNA and endogenous FIT protein accumulate in Arabidopsis roots upon iron deficiency. However, using plants constitutively expressing FIT, we observed that FIT protein accumulation is reduced in iron-limited conditions. This post-transcriptional regulation of FIT is perfectly synchronized with the accumulation of endogenous FIT and IRT1 proteins, and therefore is part of the early responses to low iron. We demonstrated that such regulation affects FIT protein stability under iron deficiency as a result of 26S proteasome-dependent degradation. In addition, we showed that FIT post-translational regulation by iron is required for FRO2 and IRT1 gene expression. Taken together our results indicate that FIT transcriptional and post-translational regulations are integrated in plant roots to ensure that the positive regulator FIT accumulates as a short-lived protein following iron shortage, and to allow proper iron-deficiency responses.

  14. Alcohol, signaling, and ECM turnover.

    PubMed

    Seth, Devanshi; D'Souza El-Guindy, Nympha B; Apte, Minoti; Mari, Montserrat; Dooley, Steven; Neuman, Manuela; Haber, Paul S; Kundu, Gopal C; Darwanto, Agus; de Villiers, Willem J; Vonlaufen, A; Xu, Z; Phillips, P; Yang, S; Goldstein, D; Pirola, R M; Wilson, J S; Moles, Anna; Fernández, Anna; Colell, Anna; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C; Meyer, Christoph; Meindl-Beinker, Nadja M

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol is recognized as a direct hepatotoxin, but the precise molecular pathways that are important for the initiation and progression of alcohol-induced tissue injury are not completely understood. The current understanding of alcohol toxicity to organs suggests that alcohol initiates injury by generation of oxidative and nonoxidative ethanol metabolites and via translocation of gut-derived endotoxin. These processes lead to cellular injury and stimulation of the inflammatory responses mediated through a variety of molecules. With continuing alcohol abuse, the injury progresses through impairment of tissue regeneration and extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover, leading to fibrogenesis and cirrhosis. Several cell types are involved in this process, the predominant being stellate cells, macrophages, and parenchymal cells. In response to alcohol, growth factors and cytokines activate many signaling cascades that regulate fibrogenesis. This mini-review brings together research focusing on the underlying mechanisms of alcohol-mediated injury in a number of organs. It highlights the various processes and molecules that are likely involved in inflammation, immune modulation, susceptibility to infection, ECM turnover and fibrogenesis in the liver, pancreas, and lung triggered by alcohol abuse.

  15. Long noncoding RNA turnover

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Je-Hyun; Kim, Jiyoung; Gorospe, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Most RNAs transcribed in mammalian cells lack protein-coding sequences. Among them is a vast family of long (>200 nt) noncoding (lnc)RNAs. LncRNAs can modulate cellular protein expression patterns by influencing the transcription of many genes, the post-transcriptional fate of mRNAs and ncRNAs, and the turnover and localization of proteins. Given the broad impact of lncRNAs on gene regulation, there is escalating interest in elucidating the mechanisms that govern the steady-state levels of lncRNAs. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the factors and mechanisms that modulate mammalian lncRNA stability. PMID:25769416

  16. Item Difficulty Modeling of Paragraph Comprehension Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorin, Joanna S.; Embretson, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    Recent assessment research joining cognitive psychology and psychometric theory has introduced a new technology, item generation. In algorithmic item generation, items are systematically created based on specific combinations of features that underlie the processing required to correctly solve a problem. Reading comprehension items have been more…

  17. Metabolic turnover of myelin glycerophospholipids.

    PubMed

    Morell, P; Ousley, A H

    1994-08-01

    The apparent half life for metabolic turnover of glycerophospholipids in the myelin sheath, as determined by measuring the rate of loss of label in a myelin glycerophospholipid following radioactive precursor injection, varies with the radioactive precursor used, age of animal, and time after injection during which metabolic turnover is studied. Experimental strategies for resolving apparent inconsistencies consequent to these variables are discussed. Illustrative data concerning turnover of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in myelin of rat brain are presented. PC of the myelin membrane exhibits heterogeneity with respect to metabolic turnover rates. There are at least two metabolic pools of PC in myelin, one with a half life of the order of days, and another with a half life of the order of weeks. To a significant extent biphasic turnover is due to differential turnover of individual molecular species (which differ in acyl chain composition). The two predominant molecular species of myelin PC turnover at very different rates (16:0, 18:1 PC turning over several times more rapidly than 18:0, 18:1 PC). Therefore, within the same membrane, individual molecular species of a phospholipid class are metabolized at different rates. Possible mechanisms for differential turnover of molecular species are discussed, as are other factors that may contribute to a multiphasic turnover of glycerophospholipids.

  18. Integrating Turnover Reasons and Shocks with Turnover Decision Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maertz, Carl P., Jr.; Kmitta, Kayla R.

    2012-01-01

    We interviewed and classified 186 quitters from many jobs and organizations via a theoretically-based protocol into five decision process types. We then tested exploratory hypotheses comparing users of these types on their propensity to report certain turnover reasons and turnover shocks. "Impulsive-type quitters," with neither a job offer in hand…

  19. Work and Career considerations in Understanding Employee Turnover Intentions and Turnover: Development of the Turnover Diagnostic.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    reviews of the psychology of turnover (Brayfleld & Crockett, 1955; Herzberg, Mausner, Peterson, & Capwell, 1957; Mobley, 1982; Mobley, Hand, Meglino...Hand, H. H., Meglino, B. M., & Griffeth, R. W. (1979). Review and conceptual analysis of the employee turnover proess. Psychological Bulletin 86 49-522...Applied Psychology 6 318-328. Schuh, A. J. (1967). The predictability of employee turnover: A review of the literature. Personnel Psychology 20 133-152

  20. Relationship between analgesia and turnover of brain biogenic amines.

    PubMed

    Bensemana, D; Gascon, A L

    1978-10-01

    The analgesic activity of morphine, delta9THC, and sodium salicylate was studied concomitantly with changes in brainstem and cortex turnover of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5HT). The results show that a correlation exists between the presence of analgesia and the increased turnover rates of the three biogenic amines. Morphine and sodium salicylate induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of all three biogenic amines; delta9THC-induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of DA and 5HT only. There is, however, no consistent relationship between the degree of analgesia and the degree of change in the turnover rates. The existence of the endogenous morphine-like substances, endorphines, may explain why morphine analgesia is distinct from that of delta9THC and sodium salicylate. The possible relationship between this morphine-like substance and biogenic amines is discussed.

  1. Salary, Performance, and Superintendent Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grissom, Jason A.; Mitani, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Superintendent retention is an important goal for many school districts, yet the factors contributing to superintendent turnover are poorly understood. Most prior quantitative studies of superintendent turnover have relied on small, cross-sectional samples, limiting the evidence base. Utilizing longitudinal administrative records from…

  2. Commitment Profiles and Employee Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Laura; Vandenberghe, Christian; Vandenberg, Robert; Bentein, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    We examined how affective (AC), normative (NC), perceived sacrifice (PS), and few alternatives (FA) commitments combine to form profiles and determine turnover intention and turnover. We theorized that three mechanisms account for how profiles operate, i.e., the degree to which membership is internally regulated, the perceived desirability and…

  3. Teacher Turnover: A Conceptual Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Garcia, Cynthia; Slate, John R.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we reviewed the available literature concerning teacher turnover. The seriousness of this issue was addressed as cause for concern is clearly present. Issues we examined in this conceptual analysis were the federal government's role in public education, the No Child Left Behind Act, teacher turnover, teacher retention, teacher…

  4. Muscarinic M1 receptors activate phosphoinositide turnover and Ca2+ mobilisation in rat sympathetic neurones, but this signalling pathway does not mediate M-current inhibition

    PubMed Central

    del Río, Elena; Bevilacqua, Jorge A; Marsh, Stephen J; Halley, Pamela; Caulfield, Malcolm P

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between muscarinic receptor activation, phosphoinositide turnover, calcium mobilisation and M-current inhibition has been studied in rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurones in primary culture. Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) stimulation was measured by the accumulation of [3H]-cytidine monophosphate phosphatidate (CMP-PA) after incubation with [3H]-cytidine in the presence of Li+. The muscarinic agonist oxotremorine methiodide (oxo-M) stimulated PLC in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of approximately 3.5 μm. The concentration-response curve for oxo-M was shifted to the right by a factor of about 10 by pirenzepine (100 nm), suggesting a pKB (—log of the apparent dissociation constant) of 7.9 ± 0.4, while himbacine (1 μm) shifted the curve by a factor of about 13 (pKB∼7.1 ± 0.6). This indicates involvement of the M1 muscarinic receptor in this response. The accumulation of CMP-PA was localised by in situ autoradiography to SCG principal neurones, with no detectable signal in glial cells present in the primary cultures. The ability of oxo-M to release Ca2+ from inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate (InsP3)-sensitive stores was determined by fura-2 microfluorimetry of SCG neurones voltage clamped in perforated patch mode. Oxo-M failed to evoke intracellular Ca2+ (Cai2+) mobilisation in SCG neurones voltage clamped at −60 mV, but produced a significant Cai2+ rise (67 ± 15 nm, n = 9) in cells voltage clamped at −25 mV. Thapsigargin (0.5–1 μm) caused a 70% inhibition of the oxo-M-induced Cai2+ increase, indicating its intracellular origin, while oxo-M-induced inhibition of M-current in the same cells was unaffected by thapsigargin. Our results do not support the involvement of InsP3-sensitive calcium mobilisation in M-current inhibition. PMID:10517804

  5. 15 CFR 764.7 - Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. 764.7 Section 764.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade... items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. (a) Introduction. As set forth in... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya before the comprehensive embargo on Libya...

  6. 15 CFR 764.7 - Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. 764.7 Section 764.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade... items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. (a) Introduction. As set forth in... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya before the comprehensive embargo on Libya...

  7. 15 CFR 764.7 - Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. 764.7 Section 764.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade... items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. (a) Introduction. As set forth in... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya before the comprehensive embargo on Libya...

  8. 15 CFR 764.7 - Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. 764.7 Section 764.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade... items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. (a) Introduction. As set forth in... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya before the comprehensive embargo on Libya...

  9. 15 CFR 764.7 - Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. 764.7 Section 764.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade... items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. (a) Introduction. As set forth in... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya before the comprehensive embargo on Libya...

  10. DECOMMISSIONING OF SHIELDED FACILITIES AT WINFRITH USED FOR POST IRRADIATION EXAMINATION OF NUCLEAR FUELS & OTHER ACTIVE ITEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.D.; Parkinson, S.J.; Cornell, R.M.; Staples, A.T.

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes the approaches used in the clearing, cleaning, decontamination and decommissioning of a very large suite of seven concrete shielded caves and other facilities used by UKAEA at Winfrith Technology Centre, England over a period of about 30 years for the postirradiation examination (PIE) of a wide range of nuclear fuels and other very active components. The basic construction of the facilities will first be described, setting the scene for the major challenges that 1970s' thinking posed for decommissioning engineers. The tendency then to use large and heavy items of equipment supported upon massive steel bench structures produced a series of major problems that had to be overcome. The means of solving these problems by utilization of relatively simple and inexpensive equipment will be described. Later, a further set of challenges was experienced to decontaminate the interior surfaces to allow man entries to be undertaken at acceptable dose rates. The paper will describe the types of tooling used and the range of complementary techniques that were employed to steadily reduce the dose rates down to acceptable levels. Some explanations will also be given for the creation of realistic dose budgets and the methods of recording and continuously assessing the progress against these budgets throughout the project. Some final considerations are given to the commercial approaches to be adopted throughout this major project by the decommissioning engineers. Particular emphasis will be given to the selection of equipment and techniques that are effective so that the whole process can be carried out in a cost-effective and timely manner. The paper also provides brief complementary information obtained during the decommissioning of a plutonium-contaminated facility used for a range of semi-experimental purposes in the late 1970s. The main objective here was to remove the alpha contamination in such a manner that the volume of Plutonium Contaminated Materials (P

  11. How many and which items of activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) are necessary for screening.

    PubMed

    Roehrig, Bernd; Hoeffken, Klaus; Pientka, Ludger; Wedding, Ulrich

    2007-05-01

    Geriatric assessment (GA) in elderly cancer patients serves as screening instrument to identify patients who are vulnerable or frail. To reduce the diagnostic burden for patients and caregivers, we asked how many and which items of ADL and IADL questionnaires are necessary to identify those patients with limitations in the sum score of ADL or IADL. Data of 327 elderly patients (age>or=60 years), of whom 27.9% had limitations in ADL and 36.0% in IADL score, were entered in a forward selection model. Four out of ten items of ADL identified 95.3% of patients with limitations in ADL. Two out of eight items of IADL identified 97.4% of patients with limitations in IADL. The combined use of these items recognised 98.5% of patients with limitations in ADL or IADL score. If ADL and IADL scores are used for screening, we recommend an abbreviated version with 6 instead of 18 items.

  12. Biomass turnover time in terrestrial ecosystems halved by land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erb, Karl-Heinz; Fetzel, Tamara; Plutzar, Christoph; Kastner, Thomas; Lauk, Christian; Mayer, Andreas; Niedertscheider, Maria; Körner, Christian; Haberl, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is not well quantified. Biomass turnover time is a crucial parameter in the global carbon cycle, and contributes to the feedback between the terrestrial carbon cycle and climate. Biomass turnover time varies substantially in time and space, but its determinants are not well known, making predictions of future global carbon cycle dynamics uncertain. Land use--the sum of activities that aim at enhancing terrestrial ecosystem services--alters plant growth and reduces biomass stocks, and is hence expected to affect biomass turnover. Here we explore land-use-induced alterations of biomass turnover at the global scale by comparing the biomass turnover of the actual vegetation with that of a hypothetical vegetation state with no land use under current climate conditions. We find that, in the global average, biomass turnover is 1.9 times faster with land use. This acceleration affects all biomes roughly equally, but with large differences between land-use types. Land conversion, for example from forests to agricultural fields, is responsible for 59% of the acceleration; the use of forests and natural grazing land accounts for 26% and 15% respectively. Reductions in biomass stocks are partly compensated by reductions in net primary productivity. We conclude that land use significantly and systematically affects the fundamental trade-off between carbon turnover and carbon stocks.

  13. Improved statistical power of Alzheimer clinical trials by item-response theory: proof of concept by application to the activities of daily living scale.

    PubMed

    Ard, M Colin; Galasko, Douglas R; Edland, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of effective treatment for Alzheimer disease (AD) depends upon the availability of outcome measures that exhibit good sensitivity to rates of longitudinal decline on global functional performance. The Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living inventory (ADCS-ADL) is a frequently used functional endpoint in clinical trials for AD that assesses patient functional ability on the basis of informant ratings of patient performance on a variety of everyday tasks. Previous research has shown that the items comprising the ADCS-ADL are sensitive to characteristic longitudinal trajectories in AD. However, standard procedures for combining information from individual items into an overall test score may not make full use of the information provided by informant responses. The current study explored an application of item-response theory (IRT) techniques to the calculation of test scores on the ADCS-ADL. Using data from 2 ADCS clinical trials on mild-to-moderate AD patients we found that IRT based scoring increased sensitivity to change in functional ability and improved prospective statistical power of the ADCS-ADL as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

  14. A psychometric investigation of the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory among highly sexually active gay and bisexual men: An item response theory analysis

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Rendina, H. Jonathon; Ventuneac, Ana; Cook, Karon F.; Grov, Christian; Mustanski, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory (HDSI) was designed as an instrument for the screening of hypersexuality by the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-5 taskforce. Aim Our study sought to conduct a psychometric analysis of the HDSI, including an investigation of its underlying structure and reliability utilizing Item Response Theory (IRT) modeling, and an examination of its polythetic scoring criteria in comparison to a standard dimensionally-based cutoff score. Methods We examined a diverse group of 202 highly sexually active gay and bisexual men in New York City. We conducted psychometric analyses of the HDSI, including both confirmatory factor analysis of its structure and item response theory analysis of the item and scale reliabilities. Main Outcome Measures We utilized the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory. Results The HDSI adequately fit a single-factor solution, although there was evidence that two of the items may measure a second factor that taps into sex as a form of coping. The scale showed evidence of strong reliability across much of the continuum of hypersexuality and results suggested that, in addition to the proposed polythetic scoring criteria, a cutoff score of 20 on the severity index might be used for preliminary classification of HD. Conclusion The HDSI was found to be highly reliable and results suggested that a unidimensional, quantitative conception of hypersexuality with a clinically relevant cutoff score may be more appropriate than a qualitative syndrome comprised of multiple distinct clusters of problems. However, we also found preliminary evidence that three clusters of symptoms may constitute an HD syndrome as opposed to the two clusters initially proposed. Future research is needed to determine which of these issues are characteristic of the hypersexuality and HD constructs themselves and which are more likely to be methodological artifacts of the HDSI. PMID:23534845

  15. Screening Test Items for Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longford, Nicholas T.

    2014-01-01

    A method for medical screening is adapted to differential item functioning (DIF). Its essential elements are explicit declarations of the level of DIF that is acceptable and of the loss function that quantifies the consequences of the two kinds of inappropriate classification of an item. Instead of a single level and a single function, sets of…

  16. Warming Effects Enzyme Turnover During Decomposition of Subtropical Peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihi, D.; Inglett, P.; Inglett, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are the proximate agents for organic matter degradation, but the turnover rate of enzymes is often assumed in most decomposition models without direct observations. Here, we assess turnover rates of C (ß-D-glucosidase), N (Leucine aminopeptidase), and P (Phosphomonoesterase) degrading enzymes by spiking commercially available enzymes to the dissolved organic matter of two subtropical peats incubated at 15°C and 25°C and monitoring of net activity of spiked enzymes (i.e. the difference between the spiked and the non-spiked samples) over time. Turnover rates of all three enzymes were greater in the samples incubated at 25°C (ranged between 0.006 hr-1 to 0.014 hr-1) as compared to those incubated at 15°C (ranged between 0.002 hr-1 to 0.009 hr-1). Concentrations of dissolved organic matter were positively correlated with the turnover rates (R2 ranged between 0.71-0.77) of all enzyme groups. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to evaluate the turnover rates of enzymes in wetland soils as a function of warming and dissolved organic matter concentration. The findings suggest that warming-induced changes in the size of soil enzyme pool due to direct (by increasing protease activity) and indirect (by increasing concentrations of dissolved organic matter) effects on their turnover rates has potential to alter soil C stocks in a warmer world.

  17. RESTRICTED INTERESTS AND TEACHER PRESENTATION OF ITEMS

    PubMed Central

    Stocco, Corey S; Thompson, Rachel H; Rodriguez, Nicole M

    2011-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behavior (RRB) is more pervasive, prevalent, frequent, and severe in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) than in their typical peers. One subtype of RRB is restricted interests in items or activities, which is evident in the manner in which individuals engage with items (e.g., repetitious wheel spinning), the types of items or activities they select (e.g., preoccupation with a phone book), or the range of items or activities they select (i.e., narrow range of items). We sought to describe the relation between restricted interests and teacher presentation of items. Overall, we observed 5 teachers interacting with 2 pairs of students diagnosed with an ASD. Each pair included 1 student with restricted interests. During these observations, teachers were free to present any items from an array of 4 stimuli selected by experimenters. We recorded student responses to teacher presentation of items and analyzed the data to determine the relation between teacher presentation of items and the consequences for presentation provided by the students. Teacher presentation of items corresponded with differential responses provided by students with ASD, and those with restricted preferences experienced a narrower array of items. PMID:21941381

  18. Restricted interests and teacher presentation of items.

    PubMed

    Stocco, Corey S; Thompson, Rachel H; Rodriguez, Nicole M

    2011-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behavior (RRB) is more pervasive, prevalent, frequent, and severe in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) than in their typical peers. One subtype of RRB is restricted interests in items or activities, which is evident in the manner in which individuals engage with items (e.g., repetitious wheel spinning), the types of items or activities they select (e.g., preoccupation with a phone book), or the range of items or activities they select (i.e., narrow range of items). We sought to describe the relation between restricted interests and teacher presentation of items. Overall, we observed 5 teachers interacting with 2 pairs of students diagnosed with an ASD. Each pair included 1 student with restricted interests. During these observations, teachers were free to present any items from an array of 4 stimuli selected by experimenters. We recorded student responses to teacher presentation of items and analyzed the data to determine the relation between teacher presentation of items and the consequences for presentation provided by the students. Teacher presentation of items corresponded with differential responses provided by students with ASD, and those with restricted preferences experienced a narrower array of items.

  19. Differences in bone mineral density, markers of bone turnover and extracellular matrix and daily life muscular activity among patients with recent motor-incomplete versus motor-complete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kostovski, E; Hjeltnes, N; Eriksen, E F; Kolset, S O; Iversen, P O

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to severe bone loss, but the associated mechanisms are poorly described in incomplete SCI individuals. The purpose of the study is to compare alterations in bone mineral density (BMD) and serum biomarkers of bone turnover in recent motor-incomplete to -complete SCI men, as well as to describe their physical activity and spasticity. We studied 31 men with acute SCI. Whole-body DXA scans, serum biomarkers and self-reported activity and spasticity were examined 1 and/or 3 and 12 months after the injury. We observed a decrease in proximal femur BMD (p < 0.02) in both the groups. Serum phosphate and carboxy-terminal-collagen crosslinks were significantly lower in motor-incomplete versus complete SCI men, whereas albumin-corrected Ca(2+) (p = 0.02) were lower only 3 months after injury. When data from all 31 SCI participants were pooled, we observed increased serum matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitors of MMP-2 (TIMP-2) (p < 0.02) whereas TIMP-1 decreased (p = 0.03). BMD correlated positively with self-reported activity (r = 0.59, p = 0.04) and negatively with spasticity (r = 0.74, p = 0.02) 12 months after injury. As a summary, men with motor-incomplete SCI developed significant proximal femur bone loss 12 months after injury and exhibited increased bone resorption throughout the first year after the injury. Compared with complete SCI men, incomplete SCI men show attenuated bone resorption. Our pooled data show increased turnover of extracellular matrix after injury and that increased exercise before and after injury correlated with reduced bone loss.

  20. Climate change induces shifts in abundance and activity pattern of bacteria and archaea catalyzing major transformation steps in nitrogen turnover in a soil from a mid-European beech forest.

    PubMed

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Tejedor, Javier; Bimüller, Carolin; Bimueller, Carolin; Dannenmann, Michael; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Knabner, Ingrid Kögel; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, including severe drought periods and intense drying rewetting cycles. This will directly influence microbial nitrogen (N) turnover rates in soil by changing the water content and the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, a space for time climate change experiment was conducted by transferring intact beech seedling-soil mesocosms from a northwest (NW) exposed site, representing today's climatic conditions, to a southwest (SW) exposed site, providing a model climate for future conditions with naturally occurring increased soil temperature (+0.8°C in average). In addition, severe drought and intense rainfall was simulated by a rainout shelter at SW and manual rewetting after 39 days drought, respectively. Soil samples were taken in June, at the end of the drought period (August), 24 and 72 hours after rewetting (August) and after a regeneration period of four weeks (September). To follow dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities involved in N turnover, abundance and activity of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, N2-fixing microbes and N-mineralizers was analyzed based on marker genes and the related transcripts by qPCR from DNA and RNA directly extracted from soil. Abundance of the transcripts was reduced under climate change with most pronounced effects for denitrification. Our results revealed that already a transfer from NW to SW without further treatment resulted in decreased cnor and nosZ transcripts, encoding for nitric oxide reductase and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, while nirK transcripts, encoding for nitrite reductase, remained unaffected. Severe drought additionally led to reduced nirK and cnor transcripts at SW. After rewetting, nirK transcripts increased rapidly at both sites, while cnor and nosZ transcripts increased only at NW. Our data indicate that the climate change influences activity pattern of microbial communities involved in denitrification processes to a different extend

  1. Climate Change Induces Shifts in Abundance and Activity Pattern of Bacteria and Archaea Catalyzing Major Transformation Steps in Nitrogen Turnover in a Soil from a Mid-European Beech Forest

    PubMed Central

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Tejedor, Javier; Bimueller, Carolin; Dannenmann, Michael; Knabner, Ingrid Kögel; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, including severe drought periods and intense drying rewetting cycles. This will directly influence microbial nitrogen (N) turnover rates in soil by changing the water content and the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, a space for time climate change experiment was conducted by transferring intact beech seedling-soil mesocosms from a northwest (NW) exposed site, representing today's climatic conditions, to a southwest (SW) exposed site, providing a model climate for future conditions with naturally occurring increased soil temperature (+0.8°C in average). In addition, severe drought and intense rainfall was simulated by a rainout shelter at SW and manual rewetting after 39 days drought, respectively. Soil samples were taken in June, at the end of the drought period (August), 24 and 72 hours after rewetting (August) and after a regeneration period of four weeks (September). To follow dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities involved in N turnover, abundance and activity of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, N2-fixing microbes and N-mineralizers was analyzed based on marker genes and the related transcripts by qPCR from DNA and RNA directly extracted from soil. Abundance of the transcripts was reduced under climate change with most pronounced effects for denitrification. Our results revealed that already a transfer from NW to SW without further treatment resulted in decreased cnor and nosZ transcripts, encoding for nitric oxide reductase and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, while nirK transcripts, encoding for nitrite reductase, remained unaffected. Severe drought additionally led to reduced nirK and cnor transcripts at SW. After rewetting, nirK transcripts increased rapidly at both sites, while cnor and nosZ transcripts increased only at NW. Our data indicate that the climate change influences activity pattern of microbial communities involved in denitrification processes to a different extend

  2. 18O-Tracer Metabolomics Reveals Protein Turnover and CDP-Choline Cycle Activity in Differentiating 3T3-L1 Pre-Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, Jay S.; Miranda, Cristobal L.; Bobe, Gerd; Maier, Claudia S.; Stevens, Jan F.

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of precursor cells into mature adipocytes (adipogenesis) has been an area of increased focus, spurred by a rise in obesity rates. Though our understanding of adipogenesis and its regulation at the cellular level is growing, many questions remain, especially regarding the regulation of the metabolome. The 3T3-L1 cell line is the most well characterized cellular model of adipogenesis. Using a time course metabolomics approach, we show that the 3T3-L1 preadipocyte metabolome is greatly altered during the first 48 hours of differentiation, where cells go through about two rounds of cell division, a process known as mitotic clonal expansion. Short-chain peptides were among several small molecules that were increased during mitotic clonal expansion. Additional indicators of protein turnover were also increased, including bilirubin, a degradation product of heme-containing proteins, and 3-methylhistidine, a post-translationally modified amino acid that is not reutilized for protein synthesis. To study the origin of the peptides, we treated differentiating preadipocytes with 18O labeled water and found that 18O was incorporated into the short chain peptides, confirming them, at least in part, as products of hydrolysis. Inhibitors of the proteasome or matrix metalloproteinases affected the peptide levels during differentiation, but inhibitors of autophagy or peptidases did not. 18O was also incorporated into several choline metabolites including cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline), glycerophosphocholine, and several phosphatidylcholine species, indicative of phosphatidylcholine synthesis/degradation and of flux through the CDP-choline cycle, a hallmark of proliferating cells. 18O-Tracer metabolomics further showed metabolic labeling of glutamate, suggestive of glutaminolysis, also characteristic of proliferating cells. Together, these results highlight the utility of 18O isotope labeling in combination with metabolomics to uncover changes in

  3. Using Turnover as a Recruitment Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Teacher turnover is notoriously high in the field of early childhood education with an estimated 33% of staff exiting the workplace each year. Turnover is costly. Not only do high levels of turnover negatively impact children's growth and development, it also erodes the program's economic stability and wherewithal to provide effective operations…

  4. Measuring Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this study the levels of staff turnover reported in the nursing home literature (1990-2003) are reviewed, as well as the definitions of turnover used in these prior studies. With the use of primary data collected from 354 facilities, the study addresses the various degrees of bias that result, depending on how staff turnover is defined…

  5. Estimating Teacher Turnover Costs: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Abigail Jurist; Joy, Lois; Ellis, Pamela; Jablonski, Erica; Karelitz, Tzur M.

    2012-01-01

    High teacher turnover in large U.S. cities is a critical issue for schools and districts, and the students they serve; but surprisingly little work has been done to develop methodologies and standards that districts and schools can use to make reliable estimates of turnover costs. Even less is known about how to detect variations in turnover costs…

  6. Quantifying T Lymphocyte Turnover

    PubMed Central

    De Boer, Rob J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral T cell populations are maintained by production of naive T cells in the thymus, clonal expansion of activated cells, cellular self-renewal (or homeostatic proliferation), and density dependent cell life spans. A variety of experimental techniques have been employed to quantify the relative contributions of these processes. In modern studies lymphocytes are typically labeled with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU), deuterium, or the fluorescent dye carboxy-fluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE), their division history has been studied by monitoring telomere shortening and the dilution of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) or the dye CFSE, and clonal expansion has been documented by recording changes in the population densities of antigen specific cells. Proper interpretation of such data in terms of the underlying rates of T cell production, division, and death has proven to be notoriously difficult and involves mathematical modeling. We review the various models that have been developed for each of these techniques, discuss which models seem most appropriate for what type of data, reveal open problems that require better models, and pinpoint how the assumptions underlying a mathematical model may influence the interpretation of data. Elaborating various successful cases where modeling has delivered new insights in T cell population dynamics, this review provides quantitative estimates of several processes involved in the maintenance of naive and memory, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell pools in mice and men. PMID:23313150

  7. Bone and bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Crofton, Patricia M

    2009-01-01

    Children with cancer are exposed to multiple influences that may adversely affect bone health. Some treatments have direct deleterious effects on bone whilst others may have indirect effects mediated through various endocrine abnormalities. Most clinical outcome studies have concentrated on survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). There is now good evidence that earlier treatment protocols that included cranial irradiation with doses of 24 Gy or greater may result in growth hormone deficiency and low bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Under current protocols, BMD decreases during intensive chemotherapy and fracture risk increases. Although total body BMD may eventually return to normal after completion of chemotherapy, lumbar spine trabecular BMD may remain low for many years. The implications for long-term fracture risk are unknown. Risk factors for low BMD include high dose methotrexate, higher cumulative doses of glucocorticoids, male gender and low physical activity. BMD outcome in non-ALL childhood cancers has been less well studied but there is evidence that survivors of childhood brain or bone tumours, and survivors of bone marrow transplants for childhood malignancy, all have a high risk of long-term osteopenia. Long-term follow-up is required, with appropriate treatment of any endocrine abnormalities identified.

  8. Altered bone turnover during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Morey, E. R.; Liu, C.; Baylink, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications in calcium metabolism during spaceflight were studied, using parameters that reflect bone turnover. Bone formation rate, medullary area, bone length, bone density, pore size distribution, and differential bone cell number were evaluated in growing rate both immediately after and 25 days after orbital spaceflights aboard the Soviet biological satellites Cosmos 782 and 936. The primary effect of space flight on bone turnover was a reversible inhibition of bone formation at the periosteal surface. A simultaneous increase in the length of the periosteal arrest line suggests that bone formation ceased along corresponding portions of that surface. Possible reasons include increased secretion of glucocorticoids and mechanical unloading of the skeleton due to near-weightlessness, while starvation and immobilization are excluded as causes.

  9. Soman-induced seizures impair norepinephrine-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Filbert, M.G.; Phann, S.; Forster, J.; Ballough, G.P.; Cann, F.J.

    1993-05-13

    Seizure activity increases turnover of phosphoinositide bisphosphate (PIP2). Turnover of PIP2 is thought to be modulated by neurotransmitter interactions. The effect of soman-induced seizures on neurotransmitter-stimulated PIP 2 turnover was examined in rats. Thirty minutes after induction of seizure activity, rats were euthanized and slices prepared from the hippocampus or cerebral cortex were incubated with myo-(2-3H) inositol for incorporation into phospholipids. Hydrolysis of phosphoinositides was determined by measuring the accumulation of (3H) inositol-l-phosphate (IP1) in the presence of LiCl. Carbachol, norepinephrine (NE) and high K+ increased accumulation of IP1 in slices from control rats. GABA was without effect on IP1 accumulation but potentiated the stimulation of PIP, hydrolysis by NE. NE-stimulated IP1 accumulation in slices from rats undergoing seizures was significantly reduced. GABA potentiation of the NE-stimulated hydrolysis was also reduced.

  10. Writing better test items.

    PubMed

    Aucoin, Julia W

    2005-01-01

    Professional development specialists have had little opportunity to learn how to write test items to meet the expectations of today's graduate nurse. Schools of nursing have moved away from knowledge-level test items and have had to develop more application and analysis items to prepare graduates for the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX). This same type of question can be used effectively to support a competence assessment system and document critical thinking skills.

  11. Turnover: strategies for staff retention.

    PubMed

    SnowAntle, S

    1990-01-01

    This discussion has focused on a number of areas where organizations may find opportunities for more effectively managing employee retention. Given the multitude of causes and consequences, there is no one quick fix. Effective management of employee retention requires assessment of the entire human resources process, that is, recruitment, selection, job design, compensation, supervision, work conditions, etc. Regular and systematic diagnosis of turnover and implementation of multiple strategies and evaluation are needed (Mobley, 1982).

  12. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-09-01

    The report presents a brief synopsis and discussion of wildlife activities undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration. The objectives of the program were wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. (ACR)

  13. Raloxifene treatment enhances brain activation during recognition of familiar items: a pharmacological fMRI study in healthy elderly males.

    PubMed

    Goekoop, Rutger; Barkhof, Frederik; Duschek, Erik J J; Netelenbos, Coen; Knol, Dirk L; Scheltens, Philip; Rombouts, Serge A R B

    2006-07-01

    Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that may delay the onset of mild cognitive impairment in elderly women. Effects of raloxifene treatment on mental performance in males remain to be investigated. In a previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we showed that raloxifene treatment enhanced brain activation in elderly males during encoding of new information (faces) into memory. The current study used fMRI in the same group of subjects to screen for effects of raloxifene treatment on brain function during face recognition. Healthy elderly males (n=28; mean age 63.6 years, SD 2.4) were scanned at baseline and after 3 months of treatment with either raloxifene 120 mg (n=14) or placebo (n=14) in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study design. Functional data were analyzed in an event-related fashion with respect to correct hits and correct rejections using FSL software. Performance data were analyzed with respect to recognition accuracy, latency, and response bias. Functional effects of treatment were found on brain activation related to correct hits only. When compared to placebo treatment, raloxifene treatment enhanced brain activation in the left posterior parahippocampal area (Z=3.9) and right inferior prefrontal cortex (Z=3.5). Recognition accuracy scores remained stable in the raloxifene group, whereas the placebo group showed a small but significant decrease in accuracy scores (p=0.02). No significant effects were found on response bias or latency. In conclusion, raloxifene treatment affects brain function during memory performance in a way that may reflect increased arousal during initial encoding, with downstream effects on brain function during retrieval of information. Behaviorally, such neurofunctional effects may actively block decreased memory performance as a result of context-dependency. The validity of these predictions can be tested in large-scale clinical trials.

  14. Restricted Interests and Teacher Presentation of Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocco, Corey S.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Rodriguez, Nicole M.

    2011-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behavior (RRB) is more pervasive, prevalent, frequent, and severe in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) than in their typical peers. One subtype of RRB is restricted interests in items or activities, which is evident in the manner in which individuals engage with items (e.g., repetitious wheel spinning),…

  15. Nitrogen turnover in soil and global change.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, Julien; Töwe, Stefanie; Bannert, Andrea; Hai, Brigitte; Kastl, Eva-Maria; Meyer, Annabel; Su, Ming Xia; Kleineidam, Kristina; Schloter, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Nitrogen management in soils has been considered as key to the sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems and a protection of major ecosystem services. However, the microorganisms driving processes like nitrification, denitrification, N-fixation and mineralization are highly influenced by changing climatic conditions, intensification of agriculture and the application of new chemicals to a so far unknown extent. In this review, the current knowledge concerning the influence of selected scenarios of global change on the abundance, diversity and activity of microorganisms involved in nitrogen turnover, notably in agricultural and grassland soils, is summarized and linked to the corresponding processes. In this context, data are presented on nitrogen-cycling processes and the corresponding microbial key players during ecosystem development and changes in functional diversity patterns during shifts in land use. Furthermore, the impact of increased temperature, carbon dioxide and changes in precipitation regimes on microbial nitrogen turnover is discussed. Finally, some examples of the effects of pesticides and antibiotics after application to soil for selected processes of nitrogen transformation are also shown.

  16. Rehearsal of to-be-remembered items is unnecessary to perform directed forgetting within working memory: Support for an active control mechanism.

    PubMed

    Festini, Sara B; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A

    2017-01-01

    Directed forgetting tasks instruct people to forget targeted memoranda. In the context of working memory, people attempt to forget representations that are currently held in mind. Here, we evaluated candidate mechanisms of directed forgetting within working memory, by (a) testing the influence of articulatory suppression, a rehearsal-reducing and attention-demanding secondary task, on directed forgetting efficacy, and by (b) assessing the ability of people to perform forgetting in the absence of to-be-remembered competitors to rehearse. In Experiment 1, articulatory suppression interfered with directed forgetting, increasing the proportion of false alarms to to-be-forgotten probes in the working memory phase and decreasing the magnitude of the directed forgetting effect as assessed by an incidental long-term memory recognition test. Experiment 2 replicated the effects of articulatory suppression and tested whether the simultaneous requirement to retain, and presumably rehearse, to-be-remembered items was necessary for successful forgetting. The long-term directed forgetting effect was equivalent whether or not participants had to-be-remembered items to rehearse during the working memory phase. Experiment 3 included an additional comparison condition and confirmed that articulatory suppression interfered with directed forgetting and that participants were as efficient at directed forgetting with and without competitors to remember. In combination, these experiments suggest that directed forgetting in working memory requires an active control process that is limited by articulatory suppression, and that the demand to remember a concurrent memory set is unnecessary for this control process to operate. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Bone turnover in malnourished children.

    PubMed

    Branca, F; Robins, S P; Ferro-Luzzi, A; Golden, M H

    Pyridinoline (PYD) and deoxypyridinoline (DPD) are cross-linking aminoacids of collagen that are located mainly in bone and cartilage. When bone matrix is resorbed these cross-links are quantitatively excreted in the urine and therefore represent specific markers. We have measured the urinary excretion rate of PYD and DPD in 46 severely malnourished boys to assess their skeletal turnover and to relate this to their subsequent rate of growth. The children were aged 13 months (SD 6), and height-for-age was -3.6 (1.6) Z-score, and weight-for-height was -2.4 (0.8) Z-score. PYD excretion when malnourished and after "recovery" was 11.2 (4.6) nmol h-1m-2 and 32.2 (10.8) nmol h-1m-2 and DPD excretion was 2.6 (1.3) nmol h-1m-2 and 7.5 (3.0) nmol h-1m-2, respectively. The ratio of the two cross-links did not change with recovery. These data show that cartilage and bone turnover is much lower in the malnourished than in the recovered child. There was no difference in the degree of depression of turnover between the children with marasmus, marasmic-kwashiorkor, or kwashiorkor. The rate of height gain during recovery was significantly related to cross-link excretion, age, and weight-for-height on admission. These three factors accounted for 44% of the variance in the height velocity of the children. PYD and DPD excretion rate could be used to assess therapeutic interventions designed to alleviate stunting.

  18. 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 is an autocrine regulator of extracellular matrix turnover and growth factor release via ERp60 activated matrix vesicle metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Boyan, Barbara D; Wong, Kevin L; Fang, Mimi; Schwartz, Zvi

    2007-03-01

    Growth plate chondrocytes produce proteoglycan-rich type II collagen extracellular matrix (ECM). During cell maturation and hypertrophy, ECM is reorganized via a process regulated by 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) and involving matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-3 and MMP-2. 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) regulates MMP incorporation into matrix vesicles (MVs), where they are stored until released. Like plasma membranes (PM), MVs contain the 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)-binding protein ERp60, phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), and caveolin-1, but appear to lack nuclear Vitamin D receptors (VDRs). Chondrocytes produce 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) (10(-8)M), which binds ERp60, activating PLA(2), and resulting lysophospholipids lead to MV membrane disorganization, releasing active MMPs. MV MMP-3 activates TGF-beta1 stored in the ECM as large latent TGF-beta1 complexes, consisting of latent TGF-beta1 binding protein, latency associated peptide, and latent TGF-beta1. Others have shown that MMP-2 specifically activates TGF-beta2. TGF-beta1 regulates 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)-production, providing a mechanism for local control of growth factor activation. 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) activates PKCalpha in the PM via ERp60-signaling through PLA(2), lysophospholipid production, and PLCbeta. It also regulates distribution of phospholipids and PKC isoforms between MVs and PMs, enriching the MVs in PKCzeta. Direct activation of MMP-3 in MVs requires ERp60. However, when MVs are treated with 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), PKCzeta activity is decreased and PKCalpha is unaffected, suggesting a more complex feedback mechanism, potentially involving MV lipid signaling.

  19. Evaluation of Item Candidates: The PROMIS Qualitative Item Review

    PubMed Central

    DeWalt, Darren A.; Rothrock, Nan; Yount, Susan; Stone, Arthur A.

    2009-01-01

    One of the PROMIS (Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System) network's primary goals is the development of a comprehensive item bank for patient-reported outcomes of chronic diseases. For its first set of item banks, PROMIS chose to focus on pain, fatigue, emotional distress, physical function, and social function. An essential step for the development of an item pool is the identification, evaluation, and revision of extant questionnaire items for the core item pool. In this work, we also describe the systematic process wherein items are classified for subsequent statistical processing by the PROMIS investigators. Six phases of item development are documented: identification of extant items, item classification and selection, item review and revision, focus group input on domain coverage, cognitive interviews with individual items, and final revision before field testing. Identification of items refers to the systematic search for existing items in currently available scales. Expert item review and revision was conducted by trained professionals who reviewed the wording of each item and revised as appropriate for conventions adopted by the PROMIS network. Focus groups were used to confirm domain definitions and to identify new areas of item development for future PROMIS item banks. Cognitive interviews were used to examine individual items. Items successfully screened through this process were sent to field testing and will be subjected to innovative scale construction procedures. PMID:17443114

  20. Whole body and tissue cholesterol turnover in the baboon

    SciTech Connect

    Dell, R.B.; Mott, G.E.; Jackson, E.M.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Carey, K.D.; McGill, H.C. Jr.; Goodman, D.S.

    1985-03-01

    Cholesterol turnover was studied in four baboons by injecting (/sup 14/C)cholesterol 186 days and (/sup 3/H)cholesterol 4 days before necropsy, and fitting a two- or three-pool model to the resulting specific activity-time data. At necropsy, cholesterol mass and specific activity were determined for the total body and for many tissues. The principal aim of this study was to estimate the extent of cholesterol synthesis in the side pools of the model, by computing the amount of side pool synthesis needed to equal the measured total body cholesterol. Central pool synthesis varied from 61 to 89% of the total cholesterol production rate. Moreover, the finding that the measured total body cholesterol fell within the range obtained from the kinetic analysis by using reasonable assumptions, provides evidence for the physiological validity of the model. A second aim of this study was to explore cholesterol turnover in various tissues. A pool model predicts that rapidly turning over tissues will have higher specific activities at early times and lower specific activities at later times after injection of tracer relative to slowly turning over tissues, except where significant synthesis occurs. Results in all four baboons were similar. Turnover rates for the different tissues loosely fell into three groups which were turning over at fast, intermediate, and slow rates. Finally, the magnitude of variation of cholesterol specific activity was moderate for several distributed tissues (fat, muscle, arteries, and the alimentary tract), but was small for liver. Cholesterol turnover in serial biopsies of skin, muscle, and fat could, however, be fitted with a single pool to estimate tissue turnover rates.

  1. Evolution of a Test Item

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaan, Mary

    2007-01-01

    This article follows the development of test items (see "Language Assessment Quarterly", Volume 3 Issue 1, pp. 71-79 for the article "Test and Item Specifications Development"), beginning with a review of test and item specifications, then proceeding to writing and editing of items, pretesting and analysis, and finally selection of an item for a…

  2. Item Banking. Basic Testing Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Roy

    This pamphlet describes the exciting potential of item banking--a new approach to testing which combines both comparability of scores with flexibility of test format. Item banks are collections of items where the characteristics of each item is known and these characteristics can be summated to described a test made from such items. The principle…

  3. Copper-deficient mice have higher cardiac norepinephrine turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, A.M.; Prohaska, J.R. )

    1989-02-01

    Male Swiss albino mice were studied at 6 weeks of age. Their dams were fed a copper-deficient diet (modified AIN-76A) starting 4 days after birth and given deionized water (-Cu) or water with CuSO{sub 4} added (+Cu) (20 {mu}g Cu/ml). When 3 weeks of age mice were weaned and housed in stainless steel cages on the respective treatment of their dams. Turnover of norepinephrine (NE) was studied in 8 experiments using 2 separate techniques. The first procedure used {alpha}-methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester (300 mg/kg i.p.) to inhibit tyrosine hydroxlase activity. The loss of residual NE was determined by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Regression lines were constructed and fractional turnover (%/h) and calculated turnover (ng/g/h) were determined for heart, cerebellum and adrenal gland. In 4 experiments loss of NE in cerebellum of -Cu ad +Cu mice was equivalent. Loss of NE from adrenal gland could not be detected in the 8 h time course. Loss of NE, both fractional turnover and calculated turnover, from heart of -Cu mice was 4-5 fold higher compared to +Cu controls. A second method using m- hydroxybenzylhydrazine (NSD-1015) (100 mg/kg i.p.), which inhibits aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, confirmed the results. For all 4 experiments the cardiac accumulation of L-DOPA (measured by HPLC) was faster in -Cu mice compared to controls. The higher turnover rate of NE in heart and perhaps other sympathetic nerves may contribute to the higher urinary NE output observed previously.

  4. Novelty and Promotional Items

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Small novelty or promotional products, primarily used for outreach and educational purposes, must effectively convey a message, and their purchase will only be allowed if the item will contribute to the accomplishment of the Agency's mission.

  5. [Functional capacity in the elderly: analyzing questions on mobility and basic and instrumental activities of daily living using Item Response Theory].

    PubMed

    César, Cibele Comini; Mambrini, Juliana Vaz de Melo; Ferreira, Fabiane Ribeiro; Lima-Costa, Maria Fernanda

    2015-05-01

    This article aims to evaluate the items used to measure functional capacity in the 2010 Health Survey in Greater Metropolitan Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, using Item Response Theory. We analyzed the scale's dimensionality, the items' position and discriminatory power, and the precision of the functional capacity estimate. The study was based on a sample of 2,174 individuals aged 60 to 99 years, 61% of whom were women, with a median of 4 years of schooling. The instrument with 21 items (4 response options) showed a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.98. Factor analysis identified one factor that explained 92% of the variability between the items. The results indicated: (i) redundancy in items; (ii) precise estimation of functional capacity only for elderly below the median on the scale; and (iii) inability of the elderly to differentiate between response options. The analysis suggests the need to discuss items included in the instrument in order to cover a wider range of the scale and seek more appropriate response options.

  6. Inactivation of thioredoxin f1 leads to decreased light activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and altered diurnal starch turnover in leaves of Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Thormählen, Ina; Ruber, Joachim; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Ehrlich, Sven-Matthias; Massot, Vincent; Hümmer, Christine; Tezycka, Justyna; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Geigenberger, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplast thioredoxin f (Trx f) is an important regulator of primary metabolic enzymes. However, genetic evidence for its physiological importance is largely lacking. To test the functional significance of Trx f in vivo, Arabidopsis mutants with insertions in the trx f1 gene were studied, showing a drastic decrease in Trx f leaf content. Knockout of Trx f1 led to strong attenuation in reductive light activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), the key enzyme of starch synthesis, in leaves during the day and in isolated chloroplasts, while sucrose-dependent redox activation of AGPase in darkened leaves was not affected. The decrease in light-activation of AGPase in leaves was accompanied by a decrease in starch accumulation, an increase in sucrose levels and a decrease in starch-to-sucrose ratio. Analysis of metabolite levels at the end of day shows that inhibition of starch synthesis was unlikely due to shortage of substrates or changes in allosteric effectors. Metabolite profiling by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry pinpoints only a small number of metabolites affected, including sugars, organic acids and ethanolamine. Interestingly, metabolite data indicate carbon shortage in trx f1 mutant leaves at the end of night. Overall, results provide in planta evidence for the role played by Trx f in the light activation of AGPase and photosynthetic carbon partitioning in plants.

  7. Protein Turnover during in vitro Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiyao; Chang, Zhen; Oliveira, Gisele; Xiong, Maiyer; Smith, Lloyd M.; Frey, Brian L.; Welham, Nathan V.

    2015-01-01

    Repopulating acellular biological scaffolds with phenotypically appropriate cells is a promising approach for regenerating functional tissues and organs. Under this tissue engineering paradigm, reseeded cells are expected to remodel the scaffold by active protein synthesis and degradation; however, the rate and extent of this remodeling remain largely unknown. Here, we present a technique to measure dynamic proteome changes during in vitro remodeling of decellularized tissue by reseeded cells, using vocal fold mucosa as the model system. Decellularization and recellularization were optimized, and a stable isotope labeling strategy was developed to differentiate remnant proteins constituting the original scaffold from proteins newly synthesized by reseeded cells. Turnover of matrix and cellular proteins and the effects of cell-scaffold interaction were elucidated. This technique sheds new light on in vitro tissue remodeling and the process of tissue regeneration, and is readily applicable to other tissue and organ systems. PMID:26724458

  8. Dynamic Aspects of Voluntary Turnover: An Integrated Approach to Curvilinearity in the Performance-Turnover Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, William J.; Cropanzano, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Previous research pertaining to job performance and voluntary turnover has been guided by 2 distinct theoretical perspectives. First, the push-pull model proposes that there is a quadratic or curvilinear relationship existing between these 2 variables. Second, the unfolding model of turnover posits that turnover is a dynamic process and that a…

  9. Preliminary Evaluation of the Values Tracker: A Two-Item Measure of Engagement in Valued Activities in Those With Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Pielech, Melissa; Bailey, Robert W; McEntee, Mindy L; Ashworth, Julie; Levell, Jayne; Sowden, Gail; Vowles, Kevin E

    2016-01-01

    Engagement in valued activities is an important outcome, particularly in treatments that aim to enhance quality of life in those with chronic conditions. The present study describes the initial evaluation of the Values Tracker (VT), a two-item measure of values engagement, in 302 treatment-seeking adults with chronic pain. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to examine the utility of the VT in the statistical prediction of pain-related functioning, after controlling for demographic variables, pain intensity, and pain-related distress. Across analyses, pain intensity accounted for significant variance (range ΔR2 = .06-.09) with pain-related distress adding additional unique variance (range ΔR2 = .07-.19). The VT accounted for additional unique variance (range ΔR2 = .02-.17) for all variables with the exception of physical disability. These findings provide initial support for the utility of the VT in those with chronic pain. Given the VT's brevity, it may be particularly useful for tracking changes in engagement in values across sessions.

  10. Inhibition by islet-activating protein, pertussis toxin, of P2-purinergic receptor-mediated iodide efflux and phosphoinositide turnover in FRTL-5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okajima, F.; Sho, K.; Kondo, Y.

    1988-08-01

    Exposure of FRTL-5 thyroid cells to ATP (1 microM to 1 mM) resulted in the stimulation of I- efflux in association with the induction of inositol trisphosphate production and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Nonhydrolyzable ATP derivatives, ADP and GTP, were also as effective in magnitude as ATP, whereas neither AMP nor adenosine exerted significant effect on I- efflux, suggesting a P2-purinergic receptor-mediated activation of I- efflux. Treatment of the cells with the islet-activating protein (IAP) pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylated a 41,000 mol wt membrane protein, effectively suppressed the phosphoinositide response to ATP in addition to ATP-dependent I- efflux at agonist concentrations below 10 microM. In contrast, the I- efflux stimulated by TSH, A23187, or phorbol myristate acetate was insusceptible to IAP. The IAP substrate, probably GTP-binding protein, is hence proposed to mediate the activation of P2-purinergic receptor-linked phospholipase-C in FRTL-5 cells. However, the responses to ATP, its nonhydrolyzable derivatives, or ADP at the higher agonist concentrations, especially above 100 microM, were only partially inhibited by IAP, even though the IAP substrate was totally ADP ribosylated by the toxin. The responses to GTP in the whole concentration range tested were not influenced by IAP treatment. Thus, signals arising from the P2-receptor might be transduced to phospholipase-C by two different pathways, i.e. IAP-sensitive and insensitive ones, and result in the stimulation of I- efflux.

  11. Rapid Turnover of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 3 by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway Defines a Novel Paradigm of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Regulation during Cellular Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Coulombe, Philippe; Rodier, Geneviève; Pelletier, Stéphane; Pellerin, Johanne; Meloche, Sylvain

    2003-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are stable enzymes that are mainly regulated by phosphorylation and subcellular targeting. Here we report that extracellular signal-regulated kinase 3 (ERK3), unlike other MAP kinases, is an unstable protein that is constitutively degraded in proliferating cells with a half-life of 30 min. The proteolysis of ERK3 is executed by the proteasome and requires ubiquitination of the protein. Contrary to other protein kinases, the catalytic activity of ERK3 is not responsible for its short half-life. Instead, analysis of ERK1/ERK3 chimeras revealed the presence of two destabilization regions (NDR1 and -2) in the N-terminal lobe of the ERK3 kinase domain that are both necessary and sufficient to target ERK3 and heterologous proteins for proteasomal degradation. To assess the physiological relevance of the rapid turnover of ERK3, we monitored the expression of the kinase in different cellular models of differentiation. We observed that ERK3 markedly accumulates during differentiation of PC12 and C2C12 cells into the neuronal and muscle lineage, respectively. The accumulation of ERK3 during myogenic differentiation is associated with the time-dependent stabilization of the protein. Terminal skeletal muscle differentiation is accompanied by cell cycle withdrawal. Interestingly, we found that expression of stabilized forms of ERK3 causes G1 arrest in NIH 3T3 cells. We propose that ERK3 biological activity is regulated by its cellular abundance through the control of protein stability. PMID:12808096

  12. Social Disadvantage and Network Turnover

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Research shows that socially disadvantaged groups—especially African Americans and people of low socioeconomic status (SES)—experience more unstable social environments. I argue that this causes higher rates of turnover within their personal social networks. This is a particularly important issue among disadvantaged older adults, who may benefit from stable networks. This article, therefore, examines whether social disadvantage is related to various aspects of personal network change. Method. Social network change was assessed using longitudinal egocentric network data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, a study of older adults conducted between 2005 and 2011. Data collection in Wave 2 included a technique for comparing respondents’ confidant network rosters between waves. Rates of network losses, deaths, and additions were modeled using multivariate Poisson regression. Results. African Americans and low-SES individuals lost more confidants—especially due to death—than did whites and college-educated respondents. African Americans also added more confidants than whites. However, neither African Americans nor low-SES individuals were able to match confidant losses with new additions to the extent that others did, resulting in higher levels of confidant network shrinkage. These trends are partly, but not entirely, explained by disadvantaged individuals’ poorer health and their greater risk of widowhood or marital dissolution. Discussion. Additional work is needed to shed light on the role played by race- and class-based segregation on group differences in social network turnover. Social gerontologists should examine the role these differences play in explaining the link between social disadvantage and important outcomes in later life, such as health decline. PMID:24997286

  13. Soybean ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit: Mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, R.B.

    1990-02-01

    The goals of examining the mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover in higher plants remain the same. We will continue with two of the major approaches (1) in vivo chemical modification of RNA structure and (2) analysis of Rubisco SSU RNA structure and turnover in transgenic plants. We plan to reduce the amount of molecular physiology (studies of transcription and steady state levels) to a minimum and expand these efforts into the analysis of plant rebonucleases. We have also broadened our examination of light induced turnover of rubisco SSU RNA to include general RNA turnover. We plan to identify specific 3{prime}->5{prime} precessive ribonuclease by complementation of E. coli mutants. The activity of these novel RNases and their potential role in plant RNA turnover and processing will be characterized.

  14. Employee Turnover: Evidence from a Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borland, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Patterns of employee turnover from a medium-sized law firm in Australia were examined in regard to theories of worker mobility (matching, sectoral shift, and incentive). Results support a role for matching effects, but personnel practices affect the timing of turnover. Matching and incentive-based theories do not explain the high rates of turnover…

  15. Principal Turnover. Information Capsule. Volume 0914

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that school districts are facing increasing rates of principal turnover. Frequent principal changes deprive schools of the leadership stability they need to succeed, disrupt long-term school reform efforts, and may even be linked to increased teacher turnover and lower levels of student achievement. This Information Capsule…

  16. Enhancer regions show high histone H3.3 turnover that changes during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Deaton, Aimee M; Gómez-Rodríguez, Mariluz; Mieczkowski, Jakub; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Kundu, Sharmistha; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Jansen, Lars ET; Kingston, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    The organization of DNA into chromatin is dynamic; nucleosomes are frequently displaced to facilitate the ability of regulatory proteins to access specific DNA elements. To gain insight into nucleosome dynamics, and to follow how dynamics change during differentiation, we used a technique called time-ChIP to quantitatively assess histone H3.3 turnover genome-wide during differentiation of mouse ESCs. We found that, without prior assumptions, high turnover could be used to identify regions involved in gene regulation. High turnover was seen at enhancers, as observed previously, with particularly high turnover at super-enhancers. In contrast, regions associated with the repressive Polycomb-Group showed low turnover in ESCs. Turnover correlated with DNA accessibility. Upon differentiation, numerous changes in H3.3 turnover rates were observed, the majority of which occurred at enhancers. Thus, time-ChIP measurement of histone turnover shows that active enhancers are unusually dynamic in ESCs and changes in highly dynamic nucleosomes predominate at enhancers during differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15316.001 PMID:27304074

  17. Investigating an Invariant Item Ordering for Polytomously Scored Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ligtvoet, Rudy; van der Ark, L. Andries; te Marvelde, Janneke M.; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the concept of an invariant item ordering (IIO) for polytomously scored items and proposes methods for investigating an IIO in real test data. Method manifest IIO is proposed for assessing whether item response functions intersect. Coefficient H[superscript T] is defined for polytomously scored items. Given that an IIO…

  18. The Role of Item Models in Automatic Item Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis

    2012-01-01

    Automatic item generation represents a relatively new but rapidly evolving research area where cognitive and psychometric theories are used to produce tests that include items generated using computer technology. Automatic item generation requires two steps. First, test development specialists create item models, which are comparable to templates…

  19. The effects of milking frequency in early lactation on milk yield, mammary cell turnover, and secretory activity in grazing dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Murney, R; Stelwagen, K; Wheeler, T T; Margerison, J K; Singh, K

    2015-01-01

    In dairy cows, short-term changes of milking frequency in early lactation have been shown to produce an immediate and a long-term effect on milk yield in stall-fed cows. The effect is controlled locally within mammary glands and could be a function of either secretory mammary epithelial cell number or activity. To resolve this and determine its applicability in other feed management systems, a unilateral milking frequency experiment was conducted with udder halves of 17 multiparous, pasture-fed dairy cows milked either 4 times (4×) or once a day (1×) for 14d from 5±2d in milk. Mean half-udder milk yield during the treatment period was higher from the 4× compared with 1× udder halves and continued to be higher until 200d in milk once returned to twice a day milking. Mammary biopsies were obtained on d 14 of treatment from both udder halves of 10 cows. Proliferation of mammary cells was higher in 4× udder halves compared with 1×, whereas no difference in apoptosis levels was detected. Abundance of αS1-casein, β-casein, α-lactalbumin, and β-lactoglobulin mRNA was higher in tissue samples from 4× udder halves compared with 1×, whereas lactoferrin mRNA abundance was lower in 4× udder halves. In summary, change in milking frequency during early lactation affects proliferation of mammary cells as well as expression of the major milk protein genes, which both contribute to the observed changes in milk yield during and after unilateral milking frequency treatment.

  20. An intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover.

    PubMed

    Yang, Won Ho; Aziz, Peter V; Heithoff, Douglas M; Mahan, Michael J; Smith, Jeffrey W; Marth, Jamey D

    2015-11-03

    The composition and functions of the secreted proteome are controlled by the life spans of different proteins. However, unlike intracellular protein fate, intrinsic factors determining secreted protein aging and turnover have not been identified and characterized. Almost all secreted proteins are posttranslationally modified with the covalent attachment of N-glycans. We have discovered an intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover linked to the stepwise elimination of saccharides attached to the termini of N-glycans. Endogenous glycosidases, including neuraminidase 1 (Neu1), neuraminidase 3 (Neu3), beta-galactosidase 1 (Glb1), and hexosaminidase B (HexB), possess hydrolytic activities that temporally remodel N-glycan structures, progressively exposing different saccharides with increased protein age. Subsequently, endocytic lectins with distinct binding specificities, including the Ashwell-Morell receptor, integrin αM, and macrophage mannose receptor, are engaged in N-glycan ligand recognition and the turnover of secreted proteins. Glycosidase inhibition and lectin deficiencies increased protein life spans and abundance, and the basal rate of N-glycan remodeling varied among distinct proteins, accounting for differences in their life spans. This intrinsic multifactorial mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover contributes to health and the outcomes of disease.

  1. An intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Won Ho; Aziz, Peter V.; Heithoff, Douglas M.; Mahan, Michael J.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Marth, Jamey D.

    2015-01-01

    The composition and functions of the secreted proteome are controlled by the life spans of different proteins. However, unlike intracellular protein fate, intrinsic factors determining secreted protein aging and turnover have not been identified and characterized. Almost all secreted proteins are posttranslationally modified with the covalent attachment of N-glycans. We have discovered an intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover linked to the stepwise elimination of saccharides attached to the termini of N-glycans. Endogenous glycosidases, including neuraminidase 1 (Neu1), neuraminidase 3 (Neu3), beta-galactosidase 1 (Glb1), and hexosaminidase B (HexB), possess hydrolytic activities that temporally remodel N-glycan structures, progressively exposing different saccharides with increased protein age. Subsequently, endocytic lectins with distinct binding specificities, including the Ashwell–Morell receptor, integrin αM, and macrophage mannose receptor, are engaged in N-glycan ligand recognition and the turnover of secreted proteins. Glycosidase inhibition and lectin deficiencies increased protein life spans and abundance, and the basal rate of N-glycan remodeling varied among distinct proteins, accounting for differences in their life spans. This intrinsic multifactorial mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover contributes to health and the outcomes of disease. PMID:26489654

  2. 41 CFR 101-28.306-6 - Sensitive items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for embarrassment of GSA and customer agencies, the level of customer complaints, and control as an accountable item of personal property. Each customer activity shall take all appropriate measures necessary to... 28.3-Customer Supply Centers § 101-28.306-6 Sensitive items. Many items stocked by the CSCs may...

  3. RNA turnover in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, B; Czichos, J; Overath, P

    1987-01-01

    Regulation of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) mRNA turnover in Trypanosoma brucei was studied in bloodstream forms, in procyclic cells, and during in vitro transformation of bloodstream forms to procyclic cells by approach-to-equilibrium labeling and pulse-chase experiments. Upon initiation of transformation at 27 degrees C in the presence of citrate-cis-aconitate, the half-life of VSG mRNA was reduced from 4.5 h in bloodstream forms to 1.2 h in transforming cells. Concomitantly, an approximately 25-fold decrease in the rate of transcription was observed, resulting in a 100-fold reduction in the steady-state level of de novo-synthesized VSG mRNA. This low level of expression was maintained for at least 7 h, finally decreasing to an undetectable level after 24 h. Transcription of the VSG gene in established procyclic cells was undetectable. For comparison, the turnover of polyadenylated and nonpolyadenylated RNA, beta-tubulin mRNA, and mini-exon-derived RNA (medRNA) was studied. For medRNA, no significant changes in the rate of transcription or stability were observed during differentiation. In contrast, while the rate of transcription of beta-tubulin mRNA in in vitro-cultured bloodstream forms, transforming cells, and established procyclic cells was similar, the half life was four to five times longer in procyclic cells (t1/2, 7 h) than in cultured bloodstream forms (t1/2, 1.4 h) or transforming cells (t1/2, 1.7 h). Inhibition of protein synthesis in bloodstream forms at 37 degrees Celsius caused a dramatic 20-fold decrease in the rate of VSG mRNA synthesis and a 6-fold decrease in half-life to 45 min, while beta-tubulin mRNA was stabilized 2- to 3-fold and mRNA stability remained unaffected. It is postulated that triggering transformation or inhibiting protein synthesis induces changes in the abundance of the same regulatory molecules which effect the shutoff of VSG gene transcription in addition to shortening the half-life of VSG mRNA. Images PMID:2436040

  4. Assessment of differential item functioning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Chung

    2008-01-01

    This study addresses several important issues in assessment of differential item functioning (DIF). It starts with the definition of DIF, effectiveness of using item fit statistics to detect DIF, and linear modeling of DIF in dichotomous items, polytomous items, facets, and testlet-based items. Because a common metric over groups of test-takers is a prerequisite in DIF assessment, this study reviews three such methods of establishing a common metric: the equal-mean-difficulty method, the all-other-item method, and the constant-item (CI) method. A small simulation demonstrates the superiority of the CI method over the others. As the CI method relies on a correct specification of DIF-free items to serve as anchors, a method of identifying such items is recommended and its effectiveness is illustrated through a simulation. Finally, this study discusses how to assess practical significance of DIF at both item and test levels.

  5. Limited life item management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaglen, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Plans are available for age-sensitive hardware management. Control plan identifies shelf life or age control requirements for materials considered age sensitive, use sensitive, or time service or shelf life controlled items, and describes methods of arriving at age controls through adherence to detailed specifications.

  6. Reading Current Events Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    People who live in a democracy should be well informed of local, state, national, and international happenings. Students should become curious about news items and relate current happenings to the personal self. They must possess skills in word recognition and in diverse kinds of comprehension since reading is an important way to glean current…

  7. The island-mainland species turnover relationship.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Yoel E; Losos, Jonathan B; Algar, Adam C

    2012-10-07

    Many oceanic islands are notable for their high endemism, suggesting that islands may promote unique assembly processes. However, mainland assemblages sometimes harbour comparable levels of endemism, suggesting that island biotas may not be as unique as is often assumed. Here, we test the uniqueness of island biotic assembly by comparing the rate of species turnover among islands and the mainland, after accounting for distance decay and environmental gradients. We modelled species turnover as a function of geographical and environmental distance for mainland (M-M) communities of Anolis lizards and Terrarana frogs, two clades that have diversified extensively on Caribbean islands and the mainland Neotropics. We compared mainland-island (M-I) and island-island (I-I) species turnover with predictions of the M-M model. If island assembly is not unique, then the M-M model should successfully predict M-I and I-I turnover, given geographical and environmental distance. We found that M-I turnover and, to a lesser extent, I-I turnover were significantly higher than predicted for both clades. Thus, in the first quantitative comparison of mainland-island species turnover, we confirm the long-held but untested assumption that island assemblages accumulate biodiversity differently than their mainland counterparts.

  8. Examining Differential Item Functions of Different Item Ordered Test Forms According to Item Difficulty Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çokluk, Ömay; Gül, Emrah; Dogan-Gül, Çilem

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to examine whether differential item function is displayed in three different test forms that have item orders of random and sequential versions (easy-to-hard and hard-to-easy), based on Classical Test Theory (CTT) and Item Response Theory (IRT) methods and bearing item difficulty levels in mind. In the correlational research, the…

  9. Keratin Dynamics: Modeling the Interplay between Turnover and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Portet, Stéphanie; Madzvamuse, Anotida; Chung, Andy; Leube, Rudolf E.; Windoffer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Keratin are among the most abundant proteins in epithelial cells. Functions of the keratin network in cells are shaped by their dynamical organization. Using a collection of experimentally-driven mathematical models, different hypotheses for the turnover and transport of the keratin material in epithelial cells are tested. The interplay between turnover and transport and their effects on the keratin organization in cells are hence investigated by combining mathematical modeling and experimental data. Amongst the collection of mathematical models considered, a best model strongly supported by experimental data is identified. Fundamental to this approach is the fact that optimal parameter values associated with the best fit for each model are established. The best candidate among the best fits is characterized by the disassembly of the assembled keratin material in the perinuclear region and an active transport of the assembled keratin. Our study shows that an active transport of the assembled keratin is required to explain the experimentally observed keratin organization. PMID:25822661

  10. The longitudinal study of turnover and the cost of turnover in EMS

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Jones, Cheryl B.; Hubble, Michael W.; Carr, Matthew; Weaver, Matthew D.; Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have examined employee turnover and associated costs in emergency medical services (EMS). The purpose of this study was to quantify the mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination in a diverse sample of EMS agencies. Methods A convenience sample of 40 EMS agencies was followed over a 6 month period. Internet, telephone, and on-site data collection methods were used to document terminations, new hires, open positions, and costs associated with turnover. The cost associated with turnover was calculated based on a modified version of the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology (NTCCM). The NTCCM identified direct and indirect costs through a series of questions that agency administrators answered monthly during the study period. A previously tested measure of turnover to calculate the mean annual rate of turnover was used. All calculations were weighted by the size of the EMS agency roster. The mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination were determined for 3 categories of agency staff mix: all paid staff, mix of paid and volunteer (mixed), and all-volunteer. Results The overall weighted mean annual rate of turnover was 10.7%. This rate varied slightly across agency staffing mix: (all-paid=10.2%, mixed=12.3%, all-volunteer=12.4%). Among agencies that experienced turnover (n=25), the weighted median cost of turnover was $71,613.75, which varied across agency staffing mix: (all-paid=$86,452.05, mixed=$9,766.65, and all-volunteer=$0). The weighted median cost per termination was $6,871.51 and varied across agency staffing mix: (all-paid=$7,161.38, mixed=$1,409.64, and all-volunteer=$0). Conclusions Annual rates of turnover and costs associated with turnover vary widely across types of EMS agencies. The study’s mean annual rate of turnover was lower than expected based on information appearing in the news media and EMS trade magazines. Findings

  11. [Energy turnover of water bugs].

    PubMed

    Waitzbauer, Wolfgang

    1976-06-01

    1. This study concerns the energy turnover of the water bug species Naucoris cimicoides (Naucoridae), Notonecta glauca (Notonectidae) and Ranatra linearis (Nepidae). The results refer to the conditions in the reed belt of the lake "Neusiedler See" in eastern Austria. 2. Population density was, using various methods, quantitatively determined for each test species. In summer the values were as follows: Naucoris 8, Notonecta 2 and Ranatra 0.5 individuals per m(2) in the closed reed belt. Abundance in the next spring was a halving of the initial values due to an increase in the death rate of males in winter. Generally, mortality was very high; the highest death rate for all species occurred in the first two larval stages. The total mortality, beginning at emergence and continuing until immediately after oviposition, was determined to be 91% for Naucoris, 97% for Notonecta and 99% for Ranatra. 3. Production of an average male was 211.45 cal (Naucoris), 243.24 cal (Notonecta) and 256.26 cal (Ranatra) for the entire life span. The production values determined for average females until oviposition are 316.87 cal (Naucoris), 300.79 cal (Notonecta) and 559.51 cal (Ranatra). 53.89 cal (Naucoris), 73.35 cal (Notonecta) and 264.66 cal (Ranatra) are needed for egg production. 4. Respiration was determined by volumetric measurement for all developmental stages and the imago at different times of the year. From emergence until death the following spring the O2-consumption of an average individual was determined as 129.27 cal (♂), 156.45 cal (♀) for Naucoris, 690.66 cal (♂), 882.04 cal (♀) for Notonecta and 548.30 cal (♂), 589.16 cal (♀) for Ranatra. 5. Assimilation was calculated from production and respiration (A=P+R) for all larval and mature stages. Assimilation was determined as 340.72 cal (♂), 419.43 cal (♀) for Naucoris, 933.90 cal (♂), 1109.48 cal (♀) for Notonecta and 804.56 cal (♂), 884.01 cal (♀) for Ranatra, (cumulative values). 6. Since the

  12. Prevention of retained surgical items.

    PubMed

    Feldman, David L

    2011-01-01

    Reduction in retained surgical items is an important part of any operating room patient-safety effort. Any item used in an operation can result in a retained surgical item, but sponges are the most frequent and the abdomen is the most common location. Retained sponges can cause significant morbidity, and the costs associated with both prevention and treatment of retained surgical items, including legal costs, can be considerable. This review will examine counting, teamwork, radiography, and new technology as methods used to prevent retained surgical items. Even though none of these techniques individually is likely to completely prevent retained surgical items, when used together the numbers can be reduced.

  13. Spatial turnover in the global avifauna.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Kevin J; Davies, Richard G; Orme, C David L; Olson, Valerie A; Thomas, Gavin H; Ding, Tzung-Su; Rasmussen, Pamela C; Lennon, Jack J; Bennett, Peter M; Owens, Ian P F; Blackburn, Tim M

    2007-07-07

    Despite its wide implications for many ecological issues, the global pattern of spatial turnover in the occurrence of species has been little studied, unlike the global pattern of species richness. Here, using a database on the breeding distributions of birds, we present the first global maps of variation in spatial turnover for an entire taxonomic class, a pattern that has to date remained largely a matter of conjecture, based on theoretical expectations and extrapolation of inconsistent patterns from different biogeographic realms. We use these maps to test four predictions from niche theory as to the form that this variation should take, namely that turnover should increase with species richness, towards lower latitudes, and with the steepness of environmental gradients and that variation in turnover is determined principally by rare (restricted) species. Contrary to prediction, we show that turnover is high both in areas of extremely low and high species richness, does not increase strongly towards the tropics, and is related both to average environmental conditions and spatial variation in those conditions. These results are closely associated with a further important and novel finding, namely that global patterns of spatial turnover are driven principally by widespread species rather than the restricted ones. This complements recent demonstrations that spatial patterns of species richness are also driven principally by widespread species, and thus provides an important contribution towards a unified model of how terrestrial biodiversity varies both within and between the Earth's major land masses.

  14. The costs of nurse turnover, part 2: application of the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl Bland

    2005-01-01

    This is the second article in a 2-part series focusing on nurse turnover and its costs. Part 1 (December 2004) described nurse turnover costs within the context of human capital theory, and using human resource accounting methods, presented the updated Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology. Part 2 presents an application of this method in an acute care setting and the estimated costs of nurse turnover that were derived. Administrators and researchers can use these methods and cost information to build a business case for nurse retention.

  15. Effect of antiresorptive drugs on bony turnover in the jaw: denosumab compared with bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Ristow, Oliver; Gerngroß, Carlos; Schwaiger, Markus; Hohlweg-Majert, Bettina; Kehl, Victoria; Jansen, Heike; Hahnefeld, Lilian; Koerdt, Steffen; Otto, Sven; Pautke, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw as a result of treatment with receptor activators of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) inhibitors (denosumab) is a new type of bony necrosis, the exact pathogenesis of which is unknown. Our aim was to find out whether the turnover of bone in the jaw is increased after denosumab has been given compared with other skeletal sites, and if that turnover might have a role in denosumab-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (DRONJ). Bone scintigraphic images of 45 female patients with breast cancer and bone metastases were analysed retrospectively, and divided into 3 groups: those given denosumab, those given a bisphosphonate, and a control group (n=15 in each). All patients had bone scintigraphy before treatment (T0) and during the course of treatment after 12 (T1) and 24 (T2) months. The data were analysed quantitatively using 6 preset bony regions of interest. There was similar turnover of bone in the mandible compared with other skeletal sites (such as the femur), while the maxilla showed significantly higher turnover. None of the bony regions investigated showed any significant changes after the bisphosphonate had been given. There was a tendency to increase bone turnover in those patients taking denosumab. The bone turnover of the jawbone is not overtly changed either by a bisphosphonate or denosumab, so it seems unlikely that oversuppression of bony turnover in the jawbones plays an important part either in the pathogenesis of DRONJ or in the bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ).

  16. Carbon turnover in pore spaces - CIPS model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuka, Katrin

    2010-05-01

    The CIPS (Carbon turnover In Pore Spaces) model has been developed to overcome the constraints of conceptual pools and to get a better insight into the nature of carbon stabilization in soil (KUKA, 2007). This pure carbon turnover model was implemented in CANDY (CArbon and Nitrogen Dynamics) model system (Franko, 1995). The CIPS model did overcome the empirical pools taking into account soil structure effects. It is based on quality driven primary stabilisation mechanism (recalcitrance of SOM) and process driven secondary stabilisation mechanism (place of turnover) of SOM in soil. In addition to the division of SOM in the qualitative pools on the basis of chemical measurability, a dependence of the turnover conditions from the location of SOM in pore space is implemented taking into account different turnover conditions in the particular pore space and the accessibility for microbial biomass. The main assumption of the CIPS model is that the biological activity is not evenly distributed through the whole pore space. The pore space classes - micro, meso and macro pores - used in the model are marked by wilting point, field capacity and pore volume as a first approach. Because of the poor aeration in the micro pores they show very low biological activity leading to a strong protection of the carbon localized in this pore space. The biological active time (BAT) concept of the CANDY model was adapted to the CIPS model in order to calculate the distribution of biological activity for each pore space class. The reduction functions of the turnover active time concept of CANDY model, related to soil temperature, soil moisture, soil texture, relative air volume and distance to the soil surface are multiplied by the step width of calendar time producing the transformed time step as total BAT (BATtot). The calculated BATtot corresponds to the time that would be required under optimal conditions in the laboratory to perform the same turnover result as under the given

  17. Norepinephrine turnover in heart and spleen of 7-, 22-, and 34 C-acclimated hamsters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. B.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of norepinephrine (NE) concentration and endogenous turnover rates in both myocardial and spleen tissues in the golden hamster is examined as a function of chronic exposure to either high or low ambient temperatures. Changes in myocardial and spleen NE turnover values are discussed in terms of functional alterations in sympathetic nerve activity and the importance of such changes in temperature acclimation. It is found that acclimation of hamsters to 7 C for 7-10 weeks results in decreased myocardial NE concentration and an apparent increase in myocardial NE turnover. In contrast, exposure to 34 C for 6-8 weeks results in increased myocardial NE concentration and an apparent decrease in NE turnover in both myocardial and spleen tissues. The implication of altered NE synthesis is that sympathetic nerve activity is reduced with heat acclimation and is enhanced with cold acclimation.

  18. The Impact of Item Characteristics on Item and Scale Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the relation between personality items' validities, defined as the items' correlations with acquaintance ratings on the Big 5 personality factors, and other itemmetric properties including ambiguity, syntactic complexity, social desirability, content, and trait indicativity. Five external validity coefficients for each item on…

  19. IRT Item Parameter Scaling for Developing New Item Pools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Hyeon-Ah; Lu, Ying; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Increasing use of item pools in large-scale educational assessments calls for an appropriate scaling procedure to achieve a common metric among field-tested items. The present study examines scaling procedures for developing a new item pool under a spiraled block linking design. The three scaling procedures are considered: (a) concurrent…

  20. Component Identification and Item Difficulty of Raven's Matrices Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kathy E.; Kluever, Raymond C.

    Item components that might contribute to the difficulty of items on the Raven Colored Progressive Matrices (CPM) and the Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM) were studied. Subjects providing responses to CPM items were 269 children aged 2 years 9 months to 11 years 8 months, most of whom were referred for testing as potentially gifted. A second…

  1. Item Context Factors Affecting Students' Performance on Mathematics Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salgado, Felipe Almuna; Stacey, Kaye

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports how the context in which a mathematics item is embedded impacts on students' performance. The performance of Year 10 students on four PISA items was compared with performance on variants with more familiar contexts. Performance was not better when they solved items with more familiar contexts but there was some evidence that…

  2. Real and Artificial Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrich, David; Hagquist, Curt

    2015-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) for an item between two groups is present if, for the same person location on a variable, persons from different groups have different expected values for their responses. Applying only to dichotomously scored items in the popular Mantel-Haenszel (MH) method for detecting DIF in which persons are classified by…

  3. Nurse accountability program improves satisfaction, turnover.

    PubMed

    Ethridge, P

    1987-05-01

    St. Mary's Hospital and Health Center, Tucson, AZ, responding to changes in health care reimbursement and the need to maintain quality, developed a comprehensive program to improve nurses' professional accountability. The project was based on the assumption that increased job satisfaction and decreased job stress for nurses in an acute care facility would improve retention and recruitment and facilitate decentralization of care delivery. The plan included the following components: Identify and enhance qualifications of nurses through a credentialing mechanism. Restructure nurses' employment terms to professional salaried status. Implement a spiritual, holistic framework for nursing. Identify programs to extend nursing's sphere of influence to activities that promote a continuum of care. Use the patient classification staffing tool as an acuity billing system. Decentralize the nursing organization and move it into the community. Promote an environment conducive to two levels of nursing practice--professional nurse case managers and associate registered nurses. The program's effectiveness was evaluated by measuring nurses' job stress and job satisfaction in 1983 (before the program's implementation), 1985, and January 1987. In 1985, compared with 1983, job stress was significantly lower in several areas measured, while job satisfaction was higher in four of six areas measured. Turnover rate of nurses decreased from 15.2 percent in 1983 to 5.4 percent in 1986. Financial savings from the program also hve been substantial: more than $500,000 for the last two fiscal years.

  4. The costs of nurse turnover: part 1: an economic perspective.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl Bland

    2004-12-01

    Nurse turnover is costly for healthcare organizations. Administrators and nurse executives need a reliable estimate of nurse turnover costs and the origins of those costs if they are to develop effective measures of reducing nurse turnover and its costs. However, determining how to best capture and quantify nurse turnover costs can be challenging. Part 1 of this series conceptualizes nurse turnover via human capital theory and presents an update of a previously developed method for determining the costs of nurse turnover, the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Method. Part 2 (January 2005) presents a recent application of the methodology in an acute care hospital.

  5. Microbial carbon turnover in the plant-rhizosphere-soil continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Ashish; Dannert, Helena; Griffiths, Robert; Thomson, Bruce; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Soil microbial biomass contributes significantly to maintenance of soil organic matter (SOM). It is well known that biochemical fractions of soil microorganisms have varying turnover and therefore contribute differentially to soil C storage. Here we compare the turnover rates of different microbial biochemical fractions using a pulse chase 13CO2 plant labelling experiment. The isotope signal was temporally traced into rhizosphere soil microorganisms using the following biomarkers: DNA, RNA, fatty acids and chloroform fumigation extraction derived microbial biomass size classes. C flow into soil microbial functional groups was assessed through phospholipid and neutral lipid fatty acid (PLFA/NLFA) analyses. Highest 13C enrichment was seen in the low molecular weight (LMW) size class of microbial biomass (Δδ13C =151) and in nucleic acids (DNA: 38o RNA: 66) immediately after the pulse followed by a sharp drop. The amount of 13C in the high molecular weight (HMW) microbial biomass (17-81) and total fatty acids (32-54) was lower initially and stayed relatively steady over the 4 weeks experimental period. We found significant differences in turnover rates of different microbial biochemical and size fractions. We infer that LMW cytosolic soluble compounds are rapidly metabolized and linked to respiratory C fluxes, whereas mid-sized products of microbial degradation and HMW polymeric compounds have lower renewal rate in that order. The turnover of cell wall fatty acids was also very slow. DNA and RNA showed faster turnover rate; and as expected RNA renewal was the fastest due to its rapid production by active microorganisms independent of cell replication. 13C incorporation into different functional groups confirmed that mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi rely on root C and are important in the initial plant C flux. We substantiated through measurements of isotope incorporation into bacterial RNA that rhizosphere bacteria are also important in the initial C conduit

  6. Exercise training in obese older adults prevents increase in bone turnover and attenuates decrease in hip bone mineral density induced by weight loss despite decline in bone-active hormones.

    PubMed

    Shah, Krupa; Armamento-Villareal, Reina; Parimi, Nehu; Chode, Suresh; Sinacore, David R; Hilton, Tiffany N; Napoli, Nicola; Qualls, Clifford; Villareal, Dennis T

    2011-12-01

    0.05). In conclusion, the addition of ET to weight loss therapy among obese older adults prevents weight loss-induced increase in bone turnover and attenuates weight loss-induced reduction in hip BMD despite weight loss-induced decrease in bone-active hormones.

  7. The Academic Medical Center Linear Disability Score (ALDS) item bank: item response theory analysis in a mixed patient population

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Rebecca; Weisscher, Nadine; Glas, Cees AW; Dijkgraaf, Marcel GW; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob J; Lindeboom, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a lot of interest in the flexible framework offered by item banks for measuring patient relevant outcomes. However, there are few item banks, which have been developed to quantify functional status, as expressed by the ability to perform activities of daily life. This paper examines the measurement properties of the Academic Medical Center linear disability score item bank in a mixed population. Methods This paper uses item response theory to analyse data on 115 of 170 items from a total of 1002 respondents. These were: 551 (55%) residents of supported housing, residential care or nursing homes; 235 (23%) patients with chronic pain; 127 (13%) inpatients on a neurology ward following a stroke; and 89 (9%) patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Results Of the 170 items, 115 were judged to be clinically relevant. Of these 115 items, 77 were retained in the item bank following the item response theory analysis. Of the 38 items that were excluded from the item bank, 24 had either been presented to fewer than 200 respondents or had fewer than 10% or more than 90% of responses in the category 'can carry out'. A further 11 items had different measurement properties for younger and older or for male and female respondents. Finally, 3 items were excluded because the item response theory model did not fit the data. Conclusion The Academic Medical Center linear disability score item bank has promising measurement characteristics for the mixed patient population described in this paper. Further studies will be needed to examine the measurement properties of the item bank in other populations. PMID:16381611

  8. Predictors of Staff Turnover and Turnover Intentions within Addiction Treatment Settings: Change Over Time Matters.

    PubMed

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which changes over time in clinicians' responses to measures of work attitude (eg, job satisfaction) and psychological climate (eg, supervisor support) could predict actual turnover and turnover intentions above and beyond absolute levels of these respective measures. Longitudinal data for this study were collected from a sample of clinicians (N = 96) being trained to implement an evidence-based treatment for adolescent substance use disorders. Supporting findings from a recent staff turnover study, we found job satisfaction change was able to predict actual turnover above and beyond average levels of job satisfaction. Representing new contributions to the staff turnover literature, we also found that change over time in several other key measures (eg, job satisfaction, role manageability, role clarity) explained a significant amount of variance in turnover intentions above and beyond the absolute level of each respective measure. A key implication of the current study is that organizations seeking to improve their ability to assess risk for staff turnover may want to consider assessing staff at multiple points in time in order to identify systematic changes in key employee attitudes like turnover intentions and job satisfaction.

  9. Molecular mechanisms regulating protein kinase Czeta turnover and cellular transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Le Good, J Ann; Brindley, David N

    2004-01-01

    The regulation of protein kinase C (PKC)zeta in relation to its turnover, cell growth and transformation was investigated in Rat2 fibroblasts by over-expressing wild-type or mutant forms of PKCzeta. Deletion of the pseudosubstrate site (PSS) produced the most active mutant (PKCzeta Delta PSS), but mutants designed to mimic phosphorylated PKCzeta had lower specific activities in an in vitro assay. The mutant lacking phosphorylation at the Thr-560 site (T560A) had similar specific activity to wild-type PKCzeta. The T560A mutant also protected PKCzeta against proteolysis, whereas phosphorylation at Thr-410 targeted it towards proteosomal degradation. Blocking proteosomal degradation with lactacystin caused the accumulation of full-length PKCzeta Delta PSS, T410E, PKCzeta Delta PSS T410/560E, PKCzeta and T560A. Expressed PKCzeta activity was paralleled by extracellular-regulated protein kinase activation, increased cell division, serum-independent growth and focus formation. These foci were seen for cells expressing higher PKCzeta activity (PKCzeta Delta PSS, PKCzeta Delta PSS T410/560E and T560A mutants), but these fibroblasts did not show significant anchorage-independent growth. This work provides novel information concerning the role of the PSS and phosphorylation sites in regulating the activity and turnover of an atypical PKC and shows how this activity can induce cell transformation with respect to focus formation. PMID:14580237

  10. Histone turnover and chromatin accessibility: Critical mediators of neurological development, plasticity, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wenderski, Wendy; Maze, Ian

    2016-01-01

    In postmitotic neurons, nucleosomal turnover was long considered to be a static process that is inconsequential to transcription. However, our recent studies in human and rodent brain indicate that replication-independent (RI) nucleosomal turnover, which requires the histone variant H3.3, is dynamic throughout life and is necessary for activity-dependent gene expression, synaptic connectivity, and cognition. H3.3 turnover also facilitates cellular lineage specification and plays a role in suppressing the expression of heterochromatic repetitive elements, including mutagenic transposable sequences, in mouse embryonic stem cells. In this essay, we review mechanisms and functions for RI nucleosomal turnover in brain and present the hypothesis that defects in histone dynamics may represent a common mechanism underlying neurological aging and disease. PMID:26990528

  11. Cholesterol turnover and metabolism in two patients with abetalipoproteinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.S.; Deckelbaum, R.J.; Palmer, R.H.; Dell, R.B.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Delpre, G.; Beigel, Y.; Cooper, M.

    1983-12-01

    Total body turnover of cholesterol was studied in two patients with abetalipoproteinemia, a 32-year-old man and a 31-year-old woman. The patients received (14C)cholesterol intravenously, and the resulting specific activity-time curves (for 40 and 30 weeks, respectively) were fitted with a three-pool model. Parameters were compared with those from studies of cholesterol turnover in 82 normal and hyperlipidemic subjects. A three-pool model gave the best fit for the abetalipoproteinemic patients, as well as for the 82 previously studied subjects, suggesting general applicability of this model. Cholesterol production rates in the two abetalipoproteinemic subjects (0.82 and 0.89 g/day) were close to values predicted for persons of their body weight. Thus, total body turnover rate of cholesterol was quite normal in abetalipoproteinemia, confirming previous reports. Very low values (9.2 and 8.4 g) were found for M1, the size of the rapidly exchanging compartment pool 1, in the two abetalipoproteinemic subjects. These values were well below the values predicted (from the comparison study population) for normal persons of this size with low plasma cholesterol levels. For one patient, total body exchangeable cholesterol was very low, although not significantly below the predicted values for a person of his size. In the second patient, the observed estimate for total body exchangeable cholesterol was well within the range of values predicted for persons of her size with low to extremely low cholesterol levels.

  12. Norepinephrine turnover in heart of the copper deficient rat

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, K.E.; Failla, M.L.; Rosebrough, R. )

    1989-02-01

    Weaned male SD rats were fed a modified AIN-76A diet containing 62% sucrose and either 7 ppm (+Cu) or 0.5 ppm (-Cu) copper for 5 weeks. Dietary copper deprivation resulted in lower concentrations of copper in liver and serum and enlarged hearts. Tissue levels of norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DPA) were quantified by HPLC using electrochemical detection. Cardiac concentration of NE and DPA and 26% lower and 63% higher, respectively, in -Cu rats than in +Cu controls. Altered cardiac levels of NE and DPA in -Cu rats were also evident after overnight fasting, a stress that depresses SNS activity. NE turnover was investigated after inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase by injection of {alpha}-methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester (250 mg/kg). The fractional rate of NE turnover in the heart was 4.6%/hour for rats fed -Cu and +Cu diets. Calculated NE turnover was greater in heart of +Cu rats than -Cu rats (26 vs. 19 ng/g/hr). NE and DPA concentration in brain, pancreas, and spleen were not affected by dietary copper. These data suggest that synthesis of NE in cardiac nerve endings of the weaned rats sensitive to dietary copper deficiency.

  13. Rapid Skeletal Turnover In A Radiographic Mimic Of Osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Michael P.; Madson, Katherine L.; Mumm, Steven; McAlister, William H.; Novack, Deborah V.; Blair, Jo C.; Helliwell, Timothy R.; Stolina, Marina; Abernethy, Laurence J.; Shaw, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Among the high bone mass disorders, the osteopetroses reflect osteoclast failure that prevents skeletal resorption and turnover leading to reduced bone growth and modeling and characteristic histopathological and radiographic findings. We report an 11-year-old boy with a new syndrome that radiographically mimics osteopetrosis but features rapid skeletal turnover. He presented at age 21 months with a parasellar, osteoclast-rich giant cell granuloma. Radiographs showed a dense skull, generalized osteosclerosis, and cortical thickening, medullary cavity narrowing, and diminished modeling of tubular bones. His serum alkaline phosphatase was > 5,000 IU/L (normal < 850). After partial resection, the granuloma re-grew but then regressed and stabilized during three years of uncomplicated pamidronate treatment. His hyperphosphatasemia transiently diminished but all bone turnover markers, especially those of apposition, remained elevated. Two years after pamidronate therapy stopped, BMD z-scores reached + 9.1 and + 5.8 in the lumbar spine and hip, respectively, and iliac crest histopathology confirmed rapid bone remodeling. Serum multiplex biomarker profiling was striking for low sclerostin. Mutation analysis was negative for activation of LRP4, LRP5, or TGFβ1 and for defective SOST, OPG, RANKL, RANK, SQSTM1, or sFRP1. Microarray showed no notable copy number variation. Studies of his non-consanguineous parents were unremarkable. The etiology and pathogenesis of this unique syndrome are unknown. PMID:24919763

  14. New Insights into the Protein Turnover Regulation in Ethylene Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Gyeong Mee

    2015-07-01

    Biosynthesis of the phytohormone ethylene is under tight regulation to satisfy the need for appropriate levels of ethylene in plants in response to exogenous and endogenous stimuli. The enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of ethylene biosynthesis, plays a central role to regulate ethylene production through changes in ACS gene expression levels and the activity of the enzyme. Together with molecular genetic studies suggesting the roles of post-translational modification of the ACS, newly emerging evidence strongly suggests that the regulation of ACS protein stability is an alternative mechanism that controls ethylene production, in addition to the transcriptional regulation of ACS genes. In this review, recent new insight into the regulation of ACS protein turnover is highlighted, with a special focus on the roles of phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and novel components that regulate the turnover of ACS proteins. The prospect of cross-talk between ethylene biosynthesis and other signaling pathways to control turnover of the ACS protein is also considered.

  15. Effects of Ignoring Item Interaction on Item Parameter Estimation and Detection of Interacting Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Cheng-Te; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the effects of ignoring item interaction on item parameter estimation and the efficiency of using the local dependence index Q[subscript 3] and the SAS NLMIXED procedure to detect item interaction under the three-parameter logistic model and the generalized partial credit model. Through simulations, it was found that ignoring…

  16. Quantification of isotopic turnover in agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, A.; Auerswald, K.; Schnyder, H.

    2012-04-01

    The isotopic turnover, which is a proxy for the metabolic rate, is gaining scientific importance. It is quantified for an increasing range of organisms, from microorganisms over plants to animals including agricultural livestock. Additionally, the isotopic turnover is analyzed on different scales, from organs to organisms to ecosystems and even to the biosphere. In particular, the quantification of the isotopic turnover of specific tissues within the same organism, e.g. organs like liver and muscle and products like milk and faeces, has brought new insights to improve understanding of nutrient cycles and fluxes, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of isotopic turnover is important in many areas, including physiology, e.g. milk synthesis, ecology, e.g. soil retention time of water, and medical science, e.g. cancer diagnosis. So far, the isotopic turnover is quantified by applying time, cost and expertise intensive tracer experiments. Usually, this comprises two isotopic equilibration periods. A first equilibration period with a constant isotopic input signal is followed by a second equilibration period with a distinct constant isotopic input signal. This yields a smooth signal change from the first to the second signal in the object under consideration. This approach reveals at least three major problems. (i) The input signals must be controlled isotopically, which is almost impossible in many realistic cases like free ranging animals. (ii) Both equilibration periods may be very long, especially when the turnover rate of the object under consideration is very slow, which aggravates the first problem. (iii) The detection of small or slow pools is improved by large isotopic signal changes, but large isotopic changes also involve a considerable change in the input material; e.g. animal studies are usually carried out as diet-switch experiments, where the diet is switched between C3 and C4 plants, since C3 and C4 plants differ strongly in their isotopic signal. The

  17. Regional scale patterns of fine root lifespan and turnover under current and future climate.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Luke M; Eissenstat, David M; Prasad, Anantha M; Smithwick, Erica A H

    2013-06-01

    Fine root dynamics control a dominant flux of carbon from plants and into soils and mediate potential uptake and cycling of nutrients and water in terrestrial ecosystems. Understanding of these patterns is needed to accurately describe critical processes like productivity and carbon storage from ecosystem to global scales. However, limited observations of root dynamics make it difficult to define and predict patterns of root dynamics across broad spatial scales. Here, we combine species-specific estimates of fine root dynamics with a model that predicts current distribution and future suitable habitat of temperate tree species across the eastern United States (US). Estimates of fine root lifespan and turnover are based on empirical observations and relationships with fine root and whole-plant traits and apply explicitly to the fine root pool that is relatively short-lived and most active in nutrient and water uptake. Results from the combined model identified patterns of faster root turnover rates in the North Central US and slower turnover rates in the Southeastern US. Portions of Minnesota, Ohio, and Pennsylvania were also predicted to experience >10% increases in root turnover rates given potential shifts in tree species composition under future climate scenarios while root turnover rates in other portions of the eastern US were predicted to decrease. Despite potential regional changes, the average estimates of root lifespan and turnover for the entire study area remained relatively stable between the current and future climate scenarios. Our combined model provides the first empirically based, spatially explicit, and spatially extensive estimates of fine root lifespan and turnover and is a potentially powerful tool allowing researchers to identify reasonable approximations of forest fine root turnover in areas where no direct observations are available. Future efforts should focus on reducing uncertainty in estimates of root dynamics by better understanding how

  18. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  19. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  20. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  1. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  2. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  3. Antecedents of Norwegian Beginning Teachers' Turnover Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiplic, Dijana; Brandmo, Christian; Elstad, Eyvind

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at exploring several individual, organizational, and contextual factors that may affect beginning teachers' turnover intentions during their first years of practice. The sample consists of 227 beginning teachers (69% female and 31% male) from 133 schools in Norway. The results show four important antecedents of beginning teachers'…

  4. Minor psychiatric morbidity and labour turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, R

    1985-01-01

    The relation of minor psychiatric morbidity with labour turnover is examined, using data from a study of young, predominantly middle class, white collar men and women. The results suggest that the presence of psychiatric symptomatology is at least as important as occupational attitudes in identifying individuals who would subsequently leave the organisation. PMID:4016004

  5. Home Visitor Job Satisfaction and Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchbinder, Sharon B.; Duggan, Anne K.; Young, Elizabeth; Fuddy, Loretta; Sia, Cal

    This paper summarizes findings of a 3-year study of the job satisfaction and turnover of home visitors, both professional and paraprofessional, in programs which link families-at-risk for impaired functioning to medical home care and other resources. Specifically, the study examined: (1) home visitor personal characteristics that influence…

  6. Employee Development and Turnover Intention: Theory Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Wali; Nas, Zekeriya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the pattern of behavior of turnover intentions in developing countries "vis-a-vis" the one in advanced countries through the empirical data from public universities in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The study provides empirical evidence from academia in Pakistan, thereby enriching the understanding of…

  7. Director Turnover: An Australian Academic Development Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ryan, Yoni

    2012-01-01

    Although it can be argued that directors of central academic development units (ADUs) are critical to the implementation of university teaching and learning strategies, it would appear there is a high director turnover rate. While research in the USA, the UK, and Australia illustrates that ADUs are frequently closed or restructured, that research…

  8. Dynamics of telomeric DNA turnover in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    McEachern, Michael J; Underwood, Dana Hager; Blackburn, Elizabeth H

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase adds telomeric DNA repeats to telomeric termini using a sequence within its RNA subunit as a template. We characterized two mutations in the Kluyveromyces lactis telomerase RNA gene (TER1) template. Each initially produced normally regulated telomeres. One mutation, ter1-AA, had a cryptic defect in length regulation that was apparent only if the mutant gene was transformed into a TER1 deletion strain to permit extensive replacement of basal wild-type repeats with mutant repeats. This mutant differs from previously studied delayed elongation mutants in a number of properties. The second mutation, TER1-Bcl, which generates a BclI restriction site in newly synthesized telomeric repeats, was indistinguishable from wild type in all phenotypes assayed: cell growth, telomere length, and in vivo telomerase fidelity. TER1-Bcl cells demonstrated that the outer halves of the telomeric repeat tracts turn over within a few hundred cell divisions, while the innermost few repeats typically resisted turnover for at least 3000 cell divisions. Similarly deep but incomplete turnover was also observed in two other TER1 template mutants with highly elongated telomeres. These results indicate that most DNA turnover in functionally normal telomeres is due to gradual replicative sequence loss and additions by telomerase but that there are other processes that also contribute to turnover. PMID:11805045

  9. MIMIC Methods for Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Shih, Ching-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Three multiple indicators-multiple causes (MIMIC) methods, namely, the standard MIMIC method (M-ST), the MIMIC method with scale purification (M-SP), and the MIMIC method with a pure anchor (M-PA), were developed to assess differential item functioning (DIF) in polytomous items. In a series of simulations, it appeared that all three methods…

  10. 48 CFR 852.214-72 - Alternate item(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alternate item(s). 852.214-72 Section 852.214-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses...

  11. Differential Item Functioning Analysis Using Rasch Item Information Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Mapuranga, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis is a statistical technique used for ensuring the equity and fairness of educational assessments. This study formulates a new DIF analysis method using the information similarity index (ISI). ISI compares item information functions when data fits the Rasch model. Through simulations and an international…

  12. Evaluating Item Fit for Multidimensional Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Bo; Stone, Clement A.

    2008-01-01

    This research examines the utility of the s-x[superscript 2] statistic proposed by Orlando and Thissen (2000) in evaluating item fit for multidimensional item response models. Monte Carlo simulation was conducted to investigate both the Type I error and statistical power of this fit statistic in analyzing two kinds of multidimensional test…

  13. A Mixed Effects Randomized Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, J.-P.; Wyrick, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    The randomized response technique ensures that individual item responses, denoted as true item responses, are randomized before observing them and so-called randomized item responses are observed. A relationship is specified between randomized item response data and true item response data. True item response data are modeled with a (non)linear…

  14. Crowding enhances lipase turnover rate on surface-immobilized substrates.

    PubMed

    Balevicius, Zigmas; Ignatjeva, Dalia; Niaura, Gediminas; Ignatjev, Ilja; Vaicikauskas, Viktoras; Babonas, Gintautas Jurgis; Valincius, Gintaras

    2015-07-01

    Utilizing surface-immobilized synthetic lipid substrates containing the redox-active ferrocene groups, the enzymatic activity of lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus was measured by the cyclic voltammetry method. The activity was correlated with the surface density of the protein by the ATR-IR spectroscopy and the total internal reflection ellipsometry. It was found that the lipase turnover rate significantly increases with its surface density. Despite expected hindrance effects due to the crowding of the enzyme molecules in the near surface-saturation range of concentrations, the turnover rate was consistently higher compared with the values measured at low concentrations. The effect was explained by the change in the surface arrangement of the enzyme. In the low concentration range, lipase adsorbs onto a surface adopting a predominantly horizontal position. At high concentrations, as the surface density approaches saturation, the enzyme molecules due to crowding are forced into the predominantly vertical position, which is more favorable for the activation of the lipase through the interaction between the "hydrophobic lid" of the lipase and the hydrophobic adsorbate surface.

  15. Work-Related Variables and Turnover Intention among Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pooyan, Abdullah; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Health institutions have become more interested in the causes of job turnover among registered nurses. Proper management of job turnover can improve the financial health and long-term survival of health care institutions. (Author)

  16. In vitro and in vivo effects of phytoestrogens on protein turnover in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) white muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybeans and other legumes investigated as fishmeal replacements in aquafeeds contain phytoestrogens capable of binding to and activating estrogen receptors. Estradiol has catabolic effects in salmonid white muscle, partially through increases in protein turnover. The current study determines whet...

  17. Human AP Endonuclease I Stimulates Multiple-Turnover Base Excision by Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase†

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Michael R.; O’Brien, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) locates and excises a wide variety of damaged purine bases from DNA, including hypoxanthine that is formed by the oxidative deamination of adenine. We used steady state, pre-steady state, and single-turnover kinetic assays to show that the multiple-turnover excision of hypoxanthine in vitro is limited by release of the abasic DNA product. This suggests the possibility that the product release step is regulated in vivo by interactions with other base excision repair (BER) proteins. Such coordination of BER activities would protect the abasic DNA repair intermediate and ensure its correct processing. AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) is the predominant enzyme for processing abasic DNA sites in human cells. Therefore, we have investigated the functional effects of added APE1 on the base excision activity of AAG. We find that APE1 stimulates the multiple-turnover excision of hypoxanthine by AAG, but has no effect on single-turnover excision. Since the amino terminus of AAG has been implicated in other protein-protein interactions we also characterize the deletion mutant lacking the first 79 amino acids. We find that APE1 fully stimulates the multiple-turnover glycosylase activity of this mutant, demonstrating that the amino terminus of AAG is not strictly required for this functional interaction. These results are consistent with a model whereby APE1 displaces AAG from the abasic site, thereby coordinating the first two steps of the base excision repair pathway. PMID:19449863

  18. Building Muscles, Keeping Muscles: Protein Turnover During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, Arny; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As we age we lose muscle mass and strength. The problem is a matter of use it or lose it and more - a fact to which any active senior can attest. An imbalance in the natural cycle of protein turnover may be a contributing factor to decreased muscle mass. But the answer is not so simple, since aging is associated with changes in hormones, activity levels, nutrition, and often, disease. The human body constantly uses amino acids to build muscle protein, which then breaks down and must be replaced. When protein turnover gets out of balance, so that more protein breaks down than the body can replace, the result is muscle loss. This is not just the bane of aging, however. Severely burned people may have difficulty building new muscle long after the burned skin has been repaired. Answers to why we lose muscle mass and strength - and how doctors can fix it - may come from space. Astronauts usually eat a well-balanced diet and maintain an exercise routine to stay in top health. During long-duration flight, they exercise regularly to reduce the muscle loss that results from being in a near-weightless environment. Despite these precautions, astronauts lose muscle mass and strength during most missions. They quickly recover after returning to Earth - this is a temporary condition in an otherwise healthy population. Members of the STS-107 crew are participating in a study of the effects of space flight, hormone levels, and stress on protein turnover. When we are under stress, the body responds with a change in hormone levels. Researchers hypothesize that this stress-induced change in hormones along with the near-weightlessness might result in the body synthesizing less muscle protein, causing muscles to lose their strength and size. Astronauts, who must perform numerous duties in a confined and unusual environment, experience some stress during their flight, making them excellent candidates for testing the researchers' hypothesis.

  19. Career and Occupational Development Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    The career and occupational development items contained in this document are part of a kit consisting of four documents which bring together different types of items that measure a number of career and occupational development (COD) objectives developed by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). (NAEP--which completed a national…

  20. Generalizability in Item Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Wilson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    An approach called generalizability in item response modeling (GIRM) is introduced in this article. The GIRM approach essentially incorporates the sampling model of generalizability theory (GT) into the scaling model of item response theory (IRT) by making distributional assumptions about the relevant measurement facets. By specifying a random…

  1. 17 CFR 229.1207 - (Item 1207) Delivery commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false (Item 1207) Delivery... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1207 (Item 1207) Delivery commitments. (a) If the registrant is... delivery commitments; and (3) The steps that the registrant has taken to ensure that available reserves...

  2. Salary and Ranking and Teacher Turnover: A Statewide Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Cynthia Martinez; Slate, John R.; Delgado, Carmen Tejeda

    2009-01-01

    This study examined three years of data obtained from the Academic Excellence Indicator System of the State of Texas regarding teacher turnover rate and teacher salary. Across all public school districts, teacher salary was consistently negatively related to teacher turnover; that is, where salary was lower, turnover rate was higher When data were…

  3. The shocking cost of turnover in health care.

    PubMed

    Waldman, J Deane; Kelly, Frank; Arora, Sanjeev; Smith, Howard L

    2004-01-01

    Review of turnover costs at a major medical center helps health care managers gain insights about the magnitude and determinants of this managerial challenge and assess the implications for organizational effectiveness. Here, turnover includes hiring, training, and productivity loss costs. Minimum cost of turnover represented a loss of >5 percent of the total annual operating budget.

  4. Superintendent Turnover in Kentucky. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 113

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jerry; Huffman, Tyler; Madden, Karen; Shope, Shane

    2011-01-01

    This study examines superintendent turnover in Kentucky public school districts for 1998/99-2007/08, looking at how turnover varies by rural status, Appalachian and non-Appalachian region, and 2007/08 school district characteristics. Key findings include: (1) Kentucky school districts averaged one superintendent turnover during 1998/99-2007/08;…

  5. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... turnover ratio. 109-27.5002 Section 109-27.5002 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property....5002 Stores inventory turnover ratio. Comparison of investment in stores inventories to annual issues... comparison may be expressed either as a turnover ratio (dollar value of issues divided by dollar value...

  6. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... turnover ratio. 109-27.5002 Section 109-27.5002 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property....5002 Stores inventory turnover ratio. Comparison of investment in stores inventories to annual issues... comparison may be expressed either as a turnover ratio (dollar value of issues divided by dollar value...

  7. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... turnover ratio. 109-27.5002 Section 109-27.5002 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property....5002 Stores inventory turnover ratio. Comparison of investment in stores inventories to annual issues... comparison may be expressed either as a turnover ratio (dollar value of issues divided by dollar value...

  8. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... turnover ratio. 109-27.5002 Section 109-27.5002 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property....5002 Stores inventory turnover ratio. Comparison of investment in stores inventories to annual issues... comparison may be expressed either as a turnover ratio (dollar value of issues divided by dollar value...

  9. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... turnover ratio. 109-27.5002 Section 109-27.5002 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property....5002 Stores inventory turnover ratio. Comparison of investment in stores inventories to annual issues... comparison may be expressed either as a turnover ratio (dollar value of issues divided by dollar value...

  10. Conditional recall and the frequency effect in the serial recall task: an examination of item-to-item associativity.

    PubMed

    Miller, Leonie M; Roodenrys, Steven

    2012-11-01

    The frequency effect in short-term serial recall is influenced by the composition of lists. In pure lists, a robust advantage in the recall of high-frequency (HF) words is observed, yet in alternating mixed lists, HF and low-frequency (LF) words are recalled equally well. It has been argued that the preexisting associations between all list items determine a single, global level of supportive activation that assists item recall. Preexisting associations between items are assumed to be a function of language co-occurrence; HF-HF associations are high, LF-LF associations are low, and mixed associations are intermediate in activation strength. This account, however, is based on results when alternating lists with equal numbers of HF and LF words were used. It is possible that directional association between adjacent list items is responsible for the recall patterns reported. In the present experiment, the recall of three forms of mixed lists-those with equal numbers of HF and LF items and pure lists-was examined to test the extent to which item-to-item associations are present in serial recall. Furthermore, conditional probabilities were used to examine more closely the evidence for a contribution, since correct-in-position scoring may mask recall that is dependent on the recall of prior items. The results suggest that an item-to-item effect is clearly present for early but not late list items, and they implicate an additional factor, perhaps the availability of resources at output, in the recall of late list items.

  11. Job Demand and Job Resources related to the turnover intention of public health nurses: An analysis using a Job Demands-Resources model.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Aya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the job demands and job resources of public health nurses based on the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model, and to build a model that can estimate turnover intention based on job demands and job resources.Method By adding 12 items to the existing questionnaire, the author created a questionnaire consisting of 10 factors and 167 items, and used statistical analysis to examine job demands and job resources in relation to turnover intention.Results Out of 2,668 questionnaires sent, 1993 (72.5%) were returned. Considering sex-based differences in occupational stress, I analyzed women's answers in 1766 (66.2%) mails among the 1798 valid responses. The average age of respondents was 41.0±9.8 years, and the mean service duration was 17.0±10.0 years. For public health nurses, there was a turnover intention of 9.2%. The "job demands" section consisted of 29 items and 10 factors, while the "job resources" section consisted of 54 items and 22 factors. The result of examining the structure of job demands and job resources, leading to turnover intention was supported by the JD-R model. Turnover intention was strong and the Mental Component Summary (MCS) is low in those who had many job demands and few job resources (experiencing 'burn-out'). Enhancement of work engagement and turnover intention was weak in those who had many job resources. This explained approximately 60% of the dispersion to "burn-out", and approximately 40% to "work engagement", with four factors: work suitability, work significance, positive work self-balance, and growth opportunity of job resources.Conclusion This study revealed that turnover intention is strong in those who are burned out because of many job demands. Enhancement of work engagement and turnover intention is weak in those with many job resources. This suggests that suitable staffing and organized efforts to raise awareness of job significance are effective in reducing

  12. Assessing item fit for unidimensional item response theory models using residuals from estimated item response functions.

    PubMed

    Haberman, Shelby J; Sinharay, Sandip; Chon, Kyong Hee

    2013-07-01

    Residual analysis (e.g. Hambleton & Swaminathan, Item response theory: principles and applications, Kluwer Academic, Boston, 1985; Hambleton, Swaminathan, & Rogers, Fundamentals of item response theory, Sage, Newbury Park, 1991) is a popular method to assess fit of item response theory (IRT) models. We suggest a form of residual analysis that may be applied to assess item fit for unidimensional IRT models. The residual analysis consists of a comparison of the maximum-likelihood estimate of the item characteristic curve with an alternative ratio estimate of the item characteristic curve. The large sample distribution of the residual is proved to be standardized normal when the IRT model fits the data. We compare the performance of our suggested residual to the standardized residual of Hambleton et al. (Fundamentals of item response theory, Sage, Newbury Park, 1991) in a detailed simulation study. We then calculate our suggested residuals using data from an operational test. The residuals appear to be useful in assessing the item fit for unidimensional IRT models.

  13. Occupational turnover intentions among substance abuse counselors

    PubMed Central

    Rothrauff, Tanja C.; Abraham, Amanda J.; Bride, Brian E.; Roman, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined predictor, moderator, and mediator variables of occupational turnover intention (OcTI) among substance abuse counselors. Data were obtained via questionnaires from 929 counselors working in 225 private substance abuse treatment (SAT) programs across the U.S. Hierarchical multiple regression models were conducted to assess predictor, moderator, and mediator variables of OcTI. OcTI scores were relatively low on a 7-point scale, indicating that very few counselors definitely intended to leave the SAT field. Age, certification, positive perceptions of procedural and distributive justice, and hospital-based status negatively predicted OcTI. Counselors’ substance use disorder impacted history moderated the association between organizational commitment and OcTI. Organizational turnover intention partially mediated the link between organizational commitment and OcTI. Workforce stability might be achieved by promoting perceptions of advantages to working in a particular treatment program, organizational commitment, showing appreciation for counselors’ work, and valuing employees from diverse backgrounds. PMID:20947285

  14. Replicator dynamics with turnover of players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juul, Jeppe; Kianercy, Ardeshir; Bernhardsson, Sebastian; Pigolotti, Simone

    2013-08-01

    We study adaptive dynamics in games where players abandon the population at a given rate and are replaced by naive players characterized by a prior distribution over the admitted strategies. We demonstrate how such a process leads macroscopically to a variant of the replicator equation, with an additional term accounting for player turnover. We study how Nash equilibria and the dynamics of the system are modified by this additional term for prototypical examples such as the rock-paper-scissors game and different classes of two-action games played between two distinct populations. We conclude by showing how player turnover can account for nontrivial departures from Nash equilibria observed in data from lowest unique bid auctions.

  15. Orthophosphate turnover in East African lakes.

    PubMed

    Peters, Robert Henry; MacIntyre, Sally

    1976-12-01

    Turnover rates of (32)P-PO4 and concentrations of orthophosphate as soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) were measured in five East African waters. Rapid incorporation of (32)P-PO4 by the seston and orthophosphate concentrations below the limit of detectibility were found in Lakes Elmenteita, Naivasha, and Naivasha Crater Lake. Turnover was slow and orthophosphate concentration high in both Lake Nakuru and the Crescent Island Crater basin of Lake Naivasha. Further experiments in Lake Nakuru indicated that colloidal binding of orthophosphate was limited and that particles retained by an 8.0 μ filter incorporated 66% as much tracer as particles retained by a 0.1 μ filter. These experiments strengthen our conclusion that a large quantity of orthophosphate is available for algal use in Lake Nakuru.

  16. Turnover of soil monosaccharides: Recycling versus Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, Anna; Dyckmans, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) represents a mixture of differently degradable compounds. Each of these compounds are characterised by different dynamics due to different chemical recalcitrance, transformation or stabilisation processes in soil. Carbohydrates represent one of these compounds and contribute up to 25 % to the soil organic matter. Vascular plants are the main source of pentose sugars (Arabinose and Xylose), whereas hexoses (Galactose and Mannose) are primarily produced by microorganisms. Several studies suggest that the mean turnover times of the carbon in soil sugars are similar to the turnover dynamics of the bulk carbon in soil. The aim of the study is to characterise the influence of stabilisation and turnover of soil carbohydrates. Soil samples are collected from (i) a continuous maize cropping experiment ('Höhere Landbauschule' Rotthalmünster, Bavaria) established 1979 on a Stagnic Luvisol and (ii) from a continuous wheat cropping, established 1969, as reference site. The effect of stabilisation is estimated by the comparison of turnover times of microbial and plant derived soil carbohydrates. As the dynamics of plant derived carbohydrate are solely influenced by stabilisation processes, whereas the dynamics of microbial derived carbohydrates are affected by recycling of organic carbon compounds derived by C3 plant substrate as well as stabilisation processes. The compound specific isotopic analysis (CSIA) of soil carbohydrates was performed using a HPLC/o/IRMS system. The chromatographic and mass spectrometric subunits were coupled with a LC-Isolink interface. Soil sugars were extracted after mild hydrolysis using 4 M trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Chromatographic separation of the sugars was achieved using a low strength 0.25 mM NaOH solution as mobile phase at a ?ow rate of 250 μL min-1 at 10 ° C.

  17. Employee Turnover and Post Decision Accommodation Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    1977; Dansereau et al., 1974; Koch and Steers, 1978, Waters et al., 1976; Krackhardt, McKenna , Porter and Steers, 1978). Variables such as these, when...worker. New York: Wiley, 1965. Krackhardt, D., McKenna , J., Porter, L. 14., and Steers, R. M. Coal- setting, supervisory behavior, and employee...consequences of turnover and to Larry Cummings, Daniel Ilgen, Terence R. Mitchell, Charles O’Reilly, and Barry Staw for their insightful and useful comments on

  18. Glucose turnover and recycling in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kokal, W A; McCulloch, A; Wright, P D; Johnston, I D

    1983-11-01

    Glucose metabolism is affected by various pathologic states including tumors. In this project, glucose turnover and recycling rates in 11 patients with colorectal carcinoma were measured using a double-labelled 3-3H and 1-14C glucose injection technique. Fasting blood glucose, lactate, pyruvate, alanine, glycerol, 3-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, plasma cortisol, and plasma insulin concentrations were also measured. No patient in the study had a history of diabetes mellitus or endocrine disorders, nor any abnormal liver function tests. The findings demonstrated a significantly elevated glucose turnover rate in patients with Dukes C and D lesions in comparison to patients with Dukes B lesions. Cori recycling rates were not significantly different between Dukes B vs. Dukes C and D patients. There were no differences between Dukes B and Dukes C and D patients in any of the metabolites measured. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in glucose turnover or recycling rates as a function of pre-illness weight loss. These data suggest that, when colorectal carcinoma extends beyond the limits of the bowel wall, glucose metabolism is significantly altered.

  19. Quantitative analysis of protein turnover in plants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Clark J; Li, Lei; Millar, A Harvey

    2014-03-01

    Proteins are constantly being synthesised and degraded as plant cells age and as plants grow, develop and adapt the proteome. Given that plants develop through a series of events from germination to fruiting and even undertake whole organ senescence, an understanding of protein turnover as a fundamental part of this process in plants is essential. Both synthesis and degradation processes are spatially separated in a cell across its compartmented structure. The majority of protein synthesis occurs in the cytosol, while synthesis of specific components occurs inside plastids and mitochondria. Degradation of proteins occurs in both the cytosol, through the action of the plant proteasome, and in organelles and lytic structures through different protease classes. Tracking the specific synthesis and degradation rate of individual proteins can be undertaken using stable isotope feeding and the ability of peptide MS to track labelled peptide fractions over time. Mathematical modelling can be used to follow the isotope signature of newly synthesised protein as it accumulates and natural abundance proteins as they are lost through degradation. Different technical and biological constraints govern the potential for the use of (13)C, (15)N, (2)H and (18)O for these experiments in complete labelling and partial labelling strategies. Future development of quantitative protein turnover analysis will involve analysis of protein populations in complexes and subcellular compartments, assessing the effect of PTMs and integrating turnover studies into wider system biology study of plants.

  20. Forest turnover rates follow global and regional patterns of productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, N.L.; van Mantgem, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Using a global database, we found that forest turnover rates (the average of tree mortality and recruitment rates) parallel broad-scale patterns of net primary productivity. First, forest turnover was higher in tropical than in temperate forests. Second, as recently demonstrated by others, Amazonian forest turnover was higher on fertile than infertile soils. Third, within temperate latitudes, turnover was highest in angiosperm forests, intermediate in mixed forests, and lowest in gymnosperm forests. Finally, within a single forest physiognomic type, turnover declined sharply with elevation (hence with temperature). These patterns of turnover in populations of trees are broadly similar to the patterns of turnover in populations of plant organs (leaves and roots) found in other studies. Our findings suggest a link between forest mass balance and the population dynamics of trees, and have implications for understanding and predicting the effects of environmental changes on forest structure and terrestrial carbon dynamics. ??2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  1. 76 FR 14641 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Identification of Critical Safety Items (DFARS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... any items being purchased that are critical safety items so that the proper risk-based surveillance... This DFARS case was initiated at the request of the Defense Contract Management Agency so that when DoD requiring activities identify procurements involving critical safety items, the buying activities...

  2. Multilevel Modeling of Item Position Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albano, Anthony D.

    2013-01-01

    In many testing programs it is assumed that the context or position in which an item is administered does not have a differential effect on examinee responses to the item. Violations of this assumption may bias item response theory estimates of item and person parameters. This study examines the potentially biasing effects of item position. A…

  3. Item Banking. ERIC/AE Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence

    This digest discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using item banks, and it provides useful information for those who are considering implementing an item banking project in their school districts. The primary advantage of item banking is in test development. Using an item response theory method, such as the Rasch model, items from multiple…

  4. Effects of Incorporating Humor in Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorris, Robert F.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Two matched forms of a 50 item grammar test were developed. Twenty items designed to be humorous were included in one form. Inclusion of humorous items did not affect grammar scores on matched humorous/nonhumorous items, nor on commmon post-treatment items. Inclusion did not affect results of anxiety measures. (Author/DWH)

  5. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Item Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2003-01-01

    Developed a multilevel item response (IRT) model that allows for differences between the distributions of item parameters of families of item clones. Results from simulation studies based on an item pool from the Law School Admission Test illustrate the accuracy of the item pool calibration and adaptive testing procedures based on the model. (SLD)

  6. 7 CFR 2902.5 - Item designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... availability of such items and the economic and technological feasibility of using such items, including life cycle costs. USDA will gather information on individual products within an item and extrapolate that product information to the item level for consideration in designating items. In considering these...

  7. Printed Comments With Item Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, J. Christopher

    1970-01-01

    The author suggests that a computer program be designed which not only computes item statistics, but also provides a running commetary in English to assist teachers in their analysis of test results. (PR)

  8. Protein turnover analysis in Salmonella Typhimurium during infection by dynamic SILAC, Topograph, and quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Han, Qiang-Qiang; Zhou, Mao-Tian; Chen, Xi; Guo, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Protein turnover affects protein abundance and phenotypes. Comprehensive investigation of protein turnover dynamics has the potential to provide substantial information about gene expression. Here we report a large-scale protein turnover study in Salmonella Typhimurium during infection by quantitative proteomics. Murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells were infected with SILAC labeled Salmonella. Bacterial cells were extracted after 0, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min. Mass spectrometry analyses yielded information about Salmonella protein turnover dynamics and a software program named Topograph was used for the calculation of protein half lives. The half lives of 311 proteins from intracellular Salmonella were obtained. For bacteria cultured in control medium (DMEM), the half lives for 870 proteins were obtained. The calculated median of protein half lives was 69.13 and 99.30 min for the infection group and the DMEM group, respectively, indicating an elevated protein turnover at the initial stage of infection. Gene ontology analyses revealed that a number of protein functional groups were significantly regulated by infection, including proteins involved in ribosome, periplasmic space, cellular amino acid metabolic process, ion binding, and catalytic activity. The half lives of proteins involved in purine metabolism pathway were found to be significantly shortened during infection.

  9. Dynamic aspects of voluntary turnover: an integrated approach to curvilinearity in the performance-turnover relationship.

    PubMed

    Becker, William J; Cropanzano, Russell

    2011-03-01

    Previous research pertaining to job performance and voluntary turnover has been guided by 2 distinct theoretical perspectives. First, the push-pull model proposes that there is a quadratic or curvilinear relationship existing between these 2 variables. Second, the unfolding model of turnover posits that turnover is a dynamic process and that a downward performance change may increase the likelihood of organizational separation. Drawing on decision theory, we propose and test an integrative framework. This approach incorporates both of these earlier models. Specifically, we argue that individuals are most likely to voluntarily exit when they are below-average performers who are also experiencing a downward performance change. Furthermore, the interaction between this downward change and performance partially accounts for the curvilinear relationship proposed by the push-pull model. Findings from a longitudinal field study supported this integrative theory.

  10. Keratins Stabilize Hemidesmosomes through Regulation of β4-Integrin Turnover.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Kristin; Cheng, Fang; Wiche, Gerhard; Eriksson, John E; Magin, Thomas M

    2015-06-01

    Epidermal integrity and wound healing depend on remodeling of cell-matrix contacts including hemidesmosomes. Mutations in β4-integrin and plectin lead to severe epidermolysis bullosa (EB). Whether mutations in keratins K5 or K14, which cause EB simplex, also compromise cell-matrix adhesion through altering hemidesmosomal components is not well investigated. In particular, the dependence of β4-integrin endocytosis and turnover on keratins remains incompletely understood. Here, we show that the absence of keratins causes loss of plectin-β4-integrin interaction and elevated β4-integrin phosphorylation at Ser1354 and Ser1362. This triggered a caveolin-dependent endocytosis of β4-integrin but not of other integrins through Rab5 and Rab11 compartments in keratinocytes. Expressing a phospho-deficient β4-integrin mutant reduces β4-integrin endocytosis and rescues plectin localization in keratin-free cells. β4-integrin phosphorylation in the absence of keratins resulted from elevated Erk1/2 activity downstream of increased EGFR and PKCα signaling. Further, increased Erk1/2 phosphorylation and altered plectin localization occur in keratin-deficient mouse epidermis in vivo. Strikingly, expression of the K14-R125P EBS mutant also resulted in plectin mislocalization and elevated β4-integrin turnover, suggesting disease relevance. Our data underscore a major role of keratins in controlling β4-integrin endocytosis involving a plectin-Erk1/2-dependent mechanism relevant for epidermal differentiation and pathogenesis.

  11. Job and organizational determinants of nursing home employee commitment, job satisfaction and intent to turnover.

    PubMed

    Karsh, B; Booske, B C; Sainfort, F

    2005-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether job characteristics, the work environment, participation in quality improvement activities and facility quality improvement environment predicted employee commitment and job satisfaction in nursing homes, and whether those same predictors and commitment and satisfaction predicted turnover intention. A total of 6,584 nursing home employees from 76 nursing homes in a midwestern state participated. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. The results supported the hypotheses that job and organizational factors predicted commitment and satisfaction while commitment and satisfaction predicted turnover intentions. The implications for retaining nursing home employees are discussed.

  12. Decoration of the layered manganese oxide birnessite with Mn(II/III) gives a new water oxidation catalyst with fifty-fold turnover number enhancement.

    PubMed

    McKendry, Ian G; Kondaveeti, Sandeep K; Shumlas, Samantha L; Strongin, Daniel R; Zdilla, Michael J

    2015-08-07

    The role of the manganese average oxidation state (AOS) in water oxidation catalysis by birnessite was investigated. Low AOS samples were most active, generating O2 immediately. Samples with a relatively high AOS showed an initial induction period and decreased turnover. Mn(ii- and iii)-enriched samples gave a 10-50 fold enhancement in turnover number.

  13. Binding agent for molding ceramic items

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshentsev, B. D.; Vityuk, N. P.; Volkov, A. V.; Yevdokimov, A. I.; Novikov, M. N.; Piskunov, Y. G.; Pobortsev, E. P.; Sadovnichaya, L. M.

    1983-01-01

    The invention refers to the fabrication of ceramic items by the molding method. It can be used to produce items of complicated configuration, in particular composition of binding agent for electroceramic items.

  14. Comparative Proteome Analysis of hAT-MSCs Isolated from Chronic Renal Failure Patients with Differences in Their Bone Turnover Status

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Gurler; Tuncay, Mehmet; Aksoy, Ayça; Karaoz, Erdal

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the stem cells and the bone turnover in uremic bone disease due to chronic renal failure (CRF) is not described. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bone turnover status on stem cell properties. To search for the presence of such link and shed some light on stem-cell relevant mechanisms of bone turnover, we carried out a study with mesenchymal stem cells. Tissue biopsies were taken from the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue of a CRF patient with secondary hyperparathyroidism with the high turnover bone disease. This patient underwent parathyroidectomy operation (PTX) and another sample was taken from this patient after PTX. A CRF patient with adynamic bone disease with low turnover and a healthy control were also included. Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the subjects were analyzed using proteomic and molecular approaches. Except ALP activity, the bone turnover status did not affect common stem cell properties. However, detailed proteome analysis revealed the presence of regulated protein spots. A total of 32 protein spots were identified following 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF analyzes. The identified proteins were classified into seven distinct groups and their potential relationship to bone turnover were discussed. Distinct protein expression patterns emerged in relation to the bone turnover status indicate a possible link between the stem cells and bone turnover in uremic bone disease due to CRF. PMID:26575497

  15. Characteristics of Teacher Induction Programs and Turnover Rates of Beginning Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Seok; Berliner, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The federal School and Staffing Survey (SASS) and Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS) were used to examine the impacts of induction activities on beginning teacher turnover. This study excluded those teachers who moved or left schools for unavoidable and involuntary reasons, a confounding factor in previous research. This analysis revealed that three…

  16. Multivariate Associations Among Health-Related Fitness, Physical Activity, and TGMD-3 Test Items in Disadvantaged Children From Low-Income Families.

    PubMed

    Burns, Ryan; Brusseau, Tim; Hannon, James

    2016-10-04

    Motor skills are needed for physical development and may be linked to health-related fitness and physical activity levels. No studies have examined the relationships among these constructs in large samples of disadvantaged children from low-income families using the Test for Gross Motor Development-3rd Edition (TGMD-3). The purpose of this study was to examine the multivariate associations among health-related fitness, physical activity, and motor skills assessed using the TGMD-3. Participants included 1460 school-aged children (730 boys, 730 girls; M age = 8.4 years, SD = 1.8 years) recruited from the K to sixth grades from three low-income schools. Health-related fitness was assessed using the FITNESSGRAM battery, physical activity was assessed using accelerometers and pedometers, and motor skills were assessed using the TGMD-3. Canonical correlations revealed statistically significant correlations between the Ball Skills and health-related fitness variates (Rc = 0.43, Rc(2 )= 17%, p < 0.001). Significant canonical coefficients in the Ball Skills variate included two-handed striking, dribbling, and catching, and significant canonical coefficients in the health-related fitness variate included body mass index and the progressive aerobic cardiovascular endurance run (p < 0.01). Locomotor skills did not significantly correlate with health-related fitness or physical activity. Ball skills are related to health-related fitness in disadvantaged children from low-income families.

  17. A Study of the Homogeneity of Items Produced From Item Forms Across Different Taxonomic Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Margaret B.; Argo, Jana K.

    This study determined whether item forms ( rules for constructing items related to a domain or set of tasks) would enable naive item writers to generate multiple-choice items at three taxonomic levels--knowledge, comprehension, and application. Students wrote 120 multiple-choice items from 20 item forms, corresponding to educational objectives…

  18. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  19. Dynamics of Adipocyte Turnover in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, K; Arner, E; Westermark, P; Bernard, S; Buchholz, B; Bergmann, O; Blomqvist, L; Hoffstedt, J; Naslund, E; Britton, T; Concha, H; Hassan, M; Ryden, M; Frisen, J; Arner, P

    2007-07-16

    Obesity is increasing in an epidemic fashion in most countries and constitutes a public health problem by enhancing the risk for cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. Owing to the increase in obesity, life expectancy may start to decrease in developed countries for the first time in recent history. The factors determining fat mass in adult humans are not fully understood, but increased lipid storage in already developed fat cells is thought to be most important. We show that adipocyte number is a major determinant for the fat mass in adults. However, the number of fat cells stays constant in adulthood in lean and obese and even under extreme conditions, indicating that the number of adipocytes is set during childhood and adolescence. To establish the dynamics within the stable population of adipocytes in adults, we have measured adipocyte turnover by analyzing the integration of {sup 14}C derived from nuclear bomb tests in genomic DNA. Approximately 10% of fat cells are renewed annually at all adult ages and levels of body mass index. Neither adipocyte death nor generation rate is altered in obesity, suggesting a tight regulation of fat cell number that is independent of metabolic profile in adulthood. The high turnover of adipocytes establishes a new therapeutic target for pharmacological intervention in obesity.

  20. Chicory increases acetate turnover, but not propionate and butyrate peripheral turnovers in rats.

    PubMed

    Pouteau, Etienne; Rochat, Florence; Jann, Alfred; Meirim, Isabelle; Sanchez-Garcia, Jose-Luis; Ornstein, Kurt; German, Bruce; Ballèvre, Olivier

    2008-02-01

    Chicory roots are rich in inulin that is degraded into SCFA in the caecum and colon. Whole-body SCFA metabolism was investigated in rats during food deprivation and postprandial states. After 22 h of food deprivation, sixteen rats received an IV injection of radioactive 14C-labelled SCFA. The volume of distribution and the fractional clearance rate of SCFA were 0.25-0.27 litres/kg and 5.4-5.9 %/min, respectively. The half-life in the first extracellular rapidly decaying compartment was between 0.9 and 1.4 min. After 22 h of food deprivation, another seventeen rats received a primed continuous IV infusion of 13C-labelled SCFA for 2 h. Isotope enrichment (13C) of SCFA was determined in peripheral arterial blood by MS. Peripheral acetate, propionate and butyrate turnover rates were 29, 4 and 0.3 micromol/kg per min respectively. Following 4 weeks of treatment with chicory root or control diets, eighteen fed rats received a primed continuous IV infusion of 13C-labelled SCFA for 2 h. Intestinal degradation of dietary chicory lowered caecal pH, enhanced caecal and colonic weights, caecal SCFA concentrations and breath H2. The diet with chicory supplementation enhanced peripheral acetate turnover by 25 % (P = 0.017) concomitant with an increase in plasma acetate concentration. There were no changes in propionate or butyrate turnovers. In conclusion, by setting up a multi-tracer approach to simultaneously assess the turnovers of acetate, propionate and butyrate it was demonstrated that a chronic chicory-rich diet significantly increases peripheral acetate turnover but not that of propionate or butyrate in rats.

  1. Thermal response based item identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. K.; Hypes, P. A.; Bracken, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems in NDA of nuclear materials is identifying the chemical form of the nuclear material and the surrounding matrix. Recent work analyzing the calorimeter response of sources embedded in a variety of matrices has led to a possible solution to this problem. The wide range of thermal time constants exhibited by typical matrix materials lends itself to permitting the differentiation between materials, based on time constants extracted from the measured response. Potential applications include simple item identification, item fingerprinting as part of shipper-receiver measurements, and distinguishing between Pu metal and Pu oxide as required under certain proposed attribute measurements. The results of applying this technique to a variety of items will be presented and discussed.

  2. SYMPATHETIC INNERVATION, NOREPINEPHRINE CONTENT, AND NOREPINEPHRINE TURNOVER IN ORTHOTOPIC AND SPONTANEOUS MODELS OF BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Ryan P.; Madden, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) drives breast cancer progression in preclinical breast cancer models, but it has yet to be established if neoplastic and stromal cells residing in the tumor are directly targeted by locally released norepinephrine (NE). In murine orthotopic and spontaneous mammary tumors, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)+ sympathetic nerves were limited to the periphery of the tumor. No TH+ staining was detected deeper within these tumors, even in regions with a high density of blood vessels. NE concentration was much lower in tumors compared to the more densely innervated spleen, reflecting the relative paucity of tumor TH+ innervation. Tumor and spleen NE concentration decreased with increased tissue mass. In mice treated with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to selectively destroy sympathetic nerves, tumor NE concentration was reduced approximately 50%, suggesting that the majority of tumor NE is derived from local sympathetic nerves. To evaluate NE utilization, NE turnover in orthotopic 4T1 mammary tumors was compared to spleen under baseline and stress conditions. In non-stressed mice, NE turnover was equivalent between tumor and spleen. In mice exposed to a stressor, tumor NE turnover was increased compared to spleen NE turnover, and compared to non-stressed tumor NE turnover. Together, these results demonstrate that NE in mammary tumors is derived from local sympathetic nerves that synthesize and metabolize NE. However, differences between spleen and tumor NE turnover with stressor exposure suggest that sympathetic NE release is regulated differently within the tumor microenvironment compared to the spleen. Local mammary tumor sympathetic innervation, despite its limited distribution, is responsive to stressor exposure and therefore can contribute to stress-induced tumor progression. PMID:26718447

  3. Sympathetic innervation, norepinephrine content, and norepinephrine turnover in orthotopic and spontaneous models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Szpunar, Mercedes J; Belcher, Elizabeth K; Dawes, Ryan P; Madden, Kelley S

    2016-03-01

    Activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) drives breast cancer progression in preclinical breast cancer models, but it has yet to be established if neoplastic and stromal cells residing in the tumor are directly targeted by locally released norepinephrine (NE). In murine orthotopic and spontaneous mammary tumors, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)+ sympathetic nerves were limited to the periphery of the tumor. No TH+ staining was detected deeper within these tumors, even in regions with a high density of blood vessels. NE concentration was much lower in tumors compared to the more densely innervated spleen, reflecting the relative paucity of tumor TH+ innervation. Tumor and spleen NE concentration decreased with increased tissue mass. In mice treated with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to selectively destroy sympathetic nerves, tumor NE concentration was reduced approximately 50%, suggesting that the majority of tumor NE is derived from local sympathetic nerves. To evaluate NE utilization, NE turnover in orthotopic 4T1 mammary tumors was compared to spleen under baseline and stress conditions. In non-stressed mice, NE turnover was equivalent between tumor and spleen. In mice exposed to a stressor, tumor NE turnover was increased compared to spleen NE turnover, and compared to non-stressed tumor NE turnover. Together, these results demonstrate that NE in mammary tumors is derived from local sympathetic nerves that synthesize and metabolize NE. However, differences between spleen and tumor NE turnover with stressor exposure suggest that sympathetic NE release is regulated differently within the tumor microenvironment compared to the spleen. Local mammary tumor sympathetic innervation, despite its limited distribution, is responsive to stressor exposure and therefore can contribute to stress-induced tumor progression.

  4. Mitogenic stimuli and phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover in cultured 3T3 fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, C.; Petersen, R.

    1986-03-01

    The hydrolysis of PI and polyphosphoinositides by phopholipase C is an early and rapid response to cell activation by a variety of neurotransmitters, hormones, growth factors and pharmacological agonists. The authors have examined the role of PI turnover and the generation of second messengers (diacylglycerol and inositol trisphosphate) in the mitogenic response of cultured Balb/c and Swiss 3T3 cells to polypeptide growth factors. Cells were prelabelled with /sup 3/H inositol for 18-20 hours, washed and suspended in Herpes + Li/sup +/ buffer, and stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vasopressin, insulin, and other growth factors. PI turnover was measured as the increase in total inositol phosphate (IP) production. IP1, IP2, and IP3 were characterized by sequential elution from a Dowex column. Partially purified PDGF produced a 2-4 fold stimulation of total IP production. This was seen as early as 30 seconds after stimulation and increased for up to 1-2 hours. Balb/c cells were more sensitive than Swiss cells to the mitogenic and PI effects of PDGF. Other mitogenic stimuli had differential effects on PI turnover. Vasopressin (4-400 ng/ml) markedly stimulated PI turnover (3-6 fold) in Swiss, but not Balb/c cells. Insulin (100 ng/ml - 10 ..mu..g/ml) increased total IP to a greater degree in Balb/c cells. Epidermal growth factor (10 ng/ml - 10 ..mu..g/ml) had no effect on PI turnover and fibroblast growth factor (10 ng/ml - 10 ..mu..g/ml) only stimulated at the higher concentrations in Swiss cells. Thrombin (1U/ml - 10 U/ml) produced a 1.5 - 2 fold stimulation in Balb/c cells. Thus, various polypeptide growth factors have differential effects on PI turnover depending on their mitogenic potential and the effector cell type.

  5. Strategies for adapting to high rates of employee turnover.

    PubMed

    Mowday, R T

    1984-01-01

    For many organizations facing high rates of employee turnover, strategies for increasing employee retention may not be practical because employees leave for reasons beyond the control of management or the costs of reducing turnover exceed the benefits to be derived. In this situation managers need to consider strategies that can minimize or buffer the organization from the negative consequences that often follow from turnover. Strategies organizations can use to adapt to uncontrollably high employee turnover rates are presented in this article. In addition, suggestions are made for how managers should make choices among the alternative strategies.

  6. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985 - April 1986, Action item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986 under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). Wildlife projects implemented prior to September 1985 are discussed in BPA's September 1985 Annual Report on Wildlife Activities. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. When available, annual and final reports are listed for each project. The wildlife section of the Program establishes a process intended to achieve two objectives: wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. The wildlife mitigation planning process developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) is a stepwise process that proceeds through the review of the status of wildlife mitigation at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities [Measure 1004 (b)(l)]; estimates wildlife losses from hydroelectric development and operation [Measure 1004 (b)(2)]; and recommends actions for the protection, mitigation, or enhancement of wildlife [Measure 1004 (b)(3), Mitigation Plans]. Implementation of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement will occur upon amendment of wildlife actions into the Program by the Council. The majority of BPA's effort to date has gone towards coordinating and implementing wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning projects.

  7. Australian Item Bank Program: Science Item Bank. Book 3: Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Council for Educational Research, Hawthorn.

    The Australian Science Item Bank consists of three volumes of multiple-choice questions. Book 3 contains questions on the biological sciences. The questions are designed to be suitable for high school students (year 8 to year 12 in Australian schools). The questions are classified by the subject content of the question, the cognitive skills…

  8. Evaluating the Magnitude of Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.

    1996-01-01

    Two possible standard error formulas for the polytomous differential item functioning index proposed by N. J. Dorans and A. P. Schmitt (1991) were derived. These standard errors, and associated hypothesis-testing procedures, were evaluated through simulated data. The standard error that performed better is based on N. Mantel's (1963)…

  9. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

  10. Psychometric Consequences of Subpopulation Item Parameter Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne

    2017-01-01

    This study defines subpopulation item parameter drift (SIPD) as a change in item parameters over time that is dependent on subpopulations of examinees, and hypothesizes that the presence of SIPD in anchor items is associated with bias and/or lack of invariance in three psychometric outcomes. Results show that SIPD in anchor items is associated…

  11. A Monte Carlo Study Investigating the Influence of Item Discrimination, Category Intersection Parameters, and Differential Item Functioning Patterns on the Detection of Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The increased use of polytomous item formats has led assessment developers to pay greater attention to the detection of differential item functioning (DIF) in these items. DIF occurs when an item performs differently for two contrasting groups of respondents (e.g., males versus females) after controlling for differences in the abilities of the…

  12. Adaptable Learning Assistant for Item Bank Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuntiyagul, Atorn; Naruedomkul, Kanlaya; Cercone, Nick; Wongsawang, Damras

    2008-01-01

    We present PKIP, an adaptable learning assistant tool for managing question items in item banks. PKIP is not only able to automatically assist educational users to categorize the question items into predefined categories by their contents but also to correctly retrieve the items by specifying the category and/or the difficulty level. PKIP adapts…

  13. Item-Writing Guidelines for Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Tom

    2015-01-01

    A teacher learning how to write test questions (test items) will almost certainly encounter item-writing guidelines--lists of item-writing do's and don'ts. Item-writing guidelines usually are presented as applicable across all assessment settings. Table I shows some guidelines that I believe to be generally applicable and two will be briefly…

  14. Completeness assessment of type II active pharmaceutical ingredient drug master files under generic drug user fee amendment: review metrics and common incomplete items.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huyi; Li, Haitao; Song, Wei; Shen, Diandian; Skanchy, David; Shen, Kun; Lionberger, Robert A; Rosencrance, Susan M; Yu, Lawrence X

    2014-09-01

    Under the Generic Drug User Fee Amendments (GDUFA) of 2012, Type II active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) drug master files (DMFs) must pay a user fee and pass a Completeness Assessment (CA) before they can be referenced in an Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA), ANDA amendment, or ANDA prior approval supplement (PAS). During the first year of GDUFA implementation, from October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013, approximately 1,500 Type II API DMFs received at least one cycle of CA review and more than 1,100 Type II DMFs were deemed complete and published on FDA's "Available for Reference List". The data from CA reviews were analyzed for factors that influenced the CA review process and metrics, as well as the areas of DMF submissions which most frequently led to an incomplete CA status. The metrics analysis revealed that electronic DMFs appear to improve the completeness of submission and shorten both the review and response times. Utilizing the CA checklist to compile and proactively update the DMFs improves the chance for the DMFs to pass the CA in the first cycle. However, given that the majority of DMFs require at least two cycles of CA before being deemed complete, it is recommended that DMF fees are paid 6 months in advance of the ANDA submissions in order to avoid negatively impacting the filling status of the ANDAs.

  15. Application of Optimal Designs to Item Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hung-Yi

    2014-01-01

    In computerized adaptive testing (CAT), examinees are presented with various sets of items chosen from a precalibrated item pool. Consequently, the attrition speed of the items is extremely fast, and replenishing the item pool is essential. Therefore, item calibration has become a crucial concern in maintaining item banks. In this study, a two-parameter logistic model is used. We applied optimal designs and adaptive sequential analysis to solve this item calibration problem. The results indicated that the proposed optimal designs are cost effective and time efficient. PMID:25188318

  16. Uncoupling histone turnover from transcription-associated histone H3 modifications.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Paolo; Strubin, Michel

    2015-04-30

    Transcription in eukaryotes is associated with two major changes in chromatin organization. Firstly, nucleosomal histones are continuously replaced by new histones, an event that in yeast occurs predominantly at transcriptionally active promoters. Secondly, histones become modified post-translationally at specific lysine residues. Some modifications, including histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and acetylation at lysines 9 (H3K9ac) and 14 (H3K14ac), are specifically enriched at active promoters where histones exchange, suggesting a possible causal relationship. Other modifications accumulate within transcribed regions and one of them, H3K36me3, is thought to prevent histone exchange. Here we explored the relationship between these four H3 modifications and histone turnover at a few selected genes. Using lysine-to-arginine mutants and a histone exchange assay, we found that none of these modifications plays a major role in either promoting or preventing histone turnover. Unexpectedly, mutation of H3K56, whose acetylation occurs prior to chromatin incorporation, had an effect only when introduced into the nucleosomal histone. Furthermore, we used various genetic approaches to show that histone turnover can be experimentally altered with no major consequence on the H3 modifications tested. Together, these results suggest that transcription-associated histone turnover and H3 modification are two correlating but largely independent events.

  17. Protein turnover, nitrogen balance and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Fern, E B; Waterlow, J C

    1983-01-01

    Not many studies have been done on protein turnover during recovery from malnutrition. Some relevant information can, however, be obtained from measurements on normal growing animals, since rehabilitation and normal growth have in common a rapid rate of net protein synthesis. The key question is the extent to which net gain in protein results from an increase in synthesis or a decrease in breakdown or both. Different studies have used different methods, and all methods for measuring protein turnover have some disadvantages and sources of error. It is important to bear this in mind in evaluating the results. Consequently, part of this paper will be devoted to questions of methodology. Whole body protein turnover has been measured in children recovering from severe malnutrition. During the phase of rapid catch-up growth the rate of protein synthesis is increased. As might be expected, it increases linearly with the rate of weight gain. At the same time there is a smaller increase in the rate of protein breakdown. The resultant of these two processes is that, over and above the basal rate of protein synthesis, 1.4 grams of protein have to be synthesized for 1 gram to be laid down. Very similar results have been obtained in rapidly growing young pigs. Experimental studies on muscle growth in general confirm the conclusion that, at least in muscle, rapid growth is associated with rapid rates of protein breakdown as well as of synthesis. This has been shown in muscles of young growing rats, as well as in muscles in which hypertrophy has been induced by stretch or other stimuli. In contrast, the evidence suggests that rapid growth involves a fall in the rate of protein degradation. The magnitude of the nitrogen balance under any conditions is determined by the difference between synthesis and breakdown. In the absence of any storage of amino acids, this must be the same as the difference between intake and excretion (S - B = I - E). A question of great interest is whether

  18. Paradoxical Results and Item Bundles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooker, Giles; Finkelman, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Hooker, Finkelman, and Schwartzman ("Psychometrika," 2009, in press) defined a paradoxical result as the attainment of a higher test score by changing answers from correct to incorrect and demonstrated that such results are unavoidable for maximum likelihood estimates in multidimensional item response theory. The potential for these results to…

  19. Analysis of the In Vivo Turnover of CD4+ T-Cell Subsets in Chronically SIV-Infected Sooty Mangabeys.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alexandra M; Carnathan, Diane G; Yu, Joana; Sheehan, Katherine M; Kim, Peter; Reynaldi, Arnold; Vanderford, Thomas H; Klatt, Nichole R; Brenchley, Jason M; Davenport, Miles P; Silvestri, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant turnover of memory CD4+ T-cells is central to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) progression. Understanding the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in natural hosts may provide insight into mechanisms of immune regulation that may serve as models for therapeutic intervention in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected persons. Sooty mangabeys (SMs) have naturally evolved with SIV to avoid AIDS progression while maintaining healthy peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts and thus represent a model by which therapeutic interventions for AIDS progression might be elucidated. To assess the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during SIV infection in non-progressive hosts, we treated 6 SIV-uninfected and 9 SIV-infected SMs with 2'-bromo-5'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 14 days and longitudinally assessed CD4+ T-cell subset turnover by polychromatic flow cytometry. We observed that, in SIV-infected SMs, turnover of CD4+ T-cell naïve and central, transitional, and effector memory subsets is comparable to that in uninfected animals. Comparable turnover of CD4+ T-cell subsets irrespective of SIV-infection status likely contributes to the lack of aberrant immune activation and disease progression observed after infection in non-progressive hosts.

  20. Analysis of the In Vivo Turnover of CD4+ T-Cell Subsets in Chronically SIV-Infected Sooty Mangabeys

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alexandra M.; Carnathan, Diane G.; Yu, Joana; Sheehan, Katherine M.; Kim, Peter; Reynaldi, Arnold; Vanderford, Thomas H.; Klatt, Nichole R.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Davenport, Miles P.; Silvestri, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant turnover of memory CD4+ T-cells is central to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) progression. Understanding the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in natural hosts may provide insight into mechanisms of immune regulation that may serve as models for therapeutic intervention in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected persons. Sooty mangabeys (SMs) have naturally evolved with SIV to avoid AIDS progression while maintaining healthy peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts and thus represent a model by which therapeutic interventions for AIDS progression might be elucidated. To assess the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during SIV infection in non-progressive hosts, we treated 6 SIV-uninfected and 9 SIV-infected SMs with 2’-bromo-5’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 14 days and longitudinally assessed CD4+ T-cell subset turnover by polychromatic flow cytometry. We observed that, in SIV-infected SMs, turnover of CD4+ T-cell naïve and central, transitional, and effector memory subsets is comparable to that in uninfected animals. Comparable turnover of CD4+ T-cell subsets irrespective of SIV-infection status likely contributes to the lack of aberrant immune activation and disease progression observed after infection in non-progressive hosts. PMID:27227993

  1. The Link between Training Satisfaction, Work Engagement and Turnover Intention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memon, Mumtaz Ali; Salleh, Rohani; Baharom, Mohamed Noor Rosli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the casual relationship between training satisfaction, work engagement (WE) and turnover intention and the mediating role of WE between training satisfaction and turnover intention. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 409 oil and gas professionals using an email survey…

  2. Turnover rates and organizational performance: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae-Youn; Shaw, Jason D

    2013-03-01

    The authors conducted a meta-analysis of the relationship between turnover rates and organizational performance to (a) determine the magnitude of the relationship; (b) test organization-, context-, and methods-related moderators of the relationship; and (c) suggest future directions for the turnover literature on the basis of the findings. The results from 300 total correlations (N = 309,245) and 110 independent correlations (N = 120,066) show that the relationship between total turnover rates and organizational performance is significant and negative (ρ = -.15). In addition, the relationship is more negative for voluntary (ρ = -.15) and reduction-in-force turnover (ρ = -.17) than for involuntary turnover (ρ = -.01). Moreover, the meta-analytic correlation differs significantly across several organization- and context-related factors (e.g., types of employment system, dimensions of organizational performance, region, and entity size). Finally, in sample-level regressions, the strength of the turnover rates-organizational performance relationship significantly varies across different average levels of total and voluntary turnover rates, which suggests a potential curvilinear relationship. The authors outline the practical magnitude of the findings and discuss implications for future organizational-level turnover research.

  3. Teacher Turnover, Teacher Quality, and Student Achievement in DCPS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adnot, Melinda; Dee, Thomas; Katz, Veronica; Wyckoff, James

    2017-01-01

    In practice, teacher turnover appears to have negative effects on school quality as measured by student performance. However, some simulations suggest that turnover can instead have large positive effects under a policy regime in which low-performing teachers can be accurately identified and replaced with more effective teachers. This study…

  4. Analysis of the Educational Personnel System: IV. Teacher Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Emmett B.

    This report attempts to predict the rates of teacher turnover in the 1970s, which teachers will leave the profession, and what the effects of turnover will be on the educational personnel system. The overall termination rate has varied from six to 11 percent over the last 15 years. An analysis of recent changes in the teaching profession is used…

  5. How Multiple Interventions Influenced Employee Turnover: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    A 3-year study of 46 textile industry workers identified causes of employee turnover (supervision, training, organizational communication) using performance analysis. A study of multiple interventions based on the analysis resulted in changes in orientation procedures, organizational leadership, and climate, reducing turnover by 24%. (SK)

  6. Re-Examining the Relationship between Age and Voluntary Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Thomas W. H.; Feldman, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    In their quantitative review of the literature, Healy, Lehman, and McDaniel [Healy, M. C., Lehman, M., & McDaniel, M. A. (1995). Age and voluntary turnover: A quantitative review. "Personnel Psychology, 48", 335-345] concluded that age is only weakly related to voluntary turnover (average r = -0.08). However, with the significant changes in…

  7. Predicting Turnover: Validating the Intent to Leave Child Welfare Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Charles; Schudrich, Wendy Zeitlin; Lawrence, Catherine K.; Claiborne, Nancy; McGowan, Brenda G.

    2014-01-01

    A number of proxies have been used in child welfare workforce research to represent actual turnover; however, there have been no psychometric studies to validate a scale specifically designed for this purpose. The Intent to Leave Child Welfare Scale is a proxy for actual turnover that measures workers' intention to leave. This scale was validated…

  8. Organizational Characteristics Associated with Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Engberg, John

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The association between certified nurse aide, licensed practical nurse, and registered nurse turnover and the organizational characteristics of nursing homes are examined. Design and Methods: Hypotheses for eight organizational characteristics are examined (staffing levels, top management turnover, resident case mix, facility quality,…

  9. A New Item Selection Procedure for Mixed Item Type in Computerized Classification Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, C. Allen; Wang, Tianyou

    This paper proposes a new Information-Time index as the basis for item selection in computerized classification testing (CCT) and investigates how this new item selection algorithm can help improve test efficiency for item pools with mixed item types. It also investigates how practical constraints such as item exposure rate control, test…

  10. Turnover of adenosine in plasma of human and dog blood

    SciTech Connect

    Moeser, G.H.S.; Schrader, J.; Deussen, A.

    1989-04-01

    To determine half-life and turnover of plasma adenosine, heparinized blood from healthy volunteers was incubated with radiolabeled adenosine in the physiological concentration range of 0.1-1 microM. Plasma levels of adenosine in vitro were 82 +/- 14 nM and were similar to those determined immediately after blood collection with a ''stopping solution.'' Dipyridamole (83 microM) and erythro-9(2-hydroxynon-3yl)-adenine (EHNA) (8 microM) did not measurably alter basal adenosine levels but completely blocked the uptake of added adenosine. Inhibition of ecto-5'-nucleotidase with 100 microM alpha, beta-methyleneadenosine 5'-diphosphate (AOPCP) reduced plasma adenosine to 22 +/- 6 nM. For the determination of adenosine turnover, the decrease in specific radioactivity of added (/sup 3/H)adenosine was measured using a dipyridamole-containing stopping solution. Without altering basal adenosine levels, the half-life was estimated to be 0.6 s. Similar experiments were carried out with washed erythrocytes or in the presence of AOPCP, yielding half-lives of 0.7 and 0.9 s, respectively. When the initial adenosine concentration was 1 microM, its specific activity decreased by only 11% within 5 s, whereas total plasma adenosine exponentially decreased with a half-life of 1.5 s. Venous plasma concentrations were measured after relief of a 3-min forearm ischemia. Changes in plasma adenosine did not correlate well with changes in blood flow but were augmented in the presence of dipyridamole.

  11. Cereal Aphid Colony Turnover and Persistence in Winter Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Winder, Linton; Alexander, Colin J.; Woolley, Chris; Perry, Joe N.; Holland, John M.

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of spatial and temporal processes in agricultural ecosystems provides a basis for rational decision-making with regards to the management and husbandry of crops, supporting the implementation of integrated farming strategies. In this study we investigated the spatial and temporal distribution of aphid pests (Sitobion avenae and Metopolophium dirhodum) within winter wheat fields. Using an intensive sampling programme we investigated distributions at both the small (single shoot) and large (field) scales. Within two fields, a grid with 82 locations was established (area 120 m by 168 m). At each location, 25 shoots were individually marked and aphid counts by observation conducted on 21 and 22 occasions as the crop matured, resulting in 43,050 and 45,100 counts being conducted in the two fields respectively. We quantified field scale spatial distributions, demonstrating that spatial pattern generally emerged, with temporal stability being both species- and field- dependent. We then measured turnover of colonies at the small (individual shoot) and large (field) scales by comparing consecutive pairs of sampling occasions. Four turnover categories were defined: Empty (no aphids recorded on either occasion); Colonised (aphids recorded on the second occasion but not the first); Extinction (aphids recorded on the first occasion but not the second); Stable (aphids recorded on both occasions). At the field scale, population stability soon established, but, at the small scale there was a consistently high proportion of unoccupied shoots with considerable colonisation and extinction and low stability. The redistribution of aphids within the crop at the local scale is a vulnerability which could be used to disrupt population development – by mediating exposure to ground-active natural enemies and by incurring a metabolic cost caused by the physiological demands to re-establish on a nearby host plant. PMID:25268240

  12. One hundred years of employee turnover theory and research.

    PubMed

    Hom, Peter W; Lee, Thomas W; Shaw, Jason D; Hausknecht, John P

    2017-03-01

    We review seminal publications on employee turnover during the 100-year existence of the Journal of Applied Psychology. Along with classic articles from this journal, we expand our review to include other publications that yielded key theoretical and methodological contributions to the turnover literature. We first describe how the earliest papers examined practical methods for turnover reduction or control and then explain how theory development and testing began in the mid-20th century and dominated the academic literature until the turn of the century. We then track 21st century interest in the psychology of staying (rather than leaving) and attitudinal trajectories in predicting turnover. Finally, we discuss the rising scholarship on collective turnover given the centrality of human capital flight to practitioners and to the field of human resource management strategy. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Promoting cold-start items in recommender systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Hu; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Yang, Zimo; Liu, Chuang; Li, Wei-Min

    2014-01-01

    As one of the major challenges, cold-start problem plagues nearly all recommender systems. In particular, new items will be overlooked, impeding the development of new products online. Given limited resources, how to utilize the knowledge of recommender systems and design efficient marketing strategy for new items is extremely important. In this paper, we convert this ticklish issue into a clear mathematical problem based on a bipartite network representation. Under the most widely used algorithm in real e-commerce recommender systems, the so-called item-based collaborative filtering, we show that to simply push new items to active users is not a good strategy. Interestingly, experiments on real recommender systems indicate that to connect new items with some less active users will statistically yield better performance, namely, these new items will have more chance to appear in other users' recommendation lists. Further analysis suggests that the disassortative nature of recommender systems contributes to such observation. In a word, getting in-depth understanding on recommender systems could pave the way for the owners to popularize their cold-start products with low costs.

  14. Promoting Cold-Start Items in Recommender Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Hu; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Yang, Zimo; Liu, Chuang; Li, Wei-Min

    2014-01-01

    As one of the major challenges, cold-start problem plagues nearly all recommender systems. In particular, new items will be overlooked, impeding the development of new products online. Given limited resources, how to utilize the knowledge of recommender systems and design efficient marketing strategy for new items is extremely important. In this paper, we convert this ticklish issue into a clear mathematical problem based on a bipartite network representation. Under the most widely used algorithm in real e-commerce recommender systems, the so-called item-based collaborative filtering, we show that to simply push new items to active users is not a good strategy. Interestingly, experiments on real recommender systems indicate that to connect new items with some less active users will statistically yield better performance, namely, these new items will have more chance to appear in other users' recommendation lists. Further analysis suggests that the disassortative nature of recommender systems contributes to such observation. In a word, getting in-depth understanding on recommender systems could pave the way for the owners to popularize their cold-start products with low costs. PMID:25479013

  15. 77 FR 26279 - Scheduled Change and Deletion of Agenda Item From April 27, 2012, Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    .... Item No. Bureau Subject 2 MEDIA TITLE: Noncommercial Educational Station Fundraising for Third- Party... fundraising activities that interrupt regular programming for the benefit of third- party...

  16. Histone H4 hyperacetylation and rapid turnover of its acetyl groups in transcriptionally inactive rooster testis spermatids.

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, R; Mezquita, C

    1982-01-01

    In order to study the relationship between acetylation of histones, chromatin structure and gene activity, the distribution and turnover of acetyl groups among nucleosomal core histones and the extent of histone H4 acetylation were examined in rooster testis cell nuclei at different stages of spermatogenesis. Histone H4 was the predominant acetylated histone in mature testes. Hyperacetylation of H4 and rapid turnover of its acetyl groups are not univocally correlated with transcriptional activity since they were detected in both genetically active testicular cells and genetically inactive elongated spermatids. During the transition from nucleohistone to nucleoprotamine in elongated spermatids the chromatin undergoes dramatic structural changes with exposition of binding sites on DNA (1). Hyperacetylation of H4 and rapid turnover of its acetyl groups could be correlated with the particular conformation of chromatin in elongated spermatids and might represent a necessary condition for binding of chromosomal proteins to DNA. Images PMID:7162988

  17. Detecting Gender Bias Through Test Item Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Espada, Wilson J.

    2009-03-01

    Many physical science and physics instructors might not be trained in pedagogically appropriate test construction methods. This could lead to test items that do not measure what they are intended to measure. A subgroup of these items might show bias against some groups of students. This paper describes how the author became aware of potentially biased items against females in his examinations, which led to the exploration of fundamental issues related to item validity, gender bias, and differential item functioning, or DIF. A brief discussion of DIF in the context of university courses, as well as practical suggestions to detect possible gender-biased items, follows.

  18. Understanding the factors that determine registered nurses' turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Joseph; Uzoka, Faith-Michael; Aladi, Flora; El-Hussein, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Turnover among registered nurses (RNs) produces a negative impact on the health outcomes of any health care organization. It is also recognized universally as a problem in the nursing profession. Little is known about the turnover intentions and career orientations of RNs working in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The aim of this study is to contribute to the knowledge of and to advance the discussion on the turnover of nursing professionals. The study population consisted of RNs employed in the five major hospitals in Calgary. There were 193 surveys returned, representing a response rate of 77.2%. The results show that age and education have a negative effect on turnover intention. Education was found to have a significant negative effect on career satisfaction but not on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Length of service has a significant negative effect on turnover intention. Role ambiguity has significant highly negative effect on career satisfaction. Growth opportunity and supervisor support have a very significant positive effect on job satisfaction, career satisfaction, and organizational commitment. External career opportunities and organizational commitment do not seem to have a significant effect on turnover intention. Career satisfaction, on the other hand, had negative significant effects on turnover intention.

  19. A Bifactor Multidimensional Item Response Theory Model for Differential Item Functioning Analysis on Testlet-Based Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuhara, Hirotaka; Kamata, Akihito

    2011-01-01

    A differential item functioning (DIF) detection method for testlet-based data was proposed and evaluated in this study. The proposed DIF model is an extension of a bifactor multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) model for testlets. Unlike traditional item response theory (IRT) DIF models, the proposed model takes testlet effects into…

  20. Endocytic turnover of Rab8 controls cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Quadras, Maite; Holst, Mikkel R.; Larsson, Elin; Hachimi, Mariam; Yau, Wai-Lok; Peränen, Johan; Martín-Belmonte, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adaptation of cell shape and polarization through the formation and retraction of cellular protrusions requires balancing of endocytosis and exocytosis combined with fine-tuning of the local activity of small GTPases like Rab8. Here, we show that endocytic turnover of the plasma membrane at protrusions is directly coupled to surface removal and inactivation of Rab8. Removal is induced by reduced membrane tension and mediated by the GTPase regulator associated with focal adhesion kinase-1 (GRAF1, also known as ARHGAP26), a regulator of clathrin-independent endocytosis. GRAF1-depleted cells were deficient in multi-directional spreading and displayed elevated levels of GTP-loaded Rab8, which was accumulated at the tips of static protrusions. Furthermore, GRAF1 depletion impaired lumen formation and spindle orientation in a 3D cell culture system, indicating that GRAF1 activity regulates polarity establishment. Our data suggest that GRAF1-mediated removal of Rab8 from the cell surface restricts its activity during protrusion formation, thereby facilitating dynamic adjustment of the polarity axis. PMID:28137756

  1. Endocytic turnover of Rab8 controls cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Quadras, Maite; Holst, Mikkel R; Francis, Monika K; Larsson, Elin; Hachimi, Mariam; Yau, Wai-Lok; Peränen, Johan; Martín-Belmonte, Fernando; Lundmark, Richard

    2017-03-15

    Adaptation of cell shape and polarization through the formation and retraction of cellular protrusions requires balancing of endocytosis and exocytosis combined with fine-tuning of the local activity of small GTPases like Rab8. Here, we show that endocytic turnover of the plasma membrane at protrusions is directly coupled to surface removal and inactivation of Rab8. Removal is induced by reduced membrane tension and mediated by the GTPase regulator associated with focal adhesion kinase-1 (GRAF1, also known as ARHGAP26), a regulator of clathrin-independent endocytosis. GRAF1-depleted cells were deficient in multi-directional spreading and displayed elevated levels of GTP-loaded Rab8, which was accumulated at the tips of static protrusions. Furthermore, GRAF1 depletion impaired lumen formation and spindle orientation in a 3D cell culture system, indicating that GRAF1 activity regulates polarity establishment. Our data suggest that GRAF1-mediated removal of Rab8 from the cell surface restricts its activity during protrusion formation, thereby facilitating dynamic adjustment of the polarity axis.

  2. Turnover of carbon isotopes in tail hair and breath CO2 of horses fed an isotopically varied diet.

    PubMed

    Ayliffe, L K; Cerling, T E; Robinson, T; West, A G; Sponheimer, M; Passey, B H; Hammer, J; Roeder, B; Dearing, M D; Ehleringer, J R

    2004-03-01

    Temporal stable isotope records derived from animal tissues are increasingly studied to determine dietary and climatic histories. Despite this, the turnover times governing rates of isotope equilibration in specific tissues following a dietary isotope change are poorly known. The dietary isotope changes recorded in the hair and blood bicarbonate of two adult horses in this study are found to be successfully described by a model having three exponential isotope pools. For horse tail hair, the carbon isotope response observed following a dietary change from a C3 to a C4 grass was consistent with a pool having a very fast turnover rate ( t1/2 approximately 0.5 days) that made up approximately 41% of the isotope signal, a pool with an intermediate turnover rate ( t1/2 approximately 4 days) that comprised approximately 15% of the isotope signal, and a pool with very slow turnover rate ( t1/2 approximately 140 days) that made up approximately 44% of the total isotope signal. The carbon isotope signature of horse blood bicarbonate, in contrast, had a different isotopic composition, with approximately 67% of the isotope signal coming from a fast turnover pool ( t1/2 0.2 days), approximately 17% from a pool with an intermediate turnover rate ( t1/2 approximately 3 days) and approximately 16% from a pool with a slow turnover rate ( t1/2 approximately 50 days). The constituent isotope pools probably correspond to one exogenous and two endogenous sources. The exogenous source equates to our fast turnover pool, and the pools with intermediate and slow turnover rates are thought to derive from the turnover of metabolically active tissues and relatively inactive tissues within the body, respectively. It seems that a greater proportion of the amino acids available for hair synthesis come from endogenous sources compared to the compounds undergoing cellular catabolism in the body. Consequently, the isotope composition of blood bicarbonate appears to be much more responsive to

  3. 7 CFR 2902.5 - Item designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., USDA will use life cycle cost information only from tests using the BEES analytical method. (c... availability of such items and the economic and technological feasibility of using such items, including life cycle costs. USDA will gather information on individual products within an item and extrapolate...

  4. Using Multimedia Technology To Create Innovative Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Ann; Godwin, Janet

    The development of innovative test item types that use multimedia technology to improve item authenticity and interaction and allow for objective scoring through partial-credit scoring methodologies was studied. Science test items were developed for community college developmental students using "Authorware 3.0," an instructional compact disc. The…

  5. On the Relationship between Differential Item Functioning and Item Difficulty: An Issue of Methods? Item Response Theory Approach to Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santelices, Maria Veronica; Wilson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between differential item functioning (DIF) and item difficulty on the SAT is such that more difficult items tended to exhibit DIF in favor of the focal group (usually minority groups). These results were reported by Kulick and Hu, and Freedle and have been enthusiastically discussed by more recent literature. Examining the…

  6. Effects of Assigning Raters to Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sykes, Robert C.; Ito, Kyoko; Wang, Zhen

    2008-01-01

    Student responses to a large number of constructed response items in three Math and three Reading tests were scored on two occasions using three ways of assigning raters: single reader scoring, a different reader for each response (item-specific), and three readers each scoring a rater item block (RIB) containing approximately one-third of a…

  7. Item Response Methods for Educational Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mislevy, Robert J.; Rieser, Mark R.

    Multiple matrix sampling (MMS) theory indicates how data may be gathered to most efficiently convey information about levels of attainment in a population, but standard analyses of these data require random sampling of items from a fixed pool of items. This assumption proscribes the retirement of flawed or obsolete items from the pool as well as…

  8. Effects of Including Humor in Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorris, Robert F.; And Others

    Two 50-item multiple-choice forms of a grammar test were developed differing only in humor being included in 20 items of one form. One hundred twenty-six (126) eighth graders received the test plus alternate forms of a questionnaire. Humor inclusion did not affect grammar scores on matched humorous/nonhumorous items nor on common post-treatment…

  9. Automatic Item Generation of Probability Word Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holling, Heinz; Bertling, Jonas P.; Zeuch, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical word problems represent a common item format for assessing student competencies. Automatic item generation (AIG) is an effective way of constructing many items with predictable difficulties, based on a set of predefined task parameters. The current study presents a framework for the automatic generation of probability word problems…

  10. Binomial Test Models and Item Difficulty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    1979-01-01

    The restrictions on item difficulties that must be met when binomial models are applied to domain-referenced testing are examined. Both a deterministic and a stochastic conception of item responses are discussed with respect to difficulty and Guttman-type items. (Author/BH)

  11. Are All Item Response Functions Monotonically Increasing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wenhao

    2012-01-01

    Item response functions of the parametric logistic IRT models follow the logistic form which is monotonically increasing. However, item response functions of some real items are nonmonotonic which might lead to examinees with lower proficiency levels receiving higher scores. This study compared three nonparametric IRF estimation methods--the…

  12. Computer Equipment Repair Test Item Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide contains 321 test items for use in teaching a course in repairing computer equipment. All test items were reviewed, revised, and validated by incumbent workers and subject matter instructors. Items are provided for assessing student achievement in the following skill areas (with selected skills mentioned in brackets): performing…

  13. 76 FR 60474 - Commercial Item Handbook

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Defense Acquisition Regulations System Commercial Item Handbook AGENCY: Defense Acquisition Regulations... Commercial Item Handbook. The purpose of the Handbook is to help acquisition personnel develop sound business strategies for procuring commercial items. DoD is seeking industry input on the contents before...

  14. A Balance Sheet for Educational Item Banking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiscox, Michael D.

    Educational item banking presents observers with a considerable paradox. The development of test items from scratch is viewed as wasteful, a luxury in times of declining resources. On the other hand, item banking has failed to become a mature technology despite large amounts of money and the efforts of talented professionals. The question of which…

  15. Processing Polarity Items: Contrastive Licensing Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saddy, Douglas; Drenhaus, Heiner; Frisch, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment that investigated the failure to license polarity items in German using event-related brain potentials (ERPs). The results reveal distinct processing reflexes associated with failure to license positive polarity items in comparison to failure to license negative polarity items. Failure to license both negative and…

  16. Criterion-Referenced Test Items for Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Diane, Ed.

    This test item bank on welding contains test questions based upon competencies found in the Missouri Welding Competency Profile. Some test items are keyed for multiple competencies. These criterion-referenced test items are designed to work with the Vocational Instructional Management System. Questions have been statistically sampled and validated…

  17. Differential Item Functioning from a Multilevel Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bergh, Huub; And Others

    The term differential item functioning (DIF) refers to whether or not the same psychological constructs are measured across different groups. If an item does not measure the same skills or subskills in different populations, it is said to function differentially or to display item bias. A multilevel approach to DIF is proposed. In such a model,…

  18. Identification of a Semiparametric Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peress, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We consider the identification of a semiparametric multidimensional fixed effects item response model. Item response models are typically estimated under parametric assumptions about the shape of the item characteristic curves (ICCs), and existing results suggest difficulties in recovering the distribution of individual characteristics under…

  19. The Multidimensionality of Verbal Analogy Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullstadius, Eva; Carlstedt, Berit; Gustafsson, Jan-Eric

    2008-01-01

    The influence of general and verbal ability on each of 72 verbal analogy test items were investigated with new factor analytical techniques. The analogy items together with the Computerized Swedish Enlistment Battery (CAT-SEB) were given randomly to two samples of 18-year-old male conscripts (n = 8566 and n = 5289). Thirty-two of the 72 items had…

  20. Ramsay-Curve Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when an item on a test, questionnaire, or interview has different measurement properties for one group of people versus another, irrespective of true group-mean differences on the constructs being measured. This article is focused on item response theory based likelihood ratio testing for DIF (IRT-LR or…

  1. Real and Artificial Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrich, David; Hagquist, Curt

    2012-01-01

    The literature in modern test theory on procedures for identifying items with differential item functioning (DIF) among two groups of persons includes the Mantel-Haenszel (MH) procedure. Generally, it is not recognized explicitly that if there is real DIF in some items which favor one group, then as an artifact of this procedure, artificial DIF…

  2. 15 CFR 742.15 - Encryption items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... encryption software are distinguished from controls on other software regulated under the EAR. (a) Licensing... items (“EI”) classified under 5A002.a.1, .a.2, .a.5, .a.6, .a.9, and .b; 5D002.a, .c.1 or .d for... items and terms. Most encryption items may be exported under the provisions of License Exception ENC...

  3. 15 CFR 742.15 - Encryption items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... encryption software are distinguished from controls on other software regulated under the EAR. (a) Licensing... items (“EI”) classified under 5A002.a.1, .a.2, .a.5, .a.6, .a.9, and .b; 5D002.a, .c.1 or .d for... items and terms. Most encryption items may be exported under the provisions of License Exception ENC...

  4. 15 CFR 742.15 - Encryption items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... encryption software are distinguished from controls on other software regulated under the EAR. (a) Licensing... items (“EI”) classified under 5A002.a.1, .a.2, .a.5, .a.6, .a.9, and .b; 5D002.a, .c.1 or .d for... items and terms. Most encryption items may be exported under the provisions of License Exception ENC...

  5. Generalized Full-Information Item Bifactor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li; Yang, Ji Seung; Hansen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Full-information item bifactor analysis is an important statistical method in psychological and educational measurement. Current methods are limited to single-group analysis and inflexible in the types of item response models supported. We propose a flexible multiple-group item bifactor analysis framework that supports a variety of…

  6. Computerized Numerical Control Test Item Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide contains 285 test items for use in teaching a course in computerized numerical control. All test items were reviewed, revised, and validated by incumbent workers and subject matter instructors. Items are provided for assessing student achievement in such aspects of programming and planning, setting up, and operating machines with…

  7. Item Selection in Computerized Classification Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nathan A.

    2009-01-01

    Several alternatives for item selection algorithms based on item response theory in computerized classification testing (CCT) have been suggested, with no conclusive evidence on the substantial superiority of a single method. It is argued that the lack of sizable effect is because some of the methods actually assess items very similarly through…

  8. Linking Item Parameters to a Base Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Taehoon; Petersen, Nancy S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares three methods of item calibration--concurrent calibration, separate calibration with linking, and fixed item parameter calibration--that are frequently used for linking item parameters to a base scale. Concurrent and separate calibrations were implemented using BILOG-MG. The Stocking and Lord in "Appl Psychol Measure"…

  9. Effects of Electromagnetic Radiation Use on Oxidant/Antioxidant Status and DNA Turn-over Enzyme Activities in Erythrocytes and Heart, Kidney, Liver, and Ovary Tissues From Rats: Possible Protective Role of Vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Devrim, Erdinç; Ergüder, Imge B; Kılıçoğlu, Bülent; Yaykaşlı, Emine; Cetin, Recep; Durak, Ilker

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, the aim was to investigate possible effects of Electromagnetic Radiation (EMR) use on oxidant and antioxidant status in erythrocytes and kidney, heart, liver, and ovary tissues from rats, and possible protective role of vitamin C. For this aim, 40 Wistar albino female rats were used throughout the study. The treatment group was exposed to EMR in a frequency of 900 MHz, the EMR plus vitamin C group was exposed to the same EMR frequency and given vitamin C (250 mg/kg/day) orally for 4 weeks. There were 10 animals in each group including control and vitamin C groups. At the end of the study period, blood samples were obtained from the animals to get erythrocyte sediments. Then the animals were sacrificed and heart, kidney, liver, and ovary tissues were removed. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), xanthine oxidase (XO), and adenosine deaminase (ADA) enzyme activities were measured in the tissues and erythrocytes. It was observed that MDA level, XO, and GSH-Px activities significantly increased in the EMR group as compared with those of the control group in the erythrocytes. In the kidney tissues, it was found that MDA level and CAT activity significantly increased, whereas XO and ADA activities decreased in the cellular phone group as compared with those of the control group. However, in the heart tissues it was observed that MDA level, ADA, and XO activities significantly decreased in the cellular phone group as compared with those of the control group. The results suggest that EMR at the frequency generated by a cell phone causes oxidative stress and peroxidation in the erythrocytes and kidney tissues from rats. In the erythrocytes, vitamin C seems to make partial protection against the oxidant stress.

  10. The Presence of Thyroid-Stimulation Blocking Antibody Prevents High Bone Turnover in Untreated Premenopausal Patients with Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun Wook; Bae, Jae Hyun; Noh, Gyeong Woon; Kim, Ye An; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Yi, Ka Hee; Park, Do Joon; Chung, June-Key; Cho, Bo Youn; Park, Young Joo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis-related fractures are one of the complications of Graves’ disease. This study hypothesized that the different actions of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) antibodies, both stimulating and blocking activities in Graves’ disease patients might oppositely impact bone turnover. Newly diagnosed premenopausal Graves’ disease patients were enrolled (n = 93) and divided into two groups: patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity (stimulating activity group, n = 83) and patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity combined with blocking activity (blocking activity group, n = 10). From the stimulating activity group, patients who had matched values for free T4 and TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) to the blocking activity group were further classified as stimulating activity-matched control (n = 11). Bone turnover markers BS-ALP, Osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide were significantly lower in the blocking activity group than in the stimulating activity or stimulating activity-matched control groups. The TBII level showed positive correlations with BS-ALP and osteocalcin levels in the stimulating activity group, while it had a negative correlation with the osteocalcin level in the blocking activity group. In conclusion, the activation of TSHR antibody-activated TSH signaling contributes to high bone turnover, independent of the actions of thyroid hormone, and thyroid-stimulation blocking antibody has protective effects against bone metabolism in Graves’ disease. PMID:26650844

  11. Approximation Preserving Reductions among Item Pricing Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamane, Ryoso; Itoh, Toshiya; Tomita, Kouhei

    When a store sells items to customers, the store wishes to determine the prices of the items to maximize its profit. Intuitively, if the store sells the items with low (resp. high) prices, the customers buy more (resp. less) items, which provides less profit to the store. So it would be hard for the store to decide the prices of items. Assume that the store has a set V of n items and there is a set E of m customers who wish to buy those items, and also assume that each item i ∈ V has the production cost di and each customer ej ∈ E has the valuation vj on the bundle ej ⊆ V of items. When the store sells an item i ∈ V at the price ri, the profit for the item i is pi = ri - di. The goal of the store is to decide the price of each item to maximize its total profit. We refer to this maximization problem as the item pricing problem. In most of the previous works, the item pricing problem was considered under the assumption that pi ≥ 0 for each i ∈ V, however, Balcan, et al. [In Proc. of WINE, LNCS 4858, 2007] introduced the notion of “loss-leader, ” and showed that the seller can get more total profit in the case that pi < 0 is allowed than in the case that pi < 0 is not allowed. In this paper, we derive approximation preserving reductions among several item pricing problems and show that all of them have algorithms with good approximation ratio.

  12. Report: Remedial Project Manager Turnover at Superfund Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2001-M-000015, June 15, 2001. We determined that EPA Region III did not have formal procedures in place to mitigate continuity problems caused by turnover of EPA personnel in the Superfund program.

  13. Organisational Commitment and Committee Turnover of Volunteers in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuskelly, Graham

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 328 volunteers serving on sports committees in Australia found that organizational commitment was higher in organizations with open decision making, conflict resolution, and attention to group process. Positive, effective committee functioning led to lower turnover. (SK)

  14. Low turnover osteoporosis in sheep induced by hypothalamic-pituitary disconnection.

    PubMed

    Beil, Frank Timo; Oheim, Ralf; Barvencik, Florian; Hissnauer, Tim N; Pestka, Jan M; Ignatius, Anita; Rueger, Johannes M; Schinke, Thorsten; Clarke, Iain J; Amling, Michael; Pogoda, Pia

    2012-08-01

    The hypothalamus is of critical importance in regulating bone remodeling. This is underscored by the fact that intracerebroventricular-application of leptin in ewe leads to osteopenia. As a large animal model of osteoporosis, this approach has some limitations, such as high technical expenditure and running costs. Therefore we asked if a surgical ablation of the leptin signaling axis would have the same effects and would thereby be a more useful model. We analyzed the bone phenotype of ewe after surgical hypothalamo-pituitary disconnection (HPD + OVX) as compared to control ewe (OVX) after 3 and 12 months. Analyses included histomorphometric characterization, micro-CT and measurement of bone turnover parameters. Already 3 months after HPD we found osteopenic ewe with a significantly decreased bone formation (69%) and osteoclast activity (49%). After a period of 12 months the HPD group additionally developed an (preclinical) osteoporosis with significant reduction (33%) of femoral cortical thickness, as compared to controls (OVX). Taken together, HPD leads after 12 month to osteoporosis with a reduction in both trabecular and cortical bone caused by a low bone turnover situation, with reduced osteoblast and osteoclast activity, as compared to controls (OVX). The HPD-sheep is a suitable large animal model of osteoporosis. Furthermore our results indicate that an intact hypothalamo-pituitary axis is required for activation of bone turnover.

  15. Emergency Power For Critical Items

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, William R.

    2009-07-01

    Natural disasters, such as hurricanes, floods, tornados, and tsunami, are becoming a greater problem as climate change impacts our environment. Disasters, whether natural or man made, destroy lives, homes, businesses and the natural environment. Such disasters can happen with little or no warning, leaving hundreds or even thousands of people without medical services, potable water, sanitation, communications and electrical services for up to several weeks. In our modern world, the need for electricity has become a necessity. Modern building codes and new disaster resistant building practices are reducing the damage to homes and businesses. Emergency gasoline and diesel generators are becoming common place for power outages. Generators need fuel, which may not be available after a disaster, but Photovoltaic (solar-electric) systems supply electricity without petroleum fuel as they are powered by the sun. Photovoltaic (PV) systems can provide electrical power for a home or business. PV systems can operate as utility interactive or stand-alone with battery backup. Determining your critical load items and sizing the photovoltaic system for those critical items, guarantees their operation in a disaster.

  16. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Item Clones. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    To reduce the cost of item writing and to enhance the flexibility of item presentation, items can be generated by item-cloning techniques. An important consequence of cloning is that it may cause variability on the item parameters. Therefore, a multilevel item response model is presented in which it is assumed that the item parameters of a…

  17. Evaluation of platelet turnover by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Salvagno, G L; Montagnana, M; Degan, M; Marradi, P L; Ricetti, M M; Riolfi, P; Poli, G; Minuz, P; Santonastaso, C L; Guidi, G C

    2006-05-01

    The number of circulating newly produced platelets depends on the thrombopoietic capacity of bone marrow as well as platelet removal from the bloodstream. Flow cytometric analysis with thiazole orange (TO), a fluorescent dye that crosses platelet membranes and binds intracellular RNA, has been used to measure circulating reticulated platelets (RPs) with high RNA content as an index of platelet turnover. We first assessed the specificity of TO flow cytometry and then applied this method in the diagnosis of thrombocytopenia caused by impaired platelet production or increased destruction. We also explored the utility of TO flow cytometry to predict thrombocytopoiesis after chemotherapy-induced bone marrow aplasia. Venous blood, anticoagulated with K(2)EDTA, was incubated with 0.6 microg/ml TO plus an anti-GPIIIa monoclonal antibody. The mean percentage of RPs in control subjects (n = 23) was 6.13 +/- 3.09%. RPs were 10.41 +/- 9.02% in patients (n = 10) with hematological malignancies during aplasia induced by chemotherapy and a significant increase in RPs (35.45 +/- 6.11%) was seen in the recovery phase. In 10 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, the percentage of TO positive platelets was 67.81 +/- 18.79 (P < 0.001 vs. controls). In patients with thrombocytopenia associated with hepatic cirrhosis (n = 21; 21.04 +/- 16.21%, P < 0.001 vs. controls) or systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 6, 29.08 +/- 15.57%; P < 0.001 vs. controls) increases in TO-stained platelets were also observed. Measurement of TO positive platelets may be a reliable tool for the laboratory identification of platelet disorders, with a higher sensitivity than measurement of platelet volume. Measurement of RPs may also prove useful to recognize the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms in thrombocytopenia.

  18. Turnover intention among new nurses: a generational perspective.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Melanie; Paquet, Maxime; Marchionni, Caroline; Drevniok, Ulrika

    2011-01-01

    With the current nursing shortage, it is crucial to understand the aspects of the nursing work environment that are related to turnover in new generation nurses. The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index was administered to new nurses in Quebec from different generations to determine what domains of the work environment were related to turnover intention. Results can help nurses in leadership and development positions target interventions to retain new graduates.

  19. Assessing the Item Response Theory with Covariate (IRT-C) Procedure for Ascertaining Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tay, Louis; Vermunt, Jeroen K.; Wang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the item response theory with covariates (IRT-C) procedure for assessing differential item functioning (DIF) without preknowledge of anchor items (Tay, Newman, & Vermunt, 2011). This procedure begins with a fully constrained baseline model, and candidate items are tested for uniform and/or nonuniform DIF using the Wald statistic.…

  20. Optimal Calibration Designs for Tests of Polytomously Scored Items Described by Item Response Theory Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Rebecca; Berger, Martijn P. F.

    2001-01-01

    Studied calibration designs that maximize the determinants of Fisher's information matrix on the item parameters for sets of polytomously scored items. Analyzed these items using a number of item response theory models. Results show that for the data and models used, a D-optimal calibration design for an answer or set of answers can reduce the…

  1. Instructional Topics in Educational Measurement (ITEMS) Module: Using Automated Processes to Generate Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis

    2013-01-01

    Changes to the design and development of our educational assessments are resulting in the unprecedented demand for a large and continuous supply of content-specific test items. One way to address this growing demand is with automatic item generation (AIG). AIG is the process of using item models to generate test items with the aid of computer…

  2. When Do Item Response Function and Mantel-Haenszel Definitions of Differential Item Functioning Coincide?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca

    1990-01-01

    Use of the Mantel-Haenszel procedure as a test for differential item functioning under the Rasch model of item-response theory is examined. Results of the procedure cannot be generalized to the class of items for which item-response functions are monotonic and local independence holds. (TJH)

  3. An Item Response Theory Model for Incorporating Response Time Data in Binary Personality Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a general item response theory model for personality items that allows the information provided by the item response times to be used to estimate the individual trait levels. The submodel describing the item response times is a modification of Thissen's log-linear model and is based on the distance-difficulty hypothesis in…

  4. Proteasome regulates turnover of toxic human amylin in pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanghamitra; Trikha, Saurabh; Sarkar, Anjali; Jeremic, Aleksandar M.

    2016-01-01

    Toxic human amylin (hA) oligomers and aggregates are implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although recent studies demonstrated a causal connection between hA uptake and toxicity in pancreatic cells, the mechanism of amylin’s clearance following its internalization and its relationship to toxicity is yet to be determined, and hence was investigated here. Using pancreatic rat insulinoma β-cells and human islets as model systems, we show that hA, following its internalization, first accumulates in the cytosol followed by its translocation into nucleus, and to a lesser extent lysosomes, keeping the net cytosolic amylin content low. An increase in hA accumulation in the nucleus of pancreatic cells correlated with its cytotoxicity, suggesting that its excessive accumulation in the nucleus is detrimental. hA interacted with 20S core and 19S lid subunits of the β-cell proteasomal complex, as suggested by immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies, which subsequently resulted in a decrease in the proteasome’s proteolytic activity in these cells. In vitro binding and activity assays confirmed an intrinsic and potent ability of amylin to interact with the 20S core complex thereby modulating its proteolytic activity. Interestingly, less toxic and aggregation incapable rat amylin (rA) showed a comparable inhibitory effect on proteasome activity and protein ubiquitination, decoupling amylin aggregation/toxicity and amylin-induced protein stress. In agreement with these studies, inhibition of proteasomal proteolytic activity significantly increased intracellular amylin content and toxicity. Taken together, our results suggest a pivotal role of proteasomes in amylin’s turnover and detoxification in pancreatic cells. PMID:27340132

  5. 6-( sup 18 F)fluoro-L-dopa probes dopamine turnover rates in central dopaminergic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Barrio, J.R.; Huang, S.C.; Melega, W.P.; Yu, D.C.; Hoffman, J.M.; Schneider, J.S.; Satyamurthy, N.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E. )

    1990-12-01

    6-({sup 18}F)Fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA) cerebral kinetics and metabolism were correlated in normal primates (Macaca nemestrina) and primates with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induced unilateral Parkinsonism. Application of a tracer kinetic model to positron emission tomography (PET) data indicated that the model allows reliable estimation of FDOPA blood brain barrier transport, decarboxylation and release of stored 6-({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine (FDA) radioactivity in normal striatum (k4 = 0.005/min, turnover half-time greater than or equal to 2 hr), in agreement with biochemical data. PET scans of MPTP treated monkeys revealed 40-50% reduction in total striatal activity in comparison with pre-MPTP scans. Monkey brain biochemical analysis revealed that the reduction in activity was mainly due to a decrease in FDA and its metabolites, 6({sup 18}F)fluorohomovanillic (FHVA) and 6-({sup 18}F)fluoro-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (FDOPAC). The remaining activity in tissue was 3-0-methyl-6-({sup 18}F)fluoro-L-DOPA (3-OMFD) of peripheral origin. The (FHVA + FDOPAC)/FDA ratio was 1:2 in normal putamen and greater than or equal to 6:1 in the lesioned putamen, indicative of a dramatic increase in turnover of FDA. Both kinetic and biochemical data indicate that FDOPA labels a slow turnover rate pool of dopamine in rat and primate brain. This turnover rate for stored dopamine (DA) is accelerated with dopaminergic cell losses (e.g., MPTP-induced Parkinsonism).

  6. Long-period astronomical forcing of mammal turnover.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Jan A; Abdul Aziz, Hayfaa; Alvarez Sierra, M Angeles; Hilgen, Frederik J; van den Hoek Ostende, Lars W; Lourens, Lucas J; Mein, Pierre; van der Meulen, Albert J; Pelaez-Campomanes, Pablo

    2006-10-12

    Mammals are among the fastest-radiating groups, being characterized by a mean species lifespan of the order of 2.5 million years (Myr). The basis for this characteristic timescale of origination, extinction and turnover is not well understood. Various studies have invoked climate change to explain mammalian species turnover, but other studies have either challenged or only partly confirmed the climate-turnover hypothesis. Here we use an exceptionally long (24.5-2.5 Myr ago), dense, and well-dated terrestrial record of rodent lineages from central Spain, and show the existence of turnover cycles with periods of 2.4-2.5 and 1.0 Myr. We link these cycles to low-frequency modulations of Milankovitch oscillations, and show that pulses of turnover occur at minima of the 2.37-Myr eccentricity cycle and nodes of the 1.2-Myr obliquity cycle. Because obliquity nodes and eccentricity minima are associated with ice sheet expansion and cooling and affect regional precipitation, we infer that long-period astronomical climate forcing is a major determinant of species turnover in small mammals and probably other groups as well.

  7. Relationships between soil microbial communities and soil carbon turnover along a vegetation and moisture gradient in interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, M. P.; Harden, J. W.; Turetsky, M. R.; Petersen, D. G.; McGuire, A. D.; Briones, M. J.; Churchill, A. C.; Doctor, D. H.; Pruett, L. E.

    2010-12-01

    Boreal landscapes are characterized by a mosaic of uplands and lowlands, which differ in plant species composition, litter biochemistry, and biogeochemical cycling rates. Boreal ecosystems, from upland black spruce stands to lowland fens, are structured largely by water table position and contain quantitatively and qualitatively different forms of soil organic matter. Differences in carbon (C) availability among ecosystems likely translate to differences in the structure of soil microbial communities, which in turn could affect rates of organic matter decomposition and turnover. We examined relationships between microbial communities and soil C turnover in near-surface soils along a topographic soil moisture and vegetation gradient in interior Alaska. We tested the hypothesis that upland black spruce sites would be dominated by soil fungi and have slow rates of C turnover, whereas lowland ecosystems would be dominated by bacteria and mesofauna (enchytraeids) and have more rapid rates of C turnover. We utilized several isotopic measures of soil C turnover including bomb radiocarbon techniques, the δ15N of SOM, and the difference between δ13C of SOM, DOC, and respired CO2. All three measures indicated greater C turnover rates in the surface soils of the lowland fen sites compared to the more upland locations. Quantitative PCR analyses of soil bacteria and archaea, combined with enchytraed counts, confirmed that surface soils from the lowland fen ecosystems had the highest abundances of these functional groups. Fungal biomass was highly variable and tended to be more abundant in the upland forest sites. Soil enzymatic results were mixed: potential cellulase activities were higher in the more upland soils even though rates of microbial activity were generally lower. Oxidative enzyme activities were higher in fens, even though these ecosystems are saturated and partly anaerobic. Overall our data support soil food web theory which argues that rapidly cycling systems

  8. Using droplet-based microfluidics to improve the catalytic properties of RNA under multiple-turnover conditions.

    PubMed

    Ryckelynck, Michael; Baudrey, Stéphanie; Rick, Christian; Marin, Annick; Coldren, Faith; Westhof, Eric; Griffiths, Andrew D

    2015-03-01

    In vitro evolution methodologies are powerful approaches to identify RNA with new functionalities. While Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX) is an efficient approach to generate new RNA aptamers, it is less suited for the isolation of efficient ribozymes as it does not select directly for the catalysis. In vitro compartmentalization (IVC) in aqueous droplets in emulsions allows catalytic RNAs to be selected under multiple-turnover conditions but suffers severe limitations that can be overcome using the droplet-based microfluidics workflow described in this paper. Using microfluidics, millions of genes in a library can be individually compartmentalized in highly monodisperse aqueous droplets and serial operations performed on them. This allows the different steps of the evolution process (gene amplification, transcription, and phenotypic assay) to be uncoupled, making the method highly flexible, applicable to the selection and evolution of a variety of RNAs, and easily adaptable for evolution of DNA or proteins. To demonstrate the method, we performed cycles of random mutagenesis and selection to evolve the X-motif, a ribozyme which, like many ribozymes selected using SELEX, has limited multiple-turnover activity. This led to the selection of variants, likely to be the optimal ribozymes that can be generated using point mutagenesis alone, with a turnover number under multiple-turnover conditions, k(ss) cat, ∼ 28-fold higher than the original X-motif, primarily due to an increase in the rate of product release, the rate-limiting step in the multiple-turnover reaction.

  9. Using droplet-based microfluidics to improve the catalytic properties of RNA under multiple-turnover conditions

    PubMed Central

    Baudrey, Stéphanie; Rick, Christian; Marin, Annick; Coldren, Faith; Westhof, Eric

    2015-01-01

    In vitro evolution methodologies are powerful approaches to identify RNA with new functionalities. While Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX) is an efficient approach to generate new RNA aptamers, it is less suited for the isolation of efficient ribozymes as it does not select directly for the catalysis. In vitro compartmentalization (IVC) in aqueous droplets in emulsions allows catalytic RNAs to be selected under multiple-turnover conditions but suffers severe limitations that can be overcome using the droplet-based microfluidics workflow described in this paper. Using microfluidics, millions of genes in a library can be individually compartmentalized in highly monodisperse aqueous droplets and serial operations performed on them. This allows the different steps of the evolution process (gene amplification, transcription, and phenotypic assay) to be uncoupled, making the method highly flexible, applicable to the selection and evolution of a variety of RNAs, and easily adaptable for evolution of DNA or proteins. To demonstrate the method, we performed cycles of random mutagenesis and selection to evolve the X-motif, a ribozyme which, like many ribozymes selected using SELEX, has limited multiple-turnover activity. This led to the selection of variants, likely to be the optimal ribozymes that can be generated using point mutagenesis alone, with a turnover number under multiple-turnover conditions, ksscat, ∼28-fold higher than the original X-motif, primarily due to an increase in the rate of product release, the rate-limiting step in the multiple-turnover reaction. PMID:25605963

  10. A survey of anatomical items relevant to the practice of rheumatology: upper extremity, head, neck, spine, and general concepts.

    PubMed

    Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo; Navarro-Zarza, José Eduardo; Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Canoso, Juan J; Biundo, Joseph J; Kalish, Robert A; de Toro Santos, Francisco Javier; McGonagle, Dennis; Carette, Simon; Alvarez-Nemegyei, José

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to identify the anatomical items of the upper extremity and spine that are potentially relevant to the practice of rheumatology. Ten rheumatologists interested in clinical anatomy who published, taught, and/or participated as active members of Clinical Anatomy Interest groups (six seniors, four juniors), participated in a one-round relevance Delphi exercise. An initial, 560-item list that included 45 (8.0 %) general concepts items; 138 (24.8 %) hand items; 100 (17.8 %) forearm and elbow items; 147 (26.2 %) shoulder items; and 130 (23.2 %) head, neck, and spine items was compiled by 5 of the participants. Each item was graded for importance with a Likert scale from 1 (not important) to 5 (very important). Thus, scores could range from 10 (1 × 10) to 50 (5 × 10). An item score of ≥40 was considered most relevant to competent practice as a rheumatologist. Mean item Likert scores ranged from 2.2 ± 0.5 to 4.6 ± 0.7. A total of 115 (20.5 %) of the 560 initial items reached relevance. Broken down by categories, this final relevant item list was composed by 7 (6.1 %) general concepts items; 32 (27.8 %) hand items; 20 (17.4 %) forearm and elbow items; 33 (28.7 %) shoulder items; and 23 (17.6 %) head, neck, and spine items. In this Delphi exercise, a group of practicing academic rheumatologists with an interest in clinical anatomy compiled a list of anatomical items that were deemed important to the practice of rheumatology. We suggest these items be considered curricular priorities when training rheumatology fellows in clinical anatomy skills and in programs of continuing rheumatology education.

  11. Explaining the Gap in Charter and Traditional Public School Teacher Turnover Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuit, David A.; Smith, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses national survey data to examine why charter school teachers are more likely to turnover than their traditional public school counterparts. We test whether the turnover gap is explained by different distributions of factors that are empirically and theoretically linked to turnover risk. We find that the turnover rate of charter…

  12. Reviewing Employee Turnover: Focusing on Proximal Withdrawal States and an Expanded Criterion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hom, Peter W.; Mitchell, Terence R.; Lee, Thomas W.; Griffeth, Rodger W.

    2012-01-01

    We reconceptualize employee turnover to promote researchers' understanding and prediction of why employees quit or stay in employing institutions. A literature review identifies shortcomings with prevailing turnover dimensions. In response, we expand the conceptual domain of the turnover criterion to include multiple types of turnover (notably,…

  13. Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Torn, M.S.; Swanston, C.W.; Castanha, C.; Trumbore, S.E.

    2008-07-15

    Historically, attention on soil organic matter (SOM) has focused on the central role that it plays in ecosystem fertility and soil properties, but in the past two decades the role of soil organic carbon in moderating atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations has emerged as a critical research area. This chapter will focus on the storage and turnover of natural organic matter in soil (SOM), in the context of the global carbon cycle. Organic matter in soils is the largest carbon reservoir in rapid exchange with atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and is thus important as a potential source and sink of greenhouse gases over time scales of human concern (Fischlin and Gyalistras 1997). SOM is also an important human resource under active management in agricultural and range lands worldwide. Questions driving present research on the soil C cycle include: Are soils now acting as a net source or sink of carbon to the atmosphere? What role will soils play as a natural modulator or amplifier of climatic warming? How is C stabilized and sequestered, and what are effective management techniques to foster these processes? Answering these questions will require a mechanistic understanding of how and where C is stored in soils. The quantity and composition of organic matter in soil reflect the long-term balance between plant carbon inputs and microbial decomposition, as well as other loss processes such as fire, erosion, and leaching. The processes driving soil carbon storage and turnover are complex and involve influences at molecular to global scales. Moreover, the relative importance of these processes varies according to the temporal and spatial scales being considered; a process that is important at the regional scale may not be critical at the pedon scale. At the regional scale, SOM cycling is influenced by factors such as climate and parent material, which affect plant productivity and soil development. More locally, factors such as plant tissue quality and soil mineralogy affect

  14. National cultures, performance appraisal practices, and organizational absenteeism and turnover: a study across 21 countries.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Hilla; Fried, Yitzhak

    2012-03-01

    Performance appraisal (PA) is a key human resource activity in organizations. However, in this global economy, we know little about how societal cultures affect PA practices. In this study, we address this gap by focusing on 2 complementary issues: (a) the influence of societal (national) cultural practices on PA practices adopted by organizations and (b) the contribution of the level of congruence between societal cultural practices and the characteristics of organizational PA practices to absenteeism and turnover. The results, based on a large data set across multiple countries and over 2 time periods, support the hypothesized effects of societal (national) cultural practices on particular PA practices and the interactive effects of societal cultural practices and PA practices on absenteeism and turnover. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of our findings.

  15. Stabilizing the Hsp70-Tau Complex Promotes Turnover in Models of Tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Young, Zapporah T; Rauch, Jennifer N; Assimon, Victoria A; Jinwal, Umesh K; Ahn, Misol; Li, Xiaokai; Dunyak, Bryan M; Ahmad, Atta; Carlson, George A; Srinivasan, Sharan R; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Dickey, Chad A; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2016-08-18

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is a chaperone that normally scans the proteome and initiates the turnover of some proteins (termed clients) by linking them to the degradation pathways. This activity is critical to normal protein homeostasis, yet it appears to fail in diseases associated with abnormal protein accumulation. It is not clear why Hsp70 promotes client degradation under some conditions, while sparing that protein under others. Here, we used a combination of chemical biology and genetic strategies to systematically perturb the affinity of Hsp70 for the model client, tau. This approach revealed that tight complexes between Hsp70 and tau were associated with enhanced turnover while transient interactions favored tau retention. These results suggest that client affinity is one important parameter governing Hsp70-mediated quality control.

  16. Combined effects of positive and negative affectivity and job satisfaction on job performance and turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    Bouckenooghe, Dave; Raja, Usman; Butt, Arif Nazir

    2013-01-01

    Capturing data from employee-supervisor dyads (N = 321) from eight organizations in Pakistan, including human service organizations, an electronics assembly plant, a packaging material manufacturing company, and a small food processing plant, we used moderated regression analysis to examine whether the relationships between trait affect (positive affectivity [PA] and negative affectivity [NA]) and two key work outcome variables (job performance and turnover) are contingent upon the level of job satisfaction. We applied the Trait Activation Theory to explain the moderating effect of job satisfaction on the relationship between affect and performance and between affect and turnover. Overall, the data supported our hypotheses. Positive and negative affectivity influenced performance and the intention to quit, and job satisfaction moderated these relationships. We discuss in detail the results of these findings and their implications for research and practice.

  17. Bringing social identity to work: the influence of manifestation and suppression on perceived discrimination, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    Madera, Juan M; King, Eden B; Hebl, Michelle R

    2012-04-01

    In the current article, we explored whether manifesting or suppressing an identity (race/ethnicity, gender, age, religion, sexual orientation, or disability) at work is related to perceived discrimination, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions. Participants included 211 working adults who completed an online survey. The results showed that efforts to suppress a group identity were positively (and behavioral manifestations of group identity negatively) related to perceived discrimination, which predicted job satisfaction and turnover intentions. These results suggest that diverse employees actively manage their nonwork identities while at work and that these identity management strategies have important consequences.

  18. Greater soil carbon stocks and faster turnover rates with increasing agricultural productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderman, Jonathan; Creamer, Courtney; Baisden, W. Troy; Farrell, Mark; Fallon, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    Devising agricultural management schemes that enhance food security and soil carbon levels is a high priority for many nations. However, the coupling between agricultural productivity, soil carbon stocks and organic matter turnover rates is still unclear. Archived soil samples from four decades of a long-term crop rotation trial were analyzed for soil organic matter (SOM) cycling-relevant properties: C and N content, bulk composition by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, amino sugar content, short-term C bioavailability assays, and long-term C turnover rates by modeling the incorporation of the bomb spike in atmospheric 14C into the soil. After > 40 years under consistent management, topsoil carbon stocks ranged from 14 to 33 Mg C ha-1 and were linearly related to the mean productivity of each treatment. Measurements of SOM composition demonstrated increasing amounts of plant- and microbially derived SOM along the productivity gradient. Under two modeling scenarios, radiocarbon data indicated overall SOM turnover time decreased from 40 to 13 years with increasing productivity - twice the rate of decline predicted from simple steady-state models or static three-pool decay rates of measured C pool distributions. Similarly, the half-life of synthetic root exudates decreased from 30.4 to 21.5 h with increasing productivity, indicating accelerated microbial activity. These findings suggest that there is a direct feedback between accelerated biological activity, carbon cycling rates and rates of carbon stabilization with important implications for how SOM dynamics are represented in models.

  19. New technologies for item monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, J.A.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1993-12-01

    This report responds to the Department of Energy`s request that Sandia National Laboratories compare existing technologies against several advanced technologies as they apply to DOE needs to monitor the movement of material, weapons, or personnel for safety and security programs. The authors describe several material control systems, discuss their technologies, suggest possible applications, discuss assets and limitations, and project costs for each system. The following systems are described: WATCH system (Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling); Tag system (an electrostatic proximity sensor); PANTRAK system (Personnel And Material Tracking); VRIS (Vault Remote Inventory System); VSIS (Vault Safety and Inventory System); AIMS (Authenticated Item Monitoring System); EIVS (Experimental Inventory Verification System); Metrox system (canister monitoring system); TCATS (Target Cueing And Tracking System); LGVSS (Light Grid Vault Surveillance System); CSS (Container Safeguards System); SAMMS (Security Alarm and Material Monitoring System); FOIDS (Fiber Optic Intelligence & Detection System); GRADS (Graded Radiation Detection System); and PINPAL (Physical Inventory Pallet).

  20. Protein turnover in the cell cycle of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nishi, A; Kogoma, T

    1965-10-01

    Nishi, Arasuke (University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan), and Tokio Kogoma. Protein turnover in the cell cycle of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 90:884-890. 1965.-Protein metabolism and enzyme formation throughout the cell cycle were investigated in synchronized cultures of Escherichia coli. The cells showed a temporary cessation of the net increase of bulk protein and of constitutive beta-galactosidase activity during the division period. By contrast, when tested by short-term experiments performed with cells at different growth stages, the bacteria displayed a constant incorporation of labeled protein precursors into the protein fraction, even during the fission period. Similar results were obtained with respect to the capacities for induced enzyme formation. On the other hand, when the cells were previously labeled and then subjected to synchronization in a nonradioactive medium, the radioactivity of the protein fraction decreased temporarily by nearly 10% during the fission period and then regained its previous level at the beginning of the ensuing phase of growth. This indicates that the products of partial degradation of protein were again utilized for protein synthesis in the next cell cycle. It was concluded that the temporary lagging of net increase of bulk protein may be due to the partial breakdown of protein occurring during the fission period.

  1. Microbial Turnover of Fixed Nitrogen Compounds in Oceanic Crustal Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, B.; Wankel, S. D.; Glazer, B. T.; Huber, J. A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Oceanic crust is the largest aquifer on Earth, with a massive volume of seawater advecting through the basaltic crust. The microbiome of this deep marine subsurface biosphere has been estimated to be substantial, and consequently their metabolic activity may have major influences on global biogeochemical cycles. While earlier and recent studies provide insight into the microbial community composition of oceanic crustal fluids, information on the microbial ecophysiology is broadly missing. Therefore, to investigate the microbial transformation of fixed nitrogen compounds in crustal aquifer fluids, fluids were sampled from different horizons of two neighbouring CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories at the North Pond sediment pond. This site is located on the western flank of the Mid Atlantic Ridge and is characterized by relatively young oceanic crust and cold fluids. The crustal fluids contain oxygen and nitrate, which potentially both may serve as electron acceptor for respiration. In a multidisciplinary approach we combined stable isotope incubations, determination of the natural isotopic compositions and plan to analyse relevant functional genes from a metagenomic dataset to investigate the nitrogen cycling at North Pond. The turnover of fixed nitrogen in oceanic crustal fluids may have important implications for the understanding of the global nitrogen cycle.

  2. Reversed item bias: an integrative model.

    PubMed

    Weijters, Bert; Baumgartner, Hans; Schillewaert, Niels

    2013-09-01

    In the recent methodological literature, various models have been proposed to account for the phenomenon that reversed items (defined as items for which respondents' scores have to be recoded in order to make the direction of keying consistent across all items) tend to lead to problematic responses. In this article we propose an integrative conceptualization of three important sources of reversed item method bias (acquiescence, careless responding, and confirmation bias) and specify a multisample confirmatory factor analysis model with 2 method factors to empirically test the hypothesized mechanisms, using explicit measures of acquiescence and carelessness and experimentally manipulated versions of a questionnaire that varies 3 item arrangements and the keying direction of the first item measuring the focal construct. We explain the mechanisms, review prior attempts to model reversed item bias, present our new model, and apply it to responses to a 4-item self-esteem scale (N = 306) and the 6-item Revised Life Orientation Test (N = 595). Based on the literature review and the empirical results, we formulate recommendations on how to use reversed items in questionnaires.

  3. Excised damaged base determines the turnover of human N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Sanjay; Uren, Aykut; Roy, Rabindra

    2009-10-02

    N-Methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) initiates base excision repair in DNA by removing a wide variety of alkylated, deaminated, and lipid peroxidation-induced purine adducts. In this study, we tested the role of excised base on MPG enzymatic activity. After the reaction, MPG produced two products: free damaged base and AP-site containing DNA. Our results showed that MPG excises 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (varepsilonA) from varepsilonA-containing oligonucleotide (varepsilonA-DNA) at a similar or slightly increased efficiency than it does hypoxanthine (Hx) from Hx-containing oligonucleotide (Hx-DNA) under similar conditions. Real-time binding experiments by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy suggested that both the substrate DNAs have a similar equilibrium binding constant (K(D)) towards MPG, but under single-turnover (STO) condition there is apparently no effect on catalytic chemistry; however, the turnover of the enzyme under multiple-turnover (MTO) condition is higher for varepsilonA-DNA than it is for Hx-DNA. Real-time binding experiments by SPR spectroscopy further showed that the dissociation of MPG from its product, AP-site containing DNA, is faster than the overall turnover of either Hx- or varepsilonA-DNA reaction. We thereby conclude that the excised base plays a critical role in product inhibition and, hence, is essential for MPG glycosylase activity. Thus, the results provide the first evidence that the excised base rather than AP-site could be rate-limiting for DNA-glycosylase reactions.

  4. Arachidonic acid incorporation and turnover is decreased in sympathetically denervated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Casey B; McHowat, Jane; Rosenberger, Thad A; Rapoport, Stanley I; Murphy, Eric J

    2005-06-01

    Heart sympathetic denervation can accompany Parkinson's disease, but the effect of this denervation on cardiac lipid-mediated signaling is unknown. To address this issue, rats were sympathetically denervated with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 50 mg/kg ip) and infused with 170 muCi/kg of either [1-(14)C]palmitic acid ([1-(14)C]16:0) or [1-(14)C]arachidonic acid ([1-(14)C]20:4 n-6), and kinetic parameters were assessed using a steady-state radiotracer model. Heart norepinephrine and epinephrine levels were decreased 82 and 85%, respectively, in denervated rats, and this correlated with a 34% reduction in weight gain in treated rats. Fatty acid tracer uptake was not significantly different between groups for either tracer, although the dilution coefficient lambda was increased in [1-(14)C]20:4 n-6-infused rats, which indicates that less 20:4 n-6 was recycled in denervated rats. In [1-(14)C]16:0-infused rats, incorporation rate and turnover values of 16:0 in stable lipid compartments were unchanged, which is indicative of preservation of beta-oxidation. In [1-(14)C]20:4 n-6-infused rats, there were dramatic reductions in incorporation rate (60-84%) and turnover value (56-85%) in denervated rats that were dependent upon the lipid compartment. In addition, phospholipase A(2) activity was reduced 40% in treated rats, which is consistent with the reduction observed in 20:4 n-6 turnover. These results demonstrate marked reductions in 20:4 n-6 incorporation rate and turnover in sympathetic denervated rats and thereby suggest an effect on lipid-mediated signal transduction mediated by a reduction in phospholipase A(2) activity.

  5. High bone turnover elevates the risk of denosumab-induced hypocalcemia in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Koji; Nagai, Takashi; Sakamoto, Keizo; Ohara, Kenji; Eguro, Takeshi; Ito, Hiroshi; Toyoshima, Yoichi; Kokaze, Akatsuki; Toyone, Tomoaki; Inagaki, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    Hypocalcemia is the most common major adverse event in patients with osteoporosis receiving the bone resorption inhibitor denosumab; however, limited information is available regarding risk factors of hypocalcemia. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the risk factors of hypocalcemia induced by denosumab treatment for osteoporosis. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who had received initial denosumab supplemented with activated vitamin D for osteoporosis. Serum levels of the following bone turnover markers (BTMs) were measured at baseline: bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), total N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen (P1NP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP-5b), and urinary cross-linked N-telopeptide of type 1 collagen (NTX). Of the 85 denosumab-treated patients with osteoporosis studied, 22 (25.9%) developed hypocalcemia. Baseline serum total P1NP, TRACP-5b, and urinary NTX were significantly higher in patients with hypocalcemia than in those with normocalcemia following denosumab administration (all P<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with total P1NP >76.5 μg/L, TRACP-5b >474 mU/dL, or urinary NTX >49.5 nmol bone collagen equivalent/mmol creatinine had a higher risk of hypocalcemia (P<0.01). Our study suggests that denosumab may have a greater impact on serum calcium levels in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis with higher baseline bone turnover than in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis with normal baseline bone turnover, because maintenance of normal serum calcium in this subgroup is more dependent on bone resorption. Close monitoring of serum calcium levels is strongly recommended for denosumab-treated patients with high bone turnover, despite supplementation with activated vitamin D and oral calcium.

  6. Bacterial and enchytraeid abundance accelerate soil carbon turnover along a lowland vegetation gradient in interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldrop, M.P.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Turetsky, M.R.; Petersen, D.G.; McGuire, A.D.; Briones, M.J.I.; Churchill, A.C.; Doctor, D.H.; Pruett, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Boreal wetlands are characterized by a mosaic of plant communities, including forests, shrublands, grasslands, and fens, which are structured largely by changes in topography and water table position. The soil associated with these plant communities contain quantitatively and qualitatively different forms of soil organic matter (SOM) and nutrient availability that drive changes in biogeochemical cycling rates. Therefore different boreal plant communities likely contain different soil biotic communities which in turn affect rates of organic matter decomposition. We examined relationships between plant communities, microbial communities, enchytraeids, and soil C turnover in near-surface soils along a shallow topographic soil moisture and vegetation gradient in interior Alaska. We tested the hypothesis that as soil moisture increases along the gradient, surface soils would become increasingly dominated by bacteria and mesofauna and have more rapid rates of C turnover. We utilized bomb radiocarbon techniques to infer rates of C turnover and the 13C isotopic composition of SOM and respired CO2 to infer the degree of soil humification. Soil phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activities were generally higher in the rich fen compared with the forest and bog birch sites. Results indicated greater C fluxes and more rapid C turnover in the surface soils of the fen sites compared to the wetland forest and shrub sites. Quantitative PCR analyses of soil bacteria and archaea, combined with enchytraeid counts, indicated that surface soils from the lowland fen ecosystems had higher abundances of these microbial and mesofaunal groups. Fungal abundance was highly variable and not significantly different among sites. Microbial data was utilized in a food web model that confirmed that rapidly cycling systems are dominated by bacterial activity and enchytraeid grazing. However, our results also suggest that oxidative enzymes play an important role in the C mineralization process in

  7. High bone turnover elevates the risk of denosumab-induced hypocalcemia in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Koji; Nagai, Takashi; Sakamoto, Keizo; Ohara, Kenji; Eguro, Takeshi; Ito, Hiroshi; Toyoshima, Yoichi; Kokaze, Akatsuki; Toyone, Tomoaki; Inagaki, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    Hypocalcemia is the most common major adverse event in patients with osteoporosis receiving the bone resorption inhibitor denosumab; however, limited information is available regarding risk factors of hypocalcemia. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the risk factors of hypocalcemia induced by denosumab treatment for osteoporosis. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who had received initial denosumab supplemented with activated vitamin D for osteoporosis. Serum levels of the following bone turnover markers (BTMs) were measured at baseline: bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), total N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen (P1NP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP-5b), and urinary cross-linked N-telopeptide of type 1 collagen (NTX). Of the 85 denosumab-treated patients with osteoporosis studied, 22 (25.9%) developed hypocalcemia. Baseline serum total P1NP, TRACP-5b, and urinary NTX were significantly higher in patients with hypocalcemia than in those with normocalcemia following denosumab administration (all P<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with total P1NP >76.5 μg/L, TRACP-5b >474 mU/dL, or urinary NTX >49.5 nmol bone collagen equivalent/mmol creatinine had a higher risk of hypocalcemia (P<0.01). Our study suggests that denosumab may have a greater impact on serum calcium levels in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis with higher baseline bone turnover than in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis with normal baseline bone turnover, because maintenance of normal serum calcium in this subgroup is more dependent on bone resorption. Close monitoring of serum calcium levels is strongly recommended for denosumab-treated patients with high bone turnover, despite supplementation with activated vitamin D and oral calcium. PMID:27980413

  8. Carbon Turnover and Dynamics from Biochemically Diverse Microbial Groups in Temperate and Tropical Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throckmorton, H.; Bird, J. A.; Firestone, M.; Horwath, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    Microorganisms represent an important source of actively cycling carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems, yet little is known of the fate or stability of microbial C in soils or the relative importance of microbial biochemistry as a factor influencing C stabilization. This project utilized uniformly 13C-labeled, biochemically diverse, non-living microbial residues including fungi, actinomycetes, bacteria Gm+, and bacteria Gm- as substrates in a reciprocal transplant experiment in a temperate forest in the Sierra Nevada and a tropical forest in Puerto Rico. Microbes were isolated from each site, grown with 13C media, autoclaved and lypholyzed, and non-living residues were added back to soils at each site. The temperate and tropical soils were analyzed over a 3 and 2 year period, respectively. Microbial C turnover differed substantially between the two sites, with microbial C levels stabilizing at 35% of initial input C after 12 months in the temperate site, while in Puerto Rico microbial C does not to begin to stabilize until about 16 months at less than 10% of initial input C. Physical fractionation of soils indicate that, despite the substantial difference in microbial C turnover between the two sites, microbial C turnover in the fraction occluded within aggregates and in the fraction associated with mineral surfaces did not differ between the two sites; the only physical fraction where microbial C turnover differed between the two sites was the light fraction, which is unassociated with the mineral matrix. These results underline the importance of the soil mineral matrix for protecting soil organic matter from mineralization. Although microbial groups did not differ in their relative partitioning among soil physical fractions, there was some evidence for slower overall decomposition of bacteria Gm+ and fungi relative to bacteria Gm- and actinomycetes; however, the observed effect was not substantial. Pyrolysis-GC-MS-IRMS results suggest there are some differences in

  9. Role of TGF-β in a Mouse Model of High Turnover Renal Osteodystrophy†

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiguang; Song, Wenping; Boulanger, Joseph H; Tang, Wen; Sabbagh, Yves; Kelley, Brian; Gotschall, Russell; Ryan, Susan; Phillips, Lucy; Malley, Katie; Cao, Xiaohong; Xia, Tai-He; Zhen, Gehua; Cao, Xu; Ling, Hong; Dechow, Paul C; Bellido, Teresita M; Ledbetter, Steven R; Schiavi, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    Altered bone turnover is a key pathologic feature of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Expression of TGF-β1, a known regulator of bone turnover, is increased in bone biopsies from individuals with CKD. Similarly, TGF-β1 mRNA and downstream signaling is increased in bones from jck mice, a model of high-turnover renal osteodystropy. A neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody (1D11) was used to explore TGF-βs role in renal osteodystrophy. 1D11 administration to jck significantly attenuated elevated serum osteocalcin and type I collagen C-telopeptides. Histomorphometric analysis indicated that 1D11 administration increased bone volume and suppressed the elevated bone turnover in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were associated with reductions in osteoblast and osteoclast surface areas. μCT confirmed the observed increase in trabecular bone volume and demonstrated improvements in trabecular architecture and increased cortical thickness. 1D11 administration was associated with significant reductions in expression of osteoblast marker genes (Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin) and the osteoclast marker gene, Trap5. Importantly, in this model, 1D11 did not improve kidney function or reduce serum PTH levels indicating that 1D11 effects on bone are independent of changes in renal or parathyroid function. 1D11 also significantly attenuated high turnover bone disease in the adenine-induced uremic rat model. Antibody administration was associated with a reduction in pSMAD2/SMAD2 in bone but not bone marrow as assessed by quantitative immunoblot analysis. Immunostaining revealed pSMAD staining in osteoblasts and osteocytes but not osteoclasts, suggesting 1D11 effects on osteoclasts may be indirect. Immunoblot and whole genome mRNA expression analysis confirmed our previous observation that repression of Wnt/β catenin expression in bone is correlated with increased osteoclast activity in jck mice and bone biopsies from CKD patients. Furthermore

  10. Diabetes, biochemical markers of bone turnover, diabetes control, and bone.

    PubMed

    Starup-Linde, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to have late complications including micro vascular and macro vascular disease. This review focuses on another possible area of complication regarding diabetes; bone. Diabetes may affect bone via bone structure, bone density, and biochemical markers of bone turnover. The aim of the present review is to examine in vivo from humans on biochemical markers of bone turnover in diabetics compared to non-diabetics. Furthermore, the effect of glycemic control on bone markers and the similarities and differences of type 1- and type 2-diabetics regarding bone markers will be evaluated. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed, Embase, Cinahl, and SveMed+ with the search terms: "Diabetes mellitus," "Diabetes mellitus type 1," "Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus," "Diabetes mellitus type 2," "Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus," "Bone," "Bone and Bones," "Bone diseases," "Bone turnover," "Hemoglobin A Glycosylated," and "HbA1C." After removing duplicates from this search 1,188 records were screened by title and abstract and 75 records were assessed by full text for inclusion in the review. In the end 43 records were chosen. Bone formation and resorption markers are investigated as well as bone regulating systems. T1D is found to have lower osteocalcin and CTX, while osteocalcin and tartrate-resistant acid are found to be lower in T2D, and sclerostin is increased and collagen turnover markers altered. Other bone turnover markers do not seem to be altered in T1D or T2D. A major problem is the lack of histomorphometric studies in humans linking changes in turnover markers to actual changes in bone turnover and further research is needed to strengthen this link.

  11. 17 CFR 229.1202 - (Item 1202) Disclosure of reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1202 (Item 1202) Disclosure of reserves. (a) Summary of oil and gas... tabular format as provided below: Summary of Oil and Gas Reserves as of Fiscal-Year End Based on Average Fiscal-Year Prices Reserves category Reserves Oil(mbbls) Natural gas(mmcf) Synthetic oil(mbbls)...

  12. 17 CFR 229.1202 - (Item 1202) Disclosure of reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1202 (Item 1202) Disclosure of reserves. (a) Summary of oil and gas... tabular format as provided below: Summary of Oil and Gas Reserves as of Fiscal-Year End Based on Average Fiscal-Year Prices Reserves category Reserves Oil(mbbls) Natural gas(mmcf) Synthetic oil(mbbls)...

  13. Word Processing for Item Banking and Test Production. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Joseph L.

    This report describes the sequence of activities that took place as the Examination Division of the New Jersey Department of Civil Service introduced a word processing system for a test item bank and for production of camera-ready test copy. The equipment selection, installation and orientation procedures are discussed. Keyboard and CRT terminals,…

  14. Science Library of Test Items. Volume Four: Practical Testing Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New South Wales Dept. of Education, Sydney (Australia).

    As one in a series of test items collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, the guide gives a wide range of questions and activities for the manipulation of scientific equipment to allow assessment of students' practical laboratory skills. Instructions are given to make norm-referenced or…

  15. Nonrestricted multiple-choice examination items.

    PubMed

    Kolstad, R; Goaz, P; Kolstad, R

    1982-08-01

    Multiple-choice items are frequently used in objective examinations. The format chosen should conform to the nature of the instruction. Knowledge about cumulative information, such as lists of attributes, can be tested efficiently by means of multiple-choice items that include a variable number of correct answers. In contrast to conventional, single-answer questions, nonrestricted multiple-choice items are capable of including more facts and fewer incorrect responses. In addition, the nonrestricted format is not burdened with the repetitious pattern of one correct answer coupled with several incorrect responses, a cue that may promote successful guessing. Item analyses can be performed on examinations that include both conventional and nonrestricted items. The reliability of one examination constructed totally with nonrestricted items was analyzed by means of the Kuder-Richardson Formula No. 20. The value 0.72 proved this examination to be both discriminating and consistent.

  16. Effect of dietary protein and iron on the fractional turnover rate of rat liver xanthine oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, D.M.; Amy, N.K.

    1987-12-01

    Rat liver xanthine oxidase activity is regulated in response to dietary protein and iron. To investigate whether the change in activity was mediated by a change in the rate of protein degradation, we measured the fractional turnover rate using the double-isotope technique with (/sup 3/H)- and (/sup 14/C)leucine and calculated the apparent half-life of xanthine oxidase in rats fed diets containing either 20 or 5% casein with either 35 or 5 mg iron/kg diet. Under control conditions, xanthine oxidase had an apparent half-life of 4.8 d and approximately 65% of the enzyme subunits were active. Rats fed diets with low dietary protein had lower xanthine oxidase activity, but the enzyme had a slower fractional turnover rate, resulting in an apparent half-life of 6.4 d, and only 15-20% of the enzyme was active. The apparent half-life of xanthine oxidase increased to 7.5 d in rats fed diets with low dietary iron, but dietary iron did not affect the specific activity of the enzyme or the percentage of active subunits. These results suggest that the loss of enzyme activity is not due to loss of enzyme protein by increased degradation, but rather to inactivation of the enzyme.

  17. A model of hippocampal spiking responses to items during learning of a context-dependent task

    PubMed Central

    Raudies, Florian; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Single unit recordings in the rat hippocampus have demonstrated shifts in the specificity of spiking activity during learning of a contextual item-reward association task. In this task, rats received reward for responding to different items dependent upon the context an item appeared in, but not dependent upon the location an item appears at. Initially, neurons in the rat hippocampus primarily show firing based on place, but as the rat learns the task this firing became more selective for items. We simulated this effect using a simple circuit model with discrete inputs driving spiking activity representing place and item followed sequentially by a discrete representation of the motor actions involving a response to an item (digging for food) or the movement to a different item (movement to a different pot for food). We implemented spiking replay in the network representing neural activity observed during sharp-wave ripple events, and modified synaptic connections based on a simple representation of spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity. This simple network was able to consistently learn the context-dependent responses, and transitioned from dominant coding of place to a gradual increase in specificity to items consistent with analysis of the experimental data. In addition, the model showed an increase in specificity toward context. The increase of selectivity in the model is accompanied by an increase in binariness of the synaptic weights for cells that are part of the functional network. PMID:25294991

  18. Turnover of recently assimilated carbon in arctic bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Street, L E; Subke, J A; Sommerkorn, M; Heinemeyer, A; Williams, M

    2011-10-01

    Carbon (C) allocation and turnover in arctic bryophytes is largely unknown, but their response to climatic change has potentially significant impacts on arctic ecosystem C budgets. Using a combination of pulse-chase experiments and a newly developed model of C turnover in bryophytes, we show significant differences in C turnover between two contrasting arctic moss species (Polytrichum piliferum and Sphagnum fuscum). (13)C abundance in moss tissues (measured up to 1 year) and respired CO(2) (traced over 5 days) were used to parameterise the bryophyte C model with four pools representing labile and structural C in photosynthetic and stem tissue. The model was optimised using an Ensemble Kalman Filter to ensure a focus on estimating the confidence intervals (CI) on model parameters and outputs. The ratio of aboveground NPP:GPP in Polytrichum piliferum was 23% (CI 9-35%), with an average turnover time of 1.7 days (CI 1.1-2.5 days). The aboveground NPP:GPP ratio in Sphagnum fuscum was 43% (CI 19-65%) with an average turnover time of 3.1 days (CI 1.6-6.1 days). These results are the first to show differences in C partitioning between arctic bryophyte species in situ and highlight the importance of modelling C dynamics of this group separately from vascular plants for a realistic representation of vegetation in arctic C models.

  19. Climate change creates rapid species turnover in montane communities.

    PubMed

    Gibson-Reinemer, Daniel K; Sheldon, Kimberly S; Rahel, Frank J

    2015-06-01

    Recent decades have seen substantial changes in patterns of biodiversity worldwide. Simultaneously, climate change is producing a widespread pattern of species' range shifts to higher latitudes and higher elevations, potentially creating novel assemblages as species shift at different rates. However, the direct link between species' turnover as a result of climate-induced range shifts has not yet been empirically evaluated. We measured rates of species turnover associated with species' range shifts in relatively undisturbed montane areas in Asia, Europe, North America, South America, and the Indo-Pacific. We show that species turnover is rapidly creating novel assemblages, and this can be explained by variable changes in species' range limits following warming. Across all the areas we analyzed, mean species' turnover was 12% per decade, which was nearly balanced between the loss of existing co-occurrences and the gain of novel co-occurrences. Turnover appears to be more rapid among ectothermic assemblages, and some evidence suggests tropical assemblages may be responding at more rapid rates than temperate assemblages.

  20. Bone turnover markers in sheep and goat: A review of the scientific literature.

    PubMed

    Camassa, José A; Diogo, Camila C; Sousa, Cristina P; Azevedo, Jorge T; Viegas, Carlos A; Reis, Rui L; Dourado, Nuno; Dias, Isabel R

    2017-03-02

    Bone turnover markers (BTMs) are product of bone cell activity and are generally divided in bone formation and bone resorption markers. The purpose of this review was to structure the available information on the use of BTMs in studies on small ruminants, especially for monitoring their variations related to diet, exercise, gestation and metabolic lactation state, circadian and seasonal variations, and also during skeletal growth. Pre-clinical and translational studies using BTMs with sheep and goats as animal models in orthopaedic research studies to help in the evaluation of the fracture healing process and osteoporosis research are also described in this review. The available information from the reviewed studies was systematically organized in order to highlight the most promising BTMs in small ruminant research, as well as provide a wide view of the use of sheep and goat as animal models in orthopaedic research, type of markers and commercial assay kits with cross-reactivity in sheep and goat, method of sample and storage of serum and urine for bone turnover markers determination and the usefulness and limitations of bone turnover markers in the different studies, therefore an effective tool for researchers that seek answers to different questions while using BTMs in small ruminants.

  1. Peak energy turnover in lactating European hares: a test of the heat dissipation limitation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Valencak, T G; Hackländer, K; Ruf, T

    2010-08-15

    It has been suggested that maximum sustained metabolic rate (SusMR) in mammals as reached, for instance, during lactation, is due to a limited capacity for heat dissipation. Here, we experimentally tested whether heat dissipation limitation (HDL) also constrains energy turnover in lactating European hares. Experimentally, we made use of the fact that hares nurse their young only once per day, which allowed us to keep females and young either at the same or at different ambient temperatures. During the last lactation week (week 4) females kept at thermoneutrality (22 degrees C), irrespective of the cold load of their young, had significantly lower rates of metabolisable energy intake (MEI) than cold-exposed mothers (5 degrees C), as predicted by the HDL hypothesis. However, in week 2 of lactation females at thermoneutrality rearing cold-exposed young were able to increase MEI to levels indistinguishable from those of cold-exposed females. Thus, even at thermoneutral temperature females reached maximum rates of energy turnover, which was inconsistent with the HDL hypothesis. We conclude that SusMR in lactating European hares typically results not from physiological constraints but from an active restriction of their energy turnover in order to maximise lifetime reproductive success.

  2. Evidence for autophagy-dependent pathways of rRNA turnover in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Brice E; Morriss, Stephanie C; MacIntosh, Gustavo C; Bassham, Diane C

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes account for a majority of the cell's RNA and much of its protein and represent a significant investment of cellular resources. The turnover and degradation of ribosomes has been proposed to play a role in homeostasis and during stress conditions. Mechanisms for the turnover of rRNA and ribosomal proteins have not been fully elucidated. We show here that the RNS2 ribonuclease and autophagy participate in RNA turnover in Arabidopsis thaliana under normal growth conditions. An increase in autophagosome formation was seen in an rns2–2 mutant, and this increase was dependent on the core autophagy genes ATG9 and ATG5. Autophagosomes and autophagic bodies in rns2–2 mutants contain RNA and ribosomes, suggesting that autophagy is activated as an attempt to compensate for loss of rRNA degradation. Total RNA accumulates in rns2–2, atg9–4, atg5–1, rns2–2 atg9–4, and rns2–2 atg5–1 mutants, suggesting a parallel role for autophagy and RNS2 in RNA turnover. rRNA accumulates in the vacuole in rns2–2 mutants. Vacuolar accumulation of rRNA was blocked by disrupting autophagy via an rns2–2 atg5–1 double mutant but not by an rns2–2 atg9–4 double mutant, indicating that ATG5 and ATG9 function differently in this process. Our results suggest that autophagy and RNS2 are both involved in homeostatic degradation of rRNA in the vacuole. PMID:26735434

  3. Evidence for autophagy-dependent pathways of rRNA turnover in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Brice E; Morriss, Stephanie C; MacIntosh, Gustavo C; Bassham, Diane C

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes account for a majority of the cell's RNA and much of its protein and represent a significant investment of cellular resources. The turnover and degradation of ribosomes has been proposed to play a role in homeostasis and during stress conditions. Mechanisms for the turnover of rRNA and ribosomal proteins have not been fully elucidated. We show here that the RNS2 ribonuclease and autophagy participate in RNA turnover in Arabidopsis thaliana under normal growth conditions. An increase in autophagosome formation was seen in an rns2-2 mutant, and this increase was dependent on the core autophagy genes ATG9 and ATG5. Autophagosomes and autophagic bodies in rns2-2 mutants contain RNA and ribosomes, suggesting that autophagy is activated as an attempt to compensate for loss of rRNA degradation. Total RNA accumulates in rns2-2, atg9-4, atg5-1, rns2-2 atg9-4, and rns2-2 atg5-1 mutants, suggesting a parallel role for autophagy and RNS2 in RNA turnover. rRNA accumulates in the vacuole in rns2-2 mutants. Vacuolar accumulation of rRNA was blocked by disrupting autophagy via an rns2-2 atg5-1 double mutant but not by an rns2-2 atg9-4 double mutant, indicating that ATG5 and ATG9 function differently in this process. Our results suggest that autophagy and RNS2 are both involved in homeostatic degradation of rRNA in the vacuole.

  4. Analysis of the Role of Insulin Signaling in Bone Turnover Induced by Fluoride.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qinyi; Liu, Hui; Yu, Xiuhua; Wang, Yan; Yang, Chen; Xu, Hui

    2016-06-01

    The role of insulin signaling on the mechanism underlying fluoride induced osteopathology was studied. We analyzed the expression of genes related with bone turnover and insulin signaling in rats treated by varying dose of fluoride with or without streptozotocin (STZ) in vivo. Furthermore, insulin receptor (InR) expression in MC3T3-E1 cells (pre-osteoblast cell line) was interfered with small interfering RNA (siRNA), and genes related with osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation were investigated in cells exposed to fluoride in vitro for 2 days. The in vivo study indicated the possible role of insulin in bone lesion induced by excessive amount of fluoride. Fluoride activated the InR and Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling, which were involved in the mechanism underlying fluoride induced bone turnover. The TGFβ1 and Wnt10/β-catenin pathway took part in the mechanism of bone lesion induced by fluoride, and insulin probably modulated the TGFβ1 and β-catenin to exert action on bone turnover during the development of bone lesion. The in vitro study showed the concomitant decrease of OPG, osterix and OCN with inhibition of InR expression in osteoblast, and three genes still was low in cells co-treated with fluoride and InR siRNA, which suggested that fluoride probably stimulated the expression of OPG, osterix and OCN through InR signaling. In conclusion, insulin played the important role in bone lesion induced by excessive amount of fluoride through mediating InR receptor signaling, and IGF1 signaling probably exerted action on bone turnover caused by overdose of fluoride.

  5. Short organic carbon turnover time and narrow 14C age spectra in early Holocene wetland paleosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Lael; Rosenheim, Brad E.; Fernandez, Alvaro; Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.

    2017-01-01

    Paleosols contain information about the rates of soil organic carbon turnover when the soil was actively forming. However, this temporal information is often difficult to interpret without tight stratigraphic control on the age of the paleosol. Here we apply ramped pyrolysis/oxidation (Ramped PyrOx) 14C analyses to evaluate age spectra of transgressive early Holocene paleosols from the Mississippi Delta in southeastern Louisiana, USA. We find 14C age spectra from soil organic matter (SOM) in both paleosols and overlying basal peats that represent variability in age that is close to, or only slightly greater than, analytical uncertainty of 14C measurements, despite different sources of carbon with likely disparate ages. Such age spectra have not previously been observed in the sedimentary record. Here they indicate vigorous soil carbon turnover prior to burial, which homogenized 14C ages within SOM across the entire thermochemical spectrum. The weighted bulk 14C ages from Ramped PyrOx of paleosols and overlying peats are identical within analytical and process-associated uncertainty, and corroborate 14C ages from charcoal fragments and plant macrofossils from the overlying peat. The youngest ages from Ramped PyrOx age spectra may also potentially be applied as chronometers for stratigraphic burial ages. Our results suggest rapid turnover (≪300 years) of carbon in these soils relative to input of allochthonous carbon, indicating that the 14C age of different soil components is decoupled from thermochemical stability and instead reflects vigorous turnover processes. The concurrence of paleosol and peat 14C ages also suggests that pedogenic processes were linked with the development of coastal marshes, and that the priming effect potentially masked the signal of allochthonous carbon inputs during sea level rise.

  6. Medial temporal lobe contributions to cued retrieval of items and contexts.

    PubMed

    Hannula, Deborah E; Libby, Laura A; Yonelinas, Andrew P; Ranganath, Charan

    2013-10-01

    Several models have proposed that different regions of the medial temporal lobes contribute to different aspects of episodic memory. For instance, according to one view, the perirhinal cortex represents specific items, parahippocampal cortex represents information regarding the context in which these items were encountered, and the hippocampus represents item-context bindings. Here, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test a specific prediction of this model-namely, that successful retrieval of items from context cues will elicit perirhinal recruitment and that successful retrieval of contexts from item cues will elicit parahippocampal cortex recruitment. Retrieval of the bound representation in either case was expected to elicit hippocampal engagement. To test these predictions, we had participants study several item-context pairs (i.e., pictures of objects and scenes, respectively), and then had them attempt to recall items from associated context cues and contexts from associated item cues during a scanned retrieval session. Results based on both univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed a role for hippocampus in content-general relational memory retrieval, and a role for parahippocampal cortex in successful retrieval of contexts from item cues. However, we also found that activity differences in perirhinal cortex were correlated with successful cued recall for both items and contexts. These findings provide partial support for the above predictions and are discussed with respect to several models of medial temporal lobe function.

  7. Medial Temporal Lobe Contributions to Cued Retrieval of Items and Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Hannula, Deborah E.; Libby, Laura A.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.; Ranganath, Charan

    2013-01-01

    Several models have proposed that different regions of the medial temporal lobes contribute to different aspects of episodic memory. For instance, according to one view, the perirhinal cortex represents specific items, parahippocampal cortex represents information regarding the context in which these items were encountered, and the hippocampus represents item-context bindings. Here, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test a specific prediction of this model – namely, that successful retrieval of items from context cues will elicit perirhinal recruitment and that successful retrieval of contexts from item cues will elicit parahippocampal cortex recruitment. Retrieval of the bound representation in either case was expected to elicit hippocampal engagement. To test these predictions, we had participants study several item-context pairs (i.e., pictures of objects and scenes, respectively), and then had them attempt to recall items from associated context cues and contexts from associated item cues during a scanned retrieval session. Results based on both univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed a role for hippocampus in content-general relational memory retrieval, and a role for parahippocampal cortex in successful retrieval of contexts from item cues. However, we also found that activity differences in perirhinal cortex were correlated with successful cued recall for both items and contexts. These findings provide partial support for the above predictions and are discussed with respect to several models of medial temporal lobe function. PMID:23466350

  8. 41 CFR 101-30.701-1 - Item reduction study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Item reduction study....7-Item Reduction Program § 101-30.701-1 Item reduction study. Item reduction study means the study... so identified, a replacement item shall be proposed. The result of item reduction studies...

  9. 41 CFR 101-30.701-1 - Item reduction study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Item reduction study. 101....7-Item Reduction Program § 101-30.701-1 Item reduction study. Item reduction study means the study... so identified, a replacement item shall be proposed. The result of item reduction studies...

  10. 41 CFR 101-30.701-1 - Item reduction study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Item reduction study. 101....7-Item Reduction Program § 101-30.701-1 Item reduction study. Item reduction study means the study... so identified, a replacement item shall be proposed. The result of item reduction studies...

  11. 41 CFR 101-30.701-1 - Item reduction study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Item reduction study. 101....7-Item Reduction Program § 101-30.701-1 Item reduction study. Item reduction study means the study... so identified, a replacement item shall be proposed. The result of item reduction studies...

  12. 41 CFR 101-30.701-1 - Item reduction study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Item reduction study. 101....7-Item Reduction Program § 101-30.701-1 Item reduction study. Item reduction study means the study... so identified, a replacement item shall be proposed. The result of item reduction studies...

  13. 41 CFR 101-30.701-2 - Item standardization code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Item standardization code....7-Item Reduction Program § 101-30.701-2 Item standardization code. Item standardization code (ISC) means a code assigned an item in the supply system which identifies the item as authorized...

  14. Software Note: Using BILOG for Fixed-Anchor Item Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMars, Christine E.; Jurich, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    The nonequivalent groups anchor test (NEAT) design is often used to scale item parameters from two different test forms. A subset of items, called the anchor items or common items, are administered as part of both test forms. These items are used to adjust the item calibrations for any differences in the ability distributions of the groups taking…

  15. Detection of Differential Item Functioning Using the Lasso Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; Tuerlinckx, Francis; De Boeck, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a novel approach to detect differential item functioning (DIF) among dichotomously scored items. Unlike standard DIF methods that perform an item-by-item analysis, we propose the "LR lasso DIF method": logistic regression (LR) model is formulated for all item responses. The model contains item-specific intercepts,…

  16. Modelling carbon and nitrogen turnover in variably saturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlle-Aguilar, J.; Brovelli, A.; Porporato, A.; Barry, D. A.

    2009-04-01

    Natural ecosystems provide services such as ameliorating the impacts of deleterious human activities on both surface and groundwater. For example, several studies have shown that a healthy riparian ecosystem can reduce the nutrient loading of agricultural wastewater, thus protecting the receiving surface water body. As a result, in order to develop better protection strategies and/or restore natural conditions, there is a growing interest in understanding ecosystem functioning, including feedbacks and nonlinearities. Biogeochemical transformations in soils are heavily influenced by microbial decomposition of soil organic matter. Carbon and nutrient cycles are in turn strongly sensitive to environmental conditions, and primarily to soil moisture and temperature. These two physical variables affect the reaction rates of almost all soil biogeochemical transformations, including microbial and fungal activity, nutrient uptake and release from plants, etc. Soil water saturation and temperature are not constants, but vary both in space and time, thus further complicating the picture. In order to interpret field experiments and elucidate the different mechanisms taking place, numerical tools are beneficial. In this work we developed a 3D numerical reactive-transport model as an aid in the investigation the complex physical, chemical and biological interactions occurring in soils. The new code couples the USGS models (MODFLOW 2000-VSF, MT3DMS and PHREEQC) using an operator-splitting algorithm, and is a further development an existing reactive/density-dependent flow model PHWAT. The model was tested using simplified test cases. Following verification, a process-based biogeochemical reaction network describing the turnover of carbon and nitrogen in soils was implemented. Using this tool, we investigated the coupled effect of moisture content and temperature fluctuations on nitrogen and organic matter cycling in the riparian zone, in order to help understand the relative

  17. Antidepressant action of tianeptine is connected with acceleration of serotonin turnover in the synapse: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Uzbekov, Marat G

    2009-06-01

    Based on the results of our investigation of patients with anxious depression under the treatment with serotonergic antidepressants with different mechanism of action on serotonin reuptake we, the first time in the literature, propose the hypothesis about neurochemical mechanism of tianeptine action. According to this hypothesis tianeptine not only activates serotonin reuptake into the synaptic ending but also activates its release from the ending into the synaptic cleft thus accelerating serotonin turnover rate in the synapse. Proposed mechanism mainly refers the first, acute phase of its action directed to the normalization of serotonergic neurotransmission.

  18. No turnover in lens lipids for the entire human lifespan.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jessica R; Levchenko, Vladimir A; Blanksby, Stephen J; Mitchell, Todd W; Williams, Alan; Truscott, Roger J W

    2015-03-11

    Lipids are critical to cellular function and it is generally accepted that lipid turnover is rapid and dysregulation in turnover results in disease (Dawidowicz 1987; Phillips et al., 2009; Liu et al., 2013). In this study, we present an intriguing counter-example by demonstrating that in the center of the human ocular lens, there is no lipid turnover in fiber cells during the entire human lifespan. This discovery, combined with prior demonstration of pronounced changes in the lens lipid composition over a lifetime (Hughes et al., 2012), suggests that some lipid classes break down in the body over several decades, whereas others are stable. Such substantial changes in lens cell membranes may play a role in the genesis of age-related eye disorders. Whether long-lived lipids are present in other tissues is not yet known, but this may prove to be important in understanding the development of age-related diseases.

  19. Light-stimulated inositolphospholipid turnover in Samanea saman leaf pulvini

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, M.J.; Crain, R.C.; Satter, R.L.

    1987-10-01

    Leaflets of Samanea saman open and close rhythmically, driven by an endogenous circadian clock. Light has a rapid, direct effect on the movements and also rephases the rhythm. The authors investigated whether light signals might be mediated by increased inositolphospholipid turnover, a mechanism for signal transduction that is widely utilized in animal systems. Samanea motor organs (pulvini) labeled with (/sup 3/H)inositol were irradiated briefly (5-30 sec) with white light, and membrane-localized phosphatidylinositol phosphates and their aqueous breakdown products, the inositol phosphates, were examined. After a 15-sec or longer light pulse, labeled phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate decreased and their labeled metabolic products inositol 1,4-biphosphate and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate increased changes characteristic of inositolphospholipid turnover. The authors conclude that inositolphospholipid turnover may act as a phototransduction mechanism in Samanea pulvini in a manner that is similar to that reported in animal systems.

  20. Dynamics of Cell Generation and Turnover in the Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Olaf; Zdunek, Sofia; Felker, Anastasia; Salehpour, Mehran; Alkass, Kanar; Bernard, Samuel; Sjostrom, Staffan L; Szewczykowska, Mirosława; Jackowska, Teresa; Dos Remedios, Cris; Malm, Torsten; Andrä, Michaela; Jashari, Ramadan; Nyengaard, Jens R; Possnert, Göran; Jovinge, Stefan; Druid, Henrik; Frisén, Jonas

    2015-06-18

    The contribution of cell generation to physiological heart growth and maintenance in humans has been difficult to establish and has remained controversial. We report that the full complement of cardiomyocytes is established perinataly and remains stable over the human lifespan, whereas the numbers of both endothelial and mesenchymal cells increase substantially from birth to early adulthood. Analysis of the integration of nuclear bomb test-derived (14)C revealed a high turnover rate of endothelial cells throughout life (>15% per year) and more limited renewal of mesenchymal cells (<4% per year in adulthood). Cardiomyocyte exchange is highest in early childhood and decreases gradually throughout life to <1% per year in adulthood, with similar turnover rates in the major subdivisions of the myocardium. We provide an integrated model of cell generation and turnover in the human heart.

  1. Quality of Working Life: An Antecedent to Employee Turnover Intention

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to measure the level of quality of work life (QWL) among hospital employees in Iran. Additionally, it aimed to identify the factors that are critical to employees’ QWL. It also aimed to test a theoretical model of the relationship between employees’ QWL and their intention to leave the organization. Methods: A survey study was conducted based on a sample of 608 hospital employees using a validated questionnaire. Face, content and construct validity were conducted on the survey instrument. Results: Hospital employees reported low QWL. Employees were least satisfied with pay, benefits, job promotion, and management support. The most important predictor of QWL was management support, followed by job proud, job security and job stress. An inverse relationship was found between employees QWL and their turnover intention. Conclusion: This study empirically examined the relationships between employees’ QWL and their turnover intention. Managers can take appropriate actions to improve employees’ QWL and subsequently reduce employees’ turnover. PMID:24596835

  2. Human turnover dynamics during sleep: statistical behavior and its modeling.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Utsumi, Hiroya; Terashi, Hiroo; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Turnover is a typical intermittent body movement while asleep. Exploring its behavior may provide insights into the mechanisms and management of sleep. However, little is understood about the dynamic nature of turnover in healthy humans and how it can be modified in disease. Here we present a detailed analysis of turnover signals that are collected by accelerometry from healthy elderly subjects and age-matched patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. In healthy subjects, the time intervals between consecutive turnover events exhibit a well-separated bimodal distribution with one mode at ⩽10 s and the other at ⩾100 s, whereas such bimodality tends to disappear in neurodegenerative patients. The discovery of bimodality and fine temporal structures (⩽10 s) is a contribution that is not revealed by conventional sleep recordings with less time resolution (≈30 s). Moreover, we estimate the scaling exponent of the interval fluctuations, which also shows a clear difference between healthy subjects and patients. We incorporate these experimental results into a computational model of human decision making. A decision is to be made at each simulation step between two choices: to keep on sleeping or to make a turnover, the selection of which is determined dynamically by comparing a pair of random numbers assigned to each choice. This decision is weighted by a single parameter that reflects the depth of sleep. The resulting simulated behavior accurately replicates many aspects of observed turnover patterns, including the appearance or disappearance of bimodality and leads to several predictions, suggesting that the depth parameter may be useful as a quantitative measure for differentiating between normal and pathological sleep. These findings have significant clinical implications and may pave the way for the development of practical sleep assessment technologies.

  3. Human turnover dynamics during sleep: Statistical behavior and its modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Utsumi, Hiroya; Terashi, Hiroo; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Turnover is a typical intermittent body movement while asleep. Exploring its behavior may provide insights into the mechanisms and management of sleep. However, little is understood about the dynamic nature of turnover in healthy humans and how it can be modified in disease. Here we present a detailed analysis of turnover signals that are collected by accelerometry from healthy elderly subjects and age-matched patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. In healthy subjects, the time intervals between consecutive turnover events exhibit a well-separated bimodal distribution with one mode at ⩽10 s and the other at ⩾100 s, whereas such bimodality tends to disappear in neurodegenerative patients. The discovery of bimodality and fine temporal structures (⩽10 s) is a contribution that is not revealed by conventional sleep recordings with less time resolution (≈30 s). Moreover, we estimate the scaling exponent of the interval fluctuations, which also shows a clear difference between healthy subjects and patients. We incorporate these experimental results into a computational model of human decision making. A decision is to be made at each simulation step between two choices: to keep on sleeping or to make a turnover, the selection of which is determined dynamically by comparing a pair of random numbers assigned to each choice. This decision is weighted by a single parameter that reflects the depth of sleep. The resulting simulated behavior accurately replicates many aspects of observed turnover patterns, including the appearance or disappearance of bimodality and leads to several predictions, suggesting that the depth parameter may be useful as a quantitative measure for differentiating between normal and pathological sleep. These findings have significant clinical implications and may pave the way for the development of practical sleep assessment technologies.

  4. An Item Analysis and Validity Investigation of Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test Score Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Nadine M.

    1971-01-01

    This investigation attempted to demonstrate the utility of standard item analysis procedures for selecting the most reliable and valid items for scoring Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test test records. (Author)

  5. [Pharmaceutical logistic in turnover of pharmaceutical products of Azerbaijan].

    PubMed

    Dzhalilova, K I

    2009-11-01

    Development of pharmaceutical logistic system model promotes optimal strategy for pharmaceutical functioning. The goal of such systems is organization of pharmaceutical product's turnover in required quantity and assortment, at preset time and place, at a highest possible degree of consumption readiness with minimal expenses and qualitative service. Organization of the optimal turnover chain in the region is offered to start from approximate classification of medicaments by logistic characteristics. Supplier selection was performed by evaluation of timeliness of delivery, quality of delivered products (according to the minimum acceptable level of quality) and time-keeping of time spending for orders delivery.

  6. Accidents, turnover, and use of a preemployment screening inventory.

    PubMed

    Borofsky, G L; Bielema, M; Hoffman, J

    1993-12-01

    This study examined the rates of work-related accidents and turnover among two contrasted groups of employees in a resort hotel/conference center environment. For each variable, measures were obtained for the year prior to the inclusion of a preemployment inventory in the organization's selection process and for each of two years subsequent to the start of inventory use. Analysis indicated the rates of work-related accidents and turnover were significantly lower in the years subsequent to the start of inventory use. Some possible design artifacts and cost/benefit implications are discussed.

  7. Support Effects on Bronsted acid site densities and alcohol dehydration turnover rates on tungsten oxide domains

    SciTech Connect

    Macht, Josef; Baertsch, Chelsey D.; May-Lozano, Marcos; Soled, Stuart L.; Wang, Yong; Iglesia, Enrique

    2005-03-01

    Initial activity and acid site density of several WAl, WSi (MCM41) and one WSn sample were determined. Trans/cis 2-butene selectivity is dependent on the support. Presumably, these differences are due to subtle differences in base strengths. 2-Butanol dehydration rates (per W-atom) reached maximum values at intermediate WOx surface densities on WAl, as reported for 2-butanol dehydration reactions on WZr. Titration results indicate that Bronsted acid sites are required for 2-butanol dehydration on WAl, WSi and WSn. UV-visible studies suggest that WAl is much more difficult to reduce than WZr. The detection of reduced centers on WAl, the number of which correlates to Bronsted acid site density and catalyst activity, as well as the temperature dependence of Bronsted acid site density indicate the in-situ formation of these active sites. We infer that this mechanism is common among all supported WOx samples described in this study. Turnover rates are a function of Bronsted acid site density only. High acid site densities lead to high turnover rates. Higher active site densities may cause stronger conjugate bases, as a higher electron density has to be stabilized, and thus weaker acidity, enabling a faster rate of product desorption. The maximum achievable active site density is dependent on the support. WZr reaches a higher active site density than WAl.

  8. The short- and long-term fates of memory items retained outside the focus of attention

    PubMed Central

    Eichenbaum, Adam S.; Starrett, Michael J.; Rose, Nathan S.; Emrich, Stephen M.; Postle, Bradley R.

    2015-01-01

    When a test of working memory (WM) requires the retention of multiple items, a subset of them can be prioritized. Recent studies have shown that, although prioritized (i.e., attended) items are associated with active neural representations, unprioritized (i.e., unattended) memory items can be retained in WM despite the absence of such active representations, and with no decrement in their recognition if they are cued later in the trial. These findings raise two intriguing questions about the nature of the short-term retention of information outside the focus of attention. First, when the focus of attention shifts from items in WM, is there a loss of fidelity for those unattended memory items? Second, could the retention of unattended memory items be accomplished by long-term memory mechanisms? We addressed the first question by comparing the precision of recall of attended versus unattended memory items, and found a significant decrease in precision for unattended memory items, reflecting a degradation in the quality of those representations. We addressed the second question by asking subjects to perform a WM task, followed by a surprise memory test for the items that they had seen in the WM task. Long-term memory for unattended memory items from the WM task was not better than memory for items that had remained selected by the focus of attention in the WM task. These results show that unattended WM representations are degraded in quality and are not preferentially represented in long-term memory, as compared to attended memory items. PMID:25472902

  9. The short- and long-term fates of memory items retained outside the focus of attention.

    PubMed

    LaRocque, Joshua J; Eichenbaum, Adam S; Starrett, Michael J; Rose, Nathan S; Emrich, Stephen M; Postle, Bradley R

    2015-04-01

    When a test of working memory (WM) requires the retention of multiple items, a subset of them can be prioritized. Recent studies have shown that, although prioritized (i.e., attended) items are associated with active neural representations, unprioritized (i.e., unattended) memory items can be retained in WM despite the absence of such active representations, and with no decrement in their recognition if they are cued later in the trial. These findings raise two intriguing questions about the nature of the short-term retention of information outside the focus of attention. First, when the focus of attention shifts from items in WM, is there a loss of fidelity for those unattended memory items? Second, could the retention of unattended memory items be accomplished by long-term memory mechanisms? We addressed the first question by comparing the precision of recall of attended versus unattended memory items, and found a significant decrease in precision for unattended memory items, reflecting a degradation in the quality of those representations. We addressed the second question by asking subjects to perform a WM task, followed by a surprise memory test for the items that they had seen in the WM task. Long-term memory for unattended memory items from the WM task was not better than memory for items that had remained selected by the focus of attention in the WM task. These results show that unattended WM representations are degraded in quality and are not preferentially represented in long-term memory, as compared to attended memory items.

  10. 38 CFR 3.1606 - Transportation items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Burial Benefits § 3.1606 Transportation items. The transportation costs of those persons who come within... case. In any such instance any excess amount would be an acceptable item to be included in the burial...) is used as a shipping case and also for burial, an allowance of $30 may be made thereon in lieu of...

  11. 38 CFR 3.1606 - Transportation items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Burial Benefits § 3.1606 Transportation items. The transportation costs of those persons who come within... case. In any such instance any excess amount would be an acceptable item to be included in the burial...) is used as a shipping case and also for burial, an allowance of $30 may be made thereon in lieu of...

  12. 38 CFR 3.1606 - Transportation items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Burial Benefits § 3.1606 Transportation items. The transportation costs of those persons who come within... case. In any such instance any excess amount would be an acceptable item to be included in the burial...) is used as a shipping case and also for burial, an allowance of $30 may be made thereon in lieu of...

  13. 38 CFR 3.1606 - Transportation items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Burial Benefits § 3.1606 Transportation items. The transportation costs of those persons who come within... case. In any such instance any excess amount would be an acceptable item to be included in the burial...) is used as a shipping case and also for burial, an allowance of $30 may be made thereon in lieu of...

  14. 38 CFR 3.1606 - Transportation items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Burial Benefits § 3.1606 Transportation items. The transportation costs of those persons who come within... case. In any such instance any excess amount would be an acceptable item to be included in the burial...) is used as a shipping case and also for burial, an allowance of $30 may be made thereon in lieu of...

  15. Modeling Rule-Based Item Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geerlings, Hanneke; Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2011-01-01

    An application of a hierarchical IRT model for items in families generated through the application of different combinations of design rules is discussed. Within the families, the items are assumed to differ only in surface features. The parameters of the model are estimated in a Bayesian framework, using a data-augmented Gibbs sampler. An obvious…

  16. Invariant Ordering of Item-Total Regressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijmstra, Jesper; Hessen, David J.; van der Heijden, Peter G. M.; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2011-01-01

    A new observable consequence of the property of invariant item ordering is presented, which holds under Mokken's double monotonicity model for dichotomous data. The observable consequence is an invariant ordering of the item-total regressions. Kendall's measure of concordance "W" and a weighted version of this measure are proposed as measures for…

  17. Geography Library of Test Items. Volume Six.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouimanos, John, Ed.

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items of value from past tests are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests, term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The…

  18. Geography Library of Test Items. Volume One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouimanos, John, Ed.

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items of value from past tests are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests, term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The…

  19. Factoring handedness data: I. Item analysis.

    PubMed

    Messinger, H B; Messinger, M I

    1995-12-01

    Recently in this journal Peters and Murphy challenged the validity of factor analyses done on bimodal handedness data, suggesting instead that right- and left-handers be studied separately. But bimodality may be avoidable if attention is paid to Oldfield's questionnaire format and instructions for the subjects. Two characteristics appear crucial: a two-column LEFT-RIGHT format for the body of the instrument and what we call Oldfield's Admonition: not to indicate strong preference for handedness item, such as write, unless "... the preference is so strong that you would never try to use the other hand unless absolutely forced to...". Attaining unimodality of an item distribution would seem to overcome the objections of Peters and Murphy. In a 1984 survey in Boston we used Oldfield's ten-item questionnaire exactly as published. This produced unimodal item distributions. With reflection of the five-point item scale and a logarithmic transformation, we achieved a degree of normalization for the items. Two surveys elsewhere based on Oldfield's 20-item list but with changes in the questionnaire format and the instructions, yielded markedly different item distributions with peaks at each extreme and sometimes in the middle as well.

  20. 47 CFR 65.830 - Deducted items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deducted items. 65.830 Section 65.830 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Rate Base § 65.830 Deducted items. (a)...

  1. Geography Library of Test Items. Volume Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouimanos, John, Ed.

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items of value from past tests are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests, term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The…

  2. Effects of Item Disclosure on TOEFL Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Gordon A.; And Others

    To ascertain how the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) would be affected if candidates had access to some of the items before administration of a test containing those items, a number of specially constructed TOEFL forms were made available to 945 foreign students in intensive English language programs. The students were later…

  3. Geography: Library of Test Items. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouimanos, John, Ed.

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items of value from past tests are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests, term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The…

  4. Similarity of Various Item Discrimination Indices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oosterhof, Albert C.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree to which various selected test item discrimination indices reflect a common factor. The indices used include the point-biserial, biserial, phi and tetrachoric coefficients, Flanagan's approximation of the product-moment correlation, Gulliksen's item reliability index, and Findley's difference…

  5. Item Calibration in Incomplete Testing Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, Theo J. H. M.; Verhelst, Norman D.

    2011-01-01

    This study discusses the justifiability of item parameter estimation in incomplete testing designs in item response theory. Marginal maximum likelihood (MML) as well as conditional maximum likelihood (CML) procedures are considered in three commonly used incomplete designs: random incomplete, multistage testing and targeted testing designs.…

  6. 78 FR 76067 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Item Unique Identifier Update (DFARS Case 2011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ...); and (v) High risk item identified by the requiring activity as vulnerable to supply chain threat, a target of cyber threats, or counterfeiting. (b) Exceptions. The contractor will not be required to...) Ensures item level traceability throughout lifecycle to strengthen supply chain integrity, enhance...

  7. 17 CFR 229.1208 - (Item 1208) Oil and gas properties, wells, operations, and acreage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false (Item 1208) Oil and gas... Registrants Engaged in Oil and Gas Producing Activities § 229.1208 (Item 1208) Oil and gas properties, wells..., the total gross and net productive wells, expressed separately for oil and gas (including...

  8. 17 CFR 229.1208 - (Item 1208) Oil and gas properties, wells, operations, and acreage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false (Item 1208) Oil and gas... Registrants Engaged in Oil and Gas Producing Activities § 229.1208 (Item 1208) Oil and gas properties, wells..., the total gross and net productive wells, expressed separately for oil and gas (including...

  9. Comparing Methods for Item Analysis: The Impact of Different Item-Selection Statistics on Test Difficulty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    Practitioners often depend on item analysis to select items for exam forms and have a variety of options available to them. These include the point-biserial correlation, the agreement statistic, the B index, and the phi coefficient. Although research has demonstrated that these statistics can be useful for item selection, no research as of yet has…

  10. Ramsay-Curve Item Response Theory for the Three-Parameter Logistic Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2008-01-01

    In Ramsay-curve item response theory (RC-IRT), the latent variable distribution is estimated simultaneously with the item parameters of a unidimensional item response model using marginal maximum likelihood estimation. This study evaluates RC-IRT for the three-parameter logistic (3PL) model with comparisons to the normal model and to the empirical…

  11. Investigating Separate and Concurrent Approaches for Item Parameter Drift in 3PL Item Response Theory Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arce-Ferrer, Alvaro J.; Bulut, Okan

    2017-01-01

    This study examines separate and concurrent approaches to combine the detection of item parameter drift (IPD) and the estimation of scale transformation coefficients in the context of the common item nonequivalent groups design with the three-parameter item response theory equating. The study uses real and synthetic data sets to compare the two…

  12. Item Purification in Differential Item Functioning Using Generalized Linear Mixed Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Qian

    2011-01-01

    For this dissertation, four item purification procedures were implemented onto the generalized linear mixed model for differential item functioning (DIF) analysis, and the performance of these item purification procedures was investigated through a series of simulations. Among the four procedures, forward and generalized linear mixed model (GLMM)…

  13. Psychometric Changes on Item Difficulty Due to Item Review by Examinees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanastasiou, Elena C.

    2015-01-01

    If good measurement depends in part on the estimation of accurate item characteristics, it is essential that test developers become aware of discrepancies that may exist on the item parameters before and after item review. The purpose of this study was to examine the answer changing patterns of students while taking paper-and-pencil multiple…

  14. Designing P-Optimal Item Pools in Computerized Adaptive Tests with Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Xuechun

    2012-01-01

    Current CAT applications consist of predominantly dichotomous items, and CATs with polytomously scored items are limited. To ascertain the best approach to polytomous CAT, a significant amount of research has been conducted on item selection, ability estimation, and impact of termination rules based on polytomous IRT models. Few studies…

  15. Asymptotic Standard Errors for Item Response Theory True Score Equating of Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cher Wong, Cheow

    2015-01-01

    Building on previous works by Lord and Ogasawara for dichotomous items, this article proposes an approach to derive the asymptotic standard errors of item response theory true score equating involving polytomous items, for equivalent and nonequivalent groups of examinees. This analytical approach could be used in place of empirical methods like…

  16. Improvement in Detection of Differential Item Functioning Using a Mixture Item Response Theory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maij-de Meij, Annette M.; Kelderman, Henk; van der Flier, Henk

    2010-01-01

    Usually, methods for detection of differential item functioning (DIF) compare the functioning of items across manifest groups. However, the manifest groups with respect to which the items function differentially may not necessarily coincide with the true source of the bias. It is expected that DIF detection under a model that includes a latent DIF…

  17. Developing and evaluating innovative items for the NCLEX: Part 2, item characteristics and cognitive processing.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Anne; Harmes, J Christine

    2009-01-01

    This article is a continuation of the research on the development and evaluation of innovative item formats for the NCLEX examinations that was published in the March/April 2009 edition of Nurse Educator. The authors discuss the innovative item templates and evaluate the statistical characteristics and level of cognitive processing required to answer the examination items.

  18. Descriptive and Inferential Procedures for Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.; Mazzeo, John

    1997-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) assessment procedures for items with more than two ordered score categories, referred to as polytomous items, were evaluated. Three descriptive statistics (standardized mean difference and two procedures based on the SIBTEST computer program) and five inferential procedures were used. Conditions under which the…

  19. A role for PERK in the mechanism underlying fluoride-induced bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Li, Xining; Yang, Chen; Lv, Peng; Li, Guangsheng; Xu, Hui

    2014-11-05

    While it has been well-documented that excessive fluoride exposure caused the skeletal disease and osteoblasts played a critical role in the advanced skeletal fluorosis, the underlying mechanism that mediated these effects remain poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of fluoride on bone of rats and MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro. Herein we found pathological features of high bone turnover in fluoride-treated rats, which was supported by an increase of osteogenic and osteoclastogenic genes expression in different stages of fluoride exposure. The skeletal toxicity of fluoride was accompanied by activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and subsequent unfolded protein response (UPR). A novel finding of this study was that expression of PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) was the same trend with receptor activator for nuclear factor-κ B ligand (RANKL), and NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was the same trend with Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) in bones of rats exposed to varied fluoride condition. Based on these data, we hypothesized that up-regulation of PERK probably played a role in mediating bone turnover induced by fluoride. Action of fluoride on MC3T3-E1 cells differentiation was demonstrated through analysis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodules formation. Meantime, an increase of binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) expression indicated the active ER stress in cells exposed to various dose of fluoride. Blocking PERK expression using siRNA showed the obvious decrease of osteogenic and osteoclastogenic factors expression in MC3T3-E1 cells exposed to certain dose of fluoride that could positively stimulate osteoblastic viability. In conclusion these findings underscore the importance of PERK in modulating fluoride induced bone formation and bone resorption. Understanding the link between PERK and bone turnover could probe into the mechanism underlying different bone lesion of

  20. Quantitative 3D Fluorescence Imaging of Single Catalytic Turnovers Reveals Spatiotemporal Gradients in Reactivity of Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals upon Steaming.

    PubMed

    Ristanović, Zoran; Hofmann, Jan P; De Cremer, Gert; Kubarev, Alexey V; Rohnke, Marcus; Meirer, Florian; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-05-27

    Optimizing the number, distribution, and accessibility of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite-based catalysts is of a paramount importance to further improve their catalytic performance. However, it remains challenging to measure real-time changes in reactivity of single zeolite catalyst particles by ensemble-averaging characterization methods. In this work, a detailed 3D single molecule, single turnover sensitive fluorescence microscopy study is presented to quantify the reactivity of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals upon steaming. This approach, in combination with the oligomerization of furfuryl alcohol as a probe reaction, allowed the stochastic behavior of single catalytic turnovers and temporally resolved turnover frequencies of zeolite domains smaller than the diffraction limited resolution to be investigated with great precision. It was found that the single turnover kinetics of the parent zeolite crystal proceeds with significant spatial differences in turnover frequencies on the nanoscale and noncorrelated temporal fluctuations. Mild steaming of zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals at 500 °C led to an enhanced surface reactivity, with up to 4 times higher local turnover rates than those of the parent H-ZSM-5 crystals, and revealed remarkable heterogeneities in surface reactivity. In strong contrast, severe steaming at 700 °C significantly dealuminated the zeolite H-ZSM-5 material, leading to a 460 times lower turnover rate. The differences in measured turnover activities are explained by changes in the 3D aluminum distribution due to migration of extraframework Al-species and their subsequent effect on pore accessibility, as corroborated by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) sputter depth profiling data.

  1. Quantitative 3D Fluorescence Imaging of Single Catalytic Turnovers Reveals Spatiotemporal Gradients in Reactivity of Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals upon Steaming

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing the number, distribution, and accessibility of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite-based catalysts is of a paramount importance to further improve their catalytic performance. However, it remains challenging to measure real-time changes in reactivity of single zeolite catalyst particles by ensemble-averaging characterization methods. In this work, a detailed 3D single molecule, single turnover sensitive fluorescence microscopy study is presented to quantify the reactivity of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals upon steaming. This approach, in combination with the oligomerization of furfuryl alcohol as a probe reaction, allowed the stochastic behavior of single catalytic turnovers and temporally resolved turnover frequencies of zeolite domains smaller than the diffraction limited resolution to be investigated with great precision. It was found that the single turnover kinetics of the parent zeolite crystal proceeds with significant spatial differences in turnover frequencies on the nanoscale and noncorrelated temporal fluctuations. Mild steaming of zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals at 500 °C led to an enhanced surface reactivity, with up to 4 times higher local turnover rates than those of the parent H-ZSM-5 crystals, and revealed remarkable heterogeneities in surface reactivity. In strong contrast, severe steaming at 700 °C significantly dealuminated the zeolite H-ZSM-5 material, leading to a 460 times lower turnover rate. The differences in measured turnover activities are explained by changes in the 3D aluminum distribution due to migration of extraframework Al-species and their subsequent effect on pore accessibility, as corroborated by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) sputter depth profiling data. PMID:25867455

  2. Differences in Bone Quality between High versus Low Turnover Renal Osteodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Daniel S.; Pienkowski, David; Faugere, Marie-Claude; Malluche, Hartmut H.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal bone turnover is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but its effects on bone quality remain unclear. This study sought to quantify the relationship between abnormal bone turnover and bone quality. Iliac crest bone biopsies were obtained from CKD-5 patients on dialysis with low (n=18) or high (n=17) turnover, and from volunteers (n=12) with normal turnover and normal kidney function. Histomorphometric methods were used to quantify the microstructural parameters; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation were used to quantify the material and mechanical properties in bone. Reduced mineral-to-matrix ratio, mineral crystal size, stiffness and hardness were observed in bone with high turnover compared to bone with normal or low turnover. Decreased cancellous bone volume and trabecular thickness were seen in bone with low turnover compared to bone with normal or high turnover. Bone quality, as defined by its microstructural, material, and mechanical properties, is related to bone turnover. These data suggest that turnover related alterations in bone quality may contribute to the known diminished mechanical competence of bone in CKD patients, albeit from different mechanisms for bone with high (material abnormality) vs. low (microstructural alteration) turnover. The present findings suggest that improved treatments for renal osteodystrophy should seek to avoid low or high bone turnover and aim for turnover rates as close to normal as possible.

  3. An Investigation into Teacher Turnover in International Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odland, Glenn; Ruzicka, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This study explored expatriate teacher turnover in international schools. Two hundred and eighty-one international teachers completed a questionnaire identifying which variables influenced their decision to leave at the end of their first contract. Using both quantitative and qualitative data, this study revealed that three causal factors were…

  4. Bibliography of Military and Non-Military Personnel Turnover Literature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    satisfaction and productivity. The authors wish to express their appreciation to SRA Gerald P. Yates and Ms. Kathleen Donahue for their assistance in...Chicago, IL: St. Clair Press, 1974. Karp , H. B., & Nickson, J. W., Jr. Motivator-hygiene deprivation as a predictor of job turnover. Personnel

  5. Chinese Teachers' Work Stress and Their Turnover Intention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Shujie; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    This survey study employed qualitative dominant mixed research to explore the sources of teacher stress in China and the possible reasons for Chinese teachers' turnover intention. The data were collected in Jilin Province of China, and 510 teachers participated in the survey. Quantitatively, 40.4% of the surveyed teachers reported that they…

  6. Principal Turnover: Upheaval and Uncertainty in Charter Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ni, Yongmei; Sun, Min; Rorrer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Informed by literature on labor market and school choice, this study aims to examine the dynamics of principal career movements in charter schools by comparing principal turnover rates and patterns between charter schools and traditional public schools. Research Methods/Approach: This study uses longitudinal data on Utah principals and…

  7. Employees as Customers: Exploring Service Climate, Employee Patronage, and Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abston, Kristie A.; Kupritz, Virginia W.

    2011-01-01

    The role of retail employees as customers was explored by quantitatively examining the influence of service climate and employee patronage on employee turnover intentions. Employees representing all shifts in two stores of a national retailer participated. Results indicated that employee patronage partially mediates the effects of service climate…

  8. The Prediction of Teacher Turnover Employing Time Series Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Crist H.

    The purpose of this study was to combine knowledge of teacher demographic data with time-series forecasting methods to predict teacher turnover. Moving averages and exponential smoothing were used to forecast discrete time series. The study used data collected from the 22 largest school districts in Iowa, designated as FACT schools. Predictions…

  9. Relationships between Emotional Labor, Job Performance, and Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Robyn E.; Groth, Markus; Frenkel, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between the emotional labor strategies surface acting and deep acting and organizational outcomes, specifically, employees' overall job performance and turnover. Call center employees from two large financial service organizations completed an online survey about their use of surface and deep acting.…

  10. Consistent assignment of nurse aides: association with turnover and absenteeism.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2013-01-01

    Consistent assignment refers to the same caregivers consistently caring for the same residents almost every time caregivers are on duty. This article examines the association of consistent assignment of nurse aides with turnover and absenteeism. Data came from a survey of nursing home administrators, the Online Survey Certification and Reporting data, and the Area Resource File. The measures were from 2007 and came from 3,941 nursing homes. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine turnover and absenteeism. An average of 68% of nursing homes reported using consistent assignment, with 28% of nursing homes using nurse aides consistent assignment at the often recommended level of 85% (or more). Nursing homes using recommended levels of consistent assignment had significantly lower rates of turnover and of absenteeism. In the multivariate analyses, consistent assignment was significantly associated with both lower turnover and lower absenteeism (p < .01). Consistent assignment is a practice recommended by many policy makers, government agencies, and industry advocates. The findings presented here provide some evidence that the use of this staffing practice can be beneficial.

  11. Faculty Turnover: Discipline-Specific Attention Is Warranted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Yonghong Jade

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the importance of discipline variations in understanding faculty turnover behaviors. A representative sample of university faculty in Research and Doctoral universities was obtained from a national database. Faculty members, self-identified into a primary academic area, were grouped into eight discipline clusters according…

  12. Sustaining Effective Practices in the Face of Principal Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland-Cohen, M. Kathleen; McIntosh, Kent; Horner, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    In the face of principal turnover, a common approach taken by staff is to simply wait until the new school year begins and hope that the new administrator will continue to support current programs. It is our experience that this passive strategy is not as helpful, because there are proactive approaches that are more likely to be successful. The…

  13. Ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelia turnover in a longleaf pine forest.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Joseph J; Mitchell, Robert J; Kuehn, Kevin A; Pecot, Stephen D

    2016-03-01

    Elucidation of the patterns and controls of carbon (C) flow and nitrogen (N) cycling in forests has been hindered by a poor understanding of ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelia (EFM) dynamics. In this study, EFM standing biomass (based on soil ergosterol concentrations), production (based on ergosterol accrual in ingrowth cores), and turnover rate (the quotient of annual production and average standing biomass estimates) were assessed in a 25-yr-old longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) plantation where C flow was manipulated by foliar scorching and N fertilization for 5 yr before study initiation. In the controls, EFM standing biomass was 30 ± 7 g m(-2) , production was 279 ± 63 g m(-2)  yr(-1) , and turnover rate was 10 ± 3 times yr(-1) . The scorched × fertilized treatment had significantly higher EFM standing biomass (38 ± 8 g m(-2) ), significantly lower production (205 ± 28 g m(-2)  yr(-1) ), and a trend of decreased turnover rate (6 ± 1 times yr(-1) ). The EFM turnover estimates, which are among the first reported for natural systems, indicate that EFM are a dynamic component of ecosystems, and that conventional assessments have probably underestimated the role of EFM in C flow and nutrient cycling.

  14. Organizational Career Growth, Affective Occupational Commitment and Turnover Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Qingxiong; McElroy, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Survey data, collected from the People's Republic of China, were used to test Weng's (2010) four facet model of career growth and to examine its effect on occupational commitment and turnover intentions. Weng conceptualized career growth as consisting of four factors: career goal progress, professional ability development, promotion speed, and…

  15. Quantifying assemblage turnover and species contributions at ecologic boundaries.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Lee-Ann C; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI) that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify intervals of community change. A second, functionally-related index (conditioned-on-boundary index, CoBI) identifies species contributions to the total assemblage turnover. With these measures we examine benthonic foraminiferal assemblages to assess glacial/interglacial contrasts at abyssal depths. Our results indicate that these measures, ATI and CoBI, have potential as sequence stratigraphic tools in abyssal depth deposits. Many peaks in the set of values of ATI coincide with terminations at the end of glaciations and delineate peak-bounded ATI intervals (PATIs) separated by boundaries that approximate to glacial terminations and to transgressions at neritic depths. These measures, however, can be used to evaluate the assemblage turnover and composition at any defined ecological or paleoecological boundary. The section used is from Ocean Drilling Program (OPD) Hole 994C, drilled on the Blake Ridge, offshore SE USA.

  16. An Investigation of Chief Administrator Turnover in International Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, John

    2011-01-01

    This article explores chief administrator turnover in international schools. Quantitative and qualitative data from the 83 chief administrators who participated in the study suggests that the average tenure of an international school chief administrator is 3.7 years and that the main reason chief administrators leave international schools is…

  17. Quantifying Assemblage Turnover and Species Contributions at Ecologic Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Lee-Ann C.; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI) that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify intervals of community change. A second, functionally-related index (conditioned-on-boundary index, CoBI) identifies species contributions to the total assemblage turnover. With these measures we examine benthonic foraminiferal assemblages to assess glacial/interglacial contrasts at abyssal depths. Our results indicate that these measures, ATI and CoBI, have potential as sequence stratigraphic tools in abyssal depth deposits. Many peaks in the set of values of ATI coincide with terminations at the end of glaciations and delineate peak-bounded ATI intervals (PATIs) separated by boundaries that approximate to glacial terminations and to transgressions at neritic depths. These measures, however, can be used to evaluate the assemblage turnover and composition at any defined ecological or paleoecological boundary. The section used is from Ocean Drilling Program (OPD) Hole 994C, drilled on the Blake Ridge, offshore SE USA. PMID:24130679

  18. The High Cost of Teacher Turnover. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Teaching and America's Future, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In 2007, the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future (NCTAF) completed an 18-month study of the costs of teacher turnover in five school districts. The selected districts varied in size, location, and demographics enabling exploration of how these variations affected costs. Costs of recruiting, hiring, processing, and training…

  19. Teachers' Perceptions of Administrative Support and Antecedents of Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Elizabeth Morgan; Williams, Sue W.; Gleason-Gomez, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the degree to which teachers' age, perceptions of fair pay, receipt of employer-sponsored health insurance, and administrative support, as operationalized by the Competing Values Framework, predicted antecedents of turnover. Teachers' thoughts of leaving their current job and commitment to a center…

  20. Presenilin 1 regulates epidermal growth factor receptor turnover and signaling in the endosomal-lysosomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Emanuela; Yoon, Il-Sang; Zheng, Hui; Kang, David E

    2007-10-26

    Mutations in the gene encoding presenilin 1 (PS1) cause the most aggressive form of early-onset familial Alzheimer disease. In addition to its well established role in Abeta production and Notch proteolysis, PS1 has been shown to mediate other physiological activities, such as regulation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway, modulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and MEK/ERK signaling, and trafficking of select membrane proteins and/or intracellular vesicles. In this study, we present evidence that PS1 is a critical regulator of a key signaling receptor tyrosine kinase, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Specifically, EGFR levels were robustly increased in fibroblasts deficient in both PS1 and PS2 (PS(-/-)) due to delayed turnover of EGFR protein. Stable transfection of wild-type PS1 but not PS2 corrected EGFR to levels comparable to PS(+/+) cells, while FAD PS1 mutations showed partial loss of activity. The C-terminal fragment of PS1 was sufficient to fully reduce EGFR levels. In addition, the rapid ligand-induced degradation of EGFR was markedly delayed in PS(-/-) cells, resulting in prolonged signal activation. Despite the defective turnover of EGFR, ligand-induced autophosphorylation, ubiquitination, and endocytosis of EGFR were not affected by the lack of PS1. Instead, the trafficking of EGFR from early endosomes to lysosomes was severely delayed by PS1 deficiency. Elevation of EGFR was also seen in brains of adult mice conditionally ablated in PS1 and in skin tumors associated with the loss of PS1. These findings demonstrate a critical role of PS1 in the trafficking and turnover of EGFR and suggest potential pathogenic effects of elevated EGFR as well as perturbed endosomal-lysosomal trafficking in cell cycle control and Alzheimer disease.

  1. Biotic turnover rates during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stivrins, Normunds; Soininen, Janne; Amon, Leeli; Fontana, Sonia L.; Gryguc, Gražyna; Heikkilä, Maija; Heiri, Oliver; Kisielienė, Dalia; Reitalu, Triin; Stančikaitė, Miglė; Veski, Siim; Seppä, Heikki

    2016-11-01

    The Northern Hemisphere is currently warming at the rate which is unprecedented during the Holocene. Quantitative palaeoclimatic records show that the most recent time in the geological history with comparable warming rates was during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition (PHT) about 14,000 to 11,000 years ago. To better understand the biotic response to rapid temperature change, we explore the community turnover rates during the PHT by focusing on the Baltic region in the southeastern sector of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet, where an exceptionally dense network on microfossil and macrofossil data that reflect the biotic community history are available. We further use a composite chironomid-based summer temperature reconstruction compiled specifically for our study region to calculate the rate of temperature change during the PHT. The fastest biotic turnover in the terrestrial and aquatic communities occurred during the Younger Dryas-Holocene shift at 11,700 years ago. This general shift in species composition was accompanied by regional extinctions, including disappearance of mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) and many arctic-alpine plant taxa, such as Dryas octopetala, Salix polaris and Saxifraga aizoides, from the region. This rapid biotic turnover rate occurred when the rate of warming was 0.17 °C/decade, thus slightly lower than the current Northern Hemisphere warming of 0.2 °C/decade. We therefore conclude that the Younger Dryas-Holocene shift with its rapid turnover rates and associated regional extinctions represents an important palaeoanalogue to the current high latitude warming and gives insights about the probable future turnover rates and patterns of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem change.

  2. The effects of sexual harassment on turnover in the military: time-dependent modeling.

    PubMed

    Sims, Carra S; Drasgow, Fritz; Fitzgerald, Louise F

    2005-11-01

    Sexual harassment has consistently negative consequences for working women, including changes in job attitudes (e.g., lower satisfaction) and behaviors (e.g., increased work withdrawal). Cross-sectional evidence suggests that harassment influences turnover intentions. However, few studies have used actual turnover; rather, they rely on proxies. With a sample of 11,521 military servicewomen with turnover data spanning approximately 4 years, the authors used the appropriate method for longitudinal turnover data--Cox's regression--to investigate the impact of harassment on actual turnover. Experiences of harassment led to increased turnover, even after controlling for job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and marital status. Among officers, harassment also affected turnover over and above rank. Given turnover's relevance to organizational bottom lines, these findings have important implications not only for individual women but also for organizations.

  3. OPTIMIZING MINIRHIZOTRON SAMPLE FREQUENCY FOR ESTIMATING FINE ROOT PRODUCTION AND TURNOVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most frequent reason for using minirhizotrons in natural ecosystems is the determination of fine root production and turnover. Our objective is to determine the optimum sampling frequency for estimating fine root production and turnover using data from evergreen (Pseudotsuga ...

  4. Investigating Item Exposure Control Methods in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Nagihan Boztunc; Dogan, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of item exposure control methods on measurement precision and on test security under various item selection methods and item pool characteristics. In this study, the Randomesque (with item group sizes of 5 and 10), Sympson-Hetter, and Fade-Away methods were used as item exposure control methods. Moreover,…

  5. A Strategy for Optimizing Item-Pool Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Adelaide; van der Linden, Wim J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2006-01-01

    Item-pool management requires a balancing act between the input of new items into the pool and the output of tests assembled from it. A strategy for optimizing item-pool management is presented that is based on the idea of a periodic update of an optimal blueprint for the item pool to tune item production to test assembly. A simulation study with…

  6. An NCME Instructional Module on Polytomous Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall David

    2014-01-01

    A polytomous item is one for which the responses are scored according to three or more categories. Given the increasing use of polytomous items in assessment practices, item response theory (IRT) models specialized for polytomous items are becoming increasingly common. The purpose of this ITEMS module is to provide an accessible overview of…

  7. The role of leadership in overcoming staff turnover in critical care.

    PubMed

    Roy, Kelly; Brunet, Fabrice

    2005-10-05

    This commentary discusses Laporta and coworkers analysis of a case study on the causes of and solutions for staff turnover in an intensive care setting. Staff turnover is a significant issue for health care leaders due to the shrinking workforce in Western countries and an increased demand for intensive care services as the population ages. The commentary considers reasons for turnover such as burnout and generational diversity, and highlights the importance of a team work approach to address the issue of turnover.

  8. Extending item response theory to online homework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2014-06-01

    Item response theory (IRT) becomes an increasingly important tool when analyzing "big data" gathered from online educational venues. However, the mechanism was originally developed in traditional exam settings, and several of its assumptions are infringed upon when deployed in the online realm. For a large-enrollment physics course for scientists and engineers, the study compares outcomes from IRT analyses of exam and homework data, and then proceeds to investigate the effects of each confounding factor introduced in the online realm. It is found that IRT yields the correct trends for learner ability and meaningful item parameters, yet overall agreement with exam data is moderate. It is also found that learner ability and item discrimination is robust over a wide range with respect to model assumptions and introduced noise. Item difficulty is also robust, but over a narrower range.

  9. Experiments in materials science from household items

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, F. Xavier

    1993-01-01

    Everyday household items are used to demonstrate some unique properties of materials. A coat hanger, rubber band, balloon, and corn starch have typical properties which we often take for granted but can be truly amazing.

  10. Investigating the Impact of Item Parameter Drift for Item Response Theory Models with Mixture Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon Soo; Lee, Young-Sun; Xing, Kuan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of item parameter drift (IPD) on parameter and ability estimation when the underlying measurement model fits a mixture distribution, thereby violating the item invariance property of unidimensional item response theory (IRT) models. An empirical study was conducted to demonstrate the occurrence of both IPD and an underlying mixture distribution using real-world data. Twenty-one trended anchor items from the 1999, 2003, and 2007 administrations of Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) were analyzed using unidimensional and mixture IRT models. TIMSS treats trended anchor items as invariant over testing administrations and uses pre-calibrated item parameters based on unidimensional IRT. However, empirical results showed evidence of two latent subgroups with IPD. Results also showed changes in the distribution of examinee ability between latent classes over the three administrations. A simulation study was conducted to examine the impact of IPD on the estimation of ability and item parameters, when data have underlying mixture distributions. Simulations used data generated from a mixture IRT model and estimated using unidimensional IRT. Results showed that data reflecting IPD using mixture IRT model led to IPD in the unidimensional IRT model. Changes in the distribution of examinee ability also affected item parameters. Moreover, drift with respect to item discrimination and distribution of examinee ability affected estimates of examinee ability. These findings demonstrate the need to caution and evaluate IPD using a mixture IRT framework to understand its effects on item parameters and examinee ability. PMID:26941699

  11. Dietary arginine affects energy metabolism through polyamine turnover in juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Andersen, Synne M; Holen, Elisabeth; Aksnes, Anders; Rønnestad, Ivar; Zerrahn, Jens-Erik; Espe, Marit

    2013-12-14

    In the present study, quadruplicate groups of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were fed plant protein-based diets with increasing arginine inclusions (range 28·8-37·4 g/kg DM) to investigate whether arginine supplementation affects growth and lipid accumulation through an elevated polyamine turnover. Dietary lysine was held at a constant concentration, just below the requirement. All other amino acids were balanced and equal in the diets. Arginine supplementation increased protein and fat accretion, without affecting the hepatosomatic or visceralsomatic indices. Dietary arginine correlated with putrescine in the liver (R 0·78, P= 0·01) and with ornithine in the muscle, liver and plasma (P= 0·0002, 0·003 and 0·0002, respectively). The mRNA of ornithine decarboxylase, the enzyme producing putrescine, was up-regulated in the white adipose tissue of fish fed the high-arginine inclusion compared with those fed the low-arginine diet. Concomitantly, spermidine/spermine-(N1)-acetyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme for polyamine turnover that consumes acetyl-CoA, showed an increased activity in the liver of fish fed the arginine-supplemented diets. In addition, lower acetyl-CoA concentrations were observed in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet, while ATP, which is used in the process of synthesising spermidine and spermine, did not show a similar trend. Gene expression of the rate-limiting enzyme for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, was up-regulated in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet. Taken together, the data support that increased dietary arginine activates polyamine turnover and β-oxidation in the liver of juvenile Atlantic salmon and may act to improve the metabolic status of the fish.

  12. Low-Turnover Drug Molecules: A Current Challenge for Drug Metabolism Scientists.

    PubMed

    Hutzler, J Matthew; Ring, Barbara J; Anderson, Shelby R

    2015-12-01

    In vitro assays using liver subcellular fractions or suspended hepatocytes for characterizing the metabolism of drug candidates play an integral role in the optimization strategy employed by medicinal chemists. However, conventional in vitro assays have limitations in their ability to predict clearance and generate metabolites for low-turnover (slowly metabolized) drug molecules. Due to a rapid loss in the activity of the drug-metabolizing enzymes, in vitro incubations are typically performed for a maximum of 1 hour with liver microsomes to 4 hours with suspended hepatocytes. Such incubations are insufficient to generate a robust metabolic response for compounds that are slowly metabolized. Thus, the challenge of accurately estimating low human clearance with confidence has emerged to be among the top challenges that drug metabolism scientists are confronted with today. In response, investigators have evaluated novel methodologies to extend incubation times and more sufficiently measure metabolism of low-turnover drugs. These methods include plated human hepatocytes in monoculture, and a novel in vitro methodology using a relay of sequential incubations with suspended cryopreserved hepatocytes. In addition, more complex in vitro cellular models, such as HepatoPac (Hepregen, Medford, MA), a micropatterned hepatocyte-fibroblast coculture system, and the HµREL (Beverley Hills, CA) hepatic coculture system, have been developed and characterized that demonstrate prolonged enzyme activity. In this review, the advantages and disadvantages of each of these in vitro methodologies as it relates to the prediction of clearance and metabolite identification will be described in an effort to provide drug metabolism scientists with the most up-to-date experimental options for dealing with the complex issue of low-turnover drug candidates.

  13. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the mdx mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Marini, Juan C; Sosa, Horacio A; Castillo, Liliana I; Grounds, Miranda D; Fiorotto, Marta L

    2014-01-01

    The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the dietary requirements for these macronutrients at different stages of the disease, are not well-understood. This study used juvenile (4- to 5- wk-old) and adult (12- to 14-wk-old) male dystrophic C57BL/10ScSn-mdx/J and age-matched C57BL/10ScSn/J control male mice to measure total and resting energy expenditure, food intake, spontaneous activity, body composition, whole body protein turnover, and muscle protein synthesis rates. In juvenile mdx mice that have extensive muscle damage, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were higher than in age-matched controls. Adaptations in food intake and decreased activity were insufficient to meet the increased energy and protein needs of juvenile mdx mice and resulted in stunted growth. In (non-growing) adult mdx mice with less severe dystropathology, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were also higher than in age-matched controls. Food intake was sufficient to meet their protein and energy needs, but insufficient to result in fat deposition. These data show that dystropathology impacts the protein and energy needs of mdx mice and that tailored dietary interventions are necessary to redress this imbalance. If not met, the resultant imbalance blunts growth, and may limit the benefits of therapies designed to protect and repair dystrophic muscles.

  14. Identification of Commercial Items Risk Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    profitable ) commercial customer-base. This means that the commercial vendors have several customers and their products are manufactured to meet more...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited IDENTIFICATION OF COMMERCIAL ITEMS...of Commercial Items Risk Factors 6. AUTHOR(S) 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School

  15. Calorimetry of low mass Pu239 items

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, Teresa L; Sampson, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    Calorimetric assay has the reputation of providing the highest precision and accuracy of all nondestructive assay measurements. Unfortunately, non-destructive assay practitioners and measurement consumers often extend, inappropriately, the high precision and accuracy of calorimetric assay to very low mass items. One purpose of this document is to present more realistic expectations for the random uncertainties associated with calorimetric assay for weapons grade plutonium items with masses of 200 grams or less.

  16. NAC Aftermarket Brake Components Project (Secondary Items)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-25

    NAC Aftermarket Brake Components Project (Secondary Items) SAE Paper #2006-01-3192 25 September 2006, Grapevine Version R4 (Final) Report...REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NAC Aftermarket Brake Components Project (Secondary Items) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 NAC Aftermarket Brake Components Project By: Leo Miller, USA

  17. 15 CFR 742.15 - Encryption items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... encryption software are distinguished from controls on other software regulated under the EAR. (a) Licensing... items (“EI”) classified under ECCN 5A002.a.1, a.2, a.5, a.6 and a.9; 5D002.a or c.1 for equipment... items may be exported under the provisions of License Exception ENC set forth in § 740.17 of the...

  18. When the Going Gets Tough: Direct, Buffering and Indirect Effects of Social Support on Turnover Intention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomaki, Georgia; DeLongis, Anita; Frey, Daniela; Short, Kathy; Woehrle, Trish

    2010-01-01

    We examined the role of social support in turnover intention among new teachers. First, we tested and found evidence for a direct negative relationship between social support and turnover intention. Second, we tested the social support buffer hypothesis, and found that teachers with higher social support had lower turnover intention in the face of…

  19. Turnover Intent in an Urban Community College: Strategies for Faculty Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dee, Jay R.

    This study examines faculty turnover intent in an urban community college, with a specific focus on the relationship between turnover intent and three structural variables: level of faculty autonomy, amount of support for faculty innovation, and degree of communication openness in the college. Turnover intent is defined as the degree of likelihood…

  20. A Review of the Literature on Administrator Turnover: Why They Move on or Are Displaced.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Bruce A.

    Employee turnover contributes to lost production, disrupts normal business practices, and is expensive. This literature review examines turnover of three administrator positions: the school superintendent, the executive director of nonprofit agencies, and the chief executive officer of for-profit corporations. The most cited reason for turnover of…

  1. Measuring Worker Turnover in Long-Term Care: Lessons from the Better Jobs Better Care Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piercy, Kathleen Walsh, Ed.; Barry, Theresa; Kemper, Peter; Brannon, S. Diane

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Turnover among direct-care workers (DCWs) continues to be a challenge in long-term care. Both policy makers and provider organizations recognize this issue as a major concern and are designing efforts to reduce turnover among these workers. However, there is currently no standardized method of measuring turnover to define the scope of the…

  2. Blind Spots: Small Rural Communities and High Turnover in the Superintendency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamrath, Barry; Brunner, C. Cryss

    2014-01-01

    This article examines high superintendency turnover through rural community members' perceptions of such attrition in their districts. Findings indicate that community members perceived high turnover as negative and believed that turnover was created by financial pressures, rural community resistance to educational trends, and bias against…

  3. Superintendent Turnover in Kentucky. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 113

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jerry; Huffman, Tyler; Madden, Karen; Shope, Shane

    2011-01-01

    This study examines superintendent turnover in Kentucky public school districts for 1998/99-2007/08, looking at how turnover varies by rural status, Appalachian and non-Appalachian region, and 2007/08 school district characteristics. Key findings include: (1) Kentucky school districts averaged one superintendent turnover during 1998/99-2007/08;…

  4. Modeling personnel turnover in the parametric organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1991-01-01

    A model is developed for simulating the dynamics of a newly formed organization, credible during all phases of organizational development. The model development process is broken down into the activities of determining the tasks required for parametric cost analysis (PCA), determining the skills required for each PCA task, determining the skills available in the applicant marketplace, determining the structure of the model, implementing the model, and testing it. The model, parameterized by the likelihood of job function transition, has demonstrated by the capability to represent the transition of personnel across functional boundaries within a parametric organization using a linear dynamical system, and the ability to predict required staffing profiles to meet functional needs at the desired time. The model can be extended by revisions of the state and transition structure to provide refinements in functional definition for the parametric and extended organization.

  5. A model for statistical forecasting of menu item demand.

    PubMed

    Wood, S D

    1977-03-01

    Foodservice planning necessarily begins with a forecast of demand. Menu item demand forecasts are needed to make food item production decisions, work force and facility acquisition plans, and resource allocation and scheduling decisions. As these forecasts become more accurate, the tasks of adjusting original plans are minimized. Forecasting menu item demand need no longer be the tedious and inaccurate chore which is so prevalent in hospital food management systems today. In most instances, data may be easily collected as a by-product of existing activities to support accurate statistical time series predictions. Forecasts of meal tray count, based on a rather sophisticated model, multiplied by average menu item preference percentages can provide accurate predictions of demand. Once the forecasting models for tray count have been developed, simple worksheets can be prepared to facilitate manual generation of the forecasts on a continuing basis. These forecasts can then be recorded on a worksheet that reflects average patient preference percentages (of tray count), so that the product of the percentages with the tray count prediction produces menu item predictions on the same worksheet. As the patient preference percentages stabilize, data collection can be reduced to the daily recording of tray count and one-step-ahead forecase errors for each meal with a periodic gathering of patient preference percentages to update and/or verify the existing date. The author is more thoroughly investigating the cost/benefit relationship of such a system through the analysis of new empirical data. It is clear that the system offers potential for reducing costs at the diet category or total tray count levels. It is felt that these benefits transfer down to the meal item level as well as offer ways of generating more accurate predictions, with perhaps only minor (if any) labor time increments. Research in progress will delineate expected savings more explicitly. The approach

  6. Endospore abundance and D:L-amino acid modeling of bacterial turnover in holocene marine sediment (Aarhus Bay)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langerhuus, Alice T.; Røy, Hans; Lever, Mark A.; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Lomstein, Bente Aa.

    2012-12-01

    In order to study bacterial activity, and turnover times of bacterial necromass and biomass in marine sediment, two stations from the Aarhus Bay, Denmark were analyzed. Sediment cores were up to 11 m deep and covered a timescale from the present to ˜11,000 years ago. Sediment was analyzed for total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA), total hydrolysable amino sugars, the bacterial endospore marker dipicolinic acid (DPA), and amino acid enantiomers (L- and D-form) of aspartic acid. Turnover times of bacterial necromass and vegetative cells, as well as carbon oxidation rates were estimated by use of the D:L-amino acid racemization model. Diagenetic indicators were applied to evaluate the diagenetic state of the sedimentary organic matter. The contribution of amino acids to total organic carbon, and the ratio between the amino acids aspartic acid and glutamic acid, and their respective non protein degradation products, β-alanine and γ-amino butyric acid, all indicated increasing degradation state of the organic matter with sediment depth and age. Quantification of DPA showed that endospores were abundant, and increased with depth relative to vegetative cells. Most of the amino acids (97%) could be ascribed to microbial necromass, i.e. the remains of dead bacterial cells. Model estimates showed that the turnover times of microbial necromass were in the range of 0.5-1 × 105 years, while turnover times of vegetative cells were in the range of tens to hundreds of years. The turnover time of the TOC pool increased with depth in the sediment, indicating that the TOC pool became progressively more refractory and unavailable to microorganisms with depth and age of the organic matter.

  7. 17 CFR 229.1115 - (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AB) § 229.1115 (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments. This item relates to derivative.... Instructions 2, 3 and 5 to Item 1114 of this Regulation AB apply to the information contemplated by...

  8. 17 CFR 229.1115 - (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... AB) § 229.1115 (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments. This item relates to derivative.... Instructions 2, 3 and 5 to Item 1114 of this Regulation AB apply to the information contemplated by...

  9. 17 CFR 229.1115 - (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AB) § 229.1115 (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments. This item relates to derivative.... Instructions 2, 3 and 5 to Item 1114 of this Regulation AB apply to the information contemplated by...

  10. 17 CFR 229.1115 - (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AB) § 229.1115 (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments. This item relates to derivative.... Instructions 2, 3 and 5 to Item 1114 of this Regulation AB apply to the information contemplated by...

  11. 17 CFR 229.1115 - (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AB) § 229.1115 (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments. This item relates to derivative.... Instructions 2, 3 and 5 to Item 1114 of this Regulation AB apply to the information contemplated by...

  12. Alternate item types: continuing the quest for authentic testing.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Anne; Kenny, Lorraine E

    2009-03-01

    Many test developers suggest that multiple-choice items can be used to evaluate critical thinking if the items are focused on measuring higher order thinking ability. The literature supports the use of alternate item types to assess additional competencies, such as higher level cognitive processing and critical thinking, as well as ways to allow examinees to demonstrate their competencies differently. This research study surveyed nurses after taking a test composed of alternate item types paired with multiple-choice items. The participants were asked to provide opinions regarding the items and the item formats. Demographic information was asked. In addition, information was collected as the participants responded to the items. The results of this study reveal that the participants thought that, in general, the items were more authentic and allowed them to demonstrate their competence better than multiple-choice items did. Further investigation into the optimal blend of alternate items and multiple-choice items is needed.

  13. Modeling Personnel Turnover in the Parametric Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1991-01-01

    A primary issue in organizing a new parametric cost analysis function is to determine the skill mix and number of personnel required. The skill mix can be obtained by a functional decomposition of the tasks required within the organization and a matrixed correlation with educational or experience backgrounds. The number of personnel is a function of the skills required to cover all tasks, personnel skill background and cross training, the intensity of the workload for each task, migration through various tasks by personnel along a career path, personnel hiring limitations imposed by management and the applicant marketplace, personnel training limitations imposed by management and personnel capability, and the rate at which personnel leave the organization for whatever reason. Faced with the task of relating all of these organizational facets in order to grow a parametric cost analysis (PCA) organization from scratch, it was decided that a dynamic model was required in order to account for the obvious dynamics of the forming organization. The challenge was to create such a simple model which would be credible during all phases of organizational development. The model development process was broken down into the activities of determining the tasks required for PCA, determining the skills required for each PCA task, determining the skills available in the applicant marketplace, determining the structure of the dynamic model, implementing the dynamic model, and testing the dynamic model.

  14. Turnover of Biogenic Amines in the Hypothalamus of Rats during Pyrogen Fever

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, P. E.; Williams, B. A.

    1979-01-01

    Many pharmacological studies have implicated the biogenic amines in the hypothalamus as playing a role in the production of fever, but few investigations of endogenous neurochemicals have been made during fever. Turnover rates of transmitters utilizing radioactive precursors may be one of the most accurate measurements of activity in brain regions. The present study was designed to measure the turnover of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) in the hypothalamus of rats during pyrogen fever. Salmonella typhosa (Wyeth, 8 units) was previously found in our laboratory to produce a significant hyperthermia in most rats by 2.5 hours. This pyrogen (N = l2) or saline control (N = 8) was injected intraperitoneally and the rats killed 2.75 hours later. Rectal temperatures (Tr) were monitored continuously with thermocouples taped to the tail and recorded automatically every 3 minutes. Half of each group received an injection of radioactive precursors, (3)H-tryptophan (0.5 mCi) and (3)H-tryptophan (1.0 mCi), via an indwelling jugular catheter 60 minutes before killing, and the other half at 90 minutes. The rats were killed by near freezing in liquid nitrogen and the brains dissected in the cold. Turnover was measured by the method of Lane (Life Sci 21, 1101, 1977). At the time of killing most of the pyrogen group showed a significant (p < .02) increase (mean +/- s.e.m.) in Tr above pre injection levels (0.75 +/- 0.13 C, N = 10). The saline group showed no change (-0.025 +/- 0.16, N = 8), and the difference between groups was also significant. No significant differences were found in the levels of the amines between the pyrogen and saline groups. A significant difference was found in the specific activity of NE between the 60 minute pyrogen and saline groups (4.41 +/- 0.41 vs 2.6 +/- 0.51 dpm/pmole) but no change in turnover. This suggests an increased accumulation of (3)H-NE in the pyrogen group, but no change in utilization. An increased turnover

  15. Food item use by coyote sex and age classes

    SciTech Connect

    Cypher, B.L.; Spencer, K.A.; Scrivner, J.H.

    1995-10-01

    Food item use by coyotes was compared between sexes and among age classes at the Naval Petroleum Reserves, California. Item use did not differ significantly between males and females. Although leporid was the item most frequently used by all age classes, item use differed significantly between pups (< 1 year), yearlings (1 year), and adults (> 1 year), probably due to differential use of secondary items. Variation in item use among age classes could potentially bias results of coyote food habit studies.

  16. Nursing assistant turnover in nursing homes and need satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Caudill, M; Patrick, M

    1989-06-01

    1. Level of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is basic physiological needs measured by salary, adequate housing, and food. Attainment of these needs increased the length of stay of nursing assistants in nursing homes. 2. Safety and security (level 2) influenced length of stay of nursing assistants. Those with benefits of retirement, vacation, and holiday pay tended to have less turnover. 3. Praise by the patient and family was most important to nursing assistants. Belonging to a peer group and praise by charge nurse also decreased turnover of nursing assistants (level 3). 4. Level 4, self-esteem measured by input into decisions and being able to criticize, increased length of stay of nursing assistants.

  17. Assembly and Turnover of Caveolae: What Do We Really Know?

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bing; Copeland, Courtney A.; Tiwari, Ajit; Kenworthy, Anne K.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to containing highly dynamic nanoscale domains, the plasma membranes of many cell types are decorated with caveolae, flask-shaped domains enriched in the structural protein caveolin-1 (Cav1). The importance of caveolae in numerous cellular functions and processes has become well-recognized, and recent years have seen dramatic advances in our understanding of how caveolae assemble and the mechanisms control the turnover of Cav1. At the same time, work from our lab and others have revealed that commonly utilized strategies such as overexpression and tagging of Cav1 have unexpectedly complex consequences on the trafficking and fate of Cav1. Here, we discuss the implications of these findings for current models of caveolae biogenesis and Cav1 turnover. In addition, we discuss how disease-associated mutants of Cav1 impact caveolae assembly and outline open questions in this still-emerging area. PMID:27446919

  18. Regulation of protein turnover by heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Bozaykut, Perinur; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal; Karademir, Betul

    2014-12-01

    Protein turnover reflects the balance between synthesis and degradation of proteins, and it is a crucial process for the maintenance of the cellular protein pool. The folding of proteins, refolding of misfolded proteins, and also degradation of misfolded and damaged proteins are involved in the protein quality control (PQC) system. Correct protein folding and degradation are controlled by many different factors, one of the most important of which is the heat shock protein family. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are in the class of molecular chaperones, which may prevent the inappropriate interaction of proteins and induce correct folding. On the other hand, these proteins play significant roles in the degradation pathways, including endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD), the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and autophagy. This review focuses on the emerging role of HSPs in the regulation of protein turnover; the effects of HSPs on the degradation machineries ERAD, autophagy, and proteasome; as well as the role of posttranslational modifications in the PQC system.

  19. Signaling Pathways That Control mRNA Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Denmon, Andria P.

    2013-01-01

    Cells regulate their genomes mainly at the level of transcription and at the level of mRNA decay. While regulation at the level of transcription is clearly important, the regulation of mRNA turnover by signaling networks is essential for a rapid response to external stimuli. Signaling pathways result in posttranslational modification of RNA binding proteins by phosphorylation, ubiquitination, methylation, acetylation etc. These modifications are important for rapid remodeling of dynamic ribonucleoprotein complexes and triggering mRNA decay. Understanding how these posttranslational modifications alter gene expression is therefore a fundamental question in biology. In this review we highlight recent findings on how signaling pathways and cell cycle checkpoints involving phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and arginine methylation affect mRNA turnover. PMID:23602935

  20. Biosynthesis, Turnover, and Functions of Chitin in Insects.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kun Yan; Merzendorfer, Hans; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Jianzhen; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is a major component of the exoskeleton and the peritrophic matrix of insects. It forms complex structures in association with different assortments of cuticle and peritrophic matrix proteins to yield biocomposites with a wide range of physicochemical and mechanical properties. The growth and development of insects are intimately coupled with the biosynthesis, turnover, and modification of chitin. The genes encoding numerous enzymes of chitin metabolism and proteins that associate with and organize chitin have been uncovered by bioinformatics analyses. Many of these proteins are encoded by sets of large gene families. There is specialization among members within each family, which function in particular tissues or developmental stages. Chitin-containing matrices are dynamically modified at every developmental stage and are under developmental and/or physiological control. A thorough understanding of the diverse processes associated with the assembly and turnover of these chitinous matrices offers many strategies to achieve selective pest control.

  1. Bone turnover markers: Emerging tool in the management of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sahana; Kapoor, Nitin; Bondu, Joseph Dian; Thomas, Nihal; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil

    2016-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue which undergoes constant remodeling throughout the life span. Bone turnover is balanced with coupling of bone formation and resorption at various rates leading to continuous remodeling of bone. A study of bone turnover markers (BTMs) provides an insight of the dynamics of bone turnover in many metabolic bone disorders. An increase in bone turnover seen with aging and pathological states such as osteoporosis leads to deterioration of bone microarchitecture and thus contributes to an increase in the risk of fracture independent of low bone mineral density (BMD). These microarchitectural alterations affecting the bone quality can be assessed by BTMs and thus may serve as a complementary tool to BMD in the assessment of fracture risk. A systematic search of literature regarding BTMs was carried out using the PubMed database for the purpose of this review. Various reliable, rapid, and cost-effective automated assays of BTMs with good sensitivity are available for the management of osteoporosis. However, BTMs are subjected to various preanalytical and analytical variations necessitating strict sample collection and assays methods along with utilizing ethnicity-based reference standards for different populations. Estimation of fracture risk and monitoring the adherence and response to therapy, which is a challenge in a chronic, asymptomatic disease such as osteoporosis, are the most important applications of measuring BTMs. This review describes the physiology of bone remodeling, various conventional and novel BTMs, and BTM assays and their role in the assessment of fracture risk and monitoring response to treatment with antiresorptive or anabolic agents. PMID:27867890

  2. Organizational Strategies for Adapting to High Rates of Employee Turnover.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    disrupt work. In addition, social involvement in the workplace has been identified as an important factor contributing to employee commitment (Mowday...scope of this paper to discuss how employee commitment to organizations can be increased (see Mowday et al., 1982). Where organizations are...successful in building and sustaining high levels of employee commitment , the probability of turnover itself, as well as the chance that work will be

  3. Pattern and process in Amazon tree turnover, 1976-2001.

    PubMed

    Phillips, O L; Baker, T R; Arroyo, L; Higuchi, N; Killeen, T J; Laurance, W F; Lewis, S L; Lloyd, J; Malhi, Y; Monteagudo, A; Neill, D A; Vargas, P Núñez; Silva, J N M; Terborgh, J; Martínez, R Vásquez; Alexiades, M; Almeida, S; Brown, S; Chave, J; Comiskey, J A; Czimczik, C I; Di Fiore, A; Erwin, T; Kuebler, C; Laurance, S G; Nascimento, H E M; Olivier, J; Palacios, W; Patiño, S; Pitman, N C A; Quesada, C A; Saldias, M; Lezama, A Torres; Vinceti, B

    2004-03-29

    Previous work has shown that tree turnover, tree biomass and large liana densities have increased in mature tropical forest plots in the late twentieth century. These results point to a concerted shift in forest ecological processes that may already be having significant impacts on terrestrial carbon stocks, fluxes and biodiversity. However, the findings have proved controversial, partly because a rather limited number of permanent plots have been monitored for rather short periods. The aim of this paper is to characterize regional-scale patterns of 'tree turnover' (the rate with which trees die and recruit into a population) by using improved datasets now available for Amazonia that span the past 25 years. Specifically, we assess whether concerted changes in turnover are occurring, and if so whether they are general throughout the Amazon or restricted to one region or environmental zone. In addition, we ask whether they are driven by changes in recruitment, mortality or both. We find that: (i) trees 10 cm or more in diameter recruit and die twice as fast on the richer soils of southern and western Amazonia than on the poorer soils of eastern and central Amazonia; (ii) turnover rates have increased throughout Amazonia over the past two decades; (iii) mortality and recruitment rates have both increased significantly in every region and environmental zone, with the exception of mortality in eastern Amazonia; (iv) recruitment rates have consistently exceeded mortality rates; (v) absolute increases in recruitment and mortality rates are greatest in western Amazonian sites; and (vi) mortality appears to be lagging recruitment at regional scales. These spatial patterns and temporal trends are not caused by obvious artefacts in the data or the analyses. The trends cannot be directly driven by a mortality driver (such as increased drought or fragmentation-related death) because the biomass in these forests has simultaneously increased. Our findings therefore indicate that

  4. Broadcast News Staff Sources and Turnover: Implications for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Vernon A.

    To evaluate the job market for college graduates in the field of broadcast news, a study was designed to provide an up-to-date assessment of turnover and staff sources and to ascertain the number of job openings over a one-year period, as well as the sources of people hired for those positions in various types of broadcast news operations.…

  5. Pattern and process in Amazon tree turnover, 1976-2001.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, O L; Baker, T R; Arroyo, L; Higuchi, N; Killeen, T J; Laurance, W F; Lewis, S L; Lloyd, J; Malhi, Y; Monteagudo, A; Neill, D A; Vargas, P Núñez; Silva, J N M; Terborgh, J; Martínez, R Vásquez; Alexiades, M; Almeida, S; Brown, S; Chave, J; Comiskey, J A; Czimczik, C I; Di Fiore, A; Erwin, T; Kuebler, C; Laurance, S G; Nascimento, H E M; Olivier, J; Palacios, W; Patiño, S; Pitman, N C A; Quesada, C A; Saldias, M; Lezama, A Torres; Vinceti, B

    2004-01-01

    Previous work has shown that tree turnover, tree biomass and large liana densities have increased in mature tropical forest plots in the late twentieth century. These results point to a concerted shift in forest ecological processes that may already be having significant impacts on terrestrial carbon stocks, fluxes and biodiversity. However, the findings have proved controversial, partly because a rather limited number of permanent plots have been monitored for rather short periods. The aim of this paper is to characterize regional-scale patterns of 'tree turnover' (the rate with which trees die and recruit into a population) by using improved datasets now available for Amazonia that span the past 25 years. Specifically, we assess whether concerted changes in turnover are occurring, and if so whether they are general throughout the Amazon or restricted to one region or environmental zone. In addition, we ask whether they are driven by changes in recruitment, mortality or both. We find that: (i) trees 10 cm or more in diameter recruit and die twice as fast on the richer soils of southern and western Amazonia than on the poorer soils of eastern and central Amazonia; (ii) turnover rates have increased throughout Amazonia over the past two decades; (iii) mortality and recruitment rates have both increased significantly in every region and environmental zone, with the exception of mortality in eastern Amazonia; (iv) recruitment rates have consistently exceeded mortality rates; (v) absolute increases in recruitment and mortality rates are greatest in western Amazonian sites; and (vi) mortality appears to be lagging recruitment at regional scales. These spatial patterns and temporal trends are not caused by obvious artefacts in the data or the analyses. The trends cannot be directly driven by a mortality driver (such as increased drought or fragmentation-related death) because the biomass in these forests has simultaneously increased. Our findings therefore indicate that

  6. The effects of autonomy and empowerment on employee turnover: test of a multilevel model in teams.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Lei; Lee, Thomas W

    2011-11-01

    Extending research on voluntary turnover in the team setting, this study adopts a multilevel self-determination theoretical approach to examine the unique roles of individual and social-contextual motivational precursors, autonomy orientation and autonomy support, in reducing team member voluntary turnover. Analysis of multilevel time-lagged data collected from 817 employees on 115 teams indicates that psychological empowerment mediates the main effect of autonomy orientation and the interactive effect of autonomy support and its differentiation on a team member's voluntary turnover. The findings have meaningful implications for the turnover and self-determination literatures as well as for managers who endeavor to prevent voluntary turnover in teams.

  7. Staff Turnover in Assertive Community Treatment (Act) Teams: The Role of Team Climate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xi; Wholey, Douglas R; Cain, Cindy; Natafgi, Nabil

    2017-03-01

    Staff turnover in Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) teams can result in interrupted services and diminished support for clients. This paper examines the effect of team climate, defined as team members' shared perceptions of their work environment, on turnover and individual outcomes that mediate the climate-turnover relationship. We focus on two climate dimensions: safety and quality climate and constructive conflict climate. Using survey data collected from 26 ACT teams, our analyses highlight the importance of safety and quality climate in reducing turnover, and job satisfaction as the main mediator linking team climate to turnover. The findings offer practical implications for team management.

  8. Determinants of local extinction and turnover rates in urban bird communities.

    PubMed

    Husté, Aurélie; Boulinier, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    Studying the effects of urbanization on the dynamics of communities has become a priority for biodiversity conservation. The consequences of urbanization are mainly an increased fragmentation of the original landscapes associated with a decrease in the amount of favorable habitats and an increased pressure of human activities on the remaining patches suitable for wildlife. Patterns of bird species richness have been studied at different levels of urbanization, but little is known about the temporal dynamics of animal communities in urban landscapes. In particular, urbanization is expected to have stronger negative effects on migratory breeding bird communities than on sedentary ones, which should lead to different patterns of change in composition. Using an estimation method accounting for heterogeneity in species detection probability and data collected between 2001 and 2003 within a suburban area near the city of Paris, France, we tested whether these communities differ in their local extinction and turnover rates. We considered the potential effects of patch size and distance to Paris' center as a measure of the degree of urbanization around the patches. As expected, local rates of extinction and turnover were higher for migratory than for sedentary species, and they were negatively related to patch size for migratory species. Mean species richness of the sedentary species increased during the study period and their local turnover rate was negatively related to the distance to the urban core, showing a trend to colonize the most urban patches. These results highlight the very dynamic nature of the composition of some local bird communities in fragmented habitats and help to identify factors affecting colonization and extinction.

  9. Reconciling findings of emotion-induced memory enhancement and impairment of preceding items

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Marisa; Mather, Mara

    2009-01-01

    A large body of work reveals that people remember emotionally arousing information better than neutral information. However, previous research reveals contradictory effects of emotional events on memory for neutral events that precede or follow them: in some studies emotionally arousing items impair memory for immediately preceding or following items and in others arousing items enhance memory for preceding items. By demonstrating both emotion-induced enhancement and impairment, Experiments 1 and 2 clarified the conditions under which these effects are likely to occur. The results suggest that emotion-induced enhancement is most likely to occur for neutral items that: (1) precede (and so are poised to predict the onset of) emotionally arousing items, (2) have high attentional weights at encoding, and (3) are tested after a delay period of a week rather than within the same experiment session. In contrast, emotion-induced impairment is most likely to occur for neutral items near the onset of emotional arousal that are overshadowed by highly activated competing items during encoding. PMID:20001121

  10. Computational model of collagen turnover in carotid arteries during hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sáez, P; Peña, E; Tarbell, J M; Martínez, M A

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that biological tissues adapt their properties because of different mechanical and chemical stimuli. The goal of this work is to study the collagen turnover in the arterial tissue of hypertensive patients through a coupled computational mechano-chemical model. Although it has been widely studied experimentally, computational models dealing with the mechano-chemical approach are not. The present approach can be extended easily to study other aspects of bone remodeling or collagen degradation in heart diseases. The model can be divided into three different stages. First, we study the smooth muscle cell synthesis of different biological substances due to over-stretching during hypertension. Next, we study the mass-transport of these substances along the arterial wall. The last step is to compute the turnover of collagen based on the amount of these substances in the arterial wall which interact with each other to modify the turnover rate of collagen. We simulate this process in a finite element model of a real human carotid artery. The final results show the well-known stiffening of the arterial wall due to the increase in the collagen content.

  11. Long-term sensitivity of soil carbon turnover to warming.

    PubMed

    Knorr, W; Prentice, I C; House, J I; Holland, E A

    2005-01-20

    The sensitivity of soil carbon to warming is a major uncertainty in projections of carbon dioxide concentration and climate. Experimental studies overwhelmingly indicate increased soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition at higher temperatures, resulting in increased carbon dioxide emissions from soils. However, recent findings have been cited as evidence against increased soil carbon emissions in a warmer world. In soil warming experiments, the initially increased carbon dioxide efflux returns to pre-warming rates within one to three years, and apparent carbon pool turnover times are insensitive to temperature. It has already been suggested that the apparent lack of temperature dependence could be an artefact due to neglecting the extreme heterogeneity of soil carbon, but no explicit model has yet been presented that can reconcile all the above findings. Here we present a simple three-pool model that partitions SOC into components with different intrinsic turnover rates. Using this model, we show that the results of all the soil-warming experiments are compatible with long-term temperature sensitivity of SOC turnover: they can be explained by rapid depletion of labile SOC combined with the negligible response of non-labile SOC on experimental timescales. Furthermore, we present evidence that non-labile SOC is more sensitive to temperature than labile SOC, implying that the long-term positive feedback of soil decomposition in a warming world may be even stronger than predicted by global models.

  12. Turnover of human and monkey plasma kininogens in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, T; Wing, D A; Pierce, J V; Pettit, G W

    1979-01-01

    The normal metabolic turnover of plasma kininogens was studied by measuring the disappearance of intravenously administered radiolabeled human and monkey plasma kininogens from the circulation of healthy adult rhesus monkeys. Curves obtained by plotting log radioactivity against time could be expressed as double exponential equations, with the first term representing diffusion, and the second, catabolism. No significant difference between the turnovers of human and monkey kininogens was observed. The difference between the t1/2 of high molecular weight kininogen (25.95 +/- 1.60 h) (mean +/- SEM) and that of low molecular weight kininogen (18.94 +/- 1.93 h) was only marginally significant (P less than 0.05). In contrast, a highly significant (P less than 0.001) difference in their mean catabolic rates (1.12 +/- 0.08 d-1 for high molecular weight kininogen vs. 2.07 +/- 0.09 d-1 for low molecular weight kininogen) was observed. These differences between the two kininogens were attributed to differences in their distribution between the intra- and extravascular pools. Studies of kininogen turnover will be useful in elucidating the in vivo functions of the various kininogens in health as well as during clinical illness. PMID:105015

  13. No turnover in lens lipids for the entire human lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Jessica R; Levchenko, Vladimir A; Blanksby, Stephen J; Mitchell, Todd W; Williams, Alan; Truscott, Roger JW

    2015-01-01

    Lipids are critical to cellular function and it is generally accepted that lipid turnover is rapid and dysregulation in turnover results in disease (Dawidowicz 1987; Phillips et al., 2009; Liu et al., 2013). In this study, we present an intriguing counter-example by demonstrating that in the center of the human ocular lens, there is no lipid turnover in fiber cells during the entire human lifespan. This discovery, combined with prior demonstration of pronounced changes in the lens lipid composition over a lifetime (Hughes et al., 2012), suggests that some lipid classes break down in the body over several decades, whereas others are stable. Such substantial changes in lens cell membranes may play a role in the genesis of age-related eye disorders. Whether long-lived lipids are present in other tissues is not yet known, but this may prove to be important in understanding the development of age-related diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06003.001 PMID:25760082

  14. Turnover and dispersal of prairie falcons in southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehman, Robert N.; Steenhof, Karen; Carpenter, L.B.; Kochert, Michael N.

    2000-01-01

    We studied Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus) breeding dispersal, natal dispersal, and turnover at nesting areas in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area (NCA) from 1971- 95. Of 61 nesting areas where falcons identified one year were known to be present or absent the following year, 57% had a different falcon. This turnover rate was 2-3 times higher than that reported elsewhere for large falcons, and may have been related to high nesting densities in the NCA. Turnover at nesting areas was independent of nesting success in the previous year, but was significantly higher for females nesting on large cliffs. Mean distance between natal and breeding locations for 26 falcons banded as nestlings and later encountered as nesting adults was 8.9 km. Natal dispersal distances were similar for males and females, but more than twice as many males marked as nestlings were later encountered nesting in the NCA. Fourteen adult falcons found on different nesting areas in successive years moved an average of 1.5 km between nesting areas; males dispersed significantly farther than females. Natal and breeding dispersal distances in the NCA were lower than those reported for Prairie Falcons in other study areas. Only four falcons banded as nestlings were found outside NCA boundaries during the breeding period, and only one of these birds was known to be occupying a nesting area. We encountered no falcons banded outside the NCA occupying nesting areas in the NCA during this study.

  15. Neuronal glucoprivation enhances hypothalamic histamine turnover in rats.

    PubMed

    Oohara, A; Yoshimatsu, H; Kurokawa, M; Oishi, R; Saeki, K; Sakata, T

    1994-08-01

    Histamine (HA) turnover in the rat hypothalamus following insufficient energy supply due to glucoprivation was examined after administration of insulin or 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG). HA turnover was assessed by accumulation of tele-methylhistamine (t-MH), a major metabolite of brain HA, following administration of pargyline. Intraperitoneal injection of 1, 2, and 4 U/kg of insulin, which had no influence on steady-state levels of HA and t-MH, increased pargyline-induced accumulation of t-MH. Accumulation of t-MH due to pargyline was inversely related to the concomitant plasma glucose concentration after different doses of insulin. The level of t-MH accumulated by pargyline did not change compared with that of controls, when a euglycemic condition was maintained or insulin at a dose of 6 mU per rat was infused into the third cerebroventricle. Intracerebroventricular infusion of 24 mumol per rat of 2-DG, which had no influence on steady-state levels of HA and t-MH, increased the level of t-MH enhanced by pargyline. The results indicate that an increase in hypothalamic HA turnover in response to glucoprivation may be involved in homeostatic regulation of energy metabolism in the brain.

  16. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum turnover by selective autophagy.

    PubMed

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Heinrich, Theresa; Mari, Muriel; Grumati, Paolo; Huebner, Antje K; Akutsu, Masato; Liebmann, Lutz; Stolz, Alexandra; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koch, Nicole; Mauthe, Mario; Katona, Istvan; Qualmann, Britta; Weis, Joachim; Reggiori, Fulvio; Kurth, Ingo; Hübner, Christian A; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-06-18

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular endomembrane system, enabling protein and lipid synthesis, ion homeostasis, quality control of newly synthesized proteins and organelle communication. Constant ER turnover and modulation is needed to meet different cellular requirements and autophagy has an important role in this process. However, its underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unexplained. Here we show that members of the FAM134 reticulon protein family are ER-resident receptors that bind to autophagy modifiers LC3 and GABARAP, and facilitate ER degradation by autophagy ('ER-phagy'). Downregulation of FAM134B protein in human cells causes an expansion of the ER, while FAM134B overexpression results in ER fragmentation and lysosomal degradation. Mutant FAM134B proteins that cause sensory neuropathy in humans are unable to act as ER-phagy receptors. Consistently, disruption of Fam134b in mice causes expansion of the ER, inhibits ER turnover, sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptotic cell death and leads to degeneration of sensory neurons. Therefore, selective ER-phagy via FAM134 proteins is indispensable for mammalian cell homeostasis and controls ER morphology and turnover in mice and humans.

  17. Development and assessment of floor and ceiling items for the PROMIS physical function item bank

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Disability and Physical Function (PF) outcome assessment has had limited ability to measure functional status at the floor (very poor functional abilities) or the ceiling (very high functional abilities). We sought to identify, develop and evaluate new floor and ceiling items to enable broader and more precise assessment of PF outcomes for the NIH Patient-Reported-Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). Methods We conducted two cross-sectional studies using NIH PROMIS item improvement protocols with expert review, participant survey and focus group methods. In Study 1, respondents with low PF abilities evaluated new floor items, and those with high PF abilities evaluated new ceiling items for clarity, importance and relevance. In Study 2, we compared difficulty ratings of new floor items by low functioning respondents and ceiling items by high functioning respondents to reference PROMIS PF-10 items. We used frequencies, percentages, means and standard deviations to analyze the data. Results In Study 1, low (n = 84) and high (n = 90) functioning respondents were mostly White, women, 70 years old, with some college, and disability scores of 0.62 and 0.30. More than 90% of the 31 new floor and 31 new ceiling items were rated as clear, important and relevant, leaving 26 ceiling and 30 floor items for Study 2. Low (n = 246) and high (n = 637) functioning Study 2 respondents were mostly White, women, 70 years old, with some college, and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) scores of 1.62 and 0.003. Compared to difficulty ratings of reference items, ceiling items were rated to be 10% more to greater than 40% more difficult to do, and floor items were rated to be about 12% to nearly 90% less difficult to do. Conclusions These new floor and ceiling items considerably extend the measurable range of physical function at either extreme. They will help improve instrument performance in populations with broad functional ranges and those concentrated at

  18. Influence of cortisol, gonadal steroids and an energy deficit on biochemical indicators of bone turnover in Swine.

    PubMed

    Weiler, U; Finsler, S; Claus, R

    2003-03-01

    In the pig a high growth potential seems to favour a disposition for skeletal problems. Hormones of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I axis as well as cortisol and gonadal steroids are endocrine determinants of the anabolic potential but their effects on bone turnover in pigs have not been described. Thus, key hormones were either infused for 7 days (cortisol, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), oestradiol) or influenced by Metyrapone (inhibition of cortisol synthesis) or energy deficit (increasing GH). Each treatment was carried out in six growing barrows/treatment. Bone turnover was characterized by daily measurements indirect parameter of osteoblastic and osteoclastic activity, osteocalcin (OC) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) respectively. All treatments except cortisol infusion seemed to favour bone formation, as they led either to a pronounced increase in OC (Metyrapone: +14%) or to significantly reduced TRAP (DHT: -9%, E2: -17%, energy deficit: -25%) followed by significantly higher OC (DHT: +9%, E2: +6%, energy deficit: +18%). Cortisol infusion affected bone loss mainly by a severe inhibition of osteoblastic activity (OC: -61%). Some reactions are explained by direct effects of the infused gonadal steroids on bone cells (inhibition of osteoclasts) or of the experimentally modified cortisol levels (inhibition of osteoblasts by cortisol). Other effects seem to be mediated by concomitant changes of IGF-I (inhibition of osteoclasts after energy deficit or cortisol) and GH-secretion (increased osteoblastic activity during energy deficit), respectively. Consequences for co-ordinated bone turnover are discussed.

  19. Measurement Assurance for End-Item Users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mimbs, Scott M.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of a Quality Management System (QMS) as specified in ISO 9001 and AS9100 is to assure the end product meets specifications and customer requirements. Measuring devices, often called measuring and test equipments (MTE), provide the evidence of product conformity to the prescribed requirements. Therefore the processes which employ MTE can become a weak link to the overall QMS if proper attention is not given to development and execution of these processes. Traditionally, calibration of MTE is given more focus in industry standards and process control efforts than the equally important proper usage of the same equipment. It is a common complaint of calibration laboratory personnel that MTE users are only interested in "a sticker." If the QMS requires the MTE "to demonstrate conformity of the product," then the quality of the measurement process must be adequate for the task. This leads to an ad hoc definition; measurement assurance is a discipline that assures that all processes, activities, environments, standards, and procedures involved in making a measurement produce a result that can be rigorously evaluated for validity and accuracy. To evaluate that the existing measurement processes are providing an adequate level of quality to support the decisions based upon this measurement data, an understanding of measurement assurance basics is essential. This topic is complimentary to the calibration standard, ANSI/NCSL Z540.3-2006, which targets the calibration of MTE at the organizational level. This paper will discuss general measurement assurance when MTE is used to provide evidence of product conformity, therefore the target audience of this paper is end item users of MTE. A central focus of the paper will be the verification of tolerances and the associated risks, so calibration professionals may find the paper useful in communication with their customers, MTE users.

  20. Qualitative Development of the PROMIS® Pediatric Stress Response Item Banks

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, William; Pajer, Kathleen; Riley, Anne W.; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the qualitative development of the Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) Pediatric Stress Response item banks. Methods Stress response concepts were specified through a literature review and interviews with content experts, children, and parents. A library comprising 2,677 items derived from 71 instruments was developed. Items were classified into conceptual categories; new items were written and redundant items were removed. Items were then revised based on cognitive interviews (n = 39 children), readability analyses, and translatability reviews. Results 2 pediatric Stress Response sub-domains were identified: somatic experiences (43 items) and psychological experiences (64 items). Final item pools cover the full range of children’s stress experiences. Items are comprehensible among children aged ≥8 years and ready for translation. Conclusions Child- and parent-report versions of the item banks assess children’s somatic and psychological states when demands tax their adaptive capabilities. PMID:23124904