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Sample records for activities volume ii

  1. Energy Activities for the Classroom: Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coon, Herbert L.; Bowman, Mary Lynne

    This resource book contains descriptions of over 100 classroom activities designed to illustrate concepts relating to energy, its production, characteristics, use, and conservations. Each activity integrates the energy lesson into a concept that relates to one or more subject areas common to public school curricula. Many of the activities included…

  2. 50+ Activities for Early Childhood Essential Elements. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Service Center Region 6, Huntsville, TX.

    Written as a companion resource to "Early Childhood Essential Elements," a document developed by the Education Service Center, Region VI, Huntsville, Texas, this second volume of a two-volume activity guide provides activities enhancing children's self-help, social/emotional, and creative/expressive skills. The guide also provides a short…

  3. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Water Pollution and Environmental Studies, Volume II - Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, John T., Ed.; And Others

    This publication, Volume II of a two volume set of water pollution studies, contains seven appendices which support the studies. Appendix 1, Water Quality Parameters, consolidates the technical aspects of water quality including chemical, biological, computer program, and equipment information. Appendix 2, Implementation, outlines techniques…

  4. Deafness Annual, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Arthur G., Ed.

    Presented is the second of two volumes on deafness which contains 12 papers and a review of programs or grants sponsored by the federal government and other groups. Larry Stewart identifies the deaf in "A Truly Silent Minority". In the "Seven-Faces of Deafness", G. Loyd tells what deafness means to seven people. E. Mindel maintains that parents…

  5. Site Environmental Report for 1998 Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggieri, Michael

    1999-09-30

    Volume II of the Site Environment Report for 1998 is provided by Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a supplemental appendix to the report printed in volume I. Volume II contains the environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate summary results in the main report for routine and non routine activities at the Laboratory (except for groundwater sampling data, which may be found in the reports referred to in chapter 6). Data presented in the tables are given in International System of Units (SI) units of measure.

  6. Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, Regina; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea; Xu, Suying

    2009-09-21

    The Site Environmental Report for 2008 is an integrated report on environmental programs at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and satisfies the requirements of DOE Order 231.1 A., Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities

  7. Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, Regina E; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea; Wyrick, Steve

    2008-09-15

    The Site Environmental Report for 2007 is an integrated report on the environmental programs at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and satisfies the requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities.

  8. Alcohol and Alcohol Safety. Volume II of II. A Curriculum Manual for Elementary Level. A Teacher's Activities Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter; Platt, Judith

    This curriculum manual for the elementary school level is the first in a series on alcohol and alcohol safety and is designed as a teacher's activities guide. Each activity provided is a self-contained learning experience which requires varying numbers of class period and focuses on one or more objectives. Activities are numbered consecutively and…

  9. Site Environmental Report for 1999 - Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggieri, M

    2000-08-01

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1999 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1999. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summary results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Each chapter in Volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow, including any tables or figures found in the chapter. Readers should use section numbers (e.g., {section}1.5) as navigational tools to find topics of interest in either the printed or the electronic version of the report. Volume II contains the individual data results from monitoring programs.

  10. Descriptive Analysis of Title VII-Funded State Education Agency Activities. Volume II: Nine Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nava, Hector; And Others

    Results of a national study of the use of funds provided by the 1974 amendments to Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act by the state education agencies (SEAs) are presented. The study was undertaken to (1) describe and analyze SEA policies and activities regarding bilingual education, (2) describe and analyze the SEA-level…

  11. Infusing a Global Perspective into the Study of Agriculture: Student Activities Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Robert A., Ed.

    These student activities are designed to be used in a variety of places in the curriculum to provide a global perspective for students as they study agriculture. This document is not a unit of instruction; rather, teachers are encouraged to study the materials and decide which will be helpful in adding a global perspective to the learning…

  12. Patterns of Innovation. An Inventory of Non-traditional Instructional Activities. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. Richard

    This document presents a collection of papers presenting an array of innovative approaches in higher education and offers papers and case studies of a variety of nontraditional activities. Some of the topics cover closed circuit TV and audio-tutorial instruction in veterinary science and medicine; televised graduate level engineering courses; the…

  13. 1996 Site environmental report. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory presents Volume II, data appendix as a reference document to supplement the 1996 Site Environmental Report. Volume II contains the raw environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate many of the summary results included in the main report for both routine and nonroutine activities. This appendix includes a legend that cross-references the enclosed data tables with summary tables in the main report. The legend also provides a listing of more detailed descriptions for the station location codes used in the appendices` tables. Data presented in the tables are given in Systeme International (SI) units. The glossary found in the main report contains a listing of the SI units.

  14. Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggieri, Michael

    2006-07-07

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. Two tables are provided at the end of the Glossary to help readers: the first defines the prefixes

  15. Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase I and Phase II. Volume IV. Field activities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, C.

    1984-01-01

    This volume describes those activities which took place at the Sperry DOE Gravity Head plant site at the East Mesa Geothermal Reservoir near Holtville, California between February 1980, when site preparation was begun, and November 1982, when production well 87-6 was permanently abandoned. Construction activities were terminated in July 1981 following the liner collapse in well 87-6. Large amounts of program time manpower, materials, and funds had been diverted in a nine-month struggle to salvage the production well. Once these efforts proved futile, there was no rationale for continuing with the site work unless and until sufficient funding to duplicate well 87-6 was obtained. Activities reported here include: plant construction and pre-operational calibration and testing, drilling and completion of well 87-6, final repair effort on well 87-6, abandonment of well 87-6, and performance evaluation of well 87.6. (MHR)

  16. Studies in Interpretation. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Esther M., Ed.; Floyd, Virginia Hastings, Ed.

    The purpose of this second book of 21 self-contained essays is the same as that of the first volume published in 1972: to bring together the scholarly theory and current research regarding oral interpretation. One third of the essays are centered on literature itself: prose fiction, poetry, and the drama. These essays discuss topics such as point…

  17. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: COOMET.RI(II)-S1.Rn-222 (169/UA/98): Rn-222 volume activity comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skliarov, V.; Röttger, A.; Honig, A.; Korostin, S.; Kuznetsov, S.; Lapenas, A.; Milevsky, V.; Ivaniukovich, A.; Kharitonov, I.; Sepman, S.

    2009-01-01

    According to a first program, a supplementary comparison of Rn-222 volume activity was drawn up as a bilateral supplementary comparison between NSC 'Institute of Metrology', Ukraine, and VNIIFTRI, Russia. It took place in March 2005. In April 2005, at the 5th meeting of COOMET held in Braunschweig (Germany), representatives of these institutes exchanged data which showed the comparability of the national standards of Ukraine and Russia for the check points. During the discussion of the procedure some other institutes decided to join the comparison program, which was extended to BelGIM (Belarus), PTB (Germany), VNIIM (Russia) and RMTC (Latvia). The national standards of volume activity of radon-222 were thus calibrated using one standard radon radiometer as the transfer standard. Results are shown in the Final Report of the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by COOMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  18. Appropriate technology sourcebook. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, K.; Keller, K.; Pam, R

    1981-01-01

    The second in a 2 volume set of guides to practical books and plans for village and small community technology, with over 500 annotated references in print in 1980/1. The forestry section includes material on deforestation, conservation, reforestation, firewood crops, agroforestry, timber drying and the safe use of chain saws. Improved cooking stoves and charcoal kilns are covered in another section, and there is also a section on aquaculture. A glossary and a general index are included.

  19. Culture of Schools. Final Report. Volume II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC.

    Volume II of this 4-volume report contains the second half of a report on the Conference on the Culture of Schools held at Greystone, New York, (the first half of the conference report appears in Vol. I, SP 003 900), and the first part of a report on the Colloquium on the Culture of Schools held at the New School for Social Research in 1966. (The…

  20. Occupational Information 1990/91. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Nebraska Career Information System.

    The Nebraska Occupational Information books (volumes I and II) contain information about 386 different occupations in the state and answer questions about specific occupations in detail. The descriptions are arranged according to a U.S. Department of Labor classification system, with occupational titles clustered in general groups of selected…

  1. Final Technical Progress Report; Closeout Certifications; CSSV Newsletter Volume I; CSSV Newsletter Volume II; CSSV Activity Journal; CSSV Final Financial Report

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, Johnny L; Geter, Kerry

    2013-08-23

    This Project?s third year of implementation in 2007-2008, the final year, as designated by Elizabeth City State University (ECSU), in cooperation with the National Association of Mathematicians (NAM) Inc., in an effort to promote research and research training programs in computational science ? scientific visualization (CSSV). A major goal of the Project was to attract the energetic and productive faculty, graduate and upper division undergraduate students of diverse ethnicities to a program that investigates science and computational science issues of long-term interest to the Department of Energy (DoE) and the nation. The breadth and depth of computational science?scientific visualization and the magnitude of resources available are enormous for permitting a variety of research activities. ECSU?s Computational Science-Science Visualization Center will serve as a conduit for directing users to these enormous resources.

  2. Managing oil and gas activities in coastal environments. Volume II: comprehensive report. Report for 1977-81

    SciTech Connect

    Longley, W.L.; Jackson, R.; Snyder, B.

    1982-03-01

    This report documents the management of oil and gas development on national wildlife refuges on the Louisiana and Texas coasts. It explains the nature of ownership, leasing rights, and legal considerations related to oil and gas extraction on refuges. The report describes five federal refuges selected for analysis and the different marsh and estuarine ecosystems found on the refuges and in the coastal zone. It explains oil and gas extraction and transport methods used in coastal systems, and examines how each habitat is affected by these activities.

  3. Chemical toxicity to environmental bacteria: Quantitative structure activity relationships and interspecies correlations and comparisons (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, D.J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Toxicity data were collected for four groups of bacteria and a fish. These data were collected for four groups of bacteria and a fish. These data were used to compare and correlate the toxicities to different organisms, and to develop Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSARs) correlating chemical structure with toxicity. Chemical toxicity to aerobic heterotrophic bacteria, Nitrosomonas, and methanogens were measured using serum bottle techniques in order to determine the concentration of chemical which caused 50% inhibition in microorganism's activity. Toxicity to Photobacteria phosphoreum (Microtox bacteria) and fathead minnows was also tested or data collected from the literature. Toxicants included chlorinated and other substituted benzenes and phenols, chlorinated alkanes, and a variety of additional compounds covering a range of chemical structures. Data were obtained for 50 to 130 chemicals per species. The sensitivity of the organism fell into two groups with Microtox bacteria, Nitrosomonas, and fathead minnows showing significantly greater sensitivity than aerobic heterotrophs and methanogens. Highly successful interspecies correlations were found between Microtox and each of the other species.

  4. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 2001 Annual Update (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, B.

    2001-04-30

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity scheduled milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  5. Immunobiology of natural killer cells. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volume include: In vivo activities of NK cells against primary and metastatic tumors in experimental animals; involvement of NK cells in human malignant disease; impaired NK cell profile in leukemia patients; in vivo modulation of NK activity in cancer patients; implications of aberrant NK cell activity in nonmalignant, chronic diseases; NK cell role in regulation of the growth and functions of hemopoietic and lymphoid cells; NK cells active against viral, bacterial, protozoan, and fungal infections; cytokine secretion and noncytotoxic functions of human large granular lymphocytes; augmentation of NK activity; regulation of NK cell activity by suppressor cells; NK cell cloning technology and characteristics of NK cell clones; comparison of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and NK activity, and index.

  6. Draft Strategic Laboratory Missions Plan. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This volume described in detail the Department`s research and technology development activities and their funding at the Department`s laboratories. It includes 166 Mission Activity Profiles, organized by major mission area, with each representing a discrete budget function called a Budget and Reporting (B & R) Code. The activities profiled here encompass the total research and technology development funding of the laboratories from the Department. Each profile includes a description of the activity and shows how the funding for that activity is distributed among the DOE laboratories as well as universities and industry. The profiles also indicate the principal laboratories for each activity, as well as which other laboratories are involved. The information in this volume is at the core of the Strategic Laboratory Mission Plan. It enables a reader to follow funds from the Department`s appropriation to a specific activity description and to specific R & D performing institutions. This information will enable the Department, along with the Laboratory Operations Board and Congress, to review the distribution of R & D performers chosen to execute the Department`s missions.

  7. Mammalian cytochromes P-450: Volume I and Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Guengerich, F.P.

    1987-01-01

    This two volume set summarizes the current knowledge of mammalian cytochromes. Ten chapters cover the current understanding of the enzymology of rat, rabbit, and human liver cytochromes P-450, extrahepatic cytochromes P-450, the diversity of substrates for the individual cytochromes P0-450 proteins, the metabolism of pro-toxicants and -carcinogens by cytochrome P-450, the degradation of cytochrome P-450 proteins, and the regulation of cytochrome P-450 activities in vitro and in vivo. The individual chapters outline the historical development of each area, the approaches which are applied, the current state of knowledge, and future directions towards unresolved questions; and index.

  8. Earthquakes and the urban environment. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    Because of the complex nature of earthquake effects, current investigations encompass many disciplines, including those of both the physical and social sciences. Research activities center on such diversified topics as earthquake mechanics, earthquake prediction and control, the prompt and accurate detection of tsunamis (seismic sea waves), earthquake-resistant construction, seismic building code improvements, land use zoning, earthquake risk and hazard perception, disaster preparedness, plus the study of the concerns and fears of people who have experienced the effects of an earthquake. This monograph attempts to amalgamate recent research input comprising the vivifying components of urban seismology at a level useful to those having an interest in the earthquake and its effects upon an urban environment. Volume 2 contains chapters on earthquake prediction, control, building design and building response.

  9. Healthy People 2010: Conference Edition, Volume I [and] Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC.

    This document contains the two volumes of the Conference Edition of Healthy People 2010, a comprehensive, nationwide health promotion and disease prevention agenda. The first section of Volume I, "Healthy People 2010: Understanding and Improving Health," includes "Introduction,""Leading Health Indicators," and "Bibliography. The second section,…

  10. AGEX II: Technical quarterly, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, C.

    1995-03-01

    The AGEX II Technical Quarterly publishes short technical contributions on above ground experiments that use pulsed power and laser drivers. The Quarterly is intended to provide rapid exposure of timely technical ideas and results as well as a means for documenting AGEX II progress and scientific quality for the AGEX II community. Suitable topics include experimental results, diagnostic apparatus, theoretical design, and scaling, among others.

  11. Gender and Education. An Encyclopedia. Volume II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bank, Barbara J., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This book represents the second of two volumes in a two-volume set where educators explore the intersection of gender and education. Their entries deal with educational theories, research, curricula, practices, personnel, and policies, but also with variations in the gendering of education across historical and cultural contexts. The various…

  12. Matter, Motion, and Man, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montag, Betty Jo

    Volume Two of the three-volume experimental program in general science attempts to provide preparation for the new approaches in biology, chemistry, and physics and to give those who will not continue in science a realistic way of understanding themselves, the world, and the role of science in society. Chapters on classification, heredity, light,…

  13. Readings in Intercultural Communication, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoopes, Davis S., Ed.

    The second volume contains five articles on the theory of culture conflict, four perspectives on intercultural communications workshop programs, and seventeen syllabi courses on or related to intercultural communications in higher education. This volume attempts to bring about a more worldly perspective in universities and in the nation itself.…

  14. 7. Photocopy of print (from Niagara Power, Volume II, p. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of print (from Niagara Power, Volume II, p. 71) Delineator and date unknown PLAN OF POWER HOUSE NUMBER ONE AND ITS AUXILIARY STRUCTURES - Edward D. Adams Station Power Plant, Niagara River & Buffalo Avenue, Niagara Falls, Niagara County, NY

  15. 6. Photocopy of print (from Niagara Power, Volume II, p. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of print (from Niagara Power, Volume II, p. 19) Delineator and date unknown DIAGRAM OF INLET-CANAL, POWER-HOUSES AND TUNNEL - Edward D. Adams Station Power Plant, Niagara River & Buffalo Avenue, Niagara Falls, Niagara County, NY

  16. Caring for Children in Family Child Care. Volume I, Volume II, and Training Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koralek, Derry G.; And Others

    This document contains volume I, volume II and the Trainer's Guide. Volume I contains 6 modules of a course of study designed to help individuals, either on their own or in a formal course of instruction, acquire the skills and knowledge needed to provide high-quality family child care for children from infancy through age 12. The other 7 modules…

  17. Family Finance Education; An Interdisciplinary Approach. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Mary S., Ed.; And Others, Eds.

    Volume II of a two-part series related to family finance education provides materials for study and discussion in the 1968 workshop. In Part I, members of the advisory council present their viewpoints concerning an interdisciplinary approach to education in family finance. Part II presents basic and current information related to principal areas…

  18. 1978-79 Michigan Social Studies Textbook Study, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, John M., Ed.

    This document, Volume II of a two-volume report on the extent to which four elementary level social studies programs reflect the multi-racial, multi-cultural nature of American society, contains individual reports of each reviewer. Fifteen reviewers examined textbooks and accompanying instructional materials according to the degree to which they…

  19. Beyond the Classroom: International Education and the Community College. Volume II: Internationalizing the Campus Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco, Robert W., Ed.; Shimabukuro, James N., Ed.

    Part of a four-volume set in which community college educators discuss their efforts to internationalize the educational experience of the students and communities they serve, volume II in this series considers the challenges, pitfalls, and rewards of creating campus environments with rich international and intercultural programs and activities.…

  20. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Doelling, H.H.

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  1. Introducing Literary Arabic, Volume II: Grammatical Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Sami A.; Greis, Naguib

    This volume, designed as a companion to "Introducing Literary Arabic" provides basic grammatical explanations essential in first-year courses. Each of the 15 units, with the exception of the first, contains related grammatical notes, paradigms, and illustrations. The grammatical rules are intended to make explicit general underlying structures.…

  2. Construction Cluster Volume II [Masonry Work].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Justice, Harrisburg. Bureau of Correction.

    The document is the second of a series, to be integrated with a G.E.D. program, containing instructional materials at the basic skills level for the construction cluster. The volume focuses on masonry and consists of 20 instructional units which require a month of study. The units include: (1) historical aspects of masonry work and occupational…

  3. Teaching, Learning and Development: Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCaro, James J., Ed.; Areson, Ann H., Ed.

    The second volume of papers commissioned by Foundations, a project designed to examine the career development needs of students entering the National Technical Institute for the Deaf, this document contains papers that deal with the instructional components of learning. An introduction presents a conceptual framework for the Foundations project,…

  4. Unified Technical Concepts. Application Modules Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    Unified Technical Concepts (UTC) is a modular system for teaching applied physics in two-year postsecondary technician programs. This UTC laboratory textbook, the second of two volumes, consists of 45 learning modules dealing with basic concepts of physics. Addressed in the individual chapters of the guide are the following topics: force…

  5. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies. (MOW)

  6. Photovoltaic module encapsulation design and materials selection. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Cuddihy, E.

    1984-06-01

    This is Volume II of Photovoltaic Module Encapsulation Design and Materials Selection: a periodically updated handbook of encapsulation technology, developed with the support of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA), managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Volume II describes FSA encapsulation technology developed between June 1, 1982, and January 1, 1984. Emphasis during this period shifted from materials development to demonstration of reliability and durability in an outdoor environment; the updated information in this volume reflects the developing technology base related to both reliability and encapsulation process improvements.

  7. An Independent Scientific Assessment of Well Stimulation in California Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Jane C.S. Long; Laura C. Feinstein; Corinne E. Bachmann; Birkholzer, Jens T.; Camarillo, Mary Kay; Jeremy K. Domen; Foxall, William; Houseworth, James; Jin, Ling; Preston D. Jordan; Randy L. Maddalena; Thomas E. McKone; Dev E. Millstein; Matthew T. Reagan; Whitney L. Sandelin; William T. Stringfellow; Varadharajan, Charuleka; Cooley, Heather; Donnelly, Kristina; Matthew G. Heberger; Hays, Jake; Seth B.C. Shonkoff; Brandt, Adam; Jacob G. Englander; Hamdoun, Amro; Sascha C.T. Nicklisch; Robert J. Harrison; Zachary S. Wettstein; Banbury, Jenner; Brian L. Cypher; Scott E. Phillips

    2015-07-01

    This study is issued in three volumes. Volume I, issued in January 2015, describes how well stimulation technologies work, how and where operators deploy these technologies for oil and gas production in California, and where they might enable production in the future. Volume II, the present volume, discusses how well stimulation could affect water, atmosphere, seismic activity, wildlife and vegetation, and human health. Volume II reviews available data, and identifies knowledge gaps and alternative practices that could avoid or mitigate these possible impacts. Volume III, also issued in July 2015, presents case studies that assess environmental issues and qualitative risks for specific geographic regions. A final Summary Report summarizes key findings, conclusions and recommendations of all three volumes.

  8. Acheii Bahane': Naaki Gone' Yiltsiligii II = Grandfather Stories: Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yellowhair, Marvin

    At one time all Navaho stories were handed down from generation to generation by word of mouth. Some stories were recorded and then trnsalated into English. In the process of translation, the stories often times lost their meaning. To avoid this, the second volume of "Grandfather Stories," which were told by elders living in the vicinity of Rough…

  9. Research Papers Sponsored by the Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs. Volume II: Philanthropic Fields of Interest, Part II-Additional Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Treasury, Washington, DC.

    Twelve papers discuss future changes and trends in philanthropic giving and activities. The report is Volume II, Part II of a five volume series examining the relationship between nonprofit institutions and their donors. The opening paper reviews the needs for better definition of the government's role in contracting and grant making, and for…

  10. Health Education Teaching Ideas: Elementary. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakala, Jane, Ed.; Buckner, W. P., Jr., Ed.; King, Karen, Ed.

    This guide contains innovative learning activities and teaching ideas to enhance classroom instruction. The 40 papers are divided into 12 areas: "Health Attitudes and Values" (e.g., understanding elementary students' perceptions of health through art, narrative and discussion); "Mental Health" (e.g., building community through friendship and…

  11. Sonoma Developmental Curriculum: Instructional Programs. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Patrick, Ed.; And Others

    The guide presents instructional materials for teaching developmentally delayed children from birth to 6 years old. The following five instructional areas are covered (with sample activities in parentheses): gross motor (demonstrates a tonic-neck reflex, demonstrates ability to bear almost full weight, and crawls backward down three steps); fine…

  12. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring; Volume II of II, Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Michak, Patty

    1991-12-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) initiated the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project in 1986. This project was a five year interagency project involving fish rearing agencies in the Columbia Basin. Participating agencies included: Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). This is the final data report for the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project. Data collected and sampling results for 1990 and 1991 are presented within this report. An evaluation of this project can be found in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Volume 1, Completion Report.'' May, 1991. Pathogen detection methods remained the same from methods described in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Annual Report 1989,'' May, 1990. From January 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991 fish health monitoring sampling was conducted. In 1990 21 returning adult stocks were sampled. Juvenile pre-release exams were completed on 20 yearling releases, and 13 sub-yearling releases in 1990. In 1991 17 yearling releases and 11 sub-yearling releases were examined. Midterm sampling was completed on 19 stocks in 1990. Organosomatic analysis was performed at release on index station stocks; Cowlitz spring and fall chinook, Lewis river early coho and Lyons Ferry fall chinook.

  13. Project NECESSITIES, Phase II. Volume II, People, Places and Things.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abt Associates, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

    The activities and materials in this Project NECESSITIES social studies unit (People, Places and Things) are meant to act as a framework by which the teacher may devise additional content material appropriate to her own students' unique background. The unit, devised for use with primary school students, has as one of its primary emphases the use…

  14. 8. Photocopy of print (from Niagara Power, Volume II, p. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of print (from Niagara Power, Volume II, p. 77) Delineator and date unknown ORIGINAL FAESCH AND PICCARD DEISGN OF WHEEL PIT FOR POWER HOUSE NUMBER ONE - Edward D. Adams Station Power Plant, Niagara River & Buffalo Avenue, Niagara Falls, Niagara County, NY

  15. National Environmental Policy Act compliance guide. Volume II (reference book)

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This document (Volume II of the National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Guide) contains current copies of regulations and guidance from the Council on Environmental Quality, the Department of Energy, the Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency, related to compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  16. Be the Volume: A Classroom Activity to Visualize Volume Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikhaylov, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    A hands-on activity can help multivariable calculus students visualize surfaces and understand volume estimation. This activity can be extended to include the concepts of Fubini's Theorem and the visualization of the curves resulting from cross-sections of the surface. This activity uses students as pillars and a sheet or tablecloth for the…

  17. Coal: America' energy future. Volume II. A technical overview

    SciTech Connect

    2006-03-15

    Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman requested the national Coal Council in April 2005 a report identifying the challenges and opportunities of more fully exploring our domestic coal resources to meet the nations' future energy needs. This resultant report addresses the Secretary's request in the context of the President's focus, with eight findings and recommendations that would use technology to leverage the USA's extensive coal assets and reduce dependence on imported energy. Volume I outlines these findings and recommendations. Volume II provides technical data and case histories to support the findings and recommendations. Chapter headings of Volume II are: Electricity Generation; Coal-to-Liquids; An Overview of the Natural Gas Situation; and Economic Benefits of Coal Conversion Investments. 8 apps.

  18. A Laboratory Facility Dedicated to Educational R&D, Volume II. Technical Attachments for Papers 1-5, Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, William H., Jr., Ed.

    The working papers that document the planning, constructing, equipping, and operation of a laboratory facility dedicated to educational research and development (R&D) are organized into three volumes. Volume I sets forth the technical substance of the 12 working papers. This volume, Volume II, includes 35 technical attachments for Working Papers…

  19. O*NET Final Technical Report. Volume I [and] Volume II [and] Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Norman G.; Mumford, Michael D.; Borman, Walter C.; Jeanneret, P. Richard; Fleishman, Edwin A.; Levin, Kerry Y.

    This document contains the three volumes of the technical report for development of the prototype of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET), which is intended to replace the "Dictionary of Occupational Titles.""General Introduction" (Norman G. Peterson) presents an overview of O*NET's purpose, content, and structure. "Research Method:…

  20. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume II contains the proceedings for the Short Course on Seismic Base Isolation held in Berkeley, California, August 10-14, 1992.

  1. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume II - Potentiometric Data Document Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Volume II of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the potentiometric data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  2. Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    D`Amelio, J.

    1994-08-30

    Site Treatment Plans (STP) are required for facilities at which the DOE generates or stores mixed waste. This Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) the second step in a three-phase process, identifies the currently preferred options for treating mixed waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) or for developing treatment technologies where technologies do not exist or need modification. The DSTP reflects site-specific preferred options, developed with the state`s input and based on existing available information. To the extent possible, the DSTP identifies specific treatment facilities for treating the mixed waste and proposes schedules. Where the selection of specific treatment facilities is not possible, schedules for alternative activities such as waste characterization and technology assessment are provided. All schedule and cost information presented is preliminary and is subject to change. The DSTP is comprised of two volumes: this Compliance Plan Volume and the Background Volume. This Compliance Plan Volume proposes overall schedules with target dates for achieving compliance with the land disposal restrictions (LDR) of RCRA and procedures for converting the target dates into milestones to be enforced under the Order. The more detailed discussion of the options contained in the Background Volume is provided for informational purposes only.

  3. The African American Education Data Book. Volume II: Preschool through High School Education. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettles, Michael T.; Perna, Laura W.

    This executive summary introduces Volume II of the "African American Education Data Book," which brings together information about the educational status of African American preschool, elementary, and secondary school children. Like Volume I, Volume II records the African American educational progress that has previously existed as part of…

  4. Physical activity, fitness, and gray matter volume

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Kirk I.; Leckie, Regina L.; Weinstein, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review we explore the association between physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and exercise on gray matter volume in older adults. We conclude that higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels are routinely associated with greater gray matter volume in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and less consistently in other regions. We also conclude that physical activity is associated with greater gray matter volume in the same regions that are associated with cardiorespiratory fitness including the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Some heterogeneity in the literature may be explained by effect moderation by age, stress, or other factors. Finally, we report promising results from randomized exercise interventions that suggest that the volume of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex remain pliable and responsive to moderate intensity exercise for 6-months to 1-year. Physical activity appears to be a propitious method for influencing gray matter volume in late adulthood, but additional well-controlled studies are necessary to inform public policies about the potential protective or therapeutic effects of exercise on brain volume. PMID:24952993

  5. Physical activity, fitness, and gray matter volume.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kirk I; Leckie, Regina L; Weinstein, Andrea M

    2014-09-01

    In this review, we explore the association among physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and exercise on gray matter volume in older adults. We conclude that higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels are routinely associated with greater gray matter volume in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus and less consistently in other regions. We also conclude that physical activity is associated with greater gray matter volume in the same regions that are associated with cardiorespiratory fitness including the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Some heterogeneity in the literature may be explained by effect moderation by age, stress, or other factors. Finally, we report promising results from randomized exercise interventions that suggest that the volume of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex remain pliable and responsive to moderate intensity exercise for 6 months-1 year. Physical activity appears to be a propitious method for influencing gray matter volume in late adulthood, but additional well-controlled studies are necessary to inform public policies about the potential protective or therapeutic effects of exercise on brain volume.

  6. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, H.; Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A.; Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R.; Clement, B.; Garner, Frank; Walters, Leon; Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Ohno, S.; Miyhara, S.; Yacout, Abdellatif; Farmer, M.; Wade, D.; Grandy, C.; Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R.; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Serre, Frederic; Natesan, Ken; Carbajo, Juan J.; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Wigeland, Roald; Corradini, Michael; Thomas, Justin; Wei, Tom; Sofu, Tanju; Flanagan, George F.; Bari, R.; Porter D.; Lambert, J.; Hayes, S.; Sackett, J.; Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  7. The African Experience. Volume I: Syllabus Lectures; Volume II: Bibliographic References; Volume IIIA: Introductory Essays; Volume IIIB: Introductory Essays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paden, John N.; Soja, Edward W.

    In response to demands for more and better teaching about Africa in American higher education, the US Office of Education requested that the Program of African Studies at Northwestern University generate a set of teaching materials which could be used in introductory undergraduate courses. Included in these volumes, these materials provide…

  8. New York State Educational Information System (NYSEIS) Systems Design. Volume I, Phase II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price Waterhouse and Co., New York, NY.

    This volume on Phase II of the New York State Educational Information System (NYSEIS) describes the Gross Systems Analysis and Design, which includes the general flow diagram and processing chart for each of the student, personnel, and financial subsystems. Volume II, Functional Specifications, includes input/output requirements and file…

  9. World War II Memorial Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Dept. of Education, Nashville.

    These learning activities can help students get the most out of a visit to the Tennessee World War II Memorial, a group of ten pylons located in Nashville (Tennessee). Each pylon contains informational text about the events of World War II. The ten pylons are listed as: (1) "Pylon E-1--Terror: America Enters the War against Fascism, June 1940";…

  10. Prescriptive Package. Improving Patrol Productivity. Volume II. Specialized Patrol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schack, Stephen; Gay, William G.

    Designed to assist police departments in improving the productivity of their patrol operations, this volume on specialized patrol and a companion volume on routine patrol operations are intended for use by various sizes of departments. The volume of specialized patrol focuses upon the appropriate use and effective operation of specialized patrol…

  11. Intracellular angiotensin II activates rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Deliu, Elena; Tica, Andrei A; Motoc, Dana; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2011-09-01

    Angiotensin II is a modulator of myometrial activity; both AT(1) and AT(2) receptors are expressed in myometrium. Since in other tissues angiotensin II has been reported to activate intracellular receptors, we assessed the effects of intracellular administration of angiotensin II via microinjection on myometrium, using calcium imaging. Intracellular injection of angiotensin II increased cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in myometrial cells in a dose-dependent manner. The effect was abolished by the AT(1) receptor antagonist losartan but not by the AT(2) receptor antagonist PD-123319. Disruption of the endo-lysosomal system, but not that of Golgi apparatus, prevented the angiotensin II-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Blockade of AT(1) receptor internalization had no effect, whereas blockade of microautophagy abolished the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) produced by intracellular injection of angiotensin II; this indicates that microautophagy is a critical step in transporting the peptide into the endo-lysosomes lumenum. The response to angiotensin II was slightly reduced in Ca(2+)-free saline, indicating a major involvement of Ca(2+) release from internal stores. Blockade of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptors with heparin and xestospongin C or inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) with U-73122 abolished the response to angiotensin II, supporting the involvement of PLC-IP(3) pathway. Angiotensin II-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was slightly reduced by antagonism of ryanodine receptors. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that in myometrial cells, intracellular angiotensin II activates AT(1)-like receptors on lysosomes and activates PLC-IP(3)-dependent Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum; the response is further augmented by a Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release mechanism via ryanodine receptors activation.

  12. Underground Energy Storage Program: 1981 annual report. Volume II. Technical summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1982-06-01

    This is the 1981 annual report for the Underground Energy Storage Program administered by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The two-volume document describes all of the major research funded under this program during the period March 1981 to March 1982. Volume II presents the amplified technical summaries of individual tasks and projects conducted during this reporting period. The activities of the authors reporting herein were actually broader in scope than may be reflected by the mini-reports. Readers wishing additional information on specific topics are invited to contact individual authors. The work described here represents one segment of a continuing effort to encourage development and implementation of advanced energy storage technology. The results and progress reported here rely on earlier studies and will, in turn, provide a basis for continued efforts to develop the STES and CAES technologies.

  13. Health Occupations Education. Units of Instruction. Teacher's Guide. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Catherine

    This manual is the second part of a two-volume teacher's guide to a series of instructional units for use in health occupations education programs in Texas. Covered in the 10 units included in this volume are the following topics: special procedures (administering oxygen to patients; using elastic bandages; assisting with postural drainage; and…

  14. Heavy Duty Mechanics Apprenticeship Training, Module One. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelor, Leslie A.; Abercrombie, Richard, Ed.

    This training manual, the second of two volumes, comprises the final three blocks in a nine-block in-service training course for apprentices working in heavy duty mechanics. Addressed in the individual blocks included in this volume are engines, basic electricity, and winches. Each block contains a section on parts theory that gives the purpose,…

  15. Summative Evaluation of Mountain-Plains. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, Michael B.; And Others

    This second document in a three-volume summative evaluation report presents a portion of the internal evaluation conducted by the Mountain-Plains program, a residential, family-based education program developed to improve the economic potential and lifestyle of selected student families in a six-state region. (The three-volume report presents both…

  16. Agricultural Development Workers Training Manual. Volume II. Extension Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Peter; And Others

    This training manual, the second volume in a four-volume series of curriculum guides for use in training Peace Corps agricultural development workers, deals with extension skills. The first chapter provides suggested guidelines for setting up and carrying out the extension skills component of the agricultural development worker training series.…

  17. Industrial Maintenance, Volume II-A. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Raymond H.; And Others

    This volume is the second of four volumes that comprise a curriculum guide for a postsecondary industrial maintenance program. It contains part of section 3 of the guide which contains the unit guides for two of the 12 duties included in the course. Each of the 197 tasks included in these two duties is presented on a separate page and contains the…

  18. Industrial Maintenance, Volume II-B. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Raymond H.; And Others

    This volume is the third of four volumes that comprise a curriculum guide for a postsecondary industrial maintenance program. It contains part of section 3 of the guide which contains the unit guides for 10 of the 12 duties included in the course. Each of the 247 tasks included in these 10 duties is presented on a separate page and contains the…

  19. Computer Chips and Paper Clips. Technology and Women's Employment. Volume II. Case Studies and Policy Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, Heidi I., Ed.; And Others

    This volume contains 12 papers commissioned by the Panel on Technology and Women's Employment. "Technology, Women, and Work: Policy Perspectives" (Eli Ginzberg) is an overview that provides a context for the volume. The four case studies in Part II describe the impact of information technology in the insurance industry, among bookkeepers, among…

  20. Individual Demand for Education: General Report and Case Studies. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    Designed to respond to the changing requirements of educational policy formation, Volume II on "Educational Demand for Education" offers a general report based on the findings of its case studies of four countries--France, Germany, Greece and the United Kingdom--together with the results of Volume I, which presented the theoretical framework used…

  1. Human Rehabilitation Techniques. Disability Analyses: Chronic Disease Disabilities. Volume II, Part C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, C.; And Others

    Volume II, Section C of a six-volume final report (which covers the findings of a research project on policy and technology related to rehabilitation of disabled individuals) presents a review of literature on six types of chronic disease disabilities--rheumatoid arthritis, coronary heart disease, emphysema, carcinoma of the colon/rectum, kidney…

  2. Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Quality Control Study: Methodological Report, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macro Systems, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    The Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Quality Control Study, Volume II focuses on study procedures used for the analytical report recorded in Volume I of the study. Copies of all data collection forms are included along with file layouts, field procedures and other general information letters. It is intended to provide a description of the…

  3. Human Rehabilitation Techniques. Disability Analyses: Behavioral Disabilities. Volume II, Part B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, C.; And Others

    Volume II, Section B of a six-volume final report (which covers the findings of a research project on policy and technology related to rehabilitation of disabled individuals) presents a review of literature on three types of behavior disabilities--epilepsy, mental retardation, and schizophrenia. Individual chapters on each disability cover the…

  4. Energy from biological processes. Volume II. Technical and environmental analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This assessment responds to a request by the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation for an evaluation of the energy potential of biomass. This volume presents the technical and environmental analyses on which the conclusions in Volume 1 are based. The biomass resource base includes forestry, agriculture, unconventional biomass, and biomass wastes. The technical, economic, and environmental aspects of developing these resources are presented. Thermochemical conversion, fermentation, and anaerobic digestion technologies are described. Possible end uses for alcohol fuels are presented. The production of chemicals from biomass is considered. Energy balances for alcohol fuels are given. (DMC)

  5. Quality of Life. Volume II: Application to Persons with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schalock, Robert L., Ed.; Siperstein, Gary N., Ed.

    This volume summarizes current policies and programmatic practices that are influencing the quality of life of persons with mental retardation and developmental disabilities. Part 1, "Service Delivery Application," contains: "Using Person-Centered Planning To Address Personal Quality of Life" (John Butterworth and others); "The Aftermath of…

  6. Data Processing (Advanced Business Programming) Volume II. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litecky, Charles R.; Lamkin, Tim

    This curriculum guide for an advanced course in data processing is for use as a companion publication to a textbook or textbooks; references to appropriate textbooks are given in most units. Student completion of assignments in Volume I, available separately (see ED 220 604), is a prerequisite. Topics covered in the 18 units are introduction,…

  7. Farm Business Management, Volume II. Vocational Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Jim

    Designed to provide an advanced core of instruction in teaching farm business management, this curriculum guide for year 2 is intended for use as an adult program of instruction for a three-year period together with Farm Business Management I and III. (Volume I is available separately. See note.) The ten instructional units are presented in a…

  8. Metrication of Technical Career Education. Final Report. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feirer, John L.

    This second volume of the metrication study report contains the instructional materials developed to help the industrial and vocational education fields to use the metric system, primarily in the area of industrial arts from the seventh through the fourteenth year. The materials are presented in three sections. Section 1, Going Metric in…

  9. Ideas Together. Volume II, Number 1, Spring 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toback, Norman P., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Designed as a channel for communication among City University of New York faculty regarding initiatives to reduce attrition and promote student success, this publication contains articles on various aspects of student development and bilingualism. The volume contains: (1) "The Process Is the Purpose," an introduction by Anthony F. Russo, which…

  10. MANUAL: BIOVENTING PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE VOLUME II. BIOVENTING DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results from bioventing research and development efforts and from the pilot-scale bioventing systems have been used to produce this two-volume manual. Although this design manual has been written based on extensive experience with petroleum hydrocarbons (and thus, many exampl...

  11. Readings in Sayable Chinese. Volumes I, II, and III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Yuen Ren

    The purpose of this series is to supply the advanced student of spoken Chinese with reading material he can actually use in his speech. The author has tried to include as great as possible a variety of subject matter and style of language. Volume I consists of "Short Stories, Conversations, and Learned Articles,""Fragments of an Autobiography"…

  12. Neighborhood Poverty. Policy Implications in Studying Neighborhoods. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne, Ed.; Duncan, Greg J., Ed.; Aber, J. Lawrence, Ed.

    Volume 2 of the "Neighborhood Poverty" series incorporates empirical data on neighborhood poverty into discussions of policy and program development. The chapters are: (1) "Ecological Perspectives on the Neighborhood Context of Urban Poverty: Past and Present" (Robert J. Sampson and Jeffrey D. Morenoff); (2) "The Influence of Neighborhoods on…

  13. An Annotated Bibliography on Refugee Mental Health. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Susan C.; And Others

    The second volume of this annotated bibliography contains primarily materials in published scientific literature on refugee mental health. References have been grouped into five major sections. Section 1, Understanding Refugees in Context, provides important background material in five categories: cultural and related information about different…

  14. Haitian Creole Basic Course: Volume II, Lessons 11-20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This volume, the second in a series comprising the field-test edition of the Defense Language Institute's "Haitian Creole Basic Course," is extracted primarily from the instructor's guide to materials contained in Albert Valdman's "Basic Course in Haitian Creole." Materials are arranged in the order of their use in the classroom. Content of each…

  15. Division II: Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Scrijver, Karel J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2015-08-01

    The Business Meeting of Commission 10 was held as part of the Business Meeting of Division II (Sun and Heliosphere), chaired by Valentin Martínez-Pillet, the President of the Division. The President of Commission 10 (C10; Solar activity), Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi, took the chair for the business meeting of C10. She summarised the activities of C10 over the triennium and the election of the incoming OC.

  16. High Performance Schools Best Practices Manual. Volume I: Planning [and] Volume II: Design [and] Volume III: Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eley, Charles, Ed.

    This three-volume manual, focusing on California's K-12 public schools, presents guidelines for establishing schools that are healthy, comfortable, energy efficient, resource efficient, water efficient, secure, adaptable, and easy to operate and maintain. The first volume describes why high performance schools are important, what components are…

  17. State energy price system. Volume II: data base development

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J.M.; Nieves, L.A.; Sherman, K.L.; Hood, L.J.

    1982-06-01

    This volume documents the entire data development process in sufficient detail to permit critical assessment of the data base. However, since a methodological discussion is included in Chapter 3 of Volume I, it is not repeated here. The data base development process was conducted in a fuel-by-fuel fashion, following the general sequence of electricity, natural gas, coal, distillate fuel, motor gasoline, diesel, kerosene, jet fuel, residual fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas. For each of the fuels, a detailed data source review was conducted, which included a preliminary screening against criteria set up for this purpose. After this first screening, the data sources that met most of the review criteria were evaluated in more detail. If one data source met all the criteria, that data source was recommended for use, with minimal change or imputation. If there were substantial gaps in the available data series, then alternative imputation procedures were developed and compared, and recommendations were formulated. This entire procedure was then documented in a draft working paper for review and discussion. To the extent reasonable and practical, comments from the formal EIA reviews were then incorporated into the final recommendations and the data base was developed.

  18. 50+ Activities for Early Childhood Essential Elements. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Service Center Region 6, Huntsville, TX.

    Written as a companion resource to "Early Childhood Essential Elements," a document developed by the Education Service Center, Region VI, Huntsville, Texas, this first volume of a two-volume activity guide provides activities enhancing children's cognitive, communication, and motor skills. Activities included in the guide are compiled from a…

  19. International Space Station (ISS) Anomalies Trending Study. Volume II; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beil, Robert J.; Brady, Timothy K.; Foster, Delmar C.; Graber, Robert R.; Malin, Jane T.; Thornesbery, Carroll G.; Throop, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) set out to utilize data mining and trending techniques to review the anomaly history of the International Space Station (ISS) and provide tools for discipline experts not involved with the ISS Program to search anomaly data to aid in identification of areas that may warrant further investigation. Additionally, the assessment team aimed to develop an approach and skillset for integrating data sets, with the intent of providing an enriched data set for discipline experts to investigate that is easier to navigate, particularly in light of ISS aging and the plan to extend its life into the late 2020s. This document contains the Appendices to the Volume I report.

  20. Scientific Research in British Universities and Colleges 1969-70, Volume II, Biological Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education and Science, London (England).

    This annual publication aims to provide a brief summary of active research topics in British universities and other institutions. This volume, the second of a three-volume series, is divided into broad subject fields and the university/college entries are arranged alphabetically within them. Also included within this volume on the biological…

  1. Indian Education Confronts the Seventies. Five Volumes; Volume II: Theoretical Considerations in Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deloria, Vine, Jr., Ed.

    Presenting six position papers, this publication is the second in a series of five volumes on American Indian education. Papers are titled as follows: (1) "The Theory of Indian Controlled Schools" (Indian control of education is perceived as the basis for a cultural renewal process in which the problems of contemporary identity and purpose are…

  2. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chii J; Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-04-21

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  3. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chii J.; Ekpenyong, Andrew E.; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J.; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  4. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chii J; Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-04-21

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells.

  5. Sources for Women's History in the Microtext Department of the Sterling C. Evans Library at Texas A&M University. Volume I and Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Yvonne D., Comp.; And Others

    This two-volume annotated bibliography is designed to provide access to materials in the microtext collection of Texas A&M University's Sterling C. Evans Library that relate to women's history. Volume I presents 96 citations to microform editions of works published by, for, and about women before 1900, and Volume II includes 444 citations to…

  6. Secretary's annual report to Congress. Volume II. Budget highlights, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    DOE budget requests for FY 1982 is summarized and then detailed. Budget highlights of the energy programs include: conservation; research, development, and applications (fossil energy, solar, electric energy and energy storage systems, magnetic fusion, nuclear fission, environment); regulation and energy information; direct energy production, and strategic petroleum reserves. Additional programs and their budget requests are given for: general science, defense activities, and departmental administration. The FY 1981 supplemental and recission request is indicated. Special budget analyses are given for Federal fossil, Federal solar, nuclear waste, conservation, and alternative fuels activities programs. The organizational table is presented. Extensive statistics are presented in the appendix. (MCW)

  7. Practical Nursing. Volume II. Health Occupations Education. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Helen V.; Reid-Sloan, Jamee

    This curriculum guide, revised from a 1975 edition, provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by practical nurses. It includes 4 sections and 24 instructional units. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance objectives, teacher activities, information sheets, assignment…

  8. Baseline tests for arc melter vitrification of INEL buried wastes. Volume II: Baseline test data appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Oden, L.L.; O`Conner, W.K.; Turner, P.C.; Soelberg, N.R.; Anderson, G.L.

    1993-11-19

    This report presents field results and raw data from the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Arc Melter Vitrification Project Phase 1 baseline test series conducted by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM). The baseline test series was conducted using the electric arc melter facility at the USBM Albany Research Center in Albany, Oregon. Five different surrogate waste feed mixtures were tested that simulated thermally-oxidized, buried, TRU-contaminated, mixed wastes and soils present at the INEL. The USBM Arc Furnace Integrated Waste Processing Test Facility includes a continuous feed system, the arc melting furnace, an offgas control system, and utilities. The melter is a sealed, 3-phase alternating current (ac) furnace approximately 2 m high and 1.3 m wide. The furnace has a capacity of 1 metric ton of steel and can process as much as 1,500 lb/h of soil-type waste materials. The surrogate feed materials included five mixtures designed to simulate incinerated TRU-contaminated buried waste materials mixed with INEL soil. Process samples, melter system operations data and offgas composition data were obtained during the baseline tests to evaluate the melter performance and meet test objectives. Samples and data gathered during this program included (a) automatically and manually logged melter systems operations data, (b) process samples of slag, metal and fume solids, and (c) offgas composition, temperature, velocity, flowrate, moisture content, particulate loading and metals content. This report consists of 2 volumes: Volume I summarizes the baseline test operations. It includes an executive summary, system and facility description, review of the surrogate waste mixtures, and a description of the baseline test activities, measurements, and sample collection. Volume II contains the raw test data and sample analyses from samples collected during the baseline tests.

  9. Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume II. Engineering design reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, R.A.; Draper, W.E.; Newmyer, J.M.; Warner, C.L.

    1982-10-01

    This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawings, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities.

  10. Results of site validation experiments. Volume II. Supporting documents 5 through 14

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains the following supporting documents: Summary of Geologic Mapping of Underground Investigations; Logging of Vertical Coreholes - ''Double Box'' Area and Exploratory Drift; WIPP High Precision Gravity Survey; Basic Data Reports for Drillholes, Brine Content of Facility Internal Strata; Mineralogical Content of Facility Interval Strata; Location and Characterization of Interbedded Materials; Characterization of Aquifers at Shaft Locations; and Permeability of Facility Interval Strate.

  11. World History. Volumes I and II. [Sahuarita High School Career Curriculum Project].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Judy

    Volumes I and II of a world history course, part of a high school career curriculum project, are outlined. Objectives are listed by course title. Course titles include: Early Communication - Languages and Writing; World History; Law and Order in Ancient Times; Early Transportation; Women in Ancient Times; Art and Literature in Ancient Times;…

  12. Proceedings of the 1984 DOE nuclear reactor and facility safety conference. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This report is a collection of papers on reactor safety. The report takes the form of proceedings from the 1984 DOE Nuclear Reactor and Facility Safety Conference, Volume II of two. These proceedings cover Safety, Accidents, Training, Task/Job Analysis, Robotics and the Engineering Aspects of Man/Safety interfaces.

  13. Proceedings of the 1995 U.S. DOE hydrogen program review. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The 1995 US DOE Hydrogen Program Review was held April 18-21, 1995 in Coral Gables, FL. Volume II of the Proceedings contains 8 papers presented under the subject of hydrogen storage and 17 papers presented on hydrogen production. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. The Quest for Relevance: Effective College Teaching. Volume II. The Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Higher Education, Washington, DC.

    Responding to a widely expressed discontent about college teaching shared by students, faculty and administrators, representatives of national professional and higher educational associations formed a committee to study means of revitalizing and reorienting instruction. Each contributor in Volume II, selected for his outstanding teaching skills in…

  15. The Clinical Teacher for Special Education. Final Report: Volume II; Evaluating the Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Louis; Oseroff, Andrew

    Effectiveness of the clinical teaching model (CTM) developed at Florida State University is documented in Volume II of the project's final report. Reviewed is literature related to teacher effectiveness and conceptual changes, conceptual models and instructional systems, and evaluation research in education. Research design and procedures are…

  16. Biennial Survey of Education, 1916-18. Volume II. Bulletin, 1919, No. 89

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1921

    1921-01-01

    Volume II of the Biennial Survey of Education, 1916-1918 includes the following chapters: (1) Education in Great Britain and Ireland (I. L. Kandel); (2) Education in parts of the British Empire: Educational Developments in the Dominion of Canada (Walter A. Montgomery), Public School System of Jamaica (Charles A. Asbury), Recent Progress of…

  17. Chromospheric Activity in Population II Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Graham M.

    2004-01-01

    One of the mysteries of Population II giants is that they still show chromospheric emission despite their great age. The global dynamo which was active during their main-sequence lifetimes is expected to become extremely weak through magnetic rotational braking. The nature of the observed emission is not understood; although acoustic shock waves might provide the heating, acoustic waves are not predicted to drive the observed mass loss - which in turn requires the dissipation of magneto-hydrodynamic waves. This program was designed to search for the faint stellar H Ly beta emission wings and the fluorescent Fe II and H2 emission from one of the brightest, metal poor, Population II stars. These FUSE diagnostics, when combined with existing UV and optical spectra, help determine the major radiative cooling channels for the chromosphere. This observation was to complement that previously planned for the mildly metal deficient giant alpha Boo (K2 III). However, alpha Boo has yet to be observed with FUSE.

  18. Active holographic interconnects for interfacing volume storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domash, Lawrence H.; Schwartz, Jay R.; Nelson, Arthur R.; Levin, Philip S.

    1992-04-01

    In order to achieve the promise of terabit/cm3 data storage capacity for volume holographic optical memory, two technological challenges must be met. Satisfactory storage materials must be developed and the input/output architectures able to match their capacity with corresponding data access rates must also be designed. To date the materials problem has received more attention than devices and architectures for access and addressing. Two philosophies of parallel data access to 3-D storage have been discussed. The bit-oriented approach, represented by recent work on two-photon memories, attempts to store bits at local sites within a volume without affecting neighboring bits. High speed acousto-optic or electro- optic scanners together with dynamically focused lenses not presently available would be required. The second philosophy is that volume optical storage is essentially holographic in nature, and that each data write or read is to be distributed throughout the material volume on the basis of angle multiplexing or other schemes consistent with the principles of holography. The requirements for free space optical interconnects for digital computers and fiber optic network switching interfaces are also closely related to this class of devices. Interconnects, beamlet generators, angle multiplexers, scanners, fiber optic switches, and dynamic lenses are all devices which may be implemented by holographic or microdiffractive devices of various kinds, which we shall refer to collectively as holographic interconnect devices. At present, holographic interconnect devices are either fixed holograms or spatial light modulators. Optically or computer generated holograms (submicron resolution, 2-D or 3-D, encoding 1013 bits, nearly 100 diffraction efficiency) can implement sophisticated mathematical design principles, but of course once fabricated they cannot be changed. Spatial light modulators offer high speed programmability but have limited resolution (512 X 512 pixels

  19. Removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution using rice husk-based activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, Mohd F. Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Shuib, Anis Suhaila Borhan, Azry

    2014-10-24

    An attempt was made to investigate the potential of rice husk-based activated carbon as an alternative low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Rice husk-based activated carbon was prepared via treatment of rice husk with NaOH followed by the carbonization process at 400°C for 2 hours. Three samples, i.e. raw rice husk, rice husk treated with NaOH and rice husk-based activated carbon, were analyzed for their morphological characteristics using field-emission scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray (FESEM/EDX). These samples were also analyzed for their carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and silica contents using CHN elemental analyzer and FESEM/EDX. The porous properties of rice husk-based activated carbon were determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, and its surface area and pore volume were 255 m{sup 2}/g and 0.17 cm{sup 2}/g, respectively. The adsorption studies for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution were carried out at a fixed initial concentration of metal ion (150 ppm) with variation amount of adsorbent (rice husk-based activated carbon) as a function of varied contact time at room temperature. The concentration of each metal ion was analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The results obtained from adsorption studies indicate the potential of rice husk as an economically promising precursor for the preparation of activated carbon for removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Isotherm and kinetic model analyses suggested that the experimental data of adsorption studies fitted well with Langmuir, Freundlich and second-order kinetic models.

  20. International and Domestic Market Opportunities for Biomass Power: Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-09-01

    This report examines the domestic and international markets for biopower. Domestic and foreign markets present fundamentally different challenges to private power developers. Volume I focuses on the domestic market for biopower. The domestic challenge lies in finding economically viable opportunities for biopower. Vol. I outlines the current state of the U.S. biomass industry, discusses policies affecting biomass development, describes some demonstration projects currently underway, and discusses the future direction of the industry. Volume II focuses on the international market for biopower. Recent literature states that the electricity investment and policy climate in foreign markets are the key elements in successful private project development. Vol. II discusses the financing issues, policy climate, and business incentives and barriers to biopower development. As India and China are the largest future markets for biopower, they are the focus of this volume. Three other top markets- -Brazil, Indonesia, and the Philippines--are also discussed. Potential financial resources wrap up the discussion.

  1. HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 3, Verification/validation assessments

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, R.A.; Lowery, P.S.

    1987-10-01

    HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite difference solution in cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum are enhanced by the incorporation of directional porosities and permeabilities that aid in modeling solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated procedures are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. Volume I - Equations and Numerics describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. Volume II - User's Manual contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a model problem. This volume, Volume III - Verification/Validation Assessments, provides a comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical simulation for problems with a known solution. This volume also documents comparisons between the results of simulations of single- and multiassembly storage systems and actual experimental data. 11 refs., 55 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 1, Equations and numerics

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, R.A.

    1987-04-01

    HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite difference solution in Cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the Cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum are enhanced by the incorporation of directional porosities and permeabilities that aid in modeling solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits of modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated procedures are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. This volume, Volume I - Equations and Numerics, describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. Volume II - User's Manual contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a model problem. The final volume, Volume III - Verification/Validation Assessments, presents results of numerical simulations of single- and multiassembly storage systems and comparisons with experimental data. 4 refs.

  3. Sensors, Volume 3, Part II, Chemical and Biochemical Sensors Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göpel, Wolfgang; Jones, T. A.; Kleitz, Michel; Lundström, Ingemar; Seiyama, Tetsuro

    1997-06-01

    'Sensors' is the first self-contained series to deal with the whole area of sensors. It describes general aspects, technical and physical fundamentals, construction, function, applications and developments of the various types of sensors. This is the second of two volumes focusing on chemical and biochemical sensors. It includes a detailed description of biosensors which often make use of transducer properties of the basic sensors and usually have additional biological components. This volume provides a unique overview of the applications, the possibilities and limitations of sensors in comparison with conventional instrumentation in analytical chemistry. Specific facettes of applications are presented by specialists from different fields including environmental, biotechnological, medical, or chemical process control. This book is an indispensable reference work for both specialits and newcomers, researchers and developers.

  4. Introduction to "Tsunami Science: Ten Years after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami. Volume II."

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Geist, Eric L.; Fritz, Hermann M.; Borrero, Jose C.

    2015-12-01

    Twenty papers on the study of tsunamis and respective tsunamigenic earthquakes are included in Volume II of the PAGEOPH topical issue "Tsunami Science: Ten Years after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami". The papers presented in this second of two special volumes of Pure and Applied Geophysics reflect the state of tsunami science during this time, including five papers devoted to new findings specifically in the Indian Ocean. Two papers compile results from global observations and eight papers cover Pacific Ocean studies, focusing mainly on the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. Remaining papers in this volume describe studies in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea and tsunami source studies. Overall, the volume not only addresses the pivotal 2004 Indian Ocean and 2011 Tohoku tsunamis, but also examines the tsunami hazard posed to other critical coasts in the world.

  5. IR Activities. IR Applications, Volume 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Stephen; Gerek, Mary Louise

    2007-01-01

    Institutional research is the sum total of all activities directed at describing the full spectrum of functions (educational, administrative, and support) occurring within a college or university. Institutional research activities examine those functions in their broadest definitions, and embrace data collection and analytical strategies in…

  6. Technologies for imaging neural activity in large volumes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Na; Freeman, Jeremy; Smith, Spencer L

    2016-08-26

    Neural circuitry has evolved to form distributed networks that act dynamically across large volumes. Conventional microscopy collects data from individual planes and cannot sample circuitry across large volumes at the temporal resolution relevant to neural circuit function and behaviors. Here we review emerging technologies for rapid volume imaging of neural circuitry. We focus on two critical challenges: the inertia of optical systems, which limits image speed, and aberrations, which restrict the image volume. Optical sampling time must be long enough to ensure high-fidelity measurements, but optimized sampling strategies and point-spread function engineering can facilitate rapid volume imaging of neural activity within this constraint. We also discuss new computational strategies for processing and analyzing volume imaging data of increasing size and complexity. Together, optical and computational advances are providing a broader view of neural circuit dynamics and helping elucidate how brain regions work in concert to support behavior. PMID:27571194

  7. HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 2, User's manual

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, R.A.; Lowery, P.S.; Lessor, D.L.

    1987-09-01

    HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite-difference solution in cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum incorporate directional porosities and permeabilities that are available to model solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated methods are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. Volume 1 - Equations and Numerics describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. This volume, Volume 2 - User's Manual, contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a sample problem. The final volume, Volume 3 - Verification/Validation Assessments, provides a comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical simulation for problems with a known solution. 6 refs.

  8. Cell volume and shape oscillations in rat type-II somatotrophs at hypotonic conditions.

    PubMed

    Engström, K G; Sävendahl, L

    1995-05-01

    The size and shape of growth hormone (GH)-producing rat type-II somatotrophs was studied during osmotic manipulation. When somatotrophs were exposed to large osmotic stress (200 and 225 mOsm), the peak projected cell area (PCA) was 132.9% +/- 12.6% and 116.8% +/- 2.8% (P < 0.01) and triggered a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) to avoid lysis. At lower osmotic stress (250 mOsm), the rate of swelling was slower, and the volume reached a steady state at 109.4% +/- 2.4% (P < 0.05) and was without RVD. At 275 and 287 mOsm, the swelling was delayed [PCA peak at 3-4 min; 105.8% +/- 1.5% (P < 0.05) and 104.2% +/- 1.7%] and then showed repeated synchronized cycles of swelling and shrink-age (P < 0.05). The data suggest that somatotrophs may have more than one mechanism for volume regulation. One mechanism is for large swelling (classic RVD response), whereas the other represents more physiological mechanisms for regulating the cell volume within a more limited geometry range. For low osmotic stress (250-287 mOsm), the somatotrophs became less spherical during swelling and, thus, were without membrane dilation. Therefore, this type of volume regulation must work independently from membrane stress. Related volume regulation mechanisms may underlie the previously observed volume fluctuations in somatotrophs seen during secretory stimulation with GH-releasing hormone. PMID:7600901

  9. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hinga, K.R.

    1981-07-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  10. Proceedings of the seventh thematic conference on remote sensing for exploration geology: Methods integration solutions. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The meeting was convened to discuss state-of-the-art applications of remote sensing in exploration programs, as well as research and development activities aimed at increasing the future capabilities of this technology for exploration geology. The presentations address the following topics: basement tectonics and their surface expressions; spectral geology; applications for hydrocarbon exploration; radar applications and future systems; engineering and environment; geobotanical remote sensing; advanced image processing; data integration and mapping; and applications for mineral exploration. The 64 papers in Volume II have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  11. Agricultural Science Lab Activities. Instructor Guide. Volume 27, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Gregory W.; And Others

    This instructor guide contains 20 laboratory activities for grades 9-10 Agricultural Science I-II classes. The activities are cross-referenced to Missouri Core Competencies and Key Skills. The activities are organized into the following areas: introductory (microscope use); animal nutrition (absorption of nutrients, bacteria and disease, enzyme…

  12. Teaching Activities in Environmental Education. Volume III - 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheatley, John H.; Coon, Herbert L.

    This volume is the third in a series of learning activities designed to supplement a K-12 curriculum. The activities are interdisciplinary in nature and include topics in science, mathematics, social studies, language arts, and fine arts. Besides a division of activities according to grade and subject matter, they are also grouped by environmental…

  13. The subthalamic nucleus part II: modelling and simulation of activity.

    PubMed

    Heida, Tjitske; Marani, Enrico; Usunoff, Kamen G

    2008-01-01

    Part I of The Subthalamic Nucleus (volume 198) (STN) accentuates the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections.The light and electron microscopical cytology focuses on the open nucleus concept and the neuronal types present in the STN. The cytochemistry encompasses enzymes, NO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), calcium binding proteins, and receptors (dopamine, cannabinoid, opioid, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin, cholinergic, and calcium channels). The ontogeny of the subthalamic cell cord is also reviewed. The topography concerns the rat, cat, baboon and human STN. The descriptions of the connections are also given from a historical point of view. Recent tracer studies on the rat nigro-subthalamic connection revealed contralateral projections. This monograph (Part II of the two volumes) on the subthalamic nucleus (STN) starts with a systemic model of the basal ganglia to evaluate the position of the STN in the direct, indirect and hyperdirect pathways. A summary of in vitro studies is given, describing STN spontaneous activity as well as responses to depolarizing and hyperpolarizing inputs and high-frequency stimulation. STN bursting activity and the underlying ionic mechanisms are investigated. Deep brain stimulation used for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease is discussed in terms of the elements that are influenced and its hypothesized mechanisms. This part of the monograph explores the pedunculopontine-subthalamic connections and summarizes attempts to mimic neurotransmitter actions of the pedunculopontine nucleus in cell cultures and high-frequency stimulation on cultured dissociated rat subthalamic neurons. STN cell models - single- and multi-compartment models and system-level models are discussed in relation to subthalamic function and dysfunction. Parts I and II are compared. PMID:18727495

  14. A Review of the Definition and Measurement of Poverty: Volume I, Summary Review Paper; Volume II, Annotated Bibliography. The Measure of Poverty, Technical Paper III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oster, Sharon; And Others

    This study reviews the existing literature on a series of issues associated with the defintion and measurement of poverty, and it consists of a summary report covering this research (Volume I), and an annotated bibliography (Volume II). Eleven specific issues were identified and reviewed in this study: (1) the historical definitions of poverty,…

  15. Experiential Activities for Intercultural Learning. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seelye, H. Ned, Ed.

    The need for new approaches, methods, and techniques in cross-cultural training and intercultural education is paramount. This collection of more than 30 exercises and activities aims to help begin a regular flow of materials into the stream of resources available to professionals in the intercultural field. The emphasis in the collection's first…

  16. Activation volumes of enzymes adsorbed on silica particles.

    PubMed

    Schuabb, Vitor; Czeslik, Claus

    2014-12-30

    The immobilization of enzymes on carrier particles is useful in many biotechnological processes. In this way, enzymes can be separated from the reaction solution by filtering and can be reused in several cycles. On the other hand, there is a series of examples of free enzymes in solution that can be activated by the application of pressure. Thus, a potential loss of enzymatic activity upon immobilization on carrier particles might be compensated by pressure. In this study, we have determined the activation volumes of two enzymes, α-chymotrypsin (α-CT) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP), when they are adsorbed on silica particles and free in solution. The experiments have been carried out using fluorescence assays under pressures up to 2000 bar. In all cases, activation volumes were found to depend on the applied pressure, suggesting different compressions of the enzyme-substrate complex and the transition state. The volume profiles of free and adsorbed HRP are similar. For α-CT, larger activation volumes are found in the adsorbed state. However, up to about 500 bar, the enzymatic reaction of α-CT, which is adsorbed on silica particles, is characterized by a negative activation volume. This observation suggests that application of pressure might indeed be useful to enhance the activity of enzymes on carrier particles.

  17. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Water Pollution and Environmental Studies, Volume I - Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, John T., Ed.; And Others

    This publication, Volume I of a two volume set, consists of many tested water pollution study activities. The activities are grouped into four headings: (1) Hydrologic Cycle, (2) Human Activities, (3) Ecological Perspectives, and (4) Social and Political Factors. Three levels of activities are provided: (1) those which increase awareness, (2)…

  18. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume II. Literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    1984-11-01

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). This first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 references and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2.

  19. Analysis of the permitting processes associated with exploration of Federal OCS leases. Final report. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    Under contract to the Office of Leasing Policy Development (LPDO), Jack Faucett Associates is currently undertaking the description and analysis of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) regulatory process to determine the nature of time delays that affect OCS production of oil and gas. This report represents the results of the first phase of research under this contract, the description and analysis of regulatory activity associated with exploration activities on the Federal OCS. Volume 1 contains the following three sections: (1) study results; (2) Federal regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases which involved the US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, US Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, and National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration; and (3) state regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases of Alaska, California, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina and Texas. Volume II contains appendices of US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, the Coastal Zone Management Act, and Alaska. The major causes of delay in the regulatory process governing exploration was summarized in four broad categories: (1) the long and tedious process associated with the Environmental Protection Agency's implementation of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit; (2) thelack of mandated time periods for the completion of individual activities in the permitting process; (3) the lack of overall coordination of OCS exploratory regulation; and (4) the inexperience of states, the Federal government and industry relating to the appropriate level of regulation for first-time lease sale areas.

  20. Cortical thickness, volume and surface area in patients with bipolar disorder types I and II

    PubMed Central

    Abé, Christoph; Ekman, Carl-Johan; Sellgren, Carl; Petrovic, Predrag; Ingvar, Martin; Landén, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Background Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common chronic psychiatric disorder mainly characterized by episodes of mania, hypomania and depression. The disorder is associated with cognitive impairments and structural brain abnormalities, such as lower cortical volumes in primarily frontal brain regions than healthy controls. Although bipolar disorder types I (BDI) and II (BDII) exhibit different symptoms and severity, previous studies have focused on BDI. Furthermore, the most frequently investigated measure in this population is cortical volume. The aim of our study was to investigate abnormalities in patients with BDI and BDII by simultaneously analyzing cortical volume, thickness and surface area, which yields more information about disease- and symptom-related neurobiology. Methods We used MRI to measure cortical volume, thickness and area in patients with BDI and BDII as well as in healthy controls. The large study cohort enabled us to adjust for important confounding factors. Results We included 81 patients with BDI, 59 with BDII and 85 controls in our analyses. Cortical volume, thickness and surface area abnormalities were present in frontal, temporal and medial occipital regions in patients with BD. Lithium and antiepileptic drug use had an effect on the observed differences in medial occipital regions. Patients with the subtypes BDI and BDII displayed common cortical abnormalities, such as lower volume, thickness and surface area than healthy controls in frontal brain regions but differed in temporal and medial prefrontal regions, where only those with BDI had abnormally low cortical volume and thickness. Limitations The group differences can be explained by progressive changes, but also by premorbid conditions. They could also have been influenced by unknown factors, such as social, environmental or genetic factors. Conclusion Our findings suggest diagnosis-related neurobiological differences between the BD subtypes, which could explain distinct symptoms and

  1. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume II. Detailed description of the model

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the second of a seven volume series of our Phase II Final Report. This volume deals with detailed descriptions of the structure of each program member (subroutines and functions), the interrelation between the members of a submodel, and the interrelation between the various submodels as such. The systems model for fluidized bed combustors (FBC-II) consists of a systematic combination of the following interrelated areas: fluid mechanics and bubble growth, char combustion and associated kinetics for particle burnout, sulfur capture, NO/sub x/ formation and reduction, freeboard reactions, and heat transfer. Program outline is shown in Figure 1.1. Input variables (supplied by the user are inspected to check that they lie inside the allowed range of values and are input to the various routines as needed. The necessary physical and fluid mechanical properties are calculated and utilized in estimating char combustion and sulfur capture in the bed and the freeboard. NO/sub x/ and CO emissions are estimated by taking into account all relevant chemical reactions. A material and energy balance is made over the bed. Figure 1.1 shows a block diagram of the systems program. In this diagram, the overall structure of the FBC program is illustrated in terms of the various submodels that together constitute the systems program. A more detailed outline of the systems program is shown in Figure 1.2. In this figure, all important subroutine members of the FBC program are shown, and their linkage to each other, as well as to the main program is indicated. A description of the exact sequence in which these various routines are called at time of program execution is provided in Chapter 8 under the executive routine MAIN.

  2. Volume Changes During Active Shape Fluctuations in Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taloni, Alessandro; Kardash, Elena; Salman, Oguz Umut; Truskinovsky, Lev; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Cells modify their volume in response to changes in osmotic pressure but it is usually assumed that other active shape variations do not involve significant volume fluctuations. Here we report experiments demonstrating that water transport in and out of the cell is needed for the formation of blebs, commonly observed protrusions in the plasma membrane driven by cortex contraction. We develop and simulate a model of fluid-mediated membrane-cortex deformations and show that a permeable membrane is necessary for bleb formation which is otherwise impaired. Taken together, our experimental and theoretical results emphasize the subtle balance between hydrodynamics and elasticity in actively driven cell morphological changes.

  3. Volume Changes During Active Shape Fluctuations in Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Porta, Caterina A. M.; Taloni, Alessandro; Kardash, Elena; Salman, Oguz Umut; Truskinovsky, Lev; Zapperi, Stefano

    Cells modify their volume in response to changes in osmotic pressure but it is usually assumed that other active shape variations do not involve significant volume fluctuations. Here we report experiments demonstrating that water transport in and out of the cell is needed for the formation of blebs, commonly observed protrusions in the plasma membrane driven by cortex contraction. We develop and simulate a model of fluid-mediated membrane-cortex deformations and show that a permeable membrane is necessary for bleb formation which is otherwise impaired. Taken together, our experimental and theoretical results emphasize the subtle balance between hydrodynamics and elasticity in actively driven cell morphological changes.

  4. Volume I. Environmental effects on contents of Cs-137 and Sr-90 in milk. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-03

    Milk, animal fodders, soils, humans, livestock, and wildlife on or near 55 dairy farms in Utah were assayed for radionuclide content. Effects of soil chemistry, water supply, plant type, farming practices, geographic location, altitude, rainfall, and other ecological differences were sought by intensive analysis. Although many analyses have not been completed, several cause-effect relationships have been defined. Wet-lands yield more /sup 137/Cs, /sup 131/I, or /sup 90/Sr to milk under like conditions of fallout intensity than dry-lands. In most cases, the station with the highest yield is also practicing wet grazing. /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs content of milk is enhanced by sandy soils. Increased altitude and higher rainfall lead to higher yields of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs in milk. Levels of /sup 137/Cs in milk increase from south to north, and Utah can be divided into several regions, each having a characteristic level of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs in milk, meat, and fodders. Poor pastures (over-grazed to the extent that stem bases are eaten and much soil is exposed) yield more /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr than improved pastures. Feeding green chop alfalfa or putting the animals on the meadows causes marked but temporary increases in the /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs content of the milk. However, the annual yield for two stations of similar ecology in the same geographic area is essentially the same. Experimental details are presented in Volume I. The appendices in Volume II are made up primarily of the data compiled at the 78 stations.

  5. Active local volume displacement cancellation of a vibrating baffled beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahui, Marcellin

    An active noise control apparatus is developed. The device reduces the sound radiated from a vibrating clamped beam. The attenuation of the sound field is obtained through minimization of local volume displacements of the vibrating beam. Two single- input/single-output cancellation devices are used. Each device employs a motion sensor and an acoustic actuator. The actuator is a loudspeaker equipped with a pressure sensor to detect its volume displacement. The motion sensor signal is related to the local volume displacement of the structure which is then reduced by a loudspeaker driven with an equal but opposing volume displacement. The volume displacement sensors are developed and fabricated using Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF). They measure the local volume displacements of the vibrating beam. The pressure sensor is mounted in the loudspeaker enclosure. It provides the feedback signal for the loudspeaker volume displacement control. Previous work showed the successful implementation of this technique for uniformly vibrating radiators. This thesis presents the development of this technique for the reduction of sound radiated from a vibrating beam. First, a numerical local volume displacement cancellation experiment is performed using several loudspeakers, each canceling the volume displacement of a section of the beam. The finite element method is used to calculate the velocity distribution of the vibrating beam. A discretized form of the Rayleigh integral is then used to find the sound pressure and the sound power radiated before and after cancellation. Second, the numerical results are verified by laboratory experiments using a beam divided into two sections. Two motion sensors for the beam and one pressure sensor for each loudspeaker are fabricated and thoroughly checked. The cancellation experiment is then performed on a broadband random noise using two independent Proportional-Derivative (PD) controllers.

  6. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 1: Title II design report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 1 provides a comprehensive narrative description of the proposed facility and systems, the basis for each of the systems design, and the engineering assessments that were performed to support the technical basis of the Title II design. The intent of the system description presented is to provide WHC an understanding of the facilities and equipment provided and the A/E`s perspective on how these systems will operate.

  7. Na+,Cl- cotransport in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells activated during volume regulation (regulatory volume increase).

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, E K; Sjøholm, C; Simonsen, L O

    1983-01-01

    Ehrlich ascites cells were preincubated in hypotonic medium with subsequent restoration of tonicity. After the initial osmotic shrinkage the cells recovered their volume within 5 min with an associated KCl uptake. The volume recovery was inhibited when NO-3 was substituted for Cl-, and when Na+ was replaced by K+, or by choline (at 5 mM external K+). The volume recovery was strongly inhibited by furosemide and bumetanide, but essentially unaffected by DIDS. The net uptake of Cl- was much larger than the value predicted from the conductive Cl- permeability. The undirectional 36Cl flux, which was insensitive to bumetanide under steady-state conditions, was substantially increased during regulatory volume increase, and showed a large bumetanide-sensitive component. During volume recovery the Cl- flux ratio (influx/efflux) for the bumetanide-sensitive component was estimated at 1.85, compatible with a coupled uptake of Na+ and Cl-, or with an uptake via a K+,Na+,2Cl- cotransport system. The latter possibility is unlikely, however, because a net uptake of KCl was found even at low external K+, and because no K+ uptake was found in ouabain-poisoned cells. In the presence of ouabain a bumetanide-sensitive uptake during volume recovery of Na+ and Cl- in nearly equimolar amounts was demonstrated. It is proposed that the primary process during the regulatory volume increase is an activation of an otherwise quiescent, bumetanide-sensitive Na+,Cl- cotransport system with subsequent replacement of Na+ by K+ via the Na+/K+ pump, stimulated by the Na+ influx through the Na+,Cl- cotransport system. PMID:6100866

  8. On the Activation Volume for Dislocation Creep and Diffusion in Olivine and Other Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karato, S.

    2006-12-01

    The activation volume is an important parameter that characterizes the pressure dependence of plastic deformation. However, experimental determination of activation volume is challenging and, for olivine, the published results range from ~0 to ~30 cm3/mol. This vast range of V* is translated into more than 10 orders of magnitude difference in viscosity in the deep upper mantle (for a given stress). The main reasons for this large discrepancy include (i) the large experimental errors in the previous experimental studies on V* due to the limited pressure range and the limited resolution of mechanical measurements and (ii) the confusions in parameterization of flow law. In this talk, I will discuss several issues in determining and interpreting V*. In addition to the issues of uncertainties in experimental measurements, one important issue in the experimental determination of V* is the choice of flow law formula. It is customary to use a power-law equation to determine V*, but the appropriateness of power-law relationship is not obvious, and two issues need to be addressed carefully. First, at stress exceeding ~200 MPa (for olivine), deviation from power- law behavior is appreciable and the exponential flow law becomes important. The transition to exponential flow law will result in (i) apparently small V* if the data were fitted to a power-law relation, and (ii) apparently negative dependence of activation enthalpy (as observed by Green and Borch (1987)). Second, the flow-law parameterization under water-saturated conditions needs to include the pressure dependence of water fugacity. When this effect is ignored, apparently small activation volume would be obtained. Third, if deform,ation is in the transient creep regime rather than in the "steady-state" creep regime, then the activation volume will be an apparent activation volume that can be significantly lower than the "true" activation volume if the transient creep behavior is pressure-dependent. I will review the

  9. A Review of the Availability of Primary Scientific and Technical Documents within the United States, Volume II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, James L.

    Volume II of a three-volume report on the availability of primary scientific and technical documents within the U.S. presents the detailed methodology and findings of the study. The design is presented under nine headings: (1) literature survey, (2) data-base design, (3) establishing data collection points, (4) review of objectives and statement…

  10. Case Studies of Three Urban University-School Collaboratives Mandated for the Improvement of Educational Practice. Volume II, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, R.; And Others

    This is Volume II of a two-volume final report of a study on the exchange and use of knowledge for school improvement in three paired educational systems in Boston, Massachusetts. The pairings, which involved the collaboration of a college/university with one or more of the Boston public schools in carrying out school improvement programs, were…

  11. Forecasting the Future Food Service World of Work. Final Report. Volume II. Centralized Food Service Systems. Service Management Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Thomas F., Ed.; Swinton, John R., Ed.

    Volume II of a three-volume study on the future of the food service industry considers the effects that centralized food production will have on the future of food production systems. Based on information from the Fair Acres Project and the Michigan State University Vegetable Processing Center, the authors describe the operations of a centralized…

  12. Possible interrelationship between changes in F-actin and myosin II, protein phosphorylation, and cell volume regulation in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, S F; Hoffmann, E K

    2002-07-01

    Osmotic shrinkage of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EATC) elicited translocation of myosin II from the cytosol to the cortical region, and swelling elicits concentration of myosin II in the Golgi region. Rho kinase and p38 both appeared to be involved in shrinkage-induced myosin II reorganization. In contrast, the previously reported shrinkage-induced actin polymerization [Pedersen et al. (1999) Exp. Cell Res. 252, 63-74] was independent of Rho kinase, p38, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), and protein kinase C (PKC), which thus do not exert their effects on the shrinkage-activated transporters via effects on F-actin. The subsequent F-actin depolymerization, however, appeared MLCK- and PKC-dependent, and the initial swelling-induced F-actin depolymerization was MLCK-dependent; both effects were apparently secondary to kinase-mediated effects on cell volume changes. NHE1 in EATC is activated both by osmotic shrinkage and by the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor Calyculin A (CL-A). Both stimuli caused Rho kinase-dependent myosin II relocation to the cortical cytoplasm, but in contrast to the shrinkage-induced F-actin polymerization, CL-A treatment elicited a slight F-actin depolymerization. Moreover, Rho kinase inhibition did not significantly affect NHE1 activation, neither by shrinkage nor by CL-A. Implications for the possible interrelationship between changes in F-actin and myosin II, protein phosphorylation, and cell volume regulation are discussed. PMID:12061817

  13. Activity report 1990-1992 and proceedings, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer-Rosa, D.; Waniek, L.; Suhadolc, P.

    A report on the activities of the European Seismological Commission (ESC) during the period 1990-1992 together with the Proceedings of the General Assembly of the ESC are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 covers the following topics: recent strong earthquakes in Europe, regional seismicity, historical earthquakes in Europe, statistical models and methods in seismology, numerical modeling in three-dimensional media, methodology of quantification of European earthquakes and recent results, seismic noise and signal detectability, regional seismic network, and history of seismometry. One paper dealing with microseismic noise characteristics around the Kozloduy nuclear power plant has been inputted to INIS.

  14. Activity Report, 1990 - 1992 and proceedings, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottnauer, Ing. Pavel

    A report of the European Seismological Commission (ESC) on 1990-1992 activities and Proceedings of the General Assembly of the ESC are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 covers the following topics: study of seismic sound, seismotectonic analysis, deep seismic sounding, the three-dimensional structure of the European lithosphere-asthenosphere system, complexity in earthquake occurrence, earthquake hazard, strong and weak earthquake ground motions, macroseismology, microzonation, and applications in earthquake engineering. One paper dealing with the connection between seismicity and the CO2- (sup 222)Rn content in spring water has been inputted to INIS.

  15. Legislative Provisions for the Improvement of Guidance Programs and Personnel Development. Final Report, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drier, Harry N.

    This second volume of the final report contains twenty-eight report appendixes. The narrative portion is available separately--see note. Contents include (1) Work Flow Network, (2) Work Breakdown Structure (components, activities, tasks), (3) Listings of Competency Literature Sources, (4) Criteria for Writing Competency Statements and Assessing…

  16. AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF C.I. DISPERSE BLUE 79 - VOLUME II, APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to determine the fate of C.I. Disperse Blue 79, one of the largest production volume dyes, and select biodegradation products in a conventionally operated activated sludge process and an anaerobic sludge digestion system. To achieve this objective, a pilo...

  17. Function of cGMP-dependent protein kinase II in volume load-induced diuresis.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Andrea; Schinner, Elisabeth; Huettner, Johannes P; Kees, Frieder; Tauber, Philipp; Hofmann, Franz; Schlossmann, Jens

    2014-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)/cGMPs cause diuresis and natriuresis. Their downstream effectors beyond cGMP remain unclear. To elucidate a probable function of cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII), we investigated renal parameters in different conditions (basal, salt diets, starving, water load) using a genetically modified mouse model (cGKII-KO), but did not detect any striking differences between WT and cGKII-KO. Thus, cGKII is proposed to play only a marginal role in the adjustment of renal concentration ability to varying salt loads without water restriction or starving conditions. When WT mice were subjected to a volume load (performed by application of a 10-mM glucose solution (3% of BW) via feeding needle), they exhibited a potent diuresis. In contrast, urine volume was decreased significantly in cGKII-KO. We showed that AQP2 plasma membrane (PM) abundance was reduced for about 50% in WT upon volume load, therefore, this might be a main cause for the enhanced diuresis. In contrast, cGKII-KO mice almost completely failed to decrease AQP2-PM distribution. This significant difference between both genotypes is not induced by an altered p-Ser256-AQP2 phosphorylation, as phosphorylation at this site decreases similarly in WT and KO. Furthermore, sodium excretion was lowered in cGKII-KO mice during volume load. In summary, cGKII is only involved to a minor extent in the regulation of basal renal concentration ability. By contrast, cGKII-KO mice are not able to handle an acute volume load. Our results suggest that membrane insertion of AQP2 is inhibited by cGMP/cGKII.

  18. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 3: Specifications

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 3 is a compilation of the construction specifications that will constitute the Title II materials and performance specifications. This volume contains CSI specifications for non-equipment related construction material type items, performance type items, and facility mechanical equipment items. Data sheets are provided, as necessary, which specify the equipment overall design parameters.

  19. Preliminary evaluation of alternative waste form solidification processes. Volume II. Evaluation of the processes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    This Volume II presents engineering feasibility evaluations of the eleven processes for solidification of nuclear high-level liquid wastes (HHLW) described in Volume I of this report. Each evaluation was based in a systematic assessment of the process in respect to six principal evaluation criteria: complexity of process; state of development; safety; process requirements; development work required; and facility requirements. The principal criteria were further subdivided into a total of 22 subcriteria, each of which was assigned a weight. Each process was then assigned a figure of merit, on a scale of 1 to 10, for each of the subcriteria. A total rating was obtained for each process by summing the products of the subcriteria ratings and the subcriteria weights. The evaluations were based on the process descriptions presented in Volume I of this report, supplemented by information obtained from the literature, including publications by the originators of the various processes. Waste form properties were, in general, not evaluated. This document describes the approach which was taken, the developent and application of the rating criteria and subcriteria, and the evaluation results. A series of appendices set forth summary descriptions of the processes and the ratings, together with the complete numerical ratings assigned; two appendices present further technical details on the rating process.

  20. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations. Volume II. Energy data on the US manufacturing subsector

    SciTech Connect

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01

    In order to characterize industrial energy service, current energy demand, its end uses, and cost of typical energy applications and resultant services in the industrial sector were examined and a projection of state industrial energy demands and prices to 1990 was developed. Volume II presents in Section 2 data on the US manufacturing subsector energy demand, intensity, growth rates, and cost for 1971, 1974, and 1976. These energy data are disaggregated not only by fuel type but also by user classifications, including the 2-digit SIC industry groups, 3-digit subgroups, and 4-digit SIC individual industries. These data characterize typical energy applications and the resultant services in this subsector. The quantities of fuel and electric energy purchased by the US manufacturing subsector were converted to British thermal units and reported in billions of Btu. The conversion factors are presented in Table 4-1 of Volume I. To facilitate the descriptive analysis, all energy cost and intensity data were expressed in constant 1976 dollars. The specific US industrial energy service characteristics developed and used in the descriptive analysis are presented in Volume I. Section 3 presents the computer program used to produce the tabulated data.

  1. INSERTION DEVICE ACTIVITIES FOR NSLS-II.

    SciTech Connect

    TANABE,T.; HARDER, D.A.; HULBERT, S.; RAKOWSKI, G.; SKARITKA, J.

    2007-06-25

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) will be a medium energy storage ring of 3GeV electron beam energy with sub-nm.rad horizontal emittance and top-off capability at 500mA. Damping wigglers will be used not only to reduce the beam emittance but also used as broadband sources for users. Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulators (CPMUs) are considered for hard X-ray linear device, and permanent magnet based elliptically polarized undulators (EPUs) for variable polarization devices for soft X-ray. 6T superconducting wiggler with minimal fan angle will be installed in the second phase as well as quasi-periodic EPU for VUV and possibly high-temperature superconducting undulator. R&D plans have been established to pursue the performance enhancement of the baseline devices and to design new types of insertion devices. A new insertion device development laboratory will also be established.

  2. Introductory Industrial Technology II. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towler, Alan L.

    This guide contains 29 learning modules intended for use by technology teachers and students in grade 8. Each module includes a student laboratory activity and instructor's resource sheet. Each student activity includes the following: activity topic and overview, challenge statement, objectives, vocabulary/concepts reinforced, equipment/supplies,…

  3. Training volume, androgen use and serum creatine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, K; Alén, M

    1989-09-01

    Serum creatine kinase (CK) activities were investigated in elite male strength athletes (n = 20) during normal weight training and bodybuilding training (one training session per day), during high volume strength training (two sessions per day) and during strength training (one session per day) with the use of high dose synthetic androgens (five athletes in each subgroup). The findings demonstrated that the increase in serum CK was highest in the subgroup using androgens. These results suggest that strength training with the use of androgenic steroids leads to higher serum CK activities than normal strength training.

  4. Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

    1989-03-01

    Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

  5. Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Public Involvement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    In regard to the proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project, the goal of the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) public involvement process is to determine the issues to be examined and pertinent analyses to be conducted and to solicit comments on the content and quality of information presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). Comments and questions are solicited from the public and government agencies during the scoping process and during the comment period and public hearing on the DEIS, to find out what is of most concern to them. The end product of the public involvement process is the Comment Report which follows in part of this volume on Public Involvement.

  6. Science Activities in Energy: Solar Energy II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Included in this science activities energy package are 14 activities related to solar energy for secondary students. Each activity is outlined on a single card and is introduced by a question such as: (1) how much solar heat comes from the sun? or (2) how many times do you have to run water through a flat-plate collector to get a 10 degree rise in…

  7. Comparative assessment of TRU waste forms and processes. Volume II. Waste form data, process descriptions, and costs.

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A.; Lokken, R.O.; May, R.P.; Roberts, F.P.; Thornhill, R.E.; Timmerman, C.L.; Treat, R.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    This volume contains supporting information for the comparative assessment of the transuranic waste forms and processes summarized in Volume I. Detailed data on the characterization of the waste forms selected for the assessment, process descriptions, and cost information are provided. The purpose of this volume is to provide additional information that may be useful when using the data in Volume I and to provide greater detail on particular waste forms and processes. Volume II is divided into two sections and two appendixes. The first section provides information on the preparation of the waste form specimens used in this study and additional characterization data in support of that in Volume I. The second section includes detailed process descriptions for the eight processes evaluated. Appendix A lists the results of MCC-1 leach test and Appendix B lists additional cost data. 56 figures, 12 tables.

  8. Retrospective Reconstructions of Active Bone Marrow Dose-Volume Histograms

    SciTech Connect

    Veres, Cristina; Allodji, Rodrigue S.; Llanas, Damien; Vu Bezin, Jérémi; Chavaudra, Jean; Mège, Jean Pierre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Quiniou, Eric; Deutsh, Eric; Vathaire, Florent de; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To present a method for calculating dose-volume histograms (DVH's) to the active bone marrow (ABM) of patients who had undergone radiation therapy (RT) and subsequently developed leukemia. Methods and Materials: The study focuses on 15 patients treated between 1961 and 1996. Whole-body RT planning computed tomographic (CT) data were not available. We therefore generated representative whole-body CTs similar to patient anatomy. In addition, we developed a method enabling us to obtain information on the density distribution of ABM all over the skeleton. Dose could then be calculated in a series of points distributed all over the skeleton in such a way that their local density reflected age-specific data for ABM distribution. Dose to particular regions and dose-volume histograms of the entire ABM were estimated for all patients. Results: Depending on patient age, the total number of dose calculation points generated ranged from 1,190,970 to 4,108,524. The average dose to ABM ranged from 0.3 to 16.4 Gy. Dose-volume histograms analysis showed that the median doses (D{sub 50%}) ranged from 0.06 to 12.8 Gy. We also evaluated the inhomogeneity of individual patient ABM dose distribution according to clinical situation. It was evident that the coefficient of variation of the dose for the whole ABM ranged from 1.0 to 5.7, which means that the standard deviation could be more than 5 times higher than the mean. Conclusions: For patients with available long-term follow-up data, our method provides reconstruction of dose-volume data comparable to detailed dose calculations, which have become standard in modern CT-based 3-dimensional RT planning. Our strategy of using dose-volume histograms offers new perspectives to retrospective epidemiological studies.

  9. Blade system design studies volume II : preliminary blade designs and recommended test matrix.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Dayton A.

    2004-06-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC is performing a Blade System Design Study (BSDS) concerning innovations in materials, processes and structural configurations for application to wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt range. The BSDS Volume I project report addresses issues and constraints identified to scaling conventional blade designs to the megawatt size range, and evaluated candidate materials, manufacturing and design innovations for overcoming and improving large blade economics. The current report (Volume II), presents additional discussion of materials and manufacturing issues for large blades, including a summary of current trends in commercial blade manufacturing. Specifications are then developed to guide the preliminary design of MW-scale blades. Using preliminary design calculations for a 3.0 MW blade, parametric analyses are performed to quantify the potential benefits in stiffness and decreased gravity loading by replacement of a baseline fiberglass spar with carbon-fiberglass hybrid material. Complete preliminary designs are then presented for 3.0 MW and 5.0 MW blades that incorporate fiberglass-to-carbon transitions at mid-span. Based on analysis of these designs, technical issues are identified and discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for composites testing under Part I1 of the BSDS, and the initial planned test matrix for that program is presented.

  10. Estimation of the outer-sphere contribution to the activation volume for electron exchange reactions using the mean spherical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Hideo D.; Swaddle, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    The outer-sphere contribution to the volume of activation of homogeneous electron exchange reactions is estimated for selected solvents on the basis of the mean spherical approximation (MSA), and the calculated values are compared with those estimated by the Strank-Hush-Marcus (SHM) theory and with activation volumes obtained experimentally for the electron exchange reaction between tris(hexafluoroacetylacetonato)ruthenium(III) and -(II) in acetone, acetonitrile, methanol and chloroform. The MSA treatment, which recognizes the molecular nature of the solvent, does not improve significantly upon the continuous-dielectric SHM theory, which represents the experimental data adequately for the more polar solvents.

  11. Training Curriculum for Alternative Clothes Cleaning. Volume I: Curriculum [and] Volume II: Instructor's Manual [and Presentation Materials].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luskin, Jack; Manning, Teena; Siegel, Jodie

    This two-volume document consists of a curriculum and an instructor's manual for a learner-centered workshop on alternative clothes cleaning that is intended for operators of dry-cleaning establishments and individuals who are interested in opening a garment wet cleaning facility. Volume 1, the curriculum, contains 11 learning modules. Each module…

  12. Preparing Leaders for the Future: A Development Program for Underrepresented Groups in Vocational Education. Volume I. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Jerome, Jr.; And Others

    This document is a 2-volume set of instructional materials for a 90-hour leadership development program for vocational educators that places special emphasis on underrepresented groups in vocational education. The two volumes of materials (here combined) are organized into three major sections as follows: introduction to the leadership development…

  13. Infinite dilution partial molar volumes of platinum(II) 2,4-pentanedionate in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kong, Chang Yi; Siratori, Tomoya; Funazukuri, Toshitaka; Wang, Guosheng

    2014-10-01

    The effects of temperature and density on retention of platinum(II) 2,4-pentanedionate in supercritical fluid chromatography were investigated at temperatures of 308.15-343.15K and pressure range from 8 to 40MPa by the chromatographic impulse response method with curve fitting. The retention factors were utilized to derive the infinite dilution partial molar volumes of platinum(II) 2,4-pentanedionate in supercritical carbon dioxide. The determined partial molar volumes were small and positive at high pressures but exhibited very large and negative values in the highly compressible near critical region of carbon dioxide.

  14. Antitubercular activity of Ru (II) isoniazid complexes.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Inara de; Tavares, Aline; Roveda, Antonio C; da Silva, Augusto C H; Marino, Leonardo B; Lopes, Érica O; Pavan, Fernando R; Lopes, Luiz G F; Franco, Douglas W

    2015-04-01

    Despite the resistance developed by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) strains, isoniazid (INH) has been recognized as one of the best drug for treatment of Tuberculosis (Tb). The coordination of INH to ruthenium metal centers was investigated as a strategy to enhance the activity of this drug against the sensitive and resistant strains of MTb. The complexes trans-[Ru(NH3)4(L)(INH)](2+) (L=SO2 or NH3) were isolated and their chemical and antituberculosis properties studied. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) data show that [Ru(NH3)5(INH)](2+) was active in both resistant and sensitive strains, whereas free INH (non-coordinated) showed to be active only against the sensitive strain. The coordination of INH to the metal center in both [Ru(NH3)5(INH)](2+) and trans-[Ru(NH3)4(SO2)(INH)](2+) complexes led to a shift in the INH oxidation potential to less positive values compared to free INH. Despite, the ease of oxidation of INH did not lead to an increase in the in vitro INH activity against MTb, it might have provided sensitivity toward resistant strains. Furthermore, ruthenium complexes with chemical structures analogous to those described above were synthesized using the oxidation products of INH as ligands (namely, isonicotinic acid and isonicotinamide). These last compounds were not active against any strains of MTb. Moreover, according to DFT calculations the formation of the acyl radical, a proposed intermediate in the INH oxidation, is favored in the [Ru(NH3)5(INH)](2+) complex by 50.7kcalmol(-1) with respect to the free INH. This result suggests that the stabilization of the acyl radical promoted by the metal center would be a more important feature than the oxidation potential of the INH for the antituberculosis activity against resistant strains.

  15. The Role of Angiotensin II and Cyclic AMP in Alveolar Active Sodium Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ismael-Badarneh, Reem; Guetta, Julia; Klorin, Geula; Berger, Gidon; Abu-saleh, Niroz; Abassi, Zaid; Azzam, Zaher S.

    2015-01-01

    Active alveolar fluid clearance is important in keeping airspaces free of edema. Angiotensin II plays a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, heart failure and others. However, little is known about its contribution to alveolar fluid clearance. Angiotensin II effects are mediated by two specific receptors; AT1 and AT2. The localization of these two receptors in the lung, specifically in alveolar epithelial cells type II, was recently reported. We hypothesize that Angiotensin II may have a role in the regulation of alveolar fluid clearance. We investigated the effect of Angiotensin II on alveolar fluid clearance in rats using the isolated perfused lung model and isolated rat alveolar epithelial cells. The rate of alveolar fluid clearance in control rats was 8.6% ± 0.1 clearance of the initial volume and decreased by 22.5%, 28.6%, 41.6%, 48.7% and 39% in rats treated with 10-10 M, 10-9 M, 10-8 M, 10-7 M or 10-6 M of Ang II respectively (P < 0.003). The inhibitory effect of Angiotensin II was restored in losartan, an AT1 specific antagonist, pretreated rats, indicating an AT1 mediated effect of Ang II on alveolar fluid clearance. The expression of Na,K-ATPase proteins and cAMP levels in alveolar epithelial cells were down-regulated following the administration of Angiotensin II; suggesting that cAMP may be involved in AngII-induced reduced Na,K-ATPase expression, though the contribution of additional factors could not be excluded. We herein suggest a novel mechanism of clinical relevance by which angiotensin adversely impairs the ability of the lungs to clear edema. PMID:26230832

  16. Activation volume for creep in the upper mantle.

    PubMed

    Ross, J V; Ave'lallemant, H G; Carter, N L

    1979-01-19

    The activation volume for creep, V*, of olivine-rich rocks has been determined in pressure-differential creep experiments on dunite at temperatures from 1100 degrees to 1350 degrees C and confining pressures from 5 to 15 kilobars. Values of V* range from 10.6 to 15.4 cubic centimeters per mole with a mean value of 13.4 cubic centimeters per mole, near that expected for oxygen ion self-diffusion. The quantity V* is incorporated into existing flow equations; in combination with observations on naturally deformed mantle xenoliths, estimates are given of the variation with depth of stress, strain rate, and viscosity. PMID:17738997

  17. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume II: Control Technology and General Source Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume II, explains in detail the following: technology of source control, modification of operations, particulate control equipment, sulfur dioxide removal systems for power plants, and control equipment for gases and vapors; inspection procedures for general sources, fuel…

  18. Preparing Elementary Teachers to Teach Mathematics: A Problem-solving Approach. Final Report. Volume II: Content Component.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Frank K., Jr.; And Others

    The "Preparing Elementary Teachers to Teach Mathematics (PETTM) Project" (1988-1991) was a cooperative university/school effort to improve the teaching of mathematics by elementary teachers with its primary focus on improving the university training of preservice teachers (PSTs) in mathematics. This document, volume II of the project's final…

  19. Toward Active X-ray Telescopes II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldroft, Thomas L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Timothy W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peter; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Lillie, Charles F.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Sanmartin, Daniel Rodriguez; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan E.; Ulmer, Melville P.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2012-01-01

    In the half century since the initial discovery of an astronomical (non-solar) x-ray source, the sensitivity for detection of cosmic x-ray sources has improved by ten orders of magnitude. Largely responsible for this dramatic progress has been the refinement of the (grazing-incidence) focusing x-ray telescope. The future of x-ray astronomy relies upon the development of x-ray telescopes with larger aperture areas (greater than 1 m2) and finer angular resolution (less than 1.). Combined with the special requirements of grazing-incidence optics, the mass and envelope constraints of space-borne telescopes render such advances technologically challenging.requiring precision fabrication, alignment, and assembly of large areas (greater than 100 m2) of lightweight (approximately 1 kg m2 areal density) mirrors. Achieving precise and stable alignment and figure control may entail active (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. This paper discusses relevant programmatic and technological issues and summarizes progress toward active x-ray telescopes.

  20. Activation of calcineurin in human failing heart ventricle by endothelin-1, angiotensin II and urotensin II.

    PubMed

    Li, Joan; Wang, Jianchun; Russell, Fraser D; Molenaar, Peter

    2005-06-01

    1 The calcineurin (CaN) enzyme-transcriptional pathway is critically involved in hypertrophy of heart muscle in some animal models. Currently there is no information concerning the regulation of CaN activation by endogenous agonists in human heart. 2 Human right ventricular trabeculae from explanted human (14 male/2 female) failing hearts were set up in a tissue bath and electrically paced at 1 Hz and incubated with or without 100 nM endothelin-1 (ET-1), 10 M, angiotensin-II (Ang II) or 20 nM human urotensin-II (hUII) for 30 min. Tissues from four patients were incubated with 200 nM tacrolimus (FK506) for 30 min and then incubated in the presence or absence of ET-1 for a further 30 min. 3 ET-1 increased contractile force in all 13 patients (P<0.001). Ang II and hUII increased contractile force in three out of eight and four out of 10 patients but overall nonsignificantly (P>0.1). FK506 had no effect on contractile force (P=0.12). 4 ET-1, Ang II and hUII increased calcineurin activity by 32, 71 and 15%, respectively, while FK506 reduced activity by 34%. ET-1 in the presence of FK506 did not restore calcineurin activity (P=0.1). 5 There was no relationship between basal CaN activity and expression levels in the right ventricle. Increased levels of free phosphate were detected in ventricular homogenates that were incubated with PKC(epsilon) compared to samples incubated without PKC(epsilon). 6 Endogenous cardiostimulants which activate G(alpha)q-coupled receptors increase the activity of calcineurin in human heart following acute (30 min) exposure. PKC may contribute to this effect by increasing levels of phosphorylated calcineurin substrate.

  1. Structural Optimization of Zn(II)-Activated MR Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Matosziuk, Lauren M.; Leibowitz, Jonathan H.; Heffern, Marie C.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Ratner, Mark A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the structural optimization and mechanistic investigation of a series of bio-activated MRI contrast agents that transform from low relaxivity to high relaxivity in the presence of Zn(II). The change in relaxivity results from a structural transformation of the complex that alters the coordination environment about the Gd(III) center. Here, we have performed a series of systematic modifications to determine the structure which provides the optimal change in relaxivity in response to the presence of Zn(II). Relaxivity measurements in the presence and absence of Zn(II) were used in conjunction with regarding water access (namely number of water molecules bound) to the Gd(III) center and temperature-dependent 13C NMR spectroscopy to determine how the coordination environment about the Gd(III) center is affected by: the distance between the Zn(II)-binding domain and the Gd(III)-chelate, the number of functional groups on the Zn(II)-binding domain, and the presence of Zn(II). The results of this study provide valuable insight into the elucidation of design principles for future bio-activated MR probes. PMID:23777423

  2. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water.

    PubMed

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10^{-23}m^{3}), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes. PMID:27627349

  3. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water.

    PubMed

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10^{-23}m^{3}), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes.

  4. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10-23m3 ), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes.

  5. Physical activity and quality of life: assessing the influence of activity frequency, intensity, volume, and motives.

    PubMed

    Lustyk, M Kathleen B; Widman, Laura; Paschane, Amy A E; Olson, Karen C

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the impact of exercise frequency, intensity, and volume along with exercise motives on quality of life (QOL) reports. The authors assessed exercise habits with the Godin Leisure Time Activity Scale and measured exercise motives with the Reasons for Exercise Inventory. The Quality of Life Inventory assessed satisfaction in 16 domains including health, work, and recreation. High-frequency exercisers reported significantly higher health, helping, and community-related QOL than those who exercised less frequently. The authors noted significantly higher health-related QOL in the heavy volume group compared with the other volume groups. Multiple regression tests revealed that activity intensity and exercise motives significantly predicted QOL reports. The strongest bivariate correlations with QOL existed for mild activity and exercising for fitness and health reasons. Thus, high-frequency activity of mild intensity that produces high kcal utilization and is performed to improve health and fitness has the strongest influence on QOL reports.

  6. Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Biological Activity Studies of Ni(II) and Zn(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Palakuri; Laxma Reddy, K.

    2014-01-01

    Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized from tridentate 3-formyl chromone Schiff bases such as 3-((2-hydroxyphenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL1), 2-((4-oxo-4H-chromen-3-yl)methylneamino)benzoic acid (HL2), 3-((3-hydroxypyridin-2-ylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL3), and 3-((2-mercaptophenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL4). All the complexes were characterized in the light of elemental analysis, molar conductance, FTIR, UV-VIS, magnetic, thermal, powder XRD, and SEM studies. The conductance and spectroscopic data suggested that, the ligands act as neutral and monobasic tridentate ligands and form octahedral complexes with general formula [M(L1–4)2]·nH2O (M = Ni(II) and Zn(II)). Metal complexes exhibited pronounced activity against tested bacteria and fungi strains compared to the ligands. In addition metal complexes displayed good antioxidant and moderate nematicidal activities. The cytotoxicity of ligands and their metal complexes have been evaluated by MTT assay. The DNA cleavage activity of the metal complexes was performed using agarose gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of oxidant H2O2. All metal complexes showed significant nuclease activity in the presence of H2O2. PMID:24948904

  7. Candesartan, an angiotensin II AT₁-receptor blocker and PPAR-γ agonist, reduces lesion volume and improves motor and memory function after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Villapol, Sonia; Yaszemski, Alexandra K; Logan, Trevor T; Sánchez-Lemus, Enrique; Saavedra, Juan M; Symes, Aviva J

    2012-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in complex pathological reactions, the initial lesion worsened by secondary inflammation and edema. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is produced in the brain and Ang II receptor type 1 (AT₁R) overstimulation produces vasoconstriction and inflammation. Ang II receptor blockers (ARBs) are neuroprotective in models of stroke but little is known of their effect when administered in TBI models. We therefore performed controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury on mice to investigate whether the ARB candesartan would mitigate any effects of TBI. We administered candesartan or vehicle to mice 5 h before CCI injury. Candesartan treatment reduced the lesion volume after CCI injury by approximately 50%, decreased the number of dying neurons, lessened the number of activated microglial cells, protected cerebral blood flow (CBF), and reduced the expression of the cytokine TGFβ1 while increasing expression of TGFβ3. Candesartan-treated mice also showed better motor skills on the rotarod 3 days after injury, and improved performance in the Morris water maze 4 weeks after injury. These results indicate that candesartan is neuroprotective, reducing neuronal injury, decreasing lesion volume and microglial activation, protecting CBF and improving functional behavior in a mouse model of TBI. Co-treatment with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) antagonist significantly reduced some of the beneficial effects of candesartan after CCI, suggesting that PPARγ activation may contribute to part or to all of the neuroprotective effect of candesartan. Overall, our data suggest that ARBs with dual AT₁R-blocking and PPARγ activation properties may have therapeutic value in treating TBI.

  8. The non-active stellar chromosphere: Ca II basal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Martínez, M. I.; Schröder, K.-P.; Hauschildt, P.

    2014-11-01

    We analyse high-resolution, high-s/n European Southern Observatories (ESO)-archive spectra (from UVES, the UV echelle spectrograph) of 76 inactive or modestly active stars of spectral type G to M, main sequence and giants. Using PHOENIX model photospheres with Ca II K lines that match the observed line profiles, we (i) revise the effective temperatures, (ii) obtain a precise surface flux scale for each star and (iii) directly determine the exact surface fluxes of each Ca II K chromospheric emission with respect to the photospheric line profile. We find that our stellar sample exhibits a lower boundary to its chromospheric surface flux distribution with an unprecedented definition. From a subsample of the 25 least active stars, we obtain a simple empirical formula for the basal Ca II flux as a function of effective temperature: log {F^basal_{Ca II(H+K)}} = 7.05(± 0.31) log {T_eff} - 20.86(± 1.15). This is in good agreement with the Mg II basal flux. In a direct comparison with the large body of Mt Wilson S-measurements of the chromospheric Ca II emission and its well-defined cut-off, excellent agreement is achieved as well. A new result, however, is the small scatter of the least active star's fluxes about the basal flux. It is about 25 per cent and equals the residual uncertainties of our approach. At the same time, we do not find any evidence for a gravity dependence within these limits. This strongly confirms the basal flux as a well-defined and universal phenomenon, which characterizes every inactive chromosphere.

  9. Energy Extension Service Pilot Program: evaluation report after two years. Volume II. State reports

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    This report, Vol. II, presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1979. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement an 18-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. In September 1978, each State received an additional $370,000 for service-delivery programs for the extension of the pilot program, April 1979 through September 1979. A case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each State is provided here, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each State for more-detailed study and survey research. Although the thrust of this volume is descriptive, some survey data and analyses are presented for the emphasis programs. Two telephone surveys of clients and a non-client sample were conducted, one at the end of the first year of the pilot program (October 1977 - September 1978) and one at the end of the second year (October 1978 - September 1979).

  10. Deschutes River Spawning Gravel Study, Volume II, Appendices I-XIV, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, Charles W.

    1985-09-01

    Spawning habitat in the Deschutes River was inventoried, gravel permeability and composition were sampled at selected gravel bars, historical flow records for the Deschutes were analyzed, salmon and trout utilization of spawning habitat was examined, and potential methods of enhancing spawning habitat in the river were explored. Some changes in river conditions since the mid-1960's were identified, including a reduction in spawning habitat immediately downstream from the hydroelectric complex. The 1964 flood was identified as a factor which profoundly affected spawning habitat in the river, and which greatly complicated efforts to identify recent changes which could be attributed to the hydrocomplex. A baseline on present gravel quality at both chinook and steelhead spawning areas in the river was established using a freeze-core methodology. Recommendations are made for enhancing spawning habitat in the Deschutes River, if it is independently determined that spawning habitat is presently limiting populations of summer steelhead or fall chinook in the river. Volume II contains appendices to the study.

  11. Critical Infrastructure Protection II, The International Federation for Information Processing, Volume 290.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa, Mauricio; Shenoi, Sujeet

    The information infrastructure -- comprising computers, embedded devices, networks and software systems -- is vital to day-to-day operations in every sector: information and telecommunications, banking and finance, energy, chemicals and hazardous materials, agriculture, food, water, public health, emergency services, transportation, postal and shipping, government and defense. Global business and industry, governments, indeed society itself, cannot function effectively if major components of the critical information infrastructure are degraded, disabled or destroyed. Critical Infrastructure Protection II describes original research results and innovative applications in the interdisciplinary field of critical infrastructure protection. Also, it highlights the importance of weaving science, technology and policy in crafting sophisticated, yet practical, solutions that will help secure information, computer and network assets in the various critical infrastructure sectors. Areas of coverage include: - Themes and Issues - Infrastructure Security - Control Systems Security - Security Strategies - Infrastructure Interdependencies - Infrastructure Modeling and Simulation This book is the second volume in the annual series produced by the International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP) Working Group 11.10 on Critical Infrastructure Protection, an international community of scientists, engineers, practitioners and policy makers dedicated to advancing research, development and implementation efforts focused on infrastructure protection. The book contains a selection of twenty edited papers from the Second Annual IFIP WG 11.10 International Conference on Critical Infrastructure Protection held at George Mason University, Arlington, Virginia, USA in the spring of 2008.

  12. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 4: Project cost estimate

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. This volume represents the total estimated costs for the W113 facility. Operating Contractor Management costs have been incorporated as received from WHC. The W113 Facility TEC is $19.7 million. This includes an overall project contingency of 14.4% and escalation of 17.4%. A January 2001 construction contract procurement start date is assumed.

  13. Frio II Brine Pilot: Report on GEOSEQ Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.M.; Freifeld, B.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Doughty, C.; Benson, S.M.

    2007-11-17

    LBNL's GEOSEQ project is a key participant in the Frio IIbrine pilot studying geologic sequestration of CO2. During During theinjection phase of the Frio-II brine pilot, LBNL collected multiple datasets including seismic monitoring, hydrologic monitoring and geochemicalsampling. These data sets are summarized in this report including allCASSM (continuous active source seismic monitoring) travel time data,injection pressure and flow rate data and gaseous sampling and tracerdata. Additional results from aqueous chemistry analysis performed by theU. S. Geological Survey (USGS) are summarized. Post injectionmodification of the flow model for Frio II is shown. Thesemodificationsare intended to facilitate integration with the monitoring data andincorporation of model heterogeneity. Current activities of LBNL's GEOSEQproject related to the Frio II test are shown, including development of anew petrophysical model for improved interpretation of seismic monitoringdata and integration of this data with flow modeling.

  14. Systems Description; Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System - Phase I and Phase II; Final Report, Volume III

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Hugh B.

    1982-01-01

    This Volume should be considered the introductory volume to the series of six volumes even though numbered out of sequence. Volumes I and II were completed first and released in 1981 while a staff member was available to do the work. Volumes III through VI are being written and released some two years later as DOE funding became available for the purpose. They are as complete as possible considering that almost all the people involved in the program are now unavailable. This Volume III is an overview of the entire program, and many of the items presented herein briefly will be found in expanded form in one of the other five volumes. It will be noticed that assumptions and parameters such as well flow, well temperature, wet bulb temperatures, etc., involved in the several different performance calculations in the volume vary somewhat. These calculations were made at different times for different purposes and no attempt has been made to bring them into exact agreement.

  15. World War II Commemoration Committee: Fact Sheet and Suggested Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    This packet suggests activities and events that school districts, schools, classes, and educational organizations can conduct to commemorate World War II. Suggestions are made to include local veterans, including those in veteran's and nursing homes and hospitals, and youth at every possible opportunity. Recognition can take the form of military…

  16. Adolescent Health. Volume II: Background and the Effectiveness of Selected Prevention and Treatment Services [and] Indexes to Volumes I, II, and III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This document, the second of three volumes in the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment's "Adolescent Health" series, provides background information on aspects of adolescents' lives and examines the effectiveness of prevention and treatment interventions. Chapter 1, an introduction to this two-part document, provides a summary of the…

  17. Tritium volume activity in the Baltic Sea in 1987-1989

    SciTech Connect

    Styro, D.B.; Korotkov, V.P.

    1994-11-01

    Tritium volume activities measured in the Baltic Sea are summarized in this paper. Activity levels were determined by the liquid scintillation method with a LS-1000 counter. The field investigations showed that the tritium volume activity in the Baltic Sea can change substantially in absolute magnitude. Therefore, average volume activity is used as an indicator of natural content. Correlations between calculated (averaged) tritium activity levels and the Chernobyl accident are very briefly discussed. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Fish Passage Center

    1986-02-01

    Volume I of this report describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the freeze brand data used in the analysis of travel time for Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Brand recoveries for Lower Monumental dam also are presented. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data.

  19. Child Support Enforcement Statistics Fiscal Year 1985. Volume II. Tenth Annual Report to Congress for the Period Ending September 30, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Support Enforcement (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    This document is the second volume of a two-volume set of reports on child support enforcement in the United States. Volume II contains a series of graphs and tables which present various financial, statistical, and program data of fiscal years (FY) 1981-1985. Graphs illustrate: (1) Child Support Enforcement Collections and Expenditures,…

  20. Pre-Employment Laboratory Training. General Agricultural Mechanics Volume II. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This course outline, the second volume of a two-volume set, consists of lesson plans for pre-employment laboratory training in general agricultural mechanics. Covered in the eight lessons included in this volume are cold metal work, soldering, agricultural safety programs, farm shops, farm structures, farm and ranch electrification, soil and water…

  1. Inside Out. Writings from the Prison Literacy Project. Volumes I-II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prison Literacy Project, Philadelphia, PA.

    These two volumes contain writings designed for the new reader who is in prison. Written by both inmates and external volunteers, the material in these volumes includes poems, stories, and short essays that deal with subjects of interest to prison inmates. To help the new reader, easier-to-read pieces are presented first. Titles in volume I are as…

  2. Duplication, Gaps and Coordination of Publicly Funded Skill Training Programs in 20 Cities. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Planning Association, Washington, DC. Center for Priority Analysis.

    A study of duplications in public skill training programs in twenty American cities resulted in a two-volume report. Volume One (ED 068 706) summarized and drew conclusions from the individual city reports contained in Volume Two. "Skill training" is used to mean all programs whose major purpose is the imparting of marketable skills to enrollees…

  3. Phase II Report. Volume II: Program Study Report. Evaluation of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lynell

    This volume, part of a series of Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP) evaluation reports, is devoted to the program study component of the CFRP evaluation. The purpose of this component is to develop the most comprehensive picture possible of the operation of the 11 CFRP's located across the country, in order to provide a backdrop against…

  4. Modular activation of Rho1 by GPCR signalling imparts polarized myosin II activation during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kerridge, Stephen; Munjal, Akankshi; Philippe, Jean-Marc; Jha, Ankita; de las Bayonas, Alain Garcia; Saurin, Andrew J; Lecuit, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Polarized cell shape changes during tissue morphogenesis arise by controlling the subcellular distribution of myosin II. For instance, during Drosophila melanogaster gastrulation, apical constriction and cell intercalation are mediated by medial-apical myosin II pulses that power deformations, and polarized accumulation of myosin II that stabilizes these deformations. It remains unclear how tissue-specific factors control different patterns of myosin II activation and the ratchet-like myosin II dynamics. Here we report the function of a common pathway comprising the heterotrimeric G proteins Gα12/13, Gβ13F and Gγ1 in activating and polarizing myosin II during Drosophila gastrulation. Gα12/13 and the Gβ13F/γ1 complex constitute distinct signalling modules, which regulate myosin II dynamics medial-apically and/or junctionally in a tissue-dependent manner. We identify a ubiquitously expressed GPCR called Smog required for cell intercalation and apical constriction. Smog functions with other GPCRs to quantitatively control G proteins, resulting in stepwise activation of myosin II and irreversible cell shape changes. We propose that GPCR and G proteins constitute a general pathway for controlling actomyosin contractility in epithelia and that the activity of this pathway is polarized by tissue-specific regulators. PMID:26780298

  5. Anticancer activity assessment of two novel binuclear platinum (II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Shahsavani, Mohammad Bagher; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Aseman, Marzieh Dadkhah; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Rashidi, Mehdi; Asadi, Zahra; Erfani, Nasrollah; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Niazi, Ali; Bahaoddini, Aminollah; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, two binuclear Pt (II) complexes, containing cis, cis-[Me2Pt (μ-NN) (μ-dppm) PtMe2] (1), and cis,cis-[Me2Pt(μ-NN)(μ dppm) Pt((CH2)4)] (2) in which NN=phthalazine and dppm=bis (diphenylphosphino) methane were evaluated for their anticancer activities and DNA/purine nucleotide binding properties. These Pt (II) complexes, with the non-classical structures, demonstrated a significant anticancer activity against Jurkat and MCF-7 cancer cell lines. The results of ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and Caspase-III activity suggest that these complexes were capable to stimulate an apoptotic mechanism of cell death in the cancer cells. Using different biophysical techniques and docking simulation analysis, we indicated that these complexes were also capable to interact efficiently with DNA via a non-intercalative mechanism. According to our results, substitution of cyclopentane (in complex 2) with two methyl groups (in complex 1) results in significant improvement of the complex ability to interact with DNA and subsequently to induce the anticancer activity. Overall, these binuclear Pt (II) complexes are promising group of the non-classical potential anticancer agents which can be considered as molecular templates in designing of highly efficient platinum anticancer drugs. PMID:27289447

  6. Special Demonstration Project for Involvement of Adult Residents of Soul City, Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Volume I: Evaluation and Final Report; Volume II: Supplementary Materials; Volume III: Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Univ., Tuscaloosa.

    This special demonstration project was designed to develop ways of reaching illiterate women and motivating them toward adult basic education goals through programs that support and strengthen family life. Volume I presents the following: Introduction and Purpose: Project Procedure; Program Accomplishments and Evaluation (Description of the…

  7. Photoluminescence properties of new Zn(II) complexes with 8-hydroxyquinoline ligands: Dependence on volume and electronic effect of substituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Yanping; Lu, Jiguo; Hu, Sheng; Zhang, Liming; Zhao, Fenghua; Huang, Huarong; Huang, Baohua; Zhang, Li

    2015-03-01

    A series of 2-arylethenyl-8-hydroxyquinoline ligands (A1-A4) with a trimethoxyphenyl, naphthyl, 2-fluoro-4-bromophenyl and anthracenyl group and their corresponding Zn(II) complexes (B1-B4) were synthesized and characterized by means of 1H NMR, ESI-MS, FT-IR and elemental analysis. A1 and A4 were characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The aggregation behavior of zinc salt and ligands in solution was investigated by several techniques, containing 1H NMR, UV-vis and photoluminescence (PL). The electronic nature and volume of arylethenyl substituents affect the absorption wavelength, the emission color, fluorescence lifetime, fluorescence quantum yield and thermostability of Zn(II) complexes. The experiments corroborated that the properties of Zinc(II) complexes can be tuned by introducing different functional substituents.

  8. CA II Emission surface fluxes in active chromosphere stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, B. W.

    1984-01-01

    Ca II emission-line surface fluxes are derived for 14 stars from 17 A/mm photographic spectra. Most of the stars observed are active chromosphere binaries; a few are known X-ray sources or have been observed by the IUE. The status of optical information on each of the objects is reviewed, and new information on v sin i and duplicity is presented.

  9. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification report, volumes I and II - 8/19/99

    SciTech Connect

    SHOOP, D.S.

    1999-09-10

    The Department of Energy policy (DOE P 450.4) is that safety is integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. In simple and straightforward terms, the Department will ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of this River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes are implemented within RFP to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The goal of an implemented ISMS is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The ISMS is comprised of the (1) described functions, components, processes, and interfaces (system map or blueprint) and (2) personnel who are executing those assigned roles and responsibilities to manage and control the ISMS. Therefore, this review evaluated both the ''paper'' and ''people'' aspects of the ISMS to ensure that the system is implemented within RPP. Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted an ISMS Phase I Verification of the TWRS from September 28-October 9, 1998. The resulting verification report recommended that TWRS-RL and the contractor proceed with Phase II of ISMS verification given that the concerns identified from the Phase I verification review are incorporated into the Phase II implementation plan.

  10. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume II, Chapter 12

    SciTech Connect

    March, F.; Guerrero, J.V.; Johns, W.H.; Schetnan, R.; Bayliss, L.S.; Kuzio, K.A.

    1999-08-01

    Operations in Tech Area IV commenced in 1980 with the construction of Buildings 980 and 981 and the Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator, which at the time was a major facility in SNL's Inertial Confinement Fusion Program. The Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator was a third-generation fusion accelerator that followed Proto I and Proto II, which were operated in Tech Area V. Another accelerator, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator I, was constructed in Tech Area IV because there was not enough room in Tech Area V, a highly restricted area that contains SNL's reactor facilities. In the early 1980s, more fusion-related facilities were constructed in Tech Area IV. Building 983 was built to house a fourth-generation fusion accelerator, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II, now called Z Machine, and Buildings 960 and 961 were built to house office space, electrical and mechanical laboratories, and highbay space for pulsed power research and development. In the mid 1980s, Building 970 was constructed to house the Simulation Technology Laboratory. The main facility in the Simulation Technology Laboratory is the High-Energy Radiation Megavolt Electron Source (HERMES) III, a third-generation gamma ray accelerator that is used primarily for the simulation of gamma rays produced by nuclear weapons. The previous generations, HERMES I and HERMES II, had been located in Tech Area V. In the late 1980s, Proto II was moved from Tech Area V to the Simulation Technology Laboratory and modified to function as an x-ray simulation accelerator, and construction of Buildings 962 and 963 began. These buildings comprised the Strategic Defense Facility, which was initially intended to support the nation's Strategic Defense Initiative or ''Star Wars'' program. It was to house a variety of pulsed power-related facilities to conduct research in such areas as directed-energy weapons (electron beams, lasers, and microwaves) and an earth-to-orbit launcher. With the reduction of the Strategic Defense

  12. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

  13. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to...

  14. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to...

  15. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to...

  16. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to...

  17. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to...

  18. DNA Binding and Antitumor Activity of α-Diimineplatinum(II) and Palladium(II) Dithiocarbamate Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Saeidifar, Maryam; Khosravi, Fatemeh; Divsalar, Adeleh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Hassani, Fatemeh

    2011-01-01

    The two water-soluble designed platinum(II) complex, [Pt(Oct-dtc)(bpy)]NO3 (Oct-dtc = Octyldithiocarbamate and bpy = 2,2′ -bipyridine) and palladium(II) complex, [Pd(Oct-dtc)(bpy)]NO3, have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductivity measurements, IR, 1H NMR, and electronic spectra studies. Studies of antitumor activity of these complexes against human cell tumor lines (K562) have been carried out. They show Ic50 values lower than that of cisplatin. The complexes have been investigated for their interaction with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) by utilizing the electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectra, and ethidium bromide displacement and gel filtration techniques. Both of these water-soluble complexes bound cooperatively and intercalatively to the CT-DNA at very low concentrations. Several binding and thermodynamic parameters are also described. PMID:22110410

  19. 77 FR 77038 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Notice of Intent to Renew Collection, Futures Volume...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... COMMISSION Agency Information Collection Activities: Notice of Intent to Renew Collection, Futures Volume... comment in response to the notice. This notice solicits comments on futures volume, open interest, price... responses. Futures Volume, Open Interest, Price, Deliveries and Exchange of Futures for Physicals,...

  20. Student Writings for Home Care Challenge. Volumes I-II. National Workplace Literacy Grant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll Community Coll., Westminster, MD.

    These two volumes contain research papers and personal reflections developed as culminating projects by adult students involved in workplace literacy classes in nursing homes, hospitals, and home care agencies. The first volume contains 18 papers: "What You Need to Know about Cancer" (Grace Bopst); "What Nursing Assistants Need to Know about Heart…

  1. South Dakota Statewide Core Curriculum, Career Ladder and Challenge System: Volumes I and II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1975

    The two volume final report of the South Dakota Statewide Core Curriculum, Career Ladder, and Challenge System Project, coordinating associated health and nursing education on a statewide basis to achieve a more systematic production and utilization of health manpower, is presented. Volume 1 includes five chapters: (1) and (2) outlining funding…

  2. Alaska Education Experiment. Final Report. Volume II, Appendices A Through E.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Governor's Office of Telecommunications, Juneau.

    This is the second volume of the three volume final report for the Health/Education Telecommunications Experiment. This appendix is a collection of documents which further elucidate the planning and construction of the communications facility. It includes a chronology of funding and contracting events, and copies of the actual grants and contracts…

  3. Folksong in the Classroom. Volume II, Numbers 1-3, 1981-82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, John A., Ed.; Seidman, Laurence I., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    The second volume of a newsletter for integrating folk music into elementary and secondary social studies, literature, and humanities courses, this publication contains three issues of the newsletter which together offer a compilation of folksongs from various historical periods and cultures. The first issue of this volume contains miscellaneous…

  4. Policy Analysis Series. Issues Related to the Welsch Consent Decree. Volumes I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Planning Agency, St. Paul.

    This two-volume compilation of 21 papers discusses issues stemming from the Welsch versus Likins suit (1974). The suit led to the 1980 Welsch-Noot consent decree requiring the State of Minnesota to reduce the overall population of mentally retarded persons residing in state institutions by nearly one-third over 6 years. The 11 papers in Volume I…

  5. Facing Up to the Learning Organization Challenge: Selected European Writings. Volume II. CEDEFOP Reference Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyhan, Barry, Ed.; Kelleher, Michael, Ed.; Cressey, Peter, Ed.; Poell, Rob, Ed.

    This volume, the second of a two-volume publication, comprises 15 papers that present the work of individual European projects dealing with learning within organizations. These five chapters in Part 1, The Meaning of the Learning Organization, examine the conceptual frameworks and dilemmas at the heart of the notion of the learning organization:…

  6. DICTIONARY OF OCCUPATIONAL TITLES, 1965. VOLUME II, OCCUPATIONAL CLASSIFICATION AND INDUSTRY INDEX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Employment Security (DOL), Washington, DC.

    VOLUME 2 COMPLEMENTS VOLUME 1 (VT 003 654) BY PROVIDING A CLASSIFICATION STRUCTURE WHICH GROUPS JOBS HAVING THE SAME BASIC OCCUPATIONAL, INDUSTRIAL, OR WORKER CHARACTERISTICS. THE SECTIONS ARE (1) THE OCCUPATIONAL CATEGORIES, DIVISIONS, AND GROUPS, (2) AN ALPHABETIC ARRANGEMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL DIVISIONS AND GROUPS, (3) THE OCCUPATIONAL GROUP…

  7. Reading Error Protocol Study: A Data Base. Volume II. Grades One and Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Herbert D.; Chambers, Richard

    This is the second of six volumes providing information drawn from a project designed to compile a substantial data base on reading errors for use by researchers and teachers. This volume contains transcriptions of oral reading error studies conducted with first and second grade students. The transcriptions are organized according to grade and the…

  8. Expansion of Vocational-Technical School Programs to Accommodate Highway Safety Manpower Requirements. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Ronald D.; And Others

    This second volume of a four-volume report covers manpower needs in motor vehicle inspection and registration, motorcycle safety, driver education, driver licensing, traffic court, and codes and laws. Aspects of training such as staffing, student recruitment, enrollments, facilities, equipment, and curriculum are discussed. Course outlines are…

  9. How To Set Up Your Own Small Business. Volumes I-II and Overhead Transparencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallek, Max

    This two-volume textbook and collection of overhead transparency masters is intended for use in a course in setting up a small business. The following topics are covered in the first volume: getting off to a good start, doing market research, forecasting sales, financing a small business, understanding the different legal needs of different types…

  10. Teaching about the Holocaust and Genocide. The Human Rights Series, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Clayton; And Others

    Designed to assist secondary school social studies, English, and humanities teachers as they teach about the Nazi Holocaust, the second of two volumes serves as a continuing introduction to the concept of human rights. Building on the first volume, which dealt with the roots of intolerance and persecution and precursors of the Holocaust, this…

  11. Evaluation of the National Science Foundation's Local Course Improvement Program, Volume II: Quantitative Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, James A.; And Others

    This report is the second of three volumes describing the results of the evaluation of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Local Course Improvement (LOCI) program. This volume describes the quantitative results of the program. Evaluation of the LOCI program involved answering questions in the areas of the need for science course improvement as…

  12. Theory in Bilingual Education: Ethnoperspectives in Bilingual Education Research, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Raymond V., Ed.

    The second of three volumes that present the three basic factors of the bilingual education equation--public policy, theory, and technology--this volume focuses on the theoretical aspects of bilingual education. Papers from the areas of language, culture, neurolinguistics, and pedagogy include: (1) "Ethnic and Linguistic Processes: The Future of…

  13. Development of an Analytical Approach to Telegraphic Communication. Volume II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Clessen J.

    This study analyzed and evaluated three major telegraphic production schemes. This second volume consists of eight appendixes which give the stimulus materials in their various reduction formats and their associated tests. For the first volume of the study see IR 001 308. (WCM)

  14. Mine drainage and surface mine reclamation. Volume II. Mine reclamation, abandoned mine lands and policy issues

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Mine waste and mine reclamation are topics of major interest to the mining industry, the government and the general public. This publication and its companion volume are the proceedings of a conference held in Pittsburgh, April 19-21, 1988. There were nine sessions (50 papers) that dealt with the geochemistry, hydrology and problems of mine waste and mine water, especially acid mine drainage. These comprise Volume 1. The nine sessions (43 papers) that dealt with reclamation and restoration of disturbed lands, as well as related policy issues, are included in volume 2. Volume 2 also contains the ten papers that pertained to control of subsidence and mine fires at abandoned mines. Poster session presentations are, in general, represented by abstracts; these have been placed in the back of both volumes.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of the biological activity of the anticancer drug elesclomol and its complexes with Cu(II), Ni(II) and Pt(II).

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arun A; Patel, Daywin; Wu, Xing; Hasinoff, Brian B

    2013-09-01

    The bis(thiohydrazide) amide elesclomol has extremely potent antiproliferative activity and is currently in clinical trials as an anticancer agent. Elesclomol strongly binds copper and may be exerting its cell growth inhibitory effects by generating copper-mediated oxidative stress. Nickel(II) and platinum(II) complexes of elesclomol were synthesized and characterized in order to investigate if these biologically redox inactive metal complexes could also inhibit cell growth. The nickel(II)-elesclomol and platinum(II) elesclomol complexes were 34- and 1040-fold less potent than the copper(II)-elesclomol complex towards human leukemia K562 cells. These results support the conclusion that a redox active metal is required for elesclomol to exert its cell growth inhibitory activity. Copper(II)-elesclomol was also shown to efficiently oxidize ascorbic acid at physiological ascorbic acid concentrations. Reoxidation of the copper(I) thus produced would lead to production of damaging reactive oxygen species. An X-ray crystallographic structure determination of copper(II)-elesclomol showed that it formed a 1:1 neutral complex with a distorted square planar structure. The kinetics and equilibria of the competition reaction of the strong copper(II) chelator TRIEN with copper(II)-elesclomol were studied spectrophotometrically under physiological conditions. These results showed elesclomol bound copper(II) with a conditional stability constant 24-fold larger than TRIEN. A log stability constant of 24.2 was thus indirectly determined for the copper(II)-elesclomol complex.

  16. Final Safety Analysis Addenda to Hazards Summary Report, Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II): upgrading of plant protection system. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, N. L.; Keeton, J. M.; Sackett, J. I.

    1980-06-01

    This report is the second in a series of compilations of the formal Final Safety Analysis Addenda (FSAA`s) to the EBR-II Hazard Summary Report and Addendum. Sections 2 and 3 are edited versions of the original FSAA`s prepared in support of certain modifications to the reactor-shutdown-system portion of the EBR-II plant-protection system. Section 4 is an edited version of the original FSAA prepared in support of certain modifications to a system classified as an engineered safety feature. These sections describe the pre- and postmodification system, the rationale for the modification, and required supporting safety analysis. Section 5 provides an updated description and analysis of the EBR-II emergency power system. Section 6 summarizes all significant modifications to the EBR-II plant-protection system to date.

  17. Methods for determining enzymatic activity comprising heating and agitation of closed volumes

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David Neil; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Reed, David William; Jensen, Jill Renee

    2016-03-15

    Methods for determining thermophilic enzymatic activity include heating a substrate solution in a plurality of closed volumes to a predetermined reaction temperature. Without opening the closed volumes, at least one enzyme is added, substantially simultaneously, to the closed volumes. At the predetermined reaction temperature, the closed volumes are agitated and then the activity of the at least one enzyme is determined. The methods are conducive for characterizing enzymes of high-temperature reactions, with insoluble substrates, with substrates and enzymes that do not readily intermix, and with low volumes of substrate and enzyme. Systems for characterizing the enzymes are also disclosed.

  18. The Feasibility of the Georgia Educational Model for Teacher Preparation--Elementary. Volume II A & B. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Charles E., Ed.; And Others

    The two sections of volume 2 of the Georgia feasibility study on elementary teacher education are intended for readers who wish for a detailed analysis of the study's activities and findings. The first section contains detailed PERT charts for the 5-year development strategy, activity lists, and the time data and time reports. The second section…

  19. DOD USER-NEEDS STUDY, PHASE II -- FLOW OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL INFORMATION WITHIN THE DEFENSE INDUSTRY. FINAL REPORT. VOLUME II, A. TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION, B. TECHNICAL APPENDICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOODMAN, ARNOLD F.; AND OTHERS

    IN PHASE II OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE (DOD) SURVEY TO FIND OUT HOW SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS IN GOVERNMENT AND INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES ACQUIRE INFORMATION, SCIENTIFIC PERSONNEL IN THE DEFENSE INDUSTRY WERE INTERVIEWED TO DETERMINE THEIR INFORMATION NEEDS AND THE FLOW OF INFORMATION INHERENT IN SATISFYING THESE…

  20. Preconcentration of Sn (II) using the methylene blue on the activated carbon and its determination by spectrophotometry method.

    PubMed

    Khodadoust, Saeid; Cham Kouri, Narges

    2014-04-01

    A simple and accurate spectrophotometric method for determination of trace amounts of Sn (II) ion in soil sample was developed by using the methylene blue (MB) in the presence of activated carbon (AC) as the adsorbent Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) of Sn (II) and then determined by UV-Vis. The Beer's law is obeyed over the concentration range of 1-80ngmL(-1) of Sn (II) with the detection limits of 0.34ngmL(-1). The influence of type and volume of eluent, concentration of MB, pH, and amount of AC on sensitivity of spectrophotometric method were optimized. The method has been successfully applied for Sn (II) ion determination in soil sample.

  1. Integrated nuclear and conventional theater warfare simulation (INWARS) documentation. Part IV. User's manual component. Volume II. Combat interactions input. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, J.R.; Gilmer, J.B.

    1980-02-08

    This is Volume II of the User's Manual Component of the Integrated Nuclear and Conventional Theater Warfare Simulation (INWARS) documentation. It presents the content and format of user inputs to the INWARS treatment of combat interactions.

  2. The active RS Canum Venaticorum binary II Pegasi. IV. The SPOT activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, S. V.; Berdyugin, A. V.; Ilyin, I.; Tuominen, I.

    1999-10-01

    A total of 6 new surface images of II Peg obtained for the years 1997 and 1998 confirms the recently revealed permanent active longitude structure. The lower limit of the active longitudes' lifetime is now extended up to 25 years. A new ``flip-flop'' phenomenon, redefined as a switch of the activity between the active longitudes, has started in summer of 1998. It coincides reasonably well with the moment predicted from the activity cycle of the star. This confirms definitely the cyclic behaviour of the activity of II Peg we recently discovered. Therefore, we assign numbers to the cycles of 4.65 yr since the earliest photoelectric observations of II Peg and define the active longitudes as ``odd'' and ``even'' corresponding to odd and even numbers of cycles. With such a definition, in late 1998 the 7th cycle began and the ``odd'' active longitude became more active. From the analysis of the spot area evolution within the active longitudes we conclude that the activity cycle is developed as a rearrangement of the nearly constant amount of the spot area between the active longitudes. We discuss the ``flip-flop'' phenomenon as a tracer of stellar activity and the role of the unseen secondary in establishing the cycle. Based on observations collected at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), La Palma, Spain; the 1.25m telescope of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, Ukraine; the Phoenix 10 robotic telescope, APT Observatory, Arizona, USA.}

  3. Fuel Quality/Processing Study. Volume II. Appendix, Task I, literature survey

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J B; Bela, A; Jentz, N E; Klumpe, H W; Kessler, R E; Kotzot, H T; Loran, B I

    1981-04-01

    This activity was begun with the assembly of information from Parsons' files and from contacts in the development and commercial fields. A further more extensive literature search was carried out using the Energy Data Base and the American Petroleum Institute Data Base. These are part of the DOE/RECON system. Approximately 6000 references and abstracts were obtained from the EDB search. These were reviewed and the especially pertinent documents, approximately 300, were acquired in the form of paper copy or microfiche. A Fuel Properties form was developed for listing information pertinent to gas turbine liquid fuel properties specifications. Fuel properties data for liquid fuels from selected synfuel processes, deemed to be successful candidates for near future commercial plants were tabulated on the forms. The processes selected consisted of H-Coal, SRC-II and Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal liquefaction processes plus Paraho and Tosco shale oil processes. Fuel properties analyses for crude and distillate syncrude process products are contained in Section 2. Analyses representing synthetic fuels given refinery treatments, mostly bench scale hydrotreating, are contained in Section 3. Section 4 discusses gas turbine fuel specifications based on petroleum source fuels as developed by the major gas turbine manufacturers. Section 5 presents the on-site gas turbine fuel treatments applicable to petroleum base fuels impurities content in order to prevent adverse contaminant effects. Section 7 relates the environmental aspects of gas turbine fuel usage and combustion performance. It appears that the near future stationary industrial gas turbine fuel market will require that some of the synthetic fuels be refined to the point that they resemble petroleum based fuels.

  4. Status of volcanic hazard studies for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.M.; Wohletz, K.H.; Vaniman, D.T.; Gladney, E.; Bower, N.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanic hazard investigations during FY 1984 focused on five topics: the emplacement mechanism of shallow basalt intrusions, geochemical trends through time for volcanic fields of the Death Valley-Pancake Range volcanic zone, the possibility of bimodal basalt-rhyolite volcanism, the age and process of enrichment for incompatible elements in young basalts of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) region, and the possibility of hydrovolcanic activity. The stress regime of Yucca Mountain may favor formation of shallow basalt intrusions. However, combined field and drill-hole studies suggest shallow basalt intrusions are rare in the geologic record of the southern Great Basin. The geochemical patterns of basaltic volcanism through time in the NTS region provide no evidence for evolution toward a large-volume volcanic field or increases in future rates of volcanism. Existing data are consistent with a declining volcanic system comparable to the late stages of the southern Death Valley volcanic field. The hazards of bimodal volcanism in this area are judged to be low. The source of a 6-Myr pumice discovered in alluvial deposits of Crater Flat has not been found. Geochemical studies show that the enrichment of trace elements in the younger rift basalts must be related to an enrichment of their mantle source rocks. This geochemical enrichment event, which may have been metasomatic alteration, predates the basalts of the silicic episode and is, therefore, not a young event. Studies of crater dimensions of hydrovolcanic landforms indicate that the worst case scenario (exhumation of a repository at Yucca Mountain by hydrovolcanic explosions) is unlikely. Theoretical models of melt-water vapor explosions, particularly the thermal detonation model, suggest hydrovolcanic explosion are possible at Yucca Mountain. 80 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Proceedings of the 1984 workshop on high-energy excitations in condensed matter. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, R.N.

    1984-12-01

    This volume covers electronic excitations, momentum distributions, high energy photons, and a wrap-up session. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  6. Cell cycle-dependent activity of the volume- and Ca2+-activated anion currents in Ehrlich lettre ascites cells.

    PubMed

    Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Bergdahl, Andreas; Hougaard, Charlotte; Christophersen, Palle; Pedersen, Stine F; Hoffmann, Else K

    2007-03-01

    Recent evidence implicates the volume-regulated anion current (VRAC) and other anion currents in control or modulation of cell cycle progression; however, the precise involvement of anion channels in this process is unclear. Here, Cl- currents in Ehrlich Lettre Ascites (ELA) cells were monitored during cell cycle progression, under three conditions: (i) after osmotic swelling (i.e., VRAC), (ii) after an increase in the free intracellular Ca2+ concentration (i.e., the Ca2+-activated Cl- current, CaCC), and (iii) under steady-state isotonic conditions. The maximal swelling-activated VRAC current decreased in G1 and increased in early S phase, compared to that in G0. The isotonic steady-state current, which seems to be predominantly VRAC, also decreased in G1, and increased again in early S phase, to a level similar to that in G0. In contrast, the maximal CaCC current (500 nM free Ca2+ in the pipette), was unaltered from G0 to G1, but decreased in early S phase. A novel high-affinity anion channel inhibitor, the acidic di-aryl-urea NS3728, which inhibited both VRAC and CaCC, attenuated ELA cell growth, suggesting a possible mechanistic link between cell cycle progression and cell cycle-dependent changes in the capacity for conductive Cl- transport. It is suggested that in ELA cells, entrance into the S phase requires an increase in VRAC activity and/or an increased potential for regulatory volume decrease (RVD), and at the same time a decrease in CaCC magnitude. PMID:17111356

  7. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle, Phase II: Title 1 report. Volume VII. Cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Poteat, T.J.

    1982-02-26

    This document, Volume VII EBT-P Cryogenic System Title I Design Report, describes the system that resulted from the Title I Preliminary Design effort. It is a self-contained document that can be read apart from the other Volumes comprising the EBT-P Title I Report. This document is a contract deliverable item and provides the detail necessary to support the Cryogenic System design contained in the EBT-P Baseline Design Data Book (BDDB).

  8. Casein kinase II stimulates rat liver mitochondrial glycerophosphate acyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Onorato, Thomas M; Haldar, Dipak

    2002-09-01

    Rat liver mitochondrial glycerophosphate acyltransferase (mtGAT) possesses 14 consensus sites for casein kinase II (CKII) phosphorylation. To study the functional relevance of phosphorylation to the activity of mtGAT, we treated isolated rat liver mitochondria with CKII and found that CKII stimulated mtGAT activity approximately 2-fold. Protein phosphatase-lambda treatment reversed the stimulation of mtGAT by CKII. Labeling of both solubilized and non-solubilized mitochondria with CKII and [gamma-32P]ATP resulted in a 32P-labeled protein of 85kDa, the molecular weight of mtGAT. Our findings suggest that CKII stimulates mtGAT activity by phosphorylation of the acyltransferase. The significance of this observation with respect to hormonal control of the enzyme is discussed.

  9. Introduction to "Historical and Recent Catastrophic Tsunamis in the World: Volume II. Tsunamis from 1755 to 2010"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Kenji; Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Dominey-Howes, Dale; Borrero, José C.

    2013-09-01

    Eighteen papers on past and recent destructive tsunamis are included in Volume II of the PAGEOPH topical issue "Historical and Recent Catastrophic Tsunamis in the World." Three papers discuss deep-sea (DART) and coastal tsunami observations, warning systems and risk management in the Pacific Ocean. Four papers examine the 1755 Lisbon, 1964 Alaska, 2003 Algeria, and 2011 Haiti tsunamis. Four more papers, as well as some papers in Volume I, report on various aspects of the 2010 Chile tsunami. Two papers present some results of field survey and modelling investigation of the 2010 Mentawai, Indonesia, tsunami. Three papers report on modelling efforts of tsunami generation by earthquake and landslide, and of tsunami propagation. Finally, two papers discuss hazard assessment using a probabilistic approach.

  10. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Uncertainty Analysis-Exploration of Core Melt Progression Uncertain Parameters-Volume II.

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Brooks, Dusty Marie

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted an uncertainty analysi s (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) accident progression wit h the MELCOR code. Volume I of the 1F1 UA discusses the physical modeling details and time history results of the UA. Volume II of the 1F1 UA discusses the statistical viewpoint. The model used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The goal of this work was to perform a focused evaluation of uncertainty in core damage progression behavior and its effect on key figures - of - merit (e.g., hydrogen production, fraction of intact fuel, vessel lower head failure) and in doing so assess the applicability of traditional sensitivity analysis techniques .

  11. Research and development study for optimization of beryllium production operations. Task II report. Volume 1. Recommendations for subscale demonstration models

    SciTech Connect

    Zuehlke, J.R.

    1983-04-01

    The eleven evaluation reports in this Task II, Volume 1 report, are the results of a comprehensive literature search and study of new concepts or alternatives for beryllium metal production, currently available in industry today. Modifications to the current beryllium metal production process were also studied. Three processes were selected for in-depth evaluation and comparison to the current process with proposed improvements: sodium reduction of beryllium chloride to produce metallic beryllium; modified Hall process for beryllium flake; and electrowinning of beryllium chloride to produce metallic beryllium.

  12. GENII (Generation II): The Hanford Environmental Radiation Dosimetry Software System: Volume 3, Code maintenance manual: Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1988-09-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project was undertaken to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in updated versions of the environmental pathway analysis models used at Hanford. The resulting second generation of Hanford environmental dosimetry computer codes is compiled in the Hanford Environmental Dosimetry System (Generation II, or GENII). This coupled system of computer codes is intended for analysis of environmental contamination resulting from acute or chronic releases to, or initial contamination of, air, water, or soil, on through the calculation of radiation doses to individuals or populations. GENII is described in three volumes of documentation. This volume is a Code Maintenance Manual for the serious user, including code logic diagrams, global dictionary, worksheets to assist with hand calculations, and listings of the code and its associated data libraries. The first volume describes the theoretical considerations of the system. The second volume is a Users' Manual, providing code structure, users' instructions, required system configurations, and QA-related topics. 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Solar/hydrogen systems technologies. Volume II (Part 2 of 2). Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, W. J.D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-02

    Volume II of the Solar/Hydrogen Systems Assessment contract report (2 volumes) is basically a technological source book. Relying heavily on expert contributions, it comprehensively reviews constituent technologies from which can be assembled a wide range of specific solar/hydrogen systems. Covered here are both direct and indirect solar energy conversion technologies; respectively, those that utilize solar radiant energy input directly and immediately, and those that absorb energy from a physical intermediary, previously energized by the sun. Solar-operated hydrogen energy production technologies are also covered in the report. The single most prominent of these is water electrolysis. Utilization of solar-produced hydrogen is outside the scope of the volume. However, the important hydrogen delivery step is treated under the delivery sub-steps of hydrogen transmission, distribution and storage. An exemplary use of the presented information is in the synthesis and analysis of those solar/hydrogen system candidates documented in the report's Volume I. Moreover, it is intended that broad use be made of this technology information in the implementation of future solar/hydrogen systems. Such systems, configured on either a distributed or a central-plant basis, or both, may well be a major significance in effecting an ultimate transition to renewable energy systems.

  14. Solar/hydrogen systems technologies. Volume II (Part 1 of 2). Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, W. J.D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-02

    Volume II of the Solar/Hydrogen Systems Assessment contract report (2 volumes) is basically a technological source book. Relying heavily on expert contributions, it comprehensively reviews constituent technologies from which can be assembled a wide range of specific solar/hydrogen systems. Covered here are both direct and indirect solar energy conversion technologies; respectively, those that utilize solar radiant energy input directly and immediately, and those that absorb energy from a physical intermediary, previously energized by the sun. Solar-operated hydrogen energy production technologies are also covered in the report. The single most prominent of these is water electrolysis. Utilization of solar-produced hydrogen is outside the scope of the volume. However, the important hydrogen delivery step is treated under the delivery sub-steps of hydrogen transmission, distribution and storage. An exemplary use of the presented information is in the synthesis and analysis of those solar/hydrogen system candidates documented in the report's Volume I. Morever, it is intended that broad use be made of this technology information in the implementation of future solar/hydrogen systems. Such systems, configured on either a distributed or a central-plant basis, or both, may well be of major significance in effecting an ultimate transition to renewable energy systems.

  15. Availability of epidemiologic data on humans exposed to animal carcinogens. II. Chemical uses and production volume

    SciTech Connect

    Karstadt, M.; Bobal, R.

    1982-01-01

    We report further findings of a survey of manufacturers, processors, and importers of chemicals determined by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) to be animal carcinogens, but whose carcinogenicity in humans was considered uncertain because of inadequate epidemiologic data. We requested epidemiologic studies from the companies marketing or using any of the 75 IARC animal carcinogens in commerce in the United States. Eighteen of the 75 IARC animal carcinogens had volumes listed of 10(6) lb/year or greater, with 8 of the 13 chemicals for which studies had been completed or are in progress in this ''high volume'' category. The use category with the largest number of chemicals was drugs--19 of the 75 IARC animal carcinogens were in this category. However, none of the 13 chemicals included in epidemiologic studies was a drug. Seven of the 13 chemicals included in studies were used primarily as pesticides. We received little information on dyes and dye intermediates, experimental carcinogens, and drugs, all of which are produced in relatively low volumes; these categories represent 42 of the 75 IARC animal carcinogens. Low volumes and declining usage/production appear to be barriers to performance of epidemiologic studies. Information we received suggests that sometimes the problem of low production volume may be avoided by studying users rather than production workers. Overall, however, we expect few additional epidemiologic studies of the 75 IARC animal carcinogens.

  16. Five Thousand American Families -- Patterns of Economic Progress. Volume II: Special Studies of the First Five Year's of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, James N., Ed.

    Volume II of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics presents special studies from the matrix of data which allowed further policy relevant analysis. The ten special studies, each corresponding to a chapter in the volume, are as follows: Housing and Homeownership; Residential Mobility and Family Housing Adjustments; Modes of Travel to Work; The…

  17. CRC handbook of lubrication. Theory and practice of tribology: Volume II: Theory and design

    SciTech Connect

    Booser, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    This handbook covers the general area of lubrication and tribology in all its facets: friction, wear lubricants (liquid, solid, and gas), greases, lubrication principles, applications to various mechanisms, design principles of devices incorporating lubrication, maintenance, lubrication scheduling, and standardized tests; as well as environmental problems and conservation. The information contained in these two volumes will aid in achieving effective lubrication for control of friction and wear, and is another step to improve understanding of the complex factors involved in tribology. Both metric and English units are provided throughout both volumes.

  18. How do activities walking, standing, and resting influence trans-tibial amputee residual limb fluid volume?

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Joan; Cagle, John; Allyn, Katheryn; Harrison, Daniel; Ciol, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine how fluid volume changes in the residual limbs of people with trans-tibial amputation were affected by activity during test sessions with equal durations of resting, standing, and walking. Residual limb extracellular fluid volume was measured using biompedance analysis on 24 participants. Results showed that all subjects lost fluid volume during standing with equal weight-bearing, averaging a loss rate of 0.4%/min, and a mean loss over the 25 min test session of 2.6% (s.d.1.1). Sixteen subjects gained limb fluid volume during standing (mean gain of 1.0% (s.d.2.5)), and fifteen gained fluid volume during rest (mean gain of 1.0% (s.d.2.2)). Walking explained only 39.3% of the total session fluid volume change. There was a strong correlation between walk and rest fluid volume changes (−0.81). Subjects with peripheral arterial disease experienced relatively high fluid volume gains during sitting but minimal changes or losses during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitioning. Healthy female subjects experienced high fluid volume changes during transitioning from sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit. The differences in fluid volume response among subjects suggest that volume accommodation technologies should be matched to the activity-dependent, fluid transport characteristics of the individual prosthesis user. PMID:24933719

  19. Astragaloside II triggers T cell activation through regulation of CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatase activity

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Chun-ping; Gao, Li-xin; Hou, Li-fei; Yang, Xiao-qian; He, Pei-lan; Yang, Yi-fu; Tang, Wei; Yue, Jian-min; Li, Jia; Zuo, Jian-ping

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the immunomodulating activity of astragalosides, the active compounds from a traditional tonic herb Astragalus membranaceus Bge, and to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions, focusing on CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatase (CD45 PTPase), which plays a critical role in T lymphocyte activation. Methods: Primary splenocytes and T cells were prepared from mice. CD45 PTPase activity was assessed using a colorimetric assay. Cell proliferation was measured using a [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay. Cytokine proteins and mRNAs were examined with ELISA and RT-PCR, respectively. Activation markers, including CD25 and CD69, were analyzed using flow cytometry. Activation of LCK (Tyr505) was detected using Western blot analysis. Mice were injected with the immunosuppressant cyclophosphamide (CTX, 80 mg/kg), and administered astragaloside II (50 mg/kg). Results: Astragaloside I, II, III, and IV concentration-dependently increased the CD45-mediated of pNPP/OMFP hydrolysis with the EC50 values ranged from 3.33 to 10.42 μg/mL. Astragaloside II (10 and 30 nmol/L) significantly enhanced the proliferation of primary splenocytes induced by ConA, alloantigen or anti-CD3. Astragaloside II (30 nmol/L) significantly increased IL-2 and IFN-γ secretion, upregulated the mRNA levels of IFN-γ and T-bet in primary splenocytes, and promoted CD25 and CD69 expression on primary CD4+ T cells upon TCR stimulation. Furthermore, astragaloside II (100 nmol/L) promoted CD45-mediated dephosphorylation of LCK (Tyr505) in primary T cells, which could be blocked by a specific CD45 PTPase inhibitor. In CTX-induced immunosuppressed mice, oral administration of astragaloside II restored the proliferation of splenic T cells and the production of IFN-γ and IL-2. However, astragaloside II had no apparent effects on B cell proliferation. Conclusion: Astragaloside II enhances T cell activation by regulating the activity of CD45 PTPase, which may explain why Astragalus

  20. Volume 1C. Modification of BOAST II-PC - BOAST III

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Walter K.; Schenewerk, Philip A.; Kimbrell, W. Clay

    1995-12-31

    A readily available public reservoir simulation model BOAST II was modified to simulate accurately the conditions encountered in steeply dipping high permeability reservoirs. The modifications also involved the development and integration of post processing programs. The modified model was evaluated, modified, and validated against commercial reservoir models.

  1. Missouri Journal of Research in Music Education, Volume II, Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Lewis B., Ed.

    1971-01-01

    The six articles presented in this journal are: I. Research in Action: The Transfer of Research in Music and Music Education into the Classroom by Jack R. Stephenson; II. Programmed Instruction and Music Education by Douglas L. Turpin; III. Music Education and the Blind by Joan Thief Gagnepain; IV. Improved Teaching Through the Use of the…

  2. TIBER II/ETR final design report: Volume 1, 1. 0 Introduction; 2. 0 plasma engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1987-09-01

    This paper discusses the design of the TIBER II tokamak test reactor. Specific topics discussed are the physics objectives for Tiber, magnetics, baseline operating point, pulsed inductive operation, edge physics and impurity control, fueling, disruption control, vertical stability and impurity flow reversal. (LSP)

  3. The Olympic Spirit: A Worldwide Connection, Volume II, 1993-94 Curriculum Guide. Olympic Day in the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games, GA.

    This curriculum guide focuses on cultural awareness for students in grades K-8 through studying participants in the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta (Georgia). The program explores the cultures of 20 countries through the eyes of an Olympic athlete. Volume 2 consists of two parts. Part 1 has five chapters with learning activities; those chapters…

  4. A Longitudinal Study of Man: A Course of Study. Volume II: Quantitative Results. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cort, H. Russell, Jr.; Peskowitz, Nancy

    This second volume of the summative evaluation of "Man: A Course of Study" (MACOS) presents results of quantitative analyses of what MACOS students seemed to learn, what they retained one year later, and how what they learned was different from what students in other social studies courses learned. The first part of the document compares MACOS and…

  5. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME II: PROCESS OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This volume presents initial results of a study to identify the issues and barriers associated with retrofitting existing solvent-based equipment to accept waterbased adhesives as part of an EPA effort to improve equipment cleaning in the coated and laminated substrate manufactur...

  6. Financial Report of Ontario Universities, 2001-02. Volume II: Affiliated and Federated Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This report contains detailed financial information that provides financial accountability to the Province of Ontario, Canada, for funds received by the 42 provincially assisted universities and colleges during the 2001-2002 fiscal year. It is the latest in an annual series that dates back more than 25 years. This volume contains information on 21…

  7. Environmental Research Laboratories in the Federal Government: An Inventory, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teich, Albert H.; And Others

    The report concludes an inventory listing of the structure, capabilities, and current research facilities of virtually all Federal Government R and D laboratories engaged in environmental studies. The inventory from DOD/USA through DOT/USCG is presented. Volume I is SE 015 598. (Author/RH)

  8. A Comparative Analysis of Postsecondary Technical Education in Texas. Phase I, Volume II--Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Cecil L.; And Others

    In response to concerns of unnecessary duplication in programs offered by Texas community/junior colleges and the Texas State Technical College (TSTC) system, TSTC conducted an examination of curricula, enrollments, and outcomes for both systems. This document provides the second volume of the study, containing the data tables used to generate the…

  9. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume II. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    This manual was prepared by experienced wastewater collection system workers to provide a home study course to develop new qualified workers and expand the abilities of existing workers. This volume emphasizes material needed by intermediate-level operators and stresses the operation and maintenance of conventional treatment plants. This volume…

  10. Communications Strategies on Alcohol and Highway Safety. Volume II. High School Youth. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grey Advertising, Inc., New York, NY.

    The second part of a two-part, two volume study deals with high school youth and identifies target populations and communications strategies for encouraging personal action steps to prevent drunk driving. Data, collected from interviews and questionnaires, are summarized and presented in tabular form. One fourth of high schoolers in a…

  11. Families Today: A Research Sampler on Families and Children. Volume II. NIMH Science Monographs 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corfman, Eunice, Ed.

    The second of two volumes, this book contains 21 studies of children and families. Selections, grouped into three sections, are intended to provide a representative sample of current research, including case studies and less formal reports. The first section reports on families in distress. Articles focus on adults who were antisocial children,…

  12. State In-Service Training for Correctional Personnel. Final Report. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiefer, George W.

    This is part of the final report on a project that focused on the inservice training needs of correctional personnel in the Illinois penal system. Most of this volume is devoted to an overview of existing staff training for line personnel and parole agents; an assessment of unmet training needs; group discussion and other demonstration projects in…

  13. Wisconsin Women, Graduate School, and the Professions. University Women: A Series of Essays, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swoboda, Marian J., Ed.; Roberts, Audrey J., Ed.

    This volume of essays examines the role of women in the development of public higher education at the University of Wisconsin and Wisconsin State Universities. Part 1, "Turn of the Century Beginnings," contains an essay by Jean Droste titled "Vocational Aspirations and Job Realities." Part 2 focuses on women in the professional schools on the…

  14. Operation and Maintenance of Wastewater Collection Systems. Volume II. Third Edition. A Field Study Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    Proper installations, inspections, operations, maintenance and repairs of wastewater collection, conveyance and treatment facilities have a significant impact on the operation and maintenance costs, and the effectiveness of these facilities. This manual is the second volume of a two-part program designed to provide wastewater collection system…

  15. Shaping the Future. Volume II: Perspectives on Undergraduate Education in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate for Education and Human Resources.

    This is a companion study to "Shaping the Future: New Expectations for Undergraduate Education in Science, Math, Engineering, and Technology (SMET)" (NSF 96-139). Both the original report and Volume 2 focus on a collaborative approach to developing and implementing strategies to improve undergraduate SMET education. The reports, compiled by the…

  16. Engineering Drawing Practices - Volume I of II: Aerospace and Ground Support Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwindt, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual establishes the essential requirements and reference documents for the preparation and revision of digital product definition data sets prepared for or by NASA at KSC. This volume is only applicable to KSC in-house programs/projects. These requirements do not apply to the preparation of illustrations, artwork, or figures in technical publications.

  17. Ethnicity, Law and the Social Good. Volume II. Ethnicity and Public Policy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horne, Winston A., Ed.; Tonnesen, Thomas V., Ed.

    This volume examines the relationship between ethnicity and the law, looking at the two, first in principle and then as they relate to education, employment, and neighborhoods. Philosophically, the papers included in the book represent 4 different perspectives: (1) that the law should recognize only individual rights and that membership in an…

  18. Higher Education and Development in South-East Asia. Volume II, Country Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Howard; And Others

    This document, the second of three volumes concerned with the role of institutions of higher education in the development of countries in South-East Asia, presents country profiles for Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Viet-Nam, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines. The profile emphasizes background, higher education, educational…

  19. Animal Science Technology. An Experimental Developmental Program. Volume II, Curriculum Course Outlines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brant, Herman G.

    This volume, the second of a two part evaluation report, is devoted exclusively to the presentation of detailed course outlines representing an Animal Science Technology curriculum. Arranged in 6 terms of study (2 academic years), outlines are included on such topics as: (1) Introductory Animal Science, (2) General Microbiology, (3) Zoonoses, (4)…

  20. Evaluation of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP). Phase II Report. Volume I: Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nauta, Marrit; And Others

    This volume, third in a series evaluating the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP), provides an overview of the evaluation, documents the first 6 months of the study, and examines initial program impact on families. Chapter 1 briefly summarizes the design of the CFRP evaluation and addresses the issues of sample selection and attrition, data…

  1. Report of Baseline Data: Evaluation of the Child and Family Resource Program. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Affholter, Dennis; And Others

    This volume reports the baseline (1978) data to be used in the 6-year longitudinal evaluation of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP). The CFRP, funded in 11 sites across the country as a Head Start demonstration program, is intended to develop models for providing services to low-income families with children from birth to eight years.…

  2. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume II: 20th Century. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teten, Carol

    This 50-minute VHS videotape is the second in a 2-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It features dance and music of the 20th century, including; 1910s: animal dances, castle walk, apache, and tango; 1920s: black bottom and charleston; 1930s: marathon, movie musicals, big apple, and jitterbug; 1940s: rumba;…

  3. Australian Family Research Conference Proceedings (Canberra, Australia, November 23-25, 1983). Volume II: Family Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Family Studies, Melbourne (Australia).

    Second in a series of seven volumes containing the proceedings of the 1983 Australian Family Research Conference, this publication deals with family law. Papers and authors included are: "Attitudes of Divorced Men and Women to the Family" (Margaret Harrison), "Dispute Resolution in Australian Family Law" (Henry Finlay), "Descriptive Analysis,…

  4. Cerebral Palsy and Related Disorders Prevention and Early Care: An Annotated Bibliography. Volume II, Part Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rembolt, Raymond R., Comp.; Roth, Beth, Comp.

    Presented alphabetically by author's name in the second of the two volume annotated bibliography are 483 abstracts of scientific and public education literature on cerebral palsy published through 1971. The entries are said to focus on children under 2 years of age whose development has been delayed by the condition. The bibliography is explained…

  5. Critical Issues in Native North America, Volume II. IWGIA Document No. 68.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Ward, Ed.

    This collection of articles forms the second of two volumes designed to impart to readers some sense of the crucial importance of what is and will be happening to the indigenous peoples of North America. "The Present and Future Status of American Indian Nations," by Robert T. Coulter argues from the perspectives of ideology, power, law, and human…

  6. Global Inventory of Regional and National Qualifications Frameworks. Volume II: National and Regional Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This second volume of the "Global Inventory of Regional and National Qualifications Frameworks" focuses on national and regional cases of national qualifications frameworks for eighty- six countries from Afghanistan to Uzbekistan and seven regional qualifications frameworks. Each country profile provides a thorough review of the main…

  7. Geologic and seismologic investigations for Rocky Flats Plant. Volume II. Appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    This volume contains the results of a seismic refraction study of the Ralston Reservoir area, soil stratigraphic investigations, unit descriptions, an analysis of geodetic data, experimental models, seismological evaluation, a seismicity survey of the Northern Golden Fault, historical data for the November 7, 1882 earthquake, and a dendrochronology study. (ACR)

  8. Teaching East Asia: China, Japan, Korea. Lesson Plans for Middle School Teachers. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beville, Francie; Boone, Mark; Chapman, Kelly; Crump, Claudia; Curtis, Lonnie; Erickson, Stacy; Kaiser-Polge, Tami; Klus, John A.; Luebbehusen, Mary Lou; Rea, Patrick S.; Ward, Mary E.

    This volume contains 23 lesson plans that were written for middle school teachers to help students learn about East Asia. The lessons are organized across six themes: (1) "People, Places & Environment"; (2) "Technology, Production, Distribution & Consumption"; (3) "Cultures, Continuity, and Change"; (4) "Aesthetics, Celebrations and Values"; (5)…

  9. Working Time in Comparative Perspective. Volume II: Life-Cycle Working Time and Nonstandard Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houseman, Susan, Ed.; Nakamura, Alice, Ed.

    This is the second of two volumes of selected papers presented at the 1996 conference "Changes in Working Hours in Canada and the United States." Eleven chapters explore an expanded set of working-time issues, which may be loosely grouped under these two topics: working time over the life cycle and nonstandard work arrangements. "Introduction and…

  10. Modern Standard Arabic: Aural Comprehension Course. Volume II: Lessons 9-16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    The second of 20 volumes of lessons designed for use in a full-time, intensive training program in Arabic is presented. In each lesson grammatical patterns and vocabulary are taught through explanations, vocabulary lists, dialogues, audiolingual drills, question-answer and free oral expression exercises. A review lesson is included after every…

  11. Radio for Education and Development: Case Studies, Volume II. World Bank Staff Working Paper No. 266.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spain, Peter L.; And Others

    Use of radio for nonformal education and development communications and the technical and economic considerations related to radio services are covered in this second volume of case studies on use of radio for education and development. Under radio and nonformal education are: an evaluation of radio schools as part of the popular promotion…

  12. An Initial Evaluation of the North Carolina Alcohol and Drug Education Traffic Schools. Volume II: Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popkin, Carol L.; And Others

    This volume is the second part of a report evaluating the North Carolina Alcohol Drug Education Traffic Schools (ADETS), established for the primary purpose of treating first offenders convicted of driving under the influence (DUI). These appendices include copies of legislation pertaining to the schools; a copy of the DMH 2604 referral form; an…

  13. Low-intensity daily walking activity is associated with hippocampal volume in older adults.

    PubMed

    Varma, Vijay R; Chuang, Yi-Fang; Harris, Gregory C; Tan, Erwin J; Carlson, Michelle C

    2015-05-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is associated with memory impairment and dementia and serves as a key biomarker in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease. Physical activity, one of the most promising behavioral interventions to prevent or delay cognitive decline, has been shown to be associated with hippocampal volume; specifically increased aerobic activity and fitness may have a positive effect on the size of the hippocampus. The majority of older adults, however, are sedentary and have difficulty initiating and maintaining exercise programs. A modestly more active lifestyle may nonetheless be beneficial. This study explored whether greater objectively measured daily walking activity was associated with larger hippocampal volume. We additionally explored whether greater low-intensity walking activity, which may be related to leisure-time physical, functional, and social activities, was associated with larger hippocampal volume independent of exercise and higher-intensity walking activity. Segmentation of hippocampal volumes was performed using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain's Software Library (FSL), and daily walking activity was assessed using a step activity monitor on 92, nondemented, older adult participants. After controlling for age, education, body mass index, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and the Mini Mental State Exam, we found that a greater amount, duration, and frequency of total daily walking activity were each associated with larger hippocampal volume among older women, but not among men. These relationships were specific to hippocampal volume, compared with the thalamus, used as a control brain region, and remained significant for low-intensity walking activity, independent of moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity and self-reported exercise. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to explore the relationship between objectively measured daily walking activity and hippocampal volume in an older adult population. Findings

  14. Low-intensity daily walking activity is associated with hippocampal volume in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Vijay R.; Chuang, Yi-fang; Harris, Gregory C.; Tan, Erwin J.; Carlson, Michelle C.

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is associated with memory impairment and dementia and serves as a key biomarker in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease. Physical activity, one of the most promising behavioral interventions to prevent or delay cognitive decline, has been shown to be associated with hippocampal volume; specifically increased aerobic activity and fitness may have a positive effect on the size of the hippocampus. The majority of older adults, however, are sedentary and have difficulty initiating and maintaining exercise programs. A modestly more active lifestyle may nonetheless be beneficial. This study explored whether greater objectively measured daily walking activity was associated with larger hippocampal volume. We additionally explored whether greater low-intensity walking activity, which may be related to leisure-time physical, functional, and social activities, was associated with larger hippocampal volume independent of exercise and higher-intensity walking activity. Segmentation of hippocampal volumes was performed using FMRIB's Software Library (FSL) and daily walking activity was assessed using a step activity monitor (SAM) on 92, non-demented, older adult participants. After controlling for age, education, body mass index (BMI), cardiovascular disease risk factors, and the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE), we found that a greater amount, duration, and frequency of total daily walking activity were each associated with larger hippocampal volume among older women, but not men. These relationships were specific to hippocampal volume, compared to the thalamus, used as a control brain region, and remained significant for low-intensity walking activity, independent of moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity and self-reported exercise. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to explore the relationship between objectively measured daily walking activity and hippocampal volume in an older adult sample. Findings suggest the importance of better

  15. Impact of geothermal technology improvements on royalty collections on federal lands: Volume II: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    This volume contains the appendices for the ''Impact of Geothermal Technology Improvements on Royalty Collections on Federal Lands, Final Report, Volume I.'' The material in this volume supports the conclusions presented in Volume I and details each Known Geothermal Resource Area's (KGRA's) royalty estimation. Appendix A details the physical characteristics of each KGRA considered in Volume I. Appendix B supplies summary narratives on each state which has a KGRA. The information presented in Appendix C shows the geothermal power plant area proxies chosen for each KGRA considered within the report. It also provides data ranges which fit into the IMGEO model for electric energy cost estimates. Appendix D provides detailed cost information from the IMGEO model if no Geothermal Program RandD goals were completed beyond 1987 and if all the RandD goals were completed by the year 2000. This appendix gives an overall electric cost and major system costs, which add up to the overall electric cost. Appendix E supplies information for avoided cost projections for each state involved in the study that were used in the IMGEO model run to determine at what cost/kWh a 50 MWe plant could come on line. Appendix F supplies the code used in the determination of royalty income, as well as, tabled results of the royalty runs (detailed in Appendix G). The tabled results show royalty incomes, assuming a 10% discount rate, with and without RandD and with and without a $0.01/kWh transmission cost. Individual data sheets for each KGRA royalty income run are presented in Appendix G.

  16. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and biological activities of N4O2 Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Resayes, Saud I.; Shakir, Mohammad; Abbasi, Ambreen; Amin, Kr. Mohammad Yusuf; Lateef, Abdul

    The Schiff base ligand, bis(indoline-2-one)triethylenetetramine (L) obtained from condensation of triethylenetetramine and isatin was used to synthesize the complexes of type, [ML]Cl2 [M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)]. L was characterized on the basis of the results of elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR, mass spectroscopic studies. The stoichiometry, bonding and stereochemistries of complexes were ascertained on the basis of results of elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility values, molar conductance and various spectroscopic studies. EPR, UV-vis and magnetic moments revealed an octahedral geometry for complexes. L and its Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes were screened for their antibacterial activity. Analgesic activity of Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes was also tested in rats by tail flick method. Both complexes were found to possess good antibacterial and moderate analgesic activity.

  17. Copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes of benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone: Synthesis, characterization and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prathima, B.; Subba Rao, Y.; Adinarayana Reddy, S.; Reddy, Y. P.; Varada Reddy, A.

    2010-09-01

    Benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone ligand (L) has been synthesized from benzyloxybenzaldehyde and 4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazide. Complexes of this ligand with chlorides of Cu(II) and Ni(II) have been prepared. The structure of the ligand (L) is proposed based on elemental analysis, IR and 1H NMR spectra. Its complexes with Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions are characterized from the studies of electronic as well as EPR spectra. On the basis of electronic and EPR studies, rhombically distorted octahedral structure has been proposed for Cu(II) complex while the Ni(II) complex has been found to acquire an octahedral structure. The ligand and their metal complexes have been tested in vitro for their biological effects. Their antibacterial activities against Gram-negative bacteria ( Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and Gram-positive bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) have been investigated. The prepared metal complexes exhibit higher antibacterial activities than the parent ligand. The in vitro antioxidant activity of free ligand and its metal(II) complexes have also been investigated and the results however reveal that the ligand exhibits greater antioxidant activity than its complexes.

  18. In vivo anticancer activity of rhomboidal Pt(II) metallacycles

    PubMed Central

    Grishagin, Ivan V.; Pollock, J. Bryant; Kushal, Swati; Cook, Timothy R.; Stang, Peter J.; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z.

    2014-01-01

    The development of novel antitumor agents that have high efficacy in suppressing tumor growth, have low toxicity to nontumor tissues, and exhibit rapid localization in the targeted tumor sites is an ongoing avenue of research at the interface of chemistry, cancer biology, and pharmacology. Supramolecular metal-based coordination complexes (SCCs) have well-defined shapes and geometries, and upon their internalization, SCCs could affect multiple oncogenic signaling pathways in cells and tissues. We investigated the uptake, intracellular localization, and antitumor activity of two rhomboidal Pt(II)-based SCCs. Laser-scanning confocal microscopy in A549 and HeLa cells was used to determine the uptake and localization of the assemblies within cells and their effect on tumor growth was investigated in mouse s.c. tumor xenograft models. The SCCs are soluble in cell culture media within the entire range of studied concentrations (1 nM–5 µM), are nontoxic, and showed efficacy in reducing the rate of tumor growth in s.c. mouse tumor xenografts. These properties reveal the potential of Pt(II)-based SCCs for future biomedical applications as therapeutic agents. PMID:25516985

  19. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume II. Plant specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R. E.

    1983-12-31

    The specifications and design criteria for all plant systems and subsystems used in developing the preliminary design of Carrisa Plains 30-MWe Solar Plant are contained in this volume. The specifications have been organized according to plant systems and levels. The levels are arranged in tiers. Starting at the top tier and proceeding down, the specification levels are the plant, system, subsystem, components, and fabrication. A tab number, listed in the index, has been assigned each document to facilitate document location.

  20. Design of Studies for Development of BPA Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Accounting Policy Phase II, Volume II, 1985-1988 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kneese, Allen V.

    1988-08-01

    The incremental costs of corrective measures to lessen the environmental impacts of the hydroelectric system are expected to increase and difficult questions to arise about the costs, effectiveness, and justification of alternative measures and their systemwide implications. The BPA anticipate this situation by launching a forward-looking research program aimed at providing methodological tools and data suitable for estimating the productivity and cost implications of mitigation alternatives in a timely manner with state-of-the-art accuracy. Resources for the Future (RFF) agreed at the request of the BPA to develop a research program which would provide an analytical system designed to assist the BPA Administrator and other interested and responsible parties in evaluating the ecological and economic aspects of alternative protection, enhancement, and mitigation measures. While this progression from an ecological understanding to cost-effectiveness analyses is straightforward in concept, the complexities of the Columbia River system make the development of analytical methods far from simple in practice. The Phase 2 final report outlines the technical issues involved in developing an analytical system and proposes a program of research to address these issues. The report is presented in the Summary Report (Volume 1), and the present volume which consists of three technical reports: Part I, Modeling the Salmon and Steelhead Fisheries of the Columbia River Basin; Part II, Models for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis; and Part III, Ocean Fisheries Harvest Management.

  1. Short transmembrane domains with high-volume exoplasmic halves determine retention of Type II membrane proteins in the Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Rodrigo; Trenchi, Alejandra; González Montoro, Ayelén; Valdez Taubas, Javier; Maccioni, Hugo J F

    2013-12-01

    It is still unclear why some proteins that travel along the secretory pathway are retained in the Golgi complex whereas others make their way to the plasma membrane. Recent bioinformatic analyses on a large number of single-spanning membrane proteins support the hypothesis that specific features of the transmembrane domain (TMD) are relevant to the sorting of these proteins to particular organelles. Here we experimentally test this hypothesis for Golgi and plasma membrane proteins. Using the Golgi SNARE protein Sft1 and the plasma membrane SNARE protein Sso1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model proteins, we modified the length of their TMDs and the volume of their exoplasmic hemi-TMD, and determined their subcellular localization both in yeast and mammalian cells. We found that short TMDs with high-volume exoplasmic hemi-TMDs confer Golgi membrane residence, whereas TMDs with low-volume exoplasmic hemi-TMDs, either short or long, confer plasma membrane residence to these proteins. Results indicate that the shape of the exoplasmic hemi-TMD, in addition to the length of the entire TMD, determine retention in the Golgi or exit to the plasma membrane of Type II membrane proteins.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro anticancer activity of 18-membered octaazamacrocyclic complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cd(II) and Sn(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kareem, Abdul; Zafar, Hina; Sherwani, Asif; Mohammad, Owais; Khan, Tahir Ali

    2014-10-01

    An effective series of 18 membered octaazamacrocyclic complexes of the type [MLX2], where X = Cl or NO3 have been synthesized by template condensation reaction of oxalyl dihydrazide with dibenzoylmethane and metal salt in 2:2:1 molar ratio. The formation of macrocyclic framework, stereochemistry and their overall geometry have been characterized by various physico-chemical studies viz., elemental analysis, electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), I.R, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TGA/DTA studies. These studies suggest formation of octahedral macrocyclic complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cd(II) and Sn(II). The molar conductance values suggest nonelectrolytic nature for all the complexes. Thermogravimatric analysis shows that all the complexes are stable up to 600 °C. All these complexes have been tested against different human cancer cell lines i.e. human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep3B), human cervical carcinoma (HeLa), human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7) and normal cells (PBMC). The newly synthesized 18-membered octaazamacrocyclic complexes during in vitro anticancer evaluation, displayed moderate to good cytotoxicity on liver (Hep3B), cervical (HeLa) and breast (MCF7) cancer cell lines, respectively. The most effective anticancer cadmium complex (C34H28N10CdO10) was found to be active with IC50 values, 2.44 ± 1.500, 3.55 ± 1.600 and 4.82 ± 1.400 in micro-molar on liver, cervical and breast cancer cell lines, respectively.

  3. Energy and Change. Elementary Science Activity Series, Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Frank F.

    This book is number 3 of a series of elementary science books that presents a wealth of ideas for science activities for the elementary school teacher. Each activity includes a standard set of information designed to help teachers determine the activity's appropriateness for their students, plan its implementation, and help children focus on a…

  4. Structure and Form. Elementary Science Activity Series, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Frank F.

    This book is number 2 of a series of elementary science books that presents a wealth of ideas for science activities for the elementary school teacher. Each activity includes a standard set of information designed to help teachers determine the activity's appropriateness for their students, plan its implementation, and help children focus on a…

  5. Adsorption and desorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) on Ca- alginate immobilized activated rice bran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suratman, A.; Kamalia, N. Z.; Kusumawati, W. A.

    2016-02-01

    Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran has been used for adsorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution. The effect of the pH, kinetics model, adsorption isotherm and desorption on the adsorption performance was investigated. Activated rice bran was immobilized by the entrapment in alginate beads. The adsorption strength of Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran was compared to Ca-alginate and non-immobilized activated rice bran. The concentrations of adsorbed ions were analyzed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The result showed that pH of 4.0 and the contact time of 120 min are the optimum condition for adsorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II). The adsorption kinetic of Zn(II) and Cu(II) followed the pseudo-second-order model with adsorption rate constant 4.9 x 10-2 and 3.14 g.mg-1.min-1, respectively. The both adsorption processes obeyed Langmuir isotherm with adsorption capacity of 2.03 and 2.42 mg.g-1 of adsorbent, respectively. The strength of Zn adsorption on Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran (86.63%) was more effective compared to Ca-alginate beads (60.96%) and activated rice bran (43.85%). The strength of Cu adsorption was 80.00%, 61.50% and 22.10%, respectively. The desorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) showed that recovery percentage of the adsorption was 76.56% and 57.80% with the condition of using HCl 0.1 M as desorption agent for 1 hour.

  6. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Water Pollution and Environmental Studies: Activities. Appendices, Volume 1 and Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, John T.; And Others

    This activity oriented guide is divided into four sections dealing with the Hydrologic Cycle; Human Activities; Ecological Perspectives; and Social and Political Factors. Each activity contains seven parts: (1) an introduction; (2) questions about the activity; (3) necessary equipment; (4) procedures; (5) results obtained by using the study; (6)…

  7. Spectroscopic, magnetic and thermal studies of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of 3-acetylcoumarin-isonicotinoylhydrazone and their antimicrobial and anti-tubercular activity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunoor, Rekha S.; Patil, Basavaraj R.; Badiger, Dayananda S.; Vadavi, Ramesh S.; Gudasi, Kalagouda B.; Chandrashekhar, V. M.; Muchchandi, I. S.

    2010-11-01

    Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with a new heterocyclic Schiff base derived by the condensation of isonicotinoylhydrazide and 3-acetylcoumarin have been synthesized. 1H, 13C and 2D HETCOR NMR analyses confirm the formation of title compound and existence of the same in two isomeric forms. The metal complexes were characterized on the basis of various spectroscopic techniques like electronic, EPR, IR, 1H and 13C NMR studies, elemental analysis, magnetic properties and thermogravimetric analysis, and also by the aid of molar conductivity measurements. It is found that the Schiff base behaves as a monobasic tridentate ligand coordinating in the imidol form with 1:1 metal to ligand stoichiometry. Trigonal bipyramidal geometry has been assigned for Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes, while tetrahedral for Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes. The compounds were subjected to antimicrobial and anti-tubercular activity screening using serial broth dilution method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) is determined. Zn(II) complex has shown significant antifungal activity with an MIC of 6.25 μg/mL while Cu(II) complex is noticeable for antibacterial activity at the same concentration. Anti-TB activity of the ligand has enhanced on complexation with Co(II) and Ni(II) ions.

  8. The Future of Small Telescopes In The New Millennium. Volume II - The Telescopes We Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswalt, T. D.

    2003-06-01

    An invaluable reference for any student, scientist or administrator, using small telescopes for research. An essential collection of data and opinions for those charged with setting scientific and funding priorities. This three-volume set, The Future of Small Telescopes in the New Millennium details the essential roles that small telescopes should play in 21st century science and how their future productivity can be maximized. Over 70 experts from all corners of the international astronomical community have created a definitive reference on the present and future of "big science with small telescopes." Despite highly publicized closures of telescopes smaller than 4-m in aperture at national facilities and their omission from national science priority studies, the oft-lamented demise of the small telescope has been greatly exaggerated. In fact, the future of these workhorses of astronomy will be brighter than ever if creative steps are taken now. This three-volume set defines the essential roles that small telescopes should play in 21st century science and the ways in which a productive future for them can be realized. A wide cross-section of the astronomical community has contributed to a definitive assessment of the present and a vision for the future. Volume 2: The Telescopes We Use Small cost-effective optical-, radio- and space-based facilities face similar problems in scientific prioritization and funding. Volume 2 highlights how current small facilities are evolving to meet the scientific priorities and economical realities of the 21st century through standardization of instrumentation, use of off-the-shelf technology, specialization, optical improvements, new modes of scheduling, automation, and internet access. The Future of Small Telescopes in the New Millennium is a fundamental resource for those looking to undertake new projects with small telescopes, for those that are responsible for their operation, and for those called upon to help set scientific

  9. Earthwatch: Designing Environmental Education into the Curriculum. Volume II, Grades 6-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Larry, Ed.; Hungerford, Nancy, Ed.

    The environmental education activities package for grades 6-8 contains activities in the following curriculum areas: (1) social science; (2) science; (3) language arts; and (4) mathematics. The activities are divided into seven sections based on seven environmental topics: (1) ecosystems; (2) population; (3) energy and resources; (4) economics,…

  10. Proceedings of the third U. S. national conference on earthquake engineering. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    During the past quarter century the North American continent has experienced a number of damaging earthquakes, among which were the 1964 Alaska earthquake, the 1971 San Fernando, California, earthquake, and most recently the 1985 Mexico City earthquake. A large number of smaller earthquakes have occurred during this period, all of which, along with large earthquakes that have occurred in other parts of the world, serve to remind one that the earthquake hazard is real. In view of potential loss of life and the economic losses that could result from large earthquakes, it is important that the United States continue its vigorous efforts towards mitigating the hazards of earthquakes including developing and implementing safe and economic methods of earthquake-resistant design and construction. In the light of the foregoing observations it it fitting that this Third U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering be held in 1986 at Charleston, South Carolina, on the one-hundred-year anniversary of the 1886 Charleston earthquake. Although intended primarily for participation by U.S. practitioners and researchers, participants from many other parts of the world are also present. From the more than 300 papers offered for publication and presentation, over 200 papers are published in the three volumes of Proceedings and the single volume of Post-Conference Proceedings.

  11. Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of some new VO(IV), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of chromone based NNO Schiff base derived from 2-aminothiazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalanithi, M.; Kodimunthiri, D.; Rajarajan, M.; Tharmaraj, P.

    2011-11-01

    Coordination compounds of VO(IV), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) with the Schiff base obtained through the condensation of 2-aminothiazole with 3-formyl chromone were synthesized. The compounds were characterized by 1H, 13C NMR, UV-Vis, IR, Mass, EPR, molar conductance and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The Cu(II) complex possesses tetrahedrally distorted square planar geometry whereas Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) show distorted tetrahedral geometry. The VO(IV) complex shows square pyramidal geometry. The cyclic voltammogram of Cu (II) complex showed a well defined redox couple Cu(II)/Cu(I) with quasireversible nature. The antimicrobial activity against the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albigans and Aspergillus niger was screened and compared to the activity of the ligand. Emission spectrum was recorded for the ligand and the metal(II) complexes. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was measured and found to have one fourth of the activity of urea. The SEM image of the copper(II) complex implies that the size of the particles is 2 μm.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of some new VO(IV), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of chromone based NNO Schiff base derived from 2-aminothiazole.

    PubMed

    Kalanithi, M; Kodimunthiri, D; Rajarajan, M; Tharmaraj, P

    2011-11-01

    Coordination compounds of VO(IV), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) with the Schiff base obtained through the condensation of 2-aminothiazole with 3-formyl chromone were synthesized. The compounds were characterized by (1)H, (13)C NMR, UV-Vis, IR, Mass, EPR, molar conductance and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The Cu(II) complex possesses tetrahedrally distorted square planar geometry whereas Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) show distorted tetrahedral geometry. The VO(IV) complex shows square pyramidal geometry. The cyclic voltammogram of Cu (II) complex showed a well defined redox couple Cu(II)/Cu(I) with quasireversible nature. The antimicrobial activity against the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albigans and Aspergillus niger was screened and compared to the activity of the ligand. Emission spectrum was recorded for the ligand and the metal(II) complexes. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was measured and found to have one fourth of the activity of urea. The SEM image of the copper(II) complex implies that the size of the particles is 2 μm.

  14. The Solar Ultraviolet Spectrum Estimated Using the Mg II K Index and Ca II K disk Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullin, D. R.; Morrill, J. S.; Floyd, L. E.

    2010-12-01

    As part of a program to estimate the solar spectrum backward in time to the early twentieth century, we have generated fits to UV spectral irradiance measurements (150 - 410 nm) as a function of two solar activity proxies, the Mg II core-to-wing ratio, or Mg II index, and the total Ca II K disk activity derived from ground based observations. In addition, irradiance spectra at shorter wavelengths (1 - 150 nm) where used to generate fits to the Mg II core-to-wing ratio alone. Two sets of spectra were used in these fitting procedures. The fits at longer wavelengths (150 to 410 nm) were based on the high resolution spectra taken by the Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) on the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS). Spectra measured by the Solar EUV Experiment (SEE) instrument on the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite were used for the fits at wavelengths from 1 to 150 nm. To generate fits between solar irradiance and solar proxies, this study uses the above irradiance data, the NOAA composite Mg II index, and daily Ca II K disk activity determined from images measured by Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). Among the results of this study is an estimated relationship between the fraction of the disk with enhanced Ca II K activity and the Mg II index, an upper bound of the average solar UV spectral irradiance during periods of pure quiet sun as was believed to be present during the Maunder Minimum, and results indicating that more than 60 % of the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) variability occurs between 150 and 400nm. In this presentation we will discuss the results of this study and the implications for estimating UV spectra for use in long-term climate models.

  15. Active flutter control for flexible vehicles, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahesh, J. K.; Garrard, W. L.; Stones, C. R.; Hausman, P. D.

    1979-01-01

    An active flutter control methodology based on linear quadratic gaussian theory and its application to the control of a super critical wing is presented. Results of control surface and sensor position optimization are discussed. Both frequency response matching and residualization used to obtain practical flutter controllers are examined. The development of algorithms and computer programs for flutter modeling and active control design procedures is reported.

  16. Solvent-refined-coal (SRC) process. Volume II. Sections V-XIV. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This report documents the completion of development work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process by The Pittsburgh and Midway Coal Mining Co. The work was initiated in 1966 under Office of Coal Research, US Department of Interior, Contract No. 14-01-0001-496 and completed under US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-79ET10104. This report discusses work leading to the development of the SRC-I and SRC-II processes, construction of the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant for the successful development of these processes, and results from the operation of this pilot plant. Process design data generated on a 1 ton-per-day Process Development Unit, bench-scale units and through numerous research projects in support of the design of major demonstration plants are also discussed in summary form and fully referenced in this report.

  17. Proceedings of the sixth international conference on fluidized bed combustion. Volume II. Technical sessions

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held April 9-11, 1980, at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The papers covered recent developments in atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion, especially the design, operation and control of pilot and demonstration plants. The cleanup of combustion products and the erosion, corrosion and fouling of gas turbines was emphasized also. Fifty-five papers from Volume 2 of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; five papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  18. Photovoltaic applications definition and photovoltaic system definition study in the agricultural sector. Volume II. Technical results

    SciTech Connect

    Mengel, R.W.; Nadolski, T.P.; Sparks, D.C.; Young, S.K.; Yingst, A.

    1980-05-01

    This volume describes the technical results of the study of potential photovoltaic (P/V) applications in US agriculture. The results presented address all technical aspects of the program and include a summary of agricultural energy consumption. The objectives of the technical effort reported have been to: (1) identify and characterize agricultural energy demands that can effectively use P/V power systems; (2) develop effective P/V system designs for the four most promising applications; (3) determine performance and cost-estimates for the designs; and (4) recommend systems for early test and demonstration and critical issues requiring further systems studies. The farms chosen for conceptual design include: (1) poultry layer farm, (2) hog production farm, (3) beef feedlot, and (4) year-round vegetable farm. (WHK)

  19. Environmental mitigation at hydroelectric projects: Volume II. Benefits and costs of fish passage and protection

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J. E.; Cada, G. F.; Dauble, D. D.; Hunt, R. T.; Jones, D. W.; Rinehart, B. N.; Sommers, G. L.; Costello, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy, through its hydropower program, is studying environmental mitigation practices at hydroelectric projects. The study of environmental mitigation is intended to provide greater understanding of environmental problems and solutions that are associated with conventional hydroelectric projects. This volume examines upstream and downstream fish passage/protection technologies and the associated practices, benefits, and costs. Fish passage/protection mitigation technologies are investigated by three methods: (a) national, regional (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission regions), and temporal frequencies of fish passage/protection mitigation are examined at 1,825 operating and conventional (excludes pumped storage) Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) regulated hydroelectric sites in the United States; (b) general fish passage/protection mitigation costs are discussed for 50 FERC regulated hydroelectric projects; and (c) 16 case studies are used to examine specific fish passage/protection mitigation practices, benefits, and costs.

  20. 78 FR 41785 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Implementation of Title I/II Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Implementation of Title I/II Program... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Implementation of Title I/II Program... Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 6,573. Abstract: The Implementation of Title I/II...

  1. Group II p21-activated kinases as therapeutic targets in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yang-Guang; Ning, Ke; Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are central players in various oncogenic signaling pathways. The six PAK family members are classified into group I (PAK1-3) and group II (PAK4-6). Focus is currently shifting from group I PAKs to group II PAKs. Group II PAKs play important roles in many fundamental cellular processes, some of which have particular significance in the development and progression of cancer. Because of their important functions, group II PAKs have become popular potential drug target candidates. However, few group II PAKs inhibitors have been reported, and most do not exhibit satisfactory kinase selectivity and “drug-like” properties. Isoform- and kinase-selective PAK inhibitors remain to be developed. This review describes the biological activities of group II PAKs, the importance of group II PAKs in the development and progression of gastrointestinal cancer, and small-molecule inhibitors of group II PAKs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26811660

  2. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2011 Horseshoe II burn area, southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruddy, Barbara C.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned in 2011 by the Horseshoe II wildfire in southeastern Arizona. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned drainage basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and debris-flows volumes for selected drainage basins. Input for the models include measures of burn severity, topographic characteristics, soil properties, and rainfall total and intensity for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall, (2) 5-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall, and (3) 10-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall. Estimated debris-flow probabilities in the drainage basins of interest ranged from less than 1 percent in response to the 2-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall to a high of 100 percent in response to the 10-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall. The high probabilities in all modeled drainage basins are likely due to the abundance of steep hillslopes and the extensive areas burned at moderate to high severities. The estimated debris-flow volumes ranged from a low of 20 cubic meters to a high of greater than 100,000 cubic meters.

  3. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy-storage system. Volume II. Introduction and technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

    1981-09-01

    The results are described of a study subcontracted by PNL to the United Technologies Research Center on the engineering feasibility and economics of a CAES concept which uses a coal fired, fluidized bed combustor (FBC) to heat the air being returned from storage during the power production cycle. By burning coal instead of fuel oil, the CAES/FBC concept can completely eliminate the dependence of compressed air energy storage on petroleum fuels. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume II presents a discussion of program background and an in-depth coverage of both fluid bed combustion and turbomachinery technology pertinent to their application in a CAES power plant system. The CAES/FBC concept appears technically feasible and economically competitive with conventional CAES. However, significant advancement is required in FBC technology before serious commercial commitment to CAES/FBC can be realized. At present, other elements of DOE, industrial groups, and other countries are performing the required R and D for advancement of FBC technology. The CAES/FBC will be reevaluated at a later date when FBC technology has matured and many of the concerns now plaguing FBC are resolved. (LCL)

  4. Portable microcomputer for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. Volume II. Software description and listings. [IAEAPU

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.

    1984-05-01

    A portable microcomputer has been developed and programmed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32-K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, a numeric keyboard for user responses, and a 20-character thermal printer for hard-copy output of results. The unit weights 11 kg and has dimensions of 33.5 x 30.5 x 23.0 cm. This compactness allows the unit to be stored under an airline seat. Only the positions of the 148-keV /sup 241/Pu and 208-keV /sup 237/U peaks are required for spectral analysis that gives plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percent abundances. Volume I of this report provides a detailed description of the data analysis methodology, operation instructions, hardware, and maintenance and troubleshooting. Volume II describes the software and provides software listings.

  5. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, molecular modeling and antimicrobial activities of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) complexes containing the tetradentate aza Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Ruchi

    2013-02-01

    Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) complexes with a tetradentate macrocyclic ligand [1.2.5.6tetraoxo-3,4,7,8tetraaza-(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8)tetrabenzene(L)] were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, mass, nmr, i.r., electronic and e.p.r. spectral studies. All the complexes are non electrolytes in nature and may be formulated as [M(L)X2] [where, M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and X = Cl-, CH3COO-]. On the basis of i.r., electronic and e.p.r. spectral studies a distorted octahedral geometry has been assigned for all complexes. The antimicrobial activities and LD50 values of the ligand and its complexes, as growth inhibiting agents, have been screened in vitro against two different species of bacteria and plant pathogenic fungi.

  6. Synthesis, characterization, and antioxidant/cytotoxic activity of new chromone Schiff base nano-complexes of Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saif, M.; El-Shafiy, Hoda F.; Mashaly, Mahmoud M.; Eid, Mohamed F.; Nabeel, A. I.; Fouad, R.

    2016-08-01

    A chromone Schiff base complexes of Zn(II) (1), Cu(II) (2), Ni(II) (3) and Co(II) (4) were successfully prepared in nano domain with crystalline or amorphous structures. The spectroscopic data revealed that the Schiff base ligand behaves as a monoanionic tridentate ligand. The metal complexes exhibited octahedral geometry. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis showed that Cu(II) complex have aggregated nanospheres morphology. The obtained nano-complexes were tested as antioxidant and antitumor agents. The H2L and its Cu(II) complex (2) were found to be more potent antioxidant (IC50(H2L) = 0.93 μM; IC50(Cu(II) complex) = 1.1 μM than standard ascorbic acid (IC50 = 2.1 μM) as evaluated by DPPH• method. The H2L and its complexes (1-4) were tested for their in vitro cytotoxicity against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma cell line (EAC). The Cu(II) nano-complex (2) effectively inhibited EAC growth with IC50 value of 47 μM in comparison with its parent compound and other prepared complexes. The high antioxidant activity and antitumor activity of Cu(II) nano-complex (2) were attributed to their chemical structure, Cu(II) reducing capacity, and nanosize property. The toxicity test on mice showed that Zn(II) (1) and Cu(II) (2) nano-complex have lower toxicity than the standard cis-platin.

  7. Sampling artifact in volume weighted velocity measurement. II. Detection in simulations and comparison with theoretical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Pengjie; Jing, Yipeng

    2015-02-01

    Measuring the volume weighted velocity power spectrum suffers from a severe systematic error due to imperfect sampling of the velocity field from the inhomogeneous distribution of dark matter particles/halos in simulations or galaxies with velocity measurement. This "sampling artifact" depends on both the mean particle number density n¯P and the intrinsic large scale structure (LSS) fluctuation in the particle distribution. (1) We report robust detection of this sampling artifact in N -body simulations. It causes ˜12 % underestimation of the velocity power spectrum at k =0.1 h /Mpc for samples with n¯ P=6 ×10-3 (Mpc /h )-3 . This systematic underestimation increases with decreasing n¯P and increasing k . Its dependence on the intrinsic LSS fluctuations is also robustly detected. (2) All of these findings are expected based upon our theoretical modeling in paper I [P. Zhang, Y. Zheng, and Y. Jing, Sampling artifact in volume weighted velocity measurement. I. Theoretical modeling, arXiv:1405.7125.]. In particular, the leading order theoretical approximation agrees quantitatively well with the simulation result for n¯ P≳6 ×10-4 (Mpc /h )-3 . Furthermore, we provide an ansatz to take high order terms into account. It improves the model accuracy to ≲1 % at k ≲0.1 h /Mpc over 3 orders of magnitude in n¯P and over typical LSS clustering from z =0 to z =2 . (3) The sampling artifact is determined by the deflection D field, which is straightforwardly available in both simulations and data of galaxy velocity. Hence the sampling artifact in the velocity power spectrum measurement can be self-calibrated within our framework. By applying such self-calibration in simulations, it is promising to determine the real large scale velocity bias of 1013M⊙ halos with ˜1 % accuracy, and that of lower mass halos with better accuracy. (4) In contrast to suppressing the velocity power spectrum at large scale, the sampling artifact causes an overestimation of the velocity

  8. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of RNA polymerase II basal transcription activity.

    PubMed Central

    Yonaha, M; Chibazakura, T; Kitajima, S; Yasukochi, Y

    1995-01-01

    Regulation of transcription by RNA polymerase II (pol II) in eukaryotic cells requires both basal and regulatory transcription factors. In this report we have investigated in vitro pol II basal transcription activity during the cell cycle by using nuclear extracts from synchronized HeLa cells. It is shown that pol II basal transcription activity is low in the S and G2 phases and high in early G1 phase and TFIID is the rate limiting component of pol II basal transcription activity during the cell cycle. Further analyses reveal that TFIID exists as a less active form in the S and G2 phases and nuclear extracts from S and G2 phase cells contain a heat-sensitive repressor(s) of TATA box binding protein (TBP). These results suggest that pol II basal transcription activity is regulated by a qualitative change in the TFIID complex, which could involve repression of TBP, during the cell cycle. Images PMID:7479063

  9. Proximal tubule NHE3 activity is inhibited by beta-arrestin-biased angiotensin II type 1 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Carneiro de Morais, Carla P; Polidoro, Juliano Z; Ralph, Donna L; Pessoa, Thaissa D; Oliveira-Souza, Maria; Barauna, Valério G; Rebouças, Nancy A; Malnic, Gerhard; McDonough, Alicia A; Girardi, Adriana C C

    2015-10-15

    Physiological concentrations of angiotensin II (ANG II) upregulate the activity of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) in the renal proximal tubule through activation of the ANG II type I (AT1) receptor/G protein-coupled signaling. This effect is key for maintenance of extracellular fluid volume homeostasis and blood pressure. Recent findings have shown that selective activation of the beta-arrestin-biased AT1 receptor signaling pathway induces diuresis and natriuresis independent of G protein-mediated signaling. This study tested the hypothesis that activation of this AT1 receptor/beta-arrestin signaling inhibits NHE3 activity in proximal tubule. To this end, we determined the effects of the compound TRV120023, which binds to the AT1R, blocks G-protein coupling, and stimulates beta-arrestin signaling on NHE3 function in vivo and in vitro. NHE3 activity was measured in both native proximal tubules, by stationary microperfusion, and in opossum proximal tubule (OKP) cells, by Na(+)-dependent intracellular pH recovery. We found that 10(-7) M TRV120023 remarkably inhibited proximal tubule NHE3 activity both in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, stimulation of NHE3 by ANG II was completely suppressed by TRV120023 both in vivo as well as in vitro. Inhibition of NHE3 activity by TRV120023 was associated with a decrease in NHE3 surface expression in OKP cells and with a redistribution from the body to the base of the microvilli in the rat proximal tubule. These findings indicate that biased signaling of the beta-arrestin pathway through the AT1 receptor inhibits NHE3 activity in the proximal tubule at least in part due to changes in NHE3 subcellular localization. PMID:26246427

  10. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 2, Rev. 14

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This appendix determines the effective G values for payload shipping categories of contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste materials, based on the radiolytic G values for waste materials that are discussed in detail in Appendix 3.6.8 of the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package. The effective G values take into account self-absorption of alpha decay energy inside particulate contamination and the fraction of energy absorbed by nongas-generating materials. As described in Appendix 3.6.8, an effective G value, G{sub eff}, is defined by: G{sub eff} - {Sigma}{sub M} (F{sub M} x G{sub M}) F{sub M}-fraction of energy absorbed by material maximum G value for a material where the sum is over all materials present inside a waste container. The G value itself is determined primarily by the chemical properties of the material and its temperature. The value of F is determined primarily by the size of the particles containing the radionuclides, the distribution of radioactivity on the various materials present inside the waste container, and the stopping distance of alpha particles in air, in the waste materials, or in the waste packaging materials.

  11. A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship. Volume II, Site Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    2001-01-01

    During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as for other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over a 100 sites in 30 States and one U.S. Territory. Hundreds of thousand of acres of residually contaminated soils, contaminated groundwater, surface water and sediment contamination, and contaminated buildings are present at many sites across the country. These sites range in size from less than one acre, containing only a single facility, to large sites spanning over 100,000 acres with huge uranium enrichment plants and plutonium processing canyons. Since 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program has made significant progress in addressing this environmental legacy. Millions of cubic meters of waste have been removed, stabilized, or disposed of, resulting in significant risk and cost reduction. In addition, DOE began disposing of transuranic (i.e., plutonium-contaminated) waste in the nation’s first deep geologic repository – the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. DOE is now carrying out its long-term stewardship obligations at dozens of sites, including smaller sites where DOE has completed cleanup work for the entire site and many larger sites where DOE has remediated portions of the site.

  12. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Evaluation of line focus solar central power systems. Volume II. Systems evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-15

    An evaluation was completed to ascertain the applicability of line focus technologies to electrical power applications and to compare their performance and cost potential with point focus central receiver power systems. It was concluded that although the high temperature line focus (SRI) and fixed mirror line focus (GA) concepts duplicate the heat source characteristics and power conversion technology of the central receiver concepts these configurations do not offer a sufficient improvement in cost to warrant full scale development. The systems are, however, less complex than their point focus counterpart and should the central receiver system development falter they provide reasonable technology alternatives. The parabolic trough concept (BDM) was found to provide a low temperature technology alternative to the central receiver concept with promising performance and cost potential. Its continued development is recommended, with special emphasis on lower temperature (< 700/sup 0/F) applications. Finally, a variety of new promising line focus power system configurations were identified for a range of utility and industrial applications and recommendations were made on their implementation. This volume contains the detailed report. (WHK)

  14. Site characterization report for the basalt waste isolation project. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1982-11-01

    The reference location for a repository in basalt for the terminal storage of nuclear wastes on the Hanford Site and the candidate horizons within this reference repository location have been identified and the preliminary characterization work in support of the site screening process has been completed. Fifteen technical questions regarding the qualification of the site were identified to be addressed during the detailed site characterization phase of the US Department of Energy-National Waste Terminal Storage Program site selection process. Resolution of these questions will be provided in the final site characterization progress report, currently planned to be issued in 1987, and in the safety analysis report to be submitted with the License Application. The additional information needed to resolve these questions and the plans for obtaining the information have been identified. This Site Characterization Report documents the results of the site screening process, the preliminary site characterization data, the technical issues that need to be addressed, and the plans for resolving these issues. Volume 2 contains chapters 6 through 12: geochemistry; surface hydrology; climatology, meteorology, and air quality; environmental, land-use, and socioeconomic characteristics; repository design; waste package; and performance assessment.

  15. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1997 Site Environmental Report Vol. II

    SciTech Connect

    Thorson, Patrick

    1998-09-30

    Volume II of the Site Environmental Report for 1997 is published by Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a supplemental appendix to the report printed in volume I. Volume II contains the environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate summary results in the main report for routine and nonroutine activities at the Laboratory (except for groundwater sampling data). Data presented in volume II are given in Systeme International (SI) units. The list below categorizes the volume II data sections with corresponding summary result tables in volume I: Stack Air, Ambient Air, Rainwater, Creeks, Creek Baseline Study, Hydraugers, Lakes, Stormwater, Sewer, Fixed Treatment Units, Soil, Sediment, Vegetation.

  16. Convoy active safety technologies war fighter experiment II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenherr, Edward W.

    2009-01-01

    The operational ability to project and sustain forces in distant, anti-access and area denial environments poses new challenges for combatant commanders. One of the new challenges is the ability to conduct sustainment operations at operationally feasible times and places on the battlefield. Combatant commanders require a sustainment system that is agile, versatile, and survivable throughout the range of military operations and across the spectrum of conflict. A key component of conducting responsive, operationally feasible sustainment operations is the ability to conduct sustainment convoys. Sustainment convoys are critical to providing combatant commanders the right support, at the right time and place, and in the right quantities, across the full range of military operations. The ability to conduct sustainment convoys in a variety of hostile environments require force protection measures that address the enemy threat and protect the Soldier. One cost effective, technically feasible method of increasing the force protection for sustainment convoys is the use of robotic follower technology and autonomous navigation. The Convoy Active Safety Technologies (CAST) system is a driver assist, convoy autopilot technology aimed to address these issues. The CAST Warfigher Experiment II, being held at The Nevada Automotive Test Center in the fall of 2008, will continue analysis of the utility of this vehicle following technology not only in measures of system integrity and performance vs. manual driving, but also the physiological effects on the operators themselves. This paper will detail this experiment's methodology and analysis. Results will be presented at the SPIE Electronic Imaging 2009 symposium.

  17. Comparison of the characteristics and mechanisms of Hg(II) sorption by biochars and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyun; Schierz, Ariette; Xu, Nan; Cao, Xinde

    2016-02-01

    Two biochars were produced from bagasse and hickory chips (referred to as BB and HCB, respectively) and evaluated for their sorption ability of Hg(II) in aqueous solution. A commercial activated carbon (AC) which is commonly used for Hg(II) removal was included for comparison. Both biochars showed higher sorption capacities than AC, following the trend of BB>HCB>AC. The sorption of Hg(II) by BB and AC was mainly attributed to the formation of (COO)2Hg(II) and (O)2Hg(II). As a result, the adsorption capacity of Hg(II) by BB decreased 17.6% and 37.6% after COOH and OH were blocked, respectively and that of Hg(II) by AC decreased 6.63% and 62.2% for COOH and OH hindered, respectively. However, blocking the function groups had little effect on the Hg removal by HCB since sorption of Hg(II) by HCB was mainly resulted from the π electrons of CC and CO induced Hg-π binding. Further X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated the possibility of reduction of the Hg(II) to Hg(I) by phenol groups or π electrons during the removal of Hg(II) by both biochars. In conclusion, biochar is more effective than activated carbon in removing Hg(II) and there exists a high potential that biochar can be a substitute of activated carbon for removal of Hg(II) from wastewater. PMID:26520810

  18. Comparison of the characteristics and mechanisms of Hg(II) sorption by biochars and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyun; Schierz, Ariette; Xu, Nan; Cao, Xinde

    2016-02-01

    Two biochars were produced from bagasse and hickory chips (referred to as BB and HCB, respectively) and evaluated for their sorption ability of Hg(II) in aqueous solution. A commercial activated carbon (AC) which is commonly used for Hg(II) removal was included for comparison. Both biochars showed higher sorption capacities than AC, following the trend of BB>HCB>AC. The sorption of Hg(II) by BB and AC was mainly attributed to the formation of (COO)2Hg(II) and (O)2Hg(II). As a result, the adsorption capacity of Hg(II) by BB decreased 17.6% and 37.6% after COOH and OH were blocked, respectively and that of Hg(II) by AC decreased 6.63% and 62.2% for COOH and OH hindered, respectively. However, blocking the function groups had little effect on the Hg removal by HCB since sorption of Hg(II) by HCB was mainly resulted from the π electrons of CC and CO induced Hg-π binding. Further X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated the possibility of reduction of the Hg(II) to Hg(I) by phenol groups or π electrons during the removal of Hg(II) by both biochars. In conclusion, biochar is more effective than activated carbon in removing Hg(II) and there exists a high potential that biochar can be a substitute of activated carbon for removal of Hg(II) from wastewater.

  19. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity, structural and spectral characterization and DFT calculations of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) complexes of 4-amino-5-pyrimidinecarbonitrile.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Tarek A; Shaaban, Ibrahim A; Farag, Rabei S; Zoghaib, Wajdi M; Afifi, Mahmoud S

    2015-01-25

    Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) complexes of 4-amino-5-pyrimidinecarbonitrile (APC) have been synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, mass spectrometry, infrared (4000-200 cm(-1)), UV-Visible (200-1100 nm), (1)H NMR and ESR spectroscopy as well as TGA analysis. The molar conductance measurements in DMSO imply non-electrolytic complexes, formulated as [M(APC)2Cl2] where M=Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II). The infrared spectra of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes indicate a bidentate type of bonding for APC through the exocyclic amino and adjacent pyrimidine nitrogen as donors whereas APC coordinated to Pd(II) ion as a monodentated ligand via a pyrimidine nitrogen donor. The magnetic measurements and the electronic absorption spectra support distorted octahedral geometries for Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes however a square planar complex was favored for the Pd(II) complex (C2h skeleton symmetry). In addition, we carried out B3LYP and ω-B97XD geometry optimization at 6-31G(d) basis set except for Pd(II) where we implemented LanL2DZ/6-31G(d) combined basis set. The computational results favor all trans geometrical isomers where amino N, pyrimidine N and Cl are trans to each other (structure 1). Finally, APC and its divalent metal ion complexes were screened for their antibacterial activity, and the synthesized complexes were found to be more potent antimicrobial agents than APC against one or more microbial species. PMID:25105264

  20. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity, structural and spectral characterization and DFT calculations of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) complexes of 4-amino-5-pyrimidinecarbonitrile.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Tarek A; Shaaban, Ibrahim A; Farag, Rabei S; Zoghaib, Wajdi M; Afifi, Mahmoud S

    2015-01-25

    Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) complexes of 4-amino-5-pyrimidinecarbonitrile (APC) have been synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, mass spectrometry, infrared (4000-200 cm(-1)), UV-Visible (200-1100 nm), (1)H NMR and ESR spectroscopy as well as TGA analysis. The molar conductance measurements in DMSO imply non-electrolytic complexes, formulated as [M(APC)2Cl2] where M=Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II). The infrared spectra of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes indicate a bidentate type of bonding for APC through the exocyclic amino and adjacent pyrimidine nitrogen as donors whereas APC coordinated to Pd(II) ion as a monodentated ligand via a pyrimidine nitrogen donor. The magnetic measurements and the electronic absorption spectra support distorted octahedral geometries for Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes however a square planar complex was favored for the Pd(II) complex (C2h skeleton symmetry). In addition, we carried out B3LYP and ω-B97XD geometry optimization at 6-31G(d) basis set except for Pd(II) where we implemented LanL2DZ/6-31G(d) combined basis set. The computational results favor all trans geometrical isomers where amino N, pyrimidine N and Cl are trans to each other (structure 1). Finally, APC and its divalent metal ion complexes were screened for their antibacterial activity, and the synthesized complexes were found to be more potent antimicrobial agents than APC against one or more microbial species.

  1. Anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residue: potential for improvement and implementation. Final report, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, W. J.; Dell'orto, S.; Fanfoni, K. J.; Hayes, T. D.; Leuschner, A. P.; Sherman, D. F.

    1980-04-01

    Earlier studies have shown that although large quantities of agricultural residues are generated on small farms, it was difficult to economically justify use of conventional anaerobic digestion technology, such as used for sewage sludge digestion. A simple, unmixed, earthen-supported structure appeared to be capable of producing significant quantities of biogas at a cost that would make it competitive with many existing fuels. The goal of this study was to define and demonstrate a methane fermentation technology that could be practical and economically feasible on small farms. This study provides the first long term, large scale (reactor volumes of 34 m/sup 3/) parallel testing of the major theory, design, construction, and operation of a low cost approach to animal manure fermentation as compared to the more costly and complex designs. The main objectives were to define the lower limits for successful fermentor operation in terms of mixing, insulation, temperature, feed rate, and management requirements in a cold climate with both pilot scale and full scale fermentors. Over a period of four years, innovative fermentation processes for animal manures were developed from theoretical concept to successful full scale demonstration. Reactors were sized for 50 to 65 dairy animals, or for the one-family dairy size. The results show that a small farm biogas generation system that should be widely applicable and economically feasible was operated successfully for nearly two years. Although this low cost system out-performed the completely mixed unit throughout the study, perhaps the greatest advantage of this approach is its ease of modification, operation, and maintenance.

  2. Direct visualization of free-volume-triggered activation of β relaxation in colloidal glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yunzhuo; Lu, Xing; Qin, Zuoxiang; Shen, Jun

    2016-07-01

    β relaxation, which is predicted by mode coupling theory and involves the localized motions of particles, initiates in a supercooled liquid and continues into glassy state. It correlates essentially with many fundamental properties of amorphous materials. Despite its importance, the underlying mechanisms leading to the β relaxation have remained elusive. As natural heterogeneity, the original distributed free volume has been supposed to be associated with the activation of β relaxation in amorphous solids. However, there has been no direct experimental proof for this hypothesis. Here we used a colloidal glass to directly observe the β relaxation and free-volume distribution. We found a spatial correlation between the β relaxation and free volume. The large free volume regions were observed to possess a low-energy cost of relaxation-induced strain, indicating that the large free volume region presenting a low-energy barrier for structural relaxation benefits the β relaxation.

  3. Direct visualization of free-volume-triggered activation of β relaxation in colloidal glass.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunzhuo; Lu, Xing; Qin, Zuoxiang; Shen, Jun

    2016-07-01

    β relaxation, which is predicted by mode coupling theory and involves the localized motions of particles, initiates in a supercooled liquid and continues into glassy state. It correlates essentially with many fundamental properties of amorphous materials. Despite its importance, the underlying mechanisms leading to the β relaxation have remained elusive. As natural heterogeneity, the original distributed free volume has been supposed to be associated with the activation of β relaxation in amorphous solids. However, there has been no direct experimental proof for this hypothesis. Here we used a colloidal glass to directly observe the β relaxation and free-volume distribution. We found a spatial correlation between the β relaxation and free volume. The large free volume regions were observed to possess a low-energy cost of relaxation-induced strain, indicating that the large free volume region presenting a low-energy barrier for structural relaxation benefits the β relaxation. PMID:27575178

  4. Visions: The Newsletter of the Preschool Coordination Project. Volume II, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Susan, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This bilingual (English/Spanish) newsletter provides reproducible information and activities that are useful for teachers, parents, and children involved in migrant preschool education. Articles for teachers offer suggestions for language development, home visits, Even Start programs, developmentally appropriate kindergarten, and cultural…

  5. North Dakota Curriculum Frameworks, Volume II: Arts Education, Business Education, Foreign Language, Health, Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Dept. of Public Instruction, Bismarck.

    Curriculum frameworks for North Dakota elementary-secondary education are presented in this document. These frameworks are voluntary and serve to promote interdisciplinary learning, active learning, and student diversity. They are part of a larger systemic approach to improve instruction in the state's schools and to identify content outcomes and…

  6. Strategies in Composition: Ideas that Work in the Classroom. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordner, Marsha S., Ed.

    This collection of 26 brief essays by college and high school faculty represents a variety of practical approaches that can be used in composition classes. After a foreword by the editor, the essays and their authors are as follows: "Writing as a Moral Activity" (Judith Anderson); "Specific Details (Orangen't You Wise to Use Them?)" (Frances…

  7. Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume II. Infrastructure and community-services requirements, Island of Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, G.A.; Buevens, W.R.

    1982-06-01

    The requirements of infrastructure and community services necessary to accommodate the development of geothermal energy on the Island of Hawaii for electricity production are identified. The following aspects are covered: Puna District-1981, labor resources, geothermal development scenarios, geothermal land use, the impact of geothermal development on Puna, labor resource requirments, and the requirements for government activity.

  8. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, First Quarter 1996, Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.D.

    1996-10-22

    This report summarizes the Savanna River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by EPD/EMS during the first quarter 1996. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program. It also provides a record of the program`s activities and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  9. Handbook of Science, Technology, and Society. Volume II: STS in Action in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thirunarayanan, M. O., Ed.

    This publication is the culmination of the efforts of many teachers involved in a 1- to 3-year Arizona Science, Technology, and Society (STS) project. It contains 34 lesson plans or units of study these teachers modified or created to integrate STS topics, issues, and problems. The major thrust of the activities and units of study cited is to help…

  10. Breaking Away from the Textbook, Volume II: Creative Ways to Teach World History. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pahl, Ron H.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching history should not simply be an endless recitation of irrelevant facts, entombed between the covers of a textbook. Instead, "Breaking Away from the Textbook" offers a fascinating journey through world history. Not a comprehensive, theory-heavy guide, this book instead focuses on exciting classroom activities, methods for students to…

  11. The Work Incentive Program: Making Adults Economically Independent. Volume II: Bibliography and Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klausner, Samuel Z.; And Others

    This publication contains the bibliography and appendixes which accompany a study of the role of the Work Incentive Program, particularly its training activities, in adult resocialization (available as VT 020 335 in this issue). Entries in the bibliography are arranged alphabetically by author under these categories: (1) Manpower-Labor Market, (2)…

  12. Science: A Practical View. Volume II. Teacher Edition. Applied Basic Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evaluation, Dissemination and Assessment Center, Dallas.

    This guide, the second in a series of three, provides the intermediate science student and teacher an opportunity to review selected science concepts and processes through activities which emphasize the applicability of scientific knowledge in the professional world. The guide is divided into three components. The first component helps students…

  13. Driver Education for the Information Superhighway. Literacy Leader Fellowship Program Reports. Volume II, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, David J.

    1998-01-01

    This document provides reports of projects related to Internet use by adult learners and practitioners. Chapter 1 reports findings of an online survey of 113 adult literacy practitioners actively using the Internet, including difficulties encountered in learning to use the Internet; training or supports that helped; Internet features used by…

  14. Math Play Therapy. Volume II. CSMP Mathematics for the Intermediate Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papy, Frederique

    This material is the result of 1 year of experimental work during the 1976-77 school year with pupils at the fifth-grade level. Once a week students participated in half-hour, small-group sessions in addition to their regular classroom mathematics period. It is felt that the activities described might be appropriate for additional grade levels. It…

  15. Tentative Outlines of a Secondary School Mathematics Curriculum, Volume II. SMSG Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    This document is the report of a curriculum writing session, and covers three activities: (1) a textbook for grade seven, written using the outlines produced the previous year (SE 012 735), was reviewed and criticized; (2) the outlines for grades eight and nine, also produced the previous year, were completed in greater detail; and (3)…

  16. United States data collection activities and requirements, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrin, S.; Mcgregor, D.

    1977-01-01

    The potential market for a data collection system was investigated to determine whether the user needs would be sufficient to support a satellite relay data collection system design. The activities of 107,407 data collections stations were studied to determine user needs in agriculture, climatology, environmental monitoring, forestry, geology, hydrology, meteorology, and oceanography. Descriptions of 50 distinct data collections networks are described and used to form the user data base. The computer program used to analyze the station data base is discussed, and results of the analysis are presented in maps and graphs. Information format and coding is described in the appendix.

  17. 1999 Annual Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Correction - Action Report (Volumes I, II, and III)

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    2000-06-14

    This Corrective Action Report (CAR) for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is being prepared to comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit Number SC1 890 008 989, dated October 31, 1999. This CAR compiles and presents all groundwater sampling and monitoring activities that are conducted at the MWMF. As set forth in previous agreements with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), all groundwater associated with the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) (comprised of the MWMF, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility, and Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground) will be addressed under this RCRA Permit. This CAR is the first to be written for the MWMF and presents monitoring activities and results as an outcome of Interim Status and limited Permitted Status activities. All 1999 groundwater monitoring activities were conducted while the MWMF was operated during Interim Status. Changes to the groundwater monitoring program were made upon receipt of the RCRA Permit, where feasible. During 1999, 152 single-screened and six multi-screened groundwater monitoring wells at the BGC monitored groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer as required by the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR), settlement agreements 87-52-SW and 91-51-SW, and RCRA Permit SC1 890 008 989. However, overall compliance with the recently issued RCRA Permit could not be implemented until the year 2000 due to the effective date of the RCRA Permit and scheduling of groundwater monitoring activities. Changes have been made to the groundwater monitoring network to meet Permit requirements for all 2000 sampling events.

  18. Removal of Cu(II) ions by biosorption onto powdered waste sludge (PWS) prior to biological treatment in an activated sludge unit: a statistical design approach.

    PubMed

    Pamukoglu, M Yunus; Kargi, Fikret

    2009-04-01

    Biological treatment of synthetic wastewater containing Cu(II) ions was realized in an activated sludge unit with pre-adsorption of Cu(II) onto powdered waste sludge (PWS). Box-Behnken experimental design method was used to investigate Cu(II), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and toxicity removal performance of the activated sludge unit under different operating conditions. The independent variables were the solids retention time (SRT, 5-30 d), hydraulic residence time (HRT, 5-25 h), feed Cu(II) concentration (0-50 mg L(-1)) and PWS loading rate (0-4 g h(-1)) while percent Cu(II), COD, toxicity (TOX) removals and the sludge volume index (SVI) were the objective functions. The data were correlated with a quadratic response function (R2=0.99). Cu(II), COD and toxicity removals increased with increasing PWS loading rate and SRT while decreasing with the increasing feed Cu(II) concentration and HRT. Optimum conditions resulting in maximum Cu(II), COD, toxicity removals and SVI values were found to be SRT of 30 d, HRT 15 h, PWS loading rate 3 g h(-1) and feed Cu(II) concentration of less than 30 mg L(-1).

  19. Chemical analyses of surface water in Illinois, 1958-74; Volume II, Illinois River basin and Mississippi River tributaries north of Illinois River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; Toler, L.G.

    1978-01-01

    Samples of surface water were collected and analyzed by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and its predecessor, the Stream Pollution Control Bureau of the Illinois Department of Public Health. The results for the period 1958 to 1974 are presented in tabular form and the history of sampling and analytical methods are included for all sites where samples were collected at gaging stations or near enough that reliable discharge estimates could be made. The report is contained in three volumes. This volume (Volume II) includes Illinois River basin and Mississippi River tributaries north of Illinois River basin. (See also W78-10034 and W78-10036) (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Coordination behavior of tetraaza [N4] ligand towards Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cu(I) and Pd(II) complexes: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and anticancer activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Boraey, Hanaa A.

    2012-11-01

    Novel eight Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cu(I) and Pd(II) complexes with [N4] ligand (L) i.e. 2-amino-N-{2-[(2-aminobenzoyl)amino]ethyl}benzamide have been synthesized and structurally characterized by elemental analysis, spectral, thermal (TG/DTG), magnetic, and molar conductivity measurements. On the basis of IR, mass, electronic and EPR spectral studies an octahedral geometry has been proposed for Co(II), Ni(II) complexes and Cu(II) chloride complex, square-pyramidal for Cu(I) bromide complex. For Cu(II) nitrate complex (6), Pd(II) complex (8) square planar geometry was proposed. The EPR data of Cu(II) complexes in powdered form indicate dx2-y2 ground state of Cu(II) ion. The antitumor activity of the synthesized ligand and some selected metal complexes has been studied. The palladium(II) complex (8) was found to display cytotoxicity (IC50 = 25.6 and 41 μM) against human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and human hepatocarcinoma HEPG2 cell line.

  1. Oligomeric state regulated trafficking of human platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II.

    PubMed

    Monillas, Elizabeth S; Caplan, Jeffrey L; Thévenin, Anastasia F; Bahnson, Brian J

    2015-05-01

    The intracellular enzyme platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II (PAFAH-II) hydrolyzes platelet-activating factor and oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. PAFAH-II in its resting state is mainly cytoplasmic, and it responds to oxidative stress by becoming increasingly bound to endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membranes. Numerous studies have indicated that this enzyme is essential for protecting cells from oxidative stress induced apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the oxidative stress response by PAFAH-II has not been fully resolved. Here, changes to the oligomeric state of human PAFAH-II were investigated as a potential regulatory mechanism toward enzyme trafficking. Native PAGE analysis in vitro and photon counting histogram within live cells showed that PAFAH-II is both monomeric and dimeric. A Gly-2-Ala site-directed mutation of PAFAH-II demonstrated that the N-terminal myristoyl group is required for homodimerization. Additionally, the distribution of oligomeric PAFAH-II is distinct within the cell; homodimers of PAFAH-II were localized to the cytoplasm while monomers were associated to the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. We propose that the oligomeric state of PAFAH-II drives functional protein trafficking. PAFAH-II localization to the membrane is critical for substrate acquisition and effective oxidative stress protection. It is hypothesized that the balance between monomer and dimer serves as a regulatory mechanism of a PAFAH-II oxidative stress response.

  2. From Forge to Fast Food: A History of Child Labor in New York State. Volume II: Civil War to the Present.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Richard B.; And Others

    This volume of essays and activities is written for use in the eighth grade course "United States and New York State History." The volume follows the chronology from the Civil War to the present, emphasizing child labor during those years. The essays are intended for teachers but can be mastered by many students. The activities focus on child…

  3. The NESA Activities Handbook for Native and Multicultural Classrooms. Volume Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Don, Comp.; Napoleon, Art, Comp.

    This book, the second of three volumes, contains educational, culture-sensitive activities tested and designed for use in native and multicultural classrooms. The activities, developed Native Education Services Associates, stress the importance of culture in students' lives, and teaches them basic personal and community-related skills so they may…

  4. The NESA Activities Handbook for Native and Multicultural Classrooms. [Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Don, Comp.; Green, Howard, Comp.

    This book, the first of three volumes, contains a collection of activities designed for or appropriate to the native Indian or multicultural classroom. Levels range from kindergarten to grade 12. Some of the activities have been borrowed from other sources, but many have been developed or adapted and are available here for the first time. The…

  5. The NESA Activities Handbook for Native and Multicultural Classrooms. Volume Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Don, Comp.; Lundeberg, Wayne, Comp.

    This book, the last of three volumes, contains educational, culture-sensitive activities tested and designed for use in native and multicultural classrooms. The activities, developed by Native Education Services Associates, stress the importance of culture in students' lives, and teaches them basic personal and community-related skills so they may…

  6. Midbrain volume segmentation using active shape models and LBPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olveres, Jimena; Nava, Rodrigo; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris; Cristóbal, Gabriel; García-Moreno, Carla María.

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to detect different brain structures such as midbrain, white matter, gray matter, corpus callosum, and cerebellum has increased. This fact together with the evidence that midbrain is associated with Parkinson's disease has led researchers to consider midbrain segmentation as an important issue. Nowadays, Active Shape Models (ASM) are widely used in literature for organ segmentation where the shape is an important discriminant feature. Nevertheless, this approach is based on the assumption that objects of interest are usually located on strong edges. Such a limitation may lead to a final shape far from the actual shape model. This paper proposes a novel method based on the combined use of ASM and Local Binary Patterns for segmenting midbrain. Furthermore, we analyzed several LBP methods and evaluated their performance. The joint-model considers both global and local statistics to improve final adjustments. The results showed that our proposal performs substantially better than the ASM algorithm and provides better segmentation measurements.

  7. TECHNICAL REPORT ON TECHNOLOGICALLY ENHANCED NATURALLY OCCURRING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS FROM URANIUM MINING, VOLUME II: INVESTIGATION OF POTENTIAL HEALTH, GEOGRAPHIC, AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES OF ABANDONED URANIUM MINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume II investigates the potential radiogenic risks from abandoned uranium mines and evaluates which may pose the greatest hazards to members of the public and to the environment. The intent of this report is to identify who may be most likely to be exposed to wastes at small a...

  8. Compilation of energy efficient concepts in advanced aircraft design and operations. Volume II. Abstract Data Base. Final report, 10 March-5 November 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Clyman, M.; Einhorn, S.J.; Shultz, R.S.

    1980-11-05

    Volume II contains the ACE Data Base arranged into eleven areas of RandD effort as follows: Fuels--Synthetic, Liquid Hydrogen, Other; Propulsion--Gas Turbine, Nuclear, Advanced; Aerodynamics; Structures and Materials; Flight Performance Management; Advanced and Unconventional Systems; and Energy Efficient Operation.

  9. TIBER II/ETR final design report: Volume 3, 5. 0 Radiation safety and environment; 6. 0 Physics and technology R and D needs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1987-09-01

    This paper discusses the design of the TIBER II Tokamak. This particular volume discusses: safety and environmental requirements and design targets; accident analyses; personnel safety and maintenance exposure; effluent control; waste management and decommissioning; safety considerations in building design; and safety and environmental conclusions and recommendations. (LSP)

  10. International Space Station Human Behavior and Performance Competency Model: Volume II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Lacey

    2008-01-01

    This document further defines the behavioral markers identified in the document "Human Behavior and Performance Competency Model" Vol. I. The Human Behavior and Performance (HBP) competencies were recommended as requirements to participate in international long duration missions, and form the basis for determining the HBP training curriculum for long duration crewmembers. This document provides details, examples, knowledge areas, and affective skills to support the use of the HBP competencies in training and evaluation. This document lists examples and details specific to HBP competencies required of astronauts/cosmonauts who participate in ISS expedition and other international long-duration missions. Please note that this model does not encompass all competencies required. While technical competencies are critical for crewmembers, they are beyond the scope of this document. Additionally, the competencies in this model (and subsequent objectives) are not intended to limit the internal activities or training programs of any international partner.

  11. Limitation in tidal volume expansion partially determines the intensity of physical activity in COPD.

    PubMed

    Kortianou, Eleni A; Aliverti, Andrea; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Vasilopoulou, Maroula; Nasis, Ioannis; Asimakos, Andreas; Zakynthinos, Spyros; Vogiatzis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), reduced levels of daily physical activity are associated with the degree of impairment in lung, peripheral muscle, and central hemodynamic function. There is, however, limited evidence as to whether limitations in tidal volume expansion also, importantly, determine daily physical activity levels in COPD. Eighteen consecutive patients with COPD [9 active (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, FEV1: 1.59 ± 0.64 l) with an average daily movement intensity >1.88 m/s(2) and 9 less active patients (FEV1: 1.16 ± 0.41 l) with an average intensity <1.88 m/s(2)] underwent a 4-min treadmill test at a constant speed corresponding to each individual patient's average movement intensity, captured by a triaxial accelerometer during a preceding 7-day period. When chest wall volumes, captured by optoelectronic plethysmography, were expressed relative to comparable levels of minute ventilation (ranging between 14.5 ± 4.3 to 33.5 ± 4.4 l/min), active patients differed from the less active ones in terms of the lower increase in end-expiratory chest wall volume (by 0.15 ± 0.17 vs. 0.45 ± 0.21 l), the greater expansion in tidal volume (by 1.76 ± 0.58 vs. 1.36 ± 0.24 l), and the larger inspiratory reserve chest wall volume (IRVcw: by 0.81 ± 0.25 vs. 0.39 ± 0.27 l). IRVcw (r(2) = 0.420), expiratory flow (r(2) change = 0.174), and Borg dyspnea score (r(2) change = 0.123) emerged as the best contributors, accounting for 71.7% of the explained variance in daily movement intensity. Patients with COPD exhibiting greater ability to expand tidal volume and to maintain adequate inspiratory reserve volume tend to be more physically active. Thus interventions aiming at mitigating restrictions on operational chest wall volumes are expected to enhance daily physical activity levels in COPD. PMID:25398190

  12. Cranial location of level II lymph nodes in laryngeal cancer: Implications for elective nodal target volume delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Braam, Petra M. . E-mail: P.M.Braam@umcutrecht.nl; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Terhaard, Chris

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the cranial distribution of level II lymph nodes in patients with laryngeal cancer to optimize the elective radiation nodal target volume delineation. Methods and Materials: The most cranially located metastatic lymph node was delineated in 67 diagnostic CT data sets. The minimum distance from the base of the skull (BOS) to the lymph node was determined. Results: A total of 98 lymph nodes were delineated including 62 ipsilateral and 36 contralateral lymph nodes. The mean ipsilateral and contralateral distance from the top of the most cranial metastatic lymph node to the BOS was 36 mm (range, -9-120; standard deviation [SD], 17.9) and 35 mm (range, 14-78; SD 15.0), respectively. Only 5% and 12% of the ipsilateral and 3% and 9% of the contralateral metastatic lymph nodes were located within 15 mm and 20 mm below the BOS, respectively. No significant differences were found between patients with only ipsilateral metastatic lymph nodes and patients with bilateral metastatic lymph nodes. Between tumors that do cross the midline and those that do not, no significant difference was found in the distance of the most cranial lymph node to the BOS and the occurrence ipsilateral or contralateral. Conclusions: Setting the cranial border of the nodal target volume 1.5 cm below the base of the skull covers 95% of the lymph nodes and should be considered in elective nodal irradiation for laryngeal cancer. Bilateral neck irradiation is mandatory, including patients with unilateral laryngeal cancer, when elective irradiation is advised.

  13. Uptake, p53 Pathway Activation, and Cytotoxic Responses for Co(II) and Ni(II) in Human Lung Cells: Implications for Carcinogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Luczak, Michal W.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt(II) and nickel(II) ions display similar chemical properties and act as hypoxia mimics in cells. However, only soluble Co(II) but not soluble Ni(II) is carcinogenic by inhalation. To explore potential reasons for these differences, we examined responses of human lung cells to both metals. We found that Co(II) showed almost 8 times higher accumulation than Ni(II) in H460 cells but caused a less efficient activation of the transcriptional factor p53 as measured by its accumulation, Ser15 phosphorylation, and target gene expression. Unlike Ni(II), Co(II) was ineffective in downregulating the p53 inhibitor MDM4 (HDMX). Co(II)-treated cells continued DNA replication at internal doses that caused massive apoptosis by Ni(II). Apoptosis and the overall cell death by Co(II) were delayed and weaker than by Ni(II). Inhibition of caspases but not programmed necrosis pathways suppressed Co(II)-induced cell death. Knockdown of p53 produced 50%–60% decreases in activation of caspases 3/7 and expression of 2 most highly upregulated proapoptotic genes PUMA and NOXA by Co(II). Overall, p53-mediated apoptosis accounted for 55% cell death by Co(II), p53-independent apoptosis for 20%, and p53/caspase-independent mechanisms for 25%. Similar to H460, normal human lung fibroblasts and primary human bronchial epithelial cells had several times higher accumulation of Co(II) than Ni(II) and showed a delayed and weaker caspase activation by Co(II). Thus, carcinogenicity of soluble Co(II) could be related to high survival of metal-loaded cells, which permits accumulation of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. High cytotoxicity of soluble Ni(II) causes early elimination of damaged cells and is expected to be cancer suppressive. PMID:24068677

  14. Concurrent and Longitudinal Relationships Between Cognitive Activity, Cognitive Performance, and Brain Volume in Older Adult Women

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Kirk I.; Espeland, Mark A.; Smith, J. Carson; Tindle, Hilary A.; Rapp, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated (a) cross-sectional associations between cognitive activity, cognitive performance, and MRI measures and (b) longitudinal associations between cognitive activity and change in cognitive performance, using structural equation modeling (SEM). Method. Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS) Extension participants who continued annual neuropsychological assessments by telephone and completed a concurrent questionnaire of cognitive activities and MRI scans were included (mean age = 81.4 years; N = 393). Cognitive performance was measured by tests of attention, working memory, verbal fluency, executive function, and memory. Cognitive activity was measured by self-reported participation in a variety of cognitive activities (e.g., reading books, playing games, computer activities; N = 11 items) during the previous 12 months. MRI measures included gray and white matter normal and white matter lesion volumes. Results. SEM demonstrated a significant association between cognitive activity and baseline cognitive performance but not change over 2–3 years. Gray and white matter was associated with cognitive performance but not cognitive activity. All effects remained significant after modeling covariates (age, education, depressive symptoms, WHIMS intervention assignment, and intracranial volume). Conclusions. Cognitive activity benefits current cognitive performance but is not associated with change over 2–3 years. Cognitive activity and MRI volumes are independently associated with cognitive performance, suggesting distinct cognitive and brain reserve constructs. PMID:25209372

  15. Cognitively Engaging Activity Is Associated with Greater Cortical and Subcortical Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Seider, Talia R.; Fieo, Robert A.; O’Shea, Andrew; Porges, Eric C.; Woods, Adam J.; Cohen, Ronald A.

    2016-01-01

    As the population ages and dementia becomes a growing healthcare concern, it is increasingly important to identify targets for intervention to delay or attenuate cognitive decline. Research has shown that the most successful interventions aim at altering lifestyle factors. Thus, this study examined how involvement in physical, cognitive, and social activity is related to brain structure in older adults. Sixty-five adults (mean age = 71.4 years, standard deviation = 8.9) received the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS), a questionnaire that polls everyday activities in which older adults may be involved, and also underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging. Stepwise regression with backward selection was used to predict weekly time spent in either social, cognitive, light physical, or heavy physical activity from the volume of one of the cortical or subcortical regions of interest (corrected by intracranial volume) as well as age, education, and gender as control variables. Regressions revealed that more time spent in cognitive activity was associated with greater volumes of all brain regions studied: total cortex (β = 0.289, p = 0.014), frontal (β = 0.276, p = 0.019), parietal (β = 0.305, p = 0.009), temporal (β = 0.275, p = 0.020), and occipital (β = 0.256, p = 0.030) lobes, and thalamus (β = 0.310, p = 0.010), caudate (β = 0.233, p = 0.049), hippocampus (β = 0.286, p = 0.017), and amygdala (β = 0.336, p = 0.004). These effects remained even after accounting for the positive association between cognitive activity and education. No other activity variable was associated with brain volumes. Results indicate that time spent in cognitively engaging activity is associated with greater cortical and subcortical brain volume. Findings suggest that interventions aimed at increasing levels of cognitive activity may delay cognitive consequences of aging and decrease the risk of developing dementia. PMID:27199740

  16. Biomass energy technology annual technical progress report, FY 1982. Volume II. Technical summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The goal of the BET program is to conduct an integrated R and D program for feedstock production and conversion of organic materials to economically produce energy products that will significantly contribute to meeting long-term US energy needs. In feedstock production, laboratory investigations are being performed to reduce the risks associated with the production of microalgal oils that can be used for energy applications and high-value chemical substitutes. Research also is being done on the biochemical mechanisms that control hydrocarbon production by macroalgal species. There has been significant progress in the DOE Short-Rotation Woods Crops Program aimed at increasing yields of biomass through both improved traditional/conventional silvicultural techniques and short-rotation intensive culture. Studies that evaluate the potential of milkweed as an energy feedstock were completed in FY 1982. In thermochemical conversion, evaluations of a variety of high-performance gasification systems for producing medium-Btu gas and synthesis gas were concluded in FY 1982. Free market forces are expected to stimulate private sector interest in developing the technology and marketing needed to commercialize medium-Btu gasification systems. Medium-Btu gases have numerous beneficial industrial applications, and this technology is close to entry into the marketplace. Progress has been made in FY 1982 toward understanding the basic mechanisms and kinetics affecting the thermochemical processing of biomass through fast pyrolysis and direct liquefaction techniques. In biochemical conversion, fundamental research is being performed on the anaerobic digestion process. FY 1982 research activities also included laboratory-scale experiments on photobiological methods for hydrogen production. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each of the 3 program areas for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  17. Branched conformational properties of macromolecules in close relation to chemical synthesis. II. Influence of excluded volume interactions.

    PubMed

    Burchard, Walther; Schweins, Ralf; Werner, Marcel

    2015-09-21

    The description of perturbed particle conformations needs as a prerequisite the algorithm of unperturbed chains which is outlined in Paper I [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 114906 (2015)]. The mean square segment length ⟨r(2)(n)⟩=b(2)n(2ν) with ν = 0.588 for linear chains in a good solvent is used as an approximation also for branched samples. The mean square radius of gyration is easily derived, but for the hydrodynamic, the segment distribution by Domb et al. [Proc. Phys. Soc., London 85, 624 (1965)] is required. Both radii can analytically be expressed by Gamma functions. For the angular dependence of scattered light, the Fourier transform of the Domb distribution for self-avoiding random walk is needed, which cannot be obtained as an analytical function and was derived by numerical integration. The summation over all segment length in the particle was performed with an analytic fit-curve for the Fourier transform and was carried out numerically. Results were derived (i) for uniform and polydisperse linear chains, (ii) or f-functional randomly branched polymers and their monodisperse fractions, (iii) for random A3B2 co-polymers, and (iv) for AB2 hyper-branched samples. The deviation of the Gaussian approximation with the variance of ⟨r(2)(n)⟩=b(2)n(2ν) slightly overestimates the excluded volume interaction but still remains a fairly good approximation for region of qR(g) < 10.

  18. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

  19. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Volume II of the programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) is a comment and response document; it is the collection of the comments received on the draft PElS. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) response to each comment is provided after each comment. If the comment resulted in a change to the PElS, the affected section number of the PElS is provided in the response. Comments 1 through 259 were received at public hearings. The name of the hearing at which the comment was received is listed after each comment. Comments were recorded on flip charts and by notetakers. DOE representatives were present to hear the comments and respond to them. The DOE's written response is provided after each comment. Comments 260 through 576 were received in writing at the hearings, and from various federal, tribal, and state agencies and from individuals during the public comment period. Copies of the written comments follow the comments and responses.

  20. Alabama Children: A Matter of Commitment and Priority. Special Report to Governor Fob James and the Alabama Legislature. Volume I and Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Bobbie H.

    This report in two volumes is the product of a year-long needs assessment undertaken by the Governor of Alabama's Commission for the Alabama Year of the Child. Volume I, which contains an overview and recommendations to the governor and the legislature, includes position papers and letters from the commission and interested citizens. These…

  1. Influence of lung volume on phrenic, hypoglossal and mylohyoid nerve activities.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D; St John, W M

    1988-07-01

    In decerebrate, paralyzed cats, ventilated by a servo-respirator in accordance with phrenic nerve activity, we examined the influence of lung volume on the activities of the phrenic, hypoglossal and mylohyoid nerves. When lung inflation was briefly withheld, the durations of inspiration (TI) and expiration (TE) and the activities of all three nerves increased. The relative increase in hypoglossal activity greatly exceeded that of phrenic activity and was apparent earlier in the course of inspiration. This hypoglossal response was enhanced by hypercapnia and isocapnic hypoxia. The responses of mylohyoid activity were quite variable: withholding lung inflation augmented inspiratory activity in some cats, but expiratory discharge in others. Sustained increases in end-expiratory lung volume were induced by application of 3-4 cm H2O of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Steady-state PEEP did not influence nerve activities or the breathing pattern. Bilateral vagotomy increased TI, TE, and the activities of all three nerves. No response to withoholding lung inflation could be discerned after vagal section. The results provide further definition of the influence of vagally mediated, lung volume dependent reflexes on the control of upper airway muscles. These reflexes are well suited to relieve or prevent upper airway obstruction. PMID:3051235

  2. PBMC telomerase activity, but not leukocyte telomere length, correlates with hippocampal volume in major depression

    PubMed Central

    Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Mellon, Synthia H.; Lindqvist, Daniel; Epel, Elissa S.; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.; Lin, Jue; Reus, Victor I.; Burke, Heather; Rosser, Rebecca; Mahan, Laura; Mackin, Scott; Yang, Tony; Weiner, Michael; Mueller, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Accelerated cell aging, indexed in peripheral leukocytes by telomere length and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by telomerase activity, has been reported in several studies of major depressive disorder (MDD). However, the relevance of these peripheral measures for brain indices that are presumably more directly related to MDD pathophysiology is unknown. In this study, we explored the relationship between PBMC telomerase activity and leukocyte telomere length and magnetic resonance imaging-estimated hippocampal volume in un-medicated depressed individuals and healthy controls. We predicted that, to the extent peripheral and central telomerase activity are directly related, PBMC telomerase activity would be positively correlated with hippocampal volume, perhaps due to hippocampal telomerase-associated neurogenesis, neuroprotection or neurotrophic facilitation, and that this effect would be clearer in individuals with increased PBMC telomerase activity, as previously reported in un-medicated MDD. We did not have specific hypotheses regarding the relationship between leukocyte telomere length and hippocampal volume, due to conflicting reports in the published literature. We found, in 25 un-medicated MDD subjects, that PBMC telomerase activity was significantly positively correlated with hippocampal volume; this relationship was not observed in 18 healthy controls. Leukocyte telomere length was not significantly related to hippocampal volume in either group (19 unmedicated MDD subjects and 17 healthy controls). Although the nature of the relationship between peripheral telomerase activity and telomere length and the hippocampus is unclear, these preliminary data are consistent with the possibility that PBMC telomerase activity indexes, and may provide a novel window into, hippocampal neuroprotection and/or neurogenesis in MDD. PMID:25773002

  3. Synthesis, structural and biochemical activity studies of a new hexadentate Schiff base ligand and its Cu(II), Ni(II), and Co(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekmekcioglu, Pinar; Karabocek, Nevin; Karabocek, Serdar; Emirik, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    A new Schiff base ligand (H2L) and its metal complexes have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic moment and spectral studies. The comparative in-vitro antimicrobial activities against various pathogens with reference to known antibiotics activity under the standard control of different concentrations revealed that the metal complexes (6-8) showed enhanced antimicrobial activities in general as compared to free ligand. As an exception, the free ligand showed better activity against Trichoderma. The antifungal activity experiments were performed in triplicate. The order of biochemical activity for metal complexes were observed as in the following. CuL > CoL > NiL, which is exactly same as the order of stability constants of these complexes. Additionally, we performed DFT and TD-DFT calculation for free ligand and Cu(II) complex to support the experimental data. The geometries of the Cu(II) complex have been optimized using the B3LYP level of theory. The theoretical calculations confirm that the copper (II) center exhibits a distorted square pyramidal geometry which is favored by experimental results.

  4. Angiotensin II Stimulation of DPP4 Activity Regulates Megalin in the Proximal Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Aroor, Annayya; Zuberek, Marcin; Duta, Cornel; Meuth, Alex; Sowers, James R.; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Nistala, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Proteinuria is a marker of incipient kidney injury in many disorders, including obesity. Previously, we demonstrated that megalin, a receptor endocytotic protein in the proximal tubule, is downregulated in obese mice, which was prevented by inhibition of dipeptidyl protease 4 (DPP4). Obesity is thought to be associated with upregulation of intra-renal angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling via the Ang II Type 1 receptor (AT1R) and Ang II suppresses megalin expression in proximal tubule cells in vitro. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Ang II will suppress megalin protein via activation of DPP4. We used Ang II (200 ng/kg/min) infusion in mice and Ang II (10−8 M) treatment of T35OK-AT1R proximal tubule cells to test our hypothesis. Ang II-infused mouse kidneys displayed increases in DPP4 activity and decreases in megalin. In proximal tubule cells, Ang II stimulated DPP4 activity concurrent with suppression of megalin. MK0626, a DPP4 inhibitor, partially restored megalin expression similar to U0126, a mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor and AG1478, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor. Similarly, Ang II-induced ERK phosphorylation was suppressed with MK0626 and Ang II-induced DPP4 activity was suppressed by U0126. Therefore, our study reveals a cross talk between AT1R signaling and DPP4 activation in the regulation of megalin and underscores the significance of targeting DPP4 in the prevention of obesity related kidney injury progression. PMID:27213360

  5. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q. Ping

    2008-08-15

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC{sub 50} value of 13.8 {mu}M, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC{sub 50} 5.3 {mu}M). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells.

  6. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity.

    PubMed

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen, Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q Ping

    2008-08-15

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC(50) value of 13.8 microM, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC(50) 5.3 microM). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells. PMID:18501397

  7. Physical activity and memory functions: are neurotrophins and cerebral gray matter volume the missing link?

    PubMed

    Flöel, A; Ruscheweyh, R; Krüger, K; Willemer, C; Winter, B; Völker, K; Lohmann, H; Zitzmann, M; Mooren, F; Breitenstein, C; Knecht, S

    2010-02-01

    Epidemiological studies reveal better cognitive function in physically active individuals. Possible mediators for this effect are neurotrophins, which are up-regulated through physical exercise and induce neuronal growth and synaptogenesis in the animal model. Here we cross-sectionally assessed 75 healthy older individuals for levels of physical activity, aerobic fitness, and memory encoding, as well as neurotrophin levels and cerebral gray matter volume. We found that physical activity, but not cardiovascular fitness, was associated with better memory encoding after controlling for age, sex, education, depression, alcohol consumption, and smoking. Higher levels of physical activity were associated with higher levels of the neurotrophin granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and increased cerebral gray matter volume in prefrontal and cingulate cortex as assessed by magnetic resonance voxel-based morphometry. While mediating factors will need to be further elucidated, these findings indicate that even low-level physical activity exerts beneficial effects on memory functions in older individuals.

  8. In-vitro antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic activity of cobalt (II), copper (II), nickel (II) and zinc (II) complexes with furanylmethyl- and thienylmethyl-dithiolenes: [1, 3-dithiole- 2-one and 1,3-dithiole-2-thione].

    PubMed

    Chohan, Zahid H; Shaikh, Ali U; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2006-12-01

    Some antibacterial and antifungal furanylmethyl-and thienylmethyl dithiolenes and, their Co(II), Cu(II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) complexes have been synthesized, characterized and screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four Gram-negative; Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and Shigella flexeneri, and two Gram-positive; Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus bacterial strains, and for in-vitro antifungal activity against Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Candida glaberata. All compounds showed significant antibacterial and antifungal activity. The metal complexes, however, were shown to possess better activity as compared to the simple ligands. The brine shrimp bioassay was also carried out to study their in-vitro cytotoxic properties. PMID:17252947

  9. Vertebrate blood cell volume increases with temperature: implications for aerobic activity.

    PubMed

    Gillooly, James F; Zenil-Ferguson, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic activity levels increase with body temperature across vertebrates. Differences in these levels, from highly active to sedentary, are reflected in their ecology and behavior. Yet, the changes in the cardiovascular system that allow for greater oxygen supply at higher temperatures, and thus greater aerobic activity, remain unclear. Here we show that the total volume of red blood cells in the body increases exponentially with temperature across vertebrates, after controlling for effects of body size and taxonomy. These changes are accompanied by increases in relative heart mass, an indicator of aerobic activity. The results point to one way vertebrates may increase oxygen supply to meet the demands of greater activity at higher temperatures.

  10. Volume of Physical Activity and Injury Occurrence in Young Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Gianoudis, Jenny; Webster, Kate E.; Cook, Jill

    2008-01-01

    Participation in organised, competitive physical activity by young athletes is increasing rapidly. This is concurrent with an increase in sporting injuries in the young population. This pilot study aimed to compare the weekly volume and types of physical activity in young basketball players injured and not injured during the season. Detailed physical activity and injury data were prospectively collected in 46 school-level basketball players aged 14 to 18 years. Participants completed physical activity logs which documented the type of physical activity undertaken, what the activity consisted of (i.e. training, competition) and the level at which it was played on a daily basis. Allied health staff completed a weekly injury form. Results showed that injured and uninjured athletes participated in a similar volume of total weekly physical activity over the season. However, injured athletes (p = 0.04) and athletes who specifically sustained overuse injuries (p = 0.01) participated in a greater amount of basketball refereeing than uninjured athletes. Based on these findings it was concluded that greater participation in running-type physical activity such as refereeing, as an addition to training and competition, may predispose the young basketball player to increased injury risk. Future research using larger sample sizes are required to further investigate the role of participation volume and type on injury occurrence in adolescent athletes. Key points Basketball players participating in larger amounts of running-type physical activity, in addition to regular training and competition, may be predisposed to overuse injury Future studies using larger sample sizes are required to investigate the precise volumes of physical activity that increase injury risk This would assist in the development of participation guidelines to decrease the current injury rates observed in the young athletic population. PMID:24150146

  11. Volume of physical activity and injury occurrence in young basketball players.

    PubMed

    Gianoudis, Jenny; Webster, Kate E; Cook, Jill

    2008-01-01

    Participation in organised, competitive physical activity by young athletes is increasing rapidly. This is concurrent with an increase in sporting injuries in the young population. This pilot study aimed to compare the weekly volume and types of physical activity in young basketball players injured and not injured during the season. Detailed physical activity and injury data were prospectively collected in 46 school-level basketball players aged 14 to 18 years. Participants completed physical activity logs which documented the type of physical activity undertaken, what the activity consisted of (i.e. training, competition) and the level at which it was played on a daily basis. Allied health staff completed a weekly injury form. Results showed that injured and uninjured athletes participated in a similar volume of total weekly physical activity over the season. However, injured athletes (p = 0.04) and athletes who specifically sustained overuse injuries (p = 0.01) participated in a greater amount of basketball refereeing than uninjured athletes. Based on these findings it was concluded that greater participation in running-type physical activity such as refereeing, as an addition to training and competition, may predispose the young basketball player to increased injury risk. Future research using larger sample sizes are required to further investigate the role of participation volume and type on injury occurrence in adolescent athletes. Key pointsBasketball players participating in larger amounts of running-type physical activity, in addition to regular training and competition, may be predisposed to overuse injuryFuture studies using larger sample sizes are required to investigate the precise volumes of physical activity that increase injury riskThis would assist in the development of participation guidelines to decrease the current injury rates observed in the young athletic population.

  12. Synthesis, Characterization, Spectral Studies and Antifungal Activity of Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) Complexes with 2-(4- Sulphophenylazo)-1,8-Dihydroxy-3,6-Napthalene Disulphonic Acid Trisodium Salt

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Gajanan; Narang, K. K.

    2005-01-01

    Complexes of the type Na6[M(HL)2(H2O)2], where M= Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) and Na3H2L= 2-(4-sulphophenylazo)-1,8-dihydroxy 3,6 naphthalene disulphonic acid trisodium salt, have been synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical (elemental analyses, solubility, electrolytic conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurement) and spectral (UV-Visible, IR, ESR, powder x-ray diffraction) techniques for their structure and studied for their antifungal activity against ten fungi. The anionic 1:2 metal:ligand complexes show octahedral geometry around M(II), a significant antifungal activity against Curvularia lunata and Alternaria triticina and a moderate activity against Alternaria brassicicola, Alternaria brassicae, Alternaria solanae, Curvularia species, Helminthosporium oryzae, Collectotrichum capsici, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium udum. PMID:18365101

  13. Alkyl sulfonic acide hydrazides: Synthesis, characterization, computational studies and anticancer, antibacterial, anticarbonic anhydrase II (hCA II) activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O. Ozdemir, Ummuhan; İlbiz, Firdevs; Balaban Gunduzalp, Ayla; Ozbek, Neslihan; Karagoz Genç, Zuhal; Hamurcu, Fatma; Tekin, Suat

    2015-11-01

    Methane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3SO2NHNH2 (1), ethane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3CH2SO2NHNH2 (2), propane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3CH2CH2SO2NHNH2 (3) and butane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3CH2CH2CH2SO2NHNH2 (4) have been synthesized as homologous series and characterized by using elemental analysis, spectrophotometric methods (1H-13C NMR, FT-IR, LC-MS). In order to gain insight into the structure of the compounds, we have performed computational studies by using 6-311G(d, p) functional in which B3LYP functional were implemented. The geometry of the sulfonic acide hydrazides were optimized at the DFT method with Gaussian 09 program package. A conformational analysis of compounds were performed by using NMR theoretical calculations with DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(2d, 2p) level of theory by applying the (GIAO) approach. The anticancer activities of these compounds on MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line investigated by comparing IC50 values. The antibacterial activities of synthesized compounds were studied against Gram positive bacteria; Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Bacillus cereus NRRL-B-3711, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 and Gram negative bacteria; Escherichia coli ATCC 11230, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Klebsiella pneumonia ATCC 70063 by using the disc diffusion method. The inhibition activities of these compounds on carbonic anhydrase II enzyme (hCA II) have been investigated by comparing IC50 and Ki values. The biological activity screening shows that butane sulfonic acide hydrazide (4) has more activity than the others against tested breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, Gram negative/Gram positive bacteria and carbonic anhydrase II (hCA II) isoenzyme.

  14. On Teaching. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Mary Ann, Ed.

    This collection of essays, which evolved from the Professional Lecture Series on Teaching and Learning and Instructional Workshops on Teaching and Learning held at the University of Colorado (Boulder), addresses a variety of styles and situations for teaching and learning. The following essays are included: (1) "Teaching as Architecture:…

  15. DNA systematics. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: PLANTS: PLANT DNA: Contents and Systematics. Repeated DNA Sequences and Polyploidy in Cereal Crops. Homology of Nonrepeated DNA Sequences in Phylogeny of Fungal Species. Chloropast DNA and Phylogenetic Relationships. rDNA: Evolution Over a Billion Years. 23S rRNA-derived Small Ribosomal RNAs: Their Structure and Evolution with Reference to Plant Phylogeny. Molecular Analysis of Plant DNA Genomes: Conserved and Diverged DNA Sequences. A Critical Review of Some Terminologies Used for Additional DNA in Plant Chromosomes and Index.

  16. Agricultural Structures, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhardt, Richard E.; Burhoe, Steve

    This guide to a curriculum unit in agricultural structures is designed to expand the curriculum materials available in vocational agriculture in Missouri. It and Agricultural Structures I (see note) provide reference materials to systematize the curriculum. The six units cover working with concrete (19 lessons, 2 laboratory exercises), drawing and…

  17. Antimicrobial activity of the synthetic peptide scolopendrasin ii from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Nam; Lee, Joon Ha; Kim, In-Woo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Yun, Eun-Young; Nam, Sung-Hee; Ahn, Mi-Young; Jeong, Mihye; Kang, Dong-Chul; Lee, In Hee; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2013-10-28

    The centipede Scolopendra subpinipes mutilans is a medicinally important arthropod species. However, its transcriptome is not currently available and transcriptome analysis would be useful in providing insight into a molecular level approach. Hence, we performed de novo RNA sequencing of S. subpinipes mutilans using next-generation sequencing. We generated a novel peptide (scolopendrasin II) based on a SVM algorithm, and biochemically evaluated the in vitro antimicrobial activity of scolopendrasin II against various microbes. Scolopendrasin II showed antibacterial activities against gram-positive and -negative bacterial strains, including the yeast Candida albicans and antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacteria, as determined by a radial diffusion assay and colony count assay without hemolytic activity. In addition, we confirmed that scolopendrasin II bound to the surface of bacteria through a specific interaction with lipoteichoic acid and a lipopolysaccharide, which was one of the bacterial cell-wall components. In conclusion, our results suggest that scolopendrasin II may be useful for developing peptide antibiotics.

  18. Angiotensin II and norepinephrine activate specific calcineurin-dependent NFAT transcription factor isoforms in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Ida G; Kvaløy, Heidi; Austbø, Bjørg; Christensen, Geir; Carlson, Cathrine R

    2011-11-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) and angiotensin II (ANG II) are primary effectors of the sympathetic adrenergic and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems, mediating hypertrophic, apoptotic, and fibrotic events in the myocardium. As NE and ANG II have been shown to affect intracellular calcium in cardiomyocytes, we hypothesized that they activate the calcium-sensitive, prohypertrophic calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFATc) signaling pathway. More specifically, we have investigated isoform-specific activation of NFAT in NE- and ANG II-stimulated cardiomyocytes, as it is likely that each of the four calcineurin-dependent isoforms, c1-c4, play specific roles. We have stimulated neonatal ventriculocytes from C57/B6 and NFAT-luciferase reporter mice with ANG II or NE and quantified NFAT activity by luciferase activity and phospho-immunoblotting. ANG II and NE increased calcineurin-dependent NFAT activity 2.4- and 1.9-fold, measured as luciferase activity after 24 h of stimulation, and induced protein synthesis, measured by radioactive leucine incorporation after 24 and 72 h. To optimize measurements of NFAT isoforms, we examined the specificity of NFAT antibodies on peptide arrays and by immunoblotting with designed blocking peptides. Western analyses showed that both effectors activate NFATc1 and c4, while NFATc2 activity was regulated by NE only, as measured by phospho-NFAT levels. Neither ANG II nor NE activated NFATc3. As today's main therapies for heart failure aim at antagonizing the adrenergic and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems, understanding their intracellular actions is of importance, and our data, through validating a method for measuring myocardial NFATs, indicate that ANG II and NE activate specific NFATc isoforms in cardiomyocytes.

  19. [Relation between neck accessory inspiratory muscle electromyographic activity and lung volume].

    PubMed

    Masubuchi, Y; Abe, T; Yokoba, M; Yamada, T; Katagiri, M; Tomita, T

    2001-04-01

    Years ago it was reported that, as lung volume increased, there was a corresponding increase in scalene EMG activity (Raper et al. J Appl Physiol 21: 497-502, 1966). Otherwise, the relationship between changing lung volume and the EMG of the respiratory muscles has not been defined. We therefore inserted fine wire electrodes into the scalene (SCLN), sternocleidomastoid (STERNO), and trapezius (TRAPEZ) muscles in 6 healthy subjects under direct vision using high-resolution ultrasound. Maximum EMG activity (EMGmax) was obtained for each muscle by a variety of respiratory and postural maneuvers. Then, in the standing posture, air flow, raw and moving average EMG signals were sampled and input to a computer during quasi-static inspiration from functional residual capacity (FRC) to total lung capacity (TLC). We found that the relationship between EMG and lung volume for SCLN, but not for STERNO or TRAPEZ, was expressed by exponential curves. The onset of SCLN, STERNO and TRAPEZ EMG occurred at 13.3 +/- 7.4 (mean +/- SE), 67.8 +/- 14.6, and 89.2 +/- 3.9% of inspiratory capacity. The EMG of SCLN, STERNO, TRAPEZ, reached 85.7 +/- 2.6, 60.7 +/- 8.6, and 11.8 +/- 5.2% of EMGmax, respectively, at TLC. We conclude that: 1) SCLN is the most, and TRAPEZ the least, active neck accessory inspiratory muscle, while STERNO is intermediate, and 2) there is a lung volume dependency of the neck accessory muscle EMG activity.

  20. Organelle size control - increasing vacuole content activates SNAREs to augment organelle volume through homotypic fusion.

    PubMed

    Desfougères, Yann; Neumann, Heinz; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-07-15

    Cells control the size of their compartments relative to cell volume, but there is also size control within each organelle. Yeast vacuoles neither burst nor do they collapse into a ruffled morphology, indicating that the volume of the organellar envelope is adjusted to the amount of content. It is poorly understood how this adjustment is achieved. We show that the accumulating content of yeast vacuoles activates fusion of other vacuoles, thus increasing the volume-to-surface ratio. Synthesis of the dominant compound stored inside vacuoles, polyphosphate, stimulates binding of the chaperone Sec18/NSF to vacuolar SNAREs, which activates them and triggers fusion. SNAREs can only be activated by lumenal, not cytosolic, polyphosphate (polyP). Control of lumenal polyP over SNARE activation in the cytosol requires the cytosolic cyclin-dependent kinase Pho80-Pho85 and the R-SNARE Nyv1. These results suggest that cells can adapt the volume of vacuoles to their content through feedback from the vacuole lumen to the SNAREs on the cytosolic surface of the organelle.

  1. Creatine Kinase Activity Weakly Correlates to Volume Completed Following Upper Body Resistance Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Marco; Willardson, Jeffrey M.; Silva, Dailson P.; Frigulha, Italo C.; Koch, Alexander J.; Souza, Sergio C.

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the relationship between serum creatine kinase (CK) activity following upper body resistance exercise with a 1- or 3-min rest between sets. Twenty men performed two sessions, each consisting of four sets with a 10-repetition maximum load. The results demonstrated significantly greater volume for the 3-min…

  2. Synthesis, characterization, biological activity of binuclear Co(II), Cu(II) and mononuclear Ni(II) complexes of bulky multi-dentate thiosemicarbazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, O. A.; Abd Al-Gader, I. M.; El-Asmy, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    The chelation behavior of 9,10-dihydro-9,10-ethanoanthracene-11,12-dicarbonyl) bis (N-ethylhydrazine-1-carbothioamide) (H6ETS)(1) towards Co2+, Ni2+and Cu2+ have been studied. The spectral data revealed that the ligand acts as a bi- and/or mono-negative multi-dentate. The isolated Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes are square-planar while the Co(II) is tetrahedral. EPR spectrum of Cu(II) complex confirmed simulated an axial spin-Hamiltonian exhibiting a four-line pattern with nitrogen super-hyperfine couplings originating from imine hydrazinic nitrogen atoms and possess a significant amount of tetrahedral distortion leading to a pseudo-square-planar geometry with unpaired electron has d ground state. Also, the thermal behavior and kinetic parameters were determined. Furthermore, the title compounds were investigated for their antibacterial activity using inhibition zone diameter and for DNA degradation, superoxide-scavenging activity as well as hydroxyl radicals that generated by the oxidation of cytochrome c in L-ascorbic acid/CuSO4-cytochrome c system.

  3. Class II: a comparison of activator and activator headgear combination appliances.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Y; Tankuter, N

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate skeletal and dental effects of activator and activator high-pull headgear combination appliances on growing patients with Class II, division 1 malocclusion. The material consisted of pre- and post-treatment cephalograms of 17 boys and 20 girls. Seventeen patients (eight male and nine female) were treated with an activator, the remaining 20 (9 male and 11 female) were treated with an activator high-pull headgear combination (AHGC) appliance. Changes due to treatment were compared with a group of 19 (nine male and ten female) untreated children. ANB angle was significantly reduced and mandibular growth development was favourable in both treatment groups. The AHGC appliance was more effective in the reduction of the maxillary prognathism. An increase of the anterior facial height and clockwise rotation of the occlusal plane was observed in the patients treated with activator appliance. The cant of the mandibular plane remained stable during both treatment periods. On the other hand, the forward displacement of the upper first molars was reduced significantly and the axial inclination of the lower incisors was controlled much better with the AHGC appliance.

  4. Educacion al Aire Libre: Libro de Actividades II = Outdoor Education: Student Activity Book II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ada, Alma Flor, Comp.; And Others

    Divided into four sections, the book includes activities for students to do before camp, on the way to camp, at camp, and after camp. Activities to do before camp include writing proverbs, tongue twisters, riddles, poems, and stories. Activities to do on the way to camp include singing songs and reading a map. The words to the following songs are…

  5. The Fe II Emission in Active Galactic Nuclei: Excitation Mechanisms and Location of the Emitting Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinello, M.; Rodríguez-Ardila, A.; Garcia-Rissmann, A.; Sigut, T. A. A.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    We present a study of Fe ii emission in the near-infrared region (NIR) for 25 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to obtain information about the excitation mechanisms that power it and the location where it is formed. We employ an NIR Fe ii template derived in the literature and find that it successfully reproduces the observed Fe ii spectrum. The Fe ii bump at 9200 Å detected in all objects studied confirms that Lyα fluorescence is always present in AGNs. The correlation found between the flux of the 9200 Å bump, the 1 μm lines, and the optical Fe ii implies that Lyα fluorescence plays an important role in Fe ii production. We determined that at least 18% of the optical Fe ii is due to this process, while collisional excitation dominates the production of the observed Fe ii. The line profiles of Fe ii λ10502, O i λ11287, Ca ii λ8664, and Paβ were compared to gather information about the most likely location where they are emitted. We found that Fe ii, O i and Ca ii have similar widths and are, on average, 30% narrower than Paβ. Assuming that the clouds emitting the lines are virialized, we show that the Fe ii is emitted in a region twice as far from the central source than Paβ. The distance, though, strongly varies: from 8.5 light-days for NGC 4051 to 198.2 light-days for Mrk 509. Our results reinforce the importance of the Fe ii in the NIR to constrain critical parameters that drive its physics and the underlying AGN kinematics, as well as more accurate models aimed at reproducing this complex emission.

  6. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, DNA interaction and biological activities of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with [(1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-ylimino)methyl]naphthalene-2-ol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaber, Mohamed; El-Wakiel, Nadia A.; El-Ghamry, Hoda; Fathalla, Shaimaa K.

    2014-11-01

    Manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes of [(1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-ylimino)methyl]naphthalene-2-ol have been synthesized. The structure of complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moment measurements and spectral (IR, 1H NMR, EI-mass, UV-Vis and ESR), and thermal studies. The results showed that the chloro and nitrato Cu(II) complexes have octahedral geometry while Ni(II), Co(II) and Mn(II) complexes in addition to acetato Cu(II) complex have tetrahedral geometry. The possible structures of the metal complexes have been computed using the molecular mechanic calculations using the hyper chem. 8.03 molecular modeling program to confirm the proposed structures. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the thermal decomposition steps were calculated from the TG curves. The binding modes of the complexes with DNA have been investigated by UV-Vis absorption titration. The results showed that the mode of binding of the complexes to DNA is intercalative or non-intercalative binding modes. Schiff base and its metal complexes have been screened for their in vitro antimicrobial activities against Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pesudomonas aeruginosa), fungi (Asperigllus flavus and Mucer) and yeast (Candida albicans and Malassezia furfur).

  7. Native Hawaiians Study Commission: Report on the Culture, Needs and Concerns of Native Hawaiians. Final Report. Volume II. Claims of Conscience: A Dissenting Study of the Culture, Needs and Concerns of Native Hawaiians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Interior, Washington, DC.

    Volume II of the final report of the Native Hawaiians Study Commission (NHSC) on the culture, needs, and concerns of native Hawaiians, this book contains a formal dissent to the conclusions and recommendations presented in Volume I made by three of the NHSC commissioners. Its principal criticism is that Volume I fails to address the underlying…

  8. Designing Studies of Extension Program Results: A Resource for Program Leaders and Specialists. Volume II--Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, William M., Ed.; And Others

    These abstracts of 42 studies of extension program results, which make up the second volume of a two-volume resource, are intended to advise state administrative program leaders and others with program evaluation responsibilities of how to design studies of cooperative extension programs. Designed to support volume I, which refers to these…

  9. BDNF val66met affects hippocampal volume and emotion-related hippocampal memory activity.

    PubMed

    Molendijk, M L; van Tol, M-J; Penninx, B W J H; van der Wee, N J A; Aleman, A; Veltman, D J; Spinhoven, P; Elzinga, B M

    2012-01-31

    The val(66)met polymorphism on the BDNF gene has been reported to explain individual differences in hippocampal volume and memory-related activity. These findings, however, have not been replicated consistently and no studies to date controlled for the potentially confounding impact of early life stress, such as childhood abuse, and psychiatric status. Using structural and functional MRI, we therefore investigated in 126 depressed and/or anxious patients and 31 healthy control subjects the effects of val(66)met on hippocampal volume and encoding activity of neutral, positive and negative words, while taking into account childhood abuse and psychiatric status. Our results show slightly lower hippocampal volumes in carriers of a met allele (n=54) relative to val/val homozygotes (n=103) (P=0.02, effect size (Cohen's d)=0.37), which appeared to be independent of childhood abuse and psychiatric status. For hippocampal encoding activity, we found a val(66)met-word valence interaction (P=0.02) such that carriers of a met allele showed increased levels of activation in response to negative words relative to activation in the neutral word condition and relative to val/val homozygotes. This, however, was only evident in the absence of childhood abuse, as abused val/val homozygotes showed hippocampal encoding activity for negative words that was comparable to that of carriers of a met allele. Neither psychiatric status nor memory accuracy did account for these associations. In conclusion, BDNF val(66)met has a significant impact on hippocampal volume independently of childhood abuse and psychiatric status. Furthermore, early adverse experiences such as childhood abuse account for individual differences in hippocampal encoding activity of negative stimuli but this effect manifests differently as a function of val(66)met.

  10. Plasma volume, osmolality, vasopressin, and renin activity during graded exercise in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Keil, L. C.; Bernauer, E. M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of work intensity on plasma volume, osmolality, vasopressin and renin activity and the interrelationships between these responses are investigated. Plasma volume, renin activity and osmotic, sodium and arginine vasopressin concentrations were measured in venous blood samples taken from 15 healthy male subjects before and after six minutes of bicycle ergometer exercise at 100, 175 and 225 W. Plasma volume is found to decrease significantly with increasing work intensity, while increases in Na(+) concentration, osmolality and vasopressin are only observed to be significant when the work intensity exceeds 40% maximal aerobic capacity and plasma resin activity increased linearly at all work levels. In addition, significant correlations are observed between plasma volume and osmolality and sodium changes, and between vasopressin and osmolality and sodium content changes. Data thus support the hypotheses that (1) vasopressin may be the primary controlling endocrine for fluid and electrolyte levels following exercise; (2) an exercise intensity greater than 40% maximal aerobic capacity is required to stimulate vasopressin release through changes in plasma osmolality; and (3) the stimulation of the renin-angiotensin system is a more general stress response.

  11. Performance of Spent Mushroom Farming Waste (SMFW) Activated Carbon for Ni (II) Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desa, N. S. Md; Ghani, Z. Ab; Talib, S. Abdul; Tay, C. C.

    2016-07-01

    The feasibility of a low cost agricultural waste of spent mushroom farming waste (SMFW) activated carbon for Ni(II) removal was investigated. The batch adsorption experiments of adsorbent dosage, pH, contact time, metal concentration, and temperature were determined. The samples were shaken at 125 rpm, filtered and analyzed using ICP-OES. The fifty percent of Ni(II) removal was obtained at 0.63 g of adsorbent dosage, pH 5-6 (unadjusted), 60 min contact time, 50 mg/L Ni(II) concentration and 25 °C temperature. The evaluated SMFW activated carbon showed the highest performance on Ni(II) removal compared to commercial Amberlite IRC86 resin and zeolite NK3. The result indicated that SMFW activated carbon is a high potential cation exchange adsorbent and suitable for adsorption process for metal removal. The obtained results contribute toward application of developed SMFW activated carbon in industrial pilot study.

  12. Momentary Affective States Are Associated with Momentary Volume, Prospective Trends, and Fluctuation of Daily Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kanning, Martina K.; Schoebi, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Several interventions aiming to enhance physical activity in everyday life showed mixed effects. Affective constructs are thought to potentially support health behavior change. However, little is known about within-subject associations between momentary affect and subsequent physical activity in everyday life. This study analyzed the extent to which three dimensions of affective states (valence, calmness, and energetic arousal) were associated with different components of daily activity trajectories. Sixty-five undergraduates’ students (Age: M = 24.6; SD = 3.2; females: 57%) participated in this study. Physical activity was assessed objectively through accelerometers during 24 h. Affective states assessments were conducted randomly every 45 min using an e-diary with a six-item mood scale that was especially designed for ambulatory assessment. We conducted three-level multi-level analyses to investigate the extent to which momentary affect accounted for momentary volume, prospective trends, and stability vs. fluctuation of physical activity in everyday life. All three affect dimensions were significantly associated with momentary activity volumes and prospective trends over 45 min periods. Physical activity didn’t fluctuate freely, but featured significant autocorrelation across repeated measurements, suggesting some stability of physical activity across 5-min assessments. After adjusting for the autoregressive structure in physical activity assessments, only energetic arousal remained a significant predictor. Feeling energized and awake was associated with an increased momentary volume of activity and initially smaller but gradually growing decreases in subsequent activity within the subsequent 45 min. Although not related to trends in physical activity, higher valence predicted lower stability in physical activity across subsequent 45 min, suggesting more short-term fluctuations in daily activity the more participants reported positive affective valence. The

  13. DNA Binding, Cleavage and Antibacterial Activity of Mononuclear Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) Complexes Derived from Novel Benzothiazole Schiff Bases.

    PubMed

    Vamsikrishna, Narendrula; Kumar, Marri Pradeep; Tejaswi, Somapangu; Rambabu, Aveli; Shivaraj

    2016-07-01

    A series of novel bivalent metal complexes M(L1)2 and M(L2)2 where M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and L1 = 2-((benzo [d] thiazol-6-ylimino)methyl)-4-bromophenol [BTEMBP], L2 = 1-((benzo [d] thiazol-6-ylimino)methyl) naphthalen-2-ol [BTEMNAPP] were synthesized. All the compounds have been characterized by elemental analysis, SEM, Mass, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, UV-Vis, IR, ESR, spectral data and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Based on the analytical and spectral data four-coordinated square planar geometry is assigned to all the complexes. DNA binding properties of these complexes have been investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. It is observed that these binary complexes strongly bind to calf thymus DNA by an intercalation mode. DNA cleavage efficacy of these complexes was tested in presence of H2O2 and UV light by gel electrophoresis and found that all the complexes showed better nuclease activity. Finally the compounds were screened for antibacterial activity against few pathogens and found that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than their free ligands.

  14. Physical activity and inflammation: effects on gray-matter volume and cognitive decline in aging.

    PubMed

    Papenberg, Goran; Ferencz, Beata; Mangialasche, Francesca; Mecocci, Patrizia; Cecchetti, Roberta; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Fratiglioni, Laura; Bäckman, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Physical activity has been positively associated with gray-matter integrity. In contrast, pro-inflammatory cytokines seem to have negative effects on the aging brain and have been related to dementia. It was investigated whether an inactive lifestyle and high levels of inflammation resulted in smaller gray-matter volumes and predicted cognitive decline across 6 years in a population-based study of older adults (n = 414). Self-reported physical activity (fitness-enhancing, health-enhancing, inadequate) was linked to gray-matter volume, such that individuals with inadequate physical activity had the least gray matter. There were no overall associations between different pro-and anti-inflammatory markers (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, G-CSF, and TNF-α) and gray-matter integrity. However, persons with inadequate activity and high levels of the pro-inflammatory marker IL-12p40 had smaller volumes of lateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus and declined more on the Mini-Mental State Examination test over 6 years compared with physically inactive individuals with low levels of IL-12p40 and to more physically active persons, irrespective of their levels of IL-12p40. These patterns of data suggested that inflammation was particularly detrimental in inactive older adults and may exacerbate the negative effects of physical inactivity on brain and cognition in old age. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3462-3473, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Single molecule microscopy reveals mechanistic insight into RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex assembly and transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Abigail E.; Kugel, Jennifer F.; Goodrich, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a complex process that requires general transcription factors and Pol II to assemble on DNA into preinitiation complexes that can begin RNA synthesis upon binding of NTPs (nucleoside triphosphate). The pathways by which preinitiation complexes form, and how this impacts transcriptional activity are not completely clear. To address these issues, we developed a single molecule system using TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) microscopy and purified human transcription factors, which allows us to visualize transcriptional activity at individual template molecules. We see that stable interactions between polymerase II (Pol II) and a heteroduplex DNA template do not depend on general transcription factors; however, transcriptional activity is highly dependent upon TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF. We also found that subsets of general transcription factors and Pol II can form stable complexes that are precursors for functional transcription complexes upon addition of the remaining factors and DNA. Ultimately we found that Pol II, TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF can form a quaternary complex in the absence of promoter DNA, indicating that a stable network of interactions exists between these proteins independent of promoter DNA. Single molecule studies can be used to learn how different modes of preinitiation complex assembly impact transcriptional activity. PMID:27112574

  16. Catalase-like activity studies of the manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ćiçek, Ekrem; Dede, Bülent

    2013-12-01

    Preparation of manganese(II) adsorbed on zeolite 3A, 4A, 5A. AW-300, ammonium Y zeolite, organophilic, molecular sieve and catalase-like enzyme activity of manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites are reported herein. Firstly zeolites are activated at 873 K for two hours before contact manganese(II) ions. In order to observe amount of adsorption, filtration process applied for the solution. The pure zeolites and manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites were analysed by FT-IR. As a result according to the FT-IR spectra, the incorporation of manganese(II) cation into the zeolite structure causes changes in the spectra. These changes are expected particularly in the pseudolattice bands connected with the presence of alumino and silicooxygen tetrahedral rings in the zeolite structure. Furthermore, the catalytic activities of the Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide were investigated in the presence of imidazole. The Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites display efficiency in the disproportion reactions of hydrogen peroxide, producing water and dioxygen in catalase-like activity.

  17. Improving vagal activity ameliorates cardiac fibrosis induced by angiotensin II: in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Jun; Huang, Ning; Lu, Yi; Zhao, Mei; Yu, Xiao-Jiang; Yang, Yang; Yang, Yong-hua; Zang, Wei-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is characterized by overactivity of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and withdrawal of vagal activity. We hypothesized that improving vagal activity could attenuate cardiac fibrosis induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) in vivo and in vitro. Rats were subjected to abdominal aorta constriction (AAC) with or without pyridostigmine (PYR) (31 mg/kg/d). After 8 weeks, PYR significantly decreased Ang II level, AT1 protein expression, and collagen deposition in cardiac tissue and improved heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity and cardiac function, which were abolished by atropine. In vitro, treatment of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) with Ang II (10−7 M) increased cell proliferation, migration, transformation, and secretory properties, which were significantly diminished by acetylcholine (ACh, 10−6 M). Subsequently, Ang II significantly increased collagen type I expression as well as metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 expression and activity. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression and Smad3 phosphorylation presented a similar trend. Notably, the knockdown of the acetylcholine M2 receptor by siRNA could abolish ACh anti-fibrotic action. These data implicated cholinesterase inhibitor can increase vagal activity and reduce local Ang II level, and ACh inhibit Ang II pro-fibrotic effects. Our findings suggested that the parasympathetic nervous system can serve as a promising target for cardiac remodeling treatment. PMID:26596640

  18. Creating a Sacred Place To Support Young American Indian and Other Learners in Grades K-3. Volume I. 2nd Edition [and] Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sandra J.

    This two-volume guide presents ingredients for developing a culturally relevant curriculum for American Indian students in the primary grades. A survey of Indian literature for young children yielded eight topic areas included here. The suggested approach to curriculum development is the integration of reading, language arts, math, and science…

  19. Class II HDAC Inhibition Hampers Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation by Induction of MicroRNA-29

    PubMed Central

    Mannaerts, Inge; Eysackers, Nathalie; Onyema, Oscar O.; Van Beneden, Katrien; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello; Odenthal, Margarete; van Grunsven, Leo A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The conversion of a quiescent vitamin A storing hepatic stellate cell (HSC) to a matrix producing, contractile myofibroblast-like activated HSC is a key event in the onset of liver disease following injury of any aetiology. Previous studies have shown that class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are involved in the phenotypical changes occurring during stellate cell activation in liver and pancreas. Aims In the current study we investigate the role of class II HDACs during HSC activation. Methods We characterized the expression of the class II HDACs freshly isolated mouse HSCs. We inhibited HDAC activity by selective pharmacological inhibition with MC1568, and by repressing class II HDAC gene expression using specific siRNAs. Results Inhibition of HDAC activity leads to a strong reduction of HSC activation markers α-SMA, lysyl oxidase and collagens as well as an inhibition of cell proliferation. Knock down experiments showed that HDAC4 contributes to HSC activation by regulating lysyl oxidase expression. In addition, we observed a strong up regulation of miR-29, a well-known anti-fibrotic miR, upon treatment with MC1568. Our in vivo work suggests that a successful inhibition of class II HDACs could be promising for development of future anti-fibrotic compounds. Conclusions In conclusion, the use of MC1568 has enabled us to identify a role for class II HDACs regulating miR-29 during HSC activation. PMID:23383282

  20. Inhibition of dihydroceramide desaturase activity by the sphingosine kinase inhibitor SKI II.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Francesca; Casasampere, Mireia; Sanllehí, Pol; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Fabrias, Gemma

    2014-08-01

    Sphingosine kinase inhibitor (SKI) II has been reported as a dual inhibitor of sphingosine kinases (SKs) 1 and 2 and has been extensively used to prove the involvement of SKs and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in cellular processes. Dihydroceramide desaturase (Des1), the last enzyme in the de novo synthesis of ceramide (Cer), regulates the balance between dihydroceramides (dhCers) and Cers. Both SKs and Des1 have interest as therapeutic targets. Here we show that SKI II is a noncompetitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.3 μM) of Des1 activity with effect also in intact cells without modifying Des1 protein levels. Molecular modeling studies support that the SKI II-induced decrease in Des1 activity could result from inhibition of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. SKI II, but not the SK1-specific inhibitor PF-543, provoked a remarkable accumulation of dhCers and their metabolites, while both SKI II and PF-543 reduced S1P to almost undetectable levels. SKI II, but not PF543, reduced cell proliferation with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. SKI II, but not PF543, induced autophagy. These overall findings should be taken into account when using SKI II as a pharmacological tool, as some of the effects attributed to decreased S1P may actually be caused by augmented dhCers and/or their metabolites.

  1. Timing of ectocranial suture activity in Gorilla gorilla as related to cranial volume and dental eruption.

    PubMed

    Cray, James; Cooper, Gregory M; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2011-05-01

    Research has shown that Pan and Homo have similar ectocranial suture synostosis patterns and a similar suture ontogeny (relative timing of suture fusion during the species ontogeny). This ontogeny includes patency during and after neurocranial expansion with a delayed bony response associated with adaptation to biomechanical forces generated by mastication. Here we investigate these relationships for Gorilla by examining the association among ectocranial suture morphology, cranial volume (as a proxy for neurocranial expansion) and dental development (as a proxy for the length of time that it has been masticating hard foods and exerting such strains on the cranial vault) in a large sample of Gorilla gorilla skulls. Two-hundred and fifty-five Gorilla gorilla skulls were examined for ectocranial suture closure status, cranial volume and dental eruption. Regression models were calculated for cranial volumes by suture activity, and Kendall's tau (a non-parametric measure of association) was calculated for dental eruption status by suture activity. Results suggest that, as reported for Pan and Homo, neurocranial expansion precedes suture synostosis activity. Here, Gorilla was shown to have a strong relationship between dental development and suture activity (synostosis). These data are suggestive of suture fusion extending further into ontogeny than brain expansion, similar to Homo and Pan. This finding allows for the possibility that masticatory forces influence ectocranial suture morphology.

  2. Structure of catabolite activator protein with cobalt(II) and sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ramya R.; Lawson, Catherine L.

    2014-04-15

    The crystal structure of E. coli catabolite activator protein with bound cobalt(II) and sulfate ions at 1.97 Å resolution is reported. The crystal structure of cyclic AMP–catabolite activator protein (CAP) from Escherichia coli containing cobalt(II) chloride and ammonium sulfate is reported at 1.97 Å resolution. Each of the two CAP subunits in the asymmetric unit binds one cobalt(II) ion, in each case coordinated by N-terminal domain residues His19, His21 and Glu96 plus an additional acidic residue contributed via a crystal contact. The three identified N-terminal domain cobalt-binding residues are part of a region of CAP that is important for transcription activation at class II CAP-dependent promoters. Sulfate anions mediate additional crystal lattice contacts and occupy sites corresponding to DNA backbone phosphate positions in CAP–DNA complex structures.

  3. 1984-1995 Evolution of Stratospheric Aerosol Size, Surface Area, and Volume Derived by Combining SAGE II and CLAES Extinction Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Bauman, Jill J.

    2000-01-01

    This SAGE II Science Team task focuses on the development of a multi-wavelength, multi- sensor Look-Up-Table (LUT) algorithm for retrieving information about stratospheric aerosols from global satellite-based observations of particulate extinction. The LUT algorithm combines the 4-wavelength SAGE II extinction measurements (0.385 <= lambda <= 1.02 microns) with the 7.96 micron and 12.82 micron extinction measurements from the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) instrument, thus increasing the information content available from either sensor alone. The algorithm uses the SAGE II/CLAES composite spectra in month-latitude-altitude bins to retrieve values and uncertainties of particle effective radius R(sub eff), surface area S, volume V and size distribution width sigma(sub g).

  4. Synthesis, spectral characterization, solution equilibria, in vitro antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of Cu(II), Ni(II), Mn(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes with Schiff base derived from 5-bromosalicylaldehyde and 2-aminomethylthiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A.; Eldebss, Taha M. A.

    2011-09-01

    Schiff base namely 2-aminomethylthiophenyl-4-bromosalicylaldehyde (ATS)(4-bromo-2-(thiophen-2-yl-imino)methylphenol) and its metal complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, mass spectra, ESR and thermal analysis (TGA). The analytical data of the complexes show the formation of 1:2 [M:L] ratio of the formula [ML 2], where M represents Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cu(II) ions, while L represents the deprotonated Schiff base. IR spectra show that ATS is coordinated to the metal ions in a bidentate manner through azomethine-N and phenolic-oxygen groups. The ligand and their metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disc diffusion method against the selected bacteria. A cytotoxicity of the compounds against colon (HCT116) and larynx (HEP2) cancer cells have been studied. Protonation constants of (ATS) ligand and stability constants of its Cu 2+, Co 2+, Mn 2+, Zn 2+ and Ni 2+ complexes were determined by potentiometric titration method in 50% (v/v) DMSO-water solution at ionic strength of 0.1 M NaNO 3.

  5. Activation of central PPAR-γ attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that the activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg per minute) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

  6. Activation of Central PPAR-γ Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg/min) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and angiotensin II type-1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26101342

  7. Synthesis, characterization, molecular modeling and antioxidant activity of (1E,5E)-1,5-bis(1-(pyridin-2-yl)ethylidene)carbonohydrazide (H2APC) and its zinc(II), cadmium(II) and mercury(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, O. A.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.; Ghazy, S. E.; Radwan, A. H.

    2012-08-01

    A new series of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes of (1E,5E)-1,5-bis(1-(pyridin-2-yl)ethylidene)carbonohydrazide (H2APC) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, spectral (IR, UV-visible, mass and 1H NMR) as well as magnetic and thermal measurements. The data revealed that the ligand acts a monobasic hexadentate, neutral tri- and monodentate in Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes, respectively. An octahedral geometry is proposed for Zn(II) complex, a trigonal bi-pyramid for Cd(II) complex and a tetrahedral one for Hg(II) complex. The bond length, bond angle, HOMO, LUMO and charges on the atoms have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligand and the investigated complexes using material studio program. Kinetic parameters were determined for each thermal degradation stage of some complexes using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. The antioxidant, anti-hemolytic, and cytotoxic activities of the compounds have been screened. H2APC showed moderate antioxidant activity using ABTS and DPPH methods. With respect to erythrocyte hemolysis and in vitro Ehrlich ascites assay, H2APC exhibited the potent antioxidative activity followed by Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes while Hg(II) complex showed very weak activity.

  8. Accelerometer-based physical activity: total volume per day and standardized measures.

    PubMed

    Bassett, David R; Troiano, Richard P; McClain, James J; Wolff, Dana L

    2015-04-01

    The use of accelerometers in physical activity (PA) research has increased exponentially over the past 20 yr. The first commercially available accelerometer for assessing PA, the Caltrac, was worn on the waist and estimated PA energy expenditure in kilocalories. Around 1995, the emphasis shifted to measuring minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), especially for bouts of 10 min or longer. Recent studies, however, show that light-intensity PA and intermittent (nonbout) MVPA also have important health benefits. The total volume of PA performed is an important variable because it takes the frequency, intensity, and duration of activity bouts and condenses them down into a single metric. The total volume of PA is appropriate for many research applications and can enhance comparisons between studies. In the future, machine learning algorithms will provide improved accuracy for activity type recognition and estimation of PA energy expenditure. However, in the current landscape of objectively measured PA, total activity counts per day (TAC/d) is a proxy for the total volume of PA. TAC/d percentiles for age- and gender-specific groups have been developed from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey ActiGraph data (2003-2006), providing a novel way to assess PA. The use of TAC/d or standardized units of acceleration could harmonize PA across studies. TAC/d should be viewed as an additional metric, not intended to replace other metrics (e.g., sedentary time, light-intensity PA, moderate PA, and vigorous PA) that may also be related to health. As future refinements to wearable monitors occur, researchers should continue to consider metrics that reflect the total volume of PA in addition to existing PA metrics. PMID:25102292

  9. Solid phase synthesis of somatostatin-28 II. A new biologically active octacosapeptide from anglerfish pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, P; Delfour, A; Boussetta, H; Morel, A; Rholam, M; Cohen, P

    1986-10-30

    Somatostatin-28 II, an octacosapeptide recently isolated from anglerfish pancreatic islets, was synthetized by the solid phase method along with its somatostatin-14 II and somatostatin-28 II-(1-12) corresponding domains. Homogeneity of the synthetic peptides was demonstrated by analytical RP-HPLC, thin layer chromatography and electrophoresis. The peptides were further characterized by amino acids analysis, fast atomic bombarding mass spectrometry and/or 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry. Synthetic somatostatin-28 II and somatostatin-14 II displace equally well the potent agonist (Tyr0,D-Trp8)-somatostatin-14 from its specific binding sites on anterior pituitary cells membranes. Both peptides activate adenylate cyclase from dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells. PMID:2877662

  10. Fibrates increase human apolipoprotein A-II expression through activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Vu-Dac, N; Schoonjans, K; Kosykh, V; Dallongeville, J; Fruchart, J C; Staels, B; Auwerx, J

    1995-01-01

    In view of the evidence linking plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels to a protective effect against coronary artery disease and the widespread use of fibrates in the treatment of hyperlipidemia, the goal of this study was to analyze the influence of fibrates on the expression of apolipoprotein (apo) A-II, a major protein constituent of HDL. Administration of fenofibrate (300 mg/d) to 16 patients with coronary artery disease resulted in a marked increase in plasma apo A-II concentrations (0.34 +/- 0.11 to 0.45 +/- 0.17 grams/liter; P < 0.01). This increase in plasma apo A-II was due to a direct effect on hepatic apo A-II production, since fenofibric acid induced apo A-II mRNA levels to 450 and 250% of control levels in primary cultures of human hepatocytes and in human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells respectively. The induction in apo A-II mRNA levels was followed by an increase in apo A-II secretion in both cell culture systems. Transient transfection experiments of a reporter construct driven by the human apo A-II gene promoter indicated that fenofibrate induced apo A-II gene expression at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, several other peroxisome proliferators, such as the fibrate, Wy-14643, and the fatty acid, eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), also induced apo A-II gene transcription. Unilateral deletions and site-directed mutagenesis identified a sequence element located in the J-site of the apo A-II promoter mediating the responsiveness to fibrates and fatty acids. This element contains two imperfect half sites spaced by 1 oligonucleotide similar to a peroxisome proliferator responsive element (PPRE). Cotransfection assays showed that the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) transactivates the apo A-II promoter through this AII-PPRE. Gel retardation assays demonstrated that PPAR binds to the AII-PPRE with an affinity comparable to its binding affinity to the acyl coA oxidase (ACO)-PPRE. In conclusion, in humans fibrates increase

  11. Demonstrating Electrical Activity in Nerve and Muscle. Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the construction of an amplifier and force transducer that can be used to demonstrate electrical activity in nerve and muscle using the gastrocnemius muscle and sciatic nerve of the frog. (MLH)

  12. Timing of ectocranial suture activity in Pan troglodytes as related to cranial volume and dental eruption.

    PubMed

    Cray, James; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2010-08-01

    Research has shown that Pan and Homo have similar ectocranial suture synostosis patterns possibly because of their phylogenetic relationship. However, unlike human data, it is unclear if the ontogeny of suture activity for Pan exhibits a relationship with the expanding neurocranium or the masticatory apparatus. These relationships were assessed by examining the associations between ectocranial suture status and morphology and cranial volume (as a proxy for neurocranial expansion) and dental development (as an indicator of adulthood and proxy for masticatory influence) in a large sample of Pan troglodytes skulls. One hundred and fifty-five P. troglodytes dry skulls were examined, and data were collected on ectocranial suture closure status, cranial volume, and dental eruption status. Regression models were calculated for suture status by cranial volumes, and Kendall's tau (a nonparametric measure of association) was calculated for suture status by dental eruption status. Results suggest that suture synostosis activity in P. troglodytes exhibits a period of stasis after neurocranial expansion cessation and does not have a strong relationship with brain development (r(2) ranged from 0.09 to 0.28), as similarly seen in Homo. Instead, suture synostosis has a stronger relationship with dental development (tau ranged from 0.59 to 0.72), where most osseous activity occurs after full adult dental eruption. This suggests that masticatory forces may influence both ectocranial suture morphology and synostosis more than brain expansion does in Pan, as also similarly noted in Homo.

  13. Low-volume multiplexed proteolytic activity assay and inhibitor analysis through a pico-injector array.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Lauffenburger, Doug A; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2015-02-21

    Secreted active proteases, from families of enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinases), participate in diverse pathological processes. To simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities, a series of parallel enzyme reactions combined with a series of inhibitor analyses for proteolytic activity matrix analysis (PrAMA) are essential but limited due to the sample quantity requirements and the complexity of performing multiple reactions. To address these issues, we developed a pico-injector array to generate 72 different reactions in picoliter-volume droplets by controlling the sequence of combinational injections, which allowed simultaneous recording of a wide range of multiple enzyme reactions and measurement of inhibitor effects using small sample volumes (~10 μL). Multiple MMP activities were simultaneously determined by 9 different substrates and 2 inhibitors using injections from a pico-injector array. Due to the advantages of inhibitor analysis, the MMP/ADAM activities of MDA-MB-231, a breast cancer cell line, were characterized with high MMP-2, MMP-3 and ADAM-10 activity. This platform could be customized for a wide range of applications that also require multiple reactions with inhibitor analysis to enhance the sensitivity by encapsulating different chemical sensors.

  14. Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S.

    1988-02-02

    The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

  15. Vertebrate blood cell volume increases with temperature: implications for aerobic activity

    PubMed Central

    Zenil-Ferguson, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic activity levels increase with body temperature across vertebrates. Differences in these levels, from highly active to sedentary, are reflected in their ecology and behavior. Yet, the changes in the cardiovascular system that allow for greater oxygen supply at higher temperatures, and thus greater aerobic activity, remain unclear. Here we show that the total volume of red blood cells in the body increases exponentially with temperature across vertebrates, after controlling for effects of body size and taxonomy. These changes are accompanied by increases in relative heart mass, an indicator of aerobic activity. The results point to one way vertebrates may increase oxygen supply to meet the demands of greater activity at higher temperatures. PMID:24765580

  16. Preventing Cancer in the Workplace and Community. Volume II. Cancer, the Worker and the Community. An Independent Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Virginia C., Ed.; And Others

    This second volume of a two-volume set on prevention of cancer in the workplace is a self-instructional manual designed for independent study by students who consult on a regular basis with an instructor. The manual follows a consistent format. The narrative text in each of three sections presents current knowledge about the subject and refers to…

  17. An Evaluation of the Project STAR Reading Program Intervention (State Technical Assistance Resources Project). Volume II: Evaluation Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holowenzak, Stephen P.

    This is the second of three volumes that constitute the final evaluation report of Project STAR (State Technical Assistance Resources), an undertaking of the Maryland State Department of Education designed to help 36 elementary schools improve their reading programs. This volume is divided into five parts. The first part contains a discussion of…

  18. Contemporary American Success Stories. Famous People of Asian Ancestry. Volume II. A Mitchell Lane Multicultural Biography Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marvis, Barbara J.

    As part of a five-volume series this volume presents biographical sketches of persons of Asian American heritage who have made contributions to American life. Asian Americans have often been subjected to racial and ethnic prejudice as have other easily identifiable groups of Americans. The series, written at a reading level of grades 5 to 6, but…

  19. The Law and Collective Negotiations in Education. Volume II, Collective Action by Public School Teachers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Wesley A.

    This volume on law and collective negotiations in the schools is the second in a series of 4 monographs comprising a broad investigation of teacher collective action in local school districts in the United States. Part I (30 pages) of this volume deals with emerging local doctrine relating to the rights of teachers and other public employees to…

  20. School Community Education Program in New York City 1988-89. Volume II. OREA Evaluation Section Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerrero, Frank; Abbott, Lori

    This second volume of a four-volume evaluation of the 1988-89 New York City School Community Education Program (also known as the Umbrella Program) comprises reports evaluating nine innovative elementary school projects on social, ethnical, and environmental studies, four of which included staff development workshops. Evaluation sources included…

  1. Restructuring To Promote Learning in America's Schools. Selected Readings, Volume II for Video Conferences 5-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pink, William T., Ed.; And Others

    This second volume of selected readings is designed to accompany Video Conferences 5-9 in the series "Restructuring to Promote Learning in America's Schools." The readings in this volume explore several key issues in school restructuring. Four sections include: (1) Schools as Learning Communities; (2) Many Roads to Fundamental Reform: Getting…

  2. Vocational Curriculum Resources for Disadvantaged Students. A Guide to Print and Non-Print Instructional Materials. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangano, R. Michael; And Others

    Volume 2 of a three-volume guide to vocational curriculum resources for disadvantaged students consists of instructional checklists for resources identified in the following areas: agriculture, auto body repair, automobile mechanics, basic math skills, basic reading skills, business education, career education, carpentry, cosmetology, custodial…

  3. Specifications for a Comprehensive Undergraduate and Inservice Teacher Education Program for Elementary Teachers. Final Report. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, William; And Others

    This second volume contains the remaining program elements and support system models for the proposal described in Volume I, SP 002 147. One section is devoted to each of three "program components" (unified sets of curricular instructional experiences each comprised of several "instructional modules," planned instructional episodes from several…

  4. Working with Refugees: A Manual for Paraprofessionals. Volume II: The Life Cycle, Mental Health, and Mental Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Joseph Jay; And Others

    This staff training manual, the second volume of a three-volume set of materials for use in training paraprofessional refugee workers, deals with the life cycle, mental health, and mental illness, focusing particularly on the unique challenges and pressures of being a refugee. Covered in the individual units are the following topics: psychological…

  5. 20 CFR 404.1321 - Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... post-World War II veterans. 404.1321 Section 404.1321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1321 Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for post-World War...

  6. 20 CFR 404.1321 - Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... post-World War II veterans. 404.1321 Section 404.1321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1321 Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for post-World War...

  7. 20 CFR 404.1321 - Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... post-World War II veterans. 404.1321 Section 404.1321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1321 Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for post-World War...

  8. 20 CFR 404.1321 - Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... post-World War II veterans. 404.1321 Section 404.1321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1321 Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for post-World War...

  9. 20 CFR 404.1321 - Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... post-World War II veterans. 404.1321 Section 404.1321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1321 Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for post-World War...

  10. Construction of chimeric enzymes out of maize endosperm branching enzymes I and II: activity and properties.

    PubMed

    Kuriki, T; Stewart, D C; Preiss, J

    1997-11-14

    Branching enzyme I and II isoforms from maize endosperm (mBE I and mBE II, respectively) have quite different properties, and to elucidate the domain(s) that determines the differences, chimeric genes consisting of part mBE I and part mBE II were constructed. When expressed under the control of the T7 promoter in Escherichia coli, several of the chimeric enzymes were inactive. The only fully active chimeric enzyme was mBE II-I BspHI, in which the carboxyl-terminal part of mBE II was exchanged for that of mBE I at a BspHI restriction site and was purified to homogeneity and characterized. Another chimeric enzyme, mBE I-II HindIII, in which the amino-terminal end of mBE II was replaced with that of mBE I, had very little activity and was only partially characterized. The purified mBE II-I BspHI exhibited higher activity than wild-type mBE I and mBE II when assayed by the phosphorylase a stimulation assay. mBE II-I BspHI had substrate specificity (preference for amylose rather than amylopectin) and catalytic capacity similar to mBE I, despite the fact that only the carboxyl terminus was from mBE I, suggesting that the carboxyl terminus may be involved in determining substrate specificity and catalytic capacity. In chain transfer experiments, mBE II-I BspHI transferred more short chains (with a degree of polymerization of around 6) in a fashion similar to mBE II. In contrast, mBE I-II HindIII transferred more long chains (with a degree of polymerization of around 11-12), similar to mBE I, suggesting that the amino terminus of mBEs may play a role in the size of oligosaccharide chain transferred. This study challenges the notion that the catalytic centers for branching enzymes are exclusively located in the central portion of the enzyme; it suggests instead that the amino and carboxyl termini may also be involved in determining substrate preference, catalytic capacity, and chain length transfer.

  11. Opposite effects of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 activity on the pressor response to angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhonghua; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Langenbach, Robert I.; Breyer, Richard M.; Redha, Reyadh; Morrow, Jason D.; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2002-01-01

    Therapeutic use of cyclooxygenase-inhibiting (COX-inhibiting) nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is often complicated by renal side effects including hypertension and edema. The present studies were undertaken to elucidate the roles of COX1 and COX2 in regulating blood pressure and renal function. COX2 inhibitors or gene knockout dramatically augment the pressor effect of angiotensin II (Ang II). Unexpectedly, after a brief increase, the pressor effect of Ang II was abolished by COX1 deficiency (either inhibitor or knockout). Ang II infusion also reduced medullary blood flow in COX2-deficient but not in control or COX1-deficient animals, suggesting synthesis of COX2-dependent vasodilators in the renal medulla. Consistent with this, Ang II failed to stimulate renal medullary prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin I2 production in COX2-deficient animals. Ang II infusion normally promotes natriuresis and diuresis, but COX2 deficiency blocked this effect. Thus, COX1 and COX2 exert opposite effects on systemic blood pressure and renal function. COX2 inhibitors reduce renal medullary blood flow, decrease urine flow, and enhance the pressor effect of Ang II. In contrast, the pressor effect of Ang II is blunted by COX1 inhibition. These results suggest that, rather than having similar cardiovascular effects, the activities of COX1 and COX2 are functionally antagonistic. PMID:12093889

  12. Apoptosis induced by Na+/H+ antiport inhibition activates the LEI/L-DNase II pathway.

    PubMed

    Altairac, S; Zeggai, S; Perani, P; Courtois, Y; Torriglia, A

    2003-05-01

    L-DNase II is derived from its precursor leucocyte elastase inhibitor (LEI) by post-translational modification. In vitro, the conversion of LEI into L-DNase II can be induced by incubation of LEI at an acidic pH. In this study, we proposed to analyze the effects of intracellular acidification on this transformation. Amiloride derivatives, like hexamethylene amiloride (HMA), are known to provoke a decrease of cytosolic pH by inhibiting the Na(+)/H(+) antiport. In BHK cells, treatment with HMA-induced apoptosis accompanied by an increase in L-DNase II immunoreactivity and L-DNase II enzymatic activity. Overexpression of L-DNase II precursor led to a significant increase of apoptosis in these cells supporting the involvement of L-DNase II in HMA induced apoptosis. As previously shown in other cells, etoposide-induced apoptosis did not activate L-DNase. On the contrary, LEI overexpression significantly increased cell survival in etoposide-induced apoptosis. Together these results suggest differential roles of LEI and L-DNase II in response to different types of apoptotic inducers.

  13. Synthesis and biological activity of nifuroxazide and analogs. II.

    PubMed

    Tavares, L C; Chisté, J J; Santos, M G; Penna, T C

    1999-09-01

    Nifuroxazyde and six analogs were synthesized by varying the substitute from the para-position of the benzenic ring and the heteroatom of the heterocyclic ring. The MIC of seven resultant compounds was determined by serial dilutions, testing the ATCC 25923 strain of Staphylococcus aureus. A significant increase in the anti-microbial activity of thyophenic analogs, as compared with furanic and pyrrholic analogs, was observed. In addition, unlike the cyano and hydroxyl groups, the acetyl group promoted anti-microbial activity. PMID:10622109

  14. Class I and class II ribonuclease H activities in Crithidia fasciculata (Protozoa).

    PubMed

    Vonwirth, H; Köck, J; Büsen, W

    1991-01-15

    The protozoan Crithidia fasciculata contains two different ribonuclease H activities. These enzymes display similar physical and biochemical characteristics to their homologues in higher eukaryotes, for instance calf thymus class I and class II ribonuclease H. Class I ribonuclease H of lower and higher eukaryotes can be activated by Mg2(+)- and Mn2(+)-ions. However, the presence of Mn2(+)-ions is inhibitory for the Mg2(+)-dependent class II ribonuclease H activity of Crithidia fasciculata and calf thymus. The protozoan class I-homologue enzyme appears to be serologically related to the class I ribonuclease H of calf thymus.

  15. Learning Activity Packets for Auto Mechanics II. Section A--Engine Rebuilding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Eight learning activity packets (LAPs) are provided for the instructional area of engine rebuilding in the auto mechanics II program. They accompany an instructor's guide available separately. The LAPs outline the study activities and performance tasks for these eight units: (1) engine condition evaluation; (2) engine removal; (3) engine…

  16. Learning Activity Packets for Auto Mechanics II. Section C--Drive Train.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Five learning activity packets (LAPs) are provided for the instructional area of drive train in the auto mechanics II program. They accompany an instructor's guide available separately. The LAPs outline the study activities and performance tasks for these five units: (1) clutch assembly, (2) standard transmission, (3) drive lines, (4) rear axle,…

  17. Apoptotic Volume Decrease (AVD) Is Independent of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Initiator Caspase Activation.

    PubMed

    Maeno, Emi; Tsubata, Takeshi; Okada, Yasunobu

    2012-12-05

    Persistent cell shrinkage is a major hallmark of apoptotic cell death. The early-phase shrinkage, which starts within 30-120 min after apoptotic stimulation and is called apoptotic volume decrease (AVD), is known to be accomplished by activation of K+ channels and volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR) Cl- channels in a manner independent of caspase-3 activation. However, it is controversial whether AVD depends on apoptotic dysfunction of mitochondria and activation of initiator caspases. Here, we observed that AVD is induced not only by a mitochondrial apoptosis inducer, staurosporine (STS), in mouse B lymphoma WEHI-231 cells, but also by ligation of the death receptor Fas in human B lymphoblastoid SKW6.4 cells, which undergo Fas-mediated apoptosis without involving mitochondria. Overexpression of Bcl-2 failed to inhibit the STS-induced AVD in WEHI-231 cells. These results indicate that AVD does not require the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. In human epithelial HeLa cells stimulated with anti-Fas antibody or STS, the AVD induction was found to precede activation of caspase-8 and caspase-9 and to be resistant to pan-caspase blockers. Thus, it is concluded that the AVD induction is an early event independent of the mitochondrial apoptotic signaling pathway and initiator caspase activation.

  18. Keratin sponge/hydrogel II, active agent delivery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Keratin sponge/hydrogels from oxidation and reduction hydrolysis of fine and coarse wool fibers were formed to behave as cationic hydrogels to swell and release active agents in the specific region of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract. Their porous, interpenetrating networks (IPN) were effective for...

  19. Physical activity and inflammation: effects on gray-matter volume and cognitive decline in aging.

    PubMed

    Papenberg, Goran; Ferencz, Beata; Mangialasche, Francesca; Mecocci, Patrizia; Cecchetti, Roberta; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Fratiglioni, Laura; Bäckman, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Physical activity has been positively associated with gray-matter integrity. In contrast, pro-inflammatory cytokines seem to have negative effects on the aging brain and have been related to dementia. It was investigated whether an inactive lifestyle and high levels of inflammation resulted in smaller gray-matter volumes and predicted cognitive decline across 6 years in a population-based study of older adults (n = 414). Self-reported physical activity (fitness-enhancing, health-enhancing, inadequate) was linked to gray-matter volume, such that individuals with inadequate physical activity had the least gray matter. There were no overall associations between different pro-and anti-inflammatory markers (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, G-CSF, and TNF-α) and gray-matter integrity. However, persons with inadequate activity and high levels of the pro-inflammatory marker IL-12p40 had smaller volumes of lateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus and declined more on the Mini-Mental State Examination test over 6 years compared with physically inactive individuals with low levels of IL-12p40 and to more physically active persons, irrespective of their levels of IL-12p40. These patterns of data suggested that inflammation was particularly detrimental in inactive older adults and may exacerbate the negative effects of physical inactivity on brain and cognition in old age. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3462-3473, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27159568

  20. Podocyte injury in diabetic nephropathy: implications of angiotensin II – dependent activation of TRPC channels

    PubMed Central

    Ilatovskaya, Daria V.; Levchenko, Vladislav; Lowing, Andrea; Shuyskiy, Leonid S.; Palygin, Oleg; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Injury to podocytes is considered a major contributor to diabetic kidney disease: their loss causes proteinuria and progressive glomerulosclerosis. Podocyte depletion may result from improper calcium handling due to abnormal activation of the calcium permeant TRPC (Transient Receptor Potential Canonical) channels. Angiotensin II (Ang II) levels are found to be elevated in diabetes; furthermore, it was reported that Ang II causes activation of TRPC6 in podocytes. We hypothesized here that Ang II-mediated calcium influx is aggravated in the podocytes under the conditions of type 1 diabetic nephropathy (DN). Diabetes was induced in the Dahl Salt-Sensitive rats by an injection of streptozotocin (STZ-SS). Eleven weeks post treatment was sufficient for the animals to develop hyperglycemia, excessive urination, weight loss, microalbuminuria, nephrinuria and display renal histological lesions typical for patients with DN. Patch-clamp electrophysiology performed on podocytes of the freshly isolated glomeruli showed enhanced basal TRPC channel activity in the STZ-SS rats, and increased response to Ang II; total calcium influx triggered by Ang II application was also augmented in podocytes of these rats. Our studies have a strong potential for advancing the understanding of TRPC-mediated effects on podocytopenia in DN initiation. PMID:26656101

  1. Volume-activated Na/H exchange activity in fetal and adult pig red cells: inhibition by cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, S; Sohn, D H; Kim, H D

    1989-08-01

    Hyposmotic swelling of pig red cells leads to a selective increase in K permeability, whereas hyperosmotic cell shrinkage augments the Na permeability. In this regard, the ouabain-resistant (OR) Na flux of red cells of newborn and adult pigs is characterized in detail. A reduction in cell volume by approximately 18% leads to an increase in the OR Na efflux of fetal and adult cells by 15- and fourfold, respectively. The OR Na influx in both cell types is equally influenced by cell shrinkage. Depletion of cellular K does not influence the volume-activated OR Na efflux. Nor does OR Na influx require external K. Both OR Na efflux and influx activated by shrinkage are inhibited by the diuretics furosemide and amiloride. The rank order of decreasing anion sensitivity for diuretic-sensitive Na efflux was acetate greater than chloride greater than gluconate greater than nitrate. Cell shrinkage induced by the addition of hypertonic salts results in an acidification of the unbuffered and CO2-free media, provided that both Na and DIDS are present. The acidification process can be reversed by either of the diuretic agents. These findings suggest that the shrinkage-activated OR Na flux is primarily mediated by a Na/H exchanger rather than by a Na/K/Cl cotransporter. Once loaded with either cAMP or cGMP, cell swelling can no longer activate the Na/H exchanger. The Na/H exchanger activity is detectable in the fetal cells of normal volume but quiescent in adult cells, indicating that the exchanger undergoes a developmental change during the transition from the fetal to adult stage. PMID:2552123

  2. Dynamic heterogeneities, boson peak and activation volume in glass-forming liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, L; Novikov, V. N.; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2011-01-01

    There are various arguments and models connecting the characteristic length associated with the boson peak vibrations to the length scale of dynamical heterogeneity Lhet. is usually defined as the ratio of the transverse sound velocity to the boson peak frequency. Here we present pressure, temperature, and molecular weight dependencies of , estimated using light scattering, in a few molecular and polymeric glass formers. These dependencies are compared with respective dependencies of the activation volume V # in the same materials. Good agreement is found for the pressure and molecular weight dependencies of and V # measured at the glass transition temperature Tg. These results provide more evidence for a possible relationship between the sensitivity of structural relaxation to density (activation volume) and the heterogeneity volume. However, contrary to the expectations for Lhet, does not decrease with temperature above Tg in most of the studied materials. The temperature dependence of is compared to that of Lhet in glycerol and orthoterphenyl (OTP) estimated from literature data. The analysis shows a clear difference in the behavior of (T) and V #(T) at temperatures above Tg, although V #(T)1/3 and Lhet(T) have similar temperature dependence. Possible reasons for the observed difference are discussed.

  3. Co(II) and Cd(II) Complexes Derived from Heterocyclic Schiff-Bases: Synthesis, Structural Characterisation, and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Riyadh M.; Yousif, Enaam I.; Al-Jeboori, Mohamad J.

    2013-01-01

    New monomeric cobalt and cadmium complexes with Schiff-bases, namely, N′-[(E)-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]furan-2-carbohydrazide (L1) and N′-[(E)-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]thiophene-2-carbohydrazide (L2) are reported. Schiff-base ligands L1 and L2 were derived from condensation of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde (iso-vanillin) with furan-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide and thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide, respectively. Complexes of the general formula [M(L)2]Cl2 (where M = Co(II) or Cd(II), L = L1 or L2) have been obtained from the reaction of the corresponding metal chloride with the ligands. The ligands and their metal complexes were characterised by spectroscopic methods (FTIR, UV-Vis, 1H, and 13C NMR spectra), elemental analysis, metal content, magnetic measurement, and conductance. These studies revealed the formation of four-coordinate complexes in which the geometry about metal ion is tetrahedral. Biological activity of the ligands and their metal complexes against gram positive bacterial strain Bacillus (G+) and gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas (G−) revealed that the metal complexes become less resistive to the microbial activities as compared to the free ligands. PMID:24027449

  4. Palladium(II) and platinum(II) derivatives of benzothiazoline ligands: Synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial and antispermatogenic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Krishna; Singh, R. V.; Fahmi, Nighat

    2011-01-01

    A series of Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes with two N ∩S donor ligands, 5-chloro-3-(indolin-2-one)benzothiazoline and 6-nitro-3-(indolin-2-one)benzothiazoline, have been synthesized by the reaction of metal chlorides (PdCl 2 and PtCl 2) with ligands in 1:2 molar ratios. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, melting point determinations and a combination of electronic, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques for structure elucidation. In order to evaluate the effect of metal ions upon chelation, both the ligands and their complexes have been screened for their antimicrobial activity against the various pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains. The metal complexes have shown to be more antimicrobial against the microbial species as compared to free ligands. One of the ligands, 5-chloro-3-(indolin-2-one)benzothiazoline and its corresponding palladium and platinum complexes have been tested for their antifertility activity in male albino rats. The marked reduction in sperm motility and density resulted in infertility by 62-90%. Significant alterations were found in biochemical parameters of reproductive organs in treated animals as compared to control group. It is concluded that all these effects may finally impair the fertility of male rats.

  5. THE ORIGIN OF [O II] EMISSION IN RECENTLY QUENCHED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kocevski, Dale D.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Lubin, Lori M.; Shapley, Alice E.; Gal, Roy R.; Squires, Gordon K.

    2011-08-20

    We have employed emission-line diagnostics derived from DEIMOS and NIRSPEC spectroscopy to determine the origin of the [O II] emission line observed in six active galactic nucleus (AGN) hosts at z {approx} 0.9. These galaxies are a subsample of AGN hosts detected in the Cl1604 supercluster that exhibit strong Balmer absorption lines in their spectra and appear to be in a post-starburst or post-quenched phase, if not for their [O II] emission. Examining the flux ratio of the [N II] to H{alpha} lines, we find that in five of the six hosts the dominant source of ionizing flux is AGN continuum emission. Furthermore, we find that four of the six galaxies have over twice the [O II] line luminosity that could be generated by star formation alone given their H{alpha} line luminosities. This strongly suggests that AGN-excited narrow-line emission is contaminating the [O II] line flux. A comparison of star formation rates calculated from extinction-corrected [O II] and H{alpha} line luminosities indicates that the former yields a five-fold overestimate of the current activity in these galaxies. Our findings reveal the [O II] line to be a poor indicator of star formation activity in a majority of these moderate-luminosity Seyferts. This result bolsters our previous findings that an increased fraction of AGN at high redshifts is hosted by galaxies in a post-starburst phase. The relatively high fraction of AGN hosts in the Cl1604 supercluster that show signs of recently truncated star formation activity may suggest that AGN feedback plays an increasingly important role in suppressing ongoing activity in large-scale structures at high redshift.

  6. The coactivator dTAF(II)110/hTAF(II)135 is sufficient to recruit a polymerase complex and activate basal transcription mediated by CREB.

    PubMed

    Felinski, E A; Quinn, P G

    2001-11-01

    A specific TATA binding protein-associated factor (TAF), dTAF(II)110/hTAF(II)135, interacts with cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) through its constitutive activation domain (CAD), which recruits a polymerase complex and activates transcription. The simplest explanation is that the TAF is a coactivator, but several studies have questioned this role of TAFs. Using a reverse two-hybrid analysis in yeast, we previously mapped the interaction between dTAF(II)110 (amino acid 1-308) and CREB to conserved hydrophobic amino acid residues in the CAD. That mapping was possible only because CREB fails to activate transcription in yeast, where all TAFs are conserved, except for the TAF recognizing CREB. To test whether CREB fails to activate transcription in yeast because it lacks a coactivator, we fused dTAF(II)110 (amino acid 1-308) to the TATA binding protein domain of the yeast scaffolding TAF, yTAF(II)130. Transformation of yeast with this hybrid TAF conferred activation by the CAD, indicating that interaction with yTFIID is sufficient to recruit a polymerase complex and activate transcription. The hybrid TAF did not mediate activation by VP16 or vitamin D receptor, each of which interacts with TFIIB, but not with dTAF(II)110 (amino acid 1-308). Enhancement of transcription activation by dTAF(II)110 in mammalian cells required interaction with both the CAD and TFIID and was inhibited by mutation of core hydrophobic residues in the CAD. These data demonstrate that dTAF(II)110/hTAF(II)135 acts as a coactivator to recruit TFIID and polymerase and that this mechanism of activation is conserved in eukaryotes.

  7. Role of AQP2 in activation of calcium entry by hypotonicity: implications in cell volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Galizia, L; Flamenco, M P; Rivarola, V; Capurro, C; Ford, P

    2008-03-01

    We previously reported in a rat cortical collecting duct cell line (RCCD(1)) that the presence of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the cell membrane is critical for the rapid activation of regulatory volume decrease mechanisms (RVD) (Ford et al. Biol Cell 97: 687-697, 2005). The aim of our present work was to investigate the signaling pathway that links AQP2 to this rapid RVD activation. Since it has been previously described that hypotonic conditions induce intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) increases in different cell types, we tested the hypothesis that AQP2 could have a role in activation of calcium entry by hypotonicity and its implication in cell volume regulation. Using a fluorescent probe technique, we studied [Ca(2+)](i) and cell volume changes in response to a hypotonic shock in WT-RCCD(1) (not expressing aquaporins) and in AQP2-RCCD(1) (transfected with AQP2) cells. We found that after a hypotonic shock only AQP2-RCCD(1) cells exhibit a substantial increase in [Ca(2+)](i). This [Ca(2+)](i) increase is strongly dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and is partially inhibited by thapsigargin (1 muM) indicating that the rise in [Ca(2+)](i) reflects both influx from the extracellular medium and release from intracellular stores. Exposure of AQP2-RCCD(1) cells to 100 muM gadolinium reduced the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) suggesting the involvement of a mechanosensitive calcium channel. Furthermore, exposure of cells to all of the above described conditions impaired rapid RVD. We conclude that the expression of AQP2 in the cell membrane is critical to produce the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) which is necessary to activate RVD in RCCD(1) cells. PMID:18094031

  8. Geology Is. Preliminary Edition. Volumes I and II, Including Activity Sheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Fallon Township High School District #203, IL.

    Presented in this document is a full-year, two-semester course in geology for high school students. Composed of 5 units and 20 chapters, the course emphasizes the practical aspects of geology with special attention to the relationship between geoscience processes and the environment and to the application of scientific and technical expertise to…

  9. Electron beam injection during active experiments. II - Collisional effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    During active beam experiments, the presence of high neutral densities at low altitudes and/or during thruster firings has been observed to modify the spacecraft charging and the properties of the beam. Two-dimensional (three-velocity) electromagnetic particle simulations with ionizing collisions incorporated are used to investigate the modification of the beam-plasma interaction as the neutral density is increased. It is shown that when the spacecraft is uniformly immersed in a neutral cloud, most of the ionization is produced by direct ionization by the beam and its secondaries, rather than via vehicle-induced or wave-induced ionization for the neutral densities considered.

  10. Active thermal figure control for the TOPS II primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Roger; Kang, Tae; Cuerden, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Stahl, Phil

    2007-09-01

    TOPS (Telescope to Observe Planetary Systems) is the first coronagraphic telescope concept designed specifically to take advantage of Guyon's method of Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization PIAA).1 The TOPS primary mirror may incorporates active figure control to help achieve the desired wavefront control to approximately 1 angstrom RMS accurate across the spectral bandwidth. Direct correction of the primary figure avoids the need for a separate small deformable mirror. Because of Fresnel propagation, correction at a separate surface can introduce serious chromatic errors unless it is precisely conjugated to the primary. Active primary control also reduces complexity and mass and increases system throughput, and will likely enable a full system test to the 10-10 level in the 1 g environment before launch. We plan to use thermal actuators with no mechanical disturbance, using radiative heating or cooling fingers distributed inside the cells of a honeycomb mirror. The glass would have very small but finite coefficient of expansion of ~ 5x10 -8/C. Low order modes would be controlled by front-to-back gradients and high order modes by local rib expansion and contraction. Finite element models indicate that for a mirror with n cells up to n Zernike modes can be corrected to better than 90% fidelity, with still higher accuracy for the lower modes. An initial demonstration has been made with a borosilicate honeycomb mirror. Interferometric measurements show a single cell influence function with 300 nm stroke and ~5 minute time constant.

  11. Inhibition of volume-activated chloride currents in endothelial cells by chromones.

    PubMed Central

    Heinke, S.; Szücs, G.; Norris, A.; Droogmans, G.; Nilius, B.

    1995-01-01

    1. We have studied the effects of the reported chloride channel blocker, sodium cromoglycate, on volume-activated Cl- currents in endothelial cells from bovine pulmonary artery by means of the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Cl- currents were activated by challenging the cells with a hypotonic extracellular solution of 60% of the normal osmolarity. 2. Half maximal activation of the current at +95 mV occurred after exposure of the cells for 148 +/- 10 s (n = 6) to hypotonic solution (HTS). At the same membrane potential but in the presence of 100 microM sodium cromoglycate (disodium-1,3-bis (2'-carboxylate-chromone-5'-yloxy)-2-hydroxy-propane) activation was delayed (253 +/- 25 s, n = 6) and the maximal current amplitude was reduced to 63 +/- 7% of the control (n = 13). 3. In comparison, an equimolar concentration of NPPB (5-nitro-2(3-phenyl) propylamino-benzoic acid), another Cl- channel blocker, completely blocked the volume-activated current in less than 20 s. 4. Sodium cromoglycate, applied at the time when the HTS-induced current was completely activated, dose-dependently inhibited this current with a concentration for half maximal inhibition of 310 +/- 70 microM. Data for nedocromil sodium were not significantly different from those for sodium cromoglycate. 5. Sodium cromoglycate, loaded into the endothelial cells via the patch pipette in ruptured patches, resulted in a decline of the HTS activated current with a time course that was compatible with diffusion of the compound from the pipette into the cell.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8564197

  12. Divergent contributions of conserved active site residues to transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases I and II.

    PubMed

    Viktorovskaya, Olga V; Engel, Krysta L; French, Sarah L; Cui, Ping; Vandeventer, Paul J; Pavlovic, Emily M; Beyer, Ann L; Kaplan, Craig D; Schneider, David A

    2013-09-12

    Multisubunit RNA polymerases (msRNAPs) exhibit high sequence and structural homology, especially within their active sites, which is generally thought to result in msRNAP functional conservation. However, we show that mutations in the trigger loop (TL) in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) yield phenotypes unexpected from studies of Pol II. For example, a well-characterized gain-of-function mutation in Pol II results in loss of function in Pol I (Pol II: rpb1- E1103G; Pol I: rpa190-E1224G). Studies of chimeric Pol II enzymes hosting Pol I or Pol III TLs suggest that consequences of mutations that alter TL dynamics are dictated by the greater enzymatic context and not solely the TL sequence. Although the rpa190-E1224G mutation diminishes polymerase activity, when combined with mutations that perturb Pol I catalysis, it enhances polymerase function, similar to the analogous Pol II mutation. These results suggest that Pol I and Pol II have different rate-limiting steps.

  13. Application of calcium peroxide activated with Fe(II)-EDDS complex in trichloroethylene degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Miao, Zhouwei; Xu, Minhui; Fu, Xiaori; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to assess the application of calcium peroxide (CP) activated with Fe(II) chelated by (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinic acid (EDDS) to enhance trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation in aqueous solution. It was indicated that EDDS prevented soluble iron from precipitation, and the optimum molar ratio of Fe(II)/EDDS to accelerate TCE degradation was 1/1. The influences of initial TCE, CP and Fe(II)-EDDS concentration were also investigated. The combination of CP and Fe(II)-EDDS complex rendered the efficient degradation of TCE at near neutral pH range. Chemical probe and scavenger tests identified that TCE degradation mainly owed to the oxidation of HO while O2(-) promoted HO generation. Cl(-), HCO3(-) and humic acid were found to inhibit CP/Fe(II)-EDDS performance on different levels. In conclusion, the application of CP activated with Fe(II)-EDDS complex is a promising technology in chemical remediation of groundwater, while further research in practical implementation is needed. PMID:27351899

  14. Application of calcium peroxide activated with Fe(II)-EDDS complex in trichloroethylene degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Miao, Zhouwei; Xu, Minhui; Fu, Xiaori; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to assess the application of calcium peroxide (CP) activated with Fe(II) chelated by (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinic acid (EDDS) to enhance trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation in aqueous solution. It was indicated that EDDS prevented soluble iron from precipitation, and the optimum molar ratio of Fe(II)/EDDS to accelerate TCE degradation was 1/1. The influences of initial TCE, CP and Fe(II)-EDDS concentration were also investigated. The combination of CP and Fe(II)-EDDS complex rendered the efficient degradation of TCE at near neutral pH range. Chemical probe and scavenger tests identified that TCE degradation mainly owed to the oxidation of HO while O2(-) promoted HO generation. Cl(-), HCO3(-) and humic acid were found to inhibit CP/Fe(II)-EDDS performance on different levels. In conclusion, the application of CP activated with Fe(II)-EDDS complex is a promising technology in chemical remediation of groundwater, while further research in practical implementation is needed.

  15. Active region upflows. II. Data driven magnetohydrodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galsgaard, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Huang, Z.; Presmann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Observations of many active regions show a slow systematic outflow/upflow from their edges lasting from hours to days. At present no physical explanation has been proven, while several suggestions have been put forward. Aims: This paper investigates one possible method for maintaining these upflows assuming, that convective motions drive the magnetic field to initiate them through magnetic reconnection. Methods: We use Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data to provide an initial potential 3D magnetic field of the active region NOAA 11123 on 2010 November 13 where the characteristic upflow velocities are observed. A simple 1D hydrostatic atmospheric model covering the region from the photosphere to the corona is derived. Local correlation tracking of the magnetic features in the HMI data is used to derive a proxy for the time dependent velocity field. The time dependent evolution of the system is solved using a resistive 3D magnetohydrodynamic code. Results: The magnetic field contains several null points located well above the photosphere, with their fan planes dividing the magnetic field into independent open and closed flux domains. The stressing of the interfaces between the different flux domains is expected to provide locations where magnetic reconnection can take place and drive systematic flows. In this case, the region between the closed and open flux is identified as the region where observations find the systematic upflows. Conclusions: In the present experiment, the driving only initiates magneto-acoustic waves without driving any systematic upflows at any of the flux interfaces. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Evaluation of anti-diabetic activity of Glucova Active Tablet on Type I and Type II diabetic model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Hardik; Patel, Sejal; Patel, Ghanshyam; Paranjape, Archana

    2014-01-01

    Background: Glucova Active Tablet is a proprietary Ayurvedic formulation with ingredients reported for anti-hyperglycemic, anti-hyperlipidemic activity and antioxidant properties. Objective: Evaluation of anti-diabetic activity of Glucova Active Tablet on Type I and Type II diabetic model in rats. Materials and Methods: Experimental Type I diabetes was induced in 24 albino rats with intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Type II diabetes was induced in 18 albino rats by intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg) along with high fat diet. The rats were divided in 5 groups for Type I model and 4 groups for Type II model. Normal control group was kept common for both experimental models. Glucova Active Tablet (108 mg/kg) treatment was provided for 28 days twice daily orally. Fasting blood glucose level, serum lipid profile and liver anti-oxidant parameters like superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione was carried out in both experimental models. Pancreas histopathology was also done. Statistical analysis were done by ‘analysis of variance’ test followed by post hoc Tukey's test, with significant level of P < 0.05. Results and Discussion: Glucova Active Tablet showed significant effect on fasting blood glucose level. It also showed significant alteration in lipid profile and antioxidant parameters. Histopathology study revealed restoration of beta cells in pancreas in Glucova Active Tablet treated group. Conclusion: Finding of this study concludes that Glucova Active Tablet has shown promising anti-diabetic activity in Type I and Type II diabetic rats. It was also found showing good anti-hyperlipidemic activity and anti-oxidant property. PMID:24948860

  17. Variability of Gross Tumor Volume Delineation in Head-and-Neck Cancer Using PET/CT Fusion, Part II: The Impact of a Contouring Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Berson, Anthony M. Stein, Nicholas F.; Riegel, Adam C.; Destian, Sylvie; Ng, Tracy; Tena, Lawrence B.; Mitnick, Robin J.; Heiba, Sherif

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a gross tumor volume (GTV) contouring protocol on interobserver variability between 4 physicians in positron emission therapy/computed tomography (PET/CT) treatment planning of head-and-neck cancer. A GTV contouring protocol for PET/CT treatment planning was developed utilizing 4 stages: Preliminary contouring on CT alone, determination of appropriate PET windowing, accurate image registration, and modification of CT contouring with correctly formatted PET/CT display and rules for modality disagreement. Two neuroradiologists and 2 radiation oncologists (designated as A, B, C, and D, respectively) were given a tutorial of PET/CT coregistered imaging individualized to their skill level, which included a step-by-step explanation of the protocol with clinical examples. Opportunities for questions and hands-on practice were given. The physicians were asked to re-contour 16 head-and-neck patients from Part I on PET/CT fusion imaging. Differences in volume magnitude were analyzed for statistical significance by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t-tests ({alpha} < 0.05). Volume overlap was analyzed for statistical significance using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests ({alpha} < 0.05). Volume overlap increased significantly from Part I to Part II (p < 0.05). One previously significant difference between physicians disappeared with the protocol in place. The mean fusion volume of Physician C, however, remained significantly larger than that of Physician D (p < 0.01). This result is unchanged from Part I. The multidisciplinary contouring protocol significantly improved the coincidence of GTVs contoured by multiple physicians. The magnitudes of the volumes showed marginal improvement in consistency. Developing an institutional contouring protocol for PET/CT treatment planning is highly recommended to reduce interobserver variability.

  18. Is Peroxiredoxin II's peroxidase activity strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes?

    PubMed

    Benfeitas, Rui; Selvaggio, Gianluca; Antunes, Fernando; Coelho, Pedro; Salvador, Armindo

    2014-10-01

    H2O2 elimination in human erythrocytes is mainly carried out by catalase (Cat), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) and the more recently discovered peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2). However, the contribution of Prx2 to H2O2 consumption is still unclear. Prx2's high reactivity with H2O2 (kPrx2=10×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kCat =7×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kGPx1 =4×10(7) M(-1)s(-1)) and high abundance ([Prx2]= 570µM, [Cat]= 32µM, [GPx1]= 1µM) suggest that under low H2O2 supply rates it should consume >99% of the H2O2. However, extensive evidence indicates that in intact erythrocytes Prx2 contributes no more than Cat to H2O2 consumption. In order for this to be attained, Prx2's effective rate constant with H2O2would have to be just ~10(5) M(-1)s(-1), much lower than that determined in multiple experiments with the purified proteins. Nevertheless, nearly all Prx2 is oxidized within 1min of exposing erythrocytes to a H2O2 bolus, which is inconsistent with an irreversible inhibition. A mathematical model of the H2O2 metabolism in human erythrocytes [Benfeitas et al. (2014) Free Radic. Biol. Med.] where Prx2 either has a low kPrx2 or is subject to a strong (>99%) but readily reversible inhibition achieves quantitative agreement with detailed experimental observations of the responses of the redox status of Prx2 in human erythrocytes and suggests functional advantages of this design (see companion abstract). By contrast, a variant where Prx2 is fully active with kPrx2=10(8) M(-1)s(-1) shows important qualitative discrepancies. Altogether, these results suggest that Prx2's peroxidase activity is strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes. We acknowledge fellowship SFRH/BD/51199/2010, grants PEst-C/SAU/LA0001/2013-2014, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0612/2013, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0313/2014, and FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-020978 (PTDC/QUI-BIQ/119657/2010) co-financed by FEDER through the COMPETE program and by FCT.

  19. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This volume contains the appendices that provide additional environment, safety, and health (ES and H) information to complement Volume 1 of this Standard. Appendix A provides a set of candidate DOE ES and H directives and external regulations, organized by hazard types that may be used to identify potentially applicable directives to a specific facility disposition activity. Appendix B offers examples and lessons learned that illustrate implementation of ES and H approaches discussed in Section 3 of Volume 1. Appendix C contains ISMS performance expectations to guide a project team in developing and implementing an effective ISMS and in developing specific performance criteria for use in facility disposition. Appendix D provides guidance for identifying potential Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) when decommissioning facilities fall under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, Liability Act (CERCLA) process. Appendix E discusses ES and H considerations for dispositioning facilities by privatization. Appendix F is an overview of the WSS process. Appendix G provides a copy of two DOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards memoranda that form the bases for some of the guidance discussed within the Standard. Appendix H gives information on available hazard analysis techniques and references. Appendix I provides a supplemental discussion to Sections 3.3.4, Hazard Baseline Documentation, and 3.3.6, Environmental Permits. Appendix J presents a sample readiness evaluation checklist.

  20. Chlorotoxin does not inhibit volume-regulated, calcium-activated and cyclic AMP-activated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Maertens, C; Wei, L; Tytgat, J; Droogmans, G; Nilius, B

    2000-02-01

    It was the aim of this study to look for a high-affinity and selective polypeptide toxin, which could serve as a probe for the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) or the calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC). We have partially purified chlorotoxin, including new and homologous short chain insectotoxins, from the crude venom of Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus (Lqq) by means of gel filtration chromatography. Material eluting between 280 and 420 min, corresponding to fractions 15-21, was lyophilized and tested on VRAC and CaCC, using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We have also tested the commercially available chlorotoxin on VRAC, CaCC, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and on the glioma specific chloride channel (GCC). VRAC and the correspondent current, I(Cl,swell), was activated in Cultured Pulmonary Artery Endothelial (CPAE) cells by a 25% hypotonic solution. Neither of the fractions 16-21 significantly inhibited I(Cl,swell) (n=4-5). Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents, I(Cl,Ca), activated by loading T84 cells via the patch pipette with 1 microM free Ca(2+), were not inhibited by any of the tested fractions (15-21), (n=2-5). Chlorotoxin (625 nM) did neither effect I(Cl,swell) nor I(Cl,Ca) (n=4-5). The CFTR channel, transiently transfected in COS cells and activated by a cocktail containing IBMX and forskolin, was not affected by 1.2 microM chlorotoxin (n=5). In addition, it did not affect currents through GCC. We conclude that submicromolar concentrations of chlorotoxin do not block volume-regulated, Ca(2+)-activated and CFTR chloride channels and that it can not be classified as a general chloride channel toxin.

  1. Type II Activation of Macrophages and Microglia by Immune Complexes Enhances Th17 Biasing in an IL-6-Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Sarrabeth; La Flamme, Anne Camille

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages can be activated into several distinct activation states. One of these states, type II activation, has a regulatory phenotype characterized by decreased IL-12 and increased IL-10, and has been shown to bias naïve CD4+ T cells to a Th2 response. Microglia, the resident macrophage-like cells in the central nervous system (CNS), are important contributors to neuroinflammation and, thus, we investigated if type II activated microglia could bias CD4+ T cell responses in a similar manner as type II activated macrophages. Using immune complex ligation in the presence of LPS to induce type II activation, we found that both type II macrophages and type II microglia biased CD4+ T cell responses in vitro to express increased levels of IL-17A and CD124. The enhanced IL-17A production occurred independently of IL-6, and IL-10 and IL-12, which were key regulators of IFN-γ production, but were not involved in the increased IL-17A. Finally, we found that another type II-activating compound, glatiramer acetate, did not bias CD4+ T cells to produce enhanced IL-17A. Taken together, this study demonstrates that microglia can be type II activated and, similarly to type II macrophages, can bias CD4+ T cell responses; however, depending on the type II stimulus, the effect on CD4+ T cell subset differentiation may vary. PMID:27732670

  2. REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE APPOINTED BY THE MINISTER FOR EDUCATION AND SCIENCE TO INVESTIGATE THE PROPOSAL TO ESTABLISH A COLLEGE OF ADVANCED EDUCATION AT BATHURST. VOLUMES I AND II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    VOLUME I OF THIS STUDY IN SUPPORT OF THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A COLLEGE OF ADVANCED EDUCATION IN BATHURST, AUSTRALIA, CONTAINS THE TEXT OF THE RESEARCH, ARGUMENTS, AND PROPOSALS. THE APPENDIXES IN VOLUME II INCLUDE THE AMPLIFYING CHARTS, TABLES, QUESTIONNAIRES, SURVEY RESULTS, ETC. THIS PROPOSED COLLEGE DIFFERS IN CONCEPT FROM THE USUAL AMERICAN…

  3. Promiscuous activity of ER glucosidase II discovered through donor specificity analysis of UGGT

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Atsushi; Totani, Kiichiro; Matsuo, Ichiro; Ito, Yukishige

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} UGGT has a narrow donor specificity. {yields} UGGT gave several non-natural high-mannose-type glycans. {yields} G-II has a promiscuous activity as broad specificity hexosidase. -- Abstract: In glycoprotein quality control system in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), UGGT (UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase) and glucosidase II (G-II) play key roles. UGGT serves as a glycoprotein folding sensor by virtue of its unique specificity to glucosylate glycoproteins at incompletely folded stage. By using various UDP-Glc analogues, we first analyzed donor specificity of UGGT, which was proven to be rather narrow. However, marginal activity was observed with UDP-galactose and UDP-glucuronic acid as well as with 3-, 4- and 6-deoxy glucose analogues to give corresponding transfer products. Intriguingly, G-II smoothly converted all of them back to Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}, providing an indication that G-II has a promiscuous activity as a broad specificity hexosidase.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of the synthetic peptide scolopendrasin ii from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Nam; Lee, Joon Ha; Kim, In-Woo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Yun, Eun-Young; Nam, Sung-Hee; Ahn, Mi-Young; Jeong, Mihye; Kang, Dong-Chul; Lee, In Hee; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2013-10-28

    The centipede Scolopendra subpinipes mutilans is a medicinally important arthropod species. However, its transcriptome is not currently available and transcriptome analysis would be useful in providing insight into a molecular level approach. Hence, we performed de novo RNA sequencing of S. subpinipes mutilans using next-generation sequencing. We generated a novel peptide (scolopendrasin II) based on a SVM algorithm, and biochemically evaluated the in vitro antimicrobial activity of scolopendrasin II against various microbes. Scolopendrasin II showed antibacterial activities against gram-positive and -negative bacterial strains, including the yeast Candida albicans and antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacteria, as determined by a radial diffusion assay and colony count assay without hemolytic activity. In addition, we confirmed that scolopendrasin II bound to the surface of bacteria through a specific interaction with lipoteichoic acid and a lipopolysaccharide, which was one of the bacterial cell-wall components. In conclusion, our results suggest that scolopendrasin II may be useful for developing peptide antibiotics. PMID:23801249

  5. Cortical Activity during a Highly-Trained Resistance Exercise Movement Emphasizing Force, Power or Volume.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Shawn D; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Comstock, Brett A; Maresh, Carl M; Volek, Jeff S; Denegar, Craig R; Kraemer, William J

    2012-11-20

    Cortical activity is thought to reflect the biomechanical properties of movement (e.g., force or velocity of movement), but fatigue and movement familiarity are important factors that require additional consideration in electrophysiological research. The purpose of this within-group quantitative electroencephalogram (EEG) investigation was to examine changes in cortical activity amplitude and location during four resistance exercise movement protocols emphasizing rate (PWR), magnitude (FOR), or volume (VOL) of force production, while accounting for movement familiarity and fatigue. EEG signals were recorded during each complete repetition and were then grouped by functional region, processed to eliminate artifacts, and averaged to compare overall differences in the magnitude and location of cortical activity between protocols over the course of six sets. Biomechanical, biochemical, and exertional data were collected to contextualize electrophysiological data. The most fatiguing protocols were accompanied by the greatest increases in cortical activity. Furthermore, despite non-incremental loading and lower force levels, VOL displayed the largest increases in cortical activity over time and greatest motor and sensory activity overall. Our findings suggest that cortical activity is strongly related to aspects of fatigue during a high intensity resistance exercise movement.

  6. Cortical Activity during a Highly-Trained Resistance Exercise Movement Emphasizing Force, Power or Volume

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Shawn D.; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Comstock, Brett A.; Maresh, Carl M.; Volek, Jeff S.; Denegar, Craig R.; Kraemer, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Cortical activity is thought to reflect the biomechanical properties of movement (e.g., force or velocity of movement), but fatigue and movement familiarity are important factors that require additional consideration in electrophysiological research. The purpose of this within-group quantitative electroencephalogram (EEG) investigation was to examine changes in cortical activity amplitude and location during four resistance exercise movement protocols emphasizing rate (PWR), magnitude (FOR), or volume (VOL) of force production, while accounting for movement familiarity and fatigue. EEG signals were recorded during each complete repetition and were then grouped by functional region, processed to eliminate artifacts, and averaged to compare overall differences in the magnitude and location of cortical activity between protocols over the course of six sets. Biomechanical, biochemical, and exertional data were collected to contextualize electrophysiological data. The most fatiguing protocols were accompanied by the greatest increases in cortical activity. Furthermore, despite non-incremental loading and lower force levels, VOL displayed the largest increases in cortical activity over time and greatest motor and sensory activity overall. Our findings suggest that cortical activity is strongly related to aspects of fatigue during a high intensity resistance exercise movement. PMID:24961265

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinase is required for the behavioural desensitization that occurs after repeated injections of angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Vento, Peter J; Daniels, Derek

    2012-12-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) acts on central angiotensin type 1 (AT(1)) receptors to increase water and saline intake. Prolonged exposure to Ang II in cell culture models results in a desensitization of the AT(1) receptor that is thought to involve receptor internalization, and a behavioural correlate of this desensitization has been shown in rats after repeated central injections of Ang II. Specifically, rats given repeated injections of Ang II drink less water than control animals after a subsequent test injection of Ang II. In the same conditions, however, repeated injections of Ang II have no effect on Ang II-induced saline intake. Given earlier studies indicating that separate intracellular signalling pathways mediate Ang II-induced water and saline intake, we hypothesized that the desensitization observed in rats may be incomplete, leaving the receptor able to activate mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases (ERK1/2), which play a role in Ang II-induced saline intake without affecting water intake. In support of this hypothesis, we found no difference in MAP kinase phosphorylation after an Ang II test injection in rats given prior treatment with repeated injections of vehicle, Ang II or Sar(1),Ile(4),Ile(8)-Ang II (SII), an Ang II analogue that activates MAP kinase without G protein coupling. In addition, we found that pretreatment with the MAP kinase inhibitor U0126 completely blocked the desensitizing effect of repeated Ang II injections on water intake. Furthermore, Ang II-induced water intake was reduced to a similar extent by repeated injections of Ang II or SII. The results suggest that G protein-independent signalling is sufficient to produce behavioural desensitization of the angiotensin system and that the desensitization requires MAP kinase activation.

  8. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this volume is limited to an assessment of the relative effects that particular choices of nuclear-power systems, for whatever reasons, may have on the possible spread of nuclear-weapons capabilities. This volume addresses the concern that non-nuclear-weapons states may be able to initiate efforts to acquire or to improve nuclear-weapons capabilities through civilian nuclear-power programs; it also addresses the concern that subnational groups may obtain and abuse the nuclear materials or facilities of such programs, whether in nuclear-weapons states (NWS's) or nonnuclear-weapons states (NNW's). Accordingly, this volume emphasizes one important factor in such decisions, the resistance of nuclear-power systems to the proliferation of nuclear-weapons capabilities.

  9. Experimental and DFT characterization, antioxidant and anticancer activities of a Cu(II)-irbesartan complex: structure-antihypertensive activity relationships in Cu(II)-sartan complexes.

    PubMed

    Islas, María S; Luengo, Alicia; Franca, Carlos A; Merino, Mercedes Griera; Calleros, Laura; Rodriguez-Puyol, Manuel; Lezama, Luis; Ferrer, Evelina G; Williams, Patricia A M

    2016-10-01

    The coordination compound of the antihypertensive ligand irbesartan (irb) with copper(II) (CuIrb) was synthesized and characterized by FTIR, FT-Raman, UV-visible, reflectance and EPR spectroscopies. Experimental evidence allowed the implementation of structural and vibrational studies by theoretical calculations made in the light of the density functional theory (DFT). This compound was designed to induce structural modifications on the ligand. No antioxidant effects were displayed by both compounds, though CuIrb behaved as a weak 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH(·)) scavenger (IC50 = 425 μM). The measurements of the contractile capacity on human mesangial cell lines showed that CuIrb improved the antihypertensive effects of the parent medication. In vitro cell growth inhibition against prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP and DU 145) was measured for CuIrb, irbesartan and copper(II). These cell lines have been selected since the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor (that was blocked by the angiotensin receptor blockers, ARB) has been identified in them. The complex exerted anticancer behavior (at 100 μM) improving the activity of the ligand. Flow cytometry determinations were used to determine late apoptotic mechanisms of cell death. Experimental and DFT characterization of an irbesartan copper(II) complex has been performed. The complex exhibits low scavenging activity against DPPH(·) and significant growth inhibition of LNCaP and DU 145 prostate cancer cell lines. Flow cytometry determinations were used to determine late apoptotic mechanisms of cell death. This compound improved the antihypertensive effect of irbesartan. This effect was observed earlier for the mononuclear Cu-candesartan complex, but not in structurally modified sartans forming dinuclear or octanuclear Cu-sartan compounds.

  10. Synthesis, spectral characterization and antioxidant activity studies of a bidentate Schiff base, 5-methyl thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde-carbohydrazone and its Cd(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harinath, Y.; Harikishore Kumar Reddy, D.; Naresh Kumar, B.; Apparao, Ch.; Seshaiah, K.

    2013-01-01

    A new Schiff base bidentate ligand (L), 5-methyl thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde-carbohydrazone and its metal (Cu(II), Cd(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II)) complexes with general stoichiometry [M(L)2X2] (where X = Cl) were synthesized. The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, ESR spectral analyses, and molar conductance studies. The molar conductance data revealed that all the metal chelates are non-electrolytes. IR spectra showed that ligand (L) is coordinated to the metal ions in a bidentate manner with N and O donor sites of the azomethine-N, and carbonyl-O. ESR and UV-Vis spectral data showed that the geometrical structure of the complexes are Orthorhombic. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of the ligand and its complexes was determined by hydroxyl radical scavenging, DPPH, NO, reducing power methods in vitro. The obtained IC50 value of the DPPH activity for the copper complex (IC50 = 66.4 μm) was higher than other compounds. Microbial assay of the above complexes against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Rhizocotonia bataticola and Alternaria alternata showed that copper complex exhibited higher activity than the other complexes.

  11. Phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from lung, isolated alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived adenomas.

    PubMed Central

    Pool, G L; Bubacz, D G; Lumb, R H; Mason, R J

    1983-01-01

    We have examined phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from rat and mouse whole lung, isolated rat alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived mouse pulmonary adenomas. We report an enrichment in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol (but not phosphatidylinositol) protein-catalysed transfer in the type II cell and adenoma cytosols compared with the whole-lung cytosols. The activities from these cytosols were resolved using column chromatofocusing, which clearly demonstrated the presence of a phosphatidylcholine-specific transfer protein in each of the four tissues. In addition, two proteins (rat) or three proteins (mouse) catalysing both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol transfer were resolved from whole lung, whereas in both the rat isolated alveolar type II cells and the mouse type II cell-derived adenomas one of these less specific proteins is not present. PMID:6661189

  12. 8 CFR 329.5 - Natives of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... service during World War II. 329.5 Section 329.5 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Natives of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II. (a) A person desiring to... Armed Forces in the Far East, or (ii) Within the Commonwealth Army of the Philippines, the...

  13. 8 CFR 329.5 - Natives of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... service during World War II. 329.5 Section 329.5 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II. (a) A person desiring to naturalize... Armed Forces in the Far East, or (ii) Within the Commonwealth Army of the Philippines, the...

  14. Synthesis and Antiproliferative Activity of Steroidal Thiosemicarbazone Platinum (Pt(II)) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanmin; Kong, Erbin; Gan, Chunfang; Liu, Zhiping; Lin, Qifu; Cui, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Steroidal compounds exhibit particular physiological activities. In this paper, some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes were synthesized by the condensation of steroidal ketones with thiosemicarbazide using estrone, chenodeoxycholic acid, and 7-deoxycholic acid as starting materials and complexation of steroidal thiosesemicarbazones with Pt(II). The complexes were characterized by IR, NMR, and MS, and their antiproliferative activities were evaluated. The results showed that some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes displayed moderate cytotoxicity to HeLa and Bel-7404 cells. Thereinto, complex 6 showed an excellent inhibited selectivity to HeLa cells with an IC50 value of 9.2 μM and SI value of 21.7. At the same time, all compounds were almost inactive to HEK293T (normal kidney epithelial cells). The information obtained from the studies may be useful for the design of novel chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26635511

  15. Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies. II. Active Galactic Nucleus Activity from Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2012-01-01

    We quantify the active galactic nucleus (AGN) contribution to the mid-infrared (mid-IR) and the total infrared (IR, 8-1000 μm) emission in a complete volume-limited sample of 53 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L IR = 1011-1012 L ⊙). We decompose the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph low-resolution 5-38 μm spectra of the LIRGs into AGN and starburst components using clumpy torus models and star-forming galaxy templates, respectively. We find that 50% (25/50) of local LIRGs have an AGN component detected with this method. There is good agreement between these AGN detections through mid-IR spectral decomposition and other AGN indicators, such as the optical spectral class, mid-IR spectral features, and X-ray properties. Taking all the AGN indicators together, the AGN detection rate in the individual nuclei of LIRGs is ~62%. The derived AGN bolometric luminosities are in the range L bol(AGN) = (0.4-50) × 1043 erg s-1. The AGN bolometric contribution to the IR luminosities of the galaxies is generally small, with 70% of LIRGs having L bol[AGN]/L IR <= 0.05. Only ~= 8% of local LIRGs have a significant AGN bolometric contribution L bol[AGN]/L IR > 0.25. From the comparison of our results with literature results of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L IR = 1012-1013 L ⊙), we confirm that in the local universe the AGN bolometric contribution to the IR luminosity increases with the IR luminosity of the galaxy/system. If we add up the AGN bolometric luminosities we find that AGNs only account for 5%^{+8%}_{-3%} of the total IR luminosity produced by local LIRGs (with and without AGN detections). This proves that the bulk of the IR luminosity of local LIRGs is due to star formation activity. Taking the newly determined IR luminosity density of LIRGs in the local universe, we then estimate an AGN IR luminosity density of ΩAGN IR = 3 × 105 L ⊙ Mpc-3 in LIRGs. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet

  16. [Impact of the activation of intention to perform physical activity in type II diabetics: a randomized clinical trial].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marco Antonio Vieira; Gouvêa, Giovana Renata; Claro, Anielle Fabiane Buoso; Agondi, Rúbia de Freitas; Cortellazzi, Karine Laura; Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Meneghim, Marcelo de Castro; Mialhe, Fábio Luiz

    2015-03-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent disease among the adult Brazilian population, and one that can be controlled by interventions such as physical activity, among others. The aim of this randomized controlled study was to evaluate the impact of a traditional motivational strategy, associated with the activation of intention theory, on adherence to physical activity in patients with type II, diabetes mellitus who are part of the Unified Health System (SUS). Participants were divided into a control group (CG) and an intervention group (IG). In both groups, the traditional motivational strategy was applied, but the activation of intention strategy was only applied to the IG Group. After a two-month follow-up, statistically significant differences were verified between the groups, related to the practice of walking (p = 0.0050), number of days per week (p = 0.0076), minutes per day (p = 0.0050) and minutes walking per week (p = 0.0015). At the end of the intervention, statistically significant differences in abdominal circumference (p = 0.0048) between the groups were observed. The conclusion drawn is that the activation of intention strategy had greater impact on adherence to physical activity and reduction in abdominal circumference in type II diabetics, than traditional motivational strategy.

  17. Divergent contributions of conserved active site residues to transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases I and II

    PubMed Central

    Viktorovskaya, Olga V.; Engel, Krysta L.; French, Sarah L.; Cui, Ping; Vandeventer, Paul J.; Pavlovic, Emily M.; Beyer, Ann L.; Kaplan, Craig D.; Schneider, David A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Multisubunit RNA polymerases (msRNAPs) exhibit high sequence and structural homology, especially within their active sites, which is generally thought to result in msRNAP functional conservation. However, we show that mutations in the trigger loop (TL) in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) yield phenotypes unexpected from studies of Pol II. For example, a well-characterized gain-of-function mutation in Pol II results in loss-of-function in Pol I [Pol II: rpb1- E1103G; Pol I: rpa190-E1224G]. Studies of chimeric Pol II enzymes hosting Pol I or Pol III TLs suggest that consequences of mutations that alter TL dynamics are dictated by the greater enzymatic context and not solely the TL sequence. Although the rpa190-E1224G mutation diminishes polymerase function, when combined with mutations that perturb Pol I catalysis, it enhances polymerase function, similar to the analogous Pol II mutation. These results suggest that Pol I and Pol II have different rate-limiting steps. PMID:23994471

  18. Active transport, substrate specificity, and methylation of Hg(II) in anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Schasfer, Jeffra; Rocks, Sara; Zheng, Wang; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua; Morel, Francois M

    2011-01-01

    The formation of methylmercury (MeHg), which is biomagnified in aquatic food chains and poses a risk to human health, is effected by some iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (FeRB and SRB) in anaerobic environments. However, very little is known regarding the mechanism of uptake of inorganic Hg by these organisms, in part because of the inherent difficulty in measuring the intracellular Hg concentration. By using the FeRB Geobacter sulfurreducens and the SRB Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as model organisms, we demonstrate that Hg(II) uptake occurs by active transport. We also establish that Hg(II) uptake by G. sulfurreducens is highly dependent on the characteristics of the thiols that bind Hg(II) in the external medium, with some thiols promoting uptake and methylation and others inhibiting both. The Hg(II) uptake system of D. desulfuricans has a higher affinity than that of G. sulfurreducens and promotes Hg methylation in the presence of stronger complexing thiols. We observed a tight coupling between Hg methylation and MeHg export from the cell, suggesting that these two processes may serve to avoid the build up and toxicity of cellular Hg. Our results bring up the question of whether cellular Hg uptake is specific for Hg(II) or accidental, occurring via some essential metal importer. Our data also point at Hg(II) complexation by thiols as an important factor controlling Hg methylation in anaerobic environments.

  19. Comprehensive Study of Educational Technology Programs Authorized from 1989-1992. Volume III: Level II Model Technology School Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    This report, the third in a series of six, evaluates the 10 school districts that received grants from the California Department of Education to develop Level II Model Technology School (MTS) Projects intended to enhance instruction and student learning through a combination of curriculum improvement and integration of technology within a single…

  20. Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (15th, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, June 23-26, 1970). Final Report and Working Papers, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Susan Shattuck: Bresie, Mayellen

    Volume 2 contains 13 working papers from the 15th Seminar on Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials. The papers are: (1) A Report on Bibliographic Activities; (2) Microfilm Projects Newsletter; (3) Role of Latin American Legal Material in the Social Science Research Library; (4) A description of sources for Legal and Social Science…