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Sample records for activities turnover items

  1. 17 CFR 229.1206 - (Item 1206) Present activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false (Item 1206) Present activities. 229.1206 Section 229.1206 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1206 (Item 1206) Present activities. (a) Disclose, by geographical...

  2. 17 CFR 229.1206 - (Item 1206) Present activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false (Item 1206) Present activities. 229.1206 Section 229.1206 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1206 (Item 1206) Present activities. (a) Disclose, by geographical...

  3. 17 CFR 229.1206 - (Item 1206) Present activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false (Item 1206) Present activities. 229.1206 Section 229.1206 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1206 (Item 1206) Present activities. (a) Disclose, by geographical...

  4. 17 CFR 229.1206 - (Item 1206) Present activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false (Item 1206) Present activities. 229.1206 Section 229.1206 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1206 (Item 1206) Present activities. (a) Disclose, by geographical...

  5. 17 CFR 229.1206 - (Item 1206) Present activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false (Item 1206) Present activities. 229.1206 Section 229.1206 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1206 (Item 1206) Present activities. (a) Disclose, by geographical...

  6. Factor- and Item-Level Analyses of the 38-Item Activities Scale for Kids-Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Anita M.; Gorton, George E.; Bjornson, Kristie; Bevans, Katherine; Stout, Jean L.; Narayanan, Unni; Tucker, Carole A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Children and adolescents highly value their ability to participate in relevant daily life and recreational activities. The Activities Scale for Kids-performance (ASKp) instrument measures the frequency of performance of 30 common childhood activities, and has been shown to be valid and reliable. A revised and expanded 38-item ASKp (ASKp38)…

  7. Statistical testing of the association between annual turnover and marketing activities in SMEs using χ2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pater, Liana; Miclea, Şerban; Izvercian, Monica

    2016-06-01

    This paper considers the impact of SMEs' annual turnover upon its marketing activities (in terms of marketing responsibility, strategic planning and budgeting). Empirical results and literature reviews unveil that SMEs managers incline to partake in planned and profitable marketing activities, depending on their turnover's level. Thus, using the collected data form 131 Romanian SMEs managers, we have applied the Chi-Square Test in order to validate or invalidate three research assumptions (hypotheses), created starting from the empirical and literature findings.

  8. Turnover Begets Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the association between turnover of caregivers and turnover of nursing home top management. The top managers examined were administrators and directors of nursing, and the caregivers examined were registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and nurse aides. Design and Methods: The data came from a survey of 419…

  9. 78 FR 35099 - Proposed Information Collection Activity: [Claim, Authorization and Invoice for Prosthetic Items...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection Activity: [Claim, Authorization and Invoice for Prosthetic Items... information needed to determine eligibility and authorize funding for various prosthetic services. DATES..., VA Form 10- 1394. (d) Prosthetic Authorization for Items or Services, VA Form 10- 2421....

  10. Differential Item Functioning Analysis of the 2003-04 NHANES Physical Activity Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Yong; Zhu, Weimo

    2011-01-01

    Using differential item functioning (DIF) analyses, this study examined whether there were any DIF items in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) physical activity (PA) questionnaire. A subset of adult data from the 2003-04 NHANES study (n = 3,083) was used. PA items related to respondents' occupational, transportation,…

  11. Self-Reported Pediatric Measures of Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior and Strength Impact for PROMIS®: Item Development

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Carole A.; Bevans, Katherine B.; Teneralli, Rachel E.; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Bowles, Heather R; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Children's activity level is commonly assessed in clinical research, but rigorous assessment tools for children are scarce. Our objectives were to improve pediatric activity self-report measures using qualitative methods to develop item pools that measure these concepts. Methods Based on the items generated from our conceptual framework development, we applied cognitive interviews and comprehensibility reviews to ensure children readily understood the items. Results Our methods resulted in 129 unique items, physical activity (80 items), sedentary behaviors (23 items), and strengthening activities (26 items), that were comprehensible to children between the ages of 8 – 18 years. Comprehensibility review resulted in the deletion of 4 items. Conclusions The resultant item pools reflect children's experiences and understanding of the concepts of physical activity, sedentary behavior and strengthening activities. The item pools will undergo calibration using item response theory to support computer adaptive test administration of self and proxy reported outcomes. PMID:25251790

  12. Modulation of bladder function by luminal adenosine turnover and A1 receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Prakasam, H. Sandeep; Herrington, Heather; Roppolo, James R.; Jackson, Edwin K.

    2012-01-01

    The bladder uroepithelium transmits information to the underlying nervous and musculature systems, is under constant cyclical strain, expresses all four adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3), and is a site of adenosine production. Although adenosine has a well-described protective effect in several organs, there is a lack of information about adenosine turnover in the uroepithelium or whether altering luminal adenosine concentrations impacts bladder function or overactivity. We observed that the concentration of extracellular adenosine at the mucosal surface of the uroepithelium was regulated by ecto-adenosine deaminase and by equilibrative nucleoside transporters, whereas adenosine kinase and equilibrative nucleoside transporters modulated serosal levels. We further observed that enriching endogenous adenosine by blocking its routes of metabolism or direct activation of mucosal A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), a selective agonist, stimulated bladder activity by lowering the threshold pressure for voiding. Finally, CCPA did not quell bladder hyperactivity in animals with acute cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis but instead exacerbated their irritated bladder phenotype. In conclusion, we find that adenosine levels at both surfaces of the uroepithelium are modulated by turnover, that blocking these pathways or stimulating A1 receptors directly at the luminal surface promotes bladder contractions, and that adenosine further stimulates voiding in animals with cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis. PMID:22552934

  13. Development of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: constructing an item pool

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Laura; Jenkinson, Crispin; Dummett, Sarah; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Morley, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire is a patient-reported outcome measure in development that is grounded on the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The study reported here aimed to inform and generate an item pool for the new measure, which is specifically designed for the assessment of participation and activity in patients experiencing a range of health conditions. Methods Items were informed through in-depth interviews conducted with 37 participants spanning a range of conditions. Interviews aimed to identify how their condition impacted their ability to participate in meaningful activities. Conditions included arthritis, cancer, chronic back pain, diabetes, motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and spinal cord injury. Transcripts were analyzed using the framework method. Statements relating to ICF themes were recast as questionnaire items and shown for review to an expert panel. Cognitive debrief interviews (n=13) were used to assess items for face and content validity. Results ICF themes relevant to activities and participation in everyday life were explored, and a total of 222 items formed the initial item pool. This item pool was refined by the research team and 28 generic items were mapped onto all nine chapters of the ICF construct, detailing activity and participation. Cognitive interviewing confirmed the questionnaire instructions, items, and response options were acceptable to participants. Conclusion Using a clear conceptual basis to inform item generation, 28 items have been identified as suitable to undergo further psychometric testing. A large-scale postal survey will follow in order to refine the instrument further and to assess its psychometric properties. The final instrument is intended for use in clinical trials and interventions targeted at maintaining or improving activity and participation. PMID:26056503

  14. Active-site motions and polarity enhance catalytic turnover of hydrated subtilisin dissolved in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Elton P; Eppler, Ross K; Beaudoin, Julianne M; Dordick, Jonathan S; Reimer, Jeffrey A; Clark, Douglas S

    2009-04-01

    The enzyme subtilisin Carlsberg was surfactant-solubilized into two organic solvents, isooctane and tetrahydrofuran, and hydrated through stepwise changes in the thermodynamic water activity, a(w). The apparent turnover number k(cat)(app) in these systems ranged from 0.2 to 80 s(-1) and increased 11-fold in isooctane and up to 50-fold in tetrahydrofuran with increasing a(w). (19)F NMR relaxation experiments employing an active-site inhibitor were used to assess the dependence of active-site motions on a(w). The rates of NMR-derived fast (k > 10(7) s(-1)) and slow (k < 10(4) s(-1)) active-site motions increased in both solvents upon hydration, but only the slow motions correlated with k(cat). The (19)F chemical shift was a sensitive probe of the local electronic environment and provided an empirical measure of the active-site dielectric constant epsilon(as), which increased with hydration to epsilon(as) approximately 13 in each solvent. In both solvents, the transition state free energy data and epsilon(as) followed Kirkwood's model for the continuum solvation of a dipole, indicating that water also enhanced catalysis by altering the active-site's electronic environment and increasing its polarity to better stabilize the transition state. These results reveal that favorable dynamic and electrostatic effects both contribute to accelerated catalysis by solubilized subtilisin Carlsberg upon hydration in organic solvents. PMID:19317505

  15. Active-site motions and polarity enhance catalytic turnover of hydrated subtilisin dissolved in organic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Elton P; Eppler, Ross K; Beaudoin, Julianne M; Dordick, Jonathan S; Reimer, Jeffrey A; Clark, Douglas S

    2009-01-01

    The enzyme subtilisin Carlsberg was surfactant-solubilized into two organic solvents, isooctane and tetrahydrofuran, and hydrated through stepwise changes in the thermodynamic water activity, aw. The apparent turnover number kcatapp in these systems ranged from 0.2 to 80 s−1 and increased 11-fold in isooctane and up to 50-fold in tetrahydrofuran with increasing aw. 19F-NMR relaxation experiments employing an active-site inhibitor were used to assess the dependence of active-site motions on aw. The rates of NMR-derived fast (k > 107 s−1) and slow (k < 104 s−1) active-site motions increased in both solvents upon hydration, but only the slow motions correlated with kcat. The 19F chemical shift was a sensitive probe of the local electronic environment and provided an empirical measure of the active-site dielectric constant εas, which increased with hydration to εas ≈ 13 in each solvent. In both solvents the transition state free energy data and εas followed Kirkwood’s model for the continuum solvation of a dipole, indicating that water also enhanced catalysis by altering the active-site’s electronic environment and increasing its polarity to better stabilize the transition state. These results reveal that favorable dynamic and electrostatic effects both contribute to accelerated catalysis by solubilized subtilisin Carlsberg upon hydration in organic solvents. PMID:19317505

  16. Deubiquitylating enzyme USP9x regulates hippo pathway activity by controlling angiomotin protein turnover

    PubMed Central

    Thanh Nguyen, Hung; Andrejeva, Diana; Gupta, Rajat; Choudhary, Chunaram; Hong, Xin; Eichhorn, Pieter J A; Loya, Anand C; Cohen, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway has been identified as a key barrier for tumorigenesis, acting through downregulation of YAP/TAZ activity. Elevated YAP/TAZ activity has been documented in many human cancers. Ubiquitylation has been shown to play a key role in regulating YAP/TAZ activity through downregulation of a number of Hippo pathway components. Several ubiquitin ligase complexes have been implicated in this process, however, little is known about the deubiquitylating enzymes that counteract these activities to regulate YAP/TAZ. Here we identify the deubiquitylating enzyme USP9x as a regulator of YAP/TAZ activity. We demonstrate that USPx regulates ubiquitin-mediated turnover of the YAP inhibitor, Angiomotin. USP9x acts to deubiquitylate Angiomotin at lysine 496, resulting in stabilization of Angiomotin and lower YAP/TAZ activity. USP9x mRNA levels were reduced in several cancers. Clinically, USP9x mRNA levels were reduced in several cancers with low USPx expression correlating with poor prognosis in renal clear cell carcinoma. Our data indicate that USP9x may be a useful biomarker for renal clear cell carcinoma. PMID:27462448

  17. Effects of Activating Mutations on EGFR Cellular Protein Turnover and Amino Acid Recycling Determined Using SILAC Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Michael J.; Niessen, Sherry; Weinrich, Scott L.; Feng, Jun Li; Shi, Manli; Johnson, Ted O.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid mutations of proteins that are targeted in cancer therapy often lead to drug resistance. Often, the mutation directly affects a drug's binding site, effectively blocking binding of the drug, but these mutations can have other effects such as changing the protein turnover half-life. Utilizing SILAC MS, we measured the cellular turnover rates of an important non-small cell lung cancer target, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Wild-type (WT) EGFR, EGFR with a single activating mutant (Del 746–750 or L858R), and the drug-resistant double mutant (L858R/T790M) EGFR were analyzed. In non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, EGFR turnover rates ranged from 28 hours in A431 cells (WT) to 7.5 hours in the PC-9 cells (Del 746–750 mutant). The measurement of EGFR turnover rate in PC-9 cells dosed with irreversible inhibitors has additional complexity due to inhibitor effects on cell viability and results were reported as a range. Finally, essential amino acid recycling (K and R) was measured in different cell lines. The recycling was different in each cell line, but the overall inclusion of the effect of amino acid recycling on calculating EGFR turnover rates resulted in a 10–20% reduction in rates. PMID:26689952

  18. Protein turnover, amino acid requirements and recommendations for athletes and active populations.

    PubMed

    Poortmans, J R; Carpentier, A; Pereira-Lancha, L O; Lancha Jr, A

    2012-10-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major deposit of protein molecules. As for any cell or tissue, total muscle protein reflects a dynamic turnover between net protein synthesis and degradation. Noninvasive and invasive techniques have been applied to determine amino acid catabolism and muscle protein building at rest, during exercise and during the recovery period after a single experiment or training sessions. Stable isotopic tracers ((13)C-lysine, (15)N-glycine, ²H5-phenylalanine) and arteriovenous differences have been used in studies of skeletal muscle and collagen tissues under resting and exercise conditions. There are different fractional synthesis rates in skeletal muscle and tendon tissues, but there is no major difference between collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis. Strenuous exercise provokes increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis, the opposite occurring during the recovery period. Individuals who exercise respond differently when resistance and endurance types of contractions are compared. Endurance exercise induces a greater oxidative capacity (enzymes) compared to resistance exercise, which induces fiber hypertrophy (myofibrils). Nitrogen balance (difference between protein intake and protein degradation) for athletes is usually balanced when the intake of protein reaches 1.2 g · kg(-1) · day(-1) compared to 0.8 g · kg(-1) · day(-1) in resting individuals. Muscular activities promote a cascade of signals leading to the stimulation of eukaryotic initiation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. As suggested in several publications, a bolus of 15-20 g protein (from skimmed milk or whey proteins) and carbohydrate (± 30 g maltodextrine) drinks is needed immediately after stopping exercise to stimulate muscle protein and tendon collagen turnover within 1 h. PMID:22666780

  19. Protein turnover, amino acid requirements and recommendations for athletes and active populations

    PubMed Central

    Poortmans, J.R.; Carpentier, A.; Pereira-Lancha, L.O.; Lancha, A.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major deposit of protein molecules. As for any cell or tissue, total muscle protein reflects a dynamic turnover between net protein synthesis and degradation. Noninvasive and invasive techniques have been applied to determine amino acid catabolism and muscle protein building at rest, during exercise and during the recovery period after a single experiment or training sessions. Stable isotopic tracers (13C-lysine, 15N-glycine, 2H5-phenylalanine) and arteriovenous differences have been used in studies of skeletal muscle and collagen tissues under resting and exercise conditions. There are different fractional synthesis rates in skeletal muscle and tendon tissues, but there is no major difference between collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis. Strenuous exercise provokes increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis, the opposite occurring during the recovery period. Individuals who exercise respond differently when resistance and endurance types of contractions are compared. Endurance exercise induces a greater oxidative capacity (enzymes) compared to resistance exercise, which induces fiber hypertrophy (myofibrils). Nitrogen balance (difference between protein intake and protein degradation) for athletes is usually balanced when the intake of protein reaches 1.2 g·kg−1·day−1 compared to 0.8 g·kg−1·day−1 in resting individuals. Muscular activities promote a cascade of signals leading to the stimulation of eukaryotic initiation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. As suggested in several publications, a bolus of 15-20 g protein (from skimmed milk or whey proteins) and carbohydrate (± 30 g maltodextrine) drinks is needed immediately after stopping exercise to stimulate muscle protein and tendon collagen turnover within 1 h. PMID:22666780

  20. Stress-induced OMA1 activation and autocatalytic turnover regulate OPA1-dependent mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Michael J; Lampe, Philipp A; Stojanovski, Diana; Korwitz, Anne; Anand, Ruchika; Tatsuta, Takashi; Langer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic network of mitochondria fragments under stress allowing the segregation of damaged mitochondria and, in case of persistent damage, their selective removal by mitophagy. Mitochondrial fragmentation upon depolarisation of mitochondria is brought about by the degradation of central components of the mitochondrial fusion machinery. The OMA1 peptidase mediates the degradation of long isoforms of the dynamin-like GTPase OPA1 in the inner membrane. Here, we demonstrate that OMA1-mediated degradation of OPA1 is a general cellular stress response. OMA1 is constitutively active but displays strongly enhanced activity in response to various stress insults. We identify an amino terminal stress-sensor domain of OMA1, which is only present in homologues of higher eukaryotes and which modulates OMA1 proteolysis and activation. OMA1 activation is associated with its autocatalyic degradation, which initiates from both termini of OMA1 and results in complete OMA1 turnover. Autocatalytic proteolysis of OMA1 ensures the reversibility of the response and allows OPA1-mediated mitochondrial fusion to resume upon alleviation of stress. This differentiated stress response maintains the functional integrity of mitochondria and contributes to cell survival. PMID:24550258

  1. Calcium mobilization and phosphoinositide turnover in fluoride-activated human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Strnad, C.F.; Wong, K.

    1986-05-01

    Fluoride ion, at concentrations above 10 mM, has been found to activate a superoxide production response in human neutrophils which is strongly dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium. In an attempt to further explore the calcium requirement of fluoride-induced neutrophil activation, intracellular calcium concentrations were monitored through use of the fluorescent calcium probe, Quin 2. Fluoride ion, at concentrations between 10 and 20 mM, was found to elicit a rise in intracellular calcium levels which was characterized by a lag period of 4 to 10 min and a prolonged duration of action (greater than 20 min). In contrast, the chemotactic peptide, formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), induced a rise in intracellular calcium concentration which peaked within 1 min. Preincubation of cells with 1 ..mu..g/ml pertussis toxin resulted in inhibition of the FMLP-induced response, but not that elicited by fluoride. Furthermore, anion exchange chromatography indicated that inositol phosphate accumulation occurred in fluoride-treated cells in association with calcium mobilization. Recent evidence suggests that the FMLP receptor is coupled to phospholipase C and phosphoinositide turnover through a guanine nucleotide binding protein susceptible to inhibition by pertussis toxin. Present results suggest that fluoride ion may serve to activate this protein in a manner resistant to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

  2. Reliability and Convergent Validity of the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey Physical Activity Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinger, Mary K.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey (NCHRBS) vigorous physical activity (VPA), moderate physical activity (MPA), flexibility (FLEX), and muscular strength and/or endurance (MSE) questions. Twenty college students completed the four items twice during the same day. During the next 7…

  3. 17 CFR 229.1205 - (Item 1205) Drilling and other exploratory and development activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Registrants Engaged in Oil and Gas Producing Activities § 229.1205 (Item 1205) Drilling and other exploratory... proves to be incapable of producing either oil or gas in sufficient quantities to justify completion as an oil or gas well. (2) A productive well is an exploratory, development, or extension well that...

  4. 17 CFR 229.1205 - (Item 1205) Drilling and other exploratory and development activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Registrants Engaged in Oil and Gas Producing Activities § 229.1205 (Item 1205) Drilling and other exploratory... proves to be incapable of producing either oil or gas in sufficient quantities to justify completion as an oil or gas well. (2) A productive well is an exploratory, development, or extension well that...

  5. 17 CFR 229.1205 - (Item 1205) Drilling and other exploratory and development activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Registrants Engaged in Oil and Gas Producing Activities § 229.1205 (Item 1205) Drilling and other exploratory... proves to be incapable of producing either oil or gas in sufficient quantities to justify completion as an oil or gas well. (2) A productive well is an exploratory, development, or extension well that...

  6. 17 CFR 229.1205 - (Item 1205) Drilling and other exploratory and development activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Registrants Engaged in Oil and Gas Producing Activities § 229.1205 (Item 1205) Drilling and other exploratory... proves to be incapable of producing either oil or gas in sufficient quantities to justify completion as an oil or gas well. (2) A productive well is an exploratory, development, or extension well that...

  7. 17 CFR 229.1205 - (Item 1205) Drilling and other exploratory and development activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Registrants Engaged in Oil and Gas Producing Activities § 229.1205 (Item 1205) Drilling and other exploratory... proves to be incapable of producing either oil or gas in sufficient quantities to justify completion as an oil or gas well. (2) A productive well is an exploratory, development, or extension well that...

  8. Modeling of Word Translation: Activation Flow from Concepts to Lexical Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roelofs, Ardi; Dijkstra, Ton; Gerakaki, Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Whereas most theoretical and computational models assume a continuous flow of activation from concepts to lexical items in spoken word production, one prominent model assumes that the mapping of concepts onto words happens in a discrete fashion (Bloem & La Heij, 2003). Semantic facilitation of context pictures on word translation has been taken to…

  9. Vitamin D Status and Bone and Connective Tissue Turnover in Brown Bears (Ursus arctos) during Hibernation and the Active State

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Peter; Støen, Ole-Gunnar; Swenson, Jon E.; Mosekilde, Leif; Heickendorff, Lene; Fröbert, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Background Extended physical inactivity causes disuse osteoporosis in humans. In contrast, brown bears (Ursus arctos) are highly immobilised for half of the year during hibernation without signs of bone loss and therefore may serve as a model for prevention of osteoporosis. Aim To study 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25OHD) levels and bone turnover markers in brown bears during the hibernating state in winter and during the active state in summer. We measured vitamin D subtypes (D2 and D3), calcitropic hormones (parathyroid hormone [PTH], 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D [1,25(OH)2D]) and bone turnover parameters (osteocalcin, ICTP, CTX-I), PTH, serum calcium and PIIINP. Material and Methods We drew blood from seven immobilised wild brown bears during hibernation in February and in the same bears while active in June. Results Serum 25-hydroxy-cholecalciferol (25OHD3) was significantly higher in the summer than in the winter (22.8±4.6 vs. 8.8±2.1 nmol/l, two tailed p - 2p = 0.02), whereas 25-hydroxy-ergocalciferol (25OHD2) was higher in winter (54.2±8.3 vs. 18.7±1.7 nmol/l, 2p<0.01). Total serum calcium and PTH levels did not differ between winter and summer. Activated 1,25(OH)2D demonstrated a statistically insignificant trend towards higher summer levels. Osteocalcin levels were higher in summer than winter, whereas other markers of bone turnover (ICTP and CTX-I) were unchanged. Serum PIIINP, which is a marker of connective tissue and to some degree muscle turnover, was significantly higher during summer than during winter. Conclusions Dramatic changes were documented in the vitamin D3/D2 ratio and in markers of bone and connective tissue turnover in brown bears between hibernation and the active state. Because hibernating brown bears do not develop disuse osteoporosis, despite extensive physical inactivity we suggest that they may serve as a model for the prevention of this disease. PMID:21731765

  10. Effect of phenmetrazine, aminorex and (±) p-chloramphetamine on the motor activity and turnover rate of brain catecholamines

    PubMed Central

    Costa, E.; Naimzada, K. M.; Revuelta, A.

    1971-01-01

    1. The minimal doses (μmol/kg i.v.) of phenmetrazine, (±)-p-chloramphetamine, and aminorex which increase motor activity are 5·6, 3·5, and 1·5, respectively. We detected stereotype behaviour neither in rats receiving intravenous doses 3 times greater nor in animals injected intraperitoneally with 44, 62 and 112 μmol/kg of (±)-p-chloramphetamine, aminorex and phenmatrazine, respectively. 2. The latter doses of the three amphetamine congeners were tested for their action on tissue monoamine content. Only (±)-p-chloramphetamine decreased the concentration of tel-diencephalon 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and this decrease lasted longer than 24 hours. This and the other two amphetamine congeners failed to affect the concentration of noradrenaline (NA) in brain, heart and lung. 3. Aminorex (1·5 μmol/kg i.v.) and (±)-p-chloramphetamine (3·5 μmol/kg i.v.) decreased the turnover time of striatum dopamine (DM) but failed to change the turnover time of tel-diencephalon and brainstem NA. Phenmetrazine (5·6 μmol/kg i.v.) changed neither the turnover time of striatum DM nor that of NA in the two brain areas assayed. PMID:5157723

  11. Effects of 3-O-methyldopa, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine metabolite, on locomotor activity and dopamine turnover in rats.

    PubMed

    Onzawa, Yoritaka; Kimura, Yasuhiro; Uzuhashi, Kengo; Shirasuna, Megumi; Hirosawa, Tasuku; Taogoshi, Takanori; Kihira, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    It has been well known that 3-O-methyldopa (3-OMD) is a metabolite of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) formed by catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT), and 3-OMD blood level often reaches higher than physiological level in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients receiving long term L-DOPA therapy. However, the physiological role of 3-OMD has not been well understood. Therefore, in order to clarify the effects of 3-OMD on physiological function, we examined the behavioral alteration in rats based on locomotor activity, and measured dopamine (DA) and its metabolites levels in rats at the same time after 3-OMD subchronic administration. The study results showed that repeated administrations of 3-OMD increased its blood and the striatum tissue levels in those rats, and decreased locomotor activity in a dose dependent manner. Although 3-OMD subchronic administration showed no significant change in DA level in the striatum, DA metabolite levels, such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), and homovanillic acid (HVA) were significantly decreased. After 3-OMD washout period (7 d), locomotor activity and DA turnover in those rats returned to normal levels. Furthermore, locomotor activity and DA turnover decreased by 3-OMD administration were recovered to normal level by acute L-DOPA administration. These results suggested that 3-OMD affect to locomotor activity via DA neuron system. In conclusion, 3-OMD itself may have a disadvantage in PD patients receiving L-DOPA therapy. PMID:22863920

  12. Delayed Turnover of Unphosphorylated Ssk1 during Carbon Stress Activates the Yeast Hog1 Map Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo, Milene Carmes; Mayinger, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway coordinates the adaptation to osmotic stress and was recently reported to respond to acute changes in glucose levels. Similarly as in osmotic stress, glucose starvation leads to a transient accumulation of Hog1 in the nucleus. However, the kinetics and the mechanism of Hog1 activation are different for these stress conditions. During osmotic shock the activation of Hog1 can be transduced by either the Sho1 or the Sln1/Ypd1/Ssk1 branch. During glucose starvation the phosphorylation of Hog1 is slower and is completely dependent on Ssk1, but independent of Sho1. To characterize the mechanism of activation of Hog1 during carbon stress, we examined the turnover of Ssk1 protein levels upon glucose starvation in the presence of cycloheximide and monitored protein levels by western blotting. Our data demonstrate that unphosphorylated Ssk1 was quickly degraded during exponential growth and after osmotic stress but remained remarkably stable during glucose limitation. We conclude that glucose starvation induces a delay in the turnover of unphosphorylated Ssk1, which is sufficient to activate the Hog1 MAPK pathway. Although unphosphorylated Ssk1 is known to be degraded by the proteasome, its stabilization is apparently not due to changes in cellular localization or decrease in ubiquitination levels during glucose limitation. PMID:26340004

  13. Construct Validity Evidence for Single-Response Items to Estimate Physical Activity Levels in Large Sample Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Allen W.; Morrow, James R., Jr.; Bowles, Heather R.; FitzGerald, Shannon J.; Blair, Steven N.

    2007-01-01

    Valid measurement of physical activity is important for studying the risks for morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to examine evidence of construct validity of two similar single-response items assessing physical activity via self-report. Both items are based on the stages of change model. The sample was 687 participants (men =…

  14. Coherent theta-band EEG activity predicts item-context binding during encoding.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Christopher; Mangels, Jennifer A

    2005-02-01

    Episodic memories consist of semantic information coupled with a rich array of contextual detail. Here, we investigate the neural processes by which information about the sensory context of a learning event is "bound" to the semantic representation of the to-be-encoded item. We present evidence that item-context binding during encoding is mediated by frontoposterior electroencephalographic (EEG) phase locking within and between hemispheres in the theta (4-8 Hz) band. During a task in which subjects encoded words in different font colors, later memory for the word was associated with sustained frontal theta activity and frontoposterior theta-band coherence, primarily within the left hemisphere. When the word-color association was later successfully retrieved, however, neurons synchronized their theta-band responses bilaterally in a more sustained fashion, particularly during the latter part of the stimulus epoch (>800 ms). Our results confirm the importance of functional coupling between frontal and posterior regions for successful encoding. One interpretation of these data is hemispheric contributions to item and context encoding may be asymmetric, with left hemisphere coherence facilitating semantic processing of an item and right hemisphere coherence facilitating processing of sensory context. Theta-band coherence may be an important mechanism by which brain networks exchange information during learning. PMID:15652304

  15. Turnover Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems contain energy and materials such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water, and are open to their flow-through. Turnover time refers to the amount of time required for replacement by flow-through of the energy or substance of interest contained in the system, and is ...

  16. Turnover control of photosystem II: Use of redox-active herbicides to form the S[sub 3] state

    SciTech Connect

    Bocarsly, J.R.; Brudvig, G.W. )

    1992-12-02

    The O[sub 2]-evolving center of photosystem II, which contains an active-site tetramanganese-oxo cluster, catalyzes the four-electron oxidation of two water molecules to dioxygen, with the concomitant production of four H[sup +] and four electrons. During catalytic turnover, the manganese-oxo cluster steps through five intermediate oxidation states, which are known as the S[sub i] states (i = 0-4). While methods have been found to manipulate the system into S[sub 1] and S[sub 2] in high yields, efficient production of the S[sub 3] state in good yield at high concentration has not yet been achieved. Previous methods have suffered from the requirement of low protein concentration so that actinic flashes are saturating; the use of temperature to control S-state advancement under continuous illumination, which can lead to S-state scrambling; or the use of herbicides that bind to the Q[sub B] site and restrict the system to one turnover. The authors describe here a method for the high-yield production of the S[sub 3] state in highly-concentrated samples of photosystem II, through the use of electron-accepting herbicides which bind to the Q[sub B] site. Redox-active herbicides can be used, in principle, to limit S-state cycling to any desired number of turnovers, given the appropriate herbicide. This work has fundamental methodological implications not only for the study of photosystem II but also for other multistate redox protein systems.

  17. Arabidopsis VILLIN1 and VILLIN3 have overlapping and distinct activities in actin bundle formation and turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Khurana, P; Henty, Jessica L; Huang, S; Staiger, A M; Blanchoin, L; Staiger, Chris J

    2010-09-28

    Actin filament bundles are higher-order cytoskeletal structures that are crucial for the maintenance of cellular architecture and cell expansion. They are generated from individual actin filaments by the actions of bundling proteins like fimbrins, LIMs, and villins. However, the molecular mechanisms of dynamic bundle formation and turnover are largely unknown. Villins belong to the villin/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily and comprise at least five isovariants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Different combinations of villin isovariants are coexpressed in various tissues and cells. It is not clear whether these isovariants function together and act redundantly or whether they have unique activities. VILLIN1 (VLN1) is a simple filament-bundling protein and is Ca{sup 2+} insensitive. Based on phylogenetic analyses and conservation of Ca{sup 2+} binding sites, we predict that VLN3 is a Ca{sup 2+}-regulated villin capable of severing actin filaments and contributing to bundle turnover. The bundling activity of both isovariants was observed directly with time-lapse imaging and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy in vitro, and the mechanism mimics the “catch and zipper” action observed in vivo. Using time-lapse TIRF microscopy, we observed and quantified the severing of individual actin filaments by VLN3 at physiological calcium concentrations. Moreover, VLN3 can sever actin filament bundles in the presence of VLN1 when calcium is elevated to micromolar levels. Collectively, these results demonstrate that two villin isovariants have overlapping and distinct activities.

  18. Determining importance and grading of items and activities for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    DeKlever, R.; Verna, B.

    1993-12-31

    Raytheon Services Nevada (RSN), in support of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project, has been responsible for the Title 2 designs of the initial structures, systems, and components for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), and the creation of the design output documents for the Surface-Based Testing (SBT) programs. The ESF and SBT programs are major scientific contributors to the overall site characterization program which will determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain to contain a proposed High Level Nuclear Waste (HLNW) repository. Accurate, traceable and objective characterization and testing documentation that is germane to the protection of public health and safety, and the environment, and that satisfies all the requirements of 10 CFR Part 60(1), must be established, evaluated and accepted. To assure that these requirements are satisfied, specific design functions and products, including items and activities depicted within respective design output documents, are subjected to the requirements of an NRC and DOE-approved Quality Assurance (QA) program. An evaluation (classification) is applied to these items and activities to determine their importance to radiological safety (ITS) and waste isolation (ITWI). Subsequently, QA program controls are selected (grading) for the items and activities. RSN has developed a DOE-approved classification process that is based on probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques and that uses accident/impact scenarios. Results from respective performance assessment and test interference evaluations are also integrated into the classification analyses for various items. The methodology and results of the RSN classification and grading processes, presented herein, relative to ESF and SBT design products, demonstrates a solid, defensible methodological basis for classification and grading.

  19. Ethanol-induced activation of adenine nucleotide turnover. Evidence for a role of acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Puig, J.G.; Fox, I.H.

    1984-09-01

    Consumption of alcohol causes hyperuricemia by decreasing urate excretion and increasing its production. Our previous studies indicate that ethanol administration increases uric acid production by increasing ATP degradation to uric acid precursors. To test the hypothesis that ethanol-induced increased urate production results from acetate metabolism and enhanced adenosine triphosphate turnover, we gave intravenous sodium acetate, sodium chloride and ethanol (0.1 mmol/kg per min for 1 h) to five normal subjects. Acetate plasma levels increased from 0.04 +/- 0.01 mM (mean +/- SE) to peak values of 0.35 +/- 0.07 mM and to 0.08 +/- 0.01 mM during acetate and ethanol infusions, respectively. Urinary oxypurines increased to 223 +/- 13% and 316 +/- 44% of the base-line values during acetate and ethanol infusions, respectively. Urinary radioactivity from the adenine nucleotide pool labeled with (8-14C) adenine increased to 171 +/- 27% and to 128 +/- 8% of the base-line values after acetate and ethanol infusions. These data indicate that both ethanol and acetate increase purine nucleotide degradation by enhancing the turnover of the adenine nucleotide pool. They support the hypothesis that acetate metabolism contributes to the increased production of urate associated with ethanol intake.

  20. Role of Turnover in Active Stress Generation in a Filament Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of turnover of cross-linkers, motors, and filaments on the generation of a contractile stress in a network of filaments connected by passive cross-linkers and subjected to the forces exerted by molecular motors. We perform numerical simulations where filaments are treated as rigid rods and molecular motors move fast compared to the time scale of an exchange of cross-linkers. We show that molecular motors create a contractile stress above a critical number of cross-linkers. When passive cross-linkers are allowed to turn over, the stress exerted by the network vanishes due to the formation of clusters. When both filaments and passive cross-linkers turn over, clustering is prevented and the network reaches a dynamic contractile steady state. A maximum stress is reached for an optimum ratio of the filament and cross-linker turnover rates. Taken together, our work reveals conditions for stress generation by molecular motors in a fluid isotropic network of rearranging filaments.

  1. Role of turnover in active stress generation in a filament network

    PubMed Central

    Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of turnover of cross-linkers, motors, and filaments on the generation of a contractile stress in a network of filaments connected by passive cross-linkers and subjected to the forces exerted by molecular motors. We perform numerical simulations where filaments are treated as rigid rods and molecular motors move fast compared to the time scale of an exchange of cross-linkers. We show that molecular motors create a contractile stress above a critical number of cross-linkers. When passive cross-linkers are allowed to turn over, the stress exerted by the network vanishes due to the formation of clusters. When both filaments and passive cross-linkers turn over, clustering is prevented and the network reaches a dynamic contractile steady state. A maximum stress is reached for an optimum ratio of the filament and cross-linker turnover rates. Taken together, our work reveals conditions for stress generation by molecular motors in a fluid isotropic network of rearranging filaments. PMID:27203344

  2. Mitochondrial Respiratory Defect Causes Dysfunctional Lactate Turnover via AMP-activated Protein Kinase Activation in Human-induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Im, Ilkyun; Jang, Mi-Jin; Park, Seung Ju; Lee, Sang-Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook; Kim, Seyun; Han, Yong-Mahn

    2015-12-01

    A defective mitochondrial respiratory chain complex (DMRC) causes various metabolic disorders in humans. However, the pathophysiology of DMRC in the liver remains unclear. To understand DMRC pathophysiology in vitro, DMRC-induced pluripotent stem cells were generated from dermal fibroblasts of a DMRC patient who had a homoplasmic mutation (m.3398T→C) in the mitochondrion-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (MTND1) gene and that differentiated into hepatocytes (DMRC hepatocytes) in vitro. DMRC hepatocytes showed abnormalities in mitochondrial characteristics, the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, the glycogen storage level, the lactate turnover rate, and AMPK activity. Intriguingly, low glycogen storage and transcription of lactate turnover-related genes in DMRC hepatocytes were recovered by inhibition of AMPK activity. Thus, AMPK activation led to metabolic changes in terms of glycogen storage and lactate turnover in DMRC hepatocytes. These data demonstrate for the first time that energy depletion may lead to lactic acidosis in the DMRC patient by reduction of lactate uptake via AMPK in liver. PMID:26491018

  3. Bats at risk? Bat activity and insecticide residue analysis of food items in an apple orchard.

    PubMed

    Stahlschmidt, Peter; Brühl, Carsten A

    2012-07-01

    Although bats are reported as being threatened by pesticides, they are currently not considered in European Union pesticide risk assessments. The reason for that contradiction is probably related to the scarcity of information on bat activity in pesticide-treated fields and the pesticide residues on their food items. The authors recorded bat activity and measured pesticide residues on bat-specific food items following applications of two insecticides in an apple orchard. High activity levels of the common pipistrelle bat, a foraging habitat generalist, were detected. Airborne foragers and bats that take part of their food by gleaning arthropods from the vegetation were recorded frequently. The initial value and the decline of pesticide residues were found to depend on the arthropod type, their surface to volume ratio, their mobility, and the mode of action of the applied pesticide. The highest initial residue values were measured on foliage-dwelling arthropods. By following the toxicity-exposure ratio approaches of the current pesticide risk assessment, no acute dietary risk was found for all recorded bat species. However, a potential reproductive risk for bat species that include foliage-dwelling arthropods in their diet was indicated. The results emphasize the importance of adequately evaluating the risks of pesticides to bats, which, compared to other mammals, are potentially more sensitive due to their ecological traits. PMID:22505289

  4. Species Turnover and Diel Flight Activity of Species of Dung Beetles, Onthophagus, in the Tropical Lowland Forest of Peninsular Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Boonrotpong, Singtoe; Sotthibandhu, Sunthorn; Satasook, Chutamas

    2012-01-01

    Species turnover and temporal variation of forest insects were used to explain the ecological succession and ecological segregation between efficiently competing species. In this study, species richness, abundance, and beta-diversity of the genus Onthophagus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) assemblages between 2003 and 2007 were described and the diel—flight activity was examined in the disturbed forest and the interior forest of the lowland tropical rain forest at Ton Nga Chang Wildlife Sanctuary in peninsular Thailand. A total of 2,260 individuals of 22 species in 2003 and 2,382 individuals of 24 species in 2007 were collected. Although species richness and abundance did not differ significantly between the two years, all similarity indices were significantly different. The community structure of Onthophagus assemblage in 2003 demonstrated a heterogeneous pattern, whereas there was a tendency for the pattern to shift toward a more homogeneous structure in 2007. The temporal variation showed two distinct diel—flight activities; diurnal and crepuscular patterns. Six species were crepuscular (O. deflexicollis Lansberge, O. orientalis Harold, O. rudis Sharp, O. sp 1, O. sp 2, and O. sp 4), whereas most of Onthophagus species demonstrated diurnal pattern. Remarkably, five species (O. taurinus White, O. pilularius Lansberge, O. punneeae Masumoto, O. laevis Harold, and O. sp 3.) could not be classified as either diurnal or crepuscular species. It was suggested that the species turnover was probably influenced by the recovery of the forest structure and the decrease of anthropogenic disturbance. Resource partitioning was suggested to be a key factor for crepuscular adaptation in Onthophagus species. PMID:23418986

  5. Inorganic carbon turnover caused by digestion of carbonate sands and metabolic activity of holothurians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Ben; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

    2013-11-01

    Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) may play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this report, we present estimates of inorganic carbon turnover rates determined from laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, Holothuria leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment compared with 6.1-6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements and the density and porosity of carbonate sediments of coral reefs, it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2 kg and 80 ± 7 kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual CaCO3 dissolution rates per H. atra and S. herrmanni individual are estimated to be 6.5 ± 1.9 g and 9.6 ± 1.4 g, respectively, suggesting that 0.05 ± 0.02% and 0.1 ± 0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During incubations the CaCO3 dissolution of the fecal casts was 0.07 ± 0.01%, 0.04 ± 0.01% and 0.21 ± 0.05% for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state in the incubation seawater decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

  6. Inorganic Carbon Turnover caused by Digestion of Carbonate Sands and Metabolic Activity of Holothurians

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

    2013-11-20

    Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this study inorganic additional aspects of carbon turnover were determined in laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, H. leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni from One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 6.1 to 6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts as opposed to 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2kg and 80 ± 7kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual dissolution rates of H. atra and S. herrmanni of 6.5±1.9g and 9.6±1.4g, respectively, suggest that 0.05±0.02% and 0.1±0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During the incubations the CaCO3 dissolution was 0.07±0.01%, 0.04±0.01% and 0.21±0.05% of the fecal casts for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state for both aragonite and calcite minerals during laboratory incubations decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

  7. Normal T-cell turnover in sooty mangabeys harboring active simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, L A; Lewin, S R; Zhang, L; Gettie, A; Luckay, A; Martin, L N; Skulsky, E; Ho, D D; Cheng-Mayer, C; Marx, P A

    2000-02-01

    Sooty mangabeys naturally infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) remain healthy though they harbor viral loads comparable to those in rhesus macaques that progress to AIDS. To assess the immunologic basis of disease resistance in mangabeys, we compared the effect of SIV infection on T-cell regeneration in both monkey species. Measurement of the proliferation marker Ki-67 by flow cytometry showed that mangabeys harbored proliferating T cells at a level of 3 to 4% in peripheral blood irrespective of their infection status. In contrast, rhesus macaques demonstrated a naturally high fraction of proliferating T cells (7%) that increased two- to threefold following SIV infection. Ki-67(+) T cells were predominantly CD45RA(-), indicating increased proliferation of memory cells in macaques. Quantitation of an episomal DNA product of T-cell receptor alpha rearrangement (termed alpha1 circle) showed that the concentration of recent thymic emigrants in blood decreased with age over a 2-log unit range in both monkey species, consistent with age-related thymic involution. SIV infection caused a limited decrease of alpha1 circle numbers in mangabeys as well as in macaques. Dilution of alpha1 circles by T-cell proliferation likely contributed to this decrease, since alpha1 circle numbers and Ki-67(+) fractions correlated negatively. These findings are compatible with immune exhaustion mediated by abnormal T-cell proliferation, rather than with early thymic failure, in SIV-infected macaques. Normal T-cell turnover in SIV-infected mangabeys provides an explanation for the long-term maintenance of a functional immune system in these hosts. PMID:10627531

  8. Staff turnover in statewide implementation of ACT: relationship with ACT fidelity and other team characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, Angela L.; Salyers, Michelle P.; Tsai, Jack; Lydick, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    Staff turnover on assertive community treatment (ACT) teams is a poorly understood phenomenon. This study examined annual turnover and fidelity data collected in a statewide implementation of ACT over a 5-year period. Mean annual staff turnover across all observations was 30.0%. Turnover was negatively correlated with overall fidelity at Year 1 and 3. The team approach fidelity item was negatively correlated with staff turnover at Year 3. For 13 teams with 3 years of follow-up data, turnover rates did not change over time. Most ACT staff turnover rates were comparable or better than other turnover rates reported in the mental health and substance abuse literature. PMID:20012481

  9. Effects of F/G-actin ratio and actin turn-over rate on NADPH oxidase activity in microglia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most in vivo studies that have addressed the role of actin dynamics in NADPH oxidase function in phagocytes have used toxins to modulate the polymerization state of actin and mostly effects on actin has been evaluated by end point measurements of filamentous actin, which says little about actin dynamics, and without consideration for the subcellular distribution of the perturbed actin cytoskeleton. Results Here, we in addition to toxins use conditional expression of the major actin regulatory protein LIM kinase-1 (LIMK1), and shRNA knock-down of cofilin to modulate the cellular F/G-actin ratio in the Ra2 microglia cell line, and we use Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) in β-actin-YFP-transduced cells to obtain a dynamic measure of actin recovery rates (actin turn-over rates) in different F/G-actin states of the actin cytoskeleton. Our data demonstrate that stimulated NADPH oxidase function was severely impaired only at extreme actin recovery rates and F/G-actin ratios, and surprisingly, that any moderate changes of these parameters of the actin cytoskeleton invariably resulted in an increased NADPH oxidase activity. Conclusion moderate actin polymerization and depolymerization both increase the FMLP and PMA-stimulated NADPH oxidase activity of microglia, which is directly correlated with neither actin recovery rate nor F/G- actin ratio. Our results indicate that NADPH oxidase functions in an enhanced state of activity in stimulated phagocytes despite widely different states of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:20825680

  10. Development of new physical activity and sedentary behavior change self-efficacy questionnaires using item response modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theoretically, increased levels of physical activity self-efficacy (PASE) should lead to increased physical activity, but few studies have reported this effect among youth. This failure may be at least partially attributable to measurement limitations. In this study, Item Response Modeling (IRM) was...

  11. Activation of D-tyrosine by Bacillus stearothermophilus tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase: 2. Cooperative binding of ATP is limited to the initial turnover of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sheoran, Anita; First, Eric A

    2008-05-01

    The activation of D-tyrosine by tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase has been investigated using single and multiple turnover kinetic methods. In the presence of saturating concentrations of D-tyrosine, the activation reaction displays sigmoidal kinetics with respect to ATP concentration under single turnover conditions. In contrast, when the kinetics for the activation reaction are monitored using a steady-state (multiple turnover) pyrophosphate exchange assay, Michaelis-Menten kinetics are observed. Previous investigations indicated that activation of l-tyrosine by the K233A variant of Bacillus stearothermophilus tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase displays sigmoidal kinetics similar to those observed for activation of d-tyrosine by the wild-type enzyme. Kinetic analyses indicate that the sigmoidal behavior of the d-tyrosine activation reaction is not enhanced when Lys-233 is replaced by alanine. This supports the hypothesis that the mechanistic basis for the sigmoidal behavior is the same for both d-tyrosine activation by wild-type tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and activation of l-tyrosine by the K233A variant. The observed sigmoidal behavior presents a paradox, as tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase displays an extreme form of negative cooperativity, known as "half-of-the-sites reactivity," with respect to tyrosine binding and tyrosyl-adenylate formation. We propose that the binding of D-tyrosine weakens the affinity with which ATP binds to the functional subunit in tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. This allows ATP to bind initially to the nonfunctional subunit, inducing a conformational change in the enzyme that enhances the affinity of the functional subunit for ATP. The observation that sigmoidal kinetics are observed only under single turnover conditions suggests that this conformational change is stable over multiple rounds of catalysis. PMID:18319246

  12. Distinct and cooperative activities of HESO1 and URT1 nucleotidyl transferases in microRNA turnover in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Bin; Liu, Li; Xu, Chi; Zhai, Jixian; Li, Shengben; Lopez, Miguel A; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yu, Yu; Ramachandran, Vanitharani; Ren, Guodong; Yu, Bin; Li, Shigui; Meyers, Blake C; Mo, Beixin; Chen, Xuemei

    2015-04-01

    3' uridylation is increasingly recognized as a conserved RNA modification process associated with RNA turnover in eukaryotes. 2'-O-methylation on the 3' terminal ribose protects micro(mi)RNAs from 3' truncation and 3' uridylation in Arabidopsis. Previously, we identified HESO1 as the nucleotidyl transferase that uridylates most unmethylated miRNAs in vivo, but substantial 3' tailing of miRNAs still remains in heso1 loss-of-function mutants. In this study, we found that among nine other potential nucleotidyl transferases, UTP:RNA uridylyltransferase 1 (URT1) is the single most predominant nucleotidyl transferase that tails miRNAs. URT1 and HESO1 prefer substrates with different 3' end nucleotides in vitro and act cooperatively to tail different forms of the same miRNAs in vivo. Moreover, both HESO1 and URT1 exhibit nucleotidyl transferase activity on AGO1-bound miRNAs. Although these enzymes are able to add long tails to AGO1-bound miRNAs, the tailed miRNAs remain associated with AGO1. Moreover, tailing of AGO1-bound miRNA165/6 drastically reduces the slicing activity of AGO1-miR165/6, suggesting that tailing reduces miRNA activity. However, monouridylation of miR171a by URT1 endows the miRNA the ability to trigger the biogenesis of secondary siRNAs. Therefore, 3' tailing could affect the activities of miRNAs in addition to leading to miRNA degradation. PMID:25928405

  13. Opposing activities of the Ras and Hippo pathways converge on regulation of YAP protein turnover.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xin; Nguyen, Hung Thanh; Chen, Qingfeng; Zhang, Rui; Hagman, Zandra; Voorhoeve, P Mathijs; Cohen, Stephen M

    2014-11-01

    Cancer genomes accumulate numerous genetic and epigenetic modifications. Yet, human cellular transformation can be accomplished by a few genetically defined elements. These elements activate key pathways required to support replicative immortality and anchorage independent growth, a predictor of tumorigenesis in vivo. Here, we provide evidence that the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway is a key barrier to Ras-mediated cellular transformation. The Hippo pathway targets YAP1 for degradation via the βTrCP-SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. In contrast, the Ras pathway acts oppositely, to promote YAP1 stability through downregulation of the ubiquitin ligase complex substrate recognition factors SOCS5/6. Depletion of SOCS5/6 or upregulation of YAP1 can bypass the requirement for oncogenic Ras in anchorage independent growth in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. Through the YAP1 target, Amphiregulin, Ras activates the endogenous EGFR pathway, which is required for transformation. Thus, the oncogenic activity of Ras(V12) depends on its ability to counteract Hippo pathway activity, creating a positive feedback loop, which depends on stabilization of YAP1. PMID:25180228

  14. Opposing activities of the Ras and Hippo pathways converge on regulation of YAP protein turnover

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xin; Nguyen, Hung Thanh; Chen, Qingfeng; Zhang, Rui; Hagman, Zandra; Voorhoeve, P Mathijs; Cohen, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genomes accumulate numerous genetic and epigenetic modifications. Yet, human cellular transformation can be accomplished by a few genetically defined elements. These elements activate key pathways required to support replicative immortality and anchorage independent growth, a predictor of tumorigenesis in vivo. Here, we provide evidence that the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway is a key barrier to Ras-mediated cellular transformation. The Hippo pathway targets YAP1 for degradation via the βTrCP-SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. In contrast, the Ras pathway acts oppositely, to promote YAP1 stability through downregulation of the ubiquitin ligase complex substrate recognition factors SOCS5/6. Depletion of SOCS5/6 or upregulation of YAP1 can bypass the requirement for oncogenic Ras in anchorage independent growth in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. Through the YAP1 target, Amphiregulin, Ras activates the endogenous EGFR pathway, which is required for transformation. Thus, the oncogenic activity of RasV12 depends on its ability to counteract Hippo pathway activity, creating a positive feedback loop, which depends on stabilization of YAP1. PMID:25180228

  15. Parallel SCF Adaptor Capture Proteomics Reveals a Role for SCFFBXL17 in NRF2 Activation via BACH1 Repressor Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Meng-Kwang Marcus; Lim, Hui-Jun; Bennett, Eric J.; Shi, Yang; Harper, J. Wade

    2014-01-01

    Modular Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) use substrate binding adaptor proteins to specify target ubiquitylation. Many of the ~200 human CRL adaptor proteins remain poorly studied due to a shortage of efficient methods to identify biologically relevant substrates. Here, we report the development of Parallel Adaptor Capture (PAC) proteomics, and its use to systematically identify candidate targets for the leucine-rich repeat family of F-box proteins (FBXLs) that function with SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) E3s. In validation experiments, we identify the unstudied F-box protein FBXL17 as a regulator of the NFR2 oxidative stress pathway. We demonstrate that FBXL17 controls the transcription of the NRF2 target HMOX1 via turnover of the transcriptional repressor BACH1 in the absence or presence of extrinsic oxidative stress. This work identifies a role for SCFFBXL17 in controlling the threshold for NRF2-dependent gene activation and provides a framework for elucidating the functions of CRL adaptor proteins. PMID:24035498

  16. Parallel SCF adaptor capture proteomics reveals a role for SCFFBXL17 in NRF2 activation via BACH1 repressor turnover.

    PubMed

    Tan, Meng-Kwang Marcus; Lim, Hui-Jun; Bennett, Eric J; Shi, Yang; Harper, J Wade

    2013-10-10

    Modular cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) use substrate binding adaptor proteins to specify target ubiquitylation. Many of the ~200 human CRL adaptor proteins remain poorly studied due to a shortage of efficient methods to identify biologically relevant substrates. Here, we report the development of parallel adaptor capture (PAC) proteomics and its use to systematically identify candidate targets for the leucine-rich repeat family of F-box proteins (FBXLs) that function with SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) E3s. In validation experiments, we identify the unstudied F-box protein FBXL17 as a regulator of the NFR2 oxidative stress pathway. We demonstrate that FBXL17 controls the transcription of the NRF2 target HMOX1 via turnover of the transcriptional repressor BACH1 in the absence or presence of extrinsic oxidative stress. This work identifies a role for SCF(FBXL17) in controlling the threshold for NRF2-dependent gene activation and provides a framework for elucidating the functions of CRL adaptor proteins. PMID:24035498

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF THYROID FUNCTION AND BONE TURNOVER ON LIPOPROTEIN PROFILE IN YOUNG PHYSICALLY ACTIVE MEN WITH DIFFERENT INSULIN SENSITIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Lutosławska, G.; Czajkowska, A.; Tkaczyk, J.; Mazurek, K.; Tomaszewski, P.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity induces changes in the endocrine system. Previous data indicated that changes in insulin secretion and the tissue response to this hormone are very important for energy metabolism. It is believed that they are accompanied by changes in lipid metabolism, but factors contributing to this process are still disputed. The aim of this study was to assess interactions among insulin sensitivity, thyroid function, a bone turnover marker and serum lipid profile in young physically active men. Eighty-seven physical education students, aged 18-23 years, participated in the study. We measured serum levels of glucose, lipids, insulin, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), osteocalcin and anthropometric parameters. Insulin sensitivity was determined using homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The median value of HOMA-IR (1.344) was used to divide the study population into Group A (above the median) and Group B (below the median). Men from both groups did not differ in anthropometric parameters or in daily physical activity. Triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels were higher in Group A (P < 0.05). TSH and osteocalcin levels were similar in males with different HOMA-IR. Multiple regression analysis for TSH and osteocalcin showed that in Group A these hormones had no effect on plasma lipoproteins. However, in Group B they significantly determined the variation of plasma TC and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels (in about 28% and 29%, respectively). We concluded that TSH and osteocalcin are involved in determination of a more healthy lipid profile at a certain level of insulin sensitivity. PMID:24899778

  18. The influence of thyroid function and bone turnover on lipoprotein profile in young physically active men with different insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kęska, A; Lutosławska, G; Czajkowska, A; Tkaczyk, J; Mazurek, K; Tomaszewski, P

    2014-06-01

    Physical activity induces changes in the endocrine system. Previous data indicated that changes in insulin secretion and the tissue response to this hormone are very important for energy metabolism. It is believed that they are accompanied by changes in lipid metabolism, but factors contributing to this process are still disputed. The aim of this study was to assess interactions among insulin sensitivity, thyroid function, a bone turnover marker and serum lipid profile in young physically active men. Eighty-seven physical education students, aged 18-23 years, participated in the study. We measured serum levels of glucose, lipids, insulin, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), osteocalcin and anthropometric parameters. Insulin sensitivity was determined using homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The median value of HOMA-IR (1.344) was used to divide the study population into Group A (above the median) and Group B (below the median). Men from both groups did not differ in anthropometric parameters or in daily physical activity. Triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels were higher in Group A (P < 0.05). TSH and osteocalcin levels were similar in males with different HOMA-IR. Multiple regression analysis for TSH and osteocalcin showed that in Group A these hormones had no effect on plasma lipoproteins. However, in Group B they significantly determined the variation of plasma TC and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels (in about 28% and 29%, respectively). We concluded that TSH and osteocalcin are involved in determination of a more healthy lipid profile at a certain level of insulin sensitivity. PMID:24899778

  19. Mice expressing markedly reduced striatal dopamine transporters exhibit increased locomotor activity, dopamine uptake turnover rate, and cocaine responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Rao, Anjali; Sorkin, Alexander; Zahniser, Nancy R

    2013-10-01

    Variations in the expression levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT) can influence responsiveness to psychostimulant drugs like cocaine. To better understand this relationship, we studied a new DAT-low expresser (DAT-LE) mouse model and performed behavioral and biochemical studies with it. Immunoblotting and [(3) H]WIN 35,428 binding analyses revealed that these mice express ∼35% of wildtype (WT) mouse striatal DAT levels. Compared to WT mice, DAT-LE mice were hyperactive in a novel open-field environment. Despite their higher basal locomotor activity, cocaine (10 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.) induced greater locomotor activation in DAT-LE mice than in WT mice. The maximal velocity (Vmax ) of DAT-mediated [(3) H]DA uptake into striatal synaptosomes was reduced by 46% in DAT-LE mice, as compared to WT. Overall, considering the reduced number of DAT binding sites (Bmax ) along with the reduced Vmax in DAT-LE mice, a 2-fold increase in DA uptake turnover rate (Vmax /Bmax ) was found, relative to WT mice. This suggests that neuroadaptive changes have occurred in the DAT-LE mice that would help to compensate for their low DAT numbers. Interestingly, these changes do not include a reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase levels, as was previously reported in DAT knockout homozygous and heterozygous animals. Further, these changes are not sufficient to prevent elevated novelty- and cocaine-induced locomotor activity. Hence, these mice represent a unique model for studying changes of in vivo DAT function and regulation that result from markedly reduced levels of DAT expression. PMID:23564231

  20. Mutations in Mtr4 Structural Domains Reveal Their Important Role in Regulating tRNAiMet Turnover in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Mtr4p Enzymatic Activities In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Burclaff, Joseph; Anderson, James T.

    2016-01-01

    RNA processing and turnover play important roles in the maturation, metabolism and quality control of a large variety of RNAs thereby contributing to gene expression and cellular health. The TRAMP complex, composed of Air2p, Trf4p and Mtr4p, stimulates nuclear exosome-dependent RNA processing and degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mtr4 protein structure is composed of a helicase core and a novel so-called arch domain, which protrudes from the core. The helicase core contains highly conserved helicase domains RecA-1 and 2, and two structural domains of unclear functions, winged helix domain (WH) and ratchet domain. How the structural domains (arch, WH and ratchet domain) coordinate with the helicase domains and what roles they are playing in regulating Mtr4p helicase activity are unknown. We created a library of Mtr4p structural domain mutants for the first time and screened for those defective in the turnover of TRAMP and exosome substrate, hypomodified tRNAiMet. We found these domains regulate Mtr4p enzymatic activities differently through characterizing the arch domain mutants K700N and P731S, WH mutant K904N, and ratchet domain mutant R1030G. Arch domain mutants greatly reduced Mtr4p RNA binding, which surprisingly did not lead to significant defects on either in vivo tRNAiMet turnover, or in vitro unwinding activities. WH mutant K904N and Ratchet domain mutant R1030G showed decreased tRNAiMet turnover in vivo, as well as reduced RNA binding, ATPase and unwinding activities of Mtr4p in vitro. Particularly, K904 was found to be very important for steady protein levels in vivo. Overall, we conclude that arch domain plays a role in RNA binding but is largely dispensable for Mtr4p enzymatic activities, however the structural domains in the helicase core significantly contribute to Mtr4p ATPase and unwinding activities. PMID:26820724

  1. Mutations in Mtr4 Structural Domains Reveal Their Important Role in Regulating tRNAiMet Turnover in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Mtr4p Enzymatic Activities In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Burclaff, Joseph; Anderson, James T

    2016-01-01

    RNA processing and turnover play important roles in the maturation, metabolism and quality control of a large variety of RNAs thereby contributing to gene expression and cellular health. The TRAMP complex, composed of Air2p, Trf4p and Mtr4p, stimulates nuclear exosome-dependent RNA processing and degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mtr4 protein structure is composed of a helicase core and a novel so-called arch domain, which protrudes from the core. The helicase core contains highly conserved helicase domains RecA-1 and 2, and two structural domains of unclear functions, winged helix domain (WH) and ratchet domain. How the structural domains (arch, WH and ratchet domain) coordinate with the helicase domains and what roles they are playing in regulating Mtr4p helicase activity are unknown. We created a library of Mtr4p structural domain mutants for the first time and screened for those defective in the turnover of TRAMP and exosome substrate, hypomodified tRNAiMet. We found these domains regulate Mtr4p enzymatic activities differently through characterizing the arch domain mutants K700N and P731S, WH mutant K904N, and ratchet domain mutant R1030G. Arch domain mutants greatly reduced Mtr4p RNA binding, which surprisingly did not lead to significant defects on either in vivo tRNAiMet turnover, or in vitro unwinding activities. WH mutant K904N and Ratchet domain mutant R1030G showed decreased tRNAiMet turnover in vivo, as well as reduced RNA binding, ATPase and unwinding activities of Mtr4p in vitro. Particularly, K904 was found to be very important for steady protein levels in vivo. Overall, we conclude that arch domain plays a role in RNA binding but is largely dispensable for Mtr4p enzymatic activities, however the structural domains in the helicase core significantly contribute to Mtr4p ATPase and unwinding activities. PMID:26820724

  2. Using a Single-Item Physical Activity Measure to Describe and Validate Parents' Physical Activity Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kyra; White, Katherine M.; Cuddihy, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The accurate measurement of health-related physical activity (PA), often interpreted as either 150 min/week of at least moderate-intensity PA (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008) or at least 30 min of at least moderate-intensity PA on 5 or more days per week (Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing [AGDHA], 2005;…

  3. FOXO/DAF-16 Activation Slows Down Turnover of the Majority of Proteins in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Ineke; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Cai, Huaihan; Vandemeulebroucke, Lieselot; Vierstraete, Andy; Smith, Richard D; Depuydt, Geert; Braeckman, Bart P

    2016-09-13

    Most aging hypotheses assume the accumulation of damage, resulting in gradual physiological decline and, ultimately, death. Avoiding protein damage accumulation by enhanced turnover should slow down the aging process and extend the lifespan. However, lowering translational efficiency extends rather than shortens the lifespan in C. elegans. We studied turnover of individual proteins in the long-lived daf-2 mutant by combining SILeNCe (stable isotope labeling by nitrogen in Caenorhabditiselegans) and mass spectrometry. Intriguingly, the majority of proteins displayed prolonged half-lives in daf-2, whereas others remained unchanged, signifying that longevity is not supported by high protein turnover. This slowdown was most prominent for translation-related and mitochondrial proteins. In contrast, the high turnover of lysosomal hydrolases and very low turnover of cytoskeletal proteins remained largely unchanged. The slowdown of protein dynamics and decreased abundance of the translational machinery may point to the importance of anabolic attenuation in lifespan extension, as suggested by the hyperfunction theory. PMID:27626670

  4. Depletion of arachidonic acid from GH3 cells. Effects on inositol phospholipid turnover and cellular activation.

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, D T; Macfarlane, D E; Spector, A A

    1987-01-01

    We have adapted rat pituitary GH3 cells to grow in delipidated culture medium. In response, esterfied linoleic acid and arachidonic acid become essentially undetectable, whereas eicosa-5,8,11-trienoic acid accumulates and oleic acid increases markedly. These changes occur in all phospholipid classes, but are particularly pronounced in inositol phospholipids, where the usual stearate/arachidonate profile is replaced with oleate/eicosatrienoate (n - 9) and stearate/eicosatrienoate (n - 9). Incubation of arachidonate-depleted cells with 10 microM-arachidonic acid for only 24 h results in extensive remodelling of phospholipid fatty acids, such that close-to-normal compositions and arachidonic acid content are achieved for the inositol phospholipids. In comparison studies with arachidonic acid-depleted or -repleted cells, it was found that the arachidonate content does not affect thyrotropin-releasing-hormone (TRH)-stimulated responses measured at long time points, including [32P]Pi labelling of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid, stimulation of protein phosphorylation, and basal or TRH-stimulated prolactin release. However, transient events such as stimulated breakdown of inositol phospholipids and an initial rise in diacylglycerol are enhanced by the presence of arachidonate. These results show that arachidonic acid itself is not required for operation of the phosphatidylinositol cycle and is not an obligatory intermediate in TRH-mediated GH3 cell activation. It is possible that any structural or functional role of arachidonic acid in these processes is largely met by replacement with eicosatrienoate (n - 9). However, since arachidonate in inositol phospholipids facilitates their hydrolysis upon stimulation by TRH, arachidonic acid apparently may have a specific role in the recognition of these lipids by phospholipase C. Images Fig. 4. PMID:3120699

  5. Effects of Delay and Number of Related List Items on Implicit Activation for DRM Critical Items in a Speeded Naming Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Michelle L.; Hutchison, Keith A.; Rand, Kristina M.

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments examined decay and additivity of semantic priming produced by DRM false memory lists on a naming task. Subjects were presented with study lists containing 14 DRM items that were either all 14 related, the first 7 related, the second 7 related, or all 14 unrelated to the non-presented critical item. Priming was measured on a naming…

  6. The role of daily physical activity and nutritional status on bone turnover in cystic fibrosis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Tejero, Sergio; Cejudo, Pilar; Quintana-Gallego, E.; Sañudo, Borja; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Nutritional status and daily physical activity (PA) may be an excellent tool for the maintenance of bone health in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Objective To evaluate the relationship between nutritional status, daily physical activity and bone turnover in cystic fibrosis patients. Method A cross-sectional study of adolescent and adult patients diagnosed with clinically stable cystic fibrosis was conducted. Total body, femoral neck, and lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) were determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and bone metabolism markers ALP, P1NP, PICP, and ß-CrossLaps. PA monitoring was assessed for 5 consecutive days using a portable device. Exercise capacity was also determined. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and vitamin K were also determined in all participants. Results Fifty patients (median age: 24.4 years; range: 16-46) were included. BMI had positive correlation with all BMD parameters, with Spearman’s coefficients ranging from 0.31 to 0.47. Total hip bone mineral density and femoral neck BMD had positive correlation with the daily time spent on moderate PA (>4.8 metabolic equivalent-minutes/day; r=0.74, p<0.001 and r=0.72 p<0.001 respectively), daily time spent on vigorous PA (>7.2 metabolic equivalent-minutes/day; r=0.45 p<0.001), body mass index (r=0.44, p=0.001), and muscle mass in limbs (r=0.41, p=0.004). Levels of carboxy-terminal propeptide of type 1 collagen were positively associated with the daily time spent on moderate (r=0.33 p=0.023) and vigorous PA (r=0.53, p<0.001). Conclusions BMI and the daily time spent on moderate PA were found to be correlated with femoral neck BMD in CF patients. The association between daily PA and biochemical markers of bone formation suggests that the level of daily PA may be linked to bone health in this patient group. Further research is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27437711

  7. Guide to good practices for operations turnover

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Operations Turnover, Chapter XII of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing operations turnover programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Operations Turnover is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for a formal operations turnover program to promote safe and efficient operations.

  8. Familiarity-Based Responding in Item Recognition: Evidence for the Role of Spreading Activation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macht, Michael L.; O'Brien, Edward J.

    1980-01-01

    Results of three experiments indicated that latency of correct recognition was sensitive to the influence of a priming treatment. The magnitude of the priming effect depended on both the taxonomic frequency of the probe items, and the length of the interval between the prime and the recognition test. (Author/RD)

  9. Item-Specific and Generalization Effects on Brain Activation when Learning Chinese Characters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Yuan; Booth, James R.; Chou, Tai-Li; Ding, Guo-Sheng; Peng, Dan-Ling

    2008-01-01

    Neural changes related to learning of the meaning of Chinese characters in English speakers were examined using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We examined item specific learning effects for trained characters, but also the generalization of semantic knowledge to novel transfer characters that shared a semantic radical (part of a…

  10. Response to platelet-activating factor in human platelets stored and aged in plasma. Decrease in aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.D.; Morrison, W.J.; Klachko, D.M.

    1989-07-01

    Human platelet concentrates were stored in polyolefin bags at 22 to 24 degrees C on a horizontal shaker for up to 8 days. At different intervals, aliquots of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were removed aseptically and five variables, i.e., platelet counts, morphology, platelet-activating factor (PAF)-stimulated aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and (3H)PAF binding to platelet receptors, were studied. The number of platelets did not change during the 8 days of storage. Scanning electron microscopy of the platelets revealed a gradual morphologic change from biconcave flat discs to irregular, crenated forms. The PAF-induced aggregation of platelets declined with time of storage. A decrease to 50 percent of the Day 1 aggregatory response to PAF was evident on Day 2, and there was a further decline to about 20 percent by Day 6. Similarly, PAF receptor-coupled phosphoinositide turnover, as monitored by 32P incorporation into individual phosphoinositides, decreased dramatically with storage. After 2 to 3 days of storage, the phosphoinositide turnover was reduced to 50 percent of the original response, and it continued to decline to about 25 percent of original response by Day 5 or 6. The binding of (3H)PAF to washed human platelets indicated subtle changes between Days 2 and 4, which became more noticeable by Day 6. These results have raised the possibility of changes in the number of the receptors and/or their affinity for the ligand during storage. We conclude that although the number of platelets was maintained during storage for 8 days, a general deterioration of their responses to PAF occurred at the levels of cell surface receptor, transmembrane signaling (phosphoinositide turnover), and response (aggregation).

  11. Development and calibration of an item bank for the assessment of activities of daily living in cardiovascular patients using Rasch analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To develop and calibrate the activities of daily living item bank (ADLib-cardio) as a prerequisite for a Computer-adaptive test (CAT) for the assessment of ADL in patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Methods After pre-testing for relevance and comprehension a pool of 181 ADL items were answered on a five-point Likert scale by 720 CVD patients, who were recruited in fourteen German cardiac rehabilitation centers. To verify that the relationship between the items is due to one factor, a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted. A Mokken analysis was computed to examine the double monotonicity (i.e. every item generates an equivalent order of person traits, and every person generates an equivalent order of item difficulties). Finally, a Rasch analysis based on the partial credit model was conducted to test for unidimensionality and to calibrate the item bank. Results Results of CFA and Mokken analysis confirmed a one factor structure and double monotonicity. In Rasch analysis, merging response categories and removing items with misfit, differential item functioning or local response dependency reduced the ADLib-cardio to 33 items. The ADLib-cardio fitted to the Rasch model with a nonsignificant item-trait interaction (chi-square=105.42, df=99; p=0.31). Person-separation reliability was 0.81 and unidimensionality could be verified. Conclusions The ADLib-cardio is the first calibrated, unidimensional item bank that allows for the assessment of ADL in rehabilitation patients with CVD. As such, it provides the basis for the development of a CAT for the assessment of ADL in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Calibrating the ADLib-cardio in other than rehabilitation cardiovascular patient settings would further increase its generalizability. PMID:23914735

  12. Item-specific and generalization effects on brain activation when learning Chinese characters

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yuan; Booth, James R.; Chou, Tai-Li; Ding, Guo-Sheng; Peng, Dan-Ling

    2009-01-01

    Neural changes related to learning of the meaning of Chinese characters in English speakers were examined using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We examined item specific learning effects for trained characters, but also the generalization of semantic knowledge to novel transfer characters that shared a semantic radical (part of a character that gives a clue to word meaning, e.g. water for lake) with trained characters. Behavioral results show that acquired semantic knowledge improves performance for both trained and transfer characters. Neuroimaging results show that the left fusiform gyrus plays a central role in the visual processing of orthographic information in characters. The left superior parietal cortex seems to play a crucial role in learning the visual–spatial aspects of the characters because it shows learning related decreases for trained characters, is correlated with behavioral improvement from early to late in learning for the trained characters, and is correlated with better long-term retention for the transfer characters. The inferior frontal gyrus seems to be associated with the efficiency of retrieving and manipulating semantic representations because there are learning related decreases for trained characters and this decrease is correlated with greater behavioral improvement from early to late in learning. PMID:18514678

  13. Item-specific and generalization effects on brain activation when learning Chinese characters.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuan; Booth, James R; Chou, Tai-Li; Ding, Guo-Sheng; Peng, Dan-Ling

    2008-01-01

    Neural changes related to learning of the meaning of Chinese characters in English speakers were examined using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We examined item specific learning effects for trained characters, but also the generalization of semantic knowledge to novel transfer characters that shared a semantic radical (part of a character that gives a clue to word meaning, e.g. water for lake) with trained characters. Behavioral results show that acquired semantic knowledge improves performance for both trained and transfer characters. Neuroimaging results show that the left fusiform gyrus plays a central role in the visual processing of orthographic information in characters. The left superior parietal cortex seems to play a crucial role in learning the visual-spatial aspects of the characters because it shows learning related decreases for trained characters, is correlated with behavioral improvement from early to late in learning for the trained characters, and is correlated with better long-term retention for the transfer characters. The inferior frontal gyrus seems to be associated with the efficiency of retrieving and manipulating semantic representations because there are learning related decreases for trained characters and this decrease is correlated with greater behavioral improvement from early to late in learning. PMID:18514678

  14. Benchmarking of homogeneous electrocatalysts: overpotential, turnover frequency, limiting turnover number.

    PubMed

    Costentin, Cyrille; Passard, Guillaume; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2015-04-29

    In relation to contemporary energy challenges, a number of molecular catalysts for the activation of small molecules, mainly based on transition metal complexes, have been developed. The time has thus come to develop tools allowing the benchmarking of these numerous catalysts. Two main factors of merit are addressed. One involves their intrinsic catalytic performances through the comparison of "catalytic Tafel plots" relating the turnover frequency to the overpotential independently of the characteristics of the electrochemical cell. The other examines the effect of deactivation of the catalyst during the course of electrolysis. It introduces the notion of the limiting turnover number as a second key element of catalyst benchmarking. How these two factors combine with one another to control the course of electrolysis is analyzed in detail, leading to procedures that allow their separate estimation from measurements of the current, the charge passed, and the decay of the catalyst concentration. Illustrative examples from literature data are discussed. PMID:25757058

  15. Alpha8 Integrin (Itga8) Signalling Attenuates Chronic Renal Interstitial Fibrosis by Reducing Fibroblast Activation, Not by Interfering with Regulation of Cell Turnover.

    PubMed

    Marek, Ines; Lichtneger, Till; Cordasic, Nada; Hilgers, Karl F; Volkert, Gudrun; Fahlbusch, Fabian; Rascher, Wolfgang; Hartner, Andrea; Menendez-Castro, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The α8 integrin (Itga8) chain contributes to the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis in renal glomerular cells. In unilateral ureteral obstruction Itga8 is de novo expressed in the tubulointerstitium and a deficiency of Itga8 results in more severe renal fibrosis after unilateral ureteral obstruction. We hypothesized that the increased tubulointerstitial damage after unilateral ureteral obstruction observed in mice deficient for Itga8 is associated with altered tubulointerstitial cell turnover and apoptotic mechanisms resulting from the lack of Itga8 in cells of the tubulointerstitium. Induction of unilateral ureteral obstruction was achieved by ligation of the right ureter in mice lacking Itga8. Unilateral ureteral obstruction increased proliferation and apoptosis rates of tubuloepithelial and interstitial cells, however, no differences were observed in the tubulointerstitium of mice lacking Itga8 and wild type controls regarding fibroblast or proliferating cell numbers as well as markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis after unilateral ureteral obstruction. In contrast, unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice lacking Itga8 led to more pronounced tubulointerstitial cell activation i.e. to the appearance of more phospho-SMAD2/3-positive cells and more α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells in the tubulointerstitium. Furthermore, a more severe macrophage and T-cell infiltration was observed in these animals compared to controls. Thus, Itga8 seems to attenuate tubulointerstitial fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstruction not via regulation of cell turnover, but via regulation of TGF-β signalling, fibroblast activation and/or immune cell infiltration. PMID:26938996

  16. Alpha8 Integrin (Itga8) Signalling Attenuates Chronic Renal Interstitial Fibrosis by Reducing Fibroblast Activation, Not by Interfering with Regulation of Cell Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Ines; Lichtneger, Till; Cordasic, Nada; Hilgers, Karl F.; Volkert, Gudrun; Fahlbusch, Fabian; Rascher, Wolfgang; Hartner, Andrea; Menendez-Castro, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The α8 integrin (Itga8) chain contributes to the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis in renal glomerular cells. In unilateral ureteral obstruction Itga8 is de novo expressed in the tubulointerstitium and a deficiency of Itga8 results in more severe renal fibrosis after unilateral ureteral obstruction. We hypothesized that the increased tubulointerstitial damage after unilateral ureteral obstruction observed in mice deficient for Itga8 is associated with altered tubulointerstitial cell turnover and apoptotic mechanisms resulting from the lack of Itga8 in cells of the tubulointerstitium. Induction of unilateral ureteral obstruction was achieved by ligation of the right ureter in mice lacking Itga8. Unilateral ureteral obstruction increased proliferation and apoptosis rates of tubuloepithelial and interstitial cells, however, no differences were observed in the tubulointerstitium of mice lacking Itga8 and wild type controls regarding fibroblast or proliferating cell numbers as well as markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis after unilateral ureteral obstruction. In contrast, unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice lacking Itga8 led to more pronounced tubulointerstitial cell activation i.e. to the appearance of more phospho-SMAD2/3-positive cells and more α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells in the tubulointerstitium. Furthermore, a more severe macrophage and T-cell infiltration was observed in these animals compared to controls. Thus, Itga8 seems to attenuate tubulointerstitial fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstruction not via regulation of cell turnover, but via regulation of TGF-β signalling, fibroblast activation and/or immune cell infiltration. PMID:26938996

  17. Visualizing synaptic vesicle turnover and pool refilling driven by calcium nanodomains at presynaptic active zones of ribbon synapses.

    PubMed

    Vaithianathan, Thirumalini; Matthews, Gary

    2014-06-10

    Ribbon synapses of photoreceptor cells and second-order bipolar neurons in the retina are specialized to transmit graded signals that encode light intensity. Neurotransmitter release at ribbon synapses exhibits two kinetically distinct components, which serve different sensory functions. The faster component is depleted within milliseconds and generates transient postsynaptic responses that emphasize changes in light intensity. Despite the importance of this fast release for processing temporal and spatial contrast in visual signals, the physiological basis for this component is not precisely known. By imaging synaptic vesicle turnover and Ca(2+) signals at single ribbons in zebrafish bipolar neurons, we determined the locus of fast release, the speed and site of Ca(2+) influx driving rapid release, and the location where new vesicles are recruited to replenish the fast pool after it is depleted. At ribbons, Ca(2+) near the membrane rose rapidly during depolarization to levels >10 µM, whereas Ca(2+) at nonribbon locations rose more slowly to the lower level observed globally, consistent with selective positioning of Ca(2+) channels near ribbons. The local Ca(2+) domain drove rapid exocytosis of ribbon-associated synaptic vesicles nearest the plasma membrane, accounting for the fast component of neurotransmitter release. However, new vesicles replacing those lost arrived selectively at the opposite pole of the ribbon, distal to the membrane. Overall, the results suggest a model for fast release in which nanodomain Ca(2+) triggers exocytosis of docked vesicles, which are then replaced by more distant ribbon-attached vesicles, creating opportunities for new vesicles to associate with the ribbon at membrane-distal sites. PMID:24912160

  18. Geminivirus Activates ASYMMETRIC LEAVES 2 to Accelerate Cytoplasmic DCP2-Mediated mRNA Turnover and Weakens RNA Silencing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jian; Yang, Junyi; Sun, Yanwei; Zhao, Pingzhi; Gao, Shiqiang; Jung, Choonkyun; Qu, Jing; Fang, Rongxiang; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant viral RNAs produced in infected plant cells serve as templates for the synthesis of dsRNAs. The derived virus-related small interfering RNAs (siRNA) mediate cleavage of viral RNAs by post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), thus blocking virus multiplication. Here, we identified ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 (AS2) as a new component of plant P body complex which mediates mRNA decapping and degradation. We found that AS2 promotes DCP2 decapping activity, accelerates mRNA turnover rate, inhibits siRNA accumulation and functions as an endogenous suppressor of PTGS. Consistent with these findings, as2 mutant plants are resistant to virus infection whereas AS2 over-expression plants are hypersensitive. The geminivirus nuclear shuttle protein BV1 protein, which shuttles between nuclei and cytoplasm, induces AS2 expression, causes nuclear exit of AS2 to activate DCP2 decapping activity and renders infected plants more sensitive to viruses. These principles of gene induction and shuttling of induced proteins to promote mRNA decapping in the cytosol may be used by viral pathogens to weaken antiviral defenses in host plants. PMID:26431425

  19. Total Glutamine Synthetase Activity during Soybean Nodule Development Is Controlled at the Level of Transcription and Holoprotein Turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Temple, S. J.; Kunjibettu, S.; Roche, D.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C.

    1996-01-01

    Gln synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia with glutamate to yield Gln. In higher plants GS is an octameric enzyme and the subunits are encoded by members of a small multigene family. In soybeans (Glycine max), following the onset of N2 fixation there is a dramatic increase in GS activity in the root nodules. GS activity staining of native polyacrylamide gels containing nodule and root extracts showed a common band of activity (GSrs). The nodules also contained a slower-migrating, broad band of enzyme activity (GSns). The GSns activity band is a complex of many isozymes made up of different proportions of two kinds of GS subunits: GSr and GSn. Root nodules formed following inoculation with an Nif- strain of Bradyrhizobium japonicum showed the presence of GS isoenzymes (GSns1) with low enzyme activity, which migrated more slowly than GSns. Gsns1 is most likely made up predominantly of GSn subunits. Our data suggest that, whereas the class I GS genes encoding the GSr subunits are regulated by the availability of NH3, the class II GS genes coding for the GSn subunits are developmentally regulated. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the GSns1 isozymes in the Nif- nodules are relatively more labile. Our overall conclusion is that GSns activity in soybean nodules is regulated by N2 fixation both at the level of transcription and at the level of holoprotein stability. PMID:12226474

  20. Selecting Lower Priced Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinert, Harold L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A program used to teach moderately to severely mentally handicapped students to select the lower priced items in actual shopping activities is described. Through a five-phase process, students are taught to compare prices themselves as well as take into consideration variations in the sizes of containers and varying product weights. (VW)

  1. ADP Ribosylation Factor 6 (ARF6) Promotes Acrosomal Exocytosis by Modulating Lipid Turnover and Rab3A Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pelletán, Leonardo E.; Suhaiman, Laila; Vaquer, Cintia C.; Bustos, Matías A.; De Blas, Gerardo A.; Vitale, Nicolas; Mayorga, Luis S.; Belmonte, Silvia A.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated secretion is a central issue for the specific function of many cells; for instance, mammalian sperm acrosomal exocytosis is essential for egg fertilization. ARF6 (ADP-ribosylation factor 6) is a small GTPase implicated in exocytosis, but its downstream effectors remain elusive in this process. We combined biochemical, functional, and microscopy-based methods to show that ARF6 is present in human sperm, localizes to the acrosomal region, and is required for calcium and diacylglycerol-induced exocytosis. Results from pulldown assays show that ARF6 exchanges GDP for GTP in sperm challenged with different exocytic stimuli. Myristoylated and guanosine 5′-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPγS)-loaded ARF6 (active form) added to permeabilized sperm induces acrosome exocytosis even in the absence of extracellular calcium. We explore the ARF6 signaling cascade that promotes secretion. We demonstrate that ARF6 stimulates a sperm phospholipase D activity to produce phosphatidic acid and boosts the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. We present direct evidence showing that active ARF6 increases phospholipase C activity, causing phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent intra-acrosomal calcium release. We show that active ARF6 increases the exchange of GDP for GTP on Rab3A, a prerequisite for secretion. We propose that exocytic stimuli activate ARF6, which is required for acrosomal calcium efflux and the assembly of the membrane fusion machinery. This report highlights the physiological importance of ARF6 as a key factor for human sperm exocytosis and fertilization. PMID:25713146

  2. Radiocarbon Evidence for Active Turnover of Pore-Water Dissolved Organic Carbon in the Methanogenic and Sulfate-Methane-Transition Zones of Santa Barbara Basin Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komada, T.; Li, H. L.; Cada, A. K.; Burdige, D.; Magen, C.; Chanton, J.; Grose, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Diverse metabolic activities have been documented in the deep biosphere. However, how these activities affect carbon cycling in the subsurface, and how they in turn affect the marine and global cycles of carbon are still unclear. Here we present natural-abundance 14C and 13C data from the uppermost 4.5 m of the sediments of the Santa Barbara Basin, California Borderland, showing active turnover of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) within, and immediately below, the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ; ~1.25 m). DOC concentrations increased with depth throughout the core, indicating net production within the sediment column. Enhanced DOC production was observed near the sediment-water interface, and also at ~30 cm below the SMTZ (~1.55 m). ∆14C values of DOC increased across the sediment-water interface, then decreased with depth, consistent with net production of modern DOC near the sediment-water interface, and input of 14C-depleted DOC from deeper horizons. An isotope mixing plot constructed with these data shows that the DOC diffusing upward at the base of the core is devoid of 14C, yet the DOC diffusing into and out of the SMTZ is relatively enriched (-460‰ and -300‰, respectively). This difference in 14C content of the DOC flux can only be reconciled if the following two are occurring within, and immediately below, the SMTZ: (1) >90% of the 14C-dead basal DOC flux is removed from the pore water (by, e.g., oxidation, fermentation, methanogenesis, precipitation), and (2) this DOC is replaced by material produced in this region at a rate that exceeds the upward basal flux. The 14C and 13C signatures suggest sedimentary organic matter to be the dominant source of DOC in process (2). Our data provide a unique insight into the active transformation of DOC and sedimentary organic matter in the subsurface.

  3. Accelerated apoptotic death and in vivo turnover of erythrocytes in mice lacking functional mitogen- and stress-activated kinase MSK1/2.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elisabeth; Bissinger, Rosi; Fajol, Abul; Salker, Madhuri S; Singh, Yogesh; Zelenak, Christine; Ghashghaeinia, Mehrdad; Gu, Shuchen; Jilani, Kashif; Lupescu, Adrian; Reyskens, Kathleen M S E; Ackermann, Teresa F; Föller, Michael; Schleicher, Erwin; Sheffield, William P; Arthur, J Simon C; Lang, Florian; Qadri, Syed M

    2015-01-01

    The mitogen- and stress-activated kinase MSK1/2 plays a decisive role in apoptosis. In analogy to apoptosis of nucleated cells, suicidal erythrocyte death called eryptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling leading to phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization. Here, we explored whether MSK1/2 participates in the regulation of eryptosis. To this end, erythrocytes were isolated from mice lacking functional MSK1/2 (msk(-/-)) and corresponding wild-type mice (msk(+/+)). Blood count, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration and mean erythrocyte volume were similar in both msk(-/-) and msk(+/+) mice, but reticulocyte count was significantly increased in msk(-/-) mice. Cell membrane PS exposure was similar in untreated msk(-/-) and msk(+/+) erythrocytes, but was enhanced by pathophysiological cell stressors ex vivo such as hyperosmotic shock or energy depletion to significantly higher levels in msk(-/-) erythrocytes than in msk(+/+) erythrocytes. Cell shrinkage following hyperosmotic shock and energy depletion, as well as hemolysis following decrease of extracellular osmolarity was more pronounced in msk(-/-) erythrocytes. The in vivo clearance of autologously-infused CFSE-labeled erythrocytes from circulating blood was faster in msk(-/-) mice. The spleens from msk(-/-) mice contained a significantly greater number of PS-exposing erythrocytes than spleens from msk(+/+) mice. The present observations point to accelerated eryptosis and subsequent clearance of erythrocytes leading to enhanced erythrocyte turnover in MSK1/2-deficient mice. PMID:26611568

  4. B Cell Lymphoma (Bcl)-2 Protein Is the Major Determinant in bcl-2 Adenine-Uridine-rich Element Turnover Overcoming HuR Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Ghisolfi, Laura; Calastretti, Angela; Franzi, Sara; Canti, Gianfranco; Donnini, Martino; Capaccioli, Sergio; Nicolin, Angelo; Bevilacqua, Annamaria

    2009-01-01

    In the 3′-untranslated region, the destabilizing adenine-uridine (AU)-rich elements (AREs) control the expression of several transcripts through interactions with ARE-binding proteins (AUBPs) and RNA degradation machinery. Although the fundamental role for AUBPs and associated factors in eliciting ARE-dependent degradation of cognate mRNAs has been recently highlighted, the molecular mechanisms underlying the specific regulation of individual mRNA turnover have not yet been fully elucidated. Here we focused on the post-transcriptional regulation of bcl-2 mRNA in human cell lines under different conditions and genetic backgrounds. In the context of an AUBPs silencing approach, HuR knockdown reduced the expression of endogenous bcl-2, whereas unexpectedly, a bcl-2 ARE-reporter transcript increased significantly, suggesting that HuR expression has opposite effects on endogenous and ectopic bcl-2 ARE. Moreover, evidence was provided for the essential, specific and dose-dependent role of the Bcl-2 protein in regulating the decay kinetics of its own mRNA, as ascertained by a luciferase reporter system. Altogether, the data support a model whereby the Bcl-2 protein is the major determinant of its own ARE-dependent transcript half-life in living cells and its effect overcomes the activity of ARE-binding proteins. PMID:19520857

  5. B cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 protein is the major determinant in bcl-2 adenine-uridine-rich element turnover overcoming HuR activity.

    PubMed

    Ghisolfi, Laura; Calastretti, Angela; Franzi, Sara; Canti, Gianfranco; Donnini, Martino; Capaccioli, Sergio; Nicolin, Angelo; Bevilacqua, Annamaria

    2009-07-31

    In the 3'-untranslated region, the destabilizing adenine-uridine (AU)-rich elements (AREs) control the expression of several transcripts through interactions with ARE-binding proteins (AUBPs) and RNA degradation machinery. Although the fundamental role for AUBPs and associated factors in eliciting ARE-dependent degradation of cognate mRNAs has been recently highlighted, the molecular mechanisms underlying the specific regulation of individual mRNA turnover have not yet been fully elucidated. Here we focused on the post-transcriptional regulation of bcl-2 mRNA in human cell lines under different conditions and genetic backgrounds. In the context of an AUBPs silencing approach, HuR knockdown reduced the expression of endogenous bcl-2, whereas unexpectedly, a bcl-2 ARE-reporter transcript increased significantly, suggesting that HuR expression has opposite effects on endogenous and ectopic bcl-2 ARE. Moreover, evidence was provided for the essential, specific and dose-dependent role of the Bcl-2 protein in regulating the decay kinetics of its own mRNA, as ascertained by a luciferase reporter system. Altogether, the data support a model whereby the Bcl-2 protein is the major determinant of its own ARE-dependent transcript half-life in living cells and its effect overcomes the activity of ARE-binding proteins. PMID:19520857

  6. Item Difficulty Modeling of Paragraph Comprehension Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorin, Joanna S.; Embretson, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    Recent assessment research joining cognitive psychology and psychometric theory has introduced a new technology, item generation. In algorithmic item generation, items are systematically created based on specific combinations of features that underlie the processing required to correctly solve a problem. Reading comprehension items have been more…

  7. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus RnpA Alter Cellular mRNA Turnover, Exhibit Antimicrobial Activity, and Attenuate Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Patrick D.; Kuechenmeister, Lisa J.; Anderson, Kelsi L.; Daily, Sonja; Beenken, Karen E.; Roux, Christelle M.; Reniere, Michelle L.; Lewis, Tami L.; Weiss, William J.; Pulse, Mark; Nguyen, Phung; Simecka, Jerry W.; Morrison, John M.; Sayood, Khalid; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Skaar, Eric P.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is estimated to cause more U.S. deaths annually than HIV/AIDS. The emergence of hypervirulent and multidrug-resistant strains has further amplified public health concern and accentuated the need for new classes of antibiotics. RNA degradation is a required cellular process that could be exploited for novel antimicrobial drug development. However, such discovery efforts have been hindered because components of the Gram-positive RNA turnover machinery are incompletely defined. In the current study we found that the essential S. aureus protein, RnpA, catalyzes rRNA and mRNA digestion in vitro. Exploiting this activity, high through-put and secondary screening assays identified a small molecule inhibitor of RnpA-mediated in vitro RNA degradation. This agent was shown to limit cellular mRNA degradation and exhibited antimicrobial activity against predominant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) lineages circulating throughout the U.S., vancomycin intermediate susceptible S. aureus (VISA), vancomycin resistant S. aureus (VRSA) and other Gram-positive bacterial pathogens with high RnpA amino acid conservation. We also found that this RnpA-inhibitor ameliorates disease in a systemic mouse infection model and has antimicrobial activity against biofilm-associated S. aureus. Taken together, these findings indicate that RnpA, either alone, as a component of the RNase P holoenzyme, and/or as a member of a more elaborate complex, may play a role in S. aureus RNA degradation and provide proof of principle for RNA catabolism-based antimicrobial therapy. PMID:21347352

  8. Platelet activation by bacterial phospholipase C involves phosphoinositide turnover and phosphorylation of 47,000 dalton but not 20,000 dalton protein

    SciTech Connect

    Huzoor-Akbar; Anwer, K.

    1986-05-01

    This study was conducted to examine the role of phosphoinositides (PIns) and phosphorylation of 47,000 dalton (P47) and 20,000 dalton (P20) proteins in platelet activation by bacterial phospholipase C (PLC). PLC induced serotonin secretion (SS) and platelet aggregation (PA) in a concentration dependent manner. PLC (0.02 U/ml) caused phosphorylation of P47 in a time dependent manner (27% at 0.5 min to 378% at 7 min). PLC did not induce more than 15% phosphorylation of P20 by 7 min. Aspirin (500 ..mu..M) blocked phosphorylation of P20 but did not inhibit SS, PA or phosphorylation of P47. PLC (0.04 U/ml) decreased radioactivity (cpm) in /sup 32/P labeled phosphatidylinositol (PI), PI-4,5-bis-PO4 (PIP2) and PI-4-PO4 (PIP) by 20%, 12% and 7.5% respectively at 15 sec. The level of PI but not that of PIP2 returned to base line in 3 min. PIP level increased above control values within one min. PLC increased phosphatidic acid level (75% at 0.5 min. to 1545% at 3 min). In other experiments PLC produced diacylglycerol (DAG) in a time and concentration dependent manner. However, no DAG was detectable in the first 60 sec. These data suggest that: (a) PIns turnover and phosphorylation of P47 but not that of P20 is involved in platelet activation by PLC; and (b) DAG production from outer membrane phospholipids is not a prerequisite for platelet activation by PLC.

  9. Job Demand and Job Satisfaction in Latent Groups of Turnover Intention Among Licensed Nurses in Taiwan Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Hui; Brown, Roger; Bowers, Barbara J; Chang, Wen-Yin

    2015-10-01

    Nurses' turnover intention is not dichotomous; it may reflect intent to leave the profession, intent to leave a type of facility, or intent to leave a specific workplace. In a latent class analysis (LCA) of data from 186 licensed nurses (RNs and LPNs) recruited from 25 nursing homes (NHs) in Taiwan, we classified nurses into turnover intention subgroups based on seven questionnaire items and used a multilevel contrast analysis to characterize the subgroups according to demographic and facility factors, job demand, and job satisfaction. A multilevel probit model was used to examine how job demand and job satisfaction influenced subgroup membership. Three turnover subgroups were identified: high turnover intention (12%), middle turnover intention (57%), and low turnover intention (31%). The high turnover intention subgroup comprised the youngest nurses and had the lowest percentage of registered nurses (RNs); nurses in this subgroup had worked the longest at the current NH and had the greatest likelihood of working at a for-profit facility. Nurses in the middle turnover intention subgroup had the lowest likelihood of working at a for-profit facility. Nurses in the low turnover intention subgroup were primarily RNs and had the shortest work experience in the current facility. Nurses in the high and middle turnover intention subgroups reported lower intrinsic job satisfaction than those with low turnover intention. Extrinsic job satisfaction mediated the relationship between job demand and turnover intention subgroup assignment. The results of this LCA can help target interventions to address heterogeneity of turnover intention and ultimately lessen turnover. PMID:26012950

  10. PKA turnover by the REGγ-proteasome modulates FoxO1 cellular activity and VEGF-induced angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang; Lai, Li; Zuo, Qiuhong; Dai, Fujun; Wu, Lin; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Qingxia; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jiang; Li, Lei; Lin, Qingxiang; Creighton, Chad J.; Costello, Myra Grace; Huang, Shixia; Jia, Caifeng; Liao, Lujian; Luo, Honglin; Fu, Junjiang; Liu, Mingyao; Yi, Zhengfang; Xiao, Jianru; Li, Xiaotao

    2014-01-01

    The REGγ-proteasome serves as a short-cut for the destruction of certain intact mammalian proteins in the absence of ubiquitin-and ATP. The biological roles of the proteasome activator REGγ are not completely understood. Here we demonstrate that REGγ controls degradation of protein kinase A catalytic subunit-α (PKAca) both in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs). Accumulation of PKAca in REGγ-deficient HUVECs or MEFs results in phosphorylation and nuclear exclusion of the transcription factor FoxO1, indicating that REGγ is involved in preserving FoxO1 transcriptional activity. Consequently, VEGF-induced expression of the FoxO1 responsive genes, VCAM-1 and E-Selectin, was tightly controlled by REGγ in a PKA dependent manner. Functionally, REGγ is crucial for the migration of HUVECs. REGγ−/− mice display compromised VEGF-instigated neovascularization in cornea and aortic ring models. Implanted matrigel plugs containing VEGF in REGγ−/− mice induced fewer capillaries than in REGγ+/+ littermates. Taken together, our study identifies REGγ as a novel angiogenic factor that plays an important role in VEGF-induced expression of VCAM-1 and E-Selectin by antagonizing PKA signaling. Identification of the REGγ–PKA–FoxO1 pathway in endothelial cells (ECs) provides another potential target for therapeutic intervention in vascular diseases. PMID:24560667

  11. Effect of chronic activity-based therapy on bone mineral density and bone turnover in persons with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Harness, Eric T.; Witzke, Kara A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Osteoporosis is a severe complication of spinal cord injury (SCI). Many exercise modalities are used to slow bone loss, yet their efficacy is equivocal. This study examined the effect of activity-based therapy (ABT) targeting the lower extremities on bone health in individuals with SCI. Methods Thirteen men and women with SCI (age and injury duration = 29.7 ± 7.8 and 1.9 ± 2.7 years) underwent 6 months of ABT. At baseline and after 3 and 6 months of training, blood samples were obtained to assess bone formation (serum procollagen type 1 N propeptide (PINP) and bone resorption (serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), and participants underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans to obtain total body and regional estimates of bone mineral density (BMD). Results Results demonstrated significant increases (p < 0.05) in spine BMD (+4.8 %; 1.27 ± 0.22–1.33 ± 0.24 g/cm2) and decreases (p < 0.01) in total hip BMD (−6.1 %; 0.98 ± 0.18–0.91 ± 0.16 g/cm2) from 0 to 6 months of training. BMD at the bilateral distal femur (−7.5 to −11.0 %) and proximal tibia (− 8.0 to −11.2 %) declined but was not different (p > 0.05) versus baseline. Neither PINP nor CTX was altered (p> 0.05) with training. Conclusions Chronic activity-based therapy did not reverse bone loss typically observed soon after injury, yet reductions in BMD were less than the expected magnitude of decline in lower extremity BMD in persons with recent SCI. PMID:24097172

  12. Pharmacological PPARα Activation Markedly Alters Plasma Turnover of the Amino Acids Glycine, Serine and Arginine in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Ericsson, Anette; Turner, Nigel; Hansson, Göran I.; Wallenius, Kristina; Oakes, Nicholas D.

    2014-01-01

    The current study extends previously reported PPARα agonist WY 14,643 (30 µmol/kg/day for 4 weeks) effects on circulating amino acid concentrations in rats fed a 48% saturated fat diet. Steady-state tracer experiments were used to examine in vivo kinetic mechanisms underlying altered plasma serine, glycine and arginine levels. Urinary urea and creatinine excretion were measured to assess whole-body amino acid catabolism. WY 14,643 treated animals demonstrated reduced efficiency to convert food consumed to body weight gain while liver weight was increased compared to controls. WY 14,643 raised total amino acid concentration (38%), largely explained by glycine, serine and threonine increases. 3H-glycine, 14C-serine and 14C-arginine tracer studies revealed elevated rates of appearance (Ra) for glycine (45.5±5.8 versus 17.4±2.7 µmol/kg/min) and serine (21.0±1.4 versus 12.0±1.0) in WY 14,643 versus control. Arginine was substantially decreased (−62%) in plasma with estimated Ra reduced from 3.1±0.3 to 1.2±0.2 µmol/kg/min in control versus WY 14,643. Nitrogen excretion over 24 hours was unaltered. Hepatic arginase activity was substantially decreased by WY 14,643 treatment. In conclusion, PPARα agonism potently alters metabolism of several specific amino acids in the rat. The changes in circulating levels of serine, glycine and arginine reflected altered fluxes into the plasma rather than changes in clearance or catabolism. This suggests that PPARα has an important role in modulating serine, glycine and arginine de novo synthesis. PMID:25486018

  13. Proteasome-mediated turnover of the transcriptional activator FIT is required for plant iron-deficiency responses.

    PubMed

    Sivitz, Alicia; Grinvalds, Claudia; Barberon, Marie; Curie, Catherine; Vert, Grégory

    2011-06-01

    Plants display a number of responses to low iron availability in order to increase iron uptake from the soil. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the ferric-chelate reductase FRO2 and the ferrous iron transporter IRT1 control iron entry from the soil into the root epidermis. To maintain iron homeostasis, the expression of FRO2 and IRT1 is tightly controlled by iron deficiency at the transcriptional level. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor FIT represents the most upstream actor known in the iron-deficiency signaling pathway, and directly regulates the expression of the root iron uptake machinery genes FRO2 and IRT1. However, how FIT is controlled by iron and acts to activate transcription of its targets remains obscure. Here we show that FIT mRNA and endogenous FIT protein accumulate in Arabidopsis roots upon iron deficiency. However, using plants constitutively expressing FIT, we observed that FIT protein accumulation is reduced in iron-limited conditions. This post-transcriptional regulation of FIT is perfectly synchronized with the accumulation of endogenous FIT and IRT1 proteins, and therefore is part of the early responses to low iron. We demonstrated that such regulation affects FIT protein stability under iron deficiency as a result of 26S proteasome-dependent degradation. In addition, we showed that FIT post-translational regulation by iron is required for FRO2 and IRT1 gene expression. Taken together our results indicate that FIT transcriptional and post-translational regulations are integrated in plant roots to ensure that the positive regulator FIT accumulates as a short-lived protein following iron shortage, and to allow proper iron-deficiency responses. PMID:21426424

  14. Job Search, Intentions, and Turnover: The Mismatched Trilogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschenbaum, Alan; Weisberg, Jacob

    1994-01-01

    Interviews with 477 Israeli blue-collar workers showed that neither intent to leave nor actual job search significantly explained actual turnover, resulting from lack of available opportunities. "Passive" search seems to occur before intent emerges; active search may bring together perceived and actual opportunities and lead to turnover. (SK)

  15. Understanding the Impacts of Induction Programs on Beginning Teacher Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Seok

    2010-01-01

    This study examines impacts of mentoring and induction activities on beginning teacher turnover using the School and Staffing Survey (SASS) of 1999-2000 and the Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS) of 2000-2001. In order to improve understanding of the influence of induction programs on beginning teacher turnover, three models are developed to achieve…

  16. DECOMMISSIONING OF SHIELDED FACILITIES AT WINFRITH USED FOR POST IRRADIATION EXAMINATION OF NUCLEAR FUELS & OTHER ACTIVE ITEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.D.; Parkinson, S.J.; Cornell, R.M.; Staples, A.T.

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes the approaches used in the clearing, cleaning, decontamination and decommissioning of a very large suite of seven concrete shielded caves and other facilities used by UKAEA at Winfrith Technology Centre, England over a period of about 30 years for the postirradiation examination (PIE) of a wide range of nuclear fuels and other very active components. The basic construction of the facilities will first be described, setting the scene for the major challenges that 1970s' thinking posed for decommissioning engineers. The tendency then to use large and heavy items of equipment supported upon massive steel bench structures produced a series of major problems that had to be overcome. The means of solving these problems by utilization of relatively simple and inexpensive equipment will be described. Later, a further set of challenges was experienced to decontaminate the interior surfaces to allow man entries to be undertaken at acceptable dose rates. The paper will describe the types of tooling used and the range of complementary techniques that were employed to steadily reduce the dose rates down to acceptable levels. Some explanations will also be given for the creation of realistic dose budgets and the methods of recording and continuously assessing the progress against these budgets throughout the project. Some final considerations are given to the commercial approaches to be adopted throughout this major project by the decommissioning engineers. Particular emphasis will be given to the selection of equipment and techniques that are effective so that the whole process can be carried out in a cost-effective and timely manner. The paper also provides brief complementary information obtained during the decommissioning of a plutonium-contaminated facility used for a range of semi-experimental purposes in the late 1970s. The main objective here was to remove the alpha contamination in such a manner that the volume of Plutonium Contaminated Materials (P

  17. Integrating Turnover Reasons and Shocks with Turnover Decision Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maertz, Carl P., Jr.; Kmitta, Kayla R.

    2012-01-01

    We interviewed and classified 186 quitters from many jobs and organizations via a theoretically-based protocol into five decision process types. We then tested exploratory hypotheses comparing users of these types on their propensity to report certain turnover reasons and turnover shocks. "Impulsive-type quitters," with neither a job offer in hand…

  18. Modulation of the Active Complex Assembly and Turnover Rate by Protein–DNA Interactions in Cre–LoxP Recombination†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Shelley S.; Chu, Victor C.; Baldwin, Enoch

    2010-01-01

    Cre promotes recombination at the 34 bp LoxP sequence. Substitution of a critical C-G base pair in LoxP with an A-T base pair, to give LoxAT, reduced Cre binding in vitro and abolished recombination in vivo. We demonstrated that LoxAT can be recombined in vitro. However, Cre discriminates against this substrate both before and after DNA binding. The preference for LoxP over LoxAT is the result of reduced binding and a slower turnover rate, amplified by changes in cooperativity of complex assembly. With LoxAT, similar levels of substrate turnover required 2–2.5-fold higher protein–DNA concentrations compared to LoxP, but the sigmoidal behavior of the concentration dependence was more pronounced. Further, the Cre–LoxAT complexes reacted 4–5-fold more slowly. In the 2.3 Å resolution Cre–LoxAT complex structure, the major groove Arg259–guanine interaction was disrupted, explaining the reduced binding. Overall structural shifts and mobility changes indicate more favorable interactions between subunits, providing a hypothesis for the reduced turnover rate. Concomitant with the displacement of Arg259 from the DNA, adjacent charged residues Glu262 and Glu266 shifted to form salt bridges with the Arg259 guanidinium moiety. Substitution of Glu262 and Glu266 with glutamine increased Cre complex assembly efficiency and reaction rates with both LoxAT and LoxP, but diminished Cre’s ability to distinguish them. The increased rate of this variant suggests that DNA substrate binding and turnover are coupled. The improved efficiency, made at some expense of sequence discrimination, may be useful for enhancing recombination in vivo. PMID:12779336

  19. Commitment Profiles and Employee Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Laura; Vandenberghe, Christian; Vandenberg, Robert; Bentein, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    We examined how affective (AC), normative (NC), perceived sacrifice (PS), and few alternatives (FA) commitments combine to form profiles and determine turnover intention and turnover. We theorized that three mechanisms account for how profiles operate, i.e., the degree to which membership is internally regulated, the perceived desirability and…

  20. Normal Bone Turnover in Transient Hyperphosphatasemia

    PubMed Central

    Kutilek, Stepan; Cervickova, Barbora; Bebova, Pavla; Kmonickova, Marie; Nemec, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Transient hyperphosphatasemia of infancy and early childhood (THI) is characterized by a temporary isolated elevation of serum alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP), predominantly its bone or liver isoform, in either sick or healthy children under 5 years of age. Return to normal ALP levels usually occurs within four months. Spontaneous rise of ALP might concern the physician, especially when treating seriously ill children. However, THI is considered a benign biochemical disorder with no clinical consequences. Some existing reports support the hypothesis that THI is a result of increased bone turnover. We present evidence of normal bone turnover in two children with THI. In a one-year-old girl and a boy of the same age, high ALP levels (31 and 109 μkat/L, respectively) were accidentally detected. The children had no signs of metabolic bone disease or of liver disease. The high ALP levels returned to normal in two months, thus fulfilling the diagnosis of THI. In both patients, serum parathyroid hormone and bone turnover markers, serum CrossLaps, and serum osteocalcin were neither elevated, nor did these markers follow the ALP dynamics, thus reflecting normal bone turnover in THI. Children with THI should be spared from extensive investigations and unnecessary vitamin D treatment. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22664360

  1. Occupational stress and employee turnover.

    PubMed

    Bridger, Robert S; Day, Andrea J; Morton, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Questionnaire data captured in January-March 2007 were examined in relation to turnover in males and females during the next five years. In general, most of the workplace stressors (such as role conflict or peer support) were not antecedents of turnover in any group. Junior personnel with psychological strain in 2007 had an increased risk of turnover in the next five years. Low commitment to the service in 2007 increased the odds of turnover in male and female juniors and in female officers. Female juniors with less effective skills for coping with stress and who exercised less frequently on a weekly basis were more likely to leave. An incidental finding was that the odds of turnover were three times greater in female officers with children than in female officers with no children. Stress management interventions focusing on effective coping and sports and exercise participation which are targeted appropriately may improve retention. PMID:24047248

  2. A psychometric investigation of the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory among highly sexually active gay and bisexual men: An item response theory analysis

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Rendina, H. Jonathon; Ventuneac, Ana; Cook, Karon F.; Grov, Christian; Mustanski, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory (HDSI) was designed as an instrument for the screening of hypersexuality by the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-5 taskforce. Aim Our study sought to conduct a psychometric analysis of the HDSI, including an investigation of its underlying structure and reliability utilizing Item Response Theory (IRT) modeling, and an examination of its polythetic scoring criteria in comparison to a standard dimensionally-based cutoff score. Methods We examined a diverse group of 202 highly sexually active gay and bisexual men in New York City. We conducted psychometric analyses of the HDSI, including both confirmatory factor analysis of its structure and item response theory analysis of the item and scale reliabilities. Main Outcome Measures We utilized the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory. Results The HDSI adequately fit a single-factor solution, although there was evidence that two of the items may measure a second factor that taps into sex as a form of coping. The scale showed evidence of strong reliability across much of the continuum of hypersexuality and results suggested that, in addition to the proposed polythetic scoring criteria, a cutoff score of 20 on the severity index might be used for preliminary classification of HD. Conclusion The HDSI was found to be highly reliable and results suggested that a unidimensional, quantitative conception of hypersexuality with a clinically relevant cutoff score may be more appropriate than a qualitative syndrome comprised of multiple distinct clusters of problems. However, we also found preliminary evidence that three clusters of symptoms may constitute an HD syndrome as opposed to the two clusters initially proposed. Future research is needed to determine which of these issues are characteristic of the hypersexuality and HD constructs themselves and which are more likely to be methodological artifacts of the HDSI. PMID:23534845

  3. Analysis of active microorganisms and their potential role in carbon dioxide turnover in the natural gas reservoirs Altmark and Schneeren (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gniese, Claudia; Muschalle, Thomas; Mühling, Martin; Frerichs, Janin; Krüger, Martin; Kassahun, Andrea; Seifert, Jana; Hoth, Nils

    2010-05-01

    RECOBIO-2, part of the BMBF-funded Geotechnologien consortium, investigates the presence of active microorganisms and their potential role in CO2 turnover in the formation waters of the Schneeren and Altmark gas fields, which are both operated by GDF SUEZ E&P Germany GmbH. Located to the north west of Hannover the natural gas reservoir Schneeren is composed of compacted Westfal-C sandstones that have been naturally fractured into a subsalinar horst structure. This gas field is characterized by a depth of 2700 to 3500m, a bottom-hole temperature between 80 and 110° C as well as a moderate salinity (30-60g/l) and high sulfate contents (~1000mg/l). During RECOBIO-1 produced formation water collected at wells in Schneeren was already used to conduct long term laboratory experiments. These served to examine possible microbial processes of the autochthonous biocenosis induced by the injection of CO2 (Ehinger et al. 2009 submitted). Microorganisms in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogens were able to grow in the presence of powdered rock material, CO2 and H2 without any other added nutrients. The observed development of DOC was now proven in another long term experiment using labelled 13CO2. In contrast to Schneeren, the almost depleted natural gas reservoir Altmark exhibits an average depth of 3300m, a higher bottom-hole temperature (111° C to 120° C), a higher salinity (275-350g/l) but sulfate is absent. This Rotliegend formation is located in the southern edge of the Northeast German Basin and is of special interest for CO2 injection because of favourable geological properties. Using molecular biological techniques two types of samples are analyzed: formation water collected at the well head (November 2008) and formation water sampled in situ from a depth of around 3000m (May 2009). Some of the wells are treated frequently with a foaming agent while others are chemically untreated. Despite the extreme environmental conditions in the Altmark gas field

  4. Brain activity is related to individual differences in the number of items stored in auditory short-term memory for pitch: evidence from magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Grimault, Stephan; Nolden, Sophie; Lefebvre, Christine; Vachon, François; Hyde, Krista; Peretz, Isabelle; Zatorre, Robert; Robitaille, Nicolas; Jolicoeur, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine brain activity related to the maintenance of non-verbal pitch information in auditory short-term memory (ASTM). We focused on brain activity that increased with the number of items effectively held in memory by the participants during the retention interval of an auditory memory task. We used very simple acoustic materials (i.e., pure tones that varied in pitch) that minimized activation from non-ASTM related systems. MEG revealed neural activity in frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices that increased with a greater number of items effectively held in memory by the participants during the maintenance of pitch representations in ASTM. The present results reinforce the functional role of frontal and temporal cortices in the retention of pitch information in ASTM. This is the first MEG study to provide both fine spatial localization and temporal resolution on the neural mechanisms of non-verbal ASTM for pitch in relation to individual differences in the capacity of ASTM. This research contributes to a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms mediating the representation and maintenance of basic non-verbal auditory features in the human brain. PMID:24642285

  5. Automated Item Selection Using Item Response Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocking, Martha L.; And Others

    This paper presents a new heuristic approach to interactive test assembly that is called the successive item replacement algorithm. This approach builds on the work of W. J. van der Linden (1987) and W. J. van der Linden and E. Boekkooi-Timminga (1989) in which methods of mathematical optimization are combined with item response theory to…

  6. RESTRICTED INTERESTS AND TEACHER PRESENTATION OF ITEMS

    PubMed Central

    Stocco, Corey S; Thompson, Rachel H; Rodriguez, Nicole M

    2011-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behavior (RRB) is more pervasive, prevalent, frequent, and severe in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) than in their typical peers. One subtype of RRB is restricted interests in items or activities, which is evident in the manner in which individuals engage with items (e.g., repetitious wheel spinning), the types of items or activities they select (e.g., preoccupation with a phone book), or the range of items or activities they select (i.e., narrow range of items). We sought to describe the relation between restricted interests and teacher presentation of items. Overall, we observed 5 teachers interacting with 2 pairs of students diagnosed with an ASD. Each pair included 1 student with restricted interests. During these observations, teachers were free to present any items from an array of 4 stimuli selected by experimenters. We recorded student responses to teacher presentation of items and analyzed the data to determine the relation between teacher presentation of items and the consequences for presentation provided by the students. Teacher presentation of items corresponded with differential responses provided by students with ASD, and those with restricted preferences experienced a narrower array of items. PMID:21941381

  7. Restricted interests and teacher presentation of items.

    PubMed

    Stocco, Corey S; Thompson, Rachel H; Rodriguez, Nicole M

    2011-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behavior (RRB) is more pervasive, prevalent, frequent, and severe in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) than in their typical peers. One subtype of RRB is restricted interests in items or activities, which is evident in the manner in which individuals engage with items (e.g., repetitious wheel spinning), the types of items or activities they select (e.g., preoccupation with a phone book), or the range of items or activities they select (i.e., narrow range of items). We sought to describe the relation between restricted interests and teacher presentation of items. Overall, we observed 5 teachers interacting with 2 pairs of students diagnosed with an ASD. Each pair included 1 student with restricted interests. During these observations, teachers were free to present any items from an array of 4 stimuli selected by experimenters. We recorded student responses to teacher presentation of items and analyzed the data to determine the relation between teacher presentation of items and the consequences for presentation provided by the students. Teacher presentation of items corresponded with differential responses provided by students with ASD, and those with restricted preferences experienced a narrower array of items. PMID:21941381

  8. 48 CFR 852.214-72 - Alternate item(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alternate item(s). 852.214... Alternate item(s). As prescribed in 814.201-6(b)(2), insert the following provision: Alternate Item(s) (JAN... .** * Contracting officer will insert an alternate item that is considered acceptable. ** Contracting officer...

  9. 48 CFR 852.214-72 - Alternate item(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alternate item(s). 852.214... Alternate item(s). As prescribed in 814.201-6(b)(2), insert the following provision: Alternate Item(s) (JAN... .** * Contracting officer will insert an alternate item that is considered acceptable. ** Contracting officer...

  10. 48 CFR 852.214-72 - Alternate item(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alternate item(s). 852.214... Alternate item(s). As prescribed in 814.201-6(b)(2), insert the following provision: Alternate Item(s) (JAN... .** * Contracting officer will insert an alternate item that is considered acceptable. ** Contracting officer...

  11. Random Item IRT Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Boeck, Paul

    2008-01-01

    It is common practice in IRT to consider items as fixed and persons as random. Both, continuous and categorical person parameters are most often random variables, whereas for items only continuous parameters are used and they are commonly of the fixed type, although exceptions occur. It is shown in the present article that random item parameters…

  12. Warming Effects Enzyme Turnover During Decomposition of Subtropical Peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihi, D.; Inglett, P.; Inglett, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are the proximate agents for organic matter degradation, but the turnover rate of enzymes is often assumed in most decomposition models without direct observations. Here, we assess turnover rates of C (ß-D-glucosidase), N (Leucine aminopeptidase), and P (Phosphomonoesterase) degrading enzymes by spiking commercially available enzymes to the dissolved organic matter of two subtropical peats incubated at 15°C and 25°C and monitoring of net activity of spiked enzymes (i.e. the difference between the spiked and the non-spiked samples) over time. Turnover rates of all three enzymes were greater in the samples incubated at 25°C (ranged between 0.006 hr-1 to 0.014 hr-1) as compared to those incubated at 15°C (ranged between 0.002 hr-1 to 0.009 hr-1). Concentrations of dissolved organic matter were positively correlated with the turnover rates (R2 ranged between 0.71-0.77) of all enzyme groups. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to evaluate the turnover rates of enzymes in wetland soils as a function of warming and dissolved organic matter concentration. The findings suggest that warming-induced changes in the size of soil enzyme pool due to direct (by increasing protease activity) and indirect (by increasing concentrations of dissolved organic matter) effects on their turnover rates has potential to alter soil C stocks in a warmer world.

  13. CERAMIDE SYNTHASE 1 IS REGULATED BY PROTEASOMAL MEDIATED TURNOVER

    PubMed Central

    Sridevi, Priya; Alexander, Hannah; Laviad, Elad L.; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Hannink, Mark; Futerman, Anthony H.; Alexander, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Ceramide is an important bioactive lipid, intimately involved in many cellular functions, including the regulation of cell death, and in cancer and chemotherapy. Ceramide is synthesized de novo from sphinganine and acyl CoA via a family of 6 ceramide synthase enzymes, each having a unique preference for different fatty acyl CoA substrates and a unique tissue distribution. However, little is known regarding the regulation of these important enzymes. In this study we focus on ceramide synthase 1 (CerS1) which is the most structurally and functionally distinct of the enzymes, and describe a regulatory mechanism that specifically controls the level of CerS1 via ubiquitination and proteasome dependent protein turnover. We show that both endogenous and ectopically expressed CerS1 have rapid basal turnover and that diverse stresses including chemotherapeutic drugs, UV light and DTT can induce CerS1 turnover. The turnover requires CerS1 activity and is regulated by the opposing actions of p38 MAP kinase and protein kinase C (PKC). p38 MAP kinase is a positive regulator of turnover, while PKC is a negative regulator of turnover. CerS1 is phosphorylated in vivo and activation of PKC increases the phosphorylation of the protein. This study reveals a novel and highly specific mechanism by which CerS1 protein levels are regulated and which directly impacts ceramide homeostasis. PMID:19393694

  14. 41 CFR 101-28.306-6 - Sensitive items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Sensitive items. 101-28... 28.3-Customer Supply Centers § 101-28.306-6 Sensitive items. Many items stocked by the CSCs may be... accountable item of personal property. Each customer activity shall take all appropriate measures necessary...

  15. 48 CFR 225.770-4 - Identifying USML items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... shall identify any covered item(s) and shall provide the pertinent USML reference(s) from 22 CFR Part... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Identifying USML items... Identifying USML items. (a) Before issuance of a solicitation, the requiring activity shall notify...

  16. 41 CFR 101-28.306-6 - Sensitive items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Sensitive items. 101-28... 28.3-Customer Supply Centers § 101-28.306-6 Sensitive items. Many items stocked by the CSCs may be... accountable item of personal property. Each customer activity shall take all appropriate measures necessary...

  17. 48 CFR 225.770-4 - Identifying USML items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... shall identify any covered item(s) and shall provide the pertinent USML reference(s) from 22 CFR Part... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Identifying USML items... Identifying USML items. (a) Before issuance of a solicitation, the requiring activity shall notify...

  18. 48 CFR 225.770-4 - Identifying USML items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shall identify any covered item(s) and shall provide the pertinent USML reference(s) from 22 CFR Part... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Identifying USML items... Identifying USML items. (a) Before issuance of a solicitation, the requiring activity shall notify...

  19. 41 CFR 101-28.306-6 - Sensitive items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Sensitive items. 101-28... 28.3-Customer Supply Centers § 101-28.306-6 Sensitive items. Many items stocked by the CSCs may be... accountable item of personal property. Each customer activity shall take all appropriate measures necessary...

  20. 41 CFR 101-28.306-6 - Sensitive items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Sensitive items. 101-28... 28.3-Customer Supply Centers § 101-28.306-6 Sensitive items. Many items stocked by the CSCs may be... accountable item of personal property. Each customer activity shall take all appropriate measures necessary...

  1. 41 CFR 101-28.306-6 - Sensitive items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sensitive items. 101-28... 28.3-Customer Supply Centers § 101-28.306-6 Sensitive items. Many items stocked by the CSCs may be... accountable item of personal property. Each customer activity shall take all appropriate measures necessary...

  2. Climate change induces shifts in abundance and activity pattern of bacteria and archaea catalyzing major transformation steps in nitrogen turnover in a soil from a mid-European beech forest.

    PubMed

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Tejedor, Javier; Bimüller, Carolin; Bimueller, Carolin; Dannenmann, Michael; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Knabner, Ingrid Kögel; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, including severe drought periods and intense drying rewetting cycles. This will directly influence microbial nitrogen (N) turnover rates in soil by changing the water content and the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, a space for time climate change experiment was conducted by transferring intact beech seedling-soil mesocosms from a northwest (NW) exposed site, representing today's climatic conditions, to a southwest (SW) exposed site, providing a model climate for future conditions with naturally occurring increased soil temperature (+0.8°C in average). In addition, severe drought and intense rainfall was simulated by a rainout shelter at SW and manual rewetting after 39 days drought, respectively. Soil samples were taken in June, at the end of the drought period (August), 24 and 72 hours after rewetting (August) and after a regeneration period of four weeks (September). To follow dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities involved in N turnover, abundance and activity of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, N2-fixing microbes and N-mineralizers was analyzed based on marker genes and the related transcripts by qPCR from DNA and RNA directly extracted from soil. Abundance of the transcripts was reduced under climate change with most pronounced effects for denitrification. Our results revealed that already a transfer from NW to SW without further treatment resulted in decreased cnor and nosZ transcripts, encoding for nitric oxide reductase and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, while nirK transcripts, encoding for nitrite reductase, remained unaffected. Severe drought additionally led to reduced nirK and cnor transcripts at SW. After rewetting, nirK transcripts increased rapidly at both sites, while cnor and nosZ transcripts increased only at NW. Our data indicate that the climate change influences activity pattern of microbial communities involved in denitrification processes to a different extend

  3. Climate Change Induces Shifts in Abundance and Activity Pattern of Bacteria and Archaea Catalyzing Major Transformation Steps in Nitrogen Turnover in a Soil from a Mid-European Beech Forest

    PubMed Central

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Tejedor, Javier; Bimueller, Carolin; Dannenmann, Michael; Knabner, Ingrid Kögel; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, including severe drought periods and intense drying rewetting cycles. This will directly influence microbial nitrogen (N) turnover rates in soil by changing the water content and the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, a space for time climate change experiment was conducted by transferring intact beech seedling-soil mesocosms from a northwest (NW) exposed site, representing today's climatic conditions, to a southwest (SW) exposed site, providing a model climate for future conditions with naturally occurring increased soil temperature (+0.8°C in average). In addition, severe drought and intense rainfall was simulated by a rainout shelter at SW and manual rewetting after 39 days drought, respectively. Soil samples were taken in June, at the end of the drought period (August), 24 and 72 hours after rewetting (August) and after a regeneration period of four weeks (September). To follow dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities involved in N turnover, abundance and activity of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, N2-fixing microbes and N-mineralizers was analyzed based on marker genes and the related transcripts by qPCR from DNA and RNA directly extracted from soil. Abundance of the transcripts was reduced under climate change with most pronounced effects for denitrification. Our results revealed that already a transfer from NW to SW without further treatment resulted in decreased cnor and nosZ transcripts, encoding for nitric oxide reductase and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, while nirK transcripts, encoding for nitrite reductase, remained unaffected. Severe drought additionally led to reduced nirK and cnor transcripts at SW. After rewetting, nirK transcripts increased rapidly at both sites, while cnor and nosZ transcripts increased only at NW. Our data indicate that the climate change influences activity pattern of microbial communities involved in denitrification processes to a different extend

  4. Turnover in the Advancement Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iarrobino, Jon D.

    2006-01-01

    Recruitment and retention is an area with which most organizations are concerned. Excessive turnover has exorbitant costs and wastes valuable time. Institutions of higher education are no exception. One of the most vital operations in nonprofit colleges and universities is its Office of Institutional Advancement. More and more, an institution of…

  5. 18O-Tracer Metabolomics Reveals Protein Turnover and CDP-Choline Cycle Activity in Differentiating 3T3-L1 Pre-Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, Jay S.; Miranda, Cristobal L.; Bobe, Gerd; Maier, Claudia S.; Stevens, Jan F.

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of precursor cells into mature adipocytes (adipogenesis) has been an area of increased focus, spurred by a rise in obesity rates. Though our understanding of adipogenesis and its regulation at the cellular level is growing, many questions remain, especially regarding the regulation of the metabolome. The 3T3-L1 cell line is the most well characterized cellular model of adipogenesis. Using a time course metabolomics approach, we show that the 3T3-L1 preadipocyte metabolome is greatly altered during the first 48 hours of differentiation, where cells go through about two rounds of cell division, a process known as mitotic clonal expansion. Short-chain peptides were among several small molecules that were increased during mitotic clonal expansion. Additional indicators of protein turnover were also increased, including bilirubin, a degradation product of heme-containing proteins, and 3-methylhistidine, a post-translationally modified amino acid that is not reutilized for protein synthesis. To study the origin of the peptides, we treated differentiating preadipocytes with 18O labeled water and found that 18O was incorporated into the short chain peptides, confirming them, at least in part, as products of hydrolysis. Inhibitors of the proteasome or matrix metalloproteinases affected the peptide levels during differentiation, but inhibitors of autophagy or peptidases did not. 18O was also incorporated into several choline metabolites including cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline), glycerophosphocholine, and several phosphatidylcholine species, indicative of phosphatidylcholine synthesis/degradation and of flux through the CDP-choline cycle, a hallmark of proliferating cells. 18O-Tracer metabolomics further showed metabolic labeling of glutamate, suggestive of glutaminolysis, also characteristic of proliferating cells. Together, these results highlight the utility of 18O isotope labeling in combination with metabolomics to uncover changes in

  6. 18O-Tracer Metabolomics Reveals Protein Turnover and CDP-Choline Cycle Activity in Differentiating 3T3-L1 Pre-Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Jay S; Miranda, Cristobal L; Bobe, Gerd; Maier, Claudia S; Stevens, Jan F

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of precursor cells into mature adipocytes (adipogenesis) has been an area of increased focus, spurred by a rise in obesity rates. Though our understanding of adipogenesis and its regulation at the cellular level is growing, many questions remain, especially regarding the regulation of the metabolome. The 3T3-L1 cell line is the most well characterized cellular model of adipogenesis. Using a time course metabolomics approach, we show that the 3T3-L1 preadipocyte metabolome is greatly altered during the first 48 hours of differentiation, where cells go through about two rounds of cell division, a process known as mitotic clonal expansion. Short-chain peptides were among several small molecules that were increased during mitotic clonal expansion. Additional indicators of protein turnover were also increased, including bilirubin, a degradation product of heme-containing proteins, and 3-methylhistidine, a post-translationally modified amino acid that is not reutilized for protein synthesis. To study the origin of the peptides, we treated differentiating preadipocytes with 18O labeled water and found that 18O was incorporated into the short chain peptides, confirming them, at least in part, as products of hydrolysis. Inhibitors of the proteasome or matrix metalloproteinases affected the peptide levels during differentiation, but inhibitors of autophagy or peptidases did not. 18O was also incorporated into several choline metabolites including cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline), glycerophosphocholine, and several phosphatidylcholine species, indicative of phosphatidylcholine synthesis/degradation and of flux through the CDP-choline cycle, a hallmark of proliferating cells. 18O-Tracer metabolomics further showed metabolic labeling of glutamate, suggestive of glutaminolysis, also characteristic of proliferating cells. Together, these results highlight the utility of 18O isotope labeling in combination with metabolomics to uncover changes in

  7. Restricted Interests and Teacher Presentation of Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocco, Corey S.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Rodriguez, Nicole M.

    2011-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behavior (RRB) is more pervasive, prevalent, frequent, and severe in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) than in their typical peers. One subtype of RRB is restricted interests in items or activities, which is evident in the manner in which individuals engage with items (e.g., repetitious wheel spinning),…

  8. Minimum Redundancy Item Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neill, John A.; Jackson, Douglas N.

    1976-01-01

    Illustrates a multivariate approach to item analysis. Previous formulation is extended by investigating techniques simultaneously taking into account scale variance with the goal of reducing the average correlation between scales. Study examines problems in determining optimum values for combinations of item parameters selected for personality…

  9. Chronic Teacher Turnover in Urban Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guin, Kacey

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the characteristics of elementary schools that experience chronic teacher turnover and the impacts of turnover on a school's working climate and ability to effectively function. Based on evidence from staff climate surveys and case studies, it is clear that high turnover schools face significant organizational challenges.…

  10. Estimating Teacher Turnover Costs: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Abigail Jurist; Joy, Lois; Ellis, Pamela; Jablonski, Erica; Karelitz, Tzur M.

    2012-01-01

    High teacher turnover in large U.S. cities is a critical issue for schools and districts, and the students they serve; but surprisingly little work has been done to develop methodologies and standards that districts and schools can use to make reliable estimates of turnover costs. Even less is known about how to detect variations in turnover costs…

  11. Measuring Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this study the levels of staff turnover reported in the nursing home literature (1990-2003) are reviewed, as well as the definitions of turnover used in these prior studies. With the use of primary data collected from 354 facilities, the study addresses the various degrees of bias that result, depending on how staff turnover is defined…

  12. Using Turnover as a Recruitment Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Teacher turnover is notoriously high in the field of early childhood education with an estimated 33% of staff exiting the workplace each year. Turnover is costly. Not only do high levels of turnover negatively impact children's growth and development, it also erodes the program's economic stability and wherewithal to provide effective operations…

  13. How Teacher Turnover Harms Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronfeldt, Matthew; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers often assume that teacher turnover harms student achievement, though recent studies suggest this may not be the case. Using a unique identification strategy that employs school-by-grade level turnover and two classes of fixed-effects models, this study estimates the effects of teacher turnover on over 850,000 New York…

  14. [Functional capacity in the elderly: analyzing questions on mobility and basic and instrumental activities of daily living using Item Response Theory].

    PubMed

    César, Cibele Comini; Mambrini, Juliana Vaz de Melo; Ferreira, Fabiane Ribeiro; Lima-Costa, Maria Fernanda

    2015-05-01

    This article aims to evaluate the items used to measure functional capacity in the 2010 Health Survey in Greater Metropolitan Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, using Item Response Theory. We analyzed the scale's dimensionality, the items' position and discriminatory power, and the precision of the functional capacity estimate. The study was based on a sample of 2,174 individuals aged 60 to 99 years, 61% of whom were women, with a median of 4 years of schooling. The instrument with 21 items (4 response options) showed a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.98. Factor analysis identified one factor that explained 92% of the variability between the items. The results indicated: (i) redundancy in items; (ii) precise estimation of functional capacity only for elderly below the median on the scale; and (iii) inability of the elderly to differentiate between response options. The analysis suggests the need to discuss items included in the instrument in order to cover a wider range of the scale and seek more appropriate response options. PMID:26083169

  15. Altered bone turnover during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Morey, E. R.; Liu, C.; Baylink, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications in calcium metabolism during spaceflight were studied, using parameters that reflect bone turnover. Bone formation rate, medullary area, bone length, bone density, pore size distribution, and differential bone cell number were evaluated in growing rate both immediately after and 25 days after orbital spaceflights aboard the Soviet biological satellites Cosmos 782 and 936. The primary effect of space flight on bone turnover was a reversible inhibition of bone formation at the periosteal surface. A simultaneous increase in the length of the periosteal arrest line suggests that bone formation ceased along corresponding portions of that surface. Possible reasons include increased secretion of glucocorticoids and mechanical unloading of the skeleton due to near-weightlessness, while starvation and immobilization are excluded as causes.

  16. Quantifying T Lymphocyte Turnover

    PubMed Central

    De Boer, Rob J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral T cell populations are maintained by production of naive T cells in the thymus, clonal expansion of activated cells, cellular self-renewal (or homeostatic proliferation), and density dependent cell life spans. A variety of experimental techniques have been employed to quantify the relative contributions of these processes. In modern studies lymphocytes are typically labeled with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU), deuterium, or the fluorescent dye carboxy-fluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE), their division history has been studied by monitoring telomere shortening and the dilution of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) or the dye CFSE, and clonal expansion has been documented by recording changes in the population densities of antigen specific cells. Proper interpretation of such data in terms of the underlying rates of T cell production, division, and death has proven to be notoriously difficult and involves mathematical modeling. We review the various models that have been developed for each of these techniques, discuss which models seem most appropriate for what type of data, reveal open problems that require better models, and pinpoint how the assumptions underlying a mathematical model may influence the interpretation of data. Elaborating various successful cases where modeling has delivered new insights in T cell population dynamics, this review provides quantitative estimates of several processes involved in the maintenance of naive and memory, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell pools in mice and men. PMID:23313150

  17. Turnover: strategies for staff retention.

    PubMed

    SnowAntle, S

    1990-01-01

    This discussion has focused on a number of areas where organizations may find opportunities for more effectively managing employee retention. Given the multitude of causes and consequences, there is no one quick fix. Effective management of employee retention requires assessment of the entire human resources process, that is, recruitment, selection, job design, compensation, supervision, work conditions, etc. Regular and systematic diagnosis of turnover and implementation of multiple strategies and evaluation are needed (Mobley, 1982). PMID:10106673

  18. Supervisory Turnover in Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Danica K.; Broome, Kirk M.; Edwards, Jennifer R.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2009-01-01

    Staff turnover is a significant issue within substance abuse treatment, with implications for service delivery and organizational health. This study examined factors associated with turnover among supervisors in outpatient substance abuse treatment. Turnover was conceptualized as being an individual response to organizational-level influences, and predictors represent aggregate program measures. Participants included 532 staff (including 467 counselors and 65 clinical/program directors) from 90 programs in four regions of the USA. Using logistic regression, analyses of structural factors indicated that programs affiliated with a parent organization and those providing more counseling hours to clients had higher turnover rates. When measures of job attitudes were included, only parent affiliation and collective appraisal of satisfaction were related to turnover. Subsequent analyses identified a trend toward increased supervisory turnover when satisfaction was low following the departure of a previous supervisor. These findings suggest that organizational-level factors can be influential in supervisory turnover. PMID:19949883

  19. Platelet-activating factor induces phospholipid turnover, calcium flux, arachidonic acid liberation, eicosanoid generation, and oncogene expression in a human B cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Schulam, P.G.; Kuruvilla, A.; Putcha, G.; Mangus, L.; Franklin-Johnson, J.; Shearer, W.T. )

    1991-03-01

    Platelet-activating factor is a potent mediator of the inflammatory response. Studies of the actions of platelet-activating factor have centered mainly around neutrophils, monocytes, and platelets. In this report we begin to uncover the influence of platelet-activating factor on B lymphocytes. Employing the EBV-transformed human B cell line SKW6.4, we demonstrate that platelet-activating factor significantly alters membrane phospholipid metabolism indicated by the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid but not significantly into phosphatidylethanolamine at concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M. The inactive precursor, lyso-platelet-activating factor, at a concentration as high as 10(-7) M had no effect on any of the membrane phospholipids. We also show that platelet-activating factor from 10(-12) to 10(-6) M induced rapid and significant elevation in intracellular calcium levels, whereas lyso-platelet-activating factor was again ineffective. We further demonstrate the impact of platelet-activating factor binding to B cells by measuring platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid production. Moreover, platelet-activating factor was capable of inducing transcription of the nuclear proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun. Finally we explored the possible role of 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid as a regulator of arachidonic acid liberation demonstrating that endogenous 5-lipoxygenase activity modulates platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release perhaps acting at the level of phospholipase A2. In summary, platelet-activating factor is shown here to have a direct and profound effect on a pure B cell line.

  20. Preliminary Evaluation of the Values Tracker: A Two-Item Measure of Engagement in Valued Activities in Those With Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Pielech, Melissa; Bailey, Robert W; McEntee, Mindy L; Ashworth, Julie; Levell, Jayne; Sowden, Gail; Vowles, Kevin E

    2016-01-01

    Engagement in valued activities is an important outcome, particularly in treatments that aim to enhance quality of life in those with chronic conditions. The present study describes the initial evaluation of the Values Tracker (VT), a two-item measure of values engagement, in 302 treatment-seeking adults with chronic pain. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to examine the utility of the VT in the statistical prediction of pain-related functioning, after controlling for demographic variables, pain intensity, and pain-related distress. Across analyses, pain intensity accounted for significant variance (range ΔR2 = .06-.09) with pain-related distress adding additional unique variance (range ΔR2 = .07-.19). The VT accounted for additional unique variance (range ΔR2 = .02-.17) for all variables with the exception of physical disability. These findings provide initial support for the utility of the VT in those with chronic pain. Given the VT's brevity, it may be particularly useful for tracking changes in engagement in values across sessions. PMID:26611467

  1. A nucleoside triphosphate-regulated, 3' exonucleolytic mechanism is involved in turnover of yeast mitochondrial RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Min, J; Zassenhaus, H P

    1993-01-01

    We have employed cell-free transcription reactions with mitochondria isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study the mechanism of RNA turnover. The specificity of RNA turnover was preserved in these preparations, as were other RNA-processing reactions, including splicing, 3' end formation of mRNAs, and maturation of rRNAs. Turnover of nascent RNAs was found to occur exonucleolytically; endonucleolytic cleavage products were not detected during turnover of the omega intron RNA, which was studied in detail. However, these experiments still leave open the possibility that endonucleolytic cleavage products with very short half-lives are kinetic intermediates in the decay of omega RNA. Exonucleolytic turnover was regulated by nucleotide triphosphates and required their hydrolysis. A unique signature of this regulation was that any one of the eight standard ribo- or deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates supported RNA turnover. A novel hybrid selection protocol was used to determine the turnover rates of the 5', middle, and 3' portions of one mitochondrial transcript, the omega intron RNA. The results suggested that degradation along that transcript occurred with a 3'-->5' polarity. The similarity between features of mitochondrial RNA turnover and the properties of a nucleotide triphosphate-dependent 3' exoribonuclease that has been purified from yeast mitochondria suggests that this single enzyme is a key activity whose regulation is involved in the specificity of mitochondrial RNA turnover. Images PMID:7691792

  2. Item Writer Judgments of Item Difficulty versus Actual Item Difficulty: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sydorenko, Tetyana

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates how accurate one item writer can be on item difficulty estimates and whether factors affecting item writer judgments correspond to predictors of actual item difficulty. The items were based on conversational dialogs (presented as videos online) that focus on pragmatic functions. Thirty-five 2nd-, 3rd-, and 4th-year learners…

  3. The Role of Item Models in Automatic Item Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis

    2012-01-01

    Automatic item generation represents a relatively new but rapidly evolving research area where cognitive and psychometric theories are used to produce tests that include items generated using computer technology. Automatic item generation requires two steps. First, test development specialists create item models, which are comparable to templates…

  4. Item Response Models for Examinee-Selected Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Jin, Kuan-Yu; Qiu, Xue-Lan; Wang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    In some tests, examinees are required to choose a fixed number of items from a set of given items to answer. This practice creates a challenge to standard item response models, because more capable examinees may have an advantage by making wiser choices. In this study, we developed a new class of item response models to account for the choice…

  5. Item Overexposure in Computerized Classification Tests Using Sequential Item Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Computerized classification tests (CCTs) often use sequential item selection which administers items according to maximizing psychometric information at a cut point demarcating passing and failing scores. This paper illustrates why this method of item selection leads to the overexposure of a significant number of items, and the performances of…

  6. Whole body and tissue cholesterol turnover in the baboon

    SciTech Connect

    Dell, R.B.; Mott, G.E.; Jackson, E.M.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Carey, K.D.; McGill, H.C. Jr.; Goodman, D.S.

    1985-03-01

    Cholesterol turnover was studied in four baboons by injecting (/sup 14/C)cholesterol 186 days and (/sup 3/H)cholesterol 4 days before necropsy, and fitting a two- or three-pool model to the resulting specific activity-time data. At necropsy, cholesterol mass and specific activity were determined for the total body and for many tissues. The principal aim of this study was to estimate the extent of cholesterol synthesis in the side pools of the model, by computing the amount of side pool synthesis needed to equal the measured total body cholesterol. Central pool synthesis varied from 61 to 89% of the total cholesterol production rate. Moreover, the finding that the measured total body cholesterol fell within the range obtained from the kinetic analysis by using reasonable assumptions, provides evidence for the physiological validity of the model. A second aim of this study was to explore cholesterol turnover in various tissues. A pool model predicts that rapidly turning over tissues will have higher specific activities at early times and lower specific activities at later times after injection of tracer relative to slowly turning over tissues, except where significant synthesis occurs. Results in all four baboons were similar. Turnover rates for the different tissues loosely fell into three groups which were turning over at fast, intermediate, and slow rates. Finally, the magnitude of variation of cholesterol specific activity was moderate for several distributed tissues (fat, muscle, arteries, and the alimentary tract), but was small for liver. Cholesterol turnover in serial biopsies of skin, muscle, and fat could, however, be fitted with a single pool to estimate tissue turnover rates.

  7. 17 CFR 229.1207 - (Item 1207) Delivery commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false (Item 1207) Delivery... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1207 (Item 1207) Delivery commitments. (a) If the registrant is... information required by this Item: (1) In a form understandable to investors; and (2) Based upon the facts...

  8. 17 CFR 229.1207 - (Item 1207) Delivery commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false (Item 1207) Delivery... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1207 (Item 1207) Delivery commitments. (a) If the registrant is... information required by this Item: (1) In a form understandable to investors; and (2) Based upon the facts...

  9. 17 CFR 229.1207 - (Item 1207) Delivery commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false (Item 1207) Delivery... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1207 (Item 1207) Delivery commitments. (a) If the registrant is... information required by this Item: (1) In a form understandable to investors; and (2) Based upon the facts...

  10. 17 CFR 229.1207 - (Item 1207) Delivery commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false (Item 1207) Delivery... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1207 (Item 1207) Delivery commitments. (a) If the registrant is... information required by this Item: (1) In a form understandable to investors; and (2) Based upon the facts...

  11. 17 CFR 229.1207 - (Item 1207) Delivery commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false (Item 1207) Delivery... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1207 (Item 1207) Delivery commitments. (a) If the registrant is... information required by this Item: (1) In a form understandable to investors; and (2) Based upon the facts...

  12. Copper-deficient mice have higher cardiac norepinephrine turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, A.M.; Prohaska, J.R. )

    1989-02-01

    Male Swiss albino mice were studied at 6 weeks of age. Their dams were fed a copper-deficient diet (modified AIN-76A) starting 4 days after birth and given deionized water (-Cu) or water with CuSO{sub 4} added (+Cu) (20 {mu}g Cu/ml). When 3 weeks of age mice were weaned and housed in stainless steel cages on the respective treatment of their dams. Turnover of norepinephrine (NE) was studied in 8 experiments using 2 separate techniques. The first procedure used {alpha}-methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester (300 mg/kg i.p.) to inhibit tyrosine hydroxlase activity. The loss of residual NE was determined by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Regression lines were constructed and fractional turnover (%/h) and calculated turnover (ng/g/h) were determined for heart, cerebellum and adrenal gland. In 4 experiments loss of NE in cerebellum of -Cu ad +Cu mice was equivalent. Loss of NE from adrenal gland could not be detected in the 8 h time course. Loss of NE, both fractional turnover and calculated turnover, from heart of -Cu mice was 4-5 fold higher compared to +Cu controls. A second method using m- hydroxybenzylhydrazine (NSD-1015) (100 mg/kg i.p.), which inhibits aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, confirmed the results. For all 4 experiments the cardiac accumulation of L-DOPA (measured by HPLC) was faster in -Cu mice compared to controls. The higher turnover rate of NE in heart and perhaps other sympathetic nerves may contribute to the higher urinary NE output observed previously.

  13. Revisiting nurse turnover costs: adjusting for inflation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl Bland

    2008-01-01

    Organizational knowledge of nurse turnover costs is important, but gathering these data frequently may not always be feasible in today's fast-paced and complex healthcare environment. The author presents a method to inflation adjust baseline nurse turnover costs using the Consumer Price Index. This approach allows nurse executives to gain current knowledge of organizational nurse turnover costs when primary data collection is not practical and to determine costs and potential savings if nurse retention investments are made. PMID:18157000

  14. Item Banking with Embedded Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCann, Robert G.; Stanley, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    An item banking method that does not use Item Response Theory (IRT) is described. This method provides a comparable grading system across schools that would be suitable for low-stakes testing. It uses the Angoff standard-setting method to obtain item ratings that are stored with each item. An example of such a grading system is given, showing how…

  15. Inhibition by islet-activating protein, pertussis toxin, of P2-purinergic receptor-mediated iodide efflux and phosphoinositide turnover in FRTL-5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okajima, F.; Sho, K.; Kondo, Y.

    1988-08-01

    Exposure of FRTL-5 thyroid cells to ATP (1 microM to 1 mM) resulted in the stimulation of I- efflux in association with the induction of inositol trisphosphate production and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Nonhydrolyzable ATP derivatives, ADP and GTP, were also as effective in magnitude as ATP, whereas neither AMP nor adenosine exerted significant effect on I- efflux, suggesting a P2-purinergic receptor-mediated activation of I- efflux. Treatment of the cells with the islet-activating protein (IAP) pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylated a 41,000 mol wt membrane protein, effectively suppressed the phosphoinositide response to ATP in addition to ATP-dependent I- efflux at agonist concentrations below 10 microM. In contrast, the I- efflux stimulated by TSH, A23187, or phorbol myristate acetate was insusceptible to IAP. The IAP substrate, probably GTP-binding protein, is hence proposed to mediate the activation of P2-purinergic receptor-linked phospholipase-C in FRTL-5 cells. However, the responses to ATP, its nonhydrolyzable derivatives, or ADP at the higher agonist concentrations, especially above 100 microM, were only partially inhibited by IAP, even though the IAP substrate was totally ADP ribosylated by the toxin. The responses to GTP in the whole concentration range tested were not influenced by IAP treatment. Thus, signals arising from the P2-receptor might be transduced to phospholipase-C by two different pathways, i.e. IAP-sensitive and insensitive ones, and result in the stimulation of I- efflux.

  16. Reading Current Events Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    People who live in a democracy should be well informed of local, state, national, and international happenings. Students should become curious about news items and relate current happenings to the personal self. They must possess skills in word recognition and in diverse kinds of comprehension since reading is an important way to glean current…

  17. Limited life item management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaglen, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Plans are available for age-sensitive hardware management. Control plan identifies shelf life or age control requirements for materials considered age sensitive, use sensitive, or time service or shelf life controlled items, and describes methods of arriving at age controls through adherence to detailed specifications.

  18. Soybean ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit: Mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, R.B.

    1990-02-01

    The goals of examining the mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover in higher plants remain the same. We will continue with two of the major approaches (1) in vivo chemical modification of RNA structure and (2) analysis of Rubisco SSU RNA structure and turnover in transgenic plants. We plan to reduce the amount of molecular physiology (studies of transcription and steady state levels) to a minimum and expand these efforts into the analysis of plant rebonucleases. We have also broadened our examination of light induced turnover of rubisco SSU RNA to include general RNA turnover. We plan to identify specific 3{prime}->5{prime} precessive ribonuclease by complementation of E. coli mutants. The activity of these novel RNases and their potential role in plant RNA turnover and processing will be characterized.

  19. Dynamic Aspects of Voluntary Turnover: An Integrated Approach to Curvilinearity in the Performance-Turnover Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, William J.; Cropanzano, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Previous research pertaining to job performance and voluntary turnover has been guided by 2 distinct theoretical perspectives. First, the push-pull model proposes that there is a quadratic or curvilinear relationship existing between these 2 variables. Second, the unfolding model of turnover posits that turnover is a dynamic process and that a…

  20. Employee Turnover among Full-time Public Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Richard

    1989-01-01

    A study of employee turnover in 31 public libraries in the American Midwest established baseline turnover rates and examined the relationship of gender to turnover behavior. Findings showed that: turnover rates are low compared to other occupations; and turnover rates of males and females are similar. (28 references) (Author/MES)

  1. Enhancer regions show high histone H3.3 turnover that changes during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Deaton, Aimee M; Gómez-Rodríguez, Mariluz; Mieczkowski, Jakub; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Kundu, Sharmistha; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Jansen, Lars ET; Kingston, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    The organization of DNA into chromatin is dynamic; nucleosomes are frequently displaced to facilitate the ability of regulatory proteins to access specific DNA elements. To gain insight into nucleosome dynamics, and to follow how dynamics change during differentiation, we used a technique called time-ChIP to quantitatively assess histone H3.3 turnover genome-wide during differentiation of mouse ESCs. We found that, without prior assumptions, high turnover could be used to identify regions involved in gene regulation. High turnover was seen at enhancers, as observed previously, with particularly high turnover at super-enhancers. In contrast, regions associated with the repressive Polycomb-Group showed low turnover in ESCs. Turnover correlated with DNA accessibility. Upon differentiation, numerous changes in H3.3 turnover rates were observed, the majority of which occurred at enhancers. Thus, time-ChIP measurement of histone turnover shows that active enhancers are unusually dynamic in ESCs and changes in highly dynamic nucleosomes predominate at enhancers during differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15316.001 PMID:27304074

  2. Influence of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonists on the intracellular turnover and secretion of apolipoprotein (Apo) B-100 and ApoB-48.

    PubMed

    Lindén, Daniel; Lindberg, Karin; Oscarsson, Jan; Claesson, Catharina; Asp, Lennart; Li, Lu; Gustafsson, Maria; Borén, Jan; Olofsson, Sven-Olof

    2002-06-21

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha agonist WY 14,643 increased the secretion of apolipoprotein (apo) B-100, but not that of apoB-48, and decreased triglyceride biosynthesis and secretion from primary rat hepatocytes. These effects resulted in decreased secretion of apoB-100-very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and an increased secretion of apoB-100 on low density lipoproteins/intermediate density lipoproteins. ApoB-48-VLDL was also replaced by more dense particles. The proteasomal inhibitor lactacystin did not influence the recovery of apoB-100 or apoB-48 in primary rat hepatocytes, indicating that co-translational (proteasomal) degradation is of less importance in these cells. Treatment with WY 14,643 made the recovery of apoB-100 sensitive to lactacystin, most likely reflecting the decreased biosynthesis of triglycerides. The PPAR alpha agonist induced a significant increase in the accumulation of pulse-labeled apoB-100 even after a short pulse (2-5 min). There was also an increase in apoB-100 nascent polypeptides, indicating that the co-translational degradation of apoB-100 was inhibited. However, a minor influence on an early posttranslation degradation cannot be excluded. This decreased co-translational degradation of apoB-100 explained the increased secretion of the protein. The levels of apoB-48 remained unchanged during these pulse-chase experiments, and albumin production was not affected, indicating a specific effect of PPAR alpha agonists on the co-translational degradation of apoB-100. These findings explain the difference in the rate of secretion of the two apoB proteins seen after PPAR alpha activation. PPAR alpha agonists increased the expression and biosynthesis of liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP). Increased expression of LFABP by transfection of McA-RH7777 cells increased the secretion of apoB-100, decreased triglyceride biosynthesis and secretion, and increased PPAR alpha mRNA levels. These findings suggest that

  3. Impact of bacterial activity on turnover of insoluble hydrophobic substrates (phenanthrene and pyrene)-Model simulations for prediction of bioremediation success.

    PubMed

    Rein, Arno; Adam, Iris K U; Miltner, Anja; Brumme, Katja; Kästner, Matthias; Trapp, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Many attempts for bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated sites failed in the past, but the reasons for this failure are not well understood. Here we apply and improve a model for integrated assessment of mass transfer, biodegradation and residual concentrations for predicting the success of remediation actions. First, we provide growth parameters for Mycobacterium rutilum and Mycobacterium pallens growing on phenanthrene (PHE) or pyrene (PYR) degraded the PAH completely at all investigated concentrations. Maximum metabolic rates vmax and growth rates μ were similar for the substrates PHE and PYR and for both strains. The investigated Mycobacterium species were not superior in PHE degradation to strains investigated earlier with this method. Real-world degradation scenario simulations including diffusive flux to the microbial cells indicate: that (i) bioaugmentation only has a small, short-lived effect; (ii) Increasing sorption shifts the remaining PAH to the adsorbed/sequestered PAH pool; (iii) mobilizing by solvents or surfactants resulted in a significant decrease of the sequestered PAH, and (iv) co-metabolization e.g. by compost addition can contribute significantly to the reduction of PAH, because active biomass is maintained at a high level by the compost. The model therefore is a valuable contribution to the assessment of potential remediation action at PAH-polluted sites. PMID:26705887

  4. Employee Turnover: An Empirical and Methodological Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muchinsky, Paul M.; Tuttle, Mark L.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews research on the prediction of employee turnover. Groups predictor variables into five general categories: attitudinal (job satisfaction), biodata, work-related, personal, and test-score predictors. Consistent relationships between common predictor variables and turnover were found for four categories. Eight methodological problems/issues…

  5. Principal Turnover. Information Capsule. Volume 0914

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that school districts are facing increasing rates of principal turnover. Frequent principal changes deprive schools of the leadership stability they need to succeed, disrupt long-term school reform efforts, and may even be linked to increased teacher turnover and lower levels of student achievement. This Information Capsule…

  6. Employee Turnover: Evidence from a Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borland, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Patterns of employee turnover from a medium-sized law firm in Australia were examined in regard to theories of worker mobility (matching, sectoral shift, and incentive). Results support a role for matching effects, but personnel practices affect the timing of turnover. Matching and incentive-based theories do not explain the high rates of turnover…

  7. Contextual Factors Related to Elementary Principal Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partlow, Michelle C.

    2007-01-01

    The issue of school leadership instability and how it affects schools and student achievement has been studied. The question of how to predict turnover of the principal remains an unknown. The purpose of this research was to search for possible relationships between certain contextual variables and principal turnover and to test the independent…

  8. Predicting Employee Turnover from Communication Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeley, Thomas H.; Barnett, George A.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates three social network models of employee turnover: a structural equivalence model, a social influence model, and an erosion model. Administers a communication network questionnaire to all 170 employees of an organization. Finds support for all three models of turnover, with the erosion model explaining more of the variance than do the…

  9. Mitochondrial Turnover in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial quality control is increasingly recognized as an essential element in maintaining optimally functioning tissues. Mitochondrial quality control depends upon a balance between biogenesis and autophagic destruction. Mitochondrial dynamics (fusion and fission) allows for the redistribution of mitochondrial components. We speculate that this permits sorting of highly functional components into one end of a mitochondrion, while damaged components are segregated at the other end, to be jettisoned by asymmetric fission followed by selective mitophagy. Ischemic preconditioning requires autophagy/mitophagy, resulting in selective elimination of damaged mitochondria, leaving behind a population of robust mitochondria with a higher threshold for opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. In this review we will consider the factors that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis and destruction, the machinery involved in both processes, and the biomedical consequences associated with altered mitochondrial turnover. PMID:21147177

  10. An intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Won Ho; Aziz, Peter V.; Heithoff, Douglas M.; Mahan, Michael J.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Marth, Jamey D.

    2015-01-01

    The composition and functions of the secreted proteome are controlled by the life spans of different proteins. However, unlike intracellular protein fate, intrinsic factors determining secreted protein aging and turnover have not been identified and characterized. Almost all secreted proteins are posttranslationally modified with the covalent attachment of N-glycans. We have discovered an intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover linked to the stepwise elimination of saccharides attached to the termini of N-glycans. Endogenous glycosidases, including neuraminidase 1 (Neu1), neuraminidase 3 (Neu3), beta-galactosidase 1 (Glb1), and hexosaminidase B (HexB), possess hydrolytic activities that temporally remodel N-glycan structures, progressively exposing different saccharides with increased protein age. Subsequently, endocytic lectins with distinct binding specificities, including the Ashwell–Morell receptor, integrin αM, and macrophage mannose receptor, are engaged in N-glycan ligand recognition and the turnover of secreted proteins. Glycosidase inhibition and lectin deficiencies increased protein life spans and abundance, and the basal rate of N-glycan remodeling varied among distinct proteins, accounting for differences in their life spans. This intrinsic multifactorial mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover contributes to health and the outcomes of disease. PMID:26489654

  11. Actin Turnover-Mediated Gravity Response in Maize Root Apices

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Stefano; Barlow, Peter W; Volkmann, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic actin cytoskeleton has been proposed to be linked to gravity sensing in plants but the mechanistic understanding of these processes remains unknown. We have performed detailed pharmacological analyses of the role of the dynamic actin cytoskeleton in gravibending of maize (Zea mays) root apices. Depolymerization of actin filaments with two drugs having different mode of their actions, cytochalasin D and latrunculin B, stimulated root gravibending. By contrast, drug-induced stimulation of actin polymerization and inhibition of actin turnover, using two different agents phalloidin and jasplakinolide, compromised the root gravibending. Importantly, all these actin drugs inhibited root growth to similar extents suggesting that high actin turnover is essential for the gravity-related growth responses rather than for the general growth process. Both latrunculin B and cytochalasin D treatments inhibited root growth but restored gravibending of the decapped root apices, indicating that there is a strong potential for effective actin-mediated gravity sensing outside the cap. This elusive gravity sensing outside the root cap is dependent not only on the high rate of actin turnover but also on weakening of myosin activities, as general inhibition of myosin ATPases induced stimulation of gravibending of the decapped root apices. Collectively, these data provide evidence for the actin turnover-mediated gravity sensing outside the root cap. PMID:19521476

  12. Social Disadvantage and Network Turnover

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Research shows that socially disadvantaged groups—especially African Americans and people of low socioeconomic status (SES)—experience more unstable social environments. I argue that this causes higher rates of turnover within their personal social networks. This is a particularly important issue among disadvantaged older adults, who may benefit from stable networks. This article, therefore, examines whether social disadvantage is related to various aspects of personal network change. Method. Social network change was assessed using longitudinal egocentric network data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, a study of older adults conducted between 2005 and 2011. Data collection in Wave 2 included a technique for comparing respondents’ confidant network rosters between waves. Rates of network losses, deaths, and additions were modeled using multivariate Poisson regression. Results. African Americans and low-SES individuals lost more confidants—especially due to death—than did whites and college-educated respondents. African Americans also added more confidants than whites. However, neither African Americans nor low-SES individuals were able to match confidant losses with new additions to the extent that others did, resulting in higher levels of confidant network shrinkage. These trends are partly, but not entirely, explained by disadvantaged individuals’ poorer health and their greater risk of widowhood or marital dissolution. Discussion. Additional work is needed to shed light on the role played by race- and class-based segregation on group differences in social network turnover. Social gerontologists should examine the role these differences play in explaining the link between social disadvantage and important outcomes in later life, such as health decline. PMID:24997286

  13. Guideline Implementation: Prevention of Retained Surgical Items.

    PubMed

    Fencl, Jennifer L

    2016-07-01

    A surgical item unintentionally retained in a patient after an operative or other invasive procedure is a serious, preventable medical error with the potential to cause the patient great harm. Perioperative RNs play a key role in preventing retained surgical items (RSIs). The updated AORN "Guideline for prevention of retained surgical items" provides guidance for implementing a consistent, multidisciplinary approach to RSI prevention; accounting for surgical items; preventing retention of device fragments; reconciling count discrepancies; and using adjunct technologies to supplement manual count procedures. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel provide optimal care during a procedure. Key points addressed include taking responsibility for RSI prevention as a team; minimizing distractions, noise, and interruptions during counts; using consistent counting methods; reconciling discrepancies; and participating in performance-improvement activities. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance in writing and updating policies and procedures. PMID:27350354

  14. Item-focussed Trees for the Identification of Items in Differential Item Functioning.

    PubMed

    Tutz, Gerhard; Berger, Moritz

    2016-09-01

    A novel method for the identification of differential item functioning (DIF) by means of recursive partitioning techniques is proposed. We assume an extension of the Rasch model that allows for DIF being induced by an arbitrary number of covariates for each item. Recursive partitioning on the item level results in one tree for each item and leads to simultaneous selection of items and variables that induce DIF. For each item, it is possible to detect groups of subjects with different item difficulties, defined by combinations of characteristics that are not pre-specified. The way a DIF item is determined by covariates is visualized in a small tree and therefore easily accessible. An algorithm is proposed that is based on permutation tests. Various simulation studies, including the comparison with traditional approaches to identify items with DIF, show the applicability and the competitive performance of the method. Two applications illustrate the usefulness and the advantages of the new method. PMID:26596721

  15. Item Sampling: Optimum Number of People and Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moy, Mabel L. Y.; Barcikowski, Robert S.

    Using a computer-based Monte Carlo approach to generate item responses, the results of this study indicate that, when item discrimination indices are considered, item-examinee sampling procedures having the same number of observations have different standard errors in estimating both test mean and test variance. With certain types of tests, a…

  16. Real and Artificial Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrich, David; Hagquist, Curt

    2015-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) for an item between two groups is present if, for the same person location on a variable, persons from different groups have different expected values for their responses. Applying only to dichotomously scored items in the popular Mantel-Haenszel (MH) method for detecting DIF in which persons are classified by…

  17. Faculty Development on Item Writing Substantially Improves Item Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naeem, Naghma; van der Vleuten, Cees; Alfaris, Eiad Abdelmohsen

    2012-01-01

    The quality of items written for in-house examinations in medical schools remains a cause of concern. Several faculty development programs are aimed at improving faculty's item writing skills. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a faculty development program in item development. An objective method was developed and used…

  18. Component Identification and Item Difficulty of Raven's Matrices Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kathy E.; Kluever, Raymond C.

    Item components that might contribute to the difficulty of items on the Raven Colored Progressive Matrices (CPM) and the Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM) were studied. Subjects providing responses to CPM items were 269 children aged 2 years 9 months to 11 years 8 months, most of whom were referred for testing as potentially gifted. A second…

  19. 'Forget me (not)?' - Remembering Forget-Items Versus Un-Cued Items in Directed Forgetting.

    PubMed

    Zwissler, Bastian; Schindler, Sebastian; Fischer, Helena; Plewnia, Christian; Kissler, Johanna M

    2015-01-01

    Humans need to be able to selectively control their memories. This capability is often investigated in directed forgetting (DF) paradigms. In item-method DF, individual items are presented and each is followed by either a forget- or remember-instruction. On a surprise test of all items, memory is then worse for to-be-forgotten items (TBF) compared to to-be-remembered items (TBR). This is thought to result mainly from selective rehearsal of TBR, although inhibitory mechanisms also appear to be recruited by this paradigm. Here, we investigate whether the mnemonic consequences of a forget instruction differ from the ones of incidental encoding, where items are presented without a specific memory instruction. Four experiments were conducted where un-cued items (UI) were interspersed and recognition performance was compared between TBR, TBF, and UI stimuli. Accuracy was encouraged via a performance-dependent monetary bonus. Experiments varied the number of items and their presentation speed and used either letter-cues or symbolic cues. Across all experiments, including perceptually fully counterbalanced variants, memory accuracy for TBF was reduced compared to TBR, but better than for UI. Moreover, participants made consistently fewer false alarms and used a very conservative response criterion when responding to TBF stimuli. Thus, the F-cue results in active processing and reduces false alarm rate, but this does not impair recognition memory beyond an un-cued baseline condition, where only incidental encoding occurs. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26635657

  20. Predicted Relative Metabolomic Turnover (PRMT): determining metabolic turnover from a coastal marine metagenomic dataset

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The world's oceans are home to a diverse array of microbial life whose metabolic activity helps to drive the earth's biogeochemical cycles. Metagenomic analysis has revolutionized our access to these communities, providing a system-scale perspective of microbial community interactions. However, while metagenome sequencing can provide useful estimates of the relative change in abundance of specific genes and taxa between environments or over time, this does not investigate the relative changes in the production or consumption of different metabolites. Results We propose a methodology, Predicted Relative Metabolic Turnover (PRMT) that defines and enables exploration of metabolite-space inferred from the metagenome. Our analysis of metagenomic data from a time-series study in the Western English Channel demonstrated considerable correlations between predicted relative metabolic turnover and seasonal changes in abundance of measured environmental parameters as well as with observed seasonal changes in bacterial population structure. Conclusions The PRMT method was successfully applied to metagenomic data to explore the Western English Channel microbial metabalome to generate specific, biologically testable hypotheses. Generated hypotheses linked organic phosphate utilization to Gammaproteobactaria, Plantcomycetes, and Betaproteobacteria, chitin degradation to Actinomycetes, and potential small molecule biosynthesis pathways for Lentisphaerae, Chlamydiae, and Crenarchaeota. The PRMT method can be applied as a general tool for the analysis of additional metagenomic or transcriptomic datasets. PMID:22587810

  1. Effect of Diet and Cold Exposure on Norepinephrine Turnover in Brown Adipose Tissue of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Young, James B.; Saville, Elizabeth; Rothwell, Nancy J.; Stock, Michael J.; Landsberg, Lewis

    1982-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is an important site of adaptive changes in thermogenesis in the rat. The sympathetic nervous system, which richly supplies BAT, is thought to play an important role in the regulation of BAT thermogenesis because catecholamines stimulate and beta adrenergic blocking agents inhibit oxygen consumption in this tissue. The present studies were carried out to assess directly sympathetic activity in BAT in response to cold exposure and to changes in dietary intake, both of which alter heat production in the rat. Sympathetic activity was determined from the rate of norepinephrine (NE) turnover in interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) after preliminary experiments validated the use of NE turnover techniques in IBAT. Acute exposure to 4°C increased NE turnover in IBAT 4- to 12-fold compared with ambient temperature controls, depending upon the interval over which the turnover measurement was made, while in the heart NE turnover doubled in response to the same cold stimulus. In animals exposed to cold continuously for 10 d before study, NE turnover measurements in IBAT and in the heart were elevated comparably to those obtained during acute exposure. Alterations in feeding were also associated with changes in NE turnover in IBAT. Fasting for 2 d decreased NE turnover in IBAT (-35% from 29.2±4.2 ng NE/h to 18.9±5.9) and in heart (-52%). In animals fed a “cafeteria” diet, a model of voluntary overfeeding in the rat, NE turnover was increased in both IBAT (+108% from 24.8±4.5 ng NE/h to 51.7±6.8) and heart (+66%). Because ganglionic blockade exerted a greater effect on NE turnover in IBAT in cafeteria-fed rats than in controls, the increase in NE turnover in IBAT with this overfeeding regimen reflects enhanced central sympathetic outflow. Thus NE turnover techniques can be satisfactorily applied to the assessment of sympathetic nervous system activity in IBAT. The experiments reported here demonstrate changes in sympathetic activity in

  2. Improvements to Kramers turnover theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollak, Eli; Ankerhold, Joachim

    2013-04-01

    The Kramers turnover problem, that is, obtaining a uniform expression for the rate of escape of a particle over a barrier for any value of the external friction was solved in the 1980s. Two formulations were given, one by Mel'nikov and Meshkov (MM) [V. I. Mel'nikov and S. V. Meshkov, J. Chem. Phys. 85, 1018 (1986), 10.1063/1.451844], which was based on a perturbation expansion for the motion of the particle in the presence of friction. The other, by Pollak, Grabert, and Hänggi (PGH) [E. Pollak, H. Grabert, and P. Hänggi, J. Chem. Phys. 91, 4073 (1989), 10.1063/1.456837], valid also for memory friction, was based on a perturbation expansion for the motion along the collective unstable normal mode of the particle. Both theories did not take into account the temperature dependence of the average energy loss to the bath. Increasing the bath temperature will reduce the average energy loss. In this paper, we analyse this effect, using a novel perturbation theory. We find that within the MM approach, the thermal energy gained from the bath diverges, the average energy gain becomes infinite implying an essential failure of the theory. Within the PGH approach increasing the bath temperature reduces the average energy loss but only by a finite small amount of the order of the inverse of the reduced barrier height. Then, this does not seriously affect the theory. Analysis and application for a cubic potential and Ohmic friction are presented.

  3. Norepinephrine turnover in heart and spleen of 7-, 22-, and 34 C-acclimated hamsters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. B.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of norepinephrine (NE) concentration and endogenous turnover rates in both myocardial and spleen tissues in the golden hamster is examined as a function of chronic exposure to either high or low ambient temperatures. Changes in myocardial and spleen NE turnover values are discussed in terms of functional alterations in sympathetic nerve activity and the importance of such changes in temperature acclimation. It is found that acclimation of hamsters to 7 C for 7-10 weeks results in decreased myocardial NE concentration and an apparent increase in myocardial NE turnover. In contrast, exposure to 34 C for 6-8 weeks results in increased myocardial NE concentration and an apparent decrease in NE turnover in both myocardial and spleen tissues. The implication of altered NE synthesis is that sympathetic nerve activity is reduced with heat acclimation and is enhanced with cold acclimation.

  4. Effects of Ignoring Item Interaction on Item Parameter Estimation and Detection of Interacting Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Cheng-Te; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the effects of ignoring item interaction on item parameter estimation and the efficiency of using the local dependence index Q[subscript 3] and the SAS NLMIXED procedure to detect item interaction under the three-parameter logistic model and the generalized partial credit model. Through simulations, it was found that ignoring…

  5. Plagued by Turnover? Train Your Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Dissatisfaction with managers is a major cause of employee turnover The Charles Schwab Corporation surveys employees annually and holds employee focus groups and online town meetings. The information is used for the coaching and training of department heads. (JOW)

  6. Coping with Turnovers in School Food Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannell, Dorothy V.

    1988-01-01

    Labor shortages, cost increases, and turnover have prompted Fairfax County Schools, Virginia, food service managers to offer training programs and recruitment bonuses, to use more convenience foods, and to price out every service. (MLF)

  7. Biomimetic catalysis: Taking on the turnover challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooley, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    Emulating the efficiency with which enzymes catalyse reactions has often been used as inspiration to develop self-assembled cages. Now two studies present approaches to achieving catalyst turnover -- one of the biggest challenges in achieving truly biomimetic catalysis.

  8. Carbon turnover in pore spaces - CIPS model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuka, Katrin

    2010-05-01

    The CIPS (Carbon turnover In Pore Spaces) model has been developed to overcome the constraints of conceptual pools and to get a better insight into the nature of carbon stabilization in soil (KUKA, 2007). This pure carbon turnover model was implemented in CANDY (CArbon and Nitrogen Dynamics) model system (Franko, 1995). The CIPS model did overcome the empirical pools taking into account soil structure effects. It is based on quality driven primary stabilisation mechanism (recalcitrance of SOM) and process driven secondary stabilisation mechanism (place of turnover) of SOM in soil. In addition to the division of SOM in the qualitative pools on the basis of chemical measurability, a dependence of the turnover conditions from the location of SOM in pore space is implemented taking into account different turnover conditions in the particular pore space and the accessibility for microbial biomass. The main assumption of the CIPS model is that the biological activity is not evenly distributed through the whole pore space. The pore space classes - micro, meso and macro pores - used in the model are marked by wilting point, field capacity and pore volume as a first approach. Because of the poor aeration in the micro pores they show very low biological activity leading to a strong protection of the carbon localized in this pore space. The biological active time (BAT) concept of the CANDY model was adapted to the CIPS model in order to calculate the distribution of biological activity for each pore space class. The reduction functions of the turnover active time concept of CANDY model, related to soil temperature, soil moisture, soil texture, relative air volume and distance to the soil surface are multiplied by the step width of calendar time producing the transformed time step as total BAT (BATtot). The calculated BATtot corresponds to the time that would be required under optimal conditions in the laboratory to perform the same turnover result as under the given

  9. A feasibility study into the screening and imaging of hand luggage for threat items at 35 GHz using an active large aperture (1.6 m) security screening imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowring, Nicholas J.; O'Reilly, Dean; Salmon, Neil A.; Andrews, David A.; Rezgui, Nacer-Ddine; Harmer, Stuart W.

    2013-10-01

    The feasibility of screening hand luggage for concealed threat items such as Person-Borne Improvised Explosive Devices (PBIED's) both metallic and non-metallic, together with handguns and at millimetre wavelengths is investigated. Previous studies by the authors and others indicate that hand baggage material and fabric is much more transmissive and has less scattering at lower millimetre wave frequencies and the ability to use K-band active imaging with high spatial resolution presents an opportunity to image and hence recognise concealed threats. For this feasibility study, a 1.6 m aperture, 35 GHz security screening imaging system with a spatial resolution of 2.5 cm and a depth of field of around 5 cm is employed, using spatially incoherent illuminating panels to enhance image contrast. In this study, realistic scenarios using backpacks containing a realistic range of threat and non-threat items are scanned, both carried and standalone. This range of items contains large vessels suitable for containing simulated home-made PBIED's and handguns. The comprehensive list of non-threat items includes laptops, bottles, clothing and power supplies. For this study, the range at which imaging data at standoff distances can be acquired is confined to that of the particular system in use, although parameters such as illumination and integration time are optimised. However, techniques for extrapolating towards effective standoff distances using aperture synthesis imagers are discussed. The transmission loss through fabrics and clothing that may form, or be contained in baggage, are reported over range of frequencies ranging from 26 to 110 GHz.

  10. The costs of nurse turnover, part 2: application of the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl Bland

    2005-01-01

    This is the second article in a 2-part series focusing on nurse turnover and its costs. Part 1 (December 2004) described nurse turnover costs within the context of human capital theory, and using human resource accounting methods, presented the updated Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology. Part 2 presents an application of this method in an acute care setting and the estimated costs of nurse turnover that were derived. Administrators and researchers can use these methods and cost information to build a business case for nurse retention. PMID:15647669

  11. Global turnover of histone post-translational modifications and variants in human cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Post-translational modifications (PTMs) on the N-terminal tails of histones and histone variants regulate distinct transcriptional states and nuclear events. Whereas the functional effects of specific PTMs are the current subject of intense investigation, most studies characterize histone PTMs/variants in a non-temporal fashion and very few studies have reported kinetic information about these histone forms. Previous studies have used radiolabeling, fluorescence microscopy and chromatin immunoprecipitation to determine rates of histone turnover, and have found interesting correlations between increased turnover and increased gene expression. Therefore, histone turnover is an understudied yet potentially important parameter that may contribute to epigenetic regulation. Understanding turnover in the context of histone modifications and sequence variants could provide valuable additional insight into the function of histone replacement. Results In this study, we measured the metabolic rate of labeled isotope incorporation into the histone proteins of HeLa cells by combining stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) pulse experiments with quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. In general, we found that most core histones have similar turnover rates, with the exception of the H2A variants, which exhibit a wider range of rates, potentially consistent with their epigenetic function. In addition, acetylated histones have a significantly faster turnover compared with general histone protein and methylated histones, although these rates vary considerably, depending on the site and overall degree of methylation. Histones containing transcriptionally active marks have been consistently found to have faster turnover rates than histones containing silent marks. Interestingly, the presence of both active and silent marks on the same peptide resulted in a slower turnover rate than either mark alone on that same peptide. Lastly, we observed

  12. Spatial turnover in the global avifauna

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Kevin J; Davies, Richard G; Orme, C. David L; Olson, Valerie A; Thomas, Gavin H; Ding, Tzung-Su; Rasmussen, Pamela C; Lennon, Jack J; Bennett, Peter M; Owens, Ian P.F; Blackburn, Tim M

    2007-01-01

    Despite its wide implications for many ecological issues, the global pattern of spatial turnover in the occurrence of species has been little studied, unlike the global pattern of species richness. Here, using a database on the breeding distributions of birds, we present the first global maps of variation in spatial turnover for an entire taxonomic class, a pattern that has to date remained largely a matter of conjecture, based on theoretical expectations and extrapolation of inconsistent patterns from different biogeographic realms. We use these maps to test four predictions from niche theory as to the form that this variation should take, namely that turnover should increase with species richness, towards lower latitudes, and with the steepness of environmental gradients and that variation in turnover is determined principally by rare (restricted) species. Contrary to prediction, we show that turnover is high both in areas of extremely low and high species richness, does not increase strongly towards the tropics, and is related both to average environmental conditions and spatial variation in those conditions. These results are closely associated with a further important and novel finding, namely that global patterns of spatial turnover are driven principally by widespread species rather than the restricted ones. This complements recent demonstrations that spatial patterns of species richness are also driven principally by widespread species, and thus provides an important contribution towards a unified model of how terrestrial biodiversity varies both within and between the Earth's major land masses. PMID:17472910

  13. On gigahertz spectral turnovers in pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajwade, K.; Lorimer, D. R.; Anderson, L. D.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsars are known to emit non-thermal radio emission that is generally a power-law function of frequency. In some cases, a turnover is seen at frequencies around 100 MHz. Kijak et al. have reported the presence of a new class of `Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum' (GPS) pulsars that show spectral turnovers at frequencies around 1 GHz. We apply a model based on free-free thermal absorption to explain these turnovers in terms of surrounding material such as the dense environments found in H II regions, pulsar wind nebulae, or in cold, partially ionized molecular clouds. We show that the turnover frequency depends on the electron temperature of the environment close to the pulsar, as well as the emission measure along the line of sight. We fitted this model to the radio fluxes of known GPS pulsars and show that it can replicate the GHz turnover. From the thermal absorption model, we demonstrate that normal pulsars would exhibit a GPS-like behaviour if they were in a dense environment. We discuss the application of this model in the context of determining the population of neutron stars within the central parsec of the Galaxy. We show that a non-negligible fraction of this population might exhibit high-frequency spectral turnovers, which has implications on the detectability of these sources in the Galactic Centre.

  14. Doxorubicin enhances nucleosome turnover around promoters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Kemp, Christopher J; Henikoff, Steven

    2013-05-01

    Doxorubicin is an anthracycline DNA intercalator that is among the most commonly used anticancer drugs. Doxorubicin causes DNA double-strand breaks in rapidly dividing cells, although whether it also affects general chromatin properties is unknown. Here, we use a metabolic labeling strategy to directly measure nucleosome turnover to examine the effect of doxorubicin on chromatin dynamics in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines derived from genetically defined mice. We find that doxorubicin enhances nucleosome turnover around gene promoters and that turnover correlates with gene expression level. Consistent with a direct action of doxorubicin, enhancement of nucleosome turnover around promoters gradually increases with time of exposure to the drug. Interestingly, enhancement occurs both in wild-type cells and in cells lacking either the p53 tumor suppressor gene or the master regulator of the DNA damage response, ATM, suggesting that doxorubicin action on nucleosome dynamics is independent of the DNA damage checkpoint. In addition, another anthracycline drug, aclarubicin, shows similar effects on enhancing nucleosome turnover around promoters. Our results suggest that anthracycline intercalation promotes nucleosome turnover around promoters by its effect on DNA topology, with possible implications for mechanisms of cell killing during cancer chemotherapy. PMID:23602475

  15. Licensing and due process in the turnover of bacterial RNA.

    PubMed

    Bandyra, Katarzyna J; Luisi, Ben F

    2013-04-01

    RNA enables the material interpretation of genetic information through time and in space. The creation, destruction and activity of RNA must be well controlled and tightly synchronized with numerous cellular processes. We discuss here the pathways and mechanism of bacterial RNA turnover, and describe how RNA itself modulates these processes as part of decision-making networks. The central roles of RNA decay and other aspects of RNA metabolism in cellular control are also suggested by their vulnerability to sabotage by phages; nonetheless, RNA can be used in defense against phage infection, and these processes are described here. Salient aspects of RNA turnover are drawn together to suggest how it could affect complex effects such as phenotypic diversity in populations and responses that persist for multiple generations. PMID:23580162

  16. The costs of nurse turnover: part 1: an economic perspective.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl Bland

    2004-12-01

    Nurse turnover is costly for healthcare organizations. Administrators and nurse executives need a reliable estimate of nurse turnover costs and the origins of those costs if they are to develop effective measures of reducing nurse turnover and its costs. However, determining how to best capture and quantify nurse turnover costs can be challenging. Part 1 of this series conceptualizes nurse turnover via human capital theory and presents an update of a previously developed method for determining the costs of nurse turnover, the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Method. Part 2 (January 2005) presents a recent application of the methodology in an acute care hospital. PMID:15632752

  17. Microbial carbon turnover in the plant-rhizosphere-soil continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Ashish; Dannert, Helena; Griffiths, Robert; Thomson, Bruce; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Soil microbial biomass contributes significantly to maintenance of soil organic matter (SOM). It is well known that biochemical fractions of soil microorganisms have varying turnover and therefore contribute differentially to soil C storage. Here we compare the turnover rates of different microbial biochemical fractions using a pulse chase 13CO2 plant labelling experiment. The isotope signal was temporally traced into rhizosphere soil microorganisms using the following biomarkers: DNA, RNA, fatty acids and chloroform fumigation extraction derived microbial biomass size classes. C flow into soil microbial functional groups was assessed through phospholipid and neutral lipid fatty acid (PLFA/NLFA) analyses. Highest 13C enrichment was seen in the low molecular weight (LMW) size class of microbial biomass (Δδ13C =151) and in nucleic acids (DNA: 38o RNA: 66) immediately after the pulse followed by a sharp drop. The amount of 13C in the high molecular weight (HMW) microbial biomass (17-81) and total fatty acids (32-54) was lower initially and stayed relatively steady over the 4 weeks experimental period. We found significant differences in turnover rates of different microbial biochemical and size fractions. We infer that LMW cytosolic soluble compounds are rapidly metabolized and linked to respiratory C fluxes, whereas mid-sized products of microbial degradation and HMW polymeric compounds have lower renewal rate in that order. The turnover of cell wall fatty acids was also very slow. DNA and RNA showed faster turnover rate; and as expected RNA renewal was the fastest due to its rapid production by active microorganisms independent of cell replication. 13C incorporation into different functional groups confirmed that mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi rely on root C and are important in the initial plant C flux. We substantiated through measurements of isotope incorporation into bacterial RNA that rhizosphere bacteria are also important in the initial C conduit

  18. Addressing employee turnover and retention: keeping your valued performers.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Employee turnover and employee retention are inextricably linked; to control turnover is to enhance retention. Turnover is a relatively simple concept; however, considerable confusion often results when addressing turnover because of differences in how it is defined; that is, what is counted, how it is counted, and how the turnover rates are expressed. Turnover is also costly, although not enough attention is paid to its cost because so much of it is indirect and thus not readily visible. There are a variety of causes of turnover, some that can be corrected and some that cannot be avoided. Reducing or otherwise controlling turnover requires continuing management attention to its causes and constant recognition of what can and should be controlled and what cannot be controlled. Ongoing attention to turnover is an essential part of the department manager's role; every improvement in turnover is a direct improvement in retention, with eventual positive effects on the bottom line. PMID:21808181

  19. Triacylglycerol turnover in the failing heart.

    PubMed

    Carley, Andrew N; Lewandowski, E Douglas

    2016-10-01

    No longer regarded as physiologically inert the endogenous triacylglyceride (TAG) pool within the cardiomyocyte is now recognized to play a dynamic role in metabolic regulation. Beyond static measures of content, the relative rates of interconversion among acyl intermediates are more closely linked to dynamic processes of physiological function in normal and diseased hearts, with the potential for both adaptive and maladaptive contributions. Indeed, multiple inefficiencies in cardiac metabolism have been identified in the decompensated, hypertrophied and failing heart. Among the intracellular responses to physiological, metabolic and pathological stresses, TAG plays a central role in the balance of lipid handling and signaling mechanisms. TAG dynamics are profoundly altered from normal in both diabetic and pathologically stressed hearts. More than just expansion or contraction of the stored lipid pool, the turnover rates of TAG are sensitive to and compete against other enzymatic pathways, anabolic and catabolic, for reactive acyl-CoA units. The rates of TAG synthesis and lipolysis thusly affect multiple components of cardiomyocyte function, including energy metabolism, cell signaling, and enzyme activation, as well as the regulation of gene expression in both normal and diseased states. This review examines the multiple etiologies and metabolic consequences of the failing heart and the central role of lipid storage dynamics in the pathogenic process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:26993578

  20. Antiplatelet drugs in patients with enhanced platelet turnover: biomarkers versus platelet function testing.

    PubMed

    Freynhofer, Matthias K; Gruber, Susanne C; Grove, Erik L; Weiss, Thomas W; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2015-08-31

    Platelets are key players in atherothrombosis. Antiplatelet therapy comprising aspirin alone or with P2Y12-inhibitors are effective for prevention of atherothrombotic complications. However, there is interindividual variability in the response to antiplatelet drugs, leaving some patients at increased risk of recurrent atherothrombotic events. Several risk factors associated with high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR), including elevated platelet turnover, have been identified. Platelet turnover is adequately estimated from the fraction of reticulated platelets. Reticulated platelets are young platelets, characterised by residual messenger RNA. They are larger, haemostatically more active and there is evidence that platelet turnover is a causal and prognostic factor in atherothrombotic disease. Whether platelet turnover per se represents a key factor in pathogenesis, progression and prognosis of atherothrombotic diseases (with focus on acute coronary syndromes) or whether it merely facilitates insufficient platelet inhibition will be discussed in this state-of-the art review. PMID:26272640

  1. Histone turnover and chromatin accessibility: Critical mediators of neurological development, plasticity, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wenderski, Wendy; Maze, Ian

    2016-01-01

    In postmitotic neurons, nucleosomal turnover was long considered to be a static process that is inconsequential to transcription. However, our recent studies in human and rodent brain indicate that replication-independent (RI) nucleosomal turnover, which requires the histone variant H3.3, is dynamic throughout life and is necessary for activity-dependent gene expression, synaptic connectivity, and cognition. H3.3 turnover also facilitates cellular lineage specification and plays a role in suppressing the expression of heterochromatic repetitive elements, including mutagenic transposable sequences, in mouse embryonic stem cells. In this essay, we review mechanisms and functions for RI nucleosomal turnover in brain and present the hypothesis that defects in histone dynamics may represent a common mechanism underlying neurological aging and disease. PMID:26990528

  2. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  3. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  4. Linking Item Response Model Parameters.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Wim J; Barrett, Michelle D

    2016-09-01

    With a few exceptions, the problem of linking item response model parameters from different item calibrations has been conceptualized as an instance of the problem of test equating scores on different test forms. This paper argues, however, that the use of item response models does not require any test score equating. Instead, it involves the necessity of parameter linking due to a fundamental problem inherent in the formal nature of these models-their general lack of identifiability. More specifically, item response model parameters need to be linked to adjust for the different effects of the identifiability restrictions used in separate item calibrations. Our main theorems characterize the formal nature of these linking functions for monotone, continuous response models, derive their specific shapes for different parameterizations of the 3PL model, and show how to identify them from the parameter values of the common items or persons in different linking designs. PMID:26155754

  5. Item-properties may influence item-item associations in serial recall.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Jeremy B; Madan, Christopher R; Bedwell, Darren J

    2015-04-01

    Attributes of words, such as frequency and imageability, can influence memory for order. In serial recall, Hulme, Stuart, Brown, and Morin (Journal of Memory and Language, 49(4), 500-518, 2003) found that high-frequency words were recalled worse, and low-frequency words better, when embedded in alternating lists than pure lists. This is predicted by associative chaining, wherein each recalled list-item becomes a recall-cue for the next item. However, Hulme, Stuart, Brown, and Morin (Journal of Memory and Language, 49(4), 500-518, 2003) argued their findings supported positional-coding models, wherein items are linked to a representation of position, with no direct associations between items. They suggested their serial-position effects were due to pre-experimental semantic similarity between pairs of items, which depended on frequency, or a complex tradeoff between item- and order-coding (Morin, Poirier, Fortin, & Hulme, Psychonomic Bulletin Review, 13(4), 724-729, 2006). We replicated the smooth serial-position effects, but accounts based on pre-existing similarity or item-order tradeoffs were untenable. Alternative accounts based, on imageability, phonological and lexical neighbourhood sizes were also ruled out. The standard chaining account predicts that if accuracy is conditionalized on whether the prior item was correct, the word-frequency effect should reappear in alternating lists; however, this prediction was not borne out, challenging this retrieval-based chaining account. We describe a new account, whereby frequency influences the strengths of item-item associations, symmetrically, during study. A manipulation of word-imageability also produced a pattern consistent with item-item cueing at study, but left room for effects of imageability at the final stage of recall. These findings provide further support for the contribution of associative chaining to serial-recall behaviour and show that item-properties may influence serial-recall in multiple ways. PMID

  6. Predictors of Staff Turnover and Turnover Intentions within Addiction Treatment Settings: Change Over Time Matters

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which changes over time in clinicians’ responses to measures of work attitude (eg, job satisfaction) and psychological climate (eg, supervisor support) could predict actual turnover and turnover intentions above and beyond absolute levels of these respective measures. Longitudinal data for this study were collected from a sample of clinicians (N = 96) being trained to implement an evidence-based treatment for adolescent substance use disorders. Supporting findings from a recent staff turnover study, we found job satisfaction change was able to predict actual turnover above and beyond average levels of job satisfaction. Representing new contributions to the staff turnover literature, we also found that change over time in several other key measures (eg, job satisfaction, role manageability, role clarity) explained a significant amount of variance in turnover intentions above and beyond the absolute level of each respective measure. A key implication of the current study is that organizations seeking to improve their ability to assess risk for staff turnover may want to consider assessing staff at multiple points in time in order to identify systematic changes in key employee attitudes like turnover intentions and job satisfaction. PMID:25336960

  7. Predictors of Staff Turnover and Turnover Intentions within Addiction Treatment Settings: Change Over Time Matters.

    PubMed

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which changes over time in clinicians' responses to measures of work attitude (eg, job satisfaction) and psychological climate (eg, supervisor support) could predict actual turnover and turnover intentions above and beyond absolute levels of these respective measures. Longitudinal data for this study were collected from a sample of clinicians (N = 96) being trained to implement an evidence-based treatment for adolescent substance use disorders. Supporting findings from a recent staff turnover study, we found job satisfaction change was able to predict actual turnover above and beyond average levels of job satisfaction. Representing new contributions to the staff turnover literature, we also found that change over time in several other key measures (eg, job satisfaction, role manageability, role clarity) explained a significant amount of variance in turnover intentions above and beyond the absolute level of each respective measure. A key implication of the current study is that organizations seeking to improve their ability to assess risk for staff turnover may want to consider assessing staff at multiple points in time in order to identify systematic changes in key employee attitudes like turnover intentions and job satisfaction. PMID:25336960

  8. Selecting Items for Criterion-Referenced Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellenbergh, Gideon J.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    1982-01-01

    Three item selection methods for criterion-referenced tests are examined: the classical theory of item difficulty and item-test correlation; the latent trait theory of item characteristic curves; and a decision-theoretic approach for optimal item selection. Item contribution to the standardized expected utility of mastery testing is discussed. (CM)

  9. A Mixed Effects Randomized Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, J.-P.; Wyrick, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    The randomized response technique ensures that individual item responses, denoted as true item responses, are randomized before observing them and so-called randomized item responses are observed. A relationship is specified between randomized item response data and true item response data. True item response data are modeled with a (non)linear…

  10. MIMIC Methods for Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Shih, Ching-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Three multiple indicators-multiple causes (MIMIC) methods, namely, the standard MIMIC method (M-ST), the MIMIC method with scale purification (M-SP), and the MIMIC method with a pure anchor (M-PA), were developed to assess differential item functioning (DIF) in polytomous items. In a series of simulations, it appeared that all three methods…

  11. Evaluating Item Fit for Multidimensional Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Bo; Stone, Clement A.

    2008-01-01

    This research examines the utility of the s-x[superscript 2] statistic proposed by Orlando and Thissen (2000) in evaluating item fit for multidimensional item response models. Monte Carlo simulation was conducted to investigate both the Type I error and statistical power of this fit statistic in analyzing two kinds of multidimensional test…

  12. Differential Item Functioning Analysis Using Rasch Item Information Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Mapuranga, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis is a statistical technique used for ensuring the equity and fairness of educational assessments. This study formulates a new DIF analysis method using the information similarity index (ISI). ISI compares item information functions when data fits the Rasch model. Through simulations and an international…

  13. Lysosomal involvement in cellular turnover of plasma membrane sphingomyelin.

    PubMed

    Sutrina, S L; Chen, W W

    1984-04-18

    At least two isoenzymes of sphingomyelinase (sphingomyelin cholinephosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.12), including lysosomal acid sphingomyelinase and nonlysosomal magnesium-dependent neutral sphingomyelinase, catalyse the degradation of sphingomyelin in cultured human skin fibroblasts. A genetically determined disorder of sphingomyelin metabolism, type A Niemann-Pick disease, is characterized by a deficiency of lysosomal acid sphingomyelinase. To investigate the involvement of lysosomes in the degradation of cellular membrane sphingomyelin, we have undertaken studies to compare the turnover of plasma membrane sphingomyelin in fibroblasts from a patient with type A Niemann-Pick disease, which completely lack acid sphingomyelinase activity but retain nonlysosomal neutral sphingomyelinase activity, with turnover in fibroblasts from normal individuals. Plasma membrane sphingomyelin was labeled by incubating cells at low temperature with phosphatidylcholine vesicles containing radioactive sphingomyelin. A fluorescent analog of sphingomyelin, N-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazoleaminocaproyl sphingosylphosphorylcholine (NBD-sphingomyelin) is seen to be readily transferred at low temperature from phosphatidylcholine liposomes to the plasma membranes of cultured human fibroblasts. Moreover, when kinetic studies were done in parallel, a constant ratio of [14C]oleoylsphingosylphosphorylcholine ( [14C]sphingomyelin) to NBD-sphingomyelin was taken up at low temperature by the fibroblast cells, suggesting that [14C]sphingomyelin undergoes a similar transfer. The comparison of sphingomyelin turnover at 37 degrees C in normal fibroblasts compared to Niemann-Pick diseased fibroblasts shows that a rapid turnover of plasma membrane-associated sphingomyelin within the first 30 min appears to be similar in both normal and Niemann-Pick diseased cells. This rapid turnover appears to be primarily due to rapid removal of the [14C]sphingomyelin from the cell surface into the incubation medium. During

  14. Career and Occupational Development Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    The career and occupational development items contained in this document are part of a kit consisting of four documents which bring together different types of items that measure a number of career and occupational development (COD) objectives developed by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). (NAEP--which completed a national…

  15. Generalizability in Item Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Wilson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    An approach called generalizability in item response modeling (GIRM) is introduced in this article. The GIRM approach essentially incorporates the sampling model of generalizability theory (GT) into the scaling model of item response theory (IRT) by making distributional assumptions about the relevant measurement facets. By specifying a random…

  16. Agriculture Library of Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Duncan, Ed.

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items of value from past tests are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests, term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection is reviewed for content validity and reliability. The test…

  17. Automatic Association of News Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrick, Christina; Watters, Carolyn

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of electronic news delivery systems and the automatic generation of electronic editions focuses on the association of related items of different media type, specifically photos and stories. The goal is to be able to determine to what degree any two news items refer to the same news event. (Author/LRW)

  18. Comparison of Unit-Level Patient Turnover Measures in Acute Care Hospital Settings.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin Hye; Dunton, Nancy; Blegen, Mary A

    2016-06-01

    High patient turnover is a critical factor increasing nursing workload. Despite the growing number of studies on patient turnover, no consensus about how to measure turnover has been achieved. This study was designed to assess the correlation among patient turnover measures commonly used in recent studies and to examine the degree of agreement among the measures for classifying units with different levels of patient turnover. Using unit-level data collected for this study from 292 units in 88 hospitals participating in the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators®, we compared four patient turnover measures: the inverse of length of stay (1/LOS), admissions, discharges, and transfers per daily census (ADTC), ADTC with short-stay adjustment, and the number of ADTs and short-stay patients divided by the total number of treated patients, or Unit Activity Index (UAI). We assessed the measures' agreement on turnover quartile classifications, using percent agreement and Cohen's kappa statistic (weighted and unweighted). Pearson correlation coefficients also were calculated. ADTC with or without adjustment for short-stay patients had high correlations and substantial agreement with the measure of 1/LOS (κ = .62 to .91; r = .90 to .95). The UAI measure required data less commonly collected by participating hospital units and showed only moderate correlations and fair agreement with the other measures (κ = .23 to .39; r = .41 to .45). The UAI may not be comparable and interchangeable with other patient turnover measures when data are obtained from multiple units and hospitals. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26998744

  19. Quantification of isotopic turnover in agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, A.; Auerswald, K.; Schnyder, H.

    2012-04-01

    The isotopic turnover, which is a proxy for the metabolic rate, is gaining scientific importance. It is quantified for an increasing range of organisms, from microorganisms over plants to animals including agricultural livestock. Additionally, the isotopic turnover is analyzed on different scales, from organs to organisms to ecosystems and even to the biosphere. In particular, the quantification of the isotopic turnover of specific tissues within the same organism, e.g. organs like liver and muscle and products like milk and faeces, has brought new insights to improve understanding of nutrient cycles and fluxes, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of isotopic turnover is important in many areas, including physiology, e.g. milk synthesis, ecology, e.g. soil retention time of water, and medical science, e.g. cancer diagnosis. So far, the isotopic turnover is quantified by applying time, cost and expertise intensive tracer experiments. Usually, this comprises two isotopic equilibration periods. A first equilibration period with a constant isotopic input signal is followed by a second equilibration period with a distinct constant isotopic input signal. This yields a smooth signal change from the first to the second signal in the object under consideration. This approach reveals at least three major problems. (i) The input signals must be controlled isotopically, which is almost impossible in many realistic cases like free ranging animals. (ii) Both equilibration periods may be very long, especially when the turnover rate of the object under consideration is very slow, which aggravates the first problem. (iii) The detection of small or slow pools is improved by large isotopic signal changes, but large isotopic changes also involve a considerable change in the input material; e.g. animal studies are usually carried out as diet-switch experiments, where the diet is switched between C3 and C4 plants, since C3 and C4 plants differ strongly in their isotopic signal. The

  20. Assessing item fit for unidimensional item response theory models using residuals from estimated item response functions.

    PubMed

    Haberman, Shelby J; Sinharay, Sandip; Chon, Kyong Hee

    2013-07-01

    Residual analysis (e.g. Hambleton & Swaminathan, Item response theory: principles and applications, Kluwer Academic, Boston, 1985; Hambleton, Swaminathan, & Rogers, Fundamentals of item response theory, Sage, Newbury Park, 1991) is a popular method to assess fit of item response theory (IRT) models. We suggest a form of residual analysis that may be applied to assess item fit for unidimensional IRT models. The residual analysis consists of a comparison of the maximum-likelihood estimate of the item characteristic curve with an alternative ratio estimate of the item characteristic curve. The large sample distribution of the residual is proved to be standardized normal when the IRT model fits the data. We compare the performance of our suggested residual to the standardized residual of Hambleton et al. (Fundamentals of item response theory, Sage, Newbury Park, 1991) in a detailed simulation study. We then calculate our suggested residuals using data from an operational test. The residuals appear to be useful in assessing the item fit for unidimensional IRT models. PMID:25106393

  1. Mitochondrial protein turnover: methods to measure turnover rates on a large scale

    PubMed Central

    Chan, X’avia CY; Black, Caitlin M; Lin, Amanda J; Ping, Peipei; Lau, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial proteins carry out diverse cellular functions including ATP synthesis, ion homeostasis, cell death signaling, and fatty acid metabolism and biogenesis. Compromised mitochondrial quality control is implicated in various human disorders including cardiac diseases. Recently it has emerged that mitochondrial protein turnover can serve as an informative cellular parameter to characterize mitochondrial quality and uncover disease mechanisms. The turnover rate of a mitochondrial protein reflects its homeostasis and dynamics under the quality control systems acting on mitochondria at a particular cell state. This review article summarizes some recent advances and outstanding challenges for measuring the turnover rates of mitochondrial proteins in health and disease. PMID:25451168

  2. In vitro and in vivo effects of phytoestrogens on protein turnover in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) white muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybeans and other legumes investigated as fishmeal replacements in aquafeeds contain phytoestrogens capable of binding to and activating estrogen receptors. Estradiol has catabolic effects in salmonid white muscle, partially through increases in protein turnover. The current study determines whet...

  3. A Turnover Model for the Mexican Maquiladoras.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maertz, Carl P.; Stevens, Michael J.; Campion, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    From interviews with 47 Mexican maquiladora workers, a model of voluntary turnover was created and compared with models from the United States, Canada, England, and Australia. Despite similarities, the cultural and economic environment affected the precise content of antecedents in the Mexican model. (Contains 63 references.) (SK)

  4. Home Visitor Job Satisfaction and Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchbinder, Sharon B.; Duggan, Anne K.; Young, Elizabeth; Fuddy, Loretta; Sia, Cal

    This paper summarizes findings of a 3-year study of the job satisfaction and turnover of home visitors, both professional and paraprofessional, in programs which link families-at-risk for impaired functioning to medical home care and other resources. Specifically, the study examined: (1) home visitor personal characteristics that influence…

  5. Job Turnover Intentions Among Pharmacy Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Mark H.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To determine the primary reasons why pharmacy faculty intend to remain or leave their current institution and why they left their most recent academic institution, and the relative contribution of various organizational and individual characteristics toward explaining variance in turnover intentions. Methods A survey instrument was e-mailed to pharmacy faculty members asking respondents to indicate up to 5 reasons for their intentions and up to 5 reasons why they left a previous institution. The survey also elicited perceptions on quality of work life in addition to demographic and institutional data, upon which turnover intentions were regressed using a forward-conditional procedure. Organizational commitment as a moderator of turnover intentions was regressed over the remaining variables not acting directly on employer intentions. Results Just over 1 in 5 respondents indicated intentions to leave their current academic institution. Excessive workload, seeking a new challenge, poor salary, and poor relationships with college or school administrators were frequently cited as reasons for leaving. Turnover intentions are influenced directly by department chair support and organizational commitment, which moderates various support and satisfaction variables. Conclusions Pharmacy faculty members’ decision to remain or leave an institution is dependent upon developing a sense of commitment toward the institution. Commitment is facilitated by support from the institution and department chair, in addition to a sense of satisfaction with the teaching environment. PMID:17786250

  6. Teacher Turnover in Charter Schools. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuit, David; Smith, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    The current study aimed to contribute to a deeper understanding of the organizational conditions of charter schools by examining teacher turnover. Using data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) 2003-04 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) and the Teacher Follow-Up Survey (TFS), researchers from the National Center on School…

  7. Turnover of Public School Superintendents in Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Joyce Ntsoaki

    2013-01-01

    This study used a descriptive qualitative design utilizing a phenomenological approach to determine and examine the reasons behind the voluntary or involuntary turnover of Arizona school superintendents. Open-ended questions were used to interview five superintendents who had left their districts between 2008 and 2013 about their perceptions on…

  8. Cusp catastrophe model of employee turnover.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, J E; Abelson, M A

    1983-09-01

    A cusp catastrophe model is developed to explain job turnover of nursing employees. The temporal dynamics of the catastrophe model suggest that leavers experience lower organization commitment than do stayers prior to termination. Leavers' perceptions of job tension and commitment appear to cross the threshold levels prior to the termination dates. PMID:10262614

  9. Employee Development and Turnover Intention: Theory Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Wali; Nas, Zekeriya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the pattern of behavior of turnover intentions in developing countries "vis-a-vis" the one in advanced countries through the empirical data from public universities in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The study provides empirical evidence from academia in Pakistan, thereby enriching the understanding of…

  10. Antecedents of Norwegian Beginning Teachers' Turnover Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiplic, Dijana; Brandmo, Christian; Elstad, Eyvind

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at exploring several individual, organizational, and contextual factors that may affect beginning teachers' turnover intentions during their first years of practice. The sample consists of 227 beginning teachers (69% female and 31% male) from 133 schools in Norway. The results show four important antecedents of beginning teachers'…

  11. Costing Child Protective Services Staff Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graef, Michelle I.; Hill, Erick L.

    2000-01-01

    Details process of determining a child welfare agency's actual dollar costs directly attributed to protective services staff turnover, using the agency's human resources database and interviews with administrative personnel. Provides formulas and process for calculating specific cost elements due to employee separation, replacement, and training.…

  12. Director Turnover: An Australian Academic Development Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ryan, Yoni

    2012-01-01

    Although it can be argued that directors of central academic development units (ADUs) are critical to the implementation of university teaching and learning strategies, it would appear there is a high director turnover rate. While research in the USA, the UK, and Australia illustrates that ADUs are frequently closed or restructured, that research…

  13. Inorganic pyrophosphate pool size and turnover rate in arthritic joints.

    PubMed

    Camerlain, M; McCarty, D J; Silcox, D C; Jung, A

    1975-06-01

    Recent studies have shown elevated inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) levels in most knee joint fluid supernates from patients with pseudogout (PG) or osteoarthritis (OA) and more modestly elevated levels in some supernates from patients with gout or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) relative to PPi levels found in the venous blood plasma of normal or arthritic subjects. We measured the intraarticular PPi pool and its rate of turnover to better understand the significance of the joint fluid-plasma PPi gradient. Preliminary studies in rabbits showed that (32-P)PPi passed from joint space to blood and vice versa without detectable hydrolysis. Incubation of natural or synthetic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) microcrystals with synovial fluid in vitro in the presence of (32P)PPi tracer showed no change in PPi specific activity in the supernate over a 19-h period so that exchange of PPi in solution with that in CPPD microcrystals could be ignored. Clearance rates of (32P)PPi and of (33P)Pi, as determined by serially sampling the catheterized knee joints of volunteers with various types of arthritis over a 3-h period, were nearly identical. The (32P)PPi/(32P)Pi was determined in each sample. A mixture of a large excess of cold PPi did not influence the clearance rate of either nuclide. The quantity of PPi turned over per hous was calculated from the pool size as determined by isotope dilution and the turnover rate. The residual joint fluid nuclide was shown to be (32P)PPi. The PPi pool was generally smaller and the rate of turnover was greater in clinically inflamed joints. The mean plus or minus SEM pool size (mu-moles) and turnover rate (percent/hour) in PG knees was 0.23 plus or minus 0.07 and 117 plus or minus 11.9, hydrolysis rate (%/h) to Pi was 27.7 plus or minus 13.2; in OA knees: 0.45 plus or minus 0.26 and 72 plus or minus 9.2, hydrolysis 6.9 plus or minus 0.9; in gouty knees: 0.8 plus or minus 0.41 and 50 plus or minus 11.6, hydrolysis 9.8 plus or minus 2.8; and in

  14. Looking for a Challenge? Watch That Labour Turnover!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Roderick

    1975-01-01

    Low labor turnover is an essential factor in the success of an enterprise. Steps in dealing with the turnover problem include: establish the objective, get the facts, decide what to do, take action, and check results. (MW)

  15. Staff turnover: occasional friend, frequent foe, and continuing frustration.

    PubMed

    McConnell, C R

    1999-09-01

    Turnover appears to be a relatively simple concept. However, considerable confusion results when discussing turnover because of differences in how it is defined--what is counted, how it is counted, and how the rate of turnover is expressed. Turnover is also costly, although not enough attention is paid to turnover's cost because so much of it is indirect and thus not readily visible. There are a variety of causes of turnover, some which can be corrected and some which cannot be avoided. Reducing or otherwise controlling turnover requires continuing management attention to its causes and constant recognition of what can and should be controlled and what cannot be controlled. Ongoing attention to turnover is an essential part of the department manager's role. PMID:10747463

  16. A concept analysis of turnover intention: implications for nursing management.

    PubMed

    Takase, Miyuki

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review and concept analysis of turnover intention. The aim was to promote Nurse Managers' understanding of the meanings and mechanisms of turnover intention, which could help them counteract nurse turnover. Sixty-six papers published between January 1998 and August 2007 were collected from CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycINFO databases, and were subjected to Rogers' concept analysis. The results showed that turnover intention is a multi-stage process involving the voluntary departure of employees from their current position, and is triggered by negative psychological responses to internal/external job context. These psychological responses evolve into withdrawal cognition and behaviours, and lead to actual turnover. To prevent nurse turnover, Nurse Managers should closely observe the internal and external causes of turnover, and the stage of nurses' turnover intention. PMID:20394269

  17. Work-Related Variables and Turnover Intention among Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pooyan, Abdullah; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Health institutions have become more interested in the causes of job turnover among registered nurses. Proper management of job turnover can improve the financial health and long-term survival of health care institutions. (Author)

  18. Assessment of health-related quality of life in arthritis: conceptualization and development of five item banks using item response theory

    PubMed Central

    Kopec, Jacek A; Sayre, Eric C; Davis, Aileen M; Badley, Elizabeth M; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Sherlock, Lesley; Williams, J Ivan; Anis, Aslam H; Esdaile, John M

    2006-01-01

    Background Modern psychometric methods based on item response theory (IRT) can be used to develop adaptive measures of health-related quality of life (HRQL). Adaptive assessment requires an item bank for each domain of HRQL. The purpose of this study was to develop item banks for five domains of HRQL relevant to arthritis. Methods About 1,400 items were drawn from published questionnaires or developed from focus groups and individual interviews and classified into 19 domains of HRQL. We selected the following 5 domains relevant to arthritis and related conditions: Daily Activities, Walking, Handling Objects, Pain or Discomfort, and Feelings. Based on conceptual criteria and pilot testing, 219 items were selected for further testing. A questionnaire was mailed to patients from two hospital-based clinics and a stratified random community sample. Dimensionality of the domains was assessed through factor analysis. Items were analyzed with the Generalized Partial Credit Model as implemented in Parscale. We used graphical methods and a chi-square test to assess item fit. Differential item functioning was investigated using logistic regression. Results Data were obtained from 888 individuals with arthritis. The five domains were sufficiently unidimensional for an IRT-based analysis. Thirty-one items were deleted due to lack of fit or differential item functioning. Daily Activities had the narrowest range for the item location parameter (-2.24 to 0.55) and Handling Objects had the widest range (-1.70 to 2.27). The mean (median) slope parameter for the items ranged from 1.15 (1.07) in Feelings to 1.73 (1.75) in Walking. The final item banks are comprised of 31–45 items each. Conclusion We have developed IRT-based item banks to measure HRQL in 5 domains relevant to arthritis. The items in the final item banks provide adequate psychometric information for a wide range of functional levels in each domain. PMID:16749932

  19. A Designed Functional Metalloenzyme that Reduces O(2) to H(2)O with Over One Thousand Turnovers

    SciTech Connect

    Miner K. D.; Robinson H.; Mukherjee, A.; Gao, Y.-G.; Null, E. L.; Petrik, I. D.; Zhao, X.; Yeung, N.; Lu, Y.

    2012-04-26

    Rational design of functional enzymes with a high number of turnovers is a challenge, especially those with a complex active site, such as respiratory oxidases. Introducing two His and one Tyr residues into myoglobin resulted in enzymes that reduce O{sub 2} to H{sub 2}O with more than 1000 turnovers and minimal release of reactive oxygen species. The positioning of the Tyr residue is critical for activity.

  20. 7 CFR 3201.5 - Item designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Item designation. 3201.5 Section 3201.5 Agriculture....5 Item designation. (a) Procedure. Designated items are listed in subpart B. In designating items, USDA will designate items composed of generic groupings of specific products and will identify...

  1. 7 CFR 3201.5 - Item designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Item designation. 3201.5 Section 3201.5 Agriculture....5 Item designation. (a) Procedure. Designated items are listed in subpart B. In designating items, USDA will designate items composed of generic groupings of specific products and will identify...

  2. 7 CFR 3201.5 - Item designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Item designation. 3201.5 Section 3201.5 Agriculture....5 Item designation. (a) Procedure. Designated items are listed in subpart B. In designating items, USDA will designate items composed of generic groupings of specific products and will identify...

  3. Item Banking. ERIC/AE Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence

    This digest discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using item banks, and it provides useful information for those who are considering implementing an item banking project in their school districts. The primary advantage of item banking is in test development. Using an item response theory method, such as the Rasch model, items from multiple…

  4. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Item Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2003-01-01

    Developed a multilevel item response (IRT) model that allows for differences between the distributions of item parameters of families of item clones. Results from simulation studies based on an item pool from the Law School Admission Test illustrate the accuracy of the item pool calibration and adaptive testing procedures based on the model. (SLD)

  5. Multilevel Modeling of Item Position Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albano, Anthony D.

    2013-01-01

    In many testing programs it is assumed that the context or position in which an item is administered does not have a differential effect on examinee responses to the item. Violations of this assumption may bias item response theory estimates of item and person parameters. This study examines the potentially biasing effects of item position. A…

  6. Gaussian Process Modeling of Protein Turnover.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Previs, Stephen F; Kasumov, Takhar; Sadygov, Rovshan G

    2016-07-01

    We describe a stochastic model to compute in vivo protein turnover rate constants from stable-isotope labeling and high-throughput liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry experiments. We show that the often-used one- and two-compartment nonstochastic models allow explicit solutions from the corresponding stochastic differential equations. The resulting stochastic process is a Gaussian processes with Ornstein-Uhlenbeck covariance matrix. We applied the stochastic model to a large-scale data set from (15)N labeling and compared its performance metrics with those of the nonstochastic curve fitting. The comparison showed that for more than 99% of proteins, the stochastic model produced better fits to the experimental data (based on residual sum of squares). The model was used for extracting protein-decay rate constants from mouse brain (slow turnover) and liver (fast turnover) samples. We found that the most affected (compared to two-exponent curve fitting) results were those for liver proteins. The ratio of the median of degradation rate constants of liver proteins to those of brain proteins increased 4-fold in stochastic modeling compared to the two-exponent fitting. Stochastic modeling predicted stronger differences of protein turnover processes between mouse liver and brain than previously estimated. The model is independent of the labeling isotope. To show this, we also applied the model to protein turnover studied in induced heart failure in rats, in which metabolic labeling was achieved by administering heavy water. No changes in the model were necessary for adapting to heavy-water labeling. The approach has been implemented in a freely available R code. PMID:27229456

  7. Building Muscles, Keeping Muscles: Protein Turnover During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, Arny; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As we age we lose muscle mass and strength. The problem is a matter of use it or lose it and more - a fact to which any active senior can attest. An imbalance in the natural cycle of protein turnover may be a contributing factor to decreased muscle mass. But the answer is not so simple, since aging is associated with changes in hormones, activity levels, nutrition, and often, disease. The human body constantly uses amino acids to build muscle protein, which then breaks down and must be replaced. When protein turnover gets out of balance, so that more protein breaks down than the body can replace, the result is muscle loss. This is not just the bane of aging, however. Severely burned people may have difficulty building new muscle long after the burned skin has been repaired. Answers to why we lose muscle mass and strength - and how doctors can fix it - may come from space. Astronauts usually eat a well-balanced diet and maintain an exercise routine to stay in top health. During long-duration flight, they exercise regularly to reduce the muscle loss that results from being in a near-weightless environment. Despite these precautions, astronauts lose muscle mass and strength during most missions. They quickly recover after returning to Earth - this is a temporary condition in an otherwise healthy population. Members of the STS-107 crew are participating in a study of the effects of space flight, hormone levels, and stress on protein turnover. When we are under stress, the body responds with a change in hormone levels. Researchers hypothesize that this stress-induced change in hormones along with the near-weightlessness might result in the body synthesizing less muscle protein, causing muscles to lose their strength and size. Astronauts, who must perform numerous duties in a confined and unusual environment, experience some stress during their flight, making them excellent candidates for testing the researchers' hypothesis.

  8. Superintendent Turnover in Kentucky. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 113

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jerry; Huffman, Tyler; Madden, Karen; Shope, Shane

    2011-01-01

    This study examines superintendent turnover in Kentucky public school districts for 1998/99-2007/08, looking at how turnover varies by rural status, Appalachian and non-Appalachian region, and 2007/08 school district characteristics. Key findings include: (1) Kentucky school districts averaged one superintendent turnover during 1998/99-2007/08;…

  9. Salary and Ranking and Teacher Turnover: A Statewide Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Cynthia Martinez; Slate, John R.; Delgado, Carmen Tejeda

    2009-01-01

    This study examined three years of data obtained from the Academic Excellence Indicator System of the State of Texas regarding teacher turnover rate and teacher salary. Across all public school districts, teacher salary was consistently negatively related to teacher turnover; that is, where salary was lower, turnover rate was higher When data were…

  10. A Ministudy of employee turnover in US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; McKinnies, Richard C; Matthews, Eric P; Collins, Kevin S

    2015-01-01

    A ministudy was conducted to collect self-reported employee turnover rates in US hospitals. The results indicate many hospitals are struggling with high employee turnover rates. Widespread variances in ratings were observed across hospitals, which may be due to lack of consistency in how they each calculate their employee turnover. This makes benchmarking for the purposes of performance improvement challenging. PMID:25627851

  11. Investing in Leadership: The District's Role in Managing Principal Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascall, Blair; Leithwood, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of research into the impact of principal turnover on schools, and the ability of schools to mitigate the negative effects of frequent turnover by distributing leadership in the schools. The findings from this qualitative and quantitative analysis show that rapid principal turnover does indeed have a negative…

  12. Job Turnover and Job Satisfaction among Nursing Home Aides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waxman, Howard M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Interviewed 234 aides in seven nursing homes concerning job turnover rate, job satisfaction, and perception of milieu. A positive association found between turnover rate and aides' perceptions of the homes' order, organization, and control suggested that job turnover would lessen with more involvement in the decision-making process. (JAC)

  13. Employee Turnover in the Federal Government. A Special Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musell, R. Mark

    A study of employee turnover in the Federal government showed that in 1984, about 195,000 full-time, nonpostal Federal workers with permanent appointments left Federal jobs or transferred to other Federal agencies--representing a turnover rate of 11.5 percent. The turnover was about three percentage points higher for white-collar workers than for…

  14. High School Band Students' Perspectives of Teacher Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloss, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Teacher turnover remains an important issue in education. The least researched perspectives, though, are those of the students who experience teacher turnover. The purpose of this study was to examine how high school band students experience teacher turnover. A total of twelve students were interviewed, representing three schools that experienced…

  15. Job Satisfaction, Commitment, Withdrawal Cognitions and Turnover: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Kenneth W.; Campbell, James P.

    Recent research on organizational turnover has examined the validity of the turnover decision process, in particular, the model of employee turnover proposed by Mobley (1977). This study followed-up on a previous (Kerber and Campbell, 1986) study of new employees of a large computer company in which participants completed a questionnaire that…

  16. An item response theory analysis of the Sexual Compulsivity Scale and its correspondence with the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory among a sample of highly sexually active gay and bisexual men

    PubMed Central

    Ventuneac, Ana; Rendina, H. Jonathon; Grov, Christian; Mustanski, Brian; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Numerous scales and assessments are available to assess sexual compulsivity (SC). Aim This study sought to conduct an Item Response Theory (IRT) analysis of the Sexual Compulsivity Scale (SCS) to provide evidence about its measurement precision at the various levels of the SC construct in a sample of highly sexually active gay and bisexual men (GBM). Methods SCS data from a sample of 202 GBM who are highly sexually active but who vary in their experiences of SC symptoms were modeled using Samejima's polytomous graded response IRT model. To describe the performance of the SCS relative to the HDSI, SCS scores were compared with participants’ corresponding HDSI results to determine sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy. Main Outcome Measures This study examined the correspondence between the SCS and the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory (HDSI), a diagnostic instrument for the screening of hypersexuality. Results IRT analyses indicated that, although two of the SCS items had low reliability, the SCS as a whole was reliable across much of the SC continuum. Scores on the SCS and the HDSI were highly correlated; however, no potential cutoffs on the SCS corresponded strongly with the polythetic scoring criteria of the HDSI. Conclusion Comparisons of SCS scores with HDSI results indicated that the SCS itself could not serve as a substitute for the HDSI and would incorrectly classify a substantial number of individuals’ levels of hypersexuality. However, the SCS could be a useful screening tool to provide a preliminary screening of people at risk for meeting criteria on the HDSI. Combining the SCS and the HDSI may be an appropriate evaluation strategy in classifying GBM as negative on both (i.e., “non-hypersexual/non-SC”), positive on the SCS only (i.e., “at risk”), and positive on both the SCS and the HDSI (i.e., “problematic hypersexuality/SC”). PMID:25496349

  17. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules.

    PubMed

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S; Gaston, J S Hill; Deery, Michael J; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  18. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M. Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M.; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S.; Gaston, J. S. Hill; Deery, Michael J.; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  19. A homolog of lariat-debranching enzyme modulates turnover of branched RNA

    PubMed Central

    Garrey, Stephen M.; Katolik, Adam; Prekeris, Mantas; Li, Xueni; York, Kerri; Bernards, Sarah; Fields, Stanley; Zhao, Rui; Damha, Masad J.; Hesselberth, Jay R.

    2014-01-01

    Turnover of the branched RNA intermediates and products of pre-mRNA splicing is mediated by the lariat-debranching enzyme Dbr1. We characterized a homolog of Dbr1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drn1/Ygr093w, that has a pseudo-metallophosphodiesterase domain with primary sequence homology to Dbr1 but lacks essential active site residues found in Dbr1. Whereas loss of Dbr1 results in lariat-introns failing broadly to turnover, loss of Drn1 causes low levels of lariat-intron accumulation. Conserved residues in the Drn1 C-terminal CwfJ domains, which are not present in Dbr1, are required for efficient intron turnover. Drn1 interacts with Dbr1, components of the Nineteen Complex, U2 snRNA, branched intermediates, and products of splicing. Drn1 enhances debranching catalyzed by Dbr1 in vitro, but does so without significantly improving the affinity of Dbr1 for branched RNA. Splicing carried out in in vitro extracts in the absence of Drn1 results in an accumulation of branched splicing intermediates and products released from the spliceosome, likely due to less active debranching, as well as the promiscuous release of cleaved 5′-exon. Drn1 enhances Dbr1-mediated turnover of lariat-intermediates and lariat-intron products, indicating that branched RNA turnover is regulated at multiple steps during splicing. PMID:24919400

  20. Serum biomarker profile associated with high bone turnover and BMD in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Siegel, Eric R; Achenbach, Sara J; Khosla, Sundeep; Suva, Larry J

    2008-07-01

    Early diagnosis of the onset of osteoporosis is key to the delivery of effective therapy. Biochemical markers of bone turnover provide a means of evaluating skeletal dynamics that complements static measurements of BMD by DXA. Conventional clinical measurements of bone turnover, primarily the estimation of collagen and its breakdown products in the blood or urine, lack both sensitivity and specificity as a reliable diagnostic tool. As a result, improved tests are needed to augment the use of BMD measurements as the principle diagnostic modality. In this study, the serum proteome of 58 postmenopausal women with high or low/normal bone turnover (training set) was analyzed by surface enhanced laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and a diagnostic fingerprint was identified using a variety of statistical and machine learning tools. The diagnostic fingerprint was validated in a separate distinct test set, consisting of serum samples from an additional 59 postmenopausal women obtained from the same Mayo cohort, with a gap of 2 yr. Specific protein peaks that discriminate between postmenopausal patients with high or low/normal bone turnover were identified and validated. Multiple supervised learning approaches were able to classify the level of bone turnover in the training set with 80% sensitivity and 100% specificity. In addition, the individual protein peaks were also significantly correlated with BMD measurements in these patients. Four of the major discriminatory peaks in the diagnostic profile were identified as fragments of interalpha-trypsin-inhibitor heavy chain H4 precursor (ITIH4), a plasma kallikrein-sensitive glycoprotein that is a component of the host response system. These data suggest that these serum protein fragments are the serum-borne reflection of the increased osteoclast activity, leading to the increased bone turnover that is associated with decreasing BMD and presumably an increased risk of fracture. In conjunction with the

  1. Metacognition influences item-method directed forgetting.

    PubMed

    Foster, Nathaniel L; Sahakyan, Lili

    2012-09-01

    In 4 experiments, we examined whether metacognitive beliefs about item memorability influence item-method directed forgetting. In Experiment 1, participants studied loud and quiet items, which were subsequently cued as to-be-remembered (TBR) or to-be-forgotten (TBF). Typically, the volume of stimuli does not influence recall, although loud items are judged as more memorable than quiet items (Rhodes & Castel, 2009). In contrast, we found a recall advantage for loud items in directed forgetting, although this was observed for TBR items but not TBF items. The loud item advantage disappeared in Experiment 2, when we eliminated all TBF trials and instead inserted additional trials during which participants could engage in extra rehearsal of earlier presented items. In Experiments 3 and 4, a recall advantage for loud items was observed again when items were assigned a mixture of positive and negative values, but it did not emerge when items were assigned graded positive values. Overall, the results showed that the recall advantage for loud items emerges only in response to the need to forget some items. We propose 2 mechanisms to account for these results-either participants select to rehearse loud items as a controlled strategy that allows them to forget some items, or they have an unconscious preference for loud items that emerges only in response to the need to forget. PMID:22468801

  2. A Study of the Homogeneity of Items Produced From Item Forms Across Different Taxonomic Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Margaret B.; Argo, Jana K.

    This study determined whether item forms ( rules for constructing items related to a domain or set of tasks) would enable naive item writers to generate multiple-choice items at three taxonomic levels--knowledge, comprehension, and application. Students wrote 120 multiple-choice items from 20 item forms, corresponding to educational objectives…

  3. Organisation turnover among registered nurses: an exploratory model.

    PubMed

    Bloom, J R; Alexander, J A; Flatt, S

    1988-11-01

    In light of current concerns over nursing shortages and productivity, turnover among hospital nurses has assumed renewed importance as a managerial issue. This study examines the thesis that organisation of hospital work is a determinant of voluntary turnover among registered nurses. This perspective differs from previous work in this area in that both turnover and its determinants are conceptualised at the organisational rather than individual level, thus opening the way for administrative intervention to reduce turnover. The conceptual model is tested using multiple regression techniques on a sample of 310 community hospitals. Results suggest the importance of administrative work structures and the professionalisation of the workforce as contributors to higher turnover. PMID:10296903

  4. Turnover intention in new graduate nurses: a multivariate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Beecroft, Pauline C; Dorey, Frederick; Wenten, Madé

    2008-01-01

    Title Turnover intention in new graduate nurses: a multivariate analysis Aim This paper is a report of a study to determine the relationship of new nurse turnover intent with individual characteristics, work environment variables and organizational factors and to compare new nurse turnover with actual turnover in the 18 months of employment following completion of a residency. Background Because of their influence on patient safety and health outcomes nurse turnover and turnover intent have received considerable attention worldwide. When nurse staffing is inadequate, especially during nursing shortages, unfavourable clinical outcomes have been documented. Method Prospective data collection took place from 1999 to 2006 with 889 new paediatric nurses who completed the same residency. Scores on study instruments were related to likelihood of turnover intent using logistic regression analysis models. Relationships between turnover intent and actual turnover were compared using Kaplan–Meier survivorship. Results The final model demonstrated that older respondents were more likely to have turnover intent if they did not get their ward choice. Also higher scores on work environment and organizational characteristics contributed to likelihood that the new nurse would not be in the turnover intent group. These factors distinguish a new nurse with turnover intent from one without 79% of the time. Increased seeking of social support was related to turnover intent and older new graduates were more likely to be in the turnover intent group if they did not get their ward choice. Conclusion When new graduate nurses are satisfied with their jobs and pay and feel committed to the organization, the odds against turnover intent decrease. What is already known about this topic There is concern in many countries about nurse turnover and the resulting effects on patient safety and quality of care. Decreasing ability to recruit experienced nurses has increased the emphasis on

  5. Replicator dynamics with turnover of players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juul, Jeppe; Kianercy, Ardeshir; Bernhardsson, Sebastian; Pigolotti, Simone

    2013-08-01

    We study adaptive dynamics in games where players abandon the population at a given rate and are replaced by naive players characterized by a prior distribution over the admitted strategies. We demonstrate how such a process leads macroscopically to a variant of the replicator equation, with an additional term accounting for player turnover. We study how Nash equilibria and the dynamics of the system are modified by this additional term for prototypical examples such as the rock-paper-scissors game and different classes of two-action games played between two distinct populations. We conclude by showing how player turnover can account for nontrivial departures from Nash equilibria observed in data from lowest unique bid auctions.

  6. Health Care Workplace Discrimination and Physician Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Pilgrim, Nanlesta; Wynia, Matthew; Desai, Mayur M.; Bright, Cedric; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between physician race/ethnicity, workplace discrimination, and physician job turnover. Methods Cross-sectional, national survey conducted in 2006–2007 of practicing physicians [n = 529] randomly identified via the American Medical Association Masterfile and The National Medical Association membership roster. We assessed the relationships between career racial/ethnic discrimination at work and several career-related dependent variables, including 2 measures of physician turnover, career satisfaction, and contemplation of career change. We used standard frequency analyses, odds ratios and χ2 statistics, and multivariate logistic regression modeling to evaluate these associations. Results Physicians who self-identified as nonmajority were significantly more likely to have left at least 1 job because of workplace discrimination (black, 29%; Asian, 24%; other race, 21%; Hispanic/Latino, 20%; white, 9%). In multivariate models, having experienced racial/ethnic discrimination at work was associated with high job turnover [adjusted odes ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4–4.9]. Among physicians who experienced work-place discrimination, only 45% of physicians were satisfied with their careers (vs 88% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value < .01], and 40% were con-templating a career change (vs 10% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value < .001). Conclusion Workplace discrimination is associated with physician job turnover, career dissatisfaction, and contemplation of career change. These findings underscore the importance of monitoring for workplace discrimination and responding when opportunities for intervention and retention still exist. PMID:20070016

  7. Strategies to manage low-bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, G

    2009-01-01

    A change in paradigm occurred lately whereby not hypocalcemia but hypercalcemia and positive calcium balance were considered negative factors. Namely, the use of calcium- based binders in combination with vitamin D analogues, has been shown to lead to an over-suppression of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and development of low-bone turnover adynamic bone disease (ABD). The changing prevalence of various types of bone diseases from a high to low-bone turnover goes in line with the presence of increased risk for vascular calcification (VC), morbidity and mortality in the dialysis population. The attenuation of the previous great expectations in calcium-based phosphate binders and vitamin D-analogues entailed a new treatment strategy to preserve bone and vascular health. Hence, a new evidence for treatment of ABD with various types of non calcium based binders and low calcium dialysate is presented. Sevelamer treatment has reduced calcium concentration and increased PTH levels, resulting in the improvement of markers of bone turnover, increased bone formation and improved trabecular architecture, providing a slower progression of VC. Data on lanthanum beneficial effect on ABD histology have been demonstrated in long-term clinical studies. Although there is a slow release of lanthanum from its bone deposits after discontinuation of the treatment and no association with aluminium- like bone toxicity, there is still an ongoing scientific debate about its long-term toxic potential. Finally, reducing the number of calcium based binders and low calcium dialysate (1.25 mmol/l) has been reported to have an impact on the evolution towards markers reflecting higher bone turnover. Then, adoption of the non calcium-based binders should be reserved to high risk patients with ABD and progression of vascular calcifications associated with increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:19668299

  8. Turnover of soil monosaccharides: Recycling versus Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, Anna; Dyckmans, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) represents a mixture of differently degradable compounds. Each of these compounds are characterised by different dynamics due to different chemical recalcitrance, transformation or stabilisation processes in soil. Carbohydrates represent one of these compounds and contribute up to 25 % to the soil organic matter. Vascular plants are the main source of pentose sugars (Arabinose and Xylose), whereas hexoses (Galactose and Mannose) are primarily produced by microorganisms. Several studies suggest that the mean turnover times of the carbon in soil sugars are similar to the turnover dynamics of the bulk carbon in soil. The aim of the study is to characterise the influence of stabilisation and turnover of soil carbohydrates. Soil samples are collected from (i) a continuous maize cropping experiment ('Höhere Landbauschule' Rotthalmünster, Bavaria) established 1979 on a Stagnic Luvisol and (ii) from a continuous wheat cropping, established 1969, as reference site. The effect of stabilisation is estimated by the comparison of turnover times of microbial and plant derived soil carbohydrates. As the dynamics of plant derived carbohydrate are solely influenced by stabilisation processes, whereas the dynamics of microbial derived carbohydrates are affected by recycling of organic carbon compounds derived by C3 plant substrate as well as stabilisation processes. The compound specific isotopic analysis (CSIA) of soil carbohydrates was performed using a HPLC/o/IRMS system. The chromatographic and mass spectrometric subunits were coupled with a LC-Isolink interface. Soil sugars were extracted after mild hydrolysis using 4 M trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Chromatographic separation of the sugars was achieved using a low strength 0.25 mM NaOH solution as mobile phase at a ?ow rate of 250 μL min-1 at 10 ° C.

  9. Forest turnover rates follow global and regional patterns of productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, N.L.; van Mantgem, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Using a global database, we found that forest turnover rates (the average of tree mortality and recruitment rates) parallel broad-scale patterns of net primary productivity. First, forest turnover was higher in tropical than in temperate forests. Second, as recently demonstrated by others, Amazonian forest turnover was higher on fertile than infertile soils. Third, within temperate latitudes, turnover was highest in angiosperm forests, intermediate in mixed forests, and lowest in gymnosperm forests. Finally, within a single forest physiognomic type, turnover declined sharply with elevation (hence with temperature). These patterns of turnover in populations of trees are broadly similar to the patterns of turnover in populations of plant organs (leaves and roots) found in other studies. Our findings suggest a link between forest mass balance and the population dynamics of trees, and have implications for understanding and predicting the effects of environmental changes on forest structure and terrestrial carbon dynamics. ??2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  10. ‘Forget me (not)?’ – Remembering Forget-Items Versus Un-Cued Items in Directed Forgetting

    PubMed Central

    Zwissler, Bastian; Schindler, Sebastian; Fischer, Helena; Plewnia, Christian; Kissler, Johanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Humans need to be able to selectively control their memories. This capability is often investigated in directed forgetting (DF) paradigms. In item-method DF, individual items are presented and each is followed by either a forget- or remember-instruction. On a surprise test of all items, memory is then worse for to-be-forgotten items (TBF) compared to to-be-remembered items (TBR). This is thought to result mainly from selective rehearsal of TBR, although inhibitory mechanisms also appear to be recruited by this paradigm. Here, we investigate whether the mnemonic consequences of a forget instruction differ from the ones of incidental encoding, where items are presented without a specific memory instruction. Four experiments were conducted where un-cued items (UI) were interspersed and recognition performance was compared between TBR, TBF, and UI stimuli. Accuracy was encouraged via a performance-dependent monetary bonus. Experiments varied the number of items and their presentation speed and used either letter-cues or symbolic cues. Across all experiments, including perceptually fully counterbalanced variants, memory accuracy for TBF was reduced compared to TBR, but better than for UI. Moreover, participants made consistently fewer false alarms and used a very conservative response criterion when responding to TBF stimuli. Thus, the F-cue results in active processing and reduces false alarm rate, but this does not impair recognition memory beyond an un-cued baseline condition, where only incidental encoding occurs. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26635657

  11. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985 - April 1986, Action item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986 under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). Wildlife projects implemented prior to September 1985 are discussed in BPA's September 1985 Annual Report on Wildlife Activities. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. When available, annual and final reports are listed for each project. The wildlife section of the Program establishes a process intended to achieve two objectives: wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. The wildlife mitigation planning process developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) is a stepwise process that proceeds through the review of the status of wildlife mitigation at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities [Measure 1004 (b)(l)]; estimates wildlife losses from hydroelectric development and operation [Measure 1004 (b)(2)]; and recommends actions for the protection, mitigation, or enhancement of wildlife [Measure 1004 (b)(3), Mitigation Plans]. Implementation of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement will occur upon amendment of wildlife actions into the Program by the Council. The majority of BPA's effort to date has gone towards coordinating and implementing wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning projects.

  12. Generational differences in registered nurse turnover.

    PubMed

    LeVasseur, Sandra A; Wang, Chen-Yen; Mathews, Barbara; Boland, Mary

    2009-08-01

    The chronic nature of the nursing workforce shortage in the United States is a continuing concern. As the nationwide gap between supply and demand grows, it remains unknown what impact turnover will have on nursing, access to care, and efforts to improve quality and safety of health care. It also remains unclear whether the recent turnover trends among new graduate registered nurses differ from past generational cohorts of new nurses. The aims of this study were to identify the reasons why registered nurses turnover by generational cohort (Veterans, Baby Boomers, and GenXMs) and to compare the length of time nurses were employed in their first five nursing positions by generational cohort. The findings suggest the three generational cohorts displayed similar reasons for leaving nursing positions with relocation, career advancement, and personal/family reasons reported most frequently. Except for the first nursing position, significant generational effects were found in the length of time Veterans, Baby Boomer, and GenXMs stayed employed in their nursing positions. It remains unknown why the GenXMs displayed a significantly shorter length of employment time in their second, third, fourth, and fifth nursing positions. The decline in length of employment time displayed in both the Baby Boomers and GenXMs may be an issue of concern requiring future research. PMID:20026454

  13. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

  14. Novel bioassay system for evaluating anti-oxidative activities of food items: use of basolateral media from differentiated Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Ai; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime

    2005-12-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, including superoxide and nitric oxide (NO), are known to be mediators of oxidative stress and play pivotal roles in the onset of numerous life style-related diseases. While a number of studies have shown that naturally occurring anti-oxidants may be applicable for prevention and therapy for those diseases, most in vitro anti-oxidation tests reported have not provided significant insight into the absorption efficiency or metabolism of dietary anti-oxidants in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, we established a novel assay system by focusing on the bioconversion of food constituents using differentiated Caco-2 cells as a model of human intestinal epithelial cells. Various fresh food preparations [ginger, garlic, shimeji (Hypsizigus marmoreus), onion, carrot] were added to the apical side of differentiated Caco-2 monolayers. After incubation, the medium was recovered and tested for its inhibitory effects on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced generation in differentiated HL-60 cells, and on combined lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and interferon (IFN)-gamma -induced NO generation in RAW 264.7 macrophages. The garlic preparation (25% v/v) basolateral medium abolished generation without any cytotoxicity toward HL-60 cells, though it was cytotoxic to Caco-2 cells. In the NO generation tests, all of the food preparations showed notable inhibitory activity, while the garlic preparation (5% v/v) basolateral medium inhibited NO generation with substantial cytotoxicity toward RAW 264.7 cells. Interestingly, the carrot preparation (1% v/v) basolateral medium inhibited NO generation in both a concentration- and time-dependent manner without any cytotoxicity toward RAW 264.7 or Caco-2 cells, and its activities were higher than those of the carrot preparation alone (1% v/v). Our results indicate that the present assay system is appropriate and reliable for determination of the anti-oxidative efficacy of dietary

  15. Comparative Proteome Analysis of hAT-MSCs Isolated from Chronic Renal Failure Patients with Differences in Their Bone Turnover Status

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Gurler; Tuncay, Mehmet; Aksoy, Ayça; Karaoz, Erdal

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the stem cells and the bone turnover in uremic bone disease due to chronic renal failure (CRF) is not described. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bone turnover status on stem cell properties. To search for the presence of such link and shed some light on stem-cell relevant mechanisms of bone turnover, we carried out a study with mesenchymal stem cells. Tissue biopsies were taken from the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue of a CRF patient with secondary hyperparathyroidism with the high turnover bone disease. This patient underwent parathyroidectomy operation (PTX) and another sample was taken from this patient after PTX. A CRF patient with adynamic bone disease with low turnover and a healthy control were also included. Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the subjects were analyzed using proteomic and molecular approaches. Except ALP activity, the bone turnover status did not affect common stem cell properties. However, detailed proteome analysis revealed the presence of regulated protein spots. A total of 32 protein spots were identified following 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF analyzes. The identified proteins were classified into seven distinct groups and their potential relationship to bone turnover were discussed. Distinct protein expression patterns emerged in relation to the bone turnover status indicate a possible link between the stem cells and bone turnover in uremic bone disease due to CRF. PMID:26575497

  16. Australian Item Bank Program: Science Item Bank. Book 3: Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Council for Educational Research, Hawthorn.

    The Australian Science Item Bank consists of three volumes of multiple-choice questions. Book 3 contains questions on the biological sciences. The questions are designed to be suitable for high school students (year 8 to year 12 in Australian schools). The questions are classified by the subject content of the question, the cognitive skills…

  17. Evaluating the Magnitude of Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.

    1996-01-01

    Two possible standard error formulas for the polytomous differential item functioning index proposed by N. J. Dorans and A. P. Schmitt (1991) were derived. These standard errors, and associated hypothesis-testing procedures, were evaluated through simulated data. The standard error that performed better is based on N. Mantel's (1963)…

  18. Rapid transcriptional activation and early mRNA turnover of brain natriuretic peptide in cardiocyte hypertrophy. Evidence for brain natriuretic peptide as an "emergency" cardiac hormone against ventricular overload.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, O; Ogawa, Y; Itoh, H; Suga, S; Komatsu, Y; Kishimoto, I; Nishino, K; Yoshimasa, T; Nakao, K

    1995-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac hormone mainly produced in the ventricle, while the major production site of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is the atrium. To assess the pathophysiological role of BNP in ventricular overload, we have examined the gene expression of BNP, In comparison with that of ANP, in a model of cardiac hypertrophy using cultured neonatal rat ventricular cardiocytes. During cardiocyte hypertrophy evoked by endothelin-1, Phenylephrine, or PMA, the steady state level of BNP mRNA increased as rapidly as the "immediate-early" induction of the c-fos gene expression, and reached a maximal level within 1 h. Actinomycin D, a transcriptional inhibitor, completely diminished the response, while the translational blocked with cycloheximide did not inhibit it. In contrast, ANP mRNA began to increase 3 h after the stimulation, and accumulated during cardiocyte hypertrophy. The BNP secretion from ventricular cardiocytes was also stimulated, more rapidly than the ANP secretion. Furthermore, the turnover of BNP mRNA was significantly faster than that of ANP mRNA, being consistent with the existence of AUUUA motif in the 3'-untranslated region of BNP mRNA. These results demonstrate that the gene expression of BNP is distinctly regulated from that of ANP at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, and indicate that the characteristics of the BNP gene expression are suitable for its possible role as an " emergency" cardiac hormone against ventricular overload. Images PMID:7657802

  19. Completeness assessment of type II active pharmaceutical ingredient drug master files under generic drug user fee amendment: review metrics and common incomplete items.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huyi; Li, Haitao; Song, Wei; Shen, Diandian; Skanchy, David; Shen, Kun; Lionberger, Robert A; Rosencrance, Susan M; Yu, Lawrence X

    2014-09-01

    Under the Generic Drug User Fee Amendments (GDUFA) of 2012, Type II active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) drug master files (DMFs) must pay a user fee and pass a Completeness Assessment (CA) before they can be referenced in an Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA), ANDA amendment, or ANDA prior approval supplement (PAS). During the first year of GDUFA implementation, from October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013, approximately 1,500 Type II API DMFs received at least one cycle of CA review and more than 1,100 Type II DMFs were deemed complete and published on FDA's "Available for Reference List". The data from CA reviews were analyzed for factors that influenced the CA review process and metrics, as well as the areas of DMF submissions which most frequently led to an incomplete CA status. The metrics analysis revealed that electronic DMFs appear to improve the completeness of submission and shorten both the review and response times. Utilizing the CA checklist to compile and proactively update the DMFs improves the chance for the DMFs to pass the CA in the first cycle. However, given that the majority of DMFs require at least two cycles of CA before being deemed complete, it is recommended that DMF fees are paid 6 months in advance of the ANDA submissions in order to avoid negatively impacting the filling status of the ANDAs. PMID:25034968

  20. Extracellular matrix turnover in coronary artery ectasia patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruifeng; Chen, Lianfeng; Wu, Wei; Chen, Houzao; Zhang, Shuyang

    2016-03-01

    Dysregulation of the metabolism of the extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to coronary artery ectasia (CAE). This study evaluated the turnover of main ECM components and related proteolytic enzymes activities. In this study, thirty patients with CAE, 30 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 30 subjects with normal coronary arteries (Control) were selected. The following circulating ECM metabolism markers were measured: soluble elastin (sElastin), collagen type I cross-linked telopeptides (ICTP), procollagen type I carboxy terminal peptide (PICP), protocollagen III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP), and procollagen a1(III) C-terminal propeptide (PIIICP). Serum total elastase activity and total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity were also determined. The level of sElastin was higher in the CAE group than in the CAD and Control groups (P1 = 0.009, P2 = 0.000). There was no difference in ICTP (P = 0.168) or PIIICP (P = 0.079) among the three groups. PICP was significantly elevated in CAE (P1 = 0.001, P2 = 0.002). PIIINP was also significantly increased in CAE (P1 = 0.002, P2 = 0.007). Total elastase activity was higher in the CAE group than in the other two groups (P1 = 0.006, P2 = 0.022). Total MMP activity was significantly higher in the CAE group than the Control group (P2 = 0.013) but not higher than the CAD group (P1 = 0.477). In conclusion, within CAE patients the main changes in ECM metabolism were increased degradation of elastin fibres and the transition of collagen from type III to type I. Elastase and MMPs appear to be associated with this kind of ECM turnover. PMID:25576491

  1. Kramers’ turnover phenomenon in the spatial diffusion region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Shrabani; Gupta, Bikash Chandra; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we have presented the dynamics of a Brownian particle with time-delayed feedback. It clearly suggests that the delayed feedback may introduce a dissipation-like effect. As a result of this a breakdown of the fluctuation-dissipation relation occurs and the system behaves like an open one. Therefore, the stationary distribution deviates from the Boltzmann type. It depends on the damping strength. The probability at the barrier top increases with the enhancement of the damping strength. This is a sharp contrast to closed systems (which obey the fluctuation-dissipation relation) and the usual open systems, where the noise strength does not depend on the damping strength. This special feature motivated us to calculate Kramers’ rate in the presence of the delayed feedback. Our calculation shows that the activation energy decreases with an increase in the damping strength. This peculiarity introduces a noticeable observation. Kramers’ turnover behaviour appears even in the spatial diffusive regime. Thus its origin is quite different from the known Kramers’ turnover, which is a result of an interplay of energy and spatial diffusive regimes. It should be mentioned here that all our theoretical results are well justified by the numerical experiments.

  2. Critical Role of Histone Turnover in Neuronal Transcription and Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Maze, Ian; Wenderski, Wendy; Noh, Kyung-Min; Bagot, Rosemary C; Tzavaras, Nikos; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Elsässer, Simon J; Guo, Yin; Ionete, Carolina; Hurd, Yasmin L; Tamminga, Carol A; Halene, Tobias; Farrelly, Lorna; Soshnev, Alexey A; Wen, Duancheng; Rafii, Shahin; Birtwistle, Marc R; Akbarian, Schahram; Buchholz, Bruce A; Blitzer, Robert D; Nestler, Eric J; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Garcia, Benjamin A; Shen, Li; Molina, Henrik; Allis, C David

    2015-07-01

    Turnover and exchange of nucleosomal histones and their variants, a process long believed to be static in post-replicative cells, remains largely unexplored in brain. Here, we describe a novel mechanistic role for HIRA (histone cell cycle regulator) and proteasomal degradation-associated histone dynamics in the regulation of activity-dependent transcription, synaptic connectivity, and behavior. We uncover a dramatic developmental profile of nucleosome occupancy across the lifespan of both rodents and humans, with the histone variant H3.3 accumulating to near-saturating levels throughout the neuronal genome by mid-adolescence. Despite such accumulation, H3.3-containing nucleosomes remain highly dynamic-in a modification-independent manner-to control neuronal- and glial-specific gene expression patterns throughout life. Manipulating H3.3 dynamics in both embryonic and adult neurons confirmed its essential role in neuronal plasticity and cognition. Our findings establish histone turnover as a critical and previously undocumented regulator of cell type-specific transcription and plasticity in mammalian brain. PMID:26139371

  3. Oil is on the agenda: Lipid turnover in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Amélie A; Feussner, Ivo

    2016-09-01

    Lipases hydrolyze ester bonds within lipids. This process is called lipolysis. They are key players in lipid turnover and involved in numerous metabolic pathways, many of which are shared between organisms like the mobilization of neutral or storage lipids or lipase-mediated membrane lipid homeostasis. Some reactions though are predominantly present in certain organisms, such as the production of signaling molecules (endocannabinoids) by diacylglycerol (DAG) and monoacylglycerol (MAG) lipases in mammals and plants or the jasmonate production in flowering plants. This review aims at giving an overview of the different functional classes of lipases and respective well-known activities, with a focus on the most recent findings in plant biology for selected classes. Here we will put an emphasis on the physiological role and contribution of lipases to the turnover of neutral lipids found in seed oil and other vegetative tissue as candidates for increasing the economical values of crop plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:27155216

  4. Dynamic aspects of voluntary turnover: an integrated approach to curvilinearity in the performance-turnover relationship.

    PubMed

    Becker, William J; Cropanzano, Russell

    2011-03-01

    Previous research pertaining to job performance and voluntary turnover has been guided by 2 distinct theoretical perspectives. First, the push-pull model proposes that there is a quadratic or curvilinear relationship existing between these 2 variables. Second, the unfolding model of turnover posits that turnover is a dynamic process and that a downward performance change may increase the likelihood of organizational separation. Drawing on decision theory, we propose and test an integrative framework. This approach incorporates both of these earlier models. Specifically, we argue that individuals are most likely to voluntarily exit when they are below-average performers who are also experiencing a downward performance change. Furthermore, the interaction between this downward change and performance partially accounts for the curvilinear relationship proposed by the push-pull model. Findings from a longitudinal field study supported this integrative theory. PMID:20853945

  5. 18 CFR 367.8 - Extraordinary items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Extraordinary items... Instructions § 367.8 Extraordinary items. Extraordinary items are to be recognized according to the rules which are considered generally accepted accounting principles. These items are related to the effects...

  6. 7 CFR 1767.24 - Extraordinary items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Extraordinary items. 1767.24 Section 1767.24....24 Extraordinary items. The extraordinary items accounts identified in this section shall be used by all RUS borrowers. Extraordinary Items 434Extraordinary Income 435Extraordinary Deductions...

  7. 18 CFR 367.8 - Extraordinary items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Extraordinary items... Instructions § 367.8 Extraordinary items. Extraordinary items are to be recognized according to the rules which are considered generally accepted accounting principles. These items are related to the effects...

  8. 18 CFR 367.8 - Extraordinary items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Extraordinary items... Instructions § 367.8 Extraordinary items. Extraordinary items are to be recognized according to the rules which are considered generally accepted accounting principles. These items are related to the effects...

  9. 7 CFR 2902.5 - Item designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Item designation. 2902.5 Section 2902.5 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE GUIDELINES FOR DESIGNATING BIOBASED PRODUCTS FOR FEDERAL PROCUREMENT General § 2902.5 Item designation. (a) Procedure. Designated items are listed in subpart B. In designating items, USDA...

  10. 12 CFR 210.13 - Unpaid items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unpaid items. 210.13 Section 210.13 Banks and... OTHER ITEMS BY FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS AND FUNDS TRANSFERS THROUGH FEDWIRE (REGULATION J) Collection of Checks and Other Items By Federal Reserve Banks § 210.13 Unpaid items. (a) Right of recovery. If...

  11. 7 CFR 1767.24 - Extraordinary items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Extraordinary items. 1767.24 Section 1767.24....24 Extraordinary items. The extraordinary items accounts identified in this section shall be used by all RUS borrowers. Extraordinary Items 434Extraordinary Income 435Extraordinary Deductions...

  12. 18 CFR 367.8 - Extraordinary items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extraordinary items... Instructions § 367.8 Extraordinary items. Extraordinary items are to be recognized according to the rules which are considered generally accepted accounting principles. These items are related to the effects...

  13. 12 CFR 210.13 - Unpaid items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Unpaid items. 210.13 Section 210.13 Banks and... OTHER ITEMS BY FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS AND FUNDS TRANSFERS THROUGH FEDWIRE (REGULATION J) Collection of Checks and Other Items By Federal Reserve Banks § 210.13 Unpaid items. (a) Right of recovery. If...

  14. 7 CFR 1767.24 - Extraordinary items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Extraordinary items. 1767.24 Section 1767.24....24 Extraordinary items. The extraordinary items accounts identified in this section shall be used by all RUS borrowers. Extraordinary Items 434Extraordinary Income 435Extraordinary Deductions...

  15. 42 CFR 414.224 - Customized items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Customized items. 414.224 Section 414.224 Public... Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.224 Customized items. (a) Criteria for a customized item. To be considered a customized item for payment purposes under paragraph (b) of this...

  16. 7 CFR 1767.24 - Extraordinary items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Extraordinary items. 1767.24 Section 1767.24....24 Extraordinary items. The extraordinary items accounts identified in this section shall be used by all RUS borrowers. Extraordinary Items 434Extraordinary Income 435Extraordinary Deductions...

  17. 42 CFR 414.224 - Customized items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Customized items. 414.224 Section 414.224 Public... Medical Equipment, Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices, and Surgical Dressings § 414.224 Customized items. (a) Criteria for a customized item. To be considered a customized item for payment purposes under paragraph...

  18. 18 CFR 367.8 - Extraordinary items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Extraordinary items... Instructions § 367.8 Extraordinary items. Extraordinary items are to be recognized according to the rules which are considered generally accepted accounting principles. These items are related to the effects...

  19. 42 CFR 414.224 - Customized items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Customized items. 414.224 Section 414.224 Public... and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.224 Customized items. (a) Criteria for a customized item. To be considered a customized item for payment purposes under paragraph (b) of this section, a...

  20. 12 CFR 210.13 - Unpaid items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Unpaid items. 210.13 Section 210.13 Banks and... OTHER ITEMS BY FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS AND FUNDS TRANSFERS THROUGH FEDWIRE (REGULATION J) Collection of Checks and Other Items By Federal Reserve Banks § 210.13 Unpaid items. (a) Right of recovery. If...

  1. 12 CFR 210.13 - Unpaid items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Unpaid items. 210.13 Section 210.13 Banks and... OTHER ITEMS BY FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS AND FUNDS TRANSFERS THROUGH FEDWIRE (REGULATION J) Collection of Checks and Other Items By Federal Reserve Banks § 210.13 Unpaid items. (a) Right of recovery. If...

  2. 42 CFR 414.224 - Customized items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Customized items. 414.224 Section 414.224 Public... Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.224 Customized items. (a) Criteria for a customized item. To be considered a customized item for payment purposes under paragraph (b) of this...

  3. 12 CFR 210.13 - Unpaid items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Unpaid items. 210.13 Section 210.13 Banks and... OTHER ITEMS BY FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS AND FUNDS TRANSFERS THROUGH FEDWIRE (REGULATION J) Collection of Checks and Other Items By Federal Reserve Banks § 210.13 Unpaid items. (a) Right of recovery. If...

  4. Item-Writing Guidelines for Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Tom

    2015-01-01

    A teacher learning how to write test questions (test items) will almost certainly encounter item-writing guidelines--lists of item-writing do's and don'ts. Item-writing guidelines usually are presented as applicable across all assessment settings. Table I shows some guidelines that I believe to be generally applicable and two will be briefly…

  5. Unidimensional Interpretations for Multidimensional Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahraman, Nilufer

    2013-01-01

    This article considers potential problems that can arise in estimating a unidimensional item response theory (IRT) model when some test items are multidimensional (i.e., show a complex factorial structure). More specifically, this study examines (1) the consequences of model misfit on IRT item parameter estimates due to unintended minor item-level…

  6. Adaptable Learning Assistant for Item Bank Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuntiyagul, Atorn; Naruedomkul, Kanlaya; Cercone, Nick; Wongsawang, Damras

    2008-01-01

    We present PKIP, an adaptable learning assistant tool for managing question items in item banks. PKIP is not only able to automatically assist educational users to categorize the question items into predefined categories by their contents but also to correctly retrieve the items by specifying the category and/or the difficulty level. PKIP adapts…

  7. Characteristics of Teacher Induction Programs and Turnover Rates of Beginning Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Seok; Berliner, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The federal School and Staffing Survey (SASS) and Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS) were used to examine the impacts of induction activities on beginning teacher turnover. This study excluded those teachers who moved or left schools for unavoidable and involuntary reasons, a confounding factor in previous research. This analysis revealed that three…

  8. Application of Optimal Designs to Item Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hung-Yi

    2014-01-01

    In computerized adaptive testing (CAT), examinees are presented with various sets of items chosen from a precalibrated item pool. Consequently, the attrition speed of the items is extremely fast, and replenishing the item pool is essential. Therefore, item calibration has become a crucial concern in maintaining item banks. In this study, a two-parameter logistic model is used. We applied optimal designs and adaptive sequential analysis to solve this item calibration problem. The results indicated that the proposed optimal designs are cost effective and time efficient. PMID:25188318

  9. Uncoupling binding of substrate CO from turnover by vanadium nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Chung; Fay, Aaron W.; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Krest, Courtney M.; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W.

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalysis by nitrogenase, particularly the reduction of N2 and CO by this enzyme, has tremendous significance in environment- and energy-related areas. Elucidation of the detailed mechanism of nitrogenase has been hampered by the inability to trap substrates or intermediates in a well-defined state. Here, we report the capture of substrate CO on the resting-state vanadium-nitrogenase in a catalytically competent conformation. The close resemblance of this active CO-bound conformation to the recently described structure of CO-inhibited molybdenum-nitrogenase points to the mechanistic relevance of sulfur displacement to the activation of iron sites in the cofactor for CO binding. Moreover, the ability of vanadium-nitrogenase to bind substrate in the resting-state uncouples substrate binding from subsequent turnover, providing a platform for generation of defined intermediate(s) of both CO and N2 reduction. PMID:26515097

  10. The effects of item familiarity on the neural correlates of successful associative memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Nancy A; Turney, Indira C; Webb, Christina E; Overman, Amy A

    2015-12-01

    Associative memory is considered to be resource-demanding, requiring individuals to learn individual items and the specific relationships between those items. Previous research has shown that prior studying of items aids in associative memory for pairs composed of those same items, as compared to pairs of items that have not been prelearned (e.g., Kilb & Naveh-Benjamin, 2011). In the present study, we sought to elucidate the neural correlates mediating this memory facilitation. After being trained on individual items, participants were scanned while encoding item pairs composed of items from the pretrained phase (familiarized-item pairs) and pairs whose items had not been previously learned (unfamiliarized-item pairs). Consistent with previous findings, the overall subsequent recollection showed the engagement of bilateral parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) and hippocampus, when compared to subsequent forgetting. However, a direct comparison between familiarized- and unfamiliarized-item pairs showed that subsequently recollected familiarized-item pairs were associated with decreased activity across much of the encoding network, including bilateral PHG, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, and regions associated with item-specific processing within occipital cortex. Increased activity for familiarized-item pairs was found in a more limited set of regions, including bilateral parietal cortex, which has been associated with the formation of novel associations. Additionally, activity in the right parietal cortex correlated with associative memory success in the familiarized condition. Taken together, these results suggest that prior exposure to items can reduce the demands incurred on neural processing throughout the associative encoding network and can enhance associative memory performance by focusing resources within regions supporting the formation of associative links. PMID:25939781

  11. Randomized Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    The randomized response (RR) technique is often used to obtain answers on sensitive questions. A new method is developed to measure latent variables using the RR technique because direct questioning leads to biased results. Within the RR technique is the probability of the true response modeled by an item response theory (IRT) model. The RR…

  12. Paradoxical Results and Item Bundles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooker, Giles; Finkelman, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Hooker, Finkelman, and Schwartzman ("Psychometrika," 2009, in press) defined a paradoxical result as the attainment of a higher test score by changing answers from correct to incorrect and demonstrated that such results are unavoidable for maximum likelihood estimates in multidimensional item response theory. The potential for these results to…

  13. 15 CFR 752.3 - Eligible items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligible items. 752.3 Section 752.3... LICENSE § 752.3 Eligible items. (a) All items subject to the EAR, including items eligible for License... 2E301 on the CCL controlled for CB reasons; (3) Items controlled by ECCNs 1C350, 1C995, 1D390,...

  14. 15 CFR 752.3 - Eligible items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Eligible items. 752.3 Section 752.3... LICENSE § 752.3 Eligible items. (a) All items subject to the EAR, including items eligible for License... 2E301 on the CCL controlled for CB reasons; (3) Items controlled by ECCNs 1C350, 1C995, 1D390,...

  15. Modelling the impact of soil tillage on SOM turnover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franko, Uwe; Spiegel, Heide

    2013-04-01

    The CCB model of the soil organic matter (SOM) turnover has been proved to be valid over a wide range of site conditions and cropping systems. It is based on the aggregation of different fresh organic matter to the flux of SOM reproducing carbon (Crep) and on the aggregation of the complexity of site conditions as Biologic Active Time (BAT). Next to carbon input and site conditions the soil tillage is known to have an impact on SOM. The CCB model calculates the BAT value from a statistically based meta model using soil texture and climate data. The CANDY model as ancestor of CCB is also based on the BAT calculation - but under consideration of soil temperature, soil moisture and the depth of the reaction layer in the top soil. Especially the latter effect takes into account that gas exchange between the reaction space in the soil pores and the atmosphere may be hindered in deeper soil layers as well as the filling of pore space with water. Depending on soil type and soil moisture dynamics the BAT at the base of the plough layer may be considerably lower than in the layers above. If the soil is ploughed regularly, there are no long-term effects on SOM dynamics in the different depth steps (10 cm) of the top soil. In contrast, on ploughless systems with reduced cultivation depth we expect depth depending effects of SOM storage. The integration of this mechanism had to be based on a simplified approach because the CCB model is working in annual time steps and is based on very few soil parameters. An analysis of the general mechanisms of BAT calculation led to a simplified solution to calculate a site specific correction factor of the BAT estimation from the meta model. Therefore, we assume a texture dependent reduction of the turnover activity with depth, indicated by the coefficient alpha. A first examination of this approach has been performed using the dataset of the Fuchsenbigl experiment in Austria with three tillage variants (conventional ploughing, reduced and

  16. Organizational commitment and turnover of nursing home administrators.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2006-01-01

    In this investigation, the associations between organizational commitment (OC), intent-to-turnover, and actual turnover of a large sample of nursing home administrators (NHAs) are examined. Data used come from a mail survey, from which 632 responses were received from the NHAs (response rate = 63%). The one-year turnover rate of NHAs was 39 percent, and in almost all cases (87%) these NHAs had also exhibited low OC scores. The intent-to-turnover results show thinking about quitting comes before searching for a new position, which in turn both comes before the intention to quit. Multivariate analyses show work overload has a strong and robust association with both intent-to-turnover and turnover of NHAs, and may indicate that NHAs are leaving their positions because they are understaffed. PMID:16648695

  17. The implications of linking the dynamic performance and turnover literatures.

    PubMed

    Sturman, M C; Trevor, C O

    2001-08-01

    This article examines how the literatures of dynamic performance and the performance-turnover relationship inform each other. The nonrandom performance turnover relationship suggests that dynamic performance studies may be biased by their elimination of participants who do not remain for the entire study period. The authors demonstrated that the performance slopes of those who leave an organization differ from the performance slopes of those who remain. This finding suggests that studies of the performance-turnover relationship need to consider employee performance trends when predicting turnover. Replicating and extending the research of D. A. Harrison, M. Virick, and S. William (1996), the authors found that performance changes from the previous month and performance trends measured over a longer time period explained variance in voluntary turnover beyond current performance. Finally, the authors showed that performance trends interacted with current performance in the prediction of voluntary turnover. PMID:11519652

  18. Sympathetic innervation, norepinephrine content, and norepinephrine turnover in orthotopic and spontaneous models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Szpunar, Mercedes J; Belcher, Elizabeth K; Dawes, Ryan P; Madden, Kelley S

    2016-03-01

    Activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) drives breast cancer progression in preclinical breast cancer models, but it has yet to be established if neoplastic and stromal cells residing in the tumor are directly targeted by locally released norepinephrine (NE). In murine orthotopic and spontaneous mammary tumors, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)+ sympathetic nerves were limited to the periphery of the tumor. No TH+ staining was detected deeper within these tumors, even in regions with a high density of blood vessels. NE concentration was much lower in tumors compared to the more densely innervated spleen, reflecting the relative paucity of tumor TH+ innervation. Tumor and spleen NE concentration decreased with increased tissue mass. In mice treated with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to selectively destroy sympathetic nerves, tumor NE concentration was reduced approximately 50%, suggesting that the majority of tumor NE is derived from local sympathetic nerves. To evaluate NE utilization, NE turnover in orthotopic 4T1 mammary tumors was compared to spleen under baseline and stress conditions. In non-stressed mice, NE turnover was equivalent between tumor and spleen. In mice exposed to a stressor, tumor NE turnover was increased compared to spleen NE turnover, and compared to non-stressed tumor NE turnover. Together, these results demonstrate that NE in mammary tumors is derived from local sympathetic nerves that synthesize and metabolize NE. However, differences between spleen and tumor NE turnover with stressor exposure suggest that sympathetic NE release is regulated differently within the tumor microenvironment compared to the spleen. Local mammary tumor sympathetic innervation, despite its limited distribution, is responsive to stressor exposure and therefore can contribute to stress-induced tumor progression. PMID:26718447

  19. Mitogenic stimuli and phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover in cultured 3T3 fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, C.; Petersen, R.

    1986-03-01

    The hydrolysis of PI and polyphosphoinositides by phopholipase C is an early and rapid response to cell activation by a variety of neurotransmitters, hormones, growth factors and pharmacological agonists. The authors have examined the role of PI turnover and the generation of second messengers (diacylglycerol and inositol trisphosphate) in the mitogenic response of cultured Balb/c and Swiss 3T3 cells to polypeptide growth factors. Cells were prelabelled with /sup 3/H inositol for 18-20 hours, washed and suspended in Herpes + Li/sup +/ buffer, and stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vasopressin, insulin, and other growth factors. PI turnover was measured as the increase in total inositol phosphate (IP) production. IP1, IP2, and IP3 were characterized by sequential elution from a Dowex column. Partially purified PDGF produced a 2-4 fold stimulation of total IP production. This was seen as early as 30 seconds after stimulation and increased for up to 1-2 hours. Balb/c cells were more sensitive than Swiss cells to the mitogenic and PI effects of PDGF. Other mitogenic stimuli had differential effects on PI turnover. Vasopressin (4-400 ng/ml) markedly stimulated PI turnover (3-6 fold) in Swiss, but not Balb/c cells. Insulin (100 ng/ml - 10 ..mu..g/ml) increased total IP to a greater degree in Balb/c cells. Epidermal growth factor (10 ng/ml - 10 ..mu..g/ml) had no effect on PI turnover and fibroblast growth factor (10 ng/ml - 10 ..mu..g/ml) only stimulated at the higher concentrations in Swiss cells. Thrombin (1U/ml - 10 U/ml) produced a 1.5 - 2 fold stimulation in Balb/c cells. Thus, various polypeptide growth factors have differential effects on PI turnover depending on their mitogenic potential and the effector cell type.

  20. Phospholipid turnover during phagocytosis in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes

    PubMed Central

    García Gil, Merche; Alonso, Fernando; Alvarez Chiva, Vicente; Sánchez Crespo, Mariano; Mato, José M.

    1982-01-01

    We have previously observed that the phagocytosis of zymosan particles coated with complement by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes is accompanied by a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of phosphatidylcholine synthesis by transmethylation [García Gil, Alonso, Sánchez Crespo & Mato (1981) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 101, 740–748]. The present studies show that phosphatidylcholine synthesis by a cholinephosphotransferase reaction is enhanced, up to 3-fold, during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear cells. This effect was tested by both measuring the incorporation of radioactivity into phosphatidylcholine in cells labelled with [Me-14C]choline, and by assaying the activity of CDP-choline:diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase. The time course of CDP-choline:diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase activation by zymosan mirrors the inhibition of phospholipid methyltransferase activity previously reported. The extent of incorporation of radioactivity into phosphatidylcholine induced by various doses of zymosan correlates with the physiological response of the cells to this stimulus. This effect was specific for phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine turnover was not affected by zymosan. The purpose of this enhanced phosphatidylcholine synthesis is not to provide phospholipid molecules rich in arachidonic acid. The present studies show that about 80% of the arachidonic acid generated in response to zymosan derives from phosphatidylinositol. A transient accumulation of arachidonoyldiacylglycerol has also been observed, which indicates that a phospholipase C is responsible, at least in part, for the generation of arachidonic acid. Finally, isobutylmethylxanthine and quinacrine, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol turnover, inhibit both arachidonic acid generation and phagocytosis, indicating a function for this pathway during this process. PMID:6181780

  1. Protein turnover in Azotobacter vinelandii during encystment and germination.

    PubMed

    Ruppen, M E; Garner, G; Sadoff, H L

    1983-12-01

    Protein turnover occurs during differentiation of Azotobacter vinelandii 12837 to the extent of 50% during encystment and 7% during germination. The addition of rifampin at the initiation of encystment prevents encystment and inhibits turnover. In germinating cysts, protein turnover is essential owing to an apparent lack of certain amino acid biosynthetic enzymes. The capacity to synthesize sulfur-containing amino acids from inorganic precursors is regained about halfway through the germination process. PMID:6643391

  2. Cortical pattern separation and item-specific memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, Laura M; Morcom, Alexa M

    2016-05-01

    Pattern separation and pattern completion are fundamental brain processes thought to be critical for episodic memory encoding and retrieval, and for discrimination between similar memories. These processes are best understood in the hippocampus, but are proposed to occur throughout the brain, in particular in sensory regions. Cortical, as well as hippocampal, pattern separation may therefore support formation of event-unique memory traces. Using fMRI, we investigated cortical pattern separation and pattern completion and their relationship to encoding activity predicting subsequent item-specific compared to gist memory. During scanning, participants viewed images of novel objects, repeated objects, and objects which were both perceptually and conceptually similar to previously presented images, while performing a size judgement task. In a later surprise recognition test, they judged whether test items were 'same' 'similar' or 'new' relative to studied items. Activity consistent with pattern separation - responses to similar items as if novel - was observed in bilateral occipito-temporal cortex. Activity consistent with pattern completion - responses to similar items as if repeated - was observed in left prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Curve fitting analysis further revealed that graded responses to change in image conceptual and perceptual similarity in bilateral prefrontal and right parietal regions met specific computational predictions for pattern separation for one or both of these similarity dimensions. Functional overlap between encoding activity predicting subsequent item-specific recognition and pattern separation activity was also observed in left occipital cortex and bilateral inferior frontal cortex. The findings suggest that extrahippocampal regions including sensory and prefrontal cortex contribute to pattern separation and pattern completion of visual input, consistent with the proposal that cortical pattern separation contributes to formation of

  3. Promoting cold-start items in recommender systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Hu; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Yang, Zimo; Liu, Chuang; Li, Wei-Min

    2014-01-01

    As one of the major challenges, cold-start problem plagues nearly all recommender systems. In particular, new items will be overlooked, impeding the development of new products online. Given limited resources, how to utilize the knowledge of recommender systems and design efficient marketing strategy for new items is extremely important. In this paper, we convert this ticklish issue into a clear mathematical problem based on a bipartite network representation. Under the most widely used algorithm in real e-commerce recommender systems, the so-called item-based collaborative filtering, we show that to simply push new items to active users is not a good strategy. Interestingly, experiments on real recommender systems indicate that to connect new items with some less active users will statistically yield better performance, namely, these new items will have more chance to appear in other users' recommendation lists. Further analysis suggests that the disassortative nature of recommender systems contributes to such observation. In a word, getting in-depth understanding on recommender systems could pave the way for the owners to popularize their cold-start products with low costs. PMID:25479013

  4. Promoting Cold-Start Items in Recommender Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Hu; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Yang, Zimo; Liu, Chuang; Li, Wei-Min

    2014-01-01

    As one of the major challenges, cold-start problem plagues nearly all recommender systems. In particular, new items will be overlooked, impeding the development of new products online. Given limited resources, how to utilize the knowledge of recommender systems and design efficient marketing strategy for new items is extremely important. In this paper, we convert this ticklish issue into a clear mathematical problem based on a bipartite network representation. Under the most widely used algorithm in real e-commerce recommender systems, the so-called item-based collaborative filtering, we show that to simply push new items to active users is not a good strategy. Interestingly, experiments on real recommender systems indicate that to connect new items with some less active users will statistically yield better performance, namely, these new items will have more chance to appear in other users' recommendation lists. Further analysis suggests that the disassortative nature of recommender systems contributes to such observation. In a word, getting in-depth understanding on recommender systems could pave the way for the owners to popularize their cold-start products with low costs. PMID:25479013

  5. Turnover intentions and voluntary turnover: the moderating roles of self-monitoring, locus of control, proactive personality, and risk aversion.

    PubMed

    Allen, David G; Weeks, Kelly P; Moffitt, Karen R

    2005-09-01

    This article explores moderators of the relationship between turnover intentions and turnover behavior to better explain why some employees translate intentions into behavior and other employees do not. Individual differences in self-monitoring, locus of control, proactive personality, and risk aversion were examined. Results indicate that self-monitoring and risk aversion moderate the intentions-turnover link. Specifically, the relationship between turnover intentions and turnover is stronger for low self-monitors and those lower in risk aversion. Locus of control moderated the relationship in 1 of 2 samples such that the relationship was stronger for those with an internal locus of control. Proactive personality, however, did not directly moderate the relationship between intentions and turnover behaviors. PMID:16162070

  6. Dynamics of Adipocyte Turnover in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, K; Arner, E; Westermark, P; Bernard, S; Buchholz, B; Bergmann, O; Blomqvist, L; Hoffstedt, J; Naslund, E; Britton, T; Concha, H; Hassan, M; Ryden, M; Frisen, J; Arner, P

    2007-07-16

    Obesity is increasing in an epidemic fashion in most countries and constitutes a public health problem by enhancing the risk for cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. Owing to the increase in obesity, life expectancy may start to decrease in developed countries for the first time in recent history. The factors determining fat mass in adult humans are not fully understood, but increased lipid storage in already developed fat cells is thought to be most important. We show that adipocyte number is a major determinant for the fat mass in adults. However, the number of fat cells stays constant in adulthood in lean and obese and even under extreme conditions, indicating that the number of adipocytes is set during childhood and adolescence. To establish the dynamics within the stable population of adipocytes in adults, we have measured adipocyte turnover by analyzing the integration of {sup 14}C derived from nuclear bomb tests in genomic DNA. Approximately 10% of fat cells are renewed annually at all adult ages and levels of body mass index. Neither adipocyte death nor generation rate is altered in obesity, suggesting a tight regulation of fat cell number that is independent of metabolic profile in adulthood. The high turnover of adipocytes establishes a new therapeutic target for pharmacological intervention in obesity.

  7. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  8. Protein turnover during in vitro tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiyao; Chang, Zhen; Oliveira, Gisele; Xiong, Maiyer; Smith, Lloyd M; Frey, Brian L; Welham, Nathan V

    2016-03-01

    Repopulating acellular biological scaffolds with phenotypically appropriate cells is a promising approach for regenerating functional tissues and organs. Under this tissue engineering paradigm, reseeded cells are expected to remodel the scaffold by active protein synthesis and degradation; however, the rate and extent of this remodeling remain largely unknown. Here, we present a technique to measure dynamic proteome changes during in vitro remodeling of decellularized tissue by reseeded cells, using vocal fold mucosa as the model system. Decellularization and recellularization were optimized, and a stable isotope labeling strategy was developed to differentiate remnant proteins constituting the original scaffold from proteins newly synthesized by reseeded cells. Turnover of matrix and cellular proteins and the effects of cell-scaffold interaction were elucidated. This technique sheds new light on in vitro tissue remodeling and the process of tissue regeneration, and is readily applicable to other tissue and organ systems. PMID:26724458

  9. Sclerostin as a novel marker of bone turnover in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Jóźków, P; Mędraś, M; Majda, M; Słowińska-Lisowska, M

    2016-01-01

    Sclerostin is a protein secreted by osteocytes that acts as an inhibitor of bone formation. It has been shown that physical activity affects sclerostin concentration and thus bone remodelling. The aim of the study was to evaluate serum concentrations of sclerostin, selected bone turnover markers (PTH, P1NP), 25(OH)D3 and the intake of calcium and vitamin D in physically active versus sedentary men. A total of 59 healthy men aged 17-37 were enrolled in the study (43 athletes and 16 non-athletes). The mean sclerostin concentration in the group of athletes (A) was significantly higher than in non-athletes (NA) (35.3±8.9 vs 28.0±5.6 pmol·l-1, p= 0.004). A compared with NA had higher concentrations of P1NP (145.6±77.5 vs 61.2±22.3 ng·ml-1, p= <0.0001) and 25(OH)D3 (16.9±8.4 vs 10.3±4.3 ng·ml-1, p= 0.004) and lower concentrations of PTH (25.8±8.3 vs 38.2±11.5 pg·ml-1, p= <0.0001). Vitamin D deficiency was found in 77% of A and 100% of NA. A and NA had similar daily energy intake. They did not differ as to the intake of calcium and vitamin D. We observed a negative correlation between the serum concentrations of sclerostin and calcium in the studied subjects. Our results suggest that regular, long-lasting physical training may be associated with higher concentration of sclerostin. It seems that increased sclerostin is not related to other bone turnover markers (PTH, P1NP). PMID:26929475

  10. Analysis of the In Vivo Turnover of CD4+ T-Cell Subsets in Chronically SIV-Infected Sooty Mangabeys

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alexandra M.; Carnathan, Diane G.; Yu, Joana; Sheehan, Katherine M.; Kim, Peter; Reynaldi, Arnold; Vanderford, Thomas H.; Klatt, Nichole R.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Davenport, Miles P.; Silvestri, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant turnover of memory CD4+ T-cells is central to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) progression. Understanding the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in natural hosts may provide insight into mechanisms of immune regulation that may serve as models for therapeutic intervention in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected persons. Sooty mangabeys (SMs) have naturally evolved with SIV to avoid AIDS progression while maintaining healthy peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts and thus represent a model by which therapeutic interventions for AIDS progression might be elucidated. To assess the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during SIV infection in non-progressive hosts, we treated 6 SIV-uninfected and 9 SIV-infected SMs with 2’-bromo-5’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 14 days and longitudinally assessed CD4+ T-cell subset turnover by polychromatic flow cytometry. We observed that, in SIV-infected SMs, turnover of CD4+ T-cell naïve and central, transitional, and effector memory subsets is comparable to that in uninfected animals. Comparable turnover of CD4+ T-cell subsets irrespective of SIV-infection status likely contributes to the lack of aberrant immune activation and disease progression observed after infection in non-progressive hosts. PMID:27227993

  11. Analysis of the In Vivo Turnover of CD4+ T-Cell Subsets in Chronically SIV-Infected Sooty Mangabeys.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alexandra M; Carnathan, Diane G; Yu, Joana; Sheehan, Katherine M; Kim, Peter; Reynaldi, Arnold; Vanderford, Thomas H; Klatt, Nichole R; Brenchley, Jason M; Davenport, Miles P; Silvestri, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant turnover of memory CD4+ T-cells is central to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) progression. Understanding the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in natural hosts may provide insight into mechanisms of immune regulation that may serve as models for therapeutic intervention in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected persons. Sooty mangabeys (SMs) have naturally evolved with SIV to avoid AIDS progression while maintaining healthy peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts and thus represent a model by which therapeutic interventions for AIDS progression might be elucidated. To assess the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during SIV infection in non-progressive hosts, we treated 6 SIV-uninfected and 9 SIV-infected SMs with 2'-bromo-5'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 14 days and longitudinally assessed CD4+ T-cell subset turnover by polychromatic flow cytometry. We observed that, in SIV-infected SMs, turnover of CD4+ T-cell naïve and central, transitional, and effector memory subsets is comparable to that in uninfected animals. Comparable turnover of CD4+ T-cell subsets irrespective of SIV-infection status likely contributes to the lack of aberrant immune activation and disease progression observed after infection in non-progressive hosts. PMID:27227993

  12. A Bifactor Multidimensional Item Response Theory Model for Differential Item Functioning Analysis on Testlet-Based Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuhara, Hirotaka; Kamata, Akihito

    2011-01-01

    A differential item functioning (DIF) detection method for testlet-based data was proposed and evaluated in this study. The proposed DIF model is an extension of a bifactor multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) model for testlets. Unlike traditional item response theory (IRT) DIF models, the proposed model takes testlet effects into…

  13. Protein turnover, nitrogen balance and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Fern, E B; Waterlow, J C

    1983-01-01

    Not many studies have been done on protein turnover during recovery from malnutrition. Some relevant information can, however, be obtained from measurements on normal growing animals, since rehabilitation and normal growth have in common a rapid rate of net protein synthesis. The key question is the extent to which net gain in protein results from an increase in synthesis or a decrease in breakdown or both. Different studies have used different methods, and all methods for measuring protein turnover have some disadvantages and sources of error. It is important to bear this in mind in evaluating the results. Consequently, part of this paper will be devoted to questions of methodology. Whole body protein turnover has been measured in children recovering from severe malnutrition. During the phase of rapid catch-up growth the rate of protein synthesis is increased. As might be expected, it increases linearly with the rate of weight gain. At the same time there is a smaller increase in the rate of protein breakdown. The resultant of these two processes is that, over and above the basal rate of protein synthesis, 1.4 grams of protein have to be synthesized for 1 gram to be laid down. Very similar results have been obtained in rapidly growing young pigs. Experimental studies on muscle growth in general confirm the conclusion that, at least in muscle, rapid growth is associated with rapid rates of protein breakdown as well as of synthesis. This has been shown in muscles of young growing rats, as well as in muscles in which hypertrophy has been induced by stretch or other stimuli. In contrast, the evidence suggests that rapid growth involves a fall in the rate of protein degradation. The magnitude of the nitrogen balance under any conditions is determined by the difference between synthesis and breakdown. In the absence of any storage of amino acids, this must be the same as the difference between intake and excretion (S - B = I - E). A question of great interest is whether

  14. Item Overlap Correlations: Definitions, Interpretations, and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Louis M.

    1994-01-01

    Item overlap coefficient (IOC) formulas are discussed, providing six warnings about their calculation and interpretation and some explanations of why item overlap influences the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory factor structures. (SLD)

  15. How Multiple Interventions Influenced Employee Turnover: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    A 3-year study of 46 textile industry workers identified causes of employee turnover (supervision, training, organizational communication) using performance analysis. A study of multiple interventions based on the analysis resulted in changes in orientation procedures, organizational leadership, and climate, reducing turnover by 24%. (SK)

  16. Estimating Cause: Teacher Turnover and School Effectiveness in Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keesler, Venessa; Schneider, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is investigate issues related to within-school teacher supply and school-specific teacher turnover within the state of Michigan using state administrative data on Michigan's teaching force. This paper 1) investigates the key predictors of teacher turnover and mobility, 2) develops a profile of schools that are likely to…

  17. Analysis of the Educational Personnel System: IV. Teacher Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Emmett B.

    This report attempts to predict the rates of teacher turnover in the 1970s, which teachers will leave the profession, and what the effects of turnover will be on the educational personnel system. The overall termination rate has varied from six to 11 percent over the last 15 years. An analysis of recent changes in the teaching profession is used…

  18. Re-Examining the Relationship between Age and Voluntary Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Thomas W. H.; Feldman, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    In their quantitative review of the literature, Healy, Lehman, and McDaniel [Healy, M. C., Lehman, M., & McDaniel, M. A. (1995). Age and voluntary turnover: A quantitative review. "Personnel Psychology, 48", 335-345] concluded that age is only weakly related to voluntary turnover (average r = -0.08). However, with the significant changes in…

  19. The Link between Training Satisfaction, Work Engagement and Turnover Intention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memon, Mumtaz Ali; Salleh, Rohani; Baharom, Mohamed Noor Rosli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the casual relationship between training satisfaction, work engagement (WE) and turnover intention and the mediating role of WE between training satisfaction and turnover intention. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 409 oil and gas professionals using an email survey…

  20. Organizational Characteristics Associated with Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Engberg, John

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The association between certified nurse aide, licensed practical nurse, and registered nurse turnover and the organizational characteristics of nursing homes are examined. Design and Methods: Hypotheses for eight organizational characteristics are examined (staffing levels, top management turnover, resident case mix, facility quality,…

  1. Predicting Turnover: Validating the Intent to Leave Child Welfare Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Charles; Schudrich, Wendy Zeitlin; Lawrence, Catherine K.; Claiborne, Nancy; McGowan, Brenda G.

    2014-01-01

    A number of proxies have been used in child welfare workforce research to represent actual turnover; however, there have been no psychometric studies to validate a scale specifically designed for this purpose. The Intent to Leave Child Welfare Scale is a proxy for actual turnover that measures workers' intention to leave. This scale was…

  2. Voluntary Turnover and Women Administrators in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jo, Victoria H.

    2008-01-01

    A salient characteristic about the U.S. workforce is the continual process of voluntary employee turnover, which can be problematic for employers who invest a substantial amount of time and money in recruiting and training employees. This paper discusses the effects of workplace policies and practices on the voluntary turnover of women…

  3. Pexophagy and peroxisomal protein turnover in plants.

    PubMed

    Young, Pierce G; Bartel, Bonnie

    2016-05-01

    Peroxisomes are dynamic, vital organelles that sequester a variety of oxidative reactions and their toxic byproducts from the remainder of the cell. The oxidative nature of peroxisomal metabolism predisposes the organelle to self-inflicted damage, highlighting the need for a mechanism to dispose of damaged peroxisomes. In addition, the metabolic requirements of plant peroxisomes change during development, and obsolete peroxisomal proteins are degraded. Although pexophagy, the selective autophagy of peroxisomes, is an obvious mechanism for executing such degradation, pexophagy has only recently been described in plants. Several recent studies in the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana implicate pexophagy in the turnover of peroxisomal proteins, both for quality control and during functional transitions of peroxisomal content. In this review, we describe our current understanding of the occurrence, roles, and mechanisms of pexophagy in plants. PMID:26348128

  4. Processing Polarity Items: Contrastive Licensing Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saddy, Douglas; Drenhaus, Heiner; Frisch, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment that investigated the failure to license polarity items in German using event-related brain potentials (ERPs). The results reveal distinct processing reflexes associated with failure to license positive polarity items in comparison to failure to license negative polarity items. Failure to license both negative and…

  5. Effects of Assigning Raters to Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sykes, Robert C.; Ito, Kyoko; Wang, Zhen

    2008-01-01

    Student responses to a large number of constructed response items in three Math and three Reading tests were scored on two occasions using three ways of assigning raters: single reader scoring, a different reader for each response (item-specific), and three readers each scoring a rater item block (RIB) containing approximately one-third of a…

  6. 76 FR 60474 - Commercial Item Handbook

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Defense Acquisition Regulations System Commercial Item Handbook AGENCY: Defense Acquisition Regulations... Commercial Item Handbook. The purpose of the Handbook is to help acquisition personnel develop sound business strategies for procuring commercial items. DoD is seeking industry input on the contents before...

  7. Automatic Item Generation of Probability Word Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holling, Heinz; Bertling, Jonas P.; Zeuch, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical word problems represent a common item format for assessing student competencies. Automatic item generation (AIG) is an effective way of constructing many items with predictable difficulties, based on a set of predefined task parameters. The current study presents a framework for the automatic generation of probability word problems…

  8. Computer Equipment Repair Test Item Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide contains 321 test items for use in teaching a course in repairing computer equipment. All test items were reviewed, revised, and validated by incumbent workers and subject matter instructors. Items are provided for assessing student achievement in the following skill areas (with selected skills mentioned in brackets): performing…

  9. Measuring Student Learning with Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Young-Jin; Palazzo, David J.; Warnakulasooriya, Rasil; Pritchard, David E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate short-term learning from hints and feedback in a Web-based physics tutoring system. Both the skill of students and the difficulty and discrimination of items were determined by applying item response theory (IRT) to the first answers of students who are working on for-credit homework items in an introductory Newtonian physics…

  10. 18 CFR 367.10 - Unaudited items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Unaudited items. 367.10... Instructions § 367.10 Unaudited items. Whenever a financial statement is required by the Commission, if it is... anticipate minor items that would not appreciably affect the accounts....

  11. 18 CFR 367.10 - Unaudited items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Unaudited items. 367.10... Instructions § 367.10 Unaudited items. Whenever a financial statement is required by the Commission, if it is... anticipate minor items that would not appreciably affect the accounts....

  12. 18 CFR 367.10 - Unaudited items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Unaudited items. 367.10... Instructions § 367.10 Unaudited items. Whenever a financial statement is required by the Commission, if it is... anticipate minor items that would not appreciably affect the accounts....

  13. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Item monitoring. 74.55 Section 74.55 Energy NUCLEAR... Quantities of Strategic Special Nuclear Material § 74.55 Item monitoring. (a) Licensees subject to § 74.51... containing less than 0.05 formula kilograms of SSNM and any uniquely identified items of SSNM that have...

  14. 47 CFR 32.7600 - Extraordinary items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Extraordinary items. 32.7600 Section 32.7600... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions For Other Income Accounts § 32.7600 Extraordinary items... account shall also include the related income tax effect of the extraordinary items. (b) This...

  15. 47 CFR 32.7600 - Extraordinary items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Extraordinary items. 32.7600 Section 32.7600... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions For Other Income Accounts § 32.7600 Extraordinary items... account shall also include the related income tax effect of the extraordinary items. (b) This...

  16. 47 CFR 32.7600 - Extraordinary items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Extraordinary items. 32.7600 Section 32.7600... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions For Other Income Accounts § 32.7600 Extraordinary items... account shall also include the related income tax effect of the extraordinary items. (b) This...

  17. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Item monitoring. 74.55 Section 74.55 Energy NUCLEAR... Quantities of Strategic Special Nuclear Material § 74.55 Item monitoring. (a) Licensees subject to § 74.51... containing less than 0.05 formula kilograms of SSNM and any uniquely identified items of SSNM that have...

  18. 18 CFR 367.10 - Unaudited items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Unaudited items. 367.10... Instructions § 367.10 Unaudited items. Whenever a financial statement is required by the Commission, if it is... anticipate minor items that would not appreciably affect the accounts....

  19. 18 CFR 367.10 - Unaudited items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Unaudited items. 367.10... Instructions § 367.10 Unaudited items. Whenever a financial statement is required by the Commission, if it is... anticipate minor items that would not appreciably affect the accounts....

  20. 47 CFR 32.7600 - Extraordinary items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Extraordinary items. 32.7600 Section 32.7600... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions For Other Income Accounts § 32.7600 Extraordinary items... account shall also include the related income tax effect of the extraordinary items. (b) This...

  1. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Item monitoring. 74.55 Section 74.55 Energy NUCLEAR... Quantities of Strategic Special Nuclear Material § 74.55 Item monitoring. (a) Licensees subject to § 74.51... containing less than 0.05 formula kilograms of SSNM and any uniquely identified items of SSNM that have...

  2. 47 CFR 65.820 - Included items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Included items. 65.820 Section 65.820... OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Rate Base § 65.820 Included items. (a... allowance either by performing a lead-lag study of interstate revenue and expense items or by using...

  3. 47 CFR 65.820 - Included items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Included items. 65.820 Section 65.820... OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Rate Base § 65.820 Included items. (a... allowance either by performing a lead-lag study of interstate revenue and expense items or by using...

  4. 47 CFR 32.7600 - Extraordinary items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Extraordinary items. 32.7600 Section 32.7600... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions For Other Income Accounts § 32.7600 Extraordinary items... account shall also include the related income tax effect of the extraordinary items. (b) This...

  5. 47 CFR 65.820 - Included items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Included items. 65.820 Section 65.820... OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Rate Base § 65.820 Included items. (a... allowance either by performing a lead-lag study of interstate revenue and expense items or by using...

  6. Identification of a Semiparametric Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peress, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We consider the identification of a semiparametric multidimensional fixed effects item response model. Item response models are typically estimated under parametric assumptions about the shape of the item characteristic curves (ICCs), and existing results suggest difficulties in recovering the distribution of individual characteristics under…

  7. Item Selection in Computerized Classification Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nathan A.

    2009-01-01

    Several alternatives for item selection algorithms based on item response theory in computerized classification testing (CCT) have been suggested, with no conclusive evidence on the substantial superiority of a single method. It is argued that the lack of sizable effect is because some of the methods actually assess items very similarly through…

  8. Criterion-Referenced Test Items for Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Diane, Ed.

    This test item bank on welding contains test questions based upon competencies found in the Missouri Welding Competency Profile. Some test items are keyed for multiple competencies. These criterion-referenced test items are designed to work with the Vocational Instructional Management System. Questions have been statistically sampled and validated…

  9. Item Analysis in Introductory Economics Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinari, Frank D.

    1979-01-01

    Computerized analysis of multiple choice test items is explained. Examples of item analysis applications in the introductory economics course are discussed with respect to three objectives: to evaluate learning; to improve test items; and to help improve classroom instruction. Problems, costs and benefits of the procedures are identified. (JMD)

  10. Item Response Modeling with Sum Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the distinctions between classical test theory and item response theory is that the former focuses on sum scores and their relationship to true scores, whereas the latter concerns item responses and their relationship to latent scores. Although item response theory is often viewed as the richer of the two theories, sum scores are still…

  11. 42 CFR 414.224 - Customized items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for the same purpose that the two items cannot be grouped together for pricing purposes. (b) Payment rule. Payment is made on a lump sum basis for the purchase of a customized item based on the carrier's... individual consideration takes into account written documentation on the costs of the item including at...

  12. 16 CFR 436.5 - Disclosure items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Disclosure items. 436.5 Section 436.5 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS CONCERNING FRANCHISING Contents of a Disclosure Document § 436.5 Disclosure items. (a) Item 1: The Franchisor, and any Parents, Predecessors,...

  13. Computerized Numerical Control Test Item Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide contains 285 test items for use in teaching a course in computerized numerical control. All test items were reviewed, revised, and validated by incumbent workers and subject matter instructors. Items are provided for assessing student achievement in such aspects of programming and planning, setting up, and operating machines with…

  14. A Balance Sheet for Educational Item Banking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiscox, Michael D.

    Educational item banking presents observers with a considerable paradox. The development of test items from scratch is viewed as wasteful, a luxury in times of declining resources. On the other hand, item banking has failed to become a mature technology despite large amounts of money and the efforts of talented professionals. The question of which…

  15. On the Relationship between Differential Item Functioning and Item Difficulty: An Issue of Methods? Item Response Theory Approach to Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santelices, Maria Veronica; Wilson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between differential item functioning (DIF) and item difficulty on the SAT is such that more difficult items tended to exhibit DIF in favor of the focal group (usually minority groups). These results were reported by Kulick and Hu, and Freedle and have been enthusiastically discussed by more recent literature. Examining the…

  16. Differential Item Functioning in Survey Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanson, George A.; Johanson, Susan N.

    Differential item functioning (DIF), or item bias, occurs when individuals in a focal group respond differently to a test item than do individuals in a reference group even when comparisons are restricted to individuals with similar overall skill levels on the trait in question. It is common in constructing a questionnaire or survey to recommend…

  17. 7 CFR 2902.5 - Item designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., USDA will use life cycle cost information only from tests using the BEES analytical method. (c... availability of such items and the economic and technological feasibility of using such items, including life cycle costs. USDA will gather information on individual products within an item and extrapolate...

  18. The Multidimensionality of Verbal Analogy Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullstadius, Eva; Carlstedt, Berit; Gustafsson, Jan-Eric

    2008-01-01

    The influence of general and verbal ability on each of 72 verbal analogy test items were investigated with new factor analytical techniques. The analogy items together with the Computerized Swedish Enlistment Battery (CAT-SEB) were given randomly to two samples of 18-year-old male conscripts (n = 8566 and n = 5289). Thirty-two of the 72 items had…

  19. Ramsay-Curve Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when an item on a test, questionnaire, or interview has different measurement properties for one group of people versus another, irrespective of true group-mean differences on the constructs being measured. This article is focused on item response theory based likelihood ratio testing for DIF (IRT-LR or…

  20. Linking Item Parameters to a Base Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Taehoon; Petersen, Nancy S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares three methods of item calibration--concurrent calibration, separate calibration with linking, and fixed item parameter calibration--that are frequently used for linking item parameters to a base scale. Concurrent and separate calibrations were implemented using BILOG-MG. The Stocking and Lord in "Appl Psychol Measure"…

  1. Real and Artificial Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrich, David; Hagquist, Curt

    2012-01-01

    The literature in modern test theory on procedures for identifying items with differential item functioning (DIF) among two groups of persons includes the Mantel-Haenszel (MH) procedure. Generally, it is not recognized explicitly that if there is real DIF in some items which favor one group, then as an artifact of this procedure, artificial DIF…

  2. 16 CFR 436.5 - Disclosure items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disclosure items. 436.5 Section 436.5 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS CONCERNING FRANCHISING Contents of a Disclosure Document § 436.5 Disclosure items. (a) Item 1: The Franchisor, and any Parents, Predecessors,...

  3. Generalized Full-Information Item Bifactor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li; Yang, Ji Seung; Hansen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Full-information item bifactor analysis is an important statistical method in psychological and educational measurement. Current methods are limited to single-group analysis and inflexible in the types of item response models supported. We propose a flexible multiple-group item bifactor analysis framework that supports a variety of…

  4. Promotion of Intestinal Epithelial Cell Turnover by Commensal Bacteria: Role of Short-Chain Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Ha; Kotani, Takenori; Konno, Tasuku; Setiawan, Jajar; Kitamura, Yasuaki; Imada, Shinya; Usui, Yutaro; Hatano, Naoya; Shinohara, Masakazu; Saito, Yasuyuki; Murata, Yoji; Matozaki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The life span of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) is short (3-5 days), and its regulation is thought to be important for homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium. We have now investigated the role of commensal bacteria in regulation of IEC turnover in the small intestine. The proliferative activity of IECs in intestinal crypts as well as the migration of these cells along the crypt-villus axis were markedly attenuated both in germ-free mice and in specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice treated with a mixture of antibiotics, with antibiotics selective for Gram-positive bacteria being most effective in this regard. Oral administration of chloroform-treated feces of SPF mice to germ-free mice resulted in a marked increase in IEC turnover, suggesting that spore-forming Gram-positive bacteria contribute to this effect. Oral administration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) as bacterial fermentation products also restored the turnover of IECs in antibiotic-treated SPF mice as well as promoted the development of intestinal organoids in vitro. Antibiotic treatment reduced the phosphorylation levels of ERK, ribosomal protein S6, and STAT3 in IECs of SPF mice. Our results thus suggest that Gram-positive commensal bacteria are a major determinant of IEC turnover, and that their stimulatory effect is mediated by SCFAs. PMID:27232601

  5. Promotion of Intestinal Epithelial Cell Turnover by Commensal Bacteria: Role of Short-Chain Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-ha; Kotani, Takenori; Konno, Tasuku; Setiawan, Jajar; Kitamura, Yasuaki; Imada, Shinya; Usui, Yutaro; Hatano, Naoya; Shinohara, Masakazu; Saito, Yasuyuki; Murata, Yoji; Matozaki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The life span of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) is short (3–5 days), and its regulation is thought to be important for homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium. We have now investigated the role of commensal bacteria in regulation of IEC turnover in the small intestine. The proliferative activity of IECs in intestinal crypts as well as the migration of these cells along the crypt-villus axis were markedly attenuated both in germ-free mice and in specific pathogen–free (SPF) mice treated with a mixture of antibiotics, with antibiotics selective for Gram-positive bacteria being most effective in this regard. Oral administration of chloroform-treated feces of SPF mice to germ-free mice resulted in a marked increase in IEC turnover, suggesting that spore-forming Gram-positive bacteria contribute to this effect. Oral administration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) as bacterial fermentation products also restored the turnover of IECs in antibiotic-treated SPF mice as well as promoted the development of intestinal organoids in vitro. Antibiotic treatment reduced the phosphorylation levels of ERK, ribosomal protein S6, and STAT3 in IECs of SPF mice. Our results thus suggest that Gram-positive commensal bacteria are a major determinant of IEC turnover, and that their stimulatory effect is mediated by SCFAs. PMID:27232601

  6. Cereal Aphid Colony Turnover and Persistence in Winter Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Winder, Linton; Alexander, Colin J.; Woolley, Chris; Perry, Joe N.; Holland, John M.

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of spatial and temporal processes in agricultural ecosystems provides a basis for rational decision-making with regards to the management and husbandry of crops, supporting the implementation of integrated farming strategies. In this study we investigated the spatial and temporal distribution of aphid pests (Sitobion avenae and Metopolophium dirhodum) within winter wheat fields. Using an intensive sampling programme we investigated distributions at both the small (single shoot) and large (field) scales. Within two fields, a grid with 82 locations was established (area 120 m by 168 m). At each location, 25 shoots were individually marked and aphid counts by observation conducted on 21 and 22 occasions as the crop matured, resulting in 43,050 and 45,100 counts being conducted in the two fields respectively. We quantified field scale spatial distributions, demonstrating that spatial pattern generally emerged, with temporal stability being both species- and field- dependent. We then measured turnover of colonies at the small (individual shoot) and large (field) scales by comparing consecutive pairs of sampling occasions. Four turnover categories were defined: Empty (no aphids recorded on either occasion); Colonised (aphids recorded on the second occasion but not the first); Extinction (aphids recorded on the first occasion but not the second); Stable (aphids recorded on both occasions). At the field scale, population stability soon established, but, at the small scale there was a consistently high proportion of unoccupied shoots with considerable colonisation and extinction and low stability. The redistribution of aphids within the crop at the local scale is a vulnerability which could be used to disrupt population development – by mediating exposure to ground-active natural enemies and by incurring a metabolic cost caused by the physiological demands to re-establish on a nearby host plant. PMID:25268240

  7. The human decapping scavenger enzyme DcpS modulates microRNA turnover

    PubMed Central

    Meziane, Oussama; Piquet, Sandra; Bossé, Gabriel D.; Gagné, Dominic; Paquet, Eric; Robert, Claude; Tones, Michael A.; Simard, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    The decapping scavenger enzyme DcpS is known for its role in hydrolyzing the cap structure following mRNA degradation. Recently, we discovered a new function in miRNA degradation activation for the ortholog of DcpS in C. elegans. Here we show that human DcpS conserves its role in miRNA turnover. In human cells, DcpS is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that activates miRNA degradation independently of its scavenger decapping activity in the cytoplasmic compartment. We also demonstrate that this new function for DcpS requires the contribution of the 5′-3′ exonuclease Xrn2. Our findings support a conserved role of DcpS as a modulator of miRNA turnover in animals. PMID:26584588

  8. Does a Corresponding Set of Variables for Explaining Voluntary Organizational Turnover Transfer to Explaining Voluntary Occupational Turnover?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Gary

    2007-01-01

    This study proposed and tested corresponding sets of variables for explaining voluntary organizational versus occupational turnover for a sample of medical technologists. This study is believed to be the first test of the Rhodes and Doering (1983) occupational change model using occupational turnover data. Results showed that corresponding job…

  9. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Item Clones. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    To reduce the cost of item writing and to enhance the flexibility of item presentation, items can be generated by item-cloning techniques. An important consequence of cloning is that it may cause variability on the item parameters. Therefore, a multilevel item response model is presented in which it is assumed that the item parameters of a…

  10. Instructional Topics in Educational Measurement (ITEMS) Module: Using Automated Processes to Generate Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis

    2013-01-01

    Changes to the design and development of our educational assessments are resulting in the unprecedented demand for a large and continuous supply of content-specific test items. One way to address this growing demand is with automatic item generation (AIG). AIG is the process of using item models to generate test items with the aid of computer…

  11. RIM: A Random Item Mixture Model to Detect Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederickx, Sofie; Tuerlinckx, Francis; De Boeck, Paul; Magis, David

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a new methodology for detecting differential item functioning (DIF). We introduce a DIF model, called the random item mixture (RIM), that is based on a Rasch model with random item difficulties (besides the common random person abilities). In addition, a mixture model is assumed for the item difficulties such that the…

  12. Assessing the Item Response Theory with Covariate (IRT-C) Procedure for Ascertaining Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tay, Louis; Vermunt, Jeroen K.; Wang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the item response theory with covariates (IRT-C) procedure for assessing differential item functioning (DIF) without preknowledge of anchor items (Tay, Newman, & Vermunt, 2011). This procedure begins with a fully constrained baseline model, and candidate items are tested for uniform and/or nonuniform DIF using the Wald statistic.…

  13. Expected Equating Error Resulting from Incorrect Handling of Item Parameter Drift among the Common Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, G. Edward; Fitzpatrick, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Incorrect handling of item parameter drift during the equating process can result in equating error. If the item parameter drift is due to construct-irrelevant factors, then inclusion of these items in the estimation of the equating constants can be expected to result in equating error. On the other hand, if the item parameter drift is related to…

  14. An Investigation of Multiple-Response-Option Multiple-Choice Items: Item Performance and Processing Demands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntley, Renee M.; Plake, Barbara S.

    The combinational-format item (CFI)--multiple-choice item with combinations of alternatives presented as response choices--was studied to determine whether CFIs were different from regular multiple-choice items in item characteristics or in cognitive processing demands. Three undergraduate Foundations of Education classes (consisting of a total of…

  15. Developing an Interpretation of Item Parameters for Personality Items: Content Correlates of Parameter Estimates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zickar, Michael J.; Ury, Karen L.

    2002-01-01

    Attempted to relate content features of personality items to item parameter estimates from the partial credit model of E. Muraki (1990) by administering the Adjective Checklist (L. Goldberg, 1992) to 329 undergraduates. As predicted, the discrimination parameter was related to the item subtlety ratings of personality items but the level of word…

  16. Differential Item Functioning of GRE Mathematics Items across Computerized and Paper-and-Pencil Testing Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, Lixiong; Drake, Samuel; Wolfe, Edward W.

    2006-01-01

    This study seeks to determine whether item features are related to observed differences in item difficulty (DIF) between computer- and paper-based test delivery media. Examinees responded to 60 quantitative items similar to those found on the GRE general test in either a computer-based or paper-based medium. Thirty-eight percent of the items were…

  17. How the Collapsing of Categories Impacts the Item Information Function in Polytomous Item Response Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lecointe, Darius A.

    The purpose of this Item Response Theory study was to investigate how the expected reduction in item information, due to the collapsing of response categories in performance assessment data, was affected by varying testing conditions: item difficulty, item discrimination, inter-rater reliability, and direction of collapsing. The investigation used…

  18. A dual isotope approach to isolate soil carbon pools of different turnover times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torn, M. S.; Kleber, M.; Zavaleta, E. S.; Zhu, B.; Field, C. B.; Trumbore, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Soils are globally significant sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2. Increasing the resolution of soil carbon turnover estimates is important for predicting the response of soil carbon cycling to environmental change. We show that soil carbon turnover times can be more finely resolved using a dual isotope label like the one provided by elevated CO2 experiments that use fossil CO2. We modeled each soil physical fraction as two pools with different turnover times using the atmospheric 14C bomb spike in combination with the label in 14C and 13C provided by an elevated CO2 experiment in a California annual grassland. In sandstone and serpentine soils, the light fraction carbon was 21-54% fast cycling with 2-9 yr turnover, and 36-79% slow cycling with turnover slower than 100 yr. This validates model treatment of the light fraction as active and intermediate cycling carbon. The dense, mineral-associated fraction also had a very dynamic component, consisting of ∼7% fast-cycling carbon and ∼93% very slow cycling carbon. Similarly, half the microbial biomass carbon in the sandstone soil was more than 5 yr old, and 40% of the carbon respired by microbes had been fixed more than 5 yr ago. Resolving each density fraction into two pools revealed that only a small component of total soil carbon is responsible for most CO2 efflux from these soils. In the sandstone soil, 11% of soil carbon contributes more than 90% of the annual CO2 efflux. The fact that soil physical fractions, designed to isolate organic material of roughly homogeneous physico-chemical state, contain material of dramatically different turnover times is consistent with recent observations of rapid isotope incorporation into seemingly stable fractions and with emerging evidence for hot spots or micro-site variation of decomposition within the soil matrix. Predictions of soil carbon storage using a turnover time estimated with the assumption of a single pool per density fraction would greatly overestimate

  19. Understanding the factors that determine registered nurses' turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Joseph; Uzoka, Faith-Michael; Aladi, Flora; El-Hussein, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Turnover among registered nurses (RNs) produces a negative impact on the health outcomes of any health care organization. It is also recognized universally as a problem in the nursing profession. Little is known about the turnover intentions and career orientations of RNs working in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The aim of this study is to contribute to the knowledge of and to advance the discussion on the turnover of nursing professionals. The study population consisted of RNs employed in the five major hospitals in Calgary. There were 193 surveys returned, representing a response rate of 77.2%. The results show that age and education have a negative effect on turnover intention. Education was found to have a significant negative effect on career satisfaction but not on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Length of service has a significant negative effect on turnover intention. Role ambiguity has significant highly negative effect on career satisfaction. Growth opportunity and supervisor support have a very significant positive effect on job satisfaction, career satisfaction, and organizational commitment. External career opportunities and organizational commitment do not seem to have a significant effect on turnover intention. Career satisfaction, on the other hand, had negative significant effects on turnover intention. PMID:25087326

  20. Turnover of metallothioneins in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, R D; Winter, W P; Maher, J J; Bernstein, I A

    1978-01-01

    Two electrophoretically distinguishable metallothioneins were isolated from the livers of Cd2+-treated rats and had thiol group/metal ratios of 3:1, a total metal content, in each of these proteins, of 3.6 atoms of Cd2+ + 2.4 atoms of Zn2+/molecule and 4.2 atoms of Cd2+ + 2.8 atoms of Zn2+/molecule and respective apoprotein mol.wts. of 5844 and 6251. Studies with 1 h pulse labels of [3H]cysteine, given after a single injection of ZnCl2 or CdCl2, showed that these metals stimulated radioactive isotope incorporation into the metallothioneins over the control value by 10- and 15-fold respectively. This stimulation was maximal at 4 h after a single CdCl2 injection and decreased to control values by 16 h, suggesting that either a translational event is responding to free intracellular Cd2+ or a short-lived mRNA is being produced or stabilized in response to the metal treatment. In rats chronically exposed to CdCl2, the metallothioneins increased to 0.2% of the liver wet weight from a control value of 2--4 mumol/kg of liver, with a maximum rate of accumulation of 2--3 mumol/h per kg of liver. The turnover of these proteins in control animals was 0.3--0.6 mumoles/h per kg of liver, measured by the rate of disappearance of 203Hg2+, which binds irreversibly to the metallothioneins. Pretreatment with CdCl2 completely stopped the rapid 203Hg turnover observed in untreated animals. Unlike CdCl2, treatment with ZnCl2 increased the concentration of metallothioneins to a new steady-state pool, 11 mumole/kg of liver, after 10 h. The increase in the zinc-thionein pool by exposure to ZnCl2 in vivo was determined to be primarily due to a stimulation of metallothionein biosynthesis. PMID:697759

  1. The Presence of Thyroid-Stimulation Blocking Antibody Prevents High Bone Turnover in Untreated Premenopausal Patients with Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun Wook; Bae, Jae Hyun; Noh, Gyeong Woon; Kim, Ye An; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Yi, Ka Hee; Park, Do Joon; Chung, June-Key; Cho, Bo Youn; Park, Young Joo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis-related fractures are one of the complications of Graves’ disease. This study hypothesized that the different actions of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) antibodies, both stimulating and blocking activities in Graves’ disease patients might oppositely impact bone turnover. Newly diagnosed premenopausal Graves’ disease patients were enrolled (n = 93) and divided into two groups: patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity (stimulating activity group, n = 83) and patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity combined with blocking activity (blocking activity group, n = 10). From the stimulating activity group, patients who had matched values for free T4 and TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) to the blocking activity group were further classified as stimulating activity-matched control (n = 11). Bone turnover markers BS-ALP, Osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide were significantly lower in the blocking activity group than in the stimulating activity or stimulating activity-matched control groups. The TBII level showed positive correlations with BS-ALP and osteocalcin levels in the stimulating activity group, while it had a negative correlation with the osteocalcin level in the blocking activity group. In conclusion, the activation of TSHR antibody-activated TSH signaling contributes to high bone turnover, independent of the actions of thyroid hormone, and thyroid-stimulation blocking antibody has protective effects against bone metabolism in Graves’ disease. PMID:26650844

  2. The Presence of Thyroid-Stimulation Blocking Antibody Prevents High Bone Turnover in Untreated Premenopausal Patients with Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sun Wook; Bae, Jae Hyun; Noh, Gyeong Woon; Kim, Ye An; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Yi, Ka Hee; Park, Do Joon; Chung, June-Key; Cho, Bo Youn; Park, Young Joo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis-related fractures are one of the complications of Graves' disease. This study hypothesized that the different actions of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) antibodies, both stimulating and blocking activities in Graves' disease patients might oppositely impact bone turnover. Newly diagnosed premenopausal Graves' disease patients were enrolled (n = 93) and divided into two groups: patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity (stimulating activity group, n = 83) and patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity combined with blocking activity (blocking activity group, n = 10). From the stimulating activity group, patients who had matched values for free T4 and TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) to the blocking activity group were further classified as stimulating activity-matched control (n = 11). Bone turnover markers BS-ALP, Osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide were significantly lower in the blocking activity group than in the stimulating activity or stimulating activity-matched control groups. The TBII level showed positive correlations with BS-ALP and osteocalcin levels in the stimulating activity group, while it had a negative correlation with the osteocalcin level in the blocking activity group. In conclusion, the activation of TSHR antibody-activated TSH signaling contributes to high bone turnover, independent of the actions of thyroid hormone, and thyroid-stimulation blocking antibody has protective effects against bone metabolism in Graves' disease. PMID:26650844

  3. New technologies for item monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, J.A.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1993-12-01

    This report responds to the Department of Energy`s request that Sandia National Laboratories compare existing technologies against several advanced technologies as they apply to DOE needs to monitor the movement of material, weapons, or personnel for safety and security programs. The authors describe several material control systems, discuss their technologies, suggest possible applications, discuss assets and limitations, and project costs for each system. The following systems are described: WATCH system (Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling); Tag system (an electrostatic proximity sensor); PANTRAK system (Personnel And Material Tracking); VRIS (Vault Remote Inventory System); VSIS (Vault Safety and Inventory System); AIMS (Authenticated Item Monitoring System); EIVS (Experimental Inventory Verification System); Metrox system (canister monitoring system); TCATS (Target Cueing And Tracking System); LGVSS (Light Grid Vault Surveillance System); CSS (Container Safeguards System); SAMMS (Security Alarm and Material Monitoring System); FOIDS (Fiber Optic Intelligence & Detection System); GRADS (Graded Radiation Detection System); and PINPAL (Physical Inventory Pallet).

  4. Long-lived reactive species formed on proteins induce changes in protein and lipid turnover.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Proteins are major targets for oxidative damage in vivo due to their high abundance and rapid rates of reaction with both one-electron (radical) and two-electron oxidants (e.g. singlet oxygen, hypochlorous acid, peroxynitrous acid, reactive aldehydes). The turnover of both native and modified proteins is critical for maintenance of cell homeostasis, with this occurring via multiple pathways including proteasomes (for cytosolic species), the Lon protease (in mitochondria), and the endo-lysosomal systems (both extra- and intra-cellular species). Evidence has been presented for both enhanced and diminished rates of catabolism of modified proteins, as well as altered turnover of native (unmodified) proteins as a result of damage to these systems, potentially as a result of the accumulation of damaged proteins. In recent studies we have shown that long-lived reactive species forms on proteins (hydroperoxides, chloramines and aldehydes) can modify the activity of proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes. Some of the above species are efficient inhibitors of the tryptic and chymotryptic activities of the 26S proteasome, as well as lysosomal cathepsin and acid lipase activities. These are key species in the turnover of both proteins and lipoproteins. The loss of enzyme activity is accompanied in many cases, by oxidation of critical thiol residues via molecular reactions. For reactive aldehydes (either free or protein-bound) direct enzyme inhibition can occur as well as modulation of protein levels and, in the case of lysosomes, changes in lysosomal numbers. Overall, these data indicate that the formation of reactive species on proteins can modulate cell function by multiple pathways including interference with the turnover of native proteins (including critical cell signalling molecules) and alterations in the rate of clearance of modified proteins. Both pathways may contribute to the development of a number of human pathologies associated with oxidative damage. PMID:26461411

  5. 17 CFR 229.1203 - (Item 1203) Proved undeveloped reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... reserves. 229.1203 Section 229.1203 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION STANDARD INSTRUCTIONS FOR FILING FORMS UNDER SECURITIES ACT OF 1933, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 AND... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1203 (Item 1203) Proved undeveloped reserves. (a) Disclose the...

  6. 17 CFR 229.1203 - (Item 1203) Proved undeveloped reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... reserves. 229.1203 Section 229.1203 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION STANDARD INSTRUCTIONS FOR FILING FORMS UNDER SECURITIES ACT OF 1933, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 AND... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1203 (Item 1203) Proved undeveloped reserves. (a) Disclose the...

  7. 17 CFR 229.1203 - (Item 1203) Proved undeveloped reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... reserves. 229.1203 Section 229.1203 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION STANDARD INSTRUCTIONS FOR FILING FORMS UNDER SECURITIES ACT OF 1933, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 AND... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1203 (Item 1203) Proved undeveloped reserves. (a) Disclose the...

  8. 17 CFR 229.1203 - (Item 1203) Proved undeveloped reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reserves. 229.1203 Section 229.1203 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION STANDARD INSTRUCTIONS FOR FILING FORMS UNDER SECURITIES ACT OF 1933, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 AND... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1203 (Item 1203) Proved undeveloped reserves. (a) Disclose the...

  9. 17 CFR 229.1203 - (Item 1203) Proved undeveloped reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reserves. 229.1203 Section 229.1203 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION STANDARD INSTRUCTIONS FOR FILING FORMS UNDER SECURITIES ACT OF 1933, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 AND... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1203 (Item 1203) Proved undeveloped reserves. (a) Disclose the...

  10. Criterion-Referenced Test Items for Vocational Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    A project was conducted to develop and validate criterion-referenced test items for the following vocational education programs: child care worker, machine shop, electronics, drafting, and automobile mechanics. For each of the programs, the following activities took place: a project coordinator was assigned, subject-area instructors and a test…

  11. 41 CFR 109-1.5109 - Control of sensitive items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Control of sensitive...-INTRODUCTION 1.51-Personal Property Management Standards and Practices § 109-1.5109 Control of sensitive items... by each DOE activity/site, taking into consideration value, costs of administration, need for...

  12. 41 CFR 109-1.5109 - Control of sensitive items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control of sensitive...-INTRODUCTION 1.51-Personal Property Management Standards and Practices § 109-1.5109 Control of sensitive items... by each DOE activity/site, taking into consideration value, costs of administration, need for...

  13. Word Processing for Item Banking and Test Production. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Joseph L.

    This report describes the sequence of activities that took place as the Examination Division of the New Jersey Department of Civil Service introduced a word processing system for a test item bank and for production of camera-ready test copy. The equipment selection, installation and orientation procedures are discussed. Keyboard and CRT terminals,…

  14. Science Library of Test Items. Volume Four: Practical Testing Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New South Wales Dept. of Education, Sydney (Australia).

    As one in a series of test items collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, the guide gives a wide range of questions and activities for the manipulation of scientific equipment to allow assessment of students' practical laboratory skills. Instructions are given to make norm-referenced or…

  15. Investigating Histone Acetylation Stoichiometry and Turnover Rate.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Baeza, J; Denu, J M

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a dynamic epigenetic modification that functions in the regulation of DNA-templated reactions, such as transcription. This lysine modification is reversibly controlled by histone (lysine) acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Here, we present methods employing isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry (MS) to comprehensively investigate histone acetylation dynamics. Turnover rates of histone acetylation are determined by measuring the kinetics of labeling from (13)C-labeled precursors of acetyl-CoA, which incorporates (13)C-carbon onto histones via the acetyltransferase reaction. Overall histone acetylation states are assessed from complete protease digestion to single amino acids, which is followed by MS analysis. Determination of site-specific acetylation stoichiometry is achieved by chemically acetylating endogenous histones with isotopic acetic anhydride, followed by trypsin digestion and LC-MS analysis. Combining metabolic labeling with stoichiometric analysis permits determination of both acetylation level and acetylation dynamics. When comparing genetic, diet, or environmental perturbations, these methods permit both a global and site-specific evaluation of how histone acetylation is dynamically regulated. PMID:27423860

  16. Turnover of cytokeratin polypeptides in mouse hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Denk, H.; Lackinger, E.; Zatloukal, K. ); Franke, W.W. )

    1987-11-01

    The turnover of cytokeratin polypeptides A (equivalent to No. 8 of the human cytokeratin catalog) and D (equivalent to human cytokeratin No. 18) of mouse hepatocytes was studied by pulse-labeling of mouse liver proteins after intraperitoneal injection of L-(guanido{sup 14}C)arginine and ({sup 14}C)sodium bicarbonate. With L-(guanido-{sup 14}C)arginine a rapid increase in the specific radioactivity of both cytokeratins was observed which reached a plateau between 12 and 24 h. With ({sup 14}C)sodium bicarbonate maximal specific radioactivity was obtained at 6 h followed by a rapid decrease to half maximum values within the subsequent 6 h and then a slower decrease. Half-lives were determined from the decrease of specific radioactivities after pulse-labeling by least-squares plots and found to be 84 h (for cytokeratin component A) and 104 h (component D) for arginine labeling . Values obtained after bicarbonate labeling were similar (95 h for A and 98 h for D). These results show that liver cytokeratins are relatively stable proteins and suggest that components A and D are synthesized and degraded at similar rates, probably in a coordinate way.

  17. Pharmacologic Stimulation of Cytochrome P450 46A1 and Cerebral Cholesterol Turnover in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Natalia; Li, Yong; Linger, Marlin; Clark, Matthew; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Pikuleva, Irina A.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 46A1 (CYP46A1) is a brain-specific cholesterol 24-hydroxylase responsible for the majority of cholesterol elimination from the brain. Genetically increased CYP46A1 expression in mice leads to improved cognition and decreases manifestations of Alzheimer disease. We found that four pharmaceuticals (efavirenz (EFV), acetaminophen, mirtazapine, and galantamine) prescribed for indications unrelated to cholesterol maintenance increased CYP46A1 activity in vitro. We then evaluated the anti-HIV medication EFV for the mode of interaction with CYP46A1 and the effect on mice. We propose a model for CYP46A1 activation by EFV and show that EFV enhanced CYP46A1 activity and cerebral cholesterol turnover in animals with no effect on the levels of brain cholesterol. The doses of EFV administered to mice and required for the stimulation of their cerebral cholesterol turnover are a hundred times lower than those prescribed to HIV patients. At such small doses, EFV may be devoid of adverse effects elicited by high drug concentrations. CYP46A1 could be a novel therapeutic target and a tool to further investigate the physiological and medical significance of cerebral cholesterol turnover. PMID:24352658

  18. New role for leucyl aminopeptidase in glutathione turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Cappiello, Mario; Lazzarotti, Alessandra; Buono, Francesca; Scaloni, Andrea; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Amodeo, Pietro; Méndez, Blanca L; Pelosi, Paolo; Del Corso, Antonella; Mura, Umberto

    2004-01-01

    A manganese-dependent cysteinyl-glycine hydrolysing activity has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from bovine lens. The characterization of the purified enzyme (molecular mass of the native protein, molecular mass of the subunit and extensive primary structure analysis) allowed the unequivocal attribution of the cysteinyl-glycine hydrolysing activity, which is usually associated with alanyl aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.2) or membrane-bound dipeptidase (EC 3.4.13.19), to LAP (leucyl aminopeptidase; EC 3.4.11.1). Analysis of the pH dependence of Cys-Gly hydrolysis catalysed by LAP, supported by a molecular modelling approach to the enzyme-substrate conformation, gave insights into the ability of the enzyme to recognize Cys-Gly as a substrate. Due to the effectiveness of LAP in hydrolysing Cys-Gly (K(m)=0.57 mM, kcat=6.0x10(3) min(-1) at pH 7.4 and 25 degrees C) with respect to other dipeptide substrates, a new role for this enzyme in glutathione turnover is proposed. PMID:14583094

  19. Relationships between soil microbial communities and soil carbon turnover along a vegetation and moisture gradient in interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, M. P.; Harden, J. W.; Turetsky, M. R.; Petersen, D. G.; McGuire, A. D.; Briones, M. J.; Churchill, A. C.; Doctor, D. H.; Pruett, L. E.

    2010-12-01

    Boreal landscapes are characterized by a mosaic of uplands and lowlands, which differ in plant species composition, litter biochemistry, and biogeochemical cycling rates. Boreal ecosystems, from upland black spruce stands to lowland fens, are structured largely by water table position and contain quantitatively and qualitatively different forms of soil organic matter. Differences in carbon (C) availability among ecosystems likely translate to differences in the structure of soil microbial communities, which in turn could affect rates of organic matter decomposition and turnover. We examined relationships between microbial communities and soil C turnover in near-surface soils along a topographic soil moisture and vegetation gradient in interior Alaska. We tested the hypothesis that upland black spruce sites would be dominated by soil fungi and have slow rates of C turnover, whereas lowland ecosystems would be dominated by bacteria and mesofauna (enchytraeids) and have more rapid rates of C turnover. We utilized several isotopic measures of soil C turnover including bomb radiocarbon techniques, the δ15N of SOM, and the difference between δ13C of SOM, DOC, and respired CO2. All three measures indicated greater C turnover rates in the surface soils of the lowland fen sites compared to the more upland locations. Quantitative PCR analyses of soil bacteria and archaea, combined with enchytraed counts, confirmed that surface soils from the lowland fen ecosystems had the highest abundances of these functional groups. Fungal biomass was highly variable and tended to be more abundant in the upland forest sites. Soil enzymatic results were mixed: potential cellulase activities were higher in the more upland soils even though rates of microbial activity were generally lower. Oxidative enzyme activities were higher in fens, even though these ecosystems are saturated and partly anaerobic. Overall our data support soil food web theory which argues that rapidly cycling systems

  20. Autoradiographic imaging of phosphoinositide turnover in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, P.M.; Bredt, D.S.; Snyder, S.H. )

    1990-08-17

    With ({sup 3}H)cytidine as a precursor, phosphoinositide turnover can be localized in brain slices by selective autoradiography of the product ({sup 3}H)cytidine diphosphate diacylglycerol, which is membrane-bound. In the cerebellum, glutamatergic stimulation elicits an increase of phosphoinositide turnover only in Purkinje cells and the molecular layer. In the hippocampus, both glutamatergic and muscarinic cholinergic stimulation increase phosphoinositide turnover, but with distinct localizations. Cholinergic stimulation affects CA1, CA3, CA4, and subiculum, whereas glutamatergic effects are restricted to the subiculum and CA3. Imaging phosphoinositide turnover in brain slices, which are amenable to electrophysiologic studies, will permit a dynamic localized analysis of regulation of this second messenger in response to synaptic stimulation of specific neuronal pathways.

  1. Using droplet-based microfluidics to improve the catalytic properties of RNA under multiple-turnover conditions

    PubMed Central

    Baudrey, Stéphanie; Rick, Christian; Marin, Annick; Coldren, Faith; Westhof, Eric

    2015-01-01

    In vitro evolution methodologies are powerful approaches to identify RNA with new functionalities. While Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX) is an efficient approach to generate new RNA aptamers, it is less suited for the isolation of efficient ribozymes as it does not select directly for the catalysis. In vitro compartmentalization (IVC) in aqueous droplets in emulsions allows catalytic RNAs to be selected under multiple-turnover conditions but suffers severe limitations that can be overcome using the droplet-based microfluidics workflow described in this paper. Using microfluidics, millions of genes in a library can be individually compartmentalized in highly monodisperse aqueous droplets and serial operations performed on them. This allows the different steps of the evolution process (gene amplification, transcription, and phenotypic assay) to be uncoupled, making the method highly flexible, applicable to the selection and evolution of a variety of RNAs, and easily adaptable for evolution of DNA or proteins. To demonstrate the method, we performed cycles of random mutagenesis and selection to evolve the X-motif, a ribozyme which, like many ribozymes selected using SELEX, has limited multiple-turnover activity. This led to the selection of variants, likely to be the optimal ribozymes that can be generated using point mutagenesis alone, with a turnover number under multiple-turnover conditions, ksscat, ∼28-fold higher than the original X-motif, primarily due to an increase in the rate of product release, the rate-limiting step in the multiple-turnover reaction. PMID:25605963

  2. Proteasome regulates turnover of toxic human amylin in pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanghamitra; Trikha, Saurabh; Sarkar, Anjali; Jeremic, Aleksandar M

    2016-09-01

    Toxic human amylin (hA) oligomers and aggregates are implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although recent studies demonstrated a causal connection between hA uptake and toxicity in pancreatic cells, the mechanism of amylin's clearance following its internalization and its relationship to toxicity is yet to be determined, and hence was investigated here. Using pancreatic rat insulinoma β-cells and human islets as model systems, we show that hA, following its internalization, first accumulates in the cytosol followed by its translocation into nucleus, and to a lesser extent lysosomes, keeping the net cytosolic amylin content low. An increase in hA accumulation in the nucleus of pancreatic cells correlated with its cytotoxicity, suggesting that its excessive accumulation in the nucleus is detrimental. hA interacted with 20S core and 19S lid subunits of the β-cell proteasomal complex, as suggested by immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies, which subsequently resulted in a decrease in the proteasome's proteolytic activity in these cells. In vitro binding and activity assays confirmed an intrinsic and potent ability of amylin to interact with the 20S core complex thereby modulating its proteolytic activity. Interestingly, less toxic and aggregation incapable rat amylin (rA) showed a comparable inhibitory effect on proteasome activity and protein ubiquitination, decoupling amylin aggregation/ toxicity and amylin-induced protein stress. In agreement with these studies, inhibition of proteasomal proteolytic activity significantly increased intracellular amylin content and toxicity. Taken together, our results suggest a pivotal role of proteasomes in amylin's turnover and detoxification in pancreatic cells. PMID:27340132

  3. Item-Writing Guidelines for Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, Tom

    2015-11-01

    A teacher learning how to write test questions (test items) will almost certainly encounter item-writing guidelines—lists of item-writing do's and don'ts. Item-writing guidelines usually are presented as applicable across all assessment settings. Table I shows some guidelines that I believe to be generally applicable and two will be briefly discussed here. The teacher may also encounter some guidelines that are not applicable in all assessment settings, or that can be applied to physics only with care. Two such guidelines, and their limitations, will be discussed as well.

  4. Absolute quantification of UGT1A1 in various tissues and cell lines using isotope label-free UPLC-MS/MS method determines its turnover number and correlates with its glucuronidation activities.

    PubMed

    Xu, Beibei; Gao, Song; Wu, Baojian; Yin, Taijun; Hu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A1 is a major phase II metabolism enzyme responsible for glucuronidation of drugs and endogenous compounds. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression level of UGT1A1 in human liver microsomes and human cell lines by using an isotope label-free LC-MS/MS method. A Waters Ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) system coupled with an API 5500Qtrap mass spectrometer was used for the analysis. Two signature peptides (Pep-1, and Pep-2) were employed to quantify UGT1A1 by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) approach. Standard addition method was used to validate the assay to account for the matrix effect. 17β-Estradiol was used as the marker substrate to determine UGT1A1 activities. The validated method has a linear range of 200-0.0195nM for both signature peptides. The precision, accuracy, and matrix effect were in acceptable ranges. UGT1A1 expression levels were then determined using 8 individual human liver microsomes, a pooled human liver microsomes, three UGT1A1 genotyped human liver microsomes, and four cell lines (Caco-2, MCF-7, Hela, and HepG2). The correlations study showed that the UGT1A1 protein levels were strongly correlated with its glucuronidation activities in human liver microsomes (R(2)=0.85) and in microsomes prepared from cell lines (R(2)=0.95). Isotope-labeled peptides were not necessary for LC-MS/MS quantitation of proteins. The isotope label-free absolute quantification method used here had good accuracy, sensitivity, linear range, and reproducibility, and were used successfully for the accurate determination of UGT1A1 from tissues and cell lines. PMID:24055854

  5. 41 CFR 101-30.101-12 - Item identification data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Item identification data... CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1-General § 101-30.101-12 Item identification data. Item identification data means recorded data which are used to differentiate an item from all other items. Item identification data...

  6. 41 CFR 101-30.101-12 - Item identification data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Item identification data... CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1-General § 101-30.101-12 Item identification data. Item identification data means recorded data which are used to differentiate an item from all other items. Item identification data...

  7. 41 CFR 101-30.701-1 - Item reduction study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Item reduction study. 101....7-Item Reduction Program § 101-30.701-1 Item reduction study. Item reduction study means the study... so identified, a replacement item shall be proposed. The result of item reduction studies...

  8. 41 CFR 101-30.701-1 - Item reduction study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Item reduction study. 101....7-Item Reduction Program § 101-30.701-1 Item reduction study. Item reduction study means the study... so identified, a replacement item shall be proposed. The result of item reduction studies...

  9. Detection of Differential Item Functioning Using the Lasso Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; Tuerlinckx, Francis; De Boeck, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a novel approach to detect differential item functioning (DIF) among dichotomously scored items. Unlike standard DIF methods that perform an item-by-item analysis, we propose the "LR lasso DIF method": logistic regression (LR) model is formulated for all item responses. The model contains item-specific intercepts,…

  10. Software Note: Using BILOG for Fixed-Anchor Item Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMars, Christine E.; Jurich, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    The nonequivalent groups anchor test (NEAT) design is often used to scale item parameters from two different test forms. A subset of items, called the anchor items or common items, are administered as part of both test forms. These items are used to adjust the item calibrations for any differences in the ability distributions of the groups taking…

  11. Bringing social identity to work: the influence of manifestation and suppression on perceived discrimination, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    Madera, Juan M; King, Eden B; Hebl, Michelle R

    2012-04-01

    In the current article, we explored whether manifesting or suppressing an identity (race/ethnicity, gender, age, religion, sexual orientation, or disability) at work is related to perceived discrimination, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions. Participants included 211 working adults who completed an online survey. The results showed that efforts to suppress a group identity were positively (and behavioral manifestations of group identity negatively) related to perceived discrimination, which predicted job satisfaction and turnover intentions. These results suggest that diverse employees actively manage their nonwork identities while at work and that these identity management strategies have important consequences. PMID:22506819

  12. Uncoupling of bone turnover following hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Whitson, H; DeMarco, D; Reilly, D; Murphy, S; Yett, H S; Mattingly, D; Greenspan, S L

    2002-07-01

    Studies using total hip replacement surgery as a model for acute hip injury have shown that bone mineral density of the proximal femur decreases 6-18% in the 6 months following surgery. To examine the acute biochemical mechanism associated with bone loss, we measured two indicators of bone formation [serum osteocalcin (OC), serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP)], as well as two markers for bone resorption [urine and serum N-telopeptide cross-linked collagen type 1 (NTx)], in 20 patients (10 men, 10 women, mean age 59.4 years) prior to hip replacement and 1-2 days postsurgery. The average OC value (ng/ml) decreased by 57.3% following surgery (7.5 +/- 4.3 to 3.2 +/- 1.1, P <0.001), and the average BSAP level (U/L) decreased by 27.6% (19.9 +/- 5.6 to 14.4 +/- 3.7, P <0.001). In contrast, levels of urine NTx (nmol BCE/mmol Cr) did not change significantly after the surgery (73.9 +/- 47.2 to 70.1 +/- 29.7). In addition, there was no change in serum NTx (nmol BCE) after surgery (11.8 +/- 2.3 to 11.8 +/- 3.0). Six months after surgery, bone mass had not changed significantly from baseline. These findings suggest that there is an uncoupling of bone turnover following hip replacement surgery which is characterized by significant reductions in bone formation without compensatory decreases in bone resorption, potentially leading to bone loss. Longer periods of follow-up are needed to assess long-term bone mass changes. PMID:12200656

  13. National cultures, performance appraisal practices, and organizational absenteeism and turnover: a study across 21 countries.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Hilla; Fried, Yitzhak

    2012-03-01

    Performance appraisal (PA) is a key human resource activity in organizations. However, in this global economy, we know little about how societal cultures affect PA practices. In this study, we address this gap by focusing on 2 complementary issues: (a) the influence of societal (national) cultural practices on PA practices adopted by organizations and (b) the contribution of the level of congruence between societal cultural practices and the characteristics of organizational PA practices to absenteeism and turnover. The results, based on a large data set across multiple countries and over 2 time periods, support the hypothesized effects of societal (national) cultural practices on particular PA practices and the interactive effects of societal cultural practices and PA practices on absenteeism and turnover. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of our findings. PMID:22040261

  14. High concentrations and turnover rates of DMS, DMSP and DMSO in Antarctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Elizabeth C.; Dacey, John W. H.; Mills, Matthew M.; Arrigo, Kevin R.; Tortell, Philippe D.

    2011-12-01

    The vast Antarctic sea-ice zone (SIZ) is a potentially significant source of the climate-active gas dimethylsulfide (DMS), yet few data are available on the concentrations and turnover rates of DMS and the related compounds dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in sea ice environments. Here we present new measurements characterizing the spatial variability of DMS, DMSP, and DMSO concentrations across the Antarctic SIZ, and results from tracer experiments quantifying the production rates of DMS from various sources. We observed extremely high concentrations (>200 nM) and turnover rates (>100 nM d-1) of DMS in sea-ice brines, indicating intense cycling of DMS/P/O. Our results demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for DMSO reduction as a major pathway of DMS production in Antarctic sea ice.

  15. Acute effects of dichloroacetate in the depancreatized dog: glucose synthesis and turnover.

    PubMed

    Searle, G L; Felts, J M; Shakelford, R

    1982-07-01

    Blood glucose turnover (entry and removal rates) and the rate of recycling of radiolabelled glucose carbon into newly synthesized blood glucose have been evaluated before and acutely after the administration of dichloroacetate to depancreatized dogs. Blood glucose concentration began to decline immediately after dichloroacetate administration and fell to new steady state levels within 1.5-3 h. Analysis of blood glucose kinetics during the decline demonstrated a 52% (average) reduction in the rate of hepatic glucose supply. Glucose supply remained reduced over the duration of these studies (3-4.5 h). Glucose turnover in the steady state following dichloroacetate administration averaged 62% of pretreatment values. Cori cycle activity was depressed by 63% after dichloroacetate administration. The results of these studies are consistent with the hypothesis that a major mechanism underlying the hypoglycaemic action of this drug is the inhibition of glucose synthesis. PMID:7117727

  16. Employees' views on outsourcing and its impact on employee turnover: A phenomenological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybelinski, Steven A.

    Increasing use of outsourcing gives employees concern about personal job security. Using a modified van Kaam approach, this qualitative phenomenological study examined perceptions and experiences of 12 employees' on the influence outsourcing had on employee turnover. Five themes describing employee perceptions emerged: (a) preparation---education gives job security, (b) plausibility---all believed job loss plausible, (c) emotional influence---feelings of stress, threat, betrayal, and not being valued, (d) environment---value of communication and interaction with leaders, and (e) confidence---gained from increased education, skills, and knowledge protected from outsourcing. Significance of this study to leadership is the identification of employee perceptions of outsourcing and motivating factors influencing employee turnover during times of outsourcing. Findings might present new information and assist leaders with employee retention concerns for future outsourcing activities.

  17. Combined effects of positive and negative affectivity and job satisfaction on job performance and turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    Bouckenooghe, Dave; Raja, Usman; Butt, Arif Nazir

    2013-01-01

    Capturing data from employee-supervisor dyads (N = 321) from eight organizations in Pakistan, including human service organizations, an electronics assembly plant, a packaging material manufacturing company, and a small food processing plant, we used moderated regression analysis to examine whether the relationships between trait affect (positive affectivity [PA] and negative affectivity [NA]) and two key work outcome variables (job performance and turnover) are contingent upon the level of job satisfaction. We applied the Trait Activation Theory to explain the moderating effect of job satisfaction on the relationship between affect and performance and between affect and turnover. Overall, the data supported our hypotheses. Positive and negative affectivity influenced performance and the intention to quit, and job satisfaction moderated these relationships. We discuss in detail the results of these findings and their implications for research and practice. PMID:23469474

  18. Explaining the Gap in Charter and Traditional Public School Teacher Turnover Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuit, David A.; Smith, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses national survey data to examine why charter school teachers are more likely to turnover than their traditional public school counterparts. We test whether the turnover gap is explained by different distributions of factors that are empirically and theoretically linked to turnover risk. We find that the turnover rate of charter…

  19. The Cost of Teacher Turnover in Five School Districts: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Gary; Crowe, Edward: Schaefer, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of a pilot study of the cost of teacher turnover in five school districts. We examine the rate of turnover, the relationship between turnover and teacher and school characteristics, and the costs associated with recruiting, hiring, and training replacement teachers. We find evidence that turnover costs,…

  20. Reviewing Employee Turnover: Focusing on Proximal Withdrawal States and an Expanded Criterion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hom, Peter W.; Mitchell, Terence R.; Lee, Thomas W.; Griffeth, Rodger W.

    2012-01-01

    We reconceptualize employee turnover to promote researchers' understanding and prediction of why employees quit or stay in employing institutions. A literature review identifies shortcomings with prevailing turnover dimensions. In response, we expand the conceptual domain of the turnover criterion to include multiple types of turnover (notably,…

  1. Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Torn, M.S.; Swanston, C.W.; Castanha, C.; Trumbore, S.E.

    2008-07-15

    Historically, attention on soil organic matter (SOM) has focused on the central role that it plays in ecosystem fertility and soil properties, but in the past two decades the role of soil organic carbon in moderating atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations has emerged as a critical research area. This chapter will focus on the storage and turnover of natural organic matter in soil (SOM), in the context of the global carbon cycle. Organic matter in soils is the largest carbon reservoir in rapid exchange with atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and is thus important as a potential source and sink of greenhouse gases over time scales of human concern (Fischlin and Gyalistras 1997). SOM is also an important human resource under active management in agricultural and range lands worldwide. Questions driving present research on the soil C cycle include: Are soils now acting as a net source or sink of carbon to the atmosphere? What role will soils play as a natural modulator or amplifier of climatic warming? How is C stabilized and sequestered, and what are effective management techniques to foster these processes? Answering these questions will require a mechanistic understanding of how and where C is stored in soils. The quantity and composition of organic matter in soil reflect the long-term balance between plant carbon inputs and microbial decomposition, as well as other loss processes such as fire, erosion, and leaching. The processes driving soil carbon storage and turnover are complex and involve influences at molecular to global scales. Moreover, the relative importance of these processes varies according to the temporal and spatial scales being considered; a process that is important at the regional scale may not be critical at the pedon scale. At the regional scale, SOM cycling is influenced by factors such as climate and parent material, which affect plant productivity and soil development. More locally, factors such as plant tissue quality and soil mineralogy affect

  2. Bacterial and enchytraeid abundance accelerate soil carbon turnover along a lowland vegetation gradient in interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldrop, M.P.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Turetsky, M.R.; Petersen, D.G.; McGuire, A.D.; Briones, M.J.I.; Churchill, A.C.; Doctor, D.H.; Pruett, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Boreal wetlands are characterized by a mosaic of plant communities, including forests, shrublands, grasslands, and fens, which are structured largely by changes in topography and water table position. The soil associated with these plant communities contain quantitatively and qualitatively different forms of soil organic matter (SOM) and nutrient availability that drive changes in biogeochemical cycling rates. Therefore different boreal plant communities likely contain different soil biotic communities which in turn affect rates of organic matter decomposition. We examined relationships between plant communities, microbial communities, enchytraeids, and soil C turnover in near-surface soils along a shallow topographic soil moisture and vegetation gradient in interior Alaska. We tested the hypothesis that as soil moisture increases along the gradient, surface soils would become increasingly dominated by bacteria and mesofauna and have more rapid rates of C turnover. We utilized bomb radiocarbon techniques to infer rates of C turnover and the 13C isotopic composition of SOM and respired CO2 to infer the degree of soil humification. Soil phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activities were generally higher in the rich fen compared with the forest and bog birch sites. Results indicated greater C fluxes and more rapid C turnover in the surface soils of the fen sites compared to the wetland forest and shrub sites. Quantitative PCR analyses of soil bacteria and archaea, combined with enchytraeid counts, indicated that surface soils from the lowland fen ecosystems had higher abundances of these microbial and mesofaunal groups. Fungal abundance was highly variable and not significantly different among sites. Microbial data was utilized in a food web model that confirmed that rapidly cycling systems are dominated by bacterial activity and enchytraeid grazing. However, our results also suggest that oxidative enzymes play an important role in the C mineralization process in

  3. Role of TGF-β in a Mouse Model of High Turnover Renal Osteodystrophy†

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiguang; Song, Wenping; Boulanger, Joseph H; Tang, Wen; Sabbagh, Yves; Kelley, Brian; Gotschall, Russell; Ryan, Susan; Phillips, Lucy; Malley, Katie; Cao, Xiaohong; Xia, Tai-He; Zhen, Gehua; Cao, Xu; Ling, Hong; Dechow, Paul C; Bellido, Teresita M; Ledbetter, Steven R; Schiavi, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    Altered bone turnover is a key pathologic feature of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Expression of TGF-β1, a known regulator of bone turnover, is increased in bone biopsies from individuals with CKD. Similarly, TGF-β1 mRNA and downstream signaling is increased in bones from jck mice, a model of high-turnover renal osteodystropy. A neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody (1D11) was used to explore TGF-βs role in renal osteodystrophy. 1D11 administration to jck significantly attenuated elevated serum osteocalcin and type I collagen C-telopeptides. Histomorphometric analysis indicated that 1D11 administration increased bone volume and suppressed the elevated bone turnover in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were associated with reductions in osteoblast and osteoclast surface areas. μCT confirmed the observed increase in trabecular bone volume and demonstrated improvements in trabecular architecture and increased cortical thickness. 1D11 administration was associated with significant reductions in expression of osteoblast marker genes (Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin) and the osteoclast marker gene, Trap5. Importantly, in this model, 1D11 did not improve kidney function or reduce serum PTH levels indicating that 1D11 effects on bone are independent of changes in renal or parathyroid function. 1D11 also significantly attenuated high turnover bone disease in the adenine-induced uremic rat model. Antibody administration was associated with a reduction in pSMAD2/SMAD2 in bone but not bone marrow as assessed by quantitative immunoblot analysis. Immunostaining revealed pSMAD staining in osteoblasts and osteocytes but not osteoclasts, suggesting 1D11 effects on osteoclasts may be indirect. Immunoblot and whole genome mRNA expression analysis confirmed our previous observation that repression of Wnt/β catenin expression in bone is correlated with increased osteoclast activity in jck mice and bone biopsies from CKD patients. Furthermore

  4. Carbon Turnover and Dynamics from Biochemically Diverse Microbial Groups in Temperate and Tropical Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throckmorton, H.; Bird, J. A.; Firestone, M.; Horwath, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    Microorganisms represent an important source of actively cycling carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems, yet little is known of the fate or stability of microbial C in soils or the relative importance of microbial biochemistry as a factor influencing C stabilization. This project utilized uniformly 13C-labeled, biochemically diverse, non-living microbial residues including fungi, actinomycetes, bacteria Gm+, and bacteria Gm- as substrates in a reciprocal transplant experiment in a temperate forest in the Sierra Nevada and a tropical forest in Puerto Rico. Microbes were isolated from each site, grown with 13C media, autoclaved and lypholyzed, and non-living residues were added back to soils at each site. The temperate and tropical soils were analyzed over a 3 and 2 year period, respectively. Microbial C turnover differed substantially between the two sites, with microbial C levels stabilizing at 35% of initial input C after 12 months in the temperate site, while in Puerto Rico microbial C does not to begin to stabilize until about 16 months at less than 10% of initial input C. Physical fractionation of soils indicate that, despite the substantial difference in microbial C turnover between the two sites, microbial C turnover in the fraction occluded within aggregates and in the fraction associated with mineral surfaces did not differ between the two sites; the only physical fraction where microbial C turnover differed between the two sites was the light fraction, which is unassociated with the mineral matrix. These results underline the importance of the soil mineral matrix for protecting soil organic matter from mineralization. Although microbial groups did not differ in their relative partitioning among soil physical fractions, there was some evidence for slower overall decomposition of bacteria Gm+ and fungi relative to bacteria Gm- and actinomycetes; however, the observed effect was not substantial. Pyrolysis-GC-MS-IRMS results suggest there are some differences in

  5. Improving the Quality of Innovative Item Types: Four Tasks for Design and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parshall, Cynthia G.; Harmes, J. Christine

    2009-01-01

    Many exam programs have begun to include innovative item types in their operational assessments. While innovative item types appear to have great promise for expanding measurement, there can also be genuine challenges to their successful implementation. In this paper we present a set of four activities that can be beneficially incorporated into…

  6. Plant TRAF Proteins Regulate NLR Immune Receptor Turnover.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuai; Chen, Xuejin; Zhong, Xionghui; Li, Meng; Ao, Kevin; Huang, Jianhua; Li, Xin

    2016-02-10

    In animals, Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) proteins are molecular adaptors that regulate innate and adaptive immunity, development, and abiotic stress responses. Although gene families encoding TRAF domain-containing proteins exhibit enriched diversity in higher plants, their biological roles are poorly defined. Here, we report the identification of two redundant TRAF proteins, Mutant, snc1-enhancing 13 (MUSE13) and MUSE14, that contribute to the turnover of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR) immune receptors SNC1 and RPS2. Loss of both MUSE13 and MUSE14 leads to enhanced pathogen resistance, NLR accumulation, and autoimmunity, while MUSE13 overexpression results in reduced NLR levels and activity. In planta, MUSE13 associates with SNC1, RPS2, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCF(CPR1). Taken together, we speculate that MUSE13 and MUSE14 associate with the SCF E3 ligase complex to form a plant-type TRAFasome, which modulates ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of NLR immune sensors to maintain their homeostasis. PMID:26867179

  7. Gene expression and cell turnover in human renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Woolf, A S; Winyard, P J

    2000-01-01

    Kidney malformations are common causes of chronic renal failure in children. Dysplastic kidneys represent a unique model of perturbed epithelial-mesenchymal interaction which leads to the formation of malformed branching tubules surrounded by undifferentiated and metaplastic mesenchymal cells. We have found that human dysplastic epithelia express PAX2 (a transcription factor), BCL2 (a survival factor) and galectin-3 (a cell adhesion/signaling molecule). These genes are implicated in oncogenesis and their persistent expression may drive proliferation of dysplastic cysts, hence explaining the massive growth of some multicystic dysplastic kidneys. We have also detected prominent apoptosis in undifferentiated tissues around dysplastic epithelia, and this may provide a potential mechanism for the well-documented regression of dysplastic kidneys. Hence, although these kidneys may not have any excretory function, it is incorrect to consider them as 'end stage organs' because they are highly active in terms of cell turnover and gene expression; furthermore, these processes can be correlated with patterns of tissue growth and involution. Further elucidation of 'molecular lesions' in renal malformations may lead to novel therapies to enhance the differentiation of progenitor cells. PMID:10668206

  8. Cavity turnover and equilibrium cavity densities in a cottonwood bottomland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental factor regulating the numbers of secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds is the number of extant cavities available for nesting. The number of available cavities may be thought of as being in an approximate equilibrium maintained by a very rough balance between recruitment and loss of cavities. Based on estimates of cavity recruitment and loss, we ascertained equilibrium cavity densities in a mature plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) bottomland along the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. Annual cavity recruitment, derived from density estimates of primary cavity nesting (PCN) birds and cavity excavation rates, was estimated to be 71-86 new cavities excavated/100 ha. Of 180 active cavities of 11 species of cavity-nesting birds found in 1985 and 1986, 83 were no longer usable by 1990, giving an average instantaneous rate of cavity loss of r = -0.230. From these values of cavity recruitment and cavity loss, equilibrium cavity density along the South Platte is 238-289 cavities/100 ha. This range of equilibrium cavity density is only slightly above the minimum of 205 cavities/100 ha required by SCN's and suggests that cavity availability may be limiting SCN densities along the South Platte River. We submit that snag management alone does not adequately address SCN habitat needs, and that cavity management, expressed in terms of cavity turnover and cavity densities, may be more useful.

  9. Microbial Turnover of Fixed Nitrogen Compounds in Oceanic Crustal Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, B.; Wankel, S. D.; Glazer, B. T.; Huber, J. A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Oceanic crust is the largest aquifer on Earth, with a massive volume of seawater advecting through the basaltic crust. The microbiome of this deep marine subsurface biosphere has been estimated to be substantial, and consequently their metabolic activity may have major influences on global biogeochemical cycles. While earlier and recent studies provide insight into the microbial community composition of oceanic crustal fluids, information on the microbial ecophysiology is broadly missing. Therefore, to investigate the microbial transformation of fixed nitrogen compounds in crustal aquifer fluids, fluids were sampled from different horizons of two neighbouring CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories at the North Pond sediment pond. This site is located on the western flank of the Mid Atlantic Ridge and is characterized by relatively young oceanic crust and cold fluids. The crustal fluids contain oxygen and nitrate, which potentially both may serve as electron acceptor for respiration. In a multidisciplinary approach we combined stable isotope incubations, determination of the natural isotopic compositions and plan to analyse relevant functional genes from a metagenomic dataset to investigate the nitrogen cycling at North Pond. The turnover of fixed nitrogen in oceanic crustal fluids may have important implications for the understanding of the global nitrogen cycle.

  10. Geography: Library of Test Items. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouimanos, John, Ed.

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items of value from past tests are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests, term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The…

  11. Item versus System Learning: Explaining Free Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Rod

    1999-01-01

    Provides an explanation for the existence of free variation in learner language. Argues that interlanguage is best conceptualized as sets of loose lexical networks that are gradually reorganized into a system or systems. Free variation arises when learners add items to those they have already acquired and before they analyze these items and…

  12. Simulated Equating Using Several Item Response Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boldt, R. F.

    The comparison of item response theory models for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) was extended to an equating context as simulation trials were used to "equate the test to itself." Equating sample data were generated from administration of identical item sets. Equatings that used procedures based on each model (simple item…

  13. 47 CFR 65.830 - Deducted items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... deposits and other deferred credits shall be determined as prescribed by 47 CFR part 36. (c) The interstate... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Deducted items. 65.830 Section 65.830... OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Rate Base § 65.830 Deducted items. (a)...

  14. 47 CFR 65.830 - Deducted items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... deposits and other deferred credits shall be determined as prescribed by 47 CFR part 36. (c) The interstate... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Deducted items. 65.830 Section 65.830... OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Rate Base § 65.830 Deducted items. (a)...

  15. 47 CFR 65.830 - Deducted items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... deposits and other deferred credits shall be determined as prescribed by 47 CFR part 36. (c) The interstate... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Deducted items. 65.830 Section 65.830... OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Rate Base § 65.830 Deducted items. (a)...

  16. Optimal Linear Ordering of Information Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Philip M.

    Efficient search of items in a store of information, such as books in a library, abstracts of articles, information in a computer data bank or the like, requires that the items most closely connected in content be close together, in order that a person looking for some particular information may concentrate his search on as small a part of the…

  17. 47 CFR 65.820 - Included items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Included items. 65.820 Section 65.820 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Rate Base § 65.820 Included items....

  18. 47 CFR 65.820 - Included items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Included items. 65.820 Section 65.820 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Rate Base § 65.820 Included items....

  19. 47 CFR 65.830 - Deducted items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... deposits and other deferred credits shall be determined as prescribed by 47 CFR part 36. (c) The interstate... OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Rate Base § 65.830 Deducted items. (a) The following items shall be deducted from the interstate rate base. (1) The interstate portion of...

  20. Detecting Gender Bias through Test Item Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson J.

    2009-01-01

    Many physical science and physics instructors might not be trained in pedagogically appropriate test construction methods. This could lead to test items that do not measure what they are intended to measure. A subgroup of these items might show bias against some groups of students. This paper describes how the author became aware of potentially…

  1. East Asians' Responses to Western Health Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Kwang B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The disparity between interview and self-report data on East Asian mental health has been attributed to the following explanations: (1) incomparability of item content; and (2) cultural differences in the social desirability of questionnaire items. Examination of groups of elderly Korean, Japanese, and European-American subjects undermine these…

  2. Geography Library of Test Items. Volume Six.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouimanos, John, Ed.

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items of value from past tests are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests, term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The…

  3. Geography Library of Test Items. Volume One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouimanos, John, Ed.

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items of value from past tests are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests, term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The…

  4. Item Banks: What, Where, Why and How.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anzaldua, Ric M.

    This paper discusses item banks calibrated to indicate levels of difficulty to assist in test development. The item bank topics discussed are: (1) purpose; (2) development issues; (3) advantages and disadvantages; and (4) practical issues. The most common issues are content validity, reliability, concerns with software purchase and programming,…

  5. 38 CFR 3.1606 - Transportation items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transportation items. 3... Burial Benefits § 3.1606 Transportation items. The transportation costs of those persons who come within... shipment. (6) Cost of transportation by common carrier including amounts paid as Federal taxes. (7) Cost...

  6. 38 CFR 3.1606 - Transportation items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transportation items. 3... Burial Benefits § 3.1606 Transportation items. The transportation costs of those persons who come within... shipment. (6) Cost of transportation by common carrier including amounts paid as Federal taxes. (7) Cost...

  7. 38 CFR 3.1606 - Transportation items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transportation items. 3... Burial Benefits § 3.1606 Transportation items. The transportation costs of those persons who come within... shipment. (6) Cost of transportation by common carrier including amounts paid as Federal taxes. (7) Cost...

  8. 38 CFR 3.1606 - Transportation items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transportation items. 3... Burial Benefits § 3.1606 Transportation items. The transportation costs of those persons who come within... shipment. (6) Cost of transportation by common carrier including amounts paid as Federal taxes. (7) Cost...

  9. 38 CFR 3.1606 - Transportation items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transportation items. 3... Burial Benefits § 3.1606 Transportation items. The transportation costs of those persons who come within... shipment. (6) Cost of transportation by common carrier including amounts paid as Federal taxes. (7) Cost...

  10. Modeling Rule-Based Item Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geerlings, Hanneke; Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2011-01-01

    An application of a hierarchical IRT model for items in families generated through the application of different combinations of design rules is discussed. Within the families, the items are assumed to differ only in surface features. The parameters of the model are estimated in a Bayesian framework, using a data-augmented Gibbs sampler. An obvious…

  11. Developing and evaluating innovative items for the NCLEX: Part 2, item characteristics and cognitive processing.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Anne; Harmes, J Christine

    2009-01-01

    This article is a continuation of the research on the development and evaluation of innovative item formats for the NCLEX examinations that was published in the March/April 2009 edition of Nurse Educator. The authors discuss the innovative item templates and evaluate the statistical characteristics and level of cognitive processing required to answer the examination items. PMID:19412048

  12. Conditional Item-Exposure Control in Adaptive Testing Using Item-Ineligibility Probabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2007-01-01

    Two conditional versions of the exposure-control method with item-ineligibility constraints for adaptive testing in van der Linden and Veldkamp (2004) are presented. The first version is for unconstrained item selection, the second for item selection with content constraints imposed by the shadow-test approach. In both versions, the exposure rates…

  13. How Important Are Items on a Student Evaluation? A Study of Item Salience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hills, Stacey Barlow; Naegle, Natali; Bartkus, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    Although student evaluations of teaching (SETs) have been the subject of numerous research studies, the salience of SET items to students has not been examined. In the present study, the authors surveyed 484 students from a large public university. The authors suggest that not all items are viewed equally and that measures of item salience can…

  14. Ramsay-Curve Item Response Theory for the Three-Parameter Logistic Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2008-01-01

    In Ramsay-curve item response theory (RC-IRT), the latent variable distribution is estimated simultaneously with the item parameters of a unidimensional item response model using marginal maximum likelihood estimation. This study evaluates RC-IRT for the three-parameter logistic (3PL) model with comparisons to the normal model and to the empirical…

  15. Test Anxiety and Item Order: New Parameters for Item Response Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershon, Richard C.

    Examinees (N=1,233) at the Johnson O'Connor Research Foundation (JOCRF) were administered one of three test forms in which only item order differed. The study was undertaken to determine the validity of the assumption underlying item response theory (IRT) that there are fixed item parameters that can predict performance. The Rasch IRT model was…

  16. A Generalized Model with Internal Restrictions on Item Difficulty for Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Jin, Kuan-Yu

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the authors extend the standard item response model with internal restrictions on item difficulty (MIRID) to fit polytomous items using cumulative logits and adjacent-category logits. Moreover, the new model incorporates discrimination parameters and is rooted in a multilevel framework. It is a nonlinear mixed model so that existing…

  17. Comparing Methods for Item Analysis: The Impact of Different Item-Selection Statistics on Test Difficulty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    Practitioners often depend on item analysis to select items for exam forms and have a variety of options available to them. These include the point-biserial correlation, the agreement statistic, the B index, and the phi coefficient. Although research has demonstrated that these statistics can be useful for item selection, no research as of yet has…

  18. Asymptotic Standard Errors for Item Response Theory True Score Equating of Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cher Wong, Cheow

    2015-01-01

    Building on previous works by Lord and Ogasawara for dichotomous items, this article proposes an approach to derive the asymptotic standard errors of item response theory true score equating involving polytomous items, for equivalent and nonequivalent groups of examinees. This analytical approach could be used in place of empirical methods like…

  19. Assessing the Utility of Item Response Theory Models: Differential Item Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheuneman, Janice Dowd

    The current status of item response theory (IRT) is discussed. Several IRT methods exist for assessing whether an item is biased. Focus is on methods proposed by L. M. Rudner (1975), F. M. Lord (1977), D. Thissen et al. (1988) and R. L. Linn and D. Harnisch (1981). Rudner suggested a measure of the area lying between the two item characteristic…

  20. Content Analysis of Gender-Related Differential Item Functioning TIMSS Items in Mathematics in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Innabi, Hanan; Dodeen, Hamzeh

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze items that exhibit gender-related Differential Item Functioning (DIF) in Mathematics in Jordan. Data was taken from the TIMSS 1999 of Jordan, which includes responses of 5, 299 eighth grade students. Mantel-Haenszel (MH) DIF procedure was applied to 124 multiple-choice items. The results showed that 37 items…

  1. Examining the Relationship between Race-Based Differential Item Functioning and Item Difficulty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherbaum, Charles A.; Goldstein, Harold W.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research examining racial differences on standardized cognitive tests has focused on the impact of test item difficulty. Studies using data from the SAT and GRE have reported a correlation between item difficulty and differential item functioning (DIF) such that minority test takers are less likely than majority test takers to respond…

  2. Item Purification in Differential Item Functioning Using Generalized Linear Mixed Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Qian

    2011-01-01

    For this dissertation, four item purification procedures were implemented onto the generalized linear mixed model for differential item functioning (DIF) analysis, and the performance of these item purification procedures was investigated through a series of simulations. Among the four procedures, forward and generalized linear mixed model (GLMM)…

  3. Psychometric Changes on Item Difficulty Due to Item Review by Examinees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanastasiou, Elena C.

    2015-01-01

    If good measurement depends in part on the estimation of accurate item characteristics, it is essential that test developers become aware of discrepancies that may exist on the item parameters before and after item review. The purpose of this study was to examine the answer changing patterns of students while taking paper-and-pencil multiple…

  4. Designing P-Optimal Item Pools in Computerized Adaptive Tests with Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Xuechun

    2012-01-01

    Current CAT applications consist of predominantly dichotomous items, and CATs with polytomously scored items are limited. To ascertain the best approach to polytomous CAT, a significant amount of research has been conducted on item selection, ability estimation, and impact of termination rules based on polytomous IRT models. Few studies…

  5. Effect of dietary protein and iron on the fractional turnover rate of rat liver xanthine oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, D.M.; Amy, N.K.

    1987-12-01

    Rat liver xanthine oxidase activity is regulated in response to dietary protein and iron. To investigate whether the change in activity was mediated by a change in the rate of protein degradation, we measured the fractional turnover rate using the double-isotope technique with (/sup 3/H)- and (/sup 14/C)leucine and calculated the apparent half-life of xanthine oxidase in rats fed diets containing either 20 or 5% casein with either 35 or 5 mg iron/kg diet. Under control conditions, xanthine oxidase had an apparent half-life of 4.8 d and approximately 65% of the enzyme subunits were active. Rats fed diets with low dietary protein had lower xanthine oxidase activity, but the enzyme had a slower fractional turnover rate, resulting in an apparent half-life of 6.4 d, and only 15-20% of the enzyme was active. The apparent half-life of xanthine oxidase increased to 7.5 d in rats fed diets with low dietary iron, but dietary iron did not affect the specific activity of the enzyme or the percentage of active subunits. These results suggest that the loss of enzyme activity is not due to loss of enzyme protein by increased degradation, but rather to inactivation of the enzyme.

  6. Linking pain items from two studies onto a common scale using item response theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Hung; Revicki, Dennis A; Lai, Jin-Shei; Cook, Karon F; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2009-10-01

    This study examined two approaches to linking items from two pain surveys to form a single item bank with a common measurement scale. Secondary analysis of two independent surveys: Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials Survey with Main Survey (959 chronic pain patients; 42 pain items) and Pain Module (n=148; 36 pain items), and Center on Outcomes, Research and Education Survey (400 cancer patients; 43 pain items). There were common items included among the three data sets. In the first approach, all items were calibrated to an item response theory (IRT) model simultaneously, and in the second approach, items were calibrated separately and then the scales were transformed to a common metric. The two approaches produced similar linking results across the two sets of pain interference items because there was sufficient number of common items and large enough sample size. For pain intensity, simultaneous calibration yielded more stable results. Separated calibration yielded an unsatisfactory linking result for pain intensity because of a single common item with small sample size. The results suggested that a simultaneous IRT calibration method produces the more stable item parameters across independent samples, and hence, should be recommended for developing comprehensive item banks. Patient-reported health outcome surveys are often limited in sample sizes and the number of items owing to the difficulty of recruitment and the burden to the patients. As a result, the surveys either lack statistical power or are limited in scope. Using IRT methodology, survey data can be pooled to lend strength to each other to expand the scope and to increase the sample sizes. PMID:19577422

  7. The turnover of mineralized growth plate cartilage into bone may be regulated by osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Cox, Lieke G E; van Rietbergen, B; van Donkelaar, C C; Ito, K

    2011-06-01

    During endochondral ossification, growth plate cartilage is replaced with bone. Mineralized cartilage matrix is resorbed by osteoclasts, and new bone tissue is formed by osteoblasts. As mineralized cartilage does not contain any cells, it is unclear how this process is regulated. We hypothesize that, in analogy with bone remodeling, osteoclast and osteoblast activity are regulated by osteocytes, in response to mechanical loading. Since the cartilage does not contain osteocytes, this means that cartilage turnover during endochondral ossification would be regulated by the adjacent bone tissue. We investigated this hypothesis with an established computational bone adaptation model. In this model, osteocytes stimulate osteoblastic bone formation in response to the mechanical bone tissue loading. Osteoclasts resorb bone near randomly occurring microcracks that are assumed to block osteocyte signals. We used finite element modeling to evaluate our hypothesis in a 2D-domain representing part of the growth plate and adjacent bone. Cartilage was added at a constant physiological rate to simulate growth. Simulations showed that osteocyte signals from neighboring bone were sufficient for successful cartilage turnover, since equilibrium between cartilage remodeling and growth was obtained. Furthermore, there was good agreement between simulated bone structures and rat tibia histology, and the development of the trabecular architecture resembled that of infant long bones. Additionally, prohibiting osteoclast invasion resulted in thickened mineralized cartilage, similar to observations in a knock-out mouse model. We therefore conclude that it is well possible that osteocytes regulate the turnover of mineralized growth plate cartilage. PMID:21546025

  8. Utilizing everyday items in play to facilitate hand therapy for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Peck-Murray, Jill Ann

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how hand therapy for pediatric patients can be enhanced through the use of play with everyday items. Playful activities integrate purposeful hand skills of pinch, grasp and manipulation, while encouraging the child to fully participate in therapy and home programs. By referring to Takata's developmental hierarchy of play, therapists can design the sessions to include novel, fun and age appropriate activities. The author offers eight sample activities for specific therapy goals utilizing inexpensive, everyday items. PMID:25060856

  9. Cost of nursing turnover in a Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Paula Buck de Oliveira; Perroca, Marcia Galan; Jericó, Marli de Carvalho

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To map the sub processes related to turnover of nursing staff and to investigate and measure the nursing turnover cost. METHOD This is a descriptive-exploratory study, classified as case study, conducted in a teaching hospital in the southeastern, Brazil, in the period from May to November 2013. The population was composed by the nursing staff, using Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology. RESULTS The total cost of turnover was R$314.605,62, and ranged from R$2.221,42 to R$3.073,23 per employee. The costs of pre-hire totaled R$101.004,60 (32,1%), and the hiring process consumed R$92.743,60 (91.8%) The costs of post-hire totaled R$213.601,02 (67,9%), for the sub process decreased productivity, R$199.982,40 (93.6%). CONCLUSION The study identified the importance of managing the cost of staff turnover and the financial impact of the cost of the employee termination, which represented three times the average salary of the nursing staff. PMID:27007427

  10. Counselor emotional exhaustion and turnover intention in therapeutic communities.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Ducharme, Lori J; Roman, Paul M

    2006-09-01

    Counselor turnover is a significant problem facing substance abuse treatment agencies. Understanding the role of organizational culture in predicting burnout and turnover intention may yield important information on how to address turnover in treatment organizations. Using data collected from 817 counselors employed in a national sample of 253 therapeutic communities (TCs), structural equation modeling was used to estimate the associations between emotional exhaustion, turnover intention, and three measures of organizational culture: centralized decision making, distributive justice, and procedural justice. The model controlled for counselor demographics, credentials, and earnings. Counselors' emotional exhaustion scores were higher in TCs with greater centralized decision making (p < .01) but lower in TCs where greater distributive justice (p < .05) and procedural justice (p < .001) were reported. Likewise, turnover intention was positively associated with centralized decision making (p < .05) and inversely associated with the workplace justice measures (p < .001). These data suggest that management practices in TCs and perhaps in other types of substance abuse treatment facilities likely play a substantial role in counselors' well-being and in their decisions to leave their jobs. Because these practices are not structural features of organizations, they may be targeted for intervention and change. PMID:16919745

  11. Generalized Full-Information Item Bifactor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Li; Yang, Ji Seung; Hansen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Full-information item bifactor analysis is an important statistical method in psychological and educational measurement. Current methods are limited to single group analysis and inflexible in the types of item response models supported. We propose a flexible multiple-group item bifactor analysis framework that supports a variety of multidimensional item response theory models for an arbitrary mixing of dichotomous, ordinal, and nominal items. The extended item bifactor model also enables the estimation of latent variable means and variances when data from more than one group are present. Generalized user-defined parameter restrictions are permitted within or across groups. We derive an efficient full-information maximum marginal likelihood estimator. Our estimation method achieves substantial computational savings by extending Gibbons and Hedeker’s (1992) bifactor dimension reduction method so that the optimization of the marginal log-likelihood only requires two-dimensional integration regardless of the dimensionality of the latent variables. We use simulation studies to demonstrate the flexibility and accuracy of the proposed methods. We apply the model to study cross-country differences, including differential item functioning, using data from a large international education survey on mathematics literacy. PMID:21534682

  12. Neural measures reveal a fixed item limit in subitizing

    PubMed Central

    Ester, Edward F.; Drew, Trafton; Klee, Daniel; Vogel, Edward K.; Awh, Edward

    2012-01-01

    For centuries, it has been known that humans can rapidly and accurately enumerate small sets of items, a process referred to as subitizing. However, there is still active debate regarding the mechanisms that mediate this ability. For example, some have argued that subitizing reflects the operation of a fixed-capacity individuation mechanism that enables concurrent access to a small number of items. However, others have argued that subitizing reflects the operation of a continuous numerical estimation mechanism whose precision varies with numerosity in a manner consistent with Weber's law. Critically, quantitative models based on either of these predictions can provide a reasonable description of subitizing performance, making it difficult to discriminate between these alternatives solely on the basis of subjects' behavioral performance. Here, we attempted to discriminate between fixed-capacity and continuous estimation models of subitizing using neural measures. In two experiments, we recorded EEG while subjects performed a demanding subitizing task and examined set-size dependent changes in a neurophysiological marker of visual selection (the N2pc ERP component) evoked by an array of to-be-enumerated items. In both experiments, N2pc amplitudes increased monotonically within the subitizing range before reaching an asymptotic limit at around 3 items. Moreover, inter-participant differences in the location of this asymptote were strongly predictive of behavioral estimates of subitizing span derived from a fixed-capacity model. Thus, neural activity linked with subitizing ability shows evidence of an early and discrete limit in the number of items that can be concurrently apprehended, supporting a fixed-capacity model of this process. PMID:22623661

  13. Active G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), matrix metalloproteinases 2/9 (MMP2/9), heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (hbEGF), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), erbB2, and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) are necessary for trenbolone acetate-induced alterations in protein turnover rate of fused bovine satellite cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Thornton, K J; Kamanga-Sollo, E; White, M E; Dayton, W R

    2016-06-01

    Trenbolone acetate (TBA), a testosterone analog, increases protein synthesis and decreases protein degradation in fused bovine satellite cell (BSC) cultures. However, the mechanism through which TBA alters these processes remains unknown. Recent studies indicate that androgens improve rate and extent of muscle growth through a nongenomic mechanism involving G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (hbEGF), the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), erbB2, and the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R). We hypothesized that TBA activates GPCR, resulting in activation of MMP2/9 that releases hbEGF, which activates the EGFR and/or erbB2. To determine whether the proposed nongenomic pathway is involved in TBA-mediated alterations in protein turnover, fused BSC cultures were treated with TBA in the presence or absence of inhibitors for GPCR, MMP2/9, hbEGF, EGFR, erbB2, or IGF-1R, and resultant protein synthesis and degradation rates were analyzed. Assays were replicated at least 9 times for each inhibitor experiment utilizing BSC cultures obtained from at least 3 different steers that had no previous exposure to steroid compounds. As expected, fused BSC cultures treated with 10 n TBA exhibited increased ( < 0.05) protein synthesis rates and decreased ( < 0.05) protein degradation rates when compared to control cultures. Treatment of fused BSC cultures with 10 n TBA in the presence of inhibitors for GPCR, MMP2/9, hbEGF, EGFR, erbB2, or IGF-1R suppressed ( < 0.05) TBA-mediated increases in protein synthesis rate. Alternatively, inhibition of GPCR, MMP2/9, hbEGF, EGFR, erbB2, or IGF-1R in the presence of 10 n TBA each had no ( > 0.05) effect on TBA-mediated decreases in protein degradation. However, inhibition of both EGFR and erbB2 in the presence of 10 n TBA resulted in decreased ( < 0.05) ability of TBA to decrease protein degradation rate. Additionally, fused BSC cultures treated with 10 n

  14. Turnover rate of cerebrospinal fluid in female sheep: changes related to different light-dark cycles

    PubMed Central

    Thiéry, Jean-Claude; Lomet, Didier; Bougoin, Sylvain; Malpaux, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    Background Sheep are seasonal breeders. The key factor governing seasonal changes in the reproductive activity of the ewe is increased negative feedback of estradiol at the level of the hypothalamus under long-day conditions. It has previously been demonstrated that when gonadotropin secretions are inhibited during long days, there is a higher concentration of estradiol in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) than during short days. This suggests an involvement of the CSF and choroid plexus in the neuroendocrine regulatory loop, but the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unknown. One possible explanation of this difference in hormonal content is an effect of concentration or dilution caused by variations in CSF secretion rate. The aim of this study was thus to investigate changes in the CSF turnover rate related to light-dark cycles. Methods The turnover rate of the CSF was estimated by measuring the time taken for the recovery of intraventricular pressure (IVP) after removal of a moderate volume (0.5 to 2 ml) of CSF (slope in mmHg/min). The turnover rate was estimated three times in the same group of sheep: during a natural period of decreasing day-length corresponding to the initial period when gonadotropin activity is stimulated (SG1), during a long-day inhibitory period (IG), and finally during a short-day stimulatory period (SG2). Results The time taken and the speed of recovery of initial IVP differed between groups: 8 min 30 sec, 0.63 ± 0.07 mmHg/min(SG1), 11 min 1 sec, 0.38 ± 0.06 mmHg/min (IG) and 9 min 0 sec, 0.72 ± 0.15 mmHg/min (SG2). Time changes of IVP differed between groups (ANOVA, p < 0.005, SG1 different from IG, p < 0.05). The turnover rate in SG2: 183.16 ± 23.82 μl/min was not significantly different from SG1: 169. 23 ± 51.58 μl/min (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.41), but was significantly different from IG: 71.33 ± 16.59 μl/min (p = 0.016). Conclusion This study shows that the turnover rate of CSF in ewes changes according to the light

  15. Support Effects on Bronsted acid site densities and alcohol dehydration turnover rates on tungsten oxide domains

    SciTech Connect

    Macht, Josef; Baertsch, Chelsey D.; May-Lozano, Marcos; Soled, Stuart L.; Wang, Yong; Iglesia, Enrique

    2005-03-01

    Initial activity and acid site density of several WAl, WSi (MCM41) and one WSn sample were determined. Trans/cis 2-butene selectivity is dependent on the support. Presumably, these differences are due to subtle differences in base strengths. 2-Butanol dehydration rates (per W-atom) reached maximum values at intermediate WOx surface densities on WAl, as reported for 2-butanol dehydration reactions on WZr. Titration results indicate that Bronsted acid sites are required for 2-butanol dehydration on WAl, WSi and WSn. UV-visible studies suggest that WAl is much more difficult to reduce than WZr. The detection of reduced centers on WAl, the number of which correlates to Bronsted acid site density and catalyst activity, as well as the temperature dependence of Bronsted acid site density indicate the in-situ formation of these active sites. We infer that this mechanism is common among all supported WOx samples described in this study. Turnover rates are a function of Bronsted acid site density only. High acid site densities lead to high turnover rates. Higher active site densities may cause stronger conjugate bases, as a higher electron density has to be stabilized, and thus weaker acidity, enabling a faster rate of product desorption. The maximum achievable active site density is dependent on the support. WZr reaches a higher active site density than WAl.

  16. Urokinase and the intestinal mucosa: evidence for a role in epithelial cell turnover

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P; Birchall, I; Rosella, O; Albert, V; Finch, C; Barkla, D; Young, G

    1998-01-01

    Background—The functions of urokinase in intestinal epithelia are unknown. 
Aims—To determine the relation of urokinase expressed by intestinal epithelial cells to their position in the crypt-villus/surface axis and of mucosal urokinase activity to epithelial proliferative kinetics in the distal colon. 
Methods—Urokinase expression was examined immunohistochemically in human intestinal mucosa. Urokinase activity was measured colorimetrically in epithelial cells isolated sequentially from the crypt-villus axis of the rat small intestine. In separate experiments, urokinase activity and epithelial kinetics (measured stathmokinetically) were measured in homogenates of distal colonic mucosa of 14 groups of eight rats fed diets known to alter epithelial turnover. 
Results—From the crypt base, an ascending gradient of expression and activity of urokinase was associated with the epithelial cells. Median mucosal urokinase activities in each of the dietary groups of rats correlated positively with autologous median number of metaphase arrests per crypt (r=0.68; p<0.005) and per 100 crypt cells (r=0.75; p<0.001), but not with crypt column height. 
Conclusions—Localisation of an enzyme capable of leading to digestion of cell substratum in the region where cells are loosely attached to their basement membrane, and the association of its activity with indexes of cell turnover, suggest a role for urokinase in facilitating epithelial cell loss in the intestine. 

 Keywords: urokinase; intestinal epithelium; colon; epithelial proliferation PMID:9824347

  17. Stressful work, psychological job strain, and turnover: a 2-year prospective cohort study of truck drivers.

    PubMed

    de Croon, Einar M; Sluiter, Judith K; Blonk, Roland W B; Broersen, Jake P J; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2004-06-01

    Based on a model that combines existing organizational stress theory and job transition theory, this 2-year longitudinal study examined antecedents and consequences of turnover among Dutch truck drivers. For this purpose, self-reported data on stressful work (job demands and control), psychological strain (need for recovery after work and fatigue), and turnover were obtained from 820 drivers in 1998 and 2000. In agreement with the model, the results showed that strain mediates the influence of stressful work on voluntary turnover. Also in conformity with the model, job movement to any job outside the trucking industry (i.e., interoccupational turnover) resulted in a larger strain reduction as compared to job movement within the trucking industry (intraoccupational turnover). Finally, strain was found to stimulate interoccupational turnover more strongly than it stimulated intraoccupational turnover. These findings provide a thorough validation of existing turnover theory and give new insights into the turnover (decision) process. PMID:15161404

  18. Light-stimulated inositolphospholipid turnover in Samanea saman leaf pulvini

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, M.J.; Crain, R.C.; Satter, R.L.

    1987-10-01

    Leaflets of Samanea saman open and close rhythmically, driven by an endogenous circadian clock. Light has a rapid, direct effect on the movements and also rephases the rhythm. The authors investigated whether light signals might be mediated by increased inositolphospholipid turnover, a mechanism for signal transduction that is widely utilized in animal systems. Samanea motor organs (pulvini) labeled with (/sup 3/H)inositol were irradiated briefly (5-30 sec) with white light, and membrane-localized phosphatidylinositol phosphates and their aqueous breakdown products, the inositol phosphates, were examined. After a 15-sec or longer light pulse, labeled phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate decreased and their labeled metabolic products inositol 1,4-biphosphate and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate increased changes characteristic of inositolphospholipid turnover. The authors conclude that inositolphospholipid turnover may act as a phototransduction mechanism in Samanea pulvini in a manner that is similar to that reported in animal systems.

  19. Quality of Working Life: An Antecedent to Employee Turnover Intention

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to measure the level of quality of work life (QWL) among hospital employees in Iran. Additionally, it aimed to identify the factors that are critical to employees’ QWL. It also aimed to test a theoretical model of the relationship between employees’ QWL and their intention to leave the organization. Methods: A survey study was conducted based on a sample of 608 hospital employees using a validated questionnaire. Face, content and construct validity were conducted on the survey instrument. Results: Hospital employees reported low QWL. Employees were least satisfied with pay, benefits, job promotion, and management support. The most important predictor of QWL was management support, followed by job proud, job security and job stress. An inverse relationship was found between employees QWL and their turnover intention. Conclusion: This study empirically examined the relationships between employees’ QWL and their turnover intention. Managers can take appropriate actions to improve employees’ QWL and subsequently reduce employees’ turnover. PMID:24596835

  20. Factors related to job turnover in physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Harkson, D G; Unterreiner, A S; Shepard, K F

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of personal and work-related factors in relation to job turnover in the physical therapy profession. A survey questionnaire was mailed to a nationwide sample of 820 physical therapists, and 567 responses (69%) were used in the data analyses. The two most important reasons for leaving a job were "desire to pursue a different area of physical therapy" and "insufficient salary to meet financial needs." Significant differences were found in the relative importance of job-turnover factors when the sample was stratified according to physical therapy education level, percentage of time in direct patient care, years in the physical therapy profession, and sex. A careful look at the factors contributing to job turnover will help physical therapy administrators retain staff members. PMID:7122704