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Sample records for activity acetylene reduction

  1. Nitrogenase activity in cyanobacteria measured by the acetylene reduction assay: a comparison between batch incubation and on-line monitoring.

    PubMed

    Staal, M; Lintel-Hekkert, S T; Harren, F; Stal, L

    2001-05-01

    A new on-line method for measuring acetylene reduction is described. It consists of a gas-flow cell connected to an electronic gas-mixing system and an automatic sample loop in the gas chromatograph. Alternatively, ethylene can be determined by using laser-based trace gas detection. The laser-based trace gas detection technique achieves a detection limit that is three orders of magnitude better than gas chromatography. We have applied the on-line method to the measurement of nitrogen fixation in a culture of the heterocystous cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena and compared it with conventional batch-type incubations. Incubation of N. spumigena in the gas-flow cell resulted in very short response times with a steady-state flux of ethylene obtained within 2 min. Nitrogenase was shown to respond immediately to changes in light and oxygen. Monitoring of nitrogenase activity could be continued for several hours without having a negative impact on nitrogen fixation rates in N. spumigena. This was not the case in batch incubations, in which changes in nitrogenase activities were recorded during incubations, probably as a result of varying oxygen concentrations. It was therefore concluded that the on-line method is superior to batch incubations when rates of nitrogenase activity are to be measured. The method is suitable for natural samples (water or sediment). PMID:11422321

  2. Effect of Acetylene on Root Respiration and Acetylene Reducing Activity in Nodulated Soya Bean

    PubMed Central

    Gerbaud, Alain

    1990-01-01

    Acetylene decreased root and nodule respiration, as measured by CO2 evolution of nodulated or non-nodulated Glycine max. An inhibition of 25 to 35% in 15 to 30 minutes occurred when 13% C2H2 was introduced in the gas flux which aerated the root nutrient solution. When the light intensity was doubled to 800 microeinsteins per square meter per second, the inhibition increased to 50% and nodule acetylene reduction activity was inhibited 50%. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667582

  3. Effect of Protein Additives on Acetylene Reduction (Nitrogen Fixation) by Rhizobium in the Presence and Absence of Soybean Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stephen J.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of protein additives on acetylene reduction (N2 fixation) by Rhizobium associated with soybean cells (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) in vitro was studied. Acetylene reduction was promoted on the basal medium supplemented with 1.4 mg of N/ml supplied as aqueous extracts of hexane-extracted soybean, red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), or peas (Pisum sativum L.). Commercial samples of α-casein, or bovine serum albumin also promoted acetylene reduction at a concentration of 1.4 mg of N/ml of basal medium, but egg albumin supplying an equal amount of nitrogen to the basal medium completely suppressed acetylene reduction. Autoclaving the aqueous extract of hexane-extracted soybean meal had no effect on its ability to promote acetylene reduction. The presence of 40 mm succinate decreased acetylene reduction with leguminous proteins supplying 1.4 mg of N/ml but promoted acetylene reduction by Rhizobium 32H1-soybean cell associations on media containing α-casein, bovine serum albumin, or egg albumin suppling 1.4 mg of N/ml. Similar results were obtained with both cowpea Rhizobium 32H1 and Rhizobium japonicum 61A96. Pure cultures of Rhizobium 32H1 developed acetylene-reducing activity in the presence of soybean extract on basal agar medium and in vermiculite supplied with N-free mineral salts plus crude soybean meal. The results suggest that in certain situations, free living Rhizobium may reduce N2 under field conditions. PMID:16659592

  4. Nitrogen Fixation (Acetylene Reduction) Associated with Duckweed (Lemnaceae) Mats

    PubMed Central

    Zuberer, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Duckweed (Lemnaceae) mats in Texas and Florida were investigated, using the acetylene reduction assay, to determine whether nitrogen fixation occurred in these floating aquatic macrophyte communities. N2-fixing microorganisms were enumerated by plating or most-probable-number techniques, using appropriate N-free media. Results of the investigations indicated that substantial N2-fixation (C2H2) was associated with duckweed mats in Texas and Florida. Acetylene reduction values ranged from 1 to 18 μmol of C2H4 g (dry weight)−1 day−1 for samples incubated aerobically in light. Dark N2 fixation was always two- to fivefold lower. 3-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (7 to 10 μM) reduced acetylene reduction to levels intermediate between light and dark incubation. Acetylene reduction was generally greatest for samples incubated anaerobically in the light. It was estimated that 15 to 20% of the N requirement of the duckweed could be supplied through biological nitrogen fixation. N2-fixing heterotrophic bacteria (105 cells g [wet weight]−1 and cyanobacteria (105 propagules g [wet weight]−1 were associated with the duckweed mats. Azotobacter sp. was not detected in these investigations. One diazotrophic isolate was classified as Klebsiella. PMID:16345992

  5. Aquatic acetylene-reduction techniques: solutions to several problems.

    PubMed

    Flett, R J; Hamilton, R D; Campbell, N E

    1976-01-01

    Previous methods of performing aquatic acetylene-reduction assays are described and several problems associated with them are discussed. A refinement of these older techniques is introduced and problems that it overcomes are also discussed. A depth profile of nitrogen fixation (C2H4 production), obtained by the refined technique, is shown for a fertilized Canadian Shield lake in the Experimental Lakes Area of northwestern Ontario. PMID:814983

  6. Application of the photoacoustic method to the measurement of acetylene reduction by nitrogenase enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, D. U.; Sthel, M. S.; Carneiro, L. O.; Franco, A. A.; Campos, A. C.; Vargas, H.

    2005-06-01

    Nitrogenase is an enzyme responsible for the reduction of the atmospheric N2 into NH4^+, which represents the key entry point of the molecular nitrogen into the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen. This enzyme is present in the rhizobial bacteroids, which are symbionts in a Leguminosae plant (Acacia Holosericea), and also reduces acetylene into ethylene at the same rate as the nitrogen reduction. Therefore, a CO2 Laser Photoacoustic system was used for detecting and monitoring the ethylene emission by the nitrogenase activity, in the rhizobial symbionts in Acacia Holosericea, when they are confined in test tubes with acetylene at two different volumes (0.1 and 0.5 ml). Ethylene concentrations are also determined in the ppm range.

  7. Effects of sulfide and low redox potential on the inhibition of nitrous oxide reduction by acetylene in Pseudomonas nautica.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K M; Cox, R P

    1992-09-01

    Membrane introduction mass spectrometry was used to investigate the inhibitory effect of acetylene on the nitrous oxide reductase activity of intact cells of Pseudomonas nautica. We studied the effects of the concentrations of nitrate and sulfide, and the redox potential, which have all been implicated in causing a decrease in the inhibitory effects of acetylene during measurements of denitrification in natural environments. There was no evidence that the concentration of nitrate influenced the effect of acetylene. Lowering the redox potential with the reductant Ti(III)-nitrilotriacetate caused a slight alleviation of acetylene inhibition. Much greater effects at the same redox potential were obtained with concentrations of sulfide in the range 1-10 microM. PMID:1526461

  8. Examining the impact of acetylene on N-fixation and the active sediment microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Heiss, Elise M.; Rogener, Mary Kate; Newell, Silvia E.; LeCleir, Gary R.; Kortebein, Sarah M.; Wilhelm, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Here we examined the impact of a commonly employed method used to measure nitrogen fixation, the acetylene reduction assay (ARA), on a marine sediment community. Historically, the ARA technique has been broadly employed for its ease of use, in spite of numerous known artifacts. To gauge the severity of these effects in a natural environment, we employed high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing to detect differences in acetylene-treated sediments vs. non-treated control sediments after a 7 h incubation. Within this short time period, significant differences were seen across all activity of microbes identified in the sediment, implying that the changes induced by acetylene occur quickly. The results have important implications for our understanding of marine nitrogen budgets. Moreover, because the ARA technique has been widely used in terrestrial and freshwater habitats, these results may be applicable to other ecosystems. PMID:26029177

  9. Potent In Vitro Antifungal Activities of Naturally Occurring Acetylenic Acids▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing-Cong; Jacob, Melissa R.; Khan, Shabana I.; Ashfaq, M. Khalid; Babu, K. Suresh; Agarwal, Ameeta K.; ElSohly, Hala N.; Manly, Susan P.; Clark, Alice M.

    2008-01-01

    Our continuing effort in antifungal natural product discovery has led to the identification of five 6-acetylenic acids with chain lengths from C16 to C20: 6-hexadecynoic acid (compound 1), 6-heptadecynoic acid (compound 2), 6-octadecynoic acid (compound 3), 6-nonadecynoic acid (compound 4), and 6-icosynoic acid (compound 5) from the plant Sommera sabiceoides. Compounds 2 and 5 represent newly isolated fatty acids. The five acetylenic acids were evaluated for their in vitro antifungal activities against Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Trichophyton rubrum by comparison with the positive control drugs amphotericin B, fluconazole, ketoconazole, caspofungin, terbinafine, and undecylenic acid. The compounds showed various degrees of antifungal activity against the 21 tested strains. Compound 4 was the most active, in particular against the dermatophytes T. mentagrophytes and T. rubrum and the opportunistic pathogens C. albicans and A. fumigatus, with MICs comparable to several control drugs. Inclusion of two commercially available acetylenic acids, 9-octadecynoic acid (compound 6) and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (compound 7), in the in vitro antifungal testing further demonstrated that the antifungal activities of the acetylenic acids were associated with their chain lengths and positional triple bonds. In vitro toxicity testing against mammalian cell lines indicated that compounds 1 to 5 were not toxic at concentrations up to 32 μM. Furthermore, compounds 3 and 4 did not produce obvious toxic effects in mice at a dose of 34 μmol/kg of body weight when administered intraperitoneally. Taking into account the low in vitro and in vivo toxicities and significant antifungal potencies, these 6-acetylenic acids may be excellent leads for further preclinical studies. PMID:18458131

  10. Highly enantioselective reductive cyclization of acetylenic aldehydes via rhodium catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jong Uk; Krische, Michael J

    2006-08-23

    Catalytic hydrogenation of acetylenic aldehydes 1a-12a using chirally modified cationic rhodium catalysts enables highly enantioselective reductive cyclization to afford cyclic allylic alcohols 1b-12b. Using an achiral hydrogenation catalyst, the chiral racemic acetylenic aldehydes 13a-15a engage in highly syn-diastereoselective reductive cyclizations to afford cyclic allylic alcohols 13b-15b. Ozonolysis of cyclization products 7b and 9b allows access to optically enriched alpha-hydroxy ketones 7c and 9c. Reductive cyclization of enyne 7a under a deuterium atmosphere provides the monodeuterated product deuterio-7b, consistent with a catalytic mechanism involving alkyne-carbonyl oxidative coupling followed by hydrogenolytic cleavage of the resulting oxametallacycle. These hydrogen-mediated transformations represent the first examples of the enantioselective reductive cyclization of acetylenic aldehydes. PMID:16910650

  11. Acetylene fuels reductive dechlorination of TCE by Dehalococcoides/Pelobacter-containing microbial consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Mao, X.; Mahandra, C.; Baesman, S. M.; Gushgari, S.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.; Liu, T.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater contamination by trichloroethene (TCE) poses a threat to health and leads to the generation of vinyl chloride (VC), a carcinogen. Dehalococcoides mccartyi is the only bacterium that can completely dechlorinate TCE to ethene (C2H4). Acetylene (C2H2) occurs in TCE-contaminated sites as a consequence of chemical degradation of TCE. Yet acetylene inhibits a variety of microbial processes including methanogesis and reductive dechlorination. Pelobacter acetylenicus and related species can metabolize acetylene via acetylene hydratase and acetaldehyde dismutatse thereby generating acetate and H2 as endproducts, which could serve as electron donor and carbon source for growth of D. mccartyi. We found that 1mM acetylene (aqueous) inhibits growth of D. mccartyi strain 195 on 0.3 mM TCE, but that the inhibition was removed after 12 days with the addition of an acetylene-utilizing isolate from San Francisco Bay, Pelobacter strain SFB93. TCE did not inhibit the growth of this Pelobacter at the concentrations tested (0.1-0.5 mM) and TCE was not consumed by strain SFB93. Co-cultures of strain 195 with strain SFB93 at 5% inoculation were established in 120 mL serum bottles containing 40 mL defined medium. TCE was supplied at a liquid concentration of 0.1 mM, with 0.1 mM acetylene and N2/CO2 (90:10 v/v) headspace at 34 °C. Co-cultures were subsequently transferred (5% vol/vol inoculation) to generate subcultures after 20 μmol TCE was reduced to VC and 36 μmol acetylene was depleted. Aqueous H2 ranged from 114 to 217 nM during TCE-dechlorination, and the cell yield of strain 195 was 3.7 ±0.3 × 107 cells μmol-1 Cl- released. In a D. mccartyi-containing enrichment culture (ANAS) under the same conditions as above, it was found that inhibition of dechlorination by acetylene was reversed after 19 days by adding SFB93. Thus we showed that a co-culture of Pelobacter SFB93 and D. mccartyi 195 could be maintained with C2H2 as the electron donor and carbon source while TCE

  12. Conformational flexibility of fused tetracenedione propellers obtained from one-pot reductive dimerization of acetylenic quinones.

    PubMed

    Vasilevsky, Sergei F; Baranov, Denis S; Mamatyuk, Victor I; Fadeev, Dmitry S; Gatilov, Yurii V; Stepanov, Aleksandr A; Vasilieva, Nadezhda V; Alabugin, Igor V

    2015-02-01

    Reductive dimerization of acetylenic anthraquinones provides synthetic access to flexible nonplanar polyaromatics with a tetracenedione core. In solution, these nonplanar, contorted polycycles exist as equilibrating mixtures of two symmetric conformers. The fused tetracenediones are easily reduced and exhibit rich electrochemical behavior. PMID:25575160

  13. Acetylene is an active-site-directed, slow-binding, reversible inhibitor of Azotobacter vinelandii hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J.

    1987-10-06

    The inhibition of purified and membrane-bound hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii by dihydrogen-free acetylene was investigated. The inhibition was a time-dependent process which exhibited first-order kinetics. Both H/sub 2/ and CO protected against the inhibition by acetylene. K/sub protect(app)/ values of 0.41 and 24 ..mu..M were derived for these gases, respectively. Both H/sub 2/-oxidizing activity and the tritium exchange capacity of the purified enzyme were inhibited at the same rate by acetylene. Removal of acetylene reversed the inhibition for both the purified and the membrane-associated form of the enzyme. The purified hydrogenases from both Rhizobium japonicum and Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 were also inhibited by acetylene in a time-dependent fashion. These findings suggest that acetylene is an active-site-directed, slow-binding, reversible inhibitor of some membrane-bound hydrogenases from aerobic bacteria.

  14. Nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction) associated with roots of winter wheat and sorghum in Nebraska.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, W L; Chakrabarty, K; Klucas, R V; Vidaver, A K

    1978-01-01

    Root segments and root-soil cores (6.5-cm diameter) from fields and nurseries of winter wheat and sorghum were tested for N2 fixation by using the acetylene reduction assay. Wheat samples (approximately 1,200) from 109 sites generally had low or no activity (0 to 3.1 nmol of C2H4 produced per h per g [dry weight] of root segments), even after 24 h of incubation. However, a commercial field of Scout 66, located in western Nebraska, exhibited appreciable activity (290 nmol of C2H4 produced per h per g [dry weight] of root segments). Of 400 sorghum lines and crosses, grain sorghums (i.e., CK-60A, Wheatland A, B517, and NP-16) generally exhibited higher nitrogenase activity than forage sorghums or winter wheats. CK-60A, a male sterile grain sorghum, was sampled at four locations and had the most consistent activity of 24 to 1,100 nmol of C2H4 produced per h per core. The maximum rate extrapolated to 2.5 g of N per hectare per day. Numerous N2-fixing bacterial isolates were obtained from wheat and sorghum roots that exhibited high nitrogenase activity. Most isolates were members of the Enterobacteriacae, i.e., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Erwinia herbicola. PMID:623458

  15. Pleomorphism and acetylene-reducing activity of free-living rhizobia.

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshiro, T; Baker, F L; Johnson, D E

    1983-01-01

    Cowpea-type Rhizobium sp. strain 32H1 and Rhizobium japonicum USDA 26 and 110 grown on a glutamate-mannitol-gluconate agar medium showed increases in the number of pleomorphic cells coincident with their acetylene-reducing activity. Pleomorphs appeared to be inhibited in growth nonuniformly, because acetylene-reducing cultures were mixtures of rod, branched (V, Y, and T), and other irregularly shaped cells. In contrast, strain USDA 10 consistently failed to reduce acetylene, even though it also could grow and yield pleomorphic cells under various conditions. With minimal inhibitory supplements (5 micrograms per ml of medium) of nalidixic acid and novobiocin as cell division inhibitors, an increase in pleomorphic cells was observed, but the inhibited cultures displayed lower acetylene-reducing activity. A study of pleomorphic cells derived in different ways indicated that not all pleomorphs reduce acetylene. Images PMID:6822472

  16. A systematic investigation of acetylene activation and hydracyanation of the activated acetylene on Aun (n = 3-10) clusters via density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Seema; Sarkar, Abir De

    2016-05-18

    A systematic investigation of the selective catalytic conversion of poisonous HCN gas through hydracyanation of C2H2 activated on Au clusters, presented here for the first time, is of paramount importance from both scientific and technological perspectives. Hydracyanation of activated acetylene on an Au-cluster based catalyst leads to vinyl isocyanide (H2C[double bond, length as m-dash]CHNC) formation, a versatile chemical intermediate. Using density functional theory, bond activation of acetylene and selective catalytic hydracyanation of activated acetylene on small gold clusters Aun (n = 3-10) have been studied through a detailed analysis of the geometric and electronic structures. Different possible complexes of Aun-CHCH have been studied and two possible modes of adsorption of acetylene over the gold clusters, namely, the π- and di-σ modes, have been observed. The hydracyanation of the acetylene molecule is found to occur via the cleavage of one of acetylene triple bonds at the cost of formation of two Au-C bonds followed by the binding of HCN to the activated C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bond via nitrogen's lone pair. Preferential binding sites for HCN and C2H2 are analyzed through Fukui function calculations, frontier molecular orbital analysis and natural population charge distribution analysis. Based on adsorption energies, odd-sized Aun clusters are found to be significantly more favorable for C2H2 adsorption with the C-C bond stretching up to 1.31 Å with respect to the C-C triple bond length of 1.21 Å in the gas phase. The stretching frequency of adsorbed complexes, C2H2/Aun, (3460 cm(-1)), decreases notably relative to the frequency of the free acetylene molecule (7948 cm(-1)), which is a signature of the bond activation of the acetylene molecule over the Au clusters. The high adsorption energy of HCN on the Au9-C2H2 complex implies the considerable binding strength and activation of C2H2 and HCN on the Au9 clusters. Due to the importance of

  17. Structure of the non-redox-active tungsten/[4Fe:4S] enzyme acetylene hydratase.

    PubMed

    Seiffert, Grazyna B; Ullmann, G Matthias; Messerschmidt, Albrecht; Schink, Bernhard; Kroneck, Peter M H; Einsle, Oliver

    2007-02-27

    The tungsten-iron-sulfur enzyme acetylene hydratase stands out from its class because it catalyzes a nonredox reaction, the hydration of acetylene to acetaldehyde. Sequence comparisons group the protein into the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family, and it contains a bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide-ligated tungsten atom and a cubane-type [4Fe:4S] cluster. The crystal structure of acetylene hydratase at 1.26 A now shows that the tungsten center binds a water molecule that is activated by an adjacent aspartate residue, enabling it to attack acetylene bound in a distinct, hydrophobic pocket. This mechanism requires a strong shift of pK(a) of the aspartate, caused by a nearby low-potential [4Fe:4S] cluster. To access this previously unrecognized W-Asp active site, the protein evolved a new substrate channel distant from where it is found in other molybdenum and tungsten enzymes. PMID:17360611

  18. Carbon dioxide reduction to methane and coupling with acetylene to form propylene catalyzed by remodeled nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-Yong; Moure, Vivian R.; Dean, Dennis R.; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2012-01-01

    A doubly substituted form of the nitrogenase MoFe protein (α-70Val→Ala, α-195His→Gln) has the capacity to catalyze the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to yield methane (CH4). Under optimized conditions, 1 nmol of the substituted MoFe protein catalyzes the formation of 21 nmol of CH4 within 20 min. The catalytic rate depends on the partial pressure of CO2 (or concentration of HCO3−) and the electron flux through nitrogenase. The doubly substituted MoFe protein also has the capacity to catalyze the unprecedented formation of propylene (H2C = CH-CH3) through the reductive coupling of CO2 and acetylene (HC≡CH). In light of these observations, we suggest that an emerging understanding of the mechanistic features of nitrogenase could be relevant to the design of synthetic catalysts for CO2 sequestration and formation of olefins. PMID:23150564

  19. High rate of N2 fixation by East Siberian cryophilic soil bacteria as determined by measuring acetylene reduction in nitrogen-poor medium solidified with gellan gum.

    PubMed

    Hara, Shintaro; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki; Desyatkin, Roman V; Hatano, Ryusuke; Tahara, Satoshi

    2009-05-01

    For evaluating N(2) fixation of diazotrophic bacteria, nitrogen-poor liquid media supplemented with at least 0.5% sugar and 0.2% agar are widely used for acetylene reduction assays. In such a soft gel medium, however, many N(2)-fixing soil bacteria generally show only trace acetylene reduction activity. Here, we report that use of a N(2) fixation medium solidified with gellan gum instead of agar promoted growth of some gellan-preferring soil bacteria. In a soft gel medium solidified with 0.3% gellan gum under appropriate culture conditions, bacterial microbiota from boreal forest bed soils and some free-living N(2)-fixing soil bacteria isolated from the microbiota exhibited 10- to 200-fold-higher acetylene reduction than those cultured in 0.2% agar medium. To determine the N(2) fixation-activating mechanism of gellan gum medium, qualitative differences in the colony-forming bacterial components from tested soil microbiota were investigated in plate cultures solidified with either agar or gellan gum for use with modified Winogradsky's medium. On 1.5% agar plates, apparently cryophilic bacterial microbiota showed strictly distinguishable microbiota according to the depth of soil in samples from an eastern Siberian Taiga forest bed. Some pure cultures of proteobacteria, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens and Burkholderia xenovorans, showed remarkable acetylene reduction. On plates solidified with 1.0% gellan gum, some soil bacteria, including Luteibacter sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Paenibacillus sp., and Arthrobacter sp., uniquely grew that had not grown in the presence of the same inoculants on agar plates. In contrast, Pseudomonas spp. and Burkholderia spp. were apparent only as minor colonies on the gellan gum plates. Moreover, only gellan gum plates allowed some bacteria, particularly those isolated from the shallow organic soil layer, to actively swarm. In consequence, gellan gum is a useful gel matrix to bring out growth potential capabilities of many soil

  20. The vanadium nitrogenase of Azotobacter chroococcum. Reduction of acetylene and ethylene to ethane.

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, M J; Eady, R R; Eldridge, M E

    1988-01-01

    1. The vanadium (V-) nitrogenase of Azobacter chroococcum transfers up to 7.4% of the electrons used in acetylene (C2H2) reduction for the formation of ethane (C2H6). The apparent Km for C2H2 (6 kPa) is the same for either ethylene (C2H4) or ethane (C2H6) formation and much higher than the reported Km values for C2H2 reduction to C2H4 by molybdenum (Mo-) nitrogenases. Reduction of C2H2 in 2H2O yields predominantly [cis-2H2]ethylene. 2. The ratio of electron flux yielding C2H6 to that yielding C2H4 (the C2H6/C2H4 ratio) is increased by raising the ratio of Fe protein to VFe protein and by increasing the assay temperature up to at least 40 degrees C. pH values above 7.5 decrease the C2H6/C2H4 ratio. 3. C2H4 and C2H6 formation from C2H2 by V-nitrogenase are not inhibited by H2. CO inhibits both processes much less strongly than it inhibits C2H4 formation from C2H2 with Mo-nitrogenase. 4. Although V-nitrogenase also catalyses the slow CO-sensitive reduction of C2H4 to C2H6, free C2H4 is not an intermediate in C2H6 formation from C2H2. 5. Propyne (CH3C identical to CH) is not reduced by the V-nitrogenase. 6. Some implications of these results for the mechanism of C2H6 formation by the V-nitrogenase are discussed. PMID:3162672

  1. Acetylene hydratase: a non-redox enzyme with tungsten and iron-sulfur centers at the active site.

    PubMed

    Kroneck, Peter M H

    2016-03-01

    In living systems, tungsten is exclusively found in microbial enzymes coordinated by the pyranopterin cofactor, with additional metal coordination provided by oxygen and/or sulfur, and/or selenium atoms in diverse arrangements. Prominent examples are formate dehydrogenase, formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase, and aldehyde oxidoreductase all of which catalyze redox reactions. The bacterial enzyme acetylene hydratase (AH) stands out of its class as it catalyzes the conversion of acetylene to acetaldehyde, clearly a non-redox reaction and a reaction distinct from the reduction of acetylene to ethylene by nitrogenase. AH harbors two pyranopterins bound to W, and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. W is coordinated by four dithiolene sulfur atoms, one cysteine sulfur, and one oxygen ligand. AH activity requires a strong reductant suggesting W(IV) as the active oxidation state. Two different types of reaction pathways have been proposed. The 1.26 Å structure reveals a water molecule coordinated to W which could gain a partially positive net charge by the adjacent protonated Asp-13, enabling a direct attack of C2H2. To access the W-Asp site, a substrate channel was evolved distant from where it is found in other members of the DMSOR family. Computational studies of this second shell mechanism led to unrealistically high energy barriers, and alternative pathways were proposed where C2H2 binds directly to W. The architecture of the catalytic cavity, the specificity for C2H2 and the results from site-directed mutagenesis do not support this first shell mechanism. More investigations including structural information on the binding of C2H2 are needed to present a conclusive answer. PMID:26790879

  2. A potential plant-derived antifungal acetylenic acid mediates its activity by interfering with fatty acid homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    6-Nonadecynoic acid (6-NDA), a plant-derived acetylenic acid, exhibits strong inhibitory activity against the human fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. In the present study, transcriptional profiling coupled with mutant and biochemical analyses...

  3. Dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite in the bovine rumen: nitrous oxide production and effect of acetylene.

    PubMed Central

    Kaspar, H F; Tiedje, J M

    1981-01-01

    15N tracer methods and gas chromatography coupled to an electron capture detector were used to investigate dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite by the rumen microbiota of a fistulated cow. Ammonium was the only 15N-labeled end product of quantitative significance. Only traces of nitrous oxide were detected as a product of nitrate reduction; but in experiments with nitrite, up to 0.3% of the added nitrogen accumulated as nitrous oxide, but it was not further reduced. Furthermore, when 13NO3- was incubated with rumen microbiota virtually no [13N]N2 was produced. Acetylene partially inhibited the reduction of nitrite to ammonium as well as the formation of nitrous oxide. It is suggested that in the rumen ecosystem nitrous oxide is a byproduct of dissimilatory nitrite reduction to ammonium rather than a product of denitrification and that the latter process is absent from the rumen habitat. PMID:7224631

  4. Diel Interactions of Oxygenic Photosynthesis and N2 Fixation (Acetylene Reduction) in a Marine Microbial Mat Community

    PubMed Central

    Bebout, Brad M.; Paerl, Hans W.; Crocker, Kenneth M.; Prufert, Leslie E.

    1987-01-01

    Diel variations in N2 fixation (acetylene reduction), CO2 fixation, and oxygen concentrations were measured, on three separate occasions, in a marine microbial mat located on Shackleford Banks, North Carolina. Nitrogenase activity (NA) was found to be inversely correlated with CO2 fixation and, in two of the three diel periods studied, was higher at night than during the day. Oxygen concentrations within the top 3 mm of the mat ranged from 0 to 400 μM on a diel cycle; anaerobic conditions generally persisted below 4 mm. NA in the mat was profoundly affected by naturally occurring oxygen concentrations. Experimentally elevated oxygen concentrations resulted in a significant depression of NA, whereas the addition of the Photosystem II inhibitor 3(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea decreased oxygen concentrations within the mat and resulted in a significant short-term enhancement of NA. Mat N2-fixing microorganisms include cyanobacteria and heterotrophic, photoautotrophic, and chemolithotrophic eubacteria. Measured (whole-mat) NA is probably due to a combination of the NA of each of these groups of organisms. The relative contributions of each group to whole-mat NA probably varied during diel and seasonal (successional) cycles. Reduced compounds derived from photosynthetic CO2 fixation appeared to be an important source of energy for NA during the day, whereas heterotrophic or chemolithotrophic utilization of reduced compounds appeared to be an important source of energy for NA at night, under reduced ambient oxygen concentrations. Previous estimates of N2 fixation calculated on the basis of daytime measurements may have seriously underestimated diel and seasonal nitrogen inputs in mat systems. PMID:16347456

  5. Nitrogen Fixation (Acetylene Reduction) Associated with Decaying Leaves of Pond Cypress (Taxodium distichum var. nutans) in a Natural and a Sewage-Enriched Cypress Dome

    PubMed Central

    Dierberg, Forrest E.; Brezonik, Patrick L.

    1981-01-01

    Surface litter from a natural and a sewage-enriched cypress dome in north-central Florida showed a pronounced seasonal pattern of nitrogenase (acetylene reduction) activity associated with seasonal leaf fall from deciduous trees in the domes. Samples of peat from cores indicated negligible nitrogenase activity below the surface layer. Integrating the monthly rates of nitrogen fixation (based on the theoretical molar ratio of 3:2 for C2H4/NH3) yielded 0.39 and 0.12 g of N/m2 per year fixed in the litter of the natural and sewage-enriched domes, respectively. The nitrogen fixed in the first 3 months after leaf fall in the natural dome represented about 14% of the nitrogen increment in the decomposing cypress leaves, but fixation contributed a negligible amount of nitrogen (<1%) to decomposing litter in the sewage-enriched dome. PMID:16345796

  6. Nitrogen fixation (Acetylene Reduction) by annual winter legumes on a coal surface mine

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielson, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    The winter annuals, crimson clover, rose clover, subterranean clover and hairy vetch, were evaluated for nitrogen fixing capacity on coal surface mine substrates by measuring their ability to reduce acetylene to ethylene. The effects of fertilizer, Abruzzi rye, Kentucky 31 fescue grass and a phytotoxic plant Chenopodium album on nitrogen fixation were also assessed. Crimson clover was recommended as the best legume to use on topsoil and shale in the south. Hairy vetch gave good results on shale and subterranean clover did well on topsoil. The use of these species for revegetation is discussed. Overall, no correlation between substrate pH and ethylene levels was found and effects of substrate depended upon the legume species. Super phosphate fertilizer supported less nitrogen fixation than 13-13-13. Abruzzi rye in some unknown way inhibited plant density and nitrogen fixation by legumes but not by free living substrate micro-organisms. Shale from under dead Chenopodium plants in both field and greehouse experiments did not inhibit nitrogen fixation. 7 tables.

  7. Nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction) by annual winter legumes on a coal surface mine

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielson, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    The winter annuals, crimson clover, rose clover, subterranean clover and hairy vetch, were evaluated for their ability to fix nitrogen on coal surface mine substrates by measuring their ability to reduce acetylene to ethylene. The effects of fertilizer, Abruzzi ryegrass, Kentucky 31 fescue grass and a phytotoxic plant Chenopodium album on nitrogen fixation was also assessed. Crimson clover was recommended as the best legume to use on topsoil and shale in the South. Hairy vetch gave good results on shale and subterranean clover did well on topsoil. The use of these species for revegetation is discussed. Overall, no correlation between substrate pH and ethylene levels was found and effects of substrate depended upon the legume species. Super phosphate fertilizer supported less nitrogen fixation than 13-13-13. Abruzzi ryegrass in some unknown way inhibited plant density and nitrogen fixation by legumes but not by free living substrate micro-organisms. Shale from under dead Chenopodium plants in both field and greenhouse experiments did not inhibit nitrogen fixation. 11 references, 7 tables.

  8. Synthesis, structure and cytotoxic activity of acetylenic derivatives of betulonic and betulinic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bębenek, Ewa; Chrobak, Elwira; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Kadela, Monika; Chrobak, Artur; Kusz, Joachim; Książek, Maria; Jastrzębska, Maria; Boryczka, Stanisław

    2016-02-01

    A series of acetylenic derivatives of betulonic and betulinic acids has been synthesized and characterized by 1H and 13C NMR, IR and MS spectroscopy. The structure of propargyl betulonate 4 and propargyl betulinate-DMF solvate 8A was solved by X-ray diffraction. Thermal properties were examined using a DSC technique. The resulting alkynyl derivatives, as well as betulin 1 and betulinic acid 3, were evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxic activity against human T47D breast cancer, CCRF/CEM leukemia, SW707 colorectal, murine P388 leukemia and BALB3T3 normal fibroblasts cell lines. Several of the obtained compounds have a favorable cytotoxic profile than betulin 1. Propargyl betulinate 8 was the most active derivative, being up to 3-fold more potent than betulin 1 against the human leukemia (CCRF/CEM) cell line, with an IC50 value of 3.9 μg/mL.

  9. Rhodium(III)-catalyzed C-H activation/annulation with vinyl esters as an acetylene equivalent.

    PubMed

    Webb, Nicola J; Marsden, Stephen P; Raw, Steven A

    2014-09-19

    The behavior of electron-rich alkenes in rhodium-catalyzed C-H activation/annulation reactions is investigated. Vinyl acetate emerges as a convenient acetylene equivalent, facilitating the synthesis of sixteen 3,4-unsubstituted isoquinolones, as well as select heteroaryl-fused pyridones. The complementary regiochemical preferences of enol ethers versus enol esters/enamides is discussed. PMID:25165993

  10. Decreased alanine aminotransferase activity in serum of man during gamma-acetylenic-GABA treatment.

    PubMed

    Olsen, R; Hørder, M

    1980-06-01

    Decreasing concentrations of alanine aminotransferase were observed in nine patients receiving gamma-acetylenic-GABA, an inhibitor of GABA aminotransferase. In vitro studies showed that preincubation at 37 degrees C of serum with gamma-acetylenic-GABA and with urine from a patient receiving the drug led to inhibition of alanine aminotransferase. This inhibition of alanine aminotransferase by gamma-acetylenic-GABA was neutralized by 1-analine, the natural substrate for the enzyme. The mechanism of inhibition may be a competition between the drug and 1-alanine for the substrate binding site of the enzyme. PMID:7414257

  11. Short-term influence of nitrate on acetylene reduction, photosynthesis and nodule respiration of black alder seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Cazell, B.H.; Samuelson, L.J.; Seiler, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Black alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaernt.) has shown significant benefits in several silvicultural applications such as nurse-trees. However, little is known concerning the nitrate/N-fixing interactions. Our objections were to examine the effects of three nitrate levels on acetylene reduction (AR), net photosynthesis (Ps) and nodule respiration (NR). Fifteen month-old black alder rooted cuttings were inoculated with one strain of Frankia inoculum (ARgN22D) at six months, maintained under 16h photoperiod at ambient greenhouse conditions, and fertilized for two months prior to study with a modified Crone's N-free solution. At study initiation seedlings were fertilized for six days with 0, 7.5 or 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Measurements of AR, Ps and NR were collected on the second, fourth and sixth day of NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} application. By day four AR was significantly lowered by 75% for the 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} treatment when compared with the controls. On day six, Ps and NR were lowered significantly by 29% and 59%, respectively, for the 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} treatments when compared to control values. Results suggest any benefit from black alder N-fixation might be negated by nitrate fertilization.

  12. Importance of surface carbide formation on the activity and selectivity of Pd surfaces in the selective hydrogenation of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Burch, Robbie; Hardacre, Christopher; Hu, P.; Hughes, Philip

    2016-04-01

    A recent experimental investigation (Kim et al. J. Catal. 306 (2013) 146-154) on the selective hydrogenation of acetylene over Pd nanoparticles with different shapes concluded that Pd(100) showed higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) for acetylene hydrogenation. However, our recent density functional calculations (Yang et al. J. Catal. 305 (2013) 264-276) observed that the clean Pd(111) surface should result in higher activity and ethylene selectivity compared with the clean Pd(100) surface for acetylene hydrogenation. In the current work, using density functional theory calculations, we find that Pd(100) in the carbide form gives rise to higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) carbide. These results indicate that the catalyst surface is most likely in the carbide form under the experimental reaction conditions. Furthermore, the adsorption energies of hydrogen atoms as a function of the hydrogen coverage at the surface and subsurface sites over Pd(100) are compared with those over Pd(111), and it is found that the adsorption of hydrogen atoms is always less favoured on Pd(100) over the whole coverage range. This suggests that the Pd(100) hydride surface will be less stable than the Pd(111) hydride surface, which is also in accordance with the experimental results reported.

  13. TOXICITY OF ACETYLENIC ALCOHOLS TO THE FATHEAD MINNOW, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS: NARCOSIS AND PROELECTROPHILE ACTIVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 96-h LC50 values for 16 acetylenic alcohols in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were determined using continuous-flow diluters. The measured LC50 values for seven tertiary propargylic alcohols agreed closely with the QSAR predictions based upon data for other organic ...

  14. Discovery of acetylene hydratase activity of the iron–sulphur protein IspH

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weixue; Zhang, Yonghui; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Li, Kai; Schulz, Charles; Oldfield, Eric; Groll, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The final step of the methylerythritol phosphate isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway is catalysed by the iron–sulphur enzyme IspH, producing the universal precursors of terpenes: isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. Here we report an unforeseen reaction discovered during the investigation of the interaction of IspH with acetylene inhibitors by X-ray crystallography, Mößbauer, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition to its role as a 2H+/2e− reductase, IspH can hydrate acetylenes to aldehydes and ketones via anti-Markovnikov/Markovnikov addition. The reactions only occur with the oxidised protein and proceed via η1-O-enolate intermediates. One of these is characterized crystallographically and contains a C4 ligand oxygen bound to the unique, fourth iron in the 4Fe-4S cluster: this intermediate subsequently hydrolyzes to produce an aldehyde product. This unexpected side to IspH reactivity is of interest in the context of the mechanism of action of other acetylene hydratases, as well as in the design of antiinfectives targeting IspH. PMID:22948824

  15. Atom-economic catalytic amide synthesis from amines and carboxylic acids activated in situ with acetylenes.

    PubMed

    Krause, Thilo; Baader, Sabrina; Erb, Benjamin; Gooßen, Lukas J

    2016-01-01

    Amide bond-forming reactions are of tremendous significance in synthetic chemistry. Methodological research has, in the past, focused on efficiency and selectivity, and these have reached impressive levels. However, the unacceptable amounts of waste produced have led the ACS GCI Roundtable to label 'amide bond formation avoiding poor atom economy' as the most pressing target for sustainable synthetic method development. In response to this acute demand, we herein disclose an efficient one-pot amide coupling protocol that is based on simple alkynes as coupling reagents: in the presence of a dichloro[(2,6,10-dodecatriene)-1,12-diyl]ruthenium catalyst, carboxylate salts of primary or secondary amines react with acetylene or ethoxyacetylene to vinyl ester intermediates, which undergo aminolysis to give the corresponding amides along only with volatile acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate, respectively. The new amide synthesis is broadly applicable to the synthesis of structurally diverse amides, including dipeptides. PMID:27282773

  16. Atom-economic catalytic amide synthesis from amines and carboxylic acids activated in situ with acetylenes

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Thilo; Baader, Sabrina; Erb, Benjamin; Gooßen, Lukas J.

    2016-01-01

    Amide bond-forming reactions are of tremendous significance in synthetic chemistry. Methodological research has, in the past, focused on efficiency and selectivity, and these have reached impressive levels. However, the unacceptable amounts of waste produced have led the ACS GCI Roundtable to label ‘amide bond formation avoiding poor atom economy' as the most pressing target for sustainable synthetic method development. In response to this acute demand, we herein disclose an efficient one-pot amide coupling protocol that is based on simple alkynes as coupling reagents: in the presence of a dichloro[(2,6,10-dodecatriene)-1,12-diyl]ruthenium catalyst, carboxylate salts of primary or secondary amines react with acetylene or ethoxyacetylene to vinyl ester intermediates, which undergo aminolysis to give the corresponding amides along only with volatile acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate, respectively. The new amide synthesis is broadly applicable to the synthesis of structurally diverse amides, including dipeptides. PMID:27282773

  17. Estimation of nitrogenase activity in the presence of ethylene biosynthesis by use of deuterated acetylene as a substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Vien, D.; Fateley, W.G.; Davis, L.C. )

    1989-02-01

    Nitrogenase reduces deuterated acetylene primarily to cis dideuterated ethylene. This can be distinguished from undeuterated ethylene by the use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Characteristic bands in the region from 800 to 3,500 cm-1 can be used to identify and quantitate levels of these products. This technique is applicable to field studies of nitrogen fixation where ethylene biosynthesis by plants or bacteria is occurring. We have verified the reaction stoichiometry by using Klebsiella pneumoniae and Bradyrhizobium japonicum in soybeans. The most useful bands for quantitation of substrate purity and product distribution are as follows: acetylene-d0, 3,374 cm-1; acetylene-d1, 2,584 cm-1; acetylene-d2, 2,439 cm-1; cis-ethylene-d2, 843 cm-1; trans-ethylene-d2, 988 cm-1; ethylene-d1, 943 cm-1; ethylene-d0, 949 cm-1. (The various deuterated ethylenes and acetylenes are designated by a lowercase d and subscript to indicate the number, but not the position, of deuterium atoms in the molecule.) Mass spectrometry coupled to a gas chromatograph system has been used to assist in quantitation of the substrate and product distributions. Significant amounts of trans-ethylene-d2 were produced by both wild-type and nifV mutant K. pneumoniae. Less of this product was observed with the soybean system.

  18. Indole synthesis by conjugate addition of anilines to activated acetylenes and an unusual ligand-free copper(II)-mediated intramolecular cross-coupling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Detian; Back, Thomas G

    2012-11-12

    A versatile new synthesis of indoles was achieved by the conjugate addition of N-formyl-2-haloanilines to acetylenic sulfones, ketones, and esters followed by a copper-catalyzed intramolecular C-arylation. The conjugate addition step was conducted under exceptionally mild conditions at room temperature in basic, aqueous DMF. Surprisingly, the C-arylation was performed most effectively by employing copper(II) acetate as the catalyst in the absence of external ligands, without the need for protection from air or water. An unusual feature of this process, for the case of acetylenic ketones, is the ability of the initial conjugate-addition product to serve as a ligand for the catalyst, which enables it to participate in the catalysis of its further transformation to the final indole product. Mechanistic studies, including EPR experiments, indicated that copper(II) is reduced to the active copper(I) species by the formate ion that is produced by the base-catalyzed hydrolysis of DMF. This process also served to recycle any copper(II) that was produced by the adventitious oxidation of copper(I), thereby preventing deactivation of the catalyst. Several examples of reactions involving acetylenic sulfones attached to a modified Merrifield resin demonstrated the feasibility of solid-phase synthesis of indoles by using this protocol, and tricyclic products were obtained in one pot by employing acetylenic sulfones that contain chloroalkyl substituents. PMID:23019064

  19. Properties of acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovcak, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    Acetylene continues to be the most widely used fuel in the oxyfuel cutting and welding industry. It displays properties that enhance its benefits to the industry, but at the same time, present potential hazards that have to be addressed. The presentation explores the main properties or characteristics of acetylene -- odor, toxicity, flammability, composition, and manufacture. it expands on those properties that are unique to acetylene and which account for its main value to the user or which constitute the chief concern for safe use of acetylene. The presentation explains characteristics such as anosmia, flammable or explosive range, ignition energy, autoignition temperature, and flame temperature, comparing these values for acetylene to other common gaseous fuels. it explains the unique property of acetylene to decompose explosively in the absence of air or oxygen. The toxicological aspects of acetylene is discussed, including anesthetic effect and simple asphyxiant, showing the increasing severity of symptoms to increasing levels of oxygen deficiency. The main value of this basic review of the properties of acetylene is to remind people of the benefits of acetylene due to its unique properties, and to realert them to the potential hazards that also have to be addressed to control the properties of acetylene.

  20. Hydrogenase activity in Azospirillum brasilense is inhibited by nitrite, nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Tibelius, K.H.; Knowles, R.

    1984-10-01

    Nitrite, NO, CO, and C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ inhibited O/sub 2/-dependent H/sub 2/ uptake (H/sup 3/H oxidation) in denitrifying Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 grown anaerobically on N/sub 2/O or NO/sub 3//sup -/. The apparent K/sub i/ values for inhibition of O/sub 2/-dependent H/sub 2/ uptake were 20 ..mu..M for NO/sub 2//sup -/, 0.4 ..mu..M for NO, 28 ..mu..M for CO, and 88 ..mu..M for C/sub 2/H/sub 2/. These inhibitors also affected methylene blue-dependent H/sub 2/ uptake, presumably by acting directly on the hydrogenase. Nitrite and NO inhibited H/sub 2/ uptake irreversibly, whereas inhibition due to CO was easily reversed by repeatedly evacuating and backfilling with N/sub 2/. The C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ inhibition was not readily reversed, partly due to difficulty in removing the last traces of this gas from solution. The NO/sub 2//sup -/ inhibition of malate-dependent respiration was readily reversed by repeatedly washing the cells, in contrast to the effect of NO/sub 2//sup -/ on H/sub 2/-dependent respiration. These results suggest that the low hydrogenase activities observed in NO/sub 3//sup -/-grown cultures of A. brasilense may be due to the irreversible inhibition of hydrogenase by NO/sub 2//sup -/ and NO produced by NO/sub 3//sup -/ reduction.

  1. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-16

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

  2. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

  3. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, Richard J.

    1998-01-01

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

  4. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, R.J.

    1998-02-10

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein. 17 figs.

  5. Effect of Nitrate and Acetylene on nirS, cnorB, and nosZ Expression and Denitrification Activity in Pseudomonas mandelii▿

    PubMed Central

    Saleh-Lakha, Saleema; Shannon, Kelly E.; Henderson, Sherri L.; Zebarth, Bernie J.; Burton, David L.; Goyer, Claudia; Trevors, Jack T.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrate acts as an electron acceptor in the denitrification process. The effect of nitrate in the range of 0 to 1,000 mg/liter on Pseudomonas mandelii nirS, cnorB, and nosZ gene expression was studied, using quantitative reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Denitrification activity was measured by using the acetylene blockage method and gas chromatography. The effect of acetylene on gene expression was assessed by comparing denitrification gene expression in P. mandelii culture grown in the presence or absence of acetylene. The higher the amount of NO3− present, the greater the induction and the longer the denitrification genes remained expressed. nirS gene expression reached a maximum at 2, 4, 4, and 6 h in cultures grown in the presence of 0, 10, 100, and 1,000 mg of KNO3/liter, respectively, while induction of nirS gene ranged from 12- to 225-fold compared to time zero. cnorB gene expression also followed a similar trend. nosZ gene expression did not respond to NO3− treatment under the conditions tested. Acetylene decreased nosZ gene expression but did not affect nirS or cnorB gene expression. These results showed that nirS and cnorB responded to nitrate concentrations; however, significant denitrification activity was only observed in culture with 1,000 mg of KNO3/liter, indicating that there was no relationship between gene expression and denitrification activity under the conditions tested. PMID:19525277

  6. Mechanism-based inactivation of cytochrome P-450 dependent benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase activity by acetylenic and olefinic polycyclic arylhydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    A series of aryl acetylenes and aryl olefins have been examined as substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P-450 dependent monooxygenases in liver microsomes from 5,6-benzoflavone or phenobarbital pretreated rats. 1-Ethynylpyrene (EP), 3-ethynylperylene (EPL), cis- and trans-1-(2-bromo-vinyl)pyrene (c-BVP and t-BVP), and 1-allylpyrene (AP) serve as mechanism-based irreversible inactivators (suicide inhibitors) of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) hydroxylase, while 1-vinyl-pyrene (VP) and phenyl 1-pyrenyl acetylene (PPA) do not cause a detectable suicide inhibition of the BP hydroxylase. The mechanism-based loss of BP hydroxylase activity caused by the aryl acetylenes is not accompanied by a corresponding loss of the P-450 content of the microsomes. In the presence of NADPH, /sup 3/H-labeled EP covalently attached to P-450 isozymes with a measured stoichiometry of one mole of EP per mole of the P-450 heme. The results of the effects of these aryl derivatives in the mammalian cell-mediated mutagenesis assay and toxicity assay show that none of the compounds examined nor any of the their metabolites produced in the incubation system are cytotoxic to V79 cells.

  7. Acetylene inhibition of N2O reduction in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays: evaluation by 15N tracer and 15N site preference of N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, Daniel; Well, Reinhard; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Lena, Rohe

    2013-04-01

    The measurement of denitrification in soils and aquifers is still challenging and often enough associated with considerable experimental effort and high costs. Against this background, the acetylene inhibition technique (AIT) applied in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays is by far the most effective approach. However, this method has been largely criticized, as it is susceptible to underestimate denitrification rates and adds an additional carbon source to the substrates to be investigated. Here we provide evidence that the AIT is not necessarily an inappropriate approach to measure denitrification, that its reliability depends on the drivers governing the process, and that the 15N site preference of N2O (SP) may serve as a tool to assess this reliability. Two laboratory batch experiments were conducted, where sandy aquifer material and a peat soil were incubated as slurries. We established (i) a standard anaerobic treatment by adding KNO3 (10 mg N L-1), (ii) an oxygen treatment by adding KNO3 and O2 (5 mg L-1), and (iii) a glucose treatment by adding KNO3 supplemented with glucose (200 mg C L-1). Both experiments were run under 10 % (v/v) acetylene atmosphere and as 15N tracer treatments using labeled K15NO3 (60 atom % 15N). In the case of the standard anaerobic treatments, we found a very good agreement of denitrification potential obtained by the AIT and 15N tracer methods. SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between -4.8 and 2.6 ‰ which is indicative for N2O production during bacterial denitrification but not for N2O reduction to N2. In contrast, we observed substantial underestimation of denitrification by AIT for the glucose treatments compared to the 15N method, i.e. denitrification was underestimated by 36 % (sandy aquifer material) and 47 % (peat soil). SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between 4.5 and 9.6 ‰, which suggests occurrence of bacterial N2O reduction. In the case of the oxygen

  8. Biologically Active Acetylenic Amino Alcohol and N-Hydroxylated 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydro-β-carboline Constituents of the New Zealand Ascidian Pseudodistoma opacum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiayi; Pearce, A Norrie; Chan, Susanna T S; Taylor, Richard B; Page, Michael J; Valentin, Alexis; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Dalton, James P; Wiles, Siouxsie; Copp, Brent R

    2016-03-25

    The first occurrence of an acetylenic 1-amino-2-alcohol, distaminolyne A (1), isolated from the New Zealand ascidian Pseudodistoma opacum, is reported. The isolation and structure elucidation of 1 and assignment of absolute configuration using the exciton coupled circular dichroism technique are described. In addition, a new N-9 hydroxy analogue (2) of the known P. opacum metabolite 7-bromohomotrypargine is also reported. Antimicrobial screening identified modest activity of 1 toward Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Mycobacterim tuberculosis, while 2 exhibited a moderate antimalarial activity (IC50 3.82 μM) toward a chloroquine-resistant strain (FcB1) of Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:26670413

  9. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathode contamination - Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Y.; St-Pierre, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Acetylene adsorption on PEMFC electrodes and contamination in single cells are investigated with 300 ppm acetylene at a cathode held at 80 °C. The results of adsorption experiments suggest that acetylene adsorbs readily on electrodes and is reduced to ethylene and ethane under an open circuit potential of H2/N2, as the adsorbates can be electro-oxidized at high potentials. The cell voltage response shows that 300 ppm acetylene results in a cell performance loss of approximately 88%. The voltage degradation curve is divided into two stages by an inflection point, which suggests that potential-dependent processes are involved in acetylene poisoning. These potential-dependent processes may include acetylene oxidation and reduction as well as accumulation of intermediates on the electrode surface. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis suggests that acetylene affects the oxygen reduction reaction and may also affect mass transport processes. Acetylene also may be reduced in the steady poisoning state of the operating cell. After neat air operation, the cyclic voltammetry results imply that the cathode catalyst surface is almost completely restored, with no contaminant residues remaining in the MEA. Linear scanning voltammetry measurements show no change in hydrogen crossover caused by contamination, and polarization curves confirm complete recovery of cell performance.

  10. Substrate reduction properties of dinitrogenase activated in vitro are dependent upon the presence of homocitrate or its analogues during iron-molybdenum cofactor synthesis.

    PubMed

    Imperial, J; Hoover, T R; Madden, M S; Ludden, P W; Shah, V K

    1989-09-19

    (R)-2-Hydroxy-1,2,4-butanetricarboxylic acid [(R)-homocitrate] has been has been recently reported to be an integral constituent of the otherwise thought to be inorganic iron-molybdenum cofactor of dinitrogenase [Hoover, T.R., Imperial, J., Ludden, P.W., & Shah, V.K. (1989) Biochemistry 28,2768-2771]. Different organic acids can substitute for homocitrate in an in vitro system for iron-molybdenum cofactor synthesis and incorporation into dinitrogenase [Hoover, T.R., Imperial, J., Ludden, P.W., & Shah, V. K. (1988) Biochemistry 27, 3647-3652]. Dinitrogenase activated with homocitrate-FeMo-co was able to reduce dinitrogen, acetylene, and protons efficiently. Homoisocitrate and isocitrate dinitrogenases did not reduce dinitrogen or acetylene, but showed very high proton reduction activities. Citrate and citramalate dinitrogenases had very low dinitrogen reduction activities and intermediate acetylene and proton reduction activities. CO inhibited proton reduction in both these cases but not in the case of dinitrogenases activated with other homocitrate analogues. By use of these and other commercially available homocitrate analogues in the in vitro system, the structural features of the homocitrate molecule absolutely required for the synthesis of a catalytically competent iron-molybdenum cofactor were determined to be the hydroxyl group, the 1- and 2-carboxyl groups, and the R configuration of the chiral center. The stringency of the structural requirements was dependent on the nitrogenase substrate used for the assay, with dinitrogen having the most stringent requirements followed by acetylene and protons. PMID:2514794

  11. Anaerobic oxidation of acetylene by estuarine sediments and enrichment cultures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culbertson, Charles W.; Zehnder, Alexander J. B.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    1981-01-01

    Acetylene disappeared from the gas phase of anaerobically incubated estuarine sediment slurries, and loss was accompanied by increased levels of carbon dioxide. Acetylene loss was inhibited by chloramphenicol, air, and autoclaving. Addition of 14C2H2 to slurries resulted in the formation of 14CO2 and the transient appearance of 14C-soluble intermediates, of which acetate was a major component. Acetylene oxidation stimulated sulfate reduction; however, sulfate reduction was not required for the loss of C2H2 to occur. Enrichment cultures were obtained which grew anaerobically at the expense of C2H2.

  12. Oxygen transport through polyethylene terephthalate (PET) coated with plasma-polymerized acetylene at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemlinger, Erik; Pedrow, Patrick; Garcia-Pérez, Manuel; Sablani, Shyam

    2011-10-01

    Moser et al. have shown that oxygen transport through polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) is reduced by a factor of up to 120 when, at reduced pressure, hydrogenated amorphous carbon film with thickness less than 100 nm is applied to the PET substrate. Our work includes using atmospheric pressure cold plasma to grow a plasma-polymerized acetylene film on PET substrate and measuring reductions in oxygen transport. The reactor utilizes corona discharges and is operated at 60 Hz with a maximum voltage of 10 kV RMS. Corona streamers emanate from an array of needles with an average radius of curvature of 50 μm. The reactor utilizes a cylindrical reaction chamber with a vertical orientation such that argon carrier gas and acetylene precursor gas are introduced at the top then pass through the cold plasma activation zone and then through a grounded stainless steel mesh. Acetylene radicals are incident on the PET substrate and form plasma-polymerized acetylene film. Moser et al. have shown that oxygen transport through polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) is reduced by a factor of up to 120 when, at reduced pressure, hydrogenated amorphous carbon film with thickness less than 100 nm is applied to the PET substrate. Our work includes using atmospheric pressure cold plasma to grow a plasma-polymerized acetylene film on PET substrate and measuring reductions in oxygen transport. The reactor utilizes corona discharges and is operated at 60 Hz with a maximum voltage of 10 kV RMS. Corona streamers emanate from an array of needles with an average radius of curvature of 50 μm. The reactor utilizes a cylindrical reaction chamber with a vertical orientation such that argon carrier gas and acetylene precursor gas are introduced at the top then pass through the cold plasma activation zone and then through a grounded stainless steel mesh. Acetylene radicals are incident on the PET substrate and form plasma-polymerized acetylene film. E.M. Moser, R. Urech, E. Hack, H. Künzli, E. Müller, Thin

  13. Acylamidation of acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Gridnev, I.D.; Balenkova, E.S.

    1989-01-10

    The reactions of phenylacetylene, 1-heptyne, and diphenylacetylene with the complexes of acetylfluoroborate with acetonitrile and with chloroacetonitrile take place regiospecifically and stereospecifically as syn-addition of the acetyl group and nitrile at the triple bond of the acetylene and lead to previously unknown Z-N-acyl-/beta/-amino, /alpha/,/beta/-unsaturated ketones.

  14. Acetylene terminated matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfarb, I. J.; Lee, Y. C.; Arnold, F. E.; Helminiak, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of resins with terminal acetylene groups has provided a promising technology to yield high performance structural materials. Because these resins cure through an addition reaction, no volatile by-products are produced during the processing. The cured products have high thermal stability and good properties retention after exposure to humidity. Resins with a wide variety of different chemical structures between the terminal acetylene groups are synthesized and their mechanical properties studied. The ability of the acetylene cured polymers to give good mechanical properties is demonstrated by the resins with quinoxaline structures. Processibility of these resins can be manipulated by varying the chain length between the acetylene groups or by blending in different amounts of reactive deluents. Processing conditions similar to the state-of-the-art epoxy can be attained by using backbone structures like ether-sulfone or bis-phenol-A. The wide range of mechanical properties and processing conditions attainable by this class of resins should allow them to be used in a wide variety of applications.

  15. Living on acetylene. A primordial energy source.

    PubMed

    Ten Brink, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The tungsten iron-sulfur enzyme acetylene hydratase catalyzes the conversion of acetylene to acetaldehyde by addition of one water molecule to the C-C triple bond. For a member of the dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase family this is a rather unique reaction, since it does not involve a net electron transfer. The acetylene hydratase from the strictly anaerobic bacterium Pelobacter acetylenicus is so far the only known and characterized acetylene hydratase. With a crystal structure solved at 1.26 Å resolution and several amino acids around the active site exchanged by site-directed mutagenesis, many key features have been explored to understand the function of this novel tungsten enzyme. However, the exact reaction mechanism remains unsolved. Trapped in the reduced W(IV) state, the active site consists of an octahedrally coordinated tungsten ion with a tightly bound water molecule. An aspartate residue in close proximity, forming a short hydrogen bond to the water molecule, was shown to be essential for enzyme activity. The arrangement is completed by a small hydrophobic pocket at the end of an access funnel that is distinct from all other enzymes of the DMSO reductase family. PMID:25416389

  16. Acetylene-Terminated Polyimide Siloxanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, Terry L.; Maudgal, Shubba

    1987-01-01

    Siloxane-containing addition polyimides yield toughened high-temperature adhesives and matrix resins. Addition polyimide made by reaction of aromatic tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride with aromatic diamine in presence of ethynyl-substituted aromatic monoamine. Acetylene-terminated siloxane imide cured by heating to yield acetylene-terminated polyimide siloxane.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of orally administered acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone), a highly potent Nrf2 activator with a reversible covalent mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Kostov, Rumen V.; Knatko, Elena V.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J.; Zheng, Suqing; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Honda, Tadashi; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.

    2015-01-01

    The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone) TBE-31 is a highly potent cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action; its best-characterized target being Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1), the cellular sensor for oxidants and electrophiles. TBE-31 reacts with cysteines of Keap1, impairing its ability to target nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) for degradation. Consequently, Nrf2 accumulates and orchestrates cytoprotective gene expression. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of TBE-31 in C57BL/6 mice. After a single oral dose of 10 μmol/kg (∼200 nmol/animal), the concentration of TBE-31 in blood exhibited two peaks, at 22.3 nM and at 15.5 nM, 40 min and 4 h after dosing, respectively, as determined by a quantitative stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method. The AUC0–24h was 195.5 h/nmol/l, the terminal elimination half-life was 10.2 h, and the kel was 0.068 h−1. To assess the pharmacodynamics of Nrf2 activation by TBE-31, we determined the enzyme activity of its prototypic target, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and found it elevated by 2.4- and 1.5-fold in liver and heart, respectively. Continuous feeding for 18 days with diet delivering the same daily doses of TBE-31 under conditions of concurrent treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine had a similar effect on Nrf2 activation without any indications of toxicity. Together with previous reports showing the cytoprotective effects of TBE-31 in animal models of carcinogenesis, our results demonstrate the high potency, efficacy and suitability for chronic administration of cysteine targeting reversible covalent drugs. PMID:26265043

  18. Acetylene, a mammalian metabolite of 1,1,1-trichloroethane.

    PubMed

    Dürk, H; Poyer, J L; Klessen, C; Frank, H

    1992-09-01

    1,1,1-Trichloroethane (TCE) is a widely used industrial solvent of low acute toxicity. It is slowly oxidized to trichloroethanol and trichloroacetic acid by cytochrome P-450-dependent mono-oxygenases. Increased inhalative uptake by rats under hypoxia and spin-trapping experiments indicate that TCE is also reductively metabolized to a radical intermediate. Acetylene is formed as a metabolite, suggesting transfer of an additional electron to form the corresponding carbene. Hypoxia and induction of mixed-function mono-oxygenases accelerate the formation of acetylene. Experiments performed in vitro with rat liver microsomal fractions yield analogous results. PMID:1326938

  19. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of orally administered acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone), a highly potent Nrf2 activator with a reversible covalent mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Kostov, Rumen V.; Knatko, Elena V.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J.; Zheng, Suqing; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Honda, Tadashi; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.

    2015-09-25

    The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone) TBE-31 is a highly potent cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action; its best-characterized target being Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1), the cellular sensor for oxidants and electrophiles. TBE-31 reacts with cysteines of Keap1, impairing its ability to target nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) for degradation. Consequently, Nrf2 accumulates and orchestrates cytoprotective gene expression. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of TBE-31 in C57BL/6 mice. After a single oral dose of 10 μmol/kg (∼200 nmol/animal), the concentration of TBE-31 in blood exhibited two peaks, at 22.3 nM and at 15.5 nM, 40 min and 4 h after dosing, respectively, as determined by a quantitative stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method. The AUC{sub 0–24h} was 195.5 h/nmol/l, the terminal elimination half-life was 10.2 h, and the k{sub el} was 0.068 h{sup −1}. To assess the pharmacodynamics of Nrf2 activation by TBE-31, we determined the enzyme activity of its prototypic target, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and found it elevated by 2.4- and 1.5-fold in liver and heart, respectively. Continuous feeding for 18 days with diet delivering the same daily doses of TBE-31 under conditions of concurrent treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine had a similar effect on Nrf2 activation without any indications of toxicity. Together with previous reports showing the cytoprotective effects of TBE-31 in animal models of carcinogenesis, our results demonstrate the high potency, efficacy and suitability for chronic administration of cysteine targeting reversible covalent drugs. - Highlights: • TBE-31 is a cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action. • After a single oral dose, the blood concentration of TBE-31 exhibits two peaks. • Oral TBE-31 is a potent activator of Nrf2-dependent enzymes in

  20. Research in acetylene containing monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogliaruso, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The preparation of precursor bisbenzils with pendant acetylene linkages for use in the synthesis of new aromatic poly (phenyl quinoxalines) was investigated. Attempts to condense para, para prime-dibromo benzil and potassium acetylide in liquid ammonia and in toluene, to prepare 4-phenyl acetyl phenyl ether, 4-(paraacetylphenyl) acetyl phenyl ether, 4-phenyl acetyl-4 primeacetyl phenyl acetyl phenyl ether, the reaction of 4-phenyl acetyl phenyl ether with Villsmeier reagent to prepare 4-(beta-chloro cinnamaldehyde) phenyl ether, the reaction of 4-(para-acetyl phenyl) acetyl phenyl ether with Villsmeier reagent, and the oxidation of bibenzil to prepare benzil are described. The reactions of phenyl acetylene with oxidizing agent, of phenyl acetylene with bromine, of 1,1,2,2-tetrabromo ethyl benzene with zinc and with oxidizing agent are described.

  1. The adaptive control system of acetylene generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaliuk, D. O.; Kovaliuk, Oleg; Burlibay, Aron; Gromaszek, Konrad

    2015-12-01

    The method of acetylene production in acetylene generator was analyzed. It was found that impossible to provide the desired process characteristics by the PID-controller. The adaptive control system of acetylene generator was developed. The proposed system combines the classic controller and fuzzy subsystem for controller parameters tuning.

  2. Preparation of 1,7- and 3,9-dideazapurines from 2-amino-3-iodo- and 3-amino-4-iodopyridines and activated acetylenes by conjugate addition and copper-catalyzed intramolecular arylation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Back, Thomas G

    2014-11-21

    The conjugate addition of N-formyl derivatives of 2-amino-3-iodo- and 3-amino-4-iodopyridines to acetylenes activated by sulfone, ester, or ketone groups, followed by intramolecular arylation, affords variously substituted 1,7- and 3,9-dideazapurines. The method employs DMF-water as the solvent and copper(II) acetate as the catalyst for the cyclization step. Neither added ligands nor the exclusion of oxygen is necessary. The process therefore provides a simple, convenient, and inexpensive route to this biologically interesting class of products. PMID:25333726

  3. Active{sup 3} noise reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Holzfuss, J.

    1996-06-01

    Noise reduction is a problem being encountered in a variety of applications, such as environmental noise cancellation, signal recovery and separation. Passive noise reduction is done with the help of absorbers. Active noise reduction includes the transmission of phase inverted signals for the cancellation. This paper is about a threefold active approach to noise reduction. It includes the separation of a combined source, which consists of both a noise and a signal part. With the help of interaction with the source by scanning it and recording its response, modeling as a nonlinear dynamical system is achieved. The analysis includes phase space analysis and global radial basis functions as tools for the prediction used in a subsequent cancellation procedure. Examples are given which include noise reduction of speech. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Effect of Au nano-particle aggregation on the deactivation of the AuCl3/AC catalyst for acetylene hydrochlorination.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bin; Wang, Qinqin; Yu, Feng; Zhu, Mingyuan

    2015-01-01

    A detailed study of the valence state and distribution of the AuCl3/AC catalyst during the acetylene hydrochlorination deactivation process is described and discussed. Temperature-programmed reduction and X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis indicate that the active Au(3+) reduction to metallic Au(0) is one reason for the deactivation of AuCl3/AC catalyst. Transmission electron microscopy characterization demonstrated that the particle size of Au nano-particles increases with increasing reaction time. The results indicated that metallic Au(0) exhibits considerable catalytic activity and that Au nano-particle aggregation may be another reason for the AuCl3/AC catalytic activity in acetylene hydrochlorination. PMID:25994222

  5. Effect of Au nano-particle aggregation on the deactivation of the AuCl3/AC catalyst for acetylene hydrochlorination

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Bin; Wang, Qinqin; Yu, Feng; Zhu, Mingyuan

    2015-01-01

    A detailed study of the valence state and distribution of the AuCl3/AC catalyst during the acetylene hydrochlorination deactivation process is described and discussed. Temperature-programmed reduction and X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis indicate that the active Au3+ reduction to metallic Au0 is one reason for the deactivation of AuCl3/AC catalyst. Transmission electron microscopy characterization demonstrated that the particle size of Au nano-particles increases with increasing reaction time. The results indicated that metallic Au0 exhibits considerable catalytic activity and that Au nano-particle aggregation may be another reason for the AuCl3/AC catalytic activity in acetylene hydrochlorination. PMID:25994222

  6. Acetylene-Based Materials in Organic Photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Silvestri, Fabio; Marrocchi, Assunta

    2010-01-01

    Fossil fuel alternatives, such as solar energy, are moving to the forefront in a variety of research fields. Organic photovoltaic systems hold the promise of a lightweight, flexible, cost-effective solar energy conversion platform, which could benefit from simple solution-processing of the active layer. The discovery of semiconductive polyacetylene by Heeger et al. in the late 1970s was a milestone towards the use of organic materials in electronics; the development of efficient protocols for the palladium catalyzed alkynylation reactions and the new conception of steric and conformational advantages of acetylenes have been recently focused the attention on conjugated triple-bond containing systems as a promising class of semiconductors for OPVs applications. We review here the most important and representative (poly)arylacetylenes that have been used in the field. A general introduction to (poly)arylacetylenes, and the most common synthetic approaches directed toward making these materials will be firstly given. After a brief discussion on working principles and critical parameters of OPVs, we will focus on molecular arylacetylenes, (co)polymers containing triple bonds, and metallopolyyne polymers as p-type semiconductor materials. The last section will deal with hybrids in which oligomeric/polymeric structures incorporating acetylenic linkages such as phenylene ethynylenes have been attached onto C60, and their use as the active materials in photovoltaic devices. PMID:20480031

  7. Acetylene-terminated polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanky, A. O.

    1983-01-01

    The nadic-encapped LARC-13 addition polyimide exhibits excellent flow, is easy to process, and can be utilized for short terms at temperatures up to 593 C. It retains good lap shear strength as an adhesive for titanium after aging in air up to 125 hours at 316 C; but lap shear strength degrades with longer exposures at that temperature. Thermid 600, an addition polyimide that is acetylene encapped, exhibits thermomechanical properties even after long term exposure in at air at 316 C. An inherent drawback of this system is that it has a narrow processing window. An acetylene encapped, addition polyimide which is a hybrid of these two systems was developed. It has good retention of strength after long term aging and is easily processed. The synthesis and characterization of various molecular weight oligomers of this system are discussed as well as the bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear adhesive samples.

  8. Acetylene-terminated polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanky, A. O.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    The nadic-encapped LARC-43 addition polyimide exhibits excellent flow, is easy to process, and can be utilized for short terms at temperatures up to 593 C. It retains good lap shear strength as an adhesive for titanium after aging in air up to 125 hours at 316 C; but lap shear strength degrades with longer exposures at that temperature. Thermid 600, an addition polyimide that is acetylene encapped, exhibits thermomechanical properties even after long term exposure in at air at 316 C. An inherent drawback of this system is that it has a narrow processing window. An acetylene encapped, addition polyimide which is a hybrid of these two systems was developed. It has good retention of strength after long term aging and is easily processed. The synthesis and characterization of various molecular weight oligomers of this system are discussed as well as the bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear adhesive samples. Previously announced in STAR as N83-18910

  9. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.; Tai, Y.C.; Tung, S.; Ho, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuators in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  10. Thermal Conversion of Methane to Acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, James Russell; Anderson, Raymond Paul; Hyde, Timothy Allen; Wright, Randy Ben; Bewley, Randy Lee; Haggard, Delon C; Swank, William David

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the experimental demonstration of a process for the direct thermal conversion of methane to acetylene. The process utilizes a thermal plasma heat source to dissociation products react to form a mixture of acetylene and hydrogen. The use of a supersonic expansion of the hot gas is investigated as a method of rapidly cooling (quenching) the product stream to prevent further reaction or thermal decomposition of the acetylene which can lower the overall efficiency of the process.

  11. Acetylene terminated aspartimides and resins therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Havens, Stephen J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Acetylene terminated aspartimides are prepared using two methods. In the first, an amino-substituted aromatic acetylene is reacted with an aromatic bismaleimide in a solvent of glacial acetic acid and/or m-cresol. In the second method, an aromatic diamine is reacted with an ethynyl containing maleimide, such an N-(3-ethynyl phenyl) maleimide, in a solvent of glacial acetic acid and/or m-cresol. In addition, acetylene terminated aspartimides are blended with various acetylene terminated oligomers and polymers to yield composite materials exhibiting improved mechanical properties.

  12. Inhibition of alkylbenzene biodegradation under denitrifying conditions by using the acetylene block technique.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, S R

    1992-01-01

    Addition of acetylene to microcosms simultaneously amended with nitrate and alkylbenzenes resulted in inhibition of the rate of alkylbenzene biodegradation under denitrifying conditions. Toluene, xylenes, and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were recalcitrant, whereas ethylbenzene was degraded at a slower rate than usual. Benzene was not degraded in either case. Addition of acetylene to microcosms preexposed to nitrate and alkylbenzenes produced similar inhibition. These data indicate that the activities of microorganisms that degrade alkylbenzenes under denitrifying conditions may be suppressed if the standard acetylene block technique is used to verify denitrifying activity. PMID:1444371

  13. Evaluation of Sorbents for Acetylene Separation in Atmosphere Revitalization Loop Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.; Barton, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    State-of-the-art carbon dioxide reduction technology uses a Sabatier reactor to recover water from metabolic carbon dioxide. In order to maximize oxygen loop closure, a byproduct of the system, methane, must be reduced to recover hydrogen. NASA is currently exploring a microwave plasma methane pyrolysis system for this purpose. The resulting product stream of this technology includes unreacted methane, product hydrogen, and acetylene. The hydrogen and the small amount of unreacted methane resulting from the pyrolysis process can be returned to the Sabatier reactor thereby substantially improving the overall efficiency of the system. However, the acetylene is a waste product that must be removed from the pyrolysis product. Two materials have been identified as potential sorbents for acetylene removal: zeolite 4A, a commonly available commercial sorbent, and HKUST-1, a newly developed microporous metal. This paper provides an explanation of the rationale behind acetylene removal and the results of separation testing with both materials

  14. Evaluation of Sorbents for Acetylene Separation in Atmosphere Revitalization Loop Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.; Barton, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-art carbon dioxide reduction technology uses a Sabatier reactor to recover water from metabolic carbon dioxide. In order to maximize oxygen loop closure, a byproduct of the system, methane, must be reduced to recover hydrogen. NASA is currently exploring a microwave plasma methane pyrolysis system for this purpose. The resulting product stream of this technology includes unreacted methane, product hydrogen, and acetylene. The hydrogen and the small amount of unreacted methane resulting from the pyrolysis process can be returned to the Sabatier reactor thereby substantially improving the overall efficiency of the system. However, the acetylene is a waste product that must be removed from the pyrolysis product. Two materials have been identified as potential sorbents for acetylene removal: zeolite 4A, a commonly available commercial sorbent, and HKUST-1, a newly developed microporous metal. This paper provides an explanation of the rationale behind acetylene removal and the results of separation testing with both materials.

  15. The effect of incomplete acetylene washout on cardiac output measurement using open circuit acetylene uptake.

    PubMed

    Balouch, Jamal; Olfert, I Mark; Wagner, Peter D; Hopkins, Susan R

    2007-02-15

    The open circuit acetylene uptake method is a useful non-invasive means of measuring cardiac output. However, because of accumulation of inhaled acetylene in tissues, the cardiac output uptake is underestimated, if residual acetylene is not allowed to wash out completely in between measurements. We determined the effect of applying a correction factor that estimates mixed venous acetylene concentration from endtidal values to the calculation of cardiac output. This accounts for mixed venous acetylene present during measurements made before complete washout. Six healthy subjects performed steady-state exercise at approximately 30% and 60% of V(O2 max). Cardiac output measurements were made at each exercise intensity using the open circuit acetylene uptake method (inspired [acetylene] approximately 1%), with the first and last measurements having no detectible levels of acetylene in expired gas (reference measurement). Data were also obtained with immediate pre-measurement endtidal concentrations ranging from 3% to 15% of the inspired [acetylene], in random order in between. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and heart rate did not change significantly during testing at each exercise intensity. Reference cardiac output also did not change significantly and averaged 11.1+/-0.8 L/min at 30% of V(O2 max) and 16.5+/-2.0 L/min at 60% of V(O2 max). Uncorrected cardiac output measurements progressively underestimated cardiac output by 15% at the 3% of inspired endtidal [acetylene] and by over 50% at 15% [acetylene] (p<0.0001). However, when corrected for residual endtidal [acetylene], cardiac outputs were not significantly different from the reference measurements. The results of this study suggest that by accounting for residual endtidal acetylene in mixed venous blood, cardiac output can be accurately measured even when washout of acetylene is incomplete, allowing measurements as often as every 10-15 s. PMID:16714151

  16. Characterization of the Minimum Energy Paths and Energetics for the Reaction of Vinylidene with Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    The reaction of vinylidene (CH2C) with acetylene may be an initiating reaction in soot formation. We report minimum energy paths and accurate energetics for a pathway leading to vinyl-acetylene and for a number of isomers of C4H4. The calculations use complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) derivative methods to characterize the stationary points and internally contacted configuration interaction (ICCI) and/or coupled cluster singles and doubles with a perturbational estimate of triple excitations (CCSD(T)) to determine the energetics. We find an entrance channel barrier of about 5 kcal/mol for the addition of vinylidene to acetylene, but no barriers above reactants for the reaction pathway leading to vinyl-acetylene.

  17. Liquor Activity Reduction (LAR) Programme - 12397

    SciTech Connect

    Pether, Colin; Carrol, Phil; Birkett, Eddie; Kibble, Matthew

    2012-07-01

    Waste material from the reprocessing of irradiated fuel has been stored under water for several decades leading to the water becoming highly radioactive. As a critical enabler to the decommissioning strategy for the Sellafield site, the Liquor Activity Reduction (LAR) programme has been established to provide a processing route for this highly radioactive liquor. This paper reviews the progress that has been made since the start of routine LAR transfer cycles (July 2010) and follows on from the earlier paper presented at WM2011. The paper focuses on the learning from the first full year of routine LAR transfer cycles and the application of this learning to the wider strategies for the treatment of further radioactive liquid effluents on the Sellafield site. During this period over 100,000 Curies of radioactivity has been safely removed and treated. The past year has witnessed the very successful introduction of the LAR programme. This has lead to hazard reduction at MSSS and demonstration that the SIXEP facility can meet the significantly increased challenge that the LAR programme represents. Part of the success has been the ability to predict and deliver a realistic production schedule with the availability of the MSSS, EDT and SIXEP facilities being central to this. Most importantly, the LAR programme has been successful in bringing together key stakeholders to deliver this work while integrating with the existing, day to day, demands of the Sellafield site. (authors)

  18. International Space Station (ISS) Risk Reduction Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodroci, Michael

    2011-01-01

    As the assembly of the ISS nears completion, it is worthwhile to step back and review some of the actions pursued by the Program in recent years to reduce risk and enhance the safety and health of ISS crewmembers, visitors, and space flight participants. While the ISS requirements and initial design were intended to provide the best practicable levels of safety, it is always possible to reduce risk -- given the determination and commitment to do so. The following is a summary of some of the steps taken by the ISS Program Manager, by our International Partners, by hardware and software designers, by operational specialists, and by safety personnel to continuously enhance the safety of the ISS. While decades of work went into developing the ISS requirements, there are many things in a Program like the ISS that can only be learned through actual operational experience. These risk reduction activities can be divided into roughly three categories: (1) Areas that were initially noncompliant which have subsequently been brought into compliance or near compliance (i.e., Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris [MMOD] protection, acoustics) (2) Areas where initial design requirements were eventually considered inadequate and were subsequently augmented (i.e., Toxicity Level 4 materials, emergency hardware and procedures) (3) Areas where risks were initially underestimated, and have subsequently been addressed through additional mitigation (i.e., Extravehicular Activity [EVA] sharp edges, plasma shock hazards) Due to the hard work and cooperation of many parties working together across the span of nearly a decade, the ISS is now a safer and healthier environment for our crew, in many cases exceeding the risk reduction targets inherent in the intent of the original design. It will provide a safe and stable platform for utilization and discovery.

  19. Mechanism-based inactivation of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase by aryl acetylenes and aryl olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, L.S.; Lu, J.Y.L.; Alworth, W.L.

    1986-05-01

    A series of aryl acetylenes and aryl olefins have been examined as substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P-450 dependent monooxgenases in liver microsomes from 5,6-benzoflavone or phenobarbital pretreated rats. 1-Ethynylpyrene, 3-ethynylperylene, 2-ethynylfluorene, methyl 1-pyrenyl acetylene, cis- and trans-1-(2-bromovinyl)pyrene, and 1-allylpyrene serve as mechanism-based irreversible inactivators (suicide inhibitors) of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase, while 1-vinylpyrene and phenyl 1-pyrenyl acetylene do not cause a detectable suicide inhibition of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase. The mechanism-based loss of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase caused by the aryl acetylenes is not accompanied by a corresponding loss of the P-450 content of the microsomes (suicide destruction). The suicide inhibition by these aryl acetylenes therefore does not involve covalent binding to the heme moiety of the monooxygenase. Nevertheless, in the presence of NADPH, /sup 3/H-labeled 1-ethynylpyrene becomes covalently attached to the cytochrome P-450 protein; the measured stoichiometry of binding is one 1-ethynylpyrene per P-450 heme unit. The authors conclude that the inhibition of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase produced by 1-ethynylpyrene may be related to the mechanism of suicide inhibition of P-450 activity by chloramphenicol rather than the mechanism of suicide destruction of P-450 previously described for acetylene and propyne.

  20. Acetylene fermentation: An Earth-based analog of biological carbon cycling on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. G.; Baesman, S. M.; Hoeft, S. E.; Kirshtein, J.; Wolf, K.; Voytek, M. A.; Oremland, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    Acetylene (C2H2) is present in part per million quantities in the atmosphere of Titan; conceivably as an intermediate product of methane photolysis. Currently, Earth’s atmosphere contains only trace amounts of C2H2 (~40 pptv), however higher concentrations likely prevailed during the Hadean and early Archean eons (4.5 - 3.5 Ga). We isolated C2H2-fermenting microbes from various aquatic and sedimentary environments. Acetylene fermentation proceeds via acetylene hydratase (AH) through acetaldehyde, which dismutates to ethanol and acetate, and if oxidants are present (e.g., sulfate) eventually to CO2. Thus, the remnants of a C2H2 cycle exists today on Earth but may also occur on Titan and/or Enceladus, both being planetary bodies hypothesized to have liquid water underlying their frozen surfaces. We developed a molecular method for AH by designing PCR primers to target the functional gene in Pelobacter acetylenicus. We used this method to scan new environments for the presence of AH and we employed DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in order to positively identify pelobacters in environmental samples. Acetylene fermentation was documented in five diverse salt-, fresh-, and ground-water sites. Pelobacter was identified as the genus responsible for acetylene fermentation in some, but not all, of these sites. Successful probing for AH preceded the discovery of acetylene consumption in a contaminated groundwater site, demonstrating the utility of functional gene probing. A pure culture of a C2H2-fermenting pelobacter was obtained from an intertidal mudflat. We also obtained an enrichment culture (co-cultured with a sulfate reducer) from freshwater lake sediments, but neither was pelobacter nor AH detected in this sample, suggesting that an alternative pathway may be involved here. Slurry experiments using these lake sediments either with or without added C2H2 or sulfate showed that sulfate reduction and acetylene fermentation were independent processes. In general, the

  1. Vapor pressures of acetylene at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masterson, C. M.; Allen, John E., Jr.; Kraus, G. F.; Khanna, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The atmospheres of many of the outer planets and their satellites contain a large number of hydrocarbon species. In particular, acetylene (C2H2) has been identified at Jupiter, Saturn and its satellite Titan, Uranus and Neptune. In the lower atmospheres of these planets, where colder temperatures prevail, the condensation and/or freezing of acetylene is probable. In order to obtain accurate models of the acetylene in these atmospheres, it is necessary to have a complete understanding of its vapor pressures at low temperatures. Vapor pressures at low temperatures for acetylene are being determined. The vapor pressures are measured with two different techniques in order to cover a wide range of temperatures and pressures. In the first, the acetylene is placed in a sample tube which is immersed in a low temperature solvent/liquid nitrogen slush bath whose temperature is measured with a thermocouple. The vapor pressure is then measured directly with a capacitance manometer. For lower pressures, a second technique which was called the thin-film infrared method (TFIR) was developed. It involves measuring the disappearance rate of a thin film of acetylene at a particular temperature. The spectra are then analyzed using previously determined extinction coefficient values, to determine the disappearance rate R (where R = delta n/delta t, the number of molecules that disappear per unit time). This can be related to the vapor pressure directly. This technique facilitates measurement of the lower temperatures and pressures. Both techniques have been calibrated using CO2, and have shown good agreement with the existing literature data.

  2. Acetylene Fermentation: Relevance to Primordial Biogeochemistry and the Search for Life in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    Acetylene is a highly reactive component of planet(oid)s with anoxic, methane-rich atmospheres, such as Jupiter, Saturn, Titan, and perhaps the primordial Earth. Included in this group is Enceladus, although it is not clear if the acetylene detected within its jets by Cassini was formed by photolysis of methane, from thermo-catalysis of organic matter in the orb's interior, or a fragmentation artifact of the mass spectrum of a larger hydrocarbon. Acetylene inhibits many microbial processes (e.g., methanogenesis, methane oxidation, hydrogen metabolism, denitrification) yet a number of anaerobes can use it as a carbon and energy source to support growth. The best studied is Pelobacter acetylenicus, which carries out a two-step reaction involving the enzymes acetylene hydratase and acetaldehyde dismutase. The former, a low potential W-containing enzyme, forms acetaldehyde while the latter produces ethanol and acetate. Metabolism of acetylene by mixed microbial communities (sediments and/or enrichment cultures) produces these intermediates, and when coupled with sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis respectively forms CO2 or an equal mixtures of CO2 plus CH4. It is not inconceivable that such an anaerobic, microbial food chain could exist in the waters beneath the ice cap of Enceladus, Titan, or even in the mesothermal atmospheric regions of the gas giants. Detection of the identified intermediate products of acetylene fermentation, namely acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetate and formate in the atmospheres of these planet(oid)s would constitute evidence for a microbial life signature. This evidence would be strongly reinforced if a stable carbon isotope fractionation was identified as well, whereby the products of acetylene fermentation were enriched in 12C relative to 13C (i.e., had a lighter δ13C signal) when compared to that of the starting acetylene. The most practical target to test this hypothesis would be Enceladus (if the detected acetylene is shown to be a real

  3. Microporous metal–organic framework with dual functionalities for highly efficient removal of acetylene from ethylene/acetylene mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tong-Liang; Wang, Hailong; Li, Bin; Krishna, Rajamani; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Han, Yu; Wang, Xue; Zhu, Weidong; Yao, Zizhu; Xiang, Shengchang; Chen, Banglin

    2015-01-01

    The removal of acetylene from ethylene/acetylene mixtures containing 1% acetylene is a technologically very important, but highly challenging task. Current removal approaches include the partial hydrogenation over a noble metal catalyst and the solvent extraction of cracked olefins, both of which are cost and energy consumptive. Here we report a microporous metal–organic framework in which the suitable pore/cage spaces preferentially take up much more acetylene than ethylene while the functional amine groups on the pore/cage surfaces further enforce their interactions with acetylene molecules, leading to its superior performance for this separation. The single X-ray diffraction studies, temperature dependent gas sorption isotherms, simulated and experimental column breakthrough curves and molecular simulation studies collaboratively support the claim, underlying the potential of this material for the industrial usage of the removal of acetylene from ethylene/acetylene mixtures containing 1% acetylene at room temperature through the cost- and energy-efficient adsorption separation process. PMID:26041691

  4. Designing supported palladium-on-gold bimetallic nano-catalysts for controlled hydrogenation of acetylene in large excess of ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malla, Pavani

    Ethylene is used as a starting point for many chemical intermediates in the petrochemical industry. It is predominantly produced through steam cracking of higher hydrocarbons (ethane, propane, butane, naphtha, and gas oil). During the cracking process, a small amount of acetylene is produced as a side product. However, acetylene must be removed since it acts as a poison for ethylene polymerization catalysts at even ppm concentrations (>5 ppm). Thus, the selective hydrogenation of acetylene to ethylene is an important process for the purification of ethylene. Conventional, low weight loading Pd catalysts are used for this selective reaction in high concentration ethylene streams. Gold was initially considered to be catalytically inactive for a long time. This changed when gold was seen in the context of the nanometric scale, which has indeed shown it to have excellent catalytic activity as a homogeneous or a heterogeneous catalyst. Gold is proved to have high selectivity to ethylene but poor at conversion. Bimetallic Au and Pd catalysts have exhibited superior activity as compared to Pd particles in semi-hydrogenation. Hydrogenation of acetylene was tested using this bimetallic combination. The Pd-on-Au bimetallic catalyst structure provides a new synthesis approach in improving the catalytic properties of monometallic Pd materials. TiO 2 as a support material and 0.05%Pd loading on 1%Au on titania support and used different treatment methods like washing plasma and reduction between the two metal loadings and was observed under 2:1 ratio. In my study there were two set of catalysts which were prepared by a modified incipient wetness impregnation technique. Out of all the reaction condition the catalyst which was reduced after impregnating gold and then impregnating palladium which was further treated in non-thermal hydrogen plasma and then pretreated in hydrogen till 250°C for 1 hour produced the best activity of 76% yield at 225°C. Stability tests were conducted

  5. Hydration of Acetylene: A 125th Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponomarev, Dmitry A.; Shevchenko, Sergey M.

    2007-01-01

    The year 2006 is the 125th anniversary of a chemical reaction, the discovery of which by Mikhail Kucherov had a profound effect on the development of industrial chemistry in the 19-20th centuries. This was the hydration of alkynes catalyzed by mercury ions that made possible industrial production of acetaldehyde from acetylene. Historical…

  6. A mid-infrared absorption diagnostic for acetylene detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KC, Utsav; Nasir, Ehson F.; Farooq, Aamir

    2015-08-01

    Acetylene is an important combustion intermediate and plays a critical role in soot formation. Accurate measurements of trace concentrations of acetylene can be very useful in validating hydrocarbon oxidation and soot formation mechanisms. Strongest vibrational band of acetylene near 13.7 μm is probed here to develop a highly sensitive absorption diagnostic. Experiments are carried out behind reflected shock waves to measure absorption cross sections of acetylene near 730 cm-1 over a wide range of temperatures (1000-2200 K) and pressures (1-5 bar). The diagnostic is demonstrated by measuring acetylene formation during the shock-heated pyrolysis and oxidation of propene.

  7. Identification of Acetylene on Titan's Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; McCord, T. B.; Rodriguez, S.; Combe, J. P.; Cornet, T.; Le Mouelic, S.; Maltagliati, L.; Chevrier, V.; Clark, R. N.

    2015-12-01

    Titan's atmosphere is opaque in the near infrared due to gaseous absorptions, mainly by methane, and scattering by aerosols, except in a few "transparency windows" (e.g., Sotin et al., 2005). Thus, the composition of Titan surface remains difficult to access from space and is still poorly constrained, limited to ethane in the polar lakes (Brown et al., 2008) and a few possible organic molecules on the surface (Clark et al., 2010). Photochemical models suggest that most of the organic compounds formed in the atmosphere are heavy enough to condense and build up at the surface in liquid and solid states over geological timescale (Cordier et al., 2009, 2011). Acetylene (C2H2) is one of the most abundant organic molecules in the atmosphere and thus thought to present on the surface as well. Here we report direct evidence of solid C2H2 on Titan's surface using Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) data. By comparing VIMS observations and laboratory measurements of solid and liquid C2H2, we identify a specific absorption at 1.55 µm that is widespread over Titan but is particularly strong in the brightest terrains. This surface variability suggests that C2H2 is mobilized by surface processes, such as surface weathering, topography, and dissolution/evaporation. The detection of C2H2 on the surface of Titan opens new paths to understand and constrain Titan's surface activity. Since C2H2 is highly soluble in Titan liquids (Singh et al. 2015), it can easily dissolve in methane/ethane and may play an important role in carving of fluvial channels and existence of karstic lakes at higher latitudes on Titan. These processes imply the existence of a dynamic surface with a continued history of erosion and deposition of C2H2 on Titan.

  8. 29 CFR 4043.23 - Active participant reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Active participant reduction. 4043.23 Section 4043.23 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION PLAN TERMINATIONS REPORTABLE EVENTS AND CERTAIN OTHER NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Post-Event Notice of Reportable Events § 4043.23 Active participant reduction....

  9. 29 CFR 4043.23 - Active participant reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Active participant reduction. 4043.23 Section 4043.23 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION PLAN TERMINATIONS REPORTABLE EVENTS AND CERTAIN OTHER NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Post-Event Notice of Reportable Events § 4043.23 Active participant reduction....

  10. Acetylenes and fatty acids from Codonopsis pilosula

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yueping; Liu, Yufeng; Guo, Qinglan; Jiang, Zhibo; Xu, Chengbo; Zhu, Chenggen; Yang, Yongchun; Lin, Sheng; Shi, Jiangong

    2015-01-01

    Four new acetylenes (1–4) and one new unsaturated ω-hydroxy fatty acid (5), together with 5 known analogues, were isolated from an aqueous extract of Codonopsis pilosula roots. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic and chemical methods. The new acetylenes are categorized as an unusual cyclotetradecatrienynone (1), tetradecenynetriol (2), and rare octenynoic acids (3 and 4), respectively, and 3 and 4 are possibly derived from oxidative metabolic degradation of 1 and/or 2. The absolute configuration of 1 was assigned by comparison of the experimental circular dichroism (CD) spectrum with the calculated electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra of stereoisomers based on the quantum-mechanical time-dependent density functional theory, while the configuration of 2 was assigned by using modified Mosher׳s method based on the MPA determination rule of ΔδRS values for diols. PMID:26579449

  11. Annual waste reduction activities report. Issue 1

    SciTech Connect

    1991-03-18

    This report discusses the waste minimization activities for the Pinellas Plant. The Pinellas Plant deals with low-level radioactive wastes, solvents, scrap metals and various other hazardous materials. This program has realized cost savings through recycling and reuse of materials.

  12. Two new acetylenic compounds from Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Mei; Cai, Jin-Long; Wang, Wen-Xiang; Ai, Hong-Lian; Mao, Zi-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Two new acetylenic compounds, asparoffins A (1) and B (2), together with two known compounds, nyasol (3) and 3″-methoxynyasol (4), were isolated from stems of Asparagus officinalis. The structures of two new compounds were elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analyses (UV, IR, MS, 1D, and 2D NMR). All compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxicities against three human cancer cell lines. PMID:26558641

  13. Feedback controllers for broadband active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitjean, Benoit; Legrain, Isabelle

    1994-09-01

    The aim of the present paper is to demonstrate the efficiency of an LQG-based controller for the active control of the acoustic field radiated by a rectangular panel. This topic has been of interest for numerous researchers in the past 10 or 15 years, but very little attention has been paid to broadband disturbances occurring in a relatively high frequency range. These are unfortunately common features of noise perturbations in realistic structures such as airplanes or helicopters. The few articles that deal with this problem provide very scarce experimental results and are related to frequency bands where the structure dynamics is rather poor. From the outset, the problem at hand involves numerous difficulties, such as the modeling of the active structure itself and the possible large size of the controller. In the following, the experimental setup is described, then the controller design procedure is developed and finally some experimental results are shown that prove the efficiency of the method.

  14. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  15. 29 CFR 4043.23 - Active participant reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EVENTS AND CERTAIN OTHER NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Post-Event Notice of Reportable Events § 4043.23 Active participant reduction. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the number of active...., facility shutdown or sale); and (2) The number of active participants at the date the reportable...

  16. 29 CFR 4043.23 - Active participant reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... EVENTS AND CERTAIN OTHER NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Post-Event Notice of Reportable Events § 4043.23 Active participant reduction. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the number of active...., facility shutdown or sale); and (2) The number of active participants at the date the reportable...

  17. 29 CFR 4043.23 - Active participant reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EVENTS AND CERTAIN OTHER NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Post-Event Notice of Reportable Events § 4043.23 Active participant reduction. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the number of active...., facility shutdown or sale); and (2) The number of active participants at the date the reportable...

  18. Opposite influence of haloalkanes on combustion and pyrolysis of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakon, A. V.; Emelianov, A. V.; Eremin, A. V.; Mikheyeva, E. Yu

    2015-11-01

    An influence of haloalkanes CF3H and CCl4 (known as inflammation and explosion suppressors) on combustion and pyrolysis of acetylene behind shock waves was experimentally studied. While ignition delay times in stoihiometric acetylene-oxygen mixtures were expectedly increased by halogenoalkanes admixtures, the induction times of carbon particle formation at acetylene pyrolysis were dramatically reduced in presence of CCl4. A simplified kinetic model was suggested and characteristic rates of diacetylene C4H2 formation were estimated as a limiting stage of acetylene polymerization. An analysis of obtained data has indicated that promoting species is atomic chlorine forming in CCl4 pyrolysis, which interacts with acetylene and produces C2H radical, initiating a chain mechanism of acetylene decomposition. The results of kinetic modeling agree well with experimental data.

  19. Mechanism of tungsten-dependent acetylene hydratase from quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Liao, Rong-Zhen; Yu, Jian-Guo; Himo, Fahmi

    2010-12-28

    Acetylene hydratase is a tungsten-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the nonredox hydration of acetylene to acetaldehyde. Density functional theory calculations are used to elucidate the reaction mechanism of this enzyme with a large model of the active site devised on the basis of the native X-ray crystal structure. Based on the calculations, we propose a new mechanism in which the acetylene substrate first displaces the W-coordinated water molecule, and then undergoes a nucleophilic attack by the water molecule assisted by an ionized Asp13 residue at the active site. This is followed by proton transfer from Asp13 to the newly formed vinyl anion intermediate. In the subsequent isomerization, Asp13 shuttles a proton from the hydroxyl group of the vinyl alcohol to the α-carbon. Asp13 is thus a key player in the mechanism, but also W is directly involved in the reaction by binding and activating acetylene and providing electrostatic stabilization to the transition states and intermediates. Several other mechanisms are also considered but the energetic barriers are found to be very high, ruling out these possibilities. PMID:21149684

  20. Purification and characterization of acetylene hydratase of Pelobacter acetylenicus, a tungsten iron-sulfur protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, B M; Schink, B

    1995-01-01

    Acetylene hydratase of the mesophilic fermenting bacterium Pelobacter acetylenicus catalyzes the hydration of acetylene to acetaldehyde. Growth of P. acetylenicus with acetylene and specific acetylene hydratase activity depended on tungstate or, to a lower degree, molybdate supply in the medium. The specific enzyme activity in cell extract was highest after growth in the presence of tungstate. Enzyme activity was stable even after prolonged storage of the cell extract or of the purified protein under air. However, enzyme activity could be measured only in the presence of a strong reducing agent such as titanium(III) citrate or dithionite. The enzyme was purified 240-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, anion-exchange chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, and a second anion-exchange chromatography step, with a yield of 36%. The protein was a monomer with an apparent molecular mass of 73 kDa, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric point was at pH 4.2. Per mol of enzyme, 4.8 mol of iron, 3.9 mol of acid-labile sulfur, and 0.4 mol of tungsten, but no molybdenum, were detected. The Km for acetylene as assayed in a coupled photometric test with yeast alcohol dehydrogenase and NADH was 14 microM, and the Vmax was 69 mumol.min-1.mg of protein-1. The optimum temperature for activity was 50 degrees C, and the apparent pH optimum was 6.0 to 6.5. The N-terminal amino acid sequence gave no indication of resemblance to any enzyme protein described so far. PMID:7592321

  1. Chromium Isotope Behaviour During Aerobic Microbial Reduction Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Amor, K.; Porcelli, D.; Thompson, I.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial activity is a very important, and possibly even the dominant, reduction mechanism for many metals in natural water systems. Isotope fractionations during microbial metal reduction can reflect one major mechanism in metal cycling in the environment, and isotopic signatures can be used to identify and quantify reduction processes during biogeochemical cycling in the present environment as well as in the past. There are many Cr (VI)-reducing bacteria that have been discovered and isolated from the environment, and Cr isotopes were found to be fractionated during microbial reduction processes. In this study, Cr reduction experiments have been undertaken to determine the conditions under which Cr is reduced and the corresponding isotope signals that are generated. The experiments have been done with a facultative bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens LB 300, and several parameters that have potential impact on reduction mechanisms have been investigated. Electron donors are important for bacteria growth and metabolism. One factor that can control the rate of Cr reduction is the nature of the electron donor. The results show that using citrate as an electron donor can stimulate bacteria reduction activity to a large extent; the reduction rate is much higher (15.10 mgˑL-1hour-1) compared with experiments using glucose (6.65 mgˑL-1ˑhour-1), acetate (4.88 mgˑL-1hour-1) or propionate (4.85 mgˑL-1hour-1) as electron donors. Groups with higher electron donor concentrations have higher reduction rates. Chromium is toxic, and when increasing Cr concentrations in the medium, the bacteria reduction rate is also higher, which reflects bacteria adapting to the toxic environment. In the natural environment, under different pH conditions, bacteria may metabolise in different ways. In our experiments with pH, bacteria performed better in reducing Cr (VI) when pH = 8, and there are no significant differences between groups with pH = 4 or pH = 6. To investigate this further, Cr

  2. Spectroscopic study of acetylene and hydrogen cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozario, Hoimonti Immaculata

    High-resolution molecular spectroscopy has been used to study acetylene line parameters and emission spectra of hydrogen cyanide. All acetylene spectra were recorded in our laboratory at the University of Lethbridge using a 3-channel tuneable diode laser spectrometer. N2-broadened line widths and N2-pressure induced line shifts have been measured for transitions in the v1+v3 band of acetylene at seven temperatures in the range 213-333K to obtain the temperature dependences of broadening and shift coefficients. The Voigt and hard-collision line profile models were used to retrieve the line parameters. The line-broadening and line-shift coefficients as well as their temperature-dependent parameters have been also evaluated theoretically, in the frame work of a semi-classical approach based on an exponential representation of the scattering operator, an intermolecular potential composed of electrostatic quadrupole--quadrupole and pairwise atom--atom interactions as well as on exact trajectories driven by an effective isotropic potential. The experimental results for both N2-broadening and shifting show good agreement with the theoretical results. We have studied the line intensities of the 1vl 20←0v120 band system from the HCN emission spectrum. The infrared emission spectrum of H12C 14N was measured at the Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany. The emission spectrum was analyzed with the spectrum analysis software Symath running using Mathematica as a platform. This approach allowed us to retrieve information on band intensity parameters.

  3. Laboratory astrochemistry: catalytic conversion of acetylene to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons over SiC grains.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T Q; Li, Q; Liu, B S; Gover, R K E; Sarre, P J; Cheung, A S-C

    2016-02-01

    Catalytic conversion reactions of acetylene on a solid SiC grain surface lead to the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and are expected to mimic chemical processes in certain astrophysical environments. Gas-phase PAHs and intermediates were detected in situ using time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and their formation was confirmed using GC-MS in a separate experiment by flowing acetylene gas through a fixed-bed reactor. Activation of acetylene correlated closely with the dangling bonds on the SiC surface which interact with and break the C-C π bond. The addition of acetylene to the resulting radical site forms a surface ring structure which desorbs from the surface. The results of HRTEM and TG indicate that soot and graphene formation on the SiC surface depends strongly on reaction temperature. We propose that PAHs as seen through the 'UIR' emission bands can be formed through decomposition of a graphene-like material, formed on the surface of SiC grains in carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes. PMID:26752613

  4. RECRYSTALLIZATION OF PMDA AND SYNTHESIS OF AN ACETYLENIC DIAMINE

    SciTech Connect

    Sanner, R; Cook, R C

    2004-09-21

    This memo provides documentation for the method of recrystallization of pyromeletic dianhydride (PMDA), the dianhydride used in the vapor deposition of Kapton-like polyimide for ICF shell ablators and for the synthesis of bis(3-aminophenyl) acetylene, a unique acetylenic diamine developed for vapor deposition testing.

  5. 76 FR 75782 - Revising Standards Referenced in the Acetylene Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... standards that reference or include language from outdated standards published by standards developing organizations (``SDO standards'') (69 FR 68283). A SDO standard referenced in OSHA's Acetylene Standard (29 CFR... of the Compressed Gas Association standard, CGA G-1-2003, in the Acetylene Standard. See 74 FR...

  6. Acetylene-based chemicals from coal and other natural resources

    SciTech Connect

    Tedeschi, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The economic and technological changes which have affected acetylene directly are examined. Commodity chemicals, which were manufactured from acetylene more than thirty years ago, are now made almost entirely from hydrocarbons such as ethylene, propylene, or butadiene. During this period, calcium carbide acetylene was displaced by petrochemical acetylene, the latter was gradually displaced by less expensive olefins and alkanes. The calcium carbide process viewed in terms of its abundant raw materials, might again become an attractive technology as petroleum-based feedstocks become scarcer and more expensive. With improved furnace design and solids handling, further economics in this process may be possible. The greatest growth area for acetylene is now in Reppe-type chemicals such as butyndiol, tetrahydrofuran, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, vinyl pyrrolidone, and polyvinyl pyrrolidone, and a variety of acetylenic alcohols and glycols. The technology and applications for large-volume acetylenic products and their derivatives are outlined. Acetylene production processes purification, stability and guidelines for its safe use in chemical operations are described. 327 references, 30 figures, 19 tables.

  7. Radiocesium activity reduction in boar meat by brining.

    PubMed

    Dvorák, P; Kunová, V; Kunová, J; Benová, K

    2008-02-01

    Meat of wild boar with an intial (137)Cs activity concentration of 103 Bq kg(-1) of fresh mass was treated by brining. Dry-salting reduced the (137)Cs activity only by about 12-18%. Subsequent brining was done by using both pure sodium chloride and a mixture of sodium chloride and potassium nitrate. After double-brine exchange, the (137)Cs activity concentration was reduced by at least 72%. The double-brine exchanges were done for two time intervals (the first each 24 h and the second each 7 days). There were no differences in the (137)Cs activity reduction for these two time intervals. From the technological point of view, the repeated exchange of the brine solution represents a relative easy method of (137)Cs activity reduction in contaminated pork meat. PMID:17882446

  8. Pressure-induced Polymerization in Substituted Acetylenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chellappa, Raja; Dattelbaum, Dana; Sheffield, Stephen; Robbins, David

    2011-06-01

    A fundamental understanding of shock-induced chemical reactions in organics is still lacking and there are limited studies devoted to determining reaction mechanisms, evolution of bonding, and effect of functional group substitutions. The fast timescale of reactions occurring during shock compression create significant experimental challenges (diagnostics) to fully quantify the mechanisms involved. Static compression provides a complementary route to investigate the equilibrium phase space and metastable intermediates during high pressure chemistry, although at a much slower timescale. In this study, we present our results from our ongoing high pressure in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy experiments on substituted acetylenes: tert-butyl acetylene [TBA: (CH3)3 -C ≡CH] and ethynyl trimethylsilane [ETMS: (CH3)3 -Si ≡CH]. We observed that the onset pressure of chemical reactions (at room temperature) in these compounds is significantly higher in static compression (TBA: 11 GPa and ETMS: 26 GPa) when compared to shock input pressures (TBA: 6.1 GPa and ETMS: 6.6 GPa). The products were polymeric in nature, recovered to ambient conditions with little degradation and fully characterized using spectroscopy, calorimetry, and other techniques to identify reaction mechanisms. LDRD-DR (PI: Dana Dattelbaum)

  9. Interpenetrating polymer networks from acetylene terminated materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    As part of a program to develop high temperature/high performance structural resins for aerospace applications, the chemistry and properties of a novel class of interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) were investigated. These IPNs consist of a simple diacetylenic compound (aspartimide) blended with an acetylene terminated arylene ether oligomer. Various compositional blends were prepared and thermally cured to evaluate the effect of crosslink density on resin properties. The cured IPNs exhibited glass transition temperatures ranging from 197 to 254 C depending upon the composition and cure temperature. The solvent resistance, fracture toughness and coefficient of thermal expansion of the cured blends were related to the crosslink density. Isothermal aging of neat resin moldings, adhesive and composite specimens showed a postcure effect which resulted in improved elevated temperature properties. The chemistry, physical and mechanical properties of these materials will be discussed.

  10. ESI-MS, DFT, and synthetic studies on the H(2)-mediated coupling of acetylene: insertion of C=X bonds into rhodacyclopentadienes and Brønsted acid cocatalyzed hydrogenolysis of organorhodium intermediates.

    PubMed

    Williams, Vanessa M; Kong, Jong Rock; Ko, Byoung Joon; Mantri, Yogita; Brodbelt, Jennifer S; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Krische, Michael J

    2009-11-11

    The catalytic mechanism of the hydrogen-mediated coupling of acetylene to carbonyl compounds and imines has been examined using three techniques: (a) ESI-MS and ESI-CAD-MS analyses, (b) computational modeling, and (c) experiments wherein putative reactive intermediates are diverted to alternate reaction products. ESI-MS analysis of reaction mixtures from the hydrogen-mediated reductive coupling of acetylene to alpha-ketoesters or N-benzenesulfonyl aldimines corroborate a catalytic mechanism involving C horizontal lineX (X = O, NSO(2)Ph) insertion into a cationic rhodacyclopentadiene obtained by way of acetylene oxidative dimerization with subsequent Brønsted acid cocatalyzed hydrogenolysis of the resulting oxa- or azarhodacycloheptadiene. Hydrogenation of 1,6-diynes in the presence of alpha-ketoesters provides analogous coupling products. ESI mass spectrometric analysis again corroborates a catalytic mechanism involving carbonyl insertion into a cationic rhodacyclopentadiene. For all ESI-MS experiments, the structural assignments of ions are supported by multistage collisional activated dissociation (CAD) analyses. Further support for the proposed catalytic mechanism derives from experiments aimed at the interception of putative reactive intermediates and their diversion to alternate reaction products. For example, rhodium-catalyzed coupling of acetylene to an aldehyde in the absence of hydrogen or Brønsted acid cocatalyst provides the corresponding (Z)-butadienyl ketone, which arises from beta-hydride elimination of the proposed oxarhodacycloheptadiene intermediate, as corroborated by isotopic labeling. Additionally, the putative rhodacyclopentadiene intermediate obtained from the oxidative coupling of acetylene is diverted to the product of reductive [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition when N-p-toluenesulfonyl-dehydroalanine ethyl ester is used as the coupling partner. The mechanism of this transformation also is corroborated by isotopic labeling. Computer model studies

  11. Active viscoelastic matter: from bacterial drag reduction to turbulent solids.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, E J; Maitra, A; Banerjee, S; Marchetti, M C; Ramaswamy, S; Fielding, S M; Cates, M E

    2015-03-01

    A paradigm for internally driven matter is the active nematic liquid crystal, whereby the equations of a conventional nematic are supplemented by a minimal active stress that violates time-reversal symmetry. In practice, active fluids may have not only liquid-crystalline but also viscoelastic polymer degrees of freedom. Here we explore the resulting interplay by coupling an active nematic to a minimal model of polymer rheology. We find that adding a polymer can greatly increase the complexity of spontaneous flow, but can also have calming effects, thereby increasing the net throughput of spontaneous flow along a pipe (a "drag-reduction" effect). Remarkably, active turbulence can also arise after switching on activity in a sufficiently soft elastomeric solid. PMID:25793858

  12. Acetylene hydratase of Pelobacter acetylenicus. Molecular and spectroscopic properties of the tungsten iron-sulfur enzyme.

    PubMed

    Meckenstock, R U; Krieger, R; Ensign, S; Kroneck, P M; Schink, B

    1999-08-01

    Acetylene hydratase of Pelobacter acetylenicus is a tungsten iron-sulfur protein involved in the fermentation of acetylene to ethanol and acetate. Expression of the enzyme was increased 10-fold by feeding a 50-L batch culture continuously with 104 Pa acetylene at pH 6.8-7.0. Acetylene hydratase was purified to homogeneity by a three-step procedure in either the absence or presence of dioxygen. The enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 73 kDa (SDS/PAGE) or 83 kDa (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization MS) and contained 0.5 +/- 0.1 W (inductively coupled plasma/MS) and 1.3 +/- 0.1 molybdopterin-guanine dinucleotide per mol. Selenium was absent. EPR spectra (enzyme as isolated, under air) showed a signal typical of a [3Fe-4S] cluster with gav = 2.01, at 10 K. In enzyme prepared under N2/H2, this signal was absent and reaction with dithionite led to a rhombic signal with gz = 2.048, gy = 1.939 and gx = 1.920 indicative of a low-potential ferredoxin-type [4Fe-4S] cluster. Upon oxidation with hexacyanoferrate(III), a new signal appeared with gx = 2.007, gy = 2.019 and gz = 2.048 (gav = 2.022), which disappeared after further oxidation. The signal was still visible at 150 K and was tentatively assigned to a W(V) center. The iron-sulfur center of acetylene hydratase (prepared under N2/H2) gave a midpoint redox potential of -410 +/- 20 mV in a spectrophotometric titration with dithionite. Enzyme activity depended on the redox potential of the solution, with 50% of maximum activity at -340 +/- 20 mV. The presence of a pterin-guanine dinucleotide cofactor differentiates acetylene hydratase from the aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase-type enzymes which have a pterin mononucleotide cofactor. PMID:10447686

  13. Charge transfer induced activity of graphene for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Anli; Xia, Weijun; Zhang, Lipeng; Dou, Shuo; Xia, Zhenhai; Wang, Shuangyin

    2016-05-01

    Tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), with its strong electron-accepting ability, was used to dope graphene as a metal-free electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The charge transfer process was observed from graphene to TCNE by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman characterizations. Our density functional theory calculations found that the charge transfer behavior led to an enhancement of the electrocatalytic activity for the ORR.

  14. A new C-10 acetylene and A new triterpenoid from Conyza canadensis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei Dong; Gao, Xue; Jia, Zhong Jian

    2007-05-01

    From the whole plants of Conyza canadensis (Compositae), a new C-10 acetylene, namely 8R, 9R-dihydroxymatricarine methyl ester (1), and a new triterpenoid, namely 3beta, 16beta, 20beta-trihydroxytaraxast-3-O-palmitoxyl ester (4), were isolated along with eleven known compounds (2, 3, 5-13). The structures of all 13 compounds were elucidated on the basis of their spectral data. The antibacterial activities of compounds 1-3 were evaluated. PMID:17615671

  15. In situ spectroscopic characterization of Ni1-xZnx/ZnO catalysts and their selectivity for acetylene semihydrogenation in excess ethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Spanjers, Charles S.; Sim, Richard S.; Sturgis, Nicholas P.; Kabius, Bernd; Rioux, Robert M.

    2015-10-30

    The structures of ZnO-supported Ni catalysts were explored with in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, temperature-programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Calcination of nickel nitrate on a nanoparticulate ZnO support at 450 °C results in the formation of Zn-doped NiO (ca. N₀̣̣₈₅ Zn₀̣̣₁₅O) nanoparticles with the rock salt crystal structure. Subsequent in situ reduction monitored by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) at the Ni K edge reveals a direct transformation of the Zn-doped NiO nanoparticles to a face-centered cubic alloy, Ni1-xZnx, at ~400 °C with x increasing with increasing temperature. Both in situ XANES and ex situ HRTEM provide evidence for intermetallic β₁-NiZn formation at ~550 °C. In comparison to a Ni/SiO₂ catalyst, Ni/ZnO necessitates a higher temperature for the reduction of NiII to Ni⁰, which highlights the strong interaction between Ni and the ZnO support. The catalytic activity for acetylene removal from an ethylene feed stream is decreased by a factor of 20 on Ni/ZnO in comparison to Ni/SiO₂. The decrease in catalytic activity of Ni/ZnO is accompanied by a reduced absolute selectivity to ethylene. H–D exchange measurements demonstrate a reduced ability of Ni/ZnO to dissociate hydrogen in comparison to Ni/SiO₂.These results of the catalytic experiments suggest that the catalytic properties are controlled, in part, by the zinc oxide support and stress the importance of reporting absolute ethylene selectivity for the catalytic semihydrogenation of acetylene in excess ethylene.

  16. Inhibiting the combustion of air-acetylene mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylov, S. N.; Gubina, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    The effect propane, methane, and a mixture of 18 vol % C3H6-40 vol % C3H8-42 vol % C4H10 have on the combustion of air-acetylene mixtures is investigated experimentally. The upper concentration limit of flame propagation, maximum explosion pressure, and maximum rate of rise of explosion pressure are determined. It is found that propane and a mixture of 18 vol % C3H6-40 vol % C3H8-42 vol % C4H10 are strong inhibitors of combustion of acetylene in its concentration ranges of 2-8 vol %. The inhibition effect becomes weaker as the acetylene content in the mixture increases. It disappears completely at C2H2 concentrations exceeding 15 vol %. The above experimental findings are explained using the proposed scheme of acetylene oxidation.

  17. Pyrethrum stabilization by inactivation of natural acetylenic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.J.

    1989-01-17

    This patent describes a mixture of naturally occurring pyrethroid substances and derivatives of naturally occurring polyacetylenic substances wherein the derivatives of polyacetylenic substances are formed by substantially inactivating the acetylenic functional groups to promote the stability of the pyrethroid substances.

  18. Reduction of salivary tissue factor (thromboplastin) activity by warfarin therapy.

    PubMed

    Zacharski, L R; Rosenstein, R

    1979-03-01

    The coagulant of normal human saliva has been identified as tissue factor (thromboplastin, TF) by virtue of its ability to cause rapid coagulation in plasmas deficient in first-stage coagulation factors and to activate factor x in the presence of factor VII and by virtue of the fact that its activity is expressed only in the presence of factor VII and is inhibited by an antibody to TF. The TF is related to cells and cell fragments in saliva. Salivary TF activity has been found to be significantly reduced in patients taking warfarin. The decline in TF activity during induction of warfarin anticoagulation occurs during the warfarin-induced decline in vitamin-K-dependent clotting factor activity, as judged by the prothrombin time. The decrease in TF activity is not related to a reduction in salivary cell count or total protein content or to a direct effect of warfarin on the assay. It is hypothesized that the mechanism by which warfarin inhibits TF activity may be related to the mechanism by which it inhibits expression of the activity of the vitamin-K-dependent clotting factors. Inhibition of the TF activity may be involved in the antithrombotic effect of warfarin. PMID:760859

  19. Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics of the Acetylene - Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Shan-Shan

    The structures, intermolecular forces and excited state dynamics of acetylene(A) cdot Ar complex are investigated by combination of laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy pairwise potential model calculations. Acetylene is linear in the X state while trans-bent in the (A) state. Although only one structure has been known to exist for the acetylene(X) cdot Ar complex, two isomeric structures are determined for the acetylene(A) cdot Ar complex from the rotational band shape analysis of the fluorescence excitation spectra. One of the isomers has the argon sitting in the molecular plane of C _2H_2 (A), 3.77 A away from the center-of-mass of acetylene, the other has the argon 3.71 A above the plane on the C_2 axis. Formulas useful for calculating axis switching angles in non-planar molecules have been derived and applied to the two isomeric structures. It was found that despite the acetylene geometry change from the (X) to the (A) state, the axis switching effect is negligible for the complex spectral calculation. A pair potential model with parameters directly extracted from the ones calculated for ethene (X) cdot Ar is able to produce the two structures. Based on the structures and the calculated potential surface, three of the vdW frequencies are assigned to be: upsilon_{rm stretch } = 28 cm^{-1} for the out-of-plane isomer, upsilon_ {rm bend1} = 11 cm^ {-1} (the in-plane bend) and upsilon_{rm bend2} = 8.5 cm^{-1} (the out -of-plane bend) for the in-plane isomer. The existence of the two isomers allowed the study of the orientation dependence in intersystem crossing (ISC) of acetylene(S _1) induced by interaction with argon. Similar ISC lifetimes (~100 ns) were observed for the two isomers, suggesting that the pi and pi^* orbitals are equally susceptible to spin-changing interactions with Ar.

  20. The ozone acetylene reaction: concerted or non-concerted reaction mechanism? A quantum chemical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Dieter; Kraka, Elfi; Crehuet, Ramon; Anglada, Josep; Gräfenstein, Jürgen

    2001-10-01

    The ozone-acetylene reaction is found to proceed via an intermediate van der Waals complex (rather than a biradical), which is the precursor for a concerted symmetry-allowed [4+2] cycloaddition reaction leading to 1,2,3-trioxolene. CCSD(T)/6-311G+(2d, 2p) and CCSD(T)/CBS (complete basis set) calculations predict the ozone-acetylene van der Waals complex to be stable by 2.2 kcal mol -1, the calculated activation enthalpy for the cycloaddition reaction is 9.6 kcal mol -1 and the reaction enthalpy -55.5 kcal mol -1. Calculated kinetic data for the overall reaction ( k=0.8 l mol -1 s-1, A=1.71×10 6 l mol -1 s-1, E a=8.6 kcal mol -1) suggest that there is a need for refined kinetic measurements.

  1. Characterization of the Minimum Energy Paths and Energetics for the reaction of Vinylidene with Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    The reaction of vinylidene (CH2C) with acetylene may be an initiating reaction in soot formation. We report minimum energy paths and accurate energetics for a pathway leading to vinylacetylene and for a number of isomers Of C4H4. The calculations use complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) derivative methods to characterize the stationary points and internally contacted configuration interaction (ICCI) and/or coupled cluster singles and doubles with a perturbational estimate of triple excitations (CCSD(T)) to determine the energetics. We find an entrance channel barrier of about 5 kcal/mol for the addition of vinylidene to acetylene, but no barriers above reactants for the reaction pathway leading to vinylacetylene.

  2. Dinitrogen activation upon reduction of a triiron(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yousoon; Sloane, Forrest T; Blondin, Geneviève; Abboud, Khalil A; García-Serres, Ricardo; Murray, Leslie J

    2015-01-26

    Reaction of a trinuclear iron(II) complex, Fe3 Br3 L (1), with KC8 under N2 leads to dinitrogen activation products (2) from which Fe3 (NH)3 L (2-1; L is a cyclophane bridged by three β-diketiminate arms) was characterized by X-ray crystallography. (1) H NMR spectra of the protonolysis product of 2 synthesized under (14) N2 and (15) N2 confirm atmospheric N2 reduction, and ammonia is detected by the indophenol assay (yield ∼30 %). IR and Mössbauer spectroscopy, and elemental analysis on 2 and 2-1 as well as the tri(amido)triiron(II) 3 and tri(methoxo)triiron 4 congeners support our assignment of the reduction product as containing protonated N-atom bridges. PMID:25504859

  3. Tuning the catalytic activity of graphene nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction via size and thickness reduction.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Xu, Qian; Wang, Peng; Shen, Yuting; Sun, Litao; Wang, Tanyuan; Li, Meixian; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2014-11-26

    Currently, the fundamental factors that control the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of graphene itself, in particular, the dependence of the ORR activity on the number of exposed edge sites remain elusive, mainly due to limited synthesis routes of achieving small size graphene. In this work, the synthesis of low oxygen content (<2.5±0.2 at. %), few layer graphene nanosheets with lateral dimensions smaller than a few hundred nanometers were achieved using a combination of ionic liquid assisted grinding of high purity graphite coupled with sequential centrifugation. We show for the first time that the graphene nanosheets possessing a plethora of edges exhibited considerably higher electron transfer numbers compared to the thicker graphene nanoplatelets. This enhanced ORR activity was accomplished by successfully exploiting the plethora of edges of the nanosized graphene as well as the efficient electron communication between the active edge sites and the electrode substrate. The graphene nanosheets were characterized by an onset potential of -0.13 V vs Ag/AgCl and a current density of -3.85 mA/cm2 at -1 V, which represent the best ORR performance ever achieved from an undoped carbon based catalyst. This work demonstrates how low oxygen content nanosized graphene synthesized by a simple route can considerably impact the ORR catalytic activity and hence it is of significance in designing and optimizing advanced metal-free ORR electrocatalysts. PMID:25334050

  4. Mortality of workers at acetylene production plants.

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, M L; Matthews, G; Sheikh, K; Knight, K L; Oakes, D; Sullivan, K R

    1988-01-01

    To reduce the risk of explosion oxyacetylene cylinders are filled with a spongy mass, acetone is added to saturate the mass, and acetylene is pumped into the cylinder. The first cylinders manufactured before 1936 used a kapok filling topped off with about 16 oz of crocidolite asbestos, with a metal gauze thimble inserted to reduce risk of flash back. Cylinders must be examined annually. The use of crocidolite ceased in 1972 and other fillings have been adopted since 1970; kapok cylinders now constitute less than 5% of the total stock. To assess possible hazards, a mortality study of workers first employed between 1935 and 1975 and followed up to December 1984 was undertaken. Simulation tests showed low concentrations of asbestos in the air even in the earliest period. The population studied consisted of 370 workers at the Bilston plant in the West Midlands, 611 at the 14 other plants in England and Wales, and 120 in Scotland. No deaths occurred from mesothelial tumours but there was an excess of deaths from cancer, particularly lung cancer, cancer of the stomach, and cancer of the pancreas, the latter accounting for eight deaths. Risks appeared to be concentrated at the Bilston plant. The importance of these findings is discussed. PMID:3342189

  5. Electron impact induced anion production in acetylene.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Ewelina; Čadež, Iztok; Krishnakumar, E; Mason, Nigel J

    2014-02-28

    A detailed experimental investigation of electron induced anion production in acetylene, C2H2, in the energy range between 1 and 90 eV is presented. The anions are formed by two processes in this energy range: dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and dipolar dissociation (DD). DEA in C2H2 is found to lead to the formation of H(-) and C2(-)/C2H(-) through excitation of resonances in the electron energy range 1-15 eV. These anionic fragments are formed with super thermal kinetic energy and reveal no anisotropy in the angular distributions. DD in C2H2 leads to the formation of H(-), C(-)/CH(-) and C2(-)/C2H(-) with threshold energies of 15.7, 20.0 and 16.5 eV respectively. The measured anion yields have been used to calculate anion production rates for H(-), C(-)/CH(-) and C2(-)/C2H(-) in Titan's ionosphere. PMID:24343432

  6. Ion-induced dissociation dynamics of acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    De, Sankar; Rajput, Jyoti; Roy, A.; Safvan, C. P.; Ghosh, P. N.

    2008-02-15

    We report on the results of dissociation dynamics of multiple charged acetylene molecules formed in collision with 1.2 MeV Ar{sup 8+} projectiles. Using the coincidence map, we can separate out the different dissociation pathways between carbon and hydrogen ionic fragments as well as complete two-body breakup events. From the measured slopes of the coincidence islands for carbon atomic fragments and theoretical values determined from the charge and momentum distribution of the correlated particles, we observe a diatom like behavior of the C-C charged complex during dissociation of multiply charged C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. We conclude that this behavior in breakup dynamics is a signature of sequentiality in dissociation of this multiply charged molecular species. The shape and orientation of the islands give further information about the momentum balance in the fragmentation process of two- or many-body dissociation pathways. Kinetic energy release of different breakup channels are reported here and compared with values calculated from the pure Coulomb explosion model.

  7. Process hydrogenates unwanted diolefins and acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Vora, B.V. )

    1988-12-05

    Diolefins and actetylenes in C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ olefin streams can be selectively hydrogenated to produce high-purity mono-olefins for downstream polyolefin production. C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ olefin sources, fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), steam crackers, and dehydrogenation of C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ paraffins, all contain these undesirable polyunsaturated compounds. Hydrogenation of these compounds in alkylation unit feeds can also improve the economics of the alkylation process. Production of high-purity mono-olefins for downstream polyolefins production requires a feedstock that is essentially free of dienes and acetylenes to minimize undesirable side reactions. Although alkylation units can tolerate some diolefins in the feed, economics dictate that these diolefins should be minimized. The selective hydrogenation process (SHP) developed by others at its Marl, West Germany, plant, has undergone additional development work since commercialization of the process in 1980. The unit was designed to feed 160,000 metric tons/year of clean C/sub 4/ raffinate from a steam cracker, with a maximum polyunsaturated content of 0.8 wt%.

  8. Acetylene on Titan’s Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; McCord, T. B.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Rodriguez, S.; Cornet, T.; Le Mouélic, S.; Clark, R. N.; Maltagliati, L.; Chevrier, V. F.

    2016-09-01

    Titan’s atmosphere is opaque in the near-infrared due to gaseous absorptions, mainly by methane, and scattering by aerosols, except in a few “transparency windows.” Thus, the composition of Titan’s surface remains difficult to access from space and is still poorly constrained. Photochemical models suggest that most of the organic compounds formed in the atmosphere are heavy enough to condense and build up at the surface in liquid and solid states over geological timescales. Acetylene (C2H2) net production in the atmosphere is predicted to be larger than any other compound and C2H2 has been speculated to exist on the surface of Titan. C2H2 was detected as a trace gas sublimated/evaporated from the surface using the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer after the landing of the Huygens probe. Here we show evidence of C2H2 on the surface of Titan by detecting absorption bands at 1.55 and 4.93 μm using the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer at three different equatorial areas—Tui Regio, eastern Shangri La, and Fensal–Aztlan/Quivira. We found that C2H2 is preferentially detected in low-albedo areas, such as sand dunes and near the Huygens landing site. The specific location of the C2H2 detections suggests that C2H2 is mobilized by surface processes, such as surface weathering by liquids through dissolution/evaporation processes.

  9. Can Analysis of Acetylene and Its Biodegradation Products in Enceladus Plumes be Used to Detect the Presence of Sub-Surface Life?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. G.; Baesman, S. M.; Oremland, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    The search for biosignatures of life on Earth includes measurement of the stable isotope fractionation of reactants and products attributed to enzymatic processes and comparison with the often smaller chemical (abiotic) fractionation. We propose that this approach might be applied to study the origin and fate of organic compounds contained in water vapor plumes emanating from Enceladus or other icy bodies, perhaps revealing information about the potential for biology occurring within a sub-surface "habitable" zone. Methanol and C2-hydrocarbons including ethylene, ethane and acetylene (C2H2) have been identified in the plumes of Enceladus. Biological degradation of acetylene proceeds by anaerobic fermentation via acetylene hydratase through acetaldehyde, with a second enzyme (acetaldehyde dismutase) forming acetate and ethanol. We found that incubation of cultures of acetylene-fermenting bacteria exhibit a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with the net removal of C2H2. Consumption of acetylene by both growing and washed-cell cultures of bacteria closely related to Pelobacter acetylenicus (e.g, strain SFB93) was accompanied by a carbon isotopic fractionation of about 2 per mil (KIE = 1.8-2.7 ‰), a result we are examining with other cultures of acetylene fermenters. In addition, we are measuring the carbon isotopic composition of acetaldehyde, ethanol and acetate during fermentation to learn whether these products are fractionated sufficiently, relative to their substrate, to warrant measurement of their isotopic composition in Enceladus (or Europa) plumes to indicate enzymatic activity in liquid environments below the crust of these moons.

  10. Electrochromic poly(acetylene)s with switchable visible/near-IR absorption characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Anja C; Varnado, C Daniel; Bielawski, Christopher W; Theato, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Ferrocene is incorporated into a poly(acetylene) derivative via the postpolymerization amidation of a polymer precursor bearing pentafluorophenyl ester-leaving groups with aminoferrocene. While the neutral polymer exhibits a strong absorbance at 553 nm due to its conjugated backbone, oxidation of the ferrocene moieties with silver tetrafluoroborate causes the material to absorb in the near-IR (λ max ≈ 1215 nm). Subsequent reduction of the oxidized polymer with decamethylferrocene restores the initial absorbance profile, demonstrating that the material features switchable visible/near-IR absorption characteristics. PMID:23996218

  11. Discovery, Development, and Commercialization of Gold Catalysts for Acetylene Hydrochlorination.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Peter; Carthey, Nicholas; Hutchings, Graham J

    2015-11-25

    Vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is a major chemical intermediate for the manufacture of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which is the third most important polymer in use today. Hydrochlorination of acetylene is a major route for the production of vinyl chloride, since production of the monomer is based in regions of the world where coal is abundant. Until now, mercuric chloride supported on carbon is used as the catalyst in the commercial process, and this exhibits severe problems associated with catalyst lifetime and mercury loss. It has been known for over 30 years that gold is a superior catalyst, but it is only now that it is being commercialized. In this Perspective we discuss the use and disadvantages of the mercury catalyst and the advent of the gold catalysts for this important reaction. The nature of the active site and the possible reaction mechanism are discussed. Recent advances in the design and preparation of active gold catalysts containing ultralow levels of gold are described. In the final part, a view to the future of this chemistry will be discussed as well as the possible avenues for the commercial potential of gold catalysis. PMID:26529366

  12. Dehalogenative Homocoupling of Terminal Alkynyl Bromides on Au(111): Incorporation of Acetylenic Scaffolding into Surface Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Cai, Liangliang; Ma, Honghong; Yuan, Chunxue; Xu, Wei

    2016-07-26

    On-surface C-C coupling reactions of molecular precursors with alkynyl functional groups demonstrate great potential for the controllable fabrication of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures/nanomaterials, such as carbyne, graphyne, and graphdiyne, which demand the incorporation of highly active sp-hybridized carbons. Recently, through a dehydrogenative homocoupling reaction of alkynes, the possibility was presented to fabricate surface nanostructures involving acetylenic linkages, while problems lie in the fact that different byproducts are inevitably formed when triggering the reactions at elevated temperatures. In this work, by delicately designing the molecular precursors with terminal alkynyl bromide, we introduce the dehalogenative homocoupling reactions on the surface. As a result, we successfully achieve the formation of dimer structures, one-dimensional molecular wires and two-dimensional molecular networks with acetylenic scaffoldings on an inert Au(111) surface, where the unexpected C-Au-C organometallic intermediates are also observed. This study further supplements the database of on-surface dehalogenative C-C coupling reactions, and more importantly, it provides us an alternative efficient way for incorporating the acetylenic scaffolding into low-dimensional surface nanostructures. PMID:27326451

  13. Long-Term International Space Station (ISS) Risk Reduction Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodroci, M. P.; Gafka, G. K.; Lutomski, M. G.; Maher, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    As the assembly of the ISS nears completion, it is worthwhile to step back and review some of the actions pursued by the Program in recent years to reduce risk and enhance the safety and health of ISS crewmembers, visitors, and space flight participants. While the initial ISS requirements and design were intended to provide the best practicable levels of safety, it is always possible to further reduce risk - given the determination, commitment, and resources to do so. The following is a summary of some of the steps taken by the ISS Program Manager, by our International Partners, by hardware and software designers, by operational specialists, and by safety personnel to continuously enhance the safety of the ISS, and to reduce risk to all crewmembers. While years of work went into the development of ISS requirements, there are many things associated with risk reduction in a Program like the ISS that can only be learned through actual operational experience. These risk reduction activities can be divided into roughly three categories: Areas that were initially noncompliant which have subsequently been brought into compliance or near compliance (i.e., Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris [MMOD] protection, acoustics) Areas where initial design requirements were eventually considered inadequate and were subsequently augmented (i.e., Toxicity Hazard Level- 4 [THL] materials, emergency procedures, emergency equipment, control of drag-throughs) Areas where risks were initially underestimated, and have subsequently been addressed through additional mitigation (i.e., Extravehicular Activity [EVA] sharp edges, plasma shock hazards) Due to the hard work and cooperation of many parties working together across the span of more than a decade, the ISS is now a safer and healthier environment for our crew, in many cases exceeding the risk reduction targets inherent in the intent of the original design. It will provide a safe and stable platform for utilization and discovery for years

  14. Long-Term International Space Station (ISS) Risk Reduction Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forroci, Michael P.; Gafka, George K.; Lutomski, Michael G.; Maher, Jacilyn S.

    2011-01-01

    As the assembly of the ISS nears completion, it is worthwhile to step back and review some of the actions pursued by the Program in recent years to reduce risk and enhance the safety and health of ISS crewmembers, visitors, and space flight participants. While the initial ISS requirements and design were intended to provide the best practicable levels of safety, it is always possible to further reduce risk given the determination, commitment, and resources to do so. The following is a summary of some of the steps taken by the ISS Program Manager, by our International Partners, by hardware and software designers, by operational specialists, and by safety personnel to continuously enhance the safety of the ISS, and to reduce risk to all crewmembers. While years of work went into the development of ISS requirements, there are many things associated with risk reduction in a Program like the ISS that can only be learned through actual operational experience. These risk reduction activities can be divided into roughly three categories: Areas that were initially noncompliant which have subsequently been brought into compliance or near compliance (i.e., Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris [MMOD] protection, acoustics) Areas where initial design requirements were eventually considered inadequate and were subsequently augmented (i.e., Toxicity hazard level-4 materials, emergency procedures, emergency equipment, control of drag-throughs) Areas where risks were initially underestimated, and have subsequently been addressed through additional mitigation (i.e., Extravehicular Activity [EVA] sharp edges, plasma shock hazards). Due to the hard work and cooperation of many parties working together across the span of more than a decade, the ISS is now a safer and healthier environment for our crew, in many cases exceeding the risk reduction targets inherent in the intent of the original design. It will provide a safe and stable platform for utilization and discovery for years to come.

  15. Propulsion Risk Reduction Activities for Nontoxic Cryogenic Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.; Klem, Mark D.; Fisher, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    The Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development (PCAD) Project s primary objective is to develop propulsion system technologies for nontoxic or "green" propellants. The PCAD project focuses on the development of nontoxic propulsion technologies needed to provide necessary data and relevant experience to support informed decisions on implementation of nontoxic propellants for space missions. Implementation of nontoxic propellants in high performance propulsion systems offers NASA an opportunity to consider other options than current hypergolic propellants. The PCAD Project is emphasizing technology efforts in reaction control system (RCS) thruster designs, ascent main engines (AME), and descent main engines (DME). PCAD has a series of tasks and contracts to conduct risk reduction and/or retirement activities to demonstrate that nontoxic cryogenic propellants can be a feasible option for space missions. Work has focused on 1) reducing the risk of liquid oxygen/liquid methane ignition, demonstrating the key enabling technologies, and validating performance levels for reaction control engines for use on descent and ascent stages; 2) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for liquid oxygen/liquid methane ascent engines; and 3) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for deep throttling liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen descent engines. The progress of these risk reduction and/or retirement activities will be presented.

  16. Propulsion Risk Reduction Activities for Non-Toxic Cryogenic Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.; Klem, Mark D.; Fisher, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development (PCAD) Project s primary objective is to develop propulsion system technologies for non-toxic or "green" propellants. The PCAD project focuses on the development of non-toxic propulsion technologies needed to provide necessary data and relevant experience to support informed decisions on implementation of non-toxic propellants for space missions. Implementation of non-toxic propellants in high performance propulsion systems offers NASA an opportunity to consider other options than current hypergolic propellants. The PCAD Project is emphasizing technology efforts in reaction control system (RCS) thruster designs, ascent main engines (AME), and descent main engines (DME). PCAD has a series of tasks and contracts to conduct risk reduction and/or retirement activities to demonstrate that non-toxic cryogenic propellants can be a feasible option for space missions. Work has focused on 1) reducing the risk of liquid oxygen/liquid methane ignition, demonstrating the key enabling technologies, and validating performance levels for reaction control engines for use on descent and ascent stages; 2) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for liquid oxygen/liquid methane ascent engines; and 3) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for deep throttling liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen descent engines. The progress of these risk reduction and/or retirement activities will be presented.

  17. Guided cobalamin biosynthesis supports Dehalococcoides mccartyi reductive dechlorination activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Im, Jeongdae; Yang, Yi; Löffler, Frank E.

    2013-01-01

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains are corrinoid-auxotrophic Bacteria and axenic cultures that require vitamin B12 (CN-Cbl) to conserve energy via organohalide respiration. Cultures of D. mccartyi strains BAV1, GT and FL2 grown with limiting amounts of 1 µg l−1 CN-Cbl quickly depleted CN-Cbl, and reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated ethenes was incomplete leading to vinyl chloride (VC) accumulation. In contrast, the same cultures amended with 25 µg l−1 CN-Cbl exhibited up to 2.3-fold higher dechlorination rates, 2.8–9.1-fold increased growth yields, and completely consumed growth-supporting chlorinated ethenes. To explore whether known cobamide-producing microbes supply Dehalococcoides with the required corrinoid cofactor, co-culture experiments were performed with the methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri strain Fusaro and two acetogens, Sporomusa ovata and Sporomusa sp. strain KB-1, as Dehalococcoides partner populations. During growth with H2/CO2, M. barkeri axenic cultures produced 4.2 ± 0.1 µg l−1 extracellular cobamide (factor III), whereas the Sporomusa cultures produced phenolyl- and p-cresolyl-cobamides. Neither factor III nor the phenolic cobamides supported Dehalococcoides reductive dechlorination activity suggesting that M. barkeri and the Sporomusa sp. cannot fulfil Dehalococcoides' nutritional requirements. Dehalococcoides dechlorination activity and growth occurred in M. barkeri and Sporomusa sp. co-cultures amended with 10 µM 5′,6′-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB), indicating that a cobalamin is a preferred corrinoid cofactor of strains BAV1, GT and FL2 when grown with chlorinated ethenes as electron acceptors. Even though the methanogen and acetogen populations tested did not produce cobalamin, the addition of DMB enabled guided biosynthesis and generated a cobalamin that supported Dehalococcoides' activity and growth. Guided cobalamin biosynthesis may offer opportunities to sustain and enhance Dehalococcoides activity in contaminated

  18. Activated carbon becomes active for oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution reactions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuecheng; Jia, Yi; Odedairo, Taiwo; Zhao, Xiaojun; Jin, Zhao; Zhu, Zhonghua; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-06-21

    We utilized a facile method for creating unique defects in the activated carbon (AC), which makes it highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The ORR activity of the defective AC (D-AC) is comparable to the commercial Pt/C in alkaline medium, and the D-AC also exhibits excellent HER activity in acidic solution. PMID:27277286

  19. Phasic motor activity reduction occurring with horizontal rapid eye movements during active sleep in human.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, J; Shimohira, M; Hasegawa, T; Kouji, T; Iwakawa, Y

    1995-01-01

    We describe the phasic reduction of motor activity occurring with horizontal rapid eye movements (REMs) during active sleep in 15 children (12 healthy children and 3 patients with severe brain damage). A REM-related decrease in intercostal muscle activity was demonstrated by averaging integrated surface electromyograms. In the healthy subjects, this reduction had a mean latency from the REM onset of 37.1 ms and a duration of 225.9 ms. This phenomenon was also observed in the 3 patients who had lost cerebral function. We hypothesized a brainstem origin for the effect. A REM-related mentalis muscle activity loss, detected by averaging mentalis muscle twitches, was observed in 10 healthy children among the subjects. This loss began at 59.1 ms before the onset of REMs and lasted for 230.2 ms on average. In addition, a transient decrease in integrated REM activity surrounding mentalis muscle twitches (a twitch-related reduction of REMs) was observed. We discuss the similarity between REM-related phasic reduction of muscle activity obtained for intercostal and mentalis muscles and pontogeniculo-occipital (PGO) wave-related inhibitory postsynaptic potentials reported for feline lumbar and trigeminal motoneurons, respectively. We then assume the presence of a phasic event generator, functioning during active sleep in healthy humans, which triggers at least three generators; that is, the generator of PGO waves (or REMs), motor inhibition, and of motor excitation including muscle twitches. PMID:8751071

  20. Adaptive control of an active seat for occupant vibration reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Zengkang; Hillis, Andrew J.; Darling, Jocelyn

    2015-08-01

    The harmful effects on human performance and health caused by unwanted vibration from vehicle seats are of increasing concern. This paper presents an active seat system to reduce the vibration level transmitted to the seat pan and the occupants' body under low frequency periodic excitation. Firstly, the detail of the mechanical structure is given and the active seat dynamics without external load are characterized by vibration transmissibility and frequency responses under different excitation forces. Owing the nonlinear and time-varying behaviour of the proposed system, a Filtered-x least-mean-square (FXLMS) adaptive control algorithm with on-line Fast-block LMS (FBLMS) identification process is employed to manage the system operation for high vibration cancellation performance. The effectiveness of the active seat system is assessed through real-time experimental tests using different excitation profiles. The system identification results show that an accurate estimation of the secondary path is achieved by using the FBLMS on-line technique. Substantial reduction is found for cancelling periodic vibration containing single and multiple frequencies. Additionally, the robustness and stability of the control system are validated through transient switching frequency tests.

  1. Reductive activation of E. coli respiratory nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, Pierre; Rendon, Julia; Léger, Christophe; Toci, René; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Magalon, Axel; Grimaldi, Stéphane; Fourmond, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Over the past decades, a number of authors have reported the presence of inactive species in as-prepared samples of members of the Mo/W-bisPGD enzyme family. This greatly complicated the spectroscopic studies of these enzymes, since it is impossible to discriminate between active and inactive species on the basis of the spectroscopic signatures alone. Escherichia coli nitrate reductase A (NarGHI) is a member of the Mo/W-bisPGD family that allows anaerobic respiration using nitrate as terminal electron acceptor. Here, using protein film voltammetry on NarGH films, we show that the enzyme is purified in a functionally heterogeneous form that contains between 20 and 40% of inactive species that activate the first time they are reduced. This activation proceeds in two steps: a non-redox reversible reaction followed by an irreversible reduction. By carefully correlating electrochemical and EPR spectroscopic data, we show that neither the two major Mo(V) signals nor those of the two FeS clusters that are the closest to the Mo center are associated with the two inactive species. We also conclusively exclude the possibility that the major "low-pH" and "high-pH" Mo(V) EPR signatures correspond to species in acid-base equilibrium. PMID:26073890

  2. Chemistry and properties of blends of acetylene terminated materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to develop new high temperature/high performance structural materials, the chemistry and properties of acetylene-containing materials and their cured resins are under investigation. The objective of this work is to develop materials that are readily processable (i.e., 200-300 C and about 1.4 MPa or less) and possess usable mechanical properties at temperatures as high as 177 C. An acetylene-terminated aspartimide (ATA) was blended with an equal weight of an acetylene-terminated arylene ether (ATAE) oligomer. The blend was subsequently thermally cured to yield a resin which was evaluated in the form of neat resin moldings, adhesive specimens, and laminates. Adhesive specimens and laminates gave good mechanical properties to temperatures as high as 177 C. In addition, preliminary laminate work is presented on the resin from a blend of a new N-methyl substituted ATA and an ATAE.

  3. Antibacterial activity of silver bionanocomposites synthesized by chemical reduction route

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to investigate the functions of polymers and size of nanoparticles on the antibacterial activity of silver bionanocomposites (Ag BNCs). In this research, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were incorporated into biodegradable polymers that are chitosan, gelatin and both polymers via chemical reduction method in solvent in order to produce Ag BNCs. Silver nitrate and sodium borohydride were employed as a metal precursor and reducing agent respectively. On the other hand, chitosan and gelatin were added as a polymeric matrix and stabilizer. The antibacterial activity of different sizes of silver nanoparticles was investigated against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by the disk diffusion method using Mueller-Hinton Agar. Results The properties of Ag BNCs were studied as a function of the polymer weight ratio in relation to the use of chitosan and gelatin. The morphology of the Ag BNCs films and the distribution of the Ag NPs were also characterized. The diameters of the Ag NPs were measured and their size is less than 20 nm. The antibacterial trait of silver/chitosan/gelatin bionanocomposites was investigated. The silver ions released from the Ag BNCs and their antibacterial activities were scrutinized. The antibacterial activities of the Ag BNC films were examined against Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli and P. aeruginosa) and Gram-positive (S. aureus and M. luteus) by diffusion method using Muller-Hinton agar. Conclusions The antibacterial activity of Ag NPs with size less than 20 nm was demonstrated and showed positive results against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The Ag NPs stabilized well in the polymers matrix. PMID:22967920

  4. The anomalous behavior of the Zeeman anticrossing spectra of à 1Au acetylene: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, George; Sherrill, C. David; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    1996-02-01

    P. Dupré, R. Jost, M. Lombardi, P. G. Green, E. Abramson, and R. W. Field have observed anomalous behavior of the anticrossing density in the Zeeman anticrossing (ZAC) spectra of gas phase à 1Au acetylene in the 42 200 to 45 300 cm-1 energy range. To best explain this result, they hypothesize a large singlet-triplet coupling due to the existence of a linear isomerization barrier connecting a triplet-excited cis- and trans-acetylene in the vicinity of the studied energy range (˜45 500 cm-1). Theoretically such a linear stationary point, however, must have two different degenerate bending vibrational frequencies which are either imaginary or exactly zero. Neither case has yet been experimentally detected. Here, we have studied the two lowest-lying linear triplet-excited-state stationary points of acetylene, 3Σ+u and 3Δu, to see if they fit Dupré et al.'s hypothesis. We have completed geometry optimization and harmonic vibrational frequency analysis using complete-active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) wave functions as well as determined energy points at those geometries using the second-order configuration interaction (SOCI) method. Harmonic vibrational analyses of both stationary points reveal two different doubly degenerate vibrational modes with imaginary vibrational frequencies (or negative force constants) indicating that they are indeed saddle points with a Hessian index of four. At the DZP SOCI//CASSCF level of theory with zero-point vibrational energy (ZPVE) correction, the 3Σ+u stationary point lies 35 840 cm-1 above the ground state of acetylene. This is much too low in energy to contribute to the ZAC spectral anomaly. At the same level of theory with ZPVE correction, the 3Δu stationary point lies 44 940 cm-1 above the ground state consistent with Dupré et al.'s hypothesis. Several solutions to the anomalous ZAC spectra are discussed. We propose that the anomaly may also be due to coupling with a nearly linear structure on the T3 surface of

  5. Microgravity Superagglomerates Produced By Silane And Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman (Technical Monitor); Bundy, Matthew; Mulholland, George W.; Manzello, Samuel; Yang, Jiann; Scott, John Henry; Sivathanu, Yudaya

    2003-01-01

    The size of the agglomerates produced in the upper portion of a flame is important for a variety of applications. Soot particle size and density effect the amount of radiative heat transfer from a fire to its surroundings. Particle size determines the lifetime of smoke in a building or in the atmosphere, and exposure hazard for smoke inhaled and deposited in the lungs. The visibility through a smoke layer and dectectability of the smoke are also greatly affected by agglomerate size. Currently there is limited understanding of soot growth with an overall dimension of 10 m and larger. In the case of polystyrene, smoke agglomerates in excess of 1 mm have been observed raining out from large fires. Unlike hydrocarbon fuels, silane has the advantage that silica particles are the major combustion product resulting in a particle volume fraction a factor of ten greater than that for a carbonaceous smoke. There are two very desirable properties of silica aero-gels that are important for both space and earth based applications. The first important property is its inertness to most oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. Therefore, silica aero-gels make excellent fire ablatives and can be used in very demanding applications. The second important property is that silica aero-gels are expected to have very high porosity (greater than 0.999), making them lightweight and ideal for aerospace applications. The added benefit of the high porosity is that they can be used as extremely efficient filters for many earth based applications as well. Evidence of the formation of superagglomerates in a laminar acetylene/air diffusion flame was found by Sorensen et al. [1]. An interconnecting web of super-agglomerates was observed to span the width of the soot plume in the region just above the flame tip and described as a gel state. It was observed that this gel state immediately breaks up into agglomerates as larges as 100 m due to buoyancy induced turbulence. Large soot agglomerates were

  6. Siloxane containing addition polyimides. II - Acetylene terminated polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Acetylene terminated polyimide oligomers having a range of molecular weights have been synthesized by reacting bis (gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane, aminophenylacetylene and 3, 3', 4, 4' benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride in different molar ratios. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for melt flow and cure properties. They show promise as adhesives for bonding titanium to titanium and as matrix resins for graphite cloth reinforced composites. The most promising system has been blended in varying proportions with Thermid 600, a commercially available acetylene terminated polyimide oligomer, and the mixtures have been tested for application as composite matrix resins.

  7. Synthesis of functional acetylene derivatives from calcium carbide.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhewang; Yu, Dingyi; Sum, Yin Ngai; Zhang, Yugen

    2012-04-01

    AHA Erlebnis: CaC(2), used to produce acetylene until several decades ago, is re-emerging as a cheap, sustainable resource synthesized from coal and lignocellulosic biomass. We report efficient catalytic protocols for the synthesis of functional acetylene derivatives from CaC(2) through aldehyde, alkyne, and amine (AAA) as well as alkyne, haloalkane, and amine (AHA) couplings, and in addition demonstrate its use in click and Sonogashira chemistry, showing that calcium carbide is a sustainable and cost-efficient carbon source. PMID:22378645

  8. Channel-resolved above-threshold double ionization of acetylene.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Lin, Kang; Pan, Haifeng; Ding, Jingxin; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2015-04-24

    We experimentally investigate the channel-resolved above-threshold double ionization (ATDI) of acetylene in the multiphoton regime using an ultraviolet femtosecond laser pulse centered at 395 nm by measuring all the ejected electrons and ions in coincidence. As compared to the sequential process, diagonal lines in the electron-electron joint energy spectrum are observed for the nonsequential ATDI owing to the correlative sharing of the absorbed multiphoton energies. We demonstrate that the distinct channel-resolved sequential and nonsequential ATDI spectra can clearly reveal the photon-induced acetylene-vinylidene isomerization via proton migration on the cation or dication states. PMID:25955049

  9. Structure and Function of the Unusual Tungsten Enzymes Acetylene Hydratase and Class II Benzoyl-Coenzyme A Reductase.

    PubMed

    Boll, Matthias; Einsle, Oliver; Ermler, Ulrich; Kroneck, Peter M H; Ullmann, G Matthias

    2016-01-01

    In biology, tungsten (W) is exclusively found in microbial enzymes bound to a bis-pyranopterin cofactor (bis-WPT). Previously known W enzymes catalyze redox oxo/hydroxyl transfer reactions by directly coordinating their substrates or products to the metal. They comprise the W-containing formate/formylmethanofuran dehydrogenases belonging to the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase (DMSOR) family and the aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) families, which form a separate enzyme family within the Mo/W enzymes. In the last decade, initial insights into the structure and function of two unprecedented W enzymes were obtained: the acetaldehyde forming acetylene hydratase (ACH) belongs to the DMSOR and the class II benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) reductase (BCR) to the AOR family. The latter catalyzes the reductive dearomatization of benzoyl-CoA to a cyclic diene. Both are key enzymes in the degradation of acetylene (ACH) or aromatic compounds (BCR) in strictly anaerobic bacteria. They are unusual in either catalyzing a nonredox reaction (ACH) or a redox reaction without coordinating the substrate or product to the metal (BCR). In organic chemical synthesis, analogous reactions require totally nonphysiological conditions depending on Hg2+ (acetylene hydration) or alkali metals (benzene ring reduction). The structural insights obtained pave the way for biological or biomimetic approaches to basic reactions in organic chemistry. PMID:26959374

  10. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  11. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  12. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  13. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  14. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  15. Treatment of activated carbon to enhance catalytic activity for reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, B.J.; Rhee, H.K. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Lee, J.K.; Park, D. )

    1994-11-01

    Catalytic activity of activated carbon treated with various techniques was examined in a fixed bed reactor for the reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia at 150 C. Activated carbon derived from coconut shell impregnated with an aqueous solution of ammonium sulfate, further treated with sulfuric acid, dried at 120 C, and then heated in an inert gas stream at 400 C, showed the highest catalytic activity within the range of experimental conditions. The enhancement of catalytic activity of modified activated carbon could be attributed to the increase in the amount of oxygen function groups which increased the adsorption site for ammonia. Catalytic activity of activated carbons depended on the surface area and the oxygen content as well.

  16. A biogeochemical and genetic survey of acetylene fermentation by environmental samples and bacterial isolates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Laurence G.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Kirshtein, Julie; Voytek, Mary A.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Anoxic samples (sediment and groundwater) from 13 chemically diverse field sites were assayed for their ability to consume acetylene (C2H2). Over incubation periods ranging from ˜ 10 to 80 days, selected samples from 7 of the 13 tested sites displayed significant C2H2 removal. No significant formation of ethylene was noted in these incubations; therefore, C2H2 consumption could be attributed to acetylene hydratase (AH) rather than nitrogenase activity. This putative AH (PAH) activity was observed in only 21% of the total of assayed samples, while amplification of AH genes from extracted DNA using degenerate primers derived from Pelobacter acetylenicus occurred in even fewer (9.8%) samples. Acetylene-fermenting bacteria were isolated as a pure culture from the sediments of a tidal mudflat in San Francisco Bay (SFB93) and as an enrichment culture from freshwater Searsville Lake (SV7). Comparison of 16S rDNA clone libraries revealed that SFB93 was closely related to P. carbolinicus, while SV7 consisted of several unrelated bacteria. AH gene was amplified from SFB93 but not SV7. The inability of the primers to generate amplicons in the SV7 enrichment, as well as from several of the environmental samples that displayed PAH activity, implied that either the primers were too highly constrained in their specificity or that there was a different type of AH gene in these environmental samples than occurs in P. acetylenicus. The significance of this work with regard to the search for life in the outer Solar System, where C2HL2 is abundant, is discussed.

  17. 46 CFR 154.1735 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... mixture must have a refrigeration system without vapor compression or have a refrigeration system with the... separate cargo piping, vent piping, and refrigeration equipment for methyl acetylene-propadiene that are segregated from other cargo piping, vent piping and refrigeration equipment on the vessel....

  18. 46 CFR 154.1735 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... mixture must have a refrigeration system without vapor compression or have a refrigeration system with the... separate cargo piping, vent piping, and refrigeration equipment for methyl acetylene-propadiene that are segregated from other cargo piping, vent piping and refrigeration equipment on the vessel....

  19. 46 CFR 154.1735 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... mixture must have a refrigeration system without vapor compression or have a refrigeration system with the... separate cargo piping, vent piping, and refrigeration equipment for methyl acetylene-propadiene that are segregated from other cargo piping, vent piping and refrigeration equipment on the vessel....

  20. Interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene welding: a case report.

    PubMed

    Brvar, Miran

    2014-01-01

    Acetylene is a colorless gas commonly used for welding. It acts mainly as a simple asphyxiant. In this paper, however, we present a patient who developed a severe interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene exposure during aluminum welding. A 44-year old man was welding with acetylene, argon and aluminum electrode sticks in a non-ventilated aluminum tank for 2 h. Four hours after welding dyspnea appeared and 22 h later he was admitted at the Emergency Department due to severe respiratory insufficiency with pO2 = 6.7 kPa. Chest X-ray showed diffuse interstitial infiltration. Pulmonary function and gas diffusion tests revealed a severe restriction (55% of predictive volume) and impaired diffusion capacity (47% of predicted capacity). Toxic interstitial pneumonitis was diagnosed and high-dose systemic corticosteroid methylprednisolone and inhalatory corticosteroid fluticasone therapy was started. Computed Tomography (CT) of the lungs showed a diffuse patchy ground-glass opacity with no signs of small airway disease associated with interstitial pneumonitis. Corticosteroid therapy was continued for the next 8 weeks gradually reducing the doses. The patient's follow-up did not show any deterioration of respiratory function. In conclusion, acetylene welding might result in severe toxic interstitial pneumonitis that improves after an early systemic and inhalatory corticosteroid therapy. PMID:24658888

  1. Fatal carbon monoxide intoxication after acetylene gas welding of pipes.

    PubMed

    Antonsson, Ann-Beth; Christensson, Bengt; Berge, Johan; Sjögren, Bengt

    2013-06-01

    Acetylene gas welding of district heating pipes can result in exposure to high concentrations of carbon monoxide. A fatal case due to intoxication is described. Measurements of carbon monoxide revealed high levels when gas welding a pipe with closed ends. This fatality and these measurements highlight a new hazard, which must be promptly prevented. PMID:23307861

  2. Low energy electron impact vibrational excitation of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Sigma; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha

    2016-05-01

    Experimental differential cross sections for the vibration excitation of the four fundamental modes of acetylene at low incident electron energies from 1 eV to 20 eV and scattering angles of 10o to 130o will be presented. The results will be compared to results available in the literature. Funded by NSF-AMOP-RUI Grant.

  3. 77 FR 13969 - Revising Standards Referenced in the Acetylene Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... Association (GGA) acetylene standard (see 76 FR 75782). In the DFR, OSHA deleted reference to CGA G-1-2003 and... final rule published on December 5, 2011 (76 FR 75782), is effective on March 5, 2012. For the purposes....C. 553, Secretary of Labor's Order 1-2012 (77 FR 3912), and 29 CFR part 1911. Signed at...

  4. 76 FR 75840 - Revising Standards Referenced in the Acetylene Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... language from outdated standards published by standards developing organizations (``SDO standards'') (69 FR... Association standard, CGA G-1-2003, in the Acetylene Standard. See 74 FR 40442 and 74 FR 40450, respectively. OSHA received no adverse comments on the DFR, and it became effective on November 9, 2009. See 74...

  5. Near-threshold vibrational excitation of acetylene by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Eliane M. de; Lima, Marco A. P.; Sanchez, Sergio d'A.; Varella, Marcio T. do N.

    2010-01-15

    We report vibrational excitation cross sections for C-C and C-H symmetric stretch modes of acetylene by positron impact. The contribution of these infrared inactive modes to the annihilation parameter is also addressed. The Feshbach projection operator approach was employed to vibrationally resolve e{sup +}-acetylene scattering phase shifts obtained with the Schwinger multichannel method. The present results point out a virtual state pole at the equilibrium geometry of acetylene that becomes a bound state as either bond is stretched, in qualitative agreement with previous calculations for small hydrocarbons. The vibrational couplings are stronger for the C-C mode, giving rise to a bound state pole within the Franck-Condon region of the vibrational ground state. These bound and virtual states give rise to sharp threshold structures (vibrational resonances) in both the vibrational excitation cross sections and the annihilation parameter (Z{sub eff}). We found fair agreement between the present calculations and previously reported e{sup +}-acetylene vibrational excitation cross sections.

  6. Exploration of Allosteric Agonism Structure-Activity Relationships within an Acetylene Series of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 (mGlu5) Positive Allosteric Modulators (PAMs): discovery of 5-((3-fluorophenyl)ethynyl)-N-(3-methyloxetan-3-yl)picolinamide (ML254)

    PubMed Central

    Turlington, Mark; Noetzel, Meredith J.; Chun, Aspen; Zhou, Ya; Gogliotti, Rocco D.; Nguyen, Elizabeth D.; Gregory, Karen J.; Vinson, Paige N.; Rook, Jerri M.; Gogi, Kiran K.; Xiang, Zixiu; Bridges, Thomas M.; Daniels, J. Scott; Jones, Carrie; Niswender, Colleen M.; Meiler, Jens; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.; Stauffer, Shaun R.

    2014-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of schizophrenia. Both allosteric agonism and high glutamate fold-shift have been implicated in the neurotoxic profile of some mGlu5 PAMs; however, these hypotheses remain to be adequately addressed. To develop tool compounds to probe these hypotheses, the structure-activity relationship of allosteric agonism was examined within an acetylenic series of mGlu5 PAMs exhibiting allosteric agonism in addition to positive allosteric modulation (ago-PAMs). PAM 38t, a low glutamate fold-shift allosteric ligand (maximum fold-shift ~3.0), was selected as a potent PAM with no agonism in the in vitro system used for compound characterization and in two native electrophysiological systems using rat hippocampal slices. PAM 38t (ML254) will be useful to probe the relative contribution of cooperativity and allosteric agonism to the adverse effect liability and neurotoxicity associated with this class of mGlu5 PAMs. PMID:24050755

  7. Oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt{111} surface alloys.

    PubMed

    Attard, Gary A; Brew, Ashley; Ye, Jin-Yu; Morgan, David; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2014-07-21

    PtM overlayers (where M=Fe, Co or Ni) supported on Pt{111} are prepared via thermal annealing in either a nitrogen/water or hydrogen ambient of dilute aqueous droplets containing M(Z+) cations directly attached to the electrode. Two different PtM phases are detected depending on the nature of the post-annealing cooling environment. The first of these consists of small (<20 nm), closely packed microcrystals comprised of a central metallic core and a shell (several monolayers thick) of mixed metal oxides/hydroxides. The second type of PtM phase is prepared by cooling in a stream of hydrogen gas. Although this second phase also consists of numerous microcrystals covering the Pt{111} electrode surface, these are both flatter than before and moreover are entirely metallic in character. A positive shift in the onset of PtM oxide formation correlates with increased activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which we ascribe to the greater availability of platinum metallic sites under ORR conditions. PMID:24986646

  8. Digital Signal Processing System for Active Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonson, William W.; Tucker, Jerry

    2002-12-01

    different adaptive noise cancellation algorithms and provide an operational prototype to understand the behavior of the system under test. DSP software was required to interface the processor with the data converters using interrupt routines. The goal is to build a complete ANC system that can be placed on a flexible circuit with added memory circuitry that also contains the power supply, sensors and actuators. This work on the digital signal processing system for active noise reduction was completed in collaboration with another ASEE Fellow, Dr. Jerry Tucker from Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA.

  9. Synthesis of (iso)quinoline, (iso)coumarin and (iso)chromene derivatives from acetylene compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabukhin, D. S.; Vasilyev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Published data on the methods of synthesis of quinoline, isoquinoline, coumarin, isocoumarin, chromene and isochromene derivatives from acetylene compounds are summarized. The reactions catalyzed by metal complexes (Pd, Pt, Ru, Rh, Au, Ag, Ni, Cu, etc.) and transformations induced by various electrophilic reagents (Brynsted and Lewis acids) are considered. Moieties of the mentioned heterocyclic systems are present in many biologically active natural products and pharmaceutical agents. Besides, derivatives of these heterocycles are used in the manufacture of catalysts, dyes, perfumery and cosmetic products, corrosion inhibitors and so on. The bibliography includes 211 references.

  10. Mitomycin antibiotic reductive potential and related pharmacological activities.

    PubMed

    Pan, S S; Gonzalez, H

    1990-06-01

    Relationships of reductive potential, kinetics of enzymatic reduction, augmented oxygen consumption, and cytotoxicity were determined for seven clinically relevant mitomycin antibiotics. Potentials for one-electron reduction were obtained by cyclic voltammetry analysis in dimethyl sulfoxide with 0.1 M tetraethyl-ammonium perchlorate. These potentials were -0.55 V for N7-acetylmitomycin C, -0.61 V for mitomycin A, -0.75 V for N7-(p-hydroxyphenyl)mitomycin C, -0.79 V for N7-(dimethylamino-methylene)mitomycin C, -0.81 V for N7-(2-(4-nitrophenyldithio)-ethyl)-mitomycin C, -0.81 V for mitomycin C, and -0.89 V for porfiromycin. All seven antibiotics were reduced by xanthine oxidase and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, but the rate of reduction varied for each antibiotic and each enzyme. The less negative the reductive potential of an antibiotic, the more easily that antibiotic was reduced enzymatically. These seven mitomycin antibiotics also augmented oxygen consumption by rat liver microsomes. As with their reduction by xanthine oxidase and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, the less negative the reductive potential of an antibiotic, the more it augmented oxygen consumption. Cytotoxicity of each antibiotic was assessed by defining the IC50 against HCT 116 human colon carcinoma cells. A relationship between the reductive potential of these antibiotics and their cytotoxicity against HCT 116 cells was also observed. PMID:2113607

  11. Effects of acido-basic support properties on the catalytic hydrogenation of acetylene on gold nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manda, Abdullah Ahmed

    Metallic gold nanoparticles supported on gamma-Al2O 3 and magnesia-alumina mixed oxide, with different magnesia content have been prepared by sol-gel method and characterized by different techniques (inductive coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), XRD, BET surface area analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), CO2 and NH 3 temperature programmed desorption (TPD), H2 temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and FTIR of adsorbed CO2). Such systems were found to produce catalysts with controllable acidity, varying from catalyst possessing large density of acidic and low density of basic sites, others with acidic and basic sites of equal strength and density, and others with large basic and low acid sites densities, respectively. The catalytic assessment of the generated acidity was carried out using 2-propanol decomposition as a test reaction. The results obtained indicate that the presence of magnesia and reduced gold nanopartilces has imparted the catalysts, 1%Au/4%Mg-Al 2O3 and 1%Au/8%Mg-Al2O3, with significant base-catalytic properties. Acetylene hydrogenation and formation of coke deposits were investigated on a gold catalyst supported on gamma-Al2O3 and gold supported on alumina-magnisia mixed oxide with different gold content; 1%Au/gamma-Al 2O3, 1%Au/15%Mg-Al2O3, 2%Au/15%Mg-Al 2O3 and 4%Au/15%Mg-Al2O3. The effect of the H2/C2H2 ratio was studied over a range of values. The catalytic activity and selectivity towards ethylene and other products were investigated at different reaction temperatures. Acetylene hydrogenation was investigated in the presence and absence of ethylene in stream. It is investigated that the adsorption of the triple bond is preferred over the double bond and during selective catalytic (SCR) of C2H2 the two hydrocarbons do not compete for the same adsorption sites. The deactivation of catalysts was studied by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO). Higher content of coke over 1%Au/Al2O3 catalyst was investigated in contrast to

  12. Transient responses of nitrogenase to acetylene and oxygen in actinorhizal nodules and cultured Frania

    SciTech Connect

    Silvester, W.B.; Winship, L.J. )

    1990-02-01

    Nitrogenase activity in root nodules of four species of actinorhizal plants showed varying declines in response to exposure to acetylene (10% v/v). Gymnostoma papuanum (S.Moore) L. Johnson. and Casuarina equisetifolia L. nodules showed a small decline (5-15%) with little or no recovery over 15 minutes. Myrica gale L. nodules showed a sharp decline followed by a rapid return to peak activity. Alnus incana ssp. rugosa (Du Roi) Clausen. nodules usually showed varying degrees of decline followed by a slower return to peak or near-peak activity. We call these effects acetylene-induced transients. Rapid increases in oxygen tension also caused dramatic transient decreases in nitrogenase activity in all species. The magnitude of the transient decrease was related to the size of the O{sub 2} partial pressure (pO{sub 2}) rise, to the proximity of the starting and ending oxygen tensions to the pO{sub 2} optimum, and to the time for which the plant was exposed to the lower pO{sub 2}. Oxygen-induced transients, induced both by step jumps in pO{sub 2} and by O{sub 2} pulses, were also observed in cultures of Frankia. The effects seen in nodules are purely a response by the bacterium and not a nodule effect per se. Oxygen-induced nitrogenase transients in actinorhizal nodules from the plant genera tested here do not appear to be a result of changes in nodule diffusion resistance.

  13. Photo- and heterotrophic nitrogenase activity by the cyano-bacterium Nostoc in symbiosis with the bryophyte Anthoceros

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, N.A.; Meeks, J.C.

    1987-04-01

    In symbiosis with Anthoceros, Nostoc is thought to do little or no photosynthesis. However, light-dependent /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixation by symbiotic Nostoc, freshly isolated from pure cultures of the reconstituted Anthoceros-Nostoc association, was 16% of that by free-living Nostoc. A DCMU-resistant mutant of Nostoc was isolated that fixed CO/sub 2/ at rates comparable to wild-type in both symbiotic and free-living growth states. To determine if symbiotic Nostoc can use its photosynthate directly to fix nitrogen, acetylene reduction by Anthoceros associations reconstituted with wild-type Nostoc was compared to associations with the DCMU-resistant mutant. In wild-type Anthoceros-Nostoc acetylene reduction was inhibited 97% by 5 ..mu..M DCMU, while inhibition of the DCMU-resistant Nostoc association was only 63%. Additions of glucose, fructose, maltose or sucrose to wild-type associations completely restored DCMU-inhibited acetylene reduction in the light. Acetylene reduction in the dark was stimulated by glucose, attaining 84% of the uninhibited light-dependent value. The authors conclude that symbiotic Nostoc maintains a pool of photosynthate which supports nitrogenase activity. The pool can also be supplemented from plant sources.

  14. Influence of External Nitrogen on Nitrogenase Enzyme Activity and Auxin Production in Herbaspirillum seropedicae (Z78)

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Tan Tzy; Pin, Ui Li; Ghazali, Amir Hamzah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The production of nitrogenase enzyme and auxins by free living diazotrophs has the potential to influence the growth of host plants. In this study, diazotrophs were grown in the presence of various concentrations of nitogen (N) to determine the optimal concentration of N for microbial growth stimulation, promotion of gaseous N (N2) fixation, and phytohormone production. Therefore, we investigate whether different levels of N supplied to Herbaspirillum seropedicae (Z78) have significant effects on nitrogenase activity and auxin production. The highest nitrogenase activity and the lowest auxin production of H. seropedicae (Z78) were both recorded at 0 gL−1 of NH4Cl. Higher levels of external N caused a significant decrease in the nitrogenase activity and an increased production of auxins. In a subsequent test, two different inoculum sizes of Z78 (106 and 1012 cfu/ml) were used to study the effect of different percentages of acetylene on nitrogenase activity of the inoculum via the acetylene reduction assay (ARA). The results showed that the optimal amount of acetylene required for nitrogenase enzyme activity was 5% for the 106 cfu/ml inoculum, whereas the higher inoculum size (1012 cfu/ml) required at least 10% of acetylene for optimal nitrogenase activity. These findings provide a clearer understanding of the effects of N levels on diazotrophic nitrogenase activity and auxin production, which are important factors influencing plant growth. PMID:26868594

  15. Rapid Rather than Gradual Weight Reduction Impairs Hemorheological Parameters of Taekwondo Athletes through Reduction in RBC-NOS Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Woo Hwi; Heine, Oliver; Pauly, Sebastian; Kim, Pilsang; Bloch, Wilhelm; Mester, Joachim; Grau, Marijke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Rapid weight reduction is part of the pre-competition routine and has been shown to negatively affect psychological and physiological performance of Taekwondo (TKD) athletes. This is caused by a reduction of the body water and an electrolyte imbalance. So far, it is unknown whether weight reduction also affects hemorheological properties and hemorheology-influencing nitric oxide (NO) signaling, important for oxygen supply to the muscles and organs. Methods For this purpose, ten male TKD athletes reduced their body weight by 5% within four days (rapid weight reduction, RWR). After a recovery phase, athletes reduced body weight by 5% within four weeks (gradual weight reduction, GWR). Each intervention was preceded by two baseline measurements and followed by a simulated competition. Basal blood parameters (red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean cellular hemoglobin and mean cellular hemoglobin concentration), RBC-NO synthase activation, RBC nitrite as marker for NO synthesis, RBC deformability and aggregation parameters were determined on a total of eight investigation days. Results Basal blood parameters were not affected by the two interventions. In contrast to GWR, RWR decreased activation of RBC-NO synthase, RBC nitrite, respective NO concentration and RBC deformability. Additionally, RWR increased RBC aggregation and disaggregation threshold. Conclusion The results point out that a rapid weight reduction negatively affects hemorheological parameters and NO signaling in RBC which might limit performance capacity. Thus, GWR should be preferred to achieve the desired weight prior to a competition to avoid these negative effects. PMID:25875585

  16. Study of acetylene poisoning of Pt cathode on proton exchange membrane fuel cell spatial performance using a segmented cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetenko, Tatyana V.; St-Pierre, Jean

    2015-08-01

    Acetylene is a welding fuel and precursor for organic synthesis, which requires considering it to be a possible air pollutant. In this work, the spatial performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell exposed to 300 ppm C2H2 and different operating currents was studied with a segmented cell system. The injection of C2H2 resulted in a cell performance decrease and redistribution of segments' currents depending on the operating conditions. Performance loss was 20-50 mV at 0.1-0.2 A cm-2 and was accompanied by a rapid redistribution of localized currents. Acetylene exposure at 0.4-1.0 A cm-2 led to a sharp voltage decrease to 0.07-0.13 V and significant changes in current distribution during a transition period, when the cell reached a voltage of 0.55-0.6 V. A recovery of the cell voltage was observed after stopping the C2H2 injection. Spatial electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data showed different segments' behavior at low and high currents. It was assumed that acetylene oxidation occurs at high cell voltage, while it reduces at low cell potential. A detailed analysis of the current density distribution, its correlation with EIS data and possible C2H2 oxidation/reduction mechanisms are presented and discussed.

  17. Silicon carbide-derived carbon nanocomposite as a substitute for mercury in the catalytic hydrochlorination of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingyun; Pan, Xiulian; Yu, Liang; Ren, Pengju; Wu, Xing; Sun, Litao; Jiao, Feng; Bao, Xinhe

    2014-04-01

    Acetylene hydrochlorination is an important coal-based technology for the industrial production of vinyl chloride, however it is plagued by the toxicity of the mercury chloride catalyst. Therefore extensive efforts have been made to explore alternative catalysts with various metals. Here we report that a nanocomposite of nitrogen-doped carbon derived from silicon carbide activates acetylene directly for hydrochlorination in the absence of additional metal species. The catalyst delivers stable performance during a 150 hour test with acetylene conversion reaching 80% and vinyl chloride selectivity over 98% at 200 °C. Experimental studies and theoretical simulations reveal that the carbon atoms bonded with pyrrolic nitrogen atoms are the active sites. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that such a nanocomposite is a potential substitute for mercury while further work is still necessary to bring this to the industrial stage. Furthermore, the finding also provides guidance for design of carbon-based catalysts for activation of other alkynes.

  18. Enhanced acetylene emission near the north pole of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drossart, Pierre; Bezard, Bruno; Encrenaz, Therese; Atreya, Sushil; Lacy, John; Serabyn, Eugene; Tokunaga, Alan

    1986-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with observations of acetylene fundamental and hot band vibrational emission lines from the planet Jupiter. It is pointed out that the observation of a polar bright spot in the atmosphere of Jupiter is characterized by an enhancement in the individual lines of C2H2 which can be interpreted as an enhancement in the acetylene abundance. However, a purely thermal effect, on non-LTE phenomena cannot be excluded. The intensity of the observed hot band lines is also consistent with either hypothesis. The reported observations were performed with a cooled Fabry-Perot Grating Spectrometer (FPGS). Observations and instrumentation are considered in detail along with the calculation of synthetic spectra on the basis of a line-by-line computation, and the interpretation of the obtained data.

  19. Enhanced acetylene emission near the north pole of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drossart, P.; Bezard, B.; Atreya, S.; Lacy, J.; Serabyn, E.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with observations of acetylene fundamental and hot band vibrational emission lines from the planet Jupiter. It is pointed out that the observation of a polar bright spot in the atmosphere of Jupiter is characterized by an enhancement in the individual lines of C2H2 which can be interpreted as an enhancement in the acetylene abundance. However, a purely thermal effect, or non-LTE phenomena cannot be excluded. The intensity of the observed hot band lines is also consistent with either hypothesis. The reported observations were performed with a cooled Fabry-Perot Grating Spectrometer (FPGS). Observations and instrumentation are considered in detail along with the calculation of synthetic spectra on the basis of a line-by-line computation, and the interpretation of the obtained data.

  20. Detonation engine fed by acetylene-oxygen mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, N. N.; Betelin, V. B.; Nikitin, V. F.; Phylippov, Yu. G.; Koo, Jaye

    2014-11-01

    The advantages of a constant volume combustion cycle as compared to constant pressure combustion in terms of thermodynamic efficiency has focused the search for advanced propulsion on detonation engines. Detonation of acetylene mixed with oxygen in various proportions is studied using mathematical modeling. Simplified kinetics of acetylene burning includes 11 reactions with 9 components. Deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) is obtained in a cylindrical tube with a section of obstacles modeling a Shchelkin spiral; the DDT takes place in this section for a wide range of initial mixture compositions. A modified ka-omega turbulence model is used to simulate flame acceleration in the Shchelkin spiral section of the system. The results of numerical simulations were compared with experiments, which had been performed in the same size detonation chamber and turbulent spiral ring section, and with theoretical data on the Chapman-Jouguet detonation parameters.

  1. Covalent attachment of catalyst molecules to conductive diamond: CO2 reduction using "smart" electrodes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shu A; Ruther, Rose E; Zhang, Linghong; Franking, Ryan A; Hamers, Robert J; Berry, John F

    2012-09-26

    We report here covalent attachment of a catalytically active cobalt complex onto boron-doped, p-type conductive diamond. Peripheral acetylene groups were appended on a cobalt porphyrin complex, and azide-alkyne cycloaddition was used for covalent linking to a diamond surface decorated with alkyl azides. The functionalized surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, and the catalytic activity was characterized using cyclic voltammetry and FTIR. The catalyst-modified diamond surfaces were used as "smart" electrodes exhibiting good stability and electrocatalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of CO(2) to CO in acetonitrile solution. PMID:22963046

  2. Orbital-resolved strong-field single ionization of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Qinying; Cui, Sen; You, Xinyuan; Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Lin, Kang; Pan, Haifeng; Ding, Jingxin; Zeng, Heping; He, Feng; Wu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    We resolve the strong-field single ionization of acetylene into different channels by differentially normalizing the lateral momenta of the directly escaped electrons from the aligned and antialigned molecules. Distinct electron momentum distributions for different channels are observed using both near-infrared and ultraviolet femtosecond laser pulses with Keldysh parameters close to 1. The results are interpreted as a signature of multiple ionization orbitals.

  3. Tuning the Electronic Properties of Acetylenic Fluorenes by Phosphaalkene Incorporation.

    PubMed

    Svyaschenko, Yurii V; Orthaber, Andreas; Ott, Sascha

    2016-03-14

    Versatile synthetic protocols for 2,7- and 3,6-diacetylenic fluorene-9-ylidene phosphanes (F9Ps) were developed. Protodesilylation of trimethylsilyl-protected acetylenic F9Ps affords terminal acetylenes that can be employed in Sonogashira and Glaser-type C-C coupling reactions to give thienyl-decorated and butadiyne-bridged fluorene-9-ylidene phosphanes, respectively. As evidenced by UV/Vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry and corroborated by ab initio calculations, the presence of the P center in the F9Ps induces a significantly reduced HOMO-LUMO splitting that originates from stabilization of the LUMO levels. Variation of the acetylene substitution pattern is an additional tool to influence the optical and electronic properties. Whereas 3,6-disubstituted F9Ps have strong absorptions around 400 nm, mainly due to π-π* transitions, 2,7-diacetylenic F9Ps exhibit longest-wavelength absorptions that have significant charge-transfer character with an onset around 520 nm. PMID:26833389

  4. Just Click It: Undergraduate Procedures for the Copper(I)-Catalyzed Formation of 1,2,3-Triazoles from Azides and Terminal Acetylenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpless, William D.; Peng Wu; Hansen, Trond Vidar; Lindberg, James G.

    2005-01-01

    The click chemistry uses only the most reliable reactions to build complex molecules from olefins, electrophiles and heteroatom linkers. A variation on Huisgen's azide-alkyne 1,2,3-triazole synthesis, the addition of the copper (I), the premium example of the click reaction, catalyst strongly activates terminal acetylenes towards the 1,3-dipole in…

  5. A Model for Self-Assembly of Carbon Nanotubes from Acetylene Based on Real-Time Studies of Vertically Aligned Growth Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Eres, Gyula

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved optical reflectivity was used to study the kinetics in the early stages of vertically aligned carbon nanotube array growth from a molecular beam of acetylene. The molecular beam environment was used to suppress gas phase reaction pathways and limit the growth to surface reactions specific to the molecular structure of acetylene. The observed acetylene flux dependent induction delay and the threshold for vertically aligned growth are characteristic features of heterogeneous chain reactions. Propagation of chain reactions requires regeneration of the active sites that can occur only if catalytic activity is transferred from the metal catalyst film to surface carbon species. After the active site transformation, acetylene self-assembles into carbon structures of progressively increasing size such as chains, graphene fragments, and nanotubes. In this paper we show that a conceptual framework supported by ab initio density functional theory calculations in which active carbon species facilitate incorporation of new carbon readily explains recent results in vertically aligned nanotube growth that are puzzling in the context of the diffusion/precipitation model.

  6. Reduction of beta activity from depleted derbies, ingots and crucibles

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, G.G.; Schonegg, E.; Kato, T.R.

    1984-09-01

    The reduction of beta radiation on uranium ingot and crucible surfaces was demonstrated in the production casting operation by adding a mixture of slag liner material (MgF/sub 2/) and calcium fluoride to the remelt charge. The beta emitters (/sup 234/Th and /sup 234/Pa) are largely discharged with the fluorides into drums during a remote crucible burnout operation; thereby, reducing operator exposure to beta radiation. A production test showed that very low beta radiation from uranium flat castings can be achieved by using derbies recently prepared by reduction. Plant tests with fluoride addition indicate that pickling of derbies may not be necessary for casting uranium flats from a plasma sprayed (ZrO/sub 2/) crucible. Also, ingots produced with fluoride additions had less pipe as compared to standard production technique. 2 references, 5 tables.

  7. Acetylene trimerization on Ag, Pd and Rh atoms deposited on MgO thin films.

    PubMed

    Judai, Ken; Wörz, Anke S; Abbet, Stéphane; Antonietti, Jean-Marie; Heiz, Ueli; Del Vitto, Annalisa; Giordano, Livia; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2005-03-01

    The acetylene trimerization on the group VIII transition metal atoms, Rh and Pd, as well as on Ag atoms supported on MgO thin films has been studied experimentally and theoretically. The three metal atoms with the atomic configurations 4d(8)5s1 (Rh), 4d10s0 (Pd) and 4d(10)5s1 (Ag) behave distinctly differently. The coinage metal atom silver is basically inert for this reaction, whereas Pd is active at 220 and 320 K, and Rh produces benzene in a rather broad temperature range from 350 to ca. 430 K. The origins of these differences are not only the different electronic configurations, leading to a weak interaction of acetylene with silver due to strong Pauli repulsion with the 5s electron but also the different stability and dynamics of the three atoms on the MgO surface. In particular, Rh and Pd atoms interact differently with surface defects like the oxygen vacancies (F centers) and the step edges. Pd atoms migrate already at low temperature exclusively to F centers where the cyclotrimerization is efficiently promoted. The Rh atoms on the other hand are not only trapped on F centers but also at step edges up to about 300 K. Interestingly, only Rh atoms on F centers catalyze the trimerization reaction whereas they are turned inert on the step edges due to strong steric effects. PMID:19791385

  8. Nonoxidative methane conversion to acetylene over zeolite in a low temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Mallinson, R.; Lobban, L.

    1998-10-01

    Previous investigations have found that the plasma catalytic conversion of methane is a low-temperature process for the activation of methane, the major component of natural gas. In this paper, the production of acetylene via plasma catalytic conversion of methane over NaY zeolite is discussed. Hydrogen is produced as a by-product during this plasma catalytic methane conversion. A methane/hydrogen feed with oxygen as an additive and helium as a diluent has been studied in this investigation. The CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} system is found to be more selective for the production of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons, compared to the CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}H{sub 2}O, and CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} systems reported previously. A higher hydrogen concentration feed is more favorable for acetylene formation. The selectivity and yield of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons are related to the hydrogen feed rate, gas temperature, concentration of oxygen additive, and flowrate. The highest yield of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons (32%) is obtained at the lowest flowrate used (10 cm{sup 3}/s; residence time {approximately}2.3 s). A reaction mechanism is also presented to explain the experimental results.

  9. Kinetics and Structure of Superagglomerates Produced by Silane and Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, G. W.; Hamins, A.; Sivathanu, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of smoke in a laminar diffusion flame involves several steps. The first step is particle inception/nucleation in the high-temperature fuel-rich region of the flame followed by surface growth and coagulation/coalescence of the small particles. As the primary spheres grow in size and lose hydrogen, the colliding particles no longer coalesce but retain their identity as a cluster of primary spheres, termed an agglomerate. Finally, in the upper portion of the flame, the particles enter an oxidizing environment which may lead to partial or complete burnout of the agglomerates. Currently there is no quantitative model for describing the growth of smoke agglomerates up to superagglomerates with an overall dimension of 10 microns and greater. Such particles are produced during the burning of acetylene and fuels containing benzene rings such as toluene and polystyrene. In the case of polystyrene, smoke agglomerates in excess of 1 mm have been observed "raining" out from large fires. Evidence of the formation of superagglomerates in a laminar acetylene/air diffusion flame has been recently reported. Acetylene was chosen as the fuel since the particulate loading in acetylene/air diffusion flames is very high. Photographs were obtained by Sorensen using a microsecond xenon lamp of the "stream" of soot just above the flame. For low flow rates of acetylene, only submicrometer soot clusters are produced and they give rise to the homogeneous appearance of the soot stream. When the flow rate is increased to 1.7 cu cm/s, soot clusters up to 10 microns are formed and they are responsible for the graininess and at a flow rate of 3.4 cu cm/s, a web of interconnected clusters as large as the width of the flame is seen. This interconnecting web of superagglomerates is described as a gel state by Sorensen et al (1998). This is the first observation of a gel for a gas phase system. It was observed that this gel state immediately breaks up into agglomerates due to buoyancy

  10. Iran’s Activities on Prevention, Treatment and Harm Reduction of Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Saberi Zafarghandi, Mohammad Bagher; Jadidi, Mohsen; Khalili, Narjes

    2015-01-01

    Context: In the present review study, authors investigated Iran’s activities regarding prevention, abuse and harm reduction of drugs nationwide. The issue appears to be important in order to show the trend of activities in the country. Evidence Acquisition: In this report, authors gathered data from different Farsi/English peer review journals issued both in printed and online versions. These journals have been indexed in PubMed, ISI, ISC, SID, Magiran, UN, etc. These are among the most referred and cited databases. Results: Summarizing the data led to three distinguished sections: 1) drug supply reduction activities; 2) drug demand reduction activities; 3) harm reduction activities. Conclusions: As the results showed, the trend of activities was encouraging and some additional activities could be included to future programs relying on early-onset preventions. PMID:26870709

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-12-01

    This project was directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction on carbonaceous supports at low temperatures. The experimental work was conducted primarily in a packed bed reactor/gas flow system that was constructed for this work. The analytical techniques employed were mass spectrometry, NO{sub x} chemiluminescence, and gas chromatography. The experimental plan was focused on steady-state reactivity experiments, followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of surface intermediates, and also selected temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) experiments. Both uncatalyzed and catalyzed (potassium-promoted) phenolic resin char, were investigated as well as the catalytic effect of additional CO in the gas phase.

  12. Acetylene-derived polymers and their applications in hair and skin care.

    PubMed

    Petter, P J

    1989-02-01

    Synopsis Since the introduction over 30 years ago of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as the first synthetic hairspray resin, acetylene-derived polymers have found wide and increasing applications in the cosmetics and toiletries industry. This review covers the two main classes of acetylenic polymers. In the first class, in which the chemistry may be traced back to reaction of acetylene with formaldehyde, are included PVP homopolymers and copolymers of VP with vinyl acetate, dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate, vinylcaprolactam and styrene. In the second class, stemming from reaction of acetylene with methanol, are the poly (vinyl methyl ether/maleic acid) monoester resins. PMID:19456933

  13. Active Flap Control of the SMART Rotor for Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Steven R.; Anand, R. Vaidyanathan; Straub, Friedrich K.; Lau, Benton H.

    2009-01-01

    Active control methodologies were applied to a full-scale active flap rotor obtained during a joint Boeing/ DARPA/NASA/Army test in the Air Force National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex 40- by 80-foot anechoic wind tunnel. The active flap rotor is a full-scale MD 900 helicopter main rotor with each of its five blades modified to include an on-blade piezoelectric actuator-driven flap with a span of 18% of radius, 25% of chord, and located at 83% radius. Vibration control demonstrated the potential of active flaps for effective control of vibratory loads, especially normal force loads. Active control of normal force vibratory loads using active flaps and a continuous-time higher harmonic control algorithm was very effective, reducing harmonic (1-5P) normal force vibratory loads by 95% in both cruise and approach conditions. Control of vibratory roll and pitch moments was also demonstrated, although moment control was less effective than normal force control. Finally, active control was used to precisely control blade flap position for correlation with pretest predictions of rotor aeroacoustics. Flap displacements were commanded to follow specific harmonic profiles of 2 deg or more in amplitude, and the flap deflection errors obtained were less than 0.2 deg r.m.s.

  14. Reduction of structural weight, costs and complexity of a control system in the active vibration reduction of flexible structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraji, A. H.; Hale, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    This paper concerns the active vibration reduction of a flexible structure with discrete piezoelectric sensors and actuators in collocated pairs bonded to its surface. In this study, a new fitness and objective function is proposed to determine the optimal number of actuators, based on variations in the average closed loop dB gain margin reduction for all of the optimal piezoelectric pairs and on the modes that are required to be attenuated using the optimal linear quadratic control scheme. The aim of this study is to find the minimum number of optimally located sensor/actuator pairs, which can achieve the same vibration reduction as a greater number, in order to reduce the cost, complexity and power requirement of the control system. This optimization was done using a genetic algorithm. The technique may be applied to any lightly damped structure, and is demonstrated here by attenuating the first six vibration modes of a flat cantilever plate. It is shown that two sensor/actuator pairs, located and controlled optimally, give almost the same vibration reduction as ten pairs. These results are validated by comparing the open and closed loop time responses and actuator feedback voltages for various numbers of piezoelectric pairs using the ANSYS finite element package and a proportional differential control scheme.

  15. Activity and Stability of Nanoscale Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Design of highly active and stable nanoscale catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules is of great importance to the development of efficient fuel cells. The amount and instability of Pt-based catalysts in the cathode limits the cost, efficiency and lifetime of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We developed a microscopic understanding of the factors governing activity and stability in Pt and PtM alloys. Experimental efforts were focused on probing the size and shape dependence of ORR activity of Pt-based nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. A microscopic understanding of the activity was achieved by correlating voltammetry and rotating ring disk electrodes to surface atomic and electronic structures, which were elucidated predominantly by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS).

  16. Sustained Reduction of Cerebellar Activity in Experimental Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rijkers, Kim; Moers-Hornikx, Véronique M. P.; Hemmes, Roelof J.; Aalbers, Marlien W.; Temel, Yasin; Vles, Johan S. H.; Hoogland, Govert

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence suggests a role for the cerebellum in seizure control, while no data are available on cerebellar activity between seizures. We hypothesized that interictal regional activity of the deep cerebellar nuclei is reduced in epilepsy and tested this in an animal model by using ΔFosB and cytochrome oxidase (COX) (immuno)histochemistry. The expression of these two markers of neuronal activity was analysed in the dentate nucleus (DN), interpositus nucleus (IN), and fastigial nucleus (FN) of the cerebellum of fully amygdala kindled rats that were sacrificed 48 hours after their last seizure. The DN and FN of kindled rats exhibited 25 to 29% less ΔFosB immunopositive cells than their respective counterpart in sham controls (P < 0.05). COX expression in the DN and FN of kindled animals was reduced by 32 to 33% compared to respective control values (P < 0.05). These results indicate that an epileptogenic state is characterized by decreased activity of deep cerebellar nuclei, especially the DN and FN. Possible consequences may include a decreased activation of the thalamus, contributing to further seizure spread. Restoration of FN activity by low frequency electrical stimulation is suggested as a possible treatment option in chronic epilepsy. PMID:26417599

  17. Appetite suppression and weight reduction by a centrally active aminosterol.

    PubMed

    Ahima, Rexford S; Patel, Hiralben R; Takahashi, Nobuhiko; Qi, Yong; Hileman, Stanley M; Zasloff, Michael A

    2002-07-01

    The rise in obesity and its complications has generated enormous interest in the regulation of feeding and body weight. We show that a spermine metabolite of cholesterol (MSI-1436) decreases body weight, specifically fat, by suppressing feeding and preventing the reduction in energy expenditure, hormonal changes, and patterns of neuropeptide expression normally associated with weight loss. MSI-1436 enters the brain after peripheral injection and is more potent when injected into the cerebral ventricle (intracerebroventricular [ICV]). Systemic or ICV MSI-1436 administration induced similar patterns of Fos immunoreactivity in the brain, especially the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN). This brain region integrates neural signals from hypothalamic and brain stem nuclei and regulates feeding behavior, autonomic function, and neuroendocrine function. Microinjection of MSI-1436 into the PVN potently suppressed feeding and reduced body weight for several days. Unlike caloric restriction, MSI-1436 decreased mRNA levels of agouti-related peptide and neuropeptide Y in the hypothalamus. These findings indicate that MSI-1436 acts in the brain to regulate food intake and energy expenditure, likely through suppression of orexigenic hypothalamic pathways. PMID:12086938

  18. Substantial Humic Acid Adsorption to Activated Carbon Air Cathodes Produces a Small Reduction in Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wulin; Watson, Valerie J; Logan, Bruce E

    2016-08-16

    Long-term operation of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can result in substantial degradation of activated carbon (AC) air-cathode performance. To examine a possible role in fouling from organic matter in water, cathodes were exposed to high concentrations of humic acids (HA). Cathodes treated with 100 mg L(-1) HA exhibited no significant change in performance. Exposure to 1000 mg L(-1) HA decreased the maximum power density by 14% (from 1310 ± 30 mW m(-2) to 1130 ± 30 mW m(-2)). Pore blocking was the main mechanism as the total surface area of the AC decreased by 12%. Minimization of external mass transfer resistances using a rotating disk electrode exhibited only a 5% reduction in current, indicating about half the impact of HA adsorption was associated with external mass transfer resistance and the remainder was due to internal resistances. Rinsing the cathodes with deionized water did not restore cathode performance. These results demonstrated that HA could contribute to cathode fouling, but the extent of power reduction was relatively small in comparison to large mass of humics adsorbed. Other factors, such as biopolymer attachment, or salt precipitation, are therefore likely more important contributors to long-term fouling of MFC cathodes. PMID:27414751

  19. Autoxidation and acetylene-accelerated oxidation of NO in a 2-phase system; implications for the expression of denitrification in ex situ experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, Shahid; Dörsch, Peter; Bakken, Lars

    2013-04-01

    flasks (with and without C2H2), and monitored for O2, NO, N2O and N2 production while depleting the oxygen and switching to anoxic respiration. Acetylene effectively scavenged NO from the cultures until oxygen concentration reached below ~0.19 mL L-1, and the estimated rate of acetylene-accelerated NO oxidation was more than sufficient to explain an observed reduction of the N2O production induced by acetylene. When [O2] reached below 0.19 mL L-1, the NO concentrations increased and stabilized at the same level as in the treatments without acetylene, but the rate of denitrification was much lower than without acetylene. The results indicate that the early accumulation of 10-20 nM NO during oxygen depletion has a significant effect on the expression of denitrification in soil communities. This warrants a greater interest in NO as a regulator of denitrification in soils and shows that the acetylene inhibition method may be problematic even for intentionally anoxic incubations, unless precautions are taken to secure initial O2-concentrations below 0.19 mL O2 L-1.

  20. Actively Controlled Landing Gear for Aircraft Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts for long-range air travel are characterized by airframe designs with long, slender, relatively flexible fuselages. One aspect often overlooked is ground induced vibration of these aircraft. This paper presents an analytical and experimental study of reducing ground-induced aircraft vibration loads using actively controlled landing gears. A facility has been developed to test various active landing gear control concepts and their performance. The facility uses a NAVY A6-intruder landing gear fitted with an auxiliary hydraulic supply electronically controlled by servo valves. An analytical model of the gear is presented including modifications to actuate the gear externally and test data is used to validate the model. The control design is described and closed-loop test and analysis comparisons are presented.

  1. Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) initial effort to provide information and analysis on the potential impacts on petroleum product markets from reductions in Northeast petroleum refining activity.

  2. Real-Time Active Cosmic Neutron Background Reduction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray-induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the low-energy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of man-made neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  3. Real-time active cosmic neutron background reduction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray‒induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the lowenergy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of manmade neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  4. Acetylene Fermentation: Relevance to Primordial Biogeochemistry and the Search for Life in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2014-02-01

    Acetylene supports the growth of some terrestrial anaerobes. The reaction is highly exothermic. The abundance of acetylene in the methane-rich planet(oid)s of the outer solar system could represent a means of nourishment for resident alien microbes.

  5. ACTINIC MASK INSPECTION AT THE ALS: RISK REDUCTION ACTIVITIES FOR 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Levesque, R; Ayers, J; Liu, Y; Gullikson, E; Barale, P

    2004-01-05

    This document reports on risk reduction activities performed at the VNL during CY2003 as a part of the Lith-343 actinic inspection project funded by International SEMATECH. The risk reduction activities described in this document comprise deliverable items 3.1.3, 3.1.4, 3.1.5 and 3.1.6 of Amendment 6 to the VNL EUV mask blank technology transfer contract.

  6. Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets

    EIA Publications

    2012-01-01

    Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets is an update to a previous Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets, released in December 2011. This update analyzes possible market responses and impacts in the event Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery closes this summer, in addition to the recently idled refineries on the East Coast and in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  7. Development of High Activity, Coal-Derived, Promoted Catalytic Systems for NOx Reduction at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Calo

    1998-05-01

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics.

  8. Reductant and sequence effects on the morphology and catalytic activity of peptide-capped Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Beverly D; Li, Yue; Swihart, Mark T; Knecht, Marc R

    2015-04-29

    The use of peptides as capping ligands for materials synthesis has been widely explored. The ambient conditions of bio-inspired syntheses using molecules such as peptides represent an attractive route for controlling the morphology and activity of nanomaterials. Although various reductants can be used in such syntheses, no comprehensive comparison of the same bio-based ligand with different reductants has been reported. In this contribution, peptides AuBP1, AuBP2, and Pd4 are used in the synthesis of Au nanoparticles. The reductant strength is varied by using three different reducing agents: NaBH4, hydrazine, and ascorbic acid. These changes in reductant produce significant morphological differences in the final particles. The weakest reductant, ascorbic acid, yields large, globular nanoparticles with rough surfaces, whereas the strongest reductant, NaBH4, yields small, spherical, smooth nanomaterials. Studies of 4-nitrophenol reduction using the Au nanoparticles as catalysts reveal a decrease in activation energy for the large, globular, rough materials relative to the small, spherical, smooth materials. These studies demonstrate that modifying the reductant is a simple way to control the activity of peptide-capped nanoparticles. PMID:25839335

  9. Revealing the Origin of Activity in Nitrogen-Doped Nanocarbons towards Electrocatalytic Reduction of Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junyuan; Kan, Yuhe; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Bingsen; Wang, Bolun; Wu, Kuang-Hsu; Lin, Yangming; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Qingfeng; Centi, Gabriele; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-05-23

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are functionalized with nitrogen atoms for reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 ). The investigation explores the origin of the catalyst's activity and the role of nitrogen chemical states therein. The catalysts show excellent performances, with about 90 % current efficiency for CO formation and stability over 60 hours. The Tafel analyses and density functional theory calculations suggest that the reduction of CO2 proceeds through an initial rate-determining transfer of one electron to CO2 , which leads to the formation of carbon dioxide radical anion (CO2 (.-) ). The initial reduction barrier is too high on pristine CNTs, resulting in a very high overpotentials at which the hydrogen evolution reaction dominates over CO2 reduction. The doped nitrogen atoms stabilize the radical anion, thereby lowering the initial reduction barrier and improving the intrinsic activity. The most efficient nitrogen chemical state for this reaction is quaternary nitrogen, followed by pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen. PMID:27100272

  10. Numerical study of ethylene and acetylene laminar flame speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Marinov, N.M.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1995-03-01

    Detailed chemical kinetic computations for ethylene-air and acetylene-air mixtures have been performed to simulate laminar flame speeds. Sensitivity analysis was applied to determine those reactions which strongly influence flame propagation. In ethylene-air mixtures, the C{sub 2}H{sub 3} + O{sub 2} = CH{sub 2}CHO + O reaction was one of the most sensitive reactions in the C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/C{sub 2}H{sub 3} submechanism and therefore this reaction was very important to ethylene flame propagation. This reaction was not considered in previously reported mechanisms used to model ethylene-air flame propagation. In acetylene-air mixtures, the C{sub 2}H{sub 2}+O {yields} Products, HCCO+H=CH{sub 2}(s)+CO, HCCO+O{sub 2}=CO{sub 2}+CO+H, H+C{sub 2}H{sub 2}(+M) = C{sub 2}H{sub 3}(+M) and CH{sub 2}(s)+C{sub 2}H{sub 2} = H{sub 2}CCCH+H were the most sensitive reactions in the C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/HCCO / CH{sub 2}(s) reaction set.

  11. Ultrafast hydrogen migration in acetylene cation driven by non-adiabatic effects.

    PubMed

    Madjet, Mohamed El-Amine; Li, Zheng; Vendrell, Oriol

    2013-03-01

    Non-adiabatic dynamics of the acetylene cation is investigated using mixed quantum-classical dynamics based on trajectory surface hopping. To describe the non-adiabatic effects, two surface hopping methods are used, namely, Tully's fewest switches and Landau-Zener surface hopping. Similarities and differences between the results based on those two methods are discussed. We find that the photoionization of acetylene into the first excited state A(2)Σg(+) drives the molecule from the linear structure to a trans-bent structure. Through a conical intersection the acetylene cation can relax back to either the ground state of acetylene or vinylidene. We conclude that hydrogen migration always takes place after non-radiative electronic relaxation to the ground state of the monocation. Based on the analysis of correlation functions we identify coherent oscillations between acetylene and vinylidene with a period of about 70 fs after the electronic relaxation. PMID:23485298

  12. RFI Risk Reduction Activities Using New Goddard Digital Radiometry Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Damon; Kim, Ed; Young, Peter; Miles, Lynn; Wong, Mark; Morris, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The Goddard Radio-Frequency Explorer (GREX) is the latest fast-sampling radiometer digital back-end processor that will be used for radiometry and radio-frequency interference (RFI) surveying at Goddard Space Flight Center. The system is compact and deployable, with a mass of about 40 kilograms. It is intended to be flown on aircraft. GREX is compatible with almost any aircraft, including P-3, twin otter, C-23, C-130, G3, and G5 types. At a minimum, the system can function as a clone of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) ground-based development unit [1], or can be a completely independent system that is interfaced to any radiometer, provided that frequency shifting to GREX's intermediate frequency is performed prior to sampling. If the radiometer RF is less than 200MHz, then the band can be sampled and acquired directly by the system. A key feature of GREX is its ability to simultaneously sample two polarization channels simultaneously at up to 400MSPS, 14-bit resolution each. The sampled signals can be recorded continuously to a 23 TB solid-state RAID storage array. Data captures can be analyzed offline using the supercomputing facilities at Goddard Space Flight Center. In addition, various Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) - amenable radiometer signal processing and RFI detection algorithms can be implemented directly on the GREX system because it includes a high-capacity Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA prototyping system that is user customizable.

  13. Characterization of Hydrogenase and Reductive Dehalogenase Activities of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes Strain 195

    PubMed Central

    Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Zinder, Stephen H.

    2005-01-01

    Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 reductively dechlorinates tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) to vinyl chloride and ethene using H2 as an electron donor. PCE- and TCE-reductive dehalogenase (RD) activities were mainly membrane associated, whereas only about 20% of the hydrogenase activity was membrane associated. Experiments with methyl viologen (MV) were consistent with a periplasmic location for the RDs or a component feeding electrons to them. The protonophore uncoupler tetrachlorosalicylanilide did not inhibit reductive dechlorination in cells incubated with H2 and PCE and partially restored activity in cells incubated with the ATPase inhibitor N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Benzyl viologen or diquat (Eo′ ≈ −360 mV) supported reductive dechlorination of PCE or TCE at rates comparable to MV (−450 mV) in cell extracts. PMID:15746376

  14. A DFT computational study of the bis-silylation reaction of acetylene catalyzed by palladium complexes.

    PubMed

    Bottoni, Andrea; Higueruelo, Alicia Perez; Miscione, Gian Pietro

    2002-05-15

    In this paper we have investigated at the DFT(B3LYP) level the catalytic cycle for the bis-silylation reaction of alkynes promoted by palladium complexes. A model-system formed by an acetylene molecule, a disilane molecule, and the Pd(PH(3))(2) complex has been used. The most relevant features of this catalytic cycle can be summarized as follows: (i) The first step of the cycle is an oxidative addition involving H(3)Si-SiH(3) and Pd(PH(3))(2). It occurs easily and leads to the cis (SiH(3))(2)Pd(PH(3))(2) complex that is 5.39 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy than reactants. (ii) The transfer of the two silyl groups to the C-C triple bond does not occur in a concerted way, but involves many steps. (iii) The cis (SiH(3))(2)Pd(PH(3))(2) complex, obtained from the oxidative addition, is involved in the formation of the first C-Si bond (activation barrier of 18.34 kcal mol(-1)). The two intermediates that form in this step cannot lead directly to the formation of the final bis(silyl)ethene product. However, they can isomerize rather easily (the two possible isomerizations have a barrier of 16.79 and 7.17 kcal mol(-1)) to new more stable species. In both these new intermediates the second silyl group is adjacent to the acetylene moiety and the formation of the second C-Si bond can occur rapidly leading to the (Z)-bis(silyl)ethene, as experimentally observed. (iv) The whole catalytic process is exothermic by 41.54 kcal mol(-1), in quite good agreement with the experimental estimate of this quantity (about 40 kcal mol(-1)). PMID:11996593

  15. A first principles study of the acetylene-water interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeli, Demeter; Mavridis, Aristides; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2000-04-08

    We present an extensive study of the stationary points on the acetylene-water (AW) ground-state potential energy surface (PES) aimed in establishing accurate energetics for the two different bonding scenarios that are considered. Those include arrangements in which water acts either as a proton acceptor from one of the acetylene hydrogen atoms or a proton donor to the triple bond. We used a hierarchy of theoretical methods to account for electron correlation [MP2 (second-order Moller-Plesset), MP4 (fourth-order Moller-Plesset), and CCSD(T) (coupled-cluster single double triple)] coupled with a series of increasing size augmented correlation consistent basis sets (aug-cc-pVnZ, n=2,3,4). We furthermore examined the effect of corrections due to basis set superposition error (BSSE). We found that those have a large effect in altering the qualitative features of the PES of the complex. They are responsible for producing a structure of higher (C{sub 2v}) symmetry for the global minimum. Zero-point energy (ZPE) corrections were found to increase the stability of the C{sub 2v} arrangement. For the global (water acceptor) minimum of C{sub 2v} symmetry our best estimates are {delta}E{sub e}=-2.87 kcal/mol ({delta}E{sub 0}=-2.04 kcal/mol) and a van der Waals distance of R{sub e}=2.190 Aa. The water donor arrangement lies 0.3 kcal/mol (0.5 kcal/mol including ZPE corrections) above the global minimum. The barrier for its isomerization to the global minimum is E{sub e}=0.18 kcal/mol; however, inclusion of BSSE- and ZPE-corrections destabilize the water donor arrangement suggesting that it can readily convert to the global minimum. We therefore conclude that there exists only one minimum on the PES in accordance with previous experimental observations. To this end, vibrational averaging and to a lesser extend proper description of intermolecular interactions (BSSE) were found to have a large effect in altering the qualitative features of the ground-state PES of the acetylene

  16. Active sites for NO reduction over Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Schwidder, M; Santhosh Kumar, M; Brückner, A; Grünert, W

    2005-02-14

    A study of Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts with variable amounts of isolated, oligomeric and heavily aggregated Fe3+ oxo sites (as evidenced by UV-Vis and EPR spectroscopic data) and their catalytic properties in the selective catalytic reduction of NO by isobutane or by NH3 is presented, which allows development of a unified concept of the active Fe sites in these reactions, according to which isolated Fe sites catalyse both SCR reactions while oligomeric sites, though also involved in the selective reduction path, limit the catalyst performance by causing the total oxidation of the reductant. PMID:15685345

  17. Enantioselective CuH-Catalyzed Reductive Coupling of Aryl Alkenes and Activated Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Bandar, Jeffrey S; Ascic, Erhad; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2016-05-11

    A new method for the enantioselective reductive coupling of aryl alkenes with activated carboxylic acid derivatives via copper hydride catalysis is described. Dual catalytic cycles are proposed, with a relatively fast enantioselective hydroacylation cycle followed by a slower diastereoselective ketone reduction cycle. Symmetrical aryl carboxyclic anhydrides provide access to enantioenriched α-substituted ketones or alcohols with excellent stereoselectivity and functional group tolerance. PMID:27121395

  18. Correlation between hydrogen bond basicity and acetylene solubility in room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Palgunadi, Jelliarko; Hong, Sung Yun; Lee, Jin Kyu; Lee, Hyunjoo; Lee, Sang Deuk; Cheong, Minserk; Kim, Hoon Sik

    2011-02-10

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are proposed as the alternative solvents for the acetylene separation in ethylene generated from the naphtha cracking process. The solubility behavior of acetylene in RTILs was examined using a linear solvation energy relationship based on Kamlet-Taft solvent parameters including the hydrogen-bond acidity or donor ability (α), the hydrogen-bond basicity or acceptor ability (β), and the polarity/polarizability (π*). It is found that the solubility of acetylene linearly correlates with β value and is almost independent of α or π*. The solubility of acetylene in RTILs increases with increasing hydrogen-bond acceptor (HBA) ability of the anion, but is little affected by the nature of the cation. Quantum mechanical calculations demonstrate that the acidic proton of acetylene specifically forms hydrogen bond with a basic oxygen atom on the anion of a RTIL. On the other hand, although C-H···π interaction is plausible, all optimized structures indicate that the acidic protons on the cation do not specifically associate with the π cloud of acetylene. Thermodynamic analysis agrees well with the proposed correlation: the higher the β value of a RTIL is, the more negative the enthalpy of acetylene absorption in the RTIL is. PMID:21218815

  19. Organogermanium Chemistry: Germacyclobutanes and digermane Additions to Acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Michael Chubb

    2003-12-12

    This dissertation comprises two main research projects. The first project, presented in Chapter 1, involves the synthesis and thermochemistry of germacyclobutanes (germetanes). Four new germetanes (spirodigermetane, diallylgermetane, dichlorogermetane, and germacyclobutane) have been synthesized using a modified di-Grignard synthesis. Diallylgermetane is shown to be a useful starting material for obtaining other germetanes, particularly the parent germetane, germacyclobutane. The gas-phase thermochemistries of spirodigermetane, diallylgermetane and germacyclobutane have been explored via pulsed stirred-flow reactor (SFR) studies, showing remarkable differences in decomposition, depending on the substitution at the germanium atom. The second project investigates the thermochemical, photochemical, and catalytic additions of several digermanes to acetylenes. The first examples of thermo- and photochemical additions of Ge-Ge bonds to C{triple_bond}C are demonstrated. Mechanistic investigations are described and comparisons are made to analogous disilane addition reactions, previously studied in their group.

  20. Acetylene fuel from atmospheric CO2 on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Linne, Diane L.

    1992-01-01

    The Mars mission scenario proposed by Baker and Zubrin (1990) intended for an unmanned preliminary mission is extended to maximize the total impulse of fuel produced with a minimum mass of hydrogen from Earth. The hydrogen along with atmospheric carbon dioxide is processed into methane and oxygen by the exothermic reaction in an atmospheric processing module. Use of simple chemical reactions to produce acetylene/oxygen rocket fuel on Mars from hydrogen makes it possible to produce an amount of fuel that is nearly 100 times the mass of hydrogen brought from earth. If such a process produces the return propellant for a manned Mars mission, the required mission mass in LEO is significantly reduced over a system using all earth-derived propellants.

  1. Inclusion of 13C and D in protonated acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Roueff, Evelyne; Lee, Timothy J.

    2016-04-01

    The rovibrational spectrum of cyclic, protonated acetylene has been established. The improvement in modern telescopes coupled with the different branching ratios in reaction models welcomes study of 13C-substitution for C2H3+. Quartic force fields (QFFs) have been previously utilized to predict the antisymmetric HCCH stretch in standard c-C2H3+ to within 0.1 cm-1 of experiment and are employed here to generate rovibrational insights for the 13C isotopologues. The zero-point energies are also given for the cyclic and 'Y'-shaped isomers for both 13C and D substitutions. Vibrational intensities and the dipole moments are provided in order to characterize more fully this simple cation.

  2. Ultrafast Extreme Ultraviolet Induced Isomerization of Acetylene Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Y.; Rudenko, Artem; Herrwerth, O.; Foucar, L.; Kurka, M.; Kuhnel, K.; Lezius, M.; Kling, Matthias; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Belkacem, Ali; Ueda, K.; Dusterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Schroter, Claus-Dieter; Moshammer, Robbert; Ullrich, Joachim

    2011-06-17

    Ultrafast isomerization of acetylene cations ([HC = CH]{sup +}) in the low-lying excited A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} state, populated by the absorption of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) photons (38 eV), has been observed at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg, (FLASH). Recording coincident fragments C{sup +} + CH{sub 2}{sup +} as a function of time between XUV-pump and -probe pulses, generated by a split-mirror device, we find an isomerization time of 52 {+-} 15 fs in a kinetic energy release (KER) window of 5.8 < KER < 8 eV, providing clear evidence for the existence of a fast, nonradiative decay channel.

  3. Adhesive and composite evaluation of acetylene-terminated phenylquinoxaline resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    A series of acetylene-terminated phenylquinoxaline (ATPQ) oligomers of various molecular weights were prepared and subsequently chain extended by the thermally induced reaction of the ethynyl groups. The processability and thermal properties of these oligomers and their cured resins were compared with that of a relatively high molecular weight linear polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) with the same chemical backbone. The ATPQ oligomers exhibited significantly better processability than the linear PPQ but the PPQ displayed substantially better thermooxidative stability. Adhesive (Ti/Ti) and composite (graphite filament reinforcement) work was performed to evaluate the potential of these materials for structural applications. The PPQ exhibited better retention of adhesive and laminate properties than the ATPQ resins at 260 C after aging for 500 hr at 260 C in circulating air.

  4. Ultrafast Extreme Ultraviolet Induced Isomerization of Acetylene Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Y. H.; Kurka, M.; Kuehnel, K. U.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Rudenko, A.; Foucar, L.; Herrwerth, O.; Lezius, M.; Kling, M. F.; Tilborg, J. van; Belkacem, A.; Ueda, K.; Duesterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2010-12-31

    Ultrafast isomerization of acetylene cations ([HC=CH]{sup +}) in the low-lying excited A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} state, populated by the absorption of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) photons (38 eV), has been observed at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg, (FLASH). Recording coincident fragments C{sup +}+CH{sub 2}{sup +} as a function of time between XUV-pump and -probe pulses, generated by a split-mirror device, we find an isomerization time of 52{+-}15 fs in a kinetic energy release (KER) window of 5.8

  5. Acetylene as Fast Food: Implications for Development of Life on Anoxic Primordial Earth and in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2008-02-01

    Acetylene occurs, by photolysis of methane, in the atmospheres of jovian planets and Titan. In contrast, acetylene is only a trace component of Earth's current atmosphere. Nonetheless, a methane-rich atmosphere has been hypothesized for early Earth; this atmosphere would also have been rich in acetylene. This poses a paradox, because acetylene is a potent inhibitor of many key anaerobic microbial processes, including methanogenesis, anaerobic methane oxidation, nitrogen fixation, and hydrogen oxidation. Fermentation of acetylene was discovered 25 years ago, and Pelobacter acetylenicus was shown to grow on acetylene by virtue of acetylene hydratase, which results in the formation of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde subsequently dismutates to ethanol and acetate (plus some hydrogen). However, acetylene hydratase is specific for acetylene and does not react with any analogous compounds. We hypothesize that microbes with acetylene hydratase played a key role in the evolution of Earth's early biosphere by exploiting an available source of carbon from the atmosphere and in so doing formed protective niches that allowed for other microbial processes to flourish. Furthermore, the presence of acetylene in the atmosphere of a planet or planetoid could possibly represent evidence for an extraterrestrial anaerobic ecosystem.

  6. Acetylene as fast food: Implications for development of life on anoxic primordial earth and in the outer solar system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Voytek, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Acetylene occurs, by photolysis of methane, in the atmospheres of jovian planets and Titan. In contrast, acetylene is only a trace component of Earth's current atmosphere. Nonetheless, a methane-rich atmosphere has been hypothesized for early Earth; this atmosphere would also have been rich in acetylene. This poses a paradox, because acetylene is a potent inhibitor of many key anaerobic microbial processes, including methanogenesis, anaerobic methane oxidation, nitrogen fixation, and hydrogen oxidation. Fermentation of acetylene was discovered 25 years ago, and Pelobacter acetylenicus was shown to grow on acetylene by virtue of acetylene hydratase, which results in the formation of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde subsequently dismutates to ethanol and acetate (plus some hydrogen). However, acetylene hydratase is specific for acetylene and does not react with any analogous compounds. We hypothesize that microbes with acetylene hydratase played a key role in the evolution of Earth's early biosphere by exploiting an available source of carbon from the atmosphere and in so doing formed protective niches that allowed for other microbial processes to flourish. Furthermore, the presence of acetylene in the atmosphere of a planet or planetoid could possibly represent evidence for an extraterrestrial anaerobic ecosystem. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  7. Acetylene as fast food: implications for development of life on anoxic primordial Earth and in the outer solar system.

    PubMed

    Oremland, Ronald S; Voytek, Mary A

    2008-02-01

    Acetylene occurs, by photolysis of methane, in the atmospheres of jovian planets and Titan. In contrast, acetylene is only a trace component of Earth's current atmosphere. Nonetheless, a methane-rich atmosphere has been hypothesized for early Earth; this atmosphere would also have been rich in acetylene. This poses a paradox, because acetylene is a potent inhibitor of many key anaerobic microbial processes, including methanogenesis, anaerobic methane oxidation, nitrogen fixation, and hydrogen oxidation. Fermentation of acetylene was discovered approximately 25 years ago, and Pelobacter acetylenicus was shown to grow on acetylene by virtue of acetylene hydratase, which results in the formation of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde subsequently dismutates to ethanol and acetate (plus some hydrogen). However, acetylene hydratase is specific for acetylene and does not react with any analogous compounds. We hypothesize that microbes with acetylene hydratase played a key role in the evolution of Earth's early biosphere by exploiting an available source of carbon from the atmosphere and in so doing formed protective niches that allowed for other microbial processes to flourish. Furthermore, the presence of acetylene in the atmosphere of a planet or planetoid could possibly represent evidence for an extraterrestrial anaerobic ecosystem. PMID:18199006

  8. Ionization of large homogeneous and heterogeneous clusters generated in acetylene-Ar expansions: cluster ion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kočišek, J; Lengyel, J; Fárník, M

    2013-03-28

    Pure acetylene and mixed Ar-acetylene clusters are formed in supersonic expansions of acetylene/argon mixtures and analysed using reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer with variable electron energy ionization source. Acetylene clusters composed of more than a hundred acetylene molecules are generated at the acetylene concentration of ≈8%, while mixed species are produced at low concentrations (≈0.7%). The electron energy dependence of the mass spectra revealed the ionization process mechanisms in clusters. The ionization above the threshold for acetylene molecule of 11.5 eV results in the main ionic fragment progression (C2H2)n(+). At the electron energies ≥21.5 eV above the CH+CH(+) dissociative ionization limit of acetylene the fragment ions nominally labelled as (C2H2)nCH(+), n ≥ 2, are observed. For n ≤ 7 these fragments correspond to covalently bound ionic structures as suggested by the observed strong dehydrogenation [(C2H2)n - k × H](+) and [(C2H2)nCH - k × H](+). The dehydrogenation is significantly reduced in the mixed clusters where evaporation of Ar instead of hydrogen can stabilize the nascent molecular ion. The C3H3(+) ion was previously assigned to originate from the benzene molecular ion; however, the low appearance energy of ≈13.7 eV indicates that a less rigid covalently bound structure of C6H6(+) ion must also be formed upon the acetylene cluster electron ionization. The appearance energy of Arn(C2H2)(+) fragments above ≈15.1 eV indicates that the argon ionization is the first step in the fragment ion production, and the appearance energy of Arn≥2(C2H2)m≥2(+) at ≈13.7 eV is discussed in terms of an exciton transfer mechanism. PMID:23556722

  9. Analogs of sex pheromone of processionary moth,Thaumetopoea pityocampa: Synthesis and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Camps, F; Fabriàs, G; Gasol, V; Guerrero, A; Hernández, R; Montoya, R

    1988-05-01

    The synthesis and biological activity of some analogs of (Z)-13-hexadecen-11-ynyl acetate1, the major component of the sex pheromone of the processionary mothThaumetopoea pityocampa is described. The analogs have been formally derived by structural modification of the enyne and acetate functions of the parent compound1. In field tests, trifluoroacetate ester16 and the analog,11, with fluorine substitution at the olefin site, decreased the pheromone action, whereas epoxy derivative,10, from epoxidation of the olefin moiety in1, and propionate ester15 gave synergistic activity. The formate14 had a variable effect according to the composition of the lure. Formal reduction of the enyne to give the acetylene2 was found to retain activity. Alcohols12 and13, resulting from hydrolysis of the enyne1 and acetylene2, respectively, inhibited the action of their parent compounds. PMID:24276283

  10. Acetylene as a substrate in the development of primordial bacterial communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culbertson, C.W.; Strohmaier, F.E.; Oremland, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The fermentation of atmospheric acetylene by anaerobic bacteria is proposed as the basis of a primordial heterotrophic food chain. The accumulation of fermentation products (acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetate and hydrogen) would create niches for sulfate-respiring bacteria as well as methanogens. Formation of acetylene-free environments in soils and sediments would also alter the function of nitrogenase from detoxification to nitrogen-fixation. The possibility of an acetylene-based anaerobic food chain in Jovian-type atmospheres is discussed. ?? 1988 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  11. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kiana L.; Rogers, Karyn L.; Rogers, Daniel R.; Johnston, David T.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, SO42−, DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits. PMID:26733984

  12. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits.

    PubMed

    Frank, Kiana L; Rogers, Karyn L; Rogers, Daniel R; Johnston, David T; Girguis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, [Formula: see text], DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits. PMID:26733984

  13. Active and stable carbon nanotube/nanoparticle composite electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hoon T.; Won, Jong H.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured carbon-based materials, such as nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays, Co3O4/nitrogen-doped graphene hybrids and carbon nanotube–graphene complexes have shown respectable oxygen reduction reaction activity in alkaline media. Although certainly promising, the performance of these materials does not yet warrant implementation in the energy conversion/storage devices utilizing basic electrolytes, for example, alkaline fuel cells, metal-air batteries and certain electrolysers. Here we demonstrate a new type of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube/nanoparticle composite oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst obtained from iron acetate as an iron precursor and from cyanamide as a nitrogen and carbon nanotube precursor in a simple, scalable and single-step method. The composite has the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity in alkaline media of any non-precious metal catalysts. When used at a sufficiently high loading, this catalyst also outperforms the most active platinum-based catalysts. PMID:23715281

  14. Pore chemistry and size control in hybrid porous materials for acetylene capture from ethylene.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xili; Chen, Kaijie; Xing, Huabin; Yang, Qiwei; Krishna, Rajamani; Bao, Zongbi; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Wei; Dong, Xinglong; Han, Yu; Li, Bin; Ren, Qilong; Zaworotko, Michael J; Chen, Banglin

    2016-07-01

    The trade-off between physical adsorption capacity and selectivity of porous materials is a major barrier for efficient gas separation and purification through physisorption. We report control over pore chemistry and size in metal coordination networks with hexafluorosilicate and organic linkers for the purpose of preferential binding and orderly assembly of acetylene molecules through cooperative host-guest and/or guest-guest interactions. The specific binding sites for acetylene are validated by modeling and neutron powder diffraction studies. The energies associated with these binding interactions afford high adsorption capacity (2.1 millimoles per gram at 0.025 bar) and selectivity (39.7 to 44.8) for acetylene at ambient conditions. Their efficiency for the separation of acetylene/ethylene mixtures is demonstrated by experimental breakthrough curves (0.73 millimoles per gram from a 1/99 mixture). PMID:27198674

  15. KISS: Kinetics and Structure of Superagglomerates Produced by Silane and Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, G. W.; Yang, J. C.; Scott, J. H.; Sivithanu, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the process of gas phase agglomeration leading to superagglomerates and a gel-like structure for microgravity (0-g) silane and acetylene flames. Ultimately one would apply this understanding to predicting flame conditions that could lead to the gas phase production of an aero-gel. The approach is to burn acetylene and silane and to analyze the evolution of the soot and silica agglomerates. Acetylene is chosen because it has one of the highest soot volume fractions and there is evidence of super agglomerates being formed in laminar acetylene flames. Silane has the advantage that silica particles are the major combustion product resulting in a particle volume fraction a factor of ten greater than that for a carbonaceous smoke.

  16. An active control system for helicopter vibration reduction by higher harmonic pitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. B.; Farrar, F. A.; Miao, W.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical study defining the basic configuration of an active control system to reduce helicopter vibrations is presented. Theoretical results for a nonlinear four-bladed single rotor helicopter simulation are discussed, showing that vibration reductions on the order of 80-90% for airspeeds up to 150 kn can be expected when using a higher harmonic pitch in an active feedback control system. The rotor performance penalty associated with this level of vibration reduction is about 1-3% and the increase in rotor blade stresses is considered to be low. The location of sensor accelerometers proved to be significant for vibration reductions, and it is noted that the RTSA controller is tolerant of sensor signal noise.

  17. Influence of nanoparticle formation on discharge properties in argon-acetylene capacitively coupled radio frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Th.; Hinz, A. M.; Faupel, F.; Strunskus, T.; Kersten, H.; Meichsner, J.

    2016-02-01

    This contribution presents experimental results regarding the influence of nanoparticle formation in capacitively coupled radio frequency (13.56 MHz) argon-acetylene plasmas. The discharge is studied using non-invasive 160 GHz Gaussian beam microwave interferometry and optical emission spectroscopy. Particularly, the temporal behavior of the electron density from microwave interferometry is analyzed and compared with the changing plasma emission and self-bias voltage caused by nanoparticle formation. The periodic particle formation with a cycle duration between 30 s and 140 s starts with an electron density drop over more than one order of magnitude below the detection limit (8 × 1014 m-3). The electron density reduction is the result of electron attachment processes due to negative ions and nanoparticle formation. The onset time constant of nanoparticle formation is five times faster compared to the expulsion of the particles from the plasma due to multi-disperse size distribution. Moreover, the intensity of the argon transition lines increases and implies a rising effective electron temperature. The cycle duration of the particle formation is affected by the total gas flow rate and exhibits an inverse proportionality to the square of the total gas flow rate. The variation in the total gas flow rate influences the force balance, which determines the confinement time of the nanoparticles. As a further result, the cycle duration is dependent on the axial position of the powered electrode, which also corresponds to different distances relative to the fixed optical axis of the microwave interferometer.

  18. Diameter control of carbon nanotubes using argon-acetylene mixture and their application as IR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Rana Arslan; Afrin, Rahat; Manzoor, Umair; Bhatti, Arshad Saleem; Islam, Mohammad; Amin, Muhammad T.; Alazba, Abdulrahman A.

    2015-08-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown via pyrolytic chemical vapor deposition technique and explored for their infrared sensing behavior. CNT synthesis was carried out over cobalt zinc ferrite (Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4) catalyst nanoparticles under different gas flow conditions to control outside diameter of the nanotubes. It was found that a progressive decrease in the carbon precursor gas (acetylene in this case) from 5:1 to 9:1 (v/v) causes reduction of average CNT diameter from 85 nm to 635 nm. Growth conditions involving higher temperatures yield nanotubes/nanofibers with outer diameter of >500 nm, presumably due to surface aggregation of nanoparticles or increased flux of carbonaceous species at the catalyst surface or both. Current-voltage characteristics of the nanotubes depending on the CNT diameter, revealed linear or nonlinear behavior. When incorporated as sensing layer, the sensitivity of ˜5.3 was noticed with response time of ˜4.1 s. It is believed that IR sensing characteristics of such CNT-based detectors can be further enhanced through post-synthesis purification and chemical functionalization treatments.

  19. Nitrous oxide reduction in nodules: denitrification or N/sub 2/ fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, M.S.; Focht, D.D.

    1987-05-01

    Detached cowpea nodules that contained a nitrous oxide reductase-positive (Nor/sup +/) rhizobium strain (8A55) and a nitrous oxide reductase-negative (Nor/sup -/) rhizobium strain (32H1) were incubated with 1% /sup 15/N/sub 2/O (95 atom% /sup 15/N) in the following three atmospheres: aerobic with C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ (10%), aerobic without C/sub 2/H/sub 2/, and anaerobic (argon atmosphere) without C/sub 2/H/sub 2/. The greatest production of /sup 15/N/sub 2/ occurred anaerobically with 8A55, yet very little was formed with 32H1. Although acetylene reduction activity was slightly higher with 32H1, about 10 times more /sup 15/N/sub 2/ was produced aerobically by 8A55 than by 32H1 in the absence of acetylene. The major reductive pathway of N/sub 2/O reduction by denitrifying rhizobium strain 8A55 is by nitrous oxide reductase rather than nitrogenase.

  20. Reduction of helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise by active rotor control technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean; Brooks, Thomas F.

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade-vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations.

  1. Activation energies for oxygen reduction on platinum alloys: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Alfred B; Roques, Jérôme; Mukerjee, Sanjeev; Murthi, Vivek S; Markovic, Nenad M; Stamenkovic, Vojislav

    2005-01-27

    A combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the electrode potential dependencies of activation energies is presented for the first step in oxygen reduction over platinum and platinum alloy catalysts in both polycrystalline and carbon supported form. Tafel data for several of the catalysts are used to predict potential-dependent activation energies for oxygen reduction over the 0.6-0.9 V range in strong and weak acid. Comparisons with the theoretical curve show good agreement above 0.8 V, suggesting a fairly constant preexponential factor. Arrhenius determinations of activation energies over the 0.7-0.9 V range yield little trend for weak acid, possibly because of the larger uncertainties in the Arrhenius fits, but the strong acid results have smaller uncertainties and for them the measured activation energies trend up with potential. PMID:16851081

  2. Reduction of Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise by Active Rotor Control Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Brooks, Thomas F.; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  3. Adsorption of Acetylene on a Pd-Pb Bimetallic Surface — a Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferullo, R. M.; Touroude, R.; Castellani, N. J.

    A semiempirical molecular orbital study of acetylene adsorption over Pd(111) and Pd3Pb(111) has been performed. A strong negative effect of Pb atoms on Pd chemisorptive strength was observed in the alloy. This behavior is related to a lower hybridization between acetylene π* and Pd orbitals when this mental interacts with Pb. Moreover this negative effect of Pb is of a strong local character.

  4. QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS FOR CHEMICAL REDUCTIONS OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sufficient kinetic data on abiotic reduction reactions involving organic contaminants are now available that quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for these reactions can be developed. Over 50 QSARs have been reported, most in just the last few years, and they ar...

  5. RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES FOR EXISTING DETACHED HOUSES - TECHNICAL GUIDANCE (THIRD EDITION) FOR ACTIVE SOIL DEPRESSURIZATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical guidance document is designed to aid in the selection, design, installation and operation of indoor radon reduction techniques using soil depressurization in existing houses. Its emphasis is on active soil depressurization; i.e., on systems that use a fan to depre...

  6. Aminotroponiminates as tunable, redox-active ligands: reversible single electron transfer and reductive dimerisation.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, C; Krummenacher, I

    2016-08-21

    Aminotroponiminates (atis) are shown to be redox-active ligands. Under strongly reducing conditions, the result of electron transfer can be controlled by the choice of the metal bound to the ati ligand. Either reversible electron transfer or a reductively induced dimerisation is observed. The latter reaction is (regio- and diastereo-) selective and chemically reversible. PMID:27452905

  7. Cubic anatase TiO2 nanocrystals with enhanced photocatalytic CO2 reduction activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Quanlong; Yu, Jiaguo; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Jinfeng; Liu, Gang

    2015-05-01

    Single-crystalline anatase TiO2 nanocubes with exposed {100} and {001} facets, prepared by hydrothermal and calcination methods, display especially high photocatalytic activity toward CO2 reduction to methane and methanol, due to the synergistic effects of better crystallization, a more negative conduction band position and co-exposed {100} and {001} facets. PMID:25864947

  8. Nickel-catalyzed reductive arylation of activated alkynes with aryl iodides

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Stephanie C. M.; Olsen, Andrew K; Kelemen, Rachel E.; Shrestha, Ruja; Weix, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The direct, regioselective, and stereoselective arylation of activated alkynes with aryl iodides using a nickel catalyst and manganese reductant is described. The reaction conditions are mild (40 °C in MeOH, no acid or base) and an intermediate organomanganese reagent is unlikely. Functional groups tolerated include halides and pseudohalides, free and protected anilines, and a benzyl alcohol. Other activated alkynes including an amide and a ketone also reacted to form arylated products in good yields. PMID:26028781

  9. Active breathing control (ABC): Determination and reduction of breathing-induced organ motion in the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Gagel, Bernd . E-mail: BGagel@UKAachen.de; Demirel, Cengiz M.P.; Kientopf, Aline; Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc; Stanzel, Sven; Breuer, Christian; Asadpour, Branka; Jansen, Thomas; Holy, Richard; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Eble, Michael J.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases starting at the same couch position without patient movement. Threshold levels were set at minimum and maximum volume during normal breathing cycles and at a volume defined as shallow breathing, reflecting the subjective maximal tolerable reduction of breath volume. To evaluate the extent of organ movement, 13 landmarks were considering using commercial software for image coregistration. In 4 patients, second examinations were performed during therapy. Results: Investigating the differences in a normal breathing cycle versus shallow breathing, a statistically significant reduction of respiratory motion in the upper, middle, and lower regions of the chest could be detected, representing potential movement reduction achieved through reduced breath volume. Evaluating interfraction reproducibility, the mean displacement ranged between 0.24 mm (chest wall/tracheal bifurcation) to 3.5 mm (diaphragm) for expiration and shallow breathing and 0.24 mm (chest wall) to 5.25 mm (diaphragm) for normal inspiration. Conclusions: By modifying regularity of the respiratory cycle through reduction of breath volume, a significant and reproducible reduction of chest and diaphragm motion is possible, enabling reduction of treatment planning margins.

  10. Influence of sulfur oxyanions on reductive dehalogenation activities in Desulfomonile tiedjei.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, G T; Suflita, J M

    1997-01-01

    The inhibition of aryl reductive dehalogenation reactions by sulfur oxyanions has been demonstrated in environmental samples, dehalogenating enrichments, and the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfomonile tiedjei; however, this phenomenon is not well understood. We examined the effects of sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate on reductive dehalogenation in the model microorganism D. tiedjei and found separate mechanisms of inhibition due to these oxyanions under growth versus nongrowth conditions. Dehalogenation activity was greatly reduced in extracts of cells grown in the presence of both 3-chlorobenzoate, the substrate or inducer for the aryl dehalogenation activity, and either sulfate, sulfite, or thiosulfate, indicating that sulfur oxyanions repress the requisite enzymes. In extracts of fully induced cells, thiosulfate and sulfite, but not sulfate, were potent inhibitors of aryl dehalogenation activity even in membrane fractions lacking the cytoplasmically located sulfur oxyanion reductase. These results suggest that under growth conditions, sulfur oxyanions serve as preferred electron acceptors and negatively influence dehalogenation activity in D. tiedjei by regulating the amount of active aryl dehalogenase in cells. Additionally, in vitro inhibition by sulfur oxyanions is due to the interaction of the reactive species with enzymes involved in dehalogenation and need not involve competition between two respiratory processes for reducing equivalents. Sulfur oxyanions also inhibited tetrachloroethylene dehalogenation by the same mechanisms, further indicating that chloroethylenes are fortuitously dehalogenated by the aryl dehalogenase. The commonly observed inhibition of reductive dehalogenation reactions under sulfate-reducing conditions may be due to similar regulation mechanisms in other dehalogenating microorganisms that contain multiple respiratory activities. PMID:9293011

  11. Tunable thermal conductivity in carbon allotrope sheets: Role of acetylenic linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Ai-Juan; Tang, Yuansheng

    2015-11-01

    The versatility of carbon in forming the hybridization states allows one to design more carbon allotropes with various fascinating properties by replacing some aromatic bonds with acetylenic linkages. We investigate thermal conductivities of carbon allotrope sheets with different configurations by nonequilibrium molecular dynamic simulations. It is found that the acetylenic linkages not only considerably reduce thermal conductivity but also can effectively tune thermal conductivity through the various bonding methods. We suggest that the structure of stripes of benzene rings transversely bonded with the acetylenic linkages can potentially be one of high thermoelectric materials. We find that the reason for the manipulation of thermal conductivity by the acetylenic linkage can be attributed to the strong localizations of phonon modes that result in the reduced phonon group velocity and the shortened lifetime of phonons. It is also observed that thermal conductivity of graphyne sheet shows a power-law divergence with respect to the length. We propose a new approach to manipulating thermal conductivities in the carbon allotropes through the assembling of acetylenic linkages. Our findings conclusively clarify the role of acetylenic linkages in thermal transport and offer some valuable insights into the exploration of new thermoelectric materials as well as the experimental control of heat flux.

  12. A porous metal-organic framework with ultrahigh acetylene uptake capacity under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jiandong; Jiang, Feilong; Wu, Mingyan; Liu, Caiping; Su, Kongzhao; Lu, Weigang; Yuan, Daqiang; Hong, Maochun

    2015-01-01

    Acetylene, an important petrochemical raw material, is very difficult to store safely under compression because of its highly explosive nature. Here we present a porous metal-organic framework named FJI-H8, with both suitable pore space and rich open metal sites, for efficient storage of acetylene under ambient conditions. Compared with existing reports, FJI-H8 shows a record-high gravimetric acetylene uptake of 224 cm(3) (STP) g(-1) and the second-highest volumetric uptake of 196 cm(3) (STP) cm(-3) at 295 K and 1 atm. Increasing the storage temperature to 308 K has only a small effect on its acetylene storage capacity (∼200 cm(3) (STP) g(-1)). Furthermore, FJI-H8 exhibits an excellent repeatability with only 3.8% loss of its acetylene storage capacity after five cycles of adsorption-desorption tests. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation reveals that not only open metal sites but also the suitable pore space and geometry play key roles in its remarkable acetylene uptake. PMID:26123775

  13. A porous metal-organic framework with ultrahigh acetylene uptake capacity under ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jiandong; Jiang, Feilong; Wu, Mingyan; Liu, Caiping; Su, Kongzhao; Lu, Weigang; Yuan, Daqiang; Hong, Maochun

    2015-01-01

    Acetylene, an important petrochemical raw material, is very difficult to store safely under compression because of its highly explosive nature. Here we present a porous metal-organic framework named FJI-H8, with both suitable pore space and rich open metal sites, for efficient storage of acetylene under ambient conditions. Compared with existing reports, FJI-H8 shows a record-high gravimetric acetylene uptake of 224 cm3 (STP) g−1 and the second-highest volumetric uptake of 196 cm3 (STP) cm−3 at 295 K and 1 atm. Increasing the storage temperature to 308 K has only a small effect on its acetylene storage capacity (∼200 cm3 (STP) g−1). Furthermore, FJI-H8 exhibits an excellent repeatability with only 3.8% loss of its acetylene storage capacity after five cycles of adsorption–desorption tests. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation reveals that not only open metal sites but also the suitable pore space and geometry play key roles in its remarkable acetylene uptake. PMID:26123775

  14. Lewis Base Activation of Silyl Acetals: Iridium-Catalyzed Reductive Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons Olefination.

    PubMed

    Dakarapu, Udaya Sree; Bokka, Apparao; Asgari, Parham; Trog, Gabriela; Hua, Yuanda; Nguyen, Hiep H; Rahman, Nawal; Jeon, Junha

    2015-12-01

    A Lewis base promoted deprotonative pronucleophile addition to silyl acetals has been developed and applied to the iridium-catalyzed reductive Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons (HWE) olefination of esters and the chemoselective reduction of the resulting enoates. Lewis base activation of silyl acetals generates putative pentacoordinate silicate acetals, which fragment into aldehydes, silanes, and alkoxides in situ. Subsequent deprotonative metalation of phosphonate esters followed by HWE with aldehydes furnishes enoates. This operationally convenient, mechanistically unique protocol converts the traditionally challenging aryl, alkenyl, and alkynyl esters to homologated enoates at room temperature within a single vessel. PMID:26566189

  15. Intracellular reduction/activation of a disulfide switch in thiosemicarbazone iron chelators.

    PubMed

    Akam, Eman A; Chang, Tsuhen M; Astashkin, Andrei V; Tomat, Elisa

    2014-10-01

    Iron scavengers (chelators) offer therapeutic opportunities in anticancer drug design by targeting the increased demand for iron in cancer cells as compared to normal cells. Prochelation approaches are expected to avoid systemic iron depletion as chelators are liberated under specific intracellular conditions. In the strategy described herein, a disulfide linkage is employed as a redox-directed switch within the binding unit of an antiproliferative thiosemicarbazone prochelator, which is activated for iron coordination following reduction to the thiolate chelator. In glutathione redox buffer, this reduction event occurs at physiological concentrations and half-cell potentials. Consistent with concurrent reduction and activation, higher intracellular thiol concentrations increase cell susceptibility to prochelator toxicity in cultured cancer cells. The reduction of the disulfide switch and intracellular iron chelation are confirmed in cell-based assays using calcein as a fluorescent probe for paramagnetic ions. The resulting low-spin Fe(III) complex is identified in intact Jurkat cells by EPR spectroscopy measurements, which also document a decreased concentration of active ribonucleotide reductase following exposure to the prochelator. Cell viability and fluorescence-based assays show that the iron complex presents low cytotoxicity and does not participate in intracellular redox chemistry, indicating that this antiproliferative chelation strategy does not rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:25100578

  16. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an active control surface located on the blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1992-01-01

    A feasibility study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using individual blade control (IBC), which is implemented by an individually controlled aerodynamic surface located on each blade, is presented. For this exploratory study, a simple offset-hinged spring restrained model of the blade is used with fully coupled flap-lag-torsional dynamics for each blade. Deterministic controllers based on local and global system models are implemented to reduce 4/rev hub loads using both an actively controlled aerodynamic surface on each blade as well as conventional IBC, where the complete blade undergoes cyclic pitch change. The effectiveness of the two approaches for simultaneous reduction of the 4/rev hub shears and hub moments is compared. Conventional IBC requires considerably more power to achieve approximately the same level of vibration reduction as that obtained by implementing IBC using an active control surface located on the outboard segment of the blade. The effect of blade torsional flexibility on the vibration reduction effectiveness of the actively controlled surface was also considered and it was found that this parameter has a very substantial influence.

  17. Intracellular reduction/activation of a disulfide switch in thiosemicarbazone iron chelators

    PubMed Central

    Akam, Eman A.; Chang, Tsuhen M.; Astashkin, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Iron scavengers (chelators) offer therapeutic opportunities in anticancer drug design by targeting the increased demand for iron in cancer cells as compared to normal cells. Prochelation approaches are expected to avoid systemic iron depletion as chelators are liberated under specific intracellular conditions. In the strategy described herein, a disulfide linkage is employed as a redox-directed switch within the binding unit of an antiproliferative thiosemicarbazone prochelator, which is activated for iron coordination following reduction to the thiolate chelator. In glutathione redox buffer, this reduction event occurs at physiological concentrations and half-cell potentials. Consistent with concurrent reduction and activation, higher intracellular thiol concentrations increase cell susceptibility to prochelator toxicity in cultured cancer cells. The reduction of the disulfide switch and intracellular iron chelation are confirmed in cell-based assays using calcein as a fluorescent probe for paramagnetic ions. The resulting low-spin Fe(III) complex is identified in intact Jurkat cells by EPR spectroscopy measurements, which also document a decreased concentration of active ribonucleotide reductase following exposure to the prochelator. Cell viability and fluorescence-based assays show that the iron complex presents low cytotoxicity and does not participate in intracellular redox chemistry, indicating that this antiproliferative chelation strategy does not rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:25100578

  18. Trend in the Catalytic Activity of Transition Metals for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction by Lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Shelton Jr, William Allison; Xu, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the intrinsic activity of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Ir, and Ru for the oxygen reduction reaction by Li (Li-ORR) forms a volcano-like trend with respect to the adsorption energy of oxygen, with Pt and Pd being the most active. The trend is based on two mechanisms: the reduction of molecular O{sub 2} on Au and Ag and of atomic O on the remaining metals. Step edges are found to be more active for catalyzing the Li-ORR than close-packed surfaces. Our findings identify important considerations in the design of catalyst-promoted air cathodes for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

  19. Acetylene-chromene terminated resins as high temperature thermosets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godschalx, J. P.; Inbasekaran, M. N.; Bartos, B. R.; Scheck, D. M.; Laman, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    A novel phase transfer catalyzed process for the preparation of propargyl ethers has been developed. The propargyl ethers serve as precursors to a new class of thermosetting resins called acetylene-chromene terminated (ACT) resins. Heat treatment of a solution of propargyl ethers with various catalysts, followed by removal of solvent leads to the ACT resins via partial conversion of the propargyl ether groups to chromenes. This process reduces the energy content of the resin systems and reduces the amount of shrinkage found during cure. Due to the presence of the solvent the process is safe and gives rise to low viscosity products suitable for resin transfer molding and filament winding type applications. Due to the high glass transition temperature, high modulus, and low moisture uptake the cured resins display better than 232 C/wet performance. The thermal stability of the ACT resins in air at 204 C is superior to that of conventional bismaleimide resins. The resins also display excellent electrical properties.

  20. An improved processible acetylene-terminated polyimide for composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, A. L.; Naselow, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    The newest member of a family of thermosetting acetylene-substituted polyimide oligomers is HR600P. This oligomer is the isoimide version of the oligomer known as HR600P and Thermid 600. Although both types of material yield the same heat resistant end products after cure, HR600P has much superior processing characteristics. This attributed to its lower melting temperature (160 + or - 10 C, 320 + or - 20 F) in contrast to 202 C (396 F) for Thermid MC-600, its longer gel time at its processing temperature (16 to 30 minutes bvs 3 minutes), and its excellent solubility in low boiling solvents such as tetrahydrofuran, glymes, or 4:1 methyl ethyl ketone/toluene mixtures. These advantages provide more acceptable coating and impregnation procedures, allow for more complete removal at lower temperatures, provide a longer pot life or working time, and allow composite structure fabrication in conventional autoclaves used for epoxy composite curing. The excellent processing characteristics of HR600P allow its use in large area laminated structures, structural composites, and molding compositions.

  1. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aspartame and their catalytic activity for p-nitrophenol reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shufen; Yan, Songjing; Qi, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Cui, Jing; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrated a facile and environmental-friendly approach to form gold nanoparticles through the reduction of HAuCl4 by aspartame. The single-crystalline structure was illustrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results indicated that aspartame played a pivotal role in the reduction and stabilization of the gold crystals. The crystals were stabilized through the successive hydrogen-bonding network constructed between the water and aspartame molecules. Additionally, gold nanoparticles synthesized through aspartame were shown to have good catalytic activity for the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4.

  2. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aspartame and their catalytic activity for p-nitrophenol reduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shufen; Yan, Songjing; Qi, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Cui, Jing; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a facile and environmental-friendly approach to form gold nanoparticles through the reduction of HAuCl4 by aspartame. The single-crystalline structure was illustrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results indicated that aspartame played a pivotal role in the reduction and stabilization of the gold crystals. The crystals were stabilized through the successive hydrogen-bonding network constructed between the water and aspartame molecules. Additionally, gold nanoparticles synthesized through aspartame were shown to have good catalytic activity for the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4. PMID:25991916

  3. Reductive dehalogenation of disinfection byproducts by an activated carbon-based electrode system.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanqing; Kemper, Jerome M; Datuin, Gwen; Akey, Ann; Mitch, William A; Luthy, Richard G

    2016-07-01

    Low molecular weight, uncharged, halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are poorly removed by the reverse osmosis and advanced oxidation process treatment units often applied for further treatment of municipal wastewater for potable reuse. Granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment effectively sorbed 22 halogenated DBPs. Conversion of the GAC to a cathode within an electrolysis cell resulted in significant degradation of the 22 halogenated DBPs by reductive electrolysis at -1 V vs. Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE). The lowest removal efficiency over 6 h electrolysis was for trichloromethane (chloroform; 47%) but removal efficiencies were >90% for 13 of the 22 DBPs. In all cases, DBP degradation was higher than in electrolysis-free controls, and degradation was verified by the production of halides as reduction products. Activated carbons and charcoal were more effective than graphite for electrolysis, with graphite featuring poor sorption for the DBPs. A subset of halogenated DBPs (e.g., haloacetonitriles, chloropicrin) were degraded upon sorption to the GAC, even without electrolysis. Using chloropicrin as a model, experiments indicated that this loss was attributable to the partial reduction of sorbed chloropicrin from reducing equivalents in the GAC. Reducing equivalents depleted by these reactions could be restored when the GAC was treated by reductive electrolysis. GAC treatment of an advanced treatment train effluent for potable reuse effectively reduced the concentrations of chloroform, bromodichloromethane and dichloroacetonitrile measured in the column influent to below the method detection limits. Treatment of the GAC by reductive electrolysis at -1 V vs. SHE over 12 h resulted in significant degradation of the chloroform (63%), bromodichloromethane (96%) and dichloroacetonitrile (99%) accumulated on the GAC. The results suggest that DBPs in advanced treatment train effluents could be captured and degraded continuously by reductive electrolysis

  4. Suppression of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt-based electrocatalysts from ionomer incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Morimoto, Yu; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of Nafion on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is studied for Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C catalysts using thin-film rotating disk electrode (TF-RDE) methods in 0.1 M HClO4. Ultrathin uniform catalyst layers and standardized activity measurement protocols are employed to obtain accurate and reproducible ORR activity. Nafion lowers the ORR activity which plateaus with increasing loading on Pt catalysts. Pt particle size is found not to have significant influence on the extent of the SA decrease upon Nafion incorporation. Catalysts using high surface area carbon (HSC) support exhibit attenuated activity loss resulting from lower ionomer coverage on catalyst particles located within the deep pores. The impact of metallic composition on the activity loss due to Nafion incorporation is also discussed.

  5. Characterization of Microbial Activities and U Reduction in a Shallow Aquifer Contaminated by Uranium Mill Tailing

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Krumholz, Lee R.; Wong, D; Long, Philip E.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2003-05-21

    A Characterization of the Shiprock, NM, uranium mill tailing site focused on the geochemical and microbiological factors governing in-situ uranium-redox reactions. Groundwater and aqueous extracts of sediment samples contained a wide concentration range of sulfate, nitrate, and U(VI) with median values of 21.2 mM, 16.1um, and 2.7 um, respectively. Iron (III) was not detected in groundwater, but a median value of 0.3 mM in sediment extracts was measured. Bacterial diversity down gradient from the disposal pile reflected the predominant geochemistry with relatively high numbers of sulfate-and nitrate-reducing microorganisms, and smaller numbers of acetogenic, methanogenic, nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfide oxidizing bacteria. In aquifer slurry incubations, nitrate reduction was always preferred and had a negative impact on sulfate-, Fe(III)-, and U-reduction rates. We also found that sulfate-reduction rates decreased sharply in the presence of clay, while Fe(III)-reduction increased with no clear impact on U reduction. In the absence of clay, iron and sulfate reduction correlated with concentrations of Fe(III) and sulfate, respectively. Rates of U(VI) loss did not correlate with the concentration of any electron acceptor. With the exception of Fe(III), electron donor amendment was largely unsuccessful in stimulating electron acceptor loss over a 1-week incubation period, suggesting that endogenous forms of organic matter were sufficient to support microbial activity. Our findings suggest that efforts to accelerate biological U reduction should initially focus on stimulating nitrate removal.

  6. Experimental evaluation of leaky least-mean-square algorithms for active noise reduction in communication headsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartes, David A.; Ray, Laura R.; Collier, Robert D.

    2002-04-01

    An adaptive leaky normalized least-mean-square (NLMS) algorithm has been developed to optimize stability and performance of active noise cancellation systems. The research addresses LMS filter performance issues related to insufficient excitation, nonstationary noise fields, and time-varying signal-to-noise ratio. The adaptive leaky NLMS algorithm is based on a Lyapunov tuning approach in which three candidate algorithms, each of which is a function of the instantaneous measured reference input, measurement noise variance, and filter length, are shown to provide varying degrees of tradeoff between stability and noise reduction performance. Each algorithm is evaluated experimentally for reduction of low frequency noise in communication headsets, and stability and noise reduction performance are compared with that of traditional NLMS and fixed-leakage NLMS algorithms. Acoustic measurements are made in a specially designed acoustic test cell which is based on the original work of Ryan et al. [``Enclosure for low frequency assessment of active noise reducing circumaural headsets and hearing protection,'' Can. Acoust. 21, 19-20 (1993)] and which provides a highly controlled and uniform acoustic environment. The stability and performance of the active noise reduction system, including a prototype communication headset, are investigated for a variety of noise sources ranging from stationary tonal noise to highly nonstationary measured F-16 aircraft noise over a 20 dB dynamic range. Results demonstrate significant improvements in stability of Lyapunov-tuned LMS algorithms over traditional leaky or nonleaky normalized algorithms, while providing noise reduction performance equivalent to that of the NLMS algorithm for idealized noise fields.

  7. Experimental evaluation of leaky least-mean-square algorithms for active noise reduction in communication headsets.

    PubMed

    Cartes, David A; Ray, Laura R; Collier, Robert D

    2002-04-01

    An adaptive leaky normalized least-mean-square (NLMS) algorithm has been developed to optimize stability and performance of active noise cancellation systems. The research addresses LMS filter performance issues related to insufficient excitation, nonstationary noise fields, and time-varying signal-to-noise ratio. The adaptive leaky NLMS algorithm is based on a Lyapunov tuning approach in which three candidate algorithms, each of which is a function of the instantaneous measured reference input, measurement noise variance, and filter length, are shown to provide varying degrees of tradeoff between stability and noise reduction performance. Each algorithm is evaluated experimentally for reduction of low frequency noise in communication headsets, and stability and noise reduction performance are compared with that of traditional NLMS and fixed-leakage NLMS algorithms. Acoustic measurements are made in a specially designed acoustic test cell which is based on the original work of Ryan et al. ["Enclosure for low frequency assessment of active noise reducing circumaural headsets and hearing protection," Can. Acoust. 21, 19-20 (1993)] and which provides a highly controlled and uniform acoustic environment. The stability and performance of the active noise reduction system, including a prototype communication headset, are investigated for a variety of noise sources ranging from stationary tonal noise to highly nonstationary measured F-16 aircraft noise over a 20 dB dynamic range. Results demonstrate significant improvements in stability of Lyapunov-tuned LMS algorithms over traditional leaky or nonleaky normalized algorithms, while providing noise reduction performance equivalent to that of the NLMS algorithm for idealized noise fields. PMID:12002860

  8. Role of active site loop in coenzyme binding and flavin reduction in cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Mothersole, Robert G; Meints, Carla E; Louder, Alex; Wolthers, Kirsten R

    2016-09-15

    Cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) contains a loop within the active site (comprising Asp(634), Ala(635), Arg(636) and Asn(637); human CPR numbering) that relocates upon NADPH binding. Repositioning of the loop triggers the reorientation of an FAD-shielding tryptophan (Trp(679)) to a partially stacked conformer, reducing the energy barrier for displacement of the residue by the NADPH nicotinamide ring: an essential step for hydride transfer. We used site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis to investigate if the amino acid composition of the loop influences the catalytic properties of CPR. The D634A and D634N variants elicited a modest increase in coenzyme binding affinity coupled with a 36- and 10-fold reduction in cytochrome c(3+) turnover and a 17- and 3-fold decrease in the pre-steady state rate of flavin reduction. These results, in combination with a reduction in the kinetic isotope effect for hydride transfer, suggest that diminished activity is due to destabilization of the partially stacked conformer of Trp(677) and slower release of NADP(+). In contrast, R636A, R636S and an A635G/R636S double mutant led to a modest increase in cytochrome c(3+) reduction, which is linked to weaker coenzyme binding and faster interflavin electron transfer. A potential mechanism by which Arg(636) influences catalysis is discussed. PMID:27461959

  9. Highly active Pd-In/mesoporous alumina catalyst for nitrate reduction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenwei; Zhang, Yonggang; Li, Deyi; Werth, Charles J; Zhang, Yalei; Zhou, Xuefei

    2015-04-01

    The catalytic reduction of nitrate is a promising technology for groundwater purification because it transforms nitrate into nitrogen and water. Recent studies have mainly focused on new catalysts with higher activities for the reduction of nitrate. Consequently, metal nanoparticles supported on mesoporous metal oxides have become a major research direction. However, the complex surface chemistry and porous structures of mesoporous metal oxides lead to a non-uniform distribution of metal nanoparticles, thereby resulting in a low catalytic efficiency. In this paper, a method for synthesizing the sustainable nitrate reduction catalyst Pd-In/Al2O3 with a dimensional structure is introduced. The TEM results indicated that Pd and In nanoparticles could efficiently disperse into the mesopores of the alumina. At room temperature in CO2-buffered water and under continuous H2 as the electron donor, the synthesized material (4.9 wt% Pd) was the most active at a Pd-In ratio of 4, with a first-order rate constant (k(obs) = 0.241 L min(-1) g(cata)(-1)) that was 1.3× higher than that of conventional Pd-In/Al2O3 (5 wt% Pd; 0.19 L min(-1) g(cata)(-1)). The Pd-In/mesoporous alumina is a promising catalyst for improving the catalytic reduction of nitrate. PMID:25600582

  10. On the occurrence of anoxic microniches, denitrification, and sulfate reduction in aerated activated sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, A.; Santegoeds, C.M.; Nielsen, H.K.; Ploug, H.; Wagner, M.; Pribyl, M.; Wanner, J.; Amann, R.; De Beer, D.

    1999-09-01

    A combination of different methods was applied to investigate the occurrence of anaerobic processes in aerated activated sludge. Microsensor measurements (O{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and H{sub 2}S) were performed on single sludge flocs to detect anoxic niches, nitrate reduction, or sulfate reduction on a microscale. Incubations of activated sludge with {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} were used to determine denitrification and sulfate reduction rates on a batch scale. In four of six investigated sludges, no anoxic zones developed during aeration, and consequently denitrification rates were very low. However, in two sludges anoxia in flocs coincided with significant denitrification rates. Sulfate reduction could not be detected in any sludge in either the microsensor or the batch investigation, not even under short-term anoxic conditions. In contrast, the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria was shown by fluorescence in situ hybridization with 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and by PCR-based detection of genes coding for the dissimilatory sulfite reductase. A possible explanation for the absence of advection, i.e., facilitated by flow through pores and channels. This possibility is suggested by the irregularity of some oxygen profiles and by confocal laser scanning microscopy of the three-dimensional floc structures, which showed that flocs from the two sludges in which anoxic zones were found were apparently denser than flocs from the other sludges.

  11. Key amino acids of arabidopsis VKOR in the activity of phylloquinone reduction and disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Jian; Cui, Hao-Ran; Yu, Zhi-Bo; Du, Jia-Jia; Xu, Jia-Ning; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins in chloroplast are regulated through the disulfide bond/thiol transformation to realize their activities. A homologue of VKOR (Vitamin K epoxide reductase) in Arabidopsis chloroplast is found to catalyze the disulfide bond formation in vivo and to mediate the specific phylloquinone reduction in vitro. It is also called LTO1 (Lumen Thiol Oxidoreductase 1). Investigations about functions and essential amino acid residues of AtVKOR have important theoretical significance to clarify the chloroplast redox regulation mechanism. In this study, several amino acids in the VKOR domain of AtVKOR were identified to be involved in binding of phylloquinone. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to study the function of these positions. The results suggested that residues Ser77, Leu87, Phe137 and Leu141 were quite important in the binding and catalyzing the reduction of phylloquinone. These residues were also involved in the electron transferring and disulfide bond formation of substrate proteins by motility assays in vivo, suggesting that the binding of phylloquinone not only affected the delivery of electrons to phylloquinone but also affected the whole electron transfer process. The conserved cysteines in the AtVKOR domain also played critical roles in phylloquinone reduction. When each of the four conserved cysteines was mutated to alanine, the mutants lost reduction activity entirely, suggesting that the four conserved cysteines played crucial roles in the electron transfer process. PMID:25267254

  12. The adsorption of small hydrocarbons on Cu(111): A combined He-atom scattering and x-ray absorption study for ethane, ethylene, and acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, D.; Wacker, D.; Weiss, K.; Hermann, K.; Witko, M.; Wöll, Ch.

    1998-02-01

    Ethane (C2H6), ethylene (C2H4), and acetylene (C2H2) adsorbed on Cu (111) are investigated using high-resolution helium atom scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS). For C2H6/Cu(111) and C2H4/Cu(111) the excitation energies of the frustrated molecular translation normal to the surface (FTz) amount to 6.7 meV, suggesting the presence of a physisorbed species which is consistent with the NEXAFS data for ethylene. In contrast, for C2H2/Cu(111) the NEXAFS data indicate strong intramolecular distortions of the acetylene adsorbate compatible with a tilt of both CH ends away from the molecular axis. While the latter finding is in agreement with recent theoretical studies the theoretically predicted chemisorbed ethylene species could not be observed by the experiment. However, more detailed theoretical studies of the ethylene-Cu(111) interaction potential reveal two minima separated by an activation barrier. The minimum closer to the surface refers to strongly distorted chemisorbed C2H4 whereas the outer minimum is characterized by a free molecule-like physisorbed species. Thus the results from the present measurements are explained by the theoretically confirmed physisorbed species while chemisorbed C2H4 has to be excluded. Complementary results for ethylene and acetylene adsorbed on Pb(111) reveal a FTz-mode energy of 6.5 and 6.7 meV, respectively, thus revealing a much weaker acetylene-substrate binding than seen for Cu(111). Also in case of Pb(111) the FTz-mode showed an Einstein-like behavior with a flat dispersion curve, as for corresponding modes on the Cu(111)-substrate, see above.

  13. Shortened cecropin A-melittin hybrids. Significant size reduction retains potent antibiotic activity.

    PubMed

    Andreu, D; Ubach, J; Boman, A; Wåhlin, B; Wade, D; Merrifield, R B; Boman, H G

    1992-01-20

    We have earlier reported two 26-residue antibacterial peptides made up from different segments of cecropin A (CA) and melittin (M). We now report a substantial reduction in size at the C-terminal section of the highly active hybrid CA(1-8)M(1-18), leading to a series of 20-, 18- and 15-residue analogs with antibiotic properties similar to the larger molecule. In particular, the 15-residue hybrids CA(1-7)M(2-9), CA(1-7)M(4-11) and CA(1-7)M(5-12) are the shortest cecropin-based peptide antibiotics described so far, with antibacterial activity and spectra similar or better than cecropin A and a 60% reduction in size. Their reduced size and highly alpha-helical structure require an alternative mechanism for their interaction with bacterial membranes. PMID:1733777

  14. INVITED PAPER: Application of an active device for helicopter noise reduction in JAXA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shigeru; Kobiki, Noboru; Tanabe, Yasutada

    2010-02-01

    Important issues in noise problems for current helicopters are described. An active tab (AT) was developed as a new active device for noise/vibration reduction under research cooperation between Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Kawada Industries, Inc. The wind tunnel test was conducted in order to investigate the effectiveness of the AT on the aeroacoustic characteristics of a helicopter. From the wind tunnel test, the capability of reducing blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise by an AT was verified. A new control law using instantaneous pressure change on a blade during BVI phenomena was introduced and applied to the wind tunnel testing. This new control law shows reasonable controllability for helicopter noise reduction. Furthermore, in order to analyze noise characteristics, the advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code named JAXA_ov3d was developed in JAXA and extended to include CFD-CSD (computational structure dynamics) coupling by using the beam theory for blade deformation.

  15. Dioxygen Binding, Activation, and Reduction to H2O by Cu Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Edward I

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen intermediates in copper enzymes exhibit unique spectroscopic features that reflect novel geometric and electronic structures that are key to reactivity. This perspective will describe: (1) the bonding origin of the unique spectroscopic features of the coupled binuclear copper enzymes and how this overcomes the spin forbiddenness of O2 binding and activates monooxygenase activity, (2) how the difference in exchange coupling in the non-coupled binuclear Cu enzymes controls the reaction mechanism, and (3) how the trinuclear Cu cluster present in the multicopper oxidases leads to a major structure/function difference in enabling the irreversible reductive cleavage of the O-O bond with little overpotential and generating a fully oxidized intermediate, different from the resting enzyme studied by crystallography, that is key in enabling fast PCET in the reductive half of the catalytic cycle. PMID:27299802

  16. Depressive symptoms among older adults: long-term reduction after a physical activity intervention.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; Konopack, James F; McAuley, Edward; Elavsky, Steriani; Jerome, Gerald J; Marquez, David X

    2005-08-01

    We examined the effects of two physical activity modes on depressive symptoms over a 5-year period among older adults and change in physical self-esteem as a mediator of changes in depressive symptoms. Formerly sedentary, older adults (N = 174) were randomly assigned into 6-month conditions of either walking or low-intensity resistance/flexibility training. Depressive symptoms and physical self-esteem were measured before and after the 6-month intervention, and 12 and 60 months after intervention initiation. Depressive symptoms scores were decreased immediately after the intervention, followed by a sustained reduction for 12 and 60 months after intervention initiation; there was no differential pattern of change between the physical activity modes. Change in physical self-esteem predicted change in depressive symptoms. This study supports the effectiveness of an exercise intervention for the sustained reduction of depressive symptoms among sedentary older adults and physical self-esteem as a potential mediator of this effect. PMID:16049630

  17. Reduction of Floor Shock Vibration by Active Momentum Exchange Impact Damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Lovely; Yamada, Keisuke; Hara, Susumu; Utsuno, Hideo; Matsuhisa, Hiroshi

    This paper proposes an active control type of momentum exchange impact damper (AMEID) and its application to reducing shock vibration of the floor. The floor is modeled as a one-degree-of-freedom system. The active component of AMEID is realized by using a linear motor. The controller design of AMEID is based on the LQR optimal control theory. The simulation results show that the performance of AMEID is not affected by the mass ratio. In addition, the performance of AMEID is compared with the conventional passive momentum exchange impact damper (PMEID), the active mass damper (AMD) and the conventional active control method in reducing the floor shock vibration. It is shown that the shock reduction performance obtained by AMEID is larger than that obtained by PMEID. The power consumption and the stroke of the actuator for AMEID are lower than those of AMD. Furthermore, the transmitted force obtained by AMEID is smaller than that of the conventional active control.

  18. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  19. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water. PMID:23389344

  20. Effect of the mechanical activation on size reduction of crystalline acetaminophen drug particles.

    PubMed

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Beitollahi, Ali; Rezayat, S Mehdi; Forati, Tahmineh; Asefnejad, Azadeh; Rahimi, Mehdi; Zeinali, Reza; Ardeshir, Mahmoud; Hatamjafari, Farhad; Sahebalzamani, Ali; Heidari, Majid

    2009-01-01

    The decrease in particle size may offer new properties to drugs. In this study, we investigated the size reduction influence of the acetaminophen (C(8)H(9)O(2)N) particles by mechanical activation using a dry ball mill. The activated samples with the average size of 1 microm were then investigated in different time periods with the infrared (IR), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The results of the IR and XRD images showed no change in the drug structure after the mechanical activation of all samples. With the peak height at full width at half maximum from XRD and the Scherrer equation, the size of the activated crystallite samples illustrated that the AFM images were in sound agreement with the Scherrer equation. According to the peaks of the AFM images, the average size of the particles in 30 hours of activation was 24 nm with a normal particle distribution. The ICP analysis demonstrated the presence of tungsten carbide particle impurities after activation from the powder sample impacting with the ball and jar. The greatest reduction in size was after milling for 30 hours. PMID:20054432

  1. Highly branched PtCu bimetallic alloy nanodendrites with superior electrocatalytic activities for oxygen reduction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Shaofang; Zhu, Chengzhou; Shi, Qiurong; Xia, Haibing; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-02-01

    Morphology control is a promising strategy to improve the catalytic performance of Pt-based catalysts. In this work, we reported a facile synthesis of PtCu bimetallic alloy nanodendrites using Brij 58 as a template. The highly branched structures and porous features offer relatively large surface areas, which is beneficial to the enhancement of the catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reactions in fuel cells. In addition, the elimination of carbon supports showed an important effect on the stability of the catalysts. By tuning the ratio of Pt and Cu precursors, PtCu nanodendrites were almost four times more active on the basis of an equivalent Pt mass for oxygen reduction reactions than the commercial Pt/C catalyst.Morphology control is a promising strategy to improve the catalytic performance of Pt-based catalysts. In this work, we reported a facile synthesis of PtCu bimetallic alloy nanodendrites using Brij 58 as a template. The highly branched structures and porous features offer relatively large surface areas, which is beneficial to the enhancement of the catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reactions in fuel cells. In addition, the elimination of carbon supports showed an important effect on the stability of the catalysts. By tuning the ratio of Pt and Cu precursors, PtCu nanodendrites were almost four times more active on the basis of an equivalent Pt mass for oxygen reduction reactions than the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07682j

  2. A General Method for Multimetallic Platinum Alloy Nanowires as Highly Active and Stable Oxygen Reduction Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Yao, Jianlin; Guo, Jun; Lu, Gang; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2015-11-25

    An unconventional class of high-performance Pt alloy multimetallic nanowires (NWs) is produced by a general method. The obtained PtNi NWs exhibit amazingly specific and mass oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities with improvement factors of 51.1 and 34.6 over commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively, and are also stable in ORR conditions, making them among the most efficient electrocatalysts for ORR. PMID:26459261

  3. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Sphaerotilus natans a filamentous micro-organism present in activated sludges.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, Alejandro H; Giannuzzi, Leda; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2008-08-15

    Wastewaters produced by various industries may contain undesirable amounts of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), as chromate and dichromate, a hazardous metal affecting flora and animals of aquatic ecosystems as well as human health. One removal strategy comprises the microbial reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), a less soluble chemical species that is less toxic than Cr(VI). In this work, the ability to reduce Cr(VI) of Sphaerotilus natans, a filamentous bacterium usually found in activated sludge systems, was evaluated. In aerobic conditions, S. natans was able to efficiently reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) from dichromate solutions ranging between 4.5 and 80 mg Cr(VI)l(-1) in the presence of a carbonaceous source. A simultaneous evaluation of the microbial respiratory activity inhibition was also carried out to analyze the toxic effect of Cr(VI). Cr(VI) reduction by S. natans was mathematically modeled; chromium(VI) reduction rate depended on both Cr(VI) concentration and active biomass concentration. Although it is known that S. natans removes heavy metal cations such as Cr(III) by biosorption, the ability of this micro-organism to reduce Cr(VI), which behaves as an oxyanion in aqueous solutions, is a novel finding. The distinctive capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) than remain soluble or precipitated becomes S. natans a potential micro-organism to decontaminate wastewaters. PMID:18215460

  4. Enhanced Activity of Nanocrystalline Zeolites for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah C. Larson; Vicki H. Grassian

    2006-12-31

    Nanocrystalline zeolites with discrete crystal sizes of less than 100 nm have different properties relative to zeolites with larger crystal sizes. Nanocrystalline zeolites have improved mass transfer properties and very large internal and external surface areas that can be exploited for many different applications. The additional external surface active sites and the improved mass transfer properties of nanocrystalline zeolites offer significant advantages for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysis with ammonia as a reductant in coal-fired power plants relative to current zeolite based SCR catalysts. Nanocrystalline NaY was synthesized with a crystal size of 15-20 nm and was thoroughly characterized using x-ray diffraction, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Copper ions were exchanged into nanocrystalline NaY to increase the catalytic activity. The reactions of nitrogen dioxides (NO{sub x}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) on nanocrystalline NaY and CuY were investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy. Significant conversion of NO{sub 2} was observed at room temperature in the presence of NH{sub 3} as monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy. Copper-exchanged nanocrystalline NaY was more active for NO{sub 2} reduction with NH{sub 3} relative to nanocrystalline NaY.

  5. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm-2) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  6. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm(-2)) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst. PMID:25229121

  7. Stable platinum nanoclusters on genomic DNA–graphene oxide with a high oxygen reduction reaction activity

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Jitendra N.; Nath, Krishna; Kumar, Susheel; Tiwari, Rajanish N.; Kemp, K. Christian; Le, Nhien H.; Youn, Duck Hyun; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Kwang S.

    2013-01-01

    Nanosize platinum clusters with small diameters of 2–4 nm are known to be excellent catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. The inherent catalytic activity of smaller platinum clusters has not yet been reported due to a lack of preparation methods to control their size (<2 nm). Here we report the synthesis of platinum clusters (diameter ≤1.4 nm) deposited on genomic double-stranded DNA–graphene oxide composites, and their high-performance electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. The electrochemical behaviour, characterized by oxygen reduction reaction onset potential, half-wave potential, specific activity, mass activity, accelerated durability test (10,000 cycles) and cyclic voltammetry stability (10,000 cycles) is attributed to the strong interaction between the nanosize platinum clusters and the DNA–graphene oxide composite, which induces modulation in the electronic structure of the platinum clusters. Furthermore, we show that the platinum cluster/DNA–graphene oxide composite possesses notable environmental durability and stability, vital for high-performance fuel cells and batteries. PMID:23900456

  8. Two-dimensional structure Au nanosheets are super active for the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Cui, Zhimin; Li, Lidong; Guo, Lin; Yang, Shihe

    2015-06-14

    Two-dimensional structure Au nanosheets with a polygon morphology and controlled thicknesses of ∼15 nm, ∼35 nm, and ∼50 nm were successfully synthesized by a one-step solution reduction method. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SEAD) analyses, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to thoroughly study the structure and the formation mechanism of the nanosheets. The catalytic activity of the Au nanosheets was investigated for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. Against all expectation, the Au nanosheets with such a big lateral (more than 1 μm) size exhibited superior catalytic activity on the selective reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) in the presence of NaBH4. On the other hand, the catalytic activity does closely depend on the thickness of the nanosheets; that is, it decreases with increasing thickness. The reaction can be completed in less than 1 min when catalyzed by Au nanosheets about 15 nm thick. The 100% conversion efficiency was further demonstrated after two catalytic cycles with the thinnest Au nanosheets. PMID:25971868

  9. Catalytic Activity of Platinum Monolayer on Iridium and Rhenium Alloy Nanoparticles for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karan, Hiroko I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Kuttiyiel, Kurian; Farberow, Carrie A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2012-05-04

    A new type of electrocatalyst with a core–shell structure that consists of a platinum monolayer shell placed on an iridium–rhenium nanoparticle core or platinum and palladium bilayer shell deposited on that core has been prepared and tested for electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. Carbon-supported iridium–rhenium alloy nanoparticles with several different molar ratios of Ir to Re were prepared by reducing metal chlorides dispersed on Vulcan carbon with hydrogen gas at 400 °C for 1 h. These catalysts showed specific electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction comparable to that of platinum. The activities of PtML/PdML/Ir2Re1, PtML/Pd2layers/Ir2Re1, and PtML/Pd2layers/Ir7Re3 catalysts were, in fact, better than that of conventional platinum electrocatalysts, and their mass activities exceeded the 2015 DOE target. Our density functional theory calculations revealed that the molar ratio of Ir to Re affects the binding strength of adsorbed OH and, thereby, the O2 reduction activity of the catalysts. The maximum specific activity was found for an intermediate OH binding energy with the corresponding catalyst on the top of the volcano plot. The monolayer concept facilitates the use of much less platinum than in other approaches. Finally, the results with the PtML/PdML/Ir2Re electrocatalyst indicate that it is a promising alternative to conventional Pt electrocatalysts in low-temperature fuel cells.

  10. A Strategy to Promote the Electrocatalytic Activity of Spinels for Oxygen Reduction by Structure Reversal.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guangping; Wang, Jun; Ding, Wei; Nie, Yao; Li, Li; Qi, Xueqiang; Chen, Siguo; Wei, Zidong

    2016-01-22

    The electrocatalytic performance of a spinel for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) can be significantly promoted by reversing its crystalline structure from the normal to the inverse. As the spinel structure reversed, the activation and cleavage of O-O bonds are accelerated owing to a dissimilarity effect of the distinct metal atoms co-occupying octahedral sites. The Co(II)Fe(III)Co(III)O4 spinel with the Fe and Co co-occupying inverse structure exhibits an excellent ORR activity, which even exceeds that of the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C by 42 mV in alkaline medium. PMID:26663768

  11. Ag–Fe2O3 nanocomposites with enhanced catalytic activity for reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shiben; Chen, Yingjie; Dong, Lifeng

    2016-07-01

    Hybrid nanostructures can be multifunctional and even possess enhanced properties. Ag–Fe2O3 nanocomposites and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were fabricated and applied to catalyze the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. Compared with Ag NPs, Ag–Fe2O3 nanocomposites demonstrated enhanced catalytic activities. Furthermore, due to their magnetic properties, Ag–Fe2O3 nanocomposites could be easily separated from the reaction mixture and recycled through an external magnetic field. These findings will help us design hybrid nanostructures with catalytic activity and explore other potential applications of magnetic nanocomposites.

  12. Structure-activity relationship in high-performance iron-based electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ping; Wang, Ying; Pan, Jing; Xu, Weilin; Zhuang, Lin

    2015-12-01

    A sustainable Iron (Fe), Nitrogen (N) co-doped high performance Fe-Nx/C electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is synthesized simply based on nitric acid oxidation of cheap carbon black. The obtained optimal nonprecious metal electrocatalyst shows high ORR performance in both alkaline and acidic conditions and possesses appreciable performance/price ratio due to its low cost. Furthermore, the structure-activity relationship of different active sites on Fe-Nx/C is revealed systematically: Fe-N4/2-C > Fe4-N-C > N-C >> Fe4-C ≥ C, from both experimental and theoretical points of view.

  13. New stereoselective titanium reductive amination synthesis of 3-amino and polyaminosterol derivatives possessing antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Salmi, Chanaz; Loncle, Celine; Vidal, Nicolas; Letourneux, Yves; Brunel, Jean Michel

    2008-03-01

    A series of 3-amino and polyaminosterol analogues of squalamine and trodusquemine were synthesized involving a new stereoselective titanium reductive amination reaction in high chemical yields of up to 95% in numerous cases. These derivatives were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial properties against human pathogens. Activity was highly dependent on the different compounds' structures involved and best results have been obtained with aminosterol derivatives 4b, 4e and 6i exhibiting activities against yeasts, Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria at average concentrations of 6.25-12.5 microg/mL. PMID:17566609

  14. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Acetylene and Ethane Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Marla H.; Ferrante, R. F.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, W. J.

    2012-10-01

    Hydrocarbon-containing ices have characteristic absorption bands in both the mid- and near-infrared spectral regions, yet accurate optical constants are not available for most of these molecules. Ices with a hydrocarbon component have been identified on several TNOs (1) and the presence of volatiles, such as hydrocarbons, is inferred for intermediate or large TNOs based on sublimation models (2, 3). In our laboratory we recently have undertaken low-temperature spectroscopic studies of C2 hydrocarbons. We report IR spectra for acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) ice in both the amorphous and crystalline phases at multiple temperatures. We include measurements of the refractive index at 670 nm for both the amorphous and crystalline phases of each ice. The optical constants, the real (n) and imaginary (k) components of the complex index of refraction, were determined from 7000 - 400 cm-1 (1.4 - 25 microns) at multiple temperatures using a Kramers-Kronig analysis. A goal of the present work is to provide a data base of optical constants of C2 molecules similar to that of Hudgins et al. (4) and Moore et al. (5). These values, as well as our calculated individual band strengths, will have great practical importance for the ongoing analysis of TNO spectra. (1) Brown, M.E. et al., Astron J., 133, 284, 2007. (2) Delsanti, A. et al., A&A, 52, A40, 2010. (3) Schaller, E. L. & Brown, M. E., ApJ, 659, L61, 2007. (4) Hudgins, D. M. et al., ApJS, 86, 713, 1993. (5) Moore, M. H. et al., ApJS, 191, 96, 2010. This work is supported by NASA’s Planetary Atmospheres, Outer Planets, and Cassini Data Analysis programs, and The Goddard Center for Astrobiology.

  15. Ionization of large homogeneous and heterogeneous clusters generated in acetylene-Ar expansions: Cluster ion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kocisek, J.; Lengyel, J.; Farnik, M.

    2013-03-28

    Pure acetylene and mixed Ar-acetylene clusters are formed in supersonic expansions of acetylene/argon mixtures and analysed using reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer with variable electron energy ionization source. Acetylene clusters composed of more than a hundred acetylene molecules are generated at the acetylene concentration of Almost-Equal-To 8%, while mixed species are produced at low concentrations ( Almost-Equal-To 0.7%). The electron energy dependence of the mass spectra revealed the ionization process mechanisms in clusters. The ionization above the threshold for acetylene molecule of 11.5 eV results in the main ionic fragment progression (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}{sup +}. At the electron energies Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 21.5 eV above the CH+CH{sup +} dissociative ionization limit of acetylene the fragment ions nominally labelled as (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}CH{sup +}, n Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 2, are observed. For n Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 7 these fragments correspond to covalently bound ionic structures as suggested by the observed strong dehydrogenation [(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}-k Multiplication-Sign H]{sup +} and [(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}CH -k Multiplication-Sign H]{sup +}. The dehydrogenation is significantly reduced in the mixed clusters where evaporation of Ar instead of hydrogen can stabilize the nascent molecular ion. The C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} ion was previously assigned to originate from the benzene molecular ion; however, the low appearance energy of Almost-Equal-To 13.7 eV indicates that a less rigid covalently bound structure of C{sub 6}H{sub 6}{sup +} ion must also be formed upon the acetylene cluster electron ionization. The appearance energy of Ar{sub n}(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sup +} fragments above Almost-Equal-To 15.1 eV indicates that the argon ionization is the first step in the fragment ion production, and the appearance energy of Ar{sub n{>=}2}(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub m{>=}2}{sup +} at Almost-Equal-To 13

  16. An ene reductase from Clavispora lusitaniae for asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan; Yu, Hui-Lei; Lin, Guo-Qiang; Xu, Jian-He

    2014-03-01

    A putative ene reductase gene from Clavispora lusitaniae was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the encoded protein (ClER) was purified and characterized for its biocatalytic properties. This NADPH-dependent flavoprotein was identified with reduction activities toward a diverse range of activated alkenes including conjugated enones, enals, maleimide derivative and α,β-unsaturated carboxylic esters. The purified ClER exhibited a relatively high activity of 7.3 U mg(prot)⁻¹ for ketoisophorone while a remarkable catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)=810 s⁻¹ mM⁻¹) was obtained for 2-methyl-cinnamaldehyde due to the high affinity. A series of prochiral activated alkenes were stereoselectively reduced by ClER furnishing the corresponding saturated products in up to 99% ee. The practical applicability of ClER was further evaluated for the production of (R)-levodione, a valuable chiral compound, from ketoisophorone. Using the crude enzyme of ClER and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH), 500 mM of ketoisophorone was efficiently converted to (R)-levodione with excellent stereoselectivity (98% ee) within 1h. All these positive features demonstrate a high synthetic potential of ClER in the asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes. PMID:24564901

  17. Enhancing Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene by Active Sites Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Leiyu; Yang, Lanqin; Huang, Zujing; Luo, Jingyang; Li, Mu; Wang, Dongbo; Chen, Yinguang

    2013-11-01

    The shortage of nitrogen active sites and relatively low nitrogen content result in unsatisfying eletrocatalytic activity and durability of nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here we report a novel approach to substantially enhance electrocatalytic oxygen reduction on NG electrode by the implantation of nitrogen active sites with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4). Electrochemical characterization revealed that in neutral electrolyte the resulting NG (I-NG) exhibited super electrocatalytic activity (completely 100% of four-electron ORR pathway) and durability (nearly no activity change after 100000 potential cyclings). When I-NG was used as cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), power density and its drop percentage were also much better than the NG and Pt/C ones, demonstrating that the current I-NG was a perfect alternative to Pt/C and offered a new potential for constructing high-performance and less expensive cathode which is crucial for large-scale application of MFC technology.

  18. Enhancing Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene by Active Sites Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Leiyu; Yang, Lanqin; Huang, Zujing; Luo, Jingyang; Li, Mu; Wang, Dongbo; Chen, Yinguang

    2013-01-01

    The shortage of nitrogen active sites and relatively low nitrogen content result in unsatisfying eletrocatalytic activity and durability of nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here we report a novel approach to substantially enhance electrocatalytic oxygen reduction on NG electrode by the implantation of nitrogen active sites with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4). Electrochemical characterization revealed that in neutral electrolyte the resulting NG (I-NG) exhibited super electrocatalytic activity (completely 100% of four-electron ORR pathway) and durability (nearly no activity change after 100000 potential cyclings). When I-NG was used as cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), power density and its drop percentage were also much better than the NG and Pt/C ones, demonstrating that the current I-NG was a perfect alternative to Pt/C and offered a new potential for constructing high-performance and less expensive cathode which is crucial for large-scale application of MFC technology. PMID:24264379

  19. The Validation of an Active Control Intervention for Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR)

    PubMed Central

    MacCoon, Donal G.; Imel, Zac E.; Rosenkranz, Melissa A.; Sheftel, Jenna G.; Weng, Helen Y.; Sullivan, Jude C.; Bonus, Katherine A.; Stoney, Catherine M.; Salomons, Tim V.; Davidson, Richard J.; Lutz, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Most of the extant literature investigating the health effects of mindfulness interventions relies on wait-list control comparisons. The current article specifies and validates an active control condition, the Health Enhancement Program (HEP), thus providing the foundation necessary for rigorous investigations of the relative efficacy of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and for testing mindfulness as an active ingredient. 63 participants were randomized to either MBSR (n=31) or HEP (n=32). Compared to HEP, MBSR led to reductions in thermal pain ratings in the mindfulness- but not the HEP-related instruction condition (η2=.18). There were significant improvements over time for general distress (η2=.09), anxiety (η2=.08), hostility (η2=.07), and medical symptoms (η2=.14), but no effects of intervention. Practice was not related to change. HEP is an active control condition for MBSR while remaining inert to mindfulness. These claims are supported by results from a pain task. Participant-reported outcomes (PROs) replicate previous improvements to well-being in MBSR, but indicate that MBSR is no more effective than a rigorous active control in improving these indices. These results emphasize the importance of using an active control condition like HEP in studies evaluating the effectiveness of MBSR. PMID:22137364

  20. Enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activities by Pt nanoclusters decorated on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun-Mi Hwang; Choi, YongMan; Kim, Min Gyu; Sohn, Young-Jun; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Joo, Sang Hoon; Yim, Sung-Dae; Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Adzic, Radoslav R.; et al

    2016-03-08

    The high cost of Pt-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is a critical hurdle for the commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Recently, non-precious metal-based catalysts (NPMCs) have demonstrated much enhanced activity but their oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is still inferior to that of Pt-based catalysts resulting in a much thicker electrode in the MEA. For the reduction of mass transport and ohmic overpotential we adopted a new concept of catalyst that combines an ultra-low amount of Pt nanoclusters with metal–nitrogen (M–Nx) doped ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbon (FeCo–OMPC(L)). The 5 wt% Pt/FeCo–OMPC(L) showed a 2-fold enhancement in activities comparedmore » to a higher loading of Pt. Our experimental results supported by first-principles calculations indicate that a trace amount of Pt nanoclusters on FeCo–OMPC(L) significantly enhances the ORR activity due to their electronic effect as well as geometric effect from the reduced active sites. Finally, in terms of fuel cell commercialization, this class of catalysts is a promising candidate due to the limited use of Pt in the MEA.« less

  1. Infrared spectroscopy and Mie scattering of acetylene aerosols formed in a low temperature diffusion cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunder, T.; Miller, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming and spectroscopically characterizing cryogenic aerosols formed in a low temperature gas cell. By adjusting the cell pressure, gas composition and flow rate, the size distribution of aerosol particles can be varied over a wide range. The combination of pressure and flow rate determine the residence time of the aerosols in the cell and hence the time available for the particles to grow. FTIR spectroscopy, over the range from 600/cm to 6000/cm, is used to characterize the aerosols. The particle size distribution can be varied so that, at one extreme, the spectra show only absorption features associated with the infrared active vibrational bands and, at the other, they display both absorption and Mie scattering. In the latter case, Mie scattering theory is used to obtain semiquantitative aerosol size distributions, which can be understood in terms of the interplay between nucleation and condensation. In the case of acetylene aerosols, the infrared spectra suggest that the particles exist in the high temperature cubic phase of the solid.

  2. Theoretical and practical limitations of the acetylene inhibition technique to determine total denitrification losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, R.; Conen, F.; Flechard, C. R.; Neftel, A.

    2012-10-01

    The loss of N2 from intensively managed agro-ecosystems is an important part of the N budget. Flux monitoring of N2 emissions at the field scale, e.g., by eddy correlation or aerodynamic gradient method, is impossible due to the large atmospheric N2 background (78%). The acetylene (C2H2) inhibition technique (AIT) is a rather simple and frequently used, albeit imperfect, method to determine N2 losses from intact soil cores. In principle, AIT allows an estimation of total denitrification at high temporal resolution and on small spatial scales, with limited workload and costs involved. To investigate its potential and limitations, a laboratory system with two different detection systems (photoacoustic IR spectroscopy and gas chromatography) is presented, which allowed simultaneous measurements of up to 7 intact soil cores in air-tight glass tubes in a temperature controlled cabinet (adjusted to field conditions) with automated C2H2 injection. A survey of total denitrification losses (N2 + N2O) over 1.5 yr in soil cores from an intensively managed, cut grassland system in central Switzerland supports previous reports on severe limitations of the AIT, which precluded reliable estimates of total denitrification losses. Further, the unavoidable sampling and transfer of soil samples to the laboratory causes unpredictable deviations from the denitrification activity in the field.

  3. Stereoselective inhibition of muscarinic receptor subtypes by the enantiomers of hexahydro-difenidol and acetylenic analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Feifel, R.; Wagner-Röder, M.; Strohmann, C.; Tacke, R.; Waelbroeck, M.; Christophe, J.; Mutschler, E.; Lambrecht, G.

    1990-01-01

    1. The affinities of the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of hexahydro-difenidol (1) and its acetylenic analogues hexbutinol (2), hexbutinol methiodide (3) and p-fluoro-hexbutinol (4) (stereochemical purity greater than 99.8%) for muscarinic receptors in rabbit vas deferens (M1), guinea-pig atria (M2) and guinea-pig ileum (M3) were measured by dose-ratio experiments. 2. The (R)-enantiomers consistently showed higher affinities than the (S)-isomers. The stereoselectivity ratios [(R)/(S)] were greatest with the enantiomers of 1 (vas deferens: 550; ileum: 191; atria: 17) and least with those of the p-Fluoro-analogue 4 (vas deferens: 34; ileum: 8.5; atria: 1.7). 3. The enantiomeric potency ratios for compounds 1-4 were highest in rabbit vas deferens, intermediate in guinea-pig ileum and much less in guinea-pig atria. Thus, these ratios may serve as a predictor of muscarinic receptor subtype identity. 4. (S)-p-Fluoro-hexbutinol [(S)-4] showed a novel receptor selectivity profile with preference for M3 receptors: M3 greater than M2 greater than or equal to M1. 5. These results do not conform to Pfeiffer's rule that activity differences between enantiomers are greater with more potent compounds. PMID:2331578

  4. Flexible band gap tuning of hexagonal boron nitride sheets interconnected by acetylenic bonds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyu; Luo, Youhua; Feng, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Lixia; Zhang, Meng

    2015-08-21

    The energetic and electronic properties of acetylenic-bond-interconnected hexagonal boron nitride sheets (BNyne), in which the number of rows of BN hexagonal rings (denoted as BN width) between neighboring arrays of acetylenic linkages increases consecutively, have been explored using first-principles calculations. Depending on the spatial position of B/N atoms with respect to the acetylenic linkages, there are two different types of configurations. The band structure features and band gap evolutions of BNyne structures as a function of the BN width can be categorized into two families, corresponding to two distinct types of configurations. In particular, for both types of BNyne structures, the band gap variations exhibit odd-even oscillating behavior depending on the BN width, which is related to the different symmetries of acetylenic chains in the unit cell. These results suggest that the embedded linear acetylenic chains can provide more flexibility for manipulation of the atomic and electronic properties of hexagonal boron nitride. These sp-sp(2) hybrid structures might promise importantly potential applications for developing nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. PMID:26194068

  5. [Photodissociation of Acetylene and Acetone using Step-Scan Time-Resolved FTIR Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaren, Ian A.; Wrobel, Jacek D.

    1997-01-01

    The photodissociation of acetylene and acetone was investigated as a function of added quenching gas pressures using step-scan time-resolved FTIR emission spectroscopy. Its main components consist of Bruker IFS88, step-scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer coupled to a flow cell equipped with Welsh collection optics. Vibrationally excited C2H radicals were produced from the photodissociation of acetylene in the unfocused experiments. The infrared (IR) emission from these excited C2H radicals was investigated as a function of added argon pressure. Argon quenching rate constants for all C2H emission bands are of the order of 10(exp -13)cc/molecule.sec. Quenching of these radicals by acetylene is efficient, with a rate constant in the range of 10(exp -11) cc/molecule.sec. The relative intensity of the different C2H emission bands did not change with the increasing argon or acetylene pressure. However, the overall IR emission intensity decreased, for example, by more than 50% when the argon partial pressure was raised from 0.2 to 2 Torr at fixed precursor pressure of 160mTorr. These observations provide evidence for the formation of a metastable C2H2 species, which are collisionally quenched by argon or acetylene. Problems encountered in the course of the experimental work are also described.

  6. Reduction of hexavalent chromium using Aerva lanata L.: elucidation of reduction mechanism and identification of active principles.

    PubMed

    Poonkuzhali, K; Rajeswari, V; Saravanakumar, T; Viswanathamurthi, P; Park, Seung-Moon; Govarthanan, M; Sathishkumar, P; Palvannan, T

    2014-05-15

    The effluent discharge treatment for controlling the environment from non biodegradable metal contaminants using plant extract is an efficient technique. The reduction of hexavalent chromium by abundantly available weed, Aerva lanata L. was investigated using batch equilibrium technique. The variables studied were Cr(VI) concentration, Aerva lanata L. dose, contact time, pH, temperature and agitation speed. Cyclic voltammetry and ICP-MS analysis confirmed the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Electrochemical analysis proved that, the chromium has not been degraded and the valency of the chromium has only been changed. ICP-MS analysis shows that 100ng/L of hexavalent chromium was reduced to 97.01ng/L trivalent chromium. These results suggest that components present in the Aerva lanata L. are responsible for the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The prime components ferulic acid, kaempherol and β-carboline present in the Aerva lanata L. may be responsible for the reduction of Cr(VI) as evident from LC-MS analysis. PMID:24681590

  7. Enhancement of sludge reduction and methane production by removing extracellular polymeric substances from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Tuan; Mohd Yasin, Nazlina Haiza; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Maeda, Toshinari

    2014-12-01

    The management of waste activated sludge (WAS) recycling is a concern that affects the development of the future low-carbon society, particularly sludge reduction and biomass utilization. In this study, we investigated the effect of removing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which play important roles in the adhesion and flocculation of WAS, on increased sludge disintegration, thereby enhancing sludge reduction and methane production by anaerobic digestion. EPS removal from WAS by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) significantly enhanced sludge reduction, i.e., 49 ± 5% compared with 27 ± 1% of the control at the end the digestion process. Methane production was also improved in WAS without EPS by 8881 ± 109 CH4 μmol g(-1) dry-weight of sludge. Microbial activity was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time polymerase chain reaction, which showed that the hydrolysis and acetogenesis stages were enhanced by pretreatment with 2% EDTA, with a larger methanogenic community and better methane production. PMID:25277968

  8. Is dihydrolipoic acid among the reductive activators of parasite CysHis proteases?

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Thomas D

    2008-04-01

    Activities of mature CysHis proteases depend upon relative rates of oxidations vs. reductions of catalytic sulfur by multiple enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions. CysHis peptidolysis is inhibited by Fe3+ but not Fe2+. Others report the paradox that malarial parasites require exogenous free lipoic acid (LA) from human host, although the apicoplast organelle produces it. Extra-cellular LA disulfide can be taken up and reduced to dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) by reductases of any cell type. Here, the opposing effects of DHLA vs. Fe3+ on the falcipain-2 hemoglobinase were investigated employing Z-Phe-Arg-AMC substrate. Despite limited solubility, non-regenerated DHLA (10 microM, threshold 2 microM) was found to be the most potent activator of the air-inactivated (sulfoxygenated) protease discovered thus far. Activation was preemptively opposed by Fe3+, but not Fe2+. However, cruzain from T. cruzi, and cathepsin B from mammal were indistinguishable in their responsiveness to DHLA and Fe redox. Thus, DHLA activation vs. Fe3+ inhibition is not unique to falcipain-2 or apicomplexans but is rather a primordial feature of CysHis peptidolysis. Free LA and/or unassociated lipoylated enzyme subunits could be among multiple pathways shuttling reducing equivalents to reduction of proteins, including CysHis proteases. It is discussed that opposing DHLA-Fe3+ modification of plasmodial proteolysis might be a specialized adaptation to intra-erythrocytic growth. PMID:18068706

  9. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  10. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-09-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank.

  11. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank. PMID:26350761

  12. Drag and lift reduction of a 3D bluff-body using active vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aider, Jean-Luc; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    In this study, a passive flow control experiment on a 3D bluff-body using vortex generators (VGs) is presented. The bluff-body is a modified Ahmed body (Ahmed in J Fluids Eng 105:429-434 1983) with a curved rear part, instead of a slanted one, so that the location of the flow separation is no longer forced by the geometry. The influence of a line of non-conventional trapezoïdal VGs on the aerodynamic forces (drag and lift) induced on the bluff-body is investigated. The high sensitivity to many geometric (angle between the trapezoïdal element and the wall, spanwise spacing between the VGs, longitudinal location on the curved surface) and physical (freestream velocity) parameters is clearly demonstrated. The maximum drag reduction is -12%, while the maximum global lift reduction can reach more than -60%, with a strong dependency on the freestream velocity. For some configurations, the lift on the rear axle of the model can be inverted (-104%). It is also shown that the VGs are still efficient even downstream of the natural separation line. Finally, a dynamic parameter is chosen and a new set-up with motorized vortex generators is proposed. Thanks to this active device. The optimal configurations depending on two parameters are found more easily, and a significant drag and lift reduction (up to -14% drag reduction) can be reached for different freestream velocities. These results are then analyzed through wall pressure and velocity measurements in the near-wake of the bluff-body with and without control. It appears that the largest drag and lift reduction is clearly associated to a strong increase of the size of the recirculation bubble over the rear slant. Investigation of the velocity field in a cross-section downstream the model reveals that, in the same time, the intensity of the longitudinal trailing vortices is strongly reduced, suggesting that the drag reduction is due to the breakdown of the balance between the separation bubble and the longitudinal vortices

  13. Deactivation mechanisms for Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} acetylene hydrogenation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.B.; Huggins, B.J.; Meyers, B.L.; Kaminsky, M.P.

    1994-12-31

    The selective hydrogenation of acetylenic impurities to ethylene is a crucial purification step in the production of olefins by steam cracking. This hydrogenation is done catalytically using a Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst in a fixed bed reactor. The designed lifetime of the catalyst in a front end acetylene converter is about 4 years. Accelerated catalyst deactivation and thermal runaways caused by loss in catalyst selectivity are common problems which plague acetylene converters. Such problems result in unscheduled shutdowns and increased costs to replace deactivated catalyst. This presentation outlines several deactivation mechanisms of the catalyst and discusses how they affect catalyst lifetime and performance. Catalyst characterization using electron microscopy and CO chemisorption provides information on how poisons deteriorate the catalyst and Pd particle size changes produced by use and regeneration. Thermal gravimetric analysis was also used to determine the extent of coke burn-off using less severe regeneration procedures.

  14. Electronic properties and strain sensitivity of CVD-grown graphene with acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Sasaki, Shinichirou; Ohnishi, Masato; Suzuki, Ken; Miura, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    Although many studies have shown that large-area monolayer graphene can be formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using methane gas, the growth of monolayer graphene using highly reactive acetylene gas remains a big challenge. In this study, we synthesized a uniform monolayer graphene film by low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) with acetylene gas. On the base of Raman spectroscopy measurements, it was found that up to 95% of the as-grown graphene is monolayer. The electronic properties and strain sensitivity of the LPCVD-grown graphene with acetylene were also evaluated by testing the fabricated field-effect transistors (FETs) and strain sensors. The derived carrier mobility and gauge factor are 862-1150 cm2/(V·s) and 3.4, respectively, revealing the potential for high-speed FETs and strain sensor applications. We also investigated the relationship between the electronic properties and the graphene domain size.

  15. Establishing a relationship between activity reduction in human perirhinal cortex and priming.

    PubMed

    Voss, Joel L; Hauner, Katherina K Y; Paller, Ken A

    2009-09-01

    Perirhinal neurons exhibit reduced firing rates with stimulus repetition, a phenomenon termed "repetition suppression." However, relationships between perirhinal repetition suppression and behavioral expressions of memory remain unclear. We used anatomically constrained functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess relationships between perirhinal activity and priming, a type of implicit memory. Priming was expressed as speeded animacy judgments for old versus new words. Concurrently, old words elicited less neural activity in bilateral perirhinal cortex. The magnitude of the left perirhinal activity reduction selectively predicted the magnitude of behavioral priming in an across-subjects hierarchical linear regression analysis. These findings have implications for considering how perirhinal cortex may contribute to different neurocognitive functions, possibly including both implicit memory and familiarity-based recognition. This study documents the first evidence linking behavioral measures of priming to information processing in perirhinal cortex. PMID:19405122

  16. Elucidating the activity of stepped Pt single crystals for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Bandarenka, Aliaksandr S; Hansen, Heine A; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L

    2014-07-21

    The unexpectedly high measured activity of Pt[n(111) × (111)] and Pt[n(111) × (100)] stepped single crystal surfaces towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is explained utilizing the hydroxyl binding energy as the activity descriptor. Using this descriptor (estimated using experimental data obtained by different groups), a well-defined Sabatier-type volcano is observed for the activities measured for the Pt[n(111) × (111)] and Pt[n(111) × (100)] stepped single crystals, in remarkable agreement with earlier theoretical studies. We propose that the observed destabilisation of *OH species at these surfaces is due to the decreased solvation of the adsorbed hydroxyl intermediates on adjacent terrace sites. PMID:24643715

  17. Catalytic activity trends of oxygen reduction reaction for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Chun; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2011-11-30

    We report the intrinsic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline palladium, platinum, ruthenium, gold, and glassy carbon surfaces in 0.1 M LiClO(4) 1,2-dimethoxyethane via rotating disk electrode measurements. The nonaqueous Li(+)-ORR activity of these surfaces primarily correlates to oxygen adsorption energy, forming a "volcano-type" trend. The activity trend found on the polycrystalline surfaces was in good agreement with the trend in the discharge voltage of Li-O(2) cells catalyzed by nanoparticle catalysts. Our findings provide insights into Li(+)-ORR mechanisms in nonaqueous media and design of efficient air electrodes for Li-air battery applications. PMID:22044022

  18. Improved oxygen reduction activity on Pt3Ni(111) via increased surface site availability.

    PubMed

    Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Fowler, Ben; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Wang, Guofeng; Ross, Philip N; Lucas, Christopher A; Marković, Nenad M

    2007-01-26

    The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is the main limitation for automotive applications. We demonstrated that the Pt3Ni(111) surface is 10-fold more active for the ORR than the corresponding Pt(111) surface and 90-fold more active than the current state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts for PEMFC. The Pt3Ni(111) surface has an unusual electronic structure (d-band center position) and arrangement of surface atoms in the near-surface region. Under operating conditions relevant to fuel cells, its near-surface layer exhibits a highly structured compositional oscillation in the outermost and third layers, which are Pt-rich, and in the second atomic layer, which is Ni-rich. The weak interaction between the Pt surface atoms and nonreactive oxygenated species increases the number of active sites for O2 adsorption. PMID:17218494

  19. Palladium–platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T.; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2015-07-02

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can be attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. Ultimately, these results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability.

  20. Palladium-platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T.; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2015-07-01

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can be attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. These results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability.

  1. Chemical and enzymatic reductive activation of acylfulvene to isomeric cytotoxic reactive intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Kathryn E.; Neels, James F.; Yu, Xiang; Gong, Jiachang; Sturla, Shana J.

    2011-01-01

    Acylfulvenes, a class of semisynthetic analogues of the sesquiterpene natural product illudin S, are cytotoxic towards cancer cells. The minor structural changes between illudin S and AFs translate to an improved therapeutic window in preclinical cell-based assays and xenograft models. AFs are, therefore, unique tools for addressing the chemical and biochemical basis of cytotoxic selectivity. AFs elicit cytotoxic responses by alkylation of biological targets, including DNA. While AFs are capable of direct alkylation, cytosolic reductive bioactivation to an electrophilic intermediate is correlated with enhanced cytotoxicity. Data obtained in this study illustrates chemical aspects of the process of AF activation. By tracking reaction mechanisms with stable isotope-labeled reagents, enzymatic versus chemical activation pathways for AF were compared for reactions involving the NADPH-dependent enzyme prostaglandin reductase 1 (PTGR1) or sodium borohydride, respectively. These two processes resulted in isomeric products that appear to give rise to similar patterns of DNA modification. The chemically activated isomer has been newly isolated and chemically characterized in this study, including an assessment of its relative stereochemistry, and stability at varying pH and under bioassay conditions. In mammalian cancer cells, this chemically activated analog was shown to not rely on further cellular activation to significantly enhance cytotoxic potency, in contrast to the requirements of AF. On the basis of this study, we anticipate that the chemically activated form of AF will serve as a useful chemical probe for evaluating biomolecular interactions independent of enzyme-mediated activation. PMID:21939268

  2. Controlled reduction of red mud waste to produce active systems for environmental applications: heterogeneous Fenton reaction and reduction of Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Costa, Regina C C; Moura, Flávia C C; Oliveira, Patrícia E F; Magalhães, Fabiano; Ardisson, José D; Lago, Rochel M

    2010-02-01

    In this work, controlled reduction of red mud with H(2) was used to produce active systems for two different environmental applications, i.e. the heterogeneous Fenton reaction and the reduction of Cr(VI). Mössbauer, powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analyses and scanning electron microscopy analyses showed that at different temperatures, i.e. 300, 400, 500 and 600 degrees C, H(2) reduces red mud to different phases, mainly Fe(3)O(4), Fe(0)/Fe(3)O(4) and Fe(0). These Fe phases are dispersed on Al, Si and Ti oxides present in the red mud and show high reactivity towards two environmental applications, i.e. the heterogeneous Fenton reaction and the reduction of Cr(VI). Reduction with H(2) at 400 degrees C showed the best results for the oxidation of the model dye methylene blue with H(2)O(2) at neutral pH due to the presence of the composite Fe(0)/Fe(3)O(4). The reduced red mud at 500-600 degrees C produced Fe(0) highly active for the reduction of Cr(VI) in aqueous medium. Another feature of these red mud based system is that after deactivation due to extensive use they can be completely regenerated by simple treatment with H(2). PMID:20060564

  3. Pharmacologic reduction in tumor necrosis factor activity of pulmonary alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Leeper-Woodford, S K; Fisher, B J; Sugerman, H J; Fowler, A A

    1993-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), an inflammatory cytokine released by macrophages, may be a mediator of lung injury during septicemia. We previously reported that the cyclooxygenase inhibitor ibuprofen and histamine receptor antagonists cimetidine (H2 antagonist) and diphenhydramine (H1 antagonist) attenuate lung injury and reduce circulating TNF surges during porcine sepsis. Since pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) may participate in early sepsis by producing TNF, we hypothesized that the TNF activity of PAM is reduced by ibuprofen, cimetidine, and diphenhydramine. To test this, we examined changes in PAM-derived TNF bioactivity and cell viability of freshly isolated porcine PAM during exposure to bacterial endotoxin (LPS), ibuprofen, cimetidine, and diphenhydramine. The TNF activity (% L929 cytotoxicity of PAM conditioned medium) was elevated in LPS-stimulated PAM cultures (15 to 25% increase at 1 to 6 h and 40 to 43% increase at 6 to 48 h, compared with non-LPS-stimulated cultures), and ibuprofen (150 micrograms/ml) added with LPS decreased the TNF activity for 24 h (20 to 28% reduction at 1 to 24 h). Ibuprofen added 1 h after LPS was less effective in reducing the PAM-derived TNF activity (20 to 22% reduction at 2 to 6 h). Cimetidine (112 micrograms/ml) reduced the TNF activity of LPS-stimulated PAM cultures during the first 4 h of LPS exposure (15 to 24% decrease at 1 to 4 h). Diphenhydramine (150 micrograms/ml) attenuated the PAM-derived TNF activity but also decreased viability of PAM, indicating a toxic effect of this agent on PAM.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8093999

  4. Heats of Formation of Triplet Ethylene, Ethylidene, and Acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.T.; Matus, M.H.; Lester Jr, W.A.; Dixon, David A.

    2007-06-28

    Heats of formation of the lowest triplet state of ethylene and the ground triplet state of ethylidene have been predicted by high level electronic structure calculations. Total atomization energies obtained from coupled-cluster CCSD(T) energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit using correlation consistent basis sets (CBS), plus additional corrections predict the following heats of formation in kcal/mol: Delta H0f(C2H4,3A1) = 80.1 at 0 K and 78.5 at 298 K, and Delta H0f(CH3CH,3A") = 86.8 at 0 K and 85.1 at 298 K, with an error of less than +-1.0 kcal/mol. The vertical and adiabatic singlet-triplet separation energies of ethylene were calculated as Delta ES-T,vert = 104.1 and Delta ES-T,adia = 65.8 kcal/mol. These results are in excellent agreement with recent quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) values of 103.5 +- 0.3 and 66.4 +- 0.3 kcal/mol. Both sets of computational values differ from the experimental estimate of 58 +- 3 kcal/mol for the adiabatic splitting. The computed singlet-triplet gap at 0 K for acetylene is Delta ES-T,adia(C2H2) = 90.5 kcal/mol, which is in notable disagreement with the experimental value of 82.6 kcal/mol. The heat of formation of the triplet is Delta H0f(C2H2,3B2) = 145.3 kcal/mol. There is a systematic underestimation of the singlet-triplet gaps in recent photodecomposition experiments by ~;;7 to 8 kcal/mol. For vinylidene, we predict Delta H0f(H2CC,1A1) = 98.8 kcal/mol at 298 K (exptl. 100.3 +- 4.0), Delta H0f(H2CC,3B2) = 146.2 at 298 K, and an energy gap Delta ES-T-adia(H2CC) = 47.7 kcal/mol.

  5. Characterization of redox activity in resting and activated mast cells by reduction and reoxidation of lipophilic nitroxides.

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Nishimura, T; Swartz, H M

    1998-10-01

    1. We measured redox systems in resting and activated rat peritoneal mast cells under anoxia by using the redox metabolism of free doxyl stearic acid (5DS) and phosphatidylcholine with two 5DS molecules esterified to the glycerol (di5DSPC). 2. In the absence of oxygen, 5DS and di5DSPC were reduced to the corresponding hydroxylamines by resting mast cells, with apparent first-order kinetics of 0.085 and 0.078/min, respectively. 3. The activation of mast cells induced by compound 48/80 and bradykinin did not affect the rates of reduction of the nitroxides, and therefore the activation appeared not to be closely coupled to the redox system of these cells; this finding implies that ischemia is unlikely to affect histamine release from mast cells. 4. The oxidation of the nitroxides by the mast cells was very fast and may be nonenzymatic. 5. We concluded that nitroxides can be useful probes of redox metabolism in the mast cells but, because the characteristics of the cellular reduction-reoxidation systems differed from that of other cells, the use of this approach in other cells will require careful characterization of the redox metabolism of nitroxides in those cells. PMID:9792226

  6. Reduction of urease activity by interaction with the flap covering the active site.

    PubMed

    Macomber, Lee; Minkara, Mona S; Hausinger, Robert P; Merz, Kenneth M

    2015-02-23

    With the increasing appreciation for the human microbiome coupled with the global rise of antibiotic resistant organisms, it is imperative that new methods be developed to specifically target pathogens. To that end, a novel computational approach was devised to identify compounds that reduce the activity of urease, a medically important enzyme of Helicobacter pylori, Proteus mirabilis, and many other microorganisms. Urease contains a flexible loop that covers its active site; Glide was used to identify small molecules predicted to lock this loop in an open conformation. These compounds were screened against the model urease from Klebsiella aerogenes, and the natural products epigallocatechin and quercetin were shown to inhibit at low and high micromolar concentrations, respectively. These molecules exhibit a strong time-dependent inactivation of urease that was not due to their oxygen sensitivity. Rather, these compounds appear to inactivate urease by reacting with a specific Cys residue located on the flexible loop. Substitution of this cysteine by alanine in the C319A variant increased the urease resistance to both epigallocatechin and quercetin, as predicted by the computational studies. Protein dynamics are integral to the function of many enzymes; thus, identification of compounds that lock an enzyme into a single conformation presents a useful approach to define potential inhibitors. PMID:25594724

  7. Reduction of Urease Activity by Interaction with the Flap Covering the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Macomber, Lee; Minkara, Mona S.; Hausinger, Robert P.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing appreciation for the human microbiome coupled with the global rise of antibiotic resistant organisms, it is imperative that new methods be developed to specifically target pathogens. To that end, a novel computational approach was devised to identify compounds that reduce the activity of urease, a medically important enzyme of Helicobacter pylori, Proteus mirabilis, and many other microorganisms. Urease contains a flexible loop that covers its active site; Glide was used to identify small molecules predicted to lock this loop in an open conformation. These compounds were screened against the model urease from Klebsiella aerogenes and the natural products epigallocatechin and quercetin were shown to inhibit at low and high micromolar concentrations, respectively. These molecules exhibit a strong time-dependent inactivation of urease that was not due to their oxygen sensitivity. Rather, these compounds appear to inactivate urease by reacting with a specific Cys residue located on the flexible loop. Substitution of this cysteine by alanine in the C319A variant increased the urease resistance to both epigallocatechin and quercetin, as predicted by the computational studies. Protein dynamics are integral to the function of many enzymes; thus, identification of compounds that lock an enzyme into a single conformation presents a useful approach to define potential inhibitors. PMID:25594724

  8. Impact of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity for Platinum Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Wang, H.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-30

    The impact of model membrane degradation compounds on the relevant electrochemical parameters for the oxygen reduction reaction (i.e. electrochemical surface area and catalytic activity), was studied for both polycrystalline Pt and carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts. Model compounds, representing previously published, experimentally determined polymer electrolyte membrane degradation products, were in the form of perfluorinated organic acids that contained combinations of carboxylic and/or sulfonic acid functionality. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids of carbon chain length C1 – C6 were found to have an impact on electrochemical surface area (ECA). The longest chain length acid also hindered the observed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, resulting in a 17% loss in kinetic current (determined at 0.9 V). Model compounds containing sulfonic acid functional groups alone did not show an effect on Pt ECA or ORR activity. Lastly, greater than a 44% loss in ORR activity at 0.9V was observed for diacid model compounds DA-Naf (perfluoro(2-methyl-3-oxa-5-sulfonic pentanoic) acid) and DA-3M (perfluoro(4-sulfonic butanoic) acid), which contained both sulfonic and carboxylic acid functionalities.

  9. Impact of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity for Platinum Electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Wang, H.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-30

    The impact of model membrane degradation compounds on the relevant electrochemical parameters for the oxygen reduction reaction (i.e. electrochemical surface area and catalytic activity), was studied for both polycrystalline Pt and carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts. Model compounds, representing previously published, experimentally determined polymer electrolyte membrane degradation products, were in the form of perfluorinated organic acids that contained combinations of carboxylic and/or sulfonic acid functionality. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids of carbon chain length C1 – C6 were found to have an impact on electrochemical surface area (ECA). The longest chain length acid also hindered the observed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, resultingmore » in a 17% loss in kinetic current (determined at 0.9 V). Model compounds containing sulfonic acid functional groups alone did not show an effect on Pt ECA or ORR activity. Lastly, greater than a 44% loss in ORR activity at 0.9V was observed for diacid model compounds DA-Naf (perfluoro(2-methyl-3-oxa-5-sulfonic pentanoic) acid) and DA-3M (perfluoro(4-sulfonic butanoic) acid), which contained both sulfonic and carboxylic acid functionalities.« less

  10. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  11. Enhanced photocatalytic CO₂-reduction activity of electrospun mesoporous TiO₂ nanofibers by solvothermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Fu, Junwei; Cao, Shaowen; Yu, Jiaguo; Low, Jingxiang; Lei, Yongpeng

    2014-06-28

    Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 into renewable hydrocarbon fuels using semiconductor photocatalysts is considered as a potential solution to the energy deficiency and greenhouse effect. In this work, mesoporous TiO2 nanofibers with high specific surface areas and abundant surface hydroxyl groups are prepared using an electrospinning strategy combined with a subsequent calcination process, followed by a solvothermal treatment. The solvothermally treated mesoporous TiO2 nanofibers exhibit excellent photocatalytic performance on CO2 reduction into hydrocarbon fuels. The significantly improved photocatalytic activity can be attributed to the enhanced CO2 adsorption capacity and the improved charge separation after solvothermal treatment. The highest activity is achieved for the sample with a 2-h solvothermal treatment, showing 6- and 25-fold higher CH4 production rate than those of TiO2 nanofibers without solvothermal treatment and P25, respectively. This work may also provide a prototype for studying the effect of solvothermal treatment on the structure and photocatalytic activity of semiconductor photocatalysts. PMID:24809306

  12. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  13. Active twist control methodology for vibration reduction of a helicopter with dissimilar rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Prashant M.; Jung, Sung Nam

    2009-03-01

    In this work, an active vibration reduction of hingeless composite rotor blades with dissimilarity is investigated using the active twist concept and the optimal control theory. The induced shear strain on the actuation mechanism by the piezoelectric constant d15 from the PZN-8% PT-based single-crystal material is used to achieve more active twisting to suppress the extra vibrations. The optimal control algorithm is based on the minimization of an objective function comprised of quadratic functions of vibratory hub loads and voltage control harmonics. The blade-to-blade dissimilarity is modeled using the stiffness degradation of composite blades. The optimal controller is applied to various possible dissimilarities arising from different damage patterns of composite blades. The governing equations of motion are derived using Hamilton's principle. The effects of composite materials and smart actuators are incorporated into the comprehensive aeroelastic analysis system. Numerical results showing the impact of addressing the blade dissimilarities on hub vibrations and voltage inputs required to suppress the vibrations are demonstrated. It is observed that all vibratory shear forces are reduced considerably and the major harmonics of moments are reduced significantly. However, the controller needs further improvement to suppress 1/rev moment loads. A mechanism to achieve vibration reduction for the dissimilar rotor system has also been identified.

  14. Simulations of shock-induced mixing& combustion of an acetylene cloud in a chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J B; Day, M S; Beckner, V E; Kuhl, A L; Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H

    2001-02-06

    In this paper we present numerical simulations of the interaction of a blast wave with an acetylene bubble in a closed chamber. We model the system using the inviscid Euler equations for a mixture of ideal gases. The formulation specifies the thermodynamic behavior of the system using a Chemkin interface and includes the capability to model combustion as the ambient air mixes with the acetylene. The simulations are performed using a three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement algorithm based on a second-order Godunov integration scheme. Simulations are compared with experimental measurements for the same configuration.

  15. Diffusion of acetylene inside the Cu-BTC metal organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhudesai, S. A.; Sharma, V. K.; Mitra, S.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2012-06-01

    Dynamic of acetylene molecule adsorbed in Copper 1, 3, 5-benzenetricarboxylate metal-organic framework as studied using molecular dynamics simulation technique is reported here. The results showed that the translational motion of the guest molecule exist in two different time scales; faster one behave as free particle and other one is found to follow jump diffusion. Rotational motion of acetylene is found to be an order of magnitude faster than translational motion. Intermediate scattering functions corresponding to rotational motion show an unusual dip, which is described by the m-diffusion model.

  16. Acetylene- and Phenylacetylene-Terminated Poly(Arylene Ether Benzimidazole)s (PAEBI's)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Polymers prepared by first synthesizing polymers terminated with hydroxy groups, then reacting them with either 4-ethynylbenzoyl chloride or 4-fluoro-4'-phenylethynylbenzophenone. Endcapped polymers thermally cured to yield materials with attractive combination of properties. Cured acetylene-and phenylacetylene-terminated PAEBI's exhibit higher glass-transition temperatures and better retention of mechanical properties at high temperatures. Cured acetylene- and phenylacetylene-terminated polymers exhibit excellent adhesion to copper foil and polyimide film. Potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, composite matrices, fibers, films, membranes, and moldings.

  17. Active vibration reduction by optimally placed sensors and actuators with application to stiffened plates by beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraji, A. H.; Hale, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    This study concerns new investigation of active vibration reduction of a stiffened plate bonded with discrete sensor/actuator pairs located optimally using genetic algorithms based on a developed finite element modeling. An isotropic plate element stiffened by a number of beam elements on its edges and having a piezoelectric sensor and actuator pair bonded to its surfaces is modeled using the finite element method and Hamilton’s principle, taking into account the effects of piezoelectric mass, stiffness and electromechanical coupling. The modeling is based on the first order shear deformation theory taking into account the effects of bending, membrane and shear deformation for the plate, the stiffening beam and the piezoelectric patches. A Matlab finite element program has been built for the stiffened plate model and verified with ANSYS and also experimentally. Optimal placement of ten piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs and optimal feedback gain for active vibration reduction are investigated for a plate stiffened by two beams arranged in the form of a cross. The genetic algorithm was set up for optimization of sensor/actuator placement and feedback gain based on the minimization of the optimal linear quadratic index as an objective function to suppress the first six modes of vibration. Comparison study is presented for active vibration reduction of a square cantilever plate stiffened by crossed beams with two sensor/actuator configurations: firstly, ten piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs are located in optimal positions; secondly, a piezoelectric layer of single sensor/actuator pair covering the whole of the stiffened plate as a SISO system.

  18. The discovery of the [2{sub s}+2{sub a}] reaction of dislanes and acetylenes and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Za, Zhongxin; Barton, T.J.; Lin, Jibing; Gordon, M. |

    1997-12-31

    A concerted [2{sub s}+2{sub a}] intramolecular addition reaction was discovered between disilanes and acetylenes in unimolecular process. The reaction was performed with the 5,5,6,6-tetramethyl-3,3,8,8-tetraphenyl-4,7-dioxa-5,6-disilyl-cyclooctyne (1) under an argon flow at 600{degrees}C to give product 1,1,4,4-tetramethyl-3,3,6,6-tetraphenyl-2,5-dioxa-1,4-disilyl-dicyclo[3,3,0]octa-7-ene (2). Ab initio calculations were performed at the MP4/6-31G** level. The transition state structure was found and the activation energy was calculated to be 34 kcal/mol. The first example of a 3,3{prime}-disilyl-indeno[2,1-a]indene (4) was synthesized from dibenzo-5,6-disilylcyclooctyne (3) in the same manner.

  19. Indenyl effect due to metal slippage? Computational exploration of rhodium-catalyzed acetylene [2+2+2] cyclotrimerization.

    PubMed

    Orian, Laura; Swart, Marcel; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2014-01-13

    The mechanism of CpRh (Cp=cyclopentadienyl) and IndRh (Ind=indenyl)-catalyzed acetylene [2+2+2] cyclotrimerization has been revisited aiming at finding an explanation for the better performance of the latter catalyst found experimentally. The hypothesis that an ancillary ligand of the precatalyst remains bonded to the metal center throughout the whole catalytic cycle, based on the experimental evidence that the nature of this ligand can exert some control in cocyclotrimerization of different alkynes, is considered. Strong hapticity variations occur in both the CpRh- and IndRh-catalyzed processes. As the Ind ligand undergoes a more facile slippage than Cp, the energy profile is far smoother in the IndRh-catalyzed cyclotrimerization. This difference in the energetics of the process translates into an enhanced activity of the IndRh catalyst, in nice agreement with experiment. PMID:24273097

  20. An ultrastable bimetallic carbide as platinum electrocatalyst support for highly active oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zaoxue; Zhang, Mingmei; Xie, Jimin; Shen, Pei Kang

    2015-11-01

    Stable bimetallic carbide (Fe2MoC) with graphitized carbon (GC) as matrix has been synthesized through an ion-exchange method. The Pt nanoparticles are loaded on the GC-Fe2MoC composite to form Pt/GC-Fe2MoC electrocatalyst which shows much higher activity and stability than those of commercial Pt/C for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic media. The excellent performances of Pt/GC-Fe2MoC are mainly due to the inherent stability of GC-Fe2MoC and the promotion effect between Fe2MoC and Pt.

  1. Iron (III) reduction: A novel activity of the human NAD(P)H:oxidoreductase

    SciTech Connect

    Onyenwoke, Rob U.; Wiegel, Juergen . E-mail: jwiegel@uga.edu

    2007-02-09

    NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1; EC 1.6.99.2) catalyzes a two-electron transfer involved in the protection of cells from reactive oxygen species. These reactive oxygen species are often generated by the one-electron reduction of quinones or quinone analogs. We report here on the previously unreported Fe(III) reduction activity of human NQO1. Under steady state conditions with Fe(III) citrate, the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub m}{sup app}) was {approx}0.3nM and the apparent maximum velocity (V{sub max}{sup app}) was 16Umg{sup -1}. Substrate inhibition was observed above 5nM. NADH was the electron donor, K{sub m}{sup app}=340{mu}M and V{sub max}{sup app}=46Umg{sup -1}. FAD was also a cofactor with a K{sub m}{sup app} of 3.1{mu}M and V{sub max}{sup app} of 89Umg{sup -1}. The turnover number for NADH oxidation was 25s{sup -1}. Possible physiological roles of the Fe(III) reduction by this enzyme are discussed.

  2. Hybrid feedforward-feedback active noise reduction for hearing protection and communication.

    PubMed

    Ray, Laura R; Solbeck, Jason A; Streeter, Alexander D; Collier, Robert D

    2006-10-01

    A hybrid active noise reduction (ANR) architecture is presented and validated for a circumaural earcup and a communication earplug. The hybrid system combines source-independent feedback ANR with a Lyapunov-tuned leaky LMS filter (LyLMS) improving gain stability margins over feedforward ANR alone. In flat plate testing, the earcup demonstrates an overall C-weighted total noise reduction of 40 dB and 30-32 dB, respectively, for 50-800 Hz sum-of-tones noise and for aircraft or helicopter cockpit noise, improving low frequency (<100 Hz) performance by up to 15 dB over either control component acting individually. For the earplug, a filtered-X implementation of the LyLMS accommodates its nonconstant cancellation path gain. A fast time-domain identification method provides a high-fidelity, computationally efficient, infinite impulse response cancellation path model, which is used for both the filtered-X implementation and communication feedthrough. Insertion loss measurements made with a manikin show overall C-weighted total noise reduction provided by the ANR earplug of 46-48 dB for sum-of-tones 80-2000 Hz and 40-41 dB from 63 to 3000 Hz for UH-60 helicopter noise, with negligible degradation in attenuation during speech communication. For both hearing protectors, a stability metric improves by a factor of 2 to several orders of magnitude through hybrid ANR. PMID:17069300

  3. Effects of a TiC substrate on the catalytic activity of Pt for NO reduction.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xingli; Fu, Zhaoming; Li, Shasha; Zhang, Xilin; Yang, Zongxian

    2016-05-11

    Density functional theory calculations are used to elucidate the catalytic properties of a Pt monolayer supported on a TiC(001) substrate (Pt/TiC) toward NO reduction. It is found that the compound system of Pt/TiC has a good stability due to the strong Pt-TiC interaction. The diverse dissociation paths (namely the direct dissociation mechanism and the dimeric mechanism) are investigated. The transition state searching calculations suggest that NO has strong diffusion ability and small activation energy for dissociation on the Pt/TiC. For NO reduction on the Pt/TiC surface, we have found that the direct dissociation mechanisms (NO + N + O → NO2 + N and NO + N + O → N2 + O + O) are easier with a smaller dissociation barrier than those on the Pt(111) surface; and the dimeric process (NO + NO → (NO)2 → N2O + O → N2 + O + O) is considered to be dominant or significant with even a lower energy barrier than that of the direct dissociation. The results show that Pt/TiC can serve as an efficient catalyst for NO reduction. PMID:27117987

  4. Active Vibration Control for Helicopter Interior Noise Reduction Using Power Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, J.; Chevva, K.; Sun, F.; Blanc, A.; Kim, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work performed by United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) for NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) under Contract NNL11AA06C. The objective of this program is to develop technology to reduce helicopter interior noise resulting from multiple gear meshing frequencies. A novel active vibration control approach called Minimum Actuation Power (MAP) is developed. MAP is an optimal control strategy that minimizes the total input power into a structure by monitoring and varying the input power of controlling sources. MAP control was implemented without explicit knowledge of the phasing and magnitude of the excitation sources by driving the real part of the input power from the controlling sources to zero. It is shown that this occurs when the total mechanical input power from the excitation and controlling sources is a minimum. MAP theory is developed for multiple excitation sources with arbitrary relative phasing for single or multiple discrete frequencies and controlled by a single or multiple controlling sources. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of MAP for structural vibration reduction of a realistic rotorcraft interior structure. MAP control resulted in significant average global vibration reduction of a single frequency and multiple frequency excitations with one controlling actuator. Simulations also demonstrate the potential effectiveness of the observed vibration reductions on interior radiated noise.

  5. Mechanisms of Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.; Mace, W. Derry; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of the aerodynamic load that acts on a generic rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active flow control was investigated in a wind tunnel test conducted on an approximately 1/3-scale powered rotorcraft model simulating forward flight. The aerodynamic mechanisms that make these reductions, in both the drag and the download, possible were examined in detail through the use of the measured surface pressure distribution on the fuselage, velocity field measurements made in the wake directly behind the ramp of the fuselage and computational simulations. The fuselage tested was the ROBIN-mod7, which was equipped with a series of eight slots located on the ramp section through which flow control excitation was introduced. These slots were arranged in a U-shaped pattern located slightly downstream of the baseline separation line and parallel to it. The flow control excitation took the form of either synthetic jets, also known as zero-net-mass-flux blowing, and steady blowing. The same set of slots were used for both types of excitation. The differences between the two excitation types and between flow control excitation from different combinations of slots were examined. The flow control is shown to alter the size of the wake and its trajectory relative to the ramp and the tailboom and it is these changes to the wake that result in a reduction in the aerodynamic load.

  6. A Computational Study of BVI Noise Reduction Using Active Twist Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, David E.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2010-01-01

    The results of a computational study examining the effects of active-twist control on blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise using the Apache Active Twist Rotor are presented. The primary goal of this activity is to reduce BVI noise during a low-speed descent flight condition using active-twist control. Rotor aeroelastic behavior was modeled using the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics code and the rotor noise was predicted using the acoustics code PSU-WOPWOP. The accuracy of the analysis was validated through comparisons with experimental acoustic data for the first generation Active Twist Rotor at an advance ratio of mu=0.14. The application of active-twist to the main rotor blade system consisted of harmonic actuation frequencies ranging from 2P to 5P, control phase angles from 0' to 360 , and tip-twist amplitudes ranging from 0.5 to 4.0 . The acoustic analysis was conducted for a single low-speed flight condition of advance ratio =0.14 and shaft angle-of-attack, c^=+6 , with BVI noise levels predicted on a flat plane of observers located 1.1 rotor diameters beneath the rotor. The results indicated reductions of up to 11dB in BVI noise using 1.25 tip-twist amplitude with negligible effects on 4P vertical hub shear.

  7. Segregated Pt on Pd nanotubes for enhanced oxygen reduction activity in alkaline electrolyte.

    PubMed

    St John, Samuel; Atkinson, Robert W; Dyck, Ondrej; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Zawodzinski, Thomas A; Papandrew, Alexander B

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscaled Pt domains were integrated with Pd nanotubes via vapor deposition to yield a highly active electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The surface-area-normalized ORR activity of these bi-metallic Pt-on-Pd nanotubes (PtPdNTs) was nearly 6× the corresponding carbon-supported Pt nanoparticle (Pt/C) activity at 0.9 V vs. RHE (1.5 vs. 0.24 mA cmmetal(-2), respectively). Furthermore, the high specific activity of the PtPdNTs was achieved without sacrificing mass-normalized activity, which is more than twice that of Pt/C (0.333 A mgPtPdNT(-1)vs. 0.141 A mgPt/C(-1)) and also greater than that of Pd/C (0.221 A mgPd/C(-1)). We attribute the enhancements in specific and mass activity to modifications of the segregated Pt electronic structure and to nanoscale porosity, respectively. PMID:26553367

  8. Atomic Ordering Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Nanoalloys for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Yang, Lefu; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2013-10-01

    For oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) over alloy electrocatalysts, the understanding of how the atomic arrangement of the metal species in the nanocatalysts is responsible for the catalytic enhancement is challenging for achieving better design and tailoring of nanoalloy catalysts. This paper reports results of an investigation of the atomic structures and the electrocatalytic activities of ternary and binary nanoalloys, aiming at revealing a fundamental insight into the unique atomic-scale structure-electrocatalytic activity relationship. PtIrCo catalyst and its binary counterparts (PtCo and PtIr) are chosen as a model system for this study. The effect of thermochemical treatment temperature on the atomic-scale structure of the catalysts was examined as a useful probe to the structure-activity correlation. The structural characterization of the binary and ternary nanoalloy catalysts was performed by combining surface sensitive techniques such as XPS and 3D atomic ordering sensitive techniques such as high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD) coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis (HE-XRD/PDFs) and computer simulations. The results show that the thermal treatment temperature tunes the nanoalloy’s atomic and chemical ordering in a different way depending on the chemical composition, leading to differences in the nanoalloy’s mass and specific activities. A unique structural tunability of the atomic ordering in a platinum-iridium-cobalt nanoalloy has been revealed for enhancing greatly the electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction, which has significant implication for rational design and nanoengineering of advanced catalysts for electrochemical energy conversion and storage.

  9. Progress Towards Fuselage Drag Reduction via Active Flow Control: A Combined CFD and Experimental Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Lienard, Caroline; LePape, Arnaud

    2010-01-01

    A combined computational and experimental effort has been undertaken to study fuselage drag reduction on a generic, non-proprietary rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active ow control. Fuselage drag reduction is an area of research interest to both the United States and France and this area is being worked collaboratively as a task under the United States/France Memorandum of Agreement on Helicopter Aeromechanics. In the first half of this task, emphasis is placed on the US generic fuselage, the ROBIN-mod7, with the experimental work being conducted on the US side and complementary US and French CFD analysis of the baseline and controlled cases. Fuselage simulations were made using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes ow solvers and with multiple turbulence models. Comparisons were made to experimental data for numerical simulations of the isolated fuselage and for the fuselage as installed in the tunnel, which includes modeling of the tunnel contraction, walls, and support fairing. The numerical simulations show that comparisons to the experimental data are in good agreement when the tunnel and model support are included. The isolated fuselage simulations compare well to each other, however, there is a positive shift in the centerline pressure when compared to the experiment. The computed flow separation locations on the rear ramp region had only slight differences with and without the tunnel walls and model support. For the simulations, the flow control slots were placed at several locations around the flow separation lines as a series of eight slots that formed a nearly continuous U-shape. Results from the numerical simulations resulted in an estimated 35% fuselage drag reduction from a steady blowing flow control configuration and a 26% drag reduction for unsteady zero-net-mass flow control configuration. Simulations with steady blowing show a delayed flow separation at the rear ramp of the fuselage that increases the surface pressure acting on the ramp

  10. Near-infrared spectra of liquid/solid acetylene under Titan relevant conditions and implications for Cassini/VIMS detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Cornet, T.; Chevrier, V. F.; Combe, J.-Ph.; McCord, T. B.; Roe, L. A.; Le Mouélic, S.; Le Menn, E.; Wasiak, F. C.

    2016-05-01

    Acetylene is thought to be abundant on Titan according to most photochemical models. While detected in the atmosphere, its likely presence at the surface still lacks physical evidence. It is thought that solid acetylene could be a major component of Titan's lakes shorelines and dry lakebed, detected as the 5 μm-bright deposits with the Cassini/VIMS instrument. Acetylene could also be present under its liquid form as dissolved solids in Titan's methane-ethane lakes, as emphasized by thermodynamics studies. This paper is devoted to the near-infrared spectroscopy study of acetylene under solid and liquid phases between 1 and 2.2 μm, synthesized in a Titan simulation chamber that is able to reproduce extreme temperature conditions. From experiments, we observed a ∼10% albedo increase between liquid acetylene at 193-188 K and solid acetylene at 93 K. Using the NIR spectroscopy technique we successfully calculated the reflectivity ratio of solid/liquid acetylene as 1.13. The second difference we observed between liquid and solid acetylene is a shift in the major absorption band detected at 1.54 μm, the shift of ∼0.01 μm occurring toward higher wavelength. In order to assess the detectability of acetylene on Titan using the Cassini/VIMS instrument, we adapted our spectra to the VIMS spectral resolution. The spectral band at 1.55 μm and a negative slope at 2.0 μm falls in the Cassini/VIMS atmospheric windows over several VIMS infrared spectels, thus Cassini/VIMS should be able to detect acetylene.

  11. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiuli; Zhang, Peng; Li, Shuang; Liu, Wei

    2016-08-17

    Developing inexpensive and non-precious metal electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is among the major goals in fuel cells. Herein, by using density-functional theory calculations, we show that N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids exhibit unexpectedly high ORR catalytic activity-even comparable to that of the Pt(111) surface. Both graphitic-type and pyridine-type N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids are highly active for the ORR and have good CO tolerance. The formation of the second H2O molecule is the rate-determining step for the ORR with the graphitic-type hybrid, whereas on the pyridine-type hybrid, it is the formation of OOH. Note that N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrid materials combine the high reactivity of olympicene and the high electrical conductivity of graphene, which allows them to be potentially used as low-cost and non-precious-metal ORR catalysts. PMID:27499058

  12. Enhanced oxygen reduction activity and solid oxide fuel cell performance with a nanoparticles-loaded cathode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Li; Zhao, Zhe; Tu, Baofeng; Ou, Dingrong; Cui, Daan; Wei, Xuming; Chen, Xiaobo; Cheng, Mojie

    2015-03-11

    Reluctant oxygen-reduction-reaction (ORR) activity has been a long-standing challenge limiting cell performance for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in both centralized and distributed power applications. We report here that this challenge has been tackled with coloading of (La,Sr)MnO3 (LSM) and Y2O3 stabilized zirconia (YSZ) nanoparticles within a porous YSZ framework. This design dramatically improves ORR activity, enhances fuel cell output (200-300% power improvement), and enables superior stability (no observed degradation within 500 h of operation) from 600 to 800 °C. The improved performance is attributed to the intimate contacts between nanoparticulate YSZ and LSM particles in the three-phase boundaries in the cathode. PMID:25686380

  13. Porous Dendritic Platinum Nanotubes with Extremely High Activity and Stability for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaixia; Sun, Shuhui; Cai, Mei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the morphology of Pt nanostructures can provide opportunities to greatly increase their activity and stability. Porous dendritic Pt nanotubes were successfully synthesized by a facile, cost-effective aqueous solution method at room temperature in large scale. These unique structures are porous, hollow, hierarchical, and single crystalline, which not only gives them a large surface area with high catalyst utilization, but also improves mass transport and gas diffusion. These novel Pt structures exhibited significantly improved catalytic activity (4.4 fold) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and greatly enhanced durability (6.1 fold) over that of the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C catalyst. This work provides a promising approach to the design of highly efficient next-generation electrocatalysts. PMID:23524665

  14. New mechanistically based model for predicting reduction of biosolids waste by ozonation of return activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Isazadeh, Siavash; Feng, Min; Urbina Rivas, Luis Enrique; Frigon, Dominic

    2014-04-15

    Two pilot-scale activated sludge reactors were operated for 98 days to provide the necessary data to develop and validate a new mathematical model predicting the reduction of biosolids production by ozonation of the return activated sludge (RAS). Three ozone doses were tested during the study. In addition to the pilot-scale study, laboratory-scale experiments were conducted with mixed liquor suspended solids and with pure cultures to parameterize the biomass inactivation process during exposure to ozone. The experiments revealed that biomass inactivation occurred even at the lowest doses, but that it was not associated with extensive COD solubilization. For validation, the model was used to simulate the temporal dynamics of the pilot-scale operational data. Increasing the description accuracy of the inactivation process improved the precision of the model in predicting the operational data. PMID:24572272

  15. Selective nitrogen doping in graphene: Enhanced catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianlong; Hou, Zhufeng; Ikeda, Takashi; Huang, Sheng-Feng; Terakura, Kiyoyuki; Boero, Mauro; Oshima, Masaharu; Kakimoto, Masa-Aki; Miyata, Seizo

    2011-12-01

    The structural and electronic properties of N-doped zigzag graphene ribbons with various ratios of dihydrogenated to monohydrogenated edge carbons are investigated within the density functional theory framework. We find that the stability of graphitic N next to the edge, which is claimed to play important roles in the catalytic activity in our previous work, will be enhanced with increasing the concentration of dihydrogenated carbons. Furthermore, the dihydrogenated edge carbons turn out to be easily converted into monohydrogenated ones in the presence of oxygen molecules at room temperature. Based on our results, we propose a possible way to enhance the oxygen reduction catalytic activity of N-doped graphene by controlling the degrees of hydrogenation of edge carbons. The characteristic features in the x-ray absorption and emission spectra for each specific N site considered here will also be given.

  16. The Origin of the Catalytic Activity of a Metal Hydride in CO2 Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke; Matam, Santhosh Kumar; Kerger, Philipp; Bernard, Laetitia; Battaglia, Corsin; Vogel, Dirk; Rohwerder, Michael; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-05-10

    Atomic hydrogen on the surface of a metal with high hydrogen solubility is of particular interest for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. In a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, methane was markedly formed on the metal hydride ZrCoHx in the course of the hydrogen desorption and not on the pristine intermetallic. The surface analysis was performed by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy and near-ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, for the in situ analysis. The aim was to elucidate the origin of the catalytic activity of the metal hydride. Since at the initial stage the dissociation of impinging hydrogen molecules is hindered by a high activation barrier of the oxidised surface, the atomic hydrogen flux from the metal hydride is crucial for the reduction of carbon dioxide and surface oxides at interfacial sites. PMID:27061237

  17. Temporal separation of catalytic activities allows anti-Markovnikov reductive functionalization of terminal alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Le; Herzon, Seth B.

    2014-01-01

    There is currently great interest in the development of multistep catalytic processes in which one or several catalysts act sequentially to rapidly build complex molecular structures. Many enzymes—often the inspiration for new synthetic transformations—are capable of processing a single substrate through a chain of discrete, mechanistically distinct catalytic steps. Here, we describe an approach to emulate the efficiency of these natural reaction cascades within a synthetic catalyst by the temporal separation of catalytic activities. In this approach, a single catalyst exhibits multiple catalytic activities sequentially, allowing for the efficient processing of a substrate through a cascade pathway. Application of this design strategy has led to the development of a method to effect the anti-Markovnikov (linear-selective) reductive functionalization of terminal alkynes. The strategy of temporal separation may facilitate the development of other efficient synthetic reaction cascades.

  18. Understanding Iron-based catalysts with efficient Oxygen reduction activity from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, Hasnain; Barbiellini, B.; Jia, Q.; Tylus, U.; Strickland, K.; Bansil, A.; Mukerjee, S.

    2015-03-01

    Catalysts based on Fe/N/C clusters can support the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) without the use of expensive metals such as platinum. These systems can also prevent some poisonous species to block the active sites from the reactant. We have performed spin-polarized calculations on various Fe/N/C fragments using the Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) code. Some results are compared to similar calculations obtained with the Gaussian code. We investigate the partial density of states (PDOS) of the 3d orbitals near the Fermi level and calculate the binding energies of several ligands. Correlations of the binding energies with the 3d electronic PDOS's are used to propose electronic descriptors of the ORR associated with the 3d states of Fe. We also suggest a structural model for the most active site with a ferrous ion (Fe2+) in the high spin state or the so-called Doublet 3 (D3).

  19. Reduction Sensitive Lipid Conjugates of Tenofovir: Synthesis, Stability, and Antiviral Activity.

    PubMed

    Giesler, Kyle E; Marengo, Jose; Liotta, Dennis C

    2016-08-11

    The therapeutic value of numerous small molecules hinges on their ability to permeate the plasma membrane. This is particularly true for tenofovir (TFV), adefovir, and other antiviral nucleosides that demonstrate potent antiviral activity but poor bioavailability. Using TFV as a model substrate, we hybridized two disparate prodrug strategies to afford novel reduction-sensitive lipid conjugates of TFV that exhibit subnanomolar activity toward HIV-1 and are stable in human plasma for more than 24 h with a therapeutic index approaching 30000. These compounds significantly rival the clinically approved formulation of TFV and revitalize the potential of disulfide-bearing prodrugs which have seen limited in vitro and in vivo success since their debut over 20 years ago. We further demonstrate the utility of these conjugates as a tool to indirectly probe the enzymatic hydrolysis of phosphonomonoesters that may further advance the development of other prodrug strategies for nucleosides, peptides, and beyond. PMID:27405794

  20. Effects of metabolic uncouplers on excess sludge reduction and microbial products of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Hu, Hai-Lan; Qin, Min-Min; Xue, Zhao-Xia; Cao, Jia-Shun; Hu, Zhi-Rong

    2015-06-01

    The present study investigated the influences of three metabolic uncouplers (pCP, oCP and oNP) on excess activated sludge reduction and microbial products of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and intracellular storage product (polyhydroxybutyrate, PHB) in short-term tests. Results showed sludge was reduced 58.2%, 59.8% and 80.8%, respectively, at pCP, oCP and oNP concentrations of 20mg/L. The dosage of three uncouplers had no obviously influences on COD removal and sludge settleability, but had significant inhibition effect on ammonia removal, especially for oNP. Low concentration of pCP and oNP (5mg/L) dosing resulted in protein and polysaccharide content increased in EPS, however, they were decreased at high pCP and oNP concentrations (>5mg/L). To oCP, the protein content in EPS was increased linearly with oCP concentration. Furthermore, metabolic uncouplers addition stimulated the production of PHB. Among three uncouplers, oCP could be an alternative uncoupler for sludge reduction in activated sludge process. PMID:25746471

  1. Classic Maya civilization collapse associated with reduction in tropical cyclone activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, M. A.; Polanco-Martinez, J. M.; Lases-Hernández, F.; Bradley, R. S.; Burns, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    In light of the increased destructiveness of tropical cyclones observed over recent decades one might assume that an increase and not a decrease in tropical cyclone activity would lead to societal stress and perhaps collapse of ancient cultures. In this study we present evidence that a reduction in the frequency and intensity of tropical Atlantic cyclones could have contributed to the collapse of the Maya civilization during the Terminal Classic Period (TCP, AD. 800-950). Statistical comparisons of a quantitative precipitation record from the Yucatan Peninsula (YP) Maya lowlands, based on the stalagmite known as Chaac (after the Mayan God of rain and agriculture), relative to environmental proxy records of El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs), and tropical Atlantic cyclone counts, suggest that these records share significant coherent variability during the TCP and that summer rainfall reductions between 30 and 50% in the Maya lowlands occurred in association with decreased Atlantic tropical cyclones. Analysis of modern instrumental hydrological data suggests cyclone rainfall contributions to the YP equivalent to the range of rainfall deficits associated with decreased tropical cyclone activity during the collapse of the Maya civilization. Cyclone driven precipitation variability during the TCP, implies that climate change may have triggered Maya civilization collapse via freshwater scarcity for domestic use without significant detriment to agriculture. Pyramid in Tikal, the most prominent Maya Kingdom that collapsed during the Terminal Classic Period (circa C.E. 800-950) Rainfall feeding stalagmites inside Rio Secreto cave system, Yucatan, Mexico.

  2. RF probe recovery time reduction with a novel active ringing suppression circuit

    PubMed Central

    Peshkovsky, A.S.; Forguez, J.; Cerioni, L.; Pusiol, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    A simple Q-damper device for active probe recovery time reduction is introduced along with a straightforward technique for the circuit's component value optimization. The device is inductively coupled to a probe through a coupling transformer positioned away from the main coil, which makes the design independent of the coil type being used. The Q-damper is a tuned circuit, which is resonant at the same frequency as the probe and can be actively interrupted. When the circuit is interrupted, it is detuned and, thereby, is uncoupled from the probe, which operates normally. Turning the device on leads to re-coupling of the circuits and causes splitting of the probe's resonance line, which can be observed through its drive port. A resistance of an appropriate value is introduced into the Q-damper circuit, resulting in smoothing of the resonance splitting into one broad line, representing the coupled system's low-Q state, in which the energy stored in the main coil is efficiently dissipated. The circuit's component values are optimized by monitoring the shape of this low-Q state. Probe recovery time reduction by, approximately, an order of magnitude has been obtained with this device. Application of the device during an NQR experiment led to an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 4.9. PMID:16111906

  3. Early Reduction of Microglia Activation by Irradiation in a Model of Chronic Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Alejandra; Crish, Samuel D.; Steele, Michael R.; Romero, Cesar O.; Inman, Denise M.; Horner, Philip J.; Calkins, David J.; Vetter, Monica L.

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease that results in the progressive decline and ultimate death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). While multiple risk factors are associated with glaucoma, the mechanisms leading to onset and progression of the disease remain unknown. Molecular analysis in various glaucoma models has revealed involvement of non-neuronal cell populations, including astrocytes, Mueller glia and microglia, at early stages of glaucoma. High-dose irradiation was reported to have a significant long-term protective effect in the DBA/2J (D2) mouse model of glaucoma, although the cellular and molecular basis for this effect remains unclear. In particular, the acute effects of irradiation on specific cell populations, including non-neuronal cells, in the D2 retina and nerve have not been assessed. Here we report that irradiation induces transient reduction in proliferating microglia within the optic nerve head and glial lamina within the first week post-irradiation. This was accompanied by reduced microglial activation, with no effect on astrocyte gliosis in those regions. At later stages we confirm that early high-dose irradiation of the mouse head results in improvement of axonal structural integrity and anterograde transport function, without reduction of intraocular pressure. Thus reduced microglial activation induced by irradiation at early stages is associated with reduced optic nerve and retinal neurodegeneration in the D2 mouse model of glaucoma. PMID:22952717

  4. Aircraft panel with sensorless active sound power reduction capabilities through virtual mechanical impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulandet, R.; Michau, M.; Micheau, P.; Berry, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with an active structural acoustic control approach to reduce the transmission of tonal noise in aircraft cabins. The focus is on the practical implementation of the virtual mechanical impedances method by using sensoriactuators instead of conventional control units composed of separate sensors and actuators. The experimental setup includes two sensoriactuators developed from the electrodynamic inertial exciter and distributed over an aircraft trim panel which is subject to a time-harmonic diffuse sound field. The target mechanical impedances are first defined by solving a linear optimization problem from sound power measurements before being applied to the test panel using a complex envelope controller. Measured data are compared to results obtained with sensor-actuator pairs consisting of an accelerometer and an inertial exciter, particularly as regards sound power reduction. It is shown that the two types of control unit provide similar performance, and that here virtual impedance control stands apart from conventional active damping. In particular, it is clear from this study that extra vibrational energy must be provided by the actuators for optimal sound power reduction, mainly due to the high structural damping in the aircraft trim panel. Concluding remarks on the benefits of using these electrodynamic sensoriactuators to control tonal disturbances are also provided.

  5. Porous Silica-Coated Gold Nanorods: A Highly Active Catalyst for the Reduction of 4-Nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Mohanta, Jagdeep; Satapathy, Smithsagar; Si, Satyabrata

    2016-02-01

    The successful coating of thin porous silica layers of various thicknesses [(10±1), (12±1), and (14±1) nm] on cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) capped gold nanorods was achieved through a modified Stöber procedure. The resulting material was applied as a novel catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. The catalytic activities of the gold nanorods increased up to eight times after coating with a layer of porous silica and the reaction followed a zero-order kinetics, having a rate constant as high as 2.92×10(-1) mol L(-1) min(-1). The spectral changes during the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol were observed within a very short span of time and a complete conversion to 4-aminophenol occured within 5-6 mins, including the induction period of ≈2 mins. The reusability of the catalyst was studied by running the catalytic reaction during five consecutive cycles with good efficiency without destroying the nanostructure. The methodology can be effectively applied to the development of composite catalysts with highly enhanced catalytic activity. PMID:26663755

  6. Structural Insight into Activation Mechanism of Toxoplasma gondii Nucleoside Triphosphate Diphosphohydrolases by Disulfide Reduction*

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Ulrike; Zebisch, Matthias; Krauss, Michel; Sträter, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii produces two nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDase1 and -3). These tetrameric, cysteine-rich enzymes require activation by reductive cleavage of a hitherto unknown disulfide bond. Despite a 97% sequence identity, both isozymes differ largely in their ability to hydrolyze ATP and ADP. Here, we present crystal structures of inactive NTPDase3 as an apo form and in complex with the product AMP to resolutions of 2.0 and 2.2 Å, respectively. We find that the enzyme is present in an open conformation that precludes productive substrate binding and catalysis. The cysteine bridge 258–268 is identified to be responsible for locking of activity. Crystal structures of constitutively active variants of NTPDase1 and -3 generated by mutation of Cys258–Cys268 show that opening of the regulatory cysteine bridge induces a pronounced contraction of the whole tetramer. This is accompanied by a 12° domain closure motion resulting in the correct arrangement of all active site residues. A complex structure of activated NTPDase3 with a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog and the cofactor Mg2+ to a resolution of 2.85 Å indicates that catalytic differences between the NTPDases are primarily dictated by differences in positioning of the adenine base caused by substitution of Arg492 and Glu493 in NTPDase1 by glycines in NTPDase3. PMID:22130673

  7. Tau reduction prevents Aβ-induced axonal transport deficits by blocking activation of GSK3β

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jordan C.; Fomenko, Vira; Miyamoto, Takashi; Suberbielle, Elsa; Knox, Joseph A.; Ho, Kaitlyn; Kim, Daniel H.; Yu, Gui-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Axonal transport deficits in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are attributed to amyloid β (Aβ) peptides and pathological forms of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Genetic ablation of tau prevents neuronal overexcitation and axonal transport deficits caused by recombinant Aβ oligomers. Relevance of these findings to naturally secreted Aβ and mechanisms underlying tau’s enabling effect are unknown. Here we demonstrate deficits in anterograde axonal transport of mitochondria in primary neurons from transgenic mice expressing familial AD-linked forms of human amyloid precursor protein. We show that these deficits depend on Aβ1–42 production and are prevented by tau reduction. The copathogenic effect of tau did not depend on its microtubule binding, interactions with Fyn, or potential role in neuronal development. Inhibition of neuronal activity, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function, or glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activity or expression also abolished Aβ-induced transport deficits. Tau ablation prevented Aβ-induced GSK3β activation. Thus, tau allows Aβ oligomers to inhibit axonal transport through activation of GSK3β, possibly by facilitating aberrant neuronal activity. PMID:25963821

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, COAL-DERIVED, PROMOTED CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph M. Calo

    2000-07-21

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics. During the reporting period, the following has been accomplished: (1) Steady-state reactivity studies in the packed bed reactor were extended to the NO/CO-carbon reaction system as a function of temperature and NO and CO concentrations. It was found that the NO reaction rate increased in the presence of CO, and the apparent activation energy decreased to about 75 {+-} 8 kJ/mol. In addition, the influence of mass transfer limitations were noted at low NO and CO concentrations. (2) The packed bed reactor/gas flow system has been applied to performing post-reaction temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies of intermediate surface complexes following steady-state reaction. It was found that the amount of CO-evolving intermediate surface complexes exceeded that of the N{sub 2}-evolving surface complexes, and that both increased with reaction temperature. The TPD spectra indicates that both types of complexes desorb late, suggesting that they have high desorption activation energies. Plans for the next reporting period include extending the temperature programmed desorption studies in the packed bed reactor system to the NO/CO reaction system, including exposure to just CO, as well as NO/CO mixtures.

  9. Microtubules Accelerate the Kinase Activity of Aurora-B by a Reduction in Dimensionality

    PubMed Central

    Noujaim, Michael; Bechstedt, Susanne; Wieczorek, Michal; Brouhard, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Aurora-B is the kinase subunit of the Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC), a key regulator of mitotic progression that corrects improper kinetochore attachments and establishes the spindle midzone. Recent work has demonstrated that the CPC is a microtubule-associated protein complex and that microtubules are able to activate the CPC by contributing to Aurora-B auto-phosphorylation in trans. Aurora-B activation is thought to occur when the local concentration of Aurora-B is high, as occurs when Aurora-B is enriched at centromeres. It is not clear, however, whether distributed binding to large structures such as microtubules would increase the local concentration of Aurora-B. Here we show that microtubules accelerate the kinase activity of Aurora-B by a “reduction in dimensionality.” We find that microtubules increase the kinase activity of Aurora-B toward microtubule-associated substrates while reducing the phosphorylation levels of substrates not associated to microtubules. Using the single molecule assay for microtubule-associated proteins, we show that a minimal CPC construct binds to microtubules and diffuses in a one-dimensional (1D) random walk. The binding of Aurora-B to microtubules is salt-dependent and requires the C-terminal tails of tubulin, indicating that the interaction is electrostatic. We show that the rate of Aurora-B auto-activation is faster with increasing concentrations of microtubules. Finally, we demonstrate that microtubules lose their ability to stimulate Aurora-B when their C-terminal tails are removed by proteolysis. We propose a model in which microtubules act as scaffolds for the enzymatic activity of Aurora-B. The scaffolding activity of microtubules enables rapid Aurora-B activation and efficient phosphorylation of microtubule-associated substrates. PMID:24498282

  10. ESTIMATION OF MICROBIAL REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION RATES FOR CHLORINATED BENZENES AND PHENOLS USING A QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A set of literature data was used to derive several quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) to predict the rate constants for the microbial reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated aromatics. Dechlorination rate constants for 25 chloroaromatics were corrected for th...

  11. Removal of micropollutants and reduction of biological activity in a full scale reclamation plant using ozonation and activated carbon filtration.

    PubMed

    Reungoat, J; Macova, M; Escher, B I; Carswell, S; Mueller, J F; Keller, J

    2010-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds are found in secondary treated effluents up to microg L(-1) levels and therefore discharged into surface waters. Since the long term effects of these compounds on the environment and human health are, to date, largely unknown, implementation of advanced treatment of wastewaters is envisaged to reduce their discharge. This is of particular relevance where surface waters are used as drinking water sources and when considering indirect potable reuse. This study aimed at assessing the removal of organic micropollutants and the concurrent reduction of their biological activity in a full scale reclamation plant treating secondary effluent. The treatment consists of 6 stages: denitrification, pre-ozonation, coagulation/flocculation/dissolved air flotation and filtration (DAFF), main ozonation, activated carbon filtration and final ozonation for disinfection. For that purpose, representative 24-hour composite samples were collected after each stage. The occurrence of 85 compounds was monitored by LC/MS-MS. A battery of 6 bioassays was also used as a complementary tool to evaluate non-specific toxicity and 5 specific toxic modes of action. Results show that, among the 54 micropollutants quantified in the influent water, 50 were removed to below their limit of quantification representing more than 90% of concentration reduction. Biological activity was reduced, depending on the specific response that was assessed, from a minimum of 62% (AhR response) to more than 99% (estrogenicity). The key processes responsible for the plant's performances were the coagulation/flocculation/DAFF, main ozonation and activated carbon filtration. The effect of these 3 processes varied from one compound or bioassay to another but their combination was almost totally responsible for the overall observed reduction. Bioassays yielded complementary information, e.g. estrogenic compounds were not detected in the secondary effluent by chemical analysis, but the samples had an

  12. 49 CFR 178.60 - Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.60 Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene. (a) Type and service pressure. A DOT 8AL cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder...

  13. 49 CFR 178.60 - Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.60 Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene. (a) Type and service pressure. A DOT 8AL cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder...

  14. 49 CFR 178.60 - Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.60 Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene. (a) Type and service pressure. A DOT 8AL cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder...

  15. Association Mechanisms of Unsaturated C2 Hydrocarbons with Their Cations: Acetylene and Ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bera, Partha P.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    The ion-molecule association mechanism of acetylene and ethylene with their cations is investigated by ab initio quantum chemical methods to understand the structures, association energies, and the vibrational and electronic spectra of the products. Stable puckered cyclic isomers are found as the result of first forming less stable linear and bridge isomers. The puckered cyclic complexes are calculated to be strongly bound, by 87, 35 and 56 kcal/mol for acetylene-acetylene cation, ethylene-ethylene cation and acetylene-ethylene cation, respectively. These stable complexes may be intermediates that participate in further association reactions. There are no association barriers, and no significant inter-conversion barriers, so the initial linear and bridge encounter complexes are unlikely to be observable. However, the energy gap between the bridged and cyclic puckered isomers greatly differs from complex to complex: it is 44 kcal/mol in C4H4 +, but only 6 kcal/mol in C4H8 +. The accurate CCSD(T) calculations summarized above are also compared against less computationally expensive MP2 and density functional theory (DFT) calculations for structures, relative energies, and vibrational spectra. Calculated vibrational spectra are compared against available experiments for cyclobutadiene cation. Electronic spectra are also calculated using time-dependent DFT.

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-79 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... acetylene-propadiene mixture must have a refrigeration system that does not compress the cargo vapor or have a refrigeration system with the following features: (1) A vapor compressor that does not raise the... suction line. (c) The piping system, including the cargo refrigeration system, for tanks to be loaded...

  17. 46 CFR 151.50-79 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... acetylene-propadiene mixture must have a refrigeration system that does not compress the cargo vapor or have a refrigeration system with the following features: (1) A vapor compressor that does not raise the... suction line. (c) The piping system, including the cargo refrigeration system, for tanks to be loaded...

  18. 46 CFR 151.50-79 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... acetylene-propadiene mixture must have a refrigeration system that does not compress the cargo vapor or have a refrigeration system with the following features: (1) A vapor compressor that does not raise the... suction line. (c) The piping system, including the cargo refrigeration system, for tanks to be loaded...

  19. 46 CFR 151.50-79 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... acetylene-propadiene mixture must have a refrigeration system that does not compress the cargo vapor or have a refrigeration system with the following features: (1) A vapor compressor that does not raise the... suction line. (c) The piping system, including the cargo refrigeration system, for tanks to be loaded...

  20. 46 CFR 151.50-79 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... acetylene-propadiene mixture must have a refrigeration system that does not compress the cargo vapor or have a refrigeration system with the following features: (1) A vapor compressor that does not raise the... suction line. (c) The piping system, including the cargo refrigeration system, for tanks to be loaded...

  1. OZONE PRODUCTION FROM IRRADIATION OF ACETYLENE/CHLORINE MIXTURES IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction of chlorine radicals with acetylene in air in the absence of oxides of nitrogen result In the formation of ozone. o ozone is observed when chlorine radicals react with methylacetylene or ethylacetylene under similar conditions. ormyl chloride is observed in all syste...

  2. Methane emissions measured at two California landfills by OTM-10 and an acetylene tracer method

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methane emissions were measured at two municipal solid waste landfills in California using static flux chambers, an optical remote sensing approach known as vertical radial plume mapping (VRPM) using a tunable diode laser (TDL) and a novel acetylene tracer method. The tracer meth...

  3. Selective hydrogenation of dienic and acetylenic compounds on metal-containing catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stytsenko, V. D.; Mel'nikov, D. P.

    2016-05-01

    Studies on selective hydrogenation of dienic and acetylenic hydrocarbons and their derivatives on metal-containing catalysts are reviewed. The review covers publications over a wide period of time and concentrates on the fundamental principles of catalyst operation. The catalysts modified in the surface layer were shown to be promising for selective hydrogenation.

  4. A Safe and Easy Classroom Demonstration of the Generation of Acetylene Gas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Marilyn Blagg; Krause, Paul

    1994-01-01

    In this demonstration of the generation and combustion of acetylene, calcium carbide and water are allowed to react in a latex examination glove. Two student volunteers perform the demonstration with instructor guidance. This safe, popular demonstration, originally intended to illustrate the alkyne family of compounds, can be used with a variety…

  5. Acetylene measurement in flames by chirp-based quantum cascade laser spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Quine, Zachary R; McNesby, Kevin L

    2009-06-01

    We have designed and characterized a mid-IR spectrometer built around a pulsed distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser using the characteristic frequency down-chirp to scan through the spectral region 6.5 cm(-1) spectral region. The behavior of this chirp is extensively measured. The accuracy and detection limits of the system as an absorption spectrometer are demonstrated first by measuring spectra of acetylene through a single pass 16 cm absorption cell in real time at low concentrations and atmospheric pressure. The smallest detectable peak is measured to be approximately 1.5 x 10(-4) absorbance units, yielding a minimum detectable concentration length product of 2.4 parts per million meter at standard temperature and pressure. This system is then used to detect acetylene within an ethylene-air opposed flow flame. Measurements of acetylene content as a function of height above the fuel source are presented, as well as measurements of acetylene produced in fuel breakdown as a function of preinjection fuel temperature. PMID:19488121

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, COAL-DERIVED, PROMOTED CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph M. Calo

    2000-07-19

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics. During the reporting period, the following has been accomplished: (1) A packed bed reactor/gas flow system has been tested and applied to performing NO-carbon reactivity studies. This system employs a Kin-Tek gas calibration/mixing system for varying NO and CO concentrations in the feed gas to the packed bed, a NO{sub x} chemiluminescence analyzer (ThermoElectron, Model 10), and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (Ametek). This system is used for both steady-state reactivity studies, as well as mechanistic studies on the effects of NO and CO in the gas phase on intermediate oxygen surface complex populations on the carbon substrates. (2) Reactivity studies of the NO-carbon system have been performed as a function of temperature and NO concentration. It was found that apparent activation energy in the ''high temperature'' regime of 180 {+-} 10 kJ/mol agrees well with corresponding values reported in the literature. At the low NO concentrations used, it was observed that the reaction is not strictly first order in NO. In addition, the influence of mass transfer limitations were noted at high temperatures and low NO concentrations. Plans for the next reporting period include applications of the packed bed reactor system to perform temperature programmed desorption studies of the reaction of the NO-carbon reaction, and to reactivity studies of the NO/CO reaction system.

  7. Experimental Study of Active Techniques for Blade/Vortex Interaction Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobiki, Noboru; Murashige, Atsushi; Tsuchihashi, Akihiko; Yamakawa, Eiichi

    This paper presents the experimental results of the effect of Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) and Active Flap on the Blade/Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise. Wind tunnel tests were performed with a 1-bladed rotor system to evaluate the simplified BVI phenomenon avoiding the complicated aerodynamic interference which is characteristically and inevitably caused by a multi-bladed rotor. Another merit to use this 1-bladed rotor system is that the several objective active techniques can be evaluated under the same condition installed in the same rotor system. The effects of the active techniques on the BVI noise reduction were evaluated comprehensively by the sound pressure, the blade/vortex miss distance obtained by Laser light Sheet (LLS), the blade surface pressure distribution and the tip vortex structure by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The correlation among these quantities to describe the effect of the active techniques on the BVI conditions is well obtained. The experiments show that the blade/vortex miss distance is more dominant for BVI noise than the other two BVI governing factors, such as blade lift and vortex strength at the moment of BVI.

  8. NMDA receptor hypofunction produces concomitant firing rate potentiation and burst activity reduction in the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Mark E.; Homayoun, Houman; Moghaddam, Bita

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive deficits associated with frontal lobe dysfunction are a determinant of long-term disability in schizophrenia and are not effectively treated with available medications. Clinical studies show that many aspects of these deficits are transiently induced in healthy individuals treated with N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists. These findings and recent genetic linkage studies strongly implicate NMDA receptor deficiency in schizophrenia and suggest that reversing this deficiency is pertinent to treating the cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Despite the wealth of behavioral data on the effects of NMDA antagonist treatment in humans and laboratory animals, there is a fundamental lack of understanding about the mechanisms by which a general state of NMDA deficiency influences the function of cortical neurons. Using ensemble recording in freely moving rats, we found that NMDA antagonist treatment, at doses that impaired working memory, potentiated the firing rate of most prefrontal cortex neurons. This potentiation, which correlated with expression of behavioral stereotypy, resulted from an increased number of irregularly discharged single spikes. Concurrent with the increase in spike activity, there was a significant reduction in organized bursting activity. These results identify two distinct mechanisms by which NMDA receptor deficiency may disrupt frontal lobe function: an increase in disorganized spike activity, which may enhance cortical noise and transmission of disinformation; and a decrease in burst activity, which reduces transmission efficacy of cortical neurons. These findings provide a physiological basis for the NMDA receptor deficiency model of schizophrenia and may clarify the nature of cortical dysfunction in this disease. PMID:15159546

  9. A unique platinum-graphene hybrid structure for high activity and durability in oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengming; Ma, Liang; Liao, Lingwen; Bai, Song; Long, Ran; Zuo, Ming; Xiong, Yujie

    2013-01-01

    It remains a grand challenge to achieve both high activity and durability in Pt electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. Here we develop a class of Pt highly concave cubic (HCC) nanocrystals, which are enriched with high-index facets, to enable high ORR activity. The durability of HCC nanocrystals can be significantly improved via assembly with graphene. Meanwhile, the unique hybrid structure displays further enhanced specific activity, which is 7-fold greater than the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts. Strikingly, it exhibits impressive performance in terms of half-wave potential (E1/2). The E1/2 of 0.967 V at the Pt loading as low as 46 μg cm−2, which stands as 63 mV higher than that of the Pt/C catalysts, is slightly superior to the record observed for the most active porous Pt-Ni catalyst in literature. This work paves the way to designing high-performance electrocatalysts by modulating their surface and interface with loading substrates. PMID:23999570

  10. Effects of combining biological treatment and activated carbon on hexavalent chromium reduction.

    PubMed

    Orozco, A M Ferro; Contreras, E M; Zaritzky, N E

    2011-02-01

    The objectives of the present work were: (a) to analyze the Cr(VI) removal by combining activated sludge (AS) with powdered activated carbon (PAC), (b) to analyze the effect of PAC and Cr(VI) on the growth kinetics of activated sludge, and (c) to determine if the combined method (AS-PAC) for Cr(VI) removal can be considered additive or synergistic with respect to the individual processes. Chromate removal was improved by increasing PAC concentrations in both PAC and AS-PAC systems. Cr(VI) removal using the AS-PAC system was higher than using AS or PAC. The increase of Cr(VI) caused longer lag phase and lower observed specific growth rate (μ(obs)), biomass yield (Y(X/S)), and specific growth substrate consumption rate (q(S)) of activated sludge; additionally, PAC did not enhance the growth kinetic parameters (μ(obs), Y(X/S), q(S)). Cr(VI) reduction in AS-PAC system was the result of the additive effect of each individual Cr(VI) removal process. PMID:21123053

  11. Platinum multicubes prepared by ni(2+) -mediated shape evolution exhibit high electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Wang, Chengming; Xia, Bao Yu; Mao, Keke; He, Jiawei; Wu, Xiaojun; Xiong, Yujie; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2015-05-01

    Pt(100) facets are generally considered less active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Reported herein is a unique Pt-branched structure, a multicube, whose surface is mostly enclosed by {100} facets but contains high-index facets at the small junction area between the adjacent cubic components. The synthesis is accomplished by a Ni(2+) -mediated facet evolution from high-index {311} to {100} facets on the frameworks of multipods. Despite the high {100} facet coverage, the Pt multicubes exhibit impressive ORR activity in terms of half-wave potential and current density nearly to the level of the most active Pt-based catalysts, while the durability of catalysts is well retained. The facet evolution creates a set of samples with tunable ratios of high-index to low-index facets. The results reveal that the excellent ORR performance of Pt multicubes is a combined result of active sites by high-index facets and low resistance by flat surface. It is anticipated that this work will offer a new approach to facet-controlled synthesis and ORR catalysts design. PMID:25756931

  12. Ultrathin Icosahedral Pt-Enriched Nanocage with Excellent Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity.

    PubMed

    He, Dong Sheng; He, Daping; Wang, Jing; Lin, Yue; Yin, Peiqun; Hong, Xun; Wu, Yuen; Li, Yadong

    2016-02-10

    Cost-efficient utilization of Pt in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of great importance for the potential industrial scale demand of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells. Designing a hollow structure of a Pt catalyst offers a great opportunity to enhance the electrocatalytic performance and maximize the use of precious Pt. Herein we report a routine to synthesize ultrathin icosahedral Pt-enriched nanocages. In detail, the Pt atoms were conformally deposited on the surface of Pd icosahedral seeds, followed by selective removal of the Pd core by a concentrated HNO3 solution. The icosahedral Pt-enriched nanocage that is a few atomic layers thick includes the merits of abundant twin defects, an ultrahigh surface/volume ratio, and an ORR-favored Pt{111} facet, all of which have been demonstrated to be promoting factors for ORR. With a 10 times higher specific activity and 7 times higher mass activity, this catalyst shows more extraordinary ORR activity than the commercial Pt/C. The ORR activity of icosahedral Pt-enriched nanocages outperforms the cubic and octahedral nanocages reported in the literature, demonstrating the superiority of the icosahedral nanocage structure. PMID:26808073

  13. Nitrogenase activity in cell-free extracts of the blue-green alga, Anabaena cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Smith, R V; Evans, M C

    1971-03-01

    Cell-free extracts with high nitrogenase activity were prepared by sonic oscillation and French press treatment from the blue-gree alga Anabaena cylindrica. Extracts were prepared from cells grown on a 95% N(2)-5% CO(2) gas mixture followed by a period of nitrogen starvation under an atmosphere of 95% argon-5% CO(2). No increase in the specific activity of extracts was achieved by breaking heterocysts. Activity (assayed by acetylene reduction) was found to be dependent on adenosine triphosphate (ATP), an ATP-generating system, and a low-potential reductant. Na(2)S(2)O(2) employed as reductant supports higher rates of nitrogenase activity than reduced ferredoxin. The activity is associated with a small-particle fraction that can be sedimented by ultracentrifugation. In contrast to the particulate nitrogenase of Azotobacter, which is stable in air, the A. cylindrica nitrogenase is an oxygen sensitive as nitrogenase prepared from anaerobic bacteria. PMID:4994040

  14. Uptake of acetylene on cosmic dust and production of benzene in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankland, Victoria L.; James, Alexander D.; Sánchez, Juan Diego Carrillo; Mangan, Thomas P.; Willacy, Karen; Poppe, Andrew R.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-11-01

    A low-temperature flow tube and ultra-high vacuum apparatus were used to explore the uptake and heterogeneous chemistry of acetylene (C2H2) on cosmic dust analogues over the temperature range encountered in Titan's atmosphere below 600 km. The uptake coefficient, γ, was measured at 181 K to be (1.6 ± 0.4) × 10-4, (1.9 ± 0.4) × 10-4 and (1.5 ± 0.4) × 10-4 for the uptake of C2H2 on Mg2SiO4, MgFeSiO4 and Fe2SiO4, respectively, indicating that γ is independent of Mg or Fe active sites. The uptake of C2H2 was also measured on SiO2 and SiC as analogues for meteoric smoke particles in Titan's atmosphere, but was found to be below the detection limit (γ < 6 × 10-8 and < 4 × 10-7, respectively). The rate of cyclo-trimerization of C2H2 to C6H6 was found to be 2.6 × 10-5 exp(-741/T) s-1, with an uncertainty ranging from ± 27 % at 115 K to ± 49 % at 181 K. A chemical ablation model was used to show that the bulk of cosmic dust particles (radius 0.02-10 μm) entering Titan's atmosphere do not ablate (< 1% mass loss through sputtering), thereby providing a significant surface for heterogeneous chemistry. A 1D model of dust sedimentation shows that the production of C6H6via uptake of C2H2 on cosmic dust, followed by cyclo-trimerization and desorption, is probably competitive with gas-phase production of C6H6 between 80 and 120 km.

  15. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Amy C; Andrusiv, Lubov P; Courtney, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of modular, oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes. Such tools are needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. The pressure-time profiles measured at 1 MHz using high-speed piezoelectric pressure sensors have relevant durations and show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of free-field blast waves. Descriptions are included for shock tube diameters of 27-79 mm. A range of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 1187 kPa (with 0.5-5.6% standard error of the mean) were produced by selection of the driver section diameter and distance from the shock tube opening. The peak pressures varied predictably with distance from the shock tube opening while maintaining both a true blast wave profile and relevant pulse duration for distances up to about one diameter from the shock tube opening. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current compression-driven shock tubes, and it does not have a large jet effect. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven shock tubes, which reduces operating costs and effort and permits greater throughput and accessibility. It is expected to be useful in assessing the response of various sensors to shock wave loading; assessing the reflection, transmission, and absorption properties of candidate armor materials; assessing material properties at high rates of loading; assessing the response of biological materials to shock wave exposure; and providing a means to validate numerical models of the interaction of shock waves with structures. All of these activities have been difficult to pursue in a laboratory setting due in part to lack of appropriate means to produce a realistic blast loading profile. PMID:22559580

  16. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Amy C.; Andrusiv, Lubov P.; Courtney, Michael W.

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of modular, oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes. Such tools are needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. The pressure-time profiles measured at 1 MHz using high-speed piezoelectric pressure sensors have relevant durations and show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of free-field blast waves. Descriptions are included for shock tube diameters of 27-79 mm. A range of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 1187 kPa (with 0.5-5.6% standard error of the mean) were produced by selection of the driver section diameter and distance from the shock tube opening. The peak pressures varied predictably with distance from the shock tube opening while maintaining both a true blast wave profile and relevant pulse duration for distances up to about one diameter from the shock tube opening. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current compression-driven shock tubes, and it does not have a large jet effect. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven shock tubes, which reduces operating costs and effort and permits greater throughput and accessibility. It is expected to be useful in assessing the response of various sensors to shock wave loading; assessing the reflection, transmission, and absorption properties of candidate armor materials; assessing material properties at high rates of loading; assessing the response of biological materials to shock wave exposure; and providing a means to validate numerical models of the interaction of shock waves with structures. All of these activities have been difficult to pursue in a laboratory setting due in part to lack of appropriate means to produce a realistic blast loading profile.

  17. Clickable Photoaffinity Ligands for Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Based on Select Acetylenic Negative Allosteric Modulators.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Karen J; Velagaleti, Ranganadh; Thal, David M; Brady, Ryan M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lapinsky, David J

    2016-07-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest class of current drug targets. In particular, small-molecule allosteric modulators offer substantial potential for selectively "tuning" GPCR activity. However, there remains a critical need for experimental strategies that unambiguously determine direct allosteric ligand-GPCR interactions, to facilitate both chemical biology studies and rational structure-based drug design. We now report the development and use of first-in-class clickable allosteric photoprobes for a GPCR based on metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) negative allosteric modulator (NAM) chemotypes. Select acetylenic mGlu5 NAM lead compounds were rationally modified to contain either a benzophenone or an aryl azide as a photoreactive functional group, enabling irreversible covalent attachment to mGlu5 via photoactivation. Additionally, a terminal alkyne or an aliphatic azide was incorporated as a click chemistry handle, allowing chemoselective attachment of fluorescent moieties to the irreversibly mGlu5-bound probe via tandem photoaffinity labeling-bioorthogonal conjugation. These clickable photoprobes retained submicromolar affinity for mGlu5 and negative cooperativity with glutamate, interacted with the "common allosteric-binding site," displayed slow binding kinetics, and could irreversibly label mGlu5 following UV exposure. We depleted the number of functional mGlu5 receptors using an irreversibly bound NAM to elucidate and delineate orthosteric agonist affinity and efficacy. Finally, successful conjugation of fluorescent dyes via click chemistry was demonstrated for each photoprobe. In the future, these clickable photoprobes are expected to aid our understanding of the structural basis of mGlu5 allosteric modulation. Furthermore, tandem photoaffinity labeling-bioorthogonal conjugation is expected to be a broadly applicable experimental strategy across the entire GPCR superfamily. PMID:27115427

  18. Measurement of cardiac output during exercise by open-circuit acetylene uptake.

    PubMed

    Barker, R C; Hopkins, S R; Kellogg, N; Olfert, I M; Brutsaert, T D; Gavin, T P; Entin, P L; Rice, A J; Wagner, P D

    1999-10-01

    Noninvasive measurement of cardiac output (QT) is problematic during heavy exercise. We report a new approach that avoids unpleasant rebreathing and resultant changes in alveolar PO(2) or PCO(2) by measuring short-term acetylene (C(2)H(2)) uptake by an open-circuit technique, with application of mass balance for the calculation of QT. The method assumes that alveolar and arterial C(2)H(2) pressures are the same, and we account for C(2)H(2) recirculation by extrapolating end-tidal C(2)H(2) back to breath 1 of the maneuver. We correct for incomplete gas mixing by using He in the inspired mixture. The maneuver involves switching the subject to air containing trace amounts of C(2)H(2) and He; ventilation and pressures of He, C(2)H(2), and CO(2) are measured continuously (the latter by mass spectrometer) for 20-25 breaths. Data from three subjects for whom multiple Fick O(2) measurements of QT were available showed that measurement of QT by the Fick method and by the C(2)H(2) technique was statistically similar from rest to 90% of maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)). Data from 12 active women and 12 elite male athletes at rest and 90% of VO(2 max) fell on a single linear relationship, with O(2) consumption (VO(2)) predicting QT values of 9.13, 15.9, 22.6, and 29.4 l/min at VO(2) of 1, 2, 3, and 4 l/min. Mixed venous PO(2) predicted from C(2)H(2)-determined QT, measured VO(2), and arterial O(2) concentration was approximately 20-25 Torr at 90% of VO(2 max) during air breathing and 10-15 Torr during 13% O(2) breathing. This modification of previous gas uptake methods, to avoid rebreathing, produces reasonable data from rest to heavy exercise in normal subjects. PMID:10517785

  19. Inactivation of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) by acetylene.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh D; Lin, Ya-Ping; Van Vuong, Quan; Nagababu, Penumaka; Chang, Brian T-A; Ng, Kok Yaoh; Chen, Chein-Hung; Han, Chau-Chung; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Li, Mai Suan; Yu, Steve S-F; Chan, Sunney I

    2015-12-01

    Acetylene (HCCH) has a long history as a mechanism-based enzyme inhibitor and is considered an active-site probe of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Here, we report how HCCH inactivates pMMO in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) by using high-resolution mass spectrometry and computational simulation. High-resolution MALDI-TOF MS of intact pMMO complexes has allowed us to confirm that the enzyme oxidizes HCCH to the ketene (C2H2O) intermediate, which then forms an acetylation adduct with the transmembrane PmoC subunit. LC-MS/MS analysis of the peptides derived from in-gel proteolytic digestion of the protein subunit identifies K196 of PmoC as the site of acetylation. No evidence is obtained for chemical modification of the PmoA or PmoB subunit. The inactivation of pMMO by a single adduct in the transmembrane PmoC domain is intriguing given the complexity of the structural fold of this large membrane-protein complex as well as the complicated roles played by the various metal cofactors in the enzyme catalysis. Computational studies suggest that the entry of hydrophobic substrates to, and migration of products from, the catalytic site of pMMO are controlled tightly within the transmembrane domain. Support of these conclusions is provided by parallel experiments with two related alkynes: propyne (CH3CCH) and trifluoropropyne (CF3CCH). Finally, we discuss the implication of these findings to the location of the catalytic site in pMMO. PMID:26275807

  20. Seasonal Variations of Temperature, Acetylene and Ethane in Saturn's Stratosphere from 2005 to 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, James; Irwin, P. G. J.; Fletcher, L. N.; Moses, J. I.; Greathouse, T. K.; Friedson, A. J.; Hesman, B.; Hurley, J.; Merlet, C.

    2012-10-01

    Acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) exemplify by-products of complex photochemistry in Saturn’s stratosphere. Their relative stability together with their strong vertical gradients in concentration allow for their use as tracers of vertical motion in Saturn’s lower stratosphere. Earlier studies of Saturn's hydrocarbons have provided only a snapshot of their behaviour with temporal variations remaining to be determined. In this study, we investigate how the thermal structure and concentrations of acetylene and ethane have evolved on Saturn with the changing season. We use FIRMAP (15.5 cm-1 spectral resolution) Cassini-CIRS observations, initially retrieve temperature and subsequently retrieve the abundances of acetylene and ethane. In comparing 2005, 2009 and 2010 results, we observe the disappearance of Saturn's southern warm polar hood with cooling of up to 18.6 K ± 0.9 K at 1.1 mbar south of 75°S (planetographic). This suggests dissipation of Saturn's south polar vortex in addition to an autumnal cooling. We observe a 20% ± 9% enrichment of acetylene and a 30% ± 10% enrichment of ethane at 2.1 mbar at 25°N, together with a 14% ± 9% depletion of acetylene and an 18% ± 7% depletion of ethane at the same altitude at 15°S. This suggests the presence of localised downwelling and upwelling at these latitudes, respectively. These vertical motions are consistent with a recently-developed GCM (global circulation model) of Saturn's tropopause and stratosphere, which predicts this pattern of upwelling and downwelling as a result of seasonally-reversing Hadley circulation.

  1. Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects: A CFD Validation Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    A rotorcraft fuselage is typically designed with an emphasis on operational functionality with aerodynamic efficiency being of secondary importance. This results in a significant amount of drag during high-speed forward flight that can be a limiting factor for future high-speed rotorcraft designs. To enable higher speed flight, while maintaining a functional fuselage design (i.e., a large rear cargo ramp door), the NASA Rotary Wing Project has conducted both experimental and computational investigations to assess active flow control as an enabling technology for fuselage drag reduction. This paper will evaluate numerical simulations of a flow control system on a generic rotorcraft fuselage with a rotor in forward flight using OVERFLOW, a structured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver developed at NASA. The results are compared to fuselage forces, surface pressures, and PN flow field data obtained in a wind tunnel experiment conducted at the NASA Langley 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel where significant drag and download reductions were demonstrated using flow control. This comparison showed that the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver was unable to predict the fuselage forces and pressure measurements on the ramp for the baseline and flow control cases. While the CFD was able to capture the flow features, it was unable to accurately predict the performance of the flow control.

  2. Reductive dehalogenation activity of indigenous microorganism in sediments of the Hackensack River, New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Seo Yean; Häggblom, Max M

    2016-07-01

    Organohalogen pollutants are of concern in many river and estuarine environments, such as the New York-New Jersey Harbor estuary and its tributaries. The Hackensack River is contaminated with various metals, hydrocarbons and halogenated organics, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins. In order to examine the potential for microbial reductive dechlorination by indigenous microorganisms, sediment samples were collected from five different estuarine locations along the Hackensack River. Hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), and pentachloroaniline (PCA) were selected as model organohalogen pollutants to assess anaerobic dehalogenating potential. Dechlorinating activity of HCB and PCA was observed in sediment microcosms for all sampling sites. HCB was dechlorinated via pentachlorobenzene (PeCB) and trichlorobenzene (TriCB) to dichlorobenzene (DCB). PCA was dechlorinated via tetrachloroaniline (TeCA), trichloroanilines (TriCA), and dichloroanilines (DCA) to monochloroaniline (MCA). No HBB debromination was observed over 12 months of incubation. However, with HCB as a co-substrate slow HBB debromination was observed with production of tetrabromobenzene (TeBB) and tribromobenzene (TriBB). Chloroflexi specific 16S rRNA gene PCR-DGGE followed by sequence analysis detected Dehalococcoides species in sediments of the freshwater location, but not in the estuarine site. Analysis targeting 12 putative reductive dehalogenase (rdh) genes showed that these were enriched concomitant with HCB or PCA dechlorination in freshwater sediment microcosms. PMID:27108041

  3. Hydrodynamic sensing does not facilitate active drag reduction in the golden shiner (Notemigonus crysoleucas).

    PubMed

    McHenry, M J; Michel, K B; Stewart, W; Müller, U K

    2010-04-01

    The lateral line system detects water flow, which allows fish to orient their swimming with respect to hydrodynamic cues. However, it is unclear whether this sense plays a role in the control of propulsion. Hydrodynamic theory suggests that fish could reduce drag by coordinating the motion of the head relative to detected flow signals. To test this hypothesis, we performed measurements of undulatory kinematics during steady swimming in the golden shiner (Notemigonus crysoleucas) at three speeds (4.5, 11.0 and 22.0 cm s(-1)). We found that the phase shift between yaw angle and lateral velocity (20.5+/-13.1 deg., N=5) was significantly greater than the theoretical optimum (0 deg.) and the amplitude of these variables created a hydrodynamic index (H=0.05+/-0.03, N=6) that was less than an order of magnitude below the theoretical prediction. Furthermore, we repeated these measurements after pharmacologically ablating the lateral line hair cells and found that drag reduction was not adversely influenced by disabling the lateral line system. Therefore, flow sensing does not facilitate active drag reduction. However, we discovered that ablating the lateral line causes the envelope of lateral displacement to nearly double at the envelope's most narrow point for swimming at 4.5 cm s(-1). Therefore, fish may use hydrodynamic sensing to modulate the lateral amplitude of slow undulatory swimming, which could allow rapid responses to changes in environmental flow. PMID:20348343

  4. Electrocatalytic activities of alkyne-functionalized copper nanoparticles in oxygen reduction in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ke; Song, Yang; Chen, Shaowei

    2014-12-01

    Stable alkyne-capped copper nanoparticles were prepared by chemical reduction of copper acetate with sodium borohydride in the presence of alkyne ligands. Transmission electron microscopic measurements showed that nanoparticles were well dispersed with a diameter in the range of 4-6 nm. FTIR and photoluminescence spectroscopic measurements confirmed the successful attachment of the alkyne ligands onto the nanoparticle surface most likely forming Cu-Ctbnd interfacial bonds. XPS measurements indicated the formation of a small amount of CuO in the nanoparticles with a satellite peak where the binding energy red-shifted with increasing Cu(II) concentration. Cu2O was also detected in the nanoparticles. Similar results were observed with commercial CuO nanoparticles. Electrochemical studies showed that the as-prepared alkyne-capped copper nanoparticles exhibited apparent electrocatalytic activity in oxygen reduction in alkaline media, a performance that was markedly better than those reported earlier with poly- or single-crystalline copper electrodes; and the fraction of peroxides in the final products decreased with decreasing concentration of oxide components in the nanoparticles.

  5. N2O reduction by the mu4-sulfide-bridged tetranuclear CuZ cluster active site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Gorelsky, Serge I; Ghosh, Somdatta; Solomon, Edward I

    2004-08-13

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) reduction is a chemical challenge both in the selective oxidation of organic substrates by N2O and in the removal of N2O as a green-house gas. The reduction of N2O is thermodynamically favorable but kinetically inert, and requires activating transition-metal centers. In biological systems, N2O reduction is the last step in the denitrification process of the bacterial nitrogen cycle and is accomplished by the enzyme nitrous oxide reductase, whose active site consists of a micro4-sulfide-bridged tetranuclear CuZ cluster which has many unusual spectroscopic features. Recent studies have developed a detailed electronic-structure description of the resting CuZ cluster, determined its catalytically relevant state, and provided insight into the role of this tetranuclear copper cluster in N2O activation and reduction. PMID:15307074

  6. Concentration Effects of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Activity for Three Platinum Catalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-04

    A rotating disk electrode (RDE) along with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), were used to investigate the impact of two model compounds representing degradation products of Nafion and 3M perfluorinated sulfonic acid membranes on the electrochemical surface area (ECA) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline Pt, nano-structured thin film (NSTF) Pt (3M), and Pt/Vulcan carbon (Pt/Vu) (TKK) electrodes. ORR kinetic currents (measured at 0.9 V and transport corrected) were found to decrease linearly with the log of concentration for both model compounds on all Pt surfaces studied. Ultimately, model compound adsorption effects on ECA weremore » more abstruse due to competitive organic anion adsorption on Pt surfaces superimposing with the hydrogen underpotential deposition (HUPD) region.« less

  7. Reduction in Power Consumption for Full-Color Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Hiroshi; Hamada, Yuji; Nishimura, Kazuki; Okumoto, Kenji; Saito, Nobuo; Mameno, Kazunobu; Shibata, Kenichi

    2006-09-01

    The active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) is expected to serve as next generation flat panels display with the outstanding features of wide viewing angle, vivid images, and quick response. For practical use of full-color AMOLEDs in mobile devices, it is essential to reduce the power consumption, which is generally higher than that of liquid crystal displays (LCDs). For this aim, a red, green, blue, and white (RGBW) pixel format combined with an RGB color filter array (RGBW format) with a common white emission layer (EML) has been developed. We find that the RGBW format can successfully reduce the power consumption of a full-color AMOLED by nearly half that of a conventionally filtered RGB pixel format. This improved power consumption is almost equal to the power consumption of a same-sized LCD. The RGBW format is a promising technique for the further reduction of the power consumption of a full-color AMOLED.

  8. Repetition-Related Reductions in Neural Activity during Emotional Simulations of Future Events

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Simulations of future experiences are often emotionally arousing, and the tendency to repeatedly simulate negative future outcomes has been identified as a predictor of the onset of symptoms of anxiety. Nonetheless, next to nothing is known about how the healthy human brain processes repeated simulations of emotional future events. In this study, we present a paradigm that can be used to study repeated simulations of the emotional future in a manner that overcomes phenomenological confounds between positive and negative events. The results show that pulvinar nucleus and orbitofrontal cortex respectively demonstrate selective reductions in neural activity in response to frequently as compared to infrequently repeated simulations of negative and positive future events. Implications for research on repeated simulations of the emotional future in both non-clinical and clinical populations are discussed. PMID:26390294

  9. Reduction of Free Edge Peeling Stress of Laminated Composites Using Active Piezoelectric Layers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Kim, Heung Soo

    2014-01-01

    An analytical approach is proposed in the reduction of free edge peeling stresses of laminated composites using active piezoelectric layers. The approach is the extended Kantorovich method which is an iterative method. Multiterms of trial function are employed and governing equations are derived by taking the principle of complementary virtual work. The solutions are obtained by solving a generalized eigenvalue problem. By this approach, the stresses automatically satisfy not only the traction-free boundary conditions, but also the free edge boundary conditions. Through the iteration processes, the free edge stresses converge very quickly. It is found that the peeling stresses generated by mechanical loadings are significantly reduced by applying a proper electric field to the piezoelectric actuators. PMID:25025088

  10. Nitride stabilized PtNi core-shell nanocatalyst for high oxygen reduction activity.

    PubMed

    Kuttiyiel, Kurian A; Sasaki, Kotaro; Choi, Yongman; Su, Dong; Liu, Ping; Adzic, Radoslav R

    2012-12-12

    We describe a route to the development of novel PtNiN core-shell catalysts with low Pt content shell and inexpensive NiN core having high activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The PtNiN synthesis involves nitriding Ni nanoparticles and simultaneously encapsulating it by 2-4 monolayer-thick Pt shell. The experimental data and the density functional theory calculations indicate nitride has the bifunctional effect that facilitates formation of the core-shell structures and improves the performance of the Pt shell by inducing both geometric and electronic effects. Synthesis of inexpensive NiN cores opens up possibilities for designing of various transition metal nitride based core-shell nanoparticles for a wide range of applications in energy conversion processes. PMID:23194259

  11. NASA Propulsion Concept Studies and Risk Reduction Activities for Resource Prospector Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Williams, Hunter; Burnside, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The Resource Prospector mission is to investigate the Moon's polar regions in search of volatiles. The government-version lander concept for the mission is composed of a braking stage and a liquid-propulsion lander stage. A propulsion trade study concluded with a solid rocket motor for the braking stage while using the 4th-stage Peacekeeper (PK) propulsion components for the lander stage. The mechanical design of the liquid propulsion system was conducted in concert with the lander structure design. A propulsion cold-flow test article was fabricated and integrated into a lander development structure, and a series of cold flow tests were conducted to characterize the fluid transient behavior and to collect data for validating analytical models. In parallel, RS-34 PK thrusters to be used on the lander stage were hot-fire tested in vacuum conditions as part of risk reduction activities.

  12. Concentration Effects of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Activity for Three Platinum Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-04

    A rotating disk electrode (RDE) along with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), were used to investigate the impact of two model compounds representing degradation products of Nafion and 3M perfluorinated sulfonic acid membranes on the electrochemical surface area (ECA) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline Pt, nano-structured thin film (NSTF) Pt (3M), and Pt/Vulcan carbon (Pt/Vu) (TKK) electrodes. ORR kinetic currents (measured at 0.9 V and transport corrected) were found to decrease linearly with the log of concentration for both model compounds on all Pt surfaces studied. Ultimately, model compound adsorption effects on ECA were more abstruse due to competitive organic anion adsorption on Pt surfaces superimposing with the hydrogen underpotential deposition (HUPD) region.

  13. Infrared observation of thermally activated oxide reduction within Al/SiOx/Si tunnel diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brendel, R.; Hezel, R.

    1992-05-01

    Electron-beam-evaporated aluminum/silicon oxide/silicon tunnel diodes with an initial oxide thickness of 1.3 nm have been annealed for up to 1 h at temperatures from 213 to 369 °C. They have been investigated by infrared grazing internal reflection (GIR) spectroscopy and current-voltage measurements. The measured IR spectra were analyzed by computer modeling. All spectral features could be explained self-consistently within a Al/AlOy/SiOx/Si layer model. In the as-deposited state less than 0.6 monolayers of Al—O bonds are formed at the Al/SiOx interface. A thermally activated reduction of the ultrathin oxide film by Al was observed. The changes in the current-voltage curves induced by slight annealing (1 min at 213 °C) are accompanied by changes in the insulator-bonding structure, which GIR is sensitive enough to detect.

  14. Activation reduction in anterior temporal cortices during repeated recognition of faces of personal acquaintances.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, M; Kawashima, R; Nakamura, K; Sato, N; Nakamura, A; Kato, T; Hatano, K; Schormann, T; Zilles, K; Sato, K; Ito, K; Fukuda, H

    2001-05-01

    Repeated recognition of the face of a familiar individual is known to show semantic repetition priming effect. In this study, normal subjects were repeatedly presented faces of their colleagues, and the effect of repetition on the regional cerebral blood flow change was measured using positron emission tomography. They repeated a set of three tasks: the familiar-face detection (F) task, the facial direction discrimination (D) task, and the perceptual control (C) task. During five repetitions of the F task, familiar faces were presented six times from different views in a pseudorandom order. Activation reduction through the repetition of the F tasks was observed in the bilateral anterior (anterolateral to the polar region) temporal cortices which are suggested to be involved in the access to the long-term memory concerning people. The bilateral amygdala, the hypothalamus, and the medial frontal cortices, were constantly activated during the F tasks, and considered to be associated with the behavioral significance of the presented familiar faces. Constant activation was also observed in the bilateral occipitotemporal regions and fusiform gyri and the right medial temporal regions during perception of the faces, and in the left medial temporal regions during the facial familiarity detection task, which are consistent with the results of previous functional brain imaging studies. The results have provided further information about the functional segregation of the anterior temporal regions in face recognition and long-term memory. PMID:11304083

  15. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M.; Crooks, Richard M.; et al

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shownmore » to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.« less

  16. Early reduction in toe flexor strength is associated with physical activity in elderly men

    PubMed Central

    Suwa, Masataka; Imoto, Takayuki; Kida, Akira; Yokochi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the toe flexor, hand grip and knee extensor strengths of young and elderly men, and to examine the association between toe flexor strength and physical activity or inactivity levels. [Subjects and Methods] Young (n=155, 18–23 years) and elderly (n=60, 65–88 years) men participated in this study. Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength were measured. Physical activity (time spent standing/walking per day) and inactivity (time spent sitting per day) were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. [Results] Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength of the elderly men were significantly lower than those of the young men. Standing/walking and sitting times of the elderly men were lower than those of the young men. Toe flexor strength correlated with hand grip and knee extensor strength in both groups. In elderly men, toe flexor strength correlated with standing/walking time. In comparison to the young men’s mean values, toe flexor strength was significantly lower than knee extensor and hand grip strength in the elderly group. [Conclusion] The results suggest that age-related reduction in toe flexor strength is greater than those of hand grip and knee extensor strengths. An early loss of toe flexor strength is likely associated with reduced physical activity in elderly men. PMID:27313353

  17. Isolated metal active site concentration and stability control catalytic CO2 reduction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Matsubu, John C; Yang, Vanessa N; Christopher, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    CO2 reduction by H2 on heterogeneous catalysts is an important class of reactions that has been studied for decades. However, atomic scale details of structure-function relationships are still poorly understood. Particularly, it has been suggested that metal particle size plays a unique role in controlling the stability of CO2 hydrogenation catalysts and the distribution of active sites, which dictates reactivity and selectivity. These studies often have not considered the possible role of isolated metal active sites in the observed dependences. Here, we utilize probe molecule diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) with known site-specific extinction coefficients to quantify the fraction of Rh sites residing as atomically dispersed isolated sites (Rhiso), as well as Rh sites on the surface of Rh nanoparticles (RhNP) for a series of TiO2 supported Rh catalysts. Strong correlations were observed between the catalytic reverse water gas shift turn over frequency (TOF) and the fraction of Rhiso sites and between catalytic methanation TOF and the fraction of RhNP sites. Furthermore, it was observed that reaction condition-induced disintegration of Rh nanoparticles, forming Rhiso active sites, controls the changing reactivity with time on stream. This work demonstrates that isolated atoms and nanoparticles of the same metal on the same support can exhibit uniquely different catalytic selectivity in competing parallel reaction pathways and that disintegration of nanoparticles under reaction conditions can play a significant role in controlling stability. PMID:25671686

  18. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M.; Crooks, Richard M.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Liu, Ping

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.

  19. Synthesis of highly active and dual-functional electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Geng; Xu, Guangran; Li, Yingjun; Liu, Baocang; Gong, Xia; Zheng, Dafang; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Qin

    2016-12-01

    The promising Pt-based ternary catalyst is crucial for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) due to improving catalytic activity and durability for both methanol oxidation reaction and oxygen reduction reaction. In this work, a facile strategy is used for the synthesis ternary RuMPt (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) nanodendrities catalysts. The ternary RuMPt alloys exhibit enhanced specific and mass activity, positive half-wave potential, and long-term stability, compared with binary Pt-based alloy and the commercial Pt/C catalyst, which is attributed to the high electron density and upshifting of the d-band center for Pt atoms, and synergistic catalytic effects among Pt, M, and Ru atoms by introducing a transition metal. Impressively, the ternary RuCoPt catalyst exhibits superior mass activity (801.59 mA mg-1) and positive half-wave potential (0.857 V vs. RHE) towards MOR and ORR, respectively. Thus, the RuMPt nanocomposite is a very promising material to be used as dual electrocatalyst in the application of PEMFCs.

  20. In Situ Probing of the Active Site Geometry of Ultrathin Nanowires for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiqing; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M; Crooks, Richard M; Adzic, Radoslav R; Liu, Ping; Wong, Stanislaus S

    2015-10-01

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (∼2 nm) core-shell Pt∼Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu∼Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Hence, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general. PMID:26402364

  1. Photocatalytic reduction synthesis of SrTiO3-graphene nanocomposites and their enhanced photocatalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SrTiO3-graphene nanocomposites were prepared via photocatalytic reduction of graphene oxide by UV light-irradiated SrTiO3 nanoparticles. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy analysis indicates that graphene oxide is reduced into graphene. Transmission electron microscope observation shows that SrTiO3 nanoparticles are well assembled onto graphene sheets. The photocatalytic activity of as-prepared SrTiO3-graphene composites was evaluated by the degradation of acid orange 7 (AO7) under a 254-nm UV irradiation, revealing that the composites exhibit significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity compared to the bare SrTiO3 nanoparticles. This can be explained by the fact that photogenerated electrons are captured by graphene, leading to an increased separation and availability of electrons and holes for the photocatalytic reaction. Hydroxyl (·OH) radicals were detected by the photoluminescence technique using terephthalic acid as a probe molecule and were found to be produced over the irradiated SrTiO3 nanoparticles and SrTiO3-graphene composites; especially, an enhanced yield is observed for the latter. The influence of ethanol, KI, and N2 on the photocatalytic efficiency was also investigated. Based on the experimental results, ·OH, h+, and H2O2 are suggested to be the main active species in the photocatalytic degradation of AO7 by SrTiO3-graphene composites. PACS 61.46. + w; 78.67.Bf; 78.66.Sq PMID:25050089

  2. Electrochemical activation of commercial polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haibo; Xia, Guangsen; Liu, Haining; Xia, Shuwei; Lu, Yonghong

    2015-03-28

    Nitrogen (N)-doped carbon and its non-noble metal composite replacing platinum-based oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts still have some fundamental problems that remain. Here the micron-sized commercial polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber (PAN-CF) electrode was modified using an electrochemical method, converting its inherent pyridinic-N into 2-pyridone (or 2-hydroxyl pyridine) functional group existing in three-dimensional active layers with remarkable ORR catalytic activity and stability. The carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen and oxygen atoms is prone to act as an active site to efficiently catalyze a two-electron ORR process. However, after coordinating pyridone to the Cu(2+) ion, together with the electrochemical reaction, the chemical redox between Cu(+) and ORR intermediates synergistically tends towards a four-electron pathway in alkaline solution. In different medium, the complexation and dissociation can induce the charge transfer and reconstruction among proton, metal ion and pyridone functionalities, eventually leading to the changes of ORR performance. PMID:25712410

  3. Palladium-platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2015-01-01

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can be attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. These results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability. PMID:26133469

  4. Palladium–platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T.; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A.; et al

    2015-07-02

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can bemore » attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. Ultimately, these results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability.« less

  5. Acetylene-derived strong organic acceptors for planar and nonplanar push-pull chromophores.

    PubMed

    Kivala, Milan; Diederich, François

    2009-02-17

    Though investigated for decades, interest in push-pull chromophores (D-pi-A), strong electron donors (D) connected by pi-conjugating spacers to strong electron acceptors (A), continues to grow. Such chromophores are of substantial interest for optoelectronic devices such as waveguides. Also, strong donors and acceptors form bimolecular charge-transfer (CT) complexes and salts, some of which exhibit electrical conductivity and magnetic behavior. Furthermore, strong organic acceptors are increasingly explored as dopants in the fabrication of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and solar cells. This Account describes systematic efforts pursued over the past decade in our laboratory to generate new families of organic electron acceptors (A) and conjugate them via pi-spacers to electron donors (D) under formation of push-pull systems with intense intramolecular CT interactions and high third-order optical nonlinearities. First, we describe donor-acceptor-substituted tetraethynylethenes (TEEs). In these chromophores, the peripherally attached p-nitrophenyl acceptors and N,N-dimethylanilino donors behave as nearly independent redox centers. Acetylenic scaffolding using TEE building blocks produces large all-carbon sheets, such as perethynylated dehydroannulenes, expanded radialenes, and radiaannulenes with potent electron-acceptor properties. Arylated TEEs act as molecular switches allowing two-way photochemical interconversion that is not perturbed by thermal isomerization pathways. Upon sequential substitution of the acetylene moieties in TEEs, we formed another family of potent acceptors, the cyanoethynylethenes (CEEs). Donor-substituted CEEs are planar CT chromophores with very high third-order optical nonlinearities. Their high environmental stability allows for the formation of thin films by vapor-phase deposition. Through careful analysis of the physicochemical properties of CEEs, we established useful guidelines for evaluating and tuning the optical gap in

  6. Density Functional Theory Study of Oxygen Reduction Activity on Ultrathin Platinum Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Matanovic, Ivana; Kent, Paul; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2012-07-13

    The structure, stability, and catalytic activity of a number of single- and double-wall platinum (n,m) nanotubes ranging in diameter from 0.3 to 2.0 nm were studied using plane-wave based density functional theory in the gas phase and water environment. The change in the catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with the size and chirality of the nanotube was studied by calculating equilibrium adsorption potentials for ORR intermediates and by constructing free energy diagrams in the ORR dissociative mechanism network. In addition, the stability of the platinum nanotubes is investigated in terms of electrochemical dissolution potentials and by determining the most stable state of the material as a function of pH and potential, as represented in Pourbaix diagrams. Our results show that the catalytic activity and the stability toward electrochemical dissolution depend greatly on the diameter and chirality of the nanotube. On the basis of the estimated overpotentials for ORR, we conclude that smaller, approximately 0.5 nm in diameter single-wall platinum nanotubes consistently show a huge, up to 400 mV larger overpotential than platinum, indicating very poor catalytic activity toward ORR. This is the result of substantial structural changes induced by the adsorption of any chemical species on these tubes. Single-wall n = m platinum nanotubes with a diameter larger than 1 nm have smaller ORR overpotentials than bulk platinum for up to 180 mV and thus show improved catalytic activity relative to bulk. We also predict that these nanotubes can endure the highest cell potentials but dissolution potentials are still for 110 mV lower than for the bulk, indicating a possible corrosion problem.

  7. Reprint of: Active subspaces for sensitivity analysis and dimension reduction of an integrated hydrologic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferson, Jennifer L.; Gilbert, James M.; Constantine, Paul G.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2016-05-01

    Integrated hydrologic models coupled to land surface models require several input parameters to characterize the land surface and to estimate energy fluxes. Uncertainty of input parameter values is inherent in any model and the sensitivity of output to these uncertain parameters becomes an important consideration. To better understand these connections in the context of hydrologic models, we use the ParFlow-Common Land Model (PF-CLM) to estimate energy fluxes given variations in 19 vegetation and land surface parameters over a 144-hour period of time. Latent, sensible and ground heat fluxes from bare soil and grass vegetation were estimated using single column and tilted-v domains. Energy flux outputs, along with the corresponding input parameters, from each of the four scenario simulations were evaluated using active subspaces. The active subspace method considers parameter sensitivity by quantifying a weight for each parameter. The method also evaluates the potential for dimension reduction by identifying the input-output relationship through the active variable - a linear combination of input parameters. The aerodynamic roughness length was the most important parameter for bare soil energy fluxes. Multiple parameters were important for energy fluxes from vegetated surfaces and depended on the type of energy flux. Relationships between land surface inputs and output fluxes varied between latent, sensible and ground heat, but were consistent between domain setup (i.e., with or without lateral flow) and vegetation type. A quadratic polynomial was used to describe the input-output relationship for these energy fluxes. The reduced-dimension model of land surface dynamics can be compared to observations or used to solve the inverse problem. Considering this work as a proof-of-concept, the active subspace method can be applied and extended to a range of domain setups, land cover types and time periods to obtain a reduced-form representation of any output of interest

  8. Update on Risk Reduction Activities for a Liquid Advanced Booster for NASA's Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, Andrew M.; Doering, Kimberly B; Meadows, Robert G.; Lariviere, Brian W.; Graham, Jerry B.

    2015-01-01

    The stated goals of NASA's Research Announcement for the Space Launch System (SLS) Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction (ABEDRR) are to reduce risks leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the evolved capabilities of SLS; and enable competition by mitigating targeted Advanced Booster risks to enhance SLS affordability. Dynetics, Inc. and Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) formed a team to offer a wide-ranging set of risk reduction activities and full-scale, system-level demonstrations that support NASA's ABEDRR goals. For NASA's SLS ABEDRR procurement, Dynetics and AR formed a team to offer a series of full-scale risk mitigation hardware demonstrations for an affordable booster approach that meets the evolved capabilities of the SLS. To establish a basis for the risk reduction activities, the Dynetics Team developed a booster design that takes advantage of the flight-proven Apollo-Saturn F-1. Using NASA's vehicle assumptions for the SLS Block 2, a two-engine, F-1-based booster design delivers 150 mT (331 klbm) payload to LEO, 20 mT (44 klbm) above NASA's requirements. This enables a low-cost, robust approach to structural design. During the ABEDRR effort, the Dynetics Team has modified proven Apollo-Saturn components and subsystems to improve affordability and reliability (e.g., reduce parts counts, touch labor, or use lower cost manufacturing processes and materials). The team has built hardware to validate production costs and completed tests to demonstrate it can meet performance requirements. State-of-the-art manufacturing and processing techniques have been applied to the heritage F-1, resulting in a low recurring cost engine while retaining the benefits of Apollo-era experience. NASA test facilities have been used to perform low-cost risk-reduction engine testing. In early 2014, NASA and the Dynetics Team agreed to move additional large liquid oxygen/kerosene engine work under Dynetics' ABEDRR contract. Also led by AR, the

  9. Activation of the nickel-deficient carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum: Kinetic characterization and reductant requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Ensign, S.A.; Campbell, M.J.; Ludden, P.W. )

    1990-02-27

    The requirements for and kinetics of the activation of the nickel-deficient (apo) CO dehydrogenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum by exogenous nickel have been investigated. The activation is strictly dependent upon the presence of a low-potential one-electron reductant. Sodium dithionite and reduced methylviologen are suitable reductants, whereas reduced indigo carmine and the two-electron reductants sodium borohydride, NADH, and dithiothreitol are ineffective in stimulating activation. The midpoint potential for activation was observed at approximately {minus}475 mV. The ability of a reductant to stimulate activation is correlated with the reduced state of the enzyme Fe{sub 4}-S{sub 4} centers. The activation follows apparent first-order kinetics in a saturable fashion, yielding a rate constant of 0.157 min{sup {minus}1} at saturating concentration of nickel. The initial rate at which the enzyme is activated by NiCl{sub 2} is also a saturable process, yielding a dissociation constant (K{sub D}) of 755 {mu}M for the initial association of nickel and enzyme. Cadmium(II), zinc(II), cobalt(II), and iron(II) are competitive inhibitors of nickel activation with inhibition constants of 2.44, 4.16, 175, and 349 {mu}M, respectively. Manganese(II), calcium(II), and magnesium(II) exhibit no inhibition of activation.

  10. Influence of pulsed mechanical activation of hematite-graphite-aluminum powder mixtures on the reduction of iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodrova, L. E.; Vatolin, N. A.; Pastukhov, E. A.; Petrova, S. A.; Popova, E. A.; Zakharov, R. G.

    2011-11-01

    To decrease the temperature of direct iron reduction by carbon and aluminum, short-term pulsed mechanical activation (PMA) of an Fe2O3 + Cgr + Al powder mixture is perfumed during sound-frequency shock loading by a flat activating plunger. The PMA efficiency for powders in comparable with mechanical activation in high-energy ball mills in a decrease in the activation time and retaining the chemical purity of a powder composition.

  11. Afferent input-associated reduction of muscle activity in microgravity environment.

    PubMed

    Kawano, F; Nomura, T; Ishihara, A; Nonaka, I; Ohira, Y

    2002-01-01

    Responses of electromyogram (EMG) of soleus, lateral portion of gastrocnemius (LG) and tibialis anterior (TA), and both afferent and efferent neurograms at the L(5) segmental level of the spinal cord, to altered gravity levels created by the parabolic flight of a jet airplane were investigated in adult rats. The EMG activity in antigravity soleus muscle gradually increased when the gravity was elevated from 1-G to 1.5-G (+23%) and 2-G (+67%) during the ascending phase of parabolic flight. The activity decreased approximately 72% from the 1-G level immediately when the rat was exposed to microgravity. The EMG level was maintained low during the 20-s microgravity, but it was restored immediately once the gravity level was increased to 1.5-G and then 1-G during the descending and recovery phase. The EMG level of LG also increased gradually when the gravity level was elevated and the level then decreased when the rat was exposed to microgravity (P>0.05). However, the activity level during the 20-s microgravity was identical to that obtained at 1-G. The EMG level of TA even increased insignificantly in response to the exposure to microgravity. The responses of afferent neurogram were similar to those of soleus EMG, even though the magnitude of the reduction of integrated neurogram level in response to microgravity exposure was small (approximately 26% vs. 1-G level) relative to that of soleus EMG. The level of efferent neurogram was also decreased, but only approximately 9% vs. 1-G level, during the 20-s microgravity. The data in the current study suggest that the afferent input is closely associated with the gravity-dependent muscular activity. PMID:12379265

  12. Preliminary Experiments on Noise Reduction in Cavities Using Active Impedance Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LACOUR, O.; GALLAND, M. A.; THENAIL, D.

    2000-02-01

    This paper reports experiments on the active control of enclosed sound fields via wall impedance changes. Two methods previously developed allow one to implement practically active acoustic impedances: the first is referred to as “direct” control and permits precise realizations for harmonic excitations, while the second is a hybrid passive/active feedback control well suited for random noise treatments. The two techniques have been already presented [1]; the contribution of this work relies on testing the efficiency of both systems in silencing two enclosures through experimental analyses, subsequently compared with classical analytical description. The first test cavity is one-dimensional; a global sound reduction is achieved by the hybrid system for a broadband primary excitation. The second system is a reactangular three-dimensional cavity closed by a simply supported elastic plate. The noise source is an external load applied at one point of the plate. Different impedance values are successively assigned, their effect being estimated through a global sound level indicator. Attention is also given to plate vibration changes, which may occur. Three typical behaviours of the plate-cavity system are investigated. A first experiment involves an excitation at an acoustic resonance and induces a weak plate-cavity coupling. The second, also at an acoustic resonance of the cavity, yields a strong coupling while the third corresponds to an off-resonance excitation. The hybrid feedback control system provides useful attenuation for all cases, and shows also a promising behaviour when dealing with broadband excitations. It confirms the interest of the method when classical feedforward active control fails, i.e., when reliable prior information of the undesired disturbance is not available.

  13. Synthesis of Pt-Ni/graphene via in situ reduction and its enhanced catalyst activity for methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Lihong; Wu, Yuen; Lu, Jun; Nan, Caiyun; Li, Yadong

    2013-09-01

    A simple in situ reduction approach was used to obtain Pt3Ni/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with dominant {111} facets. The catalytic activity of Pt-Ni/rGO toward methanol electro-oxidation was studied by performing cyclic voltammetry. The Pt3Ni/rGO nanocatalysts exhibited improved catalytic activity and durability. PMID:23863973

  14. Catalytic Reduction of 4-Nitrophenol Using Silver Nanoparticles with Adjustable Activity.

    PubMed

    Kästner, Claudia; Thünemann, Andreas F

    2016-07-26

    We report on the development of ultrasmall core-shell silver nanoparticles synthesized by an upscaled modification of the polyol process. It is foreseen to use these thoroughly characterized particles as reference material to compare the catalytic and biological properties of functionalized silver nanoparticles. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis reveals a narrow size distribution of the silver cores with a mean radius of Rc = 3.0 nm and a distribution width of 0.6 nm. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) provides a hydrodynamic radius of RH = 10.0 nm and a PDI of 0.09. The particles' surface is covered with poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) forming a shell with a thickness of 7.0 nm, which provides colloidal stability lasting for more than 6 months at ambient conditions. The PAA can be easily exchanged by biomolecules to modify the surface functionality. Replacements of PAA with glutathione (GSH) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been performed as examples. We demonstrate that the silver particles effectively catalyze the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol with sodium borohydride. With PAA as stabilizer, the catalytic activity of 436 ± 24 L g(-1) s(-1) is the highest reported in the literature for silver nanoparticles. GSH and BSA passivate the surface substantially, resulting in a catalytic activity of 77.6 ± 0.9 and 3.47 ± 0.50 L g(-1) s(-1), respectively. PMID:27380382

  15. Logarithmic InGaAs detectors with global shutter and active dark current reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yang; Arion, Bogdan; Bouvier, Christian; Noguier, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present newly developed logarithmic InGaAs detectors with global shuttering and also an active dark current reduction technique to ensure ambient temperature operation without TEC for industrial applications. The newly released detectors come with both VGA (15um pitch) and QVGA (25um pitch) resolutions, giving the possibility to use lens less than 1-inch size. The logarithmic response is obtained by using solar-cell mode InGaAs photodiodes. The VGA and QVGA ROICs have 3 analog memories inside each pixel which permit, except the classic ITR, IWR and CDS modes, a new differential imaging mode which can be a useful feature in active imaging systems. The photodiode frontend circuit, in pure voltage mode, is made with non-inverting amplifier instead of CTIA. The reason of this choice is that the exposure time can be shortened without need of excessive power consumption as in CTIA front-end. We think that this arrangement associated with true CDS could match the noise performance of CTIA based one. VGA and QVGA ROICs have been designed and manufactured by using 0.18um 1P4M CMOS process. Both ROIC have been tested with success and match the design targets. The first batch of both detectors is under fabrication and will be presented during the conference.

  16. Reduction of computational complexity in the image/video understanding systems with active vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvich, Gary

    2003-10-01

    The vision system evolved not only as a recognition system, but also as a sensory system for reaching, grasping and other motion activities. In advanced creatures, it became a component of prediction function, allowing creation of environmental models and activity planning. Fast information processing and decision making is vital for any living creature, and requires reduction of informational and computational complexities. The brain achieves this goal using symbolic coding, hierarchical compression, and selective processing of visual information. Network-Symbolic representation, where both systematic structural / logical methods and neural / statistical methods are the parts of a single mechanism, is the most feasible for such models. It converts visual information into the relational Network-Symbolic structures, instead of precise computations of a 3-dimensional models. Narrow foveal vision provides separation of figure from ground, object identification, semantic analysis, and precise control of actions. Rough wide peripheral vision identifies and tracks salient motion, guiding foveal system to salient objects. It also provides scene context. Objects with rigid bodies and other stable systems have coherent relational structures. Hierarchical compression and Network-Symbolic transformations derive more abstract structures that allow invariably recognize a particular structure as an exemplar of class. Robotic systems equipped with such smart vision will be able effectively navigate in any environment, understand situation, and act accordingly.

  17. Reduction-responsive multifunctional hyperbranched polyaminoglycosides with excellent antibacterial activity, biocompatibility and gene transfection capability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yajun; Ding, Xiaokang; Qi, Yu; Yu, Bingran; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2016-11-01

    There is an increasing demand in developing of multifunctional materials with good antibacterial activity, biocompatibility and drug/gene delivery capability for next-generation biomedical applications. To achieve this purpose, in this work series of hydroxyl-rich hyperbranched polyaminoglycosides of gentamicin, tobramycin, and neomycin (HP and SS-HP with redox-responsive disulfide bonds) were readily synthesized via ring-opening reactions in a one-pot manner. Both HP and SS-HP exhibit high antibacterial activity toward Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Meanwhile, the hemolysis assay of the above materials shows good biocompatibility. Moreover, SS-HPs show excellent gene transfection efficiency in vitro due to the breakdown of reduction-responsive disulfide bonds. For an in vivo anti-tumor assay, the SS-HP/p53 complexes exhibit potent inhibition capability to the growth of tumors. This study provides a promising approach for the design of next-generation multifunctional biomedical materials. PMID:27561884

  18. Proteolytic activity of Enterococcus faecalis VB63F for reduction of allergenicity of bovine milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Biscola, V; Tulini, F L; Choiset, Y; Rabesona, H; Ivanova, I; Chobert, J-M; Todorov, S D; Haertlé, T; Franco, B D G M

    2016-07-01

    With the aim of screening proteolytic strains of lactic acid bacteria to evaluate their potential for the reduction of allergenicity of the major bovine milk proteins, we isolated a new proteolytic strain of Enterococcus faecalis (Ent. faecalis VB63F) from raw bovine milk. The proteases produced by this strain had strong activity against caseins (αS1-, αS2-, and β-casein), in both skim milk and sodium caseinate. However, only partial hydrolysis of whey proteins was observed. Proteolysis of Na-caseinate and whey proteins, observed after sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE, was confirmed by analysis of peptide profiles by reversed-phase HPLC. Inhibition of proteolysis with EDTA indicated that the proteases produced by Ent. faecalis VB63F belonged to the group of metalloproteases. The optimal conditions for their activity were 42°C and pH 6.5. The majority of assessed virulence genes were absent in Ent. faecalis VB63F. The obtained results suggest that Ent. faecalis VB63F could be efficient in reducing the immunoreactivity of bovine milk proteins. PMID:27179865

  19. Ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons with very high electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jae Yeong; Kim, Taeyoung; Choi, YongMan; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Min Gyu; Sa, Young Jin; Kim, Jaesik; Lee, Zonghoon; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Kwon, Kyungjung; Terasaki, Osamu; Park, Gu-Gon; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The high cost of the platinum-based cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has impeded the widespread application of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. We report on a new family of non-precious metal catalysts based on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons (M-OMPC; M = Fe, Co, or FeCo) with high surface areas and tunable pore structures, which were prepared by nanocasting mesoporous silica templates with metalloporphyrin precursors. The FeCo-OMPC catalyst exhibited an excellent ORR activity in an acidic medium, higher than other non-precious metal catalysts. It showed higher kinetic current at 0.9 V than Pt/C catalysts, as well as superior long-term durability and MeOH-tolerance. Density functional theory calculations in combination with extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis revealed a weakening of the interaction between oxygen atom and FeCo-OMPC compared to Pt/C. This effect and high surface area of FeCo-OMPC appear responsible for its significantly high ORR activity. PMID:24056308

  20. Mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction via micro-electrolysis at the powdered zero-valent iron/activated carbon interface.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinghuan; Song, Guangyu; Liu, Jianyong; Qian, Guangren; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) powder always works well only at controlled pH lower than 4 due to the formation of iron (hydr)oxides on its surface. Fe(0) powder combined with activated carbon (AC), i.e., Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis system, was first introduced to enhance nitrate reduction in aqueous solution. Comparative study was carried out to investigate nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC system and Fe(0) under near-neutral conditions, showing that the Fe(0)/AC system successfully reduced nitrate even at initial pH 6 with the reduction efficiency of up to 73%, whereas for Fe(0) only ∼10%. The effect of Fe(0) to AC mass ratio on nitrate reduction efficiency was examined. Easier nitrate reduction was achieved with more contact between Fe(0) and AC as the result of decreasing Fe(0) to AC mass ratio. Ferrous ion and oxidation-reduction potential were measured to understand the mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis. The results suggest that a relative potential difference drives much more electrons from Fe(0) to AC, thus generating adsorbed atomic hydrogen which makes it possible for nitrate to be reduced at near-neural pH. Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis thus presents a great potential for practical application in nitrate wastewater treatment without excessive pH adjustment. PMID:25217726

  1. Maternal obesity is associated with a reduction in placental taurine transporter activity

    PubMed Central

    Ditchfield, A M; Desforges, M; Mills, T A; Glazier, J D; Wareing, M; Mynett, K; Sibley, C P; Greenwood, S L

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Maternal obesity increases the risk of poor pregnancy outcome including stillbirth, pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction and fetal overgrowth. These pregnancy complications are associated with dysfunctional syncytiotrophoblast, the transporting epithelium of the human placenta. Taurine, a β-amino acid with antioxidant and cytoprotective properties, has a role in syncytiotrophoblast development and function and is required for fetal growth and organ development. Taurine is conditionally essential in pregnancy and fetal tissues depend on uptake of taurine from maternal blood. We tested the hypothesis that taurine uptake into placental syncytiotrophoblast by the taurine transporter protein (TauT) is lower in obese women (body mass index (BMI)⩾30 kg m−2) than in women of ideal weight (BMI 18.5–24.9 kg m−2) and explored potential regulatory factors. Subjects/Methods: Placentas were collected from term (37–42-week gestation), uncomplicated, singleton pregnancies from women with BMI 19–49 kg m−2. TauT activity was measured as the Na+-dependent uptake of 3H-taurine into placental villous fragments. TauT expression in membrane-enriched placental samples was investigated by western blot. In vitro studies using placental villous explants examined whether leptin or IL-6, adipokines/cytokines that are elevated in maternal obesity, regulates TauT activity. Results: Placental TauT activity was significantly lower in obese women (BMI⩾30) than women of ideal weight (P<0.03) and inversely related to maternal BMI (19–49 kg m−2; P<0.05; n=61). There was no difference in TauT expression between placentas of ideal weight and obese class III (BMI⩾40) subjects. Long-term exposure (48 h) of placental villous explants to leptin or IL-6 did not affect TauT activity. Conclusions: Placental TauT activity at term is negatively related to maternal BMI. We propose that the reduction in placental TauT activity in maternal obesity

  2. Enhancement of activity of RuSex electrocatalyst by modification with nanostructured iridium towards more efficient reduction of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembinska, Beata; Kiliszek, Malgorzata; Elzanowska, Hanna; Pisarek, Marcin; Kulesza, Pawel J.

    2013-12-01

    Electrocatalytic activity of carbon (Vulcan XC-72) supported selenium-modified ruthenium, RuSex/C, nanoparticles for reduction of oxygen was enhanced through intentional decoration with iridium nanostructures (dimensions, 2-3 nm). The catalytic materials were characterized in oxygenated 0.5 mol dm-3 H2SO4 using cyclic and rotating ring disk voltammetric techniques as well as using transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy equipped with X-ray dispersive analyzer. Experiments utilizing gas diffusion electrode aimed at mimicking conditions existing in the low-temperature fuel cell. Upon application of our composite catalytic system, the reduction of oxygen proceeded at more positive potentials, and higher current densities were observed when compared to the behavior of the simple iridium-free system (RuSex/C) investigated under the analogous conditions. The enhancement effect was more pronounced than that one would expect from simple superposition of voltammetric responses for the oxygen reduction at RuSex/C and iridium nanostructures studied separately. Nanostructured iridium acted here as an example of a powerful catalyst for the reduction of H2O2 (rather than O2) and, when combined with such a moderate catalyst as ruthenium-selenium (for O2 reduction), it produced an integrated system of increased electrocatalytic activity in the oxygen reduction process. The proposed system retained its activity in the presence of methanol that could appear in a cathode compartment of alcohol fuel cell.

  3. A novel method to measure both the reductive and the radical scavenging activity in a linoleic acid model system.

    PubMed

    Lindenmeier, Michael; Burkon, Alexander; Somoza, Veronika

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a combined method for measuring the total antioxidant activity, the reductive and the radical scavenging activity. Linoleic acid was used as the substrate for an iron-initiated lipid peroxidation to measure the total antioxidant activity. In addition, methyl esters of linoleic acid hydroperoxides were used as substrates to measure the reductive antioxidant activity. The radical scavenging antioxidant activity was calculated by subtracting the reductive antioxidative activity from the total antioxidative activity. As representative examples, the antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, trans-resveratrol and L-glutathione as well as commonly used food additives such as 2(3)-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole (BHA) and 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methylphenol (BHT) were analyzed. The results for the novel antioxidation test showed that alpha-tocopherol, BHA and BHT are primarily acting as radical scavengers, whereas ascorbic acid and L-glutathione show a strong reductive capacity. As linoleic acid as well as its hydroperoxides both are present in foods and in the organism, the test presented here can be considered representative of radical reactions occurring in food matrixes and in vivo. Further experiments are required to document the comprehensive applicability in foods and in vivo. PMID:17680718

  4. Reduction of training costs using active classification in fused hyperspectral and LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuttke, Sebastian; Schilling, Hendrik; Middelmann, Wolfgang

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for the reduction of training costs in classification with co-registered hyperspectral (HS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data using an active classification framework. Fully automatic classification can be achieved by unsupervised learning, which is not suited for adjustment to specific classes. On the other hand, supervised classification with predefined classes needs a lot of training examples, which need to be labeled with the ground truth, usually at a significant cost. The concept of active classification alleviates these problems by the use of a selection strategy: only selected samples are ground truth labeled and used as training data. One common selection strategy is to incorporate in a first step the current state of the classification algorithm and choose only the examples for which the expected information gain is maximized. In the second step a conventional classification algorithm is trained using this data. By alternating between these two steps the algorithm reaches high classification accuracy results with less training samples and therefore lower training costs. The approach presented in this paper involves the user in the active selection strategy and the k-NN algorithm is chosen for classification. The results further benefit from fusing the heterogeneous information of HS and LiDAR data within the classification algorithm. For this purpose, several HS features, such as vegetation indices, and LiDAR features, such as relative height and roughness, are extracted. This increases the separability between different classes and reduces the dimensionality of the HS data. The practicability and performance of this framework is shown for the detection and separation of different kinds of vegetation, e.g. trees and grass in an urban area of Berlin. The HS data was obtained by the SPECIM AISA Eagle 2 sensor, LiDAR data by Riegl LMS Q560.

  5. Bio-inspired electron-delivering system for reductive activation of dioxygen at metal centres towards artificial flavoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Roux, Yoann; Ricoux, Rémy; Avenier, Frédéric; Mahy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Development of artificial systems, capable of delivering electrons to metal-based catalysts for the reductive activation of dioxygen, has been proven very difficult for decades, constituting a major scientific lock for the elaboration of environmentally friendly oxidation processes. Here we demonstrate that the incorporation of a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in a water-soluble polymer, bearing a locally hydrophobic microenvironment, allows the efficient reduction of the FMN by NADH. This supramolecular entity is then capable of catalysing a very fast single-electron reduction of manganese(III) porphyrin by splitting the electron pair issued from NADH. This is fully reminiscent of the activity of natural reductases such as the cytochrome P450 reductases with kinetic parameters, which are three orders of magnitude faster compared with other artificial systems. Finally, we show as a proof of concept that the reduced manganese porphyrin activates dioxygen and catalyses the oxidation of organic substrates in water. PMID:26419885

  6. Bio-inspired electron-delivering system for reductive activation of dioxygen at metal centres towards artificial flavoenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Yoann; Ricoux, Rémy; Avenier, Frédéric; Mahy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Development of artificial systems, capable of delivering electrons to metal-based catalysts for the reductive activation of dioxygen, has been proven very difficult for decades, constituting a major scientific lock for the elaboration of environmentally friendly oxidation processes. Here we demonstrate that the incorporation of a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in a water-soluble polymer, bearing a locally hydrophobic microenvironment, allows the efficient reduction of the FMN by NADH. This supramolecular entity is then capable of catalysing a very fast single-electron reduction of manganese(III) porphyrin by splitting the electron pair issued from NADH. This is fully reminiscent of the activity of natural reductases such as the cytochrome P450 reductases with kinetic parameters, which are three orders of magnitude faster compared with other artificial systems. Finally, we show as a proof of concept that the reduced manganese porphyrin activates dioxygen and catalyses the oxidation of organic substrates in water. PMID:26419885

  7. A detailed kinetic modeling study of aromatics formation in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Frenklach, M.

    1997-07-01

    A computational study was performed for the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames. A new detailed reaction mechanism describing fuel pyrolysis and oxidation, benzene formation, and PAH mass growth and oxidation is presented and critically tested. It is shown that the reaction model predicts reasonably well the concentration profiles of major and intermediate species and aromatic molecules in a number of acetylene and ethylene flames reported in the literature. It is demonstrated that reactions of n-C{sub 4}H{sub x} + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} leading to the formation of one-ring aromatics are as important as the propargyl recombination, and hence must be included in kinetic modeling of PAH formation in hydrocarbon flames. It is further demonstrated that the mass growth of PAHs can be accounted for by the previously proposed H-abstraction-C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-addiction mechanism.

  8. Isotope effect in normal-to-local transition of acetylene bending modes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ma, Jianyi; Xu, Dingguo; Guo, Hua; Tyng, Vivian; Kellman, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The normal-to-local transition for the bending modes of acetylene is considered a prelude to its isomerization to vinylidene. Here, such a transition in fully deuterated acetylene is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum model. It is found that the local benders emerge at much lower energies and bending quantum numbers than in the hydrogen isotopomer HCCH. This is accompanied by a transition to a second kind of bending mode called counter-rotator, again at lower energies and quantum numbers than in HCCH. These transitions are also investigated using bifurcation analysis of two empirical spectroscopic fitting Hamiltonians for pure bending modes, which helpsmore » to understand the origin of the transitions semiclassically as branchings or bifurcations out of the trans and normal bend modes when the latter become dynamically unstable. The results of the quantum model and the empirical bifurcation analysis are in very good agreement.« less

  9. Formation of Large Ag Clusters with Shells of Methane, Ethylene, and Acetylene in He Droplets.

    PubMed

    Loginov, Evgeny; Gomez, Luis F; Sartakov, Boris G; Vilesov, Andrey F

    2016-09-01

    Helium droplets were used to assemble composite metal-molecular clusters. Produced clusters have several hundreds of silver atoms in the core, immersed in a shell consisting of methane, ethylene, or acetylene molecules. The structure of the clusters was studied via infrared spectra of the C-H stretches of the hydrocarbon molecules. The spectra of the clusters containing methane and acetylene show two distinct features due to molecules on the interface with silver core and those in the volume of the neat molecular part of the clusters. The relative intensities of the peaks are in good agreement with the estimates based on the number of the captured particles. Experiments also suggest that selection rules for infrared transitions for molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces are also valid for silver clusters as small as 300 atoms. PMID:27500443

  10. Cold-atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of acetylene on wood flour for improved wood plastics composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekobou, William; Pedrow, Patrick; Englund, Karl; Laborie, Marie-Pierre

    2009-10-01

    Plastic composites have become a large class of construction material for exterior applications. One of the main disadvantages of wood plastic composites resides in the weak adhesion between the polar and hydrophilic surface of wood and the non-polar and hydrophobic polyolefin matrix, hindering the dispersion of the flour in the polymer matrix. To improve interfacial compatibility wood flour can be pretreated with environmentally friendly methods such as cold-atmospheric pressure plasma. The objective of this work is therefore to evaluate the potential of plasma polymerization of acetylene on wood flour to improve the compatibility with polyolefins. This presentation will describe the reactor design used to modify wood flour using acetylene plasma polymerization. The optimum conditions for plasma polymerization on wood particles will also be presented. Finally preliminary results on the wood flour surface properties and use in wood plastic composites will be discussed.

  11. Thermally and oxidatively stable carborane-siloxane-acetylenic-based thermosetting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, L.J. Jr.; Keller, T.M.

    1993-12-31

    Inorganic-organic hybrid polymers that can be pyrolyzed to generate new ceramics are of current interest as a route to high temperature materials. Ceramics have desirable thermal stabilities, but are difficult to process. Inorganic-organic hybrid polymers as ceramic precursors combine organic`s ease of processability with inorganic`s desirable thermal and oxidative stability. Carborane-siloxane-acetylenic-based polymers are an application of this approach. The synthesis, characterization and thermooxidative properties of poly(butadiyne-1,7,bis(tetramethyldisiloxyl)-m-carborane) (polymer 2) is described. Polymer 2 is a viscous dark brown polymer that is soluble in most organic solvents making it was to process. Thermal crosslinking of acetylenic groups generates a thermoset which in turn can be pyrolyzed to ceramic material. Thermal and thermo-oxidative characterization is by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Cure studies of larger samples are also presented.

  12. Isotope effect in normal-to-local transition of acetylene bending modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jianyi; Xu, Dingguo; Guo, Hua; Tyng, Vivian; Kellman, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The normal-to-local transition for the bending modes of acetylene is considered a prelude to its isomerization to vinylidene. Here, such a transition in fully deuterated acetylene is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum model. It is found that the local benders emerge at much lower energies and bending quantum numbers than in the hydrogen isotopomer HCCH. This is accompanied by a transition to a second kind of bending mode called counter-rotator, again at lower energies and quantum numbers than in HCCH. These transitions are also investigated using bifurcation analysis of two empirical spectroscopic fitting Hamiltonians for pure bending modes, which helps to understand the origin of the transitions semiclassically as branchings or bifurcations out of the trans and normal bend modes when the latter become dynamically unstable. The results of the quantum model and the empirical bifurcation analysis are in very good agreement.

  13. Low pressure R.F. plasma reactions in light hydrocarbons. Ethylene and acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, Pietro; Castello, Gianrico; Nicchia, Mario; Munari, Stelio

    The results obtained in the plasmolysis of ethylene and acetylene in an inductively coupled radiofrequency glow discharge are reported. A static system at a constant initial pressure of 0.5 torr and input power of 50 W was used; the gaseous and polymeric products were evaluated and compared with previous data on ethane plasmolysis and other available literature data. The decomposition products of ethylene were similar to those obtained during the plasmolysis of ethane, with a different distribution and a smaller initial increase of the total pressure. The total pressure of acetylene quickly decreased to near zero value at small specific energy, due to rapid polymerization. No gaseous products were detected, except hydrogen and traces of diacetylene.

  14. Probing Ionic Complexes of Ethylene and Acetylene with Vacuum-Ultraviolet Radiation.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Stein, Tamar; Fang, Yigang; Kostko, Oleg; White, Alec; Head-Gordon, Martin; Ahmed, Musahid

    2016-07-14

    Mixed complexes of acetylene-ethylene are studied using vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry and theoretical calculations. These complexes are produced and ionized at different distances from the exit of a continuous nozzle followed by reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection. Acetylene, with a higher ionization energy (11.4 eV) than ethylene (10.6 eV), allows for tuning the VUV energy and initializing reactions either from a C2H2(+) or a C2H4(+) cation. Pure acetylene and ethylene expansions are separately carried out to compare, contrast, and hence identify products from the mixed expansion: these are C3H3(+) (m/z = 39), C4H5(+) (m/z = 53), and C5H5(+) (m/z = 65). Intensity distributions of C2H2, C2H4, their dimers and reactions products are plotted as a function of ionization distance. These distributions suggest that association mechanisms play a crucial role in product formation closer to the nozzle. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves of the mixed complexes demonstrate rising edges closer to both ethylene and acetylene ionization energies. We use density functional theory (ωB97X-V/aug-cc-pVTZ) to study the structures of the neutral and ionized dimers, calculate their adiabatic and vertical ionization energies, as well as the energetics of different isomers on the potential energy surface (PES). Upon ionization, vibrationally excited clusters can use the extra energy to access different isomers on the PES. At farther ionization distances from the nozzle, where the number densities are lower, unimolecular decay is expected to be the dominant mechanism. We discuss the possible decay pathways from the different isomers on the PES and examine the ones that are energetically accessible. PMID:26983013

  15. Deposition of Functional Coatings from an Acetylene-Containing Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plevako, F. V.; Gorbatov, S. V.; Davidovich, P. A.; Prikhod‧ko, E. M.; Shushkov, S. V.; Krul‧, L. P.; Butovskaya, G. V.; Shakhno, O. V.; Gusakova, S. V.; Korolik, O. V.; Mazanik, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    Properties of thin coatings formed on polymer and glass substrates by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from a mixture of nitrogen with acetylene at atmospheric pressure were investigated. It was established that chemically stable transparent films with a mass ratio of fixed carbon and nitrogen C:N ~ 2:1 are formed on the surface of these substrates. When the deposition time was increased, arrays of dendrite-like structures were formed on the substrates.

  16. Theoretical study of the C-H bond dissociation energy of acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Peter R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a theoretical study of the convergence of the C-H bond dissociation energy (D sub o) of acetylene with respect to both the one- and n-particle spaces. Their best estimate for D sub o of 130.1 plus or minus 1.0 kcal/mole is slightly below previous theoretical estimates, but substantially above the value determined using Stark anticrossing spectroscopy that is asserted to be an upper bound.

  17. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 97. Solubility of Higher Acetylenes and Triple Bonded Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogg, Peter G. T.

    2013-03-01

    Solubility of Ethyne in Liquids was published in 2001 as Vol. 76 of the IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. The current work extends the coverage to the solubility in liquids of higher gaseous and liquid acetylenes and to derivatives that contain a triple carbon-carbon bond. Predictive methods for estimating solubilities in water are summarised and usually give values to within an order of magnitude. The literature has been surveyed to the end of 2010.

  18. Pulsed erbium fiber laser with an acetylene-filled photonic crystal fiber for saturable absorption.

    PubMed

    Marty, Patrick Thomas; Morel, Jacques; Feurer, Thomas

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the dynamics of an erbium-doped fiber ring laser that is equipped with an intracavity hollow core photonic crystal fiber gas cell. The cell is filled with acetylene as a saturable absorber. We observe cw operation at low pressures, Q switching at intermediate pressure levels, and mode locking at high pressures applied. Moreover, we show that the transition from the cw to the pulsed mode may be exploited for sensitive gas detection. PMID:21931393

  19. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Charlette M.; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A.; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material’s −0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 106 mol−1s−1 was observed for the polydopamine-coated material–over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells. PMID:27528439

  20. Reduction of Death Certificate Only (DCO) Registrations by Active Follow Back.

    PubMed

    Turano, LM; Laudico, AV; Esteban, DB; Pisani, P; Parkin, DM

    2002-01-01

    Death certificates are an important source of information for cancer registries that help to improve completeness of case finding. In many countries where routine mortality data are considered of poor quality, this source is often regarded as being of little value. We evaluated the contribution of death certificates to the total number of registrations in the years 1993-1997, in the Manila Cancer Registry (MCR). We compared the "standard" practice of retrieving clinical information if the death certificate was completed in a hospital, with active search of additional information from the deceased's relatives when the death was certified at home.The standard procedure allowed us to reduce the proportion of cases registered from a death certificate by 5%. The improvement varied significantly among the most common sites with a reduction of 10% for lymphomas to less than 1% for cancers of the cervix.The proportion of liver cancers registered from a death certificate only (DCO), originally 47%, was reduced to 29% by contacting relatives of the deceased patients. In countries with limited investment in information systems, death certificates, even when recognised as being of poor quality, are an important source of information for cancer registries. PMID:12718591

  1. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Charlette M; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A; Mudalige, Thilak K; Biris, Alexandru S; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material's -0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 10(6) mol(-1)s(-1) was observed for the polydopamine-coated material-over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells. PMID:27528439

  2. An Overview of Propulsion Concept Studies and Risk Reduction Activities for Robotic Lunar Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Story, George; Burnside, Chris; Kudlach, Al

    2010-01-01

    In support of designing robotic lunar lander concepts, the propulsion team at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), with participation from industry, conducted a series of trade studies on propulsion concepts with an emphasis on light-weight, advanced technology components. The results suggest a high-pressure propulsion system may offer some benefits in weight savings and system packaging. As part of the propulsion system, a solid rocket motor was selected to provide a large impulse to reduce the spacecraft s velocity prior to the lunar descent. In parallel to this study effort, the team also began technology risk reduction testing on a high thrust-to-weight descent thruster and a high-pressure regulator. A series of hot-fire tests was completed on the descent thruster in vacuum conditions at NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) in New Mexico in 2009. Preparations for a hot-fire test series on the attitude control thruster at WSTF and for pressure regulator testing are now underway. This paper will provide an overview of the concept trade study results along with insight into the risk mitigation activities conducted to date.

  3. Gold-doped graphene: A highly stable and active electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stolbov, Sergey Alcántara Ortigoza, Marisol

    2015-04-21

    In addressing the growing need of renewable and sustainable energy resources, hydrogen-fuel-cells stand as one of the most promising routes to transform the current energy paradigm into one that integrally fulfills environmental sustainability. Nevertheless, accomplishing this technology at a large scale demands to surpass the efficiency and enhance the cost-effectiveness of platinum-based cathodes, which catalyze the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this work, our first-principles calculations show that Au atoms incorporated into graphene di-vacancies form a highly stable and cost-effective electrocatalyst that is, at the same time, as or more (dependently of the dopant concentration) active toward ORR than the best-known Pt-based electrocatalysts. We reveal that partial passivation of defected-graphene by gold atoms reduces the reactivity of C dangling bonds and increases that of Au, thus optimizing them for catalyzing the ORR and yielding a system of high thermodynamic and electrochemical stabilities. We also demonstrate that the linear relation among the binding energies of the reaction intermediates assumed in computational high-throughput material screening does not hold, at least for this non-purely transition-metal material. We expect Au-doped graphene to finally overcome the cathode-related challenge hindering the realization of hydrogen-fuel cells as the leading means of powering transportation and portable devices.

  4. Formulation and particle size reduction improve bioavailability of poorly water-soluble compounds with antimalarial activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxing; Li, Qigui; Reyes, Sean; Zhang, Jing; Xie, Lisa; Melendez, Victor; Hickman, Mark; Kozar, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Decoquinate (DQ) is highly effective at killing malaria parasites in vitro; however, it is extremely insoluble in water. In this study, solid dispersion method was used for DQ formulation which created a suitable physical form of DQ in aqueous phase for particle manipulation. Among many polymers and surfactants tested, polyvinylpyrrolidone 10, a polymer, and L- α -phosphatidylcholine or polysorbate, two surfactants, were chosen as DQ formulation components. The formulation particles were reduced to a mean size between 200 to 400 nm, which was stable in aqueous medium for at least three weeks. Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies showed that compared to DQ microparticle suspension, a nanoparticle formulation orally dosed to mice showed a 14.47-fold increase in area under the curve (AUC) of DQ plasma concentration and a 4.53-fold increase in AUC of DQ liver distribution. WR 299666, a poorly water-soluble compound with antimalarial activity, was also tested and successfully made into nanoparticle formulation without undergoing solid dispersion procedure. We concluded that nanoparticles generated by using appropriate formulation components and sufficient particle size reduction significantly increased the bioavailability of DQ and could potentially turn this antimalarial agent to a therapeutic drug. PMID:23766925

  5. Growth and Deposition of Au Nanoclusters on Polymer-wrapped Graphene and Their Oxygen Reduction Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Kim, Chaerin; Hamasaki, Yuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2016-02-01

    The development of a non-Pt electrocatalyst with a high performance for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is one of the central issues in polymer electrolyte fuel cells science. Au-nanoparticles (Au-NPs) with a diameter of <2 nm are one of the promising substitutes of Pt-NPs; however, it is still a challenge to synthesize such a small-sized Au-NPs with a narrow diameter distribution on a carbon support without using capping agents. We here describe a facile method to deposit uniform Au-NPs (diameter = 1.6 nm and 3.3 nm) on the stacked-graphene (<10 layers) coated with poly[2,2‧-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5‧-bibenzimidazole] without using any capping agents. The obtained Au-NPs exhibit an excellent ORR activity with the onset potential at -0.11 V and -0.09 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for 1.6 nm and 3.3 nm, respectively. On the other hand, inhomogeneous Au-NPs with 4.6 nm in average diameter shows the onset potential at -0.15 V (vs. Ag/AgCl).

  6. Enhancing pyridinic nitrogen level in graphene to promote electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiaguang; Wang, Lan; Song, Ranran; Yanga, Shubin

    2016-02-01

    We develop an efficient approach to fabricate nitrogen-doped graphene with tunable pyridinic nitrogen levels (from 1.1 to 1.8 at.%), abundant in-plane holes and high surface areas (623 m2 g-1) via a hydrothermal treatment of graphene oxide with hydrogen peroxide and subsequent annealing under ammonia gas. It is found that the chemical etching is beneficial to the formation of pyridinic nitrogen in graphene during the nitrogen-doping process, which is crucial to enhancing the electrocatalytic properties of graphene for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Hence, the optimized NG exhibits good electrocatalytic activity, more positive onset potential than Pt-C (-0.08 V versus -0.09 V), good durability, and high selectivity when it is employed as a metal-free catalyst for ORR. This approach may uncover a mechanism in escalation of pyridinic N atoms doped on the graphene basal edge and provide an efficient platform for the synthesis of a series of heteroatom-doped graphene with tunable heteroatom content for broad applications.

  7. Voice communications in the cockpit noise environment: The role of active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Peter David

    The topic of voice communications in the cockpit noise environment of modern fast-jet aircraft and helicopters is addressed, and in particular, research undertaken in support of the development of a system for reducing the noise level at the operators' ear is described by acoustic cancellation within the ear defender, known as active noise reduction (ANR). The internal noise spectra of today's high performance fast-jet aircraft and military helicopters is described, and the complex interaction of acoustic noise transmission, speech, and microphone noise pick-up, which produces the total acoustic environment at the aircrews' ears, is discussed. Means of mathematically modelling the audio channel, quantifying the components identified above, and identifying areas of shortfall in performance are derived, leading to a procedure for the development of attenuation requirements, described as the communications audit. A model of the electroacoustic characteristics of the ANR ear defender assembly is presented and the sound field distribution within the ear defender/ear cavity, and its effect upon cancellation performance, is discussed. The extensive laboratory and flight testing of the ANR system that was undertaken is reviewed, paying particular attention to the measurement and analysis techniques employed in such testing. Finally, the performance characteristics of ANR are discussed and compared with the requirements previously established. Design limitations placed upon the system by the constraints of its area of application are described, and the scope for future improvements is considered.

  8. Screening of catalytic oxygen reduction reaction activity of metal-doped graphene by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Chen, Shuangjing; Wang, Jinyu

    2016-08-01

    Graphene doping is a promising direction for developing effective oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts. In this paper, we computationally investigated the ORR performance of 10 kinds of metal-doped graphene (M-G) catalysts, namely, Al-, Si-, Mn-, Fe-, Co-, Ni-, Pd-, Ag-, Pt-, and Au-G. The results shown that the binding energies of the metal atoms incorporated into the graphene vacancy are higher than their bulk cohesive energies, indicating the formed M-G catalysts are even more stable than the corresponding bulk metal surfaces, and thus avoid the metals dissolution in the reaction environment. We demonstrated that the linear relation among the binding energies of the ORR intermediates that found on metal-based materials does not hold for the M-G catalysts, therefore a single binding energy of intermediate alone is not sufficient to evaluate the ORR activity of an arbitrary catalyst. By analysis of the detailed ORR processes, we predicted that the Au-, Co-, and Ag-G materials can be used as the ORR catalysts.

  9. An active structural acoustic control approach for the reduction of the structure-borne road noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douville, Hugo; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2002-11-01

    The reduction of the structure-borne road noise generated inside the cabin of an automobile is investigated using an Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) approach. First, a laboratory test bench consisting of a wheel/suspension/lower suspension A-arm assembly has been developed in order to identify the vibroacoustic transfer paths (up to 250 Hz) for realistic road noise excitation of the wheel. Frequency Response Function (FRF) measurements between the excitation/control actuators and each suspension/chassis linkage are used to characterize the different transfer paths that transmit energy through the chassis of the car. Second, a FE/BE model (Finite/Boundary Elements) was developed to simulate the acoustic field of an automobile cab interior. This model is used to predict the acoustic field inside the cabin as a response to the measured forces applied on the suspension/chassis linkages. Finally, an experimental implementation of ASAC is presented. The control approach relies on the use of inertial actuators to modify the vibration behavior of the suspension and the automotive chassis such that its noise radiation efficiency is decreased. The implemented algorithm consists of a MIMO (Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output) feedforward configuration with a filtered-X LMS algorithm using an advanced reference signal (width FIR filters) using the Simulink/Dspace environment for control prototyping.

  10. Physiological selectivity and activity reduction of insecticides by rainfall to predatory wasps of Tuta absoluta.

    PubMed

    Barros, Emerson C; Bacci, Leandro; Picanco, Marcelo C; Martins, Júlio C; Rosado, Jander F; Silva, Gerson A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we carried out three bioassays with nine used insecticides in tomato crops to identify their efficiency against tomato leaf miner Tuta absoluta, the physiological selectivity and the activity reduction of insecticides by three rain regimes to predatory wasps Protonectarina sylveirae and Polybia scutellaris. We assessed the mortality caused by the recommended doses of abamectin, beta-cyfluthrin, cartap, chlorfenapyr, etofenprox, methamidophos, permethrin, phenthoate and spinosad to T. absoluta and wasps at the moment of application. In addition, we evaluated the wasp mortality due to the insecticides for 30 days on plants that did not receive rain and on plants that received 4 or 125 mm of rain. Spinosad, cartap, chlorfenapyr, phenthoate, abamectin and methamidophos caused mortality higher than 90% to T. absoluta, whereas the pyrethroids beta-cyfluthrin, etofenprox and permethrin caused mortality between 8.5% and 46.25%. At the moment of application, all the insecticides were highly toxic to the wasps, causing mortality higher than 80%. In the absence of rain, all the insecticides continued to cause high mortality to the wasps for 30 days after the application. The toxicity of spinosad and methamidophos on both wasp species; beta-cyfluthrin on P. sylveirae and chlorfenapyr and abamectin on P. scutellaris, decreased when the plants received 4 mm of rain. In contrast, the other insecticides only showed reduced toxicity on the wasps when the plants received 125 mm of rain. PMID:25421627

  11. Recent Status of SIM Lite Astrometric Observatory Mission: Flight Engineering Risk Reduction Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goullioud, Renaud; Dekens, Frank; Nemati, Bijan; An, Xin; Carson, Johnathan

    2010-01-01

    The SIM Lite Astrometric Observatory is a mission concept for a space-borne instrument to perform micro-arc-second narrow-angle astrometry to search 60 to 100 nearby stars for Earth-like planets, and to perform global astrometry for a broad astrophysics program. The instrument consists of two Michelson stellar interferometers and a telescope. The first interferometer chops between the target star and a set of reference stars. The second interferometer monitors the attitude of the instrument in the direction of the target star. The telescope monitors the attitude of the instrument in the other two directions. The main enabling technology development for the mission was completed during phases A & B. The project is currently implementing the developed technology onto flight-ready engineering models. These key engineering tasks will significantly reduce the implementation risks during the flight phases C & D of the mission. The main optical interferometer components, including the astrometric beam combiner, the fine steering optical mechanism, the path-length-control and modulation optical mechanisms, focal-plane camera electronics and cooling heat pipe, are currently under development. Main assemblies are built to meet flight requirements and will be subjected to flight qualification level environmental testing (random vibration and thermal cycling) and performance testing. This paper summarizes recent progress in engineering risk reduction activities.

  12. False alarm reduction in BSN-based cardiac monitoring using signal quality and activity type information.

    PubMed

    Tanantong, Tanatorn; Nantajeewarawat, Ekawit; Thiemjarus, Surapa

    2015-01-01

    False alarms in cardiac monitoring affect the quality of medical care, impacting on both patients and healthcare providers. In continuous cardiac monitoring using wireless Body Sensor Networks (BSNs), the quality of ECG signals can be deteriorated owing to several factors, e.g., noises, low battery power, and network transmission problems, often resulting in high false alarm rates. In addition, body movements occurring from activities of daily living (ADLs) can also create false alarms. This paper presents a two-phase framework for false arrhythmia alarm reduction in continuous cardiac monitoring, using signals from an ECG sensor and a 3D accelerometer. In the first phase, classification models constructed using machine learning algorithms are used for labeling input signals. ECG signals are labeled with heartbeat types and signal quality levels, while 3D acceleration signals are labeled with ADL types. In the second phase, a rule-based expert system is used for combining classification results in order to determine whether arrhythmia alarms should be accepted or suppressed. The proposed framework was validated on datasets acquired using BSNs and the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. For the BSN dataset, acceleration and ECG signals were collected from 10 young and 10 elderly subjects while they were performing ADLs. The framework reduced the false alarm rate from 9.58% to 1.43% in our experimental study, showing that it can potentially assist physicians in diagnosing a vast amount of data acquired from wireless sensors and enhance the performance of continuous cardiac monitoring. PMID:25671512

  13. False Alarm Reduction in BSN-Based Cardiac Monitoring Using Signal Quality and Activity Type Information

    PubMed Central

    Tanantong, Tanatorn; Nantajeewarawat, Ekawit; Thiemjarus, Surapa

    2015-01-01

    False alarms in cardiac monitoring affect the quality of medical care, impacting on both patients and healthcare providers. In continuous cardiac monitoring using wireless Body Sensor Networks (BSNs), the quality of ECG signals can be deteriorated owing to several factors, e.g., noises, low battery power, and network transmission problems, often resulting in high false alarm rates. In addition, body movements occurring from activities of daily living (ADLs) can also create false alarms. This paper presents a two-phase framework for false arrhythmia alarm reduction in continuous cardiac monitoring, using signals from an ECG sensor and a 3D accelerometer. In the first phase, classification models constructed using machine learning algorithms are used for labeling input signals. ECG signals are labeled with heartbeat types and signal quality levels, while 3D acceleration signals are labeled with ADL types. In the second phase, a rule-based expert system is used for combining classification results in order to determine whether arrhythmia alarms should be accepted or suppressed. The proposed framework was validated on datasets acquired using BSNs and the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. For the BSN dataset, acceleration and ECG signals were collected from 10 young and 10 elderly subjects while they were performing ADLs. The framework reduced the false alarm rate from 9.58% to 1.43% in our experimental study, showing that it can potentially assist physicians in diagnosing a vast amount of data acquired from wireless sensors and enhance the performance of continuous cardiac monitoring. PMID:25671512

  14. Catechin-capped gold nanoparticles: green synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity toward 4-nitrophenol reduction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An eco-friendly approach is described for the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using catechin as a reducing and capping agent. The reaction occurred at room temperature within 1 h without the use of any external energy and an excellent yield (99%) was obtained, as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Various shapes of gold nanoparticles with an estimated diameter of 16.6 nm were green-synthesized. Notably, the capping of freshly synthesized gold nanoparticles by catechin was clearly visualized with the aid of microscopic techniques, including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Strong peaks in the X-ray diffraction pattern of the as-prepared gold nanoparticles confirmed their crystalline nature. The catalytic activity of the as-prepared gold nanoparticles was observed in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4. The results suggest that the newly prepared gold nanoparticles have potential uses in catalysis. PMID:24589224

  15. Catechin-capped gold nanoparticles: green synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity toward 4-nitrophenol reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yoonho; Choi, Myung-Jin; Cha, Song-Hyun; Kim, Yeong Shik; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2014-03-01

    An eco-friendly approach is described for the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using catechin as a reducing and capping agent. The reaction occurred at room temperature within 1 h without the use of any external energy and an excellent yield (99%) was obtained, as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Various shapes of gold nanoparticles with an estimated diameter of 16.6 nm were green-synthesized. Notably, the capping of freshly synthesized gold nanoparticles by catechin was clearly visualized with the aid of microscopic techniques, including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Strong peaks in the X-ray diffraction pattern of the as-prepared gold nanoparticles confirmed their crystalline nature. The catalytic activity of the as-prepared gold nanoparticles was observed in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4. The results suggest that the newly prepared gold nanoparticles have potential uses in catalysis.

  16. Participation and cardiovascular risk reduction in a voluntary worksite nutrition and physical activity program

    PubMed Central

    Thorndike, Anne N.; Healey, Erica; Sonnenberg, Lillian; Regan, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Objective In a cohort of employees participating in a worksite nutrition and physical activity program, we compared program completion and changes in cardiovascular risk factors by baseline body mass index. Methods In 2007, 774 employees enrolled in a 10 week program at a hospital in Boston, MA. Program completion and change in weight, cholesterol, and blood pressure were compared between obese (BMI≥30), overweight (BMI=25–29.9), and normal weight (BMI<25) participants. Results At baseline, 63% were obese or overweight and had higher blood pressure and cholesterol compared to normal weight participants. Program completion was 82% and did not differ by BMI. Mean weight loss was 1.9 kg at end of program (p<0.001) and 0.4 kg at 1 year (p=0.002). At end of program, participants with BMI≥30 lost 3.0% body weight vs. 2.7% for BMI=25–29.9 and 1.7% for BMI<25 (p<0.001), but weight loss at 1 year did not differ by BMI. Mean cholesterol and blood pressure were lower at end of program and 1 year (p all <0.005) but did not differ by BMI. Conclusions Worksite programs can successfully initiate cardiovascular risk reduction among employees, but more intensive interventions are needed to make significant improvements in the health of higher risk obese employees. PMID:21130804

  17. Growth and Deposition of Au Nanoclusters on Polymer-wrapped Graphene and Their Oxygen Reduction Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Kim, ChaeRin; Hamasaki, Yuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2016-01-01

    The development of a non-Pt electrocatalyst with a high performance for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is one of the central issues in polymer electrolyte fuel cells science. Au-nanoparticles (Au-NPs) with a diameter of <2 nm are one of the promising substitutes of Pt-NPs; however, it is still a challenge to synthesize such a small-sized Au-NPs with a narrow diameter distribution on a carbon support without using capping agents. We here describe a facile method to deposit uniform Au-NPs (diameter = 1.6 nm and 3.3 nm) on the stacked-graphene (<10 layers) coated with poly[2,2′-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5′-bibenzimidazole] without using any capping agents. The obtained Au-NPs exhibit an excellent ORR activity with the onset potential at −0.11 V and −0.09 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for 1.6 nm and 3.3 nm, respectively. On the other hand, inhomogeneous Au-NPs with 4.6 nm in average diameter shows the onset potential at −0.15 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). PMID:26899591

  18. Myopathic Lamin Mutations Cause Reductive Stress and Activate the Nrf2/Keap-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dialynas, George; Shrestha, Om K.; Ponce, Jessica M.; Zwerger, Monika; Thiemann, Dylan A.; Young, Grant H.; Moore, Steven A.; Yu, Liping; Lammerding, Jan; Wallrath, Lori L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the human LMNA gene cause muscular dystrophy by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. The LMNA gene encodes A-type lamins, intermediate filaments that form a network underlying the inner nuclear membrane, providing structural support for the nucleus and organizing the genome. To better understand the pathogenesis caused by mutant lamins, we performed a structural and functional analysis on LMNA missense mutations identified in muscular dystrophy patients. These mutations perturb the tertiary structure of the conserved A-type lamin Ig-fold domain. To identify the effects of these structural perturbations on lamin function, we modeled these mutations in Drosophila Lamin C and expressed the mutant lamins in muscle. We found that the structural perturbations had minimal dominant effects on nuclear stiffness, suggesting that the muscle pathology was not accompanied by major structural disruption of the peripheral nuclear lamina. However, subtle alterations in the lamina network and subnuclear reorganization of lamins remain possible. Affected muscles had cytoplasmic aggregation of lamins and additional nuclear envelope proteins. Transcription profiling revealed upregulation of many Nrf2 target genes. Nrf2 is normally sequestered in the cytoplasm by Keap-1. Under oxidative stress Nrf2 dissociates from Keap-1, translocates into the nucleus, and activates gene expression. Unexpectedly, biochemical analyses revealed high levels of reducing agents, indicative of reductive stress. The accumulation of cytoplasmic lamin aggregates correlated with elevated levels of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, which also binds Keap-1, abrogating Nrf2 cytoplasmic sequestration, allowing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and target gene activation. Elevated p62/SQSTM1 and nuclear enrichment of Nrf2 were identified in muscle biopsies from the corresponding muscular dystrophy patients, validating the disease relevance of our Drosophila model. Thus, novel connections were made

  19. Soluble fluorinated polyimides that contain curable acetylene units in the backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Takeichi, T.; Ogura, S.

    1993-12-31

    Soluble polyimides that contain internal acetylene groups in the backbone were prepared by reacting 2,2-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl)hexafluoropropane dianhydride with various ratio of bis(3-aminophenyl)acetylene and 4,4`-diaminodiphenyl ether. The polyimides were soluble in organic solvents such as N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and N,N-dimethylacetamide, and exhibited reduced viscosities in the range of 0.76-1.44 (in NMP at 30{degrees}C). The crosslinking behavior was examined by DSC. The onset of exotherm appeared at 321-345{degrees}C depending on the acetylene content. After thermal treatment at 350{degrees}C, the polyimides became insoluble in any organic solvents examined and in conc. sulfuric acid. The viscoelastic analyses showed the effect of crosslinking clearly. For example, Tg increased with thermal treatment, and was finally above 400{degrees}C. The drop of modulus at higher temperature also became very small. The TGA analyses also showed excellent thermal stability.

  20. Toward spectroscopically accurate global ab initio potential energy surface for the acetylene-vinylidene isomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Huixian; Li, Anyang; Guo, Hua

    2014-12-28

    A new full-dimensional global potential energy surface (PES) for the acetylene-vinylidene isomerization on the ground (S{sub 0}) electronic state has been constructed by fitting ∼37 000 high-level ab initio points using the permutation invariant polynomial-neural network method with a root mean square error of 9.54 cm{sup −1}. The geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies of acetylene, vinylidene, and all other stationary points (two distinct transition states and one secondary minimum in between) have been determined on this PES. Furthermore, acetylene vibrational energy levels have been calculated using the Lanczos algorithm with an exact (J = 0) Hamiltonian. The vibrational energies up to 12 700 cm{sup −1} above the zero-point energy are in excellent agreement with the experimentally derived effective Hamiltonians, suggesting that the PES is approaching spectroscopic accuracy. In addition, analyses of the wavefunctions confirm the experimentally observed emergence of the local bending and counter-rotational modes in the highly excited bending vibrational states. The reproduction of the experimentally derived effective Hamiltonians for highly excited bending states signals the coming of age for the ab initio based PES, which can now be trusted for studying the isomerization reaction.

  1. An autopsy case of suicide by acetylene explosion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Masayuki; Hara, Kenji; Takamoto, Mutsuo; Kageura, Mitsuyoshi; Matsusue, Aya; Sugimura, Tomoko; Kubo, Shin-ichi

    2009-04-01

    We report an autopsy case of a male welder in his thirties who was found dead in an exploded truck cabin. The roof, windows and doors of the cabin had been blown up to 50 metres away. An oxygen cylinder and an acetylene cylinder, both unexploded, were found in the back of the truck. The deceased was lying on the driver's seat. His entire body was burnt, carbonised and partially skeletonised. There was a small amount of soot in his oesophagus and stomach and a large volume of bloody fluid in the trachea and bronchi. There was an extensive haemorrhage in the posterior thoracic wall. No drugs were detected in the blood. Hardly any carbon monoxide and combustion-related gases were detected in the blood, therefore he was not considered to have died from the fire. Acetylene was detected in his blood (21.5 microg/ml in the femoral vein blood) and urine (7.49 microg/ml), with marked haemorrhaging in his back. We therefore concluded that the victim died because of an acetylene explosion in the cabin and also that this was a suicide. PMID:19537452

  2. Chemistry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons formation from phenyl radical pyrolysis and reaction of phenyl and acetylene.

    PubMed

    Comandini, A; Malewicki, T; Brezinsky, K

    2012-03-15

    An experimental investigation of phenyl radical pyrolysis and the phenyl radical + acetylene reaction has been performed to clarify the role of different reaction mechanisms involved in the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) serving as precursors for soot formation. Experiments were conducted using GC/GC-MS diagnostics coupled to the high-pressure single-pulse shock tube present at the University of Illinois at Chicago. For the first time, comprehensive speciation of the major stable products, including small hydrocarbons and large PAH intermediates, was obtained over a wide range of pressures (25-60 atm) and temperatures (900-1800 K) which encompass the typical conditions in modern combustion devices. The experimental results were used to validate a comprehensive chemical kinetic model which provides relevant information on the chemistry associated with the formation of PAH compounds. In particular, the modeling results indicate that the o-benzyne chemistry is a key factor in the formation of multi-ring intermediates in phenyl radical pyrolysis. On the other hand, the PAHs from the phenyl + acetylene reaction are formed mainly through recombination between single-ring aromatics and through the hydrogen abstraction/acetylene addition mechanism. Polymerization is the common dominant process at high temperature conditions. PMID:22339468

  3. New insights into the anion formation mechanisms in dusty acetylene discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ming; Benedikt, Jan; Consoli, Angelo; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2008-10-01

    Dust (or nanoparticle) formation is a well-known phenomenon occurring in reactive gas plasmas, such as silane or acetylene. Under some conditions, the dust formation is considered to be harmful, whereas for other applications, it turns out to be beneficial. In this presentation, the initial mechanisms of nanoparticle formation and growth in radiofrequency (RF) acetylene (C2H2) plasmas are investigated by means of a comprehensive self-consistent one-dimensional (1D) fluid model. Based on the comparison of our calculation results with available experimental data for acetylene plasmas in the literature, some new mechanisms for negative ion formation and growth are proposed. Possible routes are considered for the formation of larger (linear and branched) hydrocarbons C2nH2 (n=3-5), which contribute to the generation of C2nH^-anions (n=3-5) due to dissociative electron attachment. Moreover, beside the C2nH^- ions, also the vinylidene anion (H2CC^-) and higher C2nH2^- anions (n=2-4) are found to be important plasma species. This project was supported financially by the Fund for Scientific Research (FWO) Flanders (Project G. 0068.07), the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme of the Belgian State (Belgian Science Policy; Project P6/42) and the CALCUA computing facilities of the University of Antwerp.

  4. Report on INL Activities for Uncertainty Reduction Analysis of FY11

    SciTech Connect

    G. Plamiotti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

    2011-09-01

    This report presents the status of activities performed at INL under the ARC Work Package on 'Uncertainty Reduction Analyses' that has a main goal the reduction of uncertainties associated with nuclear data on neutronic integral parameters of interest for the design of advanced fast reactors under consideration by the ARC program. First, an analysis of experiments was carried out. For both JOYO (the first Japanese fast reactor) and ZPPR-9 (a large size zero power plutonium fueled experiment performed at ANL-W in Idaho) the performance of ENDF/B-VII.0 is quite satisfying except for the sodium void configurations of ZPPR-9, but for which one has to take into account the approximation of the modeling. In fact, when one uses a more detailed model (calculations performed at ANL in a companion WP) more reasonable results are obtained. A large effort was devoted to the analysis of the irradiation experiments, PROFIL-1 and -2 and TRAPU, performed at the French fast reactor PHENIX. For these experiments a pre-release of the ENDF/B-VII.1 cross section files was also used, in order to provide validation feedback to the CSWEG nuclear data evaluation community. In the PROFIL experiments improvements can be observed for the ENDF/B-VII.1 capture data in 238Pu, 241Am, 244Cm, 97Mo, 151Sm, 153Eu, and for 240Pu(n,2n). On the other hand, 240,242Pu, 95Mo, 133Cs and 145Nd capture C/E results are worse. For the major actinides 235U and especially 239Pu capture C/E's are underestimated. For fission products, 105,106Pd, 143,144Nd and 147,149Sm are significantly underestimated, while 101Ru and 151Sm are overestimated. Other C/E deviations from unity are within the combined experimental and calculated statistical uncertainty. From the TRAPU analysis, the major improvement is in the predicted 243Cm build-up, presumably due to an improved 242Cm capture evaluation. The COSMO experiment was also analyzed in order to provide useful feedback on fission cross sections. It was found out that ENDF

  5. Aerobic Reduction of Arsenate by a Bacterium Isolated From Activated Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, N.; Ohnuki, T.; Hanada, S.; Nakamura, K.; Francis, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Microlunatus phosphovorus strain NM-1 is a polyphosphate-accumulating bacterium isolated from activated sludge. This bacterium takes up a large amount of polyphosphate under aerobic conditions and release phosphate ions by hydrolysis of polyphosphate to orthophosphate under anaerobic conditions to derive energy for taking up substrates. To understand the nature of this strain, especially, influence of potential contaminants in sewage and wastewater on growth, we have been investigating behavior of this bacterium in media containing arsenic. The present paper mainly reports reduction of arsenate by this bacterium under aerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 (JCM 9379) was aerobically cultured at 30 °C in a nutrient medium containing 2.5 g/l peptone, 0.5 g/l glucose, 1.5 g/l yeast extract, and arsenic [Na2HAsO4 (As(V)) or Na3AsO3 (As(III))] at concentrations between 0 and 50 mM. The cells collected from arsenic-free media were dispersed in buffer solutions containing 2mM HEPES, 10mM NaCl, prescribed concentrations of As(V), and 0-0.2 percent glucose. Then, this cell suspension was kept at 20 °C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The speciation of arsenic was carried out by ion chromatography and ICP-MS. The growth of the strain under aerobic conditions was enhanced by the addition of As(V) at the concentration between 1 and 10 mM. The maximum optical density of the culture in the medium containing 5mM As(V) was 1.4 times greater than that of the control culture. Below the As(V) concentration of 10mM, most of the As(V) was reduced to As(III). The growth of the strain under anaerobic conditions has not been observed so far. The cells in the buffer solutions reduced As(V) under aerobic condition. The reduction was enhanced by the addition of glucose. However, the cell did not reduce As(V) under anaerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 showed high resistance to As(V) and As(III). The maximum optical density of the culture grown in a medium containing 50 mM As(V) was only

  6. Simultaneous BVI noise and vibration reduction in rotorcraft using actively-controlled flaps and including performance considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, Daniel A.

    This work presents the development and application of an active control approach for reduction of both vibration and noise induced by helicopter rotor blade vortex interaction (BVI). Control is implemented through single or dual actively controlled flaps (ACFs) on each blade. Low-speed helicopter flight is prone to severe BVI, resulting in elevated vibration and noise levels. Existing research has suggested that when some form of active control is used to reduce vibration, noise will increase and vice versa. The present research achieves simultaneous reduction of noise and vibration, and also investigates the physical sources of the observed reduction. The initial portion of this work focused on developing a tool for simulating helicopter noise and vibrations in the BVI flight regime. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades was developed and combined with an enhanced free-wake model and an acoustic prediction tool with provisions for blade flexibility. These elements were incorporated within an aeroelastic analysis featuring fully coupled flap-lag-torsional blade dynamics. Subsequently, control algorithms were developed that were effective for reducing noise and vibration even in the nonlinear BVI flight regime; saturation limits were incorporated constraining flap deflections to specified limits. The resulting simulation was also validated with a wide range of experimental data, achieving excellent correlation. Finally, a number of active control studies were performed. Multi-component vibration reductions of 40--80% could be achieved, while incurring a small noise penalty. Noise was reduced using an onboard feedback microphone; reductions of 4--10 dB on the advancing side were observed on a plane beneath the rotor when using dual flaps. Finally, simultaneous noise and vibration reduction was studied. A reduction of about 5 dB in noise on the advancing side combined with a 60% reduction in vibration was

  7. A new APE1/Ref-1-dependent pathway leading to reduction of NF-kappaB and AP-1, and activation of their DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kozue; Hirao, Satoshi; Kabe, Yasuaki; Ogura, Yuji; Sato, Iwao; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Wada, Tadashi; Handa, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    APE1/Ref-1 is thought to be a multifunctional protein involved in reduction-oxidation (redox) regulation and base excision DNA repair, and is required for early embryonic development in mice. APE1/Ref-1 has redox activity and AP endonuclease activity, and is able to enhance DNA-binding activity of several transcription factors, including NF-kappaB, AP-1 and p53, through reduction of their critical cysteine residues. However, it remains elusive exactly how APE1/Ref-1 carries out its essential functions in vivo. Here, we show that APE1/Ref-1 not only reduces target transcription factors directly but also facilitates their reduction by other reducing molecules such as glutathione or thioredoxin. The new activity of APE1/Ref-1, termed redox chaperone activity, is exerted at concentration significantly lower than that required for its redox activity and is neither dependent on its redox activity nor on its AP endonuclease activity. We also show evidence that redox chaperone activity of APE1/Ref-1 is critical to NF-kappaB-mediated gene expression in human cells and is mediated through its physical association with target transcription factors. Thus, APE1/Ref-1 may play multiple roles in an antioxidative stress response pathway through its different biochemical activities. These findings also provide new insight into the mechanism of intracellular redox regulation. PMID:18586825

  8. Reactions of glutamate semialdehyde aminotransferase (glutamate-1-semialdehyde 2,1 aminomutase) with vinyl and acetylenic substrate analogues analysed by rapid scanning spectrophotometry.

    PubMed Central

    Tyacke, R J; Contestabile, R; Grimm, B; Harwood, J L; John, R A

    1995-01-01

    The reactions occurring when glutamate-1-semialdehyde amino-transferase (glutamate-1-semialdehyde 2,1 aminomutase, EC 5.4.3.8) was treated with two potential mechanism-based inactivators, namely 4-aminohex-5-enoate and 4-aminohex-5-ynoate, have been investigated by monitoring rapid transient changes in the absorption spectrum of the enzyme's prosthetic group, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. In both cases a short-lived chromophore absorbing maximally at about 500 nm was formed in a few milliseconds. In the case of the vinyl analogue (4-aminohex-5-enoate) this chromophore, considered to be a quinonoid intermediate, converted rapidly into the pyridoxamine phosphate form of the co-enzyme in a single turnover which was accompanied by negligible inactivation. However, slow inactivation of the enzyme by this compound was observed when the enzyme was made to undergo multiple turnovers by including the efficient aldehyde substrate, succinic semialdehyde. The acetylenic compound, aminohexynoate, produced more complex spectral changes with the consecutive formation of compounds absorbing maximally at 496 nm, 450 nm, 564 nm and 330 nm. The enzyme was 90% inactivated by aminohexynoate within 10 s and thereafter lost no further activity unless aldehyde substrate was added. Mechanisms and kinetic constants consistent with the observations are proposed for each compound. The observation that the acetylenic compound is a much more potent inactivator than its vinyl analogue is attributed to the occurrence of a conjugated allene as intermediate. PMID:7619072

  9. Effect of chloroethene concentrations and granular activated carbon on reductive dechlorination rates and growth of Dehalococcoides spp.

    PubMed

    Aktaş, Özgür; Schmidt, Kathrin R; Mungenast, Sarah; Stoll, Claudia; Tiehm, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the investigation of (i) the tetrachloroethene (PCE) toxicity threshold of a reductively dechlorinating mixed culture containing Dehalococcoides spp., (ii) the adsorption of PCE on different types of granular activated carbon (GAC), and (iii) the bioavailability and reductive dechlorination in the presence of GAC. The abundance of Dehalococcoides spp. detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was found to increase by 2-4 orders of magnitude during degradation of PCE. No degradation occurred at dissolved concentrations beyond 420 μM (70 mg/L). Different adsorption isotherms were determined for thermally and chemically activated carbons. The addition of GAC to biological assays reduced the dissolved PCE concentration below the toxicity threshold. The combination of microbial reductive dechlorination with GAC adsorption proved to be a promising method for remediation of groundwater contaminated by high concentrations of chloroethenes. PMID:22044603

  10. Facet-Dependent Catalytic Activity of Platinum Nanocrystals for Triiodide Reduction in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Dong; Hou, Yu; Yang, Shuang; Yang, Xiao Hua; Zhong, Ju Hua; Liu, Jian; Wang, Hai Feng; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Yang, Hua Gui

    2013-01-01

    Platinum (Pt) nanocrystals have demonstrated to be an effective catalyst in many heterogeneous catalytic processes. However, pioneer facets with highest activity have been reported differently for various reaction systems. Although Pt has been the most important counter electrode material for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), suitable atomic arrangement on the exposed crystal facet of Pt for triiodide reduction is still inexplicable. Using density functional theory, we have investigated the catalytic reaction processes of triiodide reduction over {100}, {111} and {411} facets, indicating that the activity follows the order of Pt(111) > Pt(411) > Pt(100). Further, Pt nanocrystals mainly bounded by {100}, {111} and {411} facets were synthesized and used as counter electrode materials for DSCs. The highest photovoltaic conversion efficiency of Pt(111) in DSCs confirms the predictions of the theoretical study. These findings have deepened the understanding of the mechanism of triiodide reduction at Pt surfaces and further screened the best facet for DSCs successfully. PMID:23670438

  11. Acetylene from the co-pyrolysis of biomass and waste tires or coal in the H{sub 2}/Ar plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, W.; Cao, Q.; Lv, Y.; Chang, L.

    2008-07-01

    Acetylene from carbon-containing materials via plasma pyrolysis is not only simple but also environmentally friendly. In this article, the acetylene produced from co-pyrolyzing biomass with waste tire or coal under the conditions of H{sub 2}/Ar DC arc plasma jet was investigated. The experimental results showed that the co-pyrolysis of mixture with biomass and waste tire or coal can improve largely the acetylene relative volume fraction (RVF) in gaseous products and the corresponding yield of acetylene. The change trends for the acetylene yield of plasma pyrolysis from mixture with raw sample properties were the same as relevant RVF. But the yield change trend with feeding rate is different from its RVF. The effects of the feeding rate of raw materials and the electric current of plasmatron on acetylene formation are also discussed.

  12. Enediyne antibiotics and their models: new potential of acetylene chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maretina, Irina A.; Trofimov, Boris A.

    2006-09-01

    Structures and chemical properties of enediynes, viz., compounds comprising a system of conjugated double and triple bonds, are surveyed. The presence of this system in the molecules of enediyne antitumour antibiotics ensures their high activity. The mechanism of biological action of enediynes is discussed based on cycloaromatisation of the enediyne chromophore resulting in highly active benzenoid 1,4-diradicals, which selectively cleave DNA. The key strategies of enediyne synthesis are analysed.

  13. Plant Thioredoxin CDSP32 Regenerates 1-Cys Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase B Activity through the Direct Reduction of Sulfenic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Tarrago, Lionel; Laugier, Edith; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Marchand, Christophe H.; Le Maréchal, Pierre; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Rey, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are ubiquitous enzymes catalyzing the reduction of disulfide bonds, thanks to a CXXC active site. Among their substrates, 2-Cys methionine sulfoxide reductases B (2-Cys MSRBs) reduce the R diastereoisomer of methionine sulfoxide (MetSO) and possess two redox-active Cys as follows: a catalytic Cys reducing MetSO and a resolving one, involved in disulfide bridge formation. The other MSRB type, 1-Cys MSRBs, possesses only the catalytic Cys, and their regeneration mechanisms by Trxs remain unclear. The plant plastidial Trx CDSP32 is able to provide 1-Cys MSRB with electrons. CDSP32 includes two Trx modules with one potential active site 219CGPC222 and three extra Cys. Here, we investigated the redox properties of recombinant Arabidopsis CDSP32 and delineated the biochemical mechanisms of MSRB regeneration by CDSP32. Free thiol titration and 4-acetamido-4′-maleimidyldistilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid alkylation assays indicated that the Trx possesses only two redox-active Cys, very likely the Cys219 and Cys222. Protein electrophoresis analyses coupled to mass spectrometry revealed that CDSP32 forms a heterodimeric complex with MSRB1 via reduction of the sulfenic acid formed on MSRB1 catalytic Cys after MetSO reduction. MSR activity assays using variable CDSP32 amounts revealed that MSRB1 reduction proceeds with a 1:1 stoichiometry, and redox titrations indicated that CDSP32 and MSRB1 possess midpoints potentials of −337 and −328 mV at pH 7.9, respectively, indicating that regeneration of MSRB1 activity by the Trx through sulfenic acid reduction is thermodynamically feasible in physiological conditions. PMID:20236937

  14. A feasibility study on assessing public health impacts of cumulative air pollution reduction activities in a small geographic area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background and Objective: The rnain objective ofthis study was to examine the feasibility ofconducting a local (e.g., city level) assessment ofthe public health impacts ofcumulative air pollution reduction activities (a.k.a. accountability) from the federal, state, local and vo...

  15. Further Examination of the Vibratory Loads Reduction Results from the NASA/ARMY/MIT Active Twist Rotor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Matthew L.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2002-01-01

    The vibration reduction capabilities of a model rotor system utilizing controlled, strain-induced blade twisting are examined. The model rotor blades, which utilize piezoelectric active fiber composite actuators, were tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel using open-loop control to determine the effect of active-twist on rotor vibratory loads. The results of this testing have been encouraging, and have demonstrated that active-twist rotor designs offer the potential for significant load reductions in future helicopter rotor systems. Active twist control was found to use less than 1% of the power necessary to operate the rotor system and had a pronounced effect on both rotating- and fixed-system loads, offering reductions in individual harmonic loads of up to 100%. A review of the vibration reduction results obtained is presented, which includes a limited set of comparisons with results generated using the second-generation version of the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD II) rotorcraft comprehensive analysis.

  16. Aligned carbon nanotubes with built-in FeN{sub 4} active sites for electrocatalytic reduction of oxygen.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Liu, D. J.; Chemical Engineering

    2008-01-01

    The electrocatalytic site FeN{sub 4}, which is active towards the oxygen reduction reaction, is incorporated into the graphene layer of aligned carbon nanotubes prepared through a chemical vapor deposition process, as is confirmed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and other characterization techniques.

  17. Interpretation of PAN, acetone and acetylene measurements from the MIPAS-E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. P.; Remedios, J. J.; Parker, R. J.

    2009-04-01

    Emissions of anthropogenic pollution, from biomass burning events in particular, result in the injection of a wide range of carbon compounds into the atmosphere. Carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released in significant amounts, affecting both the oxidation capacity of the troposphere and ozone production. Upper troposphere (UT) measurements of PAN, acetone and acetylene have, in the past, been generally limited to sporadic in situ sampling during specialised campaign periods. The recent rapid progress in both the detection and retrieval of many VOC species from spaceborne instrumentation has been large. It has recently been established that the observation of the global distribution of VOCs in the UT can be made by measurements provided by instruments such as the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding onboard ENVISAT (MIPAS-E) or the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) onboard SCISAT-1. In this work, we discuss the ability of MIPAS-E to provide new global measurements of acetone in the UT. We also describe both the distribution and seasonality observed in UT PAN volume mixing ratios (vmrs). From the MIPAS-E acetylene measurements, we analyse the extent and magnitude of the chemical isolation observed over the Middle East during August 2003. We show that this enhancement is due to fast westward transport from Asia via the Easterly Jet associated with the Asian monsoon anticyclone. A full error analysis is carried out for each of the three gases we analyse. Previous work has shown that characteristic infrared signatures of PAN, acetone and acetylene can be detected in MIPAS-E thermal emission spectra, with the 787-790 cm-1, 1216-1218 cm-1 and 776.0-776.15 cm-1 spectral ranges respectively being particularly sensitive to changes in each of the gases. We invert the measured MIPAS-E spectra into vmrs using an independent offline-retrieval scheme based on the optimal estimation approach which was

  18. Development of bioelectrocatalytic activity stimulates mixed-culture reduction of glycerol in a bioelectrochemical system

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mi; Freguia, Stefano; Dennis, Paul G; Keller, Jürg; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-01-01

    In a microbial bioelectrochemical system (BES), organic substrate such as glycerol can be reductively converted to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) by a mixed population biofilm growing on the cathode. Here, we show that 1,3-PDO yields positively correlated to the electrons supplied, increasing from 0.27 ± 0.13 to 0.57 ± 0.09 mol PDO mol−1 glycerol when the cathodic current switched from 1 A m−2 to 10 A m−2. Electrochemical measurements with linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) demonstrated that the biofilm was bioelectrocatalytically active and that the cathodic current was greatly enhanced only in the presence of both biofilm and glycerol, with an onset potential of −0.46 V. This indicates that glycerol or its degradation products effectively served as cathodic electron acceptor. During long-term operation (> 150 days), however, the yield decreased gradually to 0.13 ± 0.02 mol PDO mol−1 glycerol, and the current–product correlation disappeared. The onset potentials for cathodic current decreased to −0.58 V in the LSV tests at this stage, irrespective of the presence or absence of glycerol, with electrons from the cathode almost exclusively used for hydrogen evolution (accounted for 99.9% and 89.5% of the electrons transferred at glycerol and glycerol-free conditions respectively). Community analysis evidenced a decreasing relative abundance of Citrobacter in the biofilm, indicating a community succession leading to cathode independent processes relative to the glycerol. It is thus shown here that in processes where substrate conversion can occur independently of the electrode, electroactive microorganisms can be outcompeted and effectively disconnected from the substrate. PMID:25817314

  19. Extraordinary Separation of Acetylene-Containing Mixtures with Microporous Metal-Organic Frameworks with Open O Donor Sites and Tunable Robustness through Control of the Helical Chain Secondary Building Units.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zizhu; Zhang, Zhangjing; Liu, Lizhen; Li, Ziyin; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Han, Yu; Chen, Banglin; Krishna, Rajamani; Xiang, Shengchang

    2016-04-11

    Acetylene separation is a very important but challenging industrial separation task. Here, through the solvothermal reaction of CuI and 5-triazole isophthalic acid in different solvents, two metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, FJU-21 and FJU-22) with open O donor sites and controllable robustness have been obtained for acetylene separation. They contain the same paddle-wheel {Cu2 (COO2 )4 } nodes and metal-ligand connection modes, but with different helical chains as secondary building units (SBUs), leading to different structural robustness for the MOFs. FJU-21 and FJU-22 are the first examples in which the MOFs' robustness is controlled by adjusting the helical chain SBUs. Good robustness gives the activated FJU-22 a, which has higher surface area and gas uptakes than the flexible FJU-21 a. Importantly, FJU-22 a shows extraordinary separation of acetylene mixtures under ambient conditions. The separation capacity of FJU-22 a for 50:50 C2 H2 /CO2 mixtures is about twice that of the high-capacity HOF-3, and its actual separation selectivity for C2 H2 /C2 H4 mixtures containing 1 % acetylene is the highest among reported porous materials. Based on first-principles calculations, the extraordinary separation performance of C2 H2 for FJU-22 a was attributed to hydrogen-bonding interactions between the C2 H2 molecules with the open O donors on the wall, which provide better recognition ability for C2 H2 than other functional sites, including open metal sites and amino groups. PMID:26934040

  20. Report on INL Activities for Uncertainty Reduction Analysis of FY12

    SciTech Connect

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores

    2012-09-01

    The work scope of this project related to the Work Packages of “Uncertainty Reduction Analyses” with the goal of reducing nuclear data uncertainties is to produce a set of improved nuclear data to be used both for a wide range of validated advanced fast reactor design calculations, and for providing guidelines for further improvements of the ENDF/B files (i.e. ENDF/B-VII, and future releases). Recent extensive sensitivity/uncertainty studies, performed within an international OECD-NEA initiative, have quantified for the first time the impact of current nuclear data uncertainties on design parameters of the major FCR&D and GEN-IV systems, and in particular on Na-cooled fast reactors with different fuels (oxide or metal), fuel composition (e.g. different Pu/TRU ratios) and different conversion ratios. These studies have pointed out that present uncertainties on the nuclear data should be significantly reduced, in order to get full benefit from the advanced modeling and simulation initiatives. Nuclear data plays a fundamental role in performance calculations of advanced reactor concepts. Uncertainties in the nuclear data propagate into uncertainties in calculated integral quantities, driving margins and costs in advanced system design, operation and safeguards. This package contributes to the resolution of technical, cost, safety, security and proliferation concerns in a multi-pronged, systematic, science-based R&D approach. The Nuclear Data effort identifies and develops small scale, phenomenon-specific experiments informed by theory and engineering to reduce the number of large, expensive integral experiments. The Nuclear Data activities are leveraged by effective collaborations between experiment and theory, between DOE programs and offices, at national laboratories and universities, both domestic and international. The primary objective is to develop reactor core sensitivity and uncertainty analyses that identify the improvement needs of key nuclear data which