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Sample records for activity assays demonstrated

  1. A Demonstration of the Uncertainty in Predicting the Estrogenic Activity of Individual Chemicals and Mixtures From an In Vitro Estrogen Receptor Transcriptional Activation Assay (T47D-KBluc) to the In Vivo Uterotrophic Assay Using Oral Exposure.

    PubMed

    Conley, Justin M; Hannas, Bethany R; Furr, Johnathan R; Wilson, Vickie S; Gray, L Earl

    2016-10-01

    In vitro estrogen receptor assays are valuable tools for identifying environmental samples and chemicals that display estrogenic activity. However, in vitro potency cannot necessarily be extrapolated to estimates of in vivo potency because in vitro assays are currently unable to fully account for absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. To explore this issue, we calculated relative potency factors (RPF), using 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) as the reference compound, for several chemicals and mixtures in the T47D-KBluc estrogen receptor transactivation assay. In vitro RPFs were used to predict rat oral uterotrophic assay responses for these chemicals and mixtures. EE2, 17β-estradiol (E2), benzyl-butyl phthalate (BBP), bisphenol-A (BPA), bisphenol-AF (BPAF), bisphenol-C (BPC), bisphenol-S (BPS), and methoxychlor (MET) were tested individually, while BPS + MET, BPAF + MET, and BPAF + BPC + BPS + EE2 + MET were tested as equipotent mixtures. In vivo ED50 values for BPA, BPAF, and BPC were accurately predicted using in vitro data; however, E2 was less potent than predicted, BBP was a false positive, and BPS and MET were 76.6 and 368.3-fold more active in vivo than predicted from the in vitro potency, respectively. Further, mixture ED50 values were more accurately predicted by the dose addition model using individual chemical in vivo uterotrophic data (0.7-1.5-fold difference from observed) than in vitro data (1.4-86.8-fold). Overall, these data illustrate the potential for both underestimating and overestimating in vivo potency from predictions made with in vitro data for compounds that undergo substantial disposition following oral administration. Accounting for aspects of toxicokinetics, notably metabolism, in in vitro models will be necessary for accurate in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolations.

  2. Performance in the WIPP nondestructive assay performance demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Marcinkiewicz, C.J.; Connolly, M.J.; Becker, G.K.

    1997-11-01

    Measurement facilities performing nondestructive assay (NDA) of wastes intended for disposal at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are required to demonstrate their ability to meet specific Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs). This demonstration is performed, in part, by participation in the NDA Performance Demonstration Program (PDP). The PDP is funded and managed by the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) of DOE and is conducted by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It tests the characteristics of precision, system bias and/or total uncertainty through the measurement of variable, blind combinations of simulated waste drums and certified radioactive standards. Each facility must successfully participate in the PDP using each different type of measurement system planned for use in waste characterization. The first cycle of the PDP using each different type of measurement system planned for use in waste characterization. The first cycle of the PDP was completed in July 1996 and the second is scheduled for completion by December 1996. Seven sites reported data in cycle 1 for 11 different measurement systems. This paper describes the design and operation of the PDP and provides the performance data from cycle 1. It also describes the preliminary results from cycle 2 and updates the status and future plans for the NDA PDP. 4 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. Demonstration of Active Combustion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovett, Jeffrey A.; Teerlinck, Karen A.; Cohen, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate active control of combustion instabilities in a direct-injection gas turbine combustor that accurately simulates engine operating conditions and reproduces an engine-type instability. This report documents the second phase of a two-phase effort. The first phase involved the analysis of an instability observed in a developmental aeroengine and the design of a single-nozzle test rig to replicate that phenomenon. This was successfully completed in 2001 and is documented in the Phase I report. This second phase was directed toward demonstration of active control strategies to mitigate this instability and thereby demonstrate the viability of active control for aircraft engine combustors. This involved development of high-speed actuator technology, testing and analysis of how the actuation system was integrated with the combustion system, control algorithm development, and demonstration testing in the single-nozzle test rig. A 30 percent reduction in the amplitude of the high-frequency (570 Hz) instability was achieved using actuation systems and control algorithms developed within this effort. Even larger reductions were shown with a low-frequency (270 Hz) instability. This represents a unique achievement in the development and practical demonstration of active combustion control systems for gas turbine applications.

  4. An Undergraduate Laboratory Activity Demonstrating Bacteriophage Specificity†

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Mary E.; Gyure, Ruth A.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophage are among the most diverse and numerous microbes inhabiting our planet. Yet many laboratory activities fail to engage students in meaningful exploration of their diversity, unique characteristics, and abundance. In this curriculum activity students use a standard plaque assay to enumerate bacteriophage particles from a natural sample and use the scientific method to address questions about host specificity and diversity. A raw primary sewage sample is enriched for bacteriophage using hosts in the family Enterobacteriaceae. Students hypothesize about host specificity and use quantitative data (serial dilution and plaque assay) to test their hypotheses. Combined class data also help them answer questions about phage diversity. The exercise was field tested with a class of 47 students using pre- and posttests. For all learning outcomes posttest scores were higher than pretest scores at or below p = 0.01. Average individualized learning gain (G) was also calculated for each learning outcome. Students’ use of scientific language in reference to bacteriophage and host interaction significantly improved (p = 0.002; G = 0.50). Improved means of expression helped students construct better hypotheses on phage host specificity (G = 0.31, p = 0.01) and to explain the plaque assay method (G = 0.33, p = 0.002). At the end of the exercise students also demonstrated improved knowledge and understanding of phage specificity as related to phage therapy in humans (p < 0.001; G = 51). PMID:23858357

  5. DNA Methyltransferase Activity Assays: Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Wan Jun; Wee, Cayden Pang Pee; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases), a family of enzymes that catalyse the methylation of DNA, have a profound effect on gene regulation. A large body of evidence has indicated that DNA MTase is potentially a predictive biomarker closely associated with genetic disorders and genetic diseases like cancer. Given the attention bestowed onto DNA MTases in molecular biology and medicine, highly sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential in determining gene regulation, epigenetic modification, clinical diagnosis and therapeutics. Conventional techniques such as isotope labelling are effective, but they often require laborious sample preparation, isotope labelling, sophisticated equipment and large amounts of DNA, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Simple, portable, highly sensitive and low-cost assays are urgently needed for DNA MTase activity screening. In most recent technological advances, many alternative DNA MTase activity assays such as fluorescent, electrochemical, colorimetric and chemiluminescent assays have been proposed. In addition, many of them are coupled with nanomaterials and/or enzymes to significantly enhance their sensitivity. Herein we review the progress in the development of DNA MTase activity assays with an emphasis on assay mechanism and performance with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. It is hoped that this article will provide a broad coverage of DNA MTase activity assays and their latest developments and open new perspectives toward the development of DNA MTase activity assays with much improved performance for uses in molecular biology and clinical practice. PMID:26909112

  6. DNA Methyltransferase Activity Assays: Advances and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Poh, Wan Jun; Wee, Cayden Pang Pee; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases), a family of enzymes that catalyse the methylation of DNA, have a profound effect on gene regulation. A large body of evidence has indicated that DNA MTase is potentially a predictive biomarker closely associated with genetic disorders and genetic diseases like cancer. Given the attention bestowed onto DNA MTases in molecular biology and medicine, highly sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential in determining gene regulation, epigenetic modification, clinical diagnosis and therapeutics. Conventional techniques such as isotope labelling are effective, but they often require laborious sample preparation, isotope labelling, sophisticated equipment and large amounts of DNA, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Simple, portable, highly sensitive and low-cost assays are urgently needed for DNA MTase activity screening. In most recent technological advances, many alternative DNA MTase activity assays such as fluorescent, electrochemical, colorimetric and chemiluminescent assays have been proposed. In addition, many of them are coupled with nanomaterials and/or enzymes to significantly enhance their sensitivity. Herein we review the progress in the development of DNA MTase activity assays with an emphasis on assay mechanism and performance with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. It is hoped that this article will provide a broad coverage of DNA MTase activity assays and their latest developments and open new perspectives toward the development of DNA MTase activity assays with much improved performance for uses in molecular biology and clinical practice.

  7. Assay and Inhibition of Diacylglycerol Lipase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Meghan; Bhatt, Shachi R.; Sikka, Surina; Mercier, Richard W.; West, Jay M.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Gatley, S. John; Duclos, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    A series of N-formyl-α-amino acid esters of β-lactone derivatives structurally related to tetrahydrolipstatin (THL) and O-3841 were synthesized that inhibit human and murine diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) activities. New ether lipid reporter compounds were developed for an in vitro assay to efficiently screen inhibitors of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol hydrolysis and related lipase activities using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). A standardized thin layer chromatography (TLC) radioassay of diacylglycerol lipase activity utilizing the labeled endogenous substrate [1″-14C]1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol with phosphorimaging detection was used to quantify inhibition by following formation of the initial product [1″-14C]2-arachidonoylglycerol and further hydrolysis under the assay conditions to [1-14C]arachidonic acid. PMID:22738638

  8. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Boxed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-10-01

    Each testing and analytical facility performing waste characterization activities for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) participates in the Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) to comply with the Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC) (DOE/WIPP-02-3122) and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (CBFO-94-1012). The PDP serves as a quality control check for data generated in the characterization of waste destined for WIPP. Single-blind audit samples are prepared and distributed to each of the facilities participating in the PDP. Different PDPs evaluate the analyses of simulated headspace gases (HSGs), constituents of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and transuranic (TRU) radionuclides using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques.

  9. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Drummed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2009-04-01

    Each testing and analytical facility performing waste characterization activities for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) participates in the Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) to comply with the Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC) (DOE/WIPP-02-3122) and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (CBFO-94-1012). The PDP serves as a quality control check for data generated in the characterization of waste destined for WIPP. Single blind audit samples are prepared and distributed to each of the facilities participating in the PDP. The PDP evaluates analyses of simulated headspace gases, constituents of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and transuranic (TRU) radionuclides using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques.

  10. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Drummed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program

    SciTech Connect

    DOE Carlsbad Field Office

    2001-04-06

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for nondestructive assay (NDA) consists of a series of tests to evaluate the capability for NDA of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each test is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements obtained from NDA systems used to characterize the radiological constituents of TRU waste. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC; DOE 1999a) and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE 1999b). The WAC requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAC. The WAC contains technical and quality requirements for acceptable NDA. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and applicable requirements of the WAC for the NDA PDP. Measurement facilities demonstrate acceptable performance by the successful testing of simulated waste containers according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Comparison among DOE measurement groups and commercial assay services is achieved by comparing the results of measurements on similar simulated waste containers reported by the different measurement facilities. These tests are used as an independent means to assess the performance of measurement groups regarding compliance with established quality assurance objectives (QAO's). Measurement facilities must analyze the simulated waste containers using the same procedures used for normal waste characterization activities. For the drummed waste PDP, a simulated waste container consists of a 55-gallon matrix drum emplaced with radioactive standards and fabricated matrix inserts. These PDP sample components are distributed to the participating measurement facilities that have been designated and authorized by the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO). The NDA Drum PDP materials are stored at these sites under secure conditions to

  11. Assay of DAGLα/β Activity.

    PubMed

    Bisogno, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) exerts its physiological action by binding to and functionally activating type-1 (CB1) and type-2 (CB2) cannabinoid receptors. It is thought to be produced through the action of sn-1 selective diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) that catalyzes 2-AG biosynthesis from sn-2-arachidonate-containing diacylglycerols. Since 2-AG biosynthetic enzymes have been identified only recently, little information on methodological approaches for measuring DAGL activity is as yet available. Here, a highly sensitive radiometric assay to measure DAGL activity by using 1-oleoyl[1-(14)C]-2-arachidonoylglycerol as the substrate is reported. All the steps needed to perform lipid extraction, fractionation by thin-layer chromatography (TLC), and quantification of radiolabeled [(14)C]-oleic acid via scintillation counting are described in detail. PMID:27245901

  12. Use of a Simple, Colorimetric Assay to Demonstrate Conditions for Induction of Nitrate Reductase in Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Suzanne M.

    1993-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation by plants provides an excellent system for demonstrating control of gene expression in a eukaryotic organism. Describes an assay method that allows students to complete experiments designed around the measurement of nitrate reductase within a three-hour laboratory experiment. (PR)

  13. A miniaturized fibrinolytic assay for plasminogen activators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. L.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Damron, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes a micro-clot lysis assay (MCLA) for evaluating fibrinolytic activity of plasminogen activators (PA). Fibrin clots were formed in wells of microtiter plates. Lysis of the clots by PA, indicated by change in turbidity (optical density, OD), was monitored with a microplate reader at five minutes intervals. Log-log plots of PA dilution versus endpoint, the time at which the OD value was halfway between the maximum and minimum value for each well, were linear over a broad range of PA concentrations (2-200 International units/ml). The MCLA is a modification and miniaturization of well established fibrinolytic methods. The significant practical advantages of the MCLA are that it is a simple, relatively sensitive, non-radioactive, quantitative, kinetic, fibrinolytic micro-technique which can be automated.

  14. An Overhead Projection Demonstration of Optical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, John W.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the use of two polarizing lenses, a yellow filter, an oatmeal bos, a piece of cardboard, a 1,000 ml beaker, and an overhead projector to demonstrate compound optical activity to large classes. Indicates the presence of an accuracy within 1-2 degrees of usually acceptable data. (CC)

  15. Rho family and Rap GTPase activation assays.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Richard T; Knaus, Ulla G

    2014-01-01

    The detection of Ras superfamily GTPase activity in innate immune cells is important when studying signaling events elicited by various ligands and cellular processes. The development of high-affinity probes detecting the activated, GTP-bound form of small GTPases has significantly enhanced our understanding of initiation and termination of GTPase-regulated signaling pathways. These probes are created by fusing a high-affinity GTPase-binding domain derived from a specific downstream effector protein to glutathione S-transferase (GST). Such domains bind preferentially to the GTP-bound form of the upstream Rho or Ras GTPase. Coupling these probes to beads enables extraction of the complex and subsequent quantification of the active GTP-binding protein by immunoblotting. Although effector domains that discriminate efficiently between GDP- and GTP-bound states and highly specific antibodies are not yet available for every small GTPase, analysis of certain members of the Rho and Ras GTPase family is now routinely performed. Here, we describe affinity-based pulldown assays for detection of Rho GTPase (Rac1/2, Cdc42, RhoA/B) and Rap1/2 activity in stimulated neutrophils or macrophages.

  16. Making Waves: Seismic Waves Activities and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braile, S. J.; Braile, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    The nature and propagation of seismic waves are fundamental concepts necessary for understanding the exploration of Earth's interior structure and properties, plate tectonics, earthquakes, and seismic hazards. Investigating seismic waves is also an engaging approach to learning basic principles of the physics of waves and wave propagation. Several effective educational activities and demonstrations are available for teaching about seismic waves, including the stretching of a spring to demonstrate elasticity; slinky wave propagation activities for compressional, shear, Rayleigh and Love waves; the human wave activity to demonstrate P- and S- waves in solids and liquids; waves in water in a simple wave tank; seismic wave computer animations; simple shake table demonstrations of model building responses to seismic waves to illustrate earthquake damage to structures; processing and analysis of seismograms using free and easy to use software; and seismic wave simulation software for viewing wave propagation in a spherical Earth. The use of multiple methods for teaching about seismic waves is useful because it provides reinforcement of the fundamental concepts, is adaptable to variable classroom situations and diverse learning styles, and allows one or more methods to be used for authentic assessment. The methods described here have been used effectively with a broad range of audiences, including K-12 students and teachers, undergraduate students in introductory geosciences courses, and geosciences majors.

  17. Analyte detection using an active assay

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor; Bailey, Charles L.; Evanskey, Melissa R.

    2010-11-02

    Analytes using an active assay may be detected by introducing an analyte solution containing a plurality of analytes to a lacquered membrane. The lacquered membrane may be a membrane having at least one surface treated with a layer of polymers. The lacquered membrane may be semi-permeable to nonanalytes. The layer of polymers may include cross-linked polymers. A plurality of probe molecules may be arrayed and immobilized on the lacquered membrane. An external force may be applied to the analyte solution to move the analytes towards the lacquered membrane. Movement may cause some or all of the analytes to bind to the lacquered membrane. In cases where probe molecules are presented, some or all of the analytes may bind to probe molecules. The direction of the external force may be reversed to remove unbound or weakly bound analytes. Bound analytes may be detected using known detection types.

  18. Guidance manual for conducting technology demonstration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, Robert L.; Morris, Michael I.; Singh, Suman P.N.

    1991-12-01

    This demonstration guidance manual has been prepared to assist Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), staff in conducting demonstrations. It is prepared in checklist style to facilitate its use and assumes that Energy Systems personnel have project management responsibility. In addition to a detailed step-by-step listing of procedural considerations, a general checklist, logic flow diagram, and several examples of necessary plans are included to assist the user in developing an understanding of the many complex activities required to manage technology demonstrations. Demonstrations are pilot-scale applications of often innovative technologies to determine the commercial viability of the technologies to perform their designed function. Demonstrations are generally conducted on well-defined problems for which existing technologies or processes are less than satisfactory in terms of effectiveness, cost, and/or regulatory compliance. Critically important issues in demonstration management include, but are not limited to, such factors as communications with line and matrix management and with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Energy Systems staff responsible for management oversight, budgetary and schedule requirements, regulatory compliance, and safety.

  19. Automated conductimetric assay of human serum cholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Duffy, P; Wallach, J M

    1989-01-01

    Serum cholinesterase activity was determined by conductimetry using samples in the microliter range. Butyrylcholine iodide was demonstrated to be a convenient substrate for the conductimetric assay. Validation of the microassay was made by using either purified enzyme or control serum. In the range of 0-60 U/l, a linear relationship was demonstrated. Correlation with a reference spectrophotometric method was obtained with a slope of 1.18. An explanation of this value is proposed, as different hydrolysis rates were obtained with human sera, depending on the substrate used (butyrylthio- or butyryl-choline ester).

  20. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Drummed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2005-08-03

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Nondestructive Assay (NDA) is a test program designed to yield data on measurement system capability to characterize drummed transuranic (TRU) waste generated throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The tests are conducted periodically and provide a mechanism for the independent and objective assessment of NDA system performance and capability relative to the radiological characterization objectives and criteria of the Office of Characterization and Transportation (OCT). The primary documents requiring an NDA PDP are the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC), which requires annual characterization facility participation in the PDP, and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD). This NDA PDP implements the general requirements of the QAPD and applicable requirements of the WAC. Measurement facilities must demonstrate acceptable radiological characterization performance through measurement of test samples comprised of pre-specified PDP matrix drum/radioactive source configurations. Measurement facilities are required to analyze the NDA PDP drum samples using the same procedures approved and implemented for routine operational waste characterization activities. The test samples provide an independent means to assess NDA measurement system performance and compliance per criteria delineated in the NDA PDP Plan. General inter-comparison of NDA measurement system performance among DOE measurement facilities and commercial NDA services can also be evaluated using measurement results on similar NDA PDP test samples. A PDP test sample consists of a 55-gallon matrix drum containing a waste matrix type representative of a particular category of the DOE waste inventory and nuclear material standards of known radionuclide and isotopic composition typical of DOE radioactive material. The PDP sample components are made available to participating measurement facilities as designated by the

  1. A Spectrophotometric Assay Optimizing Conditions for Pepsin Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Ethelynda E.; Kimsey, R. Scott

    1998-01-01

    Describes a laboratory protocol optimizing the conditions for the assay of pepsin activity using the Coomasie Blue dye binding assay of protein concentration. The dye bonds through strong, noncovalent interactions to basic and aromatic amino acid residues. (DDR)

  2. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays

    PubMed Central

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Rodionov, Valentin; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare. PMID:26658480

  3. Experimental Demonstration of Active Electromagnetic Cloaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvanayagam, Michael; Eleftheriades, George V.

    2013-10-01

    Active electromagnetic cloaking uses an array of elementary sources to cancel the scattered fields created by an object. An active interior cloak does this by placing the sources along the boundary of the object. This process can be thought of as introducing a discontinuity in the field to cancel out the scattered field by the object. Here, an experimental version of a thin active cloak at microwave frequencies is demonstrated for an aluminum cylinder with a radius of 0.56λ. The cloak consists of a 12-element magnetic-dipole array. By controlling the weights of the current on each element of the array, the scattering off of the cylinder is reduced in the backward and forward directions. The ability to disguise the aluminum cylinder as another object by varying the weights of the dipole array is also demonstrated. Finally, potential ways of overcoming the constraint of requiring a priori knowledge of the incident field leading to camouflaging-type behavior are discussed.

  4. Demonstration of DSI-semen--A novel DNA methylation-based forensic semen identification assay.

    PubMed

    Wasserstrom, Adam; Frumkin, Dan; Davidson, Ariane; Shpitzen, Moshe; Herman, Yael; Gafny, Ron

    2013-01-01

    sample likely represents true semen because sperm cells were detected from an adjacent sample from the same garment, therefore in this case the assay appears to be more sensitive than the microscopic examination. These results demonstrate that this assay is a bona fide confirmatory test for semen.

  5. Quantitative comparisons of in vitro assays for estrogenic activities.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, H; Tong, W; Perkins, R; Soto, A M; Prechtl, N V; Sheehan, D M

    2000-01-01

    Substances that may act as estrogens show a broad chemical structural diversity. To thoroughly address the question of possible adverse estrogenic effects, reliable methods are needed to detect and identify the chemicals of these diverse structural classes. We compared three assays--in vitro estrogen receptor competitive binding assays (ER binding assays), yeast-based reporter gene assays (yeast assays), and the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay (E-SCREEN assay)--to determine their quantitative agreement in identifying structurally diverse estrogens. We examined assay performance for relative sensitivity, detection of active/inactive chemicals, and estrogen/antiestrogen activities. In this examination, we combined individual data sets in a specific, quantitative data mining exercise. Data sets for at least 29 chemicals from five laboratories were analyzed pair-wise by X-Y plots. The ER binding assay was a good predictor for the other two assay results when the antiestrogens were excluded (r(2) is 0.78 for the yeast assays and 0.85 for the E-SCREEN assays). Additionally, the examination strongly suggests that biologic information that is not apparent from any of the individual assays can be discovered by quantitative pair-wise comparisons among assays. Antiestrogens are identified as outliers in the ER binding/yeast assay, while complete antagonists are identified in the ER binding and E-SCREEN assays. Furthermore, the presence of outliers may be explained by different mechanisms that induce an endocrine response, different impurities in different batches of chemicals, different species sensitivity, or limitations of the assay techniques. Although these assays involve different levels of biologic complexity, the major conclusion is that they generally provided consistent information in quantitatively determining estrogenic activity for the five data sets examined. The results should provide guidance for expanded data mining examinations and the selection of appropriate

  6. Active and passive computed tomography for nondestructive assay

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardi, R T; Camp, D E; Clard, D; Jackson, J A; Martz, H E, Decman, D J; Roberson, G P

    1998-10-28

    Traditional gamma-ray methods used to characterize nuclear waste introduce errors that are related to non-uniform measurement responses associated with unknown radioactive source and matrix material distributions. These errors can be reduced by applying an active and passive tomographic technique (A&PCT) developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The technique uses an external radioactive source and active tomography to map the attenuation within a waste barrel as a function of mono-energetic gamma-ray energy. Passive tomography is used to localize and identify specific radioactive waste within the same container. Reconstruction of the passive data using the attenuation maps at specific energies allows internal waste radioactivity to be corrected for any overlying heterogeneous materials, thus yielding an absolute assay of the waste activity. LLNL and Bio-Imaging Research, Inc. have collaborated in a technology transfer effort to integrate an A&PCT assay system into a mobile waste characterization trailer. This mobile system has participated in and passed several formal DOE-sponsored performance demonstrations, tests and evaluations. The system is currently being upgraded with multiple detectors to improve throughput, automated gamma-ray analysis code to simplify the assay, and a new emission reconstruction code to improve accuracy

  7. How-to-do-it: Immunological Assays for the Classroom 1. Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA): A Laboratory Tool for Demonstration of Antibody-Antigen Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, A. J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of required materials, and procedures are provided for an immunological assay which has been modified for use as a classroom/laboratory demonstration of antigen-antibody reaction. The assay is designed for a two and one-half hour laboratory period but may be modified for one hour laboratories. (JN)

  8. Biochemical assays on plasminogen activators and hormones from kidney sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Grant H.; Lewis, Marian L.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Investigations were established for the purpose of analyzing the conditioned media from human embryonic kidney cell subpopulations separated in space by electrophoresis. This data is based on the experiments performed on STS-8 on the continuous flow electrophoresis system. The primary biological activity that was analyzed was plasminogen activator activity, but some assays for erythropoeitin and human granulocyte colony stimulating activity were also performed. It is concluded that a battery of assays are required to completely define the plasminogen activator profile of a conditioned media from cell culture. Each type of assay measures different parts of the mixture and are influenced by different parameters. The functional role of each assay is given along with an indication of which combination of assays are required to answer specific questions. With this type of information it is possible by combinations of assays with mathematical analysis to pinpoint a specific component of the system.

  9. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay for the TRU Waste Characterization Program. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Nondestructive Assay (NDA) consists of a series of tests conducted on a regular frequency to evaluate the capability for nondestructive assay of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each test is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed with TRU waste characterization systems. Measurement facility performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples according to the criteria set by this Program Plan. Intercomparison between measurement groups of the DOE complex will be achieved by comparing the results of measurements on similar or identical blind samples reported by the different measurement facilities. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess the performance of measurement groups regarding compliance with established Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs). As defined for this program, a PDP sample consists of a 55-gallon matrix drum emplaced with radioactive standards and fabricated matrix inserts. These PDP sample components, once manufactured, will be secured and stored at each participating measurement facility designated and authorized by Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) under secure conditions to protect them from loss, tampering, or accidental damage.

  10. High prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in saliva demonstrated by a novel PCR assay.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Musich, P R; Ha, T; Ferguson, D A; Patel, N R; Chi, D S; Thomas, E

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in the saliva of patients infected with this bacterium. METHODS--A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to detect H pylori in saliva and gastric biopsy specimens from patients undergoing endoscopy. RESULTS--Our PCR assay amplified a 417 base pair fragment of DNA from all 21 DNAs derived from H pylori clinical isolates but did not amplify DNA from 23 non-H pylori strains. Sixty three frozen gastric biopsy and 56 saliva specimens were tested. H pylori specific DNA was detected by PCR in all 39 culture positive biopsy specimens and was also identified from another seven biopsy specimens which were negative by culture but positive by histology. H pylori specific DNA was identified by PCR in saliva specimens from 30 (75%) of 40 patients with H pylori infection demonstrated by culture or histological examination, or both, and in three patients without H pylori infection in the stomach. CONCLUSION--The results indicate that the oral cavity harbours H pylori and may be the source of infection and transmission. Images PMID:7560176

  11. Novel assay for direct fluorescent imaging of sialidase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomin, A.; Shkandina, T.; Bilyy, R.

    2011-07-01

    Here we describe a novel approach to sialidase activity estimation. Sialidases (EC 3.2.1.18, exo-α-sialidases), also known as neuraminidases, are the group of enzymes, which hydrolyze the glycoside bound between terminal sialic acid and subsequent carbohydrate residue in glycoproteins and glycolipids. Sialic acids are the group of monosaccharides with acidic properties, since they are acetylated or glycolylated derivates of neuraminic acid. Flu and some other viruses use neuraminidase activity to infect host cells. The level of sialylation was shown to be tightly connected with tumor cell invasiveness and metastatic potential, sialylation level also determines the clearance of aged or virus-infected cells. Thus, detection of sialidase activity is of primary importance for clinical diagnostics as well as life science research. The authors developed the assay for both visualization and estimation of sialidase activity in living cells. Previously known methods for sialidase activity detection required destruction of cellular material, or were low-sensitive, or provided no information on the activity localization in certain intracellular compartment. To overcome these problems, a fluorogenic neuraminidase substrate, 4-MUNA was utilized, and the method for detection of neuraminidase activity using fluorescent microscopy was proposed, it provided a high signal level and information on cellular localization of the studied enzyme. By using this approach the increase of sialidase activity on apoptotic cells was demonstrated in comparison to viable and primary necrotic cells.

  12. Monkey Feeding Assay for Testing Emetic Activity of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Seo, Keun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) are unique bacterial toxins that cause gastrointestinal toxicity as well as superantigenic activity. Since systemic administration of SEs induces superantigenic activity leading to toxic shock syndrome that may mimic enterotoxic activity of SEs such as vomiting and diarrhea, oral administration of SEs in the monkey feeding assay is considered as a standard method to evaluate emetic activity of SEs. This chapter summarizes and discusses practical considerations of the monkey feeding assay used in studies characterizing classical and newly identified SEs.

  13. Assay of nitrogenase activity in intact plant systems.

    PubMed

    Jain, M K; Vlassak, K

    1975-01-01

    Nitrogenase activity was assayed in intact system of Cichorium intybus, a non-leguminous commercially cultivated crop, Dahlia pinnata and Helianthus annus, and Taraxacum officinale, a common weed plant. The assay was made in fabricated cylinders which could accomodate pot with plants. In such kind of assay along with rhizosphere microflora, the nitrogen fixed by phyllosphere nitrogen fixing microflora could also be accounted, which otherwise was difficult to be accounted for. PMID:1211718

  14. Automated filter paper assay for determination of cellulase activity.

    PubMed

    Decker, Stephen R; Adney, William S; Jennings, Edward; Vinzant, Todd B; Himmel, Michael E

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments in molecular breeding and directed evolution have promised great developments in industrial enzymes as demonstrated by exponential improvements in beta-lactamase and green fluorescent protein (GFP). Detection of and screening for improved enzymes are relatively easy if the target enzyme is expressible in a suitable high-throughput screening host and a clearly defined and usable screen or selection is available, as with GFP and beta-lactamase. Fungal cellulases, however, are difficult to measure and have limited expressibility in heterologous hosts. Furthermore, traditional cellulase assays are tedious and time-consuming. Multiple enzyme components, an insoluble substrate, and generally slow reaction rates have plagued cellulase researchers interested in creating cellulase mixtures with increased activities and/or enhanced biochemical properties. Although the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemists standard measure of cellulase activity, the filter paper assay (FPA), can be reproduced in most laboratories with some effort, this method has long been recognized for its complexity and susceptibility to operator error. Our current automated FPA method is based on a Cyberlabs C400 robotics deck equipped with customized incubation, reagent storage, and plate-reading capabilities that allow rapid evaluation of cellulases acting on cellulose and has a maximum throughput of 84 enzyme samples per day when performing the automated FPA.

  15. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell demonstration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, E.R.; Veyo, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    This reports on a solid oxide fuel cell demonstration program in which utilities are provided fully integrated, automatically controlled, packaged solid oxide fuel cell power generation systems. These field units serve to demonstrate to customers first hand the beneficial attributes of the SOFC, to expose deficiencies through experience in order to guide continued development, and to garner real world feedback and data concerning not only cell and stack parameters, but also transportation, installation, permitting and licensing, start-up and shutdown, system alarming, fault detection, fault response, and operator interaction.

  16. Simple Activity Demonstrates Wind Energy Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Wind energy is an exciting and clean energy option often described as the fastest-growing energy system on the planet. With some simple materials, teachers can easily demonstrate its key principles in their classroom. (Contains 1 figure and 2 tables.)

  17. Demonstration of Zoospore Activities by Fungi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarter, States M.

    1978-01-01

    The demonstrations and experiments described in this article are appropriate for junior high school and older students, including beginning students in college biology or botany. Included are culture and observation of zoospores, zoospore attraction to plant roots, and other topics. (BB)

  18. Nanochannel-based electrochemical assay for transglutaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Iñigo; Sánchez, Alfredo; Díez, Paula; Martínez-Ruiz, Paloma; Di Pierro, Prospero; Porta, Raffaele; Villalonga, Reynaldo; Pingarrón, José M

    2014-11-11

    A novel electrochemical assay to quantify transglutaminase activity is reported. The assay is based on the enzyme-controlled diffusion of Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) through amino-functionalized nanochannels of a mesoporous silica thin film on a Au surface in the presence of N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-glutaminylglycine.

  19. Assaying the Kinase Activity of LRRK2 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Patrick A.

    2012-01-01

    Leucine Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a 2527 amino acid member of the ROCO family of proteins, possessing a complex, multidomain structure including a GTPase domain (termed ROC, for Ras of Complex proteins) and a kinase domain1. The discovery in 2004 of mutations in LRRK2 that cause Parkinson's disease (PD) resulted in LRRK2 being the focus of a huge volume of research into its normal function and how the protein goes awry in the disease state2,3. Initial investigations into the function of LRRK2 focused on its enzymatic activities4-6. Although a clear picture has yet to emerge of a consistent alteration in these due to mutations, data from a number of groups has highlighted the importance of the kinase activity of LRRK2 in cell death linked to mutations7,8. Recent publications have reported inhibitors targeting the kinase activity of LRRK2, providing a key experimental tool9-11. In light of these data, it is likely that the enzymatic properties of LRRK2 afford us an important window into the biology of this protein, although whether they are potential drug targets for Parkinson's is open to debate. A number of different approaches have been used to assay the kinase activity of LRRK2. Initially, assays were carried out using epitope tagged protein overexpressed in mammalian cell lines and immunoprecipitated, with the assays carried out using this protein immobilised on agarose beads4,5,7. Subsequently, purified recombinant fragments of LRRK2 in solution have also been used, for example a GST tagged fragment purified from insect cells containing residues 970 to 2527 of LRRK212. Recently, Daniëls et al. reported the isolation of full length LRRK2 in solution from human embryonic kidney cells, however this protein is not widely available13. In contrast, the GST fusion truncated form of LRRK2 is commercially available (from Invitrogen, see table 1 for details), and provides a convenient tool for demonstrating an assay for LRRK2 kinase activity. Several different

  20. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell demonstration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Veyo, S.E.

    1995-08-01

    The development of a viable fuel cell driven electrical power generation system involves not only the development of cell and stack technology, but also the development of the overall system concept, the strategy for control, and the ancillary subsystems. The design requirements used to guide system development must reflect a customer focus in order to evolve a commercial product. In order to obtain useful customer feedback, Westinghouse has practiced the deployment with customers of fully integrated, automatically controlled, packaged solid oxide fuel cell power generation systems. These field units have served to demonstrate to customers first hand the beneficial attributes of the SOFC, to expose deficiencies through experience in order to guide continued development, and to garner real world feedback and data concerning not only cell and stack parameters, but also transportation, installation, permitting and licensing, start-up and shutdown, system alarming, fault detection, fault response, and operator interaction.

  1. Diced electrophoresis gel assay for screening enzymes with specified activities.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Toru; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Adibekian, Alexander; Yoshioka, Kentaro; Terai, Takuya; Ueno, Tasuku; Kawaguchi, Mitsuyasu; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2013-04-24

    We have established the diced electrophoresis gel (DEG) assay as a proteome-wide screening tool to identify enzymes with activities of interest using turnover-based fluorescent substrates. The method utilizes the combination of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) with a multiwell-plate-based fluorometric assay to find protein spots with the specified activity. By developing fluorescent substrates that mimic the structure of neutrophil chemoattractants, we could identify enzymes involved in metabolic inactivation of the chemoattractants.

  2. Measuring MAP kinase activity in immune complex assays.

    PubMed

    Cherkasova, Vera A

    2006-11-01

    I present an overview of published methods for measuring mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase activity on endogenous associated substrates, exogenously added substrates as well as determination of activation loop phosphorylation as a read-out of kinase activity in vivo. Detailed procedures for these assays are given for two MAP kinases (MAPKs) Fus3 and Kss1 and compared with other published protocols, including the protocols for Hog1 and Mpk1 MAPKs. Measuring kinase activity in immune complex assays can serve as an approach for identification of potential substrates of protein kinases as well as for detecting other kinase-associated proteins. PMID:16890454

  3. Selected demonstration and educational products/activities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.J.; Mann, H.C.

    1992-07-01

    The information in this paper was assembled for several informal presentations to a variety of visitor groups during the summer of 1992. A number of staff members at TVA`s National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) found it useful as a quick overview for their use and for their sharing with external colleagues and customers. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive list or explanation of all products and services available from NFERC. However, the authors believe it will give a flavor and tenor of some of the ongoing activities of the Center, especially those activities relating to the retail fertilizer dealer. Programs over the years have focused on key aspects of nutrient efficiency and management. TVA is uniquely positioned to assist the fertilizer industry and US agriculture in protecting the environment from potential adverse environmental impacts of agriculture, especially for fertilizer and the attendant agrichemicals. TVA has the technical base and an ongoing working relationship with the fertilizer industry in technology development and introduction. Dealer education is very important in TVA programs in two aspects: (1) education for the dealer in meeting new environmental stewardship challenges from an operational perspective; and (2) education for the dealer in meeting the site-specific information needs of the farmer.

  4. Enzyme activity assays within microstructured optical fibers enabled by automated alignment

    PubMed Central

    Warren-Smith, Stephen C.; Nie, Guiying; Schartner, Erik P.; Salamonsen, Lois A.; Monro, Tanya M.

    2012-01-01

    A fluorescence-based enzyme activity assay has been demonstrated within a small-core microstructured optical fiber (MOF) for the first time. To achieve this, a reflection-based automated alignment system has been developed, which uses feedback and piezoelectric actuators to maintain optical alignment. The auto-alignment system provides optical stability for the time required to perform an activity assay. The chosen assay is based on the enzyme proprotein convertase 5/6 (PC6) and has important applications in women’s health. PMID:23243579

  5. Enzyme activity assay of glycoprotein enzymes based on a boronate affinity molecularly imprinted 96-well microplate.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhen

    2014-12-16

    Enzyme activity assay is an important method in clinical diagnostics. However, conventional enzyme activity assay suffers from apparent interference from the sample matrix. Herein, we present a new format of enzyme activity assay that can effectively eliminate the effects of the sample matrix. The key is a 96-well microplate modified with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) prepared according to a newly proposed method called boronate affinity-based oriented surface imprinting. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a glycoprotein enzyme that has been routinely used as an indicator for several diseases in clinical tests, was taken as a representative target enzyme. The prepared MIP exhibited strong affinity toward the template enzyme (with a dissociation constant of 10(-10) M) as well as superb tolerance for interference. Thus, the enzyme molecules in a complicated sample matrix could be specifically captured and cleaned up for enzyme activity assay, which eliminated the interference from the sample matrix. On the other hand, because the boronate affinity MIP could well retain the enzymatic activity of glycoprotein enzymes, the enzyme captured by the MIP was directly used for activity assay. Thus, additional assay time and possible enzyme or activity loss due to an enzyme release step required by other methods were avoided. Assay of ALP in human serum was successfully demonstrated, suggesting a promising prospect of the proposed method in real-world applications.

  6. Nondestructive assay using active and passive computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, G. P. ,LLNL

    1998-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has over 600,000 transuranic (TRU) waste drums temporarily stored at nearly 40 sites within the United States. Contents of these drums must be characterized before they are transported for permanent disposal. Traditional gamma-ray methods used to characterize nuclear waste introduce errors that are related to nonuniform measurement responses associated with unknown radioactive source and matrix material distributions. These errors can be reduced by application of tomographic techniques, that measure these distributions. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed two tomographic-based waste assay systems. They use external radioactive sources and tomography-protocol to map the attenuation within a waste drum as a function of mono-energetic gamma-ray energy in waste containers. Passive tomography is used to localize and identify specific radioactive waste contents within the same waste containers. Reconstruction of the passive data via the active images allows internal waste radioactivities in a drum to be corrected for any overlying heterogeneous materials, thus yielding an absolute assay of the waste radioactivities. Calibration of both systems requires only point source measurements and are independent of matrix materials. The first system is housed at LLNL and was developed to study and validate research concepts. The second system is being developed with Bioimaging Research, Inc. (BIR) and is housed within a mobile waste characterization trailer. This system has traveled to three DOE facilities to demonstrate the active and passive computed tomography capability. Both systems have participated in and successfully passed the requirements of formal DOE-sponsored intercomparison studies. The systems have measured approximately 1 to 100 grains of plutonium within a variety of waste matrix materials. Laboratory and field results from these two systems over the past several years show that both systems

  7. An in vivo assay for chemoattractant activity.

    PubMed

    Zetter, B R; Rasmussen, N; Brown, L

    1985-09-01

    We have devised an implantable device for the study of leukocyte chemoattraction. The device consists of a 0.25-mm thick patch of Dacron fabric coupled to a disc of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer. Such polymers can release biologically active molecules at a constant rate for at least 18 days. Attracted cells invade and are trapped within the Dacron fabric. Upon removal from the host, the fabric patches are sectioned and stained to reveal the distribution of attracted cells. Distinct patterns of cellular accumulation can be seen for different chemoattractant molecules. These include the attraction of eosinophils by histamine, monocytes by tuftsin, and mast cells by glycyl-histidyl-lysine. Maximal accumulation of specific cell types occurs at postimplantation days 1 to 2 for neutrophils, days 3 to 5 for monocytes, and days 5 to 6 for macrophages and eosinophils. Control polymers fail to cause significant leukocyte accumulation, indicating that neither the polymer nor the Dacron fabric provokes an inflammatory response. PMID:3162062

  8. A supplemented soft agar chemotaxis assay demonstrates the Helicobacter pylori chemotactic response to zinc and nickel

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Lisa; Andermann, Tessa M.

    2013-01-01

    Directed motility, or chemotaxis, is required for Helicobacter pylori to establish infection in the stomach, although the full repertoire of this bacterium’s chemotactic responses is not yet known. Here we report that H. pylori responds to zinc as an attractant and nickel as a repellent. To reach this conclusion, we employed both a temporal chemotaxis assay based on bacterial reversals and a supplemented soft agar spatial assay. We refined the temporal assay using a previously described chemorepellent, acid, and found that H. pylori requires rich media with serum to maintain optimal swimming motility. Surprisingly, we found that some strains respond to acid as an attractant, and that the TlpC chemoreceptor correlated with whether acid was sensed as an attractant or repellent. Using this same assay, we detected weak repellent responses to nickel and copper, and a varied response to zinc. We thus developed an alternative spatial chemotactic assay called the supplemented soft agar assay, which utilizes soft agar medium supplemented with the test compound. With Escherichia coli, the attractant serine slowed overall bacterial migration, while the repellent nickel increased the speed of overall migration. In H. pylori we detected slowed migration with doubled tryptone media, as well as zinc, consistent with an attractant response. In contrast, nickel increased migration, consistent with repulsion. PMID:23139399

  9. Pitfalls in the assay of carboxymethylcellulase activity. [Sclerotium rolfsii

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, W.A.; Dennison, C.; Quicke, G.V.

    1983-02-01

    A purified endocellulase from Sclerotium rolfsii and a crude cellulase preparation from Trichoderma reesei are used to illustrate several pitfalls associated with the assay of carboxymethylcellulase activity and the subsequent attainment of linear enzyme dilution curves. It is shown that the nature of both the enzymes and the substrate make the assay unsuitable for use in the calculation of enzyme recovery and purity. (Refs. 16).

  10. Time-resolved Förster-resonance-energy-transfer DNA assay on an active CMOS microarray

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David Eric; Gong, Ping; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2008-01-01

    We present an active oligonucleotide microarray platform for time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assays. In these assays, immobilized probe is labeled with a donor fluorophore and analyte target is labeled with a fluorescence quencher. Changes in the fluorescence decay lifetime of the donor are measured to determine the extent of hybridization. In this work, we demonstrate that TR-FRET assays have reduced sensitivity to variances in probe surface density compared with standard fluorescence-based microarray assays. Use of an active array substrate, fabricated in a standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process, provides the additional benefits of reduced system complexity and cost. The array consists of 4096 independent single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) pixel sites and features on-chip time-to-digital conversion. We demonstrate the functionality of our system by measuring a DNA target concentration series using TR-FRET with semiconductor quantum dot donors. PMID:18515059

  11. Evaluation of potential endocrine activity of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid using in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Coady, Katherine K; Kan, H Lynn; Schisler, Melissa R; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Neal, Barbara; Williams, Amy; LeBaron, Matthew J

    2014-08-01

    The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was evaluated in five in vitro screening assays to assess the potential for interaction with the androgen, estrogen and steroidogenesis pathways in the endocrine system. The assays were conducted to meet the requirements of the in vitro component of Tier 1 of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP), and included assays for estrogen receptor (ER) binding (rat uterine cytosol ER binding assay), ER-mediated transcriptional activation (HeLa-9903-ERα transactivation assay), androgen receptor (AR) binding (rat prostate cytosol AR binding assay), aromatase enzymatic activity inhibition (recombinant human CYP19 aromatase inhibition assay), and interference with steroidogenesis (H295R steroidogenesis assay). Results from these five assays demonstrated that 2,4-D does not have the potential to interact in vitro with the estrogen, androgen, or steroidogenesis pathways. These in vitro data are consistent with a corresponding lack of endocrine effects observed in apical in vivo animal studies, and thus provide important supporting data valuable in a comprehensive weight of evidence evaluation indicating a low potential of 2,4-D to interact with the endocrine system.

  12. In vitro cytotoxicity of crustacean immunostimulants for lobster (Homarus gammarus) granulocytes demonstrated using the neutral red uptake assay.

    PubMed

    Hauton, Chris; Smith, Valerie J

    2004-07-01

    The neutral red uptake (NRU) cell viability assay was adapted for use with lobster Homarus gammarus (Linnaeus, 1758) granulocytes cultured in vitro. The assay was more sensitive than the conventional trypan blue exclusion assay and facilitated a higher sample throughput than subjective microscope-based assessments of cell viability. The NRU assay was demonstrated to have a linear response from 470 to at least 126000 cells cm(-2). It was used to investigate the acute cytotoxicity of three commercial and two candidate crustacean aquaculture immunostimulants on lobster granulocytes. All five stimulants had a cytotoxic action on the granulocytes and the toxic dose for some of these stimulants was found to be below their commercially prescribed dose. The long term energetic cost of the use of these stimulants and the concomitant potential for a reduction in growth rate of cultured decapod crustaceans, which is fundamental to the success of commercial aquaculture, is identified and discussed. PMID:15145418

  13. Comparison of the luminescent ADP-Glo assay to a standard radiometric assay for measurement of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Li, Rick; Yan, Jun

    2009-12-01

    Many assay technologies have been developed and utilized to efficiently assay and screen against protein kinase targets. The radiometric assay format for assaying the protein kinase targets has been considered the "Gold Standard" format since it allows the direct readout of kinase functional activity and is a universal assay that is highly sensitive. However, the hazardous nature of the radiometric assay together with the regulatory hurdles has led to the development of alternative assay formats for assessing protein kinase activity measurements. The luminescent ADP-Glo assay has been developed as an alternative to radiometric format for assaying protein kinase targets. This assay allows the measurement of the ADP product formed during the kinase reaction. Therefore, the luminescent ADP-Glo assay is similar to the radiometric format in that it measures the direct product of the protein kinase reaction. Furthermore, since the ADP product is generated by all protein kinase reactions, this is a universal format that can be used for assaying any given protein kinase target. Analysis of data generated with multiple protein kinase targets and the luminescent ADP-Glo technology shows comparable results to the radiometric assay format. Therefore, the luminescent ADP-Glo assay is a robust new technology for evaluating catalytic function of protein kinases as well as other ATPases.

  14. Toxin activity assays, devices, methods and systems therefor

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Chung-Yan; Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sommer, Gregory Jon

    2016-04-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward devices, system and method for conducting toxin activity assay using sedimentation. The toxin activity assay may include generating complexes which bind to a plurality of beads in a fluid sample. The complexes may include a target toxin and a labeling agent, or may be generated due to presence of active target toxin and/or labeling agent designed to be incorporated into complexes responsive to the presence of target active toxin. The plurality of beads including the complexes may be transported through a density media, wherein the density media has a lower density than a density of the beads and higher than a density of the fluid sample, and wherein the transporting occurs, at least in part, by sedimentation. Signal may be detected from the labeling agents of the complexes.

  15. A new robust kinetic assay for DAP epimerase activity.

    PubMed

    Hor, Lilian; Peverelli, Martin G; Perugini, Matthew A; Hutton, Craig A

    2013-10-01

    DAP epimerase is the penultimate enzyme in the lysine biosynthesis pathway. The most versatile assay for DAP epimerase catalytic activity employs a coupled DAP epimerase-DAP dehydrogenase enzyme system with a commercial mixture of DAP isomers as substrate. DAP dehydrogenase converts meso-DAP to THDP with concomitant reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH. We show that at high concentrations, accumulation of NADPH results in inhibition of DAPDH, resulting in spurious kinetic data. A new assay has been developed employing DAP decarboxylase that allows the reliable characterisation of DAP epimerase enzyme kinetics. PMID:23838343

  16. An Anesthetic Drug Demonstration and an Introductory Antioxidant Activity Experiment with "Eugene, the Sleepy Fish"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcena, Homar; Chen, Peishan

    2016-01-01

    Students are introduced to spectrophotometry in comparing the antioxidant activity of pure eugenol and oil of cloves from a commercial source using a modified ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. The extraction of the essential oil from dried cloves is demonstrated to facilitate discussions on green chemistry. The anesthetic properties…

  17. New immunocapture enzyme (ICE) assay for quantification of cancer procoagulant activity: studies of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mielicki, W P; Tagawa, M; Gordon, S G

    1994-04-01

    A new, sensitive and specific immunocapture enzyme (ICE) assay for quantitation of the enzymatic activity of cancer procoagulant (CP) has been developed. The assay had good reproducibility (inter- and intra-assay CV were 6.4% and 5.7% respectively) and was linear for concentrations of CP from 0.5 microgram/ml to 10 micrograms/ml (r2 = 0.995). Using this assay the inhibition of CP by iodoacetamide, mercuric chloride, E-64, leupeptin and antipain was demonstrated. There was no significant effect of cystatin and natural plasma proteinase inhibitors alpha 1-antitrypsin, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, alpha 2-macroglobulin and antithrombin-III/heparin, on the activity of the CP.

  18. Demonstrating Enzyme Activation: Calcium/Calmodulin Activation of Phosphodiesterase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.

    2004-01-01

    Demonstrating the steps of a signal transduction cascade usually involves radioactive materials and thus precludes its use in undergraduate teaching labs. Developing labs that allow the visual demonstration of these steps without the use of radioactivity is important for allowing students hands-on methods of illustrating each step of a signal…

  19. A calibration curve for immobilized dihydrofolate reductase activity assay.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyanka; Morris, Holly; Tivanski, Alexei V; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-09-01

    An assay was developed for measuring the active-site concentration, activity, and thereby the catalytic turnover rate (k cat) of an immobilized dihydrofolate reductase model system (Singh et al., (2015), Anal. Biochem). This data article contains a calibration plot for the developed assay. In the calibration plot rate is plotted as a function of DHFR concentration and shows linear relationship. The concentration of immobilized enzyme was varied by using 5 different size mica chips. The dsDNA concentration was the same for all chips, assuming that the surface area of the mica chip dictates the resulting amount of bound enzyme (i.e. larger sized chip would have more bound DHFR). The activity and concentration of each chip was measured.

  20. A new assay system for guinea pig interferon biological activity.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiko; Jeevan, Amminikutty; Ohishi, Kazue; Nojima, Yasuhiro; Umemori, Kiyoko; Yamamoto, Saburo; McMurray, David N

    2002-07-01

    We have developed an assay system for guinea pig interferon (IFN) based on reduction of viral cytopathic effect (CPE) in various cell lines. CPE inhibition was detected optimally in the guinea pig fibroblast cell line 104C1 infected with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV). The amount of biologically active guinea pig IFN was quantified by estimating viable cell numbers colorimetrically by means of a tetrazolium compound, 2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium monosodium salt (WST-1) and 1-methoxy-5-methylphenazinium methylsulfate (PMS). WST-1 color developed until stopped by the addition of sulfuric acid. This had no effect on the colorimetric assay, and the color was stable for at least 24 h. The acid also inactivated the EMCV and, thus, eliminated the viral hazard. Inhibition of CPE activity was highly correlated with the concentration of culture supernatants from BCG-vaccinated guinea pig splenocytes stimulated in vitro with tuberculin or an immunostimulatory oligoDNA. This assay detected guinea pig IFN and human IFN-alpha, but not IFN-gamma from human, mouse, rat, pig, or dog. This assay system has proved useful for the titration of guinea pig IFN, being easy to perform, free from viral hazard, relatively species specific, highly reproducible, and inexpensive.

  1. Dehydrogenase activity of forest soils depends on the assay used

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszek, Kazimierz; Długa, Joanna; Socha, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Dehydrogenases are exclusively intracellular enzymes, which play an important role in the initial stages of oxidation of soil organic matter. One of the most frequently used methods to estimate dehydrogenase activity in soil is based on the use of triphenyltetrazolium chloride as an artificial electron acceptor. The purpose of this study was to compare the activity of dehydrogenases of forest soils with varied physicochemical properties using different triphenyltetrazolium chloride assays. The determination was carried out using the original procedure by Casida et al., a modification of the procedure which involves the use of Ca(OH)2 instead of CaCO3, the Thalmann method, and the assay by Casida et al. without addition of buffer or any salt. Soil dehydrogenase activity depended on the assay used. Dehydrogenase determined by the Casida et al. method without addition of buffer or any salt correlated with the pH values of soils. The autoclaved strongly acidic samples of control soils showed high concentrations of triphenylformazan, probably due to chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride. There is, therefore, a need for a sterilization method other than autoclaving, ie a process that results in significant changes in soil properties, thus helping to increase the chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride.

  2. A molecular beacon assay for measuring base excision repair activities.

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, Andrei; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Sanz, Guenhaël; Laval, Jacques; Elder, Rhoderick H; Saparbaev, Murat K

    2004-06-18

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway plays a key role in protecting the genome from endogenous DNA damage. Current methods to measure BER activities are indirect and cumbersome. Here, we introduce a direct method to assay DNA excision repair that is suitable for automation and industrial use, based on the fluorescence quenching mechanism of molecular beacons. We designed a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide labelled with a 5'-fluorescein (F) and a 3'-Dabcyl (D) in which the fluorophore, F, is held in close proximity to the quencher, D, by the stem-loop structure design of the oligonucleotide. Following removal of the modified base or incision of the oligonucleotide, the fluorophore is separated from the quencher and fluorescence can be detected as a function of time. Several modified beacons have been used to validate the assay on both cell-free extracts and purified proteins. We have further developed the method to analyze BER in cultured cells. As described, the molecular beacon-based assay can be applied to all DNA modifications processed by DNA excision/incision repair pathways. Possible applications of the assay are discussed, including high-throughput real-time DNA repair measurements both in vitro and in living cells.

  3. Classroom Activities and Demonstrations for Use in Behavioral Science Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cology, Lorry J.

    This compilation provides descriptions of and resource materials for 25 classroom activities or demonstrations for behavioral science courses. For each activity, the following information is provided: subject area, source, time required and materials needed. In addition, discussion questions and comments on the value and use of the activities are…

  4. Enzymatic assay for calmodulins based on plant NAD kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, A.C.; Jarrett, H.W.; Cormier, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    NAD kinase with increased sensitivity to calmodulin was purified from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L., Willet Wonder). Assays for calmodulin based on the activities of NAD kinase, bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and human erythrocyte Ca/sup 2 -/-ATPase were compared for their sensitivities to calmodulin and for their abilities to discriminate between calmodulins from different sources. The activities of the three enzymes were determined in the presence of various concentrations of calmodulins from human erythrocyte, bovine brain, sea pansy (Renilla reniformis), mung bean seed (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek), mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The concentrations of calmodulin required for 50% activation of the NAD kinase (K/sub 0.5/) ranged from 0.520 ng/ml for Tetrahymena to 2.20 ng/ml for bovine brain. The A/sub 0.5/ s ranged from 19.6 ng/ml for bovine brain calmodulin to 73.5 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin for phosphodiesterase activation. The K/sub 0.5/'s for the activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase ranged from 36.3 ng/mol for erythrocyte calmodulin to 61.7 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin. NAD kinase was not stimulated by phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, or palmitoleic acid in the absence or presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitic acid had a slightly stimulatory effect in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ (10% of maximum), but no effect in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitoleic acid inhibited the calmodulin-stimulated activity by 50%. Both the NAD kinase assay and radioimmunoassay were able to detect calmodulin in extracts containing low concentrations of calmodulin. Estimates of calmodulin contents of crude homogenates determined by the NAD kinase assay were consistent with amounts obtained by various purification procedures. 30 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  5. Synthesis and Assay of SIRT1-Activating Compounds.

    PubMed

    Dai, H; Ellis, J L; Sinclair, D A; Hubbard, B P

    2016-01-01

    The NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 plays key roles in numerous cellular processes including DNA repair, gene transcription, cell differentiation, and metabolism. Overexpression of SIRT1 protects against a number of age-related diseases including diabetes, cancer, and Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, overexpression of SIRT1 in the murine brain extends lifespan. A number of small-molecule sirtuin-activating compounds (STACs) that increase SIRT1 activity in vitro and in cells have been developed. While the mechanism for how these compounds act on SIRT1 was once controversial, it is becoming increasingly clear that they directly interact with SIRT1 and enhance its activity through an allosteric mechanism. Here, we present detailed chemical syntheses for four STACs, each from a distinct structural class. Also, we provide a general protocol for purifying active SIRT1 enzyme and outline two complementary enzymatic assays for characterizing the effects of STACs and similar compounds on SIRT1 activity. PMID:27423864

  6. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  7. Demonstrating Electrical Activity in Nerve and Muscle. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a demonstration for showing the electrical activity in nerve and muscle including action potentials, refractory period of a nerve, and fatigue. Presents instructions for constructing an amplifier, electronic stimulator, and force transducer. (GS)

  8. Demonstrating Electrical Activity in Nerve and Muscle. Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the construction of an amplifier and force transducer that can be used to demonstrate electrical activity in nerve and muscle using the gastrocnemius muscle and sciatic nerve of the frog. (MLH)

  9. The Importance of Engaging Pupils Actively in Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suomela, Liisa; Juuti, Kalle; Ahtee, Maija

    2013-01-01

    Demonstrating is a traditional method in teaching science that can raise interest and encourage pupils to think about a topic. While demonstrating, the teacher can focus the pupils' attention on the relevant facts and introduce scientific principles and concepts. Through discussion and actively making observations and inferences, rather than…

  10. Fluorescence assay for evaluating microbicidal activity of hand antiseptics.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gigosos, Rosa M; Mariscal, Alberto; Mariscal-Lopez, Eloisa; Gutierrez-Bedmar, Mario; Fernandez, Joaquin

    2015-11-01

    We developed a fluorescent β-d-glucuronidase activity (BGA)-based assay for detecting and quantifying Escherichia coli in samples to assess the biocide efficacy of hand antiseptics. The fluorescence level is proportional to the number of viable E. coli organisms present. We compared our assay results to those of the E. coli plate count method specified by the European standard for testing hygienic hand rub disinfectant products (EN1500). The plate count method requires excessive handling and materials and is not valid if the number of organisms per plate is too low or high for counting in many of the samples. We optimized the fluorescent assay based on the cleavage of 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide by adding 4-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucuronide, a nonfluorogenic BGA substrate, to induce glucuronidase activity and reduce assay time. Furthermore, our method can be automated and eliminates the need for multiple dilutions. Fluorescence was temporally monitored, and the time required to reach a specific value of fluorescence was correlated with the initial number of viable E. coli organisms on the samples. There was a positive correlation (P < 0.05) with a high correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.82) between the E. coli counts by plate count and fluorescence methods. Reported effects in fluorescent BGA were compared to the EN1500 plate count method with five hand disinfectants. We found our method more advantageous, because it was as sensitive as the EN1500 method, requires less time to complete, and is less expensive and less laborious than conventional plating techniques.

  11. Fluorescence assay for evaluating microbicidal activity of hand antiseptics.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gigosos, Rosa M; Mariscal, Alberto; Mariscal-Lopez, Eloisa; Gutierrez-Bedmar, Mario; Fernandez, Joaquin

    2015-11-01

    We developed a fluorescent β-d-glucuronidase activity (BGA)-based assay for detecting and quantifying Escherichia coli in samples to assess the biocide efficacy of hand antiseptics. The fluorescence level is proportional to the number of viable E. coli organisms present. We compared our assay results to those of the E. coli plate count method specified by the European standard for testing hygienic hand rub disinfectant products (EN1500). The plate count method requires excessive handling and materials and is not valid if the number of organisms per plate is too low or high for counting in many of the samples. We optimized the fluorescent assay based on the cleavage of 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide by adding 4-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucuronide, a nonfluorogenic BGA substrate, to induce glucuronidase activity and reduce assay time. Furthermore, our method can be automated and eliminates the need for multiple dilutions. Fluorescence was temporally monitored, and the time required to reach a specific value of fluorescence was correlated with the initial number of viable E. coli organisms on the samples. There was a positive correlation (P < 0.05) with a high correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.82) between the E. coli counts by plate count and fluorescence methods. Reported effects in fluorescent BGA were compared to the EN1500 plate count method with five hand disinfectants. We found our method more advantageous, because it was as sensitive as the EN1500 method, requires less time to complete, and is less expensive and less laborious than conventional plating techniques. PMID:26276114

  12. Fluorescence Assay for Evaluating Microbicidal Activity of Hand Antiseptics

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Gigosos, Rosa M.; Mariscal-Lopez, Eloisa; Gutierrez-Bedmar, Mario; Fernandez, Joaquin

    2015-01-01

    We developed a fluorescent β-d-glucuronidase activity (BGA)-based assay for detecting and quantifying Escherichia coli in samples to assess the biocide efficacy of hand antiseptics. The fluorescence level is proportional to the number of viable E. coli organisms present. We compared our assay results to those of the E. coli plate count method specified by the European standard for testing hygienic hand rub disinfectant products (EN1500). The plate count method requires excessive handling and materials and is not valid if the number of organisms per plate is too low or high for counting in many of the samples. We optimized the fluorescent assay based on the cleavage of 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide by adding 4-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucuronide, a nonfluorogenic BGA substrate, to induce glucuronidase activity and reduce assay time. Furthermore, our method can be automated and eliminates the need for multiple dilutions. Fluorescence was temporally monitored, and the time required to reach a specific value of fluorescence was correlated with the initial number of viable E. coli organisms on the samples. There was a positive correlation (P < 0.05) with a high correlation coefficient (R2 = 0.82) between the E. coli counts by plate count and fluorescence methods. Reported effects in fluorescent BGA were compared to the EN1500 plate count method with five hand disinfectants. We found our method more advantageous, because it was as sensitive as the EN1500 method, requires less time to complete, and is less expensive and less laborious than conventional plating techniques. PMID:26276114

  13. An Activity for Demonstrating the Concept of a Neural Circuit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreiner, David S.

    2012-01-01

    College students in two sections of a general psychology course participated in a demonstration of a simple neural circuit. The activity was based on a neural circuit that Jeffress proposed for localizing sounds. Students in one section responded to a questionnaire prior to participating in the activity, while students in the other section…

  14. Development of a spontaneously active dorsal root ganglia assay using multiwell multielectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Kim; Wang, Shuya; Hoque, Nina; Kiss, Laszlo; Ahlijanian, Michael K; Herrington, James; Graef, John D

    2016-06-01

    In vitro phenotypic assays of sensory neuron activity are important tools for identifying potential analgesic compounds. These assays are typically characterized by hyperexcitable and/or abnormally, spontaneously active cells. Whereas manual electrophysiology experiments provide high-resolution biophysical data to characterize both in vitro models and potential therapeutic modalities (e.g., action potential characteristics, the role of specific ion channels, and receptors), these techniques are hampered by their low throughput. We have established a spontaneously active dorsal root ganglia (DRG) platform using multiwell multielectrode arrays (MEAs) that greatly increase the ability to evaluate the effects of multiple compounds and conditions on DRG excitability within the context of a cellular network. We show that spontaneous DRG firing can be attenuated with selective Na(+) and Ca(2+) channel blockers, as well as enhanced with K(+) channel blockers. In addition, spontaneous activity can be augmented with both the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 agonist capsaicin and the peptide bradykinin and completely blocked with neurokinin receptor antagonists. Finally, we validated the use of this assay by demonstrating that commonly used neuropathic pain therapeutics suppress DRG spontaneous activity. Overall, we have optimized primary rat DRG cells on a multiwell MEA platform to generate and characterize spontaneously active cultures that have the potential to be used as an in vitro phenotypic assay to evaluate potential therapeutics in rodent models of pain. PMID:27052585

  15. Hormonal activity of polycyclic musks evaluated by reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Mori, Taiki; Iida, Mitsuru; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Kohra, Shinya; Takao, Yuji; Takemasa, Takehiro; Arizono, Koji

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic musk fragrance compounds, such as polycyclic musks (PCMs), are a group of chemicals used extensively as personal care products, and can be found in the environment and the human body. PCMs, such as 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexa-methylcyclopenta-gamma-2-benzopyran (HHCB) and 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyltetralin (AHTN), are known to have agonistic activities toward human estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha) and hERbeta, and have antagonistic activity toward the human androgen receptor (hAR), as shown in several reporter gene assays. However, little is known about the interaction of PCMs with the human thyroid hormone receptor (hTR), and the hormonal effects of other PCMs except for HHCB and AHTN. In this study, we focus on the interactions of six PCMs, namely, HHCB, AHTN, 4-acetyl-1,1-dimethyl-6-tert-butyl-indan (ADBI), 6-acetyl-1,1,2,3,3,5-hexamethylindan (AHMI), 6,7-dihydro-1,1,2,3,3-pentamethyl-4(5H)-indanone (DPMI), and 5-acetyl-1,1,2,6-tetramethyl-3-isopropy-lindan (ATII) with hERalpha, hAR, and hTRbeta by in vitro reporter gene assay using Chinese hamster ovary cells. All the samples were found to be agonists toward hERalpha, whereas no agonistic activities of these PCMs for hAR and hTRbeta were observed. No antagonistic activities for hERalpha and hTRbeta were observed at the concentrations tested. However, several PCMs, namely, HHCB, AHTN, ATII, ADBI, and AHMI, showed dose-dependent antagonistic activities for hAR, and the IC50 values of these compounds were estimated to be 1.0 x 10(-7), 1.5 x 10(-7), 1.4 x 10(-7), 9.8 x 10(-6), and 1.4 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The results suggest that these PCMs interact with hERalpha and hAR but have no hormonal effect on hTRbeta. This is the first report on the agonistic and antagonistic activities of ATII, ADBI, AHMI, and DPMI for hERalpha and hAR as determined by in vitro reporter gene assay using stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  16. The Peptide Microarray-Based Resonance Light Scattering Assay for Sensitively Detecting Intracellular Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Liu, Xia; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-01-01

    The peptide microarray technology is a robust, reliable, and efficient technique for large-scale determination of enzyme activities, and high-throughput profiling of substrate/inhibitor specificities of enzymes. Here, the activities of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) in different cell lysates have been detected by a peptide microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay with gold nanoparticle (GNP) probes. Highly sensitive detection of PKA activity in 0.1 μg total cell proteins of SHG-44 (human glioma cell) cell lysate (corresponding to 200 cells) is achieved by a selected peptide substrate. The experimental results also demonstrate that the RLS assay can be employed to evaluate the chemical regulation of intracellular kinase activity. PMID:26490469

  17. Estimation of specific activity of 177Lu by 'saturation assay' principle using DOTA as ligand.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Ambikalmajan M R; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Das, Tapas

    2015-01-01

    Lutetium-177 is a widely used therapeutic radionuclide in targeted therapy and it is important to know its specific activity at the time of radiopharmaceutical preparation, especially for radiolabeling peptides. However, there are no direct methods for the experimental determination of the specific activity which can be readily applied in a hospital radiopharmacy. A new technique based on the 'saturation assay' principle using DOTA as the binding agent for the estimation of specific activity of (177)Lu is reported. The studies demonstrate the proof of principle of this new assay technique. The method is general and can be modified and applied for the estimation of specific activity of other metallic radionuclides by using DOTA or other suitable chelating agents.

  18. Mechanism of PTC124 activity in cell-based luciferase assays of nonsense codon suppression.

    PubMed

    Auld, Douglas S; Thorne, Natasha; Maguire, William F; Inglese, James

    2009-03-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) assays used in drug discovery frequently use reporter enzymes such as firefly luciferase (FLuc) as indicators of target activity. An important caveat to consider, however, is that compounds can directly affect the reporter, leading to nonspecific but highly reproducible assay signal modulation. In rare cases, this activity appears counterintuitive; for example, some FLuc inhibitors, acting through posttranslational Fluc reporter stabilization, appear to activate gene expression. Previous efforts to characterize molecules that influence luciferase activity identified a subset of 3,5-diaryl-oxadiazole-containing compounds as FLuc inhibitors. Here, we evaluate a number of compounds with this structural motif for activity against FLuc. One such compound is PTC124 {3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid}, a molecule originally identified in a cell-based FLuc assay as having nonsense codon suppression activity [Welch EM, et al., Nature (2007) 447:87-91]. We find that the potency of FLuc inhibition for the tested compounds strictly correlates with their activity in a FLuc reporter cell-based nonsense codon assay, with PTC124 emerging as the most potent FLuc inhibitor (IC(50) = 7 +/- 1 nM). However, these compounds, including PTC124, fail to show nonsense codon suppression activity when Renilla reniformis luciferase (RLuc) is used as a reporter and are inactive against the RLuc enzyme. This suggests that the initial discovery of PTC124 may have been biased by its direct effect on the FLuc reporter, implicating firefly luciferase as a molecular target of PTC124. Our results demonstrate the value of understanding potential interactions between reporter enzymes and chemical compounds and emphasize the importance of implementing the appropriate control assays before interpreting HTS results.

  19. Activity-based assay for ricin-like toxins

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2007-02-06

    A method of detecting N-glycosylase activity in a sample involves incubating an oligodeoxyribonucleotide substrate containing a deoxyadenosine or deoxyuridine residue with the sample to be tested such that the N-glycosylase, if present, hydrolyzes the deoxyadenosine or deoxyuridine residue to result in an N-glycosylase product having an abasic site. A primer is annealed to the N-glycosylase product, and the primer is extended with a DNA polymerase, such as Taq DNA polymerase, that pauses at abasic sites. The resulting extension products are melted from the N-glycosylase product, allowed to form hairpins due to self-complementarity, and further extended in the presence of labeled precursors to result in labeled products. Extension products synthesized from undigested substrate as template do not result in labeled products. Thus, detection of labeled products results in detection of N-glycosylase activity. Oligodeoxyribonucleotide substrates, primer, and positive controls and a kit for N-glycosylase assay are also disclosed.

  20. Evaluation of immunostimulatory activity of Chyawanprash using in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Madaan, Alka; Kanjilal, Satyajyoti; Gupta, Arun; Sastry, J L N; Verma, Ritu; Singh, Anu T; Jaggi, Manu

    2015-03-01

    Chyawanprash is an ayurvedic formulation used in Indian traditional medicinal system for its beneficial effect on human health. We investigated the immunostimulatory effects of Chyawanprash (CHY) using in vitro assays evaluating the secretion of cytokines such as Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1-alpha (MIP-1-α) from murine bone marrow derived Dendritic Cells (DC) which play pivotal role in immunostimulation. The effects of CHY on phagocytosis in murine macrophages (RAW264.7) and Natural Killer (NK) cell activity were also investigated. At non-cytotoxic concentrations (20-500 μg/ml), CHY enhanced the secretion of all the three cytokines from DC. CHY also stimulated both, macrophage (RAW264.7) as well as NK cell activity, in vitro. In conclusion, the data substantiates the immunoprotective role of CHY at cellular level mediated by immunostimulation in key immune cells viz. dendritic Cells, macrophages and NK cells.

  1. Gold nanorods-based FRET assay for ultrasensitive detection of DNA methylation and DNA methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang Lin; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2014-09-21

    A fluorescence method for the detection of DNA methylation and the assay of methyltransferase activity is proposed using gold nanorods as a fluorescence quencher on the basis of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. It is demonstrated that this method is capable of detecting methyltransferase with a detection limit of 0.25 U mL(-1), which might make this method a good candidate for monitoring DNA methylation in the future. PMID:25028809

  2. A Fluorescence-based Assay of Phospholipid Scramblase Activity.

    PubMed

    Ploier, Birgit; Menon, Anant K

    2016-01-01

    Scramblases translocate phospholipids across the membrane bilayer bidirectionally in an ATP-independent manner. The first scramblase to be identified and biochemically verified was opsin, the apoprotein of the photoreceptor rhodopsin. Rhodopsin is a G protein-coupled receptor localized in rod photoreceptor disc membranes of the retina where it is responsible for the perception of light. Rhodopsin's scramblase activity does not depend on its ligand 11-cis-retinal, i.e., the apoprotein opsin is also active as a scramblase. Although constitutive and regulated phospholipid scrambling play an important role in cell physiology, only a few phospholipid scramblases have been identified so far besides opsin. Here we describe a fluorescence-based assay of opsin's scramblase activity. Opsin is reconstituted into large unilamellar liposomes composed of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol and a trace quantity of fluorescent NBD-labeled PC (1-palmitoyl-2-{6-[7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazole-4-yl)amino]hexanoyl}-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine). Scramblase activity is determined by measuring the extent to which NBD-PC molecules located in the inner leaflet of the vesicle are able to access the outer leaflet where their fluorescence is chemically eliminated by a reducing agent that cannot cross the membrane. The methods we describe have general applicability and can be used to identify and characterize scramblase activities of other membrane proteins. PMID:27684510

  3. A Classroom Activity To Demonstrate the Principle of Negative Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, David; Simmons, Sharanne

    This paper describes a classroom activity to demonstrate to undergraduate psychology students studying learning principles the principle of negative reinforcement. The students (n=25) were either enrolled in an introductory psychology course at a business college or the students (n=21) were enrolled in an educational psychology course at a state…

  4. Chemistry: Experiments, Demonstrations and Other Activities Suggested for Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This publication is a handbook used in conjunction with the course of study in chemistry developed through the New York State Education Department and The University of the State of New York. It contains experiments, demonstrations, and other activities for a chemistry course. Areas covered include the science of chemistry, the atomic structure of…

  5. Interactive lecture demonstrations, active learning, and the ALOP project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2011-05-01

    There is considerable evidence from the physics education literature that traditional approaches are ineffective in teaching physics concepts. A better teaching method is to use the active learning environment, which can be created using interactive lecture demonstrations. Based on the active learning methodology and within the framework of the UNESCO mandate in physics education and introductory physics, the ALOP project (active learning in optics and photonics) was started in 2003, to provide a focus on an experimental area that is adaptable and relevant to research and educational conditions in many developing countries. This project is discussed in this paper.

  6. Cell-based flow cytometry assay to measure cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Noto, Alessandra; Ngauv, Pearline; Trautmann, Lydie

    2013-12-17

    Cytolytic activity of CD8+ T cells is rarely evaluated. We describe here a new cell-based assay to measure the capacity of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells to kill CD4+ T cells loaded with their cognate peptide. Target CD4+ T cells are divided into two populations, labeled with two different concentrations of CFSE. One population is pulsed with the peptide of interest (CFSE-low) while the other remains un-pulsed (CFSE-high). Pulsed and un-pulsed CD4+ T cells are mixed at an equal ratio and incubated with an increasing number of purified CD8+ T cells. The specific killing of autologous target CD4+ T cells is analyzed by flow cytometry after coculture with CD8+ T cells containing the antigen-specific effector CD8+ T cells detected by peptide/MHCI tetramer staining. The specific lysis of target CD4+ T cells measured at different effector versus target ratios, allows for the calculation of lytic units, LU₃₀/10(6) cells. This simple and straightforward assay allows for the accurate measurement of the intrinsic capacity of CD8+ T cells to kill target CD4+ T cells.

  7. Quantitative detection of RT activity by PERT assay: feasibility and limits to a standardized screening assay for human vaccines.

    PubMed

    André, M; Morgeaux, S; Fuchs, F

    2000-06-01

    The detection of adventitious retroviruses has always been critical for assessing the safety concerns associated with viral vaccines. Assays for the enzymatic activity of reverse transcriptase (RT) are used as general methods for the detection of both known and unknown retroviruses. Several studies using newly-developed ultrasensitive PCR-based RT assays reported RT activity in viral vaccines grown in chicken cells. Here, we have assessed the performances of such a PCR-based RT assay--PERT assay--for the quantitative detection of RT activity in vaccines. Sensitivity, linearity and reproducibility of the method were studied on purified RT and viral vaccines treated to release RT from potentially contaminant retroviruses. The level of RT activity detected in chicken cell-derived vaccines was higher for live attenuated vaccines compared to inactivated ones. Contrary to other studies, RT activity was found in some mammalian cell-derived vaccines. AZT-TP sensitivity of RT activities detected in these vaccines and discrimination between retroviral and RT-like activities was further investigated. Feasibility and limits of PERT assay as a broad-spectrum retroviruses detection method in vaccines are discussed.

  8. A simple liposome assay for the screening of zinc ionophore activity of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Clergeaud, Gael; Dabbagh-Bazarbachi, Husam; Ortiz, Mayreli; Fernández-Larrea, Juan B; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2016-04-15

    An efficient liposomal system for screening the zinc ionophore activity of a selected library consisting of the most relevant dietary polyphenols is presented. The zinc ionophore activity was demonstrated by exploring the use of zinc-specific fluorophore FluoZin-3 loaded liposomes as simple membrane tools that mimic the cell membrane. The zinc ionophore activity was demonstrated as the capacity of polyphenols to transport zinc cations across the liposome membrane and increase the zinc-specific fluorescence of the encapsulated fluorophore FluoZin-3. In addition, the zinc chelation strength of the polyphenols was also tested in a competition assay based on the fluorescence quenching of zinc-dependent fluorescence emitted by zinc-FluoZin-3 complex. Finally, the correlation between the chelation capacity and ionophore activity is demonstrated, thus underlining the sequestering or ionophoric activity that the phenolic compounds can display, thus, providing better knowledge of the importance of the structural conformation versus their biological activity. Furthermore, the assays developed can be used as tools for rapid, high-throughput screening of families of polyphenols towards different biometals. PMID:26617034

  9. A simple liposome assay for the screening of zinc ionophore activity of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Clergeaud, Gael; Dabbagh-Bazarbachi, Husam; Ortiz, Mayreli; Fernández-Larrea, Juan B; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2016-04-15

    An efficient liposomal system for screening the zinc ionophore activity of a selected library consisting of the most relevant dietary polyphenols is presented. The zinc ionophore activity was demonstrated by exploring the use of zinc-specific fluorophore FluoZin-3 loaded liposomes as simple membrane tools that mimic the cell membrane. The zinc ionophore activity was demonstrated as the capacity of polyphenols to transport zinc cations across the liposome membrane and increase the zinc-specific fluorescence of the encapsulated fluorophore FluoZin-3. In addition, the zinc chelation strength of the polyphenols was also tested in a competition assay based on the fluorescence quenching of zinc-dependent fluorescence emitted by zinc-FluoZin-3 complex. Finally, the correlation between the chelation capacity and ionophore activity is demonstrated, thus underlining the sequestering or ionophoric activity that the phenolic compounds can display, thus, providing better knowledge of the importance of the structural conformation versus their biological activity. Furthermore, the assays developed can be used as tools for rapid, high-throughput screening of families of polyphenols towards different biometals.

  10. Central Limit Theorem: New SOCR Applet and Demonstration Activity.

    PubMed

    Dinov, Ivo D; Christou, Nicolas; Sanchez, Juana

    2008-07-01

    Modern approaches for information technology based blended education utilize a variety of novel instructional, computational and network resources. Such attempts employ technology to deliver integrated, dynamically linked, interactive content and multifaceted learning environments, which may facilitate student comprehension and information retention. In this manuscript, we describe one such innovative effort of using technological tools for improving student motivation and learning of the theory, practice and usability of the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) in probability and statistics courses. Our approach is based on harnessing the computational libraries developed by the Statistics Online Computational Resource (SOCR) to design a new interactive Java applet and a corresponding demonstration activity that illustrate the meaning and the power of the CLT. The CLT applet and activity have clear common goals; to provide graphical representation of the CLT, to improve student intuition, and to empirically validate and establish the limits of the CLT. The SOCR CLT activity consists of four experiments that demonstrate the assumptions, meaning and implications of the CLT and ties these to specific hands-on simulations. We include a number of examples illustrating the theory and applications of the CLT. Both the SOCR CLT applet and activity are freely available online to the community to test, validate and extend (Applet: http://www.socr.ucla.edu/htmls/SOCR_Experiments.html and Activity: http://wiki.stat.ucla.edu/socr/index.php/SOCR_EduMaterials_Activities_GeneralCentralLimitTheorem). PMID:21833159

  11. Central Limit Theorem: New SOCR Applet and Demonstration Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Christou, Nicolas; Sanchez, Juana

    2011-01-01

    Modern approaches for information technology based blended education utilize a variety of novel instructional, computational and network resources. Such attempts employ technology to deliver integrated, dynamically linked, interactive content and multifaceted learning environments, which may facilitate student comprehension and information retention. In this manuscript, we describe one such innovative effort of using technological tools for improving student motivation and learning of the theory, practice and usability of the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) in probability and statistics courses. Our approach is based on harnessing the computational libraries developed by the Statistics Online Computational Resource (SOCR) to design a new interactive Java applet and a corresponding demonstration activity that illustrate the meaning and the power of the CLT. The CLT applet and activity have clear common goals; to provide graphical representation of the CLT, to improve student intuition, and to empirically validate and establish the limits of the CLT. The SOCR CLT activity consists of four experiments that demonstrate the assumptions, meaning and implications of the CLT and ties these to specific hands-on simulations. We include a number of examples illustrating the theory and applications of the CLT. Both the SOCR CLT applet and activity are freely available online to the community to test, validate and extend (Applet: http://www.socr.ucla.edu/htmls/SOCR_Experiments.html and Activity: http://wiki.stat.ucla.edu/socr/index.php/SOCR_EduMaterials_Activities_GeneralCentralLimitTheorem). PMID:21833159

  12. Central Limit Theorem: New SOCR Applet and Demonstration Activity.

    PubMed

    Dinov, Ivo D; Christou, Nicolas; Sanchez, Juana

    2008-07-01

    Modern approaches for information technology based blended education utilize a variety of novel instructional, computational and network resources. Such attempts employ technology to deliver integrated, dynamically linked, interactive content and multifaceted learning environments, which may facilitate student comprehension and information retention. In this manuscript, we describe one such innovative effort of using technological tools for improving student motivation and learning of the theory, practice and usability of the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) in probability and statistics courses. Our approach is based on harnessing the computational libraries developed by the Statistics Online Computational Resource (SOCR) to design a new interactive Java applet and a corresponding demonstration activity that illustrate the meaning and the power of the CLT. The CLT applet and activity have clear common goals; to provide graphical representation of the CLT, to improve student intuition, and to empirically validate and establish the limits of the CLT. The SOCR CLT activity consists of four experiments that demonstrate the assumptions, meaning and implications of the CLT and ties these to specific hands-on simulations. We include a number of examples illustrating the theory and applications of the CLT. Both the SOCR CLT applet and activity are freely available online to the community to test, validate and extend (Applet: http://www.socr.ucla.edu/htmls/SOCR_Experiments.html and Activity: http://wiki.stat.ucla.edu/socr/index.php/SOCR_EduMaterials_Activities_GeneralCentralLimitTheorem).

  13. A passive-active neutron device for assaying remote-handled transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Estep, R.J.; Coop, K.L.; Deane, T.M.; Lujan, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    A combined passive-active neutron assay device was constructed for assaying remote-handled transuranic waste. A study of matrix and source position effects in active assays showed that a knowledge of the source position alone is not sufficient to correct for position-related errors in highly moderating or absorbing matrices. An alternate function for the active assay of solid fuel pellets was derived, although the efficacy of this approach remains to be established. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  14. High-Throughput FRET Assay Yields Allosteric SERCA Activators

    PubMed Central

    Cornea, Razvan L.; Lockamy, Elizabeth L.; Gruber, Simon J.; Muretta, Joseph M.; Jin, Dongzhu; Chen, Jiqiu; Dahl, Russell; Bartfai, Tamas; Zsebo, Krisztina M.; Gillispie, Gregory D.; Thomas, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we performed a high-throughput screen (HTS) in a reconstituted membrane system, seeking compounds that reverse inhibition of sarco-/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) by its endogenous regulator, phospholamban (PLB). Such compounds have long been sought to correct aberrant Ca2+ regulation in heart failure. Donor-SERCA was reconstituted in phospholipid membranes with or without acceptor-PLB, and FRET was measured in a steady-state fluorescence microplate reader. A 20,000-compound library was tested in duplicate. Compounds that decreased FRET by more than three standard deviations were considered hits. From 43 primary hits (0.2%), 31 (72%) were found to be false positives upon more thorough testing. The remaining 12 hits were tested in assays of Ca-ATPase activity, and six of these activated SERCA significantly, by as much as 60%, and several also enhanced cardiomyocyte contractility. These compounds directly activated SERCA from heart and other tissues. These results validate our FRET approach and set the stage for medicinal chemistry and pre-clinical testing. We were concerned about the high rate of false positives, resulting from the low precision of steady-state fluorescence. Preliminary studies with a novel fluorescence lifetime plate reader show 20-fold higher precision. This instrument can dramatically increase the quality of future HT. PMID:22923787

  15. High-throughput FRET assay yields allosteric SERCA activators.

    PubMed

    Cornea, Razvan L; Gruber, Simon J; Lockamy, Elizabeth L; Muretta, Joseph M; Jin, Dongzhu; Chen, Jiqiu; Dahl, Russell; Bartfai, Tamas; Zsebo, Krisztina M; Gillispie, Gregory D; Thomas, David D

    2013-01-01

    Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we performed a high-throughput screen (HTS) in a reconstituted membrane system, seeking compounds that reverse inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) by its cardiac regulator, phospholamban (PLB). Such compounds have long been sought to correct aberrant Ca(2+) regulation in heart failure. Donor-SERCA was reconstituted in phospholipid membranes with or without acceptor-PLB, and FRET was measured in a steady-state fluorescence microplate reader. A 20 000-compound library was tested in duplicate. Compounds that decreased FRET by more than three standard deviations were considered hits. From 43 hits (0.2%), 31 (72%) were found to be false-positives upon more thorough FRET testing. The remaining 12 hits were tested in assays of Ca-ATPase activity, and six of these activated SERCA significantly, by as much as 60%, and several also enhanced cardiomyocyte contractility. These compounds directly activated SERCA from heart and other tissues. These results validate our FRET approach and set the stage for medicinal chemistry and preclinical testing. We were concerned about the high rate of false-positives, resulting from the low precision of steady-state fluorescence. Preliminary studies with a novel fluorescence lifetime plate reader show 20-fold higher precision. This instrument can dramatically increase the quality of future HTS.

  16. Demonstrating Optical Activity Using an iPad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Pauline M.; Lepore, Dante M.; Morneau, Brandy N.; Barratt, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Optical activity using an iPad as a source of polarized light is demonstrated. A sample crystal or solution can be placed on the iPad running a white screen app. The sample is viewed through a polarized filter that can be rotated. This setup can be used in the laboratory or with a document camera to easily project in a large lecture hall.…

  17. Immunomodulatory assays to study structure-activity relationships of thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Shannon, E J; Morales, M J; Sandoval, F

    1997-01-01

    Thalidomide, which has a long history of tragedy because of its ability to cause severe birth defects, is very effective in alleviating erythema nodosum leprosum in leprosy patients and aphthous ulcers in AIDS patients. The causes of these inflammatory diseases and the mechanism by which thalidomide diminishes them are unknown. It has been suggested that modulation of the immune response plays an important role. We found that thalidomide exerts immunomodulatory activity in three bioassays. It suppresses an IgM plaque forming cell response in mice injected with sheep erythrocytes: it inhibits TNF-alpha production by LPS stimulated human mononuclear cells: and it enhances IL-2 production by Con-A stimulated human mononuclear cells. We employed these bioassays to compare the activity of 15 analogs of thalidomide with thalidomide itself. Eight of the compounds were derivatives of the glutarimide moiety of thalidomide and the others were phthalimide or derivatives of the phthalimide moiety of thalidomide. N-hydroxyphthalimide, a simple derivative of phthalimide, was more effective than thalidomide and was also the most effective of the compounds assayed in suppressing the IgM plaque and TNF-alpha responses, but it did not enhance the IL-2 response, instead, it significantly suppressed it.

  18. GTP-specific fab fragment-based GTPase activity assay.

    PubMed

    Kopra, Kari; Rozwandowicz-Jansen, Anita; Syrjänpää, Markku; Blaževitš, Olga; Ligabue, Alessio; Veltel, Stefan; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Abankwa, Daniel; Härmä, Harri

    2015-03-17

    GTPases are central cellular signaling proteins, which cycle between a GDP-bound inactive and a GTP-bound active conformation in a controlled manner. Ras GTPases are frequently mutated in cancer and so far only few experimental inhibitors exist. The most common methods for monitoring GTP hydrolysis rely on luminescent GDP- or GTP-analogs. In this study, the first GTP-specific Fab fragment and its application are described. We selected Fab fragments using the phage display technology. Six Fab fragments were found against 2'/3'-GTP-biotin and 8-GTP-biotin. Selected antibody fragments allowed specific detection of endogenous, free GTP. The most potent Fab fragment (2A4(GTP)) showed over 100-fold GTP-specificity over GDP, ATP, or CTP and was used to develop a heterogeneous time-resolved luminescence based assay for the monitoring of GTP concentration. The method allows studying the GEF dependent H-Ras activation (GTP binding) and GAP-catalyzed H-Ras deactivation (GTP hydrolysis) at nanomolar protein concentrations.

  19. Mutagenic activity of isoxazolylnaphthoquinoneimines assayed by micronucleus bone marrow test.

    PubMed

    Sicardi, S M; Ferrato, E

    1995-05-01

    Studies were undertaken to evaluate the ability of various quinoneimines to induce micronuclei in bone marrow cells as a measure of their genotoxicity. Accordingly, 2-hydroxy-N-(3,4-dimethyl-5-isoxazolyl)-1,4-naphthoquinone-4-imine (I), its 2-acetyl derivative (II) and 2-[(5-methyl-3-isoxazolyl)amino]-N-(5-methyl-3-isoxazolyl)-1 ,4- naphthoquinone-4-imine (III), as well as two of their precursors, 2-hydroxynaphthoquinone (NQ-2-OH) and 3,4-dimethyl-5-aminoisoxazole (DMAI) were given by intraperitoneal injection at 5, 50, 100 and 200 mg/Kg doses to S.J.L. Swiss mice with 24 h sampling time. Compounds I and II displayed highly significant differences at 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg doses (p < 0.01) and their mutagenic dose response curves correlated closely with an inverted U-shaped form whose interpretation is still the subject of controversy. NQ-2-OH only produced a significant increase in micronucleus frequency at 50 mg/kg, whereas no mutagenic activity was found for compound III and DMAI at the doses assayed. At 50 mg/kg the order of relative mutagenic potencies was I > II > NQ-2-OH. Mechanisms advanced to explain loss of drug activity at high doses include capture saturation, enzymatic induction during metabolism and participation of an independent defense system. PMID:7753107

  20. A high-content screening assay in transgenic zebrafish identifies two novel activators of fgf signaling.

    PubMed

    Saydmohammed, Manush; Vollmer, Laura L; Onuoha, Ezenwa Obi; Vogt, Andreas; Tsang, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Zebrafish have become an invaluable vertebrate animal model to interrogate small molecule libraries for modulators of complex biological pathways and phenotypes. We have recently described the implementation of a quantitative, high-content imaging assay in multi-well plates to analyze the effects of small molecules on Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) signaling in vivo. Here we have evaluated the capability of the assay to identify compounds that hyperactivate FGF signaling from a test cassette of agents with known biological activities. Using a transgenic zebrafish reporter line for FGF activity, we screened 1040 compounds from an annotated library of known bioactive agents, including FDA-approved drugs. The assay identified two molecules, 8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate and pyrithione zinc, that enhanced FGF signaling in specific areas of the brain. Subsequent studies revealed that both compounds specifically expanded FGF target gene expression. Furthermore, treatment of early stage embryos with either compound resulted in dorsalized phenotypes characteristic of hyperactivation of FGF signaling in early development. Documented activities for both agents included activation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), consistent with FGF hyperactivation. To conclude, we demonstrate the power of automated quantitative high-content imaging to identify small molecule modulators of FGF. PMID:21932436

  1. A Fluorescent Microplate Assay Quantifies Bacterial Efflux and Demonstrates Two Distinct Compound Binding Sites in AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Annette; Rijnbrand, R.; Erwin, Alice L.

    2015-01-01

    A direct assay of efflux by Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC and related multidrug pumps would have great value in discovery of new Gram-negative antibiotics. The current understanding of how efflux is affected by the chemical structure and physical properties of molecules is extremely limited, derived from antibacterial data for compounds that inhibit growth of wild-type E. coli. We adapted a previously described fluorescent efflux assay to a 96-well microplate format that measured the ability of test compounds to compete for efflux with Nile Red (an environment-sensitive fluor), independent of antibacterial activity. We show that Nile Red and the lipid-sensitive probe DiBAC4-(3) [bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid)-trimethine oxonol] can quantify efflux competition in E. coli. We extend the previous findings that the tetracyclines compete with Nile Red and show that DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides. The extent of the competition shows a modest correlation with the effect of the acrB deletion on MICs within the compound sets for both dyes. Crystallographic studies identified at least two substrate binding sites in AcrB, the proximal and distal pockets. High-molecular-mass substrates bound the proximal pocket, while low-mass substrates occupied the distal pocket. As DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides but not with Nile Red, we propose that DiBAC4-(3) binds the proximal pocket and Nile Red likely binds the distal site. In conclusion, competition with fluorescent probes can be used to study the efflux process for diverse chemical structures and may provide information as to the site of binding and, in some cases, enable rank-ordering a series of related compounds by efflux. PMID:25645845

  2. Antioxidant activity of puha (Sonchus oleraceus L.) as assessed by the cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Arlene; Thompson, Scott; Stark, Mirjam; Ou, Zong-Quan; Gould, Kevin S

    2011-12-01

    There is considerable interest in antioxidant dietary components that can be protective against degenerative diseases in humans. Puha (Sonchus oleraceus L.) is a rich source of polyphenols, and exhibits strong antioxidant activity as measured by the 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. However, the potential of puha to protect against degenerative diseases requires that low molecular weight antioxidants (LMWA) are absorbed by, and active in, human cells. The cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay was used to investigate the antioxidant activity of puha leaf extracts. Preparation methods of freezing and freeze-drying reduced the total polyphenolic content compared with fresh puha, but did not affect the LMWA potential as determined by the DPPH assay. The IC(50) values were 0.012 ± 0.003 mg/mL and 0.010 ± 0.005 mg/mL for freeze-dried and fresh puha leaves, respectively. Using the CAA assay, it was shown that LMWAs from foliar extracts of puha were effectively absorbed into HepG2 cells, and exerted antioxidant activity at levels comparable to those of extracts from blueberry fruits, the much-touted antioxidant superfood. Methylene blue staining of HepG2 cells indicated that puha extracts were not cytotoxic at concentrations below 100 mg DW/mL. The data indicate the potential of puha as a nutraceutical supplement for human health.

  3. Complete validation of a unique digestion assay to detect Trichinella larvae in horse meat demonstrates the reliability of this assay for meeting food safety and trade requirements.

    PubMed

    Forbes, L B; Hill, D E; Parker, S; Tessaro, S V; Gamble, H R; Gajadhar, A A

    2008-03-01

    A tissue digestion assay using a double separatory funnel procedure for the detection of Trichinella larvae in horse meat was validated for application in food safety programs and trade. The assay consisted of a pepsin-HCl digestion step to release larvae from muscle tissue and two sequential sedimentation steps in separatory funnels to recover and concentrate larvae for detection with a stereomicroscope. With defined critical control points, the assay was conducted within a quality assurance system compliant with International Organization for Standardization-International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC) 17025 guidelines. Samples used in the validation were obtained from horses experimentally infected with Trichinella spiralis to obtain a range of muscle larvae densities. One-, 5-, and 10-g samples of infected tissue were combined with 99, 95, and 90 g, respectively, of known negative horse tissue to create a 100-g sample for testing. Samples of 5 and 10 g were more likely to be positive than were 1-g samples when larval densities were less than three larvae per gram (lpg). This difference is important because ingested meat with 1 lpg is considered the threshold for clinical disease in humans. Using a 5-g sample size, all samples containing 1.3 to 2 lpg were detected, and 60 to 100% of samples with infected horse meat containing 0.1 to 0.7 lpg were detected. In this study, the double separatory funnel digestion assay was efficient and reliable for its intended use in food safety and trade. This procedure is the only digestion assay for Trichinella in horse meat that has been validated as consistent and effective at critical levels of sensitivity.

  4. A Caco-2 cell-based quantitative antioxidant activity assay for antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hongxia; Liu, Dong; Yu, Xiangying; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Yan

    2015-05-15

    A Caco-2 cell-based antioxidant activity (CAA) assay for quantitative evaluation of antioxidants was developed by optimizing seeding density and culture time of Caco-2 cells, incubation time and concentration of fluorescent probe (2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate, DCFH-DA), incubation way and incubation time of antioxidants (pure phytochemicals) and DCFH-DA with cells, and detection time of fluorescence. Results showed that the CAA assay was of good reproducibility and could be used to evaluate the antioxidant activity of antioxidants at the following conditions: seeding density of 5 × 10(4)/well, cell culture time of 24h, co-incubation of 60 μM DCFH-DA and pure phytochemicals with Caco-2 cells for 20 min and fluorescence recorded for 90 min. Additionally, a significant correlation was observed between CAA values and rat plasma ORAC values following the intake of antioxidants for selected pure phytochemicals (R(2) = 0.815, p < 0.01), demonstrating the good biological relevance of CAA assay.

  5. Activation of chemical promutagens by Selenastrum capricornutum in the plant cell/microbe coincubation assay

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, J.M.; Lippert, M.; Johnson, P.; Shafer, T. )

    1990-05-01

    The critical balance of organisms living in aquatic environments is influenced by the presence and relationship of plants to those environments. However, even though plants occupy a fundamental trophic level within aquatic ecosystems, few studies have focused upon the effect of xenobiotics on aquatic plants, and even fewer studies have dealt with xenobiotic metabolism by aquatic plants. It is well established that plants can metabolize chemicals into mutagens. The impact of these unique plant-activated chemical mutagens on ecosystems, food chains and, ultimately, human health is an important question that will require intensive and integrative investigation. The plant cell/microbe coincubation assay is particularly advantageous for use with unicellular algae. The conditions of this assay are such that chemical metabolism and subsequent mutagen detection can be followed in intact algal cells under simulated field conditions. The purpose of this research was to demonstrate that a unicellular algal species could be used effectively in the plant cell/microbe coincubation assay to activate model chemical mutagens.

  6. Development of a QPatch Automated Electrophysiology Assay for Identifying KCa3.1 Inhibitors and Activators

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, David Paul; Yu, Weifeng; Brown, Brandon M.; Løjkner, Lars Damgaard

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel KCa3.1 (also known as KCNN4, IK1, or the Gárdos channel) plays an important role in the activation of T and B cells, mast cells, macrophages, and microglia by regulating membrane potential, cellular volume, and calcium signaling. KCa3.1 is further involved in the proliferation of dedifferentiated vascular smooth muscle cells and fibroblast and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization responses in the vascular endothelium. Accordingly, KCa3.1 inhibitors are therapeutically interesting as immunosuppressants and for the treatment of a wide range of fibroproliferative disorders, whereas KCa3.1 activators constitute a potential new class of endothelial function preserving antihypertensives. Here, we report the development of QPatch assays for both KCa3.1 inhibitors and activators. During assay optimization, the Ca2+ sensitivity of KCa3.1 was studied using varying intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. A free Ca2+ concentration of 1 μM was chosen to optimally test inhibitors. To identify activators, which generally act as positive gating modulators, a lower Ca2+ concentration (∼200 nM) was used. The QPatch results were benchmarked against manual patch-clamp electrophysiology by determining the potency of several commonly used KCa3.1 inhibitors (TRAM-34, NS6180, ChTX) and activators (EBIO, riluzole, SKA-31). Collectively, our results demonstrate that the QPatch provides a comparable but much faster approach to study compound interactions with KCa3.1 channels in a robust and reliable assay. PMID:24351043

  7. Development of a protease activity assay using heat-sensitive Tus-GFP fusion protein substrates.

    PubMed

    Askin, Samuel P; Morin, Isabelle; Schaeffer, Patrick M

    2011-08-15

    Proteases are implicated in various diseases and several have been identified as potential drug targets or biomarkers. As a result, protease activity assays that can be performed in high throughput are essential for the screening of inhibitors in drug discovery programs. Here we describe the development of a simple, general method for the characterization of protease activity and its use for inhibitor screening. GFP was genetically fused to a comparatively unstable Tus protein through an interdomain linker containing a specially designed protease site, which can be proteolyzed. When this Tus-GFP fusion protein substrate is proteolyzed it releases GFP, which remains in solution after a short heat denaturation and centrifugation step used to eliminate uncleaved Tus-GFP. Thus, the increase in GFP fluorescence is directly proportional to protease activity. We validated the protease activity assay with three different proteases, i.e., trypsin, caspase 3, and neutrophil elastase, and demonstrated that it can be used to determine protease activity and the effect of inhibitors with small sample volumes in just a few simple steps using a fluorescence plate reader.

  8. A novel protease activity assay using a protease-responsive chaperone protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sao, Kentaro; Murata, Masaharu; Fujisaki, Yuri; Umezaki, Kaori; Mori, Takeshi; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki; Hashizume, Makoto

    2009-06-05

    Protease activity assays are important for elucidating protease function and for developing new therapeutic agents. In this study, a novel turbidimetric method for determining the protease activity using a protease-responsive chaperone protein is described. For this purpose, a recombinant small heat-shock protein (sHSP) with an introduced Factor Xa protease recognition site was synthesized in bacteria. This recombinant mutant, FXa-HSP, exhibited chaperone-like activity at high temperatures in cell lysates. However, the chaperone-like activity of FXa-HSP decreased dramatically following treatment with Factor Xa. Protein precipitation was subsequently observed in the cell lysates. The reaction was Factor Xa concentration-dependent and was quantitatively suppressed by a specific inhibitor for Factor Xa. Protein aggregation was detected by a simple method based on turbidimetry. The results clearly demonstrate that this assay is an effective, easy-to-use method for determining protease activities without the requirement of labeling procedures and the use of radioisotopes.

  9. In vivo virus growth competition assays demonstrate equal fitness of fish rhabdovirus strains that co-circulate in aquaculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troyer, R.M.; Garver, K.A.; Ranson, J.C.; Wargo, A.R.; Kurath, G.

    2008-01-01

    A novel virus growth competition assay for determining relative fitness of RNA virus variants in vivo has been developed using the fish rhabdovirus, Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). We have conducted assays with IHNV isolates designated B, C, and D, representing the three most common genetic subtypes that co-circulate in Idaho trout farm aquaculture. In each assay, groups of 30 fish were immersed in a 1:1 mixture of two genotypes of IHNV, and then held in individual beakers for a 72 h period of in vivo competitive virus replication. Progeny virus populations in each fish were analyzed for the presence and proportion of each viral genotype. In two independent assays of the B:C isolate pair, and two assays of the B:D pair, all fish were co-infected and there was a high level of fish-to-fish variation in the ratio of the two competing genotypes. However, in each assay the average ratio in the 30-fish group was not significantly different from the input ratio of 1:1, indicating equal or nearly equal viral fitness on a host population basis, under the conditions tested. ?? 2008.

  10. Erythrocytes and cell line-based assays to evaluate the cytoprotective activity of antioxidant components obtained from natural sources.

    PubMed

    Botta, Albert; Martínez, Verónica; Mitjans, Montserrat; Balboa, Elena; Conde, Enma; Vinardell, M Pilar

    2014-02-01

    Oxidative stress can damage cellular components including DNA, proteins or lipids, and may cause several skin diseases. To protect from this damage and addressing consumer's appeal to natural products, antioxidants obtained from algal and vegetal extracts are being proposed as antioxidants to be incorporated into formulations. Thus, the development of reliable, quick and economic in vitro methods to study the cytoactivity of these products is a meaningful requirement. A combination of erythrocyte and cell line-based assays was performed on two extracts from Sargassum muticum, one from Ulva lactuca, and one from Castanea sativa. Antioxidant properties were assessed in erythrocytes by the TBARS and AAPH assays, and cytotoxicity and antioxidant cytoprotection were assessed in HaCaT and 3T3 cells by the MTT assay. The extracts showed no antioxidant activity on the TBARS assay, whereas their antioxidant capacity in the AAPH assay was demonstrated. On the cytotoxicity assays, extracts showed low toxicity, with IC50 values higher than 200μg/mL. C. sativa extract showed the most favourable antioxidant properties on the antioxidant cytoprotection assays; while S. muticum and U. lactuca extracts showed a slight antioxidant activity. This battery of methods was useful to characterise the biological antioxidant properties of these natural extracts.

  11. Erythrocytes and cell line-based assays to evaluate the cytoprotective activity of antioxidant components obtained from natural sources.

    PubMed

    Botta, Albert; Martínez, Verónica; Mitjans, Montserrat; Balboa, Elena; Conde, Enma; Vinardell, M Pilar

    2014-02-01

    Oxidative stress can damage cellular components including DNA, proteins or lipids, and may cause several skin diseases. To protect from this damage and addressing consumer's appeal to natural products, antioxidants obtained from algal and vegetal extracts are being proposed as antioxidants to be incorporated into formulations. Thus, the development of reliable, quick and economic in vitro methods to study the cytoactivity of these products is a meaningful requirement. A combination of erythrocyte and cell line-based assays was performed on two extracts from Sargassum muticum, one from Ulva lactuca, and one from Castanea sativa. Antioxidant properties were assessed in erythrocytes by the TBARS and AAPH assays, and cytotoxicity and antioxidant cytoprotection were assessed in HaCaT and 3T3 cells by the MTT assay. The extracts showed no antioxidant activity on the TBARS assay, whereas their antioxidant capacity in the AAPH assay was demonstrated. On the cytotoxicity assays, extracts showed low toxicity, with IC50 values higher than 200μg/mL. C. sativa extract showed the most favourable antioxidant properties on the antioxidant cytoprotection assays; while S. muticum and U. lactuca extracts showed a slight antioxidant activity. This battery of methods was useful to characterise the biological antioxidant properties of these natural extracts. PMID:24134852

  12. Arginase Activity in Mitochondria - an Interfering Factor in Nitric Oxide Synthase Activity Assays

    PubMed Central

    Venkatakrishnan, Priya; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Almeida, Igor C.; Miller, R. Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Previously, in tightly controlled studies, using three independent, yet complementary techniques, we refuted the claim that a mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS) isoform exists within pure, rat liver mitochondria (MT). Of those techniques, the NOS-catalyzed [14C]-L-arginine to [14C]-L-citrulline conversion assay (NOS assay) with MT samples indicated a weak, radioactive signal that was NOS-independent [1]. Aliquots of samples from the NOS assays were then extracted with acetone, separated by high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and exposed to autoradiography. Results obtained from these samples showed no radioactive band for L-citrulline. However, a fast-migrating, diffuse, radioactive band was observed in the TLC lanes loaded with MT samples. In this manuscript, we identify and confirm that this radioactive signal in MT samples is due to the arginase-catalyzed conversion of [14C]-L-arginine to [14C]-urea. The current results, in addition to reconfirming the absence of NOS activity in rat liver MT, also show the need to include arginase inhibitors in studies using MT samples in order to avoid confounding results when using NOS activity assays. (Supported by ES 011982 & 2G12RR008124 to RTM & UTEP, respectively). PMID:19896461

  13. Arginase activity in mitochondria - An interfering factor in nitric oxide synthase activity assays

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatakrishnan, Priya; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Almeida, Igor C.; Miller, R.T.

    2010-04-09

    Previously, in tightly controlled studies, using three independent, yet complementary techniques, we refuted the claim that a mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS) isoform exists within pure, rat liver mitochondria (MT). Of those techniques, the NOS-catalyzed [{sup 14}C]-L-arginine to [{sup 14}C]-L-citrulline conversion assay (NOS assay) with MT samples indicated a weak, radioactive signal that was NOS-independent . Aliquots of samples from the NOS assays were then extracted with acetone, separated by high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and exposed to autoradiography. Results obtained from these samples showed no radioactive band for L-citrulline. However, a fast-migrating, diffuse, radioactive band was observed in the TLC lanes loaded with MT samples. In this manuscript, we identify and confirm that this radioactive signal in MT samples is due to the arginase-catalyzed conversion of [{sup 14}C]-L-arginine to [{sup 14}C]-urea. The current results, in addition to reconfirming the absence of NOS activity in rat liver MT, also show the need to include arginase inhibitors in studies using MT samples in order to avoid confounding results when using NOS activity assays.

  14. A high-throughput assay for modulators of NNT activity in permeabilized yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Nicholas A; Saxty, Barbara; Albury, Mary S; Kettleborough, Catherine A; Ashcroft, Frances M; Moore, Anthony L; Cox, Roger D

    2011-08-01

    Nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT) mutant mice show glucose intolerance with impaired insulin secretion during glucose tolerance tests. Uncoupling of the β cell mitochondrial metabolism due to such mutations makes NNT a novel target for therapeutics in the treatment of pathologies such as type 2 diabetes. The authors propose that increasing NNT activity would help reduce deleterious buildup of reactive oxygen species in the inner mitochondrial matrix. They have expressed human Nnt cDNA for the first time in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and transhydrogenase activity in mitochondria isolated from these cells is six times greater than is seen in wild-type mitochondria. The same mitochondria have partially uncoupled respiration, and the cells have slower growth rates compared to cells that do not express NNT. The authors have used NNT's role as a redox-driven proton pump to develop a robust fluorimetric assay in permeabilized yeast. Screening in parallel a library of known pharmacologically active compounds (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke collection) against NNT ± cells, they demonstrate a robust and reproducible assay suitable for expansion into larger and more diverse compound sets. The identification of NNT activators may help in the elucidation of the role of NNT in mammalian cells and assessing its potential as a therapeutic target for insulin secretion disorders.

  15. Mutagenic activity of sweepings and pigments from a household-wax factory assayed with Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Varella, S D; Pozetti, G L; Vilegas, W; Varanda, E A

    2004-12-01

    The mutagenic activity of garbage originating from a household wax industry was determined by the Salmonella/microsome assay, using the bacterial strains TA100, TA98 and YG1024. The garbage was obtained by sweeping the floor of the factory at the end of the work shift. Organic compounds were extracted by ultrasound for 30 min in dichloromethane or 70% ethanol. After evaporation of solvent, these extracts (HFS: household-wax factory sweepings) were dissolved in DMSO, and were tested for the mutagenic activity at varying concentrations (HFS-ET: 0.08-0.68 mg/plate, HFS-DCM: 0.60-7.31 mg/plate). The colouring agents (pigments) used in the production of the wax were also dissolved in DMSO and tested with the assay. The concentrations tested for each pigment were: Amaranth: 0.46-3.65 mg/plate, Auramine: 0.15-1.2 mg/plate and Rhodamine B: 0.22-1.82 mg/plate. Both ET and DCM organic extracts had mutagenic activity, especially in the YG1024 strain. The pigments behaved in a similar way, demonstrating that YG1024 was the most sensitive strain for the detection of mutagenicity, and that metabolization increased the activity. Human exposure (occupational and non-occupational) to industrial residues generated during the household-wax manufacturing and packaging process should be monitored, since this type of garbage is normally deposited in the environment without any control.

  16. Assays to Measure PTEN Lipid Phosphatase Activity In Vitro from Purified Enzyme or Immunoprecipitates.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Laura; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2016-01-01

    PTEN is a one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressors in human cancers. It is essential for regulating diverse biological processes and through its lipid phosphatase activity regulates the PI 3-Kinase signaling pathway. Sensitive phosphatase assays are employed to study the catalytic activity of PTEN against phospholipid substrates. Here we describe protocols to assay PTEN lipid phosphatase activity using either purified enzyme (purified PTEN lipid phosphatase assay) or PTEN immunopurified from tissues or cultured cells (cellular IP PTEN lipid phosphatase assay) against vesicles containing radiolabeled PIP3 substrate. PMID:27514802

  17. Telomerase activity in the various regions of mouse brain: non-radioactive telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay.

    PubMed

    Grin, Yossi; Admoni, Tamar; Priel, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein, is responsible for maintaining the telomere length and therefore promoting genomic integrity, proliferation, and lifespan. In addition, telomerase protects the mitochondria from oxidative stress and confers resistance to apoptosis, suggesting its possible importance for the surviving of non-mitotic, highly active cells such as neurons. We previously demonstrated the ability of novel telomerase activators to increase telomerase activity and expression in the various mouse brain regions and to protect motor neurons cells from oxidative stress. These results strengthen the notion that telomerase is involved in the protection of neurons from various lesions. To underline the role of telomerase in the brain, we here compare the activity of telomerase in male and female mouse brain and its dependence on age. TRAP assay is a standard method for detecting telomerase activity in various tissues or cell lines. Here we demonstrate the analysis of telomerase activity in three regions of the mouse brain by non-denaturing protein extraction using CHAPS lysis buffer followed by modification of the standard TRAP assay. In this 2-step assay, endogenous telomerase elongates a specific telomerase substrate (TS primer) by adding TTAGGG 6 bp repeats (telomerase reaction). The telomerase reaction products are amplified by PCR reaction creating a DNA ladder of 6 bp increments. The analysis of the DNA ladder is made by 4.5% high resolution agarose gel electrophoresis followed by staining with highly sensitive nucleic acid stain. Compared to the traditional TRAP assay that utilize (32)P labeled radioactive dCTP's for DNA detection and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for resolving the DNA ladder, this protocol offers a non-toxic time saving TRAP assay for evaluating telomerase activity in the mouse brain, demonstrating the ability to detect differences in telomerase activity in the various female and male mouse brain region. PMID:25225832

  18. Development and Demonstration of Active Noise Control Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R.; Hu, Z.; Sommerfeldt, S.; Walker, B.; Hersh, A.; Luo, H.; Spencer, M.; Hallman, D.; Mitchell, C.; Sutliff, D.

    2000-01-01

    This report details design methods for and feasibility of an Active Noise Control (ANC) system using flush-wall-mounted sensors and actuators to reduce turbofan engine rotor-stator interaction noise. ANC concepts capable of suppressing discrete-tone spinning modes containing several cut-on radial mode were identified, developed analytically, and evaluated. Separate ANC systems that suppressed at least three radial modes in a cylindrical inlet duct and three radial modes in an exhaust annulus were developed. These designs resulted in inlet duct and exhaust duct tests that were performed at NASA on the 4-ft ANC Fan in the NASA Glenn AAPL facility. Effective suppression of 2-BPF spinning mode m = 2 tone noise was achieved over a range of fan speeds 1800 to 2450 rpm, where up to 4 radials were present. In the inlet duct, up to 12 dB reduction was obtained for 3 radial modes, and up to 4 dB was obtained with 4 radial modes. In the exhaust duct, up to 15 dB PWL reduction was obtained with either two or three radial modes present. Thus, the ability to suppress multiple radial modes for tones in both the inlet and exhaust ducts has been successfully demonstrated. Implications of ANC system design requirements on installation and system integration issues for ANC systems capable of suppressing higher order radial mode content when applied to a 767 using twin CF6 engines were evaluated analytically. The analytical results indicated an ANC system must be part of an integrated design to be effective.

  19. Herpes Murine Model as a Biological Assay to Test Dialyzable Leukocyte Extracts Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salinas-Jazmín, Nohemí; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Becerril-García, Miguel Angel; Limón-Flores, Alberto Yairh; Vázquez-Leyva, Said; Pavón, Lenin; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia Mayra

    2015-01-01

    Human dialyzable leukocyte extracts (DLEs) are heterogeneous mixtures of low-molecular-weight peptides that are released on disruption of peripheral blood leukocytes from healthy donors. DLEs improve clinical responses in infections, allergies, cancer, and immunodeficiencies. Transferon is a human DLE that has been registered as a hemoderivate by Mexican health authorities and commercialized nationally. To develop an animal model that could be used routinely as a quality control assay for Transferon, we standardized and validated a murine model of cutaneous HSV-1 infection. Using this model, we evaluated the activity of 27 Transferon batches. All batches improved the survival of HSV-1-infected mice, wherein average survival rose from 20.9% in control mice to 59.6% in Transferon-treated mice. The activity of Transferon correlated with increased serum levels of IFN-γ and reduced IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations. Our results demonstrate that (i) this mouse model of cutaneous herpes can be used to examine the activity of DLEs, such as Transferon; (ii) the assay can be used as a routine test for batch release; (iii) Transferon is produced with high homogeneity between batches; (iv) Transferon does not have direct virucidal, cytoprotective, or antireplicative effects; and (v) the protective effect of Transferon in vivo correlates with changes in serum cytokines. PMID:25984538

  20. Herpes murine model as a biological assay to test dialyzable leukocyte extracts activity.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Jazmín, Nohemí; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Becerril-García, Miguel Angel; Limón-Flores, Alberto Yairh; Vázquez-Leyva, Said; Medina-Rivero, Emilio; Pavón, Lenin; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia Mayra

    2015-01-01

    Human dialyzable leukocyte extracts (DLEs) are heterogeneous mixtures of low-molecular-weight peptides that are released on disruption of peripheral blood leukocytes from healthy donors. DLEs improve clinical responses in infections, allergies, cancer, and immunodeficiencies. Transferon is a human DLE that has been registered as a hemoderivate by Mexican health authorities and commercialized nationally. To develop an animal model that could be used routinely as a quality control assay for Transferon, we standardized and validated a murine model of cutaneous HSV-1 infection. Using this model, we evaluated the activity of 27 Transferon batches. All batches improved the survival of HSV-1-infected mice, wherein average survival rose from 20.9% in control mice to 59.6% in Transferon-treated mice. The activity of Transferon correlated with increased serum levels of IFN-γ and reduced IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations. Our results demonstrate that (i) this mouse model of cutaneous herpes can be used to examine the activity of DLEs, such as Transferon; (ii) the assay can be used as a routine test for batch release; (iii) Transferon is produced with high homogeneity between batches; (iv) Transferon does not have direct virucidal, cytoprotective, or antireplicative effects; and (v) the protective effect of Transferon in vivo correlates with changes in serum cytokines.

  1. A MEMBRANE FILTER PROCEDURE FOR ASSAYING CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY IN HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytotoxic activity assays of Gram-negative, heterotrophic bacteria are often laborious and time consuming. The objective of this study was to develop in situ procedures for testing potential cytotoxic activities of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from drinking water systems. Wate...

  2. Immobilization and activity assay of cytochrome P450 on patterned lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Morigaki, Kenichi . E-mail: morigaki-kenichi@aist.go.jp; Tatsu, Yoshiro; Yumoto, Noboru; Imaishi, Hiromasa . E-mail: himaish@kobe-u.ac.jp

    2007-04-20

    We report on a methodology for immobilizing cytochrome P450 on the surface of micropatterned lipid bilayer membranes and measuring the enzymatic activity. The patterned bilayer comprised a matrix of polymeric lipid bilayers and embedded fluid lipid bilayers. The polymeric lipid bilayer domains act as a barrier to confine fluid lipid bilayers in defined areas and as a framework to stabilize embedded membranes. The fluid bilayer domains, on the other hand, can contain lipid compositions that facilitate the fusion between lipid membranes, and are intended to be used as the binding agent of microsomes containing rat CYP1A1. By optimizing the membrane compositions of the fluid bilayers, we could selectively immobilize microsomal membranes on these domains. The enzymatic activity was significantly higher on lipid bilayer substrates compared with direct adsorption on glass. Furthermore, competitive assay experiment between two fluorogenic substrates demonstrated the feasibility of bioassays based on immobilized P450s.

  3. Chlorosulfonation of polystyrene substrates for bioanalytical assays: distribution of activated groups at the surface.

    PubMed

    del Prado, Anselmo; Briz, Nerea; Navarro, Rodrigo; Pérez, Mónica; Gallardo, Alberto; Reinecke, Helmut

    2012-12-01

    In this work the activation of transparent PS substrates by chlorosulfonation is described and their distribution in the subsurface region is analyzed. For this purpose XPS, FTIR-ATR and colorimetry have been used. It is shown that the electrophilic aromatic substitution of polystyrene in pure chlorosulfonic acid is extremely quick with complete surface coverage by chlorosulfonic groups achieved after only a 10 minute reaction time at -10 °C. It is further demonstrated that the reaction is very surface selective and that even after reaction times as long as 3 hours, the modification is limited to a layer with a thickness of less than one micron. The activated PS substrates can be further functionalized in a second step with carboxylic groups. Due to the excellent optical transparency that the samples maintain upon modification, the modified systems were successfully probed for use in ELISA assays.

  4. A real-time fluorogenic assay for the visualization of glycoside hydrolase activity in planta.

    PubMed

    Ibatullin, Farid M; Banasiak, Alicja; Baumann, Martin J; Greffe, Lionel; Takahashi, Junko; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Brumer, Harry

    2009-12-01

    There currently exists a diverse array of molecular probes for the in situ localization of polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins in plant cells, including reporter enzyme strategies (e.g. protein-glucuronidase fusions). In contrast, however, there is a paucity of methods for the direct analysis of endogenous glycoside hydrolases and transglycosidases responsible for cell wall remodeling. To exemplify the potential of fluorogenic resorufin glycosides to address this issue, a resorufin beta-glycoside of a xylogluco-oligosaccharide (XXXG-beta-Res) was synthesized as a specific substrate for in planta analysis of XEH activity. The resorufin aglycone is particularly distinguished for high sensitivity in muro assays due to a low pK(a) (5.8) and large extinction coefficient (epsilon 62,000 M(-1) cm(-1)), long-wavelength fluorescence (excitation 571 nm/emission 585 nm), and high quantum yield (0.74) of the corresponding anion. In vitro analyses demonstrated that XXXG-beta-Res is hydrolyzed by the archetypal plant XEH, nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) NXG1, with classical Michaelis-Menten substrate saturation kinetics and a linear dependence on both enzyme concentration and incubation time. Further, XEH activity could be visualized in real time by observing the localized increase in fluorescence in germinating nasturtium seeds and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) inflorescent stems by confocal microscopy. Importantly, this new in situ XEH assay provides an essential complement to the in situ xyloglucan endotransglycosylase assay, thus allowing delineation of the disparate activities encoded by xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase genes directly in plant tissues. The observation that XXXG-beta-Res is also hydrolyzed by diverse microbial XEHs indicates that this substrate, and resorufin glycosides in general, may find broad applicability for the analysis of wall restructuring by polysaccharide hydrolases during morphogenesis and plant-microbe interactions.

  5. Electrochemical Assay for the Signal-on Detection of Human DNA Methyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Muren, Natalie B.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2013-01-01

    Strategies to detect human DNA methyltransferases are needed, given that aberrant methylation by these enzymes is associated with cancer initiation and progression. Here we describe a non-radioactive, antibody-free, electrochemical assay in which methyltransferase activity on DNA-modified electrodes confers protection from restriction for signal-on detection. We implement this assay with a multiplexed chip platform and show robust detection of both bacterial (SssI) and human (Dnmt1) methyltransferase activity. Essential to work with human methyltransferases, our unique assay design allows activity measurements on both unmethylated and hemimethylated DNA substrates. We validate this assay by comparison with a conventional radioactive method. The advantages of electrochemistry over radioactivity and fluorescence make this assay an accessible and promising new approach for the sensitive, label-free detection of human methyltransferase activity. PMID:24164112

  6. A microsystem to assay lysosomal enzyme activities in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cabral, L; Unger, W; Boulton, M; Marshall, J

    1988-11-01

    A microsystem to assay the activity of lysosomal enzymes in a small number of cultured RPE cells is described. The activities of acid phosphatase, a-mannosidase, B-glucuronidase and N-acetyl-B-glucosaminidase were estimated in different human RPE cultures of varying passages. Some biochemical characteristics for each of the enzyme assays were studied including the effect of pH, the saturating concentrations of the appropriate substrates and the relationship between the enzyme activity and the number of cells assayed. The method presented is straightforward, avoids complicated tissue fractionation procedures and is able to estimate enzyme activities in as few as 10(4) cells. PMID:3243083

  7. Comparison of in vitro hormone activities of selected phthalates using reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ouxi; Du, Guizhen; Sun, Hong; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Yi; Song, Ling; Wang, Xinru

    2009-12-01

    Phthalates are widely used in the plastic industry and food packaging, imparting softness and flexibility to normally rigid plastic medical devices and children's toys. Even though phthalates display low general toxicity, there is increasing concern on the effects of endocrine system induced by some of phthalate compounds. The hormone activity of dibutyl phthalate (DBP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MBP) and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) were assessed using the luciferase reporter gene assays. The results showed that DBP, MBP and DEHP, not only exhibited potent antiandrogenic activity, with IC(50) value of 1.05x10(-6), 1.22x10(-7)M and exceeding 1x10(-4)M respectively, but also showed the androgenic activity with EC(50) value of 6.17x10(-6), 1.13x10(-5)M and exceeding 1x10(-4)M. We also found that all the three related chemicals possessed thyroid receptor (TR) antagonist activity with IC(50) of 1.31x10(-5), 2.77x10(-6)M and exceeding 1x10(-4)M respectively, and none showed TR agonist activity. These results indicate that TR might be the targets of industrial chemicals. In the ER mediate reporter gene assay, three chemicals showed no agonistic activity except for DBP, which appeared weakly estrogenic at the concentration of 1.0x10(-4)M. Together, the findings demonstrate that the three phthalates could simultaneously disrupt the function of two or more hormonal receptors. Therefore, these phthalates should be considered in risk assessments for human health.

  8. In Vitro Assay to Measure Phosphatidylethanolamine Methyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zufferey, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferases are biosynthetic enzymes that catalyze the transfer of one or more methyl group(s) from S-adenosyl-L-methionine onto phosphatidylethanolamine, monomethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine, or dimethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine to give either monomethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine, dimethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylcholine. These enzymes are ubiquitous in animal cells, fungi, and are also found in approximately 10% of bacteria. They fulfill various important functions in cell physiology beyond their direct role in lipid metabolism such as in insulin resistance, diabetes, atherosclerosis, cell growth, or virulence. The present manuscript reports on a simple cell-free enzymatic assay that measures the transfer of tritiated methyl group(s) from S-[Methyl-3H]adenosyl-L-methionine onto phosphatidylethanolamine using whole cell extracts as an enzyme source. The resulting methylated forms of phosphatidylethanolamine are hydrophobic and thus, can be separated from water soluble S-[Methyl-3H]adenosyl-L-methionine by organic extraction. This assay can potentially be applied to any other cell types and used to test inhibitors/drugs specific to a phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase of interest without the need to purify the enzyme. PMID:26780155

  9. Urolithins display both antioxidant and pro-oxidant activities depending on assay system and conditions.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Tuija; Kallio, Johanna; Jaakkola, Mari; Mäki, Marianne; Kilpeläinen, Pekka; Virtanen, Vesa

    2013-11-13

    The biological effects of polyphenolic ellagitannins are mediated by their intestinal metabolites, urolithins. This study investigated redox properties of urolithins A and B using ORAC assay, three cell-based assays, copper-initiated pro-oxidant activity (CIPA) assay, and cyclic voltammetry. Urolithins were strong antioxidants in the ORAC assay, but mostly pro-oxidants in cell-based assays, although urolithin A was an antioxidant in cell culture medium. Parent compound ellagic acid was a strong extracellular antioxidant, but showed no response in the intracellular assay. The CIPA assay confirmed the pro-oxidant activity of ellagitannin metabolites. In the cell proliferation assay, urolithins but not ellagic acid decreased growth and metabolism of HepG2 liver cells. In cyclic voltammetry, the oxidation of urolithin A was partly reversible, but that of urolithin B was irreversible. These results illustrate how strongly measured redox properties depend on the employed assay system and conditions and emphasize the importance of studying pro-oxidant and antioxidant activities in parallel.

  10. Californium interrogation prompt neutron (CIPN) instrument for non-destructive assay of spent nuclear fuel-Design concept and experimental demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzlova, D.; Menlove, H. O.; Rael, C. D.; Trellue, H. R.; Tobin, S. J.; Park, Se-Hwan; Oh, Jong-Myeong; Lee, Seung-Kyu; Ahn, Seong-Kyu; Kwon, In-Chan; Kim, Ho-Dong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of the first experimental demonstration of the Californium Interrogation Prompt Neutron (CIPN) instrument developed within a multi-year effort launched by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel Project of the United States Department of Energy. The goals of this project focused on developing viable non-destructive assay techniques with capabilities to improve an independent verification of spent fuel assembly characteristics. For this purpose, the CIPN instrument combines active and passive neutron interrogation, along with passive gamma-ray measurements, to provide three independent observables. This paper describes the initial feasibility demonstration of the CIPN instrument, which involved measurements of four pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies with different levels of burnup and two initial enrichments. The measurements were performed at the Post-Irradiation Examination Facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Institute in the Republic of Korea. The key aim of the demonstration was to evaluate CIPN instrument performance under realistic deployment conditions, with the focus on a detailed assessment of systematic uncertainties that are best evaluated experimentally. The measurements revealed good positioning reproducibility, as well as a high degree of insensitivity of the CIPN instrument's response to irregularities in a radial burnup profile. Systematic uncertainty of individual CIPN instrument signals due to assembly rotation was found to be <4.5%, even for assemblies with fairly extreme gradients in the radial burnup profile. These features suggest that the CIPN instrument is capable of providing a good representation of assembly average characteristics, independent of assembly orientation in the instrument.

  11. Adult Basic Learning in an Activity Center: A Demonstration Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metropolitan Adult Education Program, San Jose, CA.

    Escuela Amistad, an activity center in San Jose, California, is now operating at capacity, five months after its origin. Average daily attendance has been 125 adult students, 18-65, most of whom are females of Mexican-American background. Activities and services provided by the center are: instruction in English as a second language, home…

  12. Antiviral activity of a Rac GEF inhibitor characterized with a sensitive HIV/SIV fusion assay

    SciTech Connect

    Pontow, Suzanne; Harmon, Brooke; Campbell, Nancy; Ratner, Lee

    2007-11-10

    A virus-dependent fusion assay was utilized to examine the activity of a panel of HIV-1, -2, and SIV isolates of distinct coreceptor phenotypes. This assay allowed identification of entry inhibitors, and characterization of an antagonist of a Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor, as an inhibitor of HIV-mediated fusion.

  13. Assays to measure the activation of membrane tyrosine kinase receptors: focus on cellular methods.

    PubMed

    Minor, Lisa K

    2003-09-01

    Many methods have been explored as means to measure the activation and inhibition of tyrosine kinase receptors, in vitro using the isolated kinase domain, and in living cells. Kinase activity has been measured in enzyme assays using a peptide substrate, but with different detection systems. These include the radioactive FlashPlate assay, the fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay, the dissociation-enhance lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA) and other formats. These methods have successfully identified inhibitors of receptor activity. Cell-based assays have recently emerged to measure receptor activation and inhibition. When membrane tyrosine kinase receptors become activated, they increase their state of phosphorylation. This phosphorylation may lead to an increase in tyrosine kinase-specific activity. Methods have been developed that take advantage of these properties. These include measuring the ligand-stimulated total tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor using a DELFIA or an ELISA assay, measuring ligand-stimulated enzyme activation of the receptor by quantifying enzyme activity, and dimerization of the activated receptor using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). Although cell-based assays are still in their infancy, these techniques may prove a valuable addition to the receptor screening strategy.

  14. Air Pollution and Weather: Activities and Demonstrations for Science Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Henry S.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses a number of concepts (turbulence, dispersion, vertical temperature distribution, atmospheric stability and instability, and inversions) which are prerequisite to understanding how weather affects air quality. Describes classroom demonstrations effective in introducing these concepts to students at the elementary, secondary and college…

  15. Design of benign matrix drums for the non-destructive assay performance demonstration program for the National TRU Program

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, G.K.

    1996-09-01

    Regulatory compliance programs associated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program) require the collection of waste characterization data of known quality to support repository performance assessment, permitting, and associated activities. Blind audit samples, referred to as PDP (performance demonstration program) samples, are devices used in the NDA PDP program to acquire waste NDA system performance data per defined measurement routines. As defined under the current NDA PDP Program Plan, a PDP sample consists of a DOT 17C 55-gallon PDP matrix drum configured with insertable radioactive standards, working reference materials (WRMs). The particular manner in which the matrix drum and PDP standard(s) are combined is a function of the waste NDA system performance test objectives of a given cycle. The scope of this document is confined to the design of the PDP drum radioactive standard internal support structure, the matrix type and the as installed configuration. The term benign is used to designate a matrix possessing properties which are nominally non-interfering to waste NDA measurement techniques. Measurement interference sources are technique specific but include attributes such as: high matrix density, heterogeneous matrix distributions, matrix compositions containing high moderator/high Z element concentrations, etc. To the extent practicable the matrix drum design should not unduly bias one NDA modality over another due to the manner in which the matrix drum configuration manifests itself to the measurement system. To this end the PDP matrix drum configuration and composition detailed below is driven primarily by the intent to minimize the incorporation of matrix attributes known to interfere with fundamental waste NDA modalities, i.e. neutron and gamma based techniques.

  16. ACTIVE SOIL DEPRESSURIZATION (ASD) DEMONSTRATION IN A LARGE BUILDING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the feasibility of implementing radon resistant construction techniques -- especially active soil depressurization (ASD) -- in new large buildings in Florida. Indoor radon concentrations and radon entry were monitored in a finished bui...

  17. Demonstration of the invariance principle for active sonar.

    PubMed

    Quijano, Jorge E; Zurk, Lisa M; Rouseff, Daniel

    2008-03-01

    Active sonar systems can provide good target detection potential but are limited in shallow water environments by the high level of reverberation produced by the interaction between the acoustic signal and the ocean bottom. The nature of the reverberation is highly variable and depends critically on the ocean and seabed properties, which are typically poorly known. This has motivated interest in techniques that are invariant to the environment. In passive sonar, a scalar parameter termed the waveguide invariant, has been introduced to describe the slope of striations observed in lofargrams. In this work, an invariant for active sonar is introduced. This active invariant is shown to be present in the time-frequency structure observed in sonar data from the Malta Plateau, and the structure agrees with results produced from normal mode simulations. The application of this feature in active tracking algorithms is discussed.

  18. [Methods of hygromycin B phosphotransferase activity assay in transgenic plant].

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Qin; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2004-07-01

    Hygromycin B phosphotransferase (HPT) is a widely used selectable marker protein of transgenic plant. Detection of its activity is critical to studies on the development of various transgenic plants, silence of inserted gene, marker-free system development and safety assessment of transgenic food. In this paper, several methods for detecting the activity of this enzyme were reviewed.

  19. FRET-based protein-DNA binding assay for detection of active NF-kappa B

    SciTech Connect

    Giannetti, Ambra; Baldini, Francesco; Wabuyele, Musundi B; Vo Dinh, Tuan

    2006-01-01

    A novel method to detect the active form of NF-{kappa}B, a transcription factor regulating a battery of inflammatory genes and playing a fundamental role in the development of numerous pathological states, has been developed. In the present work, we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study DNA-protein binding interaction taking place between double-strand (ds) DNA immobilized in a glass capillary wall and p50 proteins. For this purpose, we developed a regenerable FRET-based system comprising of a single-strand (ss) DNA with auto-complementary sequence that is end-labeled with Cy5 dye and is highly specific for p50 proteins. The proteins were labeled with a Black Hole Quencher (BHQ-3) to be used as FRET pair. The interaction of p50/p50 homodimer active form with its DNA binding site was demonstrated by both electrophoretic mobility shift assays and FRET studies. These preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility of the FRET-based DNA technique to detect the active form of NF-{kappa}B protein with 90% detection efficiency. In addition, we show that the system is stable and highly regenerable.

  20. Photography by Cameras Integrated in Smartphones as a Tool for Analytical Chemistry Represented by an Butyrylcholinesterase Activity Assay.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2015-06-11

    Smartphones are popular devices frequently equipped with sensitive sensors and great computational ability. Despite the widespread availability of smartphones, practical uses in analytical chemistry are limited, though some papers have proposed promising applications. In the present paper, a smartphone is used as a tool for the determination of cholinesterasemia i.e., the determination of a biochemical marker butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). The work should demonstrate suitability of a smartphone-integrated camera for analytical purposes. Paper strips soaked with indoxylacetate were used for the determination of BChE activity, while the standard Ellman's assay was used as a reference measurement. In the smartphone-based assay, BChE converted indoxylacetate to indigo blue and coloration was photographed using the phone's integrated camera. A RGB color model was analyzed and color values for the individual color channels were determined. The assay was verified using plasma samples and samples containing pure BChE, and validated using Ellmans's assay. The smartphone assay was proved to be reliable and applicable for routine diagnoses where BChE serves as a marker (liver function tests; some poisonings, etc.). It can be concluded that the assay is expected to be of practical applicability because of the results' relevance.

  1. Photography by Cameras Integrated in Smartphones as a Tool for Analytical Chemistry Represented by an Butyrylcholinesterase Activity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Smartphones are popular devices frequently equipped with sensitive sensors and great computational ability. Despite the widespread availability of smartphones, practical uses in analytical chemistry are limited, though some papers have proposed promising applications. In the present paper, a smartphone is used as a tool for the determination of cholinesterasemia i.e., the determination of a biochemical marker butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). The work should demonstrate suitability of a smartphone-integrated camera for analytical purposes. Paper strips soaked with indoxylacetate were used for the determination of BChE activity, while the standard Ellman’s assay was used as a reference measurement. In the smartphone-based assay, BChE converted indoxylacetate to indigo blue and coloration was photographed using the phone’s integrated camera. A RGB color model was analyzed and color values for the individual color channels were determined. The assay was verified using plasma samples and samples containing pure BChE, and validated using Ellmans’s assay. The smartphone assay was proved to be reliable and applicable for routine diagnoses where BChE serves as a marker (liver function tests; some poisonings, etc.). It can be concluded that the assay is expected to be of practical applicability because of the results’ relevance. PMID:26110404

  2. Interlaboratory comparison of four in vitro assays for assessing androgenic and antiandrogenic activity of environmental chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Körner, Wolfgang; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Térouanne, Béatrice; Ma, Risheng; Wieloch, Carise; Schlumpf, Margret; Sultan, Charles; Soto, Ana M

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated and compared four in vitro assays to detect androgen agonists and antagonists in an international interlaboratory study. Laboratory 1 used a cell proliferation assay (assay 1) with human mammary carcinoma cells stably transfected with human androgen receptor. The other laboratories used reporter gene assays, two based on stably transfected human prostate carcinoma cells (assay 2) or human mammary carcinoma cells (assay 4), and the third based on transient transfection of Chinese hamster ovary cells (assay 3). Four laboratories received four coded compounds and two controls: two steroidal androgens, two antiandrogens, an androgenic control, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and an antiandrogenic control, bicalutamide (ICI 176,334). All laboratories correctly detected the androgenic activity of 4-androsten-3,17-dione and 17alpha-methyltestosterone. For both compounds, the calculated androgenic potencies relative to the positive control (RAPs) remained within one order of magnitude. However, laboratory 3 calculated a 50-fold higher RAP for 4-androsten-3,17-dione. All assays detected and quantified the antiandrogenic effect of vinclozolin [median inhibitory concentration (IC50) values ranging from 1.1 times symbol 10(-7) M to 4.7 times symbol 10(-7) M]. In assays 2 and 3, vinclozolin showed partial androgenic activity at the highest concentrations tested. For vinclozolin, calculated antiandrogenic potencies relative to bicalutamide (RAAPs) differed no more than a factor of 10, and IC50 values matched those of bicalutamide. Similarly, we found antiandrogenic activity for tris-(4-chlorophenyl)methanol. RAAP values were between 0.086 and 0.37. Three assays showed cytotoxicity for this compound at or above 1 times symbol 10(-5) M. In summary, all assays proved sensitive screening tools to detect and quantify androgen receptor-mediated androgenic and antiandrogenic effects of these chemicals accurately, with coefficients of variation between 8 and 90%. PMID

  3. Measurement of factor v activity in human plasma using a microplate coagulation assay.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Derek; Levit, Irina; Samis, John A

    2012-09-09

    In response to injury, blood coagulation is activated and results in generation of the clotting protease, thrombin. Thrombin cleaves fibrinogen to fibrin which forms an insoluble clot that stops hemorrhage. Factor V (FV) in its activated form, FVa, is a critical cofactor for the protease FXa and accelerator of thrombin generation during fibrin clot formation as part of prothrombinase (1, 2). Manual FV assays have been described (3, 4), but they are time consuming and subjective. Automated FV assays have been reported (5-7), but the analyzer and reagents are expensive and generally provide only the clot time, not the rate and extent of fibrin formation. The microplate platform is preferred for measuring enzyme-catalyzed events because of convenience, time, cost, small volume, continuous monitoring, and high-throughput (8, 9). Microplate assays have been reported for clot lysis (10), platelet aggregation (11), and coagulation Factors (12), but not for FV activity in human plasma. The goal of the method was to develop a microplate assay that measures FV activity during fibrin formation in human plasma. This novel microplate method outlines a simple, inexpensive, and rapid assay of FV activity in human plasma. The assay utilizes a kinetic microplate reader to monitor the absorbance change at 405 nm during fibrin formation in human plasma (Figure 1) (13). The assay accurately measures the time, initial rate, and extent of fibrin clot formation. It requires only μl quantities of plasma, is complete in 6 min, has high-throughput, is sensitive to 24-80 pM FV, and measures the amount of unintentionally activated (1-stage activity) and thrombin-activated FV (2-stage activity) to obtain a complete assessment of its total functional activity (2-stage activity - 1-stage activity). Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired coagulopathy that most often develops from pre-existing infections (14). DIC is associated with a poor prognosis and increases mortality

  4. An Experiential Learning Activity Demonstrating Normal and Phobic Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canu, Will H.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an activity for an undergraduate abnormal psychology course that used student-generated data to illustrate normal versus clinically significant anxiety responses related to specific phobias. Students (N = 37) viewed 14 images of low- or high-anxiety valence and rated their subjective response to each. Discussion in a…

  5. Evaluation of the oxidase like activity of nanoceria and its application in colorimetric assays.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Akhtar; Cunningham, Jessica; Bulbul, Gonca; Andreescu, Silvana

    2015-07-23

    Nanomaterial-based enzyme mimics have attracted considerable interest in chemical analysis as alternative catalysts to natural enzymes. However, the conditions in which such particles can replace biological catalysts and their selectivity and reactivity profiles are not well defined. This work explored the oxidase like properties of nanoceria particles in the development of colorimetric assays for the detection of dopamine and catechol. Selectivity of the system with respect to several phenolic compounds, the effect of interferences and real sample analysis are discussed. The conditions of use such as buffer composition, selectivity, pH, reaction time and particle type are defined. Detection limits of 1.5 and 0.2μM were obtained with nanoceria for dopamine and catechol. The same assay could be used as a general sensing platform for the detection of other phenolics. However, the sensitivity of the method varies significantly with the particle type, buffer composition, pH and with the structure of the phenolic compound. The results demonstrate that nanoceria particles can be used for the development of cost effective and sensitive methods for the detection of these compounds. However, the selection of the particle system and experimental conditions is critical for achieving high sensitivity. Recommendations are provided on the selection of the particle system and reaction conditions to maximize the oxidase like activity of nanoceria. PMID:26231899

  6. Paraoxonase-1 Enzyme Activity Assay for Clinical Samples: Validation and Correlation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Garelnabi, Mahdi; Younis, Abdelmoneim

    2015-01-01

    Background Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) enzyme is reported in various types of tissues and linked to numerous pathophysiological disorders. It is a potential biomarker in many pathological conditions such as cardiovascular diseases. Material/Methods We conducted several small-scale studies to evaluate PON1 performance as affected by sample types, storage, and interferences. We also carried out short-term studies to compare the performance of the widely used PON1 assay to the similar commercially available PON1 kit assay method; sample size for the method comparison was N=40, and the number varied for other validation experiments. Results Our studies using various types of anticoagulants show that samples collected in tubes with NaF, citrate, EDTA, clot activator, and sodium heparin have increased PON1 levels that are 49%, 24.5%, 19.8%, 11.4%, and 8%, respectively, higher compared to serum samples collected in plain tubes. However, samples collected in lithium heparin tubes demonstrated 10.4% lower PON1 levels compared to serum collected in plain tubes. Biological interference such as hemolysis has little effect on PON1 levels; however, samples spiked with lipids have shown 13% lower PON 1 levels. Our studies comparing the PON1 method commonly available for PON1 assay and a similar non-ELISA commercially available PON1 kit method showed a weak Spearman correlation coefficient of R2=0.40 for the range of 104.9–245.6 U/L. Conclusions The current study provides new validation data on enzyme PON1 performance. While no appreciable change was seen with storage, samples type affects the enzyme performance. Our results should encourage additional clinical studies to investigate other aspects of factors known to affect PON1 enzyme function and performance. PMID:25814092

  7. A Bioluminescence Assay System for Imaging Metal Cationic Activities in Urban Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi; Murata, Shingo; Nakayama, Takayoshi; Miller, Simon; Senda, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    A bioluminescence-based assay system was fabricated for an efficient determination of the activities of air pollutants. The following four components were integrated into this assay system: (1) an 8-channel assay platform uniquely designed for simultaneously sensing multiple optical samples, (2) single-chain probes illuminating toxic chemicals or heavy metal cations from air pollutants, (3) a microfluidic system for circulating medium mimicking the human body, and (4) the software manimulating the above system. In the protocol, we briefly introduce how to integrate the components into the system and the application to the illumination of the metal cationic activities in air pollutants. PMID:27424913

  8. A Bioluminescence Assay System for Imaging Metal Cationic Activities in Urban Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi; Murata, Shingo; Nakayama, Takayoshi; Miller, Simon; Senda, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    A bioluminescence-based assay system was fabricated for an efficient determination of the activities of air pollutants. The following four components were integrated into this assay system: (1) an 8-channel assay platform uniquely designed for simultaneously sensing multiple optical samples, (2) single-chain probes illuminating toxic chemicals or heavy metal cations from air pollutants, (3) a microfluidic system for circulating medium mimicking the human body, and (4) the software manimulating the above system. In the protocol, we briefly introduce how to integrate the components into the system and the application to the illumination of the metal cationic activities in air pollutants.

  9. A limitation of the continuous spectrophotometric assay for the measurement of myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinyi; Hernick, Marcy

    2011-10-15

    Myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS) catalyzes the conversion of glucose-6-phosphate to myo-inositol-1-phosphate. The reaction catalyzed by MIPS is the first step in the biosynthesis of inositol and inositol-containing molecules that serve important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Consequently, MIPS is a target for the development of therapeutic agents for the treatment of infectious diseases and bipolar disorder. We recently reported a continuous spectrophotometric method for measuring MIPS activity using a coupled assay that allows the rapid characterization of MIPS in a multiwell plate format. Here we validate the continuous assay as a high-throughput alternative for measuring MIPS activity and report on one limitation of this assay-the inability to examine the effect of divalent metal ions (at high concentrations) on MIPS activity. In addition, we demonstrate that the activity of MIPS from Arabidopsis thaliana is moderately enhanced by the addition Mg(2+) and is not enhanced by other divalent metal ions (Zn(2+) and Mn(2+)), consistent with what has been observed for other eukaryotic MIPS enzymes. Our findings suggest that the continuous assay is better suited for characterizing eukaryotic MIPS enzymes that require monovalent cations as cofactors than for characterizing bacterial or archeal MIPS enzymes that require divalent metal ions as cofactors. PMID:21729692

  10. A zebrafish scale assay to monitor dioxin-like activity in surface water samples.

    PubMed

    Pelayo, Sergi; López-Roldán, Ramón; González, Susana; Casado, Marta; Raldúa, Demetrio; Cortina, Jose Luis; Piña, Benjamin

    2011-10-01

    New regulations on water quality require a close control of the possible biological activities known or unexpected pollutants may bring about. We present here a protocol based on the direct exposure of zebrafish to river water and the analysis of expression of specific genes in their scales to determine the presence of compounds with dioxin-like biological activity. The method does not require the killing of animals and allows detection of the biological activity after a single day of exposure. When tested, the method with real samples from the Llobregat River, clear temporal and spatial variations were observed, demonstrating its suitability for monitoring natural variations in water quality linked to specific discharges. High biological activities were unrelated to the currently checked water quality parameters (macropollutants, turbidity, TOC, etc.), but they did correlate with the presence of micropollutants (estrogens, detergents, etc.) related to domestic and/or industrial runoffs. The scale assay therefore provides a new tool to evaluate water quality changes that cannot be easily derived from the existing standard analytical procedures. It ranks among the very few described protocols able to detect biological effects from natural water samples, without a pre-concentration step, and after only 24 h of exposure. PMID:21822775

  11. Demonstrating the Role of Anticholinergic Activity in a Mood Disorder.

    PubMed

    Hori, Koji; Konishi, Kimiko; Hanashi, Takahiro; Tani, Masayuki; Tomioka, Hiroi; Kitajima, Yuka; Akashi, Norihisa; Inamoto, Atsuko; Kurosawa, Kenzo; Hasegawa, Sayaka; Izuno, Takuji; Kikuchi, Nodoka; Hosoi, Misa; Hachisu, Mitsugu

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 54-year-old woman presenting with amnesia, apathy, work-related difficulties and mental stress. At presentation, her Mini-Mental State Examination score was 27 and her serum anticholinergic activity (SAA) was positive without medication or recent physical illnesses. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging revealed mild atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes, with a relatively intact hippocampus. Consequently, we diagnosed mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease and prescribed a cholinesterase inhibitor (donepezil, 10 mg/day); her SAA fully disappeared and clinical symptoms partially resolved. Addition of duloxetine coupled with environmental adjustments caused her cognitive function to return to a normal level, so we diagnosed pseudodementia due to depression. In this case, we believe that the simultaneous cholinergic burden and mental stress led to positive SAA, which made it reasonable to prescribe a cholinesterase inhibitor to ameliorate the associated acetylcholine hypoactivity. We believe that it is essential to recognize the importance of prescribing a cholinesterase inhibitor for specific patients, even those with pseudodementia, to control their clinical symptoms. Moreover, SAA might be a useful biomarker for identifying this subgroup of patients. We propose that anticholinergic activity appears endogenously in mood disorders (depression and bipolar disorder) and set out our rationalization for this hypothesis. PMID:26138496

  12. A sensitive and facile assay for the measurement of activated protein C activity levels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Orthner, C L; Kolen, B; Drohan, W N

    1993-05-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is a serine protease which plays an important role as a naturally occurring antithrombotic enzyme. APC, which is formed by thrombin-catalyzed limited proteolysis of the zymogen protein C, functions as an anticoagulant by proteolytic inactivation of the coagulation cofactors VIIIa and Va: APC is inhibited by several members of the serpin family as well a by alpha 2-macroglobulin. APC is being developed as a therapeutic for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis. We have developed an assay to quantify circulating levels of enzymatically active APC during its administration to patients, in healthy individuals, and in various disease states. This assay utilizes an EDTA-dependent anti-protein C monoclonal antibody (Mab) 7D7B10 to capture both APC and protein C from plasma, prepared from blood collected in an anticoagulant supplemented with the reversible inhibitor p-aminobenzamidine. Mab 7D7B10-derivatized agarose beads are added to the wells of a 96-well filtration plate, equilibrated with Tris-buffered saline, and incubated for 10 min with 200 microliters of plasma. After washing, APC and protein C are eluted from the immunosorbent beads with a calcium-containing buffer into the wells of a 96-well microtiter plate containing antithrombin III (ATIII) and heparin. The amidolytic activity of APC is then measured on a kinetic plate reader following the addition of L-pyroglutamyl-L-prolyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide (S-2366) substrate. The rate of substrate hydrolysis was proportional to APC concentration over a 200-fold concentration range (5.0 to 1,000 ng/ml) when measured continuously over a 15 to 30 min time period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Apolipoprotein A-I from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) demonstrates antibacterial activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Johnston, L Danielle; Brown, Gwynne; Gauthier, David; Reece, Kimberly; Kator, Howard; Van Veld, Peter

    2008-10-01

    HDL and apolipoprotein A-I from teleostean fishes demonstrate in vitro activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we purified ApoA-1 from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) plasma and examined its in vitro antibacterial activity against Streptococcus sp., Escherichia coli, and Mycobacterium marinum. In addition, we obtained sequence for a putative striped bass ApoA-1 gene, which when translated contained the identical sequence generated from N-terminal sequencing of the purified ApoA-1. The predicted secondary and tertiary structures contained the characteristic proline residues and high alpha-helical content conserved between mammals and fishes. Purified ApoA-1 exhibited antibacterial activity against the bacteria assayed. Concentrations of 125 microg/mL for E. coli, 250 microg/mL for Streptococcus sp., and 250 microg/mL for M. marinum, inhibited bacterial growth by 50% compared to control. ApoA-1 plasma concentrations in experimental and wild fish ranged from undetectable levels to greater than 5 mg/mL, indicating that striped bass ApoA-1 is an effective antibacterial agent at concentrations below the range of physiological concentrations in striped bass plasma. We therefore conclude that ApoA-1 could play a role in innate defense against bacterial pathogens in striped bass.

  14. Inhibition of Cathepsin Activity in a Cell-Based Assay by a Light-Activated Ruthenium Compound

    PubMed Central

    Respondek, Tomasz; Sharma, Rajgopal; Herroon, Mackenzie K.; Garner, Robert N.; Knoll, Jessica D.; Cueny, Eric; Turro, Claudia; Podgorski, Izabela; Kodanko, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    Light-activated inhibition of cathepsin activity was demonstrated with in a cell-based assay. Inhibitors of cathepsin K, Cbz-Leu-NHCH2CN (2) and Cbz-Leu-Ser(OBn)-CN (3), were caged within the complexes cis-[Ru(bpy)2(2)2]Cl2 (4) and cis-[Ru(bpy)2(3)2](BF4)2 (5), where bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine, as 1:1 mixtures of Δ- and Λ stereoisomers. Complexes 4 and 5 were characterized by 1H NMR, IR and UV-vis spectroscopies and electrospray mass spectrometry. Photochemical experiments confirm that 4 releases two molecules of 2 upon exposure to visible light for 15 min, whereas release of 3 by 5 requires longer irradiation times. IC50 determinations against purified cathepsin K under light and dark conditions with 4 and 5 confirm that inhibition is enhanced from 35 to 88-fold, respectively, upon irradiation with visible light. No apparent toxicity was observed for 4 in the absence or presence of irradiation in bone marrow macrophage (BMM) or PC-3 cells, as judged by the MTT assay, at concentrations up to 10 μM. Compound 5 is well tolerated at lower concentrations (<1 μM) but does show growth inhibitory effects at higher concentrations. Confocal microscopy experiments show that 4 reduces intracellular cathepsin activity in osteoclasts with light activation. These results support further development of caged nitrile-based inhibitors as chemical tools for investigating spatial aspects of proteolysis within living systems. PMID:24729544

  15. Assessing Kinase Activity in Plants with In-Gel Kinase Assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengcheng; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The in-gel protein kinase assay is a powerful method to measure the protein phosphorylation activity of specific protein kinases. Any protein substrate can be embedded in polyacrylamide gels where they can be phosphorylated by protein kinases that are separated in the gel under denaturing conditions and then renatured. The kinase activity can be visualized in situ in the gels by autoradiography. This method has been used to compare the activities of protein kinases in parallel samples or to identify their potential substrates. Here, we describe in detail an in-gel kinase assay to measure the activity of some protein kinases in plants.

  16. Active nondestructive assay of nuclear materials: principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gozani, Tsahi

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to present, coherently and comprehensively, the wealth of available but scattered information on the principles and applications of active nondestructive analysis (ANDA). Chapters are devoted to the following: background and overview; interactions of neutrons with matter; interactions of ..gamma..-rays with matter; neutron production and sources; ..gamma..-ray production and sources; effects of neutron and ..gamma..-ray transport in bulk media; signatures of neutron- and photon-induced fissions; neutron and photon detection systems and electronics; representative ANDA systems; and instrument analysis, calibration, and measurement control for ANDA. Each chapter has an introductory section describing the relationship of the topic of that chapter to ANDA. Each chapter ends with a section that summarizes the main results and conclusions of the chapter, and a reference list.

  17. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  18. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  19. Development and validation of a potentiometric biosensor assay for tylosin with demonstrated applicability for the detection of two other antimicrobial growth-promoter compounds in feedstuffs.

    PubMed

    Stead, S L; Wolodko-Cierniak, K B; Richmond, S F; Sharman, M; Driver, P; Teale, P; Leonardova, O; Purvis, D

    2011-01-01

    A potentiometric biosensor assay based on a commercially available polyclonal antibody was developed to detect tylosin residues in animal feed. The method can be used as a rapid (less than 45 min) laboratory-based procedure or as a portable field-test for the simultaneous measurement of up to 12 different samples. For both procedures the qualitative detection capability (CCβ) for tylosin was determined as 0.2 mg kg(-1) in a range of animal feeds with a measurement repeatability at concentrations between 0.2 and 4 mg kg(-1) of ≤13% coefficient of variation (%CV). The field-test format was capable of detecting tylosin residues at operating (external air) temperatures ranging between +4 and 37°C, although some reduction in signal was observed at the lower temperatures. The laboratory-based tylosin assay was evaluated using 16 medicated and 22 non-medicated feeds and was found to give comparable data with a confirmatory method based upon liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The potential to develop a multi-probe format assay for the simultaneous detection of tylosin, spiramycin and virginiamycin was also demonstrated. Cross-validation in a second laboratory showed the assay to be transferable, reliable and robust.

  20. beta-Galactosidase activity assay using far-red-shifted fluorescent substrate DDAOG.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haibiao; Zhang, Bin; Little, Garrick; Kovar, Joy; Chen, Huaxian; Xie, Wen; Schutz-Geschwender, Amy; Olive, D Michael

    2009-03-01

    beta-Galactosidase (beta-gal) is commonly used as a reporter gene in biological research, and a wide variety of substrates have been developed to assay its activity. One substrate, 9H-(1,3-dichloro-9,9-dimethylacridin-2-one-7-yl) beta-d-galactopyranoside (DDAOG), can be cleaved by beta-gal to produce 7-hydroxy-9H(I,3-dichloro-9,9-dimethylacridin-2-one) (DDAO). On excitation, DDAO generates a far-red-shifted fluorescent signal. Using this substrate, we developed a beta-gal activity assay method. The DDAO signal was stable for at least 18h. The signal intensity was linearly related to both the enzyme amount and substrate concentration. An optimized buffer for the beta-gal/DDAOG assay was also formulated. When compared with the colorimetric substrate o-nitrophenyl-beta-d-galactopyranoside (ONPG), the signal-to-background ratio of the DDAOG method was approximately 12-fold higher. The beta-gal/DDAOG assay method was also tested in transiently transfected cells employing both pharmacologically and genetically inducible gene expression systems. The ability to detect signal induction is comparable to a similar assay using luciferase as the signal generating moiety. The beta-gal/DDAOG assay method should provide a fluorescent reporter assay system for the wide variety of beta-gal systems currently in use. PMID:19103143

  1. A novel prothrombin time assay for assessing the anticoagulant activity of oral factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Yu Chen; Wang, Zhaoqing; Knabb, Robert M

    2013-09-01

    Conventional prothrombin time (PT) assays have limited sensitivity and dynamic range in monitoring the anticoagulant activity of direct factor Xa inhibitors. Hence, new assays are needed. We modified a PT assay by adding calcium chloride (CaCl2) to the thromboplastin reagent to increase assay dynamic range and improve sensitivity. Effects of calcium and sodium ion concentrations, and sample handling, were evaluated to optimize assay performance. Increasing concentrations of calcium ions produced progressive increases in PT across the factor Xa inhibitor concentrations of 0 to 2500 nmol/L for razaxaban and apixaban. The greatest effect was seen when the thromboplastin reagent was diluted 1:2.25 with 100 mmol/L CaCl2 (thus selected for routine use). The optimized assay showed an interassay precision of 1.5 to 9.3 percentage coefficient of variation (%CV) for razaxaban and 3.1 to 4.6 %CV for apixaban. We conclude that the modified PT assay is likely to be suitable as a pharmacodynamic marker for activity at therapeutic concentrations of factor Xa inhibitors.

  2. A highly sensitive telomerase activity assay that eliminates false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    An assay for telomerase activity based on asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (A-PCR) on magnetic beads (MBs) and subsequent application of cycling probe technology (CPT) is described. In this assay, the telomerase reaction products are immobilized on MBs, which are then washed to remove PCR inhibitors that are commonly found in clinical samples. The guanine-rich sequences (5'-(TTAGGG)n-3') of the telomerase reaction products are then preferentially amplified by A-PCR, and the amplified products are subsequently detected via CPT, where a probe RNA with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3' end is hydrolyzed by RNase H in the presence of the target DNA. The catalyst-mediated cleavage of the probe RNA enhances fluorescence from the 5' end of the probe. The assay allowed us to successfully detect HeLa cells selectively over normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) cells. Importantly, this selectivity produced identical results with regard to detection of HeLa cells in the absence and presence of excess NHDF cells; therefore, this assay can be used for practical clinical applications. The lower limit of detection for HeLa cells was 50 cells, which is lower than that achieved with a conventional telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay. Our assay also eliminated false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors. Furthermore, we show that this assay is appropriate for screening among G-quadruplex ligands to find those that inhibit telomerase activity.

  3. A highly sensitive telomerase activity assay that eliminates false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    An assay for telomerase activity based on asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (A-PCR) on magnetic beads (MBs) and subsequent application of cycling probe technology (CPT) is described. In this assay, the telomerase reaction products are immobilized on MBs, which are then washed to remove PCR inhibitors that are commonly found in clinical samples. The guanine-rich sequences (5'-(TTAGGG)n-3') of the telomerase reaction products are then preferentially amplified by A-PCR, and the amplified products are subsequently detected via CPT, where a probe RNA with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3' end is hydrolyzed by RNase H in the presence of the target DNA. The catalyst-mediated cleavage of the probe RNA enhances fluorescence from the 5' end of the probe. The assay allowed us to successfully detect HeLa cells selectively over normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) cells. Importantly, this selectivity produced identical results with regard to detection of HeLa cells in the absence and presence of excess NHDF cells; therefore, this assay can be used for practical clinical applications. The lower limit of detection for HeLa cells was 50 cells, which is lower than that achieved with a conventional telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay. Our assay also eliminated false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors. Furthermore, we show that this assay is appropriate for screening among G-quadruplex ligands to find those that inhibit telomerase activity. PMID:24071983

  4. Suggested improvements to the standard filter paper assay used to measure cellulase activity.

    PubMed

    Coward-Kelly, Guillermo; Aiello-Mazzari, Cateryna; Kim, Sehoon; Granda, Cesar; Holtzapple, Mark

    2003-06-20

    Two suggestions can be found in the literature to improve the reproducibility of the Mandels' filter paper assay: add supplemental cellobiase and increase the boiling time for color development. Here we provide data that strongly supports adding supplemental cellobiase. Adding supplemental cellobiase increased assay response by 56%. Cellulases from different sources have different cellobiase activities, which would cause significant variation in the assay response. There is no need for additional boiling time-5 minutes is sufficient. For maximum reproducibility, it is essential that the water bath vigorously boil so that temperature excursions are minimized.

  5. Suggested improvements to the standard filter paper assay used to measure cellulase activity.

    PubMed

    Coward-Kelly, Guillermo; Aiello-Mazzari, Cateryna; Kim, Sehoon; Granda, Cesar; Holtzapple, Mark

    2003-06-20

    Two suggestions can be found in the literature to improve the reproducibility of the Mandels' filter paper assay: add supplemental cellobiase and increase the boiling time for color development. Here we provide data that strongly supports adding supplemental cellobiase. Adding supplemental cellobiase increased assay response by 56%. Cellulases from different sources have different cellobiase activities, which would cause significant variation in the assay response. There is no need for additional boiling time-5 minutes is sufficient. For maximum reproducibility, it is essential that the water bath vigorously boil so that temperature excursions are minimized. PMID:12673775

  6. Heavy metal impurities impair the spectrophotometric assay of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Walbot, V

    1977-01-01

    An inverse relationship between the concentration of ribose 5-phosphate and apparent ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity was observed. The Lilley-Walker assay spectrophotometric assay, in which the 3-phosphoglyceric acid-dependent oxidation of reduced pyridine nucleotide is measured, is shown to be highly sensitive to inhibition by heavy metals. Analysis of the purity of reagents showed that ribose 5-phosphate is often contaminated with lead in sufficient quantity to impair the assay. This noncompetitive inhibition by ribose 5-phosphate is independent of the competitive inhibition of this substrate as an ATP sink as described by Slabas and Walker. A method for checking reagent purity and removing heavy metal contaminants is described.

  7. An evaluation of a genotoxicity assay with liver s9 for activation and luminescent bacteria for detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B. Thomas

    1992-01-01

    A new short-term in vitro genotoxicity assay with marine bioluminescent bacteria was evaluated for sensitivity and cost. Known under the trade name of Mutatox™, this assay is a simple and rapid screening tool that detects DNA-damaging substances (genotoxins) by measuring light output from an isolated dark mutant strain of the luminescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum. A positive response indicates the ability of the test chemical to restore the luminescent state in the dark mutant strain; the degree of light increase indicates the relative genotoxicity of the sample. In this study, the Mutatox assay with rat hepatic fractions (S9) as an exogenous metabolic activation system detected genotoxic activity with known progenotoxins: 2-acetamidofluorene, aflatoxin B1, 2-aminoanthracene, 2-aminofluorene, 2-aminonaphthalene, benzo[a]pyrene, 3-methyl-cholanthrene, and pyrene. Each chemical clearly demonstrated a dose response between 5.0 and 0.6 μg per tube. Known nongenotoxic controls carbofuran, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, malathion, simazine, and permethrin showed no genotoxic responses. The optimum assay conditions were determined to be rat S9 concentration of 0.4 mg/ml, preincubation at 37°C for 30 min, and 18 h incubation at 23°C. Genotoxicity data were obtained in <24 h. The Mutatox assay compared favorably in sensitivity with the Ames test; it was easier and more rapid to perform and, as a result, cost less. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value suggested that the Mutatox assay could be a valuable screening tool to monitor complex environmental samples for genotoxins.

  8. How Do Detergents Work? A Qualitative Assay to Measure Amylase Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novo, M. Teresa; Casanoves, Marina; Garcia-Vallvé, Santi; Pujadas, Gerard; Mulero, Miquel; Valls, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    We present a practical activity focusing on two main goals: to give learners the opportunity to experience how the scientific method works and to increase their knowledge about enzymes in everyday situations. The exercise consists of determining the amylase activity of commercial detergents. The methodology is based on a qualitative assay using a…

  9. A novel live cell assay to measure diacylglycerol lipase α activity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Praveen K.; Markwick, Rachel; Howell, Fiona V.; Williams, Gareth; Doherty, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Diacylglycerol lipase α (DAGLα) hydrolyses DAG to generate the principal endocannabinoid (eCB) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the central nervous system. DAGLα dependent cannabinoid (CB) signalling has been implicated in numerous processes including axonal growth and guidance, adult neurogenesis and retrograde signalling at the synapse. Recent studies have implicated DAGLα as an emerging drug target for several conditions including pain and obesity. Activity assays are critical to the drug discovery process; however, measurement of diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) activity using its native substrate generally involves low-throughput MS techniques. Some relatively high-throughput membrane based assays utilizing surrogate substrates have been reported, but these do not take into account the rate-limiting effects often associated with the ability of a drug to cross the cell membrane. In the present study, we report the development of a live cell assay to measure DAGLα activity. Two previously reported DAGLα surrogate substrates, p-nitrophenyl butyrate (PNPB) and 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl octanoate (DiFMUO), were evaluated for their ability to detect DAGLα activity in live cell assays using a human cell line stably expressing the human DAGLα transgene. Following optimization, the small molecule chromogenic substrate PNPB proved to be superior by providing lower background activity along with a larger signal window between transfected and parental cells when compared with the fluorogenic substrate DiFMUO. The assay was further validated using established DAGL inhibitors. In summary, the live cell DAGLα assay reported here offers an economical and convenient format to screen for novel inhibitors as part of drug discovery programmes and compliments previously reported high-throughput membrane based DAGL assays. PMID:27013337

  10. A novel live cell assay to measure diacylglycerol lipase α activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Praveen K; Markwick, Rachel; Howell, Fiona V; Williams, Gareth; Doherty, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Diacylglycerol lipase α (DAGLα) hydrolyses DAG to generate the principal endocannabinoid (eCB) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the central nervous system. DAGLα dependent cannabinoid (CB) signalling has been implicated in numerous processes including axonal growth and guidance, adult neurogenesis and retrograde signalling at the synapse. Recent studies have implicated DAGLα as an emerging drug target for several conditions including pain and obesity. Activity assays are critical to the drug discovery process; however, measurement of diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) activity using its native substrate generally involves low-throughput MS techniques. Some relatively high-throughput membrane based assays utilizing surrogate substrates have been reported, but these do not take into account the rate-limiting effects often associated with the ability of a drug to cross the cell membrane. In the present study, we report the development of a live cell assay to measure DAGLα activity. Two previously reported DAGLα surrogate substrates, p-nitrophenyl butyrate (PNPB) and 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl octanoate (DiFMUO), were evaluated for their ability to detect DAGLα activity in live cell assays using a human cell line stably expressing the human DAGLα transgene. Following optimization, the small molecule chromogenic substrate PNPB proved to be superior by providing lower background activity along with a larger signal window between transfected and parental cells when compared with the fluorogenic substrate DiFMUO. The assay was further validated using established DAGL inhibitors. In summary, the live cell DAGLα assay reported here offers an economical and convenient format to screen for novel inhibitors as part of drug discovery programmes and compliments previously reported high-throughput membrane based DAGL assays.

  11. Detection of sodium channel activators by a rapid fluorimetric microplate assay.

    PubMed

    Louzao, M C; Vieytes, M R; Yasumoto, T; Botana, L M

    2004-04-01

    Marine toxins such as brevetoxins and ciguatoxins are produced by dinoflagellates and can accumulate in seafood. These toxins affect humans through seafood consumption. Intoxication is mainly characterized by gastrointestinal and neurological disorders and, in most severe cases, by cardiovascular problems. To prevent the consumption of food contaminated with these toxins, shellfish have been tested by mouse bioassay. However, this method is expensive, time-consuming, and ethically questionable. The objective of this study was to use a recently developed fluorimetric microplate assay to rapidly detect brevetoxins and ciguatoxins. The method is based on the pharmacological effect of brevetoxins and ciguatoxins known to activate sodium channels and involves (i). the incubation of excitable cells in 96 well microtiter plates with the fluorescent dye bis-oxonol, whose distribution across the membrane is potential-dependent, and (ii). dose-dependent cell depolarization by the toxins. Our findings demonstrate that measuring changes in membrane potential induced by brevetoxins and ciguatoxins allowed their quantitation. Active toxins could be reliably detected at concentrations in the nanomolar range. The simplicity, sensitivity, and possibility of being automated provide the basis for development of a practical alternative to conventional testing for brevetoxins and ciguatoxins.

  12. Exonuclease I manipulating primer-modified gold nanoparticles for colorimetric telomerase activity assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Sijin; Pan, Wei; Liang, Qingcheng; Song, Xingyu

    2016-03-15

    Telomerase is a widely accepted cancer biomarker. The conventional method for telomerase activity assay, the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP), is time-consuming and susceptible to contaminants. Therefore, development of simple and sensitive strategies for telomerase detection is still a challenging subject. Here we develop a highly sensitive method for telomerase detection based on primer-modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs) manipulated by exonuclease I (Exo I). In the absence of telomerase, Exo I digests the substrate nucleic acid on the surface of GNPs, inducing the GNPs' aggregation. In the presence of telomerase, the telomerase elongation products which fold into G-quadruplex are resistant to the digestion of Exo I, and protect the GNPs from aggregation. By using this method, we can detect telomerase activity in 100 HL-60 cancer cells mL(-1) by naked eyes, and the detection limit is 29 HL-60 cells mL(-1). This method is very simple and reliable, without any separation and amplification procedure. We also demonstrate the feasibility of this protocol for screening of telomerase inhibitors as anticancer agents. This method is promising to be applied in early clinical diagnosis and drug discovery. PMID:26402592

  13. Neutron Activation Analysis for the Demonstration of Amphibolite Rock-Weathering Activity of a Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rades-Rohkohl, E.; Hirsch, P.; Fränzle, O.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis was employed in a survey of weathering abilities of rock surface microorganisms. A yeast isolated from an amphibolite of a megalithic grave was found actively to concentrate, in media and in or on cells, iron and other elements when grown in the presence of ground rock. This was demonstrated by comparing a spectrum of neutron-activated amphibolite powder (particle size, 50 to 100 μm) with the spectra of neutron-activated, lyophilized yeast cells which had grown with or without amphibolite powder added to different media. The most active yeast (IFAM 1171) did not only solubilize Fe from the rock powder, but significant amounts of Co, Eu, Yb, Ca, Ba, Sc, Lu, Cr, Th, and U were also mobilized. The latter two elements occurred as natural radioactive isotopes in this amphibolite. When the yeast cells were grown with neutron-activated amphibolite, the cells contained the same elements. Furthermore, the growth medium contained Fe, Co, and Eu which had been solubilized from the amphibolite. This indicates the presence, in this yeast strain, of active rockweathering abilities as well as of uptake mechanisms for solubilized rock components. PMID:16345472

  14. Determination of Pulmozyme (dornase alpha) stability using a kinetic colorimetric DNase I activity assay.

    PubMed

    Lichtinghagen, Ralf

    2006-07-01

    An enzymatic activity assay was developed for the determination of dornase alpha human recombinant desoxyribonuclease (DNase I) stability. The method was adapted from a colorimetric endpoint enzyme activity assay for DNase I based on the degradation of a DNA/methyl green complex. With the described modifications the kinetic measurement of enzyme activity is feasible on an automated analyzer system within a rather short time. The development of this assay was based on the need for reliable detection of a possible loss of enzyme activity after transferring the commercial therapeutic agent into sealed glass vials required for a placebo-controlled study. The measuring range of this stability test was from 0 to 3000 U/L corresponding to 0-120% of the original enzyme activity; CV values of control solutions inside the measuring range were between 3% and 5%. The enzyme activity decreased less than 15% during the observation period of 180 days. In conclusion the current kinetic assay is a reliable method for a simple time-saving determination of DNase I activity to test Pulmozyme stability as required for quality control. As dornase alpha is used for inhalation, this method also proved its reliability in testing DNase stability during aerosolization with new inhalation devices (e-flow). PMID:16682175

  15. Improved sensitivity of an acid sphingomyelinase activity assay using a C6:0 sphingomyelin substrate.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wei-Lien; Pacheco, Joshua; Cooper, Samantha; Kingsbury, Jonathan S; Hinds, John; Wolf, Pavlina; Oliva, Petra; Keutzer, Joan; Cox, Gerald F; Zhang, Kate

    2015-06-01

    Short-chain C6-sphingomyelin is an artificial substrate that was used in an acid sphingomyelinase activity assay for a pilot screening study of patients with Niemann-Pick disease types A and B. Using previously published multiplex and single assay conditions, normal acid sphingomyelinase activity levels (i.e. false negative results) were observed in two sisters with Niemann-Pick B who were compound heterozygotes for two missense mutations, p.C92W and p.P184L, in the SMPD1 gene. Increasing the sodium taurocholate detergent concentration in the assay buffer lowered the activity levels of these two patients into the range observed with other patients with clear separation from normal controls. PMID:26937397

  16. Activities of the OECD/NEA Expert Group on Assay Data for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, Ian C; Rugama, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    Management of spent nuclear fuel is a key issue for many NEA member countries. In nuclear criticality safety, the decision of many countries to advance burnup credit as part of their licensing strategy has heightened recent interest in experimental data needed to validate computer codes used in burnup credit calculations. This paper discusses recent activities of an Expert Group on assay data, formed under the OECD/NEA/NSC/WPNCS (Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety) to help coordinate isotopic assay data activities and facilitate international collaboration between NEA member countries developing or implementing burnup credit methodologies. Recent activities of the Expert Group are described, focusing on the planned expansion of the Spent Fuel Isotopic Composition Database (SFCOMPO), and preparation of a state-of-the-art report on assay data that includes sections on recommended radiochemical analysis methods, techniques, and lessons learned from previous experiments.

  17. A modified ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange assay for lipoxygenase activity in rice grains.

    PubMed

    Timabud, Tarinee; Sanitchon, Jirawat; Pongdontri, Paweena

    2013-12-01

    Ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange assay reagent was reformulated by using spectral analysis of ferric-xylenol orange complex to detect low concentrations of lipoxygenase rice grain products. Reducing the levels of ferrous sulphate and xylenol orange in the FOX reagent enabled the detection of low concentrations of hydroperoxy fatty acid derived from lipoxygenase activity in the range of 0.1-1.5 μM. Protein, substrate and time courses of the modified FOX assay were studied to determine lipoxygenase activity in rice grain. The assay was also applicable as a high throughput technique for comparisons of lipoxygenase activity from various rice varieties. This has important implications for rapid screening for low-lipoxygenase containing rice cultivars in rice breeding program and grain quality during storage.

  18. Evaluating the anti Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of Alpinia galanga (L.) Willd. axenically under reducing oxygen conditions and in intracellular assays

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In tuberculosis (TB), the steadily increasing bacterial resistance to existing drugs and latent TB continue to be major concerns. A combination of conventional drugs and plant derived therapeutics can serve to expand the antimicrobial spectrum, prevent the emergence of drug resistant mutants and minimize toxicity. Alpinia galanga, used in various traditional medicines, possesses broad spectrum antibacterial properties. The study was undertaken to assess the antimycobacterial potential of A. galanga in axenic (under aerobic and anaerobic conditions) and intracellular assays. Methods Phytochemical analysis was done using HPTLC. The acetone, aqueous and ethanolic extracts (1, 10, 25, 50 and 100 μg/ml) of A. galanga were tested axenically using Microplate Alamar Blue Assay (MABA) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) H37Rv and three drug sensitive and three multi drug resistant clinical isolates. The activity of the extracts was also evaluated intracellularly in A549 cell line against these strains. The extracts active under intracellular conditions were further tested in an axenic setup under reducing oxygen concentrations using only H37Rv. Results 1´ acetoxychavicol acetate, the reference standard used, was present in all the three extracts. The acetone and ethanolic extracts were active in axenic (aerobic and anaerobic) and intracellular assays. The aqueous extract did not demonstrate activity under the defined assay parameters. Conclusion A. galanga exhibits anti M.tb activity with multiple modes of action. Since the activity of the extracts was observed under reducing oxygen concentrations, it may be effective in treating the dormant and non-replicating bacteria of latent TB. Though the hypothesis needs further testing, A. galanga being a regular dietary component may be utilized in combination with the conventional TB therapy for enhanced efficacy. PMID:24592852

  19. An improved 96-well turbidity assay for T4 lysozyme activity.

    PubMed

    Toro, Tasha B; Nguyen, Thao P; Watt, Terry J

    2015-01-01

    T4 lysozyme (T4L) is an important model system for investigating the relationship between protein structure and function. Despite being extensively studied, a reliable, quantitative activity assay for T4L has not been developed. Here, we present an improved T4L turbidity assay as well as an affinity-based T4L expression and purification protocol. This assay is designed for 96-well format and utilizes conditions amenable for both T4L and other lysozymes. This protocol enables easy, efficient, and quantitative characterization of T4L variants and allows comparison between different lysozymes. Our method: •Is applicable for all lysozymes, with enhanced sensitivity for T4 lysozyme compared to other 96-well plate turbidity assays;•Utilizes standardized conditions for comparing T4 lysozyme variants and other lysozymes; and•Incorporates a simplified expression and purification protocol for T4 lysozyme.

  20. Zebrafish-based reporter gene assays reveal different estrogenic activities in river waters compared to a conventional human-derived assay.

    PubMed

    Sonavane, Manoj; Creusot, Nicolas; Maillot-Maréchal, Emmanuelle; Péry, Alexandre; Brion, François; Aїt-Aïssa, Selim

    2016-04-15

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) act on the endocrine system through multiple mechanisms of action, among them interaction with estrogen receptors (ERs) is a well-identified key event in the initiation of adverse outcomes. As the most commonly used estrogen screening assays are either yeast- or human-cell based systems, the question of their (eco)toxicological relevance when assessing risks for aquatic species can be raised. The present study addresses the use of zebrafish (zf) derived reporter gene assays, both in vitro (i.e. zf liver cell lines stably expressing zfERα, zfERβ1 and zfERβ2 subtypes) and in vivo (i.e. transgenic cyp19a1b-GFP zf embryos), to assess estrogenic contaminants in river waters. By investigating 20 French river sites using passive sampling, high frequencies of in vitro zfER-mediated activities in water extracts were measured. Among the different in vitro assays, zfERβ2 assay was the most sensitive and responsive one, enabling the detection of active compounds at all investigated sites. In addition, comparison with a conventional human-based in vitro assay highlighted sites that were able to active zfERs but not human ER, suggesting the occurrence of zf-specific ER ligands. Furthermore, a significant in vivo estrogenic activity was detected at the most active sites in vitro, with a good accordance between estradiol equivalent (E2-EQ) concentrations derived from both in vitro and in vivo assays. Overall, this study shows the relevance and usefulness of such novel zebrafish-based assays as screening tools to monitor estrogenic activities in complex mixtures such as water extracts. It also supports their preferred use compared to human-based assays to assess the potential risks caused by endocrine disruptive chemicals for aquatic species such as fish.

  1. Chimeric RNA-DNA molecular beacon assay for ribonuclease H activity.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, J; Gifford, L K; Zhang, X; Gewirtz, A M; Lu, P

    2002-08-01

    Current methods to detect and assay ribonuclease H (RNase H) activity are indirect and time-consuming. Here we introduce a direct and sensitive method, based on the fluorescence quenching mechanism of molecular beacons, to assay RNA cleavage in RNA:DNA hybrids. An RNA-DNA chimeric beacon assay for RNase H enzymatic activity was developed. The substrate is a single-stranded RNA-DNA chimeric oligonucleotide labeled with a 5'-fluorescein and a 3'-DABCYL. The fluorophore (fluorescein) of the probe is held in close proximity to the quencher (DABCYL) by the RNA:DNA stem-loop structure. When the RNA sequence of the RNA:DNA hybrid stem is cleaved, the fluorophore is separated from the quencher and fluorescence can be detected as a function of time. Chimeric beacons with different stem lengths and sequences have been surveyed for this assay with E. coli RNase H. We found that the beacon kinetic parameters are in qualitative agreement with previously reported values using more cumbersome assays. This method permits real-time detection of RNase H activity and a convenient approach to RNase H kinetic and mechanistic study.

  2. Measurement of Separase Proteolytic Activity in Single Living Cells by a Fluorogenic Flow Cytometry Assay

    PubMed Central

    Haaß, Wiltrud; Kleiner, Helga; Müller, Martin C.; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Fabarius, Alice; Seifarth, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    ESPL1/Separase, an endopeptidase, is required for centrosome duplication and separation of sister-chromatides in anaphase of mitosis. Overexpression and deregulated proteolytic activity of Separase as frequently observed in human cancers is associated with the occurrence of supernumerary centrosomes, chromosomal missegregation and aneuploidy. Recently, we have hypothesized that increased Separase proteolytic activity in a small subpopulation of tumor cells may serve as driver of tumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Currently, there is no quantitative assay to measure Separase activity levels in single cells. Therefore, we have designed a flow cytometry-based assay that utilizes a Cy5- and rhodamine 110 (Rh110)-biconjugated Rad21 cleavage site peptide ([Cy5-D-R-E-I-M-R]2-Rh110) as smart probe and intracellular substrate for detection of Separase enzyme activity in living cells. As measured by Cy5 fluorescence the cellular uptake of the fluorogenic peptide was fast and reached saturation after 210 min of incubation in human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells. Separase activity was recorded as the intensity of Rh110 fluorescence released after intracellular peptide cleavage providing a linear signal gain within a 90–180 min time slot. Compared to conventional cell extract-based methods the flow cytometric assay delivers equivalent results but is more reliable, bypasses the problem of vague loading controls and unspecific proteolysis associated with whole cell extracts. Especially suited for the investigaton of blood- and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells the flow cytometric Separase assay allows generation of Separase activity profiles that tell about the number of Separase positive cells within a sample i.e. cells that currently progress through mitosis and about the range of intercellular variation in Separase activity levels within a cell population. The assay was used to quantify Separase proteolytic activity in leukemic

  3. Inter-nanocarrier and nanocarrier-to-cell transfer assays demonstrate the risk of an immediate unloading of dye from labeled lipid nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Simonsson, Carl; Bastiat, Guillaume; Pitorre, Marion; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Béjaud, Jérôme; Mély, Yves; Benoit, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Release studies constitute a fundamental part of the nanovector characterization. However, it can be difficult to correctly assess the release of lipophilic compounds from lipid nanocarriers using conventional assays. Previously, we proposed a method including an extraction with oil to measure the loading stability of lipophilic dyes in lipid nanocapsules (LNCs). The method indicated a rapid release of Nile Red from LNCs, while the loading of lipophilic carbocyanine dyes remained stable. This method, although interesting for a rapid screening of the fluorescence labeling stability of nanocarriers, is far from what happens in vivo, where lipid acceptor phases are nanostructured. Here, lipophilic dye loading stability has been assessed, by monitoring dye transfer from LNCs toward stable colloidal lipid nanocompartments, i.e. non-loaded LNCs, using new methodology based on size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). Dye transfer between LNCs and THP-1 cells (as model for circulating cells) has also been studied by FACS. The assays reveal an almost instantaneous transfer of Nile Red between LNCs, from LNCs to THP-1 cells, between THP-1 cells, and a reversal transfer from THP-1 cells to LNCs. On the contrary, there was no detectable transfer of the lipophilic carbocyanine dyes. Dye release was also analyzed using dialyses, which only revealed a very slow release of Nile Red from LNCs, demonstrating the weakness of membrane based assays for investigations of the lipophilic compound loading stability in lipid nanocarriers. These results highlight the importance of using relevant release assays, and the potential risk of an immediate unloading of lipophilic fluorescent dyes from lipid nanocarriers, in the presence of a lipid acceptor nanocompartment. Some misinterpretations of cellular trafficking and in vivo biodistribution of fluorescent nanoparticles should be avoided. PMID:26522878

  4. Modulating temporal control of NF-kappaB activation: implications for therapeutic and assay selection.

    PubMed

    Klinke, David J; Ustyugova, Irina V; Brundage, Kathleen M; Barnett, John B

    2008-06-01

    The activation of transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor-kappaB) plays a central role in the induction of many inflammatory response genes. This process is characterized by either oscillations or stable induction of NF-kappaB nuclear binding. Changes in dynamics of binding result in the expression of distinct subsets of genes leading to different physiological outcomes. We examined NF-kappaB DNA binding activity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated IC-21 cells by electromobility shift assay and nonradioactive transcription factor assay and interpreted the results using a kinetic model of NF-kappaB activation. Both assays detected damped oscillatory behavior of NF-kappaB with differences in sensitivity and reproducibility. 3,4-Dichloropropionaniline (DCPA) was used to modulate the oscillatory behavior of NF-kappaB after LPS stimulation. DCPA is known to inhibit the production of two NF-kappaB-inducible cytokines, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha, by reducing but not completely abrogating NF-kappaB-induced transcription. DCPA treatment resulted in a potentiation of early LPS-induced NF-kappaB activation. The nonradioactive transcription factor assay, which has a higher signal/noise ratio than the electromobility shift assay, combined with in silico modeling, produced results that revealed changes in NF-kappaB dynamics which, to the best of our knowledge, have never been previously reported. These results highlight the importance of cell type and stimulus specificity in transcription factor activity assessment. In addition, assay selection has important implications for network inference and drug discovery. PMID:18281385

  5. Modulating Temporal Control of NF-κB Activation: Implications for Therapeutic and Assay Selection

    PubMed Central

    Klinke, David J.; Ustyugova, Irina V.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Barnett, John B.

    2008-01-01

    The activation of transcription factor NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB) plays a central role in the induction of many inflammatory response genes. This process is characterized by either oscillations or stable induction of NF-κB nuclear binding. Changes in dynamics of binding result in the expression of distinct subsets of genes leading to different physiological outcomes. We examined NF-κB DNA binding activity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated IC-21 cells by electromobility shift assay and nonradioactive transcription factor assay and interpreted the results using a kinetic model of NF-κB activation. Both assays detected damped oscillatory behavior of NF-κB with differences in sensitivity and reproducibility. 3,4-Dichloropropionaniline (DCPA) was used to modulate the oscillatory behavior of NF-κB after LPS stimulation. DCPA is known to inhibit the production of two NF-κB-inducible cytokines, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor α, by reducing but not completely abrogating NF-κB-induced transcription. DCPA treatment resulted in a potentiation of early LPS-induced NF-κB activation. The nonradioactive transcription factor assay, which has a higher signal/noise ratio than the electromobility shift assay, combined with in silico modeling, produced results that revealed changes in NF-κB dynamics which, to the best of our knowledge, have never been previously reported. These results highlight the importance of cell type and stimulus specificity in transcription factor activity assessment. In addition, assay selection has important implications for network inference and drug discovery. PMID:18281385

  6. A protein chip membrane-capture assay for botulinum neurotoxin activity

    SciTech Connect

    Marconi, Severine; Ferracci, Geraldine; Berthomieu, Maelys; Kozaki, Shunji; Miquelis, Raymond; Boucraut, Jose; Seagar, Michael

    2008-12-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins A and B (BoNT/A and B) are neuromuscular blocking agents which inhibit neurotransmission by cleaving the intra-cellular presynaptic SNARE proteins SNAP-25 and VAMP2, localized respectively in plasma membrane and synaptic vesicles. These neurotoxins are both dangerous pathogens and powerful therapeutic agents with numerous clinical and cosmetic applications. Consequently there is a need for in vitro assays of their biological activity to screen for potential inhibitors and to replace the widely used in vivo mouse assay. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to measure membrane vesicle capture by antibodies against SNAP-25 and VAMP2. Substrate cleavage by BoNTs modified capture providing a method to assay toxin activity. Firstly using synaptic vesicles as a substrate, a comparison of the EC{sub 50}s for BoNT/B obtained by SPR, ELISA or flow cytometry indicated similar sensitivity although SPR assays were more rapid. Sonication of brain or neuronal cultures generated plasma membrane fragments with accessible intra-cellular epitopes adapted to measurement of BoNT/A activity. SPR responses were proportional to antigen concentration permitting detection of as little as 4 pM SNAP-25 in crude lysates. BoNT/A activity was assayed using monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize a SNAP-25 epitope generated by the proteolytic action of the toxin. Incubation of intact primary cultured neurons with BoNT/A yielded an EC{sub 50} of 0.5 pM. The SPR biosensor method was sensitive enough to monitor BoNT/A and B activity in cells cultured in a 96-well format providing an alternative to experimental animals for toxicological assays.

  7. Selective activation of SHP2 activity by cisplatin revealed by a novel chemical probe-based assay

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Chun-Chen; Chu, Chi-Yuan; Lin, Jing-Jer; Lo, Lee-Chiang

    2010-01-01

    Src homology-2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP2) is known to participate in several different signaling pathways to mediate cell growth, survival, migration, and differentiation. However, due to the lack of proper analytical tools, it is unclear whether the phosphatase activity of SHP2 is activated in most studies. We have previously developed an activity-based probe LCL2 that formed covalent linkage with catalytically active protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Here, by combining LCL2 with a SHP2 specific antibody, we established an assay system that enables the direct monitoring of SHP2 activity upon cisplatin treatment of cancer cells. The protocol is advantageous over conventional colorimetric or in-gel PTP assays as it is specific and does not require the use of radioisotope reagents. Using this assay, we found SHP2 activity was selectively activated by cisplatin. Moreover, the activation of SHP2 appeared to be specific for cisplatin as other DNA damage agents failed to activate the activity. Although the role of SHP2 activation by cisplatin treatments is still unclear to us, our results provide the first direct evidence for the activation of SHP2 during cisplatin treatments. More importantly, the concept of using activity-based probe in conjunction with target-specific antibodies could be extended to other enzyme classes.

  8. A nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry-based enzyme activity assay

    PubMed Central

    Northen, Trent R.; Lee, Jinq-Chyi; Hoang, Linh; Raymond, Jason; Hwang, Der-Ren; Yannone, Steven M.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Siuzdak, Gary

    2008-01-01

    We describe a Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) enzymatic (Nimzyme) assay in which enzyme substrates are immobilized on the mass spectrometry surface by using fluorous-phase interactions. This “soft” immobilization allows efficient desorption/ionization while also enabling the use of surface-washing steps to reduce signal suppression from complex biological samples, which results from the preferential retention of the tagged products and reactants. The Nimzyme assay is sensitive to subpicogram levels of enzyme, detects both addition and cleavage reactions (sialyltransferase and galactosidase), is applicable over a wide range of pHs and temperatures, and can measure activity directly from crude cell lysates. The ability of the Nimzyme assay to analyze complex mixtures is illustrated by identifying and directly characterizing β-1,4-galactosidase activity from a thermophilic microbial community lysate. The optimal enzyme temperature and pH were found to be 65°C and 5.5, respectively, and the activity was inhibited by both phenylethyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside and deoxygalactonojirimycin. Metagenomic analysis of the community suggests that the activity is from an uncultured, unsequenced γ-proteobacterium. In general, this assay provides an efficient method for detection and characterization of enzymatic activities in complex biological mixtures prior to sequencing or cloning efforts. More generally, this approach may have important applications for screening both enzymatic and inhibitor libraries, constructing and screening glycan microarrays, and complementing fluorous-phase organic synthesis. PMID:18319341

  9. [Detection of viable metabolically active yeast cells using a colorimetric assay].

    PubMed

    Růzicka, F; Holá, V

    2008-02-01

    The increasing concern of yeasts able to form biofilm brings about the need for susceptibility testing of both planktonic and biofilm cells. Detection of viability or metabolic activity of yeast cells after exposure to antimicrobials plays a key role in the assessment of susceptibility testing results. Colorimetric assays based on the color change of the medium in the presence of metabolically active cells proved suitable for this purpose. In this study, the usability of a colorimetric assay with the resazurin redox indicator for monitoring the effect of yeast inoculum density on the reduction rate was tested. As correlation between the color change rate and inoculum density was observed, approximate quantification of viable cells was possible. The assay would be of relevance to antifungal susceptibility testing in both planktonic and biofilm yeasts.

  10. Inhibition of Microglia Activation as a Phenotypic Assay in Early Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Figuera-Losada, Mariana; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    Complex biological processes such as inflammation, cell death, migration, proliferation, and the release of biologically active molecules can be used as outcomes in phenotypic assays during early stages of drug discovery. Although target-based approaches have been widely used over the past decades, a disproportionate number of first-in-class drugs have been identified using phenotypic screening. This review details phenotypic assays based on inhibition of microglial activation and their utility in primary and secondary screening, target validation, and pathway elucidation. The role of microglia, both in normal as well as in pathological conditions such as chronic neurodegenerative diseases, is reviewed. Methodologies to assess microglia activation in vitro are discussed in detail, and classes of therapeutic drugs known to decrease the proinflammatory and cytotoxic responses of activated microglia are appraised, including inhibitors of glutaminase, cystine/glutamate antiporter, nuclear factor κB, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. PMID:23945875

  11. An in vitro assay using overexpressed yeast SRP demonstrates that cotranslational translocation is dependent upon the J-domain of Sec63p.

    PubMed

    Willer, Martin; Jermy, Andrew J; Steel, Gregor J; Garside, Helen J; Carter, Stephanie; Stirling, Colin J

    2003-06-17

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) is required for co-translational targeting of polypeptides to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Once at the membrane, the precursor interacts with a complex proteinaceous machinery that mediates its translocation across the bilayer. Genetic studies in yeast have identified a number of genes whose products are involved in this complex process. These mutants offer a potentially valuable resource with which to analyze the biochemical role played by each component in the pathway. However, such analyses have been hampered by the failure to reconstitute an efficient in vitro assay for SRP-dependent translocation. We report the construction of two multicopy vectors that allow overexpression of all seven gene products required to make SRP in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The overexpressed subunits assemble into intact and functional SRP particles, and we further demonstrate that in vitro reconstitution of co-translational translocation is greatly enhanced using cytosol from the overexpression strain. We use this assay to demonstrate that Sec63p is required for co-translational translocation in vitro and specifically identify the "J-domain" of Sec63p as crucial for this pathway.

  12. Editor's Highlight: Analysis of the Effects of Cell Stress and Cytotoxicity on In Vitro Assay Activity Across a Diverse Chemical and Assay Space.

    PubMed

    Judson, Richard; Houck, Keith; Martin, Matt; Richard, Ann M; Knudsen, Thomas B; Shah, Imran; Little, Stephen; Wambaugh, John; Woodrow Setzer, R; Kothya, Parth; Phuong, Jimmy; Filer, Dayne; Smith, Doris; Reif, David; Rotroff, Daniel; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Sipes, Nisha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Crofton, Kevin; Thomas, Russell S

    2016-08-01

    Chemical toxicity can arise from disruption of specific biomolecular functions or through more generalized cell stress and cytotoxicity-mediated processes. Here, responses of 1060 chemicals including pharmaceuticals, natural products, pesticidals, consumer, and industrial chemicals across a battery of 815 in vitro assay endpoints from 7 high-throughput assay technology platforms were analyzed in order to distinguish between these types of activities. Both cell-based and cell-free assays showed a rapid increase in the frequency of responses at concentrations where cell stress/cytotoxicity responses were observed in cell-based assays. Chemicals that were positive on at least 2 viability/cytotoxicity assays within the concentration range tested (typically up to 100 μM) activated a median of 12% of assay endpoints whereas those that were not cytotoxic in this concentration range activated 1.3% of the assays endpoints. The results suggest that activity can be broadly divided into: (1) specific biomolecular interactions against one or more targets (eg, receptors or enzymes) at concentrations below which overt cytotoxicity-associated activity is observed; and (2) activity associated with cell stress or cytotoxicity, which may result from triggering specific cell stress pathways, chemical reactivity, physico-chemical disruption of proteins or membranes, or broad low-affinity non-covalent interactions. Chemicals showing a greater number of specific biomolecular interactions are generally designed to be bioactive (pharmaceuticals or pesticidal active ingredients), whereas intentional food-use chemicals tended to show the fewest specific interactions. The analyses presented here provide context for use of these data in ongoing studies to predict in vivo toxicity from chemicals lacking extensive hazard assessment. PMID:27208079

  13. Editor's Highlight: Analysis of the Effects of Cell Stress and Cytotoxicity on In Vitro Assay Activity Across a Diverse Chemical and Assay Space.

    PubMed

    Judson, Richard; Houck, Keith; Martin, Matt; Richard, Ann M; Knudsen, Thomas B; Shah, Imran; Little, Stephen; Wambaugh, John; Woodrow Setzer, R; Kothya, Parth; Phuong, Jimmy; Filer, Dayne; Smith, Doris; Reif, David; Rotroff, Daniel; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Sipes, Nisha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Crofton, Kevin; Thomas, Russell S

    2016-08-01

    Chemical toxicity can arise from disruption of specific biomolecular functions or through more generalized cell stress and cytotoxicity-mediated processes. Here, responses of 1060 chemicals including pharmaceuticals, natural products, pesticidals, consumer, and industrial chemicals across a battery of 815 in vitro assay endpoints from 7 high-throughput assay technology platforms were analyzed in order to distinguish between these types of activities. Both cell-based and cell-free assays showed a rapid increase in the frequency of responses at concentrations where cell stress/cytotoxicity responses were observed in cell-based assays. Chemicals that were positive on at least 2 viability/cytotoxicity assays within the concentration range tested (typically up to 100 μM) activated a median of 12% of assay endpoints whereas those that were not cytotoxic in this concentration range activated 1.3% of the assays endpoints. The results suggest that activity can be broadly divided into: (1) specific biomolecular interactions against one or more targets (eg, receptors or enzymes) at concentrations below which overt cytotoxicity-associated activity is observed; and (2) activity associated with cell stress or cytotoxicity, which may result from triggering specific cell stress pathways, chemical reactivity, physico-chemical disruption of proteins or membranes, or broad low-affinity non-covalent interactions. Chemicals showing a greater number of specific biomolecular interactions are generally designed to be bioactive (pharmaceuticals or pesticidal active ingredients), whereas intentional food-use chemicals tended to show the fewest specific interactions. The analyses presented here provide context for use of these data in ongoing studies to predict in vivo toxicity from chemicals lacking extensive hazard assessment.

  14. Evaluation of chemicals requiring metabolic activation in the EpiDerm™ 3D human reconstructed skin micronucleus (RSMN) assay.

    PubMed

    Aardema, Marilyn J; Barnett, Brenda B; Mun, Greg C; Dahl, Erica L; Curren, Rodger D; Hewitt, Nicola J; Pfuhler, Stefan

    2013-01-20

    The in vitro human reconstructed skin micronucleus (RSMN) assay in EpiDerm™ is a promising new assay for evaluating genotoxicity of dermally applied chemicals. A global pre-validation project sponsored by the European Cosmetics Association (Cosmetics Europe - formerly known as COLIPA), and the European Center for Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM), is underway. Results to date demonstrate international inter-laboratory and inter-experimental reproducibility of the assay for chemicals that do not require metabolism [Aardema et al., Mutat. Res. 701 (2010) 123-131]. We have expanded these studies to investigate chemicals that do require metabolic activation: 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4NQO), cyclophosphamide (CP), dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA), dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), dibenzanthracene (DBA) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). In this study, the standard protocol of two applications over 48h was compared with an extended protocol involving three applications over 72h. Extending the treatment period to 72h changed the result significantly only for 4NQO, which was negative in the standard 48h dosing regimen, but positive with the 72h treatment. DMBA and CP were positive in the standard 48h assay (CP induced a more reproducible response with the 72h treatment) and BaP gave mixed results; DBA and DMN were negative in both the 48h and the 72h dosing regimens. While further work with chemicals that require metabolism is needed, it appears that the RMSN assay detects some chemicals that require metabolic activation (4 out of 6 chemicals were positive in one or both protocols). At this point in time, for general testing, the use of a longer treatment period in situations where the standard 48h treatment is negative or questionable is recommended.

  15. Image-based ELISA on an activated polypropylene microtest plate--a spectrophotometer-free low cost assay technique.

    PubMed

    Parween, Shahila; Nahar, Pradip

    2013-10-15

    In this communication, we report ELISA technique on an activated polypropylene microtest plate (APPµTP) as an illustrative example of a low cost diagnostic assay. Activated test zone in APPµTP binds a capture biomolecule through covalent linkage thereby, eliminating non-specific binding often prevalent in absorption based techniques. Efficacy of APPµTP is demonstrated by detecting human immunoglobulin G (IgG), human immunoglobulin E (IgE) and Aspergillus fumigatus antibody in patient's sera. Detection is done by taking the image of the assay solution by a desktop scanner and analyzing the color of the image. Human IgE quantification by color saturation in the image-based assay shows excellent correlation with absorbance-based assay (Pearson correlation coefficient, r=0.992). Significance of the relationship is seen from its p value which is 4.087e-11. Performance of APPµTP is also checked with respect to microtiter plate and paper-based ELISA. APPµTP can quantify an analyte as precisely as in microtiter plate with insignificant non-specific binding, a necessary prerequisite for ELISA assay. In contrast, paper-ELISA shows high non-specific binding in control sera (false positive). Finally, we have carried out ELISA steps on APPµTP by ultrasound waves on a sonicator bath and the results show that even in 8 min, it can convincingly differentiate a test sample from a control sample. In short, spectrophotometer-free image-based miniaturized ELISA on APPµTP is precise, reliable, rapid, and sensitive and could be a good substitute for conventional immunoassay procedures widely used in clinical and research laboratories.

  16. A chemiluminescent microtiter plate assay for sensitive detection of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Lehel, C; Daniel-Issakani, S; Brasseur, M; Strulovici, B

    1997-01-15

    A chemiluminescent protein kinase assay using biotinylated substrate peptides captured on a streptavidin-coated microtiter plate and monoclonal antibodies to detect their phosphorylation is described. Assay conditions were optimized and validated for sensitive measurement of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAM-KII), receptor interacting protein, and src activities. The newly developed chemiluminescent assay has several advantages over currently used radioactive or colorimetric methods. It is highly sensitive at low enzyme and substrate concentrations and high, close to physiological ATP levels. It is fast, simple to perform and amenable to automation and high-throughput drug screening. The assay is also robust, exhibiting minimum interference from solvents and test substances from various sources. Overall, among the presently available methods for the detection of protein kinase activity, chemiluminescence was found to provide the highest sensitivity under conditions most closely mimicking the intracellular environment. This assay is expected to be useful in both academic and industrial laboratories, especially in identifying novel classes of protein kinase inhibitors.

  17. A fluorescence-based assay to monitor transcriptional activity of NFAT in living cells.

    PubMed

    Rinne, Andreas; Blatter, Lothar A

    2010-09-01

    Ca(2+)-sensitive NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) transcription factors are implicated in many pathophysiological processes in different cell types. The precise control of activation varies with NFAT isoform and cell type. Here we present feasibility of an in vivo assay (NFAT-RFP) that reports transcriptional activity of NFAT via expression of red fluorescent protein (RFP) in individual cells. This new tool allows continuous monitoring of transcriptional activity of NFAT in a physiological context in living cells. Furthermore, NFAT-RFP can be used simultaneously with NFAT-GFP fusion proteins to monitor transcriptional activity and subcellular localization of NFAT in the same cell.

  18. A sensitive fluorescent assay for measuring the cysteine protease activity of Der p 1, a major allergen from the dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus.

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, O; Sewell, H F; Shakib, F

    1998-01-01

    The potent allergenicity of Der p 1, a major allergen of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, is thought to be related to its cysteine protease activity. Therefore, there is considerable interest in developing a sensitive assay for measuring Der p 1 activity to screen for specific inhibitors. This study demonstrates for the first time that the activity of Der p 1 can be measured conveniently in a continuous rate assay with the fluorogenic substrate Boc-Gln-Ala-Arg-AMC (K(m) = 280 microM and kcat/K(m) = 4.6 x 10(3)/M/s). PMID:9893750

  19. A Chromogenic Assay Suitable for High-Throughput Determination of Limit Dextrinase Activity in Barley Malt Extracts.

    PubMed

    Bøjstrup, Marie; Marri, Lucia; Lok, Finn; Hindsgaul, Ole

    2015-12-23

    Twenty-four malt samples were assayed for limit dextrinase activity using a chromogenic assay developed recently in our group. The assay utilizes a small soluble chromogenic substrate which is hydrolyzed selectively by limit dextrinase in a coupled assay to release the chromophore 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol. The release of the chromophore, corresponding to the activity of limit dextrinase, can be followed by measuring the UV absorption at 405 nm. The 24 malt samples represented a wide variation of limit dextrinase activities, and these activities could be clearly differentiated by the assay. The results obtained were comparable with the results obtained from a commercially available assay, Limit-Dextrizyme from Megazyme International Ireland. Furthermore, the improved assay uses a soluble substrate. That makes it well suited for high-throughput screening as it can be handled in a 96-well plate format. PMID:26615836

  20. A barium based coordination polymer for the activity assay of deoxyribonuclease I.

    PubMed

    Song, Chan; Wang, Guan-Yao; Wang, Ya-Ling; Kong, De-Ming; Wang, Yong-Jian; Li, Yue; Ruan, Wen-Juan

    2014-10-01

    A new coordination polymer which shows an unusual 2D inorganic connectivity was constructed. This compound exhibits distinct fluorescence quenching ability to the dye-labeled single-stranded DNA probes with different lengths, based on which an analytical method was developed for the activity assay of deoxyribonuclease I.

  1. Reconciling apparent variability in effects of biochar amendment on soil enzyme activities by assay optimization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the effects of a biochar made from switchgrass on four soil enzymes (ß- glucosidase, ß-N-acetylglucosaminidase, lipase, and leucine aminopeptidase) to determine if biochar would consistently modify soil biological activities. Inconsistent results from enzyme assays of char-amended soils s...

  2. A chip-based assay for botulinum neurotoxin A activity in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Christian; Ferracci, Géraldine; Maulet, Yves; Grand-Masson, Chloé; Seagar, Michael; El Far, Oussama

    2015-05-01

    The production of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) for therapeutic and cosmetic applications requires precise determination of batch potency, and the enzymatic activity of BoNT/A light chain is a crucial index that can be measured in vitro. We previously established a SNAP-25 chip-based assay using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) that is more sensitive than the standard mouse bioassay for the quantification of BoNT/A activity. We have now adapted this procedure for pharmaceutical preparations. The optimized SPR assay allowed multiple measurements on a single chip, including the kinetics of substrate cleavage. The activity of five different batches of a pharmaceutical BoNT/A preparation was determined in a blind study by SPR and found to be in agreement with data from the in vivo mouse lethality assay. Biosensor detection of specific proteolytic products has the potential to accurately monitor the activity of pharmaceutical BoNT/A preparations, and a single chip can be used to assay more than 100 samples.

  3. A specific mechanism for nonspecific activation in reporter-gene assays.

    PubMed

    Auld, Douglas S; Thorne, Natasha; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; Inglese, James

    2008-08-15

    The importance of bioluminescence in enabling a broad range of high-throughput screening (HTS) assay formats is evidenced by widespread use in industry and academia. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms by which reporter enzyme activity can be modulated by small molecules is critical to the interpretation of HTS data. In this Perspective, we provide evidence for stabilization of luciferase by inhibitors in cell-based luciferase reporter-gene assays resulting in the counterintuitive phenomenon of signal activation. These data were derived from our analysis of luciferase inhibitor compound structures and their prevalence in the Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository using 100 HTS experiments available in PubChem. Accordingly, we found an enrichment of luciferase inhibitors in luciferase reporter-gene activation assays but not in assays using other reporters. In addition, for several luciferase inhibitor chemotypes, we measured reporter stabilization and signal activation in cells that paralleled the inhibition determined using purified luciferase to provide further experimental support for these contrasting effects.

  4. Enhanced Stability of Blood Matrices Using a Dried Sample Spot Assay to Measure Human Butyrylcholinesterase Activity and Nerve Agent Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jonas W.; Pantazides, Brooke G.; Watson, Caroline M.; Thomas, Jerry D.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2015-01-01

    Dried matrix spots are safer to handle and easier to store than wet blood products, but factors such as intra-spot variability and unknown sample volumes have limited their appeal as a sampling format for quantitative analyses. In this work, we introduce a dried spot activity assay for quantifying butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) specific activity which is BChE activity normalized to the total protein content in a sample spot. The method was demonstrated with blood, serum, and plasma spotted on specimen collection devices (cards) which were extracted to measure total protein and BChE activity using a modified Ellman assay. Activity recovered from dried spots was ∼80% of the initial spotted activity for blood and >90% for plasma and serum. Measuring total protein in the sample and calculating specific activity substantially improved quantification and reduced intra-spot variability. Analyte stability of nerve agent adducts was also evaluated, and the results obtained via BChE-specific activity measurements were confirmed by quantification of BChE adducts using a previously established LC-MS/MS method. The spotted samples were up to 10-times more resistant to degradation compared to unspotted control samples when measuring BChE inhibition by the nerve agents sarin and VX. Using this method, both BChE activity and adducts can be accurately measured from a dried sample spot. This use of a dried sample spot with normalization to total protein is robust, demonstrates decreased intra-spot variability without the need to control for initial sample volume, and enhances analyte stability. PMID:25955132

  5. A TR-FRET-based functional assay for screening activators of CARM1.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hao; Wu, Jiacai; Bedford, Mark T; Sbardella, Gianluca; Hoffmann, F Michael; Bi, Kun; Xu, Wei

    2013-05-10

    Epigenetics is an emerging field that demands selective cell-permeable chemical probes to perturb, especially in vivo, the activity of specific enzymes involved in modulating the epigenetic codes. Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) is a coactivator of estrogen receptor α (ERα), the main target in human breast cancer. We previously showed that twofold overexpression of CARM1 in MCF7 breast cancer cells increased the expression of ERα-target genes involved in differentiation and reduced cell proliferation, thus leading to the hypothesis that activating CARM1 by chemical activators might be therapeutically effective in breast cancer. Selective, potent, cell-permeable CARM1 activators will be essential to test this hypothesis. Here we report the development of a cell-based, time-resolved (TR) FRET assay that uses poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABP1) methylation to monitor cellular activity of CARM1. The LanthaScreen TR-FRET assay uses MCF7 cells expressing GFP-PABP1 fusion protein through BacMam gene delivery system, methyl-PABP1 specific antibody, and terbium-labeled secondary antibody. This assay has been validated as reflecting the expression and/or activity of CARM1 and optimized for high throughput screening to identify CARM1 allosteric activators. This TR-FRET platform serves as a generic tool for functional screening of cell-permeable, chemical modulators of CARM1 for elucidation of its in vivo functions. PMID:23585185

  6. Interference sources in ATP bioluminescence assay of silica nanoparticle toxicity to activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Sibag, Mark; Kim, Seung Hwan; Kim, Choah; Kim, Hee Jun; Cho, Jinwoo

    2015-06-01

    ATP measurement provides an overview of the general state of microbial activity, and thus it has proven useful for the evaluation of nanoparticle toxicity in activated sludge. ATP bioluminescence assay, however, is susceptible to interference by the components of activated sludge other than biomass. This paper presents the interference identified specific to the use of this assay after activated sludge respiration inhibition test of silica nanoparticles (OECD 209). We observed a high degree of interference (90%) in the presence of 100 mg/L silica nanoparticles and a low level of ATP being measured (0.01 μM); and 30% interference by the synthetic medium regardless of silica nanoparticle concentration and ATP level in the samples. ATP measurement in activated sludge with different MLSS concentrations revealed interference of high biomass content. In conclusion, silica nanoparticles, synthetic medium and activated sludge samples themselves interfere with ATP bioluminescence; this will need to be considered in the evaluation of silica nanoparticle toxicity to activated sludge when this type of assay is used. PMID:25892589

  7. Interference sources in ATP bioluminescence assay of silica nanoparticle toxicity to activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Sibag, Mark; Kim, Seung Hwan; Kim, Choah; Kim, Hee Jun; Cho, Jinwoo

    2015-06-01

    ATP measurement provides an overview of the general state of microbial activity, and thus it has proven useful for the evaluation of nanoparticle toxicity in activated sludge. ATP bioluminescence assay, however, is susceptible to interference by the components of activated sludge other than biomass. This paper presents the interference identified specific to the use of this assay after activated sludge respiration inhibition test of silica nanoparticles (OECD 209). We observed a high degree of interference (90%) in the presence of 100 mg/L silica nanoparticles and a low level of ATP being measured (0.01 μM); and 30% interference by the synthetic medium regardless of silica nanoparticle concentration and ATP level in the samples. ATP measurement in activated sludge with different MLSS concentrations revealed interference of high biomass content. In conclusion, silica nanoparticles, synthetic medium and activated sludge samples themselves interfere with ATP bioluminescence; this will need to be considered in the evaluation of silica nanoparticle toxicity to activated sludge when this type of assay is used.

  8. Antioxidant Activity/Capacity Measurement. 3. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS/RNS) Scavenging Assays, Oxidative Stress Biomarkers, and Chromatographic/Chemometric Assays.

    PubMed

    Apak, Reşat; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Çapanoğlu, Esra

    2016-02-10

    There are many studies in which the antioxidant potential of different foods have been analyzed. However, there are still conflicting results and lack of information as a result of unstandardized assay techniques and differences between the principles of the methods applied. The measurement of antioxidant activity, especially in the case of mixtures, multifunctional or complex multiphase systems, cannot be evaluated satisfactorily using a simple antioxidant test due to the many variables influencing the results. In the literature, there are many antioxidant assays that are used to measure the total antioxidant activity/capacity of food materials. In this review, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) scavenging assays are evaluated with respect to their mechanism, advantages, disadvantages, and potential use in food systems. On the other hand, in vivo antioxidant activity (AOA) assays including oxidative stress biomarkers and cellular-based assays are covered within the scope of this review. Finally, chromatographic and chemometric assays are reviewed, focusing on their benefits especially with respect to their time saving, cost-effective, and sensitive nature.

  9. HPLC-MTT assay: anticancer activity of aqueous garlic extract is from allicin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Bao-Shiang

    2013-05-15

    A strategy using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), thin layer chromatography (TLC), mass spectrometry (MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), chemical synthesis, and MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) cell viability assay to identify allicin as the active anticancer compound in aqueous garlic extract (AGE) is described. Changing the pH of AGE from 7.0 to 5.0 eliminated interfering molecules and enabled a clean HPLC separation of the constituents in AGE. MTT assay of the HPLC fractions identified an active fraction. Further analysis by TLC, MS, and NMR verified the active HPLC fraction as allicin. Chemically synthesized allicin was used to provide further confirmation. The results clearly identify the active compound in AGE as allicin.

  10. Measurement of factor VIII activity using one-stage clotting assay: a calibration curve has not to be systematically included in each run.

    PubMed

    Lattes, S; Appert-Flory, A; Fischer, F; Jambou, D; Toulon, P

    2011-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is usually evaluated using activated partial thromboplastin time-based one-stage clotting assays. Guidelines for clotting factor assays indicate that a calibration curve should be included each time the assay is performed. Therefore, FVIII measurement is expensive, reagent- and time-consuming. The aim of this study was to compare FVIII activities obtained using the same fully automated assay that was calibrated once (stored calibration curve) or each time the assay was performed. Unique lots of reagents were used throughout the study. We analysed 255 frozen plasma samples from patients who were prescribed FVIII measurement including treated and untreated haemophilia A patients. Twenty-six runs were performed on a 28-week period, each including four lyophilized control and at most 10 patient plasma samples. In control samples, FVIII activities were not significantly different when the assay was performed using the stored calibration curve or was daily calibrated. The same applied to FVIII activities in patient plasma samples that were not significantly different throughout the measuring range of activities [68.3% (<1-179) vs. 67.6% (<1-177), P=0.48] and no relevant bias could be demonstrated when data were compared according to Bland and Altman. These results suggest that in the studied technical conditions, performing the FVIII assay using a stored calibration curve is reliable, for at least 6 months. Therefore, as far as the same lots of reagents are used, it is not mandatory to include a calibration curve each time the FVIII assay was performed. However, this strategy has to be validated if the assay is performed in different technical conditions.

  11. Capability and limitation study of the DDT passive-active neutron waste assay instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, N.J.; Coop, K.L.; Estep, R.J.

    1992-05-01

    The differential-dieaway-technique passive-active neutron assay system is widely used by transuranic waste generators to certify their drummed waste for eventual shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Stricter criteria being established for waste emplacement at the WIPP site has led to a renewed interest in improvements to and a better understanding of current nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. Our study includes the effects of source position, extreme matrices, high neutron backgrounds, and source self-shielding to explore the system`s capabilities and limitations and to establish a basis for comparison with other NDA systems. 11 refs.

  12. Capability and limitation study of the DDT passive-active neutron waste assay instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, N.J.; Coop, K.L.; Estep, R.J.

    1992-05-01

    The differential-dieaway-technique passive-active neutron assay system is widely used by transuranic waste generators to certify their drummed waste for eventual shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Stricter criteria being established for waste emplacement at the WIPP site has led to a renewed interest in improvements to and a better understanding of current nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. Our study includes the effects of source position, extreme matrices, high neutron backgrounds, and source self-shielding to explore the system's capabilities and limitations and to establish a basis for comparison with other NDA systems. 11 refs.

  13. Data set of optimal parameters for colorimetric red assay of epoxide hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriel Stephani; Adriani, Patricia Pereira; Borges, Flavia Garcia; Lopes, Adriana Rios; Campana, Patricia T; Chambergo, Felipe S

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Epoxide hydrolase of Trichoderma reesei: Biochemical properties and conformational characterization" [1]. Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxides to the corresponding vicinal diols. This article describes the optimal parameters for the colorimetric red assay to determine the enzymatic activity, with an emphasis on the characterization of the kinetic parameters, pH optimum and thermal stability of this enzyme. The effects of reagents that are not resistant to oxidation by sodium periodate on the reactions can generate false positives and interfere with the final results of the red assay. PMID:27366781

  14. Development and validation of an assay for urinary tissue factor activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lwaleed, B A; Chisholm, M; Francis, J L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Activation of blood coagulation is a common complication of cancer and inflammation in both humans and experimental animals. Increased production of tissue factor--the principal initiator of the coagulation process--by endothelial cells, monocytes, and macrophages has been implicated in these conditions. AIM: To investigate whether urinary tissue factor (uTF) might reflect the state of monocyte/macrophage activation and be a useful diagnostic test. METHODS: Urine was centrifuged at 51,000 g to sediment tissue factor containing membrane vesicles. The tissue factor was then solubilised in beta-octyl-glucopyranoside and assayed in a specific chromogenic assay adapted for use in microtitre plates. RESULTS: The assay proved to be sensitive, specific, and reproducible. The normal range of uTF was relatively narrow and unaffected by age, sex, or cigarette smoking. Levels were not significantly influenced by storage of urine samples before assay or by the presence of fresh blood in the urine sample. CONCLUSIONS: This method may have diagnostic application in the study of haemostatic activation in patients with cancer and other disease states. Images PMID:10450183

  15. An optical assay of the transport activity of ClC-7

    PubMed Central

    Zanardi, Ilaria; Zifarelli, Giovanni; Pusch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis, characterized by excessive osteoclast mediated bone resorption, affects millions of people worldwide representing a major public health problem. ClC-7 is a chloride-proton exchanger localized in lysosomes and in the resorption lacuna in osteoclasts where it is essential for bone resorption. Thus, drugs targeted at ClC-7 have been proposed for ameliorating osteoporosis. However, functional assays suited for high throughput screening (HTS) of ClC-7 function are lacking. Here we describe two complementary variants of purely optical assays of the transport activity of ClC-7, redirected to the plasma membrane employing a genetically encoded fluorescent Cl−/pH indicator fused to the ClC-7 protein. These simple and robust functional assays of ClC-7 transport are well-suited to be applied in HTS of small-molecule inhibitors and may help to develop drugs suited for the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:23390581

  16. In vitro activity assays for MYST histone acetyltransferases and adaptation for high-throughput inhibitor screening

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Cheryl E.; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification that is carried out by acetyltransferases. The MYST proteins form the largest and most diverse family of acetyltransferases, which regulate gene expression, DNA repair, and cell cycle homeostasis, among other activities, by acetylating both histone and non-histone proteins. This chapter will describe methods for the preparation and biochemical characterization of MYST family acetyltransferases, including protocols for the preparation of recombinant protein, enzyme assays for measuring steady state parameters and binding assays to measure cofactor and inhibitor binding. We also provide details on adapting these assays for high throughput screening for small molecule MYST inhibitors. This chapter seeks to prepare researchers for some hurdles that they may encounter when studying the MYST proteins so that there may be better opportunity to plan appropriate controls and obtain high quality data. PMID:27372752

  17. Assay of insulator enhancer-blocking activity with the use of transient transfection.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, N A; Didych, D A; Akopov, S B; Nikolaev, L G; Sverdlov, E D

    2013-08-01

    We used a transient transfection of cultured cells with linearized plasmids to analyze the enhancer-blocking activity of potential insulators including the standard cHS4 chicken beta-globin insulator and several DNA fragments selected from the human genome sequence. About 60-80% of the potential insulators do reveal the enhancer-blocking activity when probed by the transient transfection assay. The activity of different sequences is characterized by certain tissue specificity and by dependence on the orientation of the fragments relative to the promoter. Thus, the transfection model may be used for quantitative analysis of the enhancer-blocking activity of the potential insulators. PMID:24228877

  18. Plant Compounds Enhance the Assay Sensitivity for Detection of Active Bacillus cereus Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Rasooly, Reuven; Hernlem, Bradley; He, Xiaohua; Friedman, Mendel

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is an important food pathogen, producing emetic and diarrheal syndromes, the latter mediated by enterotoxins. The ability to sensitively trace and identify this active toxin is important for food safety. This study evaluated a nonradioactive, sensitive, in vitro cell-based assay, based on B. cereus toxin inhibition of green fluorescent protein (GFP) synthesis in transduced monkey kidney Vero cells, combined with plant extracts or plant compounds that reduce viable count of B. cereus in food. The assay exhibited a dose dependent GFP inhibition response with ~25% inhibition at 50 ng/mL toxin evaluated in culture media or soy milk, rice milk or infant formula, products associated with food poisonings outbreak. The plant extracts of green tea or bitter almond and the plant compounds epicatechin or carvacrol were found to amplify the assay response to ~90% inhibition at the 50 ng/mL toxin concentration greatly increasing the sensitivity of this assay. Additional studies showed that the test formulations also inhibited the growth of the B. cereus bacteria, likely through cell membrane disruption. The results suggest that the improved highly sensitive assay for the toxin and the rapid inactivation of the pathogen producing the toxin have the potential to enhance food safety. PMID:25767986

  19. Transactivation and Coactivator Recruitment Assays for Measuring Farnesoid X Receptor Activity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Wen Amy; Zhao, Jinghua; Xia, Menghang

    2016-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor responsible for homeostasis of bile acids, lipids, and glucose. Compounds that alter endogenous FXR signaling can be used as therapeutic candidates or identified as potentially hazardous compounds depending on exposure doses and health states. Therefore, there is an increasing need for high-throughput screening assays of FXR activity to profile large numbers of environmental chemicals and drugs. This chapter describes a workflow of FXR modulator identification and characterization. To identify compounds that modulate FXR transactivation at the cellular level, we first screen compounds from the Tox21 10 K compound library in an FXR-driven beta-lactamase reporter gene assay multiplexed with a cell viability assay in the same well of the 1536-well plates. The selected compounds are then tested biochemically for their ability to modulate FXR-coactivator binding interactions using a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) coactivator assay. The assay results from the workflow can be used to prioritize compounds for more extensive investigations. PMID:27518622

  20. Plant compounds enhance the assay sensitivity for detection of active Bacillus cereus toxin.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Reuven; Hernlem, Bradley; He, Xiaohua; Friedman, Mendel

    2015-03-01

    Bacillus cereus is an important food pathogen, producing emetic and diarrheal syndromes, the latter mediated by enterotoxins. The ability to sensitively trace and identify this active toxin is important for food safety. This study evaluated a nonradioactive, sensitive, in vitro cell-based assay, based on B. cereus toxin inhibition of green fluorescent protein (GFP) synthesis in transduced monkey kidney Vero cells, combined with plant extracts or plant compounds that reduce viable count of B. cereus in food. The assay exhibited a dose dependent GFP inhibition response with ~25% inhibition at 50 ng/mL toxin evaluated in culture media or soy milk, rice milk or infant formula, products associated with food poisonings outbreak. The plant extracts of green tea or bitter almond and the plant compounds epicatechin or carvacrol were found to amplify the assay response to ~90% inhibition at the 50 ng/mL toxin concentration greatly increasing the sensitivity of this assay. Additional studies showed that the test formulations also inhibited the growth of the B. cereus bacteria, likely through cell membrane disruption. The results suggest that the improved highly sensitive assay for the toxin and the rapid inactivation of the pathogen producing the toxin have the potential to enhance food safety. PMID:25767986

  1. An assay to measure poly(ADP ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) activity in cells.

    PubMed

    James, Dominic I; Durant, Stephen; Eckersley, Kay; Fairweather, Emma; Griffiths, Louise A; Hamilton, Nicola; Kelly, Paul; O'Connor, Mark; Shea, Kerry; Waddell, Ian D; Ogilvie, Donald J

    2016-01-01

    After a DNA damage signal multiple polymers of ADP ribose attached to poly(ADP) ribose (PAR) polymerases (PARPs) are broken down by the enzyme poly(ADP) ribose glycohydrolase (PARG). Inhibition of PARG leads to a failure of DNA repair and small molecule inhibition of PARG has been a goal for many years. To determine whether biochemical inhibitors of PARG are active in cells we have designed an immunofluorescence assay to detect nuclear PAR after DNA damage. This 384-well assay is suitable for medium throughput high-content screening and can detect cell-permeable inhibitors of PARG from nM to µM potency. In addition, the assay has been shown to work in murine cells and in a variety of human cancer cells. Furthermore, the assay is suitable for detecting the DNA damage response induced by treatment with temozolomide and methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). Lastly, the assay has been shown to be robust over a period of several years. PMID:27610220

  2. Direct assay of glutathione peroxidase activity using high-performance capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Pascual, P; Martinez-Lara, E; Bárcena, J A; López-Barea, J; Toribio, F

    1992-10-01

    A fast, sensitive and direct method has been developed for the determination of glutathione peroxidase activity (both selenium- and non-selenium-dependent) in cell-free preparations. The assay is based on the separation and quantitation of reduced and oxidized glutathione by capillary electrophoresis. The electrophoretic separation buffer was 100 mM sodium tetraborate (pH 8.2) containing 100 mM sodium dodecylsulphate. A micellar electrokinetic mechanism took place under these conditions, and a total mass recovery was observed for both peptides. The reproducibility of migration times was excellent (less than 3% variability). A linear detector response range was observed in the range 5-50 U/ml, and both the reproducibility and accuracy were satisfied. Samples out of this linear range could be analysed by either increasing the reaction time or diluting the enzyme preparation. The results obtained with the new direct capillary electrophoresis assay were compared with those derived from a reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatographic and spectrophotometric coupled assay. A very good agreement was found between the two direct assay methods in all samples. Capillary electrophoresis is a versatile technique that allows the automation of the glutathione peroxidase assay in a reproducible manner and within a relatively short time with sufficient accuracy and precision. PMID:1430007

  3. Transactivation and Coactivator Recruitment Assays for Measuring Farnesoid X Receptor Activity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Wen Amy; Zhao, Jinghua; Xia, Menghang

    2016-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor responsible for homeostasis of bile acids, lipids, and glucose. Compounds that alter endogenous FXR signaling can be used as therapeutic candidates or identified as potentially hazardous compounds depending on exposure doses and health states. Therefore, there is an increasing need for high-throughput screening assays of FXR activity to profile large numbers of environmental chemicals and drugs. This chapter describes a workflow of FXR modulator identification and characterization. To identify compounds that modulate FXR transactivation at the cellular level, we first screen compounds from the Tox21 10 K compound library in an FXR-driven beta-lactamase reporter gene assay multiplexed with a cell viability assay in the same well of the 1536-well plates. The selected compounds are then tested biochemically for their ability to modulate FXR-coactivator binding interactions using a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) coactivator assay. The assay results from the workflow can be used to prioritize compounds for more extensive investigations.

  4. An assay to measure poly(ADP ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) activity in cells

    PubMed Central

    James, Dominic I.; Durant, Stephen; Eckersley, Kay; Fairweather, Emma; Griffiths, Louise A.; Hamilton, Nicola; Kelly, Paul; O'Connor, Mark; Shea, Kerry; Waddell, Ian D.; Ogilvie, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    After a DNA damage signal multiple polymers of ADP ribose attached to poly(ADP) ribose (PAR) polymerases (PARPs) are broken down by the enzyme poly(ADP) ribose glycohydrolase (PARG). Inhibition of PARG leads to a failure of DNA repair and small molecule inhibition of PARG has been a goal for many years. To determine whether biochemical inhibitors of PARG are active in cells we have designed an immunofluorescence assay to detect nuclear PAR after DNA damage. This 384-well assay is suitable for medium throughput high-content screening and can detect cell-permeable inhibitors of PARG from nM to µM potency. In addition, the assay has been shown to work in murine cells and in a variety of human cancer cells. Furthermore, the assay is suitable for detecting the DNA damage response induced by treatment with temozolomide and methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). Lastly, the assay has been shown to be robust over a period of several years. PMID:27610220

  5. A Simple Luminescent Adenylate-Cyclase Functional Assay for Evaluation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Israeli, Ma’ayan; Rotem, Shahar; Elia, Uri; Bar-Haim, Erez; Cohen, Ofer; Chitlaru, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Edema Factor (EF), the toxic sub-unit of the Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin (ET) is a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase whose detrimental activity in the infected host results in severe edema. EF is therefore a major virulence factor of B. anthracis. We describe a simple, rapid and reliable functional adenylate-cyclase assay based on inhibition of a luciferase-mediated luminescence reaction. The assay exploits the efficient adenylate cyclase-mediated depletion of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), and the strict dependence on ATP of the light-emitting luciferase-catalyzed luciferin-conversion to oxyluciferin, which can be easily visualized. The assay exhibits a robust EF-dose response decrease in luminescence, which may be specifically reverted by anti-EF antibodies. The application of the assay is exemplified in: (a) determining the presence of EF in B. anthracis cultures, or its absence in cultures of EF-defective strains; (b) evaluating the anti-EF humoral response in experimental animals infected/vaccinated with B. anthracis; and (c) rapid discrimination between EF producing and non-producing bacterial colonies. Furthermore, the assay may be amenable with high-throughput screening for EF inhibitory molecules. PMID:27548219

  6. An assay to measure poly(ADP ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) activity in cells

    PubMed Central

    James, Dominic I.; Durant, Stephen; Eckersley, Kay; Fairweather, Emma; Griffiths, Louise A.; Hamilton, Nicola; Kelly, Paul; O'Connor, Mark; Shea, Kerry; Waddell, Ian D.; Ogilvie, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    After a DNA damage signal multiple polymers of ADP ribose attached to poly(ADP) ribose (PAR) polymerases (PARPs) are broken down by the enzyme poly(ADP) ribose glycohydrolase (PARG). Inhibition of PARG leads to a failure of DNA repair and small molecule inhibition of PARG has been a goal for many years. To determine whether biochemical inhibitors of PARG are active in cells we have designed an immunofluorescence assay to detect nuclear PAR after DNA damage. This 384-well assay is suitable for medium throughput high-content screening and can detect cell-permeable inhibitors of PARG from nM to µM potency. In addition, the assay has been shown to work in murine cells and in a variety of human cancer cells. Furthermore, the assay is suitable for detecting the DNA damage response induced by treatment with temozolomide and methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). Lastly, the assay has been shown to be robust over a period of several years.

  7. Complementary non-radioactive assays for investigation of human flap endonuclease 1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Kim, Daemyung; Maloney, David J.; Wilson, David M.; Simeonov, Anton

    2011-01-01

    FEN1, a key participant in DNA replication and repair, is the major human flap endonuclease that recognizes and cleaves flap DNA structures. Deficiencies in FEN1 function or deletion of the fen1 gene have profound biological effects, including the suppression of repair of DNA damage incurred from the action of various genotoxic agents. Given the importance of FEN1 in resolving abnormal DNA structures, inhibitors of the enzyme carry a potential as enhancers of DNA-interactive anticancer drugs. To facilitate the studies of FEN1 activity and the search for novel inhibitors, we developed a pair of complementary-readout homogeneous assays utilizing fluorogenic donor/quencher and AlphaScreen chemiluminescence strategies. A previously reported FEN1 inhibitor 3-hydroxy-5-methyl-1-phenylthieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione displayed equal potency in the new assays, in agreement with its published IC50. The assays were optimized to a low 4 µl volume and used to investigate a set of small molecules, leading to the identification of previously-unreported FEN1 inhibitors, among which aurintricarboxylic acid and NSC-13755 (an arylstibonic derivative) displayed submicromolar potency (average IC50 of 0.59 and 0.93 µM, respectively). The availability of these simple complementary assays obviates the need for undesirable radiotracer-based assays and should facilitate efforts to develop novel inhibitors for this key biological target. PMID:21062821

  8. Plant compounds enhance the assay sensitivity for detection of active Bacillus cereus toxin.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Reuven; Hernlem, Bradley; He, Xiaohua; Friedman, Mendel

    2015-03-11

    Bacillus cereus is an important food pathogen, producing emetic and diarrheal syndromes, the latter mediated by enterotoxins. The ability to sensitively trace and identify this active toxin is important for food safety. This study evaluated a nonradioactive, sensitive, in vitro cell-based assay, based on B. cereus toxin inhibition of green fluorescent protein (GFP) synthesis in transduced monkey kidney Vero cells, combined with plant extracts or plant compounds that reduce viable count of B. cereus in food. The assay exhibited a dose dependent GFP inhibition response with ~25% inhibition at 50 ng/mL toxin evaluated in culture media or soy milk, rice milk or infant formula, products associated with food poisonings outbreak. The plant extracts of green tea or bitter almond and the plant compounds epicatechin or carvacrol were found to amplify the assay response to ~90% inhibition at the 50 ng/mL toxin concentration greatly increasing the sensitivity of this assay. Additional studies showed that the test formulations also inhibited the growth of the B. cereus bacteria, likely through cell membrane disruption. The results suggest that the improved highly sensitive assay for the toxin and the rapid inactivation of the pathogen producing the toxin have the potential to enhance food safety.

  9. Solid-phase assay of lectin activity using HRP-conjugated glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kojima-Aikawa, Kyoko

    2014-01-01

    Various enzyme-conjugated probes have been widely used for detection of specific interactions between biomolecules. In the case of glycan-protein interaction, horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated glycoproteins (HRP-GPs) are useful for the detection of carbohydrate-binding activity of plant and animal lectins. In this chapter, a typical solid-phase assay of the carbohydrate-binding activity of Sophora japonica agglutinin I, a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin, using HRP-conjugated asialofetuin is described. HRP-GPs are versatile tools for probing lectin activities in crude extracts, screening many samples at one time, and applicable not only for solid-phase binding assays but also samples which are dot- or Western-blotted onto the membrane. PMID:25117228

  10. Transactivation Assays to Assess Canine and Rodent Pregnane X Receptor (PXR) and Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pinne, Marija; Ponce, Elsa; Raucy, Judy L.

    2016-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR/SXR, NR1I2) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) are nuclear receptors (NRs) involved in the regulation of many genes including cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) and transporters important in metabolism and uptake of both endogenous substrates and xenobiotics. Activation of these receptors can lead to adverse drug effects as well as drug-drug interactions. Depending on which nuclear receptor is activated will determine which adverse effect could occur, making identification important. Screening for NR activation by New Molecular Entities (NMEs) using cell-based transactivation assays is the singular high throughput method currently available for identifying the activation of a particular NR. Moreover, screening for species-specific NR activation can minimize the use of animals in drug development and toxicology studies. With this in mind, we have developed in vitro transactivation assays to identify compounds that activate canine and rat PXR and CAR3. We found differences in specificity for canine and rat PXR, with the best activator for canine PXR being 10 μM SR12813 (60.1 ± 3.1-fold) and for rat PXR, 10 μM dexamethasone (60.9 ± 8.4 fold). Of the 19 test agents examined, 10 and 9 significantly activated rat and canine PXR at varying degrees, respectively. In contrast, 5 compounds exhibited statistically significant activation of rat CAR3 and 4 activated the canine receptor. For canine CAR3, 50 μM artemisinin proved to be the best activator (7.3 ± 1.8 and 10.5 ± 2.2 fold) while clotrimazole (10 μM) was the primary activator of the rat variant (13.7 ± 0.8 and 26.9 ± 1.3 fold). Results from these studies demonstrated that cell-based transactivation assays can detect species-specific activators and revealed that PXR was activated by at least twice as many compounds as was CAR3, suggesting that there are many more agonists for PXR than CAR. PMID:27732639

  11. Considerations for an active and passive scanner to assay nuclear waste drums

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H.E.; Azevedo, S.G.; Roberson, G.P.; Schneberk, D.J.; Koenig, Z.M.; Camp, D.C. )

    1990-06-08

    Radioactive wastes are generated at many DOE laboratories, military facilities, fuel fabrication and enrichment plants, reactors, hospitals, and university research facilities. At all of these sites, wastes must be separated, packaged, categorized, and packed into some sort of container--usually 208-L (55-gal) drums--for shipment to waste-storage sites. Prior to shipment, the containers must be labeled, assayed, and certified; the assay value determines the ultimate disposition of the waste containers. An accurate nondestructive assay (NDA) method would identify all the radioisotopes present and provide a quantitative measurement of their activity in the drum. In this way, waste containers could be routed in the most cost-effective manner and without having to reopen them. Currently, the most common gamma-ray method used to assay nuclear waste drums is segmented gamma-ray scanning (SGS) spectrometer that crudely measures only the amount of {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu present in the drum. This method uses a spatially-averaged, integrated, emitted gamma-ray-intensity value. The emitted intensity value is corrected by an assumed constant-attenuation value determined by a spatially-averaged, transmission (or active) measurement. Unfortunately, this typically results in an inaccurate determination of the radioactive activities within a waste drum because this measurement technique is valid only for homogeneous-attenuation or known drum matrices. However, since homogeneous-attenuation matrices are not common and may be unknown, other NDA techniques based on active and Passive CT (A PCT) are under development. The active measurement (ACT) yields a better attenuation matrix for the drum, while the passive measurement (PCT) more accurately determines the identity of the radioisotopes present and their activities. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Thiopurine methyl transferase activity: new extraction conditions for high-performance liquid chromatographic assay.

    PubMed

    Ganiere-Monteil, C; Pineau, A; Kergueris, M F; Azoulay, C; Bourin, M

    1999-04-30

    A new liquid-liquid extraction is described for thiopurine methyl transferase (TPMT, EC 2.1.1.67) activity determination: the use of a pH 9.5 NH4Cl buffer solution, before adding the solvent mixture, allows more rapid extraction, avoiding a centrifugation step, and reduces the global cost of analysis. After the extraction step, 6-methylmercaptopurine, synthesised during the enzymatic reaction, is determined by a liquid chromatographic assay. Analytical performance of the assay was tested on spiked erythrocyte lysates. The linear concentration range was 5-250 ng ml(-1) (r> or =0.997, slope=1.497, intercept=-0.367). The recoveries were 82.8, 89.9 and 82.2% for 75, 125 and 225 ng ml(-1), respectively. The coefficients of variation were < or =6.1% for within-day assay (n=6) and < or =9.5% for between-day assay precision (n=6; 14 days). TPMT activity was determined in a French adult Caucasian population (7 =70). The results ranged from 7.8 to 27.8 nmol h(-1) ml(-1) packed red blood cells and the frequency distribution histogram is similar to that previously published.

  13. Determining antioxidant activities of lactobacilli cell-free supernatants by cellular antioxidant assay: a comparison with traditional methods.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jiali; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Liu, Xiaoming; Gu, Zhennan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Antioxidant activity of lactic acid bacteria is associated with multiple health-protective effects. Traditional indexes of chemical antioxidant activities poorly reflect the antioxidant effects of these bacteria in vivo. Cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay was used in this study to determine the antioxidant activity of cell-free supernatants (CFSs) of 10 Lactobacillus strains. The performance of the CAA assay was compared with that of four chemical antioxidant activity assays, namely, DPPH radical scavenging, hydroxyl radical scavenging (HRS), reducing power (RP), and inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation (ILAP). Results of the CAA assay were associated with those of DPPH and ILAP assays, but not with those of RP and HRS assays. The inter- and intra-specific antioxidant activities of CFS were characterized by chemical and CAA assays. L. rhamnosus CCFM 1107 displayed a high antioxidative effect similar to positive control L. rhamnosus GG ATCC 53103 in all of the assays. The CAA assay is a potential method for the detection of antioxidant activities of lactobacilli CFSs. PMID:25789875

  14. Indole-based assay to assess the effect of ethanol on Pseudomonas putida F1 dioxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Márcio Luis Busi; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2010-06-01

    Toluene dioxygenase (TDO) is ubiquitous in nature and has a broad substrate range, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX). Pseudomonas putida F1 (PpF1) induced on toluene is known to produce indigo from indole through the activity of TDO. In this work, a spectrophotometric assay previously developed to measure indole to indigo production rates was modified to characterize the effects of various ethanol concentrations on toluene aerobic biodegradation activity and assess catabolite repression of TDO. Indigo production rate by cells induced on toluene alone was 0.0012 +/- 0.0006 OD(610) min(-1). The presence of ethanol did not fully repress TDO activity when toluene was also available as a carbon source. However, indigo production rates by PpF1 grown on ethanol:toluene mixtures (3:1 w/w) decreased by approximately 50%. Overall, the proposed spectrophotometric assay is a simple approach to quantify TDO activity, and demonstrates how the presence of ethanol in groundwater contaminated with reformulated gasoline is likely to interfere with naturally occurring microorganisms from fully expressing their aerobic catabolic potential towards hydrocarbons bioremediation.

  15. A continuous spectrophotometric assay that distinguishes between phospholipase A1 and A2 activities[S

    PubMed Central

    El Alaoui, Meddy; Soulère, Laurent; Noiriel, Alexandre; Popowycz, Florence; Khatib, Abdallah; Queneau, Yves; Abousalham, Abdelkarim

    2016-01-01

    A new spectrophotometric assay was developed to measure, continuously and specifically, phospholipase A1 (PLA1) or phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activities using synthetic glycerophosphatidylcholines (PCs) containing α-eleostearic acid, either at the sn-1 position [1-α-eleostearoyl-2-octadecyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (EOPC)] or at the sn-2 position [1-octadecyl-2-α-eleostearoyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (OEPC)]. The substrates were coated onto the wells of microtiter plates. A nonhydrolyzable ether bond, with a non-UV-absorbing alkyl chain, was introduced at the other sn position to prevent acyl chain migration during lipolysis. Upon enzyme action, α-eleostearic acid is liberated and then solubilized into the micellar phase. The PLA1 or PLA2 activity was measured by the increase in absorbance at 272 nm due to the transition of α-eleostearic acid from the adsorbed to the soluble state. EOPC and OEPC differentiate, with excellent accuracy, between PLA1 and PLA2 activity. Lecitase®, guinea pig pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (known to be a PLA1 enzyme), bee venom PLA2, and porcine pancreatic PLA2 were all used to validate the assay. Compared with current assays used for continuously measuring PLA1 or PLA2 activities and/or their inhibitors, the development of this sensitive enzymatic method, using coated PC substrate analogs to natural lipids and based on the UV spectroscopic properties of α-eleostearic acid, is a significant improvement. PMID:27194811

  16. Electrochemical cells for voltammetry, coulometry, and protein activity assays of small-volume biological samples.

    PubMed

    Feldman, B J; Gheller, S F; Bailey, G F; Newton, W E; Schultz, F A

    1990-02-15

    Cell designs, experimental protocols, and results for electrochemical investigation of small quantitites of biological materials under anaerobic conditions are reported. Three types of electrochemical experiments are considered: (i) cyclic voltammetry of 20- to 100-microliters samples; (ii) direct coulometry of 0.5- to 1.5-ml samples; and (iii) an electrochemically initiated protein activity assay which includes provision for analysis of gaseous reaction products and correlation with electron flux. The first two procedures are illustrated by measurement of the formal electrode potential (E0') and number of electrons transferred (n) in redox reactions of small quantities of biological and inorganic materials. The third procedure is illustrated by assaying the activity of the MoFe protein plus Fe protein complex from Azotobacter vinelandii nitrogenase for reduction of C2H2 to C2H4.

  17. Reconciling Apparent Variability in Effects of Biochar Amendment on Soil Enzyme Activities by Assay Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Smith, Jeffery L.; Bolton, Harvey

    2011-02-01

    Applying biochar to soils as an ameliorative substance and mechanism for C sequestration has received a great deal of interest in light of the sustained fertility observed in the Terra Preta soils of Brazil. The effects of synthetic biochars on biochemical processes needs to be better understood in order to determine if this is a reasonable practice in managed systems. The biochar studied was formed from the fast-pyrolysis of a switchgrass feedstock. Four soil enzymes were studied: β-glucosidase, β-N-acetylglucosaminidase, lipase, and leucine aminopeptidase. Both colorimetric and fluorescent assays were used for β-glucosidase and β-N-acetylglucosaminidase. Seven days after biochar was added to microcosms of a Palouse silt loam, the fluorescence-based assays indicated increased activities of the four enzymes, compared to non-amended soil. To clarify the mechanisms of the observed effects,in the absence of soil, purified enzymes or substrates were briefly exposed to biochar and then assayed. Except for β-N-acetylglucosaminidase, the exposure of substrate to biochar reduced the apparent activity of the remaining three enzymes in vitro, suggesting that sorption reactions between the substrate and biochar either removed the substrate from the assays or impeded the enzyme binding. The activity of purified β-N-acetylglucosaminidase increased significantly following biochar exposure, suggesting a chemical stimulation of enzyme functioning. We conclude that biochar added to soil acts as a substrate that can stimulate the soil microbial biomass and its activity. Our in vitro study suggests that biochar is not biochemically inert. Biochar amendments are likely to have effects that are currently difficult to predict, and that could impact overall soil function.

  18. Rapid parallel flow cytometry assays of active GTPases using effector beads

    PubMed Central

    Buranda, Tione; BasuRay, Soumik; Swanson, Scarlett; Agola, Jacob; Bondu, Virginie; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2013-01-01

    We describe a rapid assay for measuring the cellular activity of small GTPases in response to a specific stimulus. Effector functionalized beads are used to quantify in parallel multiple, GTP-bound GTPases in the same cell lysate by flow cytometry. In a biologically relevant example, five different Ras family GTPases are shown for the first time to be involved in a concerted signaling cascade downstream of receptor ligation by Sin Nombre hantavirus. PMID:23928044

  19. Screening of Dengue Virus Antiviral Activity of Marine Seaweeds by an In Situ Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Koishi, Andrea Cristine; Zanello, Paula Rodrigues; Bianco, Éverson Miguel; Bordignon, Juliano; Nunes Duarte dos Santos, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is a significant public health problem worldwide. Despite the important social and clinical impact, there is no vaccine or specific antiviral therapy for prevention and treatment of dengue virus (DENV) infection. Considering the above, drug discovery research for dengue is of utmost importance; in addition natural marine products provide diverse and novel chemical structures with potent biological activities that must be evaluated. In this study we propose a target-free approach for dengue drug discovery based on a novel, rapid, and economic in situ enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the screening of a panel of marine seaweed extracts. The in situ ELISA was standardized and validated for Huh7.5 cell line infected with all four serotypes of DENV, among them clinical isolates and a laboratory strain. Statistical analysis showed an average S/B of 7.2 and Z-factor of 0.62, demonstrating assay consistency and reliability. A panel of fifteen seaweed extracts was then screened at the maximum non-toxic dose previously determined by the MTT and Neutral Red cytotoxic assays. Eight seaweed extracts were able to reduce DENV infection of at least one serotype tested. Four extracts (Phaeophyta: Canistrocarpus cervicornis, Padina gymnospora; Rhodophyta: Palisada perforate; Chlorophyta: Caulerpa racemosa) were chosen for further evaluation, and time of addition studies point that they might act at an early stage of the viral infection cycle, such as binding or internalization. PMID:23227238

  20. Kinetic assays for determining in vitro APS reductase activity in plants without the use of radioactive substances.

    PubMed

    Brychkova, Galina; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Sagi, Moshe

    2012-09-01

    Adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase (APR; EC 1.8.4.9) catalyzes the two-electron reduction of APS to sulfite and AMP, a key step in the sulfate assimilation pathway in higher plants. In spite of the importance of this enzyme, methods currently available for detection of APR activity rely on radioactive labeling and can only be performed in a very few specially equipped laboratories. Here we present two novel kinetic assays for detecting in vitro APR activity that do not require radioactive labeling. In the first assay, APS is used as substrate and reduced glutathione (GSH) as electron donor, while in the second assay APS is replaced by an APS-regenerating system in which ATP sulfurylase catalyzes APS in the reaction medium, which employs sulfate and ATP as substrates. Both kinetic assays rely on fuchsin colorimetric detection of sulfite, the final product of APR activity. Incubation of the desalted protein extract, prior to assay initiation, with tungstate that inhibits the oxidation of sulfite by sulfite oxidase activity, resulted in enhancement of the actual APR activity. The reliability of the two methods was confirmed by assaying leaf extract from Arabidopsis wild-type and APR mutants with impaired or overexpressed APR2 protein, the former lacking APR activity and the latter exhibiting much higher activity than the wild type. The assays were further tested on tomato leaves, which revealed a higher APR activity than Arabidopsis. The proposed APR assays are highly specific, technically simple and readily performed in any laboratory.

  1. A rapid bioluminescence assay for measuring myeloperoxidase activity in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Goiffon, Reece J; Martinez, Sara C; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2015-02-10

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a circulating cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarker used to estimate clinical risk and patient prognosis. Current enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for MPO concentration are costly and time-intensive. Here we report a novel bioluminescence assay, designated MPO activity on a polymer surface (MAPS), for measuring MPO activity in human plasma samples using the bioluminescent substrate L-012. The method delivers a result in under an hour and is resistant to confounding effects from endogenous MPO inhibitors. In a pilot clinical study, we compared MAPS and two clinical ELISAs using 72 plasma samples from cardiac catheterization patients. Results from parallel MAPS and ELISAs were concordant within 2±11 μg l(-1) MPO with similar uncertainty and reproducibility. Results between parallel MAPS and ELISA were in better agreement than those between independent ELISAs. MAPS may provide an inexpensive and rapid assay for determining MPO activity in plasma samples from patients with CVD or potentially other immune and inflammatory disorders.

  2. A high-throughput colorimetric assay to measure the activity of glutamate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Hu, Sheng; Huang, Jun; Mei, Le-He

    2011-08-10

    A pH-sensitive colorimetric assay has been established to quantitatively measure glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity in bacterial cell extracts using a microplate format. GAD catalyzes the irreversible α-decarboxylation of L-glutamate to γ-aminobutyrate. The assay is based on the color change of bromocresol green due to an increase in pH as protons are consumed during the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Bromocresol green was chosen as the indicator because it has a similar pK(a) to the acetate buffer used. The corresponding absorbance change at 620 nm was recorded with a microplate reader as the reaction proceeded. A difference in the enzyme preparation pH and optimal pH for GAD activity of 2.5 did not prevent this method from successfully allowing the determination of reaction kinetic parameters and the detection of improvements in enzymatic activity with a low coefficient of variance. Our assay is simple, rapid, requires minimal sample concentration and can be carried out in robotic high-throughput devices used as standard in directed evolution experiments. In addition, it is also applicable to other reactions that involve a change in pH.

  3. A rapid bioluminescence assay for measuring myeloperoxidase activity in human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Goiffon, Reece J.; Martinez, Sara C.; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2015-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a circulating cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarker used to estimate clinical risk and patient prognosis. Current enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for MPO concentration are costly and time-intensive. Here we report a novel bioluminescence assay, designated MPO activity on a polymer surface (MAPS), for measuring MPO activity in human plasma samples using the bioluminescent substrate L-012. The method delivers a result in under an hour and is resistant to confounding effects from endogenous MPO inhibitors. In a pilot clinical study, we compared MAPS and two clinical ELISAs using 72 plasma samples from cardiac catheterization patients. Results from parallel MAPS and ELISAs were concordant within 2±11 μg l−1 MPO with similar uncertainty and reproducibility. Results between parallel MAPS and ELISA were in better agreement than those between independent ELISAs. MAPS may provide an inexpensive and rapid assay for determining MPO activity in plasma samples from patients with CVD or potentially other immune and inflammatory disorders. PMID:25666092

  4. Assessment of estrogenic activity in Tunisian water and wastewater by E-screen assay.

    PubMed

    Limam, Atef; Talorete, Terence P N; Ali, Mourad Ben Sik; Kawano, Mitsuko; Jenhani, Amel Ben Rejeb; Abe, Yukuo; Ghrabi, Ahmed; Isoda, Hiroko

    2007-01-01

    Wastewater and surface water samples from three wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and three rivers in Tunisia were assayed for estrogenic activity using the E-screen assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results showed that all the Tunisian raw wastewater samples as well as the Roriche river water sample induced a strong proliferative response in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Tunisian raw wastewater had an average 17beta-estradiol content of 2,705.4 pg/ml, whereas that of the Roriche river was 36.7 pg/ml, which is sufficient for inducing endocrine-mediated responses in aquatic organisms. Results further showed that the Mornag WWTP, which uses the activated-sludge treatment system, has a higher estrogen removal efficiency than the stabilization ponds of the Gammart and pilot WWTPs. This study, which is the first of such studies in Tunisia, and probably the first in the North African region, underscores the need to detect and monitor the estrogenic activity of water and wastewater, given the scarcity of water in Tunisia and the detrimental impact of endocrine-disrupting compounds on the physiology of both animals and humans. PMID:18382414

  5. Development of a sensitive multi-well colorimetric assay for active NFκB

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Patricia; Ernest, Isabelle; Houbion, Andrée; Art, Muriel; Le Calvez, Hervé; Raes, Martine; Remacle, José

    2001-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NFκB) is a key factor in the immune response triggered by a wide variety of molecules such as inflammatory cytokines, or some bacterial and viral products. This transcription factor represents a new target for the development of anti-inflammatory molecules, but this type of research is currently hampered by the lack of a convenient and rapid screening assay for NFκB activation. Indeed, NFκB DNA-binding capacity is traditionally estimated by radioactive gel shift assay. Here we propose a new DNA-binding assay based on the use of multi-well plates coated with a cold oligonucleotide containing the consensus binding site for NFκB. The presence of the DNA-bound transcription factor is then detected by anti-NFκB antibodies and revealed by colorimetry. This assay is easy to use, non-radioactive, highly reproducible, specific for NFκB, more sensitive than regular radioactive gel shift and very convenient for high throughput screening. PMID:11160941

  6. A Cell-Based Assay for Measuring Endogenous BcrAbl Kinase Activity and Inhibitor Resistance.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Steven B; Noel, Brett M; Parker, Laurie L

    2016-01-01

    Kinase enzymes are an important class of drug targets, particularly in cancer. Cell-based kinase assays are needed to understand how potential kinase inhibitors act on their targets in a physiologically relevant context. Current cell-based kinase assays rely on antibody-based detection of endogenous substrates, inaccurate disease models, or indirect measurements of drug action. Here we expand on previous work from our lab to introduce a 96-well plate compatible approach for measuring cell-based kinase activity in disease-relevant human chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines using an exogenously added, multi-functional peptide substrate. Our cellular models natively express the BcrAbl oncogene and are either sensitive or have acquired resistance to well-characterized BcrAbl tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This approach measures IC50 values comparable to established methods of assessing drug potency, and its robustness indicates that it can be employed in drug discovery applications. This medium-throughput assay could bridge the gap between single target focused, high-throughput in vitro assays and lower-throughput cell-based follow-up experiments. PMID:27598410

  7. A Cell-Based Assay for Measuring Endogenous BcrAbl Kinase Activity and Inhibitor Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Steven B.; Noel, Brett M.; Parker, Laurie L.

    2016-01-01

    Kinase enzymes are an important class of drug targets, particularly in cancer. Cell-based kinase assays are needed to understand how potential kinase inhibitors act on their targets in a physiologically relevant context. Current cell-based kinase assays rely on antibody-based detection of endogenous substrates, inaccurate disease models, or indirect measurements of drug action. Here we expand on previous work from our lab to introduce a 96-well plate compatible approach for measuring cell-based kinase activity in disease-relevant human chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines using an exogenously added, multi-functional peptide substrate. Our cellular models natively express the BcrAbl oncogene and are either sensitive or have acquired resistance to well-characterized BcrAbl tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This approach measures IC50 values comparable to established methods of assessing drug potency, and its robustness indicates that it can be employed in drug discovery applications. This medium-throughput assay could bridge the gap between single target focused, high-throughput in vitro assays and lower-throughput cell-based follow-up experiments. PMID:27598410

  8. A nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry-based enzyme activity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Siuzdak, Gary; Northen, Trent R.; Lee, Jinq-Chyi; Hoang, Linh; Raymond, Jason; Hwang, Der-Ren; Yannone, Steven M.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Siuzdak, Gary

    2008-03-10

    We describe a Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) enzymatic (Nimzyme) assay in which enzyme substrates are immobilized on the mass spectrometry surface by using fluorous-phase interactions. This 'soft' immobilization allows efficient desorption/ionization while also enabling the use of surface-washing steps to reduce signal suppression from complex biological samples, which results from the preferential retention of the tagged products and reactants. The Nimzyme assay is sensitive to subpicogram levels of enzyme, detects both addition and cleavage reactions (sialyltransferase and galactosidase), is applicable over a wide range of pHs and temperatures, and can measure activity directly from crude cell lysates. The ability of the Nimzyme assay to analyze complex mixtures is illustrated by identifying and directly characterizing {beta}-1,4-galactosidase activity from a thermophilic microbial community lysate. The optimal enzyme temperature and pH were found to be 65 C and 5.5, respectively, and the activity was inhibited by both phenylethyl-{beta}-d-thiogalactopyranoside and deoxygalactonojirimycin. Metagenomic analysis of the community suggests that the activity is from an uncultured, unsequenced {gamma}-proteobacterium. In general, this assay provides an efficient method for detection and characterization of enzymatic activities in complex biological mixtures prior to sequencing or cloning efforts. More generally, this approach may have important applications for screening both enzymatic and inhibitor libraries, constructing and screening glycan microarrays, and complementing fluorous-phase organic synthesis. The interest in leveraging mass spectrometry for studying enzyme activities in complex biological samples derives from its high sensitivity and specificity; however, signal suppression and significant sample preparation requirements limit its overall utility (1). Here we describe a Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) enzymatic (Nimzyme

  9. Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid extraction and assay of alpha-emitting radionuclides from urine: demonstration of a novel radiobioassay method.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Matthew J; Carter, Jennifer C; MacLellan, Jay A; Warner, Cynthia L; Warner, Marvin G; Addleman, R Shane

    2011-08-01

    In the event of an accidental or intentional release of radionuclides into a populated area, massive numbers of people may require radiobioassay screening as triage for dose-reduction therapy or identification for longer-term follow-up. If the event released significant levels of beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclides, in vivo assays would be ineffective. Therefore, highly efficient and rapid analytical methods for radionuclide detection from submitted spot urine samples (≤50 mL) would be required. At present, the quantitative determination of alpha-emitting radionuclides from urine samples is highly labor intensive and requires significant time to prepare and analyze samples. Sorbent materials that provide effective collection and enable rapid assay could significantly streamline the radioanalytical process. The authors have demonstrated the use of magnetic nanoparticles as a novel method of extracting media for four alpha-emitting radionuclides of concern (polonium, radium, uranium and americium) from chemically-unmodified and pH-2 human urine. Herein, the initial experimental sorption results are presented along with a novel method that uses magnetic nanoparticles to extract radionuclides from unmodified human urine and then collect the magnetic field-induced particles for subsequent alpha-counting-source preparation. Additionally, a versatile human dose model is constructed that determines the detector count times required to estimate dose at specific protective-action thresholds. The model provides a means to assess a method's detection capabilities and uses fundamental health physics parameters and actual experimental data as core variables. The modeling shows that, with effective sorbent materials, rapid screening for alpha-emitters is possible with a 50-mL urine sample collected within 1 wk of exposure/intake. PMID:21709509

  10. Sensitive assay of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity in rat and human tissues using radioimmunoassay of neopterin

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, M.; Horikoshi, T.; Masada, M.; Akino, M.; Sugimoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Nagatsu, T.

    1986-04-01

    A highly sensitive and simple assay for the activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I (EC 3.5.4.16) was established using a newly developed radioimmunoassay. D-erythro-7,8-Dihydroneopterin triphosphate formed from GTP by GTP cyclohydrolase I was oxidized by iodine and dephosphorylated by alkaline phosphatase to D-erythro-neopterin, and quantified by a radioimmunoassay for D-erythro-neopterin. This method was highly sensitive and required only 0.2 mg of rat liver tissues for the measurement of the activity. It was reproducible and can be applied for the simultaneous assay of many samples. The activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I was measured in several rat tissues. For example, the enzyme activity in rat striatum (n = 5) was 13.7 +/- 1.5 pmol/mg protein per hour (mean +/- SE), and agreed well with those obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The activity in the autopsy human brains (caudate nucleus) was measured by this new method for the first time. The activity in the caudate nucleus from parkinsonian patients (n = 6) was 0.82 +/- 0.56 pmol/mg protein per hour which was significantly lower than the control value, 4.22 +/- 0.43 pmol/mg protein per hour (n = 10).

  11. Progress in high-throughput assays of MGMT and APE1 activities in cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, Panagiotis; Polychronaki, Nektaria; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A

    2012-08-01

    DNA repair activity is of interest as a potential biomarker of individual susceptibility to genotoxic agents. In view of the current trend for exploitation of large cohorts in molecular epidemiology projects, there is a pressing need for the development of phenotypic DNA repair assays that are high-throughput, very sensitive, inexpensive and reliable. Towards this goal we have developed and validated two phenotypic assays for the measurement of two DNA repair enzymes in cell extracts: (1) O(6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT), which repairs the O(6)-alkylguanine-type of adducts induced in DNA by alkylating genotoxins; and (2) apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE 1), which participates in base excision repair (BER) by causing a rate-limiting DNA strand cleavage 5' to the abasic sites. The MGMT assay makes use of the fact that: (a) the enzyme works by irreversibly transferring the alkyl group from the O(6) position of guanine to a cystein residue in its active site and thereby becomes inactivated and (b) that the free base O(6)-benzylguanine (BG) is a very good substrate for MGMT. In the new assay, cell extracts are incubated with BG tagged with biotin and the resulting MGMT-BG-biotin complex is immobilized on anti-MGMT-coated microtiter plates, followed by quantitation using streptavidin-conjugated alkaline phosphatase and a chemiluminescence-producing substrate. A one-step/one-tube phenotypic assay for APE1 activity has been developed based on the use of a fluorescent molecular beacon (partially self-complementary oligonucleotide with a hairpin-loop structure carrying a fluorophore and a quencher at each end). It also contains a single tetrahydrofuran residue (THF) which is recognized and cleaved by APE1, and the subsequently formed single-stranded oligomer becomes a fluorescence signal emitter. Both assays are highly sensitive, require very small amounts of protein extracts, are relatively inexpensive and can be easily automated. They have been

  12. [Detection of endotoxin activity in water environment and analysis of influence factors for TAL assay].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Liu, Wen-jun; Zhang, Ming-lu; Tian, Fang; Sun, Wen; Qian, Ling-jia; Zhan, Rui

    2013-09-01

    Endotoxins, derived from cell walls of most Gram-negative bacteria and some cyanobacteria, are common pyrogen and highly immunogenic molecules, and related to many diseases. In this paper, a detection method for endotoxin activity in water environment using kinetic-turbid assay of Tachypleus Amebocyte Lysate (TAL) was established, the influence of pH and salts on TAL assay was investigated. Results showed that it was favorable for TAL assay in the pH range of 6.0-8.4, at low pHs, inhibition results were observed and opposite results were obtained at high pHs. The pH should be adjusted by Tris-HCl (pH = 7.4) buffer before the endotoxin detection. No significant interference was shown in the detection of water containing NaCl, Na2SO4, CaCl2, MgCl2 and KCl with a concentration of less than 50 mg x L(-1), however, the inhibition occurred at the concentration up to 1000-10,000 mg x L(-1). Only 2. 5 mg x L(-1) of FeCl, Fe2(SO4)3, AlCl3 and Al2 (SO4)3 caused significant inhibition. Endotoxin activities of ultrapure water, tap water and recreational water were detected by TAL assay, and their endotoxin activities were < 0.06 EU x mL(-1), 0.46 EU x mL(-1) and 432. 68 EU x mL(-1), respectively. PMID:24288979

  13. "Singing in the Tube"--audiovisual assay of plant oil repellent activity against mosquitoes (Culex pipiens).

    PubMed

    Adams, Temitope F; Wongchai, Chatchawal; Chaidee, Anchalee; Pfeiffer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Plant essential oils have been suggested as a promising alternative to the established mosquito repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide). Searching for an assay with generally available equipment, we designed a new audiovisual assay of repellent activity against mosquitoes "Singing in the Tube," testing single mosquitoes in Drosophila cultivation tubes. Statistics with regression analysis should compensate for limitations of simple hardware. The assay was established with female Culex pipiens mosquitoes in 60 experiments, 120-h audio recording, and 2580 estimations of the distance between mosquito sitting position and the chemical. Correlations between parameters of sitting position, flight activity pattern, and flight tone spectrum were analyzed. Regression analysis of psycho-acoustic data of audio files (dB[A]) used a squared and modified sinus function determining wing beat frequency WBF ± SD (357 ± 47 Hz). Application of logistic regression defined the repelling velocity constant. The repelling velocity constant showed a decreasing order of efficiency of plant essential oils: rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), citronella (Cymbopogon nardus), tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia), clove (Syzygium aromaticum), lemon (Citrus limon), patchouli (Pogostemon cablin), DEET, cedar wood (Cedrus atlantica). In conclusion, we suggest (1) disease vector control (e.g., impregnation of bed nets) by eight plant essential oils with repelling velocity superior to DEET, (2) simple mosquito repellency testing in Drosophila cultivation tubes, (3) automated approaches and room surveillance by generally available audio equipment (dB[A]: ISO standard 226), and (4) quantification of repellent activity by parameters of the audiovisual assay defined by correlation and regression analyses.

  14. "Singing in the Tube"--audiovisual assay of plant oil repellent activity against mosquitoes (Culex pipiens).

    PubMed

    Adams, Temitope F; Wongchai, Chatchawal; Chaidee, Anchalee; Pfeiffer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Plant essential oils have been suggested as a promising alternative to the established mosquito repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide). Searching for an assay with generally available equipment, we designed a new audiovisual assay of repellent activity against mosquitoes "Singing in the Tube," testing single mosquitoes in Drosophila cultivation tubes. Statistics with regression analysis should compensate for limitations of simple hardware. The assay was established with female Culex pipiens mosquitoes in 60 experiments, 120-h audio recording, and 2580 estimations of the distance between mosquito sitting position and the chemical. Correlations between parameters of sitting position, flight activity pattern, and flight tone spectrum were analyzed. Regression analysis of psycho-acoustic data of audio files (dB[A]) used a squared and modified sinus function determining wing beat frequency WBF ± SD (357 ± 47 Hz). Application of logistic regression defined the repelling velocity constant. The repelling velocity constant showed a decreasing order of efficiency of plant essential oils: rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), citronella (Cymbopogon nardus), tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia), clove (Syzygium aromaticum), lemon (Citrus limon), patchouli (Pogostemon cablin), DEET, cedar wood (Cedrus atlantica). In conclusion, we suggest (1) disease vector control (e.g., impregnation of bed nets) by eight plant essential oils with repelling velocity superior to DEET, (2) simple mosquito repellency testing in Drosophila cultivation tubes, (3) automated approaches and room surveillance by generally available audio equipment (dB[A]: ISO standard 226), and (4) quantification of repellent activity by parameters of the audiovisual assay defined by correlation and regression analyses. PMID:26412058

  15. Fe65 does not stabilize AICD during activation of transcription in a luciferase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Huysseune, Sandra; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-Noel . E-mail: octave@nchm.ucl.ac.be

    2007-09-21

    The APP intracellular domain (AICD) could be involved in signaling via interaction with the adaptor protein Fe65, and with the histone acetyl transferase Tip60. However, the real function of AICD and Fe65 in regulation of transcription remains controversial. In this study, the human APPGal4 fusion protein was expressed in CHO cells and the transcriptional activity of AICDGal4 was measured in a luciferase-based reporter assay. AICDGal4 was stabilized by expression of Fe65 and levels of AICDGal4 controlled luciferase activity. On the contrary, when human APP was expressed in CHO cells, coexpression of Fe65 increased luciferase activity without affecting the amount of AICD fragment. AICD produced from APP was protected from degradation by orthophenanthroline, but not by lactacystine, indicating that AICD is not a substrate of the chymotryptic activity of the proteasome. It is concluded that Fe65 can control luciferase activity without stabilizing the labile AICD fragment.

  16. An easy-to-perform photometric assay for methyltransferase activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Schäberle, Till F; Siba, Christian; Höver, Thomas; König, Gabriele M

    2013-01-01

    Methyltransferases (MTs) catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to a suitable substrate. Such methylations are important modifications in secondary metabolisms, especially on natural products produced by polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases, many of which are of special interest due to their prominent pharmacological activities (e.g., lovastatin, cyclosporin). To gain basic biochemical knowledge on the methylation process, it is of immense relevance to simplify methods concerning experimental problems caused by a large variety in substrates. Here, we present a photometric method to analyze MT activity by measuring SAM consumption in a coupled enzyme assay.

  17. A High-Content Assay for Biosensor Validation and for Examining Stimuli that Affect Biosensor Activity.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Scott D; Hahn, Klaus M

    2014-12-01

    Biosensors are valuable tools used to monitor many different protein behaviors in vivo. Demand for new biosensors is high, but their development and characterization can be difficult. During biosensor design, it is necessary to evaluate the effects of different biosensor structures on specificity, brightness, and fluorescence responses. By co-expressing the biosensor with upstream proteins that either stimulate or inhibit the activity reported by the biosensor, one can determine the difference between the biosensor's maximally activated and inactivated state, and examine response to specific proteins. We describe here a method for biosensor validation in a 96-well plate format using an automated microscope. This protocol produces dose-response curves, enables efficient examination of many parameters, and unlike cell suspension assays, allows visual inspection (e.g., for cell health and biosensor or regulator localization). Optimization of single-chain and dual-chain Rho GTPase biosensors is addressed, but the assay is applicable to any biosensor that can be expressed or otherwise loaded in adherent cells. The assay can also be used for purposes other than biosensor validation, using a well-characterized biosensor as a readout for effects of upstream molecules.

  18. A continuous assay for foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C protease activity.

    PubMed

    Jaulent, Agnès M; Fahy, Aodhnait S; Knox, Stephen R; Birtley, James R; Roqué-Rosell, Núria; Curry, Stephen; Leatherbarrow, Robin J

    2007-09-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus is a highly contagious pathogen that spreads rapidly among livestock and is capable of causing widespread agricultural and economic devastation. The virus genome is translated to produce a single polypeptide chain that subsequently is cleaved by viral proteases into mature protein products, with one protease, 3C(pro), carrying out the majority of the cleavages. The highly conserved nature of this protease across different viral strains and its crucial role in viral maturation and replication make it a very desirable target for inhibitor design. However, the lack of a convenient and high-throughput assay has been a hindrance in the characterization of potential inhibitors. In this article, we report the development of a continuous assay with potential for high throughput using fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based peptide substrates. Several peptide substrates containing the 3C-specific cleavage site were synthesized, varying both the positions and separation of the fluorescent donor and quencher groups. The best substrate, with a specificity constant k(cat)/K(M) of 57.6+/-2.0M(-1) s(-1), was used in inhibition assays to further characterize the protease's activity against a range of commercially available inhibitors. The inhibition profile of the enzyme showed characteristics of both cysteine and serine proteases, with the chymotrypsin inhibitor TPCK giving stoichiometric inhibition of the enzyme and allowing active site titration of the 3C(pro).

  19. A Fluorometric Activity Assay for Light-Regulated Cyclic-Nucleotide-Monophosphate Actuators.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Charlotte Helene; Körschen, Heinz G; Nicol, Christopher; Gasser, Carlos; Seifert, Reinhard; Schwärzel, Martin; Möglich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    As a transformative approach in neuroscience and cell biology, optogenetics grants control over manifold cellular events with unprecedented spatiotemporal definition, reversibility, and noninvasiveness. Sensory photoreceptors serve as genetically encoded, light-regulated actuators and hence embody the cornerstone of optogenetics. To expand the scope of optogenetics, ever more naturally occurring photoreceptors are being characterized, and synthetic photoreceptors with customized, light-regulated function are being engineered. Perturbational control over intracellular cyclic-nucleotide-monophosphate (cNMP) levels is achieved via sensory photoreceptors that catalyze the making and breaking of these second messengers in response to light. To facilitate discovery, engineering and quantitative characterization of such light-regulated cNMP actuators, we have developed an efficient fluorometric assay. Both the formation and the hydrolysis of cNMPs are accompanied by proton release which can be quantified with the fluorescent pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). This assay equally applies to nucleotide cyclases, e.g., blue-light-activated bPAC, and to cNMP phosphodiesterases, e.g., red-light-activated LAPD. Key benefits include potential for parallelization and automation, as well as suitability for both purified enzymes and crude cell lysates. The BCECF assay hence stands to accelerate discovery and characterization of light-regulated actuators of cNMP metabolism. PMID:26965118

  20. Visualizing repetitive diffusion activity of double-strand RNA binding proteins by single molecule fluorescence assays.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hye Ran; Wang, Xinlei; Myong, Sua

    2016-08-01

    TRBP, one of double strand RNA binding proteins (dsRBPs), is an essential cofactor of Dicer in the RNA interference pathway. Previously we reported that TRBP exhibits repetitive diffusion activity on double strand (ds)RNA in an ATP independent manner. In the TRBP-Dicer complex, the diffusion mobility of TRBP facilitates Dicer-mediated RNA cleavage. Such repetitive diffusion of dsRBPs on a nucleic acid at the nanometer scale can be appropriately captured by several single molecule detection techniques. Here, we provide a step-by-step guide to four different single molecule fluorescence assays by which the diffusion activity of dsRBPs on dsRNA can be detected. One color assay, termed protein induced fluorescence enhancement enables detection of unlabeled protein binding and diffusion on a singly labeled RNA. Two-color Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in which labeled dsRBPs is applied to labeled RNA, allows for probing the motion of protein along the RNA axis. Three color FRET reports on the diffusion movement of dsRBPs from one to the other end of RNA. The single molecule pull down assay provides an opportunity to collect dsRBPs from mammalian cells and examine the protein-RNA interaction at single molecule platform. PMID:27012177

  1. Highly sensitive and selective immuno-capture/electrochemical assay of acetylcholinesterase activity in red blood cells: a biomarker of exposure to organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiqiong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity in red blood cells (RBCs) is a useful biomarker for biomonitoring of exposures to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and chemical nerve agents. In this paper, we reported a new method for AChE activity assay based on selective immuno-capture of AChE from biological samples followed by enzyme activity assay of captured AChE using a disposable electrochemical sensor. The electrochemical sensor is based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-gold (MWCNTs-Au) nanocomposites modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE), which is used for the immobilization of AChE specific antibody. Upon the completion of immunoreaction, the target AChE (including active and inhibited) is captured onto the electrode surface and followed by an electrochemical detection of enzymatic activity in the presence of acetylthiocholine. A linear response is obtained over standard AChE concentration range from 0.1 to 10 nM. To demonstrate the capability of this new biomonitoring method, AChE solutions dosed with different concentrations of paraoxon were used to validate the new AChE assay method. AChE inhibition in OP dosed solutions was proportional to OP concentration from 0.2 to 50 nM. The new AChE activity assay method for biomonitoring of OP exposure was further validated with in vitro paraoxon-dosed RBC samples. The established electrochemical sensing platform for AChE activity assay not only avoids the problem of overlapping substrate specificity with esterases by using selective antibody, but also eliminates potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It offers a new approach for sensitive, selective, and rapid AChE activity assay for biomonitoring of exposure to OPs.

  2. Highly Sensitive and Selective Immuno-capture/Electrochemical Assay of Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Red Blood Cells: A Biomarker of Exposure to Organophosphorus Pesticides and Nerve Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Aiqiong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-09

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity in red blood cells (RBCs) is a useful biomarker for biomonitoring of exposures to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and chemical nerve agents. In this paper, we reported a new method for AChE activity assay based on selective immuno-capture of AChE from biological samples followed by enzyme activity assay of captured AChE using a disposable electrochemical sensor. The electrochemical sensor is based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-gold nanocomposites (MWCNTs-Au) modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE). Upon the completion of immunoreaction, the target AChE (including active and inhibited) is captured onto the electrode surface and followed by an electrochemical detection of enzymatic activity in the presence of acetylthiocholine. A linear response is obtained over standard AChE concentration range from 0.1 to 10 nM. To demonstrate the capability of this new biomonitoring method, AChE solutions dosed with different concentration of paraoxon were used to validate the new AChE assay method. AChE inhibition in OP dosed solutions was proportional to its concentration from 0.2 to 50 nM. The new AChE activity assay method for biomonitoring of OP exposure was further validated with in-vitro paraoxon-dosed RBC samples. The established electrochemical sensing platform for AChE activity assay not only avoids the problem of overlapping substrate specificity with esterases by using selective antibody, but also eliminates potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It offers a new approach for sensitive, selective, and rapid AChE activity assay for biomonitoring of exposures to OPs.

  3. SELENIUM TREATMENT/REMOVAL ALTERNATIVES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM ACTIVITY III, PROJECT 20

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the final report for EPA's Mine WAste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 20--Selenium Treatment/Removal Alternatives Demonstration project. Selenium contamination originates from many sources including mining operations, mineral processing, abandoned...

  4. Estrogenic and androgenic activities of TBBA and TBMEPH, metabolites of novel brominated flame retardants, and selected bisphenols, using the XenoScreen XL YES/YAS assay.

    PubMed

    Fic, Anja; Žegura, Bojana; Gramec, Darja; Mašič, Lucija Peterlin

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated and compared the estrogenic and androgenic activities of the three different classes of environmental pollutants and their metabolites using the XenoScreen XL YES/YAS assay, which has advantages compared with the original YES/YAS protocol. Contrary to the parent brominated flame retardants TBB and TBPH, which demonstrated no or very weak (anti)estrogenic or (anti)androgenic activities, their metabolites, TBBA and TBMEPH, exhibited anti-estrogenic (IC50 for TBBA=31.75 μM and IC50 for TBMEPH=0.265 μM) and anti-androgenic (IC50 for TBBA=73.95 μM and IC50 for TBMEPH=2.92 μM) activities. These results reveal that metabolism can enhance the anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic effects of these two novel brominated flame retardants. Based on the activities of BPAF, BPF, BPA and MBP, we can conclude that the XenoScreen XL YES/YAS assay gives comparable results to the (anti)estrogenic or (anti)androgenic assays that are reported in the literature. For BPA, it was confirmed previously that the metabolite formed after an ipso-reaction (hydroxycumyl alcohol) exhibited higher estrogenic activity compared with the parent BPA, but this was not confirmed for BPAF and BPF ipso-metabolites, which were not active in the XenoScreen YES/YAS assay. Among the substituted BPA analogues, bis-GMA exhibited weak anti-estrogenic activity, BADGE demonstrated weak anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities (IC50=13.73 μM), and the hydrolysed product BADGE·2H2O demonstrated no (anti)estrogenic or (anti)androgenic activities.

  5. H2Oh!: Classroom demonstrations and activities for improving student learning of water concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan-Hilton, A.; Neupauer, R. M.; Burian, S. J.; Lauer, J. W.; Mathisen, P. P.; Mays, D. C.; Olson, M. S.; Pomeroy, C. A.; Ruddell, B. L.; Sciortino, A.

    2012-12-01

    Research has shown that the use of demonstrations and hands-on activities in the classroom enhances student learning. Students learn more and enjoy classes more when visual and active learning are incorporated into the lecture. Most college-aged students prefer visual modes of learning, while most instruction is conducted in a lecture, or auditory, format. The use of classroom demonstrations provides opportunities for incorporating visual and active learning into the classroom environment. However, while most instructors acknowledge the benefits of these teaching methods, they typically do not have the time and resources to develop and test such activities and to develop plans to incorporate them into their lectures. Members of the Excellence in Water Resources Education Task Committee of the Environmental and Water Resources Institute (EWRI) of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) have produced a publication that contains a collection of activities aimed to foster excellence in water resources and hydrology education and improve student learning of principles. The book contains forty-five demonstrations and activities that can be used in water-related classes with topics in fluid mechanics, hydraulics, surface water hydrology, groundwater hydrology, and water quality. We present examples of these activities, including topics such as conservation of momentum, buoyancy, Bernoulli's principle, drag force, pipe flow, watershed delineation, reservoir networks, head distribution in aquifers, and molecular diffusion in a porous medium. Unlike full laboratory exercises, these brief demonstrations and activities (most of which take less than fifteen minutes) can be easily incorporated into classroom lectures. For each demonstration, guidance for preparing and conducting the activity, along with a brief overview of the principles that are demonstrated, is provided. The target audience of the activities is undergraduate students, although the activities also may be

  6. Research on the chemical inactivation of antibiotic activity in assays of sterility and contamination of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Negretti, F; Casetta, P

    1991-01-01

    Membrane filtration, frequently used for removing antibacterial activity in assays of sterility and contamination of the antibiotics, presents the drawback of adsorption of antibiotic to membrane. The washing with large volumes of peptone water removes partially interferences with microbial growth. We evaluated the inactivating action of some chemical substances (albumin, calcium pantothenate, heparin, hydroxylamine, tri-valent iron) on the antimicrobial activity of membranes employed for antibiotic filtration. The results are not positive for the use of chemical substances in the antibiotic activity neutralization. In fact the per cent reduction of inhibition zones ranges from -61.5% to +20.0% and the inhibiting activity on the growth of colony forming units (CFU) oscillates from 89.6% to 100%. Discovery of new neutralizing substances and severe measures of asepsis in pharmaceutical production are recommended. PMID:12041793

  7. Comparative analysis of cholinesterase activities in food animals using modified Ellman and Michel assays

    PubMed Central

    Askar, Kasim Abass; Kudi, A. Caleb; Moody, A. John

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated correlations between modified Ellman and Michel assay methods for measuring cholinesterase (ChE) activities. It also established a foundation for the applicability of measuring ChE activities in food animal species as biochemical biomarkers for evaluating exposure to and effects of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides. Measuring ChE activities in blood and tissue is currently the most important method of confirming the diagnosis of such exposure. The study also characterized the level of ChE activity in the selected organs/tissues of these animals and determined the best organ/tissue in which to measure ChE activity. The ChE activities were found to be higher in cattle than in sheep and higher in erythrocytes than in plasma and serum. The anticoagulant heparin significantly affects AChE activity in plasma compared with ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA). Of the different tissues tested, the mean of ChE activities was found to be highest in tissue from liver, followed by lung, muscle, kidney, and heart for sheep and cattle. In pigs, the ChE activities tested higher in kidney, liver, lung, muscle, and heart. The highest activities of ChE were found in pigs, followed by cattle and sheep. There was no significant difference between the modified Ellman and Michel method, but the percentage coefficient of variance (%CV) values were higher when the Michel method was used. PMID:22468023

  8. Estrogenic activity assessment of environmental chemicals using in vitro assays: identification of two new estrogenic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Lascombe, I; Beffa, D; Rüegg, U; Tarradellas, J; Wahli, W

    2000-01-01

    Environmental chemicals with estrogenic activities have been suggested to be associated with deleterious effects in animals and humans. To characterize estrogenic chemicals and their mechanisms of action, we established in vitro and cell culture assays that detect human estrogen receptor [alpha] (hER[alpha])-mediated estrogenicity. First, we assayed chemicals to determine their ability to modulate direct interaction between the hER[alpha] and the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and in a competition binding assay to displace 17ss-estradiol (E(2)). Second, we tested the chemicals for estrogen-associated transcriptional activity in the yeast estrogen screen and in the estrogen-responsive MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. The chemicals investigated in this study were o,p'-DDT (racemic mixture and enantiomers), nonylphenol mixture (NPm), and two poorly analyzed compounds in the environment, namely, tris-4-(chlorophenyl)methane (Tris-H) and tris-4-(chlorophenyl)methanol (Tris-OH). In both yeast and MCF-7 cells, we determined estrogenic activity via the estrogen receptor (ER) for o,p'-DDT, NPm, and for the very first time, Tris-H and Tris-OH. However, unlike estrogens, none of these xenobiotics seemed to be able to induce ER/SRC-1 interactions, most likely because the conformation of the activated receptor would not allow direct contacts with this coactivator. However, these compounds were able to inhibit [(3)H]-E(2) binding to hER, which reveals a direct interaction with the receptor. In conclusion, the test compounds are estrogen mimics, but their molecular mechanism of action appears to be different from that of the natural hormone as revealed by the receptor/coactivator interaction analysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:10903615

  9. Arsenite as the probable active species in the human carcinogenicity of arsenic: mouse micronucleus assays on Na and K arsenite, orpiment, and Fowler's solution.

    PubMed Central

    Tinwell, H; Stephens, S C; Ashby, J

    1991-01-01

    Sodium arsenite, potassium arsenite, and Fowler's solution (arsenic trioxide dissolved in potassium bicarbonate) are equally active in the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay (approximately 10 mg/kg by IP injection). The natural ore orpiment (principally As2S3) was inactive despite blood levels of arsenic of 300 to 900 ng/mL in treated mice at 24 hr. Sodium arsenite was active in three strains of mice. It is suggested that the human lung cancer observed among arsenic ore smelters and the skin cancer among people exposed therapeutically to Fowler's solution, have, as their common origin, the genotoxic arsenite ion AsO2-. The difficulty experienced when attempting to demonstrate rodent carcinogenicity for derivatives of arsenic suggests that the bone marrow micronucleus assay may act as a useful assay for potentially carcinogenic arsenic derivatives. PMID:1821373

  10. Double-layered collagen gel hemisphere for cell invasion assay: successful visualization and quantification of cell invasion activity.

    PubMed

    Takata, Masahiko; Maniwa, Yoshimasa; Doi, Takefumi; Tanaka, Yugo; Okada, Kenji; Nishio, Wataru; Ohbayashi, Chiho; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Okita, Yutaka

    2007-10-01

    Although various methods for collagen gel-based cell invasion assays have been described, there continues to be a need for a simpler and more objective assay. Here, we describe an easy-to-prepare double-layered collagen gel hemisphere (DL-CGH) system that satisfies these requirements, and we demonstrate the advantages of this new system for visualizing cell movements during invasion. DL-CGH consists of a central core collagen layer surrounded by an outer cover collagen layer. A droplet of collagen I solution (containing cells to be examined) naturally forms a small hemisphere on the bottom of the culture dish. After this central core layer gels, a second droplet is placed atop the first gel, encapsulating it completely. The hemisphere is submerged in the medium and cultured. The invasive activity of cells that infiltrate from the inner to the outer layer can be evaluated optically. Using this in vitro system, we measured the inhibitory effect of E-cadherin expression on cancer cell invasion. DL-CGH also allowed visualization of interactions between invading cancer cells and the stroma. Cancer cells, which lack the proteases required for direct entrance into the three-dimensional collagen matrix, were seen to slip like amoebas through matrix gaps generated by the pericellular proteolytic activity of fibroblasts. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Cell Communication and Adhesion for the following free supplemental resources: Movies 1-3; 4a and b]. PMID:17957531

  11. Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid extraction and assay of alpha-emitting radionuclides from urine: Demonstration of a novel radiobioassay method

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, Matthew J.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2011-08-01

    In the event of an accidental or intentional release of radionuclides into a populated area, three things must occur in a timely manner: food and drinking water supplies must be determined to be safe to eat / drink, civilians and/or military personnel must be surveyed to ensure that they do not have external contamination, and they must be screened to ensure that significant ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides has not occurred (this paper is concerned with the latter). In the event of such a disaster, the volume of radiobioassays to be performed would be tremendous. If the event released significant levels of β- or α-emitting radionuclides, in vivo assays would be ineffective. Therefore, highly efficient and rapid analytical methods for radionuclide detection from submitted spot urine samples (≤ 50 mL) would be required. At present, the quantitative determination of α-emitting radionuclides from urine samples is highly labor intensive, and requires significant sample preparation and analysis time. Sorbent materials that provide effective collection and enable rapid assay could significantly streamline the radioanalytical process. We have demonstrated the use of paramagnetic nanoparticles as a novel class of extracting media for four α-emitting radionuclides of concern (Po, Ra, Am, and U) from chemically unmodified and pH 2 human urine. Herein the initial experimental sorption results are presented along with a novel method that utilizes paramagnetic nanoparticles for the extraction of radionuclides from unmodified human urine followed by the magnetic field-induced collection of the particles for subsequent α-counting-source preparation. Additionally, we construct a versatile human dose model that determines the detector count times required to estimate internal human dose at specific protective action thresholds. The model provides a means to assess a method’s detection capabilities and use fundamental health physics parameters and actual experimental

  12. A fluorometric assay for measurement of mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Klebl, B M; Pette, D

    1996-08-01

    Using 1,N6-etheno NAD, a fluorescent analog of NAD, we extended an existing assay for NAD glycohydrolase to the measurement of mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase (mADP-RT) activity using agmatine as acceptor for ADP-ribose. The reaction products were analyzed by reversed-phase chromatography. In the presence of agmatine two newly formed fluorescent products were tentatively identified as ADP-ribosylagmatine anomers. Fluorescence intensity increased upon splitting the N-glycoside bondage of 1,N6-etheno NAD. Therefore, 1, N6-etheno AMP could be used for calibration. The nonradioactive assay yielded values nearly identical to those obtained with the [carbonyl-14C]NAD method. It proved to be highly reproducible, rapid, and suitable for an improved purification protocol yielding a 76,000-fold enriched mADP-RT preparation from rabbit skeletal muscle. The identity and high purity of the enzyme were confirmed immunochemically. The assay served to determine the pH optimum of the enzyme (pH 9.0) and its KM for 1,N6-etheno NAD (287 microM). PMID:8811894

  13. A Simple Assay to Screen Antimicrobial Compounds Potentiating the Activity of Current Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Junaid; Kazmi, Shahana Urooj; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to pose a significant problem in the management of bacterial infections, despite advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and supportive care. Here, we suggest a simple, inexpensive, and easy-to-perform assay to screen antimicrobial compounds from natural products or synthetic chemical libraries for their potential to work in tandem with the available antibiotics against multiple drug-resistant bacteria. The aqueous extract of Juglans regia tree bark was tested against representative multiple drug-resistant bacteria in the aforementioned assay to determine whether it potentiates the activity of selected antibiotics. The aqueous extract of J. regia bark was added to Mueller-Hinton agar, followed by a lawn of multiple drug-resistant bacteria, Salmonella typhi or enteropathogenic E. coli. Next, filter paper discs impregnated with different classes of antibiotics were placed on the agar surface. Bacteria incubated with extract or antibiotics alone were used as controls. The results showed a significant increase (>30%) in the zone of inhibition around the aztreonam, cefuroxime, and ampicillin discs compared with bacteria incubated with the antibiotics/extract alone. In conclusion, our assay is able to detect either synergistic or additive action of J. regia extract against multiple drug-resistant bacteria when tested with a range of antibiotics. PMID:23865073

  14. Classroom Activity Connections: Demonstrating Various Flame Tests Using Common Household Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Bruce W.; Hasbrouck, Scott; Smith, Jordan; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    In "JCE" Activity #67, "Flame Tests: Which Ion Causes the Color?", Michael Sanger describes how to conduct flame tests with household items. We have used this activity in outreach settings, and have extended it in a variety of ways. For example, we have demonstrated large-scale strontium (red), copper (green), and carbon (blue) flames using only…

  15. Teaching with Movement: Using the Health Privilege Activity to Physically Demonstrate Disparities in Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby-Shasanmi, Amy; Oberlin, Kathleen C.; Saunders, Tiffani N.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes and evaluates an activity designed to demonstrate how biological factors (e.g., genetics), individual-level behaviors (e.g., smoking), and social factors (e.g., socioeconomic status) shape health status and access to health care. Active learning techniques were utilized to introduce the sociological imagination as it…

  16. Da0324, an inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB activation, demonstrates selective antitumor activity on human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Xia, Yiqun; Chen, Qiuxiang; Li, Wulan; Chen, Dahui; Ye, Hui; Zhao, Chengguang; Du, Xiaojing; Shi, Dengjian; Wu, Jianzhang; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is constitutively activated in a variety of human cancers, including gastric cancer. NF-κB inhibitors that selectively kill cancer cells are urgently needed for cancer treatment. Curcumin is a potent inhibitor of NF-κB activation. Unfortunately, the therapeutic potential of curcumin is limited by its relatively low potency and poor cellular bioavailability. In this study, we presented a novel NF-κB inhibitor named Da0324, a synthetic asymmetric mono-carbonyl analog of curcumin. The purpose of this study is to research the expression of NF-κB in gastric cancer and the antitumor activity and mechanism of Da0324 on human gastric cancer cells. Methods The expressions between gastric cancer tissues/cells and normal gastric tissues/cells of NF-κB were evaluated by Western blot. The inhibition viability of compounds on human gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901, BGC-823, MGC-803, and normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell line GES-1 was assessed with the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Absorption spectrum method and high-performance liquid chromatography method detected the stability of the compound in vitro. The compound-induced changes of inducible NF-κB activation in the SGC-7901 and BGC-823 cells were examined by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence methods. The antitumor activity of compound was performed by clonogenic assay, matrigel invasion assay, flow cytometric analysis, Western blot analysis, and Hoechst 33258 staining assay. Results High levels of p65 were found in gastric cancer tissues and cells. Da0324 displayed higher growth inhibition against several types of gastric cancer cell lines and showed relatively low toxicity to GES-1. Moreover, Da0324 was more stable than curcumin in vitro. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence methods showed that Da0324 blocked NF-κB activation. In addition, Da0324 significantly inhibited tumor proliferation

  17. Quantifying microbial activity in deep subsurface sediments using a tritium based hydrognease enzyme assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, R.; Nickel, J.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Microbial life is widespread in Earth's subsurface and estimated to represent a significant fraction of Earth's total living biomass. However, very little is known about subsurface microbial activity and its fundamental role in biogeochemical cycles of carbon and other biologically important elements. Hydrogen is one of the most important elements in subsurface anaerobic microbial metabolism. Heterotrophic and chemoautotrophic microorganisms use hydrogen in their metabolic pathways. They either consume or produce protons for ATP synthesis. Hydrogenase (H2ase) is a ubiquitous intracellular enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of molecular hydrogen and/or water into protons and electrons. The protons are used for the synthesis of ATP, thereby coupling energy generating metabolic processes to electron acceptors such as CO2 or sulfate. H2ase enzyme targets a key metabolic compound in cellular metabolism therefore the assay can be used as a measure for total microbial activity without the need to identify any specific metabolic process. Using the highly sensitive tritium assay we measured H2ase enzyme activity in the organic-rich sediments of Lake Van, a saline, alkaline lake in eastern Turkey, in marine sediments of the Barents Sea and in deep subseafloor sediments from the Nankai Trough. H2ase activity could be quantified at all depths of all sites but the activity distribution varied widely with depth and between sites. At the Lake Van sites H2ase activity ranged from ca. 20 mmol H2 cm-3d-1 close to the sediment-water interface to 0.5 mmol H2 cm-3d-1 at a depth of 0.8 m. In samples from the Barents Sea H2ase activity ranged between 0.1 to 2.5 mmol H2 cm-3d-1 down to a depth of 1.60 m. At all sites the sulfate reduction rate profile followed the upper part of the H2ase activity profile until sulfate reduction reached the minimum detection limit (ca. 10 pmol cm-3d-1). H2ase activity could still be quantified after the decline of sulfate reduction, indicating that

  18. The antioxidant activity of sulphurous thermal water protects against oxidative DNA damage: a comet assay investigation.

    PubMed

    Braga, P C; Ceci, C; Marabini, L; Nappi, G

    2013-04-01

    Various studies have recently shown that sulphurous waters acts against the oxidants released during respiratory bursts of human neutrophils, and free radicals such as HO•, O2¯•, Tempol and Fremy's salt. However, there is still a lack of data concerning their direct protection of DNA. The aim of this study was to investigate the antigenotoxicity effects of sulphurous water, which has never been previously investigated for this purpose, using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) approach (comet assay). The comet assay is a sensitive method for assessing DNA fragmentation in individual cells in genotoxicity studies but can also be used to investigate the activity of agents that protect against DNA damage. The extent of migration was measured by means of SCGE, and DNA damage was expressed as tail moment. All of these assays were made using natural sulphurous water, degassed sulphurous water (no detectable HS), and reconstituted sulphurous water (degassed plus NaHS). DNA damages was significantly inhibited by natural water with HS concentrations of 5.0 and 2.5 μg/mL. The use of degassed water did not lead to any significant differences from baseline values, whereas the reconstituted water led to significant results overlapping those obtained using natural water. These findings confirm the importance of the presence of an HS group (reductive activity) and indicate that, in addition to their known mucolytic activity and trophic effects on respiratory mucosa, HS groups in sulphurous water also protect against oxidative DNA damage and contribute to the water's therapeutic effects on upper and lower airway inflammatory diseases.

  19. Utility of an appropriate reporter assay: Heliotrine interferes with GAL4/upstream activation sequence-driven reporter gene systems.

    PubMed

    Luckert, Claudia; Hessel, Stefanie; Lampen, Alfonso; Braeuning, Albert

    2015-10-15

    Reporter gene assays are widely used for the assessment of transcription factor activation following xenobiotic exposure of cells. A critical issue with such assays is the possibility of interference of test compounds with the test system, for example, by direct inhibition of the reporter enzyme. Here we show that the pyrrolizidine alkaloid heliotrine interferes with reporter signals derived from GAL4-based nuclear receptor transactivation assays by a mechanism independent of luciferase enzyme inhibition. These data highlight the necessity to conduct proper control experiments in order to avoid perturbation of reporter assays by test chemicals.

  20. An improved thyroid hormone reporter assay to determine the thyroid hormone-like activity of amiodarone, bithionol, closantel and rafoxanide.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kana; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Sugihara, Kazumi; Fujimoto, Nariaki

    2012-01-01

    A number of environmental chemicals have been reported to exhibit thyroid hormone-like activity. Since thyroid hormones play a crucial role in development, it is important to identify chemicals in the environment that are capable of endocrine disruption of thyroid hormone homeostasis. In order to detect thyroid hormone-like activity, the growth of pituitary cell lines has been commonly used as a sensitive marker, albeit with limited specificity to thyroid hormones. Reporter gene assays using the thyroid hormone responsive element (TRE) connected to the luciferase reporter gene have also been developed. Thus far however, this type of assay appears to have limited sensitivity compared to cell growth assays. In the present study, we developed a highly sensitive TRE reporter gene assay by using a pituitary cell line, MtT/E-2, and by culturing cells in a serum-free medium. Our assay was developed in order to detect T3 activity at a concentration of 10(-11)M. This assay identified thyroid hormone-like activity from the antiarrhythmic drug, amiodarone, and from three anti-parasitic drugs, bithionol, closantel and rafoxanide, all commonly used in veterinary medicine. Thyroid hormone-like activity of these compounds was further confirmed by the induction of BCL3 gene expression in MtT/E-2, which is known to be regulated by thyroid hormones. Our improved assay was proved to be a sensitive tool for assessing thyroid hormone-like activity of environmental chemicals. PMID:22015988

  1. A simple assay for determining activities of phosphopentomutase from a hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Hanan M A; Zaghloul, Taha I; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-05-15

    Phosphopentomutase (PPM) catalyzes the interconversion of α-D-(deoxy)-ribose 1-phosphate and α-D-(deoxy)-ribose 5-phosphate. We developed a coupled or uncoupled enzymatic assay with an enzyme nucleoside phosphorylase for determining PPM activities on D-ribose 5-phosphate at a broad temperature range from 30 to 90 °C. This assay not only is simple and highly sensitive but also does not require any costly special instrument. Via this technology, an open reading frame TM0167 from a thermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima putatively encoding PPM was cloned. The recombinant PPM was overexpressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta. This enzyme has the highest activity at 90 °C. MnCl2 (0.1 mM) and 50 μM α-D-glucose 1,6-bisphosphate are cofactors. The kinetic parameters of Km and kcat are 1.2 mM and 185 s(-1) at 90 °C, respectively. The enzyme has a half-life time of up to 156 min at 90 °C. This enzyme is the most active and thermostable PPM reported to date. PMID:26924489

  2. Improved assay for cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity using phospholipid liposome solubilized substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Junker, L.H.; Story, J.A.

    1985-10-01

    A persistent problem in measurement of cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (7 alpha-OHase) activity by isotope incorporation has been solubilization of cholesterol substrate. Solubilization with Tween 20, for example, resulted in a 75% reduction in 7 alpha-OHase activity after a 60 min incubation of substrate with microsomes. Incorporation of cholesterol substrate into small, unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) prevented this effect, resulting in a 50% increase in activity over the same 60 min incubation at optimal concentrations. Using cholesterol in liposomes as substrate, standard assay conditions were determined to be: preparation of liposomes with 180 microM cholesterol substrate and 0.5 mg phospholipid/assay; incubation of these liposomes with 0.5 mg microsomal protein at 37 C for 60 min; addition of a NADPH generating system to start the reaction, and incubation at 37 C for 30 min before stopping the reaction and determining the amount of 7 alpha-hydroxycholesterol formed. This method provides a sensitive and reliable alternative to methods which require more sophisticated equipment and allows total control of substrate concentration in a form readily accessible to the enzyme.

  3. A plaque assay for malignant catarrhal fever virus and virus neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, D T

    1980-05-01

    A cell-free strain of malignant catarrhal fever virus which produced a readily recognizable cytopathic effect was obtained by serial passage of the virus in a rabbit kidney cell line. Plaque assay of the virus was more rapid and gave higher titres 11 days postinoculation than tube titration, but the latter advantage decreased with a longer incubation period. Plaques were clear with sharp edges and measured 0.5 to 2 mm in diameter after 15 days. A plaque neutralization test was developed and successfully employed for the titration of malignant catarrhal fever virus neutralizing activity in the sera and nasal secretions of blue wildebeest.

  4. A chromism-based assay (CHROBA) technique for in situ detection of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Tomizaki, Kin-ya; Jie, Xu; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2005-03-15

    A unique chromism-based assay technique (CHROBA) using photochromic spiropyran-containing peptides has been firstly established for detection of protein kinase A-catalyzed phosphorylation. The alternative method has advantages that avoid isolation and/or immobilization of kinase substrates to remove excess reagents including nonreactive isotope-labeled ATP or fluorescently-labeled anti-phosphoamino acid antibodies from the reaction mixture. Such a novel protocol based on thermocoloration of the spiropyran moiety in the peptide can offer not only an efficient screening method of potent kinase substrates but also a versatile analytical tool for monitoring other post-translational modification activities. PMID:15745830

  5. Comparative Antimicrobial Activities of Aerosolized Sodium Hypochlorite, Chlorine Dioxide, and Electrochemically Activated Solutions Evaluated Using a Novel Standardized Assay

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, R. M. S.; Robinson, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a standardized experimental assay to enable differential antimicrobial comparisons of test biocidal aerosols. This study represents the first chlorine-matched comparative assessment of the antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solution (ECAS) to determine their relative abilities to decontaminate various surface-associated health care-relevant microbial challenges. Standard microbiological challenges were developed by surface-associating typed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis spores, or a clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain on stainless steel, polypropylene, or fabric. All test coupons were subjected to 20-min biocidal aerosols of chlorine-matched (100 ppm) sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, or ECAS within a standard aerosolization chamber using a commercial humidifier under defined conditions. Biocidal treatment type and material surface had a significant effect on the number of microorganisms recovered from various material surfaces following treatment exposure. Under the conditions of the assay, the order of antimicrobial efficacy of biocidal aerosol treatment was as follows: ECAS > chlorine dioxide > sodium hypochlorite. For all biocides, greater antimicrobial reductions were seen when treating stainless steel and fabric than when treating plastic-associated microorganisms. The experimental fogging system and assay protocol designed within this study were shown capable of differentiating the comparative efficacies of multiple chlorine-matched biocidal aerosols against a spectrum of target organisms on a range of test surface materials and would be appropriate for testing other biocidal aerosol treatments or material surfaces. PMID:23459480

  6. A continuous spectrophotometric assay for the activation of plant NAD kinase by calmodulin, calcium(II), and europium(III) ions.

    PubMed

    Amann, B T; Mulqueen, P; Horrocks, W D

    1992-12-01

    A continuous spectrophotometric assay has been developed to quantify the calmodulin, calcium(II) ion, and europium(III) ion dependence of the activation of NAD kinase from pea seedlings. Experimental enzyme activation data are compared with the theoretical curves for the binding of calcium(II) ions to the individual calcium binding sites of calmodulin. These results indicate that the binding of three calcium(II) ions is necessary for activation of plant NAD kinase. Further studies demonstrate that europium(III) ions can replace calcium(II) ions in calmodulin with retention of its ability to activate NAD kinase.

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details three demonstrations for use in chemistry classrooms. Includes: "A Demonstration of Corrosion by Differential Aeration"; "A Simple Demonstration of the Activation Energy Concept"; and "A Boiling Demonstration at Room Temperature." Each description includes equipment, materials, and methods. (CW)

  8. A Novel Cell-Associated Protection Assay Demonstrates the Ability of Certain Antibiotics To Protect Ocular Surface Cell Lines from Subsequent Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Challenge▿†

    PubMed Central

    Wingard, J. B.; Romanowski, E. G.; Kowalski, R. P.; Mah, F. S.; Ling, Y.; Bilonick, R. A.; Shanks, R. M. Q.

    2011-01-01

    In vivo effectiveness of topical antibiotics may depend on their ability to associate with epithelial cells to provide continued protection, but this contribution is not measured by standard antibiotic susceptibility tests. We report a new in vitro method that measures the ability of test antibiotics azithromycin (AZM), erythromycin (ERY), tetracycline (TET), and bacitracin (BAC) to associate with mammalian cells and to protect these cells from destruction by bacteria. Mammalian cell lines were grown to confluence using antibiotic-free medium and then incubated in medium containing a single antibiotic (0 to 512 μg/ml). After incubation, the cells were challenged with Staphylococcus aureus ocular isolates, without antibiotics added to the culture medium. Epithelial cell layer integrity was assessed by gentian violet staining, and the minimum cell layer protective concentration (MCPC) of an antibiotic sufficient to protect the mammalian cells from S. aureus was determined. Staining was also quantified and analyzed. Bacterial viability was determined by culture turbidity and growth on agar plates. Preincubation of Chang and human corneal limbal epithelial cells with AZM, ERY, and TET at ≥64 μg/ml provided protection against AZM-susceptible S. aureus strains, with increasing protection at higher concentrations. TET toxicity was demonstrated at >64 μg/ml, whereas AZM displayed toxicity to one cell line at 512 μg/ml. BAC failed to show consistent protection at any dose, despite bacterial susceptibility to BAC as determined by traditional antibiotic susceptibility testing. A range of antibiotic effectiveness was displayed in this cell association assay, providing data that may be considered in addition to traditional testing when determining therapeutic dosing regimens. PMID:21628536

  9. Scaling down the size and increasing the throughput of glycosyltransferase assays: activity changes on stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shilpa A; Chandrasekaran, E V; Matta, Khushi L; Parikh, Abhirath; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2012-06-15

    Glycosyltransferases (glycoTs) catalyze the transfer of monosaccharides from nucleotide-sugars to carbohydrate-, lipid-, and protein-based acceptors. We examined strategies to scale down and increase the throughput of glycoT enzymatic assays because traditional methods require large reaction volumes and complex chromatography. Approaches tested used (i) microarray pin printing, an appropriate method when glycoT activity was high; (ii) microwells and microcentrifuge tubes, a suitable method for studies with cell lysates when enzyme activity was moderate; and (iii) C(18) pipette tips and solvent extraction, a method that enriched reaction product when the extent of reaction was low. In all cases, reverse-phase thin layer chromatography (RP-TLC) coupled with phosphorimaging quantified the reaction rate. Studies with mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) demonstrated an increase in overall β(1,3)galactosyltransferase and α(2,3)sialyltransferase activity and a decrease in α(1,3)fucosyltransferases when these cells differentiate toward cardiomyocytes. Enzymatic and lectin binding data suggest a transition from Lewis(x)-type structures in mESCs to sialylated Galβ1,3GalNAc-type glycans on differentiation, with more prominent changes in enzyme activity occurring at later stages when embryoid bodies differentiated toward cardiomyocytes. Overall, simple, rapid, quantitative, and scalable glycoT activity analysis methods are presented. These use a range of natural and synthetic acceptors for the analysis of complex biological specimens that have limited availability.

  10. Lysozyme activity in earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) coelomic fluid and coelomocytes: Enzyme assay for immunotoxicity of xenobiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Goven, A.J.; Chen, S.C.; Fitzpatrick, L.C. . Dept. of Biological Sciences); Venables, B.J. . Dept. of Biological Sciences TRAC Laboratories Inc., Denton, TX )

    1994-04-01

    Lysozyme activity in earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) coelomic fluid and coelomocytes appears sufficiently sensitive for use as a nonmammalian biomarker to detect toxic effects of sublethal body burdens of Cu[sup 2+]. Lysozyme, a phylogenetically conserved enzyme, is capable of bactericidal activity via action on peptidoglycan of gram-positive bacterial cell walls and functions as a component of an organism's innate antimicrobial defense mechanism. Coelomic fluid and coelomocyte lysozyme activities, which exhibit temperature-response patterns similar to those of human saliva, plasma, serum and leukocyte extracts, were sensitive to Cu[sup 2+] exposure. Lysozyme activity of coelomic fluid and coelomocyte extracts from earthworms exposed for 5 d to CuSO[sub 4], using filter paper contact exposure, decreased with increasing sublethal Cu[sup 2+] concentrations of 0.05 and 0.1 [mu]g/cm[sup 2]. Compared to controls, coelomic fluid lysozyme activity was suppressed significantly at both exposure concentrations, whereas coelomocyte extract lysozyme activity was suppressed significantly at the 0.1-[mu]g/cm[sup 2] exposure concentration. Low inherent natural variability and sensitivity to sublethal Cu[sup 2+] body burdens indicate that lysozyme activity has potential as a biomarker for assaying immunotoxicity of metals.

  11. Chemical models for cytochrome P450 as a biomimetic metabolic activation system in mutation assays.

    PubMed

    Inami, Keiko; Mochizuki, Masataka

    2002-08-26

    DNA damage is a critical factor in carcinogenesis. The Ames assay is a short-term test that screens for DNA-damaging agents. To be detected in the assay, most carcinogens require oxidation by cytochrome P450, a component of the liver homogenate preparation (S9 mix) that is traditionally used to metabolize promutagens to an active form in vitro. A combination of iron(III) porphyrin plus an oxidant activates many promutagens by mimicking cytochrome P450 metabolism. We previously reported that the mutagenicity of the N-nitrosodialkylamines was detected following reaction with tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrinatoiron(III) chloride (Fe(F(5)P)Cl) plus tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH), which yielded the same alcohols and aldehydes as the enzymatic reaction. In the present study, to extend the scope of biomimetic models, we tested the mutagenicity of other carcinogens exposed to chemical oxidation systems.We investigated the optimal assay conditions for the models in Salmonella typhimurium TA1538, a strain sensitive to frame-shift mutagens. We activated 2-aminofluorene (AF), benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a tryptophane pyrolysate 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-2), and 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) with Fe(F(5)P)Cl plus an oxidant-t-BuOOH, m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid (mCPBA), or magnesium monoperoxyphthalate (MPPT)-and we noted the effect of three solvents-acetonitrile (CH(3)CN),1,4-dioxane, and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF)-on AF activation. All the promutagens became mutagenic in the presence of Fe(F(5)P)Cl plus an oxidant, with the effectiveness of the oxidant varying with the chemical. Aromatic amines, for example, showed the strongest mutagenicity with t-BuOOH whereas polycyclic hydrocarbons showed the strongest mutagenicity with mCPBA. All the promutagens were mutagenic in the presence of Fe(F(5)P)Cl plus MPPT. For AF activation, the order of effectiveness of the solvents was CH(3)CN>1,4-dioxane>DMF. The results suggested that these systems would serve as

  12. Advantages and limitations of different p62-based assays for estimating autophagic activity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Pircs, Karolina; Nagy, Peter; Varga, Agnes; Venkei, Zsolt; Erdi, Balazs; Hegedus, Krisztina; Juhasz, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    Levels of the selective autophagy substrate p62 have been established in recent years as a specific readout for basal autophagic activity. Here we compared different experimental approaches for using this assay in Drosophila larvae. Similar to the more commonly used western blots, quantifying p62 dots in immunostained fat body cells of L3 stage larvae detected a strong accumulation of endogenous p62 aggregates in null mutants for Atg genes and S6K. Importantly, genes whose mutation or silencing results in early stage lethality can only be analyzed by microscopy using clonal analysis. The loss of numerous general housekeeping genes show a phenotype in large-scale screens including autophagy, and the p62 assay was potentially suitable for distinguishing bona fide autophagy regulators from silencing of a DNA polymerase subunit or a ribosomal gene that likely has a non-specific effect on autophagy. p62 accumulation upon RNAi silencing of known autophagy regulators was dependent on the duration of the knockdown effect, unlike in the case of starvation-induced autophagy. The endogenous p62 assay was more sensitive than a constitutively overexpressed p62-GFP reporter, which showed self-aggregation and large-scale accumulation even in control cells. We recommend western blots for following the conversion of overexpressed p62-GFP reporters to estimate autophagic activity if sample collection from mutant larvae or adults is possible. In addition, we also showed that overexpressed p62 or Atg8 reporters can strongly influence the phenotypes of each other, potentially giving rise to false or contradicting results. Overexpressed p62 aggregates also incorporated Atg8 reporter molecules that might lead to a wrong conclusion of strongly enhanced autophagy, whereas expression of an Atg8 reporter transgene rescued the inhibitory effect of a dominant-negative Atg4 mutant on basal and starvation-induced autophagy. PMID:22952930

  13. National commercial solar heating and cooling demonstration: purposes, program activities, and implications for future programs

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.; Genest, M.; Bryant, B.

    1980-05-01

    The Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Act of 1974 created a set of activities to demonstrate the potential use of solar heating within a three-year period and of combined solar heating and cooling within a five-year period. This study assesses the Commercial Demonstration Program portion of the activity in terms of its stated goals and objectives. The primary data base was DOE contractor reports on commercial demonstration projects. It was concluded that the program did not provide data to support a positive decision for the immediate construction or purchase of commercial solar systems. However, the program may have contributed to other goals in the subsequent legislation; i.e., research and development information, stimulation of the solar industry, and more informed policy decisions.

  14. Authentic active learning activities demonstrating the use of serial dilutions and plate counts.

    PubMed

    March, Jordon K; Jensen, Kyle C; Porter, Nathan T; Breakwell, Donald P

    2011-01-01

    Serial dilution and plate counting is often taught in courses for both microbiology and allied health students. Lecture examples and examination questions addressing how the method is used can sometimes be contrived: artificial data sets may have little or no meaning other than to have students perform a calculation. Here we provide a set of activities employing data sets acquired from the primary literature. Our objective was to have the students think critically about a real scenario in which serial dilution and plate count was used. Each activity requires students to read a paragraph describing the study, predict the results, perform the appropriate calculations, and then evaluate the results in light of their predictions. To test the efficacy of these activities, a pretest quiz was given to approximately 100 students in an allied health/general microbiology course. After a lecture on how microbes are enumerated, students were given a different quiz. The class was then divided randomly into groups of three or four students and assigned one of the activities. A postactivity quiz was also administered. Approximately two weeks later, a serial dilution/plate count question was used on an examination and served as a final posttest. Standardized learning gains were calculated for the quiz administered after each learning activity. Even though learning gains were significantly higher after the lecture, there was also a significant improvement between the lecture and the activity. Using an exercise based on an authentic set of data significantly improved student learning gains, and is a useful practice for teaching microbiology.

  15. A continuous sirtuin activity assay without any coupling to enzymatic or chemical reactions

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Sabine; Roessler, Claudia; Meleshin, Marat; Zimmermann, Philipp; Simic, Zeljko; Kambach, Christian; Schiene-Fischer, Cordelia; Steegborn, Clemens; Hottiger, Michael O.; Schutkowski, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are NAD+ dependent lysine deacylases involved in many regulatory processes such as control of metabolic pathways, DNA repair and stress response. Modulators of sirtuin activity are required as tools for uncovering the biological function of these enzymes and as potential therapeutic agents. Systematic discovery of such modulators is hampered by the lack of direct and continuous activity assays. The present study describes a novel continuous assay based on the increase of a fluorescence signal subsequent to sirtuin mediated removal of a fluorescent acyl chain from a modified TNFα-derived peptide. This substrate is well recognized by human sirtuins 1–6 and represents the best sirtuin 2 substrate described so far with a kcat/KM-value of 176 000 M−1s−1. These extraordinary substrate properties allow the first determination of Ki-values for the specific Sirt2 inhibitory peptide S2iL5 (600 nM) and for the quasi-universal sirtuin inhibitor peptide thioxo myristoyl TNFα (80 nM). PMID:26940860

  16. Evaluation and analysis of dengue virus enhancing and neutralizing activities using simple high-throughput assays.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Quan; Chen, Jing; Huang, Yan-Fen; Ding, Xi-Xia; Liu, Li-Dong; Qiu, Li-Wen; Pan, Yu-Xian; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Hu, Dong-Mei; Di, Biao; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Che, Xiao-Yan

    2013-07-01

    The risk of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus (DENV) infection is a major obstacle for the development of dengue vaccine candidates. Here, we described a novel approach for assessment of ADE by measuring DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) production in culture supernatants with Fcγ receptor-expressing K562 cells in ELISA format (ELISA-ADE). Enhancing activities quantified by measurement of kinetics of NS1 production were in a good agreement with the results of the virus titration assay. In conjunction with the previously established enzyme-linked immunospot-based micro-neutralization test (ELISPOT-MNT) in 96-well format, the observable dose-response profiles of enhancing and neutralizing activities against all four DENV serotypes were produced with two flaviviral envelope cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies and four primary DENV-1-infected human sera. The simple high-throughput ELISA-ADE assay offers advantages for quantitative measurement of infection enhancement that can potentially be applied to large-scale seroepidemiological studies of DENV infection and vaccination.

  17. A sensitive hydroosmotic toad bladder assay. Affinity and intrinsic activity of neurohypophyseal peptides.

    PubMed

    Eggena, P; Schwartz, I L; Walter, R

    1968-09-01

    A sensitive and precise method for assaying the water permeability response evoked by neurohypophyseal hormones and their synthetic analogues on the isolated urinary bladder of the toad (Bufo marinus L.) is described. The method permits detection of 8-arginine-vasotocin at concentrations as low as 10(-12)M. This sensitivity, not achieved heretofore with this tissue, results largely from minimizing interference of inhibitory substances by means of an "in vitro circulation assembly." The precision of the method derives from a direct comparison between the cumulative dose-response curve of an agonist of unknown potency acting on one hemibladder and that of a reference compound acting on the contralateral hemibladder. Crystalline deamino-oxytocin is used as the reference standard in this assay. The intrinsic activity of 2-(O-methyltyrosine)-oxytocin, as defined by the maximal response, is 12% lower than that of deamino-oxytocin. All other hormonal peptides investigated have the same intrinsic activity as deamino-oxytocin, even 5-valine-oxytocin, in spite of its extremely low affinity. A comparison of the potencies of 8-arginine-vasotocin vs. 8-arginine-vasopressin, 8-ornithine-vasotocin vs. 8-ornithine-vasopressin, 8-alanine-oxytocin vs. 8-alanine-oxypressin, and deamino-8-alanine-oxytocin vs. deamino-8-alanine-oxypressin suggests that an isoleucine residue in position 3 imparts a higher specificity for binding of the hormonal peptide molecule to the bladder receptor than a phenylalanine residue in this locus.

  18. A MULTIPLEXED ASSAY FOR DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICANT EFFECTS ON SPONTANEOUS NETWORK ACTIVITY AND CELL VIABILITY FROM MICROELECTRODE ARRAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    AbstractTITLE: A MULTIPLEXED ASSAY FOR DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICANT EFFECTS ON SPONTANEOUS NETWORK ACTIVITY AND CELL VIABILITY FROM MICROELECTRODE ARRAYSABSTRACT BODY: Microelectrode array (MEA) recordings are increasingly being used as an in vitro method to detect and characte...

  19. Multi-tiered Approach to Development of Increased Throughput Assay Models to Assess Endocrine-Disrupting Activity of Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Screening for endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) requires sensitive, scalable assays. Current high-throughput screening (HTPS) approaches for estrogenic and androgenic activity yield rapid results, but many are not sensitive to physiological hormone concentrations, suggesting ...

  20. Integrated gasification combined-cycle research development and demonstration activities in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, H.M.

    1994-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) advanced power systems for demonstration in the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, is managing a research development and demonstration (RD&D)program that supports the CCT program, and addresses long-term improvements in support of IGCC technology. This overview briefly describes the CCT projects and the supporting RD&D activities.

  1. Epirubicin, Identified Using a Novel Luciferase Reporter Assay for Foxp3 Inhibitors, Inhibits Regulatory T Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Hajime; Momose, Fumiyasu; Umehara, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Nao; Ogo, Naohisa; Muraoka, Daisuke; Shiku, Hiroshi; Harada, Naozumi; Asai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box protein p3 (Foxp3) is crucial to the development and suppressor function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that have a significant role in tumor-associated immune suppression. Development of small molecule inhibitors of Foxp3 function is therefore considered a promising strategy to enhance anti-tumor immunity. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based assay system in which the NF-κB luciferase reporter signal is suppressed by the co-expressed Foxp3 protein. Using this system, we screened our chemical library consisting of approximately 2,100 compounds and discovered that a cancer chemotherapeutic drug epirubicin restored the Foxp3-inhibited NF-κB activity in a concentration-dependent manner without influencing cell viability. Using immunoprecipitation assay in a Treg-like cell line Karpas-299, we found that epirubicin inhibited the interaction between Foxp3 and p65. In addition, epirubicin inhibited the suppressor function of murine Tregs and thereby improved effector T cell stimulation in vitro. Administration of low dose epirubicin into tumor-bearing mice modulated the function of immune cells at the tumor site and promoted their IFN-γ production without direct cytotoxicity. In summary, we identified the novel action of epirubicin as a Foxp3 inhibitor using a newly established luciferase-based cellular screen. Our work also demonstrated our screen system is useful in accelerating discovery of Foxp3 inhibitors. PMID:27284967

  2. The antimutagenic activity of Lavandula angustifolia (lavender) essential oil in the bacterial reverse mutation assay.

    PubMed

    Evandri, M G; Battinelli, L; Daniele, C; Mastrangelo, S; Bolle, P; Mazzanti, G

    2005-09-01

    Essential oils from Melaleuca alternifolia (tea-tree oil) and Lavandula angustifolia (lavender oil) are commonly used to treat minor health problems. Tea-tree oil possesses broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, and is increasingly used for skin problems. Lavender oil, traditionally used as an antiseptic agent, is now predominantly used as a relaxant, carminative, and sedative in aromatherapy. Despite their growing use no data are available on their mutagenic potential. In this study, after determining the chemical composition of tea-tree oil and lavender oil, by gas-chromatography and mass spectrometry, we investigated their mutagenic and antimutagenic activities by the bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains and in Escherichia coli WP2 uvrA strain, with and without an extrinsic metabolic activation system. Neither essential oil had mutagenic activity on the two tested Salmonella strains or on E. coli, with or without the metabolic activation system. Conversely, lavender oil exerted strong antimutagenic activity, reducing mutant colonies in the TA98 strain exposed to the direct mutagen 2-nitrofluorene. Antimutagenicity was concentration-dependent: the maximal concentration (0.80 mg/plate) reduced the number of histidine-independent revertant colonies by 66.4%. Lavender oil (0.80 mg/plate) also showed moderate antimutagenicity against the TA98 strain exposed to the direct mutagen 1-nitropyrene. Its antimutagenic property makes lavender oil a promising candidate for new applications in human healthcare. PMID:15907354

  3. The antimutagenic activity of Lavandula angustifolia (lavender) essential oil in the bacterial reverse mutation assay.

    PubMed

    Evandri, M G; Battinelli, L; Daniele, C; Mastrangelo, S; Bolle, P; Mazzanti, G

    2005-09-01

    Essential oils from Melaleuca alternifolia (tea-tree oil) and Lavandula angustifolia (lavender oil) are commonly used to treat minor health problems. Tea-tree oil possesses broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, and is increasingly used for skin problems. Lavender oil, traditionally used as an antiseptic agent, is now predominantly used as a relaxant, carminative, and sedative in aromatherapy. Despite their growing use no data are available on their mutagenic potential. In this study, after determining the chemical composition of tea-tree oil and lavender oil, by gas-chromatography and mass spectrometry, we investigated their mutagenic and antimutagenic activities by the bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains and in Escherichia coli WP2 uvrA strain, with and without an extrinsic metabolic activation system. Neither essential oil had mutagenic activity on the two tested Salmonella strains or on E. coli, with or without the metabolic activation system. Conversely, lavender oil exerted strong antimutagenic activity, reducing mutant colonies in the TA98 strain exposed to the direct mutagen 2-nitrofluorene. Antimutagenicity was concentration-dependent: the maximal concentration (0.80 mg/plate) reduced the number of histidine-independent revertant colonies by 66.4%. Lavender oil (0.80 mg/plate) also showed moderate antimutagenicity against the TA98 strain exposed to the direct mutagen 1-nitropyrene. Its antimutagenic property makes lavender oil a promising candidate for new applications in human healthcare.

  4. Rapid reverse phase-HPLC assay of HMG-CoA reductase activity

    PubMed Central

    Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Eleuteri, Anna Maria; Angeletti, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Radioisotope-based and mass spectrometry coupled to chromatographic techniques are the conventional methods for monitoring HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) activity. Irrespective of offering adequate sensitivity, these methods are often cumbersome and time-consuming, requiring the handling of radiolabeled chemicals or elaborate ad-hoc derivatizing procedures. We propose a rapid and versatile reverse phase-HPLC method for assaying HMGR activity capable of monitoring the levels of both substrates (HMG-CoA and NADPH) and products (CoA, mevalonate, and NADP+) in a single 20 min run with no pretreatment required. The linear dynamic range was 10–26 pmol for HMG-CoA, 7–27 nmol for NADPH, 0.5–40 pmol for CoA and mevalonate, and 2–27 nmol for NADP+, and limit of detection values were 2.67 pmol, 2.77 nmol, 0.27 pmol, and 1.3 nmol, respectively. PMID:20418539

  5. A continuous spectrophotometric assay method for peptidylarginine deiminase type 4 activity.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ya-Fan; Hsieh, Hui-Chieh; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2005-12-15

    A simple, continuous spectrophotometric assay for peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) is described. Deimination of peptidylarginine results in the formation of peptidylcitrulline and ammonia. The ammonia released during peptidylarginine hydrolysis is coupled to the glutamate-dehydrogenase-catalyzed reductive amination of alpha-ketoglutarate to glutamate and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidation. The disappearance of absorbance at 340nm due to NADH oxidation is continuously measured. The specific activity obtained by this new protocol for highly purified human PAD is comparable to that obtained by a commonly used colorimetric procedure, which measures the ureido group of peptidylcitrulline by coupling with diacetyl monoxime. The present continuous spectrophotometric method is highly sensitive and accurate and is thus suitable for enzyme kinetic analysis of PAD. The Ca(2+) concentration for half-maximal activity of PAD obtained by this method is comparable to that previously obtained by the colorimetric procedure.

  6. A rapid fluorescence assay for hSMUG1 activity based on modified molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue; Tong, Chunyi; Long, Ying; Liu, Bin

    2011-01-01

    A new method for assay of hSMUG1 in real-time using molecular beacon is reported. hSMUG1 could be detected linearly in the range from 0.67 nM to 10.05 nM and the detection limit is 0.168 nM. In addition, this method was applied to detect the activity of hSMUG1 in tumor cells and study kinetics. The probe with low background signal has been shown to be suitable for the real-time monitoring of hSMUG1 activity, making this a promising method of high-throughput clinical sample analysis.

  7. mRNA 5'-cap binding activity in purified influenza virus detected by simple, rapid assay.

    PubMed Central

    Kroath, H; Shatkin, A J

    1982-01-01

    Reovirus mRNA 5'-terminal caps were 3'-radiolabeled with pCp and as affinity probes for proteins with cap binding activity. A rapid, simple, and sensitive blot assay was devised that could detect cellular cap binding protein in a complex polypeptide mixture. By using this method, cap binding activity was found in detergent-treated influenza virus but not in reovirus or vaccinia virus. Preincubation of capped reovirus mRNA with purified cellular cap binding protein reduced its primer effect on influenza transcriptase, whereas priming by ApG was not affected. The results indicate that influenza transcriptase complexes include cap-recognizing proteins that are involved in the formation of chimeric mRNAs. Images PMID:7097854

  8. Contact activation of blood coagulation on a defined kaolin/collagen surface in a microfluidic assay.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Diamond, Scott L

    2014-12-01

    Generation of active Factor XII (FXIIa) triggers blood clotting on artificial surfaces and may also enhance intravascular thrombosis. We developed a patterned kaolin (0 to 0.3 pg/μm(2))/type 1 collagen fibril surface for controlled microfluidic clotting assays. Perfusion of whole blood (treated only with a low level of 4 μg/mL of the XIIa inhibitor, corn trypsin inhibitor) drove platelet deposition followed by fibrin formation. At venous wall shear rate (100 s(-1)), kaolin accelerated onset of fibrin formation by ~100 sec when compared to collagen alone (250 sec vs. 350 sec), with little effect on platelet deposition. Even with kaolin present, arterial wall shear rate (1000 s(-1)) delayed and suppressed fibrin formation compared to venous wall shear rate. A comparison of surfaces for extrinsic activation (tissue factor TF/collagen) versus contact activation (kaolin/collagen) that each generated equal platelet deposition at 100 s(-1) revealed: (1) TF surfaces promoted much faster fibrin onset (at 100 sec) and more endpoint fibrin at 600 sec at either 100 s(-1) or 1000 s(-1), and (2) kaolin and TF surfaces had a similar sensitivity for reduced fibrin deposition at 1000 s(-1) (compared to fibrin formed at 100 s(-1)) despite differing coagulation triggers. Anti-platelet drugs inhibiting P2Y1, P2Y12, cyclooxygenase-1 or activating IP-receptor or guanylate cyclase reduced platelet and fibrin deposition on kaolin/collagen. Since FXIIa or FXIa inhibition may offer safe antithrombotic therapy, especially for biomaterial thrombosis, these defined collagen/kaolin surfaces may prove useful in drug screening tests or in clinical diagnostic assays of blood under flow conditions.

  9. Contact activation of blood coagulation on a defined kaolin/collagen surface in a microfluidic assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shu; Diamond, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    Generation of active Factor XII (FXIIa) triggers blood clotting on artificial surfaces and may also enhance intravascular thrombosis. We developed a patterned kaolin (0 to 0.3 pg/μm2)/type 1 collagen fibril surface for controlled microfluidic clotting assays. Perfusion of whole blood (treated only with a low level of 4 μg/mL of the XIIa inhibitor, corn trypsin inhibitor) drove platelet deposition followed by fibrin formation. At venous wall shear rate (100 s−1), kaolin accelerated onset of fibrin formation by ~100 sec when compared to collagen alone (250 sec vs. 350 sec), with little effect on platelet deposition. Even with kaolin present, arterial wall shear rate (1000 s−1) delayed and suppressed fibrin formation compared to venous wall shear rate. A comparison of surfaces for extrinsic activation (tissue factor TF/collagen) versus contact activation (kaolin/collagen) that each generated equal platelet deposition at 100 s−1 revealed: (1) TF surfaces promoted much faster fibrin onset (at 100 sec) and more endpoint fibrin at 600 sec at either 100 s−1 or 1000 s−1, and (2) kaolin and TF surfaces had a similar sensitivity for reduced fibrin deposition at 1000 s−1 (compared to fibrin formed at 100 s−1) despite differing coagulation triggers. Anti-platelet drugs inhibiting P2Y1, P2Y12, cyclooxygenase-1 or activating IP-receptor or guanylate cyclase reduced platelet and fibrin deposition on kaolin/collagen. Since FXIIa or FXIa inhibition may offer safe antithrombotic therapy, especially for biomaterial thrombosis, these defined collagen/kaolin surfaces may prove useful in drug screening tests or in clinical diagnostic assays of blood under flow conditions. PMID:25303860

  10. Contact activation of blood coagulation on a defined kaolin/collagen surface in a microfluidic assay.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Diamond, Scott L

    2014-12-01

    Generation of active Factor XII (FXIIa) triggers blood clotting on artificial surfaces and may also enhance intravascular thrombosis. We developed a patterned kaolin (0 to 0.3 pg/μm(2))/type 1 collagen fibril surface for controlled microfluidic clotting assays. Perfusion of whole blood (treated only with a low level of 4 μg/mL of the XIIa inhibitor, corn trypsin inhibitor) drove platelet deposition followed by fibrin formation. At venous wall shear rate (100 s(-1)), kaolin accelerated onset of fibrin formation by ~100 sec when compared to collagen alone (250 sec vs. 350 sec), with little effect on platelet deposition. Even with kaolin present, arterial wall shear rate (1000 s(-1)) delayed and suppressed fibrin formation compared to venous wall shear rate. A comparison of surfaces for extrinsic activation (tissue factor TF/collagen) versus contact activation (kaolin/collagen) that each generated equal platelet deposition at 100 s(-1) revealed: (1) TF surfaces promoted much faster fibrin onset (at 100 sec) and more endpoint fibrin at 600 sec at either 100 s(-1) or 1000 s(-1), and (2) kaolin and TF surfaces had a similar sensitivity for reduced fibrin deposition at 1000 s(-1) (compared to fibrin formed at 100 s(-1)) despite differing coagulation triggers. Anti-platelet drugs inhibiting P2Y1, P2Y12, cyclooxygenase-1 or activating IP-receptor or guanylate cyclase reduced platelet and fibrin deposition on kaolin/collagen. Since FXIIa or FXIa inhibition may offer safe antithrombotic therapy, especially for biomaterial thrombosis, these defined collagen/kaolin surfaces may prove useful in drug screening tests or in clinical diagnostic assays of blood under flow conditions. PMID:25303860

  11. Antimutagenic activity of extracts of natural substances in the Salmonella/microsome assay.

    PubMed

    Horn, Rubem Cesar; Vargas, Vera Maria Ferrão

    2003-03-01

    Scientific information regarding plants used in folk medicine in the form of teas and their effect on human health or on genetic material has been the subject of many different types of investigation. The antimutagenic activity of two plants Maytenus ilicifolia and Peltastes peltatus, both rich in compounds of the flavonoid and tannin groups and frequently employed in folk medicine, was studied. Antimutagenicity was determined against known mutagenic substances (4-oxide-1-nitroquinoline, sodium azide, 2-nitrofluorene, aflatoxin B(1), 2-aminofluorene and 2-aminoanthracene), using the Salmonella/microsome assay. Infusions of P.peltatus showed high cytotoxicity and a co-mutagenic effect for induction of base pair substitution mutations with 4-oxide-1-nitroquinoline (-S9 mix). Infusions of M.ilicifolia produced similar effects for frameshift and base pair substitution mutations. With the mutagens 2-nitrofluorene (TA98) and sodium azide (TA100) no significant enhancement effects (co-mutagenic effects) were observed and inhibition of mutagenic activity and cytotoxicity were also diminished. In assays evaluating antimutagenic activity in the presence of metabolic activation utilizing S9 mix, high and significant inhibition of aflatoxin B(1)-, 2-aminofluorene- and 2-aminoanthracene-induced mutagenicity was observed in the presence of the infusions using both TA98 and TA100 and employing doses ranging from 25 to 500 mg/plate. Seventy-five percent of the doses tested exhibited a significant or suggestive decrease in induced mutagenicity with the infusion of M.ilicifolia. With the infusion of P.peltatus significant or suggestive antimutagenic responses were observed with 50% of the doses evaluated. Complexity was clearly noted in the responses observed in the interaction of aqueous extracts of M.ilicifolia and P.peltastes with the genetic material and metabolites generated by the S9 mix played an important role in the protection of DNA. PMID:12621065

  12. Quantification of microbial activity in subsurface environments using a hydrogenase enzyme assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, R. R.; Nickel, J.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-04-01

    The subsurface biosphere is the largest microbial ecosystem on Earth. Despite its large size and extensive industrial exploitation, very little is known about the role of microbial activity in the subsurface. Subsurface microbial activity plays a fundamental role in geochemical cycles of carbon and other biologically important elements. How the indigenous microbial communities are supplied with energy is one of the most fundamental questions in subsurface research. It is still an enigma how these communities can survive with such recalcitrant carbon over geological time scales. Despite its usually very low concentration, hydrogen is an important element in subsurface environments. Heterotrophic and chemoautotrophic microorganisms use hydrogen in their metabolic pathways; they either obtain protons from the radiolysis of water and/or cleavage of hydrogen generated by the alteration of basaltic crust, or they dispose of protons by formation of water. Hydrogenase (H2ase) is a ubiquitous intracellular enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of molecular hydrogen and/or water into protons and electrons. The protons are used for the synthesis of ATP, thereby coupling energy-generating metabolic processes to electron acceptors such as carbon dioxide or sulfate. H2ase activity can therefore be used as a measure for total microbial activity as it targets a key metabolic compound rather than a specific turnover process. Using a highly sensitive tritium assay we measured H2ase enzyme activity in the organic-rich sediments of Lake Van, a saline, alkaline lake in eastern Turkey and in marine subsurface sediments of the Barents Sea. Additionally, sulfate reduction rates (SRRs) were measured to compare the results of the H2ase enzyme assay with the quantitatively most important electron acceptor process. H2ase activity was found at all sites, measured values and distribution of activity varied widely with depth and between sites. At the Lake Van sites H2ase activity ranged from

  13. The relevance of chemical interactions with CYP17 enzyme activity: Assessment using a novel in vitro assay

    SciTech Connect

    Roelofs, Maarke J.E.; Piersma, Aldert H.; Berg, Martin van den; Duursen, Majorie B.M. van

    2013-05-01

    The steroidogenic cytochrome P450 17 (CYP17) enzyme produces dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), which is the most abundant circulating endogenous sex steroid precursor. DHEA plays a key role in e.g. sexual functioning and development. To date, no rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available. In this study, a novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. Effects of twenty-eight suggested endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) on CYP17 activity were compared with effects in the US EPA validated H295R (human adrenocorticocarcinoma cell line) steroidogenesis assay. In the PACM assay DHEA production was higher compared with the H295R assay (4.4 versus 2.2 nmol/h/mg protein). To determine the additional value of a CYP17 assay, all compounds were also tested for interaction with CYP19 (aromatase) using human placental microsomes (HPMs) and H295R cells. 62.5% of the compounds showed enzyme inhibition in at least one of the microsomal assays. Only the cAMP inducer forskolin induced CYP17 activity, while CYP19 was induced by four test compounds in the H295R assay. These effects remained unnoticed in the PACM and HPM assays. Diethylstilbestrol and tetrabromobisphenol A inhibited CYP17 but not CYP19 activity, indicating different mechanisms for the inhibition of these enzymes. From our results it becomes apparent that CYP17 can be a target for EDCs and that this interaction differs from interactions with CYP19. Our data strongly suggest that research attention should focus on validating a specific assay for CYP17 activity, such as the PACM assay, that can be included in the EDC screening battery. - Highlights: ► DHEA, produced by CYP17, plays a key role in sexual functioning and development. ► No rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available yet. ► A novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. ► Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) targeting CYP17 interact differently with CYP19. ► A

  14. Activity of nitro-polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in the sister chromatid exchange assay with and without metabolic activation.

    PubMed

    Nachtman, J P; Wolff, S

    1982-01-01

    Nitro-polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons are found in diesel particulates. These compounds are potent mutagens in the Ames test. To determine whether nitro-polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons are active in a mammalian cell assay, 1-nitropyrene, 1,8-dinitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, and 4-nitrobiphenyl were incubated with cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells. The frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) was measured in the presence and absence of rat liver S-9 mix. The addition of S-9 mix resulted in a large increase in the SCEs induced by all four compounds. PMID:7067667

  15. Activity of nitro-polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in the sister chromatid exchange assay with and without metabolic activation. [Hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Nachtman, J.P.; Wolff, S.

    1982-01-01

    Nitro-polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons are found in diesel particulates.These compounds are potent mutagens in the Ames test. To determine whether nitro-polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons are active in a mammalian cell assay, 1-nitropyrene, 1,8-dinitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, and 4-nitrobiphenyl were incubated with cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells. The frequency of sister chromatic exchange (SCE) was measured in the presence and absence of rat liver S-9 mix. The addition of S-9 mix resulted in a large increase in the SCEs induced by all four compounds.

  16. Detection and characterisation of Complement protein activity in bovine milk by bactericidal sequestration assay.

    PubMed

    Maye, Susan; Stanton, Catherine; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Kelly, Philip M

    2015-08-01

    While the Complement protein system in human milk is well characterised, there is little information on its presence and activity in bovine milk. Complement forms part of the innate immune system, hence the importance of its contribution during milk ingestion to the overall defences of the neonate. A bactericidal sequestration assay, featuring a Complement sensitive strain, Escherichia coli 0111, originally used to characterise Complement activity in human milk was successfully applied to freshly drawn bovine milk samples, thus, providing an opportunity to compare Complement activities in both human and bovine milks. Although not identical in response, the levels of Complement activity in bovine milk were found to be closely comparable with that of human milk. Differential counts of Esch. coli 0111 after 2 h incubation were 6.20 and 6.06 log CFU/ml, for raw bovine and human milks, respectively - the lower value representing a stronger Complement response. Exposing bovine milk to a range of thermal treatments e.g. 42, 45, 65, 72, 85 or 95 °C for 10 min, progressively inhibited Complement activity by increasing temperature, thus confirming the heat labile nature of this immune protein system. Low level Complement activity was found, however, in 65 and 72 °C heat treated samples and in retailed pasteurised milk which highlights the outer limit to which high temperature, short time (HTST) industrial thermal processes should be applied if retention of activity is a priority. Concentration of Complement in the fat phase was evident following cream separation, and this was also reflected in the further loss of activity recorded in low fat variants of retailed pasteurised milk. Laboratory-based churning of the cream during simulated buttermaking generated an aqueous (buttermilk) phase with higher levels of Complement activity than the fat phase, thus pointing to a likely association with the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) layer.

  17. Effect of Lead stress on phosphatase activity and reducing power assay of Triticum aestivum.

    PubMed

    Gubrelay, U; Agnihotri, R K; Shrotriya, S; Sharma, R

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a highly toxic heavy metal for both plants and animals; the environment is increasingly polluted with heavy metals and reduces crop productivity. Plants possess homeostatic mechanisms that allow them to keep correct concentrations of essential metal ions in cellular compartments and to minimize the damaging effects of an excess of nonessential ones. One of their adverse effects on plants are the generation of harmful active oxygen species, leading to oxidative stress and the antioxidative activity seems to be of fundamental importance for adaptive response of plant against environmental stress. The present study explores the effects of lead (soil treated twice/ week) with (10, 30 and 60 mM) on the specific activities of phosphatases which might lead to reducing power assay in (Triticum aestivum PBW344) seedling. A significant decrease in the redox potential of shoot compared to root was observed at the similar concentration of lead. A similar trend on leaves was also noted. Acid and alkaline phosphatase activities were significantly higher in roots than in shoot at all the three concentration of lead i.e. 10, 30 and 60 mM, compared to controls. The above mentioned changes were more pronounced at 60 mM concentration of lead than two other concentrations. These results lead us to suggest that increased lead concentration in soil might lead to adverse effects on plant growth and phosphatase activities. PMID:26107501

  18. Metabolic activation by hamster and rat hepatocytes in the Salmonella mutagenicity assay.

    PubMed

    Poiley, J A; Raineri, R; Andrews, A W; Cavanaugh, D M; Pienta, R J

    1980-12-01

    Intact and homogenized hepatocytes from untreated or Aroclor 1254-treated male and female noninbred Sprague-Dawley rats and noninbred Syrian golden hamsters were compared for their ability to metabolize chemicals in the Salmonella-mammalian microsome mutagenesis assay. The following chemicals were used: two aromatic amines, 2-amino-anthracene and N-2-fluorenylacetamide; two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 3-methylcholanthrene and benzo[a]pyrene (BP); and one nitrosamine, diethylnitrosamine (DENA). With one exception, hepatocytes from hamsters were more active than were hepatocytes from rats in the activation of these mutagens. The homogenized preparations from Aroclor 1254-treated rats were slightly more active with BP than was the equivalent hamster preparation. Intact hepatocytes from Aroclor 1254-treated hamsters were more efficient at metabolizing the aromatic amines and DENA, whereas homogenates were more effective with the hydrocarbons. Results were similar with the rat preparations, except that only large quantities of Aroclor 1254-treated intact male rat hepatocytes appeared to activate DENA. These results suggest that, in the choice of an activation system, the kind of chemical being evaluated should be considered.

  19. Fluorometric microplate assay to measure glutathione S-transferase activity in insects and mites using monochlorobimane.

    PubMed

    Nauen, Ralf; Stumpf, Natascha

    2002-04-15

    Elevated levels of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a major role as a mechanism of resistance to insecticides and acaricides in resistant pest insects and mites, respectively. Such compounds are either detoxicated directly via phase I metabolism or detoxicated by phase II metabolism of metabolites as formed by microsomal monooxygenases. Here we used monochlorobimane (MCB) as an artificial substrate and glutathione to determine total GST activity in equivalents of single pest insects and spider mites in a sensitive 96-well plate-based assay system by measuring the enzymatic conversion of MCB to its fluorescent bimane-glutathione adduct. The differentiation by their GST activity between several strains of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae), with different degrees of resistance to numerous acaricides was more sensitive with MCB compared to the commonly used substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Compared to an acaricide-susceptible reference strain, one field population of T. urticae showed a more than 10-fold higher GST activity measured with MCB, in contrast to a less than 2-fold higher activity when CDNB was used. Furthermore, we showed that GST activity can be sensitively assessed with MCB in homogenates of pest insects such as Heliothis virescens, Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae), and Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae). PMID:11950219

  20. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  1. Active Learning in PhysicsTechnology and Research-based Techniques Emphasizing Interactive Lecture Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    Physics education research has shown that learning environments that engage students and allow them to take an active part in their learning can lead to large conceptual gains compared to traditional instruction. Examples of successful curricula and methods include Peer Instruction, Just in Time Teaching, RealTime Physics, Workshop Physics, Scale-Up, and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs). An active learning environment is often difficult to achieve in lecture sessions. This presentation will demonstrate the use of sequences of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs) that use real experiments often involving real-time data collection and display combined with student interaction to create an active learning environment in large or small lecture classes. Interactive lecture demonstrations will be done in the area of mechanics using real-time motion probes and the Visualizer. A video tape of students involved in interactive lecture demonstrations will be shown. The results of a number of research studies at various institutions (including international) to measure the effectiveness of ILDs and guided inquiry conceptual laboratories will be presented.

  2. Fluorometric cell-based assay for β-galactosidase activity in probiotic gram-positive bacterial cells - Lactobacillus helveticus.

    PubMed

    Watson, Amanda L; Chiu, Norman H L

    2016-09-01

    Although methods for measuring β-galactosidase activity in intact gram-negative bacterial cells have been reported, the methods may not be applicable to measuring β-galactosidase activity in gram-positive bacterial cells. This report focuses on the development of a fluorometric cell-based assay for measuring β-galactosidase activity in gram-positive cells.

  3. 34 CFR 426.4 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Demonstration Projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities does the Secretary fund under the Demonstration Projects? 426.4 Section 426.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION COOPERATIVE...

  4. 34 CFR 426.4 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Demonstration Projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION COOPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION... recipients as defined in 34 CFR 400.4). (2) The projects described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section must... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What activities does the Secretary fund under...

  5. 34 CFR 426.4 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Demonstration Projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION COOPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION... recipients as defined in 34 CFR 400.4). (2) The projects described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section must... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What activities does the Secretary fund under...

  6. 34 CFR 350.15 - What must a grantee do in carrying out a demonstration activity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What must a grantee do in carrying out a demonstration activity? 350.15 Section 350.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY...

  7. 34 CFR 350.15 - What must a grantee do in carrying out a demonstration activity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must a grantee do in carrying out a demonstration activity? 350.15 Section 350.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY...

  8. 34 CFR 350.15 - What must a grantee do in carrying out a demonstration activity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must a grantee do in carrying out a demonstration activity? 350.15 Section 350.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY...

  9. 34 CFR 350.15 - What must a grantee do in carrying out a demonstration activity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true What must a grantee do in carrying out a demonstration activity? 350.15 Section 350.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY...

  10. A Classroom Activity to Demonstrate Self-Other Agreement in Personality Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Seth A.; Stachowski, Alicia A.; Bradley-Geist, Jill C.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a classroom activity to demonstrate (dis)agreement in personality judgments, using an exercise derived from Watson's research on the accuracy of rating strangers' personalities. On the first day of class, undergraduate students in psychology courses rated their own personality and the personality of a classmate, using items…

  11. A rapid, sensitive, simple plate assay for detection of microbial alginate lyase activity.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Shailesh S; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Kim, Beom Soo

    2015-09-01

    Screening of microorganisms capable of producing alginate lyase enzyme is commonly carried out by investigating their abilities to grow on alginate-containing solid media plates and occurrence of a clearance zone after flooding the plates with agents such as 10% (w/v) cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC), which can form complexes with alginate. Although the CPC method is good, advantageous, and routinely used, the agar in the media interferes with the action of CPC, which makes judgment about clearance zones very difficult. In addition, this method takes a minimum of 30 min to obtain the zone of hydrolysis after flooding and the hydrolyzed area is not sharply discernible. An improved plate assay is reported herein for the detection of extracellular alginate lyase production by microorganisms. In this method, alginate-containing agar plates are flooded with Gram's iodine instead of CPC. Gram's iodine forms a bluish black complex with alginate but not with hydrolyzed alginate, giving sharp, distinct zones around the alginate lyase producing microbial colonies within 2-3 min. Gram's iodine method was found to be more effective than the CPC method in terms of visualization and measurement of zone size. The alginate-lyase-activity area indicated using the Gram's iodine method was found to be larger than that indicated by the CPC method. Both methods (CPC and Gram's iodine) showed the largest alginate lyase activity area for Saccharophagus degradans (ATCC 43961) followed by Microbulbifer mangrovi (KCTC 23483), Bacillus cereus (KF801505) and Paracoccus sp. LL1 (KP288668) grown on minimal sea salt medium. The rate of growth and metabolite production in alginate-containing minimal sea salt liquid medium, followed trends similar to that of the zone activity areas for the four bacteria under study. These results suggested that the assay developed in this study of Gram's iodine could be useful to predict the potential of microorganisms to produce alginate lyase. The method also

  12. A Simple and Fast Kinetic Assay for the Determination of Fructan Exohydrolase Activity in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Gasperl, Anna; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that fructans are the main constituent of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates, little knowledge is available on the regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism. The analysis of enzyme activities involved in this process has been hampered by the low affinity of the fructan enzymes for sucrose and fructans used as fructosyl donor. Further, the analysis of fructan composition and enzyme activities is restricted to specialized labs with access to suited HPLC equipment and appropriate fructan standards. The degradation of fructan polymers with high degree of polymerization (DP) by fructan exohydrolases (FEHs) to fructosyloligomers is important to liberate energy in the form of fructan, but also under conditions where the generation of low DP polymers is required. Based on published protocols employing enzyme coupled endpoint reactions in single cuvettes, we developed a simple and fast kinetic 1-FEH assay. This assay can be performed in multi-well plate format using plate readers to determine the activity of 1-FEH against 1-kestotriose, resulting in a significant time reduction. Kinetic assays allow an optimal and more precise determination of enzyme activities compared to endpoint assays, and enable to check the quality of any reaction with respect to linearity of the assay. The enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay was validated in a case study showing the expected increase in 1-FEH activity during cold treatment. This assay is cost effective and could be performed by any lab with access to a plate reader suited for kinetic measurements and readings at 340 nm, and is highly suited to assess temporal changes and relative differences in 1-FEH activities. Thus, this enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay is of high importance both to the field of basic fructan research and plant breeding.

  13. A Simple and Fast Kinetic Assay for the Determination of Fructan Exohydrolase Activity in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    PubMed Central

    Gasperl, Anna; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud’homme, Marie-Pascale; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that fructans are the main constituent of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates, little knowledge is available on the regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism. The analysis of enzyme activities involved in this process has been hampered by the low affinity of the fructan enzymes for sucrose and fructans used as fructosyl donor. Further, the analysis of fructan composition and enzyme activities is restricted to specialized labs with access to suited HPLC equipment and appropriate fructan standards. The degradation of fructan polymers with high degree of polymerization (DP) by fructan exohydrolases (FEHs) to fructosyloligomers is important to liberate energy in the form of fructan, but also under conditions where the generation of low DP polymers is required. Based on published protocols employing enzyme coupled endpoint reactions in single cuvettes, we developed a simple and fast kinetic 1-FEH assay. This assay can be performed in multi-well plate format using plate readers to determine the activity of 1-FEH against 1-kestotriose, resulting in a significant time reduction. Kinetic assays allow an optimal and more precise determination of enzyme activities compared to endpoint assays, and enable to check the quality of any reaction with respect to linearity of the assay. The enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay was validated in a case study showing the expected increase in 1-FEH activity during cold treatment. This assay is cost effective and could be performed by any lab with access to a plate reader suited for kinetic measurements and readings at 340 nm, and is highly suited to assess temporal changes and relative differences in 1-FEH activities. Thus, this enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay is of high importance both to the field of basic fructan research and plant breeding. PMID:26734049

  14. PERKINSUS-"CIDAL" ACTIVITY OF OYSTER HEMOCYTES USING A TETRAZOLIUM DYE REDUCTION ASSAY: OPTIMIZATION AND APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A bactericidal assay developed to assess the ability of oyster (Crassostrea virginica) hemocytes to kill the human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus was optimized to estimate killing of the oyster parasite Perkinsus marinus. Assay variables, temperature, hemocyte:parasite ratio, i...

  15. Honokiol bis-dichloroacetate (Honokiol DCA) demonstrates activity in vemurafenib-resistant melanoma in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Michael Y.; Karlsson, Isabella; Rodolfo, Monica; Arnold, Rebecca S.; Vergani, Elisabetta; Arbiser, Jack L.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of human melanomas bears BRAF mutations and thus is treated with inhibitors of BRAF, such as vemurafenib. While patients with BRAF mutations often demonstrate an initial dramatic response to vemurafenib, relapse is extremely common. Thus, novel agents are needed for the treatment of these aggressive melanomas. Honokiol is a small molecule compound derived from Magnolia grandiflora that has activity against solid tumors and hematopoietic neoplasms. In order to increase the lipophilicity of honokiol, we have synthesized honokiol DCA, the dichloroacetate ester of honokiol. In addition, we synthesized a novel fluorinated honokiol analog, bis-trifluoromethyl-bis-(4-hydroxy-3-allylphenyl) methane (hexafluoro). Both compounds exhibited activity against A375 melanoma in vivo, but honokiol DCA was more active. Gene arrays comparing treated with vehicle control tumors demonstrated induction of the respiratory enzyme succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) by treatment, suggesting that our honokiol analogs induce respiration in vivo. We then examined its effect against a pair of melanomas, LM36 and LM36R, in which LM36R differs from LM36 in that LM36R has acquired vemurafenib resistance. Honokiol DCA demonstrated in vivo activity against LM36R (vemurafenib resistant) but not against parental LM36. Honokiol DCA and hexafluoro inhibited the phosphorylation of DRP1, thus stimulating a phenotype suggestive of respiration through mitochondrial normalization. Honokiol DCA may act in vemurafenib resistant melanomas to increase both respiration and reactive oxygen generation, leading to activity against aggressive melanoma in vivo. PMID:26871475

  16. Honokiol bis-dichloroacetate (Honokiol DCA) demonstrates activity in vemurafenib-resistant melanoma in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Michael Y; Karlsson, Isabella; Rodolfo, Monica; Arnold, Rebecca S; Vergani, Elisabetta; Arbiser, Jack L

    2016-03-15

    The majority of human melanomas bears BRAF mutations and thus is treated with inhibitors of BRAF, such as vemurafenib. While patients with BRAF mutations often demonstrate an initial dramatic response to vemurafenib, relapse is extremely common. Thus, novel agents are needed for the treatment of these aggressive melanomas. Honokiol is a small molecule compound derived from Magnolia grandiflora that has activity against solid tumors and hematopoietic neoplasms. In order to increase the lipophilicity of honokiol, we have synthesized honokiol DCA, the dichloroacetate ester of honokiol. In addition, we synthesized a novel fluorinated honokiol analog, bis-trifluoromethyl-bis-(4-hydroxy-3-allylphenyl) methane (hexafluoro). Both compounds exhibited activity against A375 melanoma in vivo, but honokiol DCA was more active. Gene arrays comparing treated with vehicle control tumors demonstrated induction of the respiratory enzyme succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) by treatment, suggesting that our honokiol analogs induce respiration in vivo. We then examined its effect against a pair of melanomas, LM36 and LM36R, in which LM36R differs from LM36 in that LM36R has acquired vemurafenib resistance. Honokiol DCA demonstrated in vivo activity against LM36R (vemurafenib resistant) but not against parental LM36. Honokiol DCA and hexafluoro inhibited the phosphorylation of DRP1, thus stimulating a phenotype suggestive of respiration through mitochondrial normalization. Honokiol DCA may act in vemurafenib resistant melanomas to increase both respiration and reactive oxygen generation, leading to activity against aggressive melanoma in vivo. PMID:26871475

  17. Demonstration of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity in the second of two homologous domains of CD45.

    PubMed

    Tan, X; Stover, D R; Walsh, K A

    1993-04-01

    It has been reported that alteration of deletion of critical residues within one of the two homologous protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase)-like domains of CD45 completely abolishes all activity, suggesting that only the more N-terminal domain is catalytically active. However, we now demonstrate, by two independent techniques, that the second (C-terminal) domain is also a viable phosphatase. Limited proteolysis by endoproteinase Lys-C or trypsin increased the phosphatase activity toward reduced, carboxymethylated, and maleylated lysozyme approximately 8-fold. A 50-kDa fragment, isolated by ion exchange chromatography, was found to be responsible for this activity. N-terminal sequencing revealed that this fragment includes less than half of the first phosphatase domain and most, if not all, of the second. In a second experiment, 109 residues, including the presumed catalytic region, were removed from domain I by site-directed mutagenesis. Expression of this construct in a mammalian cell line resulted in increased PTPase activity over nontransfected control cells. Isolation of the recombinant CD45 by immunoprecipitation and immunoaffinity chromatography revealed that it had phosphatase activity. Both of these experimental approaches demonstrate that the second conserved PTPase domain of CD45 is a functioning PTPase, but that external regulation may be required to express its activity in the context of the native molecule. PMID:8463207

  18. A novel assay of biofilm antifungal activity reveals that amphotericin B and caspofungin lyse Candida albicans cells in biofilms.

    PubMed

    DiDone, Louis; Oga, Duana; Krysan, Damian J

    2011-08-01

    The ability of Candida albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms is an important factor in its contribution to human disease. Assays to identify and characterize molecules with activity against fungal biofilms are crucial for the development of drugs with improved anti-biofilm activity. Here we report the application of an adenylate kinase (AK)-based cytotoxicity assay of fungal cell lysis to the characterization of agents active against C. albicans biofilms. We have developed three protocols for the AK assay. The first measures AK activity in the supernatants of biofilms treated with antifungal drugs and can be performed in parallel with a standard 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-caboxanilide-based biofilm susceptibility assay; a second, more sensitive protocol measures the AK activity present within the biofilm matrix; and a third procedure allows the direct visualization of lytic activity toward biofilms formed on catheter material. Amphotericin B and caspofungin, the two most effective anti-biofilm drugs currently used to treat fungal infections, both directly lyse planktonic C. albicans cells in vitro, leading to the release of AK into the culture medium. These studies serve to validate the AK-based lysis assay as a useful addition to the methods for the characterization of antifungal agents active toward biofilms and provide insights into the mode of action of amphotericin B and caspofungin against C. albicans biofilms.

  19. A novel assay of biofilm antifungal activity reveals that amphotericin B and caspofungin lyse Candida albicans cells in biofilms.

    PubMed

    DiDone, Louis; Oga, Duana; Krysan, Damian J

    2011-08-01

    The ability of Candida albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms is an important factor in its contribution to human disease. Assays to identify and characterize molecules with activity against fungal biofilms are crucial for the development of drugs with improved anti-biofilm activity. Here we report the application of an adenylate kinase (AK)-based cytotoxicity assay of fungal cell lysis to the characterization of agents active against C. albicans biofilms. We have developed three protocols for the AK assay. The first measures AK activity in the supernatants of biofilms treated with antifungal drugs and can be performed in parallel with a standard 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-caboxanilide-based biofilm susceptibility assay; a second, more sensitive protocol measures the AK activity present within the biofilm matrix; and a third procedure allows the direct visualization of lytic activity toward biofilms formed on catheter material. Amphotericin B and caspofungin, the two most effective anti-biofilm drugs currently used to treat fungal infections, both directly lyse planktonic C. albicans cells in vitro, leading to the release of AK into the culture medium. These studies serve to validate the AK-based lysis assay as a useful addition to the methods for the characterization of antifungal agents active toward biofilms and provide insights into the mode of action of amphotericin B and caspofungin against C. albicans biofilms. PMID:21674619

  20. Are fish and standardized FETAX assays protective enough for amphibians? A case study on Xenopus laevis larvae assay with biologically active substances present in livestock wastes.

    PubMed

    Martini, Federica; Tarazona, José V; Pablos, M Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Biologically active substances could reach the aquatic compartment when livestock wastes are considered for recycling. Recently, the standardized FETAX assay has been questioned, and some researchers have considered that the risk assessment performed on fish could not be protective enough to cover amphibians. In the present study a Xenopus laevis acute assay was developed in order to compare the sensitivity of larvae relative to fish or FETAX assays; veterinary medicines (ivermectin, oxytetracycline, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim) and essential metals (zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium) that may be found in livestock wastes were used for the larvae exposure. Lethal (LC(50)) and sublethal effects were estimated. Available data in both, fish and FETAX studies, were in general more protective than values found out in the current study, but not in all cases. Moreover, the presence of nonlethal effects, caused by ivermectin, zinc, and copper, suggested that several physiological mechanisms could be affected. Thus, this kind of effects should be deeply investigated. The results obtained in the present study could expand the information about micropollutants from livestock wastes on amphibians. PMID:22629159

  1. Are Fish and Standardized FETAX Assays Protective Enough for Amphibians? A Case Study on Xenopus laevis Larvae Assay with Biologically Active Substances Present in Livestock Wastes

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Federica; Tarazona, José V.; Pablos, M. Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Biologically active substances could reach the aquatic compartment when livestock wastes are considered for recycling. Recently, the standardized FETAX assay has been questioned, and some researchers have considered that the risk assessment performed on fish could not be protective enough to cover amphibians. In the present study a Xenopus laevis acute assay was developed in order to compare the sensitivity of larvae relative to fish or FETAX assays; veterinary medicines (ivermectin, oxytetracycline, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim) and essential metals (zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium) that may be found in livestock wastes were used for the larvae exposure. Lethal (LC50) and sublethal effects were estimated. Available data in both, fish and FETAX studies, were in general more protective than values found out in the current study, but not in all cases. Moreover, the presence of nonlethal effects, caused by ivermectin, zinc, and copper, suggested that several physiological mechanisms could be affected. Thus, this kind of effects should be deeply investigated. The results obtained in the present study could expand the information about micropollutants from livestock wastes on amphibians. PMID:22629159

  2. A label-free electrochemical strategy for highly sensitive methyltransferase activity assays.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiawan; Zhang, Xiaohua; Xiong, Erhu; Yu, Peng; Chen, Jinhua

    2015-03-25

    A new electrochemical strategy for the simple and ultrasensitive evaluation of DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity was developed based on electrocatalytic oxidation of ascorbic acid by graphene. In addition, the suitability of this sensing platform for MTase inhibitor screening was also demonstrated.

  3. Development of an activity assay for discovery of inhibitors of lipopolysaccharide transport.

    PubMed

    Gronenberg, Luisa S; Kahne, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    The outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria contains an outer leaflet composed of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that is transported to this location by a pathway that is essential for viability. It has been suggested that inhibitors of this pathway could be useful antibiotics. Herein we reconstitute the activity of the ATPase component (LptB) of the ABC transporter that initiates LPS transport and assembly. We developed a high-throughput assay and screened a library of kinase inhibitors against LptB. We identified two classes of ATP-competitive inhibitors. These are the first inhibitors of the ATPase component of any bacterial ABC transporter. The small-molecule inhibitors will be very useful tools for further biochemical studies of the proteins involved in LPS transport and assembly.

  4. A sensitive fluorescent assay for thiamine based on metal-organic frameworks with intrinsic peroxidase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hongliang; Li, Qian; Zhou, Zhengchen; Ma, Chanjiao; Song, Yonghai; Xu, Fugang; Wang, Li

    2015-01-26

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with tunable structures and properties have recently been emerged as very interesting functional materials. However, the catalytic properties of MOFs as enzymatic mimics remain to be further investigated. In this work, we for the first time demonstrated the peroxidase-like activity of copper-based MOFs (HKUST-1) by employing thiamine (TH) as a peroxidase substrate. In the presence of H2O2, HKUST-1 can catalyze efficiently the conversion of non-fluorescent TH to strong fluorescent thiochrome. The catalytic activity of HKUST-1 is highly dependent on the temperature, pH and H2O2 concentrations. As a peroxidase mimic, HKUST-1 not only has the features of low cost, high stability and easy preparation, but also follows Michaelis-Menten behaviors and shows stronger affinity to TH than horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Based on the peroxidase-like activity of HKUST-1, a simple and sensitive fluorescent method for TH detection has been developed. As low as 1 μM TH can be detected with a linear range from 4 to 700 μM. The detection limit for TH is about 50 fold lower than that of HRP-based fluorescent assay. The proposed method was successfully applied to detect TH in tablets and urine samples and showed a satisfactory result. We believed that the present work could improve the understanding of catalytic behaviors of MOFs as enzymatic mimics and find out a wider application in bioanalysis.

  5. Rapid determination of the active fraction of DNA repair glycosylases: a novel fluorescence assay for trapped intermediates.

    PubMed

    Blaisdell, Jeffrey O; Wallace, Susan S

    2007-01-01

    Current methods to measure the fraction of active glycosylase molecules in a given enzyme preparation are slow and cumbersome. Here we report a novel assay for rapidly determining the active fraction based on molecular accessibility of a fluorescent DNA minor groove binder, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). Several 5,6-dihydrouracil-containing (DHU) DNA substrates were designed with sequence-dependent DAPI-binding sites to which base excision repair glycosylases were covalently trapped by reduction. Trapped complexes impeded the association of DAPI in a manner dependent on the enzyme used and the location of the DAPI-binding site in relation to the lesion. Of the sequences tested, one was shown to give an accurate measure of the fraction of active molecules for each enzyme tested from both the Fpg/Nei family and HhH-GPD Nth superfamily of DNA glycosylases. The validity of the approach was demonstrated by direct comparison with current gel-based methods. Additionally, the results are supported by in silico modeling based on available crystal structures. PMID:17289752

  6. A simple and efficient diffusion technique for assay of endo β-1,4-xylanase activity

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, A.K.; Kolte, Atul P.; Senani, S.; Sridhar, Manpal.; Jayapal, Natasha.

    2011-01-01

    Endo-β-1, 4-xylanases is thought to be of great significance for several industries namely paper, pharmaceuticals, food, feed etc. in addition to better utilization of lignocellulosic biomass. The present investigation was aimed to develop an easy, simple and efficient assay technique for endo-β-1, 4-xylanases secreted by the aerobic fungi. Under the proposed protocol, 9 g/L xylan containing agar was prepared in 100 mM phosphate buffer at different pH (4.5, 5.5 and 6.5). The sterilized xylan agar was dispensed in 90 mm petri dishes. 100 µl of culture supernatant of 12 fungal isolates was added to the wells and left overnight at 31±10C. The petri dishes were observed for zone of clearance by naked eye and diameter was measured. Congo red solution (1 g/L) was applied over the petri dishes as per the established protocol and thereafter plates were flooded with 1M Sodium chloride solution for the appearance of zone of clearance. The diameter for zone of clearance by the proposed method and the established protocol was almost identical and ranged from 21 to 42 mm at different pH depending upon the activity of endo-β-1, 4-xylanases. Change of pH towards alkaline side enabled similar or marginal decrease of diameter for the zone of clearance in most of the fungal isolates. The specific activities of these fungal isolates varied from 1.85 to 11.47 IU/mg protein. The present investigation revealed that the proposed simple diffusion technique gave similar results as compared to the established Congo red assay for endo-β-1, 4-xylanases. Moreover, the present technique avoided the cumbersome steps of staining by Congo red and de-staining by sodium chloride. PMID:24031763

  7. Conjugated polyelectrolyte based fluorescence turn-on assay for real-time monitoring of protease activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Bin

    2010-10-15

    A fluorescence "turn-on" assay for monitoring protease activity is developed on the basis of a water-soluble carboxylated polyfluorene derivative, PFP-CO₂Na, and its different fluorescence response toward cytochrome c (cyt c) and its fragments. PFP-CO₂Na is synthesized via Suzuki coupling polymerization between 2,7-dibromo-9,9-bis(3'-tert-butyl propanoate)fluorene and 1,4-bis(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl)-benzene, followed by treatment with trifluoroacetic acid and Na₂CO₃. The fluorescence of PFP-CO₂Na can be significantly quenched by cyt c due to complexation-mediated electron transfer between the polymer and protein. Using the complex of PFP-CO₂Na/cyt c as a substrate, a real-time fluorescence turn-on assay for trypsin activity study has been developed. Addition of trypsin to the substrate solution induces gradual recovery of the fluorescence intensity for PFP-CO₂Na due to trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of cyt c, which dissociates the heme moiety from the polymer vicinity. The time-dependent fluorescence intensity increase of PFP-CO₂Na in the presence of trypsin allows us to derive the initial reaction rates and k(cat)/K(m) (5350 M⁻¹ s⁻¹) for trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis. Addition of trypsin inhibitor efficiently inhibits trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis reaction of cyt c, which leads to a decreased fluorescence turn-on response of PFP-CO₂Na.

  8. Validation of a high throughput flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay including assessment of metabolic activation in TK6 cells.

    PubMed

    Thougaard, Annemette V; Christiansen, Joan; Mow, Tomas; Hornberg, Jorrit J

    2014-12-01

    Genotoxicity is an unacceptable property for new drug candidates and we employ three screening assays during the drug discovery process to identify genotoxicity early and optimize chemical series. One of these methods is the flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay for which protocol optimizations have been described recently. Here, we report further validation of the assay in TK6 cells including assessment of metabolic activation. We first optimized assay conditions to allow for testing with and without metabolic activation in parallel in a 96-well plate format. Then, we tested a set of 48 compounds carefully selected to contain known in vivo genotoxins, nongenotoxins and drugs. Avoidance of irrelevant positives, a known issue with mammalian cell-based genotoxicity assays, is important to prevent early deselection of potentially promising compounds. Therefore, we enriched the validation set with compounds that were previously reported to produce irrelevant positive results in mammalian cell-based genotoxicity assays. The resulting dataset was used to set the relevant cut-off values for scoring a compound positive or negative, such that we obtained an optimal balance of high sensitivity (88%) and high specificity (87%). Finally, we tested an additional set of 16 drugs to further probe assay performance and 14 of them were classified correctly. To our knowledge, the present study is the most comprehensive validation of the in vitro flow cytometric micronucleus assay and the first to report parallel assessment with metabolic activation in reasonable throughput. The assay allows for rapidly screening novel compounds for genotoxicity and is therefore well-suited for use in early drug discovery projects. Environ.

  9. Activity-Dependent Enzymatic Assay for the Detection of Toluene-Oxidizing Bacteria Capable of Trichloroethylene Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, M. E.; Kauffman, M. E.; Keener, W. K.; Watwood, M. E.; Lehman, R. M.

    2001-12-01

    Toluene-oxidizing bacteria produce enzymes that cometabolically degrade trichloroethylene (TCE). These inducible enzymes are produced only in the presence of certain aromatic substrates such as toluene or phenol. Recent laboratory studies have utilized analog chemical substrates to identify production of bacterial enzymes capable of degrading trichloroethylene. These analog substrates produce chromogenic and/or fluorescent products when biotransformed by the enzymes of interest. In this study, 3-hydroxyphenylacetylene (3-HPA) was identified as an activity-dependent enzymatic probe for the detection of three of the four known toluene oxygenase enzymes capable of TCE degradation. Laboratory studies were conducted using pure cultures of Burkholderia cepacia G4, Burkholderia pickettii PKO1, and Pseudomonas putida F1. Cell cultures grown on lactate (non-enzyme inducing) or lactate and toluene (inducing) were trapped trapped on black polycarbonate filters, exposed to 3-HPA, and examined for fluorescence using an epifluorescent microscope. Additionally, B. cepacia G4 cells were grown under the same conditions, but in the presence of mineral and basalt specimens to allow for bacterial attachment. The specimens were then exposed to 3-HPA and examined under an epifluorescent microscope. Our results demonstrate that cells induced for the production of oxygenase enzymes, both unattached and attached, are able to transform 3-HPA to a fluorescent product, although cells attached to geologic materials, such as basalt, take substantially longer to transform the probe. Cells grown under non-inducing conditions do not transform the probe, regardless of their attachment status. Additionally, well water samples taken from a TCE-contaminated aquifer were successfully assayed using the 3-HPA enzymatic probe. The development of this enzyme activity-dependent enzymatic assay provides a fast and reliable method to assess the potential for TCE and aromatic contaminant bioremediation.

  10. Complete validation of a unique digestion assay to detect Trichinella larvae in horsemeat demonstrates its reliability for meeting food safety and trade requirements.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A tissue digestion assay using a double separatory funnel (DSF) procedure for the detection of Trichinella larvae in horsemeat was validated for application in food safety programs and trade. It consisted of a pepsin-HCl digestion step to release larvae from muscle tissue followed by two sequential ...

  11. Determining estrogenic activity in serum from ovariectomized rats treated with environmental compounds using an in vitro estrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of cell-based assays to quantify low levels of estrogen in human serum is an accepted method. These assays are more sensitive but less specific than radioimmunoassays (RIA). Thus, we hypothesized that estrogen responsive T47D-KBluc cells would detect estrogenic activity i...

  12. Determining estrogenic activity in serum from ovariectomized rats treated with environmental compounds using an in vitro estrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of cell-based assays to quantify low levels of estrogen in human serum is an accepted method. These assays are more sensitive but less specific than radioimmunoassays (RIA). Thus, we hypothesized that estrogen responsive T47D-KBluc cells would detect estrogenic activity i...

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations for chemical education. The activities include: (1) demonstration of vapor pressure; (2) a multicolored luminol-based chemiluminescence demonstration; and (3) a Charles's Law/Vapor pressure apparatus. (RH)

  14. Suramin inhibits helicase activity of NS3 protein of dengue virus in a fluorescence-based high throughput assay format.

    PubMed

    Basavannacharya, Chandrakala; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2014-10-24

    Dengue fever is a major health concern worldwide. The virus encoded non-structural protein 3 (NS3) is a multifunctional protein endowed with protease, helicase, nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) and RNA 5' triphosphatase (RTPase) activities. Helicase activity of NS3 catalyzes the unwinding of double stranded polynucleotides by utilizing the energy released from ATP hydrolysis. As this activity is essential for replication, NS3 helicase represents an attractive drug target for developing a dengue antiviral drug. Here, we report fluorescence based molecular beacon helicase assay using a duplex RNA substrate that contains a fluorophore on the 5' end and a quencher on the 3' end of one of the strands. The assay was optimized with respect to several parameters and adapted to 384-well high-throughput screening format, with an average Z' factor of 0.65. Assay validation with a small diverse set library of 1600 compounds identified, suramin as a significant inhibitor of the helicase activity of NS3. Helicase activity deficient NS3 K199A was used in a counter-screen to identify compounds interfering with the assay. Suramin inhibited DENV (dengue virus) NS3 helicase activity with a Ki of 0.75±0.03μM as a non-competitive inhibitor. The molecular beacon helicase assay together with the counter screen and suramin as a tool compound can be used to identify novel inhibitors of DENV helicase.

  15. Assays of physical stability and antioxidant activity of a topical formulation added with different plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Di Mambro, Valéria M; Fonseca, Maria J V

    2005-02-23

    In the present investigation the changes on physical stability (pH, viscosity, flow index and tixotropy) of topical formulations were evaluated following inclusion of different plant extracts containing flavonoids. Also, the antioxidant effect of these plant extracts alone and after addition in the formulation was evaluated using chemiluminescence and the stable free radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(.-)) assays, as well as the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. Formulation added with dl-alpha-tocopherol was used to compare the physical stability and antioxidant activity. Formulations with plant extracts showed pseudoplastic behavior with decreasing on viscosity and tixotropy. The Glycyrrhiza glabra (GG) and Ginkgo biloba (GB) extracts alone and the formulations containing these extracts showed great antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities while the other extracts studied (mixture of Glycyrrhiza glabra, Symphytum officinale L and Arctium majus root, Nelumbium speciosum and soybean) showed lower activity. The results suggest that GG and GB extracts may be used in topical formulations in order to protect skin against damage caused by free radical and reactive oxygen species. PMID:15708669

  16. A yeast-based assay identifies drugs active against human mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Couplan, Elodie; Aiyar, Raeka S; Kucharczyk, Roza; Kabala, Anna; Ezkurdia, Nahia; Gagneur, Julien; St Onge, Robert P; Salin, Bénédicte; Soubigou, Flavie; Le Cann, Marie; Steinmetz, Lars M; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Blondel, Marc

    2011-07-19

    Due to the lack of relevant animal models, development of effective treatments for human mitochondrial diseases has been limited. Here we establish a rapid, yeast-based assay to screen for drugs active against human inherited mitochondrial diseases affecting ATP synthase, in particular NARP (neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa) syndrome. This method is based on the conservation of mitochondrial function from yeast to human, on the unique ability of yeast to survive without production of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation, and on the amenability of the yeast mitochondrial genome to site-directed mutagenesis. Our method identifies chlorhexidine by screening a chemical library and oleate through a candidate approach. We show that these molecules rescue a number of phenotypes resulting from mutations affecting ATP synthase in yeast. These compounds are also active on human cybrid cells derived from NARP patients. These results validate our method as an effective high-throughput screening approach to identify drugs active in the treatment of human ATP synthase disorders and suggest that this type of method could be applied to other mitochondrial diseases.

  17. A yeast-based assay identifies drugs active against human mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Couplan, Elodie; Aiyar, Raeka S.; Kucharczyk, Roza; Kabala, Anna; Ezkurdia, Nahia; Gagneur, Julien; St. Onge, Robert P.; Salin, Bénédicte; Soubigou, Flavie; Le Cann, Marie; Steinmetz, Lars M.; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Blondel, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Due to the lack of relevant animal models, development of effective treatments for human mitochondrial diseases has been limited. Here we establish a rapid, yeast-based assay to screen for drugs active against human inherited mitochondrial diseases affecting ATP synthase, in particular NARP (neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa) syndrome. This method is based on the conservation of mitochondrial function from yeast to human, on the unique ability of yeast to survive without production of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation, and on the amenability of the yeast mitochondrial genome to site-directed mutagenesis. Our method identifies chlorhexidine by screening a chemical library and oleate through a candidate approach. We show that these molecules rescue a number of phenotypes resulting from mutations affecting ATP synthase in yeast. These compounds are also active on human cybrid cells derived from NARP patients. These results validate our method as an effective high-throughput screening approach to identify drugs active in the treatment of human ATP synthase disorders and suggest that this type of method could be applied to other mitochondrial diseases. PMID:21715656

  18. Antimutagenic and mutagenic activities of some terpenes in the bacterial reverse mutation assay.

    PubMed

    Di Sotto, Antonella; Evandri, Maria Grazia; Mazzanti, Gabriela

    2008-05-31

    The mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of linalool, linalyl acetate and beta-caryophyllene were evaluated by the bacterial reverse mutation assay on Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 and TA 100, and on Escherichia coli WP2uvrA strains. Neither linalool nor beta-caryophyllene showed mutagenicity, but linalyl acetate induced a statistically significant increase in the number of revertant colonies in WP2uvrA, both with and without S9 mixture. Linalool was devoid of antimutagenic activity against 2-nitrofluorene (2NF), sodium azide (SA), methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) and 2-aminoanthracene (2AA). In contrast, beta-caryophyllene showed a strong antimutagenic activity against 2NF: at the maximum concentration tested (6.40mg/plate) the number of 2NF-induced revertant colonies was reduced by 83.9%. beta-Caryophyllene also showed to counteract the mutagenicity of SA (in TA 100), MMS and 2AA (in WP2uvrA): the effect was weak against SA (inhibition lower than 25%) and moderate against MMS and 2AA (up to 30.5%). The antimutagenic activity of beta-caryophyllene observed here suggests further studies to evaluate its possible chemopreventive properties. PMID:18514567

  19. Fluorometric assay using naphthylamide substrates for assessing novel venom peptidase activities.

    PubMed

    Gasparello-Clemente, Elaine; Silveira, Paulo Flávio

    2002-11-01

    In the present study we examined the feasibility of using the fluorometry of naphthylamine derivatives for revealing peptidase activities in venoms of the snakes Bothrops jararaca, Bothrops alternatus, Bothrops atrox, Bothrops moojeni, Bothrops insularis, Crotalus durissus terrificus and Bitis arietans, of the scorpions Tityus serrulatus and Tityus bahiensis, and of the spiders Phoneutria nigriventer and Loxosceles intermedia. Neutral aminopeptidase (APN) and prolyl-dipeptidyl aminopeptidase IV (DPP IV) activities were presented in all snake venoms, with the highest levels in B. alternatus. Although all examined peptidase activities showed relatively low levels in arthropod venoms, basic aminopeptidase (APB) activity from P. nigriventer venom was the exception. Compared to the other peptidase activities, relatively high levels of acid aminopeptidase (APA) activity were restricted to B. arietans venom. B. arietans also exhibited a prominent content of APB activity which was lower in other venoms. Relatively low prolyl endopeptidase and proline iminopeptidase activities were, respectively, detectable only in T. bahiensis and B. insularis. Pyroglutamate aminopeptidase activity was undetectable in all venoms. All examined peptidase activities were undetectable in T. serrulatus venom. In this study, the specificities of a diverse array of peptidase activities from representative venoms were demonstrated for the first time, with a description of their distribution which may contribute to guiding further investigations. The expressive difference between snake and arthropod venoms was indicated by APN and DPP IV activities while APA and APB activities distinguished the venom of B. arietans from those of Brazilian snakes. The data reflected the relatively uniform qualitative distribution of the peptidase activities investigated, together with their unequal quantitative distribution, indicating the evolutionary divergence in the processing of peptides in these different

  20. Spectrophotometric assays for the enzymatic hydrolysis of the active metabolites of chlorpyrifos and parathion by plasma paraoxonase/arylesterase.

    PubMed

    Furlong, C E; Richter, R J; Seidel, S L; Costa, L G; Motulsky, A G

    1989-08-01

    Human serum plasma paraoxonase/arylesterase exhibits a genetic polymorphism for the hydrolysis of paraoxon. One allelic form of the enzyme hydrolyzes paraoxon slowly with a low turnover number and the other(s) hydrolyzes paraoxon rapidly with a high turnover number. Chlorpyrifos-oxon, the active metabolite of the insecticide chlorpyrifos (Dursban), is also hydrolyzed by plasma arylesterase/paraoxonase. A specific assay for measuring hydrolysis of this compound is described. This assay is not subject to interference by the esterase activity of serum albumin. The Km for chlorpyrifos-oxon hydrolysis was 75 microM. Hydrolysis was inhibited by phenyl acetate, EDTA, and organic solvents. Enzyme activity required calcium ions and was stimulated by sodium chloride. Hydrolysis was optimized by using methanol instead of acetone to dissolve substrate. Unlike the multimodal distribution of paraoxonase, the distribution of chlorpyrifos-oxonase activity failed to show clear multimodality. An improvement in the assay for hydrolysis of paraoxon by plasma arylesterase/paraoxonase was achieved by elimination of organic solvents. Plotting chlorpyrifos-oxonase activity vs paraoxonase activity for a human population using the new assay conditions provided an excellent resolution of low activity homozygotes from heterozygotes for this allele. A greater than 40-fold difference in rates of chlorpyrifosoxon hydrolysis observed between rat (low activity) and rabbit sera (high activity) correlated well with the reported large differences in LD50 values for chlorpyrifos in these two animals, consistent with an important role of serum paraoxonase in detoxification of organophosphorus pesticides in vivo.

  1. Chromogenic assay for the prothrombin activator ecarin from the venom of the saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus).

    PubMed

    Stocker, K; Fischer, H; Brogli, M

    1986-01-01

    Ecarin, by limited proteolysis and subsequent autocatalytic reactions, causes the conversion of prothrombin into three products with amidolytic activity: meizothrombin, meizothrombin 1 and lpha-thrombin. Ecarin action may be abolished by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and the activity of alpha-thrombin can, with a high degree of selectivity, be inhibited by heparin. Thus, ecarin potency may be assayed by measuring the meizothrombin activity generated by ecarin action on human plasma in the presence of heparin. The chromogenic substrate Tosyl-glycyl-L-prolyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide (Chromozym TH) is used in this assay. PMID:3082039

  2. Chick Heart Invasion Assay for Testing the Invasiveness of Cancer Cells and the Activity of Potentially Anti-invasive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bracke, Marc E; Roman, Bart I; Stevens, Christian V; Mus, Liselot M; Parmar, Virinder S; De Wever, Olivier; Mareel, Marc M

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the chick heart assay is to offer a relevant organ culture method to study tumor invasion in three dimensions. The assay can distinguish between invasive and non-invasive cells, and enables study of the effects of test compounds on tumor invasion. Cancer cells - either as aggregates or single cells - are confronted with fragments of embryonic chick heart. After organ culture in suspension for a few days or weeks the confronting cultures are fixed and embedded in paraffin for histological analysis. The three-dimensional interaction between the cancer cells and the normal tissue is then reconstructed from serial sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin or after immunohistochemical staining for epitopes in the heart tissue or the confronting cancer cells. The assay is consistent with the recent concept that cancer invasion is the result of molecular interactions between the cancer cells and their neighbouring stromal host elements (myofibroblasts, endothelial cells, extracellular matrix components, etc.). Here, this stromal environment is offered to the cancer cells as a living tissue fragment. Supporting aspects to the relevance of the assay are multiple. Invasion in the assay is in accordance with the criteria of cancer invasion: progressive occupation and replacement in time and space of the host tissue, and invasiveness and non-invasiveness in vivo of the confronting cells generally correlates with the outcome of the assay. Furthermore, the invasion pattern of cells in vivo, as defined by pathologists, is reflected in the histological images in the assay. Quantitative structure-activity relation (QSAR) analysis of the results obtained with numerous potentially anti-invasive organic congener compounds allowed the study of structure-activity relations for flavonoids and chalcones, and known anti-metastatic drugs used in the clinic (e.g., microtubule inhibitors) inhibit invasion in the assay as well. However, the assay does not take into account

  3. Comparative metagenomics demonstrating different degradative capacity of activated biomass treating hydrocarbon contaminated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Trilok Chandra; Pal, Rajesh Ramavadh; Shastri, Sunita; Jadeja, Niti B; Kapley, Atya

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the diverse degradative capacity of activated biomass, when exposed to different levels of total dissolved solids (TDS) using a comparative metagenomics approach. The biomass was collected at two time points to examine seasonal variations. Four metagenomes were sequenced on Illumina Miseq platform and analysed using MG-RAST. STAMP tool was used to analyse statistically significant differences amongst different attributes of metagenomes. Metabolic pathways related to degradation of aromatics via the central and peripheral pathways were found to be dominant in low TDS metagenome, while pathways corresponding to central carbohydrate metabolism, nitrogen, organic acids were predominant in high TDS sample. Seasonal variation was seen to affect catabolic gene abundance as well as diversity of the microbial community. Degradation of model compounds using activated sludge demonstrated efficient utilisation of single aromatic ring compounds in both samples but cyclic compounds were not efficiently utilised by biomass exposed to high TDS.

  4. Development of a fluorescent microsphere-based multiplexed high-throughput assay system for profiling of transcription factor activation.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, Takuro; Jiang, Xin; Li, Xianqiang

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors (TFs), which play crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression in the human genome, are highly regulated by a variety of mechanisms. A single extracellular stimulus can trigger multiple signaling pathways, and these in turn can activate multiple TFs to mediate the inducible expression of target genes. Alterations in the activities of TFs are often associated with human diseases, such as altered activating factor 1, estrogen receptor, and p53 function in cancer, nuclear factor kappaB in inflammatory diseases, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in obesity. A systematic assay for profiling the activation of TFs will aid in elucidating the mechanisms of TF activation, reveal altered TFs associated with human diseases, and aid in developing assays for drug discovery. Here, we developed a 24-plex fluorescent microsphere-based TF activation assay system with a 96-well plate format. The assay system enabled high-throughput profiling of the DNA binding activity of TFs in multiple samples with high sensitivity. PMID:16834534

  5. 41 CFR 102-74.495 - If a permit involves demonstrations or activities that may lead to civil disturbances, what...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... demonstrations or activities that may lead to civil disturbances, what action must a Federal agency take before... demonstrations or activities that may lead to civil disturbances, what action must a Federal agency take before... with their law enforcement organization if a permit involves demonstrations or activities that may...

  6. Active vibration control testing of the SPICES program: final demonstration article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, James P.; Jacobs, Jack H.

    1996-05-01

    The Synthesis and Processing of Intelligent Cost Effective Structures (SPICES) Program is a partnership program sponsored by the Advanced Research Projects Agency. The mission of the program is to develop cost effective material processing and synthesis technologies to enable new products employing active vibration suppression and control devices to be brought to market. The two year program came to fruition in 1995 through the fabrication of the final smart components and testing of an active plate combined with two trapezoidal rails, forming an active mount. Testing of the SPICES combined active mount took place at McDonnell Douglas facilities in St. Louis, MO, in October-December 1995. Approximately 15 dB reduction in overall response of a motor mounted on the active structure was achieved. Further details and results of the SPICES combined active mount demonstration testing are outlined. Results of numerous damping and control strategies that were developed and employed in the testing are presented, as well as aspects of the design and fabrication of the SPICES active mount components.

  7. Evaluation of mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of alpha-bisabolol in the Salmonella/microsome assay.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Carneiro, M R; Dias, Daniela M M; De-Oliveira, A C A X; Paumgartten, Francisco J R

    2005-08-01

    alpha-Bisabolol (BISA) is a sesquiterpene alcohol found in the oils of chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla) and other plants. BISA has been widely used in dermatological and cosmetic formulations. This study was undertaken to investigate the mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of BISA in the Salmonella/microsome assay. Mutagenicity of BISA was evaluated with TA100, TA98, TA97a and TA1535 Salmonella typhimurium strains, without and with addition of S9 mixture. No increase in the number of his+ revertant colonies over the negative (solvent) control values was observed with any of the four tester strains. In the antimutagenicity assays, BISA was tested up to the highest nontoxic dose (i.e. 50 and 150 microg/plate, with and without S9 mix, respectively) against direct-acting (sodium azide, SA; 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide, 4-NQNO; 2-nitrofluorene, 2-NF; and nitro-o-phenylenediamine, NPD) as well as indirect-acting (cyclophosphamide, CP; benzo[a]pyrene, B[a]P; aflatoxin B1, AFB1; 2-aminoanthracene, 2-AA; and 2-aminofluorene, 2-AF) mutagens. BISA did not alter mutagenic activity of SA and of NPD, and showed only a weak inhibitory effect on the mutagenicity induced by 4-NQNO and 2-NF. The mutagenic effects of AFB1, CP, B[a]P, 2-AA and 2-AF, on the other hand, were all markedly and dose-dependently reduced by BISA. It was also found that BISA inhibited pentoxyresorufin-o-depentylase (PROD, IC50 2.76 microM) and ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD, 33.67 microM), which are markers for cytochromes CYP2B1 and 1A1 in rat liver microsomes. Since CYP2B1 converts AFB1 and CP into mutagenic metabolites, and CYP1A1 activates B[a]P, 2-AA and 2-AF, results suggest that BISA-induced antimutagenicity could be mediated by an inhibitory effect on the metabolic activation of these promutagens. PMID:15936245

  8. A novel non-radioactive primase-pyrophosphatase activity assay and its application to the discovery of inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis primase DnaG.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Tapan; Resto-Roldán, Esteban; Sawyer, Sean K; Artsimovitch, Irina; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial DNA primase DnaG synthesizes RNA primers required for chromosomal DNA replication. Biochemical assays measuring primase activity have been limited to monitoring formation of radioactively labelled primers because of the intrinsically low catalytic efficiency of DnaG. Furthermore, DnaG is prone to aggregation and proteolytic degradation. These factors have impeded discovery of DnaG inhibitors by high-throughput screening (HTS). In this study, we expressed and purified the previously uncharacterized primase DnaG from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb DnaG). By coupling the activity of Mtb DnaG to that of another essential enzyme, inorganic pyrophosphatase from M. tuberculosis (Mtb PPiase), we developed the first non-radioactive primase-pyrophosphatase assay. An extensive optimization of the assay enabled its efficient use in HTS (Z' = 0.7 in the 384-well format). HTS of 2560 small molecules to search for inhibitory compounds yielded several hits, including suramin, doxorubicin and ellagic acid. We demonstrate that these three compounds inhibit Mtb DnaG. Both suramin and doxorubicin are potent (low-µM) DNA- and nucleotide triphosphate-competitive priming inhibitors that interact with more than one site on Mtb DnaG. This novel assay should be applicable to other primases and inefficient DNA/RNA polymerases, facilitating their characterization and inhibitor discovery.

  9. A novel non-radioactive primase–pyrophosphatase activity assay and its application to the discovery of inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis primase DnaG

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Tapan; Resto-Roldán, Esteban; Sawyer, Sean K.; Artsimovitch, Irina; Tsodikov, Oleg V.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial DNA primase DnaG synthesizes RNA primers required for chromosomal DNA replication. Biochemical assays measuring primase activity have been limited to monitoring formation of radioactively labelled primers because of the intrinsically low catalytic efficiency of DnaG. Furthermore, DnaG is prone to aggregation and proteolytic degradation. These factors have impeded discovery of DnaG inhibitors by high-throughput screening (HTS). In this study, we expressed and purified the previously uncharacterized primase DnaG from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb DnaG). By coupling the activity of Mtb DnaG to that of another essential enzyme, inorganic pyrophosphatase from M. tuberculosis (Mtb PPiase), we developed the first non-radioactive primase–pyrophosphatase assay. An extensive optimization of the assay enabled its efficient use in HTS (Z′ = 0.7 in the 384-well format). HTS of 2560 small molecules to search for inhibitory compounds yielded several hits, including suramin, doxorubicin and ellagic acid. We demonstrate that these three compounds inhibit Mtb DnaG. Both suramin and doxorubicin are potent (low-µM) DNA- and nucleotide triphosphate-competitive priming inhibitors that interact with more than one site on Mtb DnaG. This novel assay should be applicable to other primases and inefficient DNA/RNA polymerases, facilitating their characterization and inhibitor discovery. PMID:23267008

  10. Unchanged NADPH Oxidase Activity in Nox1-Nox2-Nox4 Triple Knockout Mice: What Do NADPH-Stimulated Chemiluminescence Assays Really Detect?

    PubMed

    Rezende, Flávia; Löwe, Oliver; Helfinger, Valeska; Prior, Kim-Kristin; Walter, Maria; Zukunft, Sven; Fleming, Ingrid; Weissmann, Norbert; Brandes, Ralf P; Schröder, Katrin

    2016-03-01

    NADPH oxidases of the Nox family are considered important sources of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. This conclusion is, in part, based on the ability of NADPH to elicit a chemiluminescence signal in tissue/cell homogenates or membrane preparations in the presence of enhancers such as lucigenin, luminol, or L012. However, the ability of these particular assays to specifically detect Nox activity and Nox-derived ROS has not been proven. In this study, we demonstrate that combined knockout of the three main Nox enzymes of the mouse (Nox1-Nox2-Nox4 triple knockout) had no impact on NADPH-stimulated chemiluminescence signals in the aorta, heart, and kidney homogenates. In the NADPH-stimulated membrane assays, no effect of in vivo angiotensin II pretreatment or deletion of Nox enzymes was observed. In in vitro studies in HEK293 cells, the overexpression of Nox5 or Nox4 markedly increased ROS production in intact cells, whereas overexpression of Nox5 or Nox4 had no influence on the signal in membrane assays. In contrast, overexpression of nitric oxide synthase or cytochrome P450 enzymes resulted in an increased chemiluminescence signal in isolated membranes. On the basis of these observations, we propose the hypothesis that NADPH-stimulated chemiluminescence-based membrane assays, as currently used, do not reflect Nox activity. PMID:25906178

  11. Library screening by means of mass spectrometry (MS) binding assays-exemplarily demonstrated for a pseudostatic library addressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1).

    PubMed

    Sindelar, Miriam; Wanner, Klaus T

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, the application of mass spectrometry (MS) binding assays as a tool for library screening is reported. For library generation, dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) was used. These libraries can be screened by means of MS binding assays when appropriate measures are taken to render the libraries pseudostatic. That way, the efficiency of MS binding assays to determine ligand binding in compound screening with the ease of library generation by DCC is combined. The feasibility of this approach is shown for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1) as a target, representing the most important subtype of the GABA transporters. For the screening, hydrazone libraries were employed that were generated in the presence of the target by reacting various sets of aldehydes with a hydrazine derivative that is delineated from piperidine-3-carboxylic acid (nipecotic acid), a common fragment of known GAT1 inhibitors. To ensure that the library generated is pseudostatic, a large excess of the nipecotic acid derivative is employed. As the library is generated in a buffer system suitable for binding and the target is already present, the mixtures can be directly analyzed by MS binding assays-the process of library generation and screening thus becoming simple to perform. The binding affinities of the hits identified by deconvolution were confirmed in conventional competitive MS binding assays performed with single compounds obtained by separate synthesis. In this way, two nipecotic acid derivatives exhibiting a biaryl moiety, 1-{2-[2'-(1,1'-biphenyl-2-ylmethylidene)hydrazine]ethyl}piperidine-3-carboxylic acid and 1-(2-{2'-[1-(2-thiophenylphenyl)methylidene]hydrazine}ethyl)piperidine-3-carboxylic acid, were found to be potent GAT1 ligands exhibiting pK(i) values of 6.186 ± 0.028 and 6.229 ± 0.039, respectively. This method enables screening of libraries, whether generated by conventional chemistry or DCC, and is applicable to all kinds of targets including

  12. Library screening by means of mass spectrometry (MS) binding assays-exemplarily demonstrated for a pseudostatic library addressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1).

    PubMed

    Sindelar, Miriam; Wanner, Klaus T

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, the application of mass spectrometry (MS) binding assays as a tool for library screening is reported. For library generation, dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) was used. These libraries can be screened by means of MS binding assays when appropriate measures are taken to render the libraries pseudostatic. That way, the efficiency of MS binding assays to determine ligand binding in compound screening with the ease of library generation by DCC is combined. The feasibility of this approach is shown for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1) as a target, representing the most important subtype of the GABA transporters. For the screening, hydrazone libraries were employed that were generated in the presence of the target by reacting various sets of aldehydes with a hydrazine derivative that is delineated from piperidine-3-carboxylic acid (nipecotic acid), a common fragment of known GAT1 inhibitors. To ensure that the library generated is pseudostatic, a large excess of the nipecotic acid derivative is employed. As the library is generated in a buffer system suitable for binding and the target is already present, the mixtures can be directly analyzed by MS binding assays-the process of library generation and screening thus becoming simple to perform. The binding affinities of the hits identified by deconvolution were confirmed in conventional competitive MS binding assays performed with single compounds obtained by separate synthesis. In this way, two nipecotic acid derivatives exhibiting a biaryl moiety, 1-{2-[2'-(1,1'-biphenyl-2-ylmethylidene)hydrazine]ethyl}piperidine-3-carboxylic acid and 1-(2-{2'-[1-(2-thiophenylphenyl)methylidene]hydrazine}ethyl)piperidine-3-carboxylic acid, were found to be potent GAT1 ligands exhibiting pK(i) values of 6.186 ± 0.028 and 6.229 ± 0.039, respectively. This method enables screening of libraries, whether generated by conventional chemistry or DCC, and is applicable to all kinds of targets including

  13. High specific activity enantiomerically enriched juvenile hormones: synthesis and binding assay

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, G.D.; Wawrzenczyk, C.

    1985-08-01

    A stereoselective total synthesis of chiral juvenile hormone I is described that allows stoichiometric introduction of two tritium atoms in the final step. Both optical antipodes of the pivotal epoxy alcohol intermediate were prepared in 95% enantiomeric excess by the Sharpless epoxidation of a (Z)-allylic alcohol. Elaboration of the hydroxy-methyl group to a vinyl group followed by selective homogeneous tritiation affords optically active juvenile hormone I analogs at 58 Ci/mmol. Competitive binding of the labeled 10R, 11S and 10S,11R enantiomers with unlabeled enantiomers to the hemolymph binding protein of Manduca sexta larvae was determined by using a dextran-coated charcoal assay. The natural 10R,11S enantiomer has twice the relative binding affinity of the 10S,11R enantiomer. The availability of such high specific activity optically pure hormones will contribute substantially to the search for high-affinity receptors for juvenile hormones in the nuclei of cells. Moreover, the chiral 12-hydroxy-(10R,11S)-epoxy intermediate allows modification of juvenile hormone for solid-phase biochemical and radioimmunochemical work without altering either the biologically important carbomethoxy or epoxy recognition sites.

  14. High specific activity enantiomerically enriched juvenile hormones: synthesis and binding assay.

    PubMed Central

    Prestwich, G D; Wawrzeńczyk, C

    1985-01-01

    A stereoselective total synthesis of chiral juvenile hormone I is described that allows stoichiometric introduction of two tritium atoms in the final step. Both optical antipodes of the pivotal epoxy alcohol intermediate were prepared in 95% enantiomeric excess by the Sharpless epoxidation of a (Z)-allylic alcohol. Elaboration of the hydroxy-methyl group to a vinyl group followed by selective homogeneous tritiation affords optically active juvenile hormone I analogs at 58 Ci/mmol. Competitive binding of the labeled 10R, 11S and 10S,11R enantiomers with unlabeled enantiomers to the hemolymph binding protein of Manduca sexta larvae was determined by using a dextran-coated charcoal assay. The natural 10R,11S enantiomer has twice the relative binding affinity of the 10S,11R enantiomer. The availability of such high specific activity optically pure hormones will contribute substantially to the search for high-affinity receptors for juvenile hormones in the nuclei of cells. Moreover, the chiral 12-hydroxy-(10R,11S)-epoxy intermediate allows modification of juvenile hormone for solid-phase biochemical and radioimmunochemical work without altering either the biologically important carbomethoxy or epoxy recognition sites. PMID:3860862

  15. Electrochemical assay of α-glucosidase activity and the inhibitor screening in cell medium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Liu, Ying; Wang, Xiaonan; Chen, Yangyang; Li, Genxi

    2015-12-15

    An electrochemical method is established in this work for the assay of α-glucosidase activity and the inhibitor screening through one-step displacement reaction, which can be directly used in cell medium. The displacement reaction can be achieved via strong binding of 4-aminophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (pAPG)/magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to pyrene boric acid (PBA) immobilized on the surface of graphite electrode (GE), compared to that of dopamine (DA)/sliver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Since α-glucosidase can specifically catalyze MNPs/pAPG into MNPs/pAP which has no binding capacity with PBA, the activity of both isolated and membrane bound enzyme can be well evaluated by using this proposed method. Meanwhile, signal amplification can be accomplished via the immobilization of DA at the outer layer of AgNPs, and the accuracy can be strengthened through magnetic separation. Moreover, this method can also be utilized for inhibitor screening not only in the medium containing the enzyme but also in cell medium. With good precision and accuracy, it may be extended to other proteases and their inhibitors as well. PMID:26201984

  16. Methodology to assay CYP2E1 mixed function oxidase catalytic activity and its induction

    PubMed Central

    Cederbaum, Arthur I.

    2014-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 mixed function oxidase enzymes are the major catalysts involved in drug metabolism. There are many forms of P450. CYP2E1 metabolizes many toxicologically important compounds including ethanol and is active in generating reactive oxygen species. Since several of the contributions in the common theme series “Role of CYP2E1 and Oxidative/Nitrosative Stress in the Hepatotoxic Actions of Alcohol” discuss CYP2E1, this methodology review describes assays on how CYP2E1 catalytic activity and its induction by ethanol and other inducers can be measured using substrate probes such as the oxidation of para-nitrophenol to para-nitrocatechol and the oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde. Approaches to validate that a particular reaction e.g. oxidation of a drug or toxin is catalyzed by CYP2E1 or that induction of that reaction is due to induction of CYP2E1 are important and specific examples using inhibitors of CYP2E1, anti-CYP2E1 IgG or CYP2E1 knockout and knockin mice will be discussed. PMID:25454746

  17. Liquid crystal based sensors monitoring lipase activity: a new rapid and sensitive method for cytotoxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Zakir; Zafiu, Christian; Küpcü, Seta; Pivetta, Lucineia; Hollfelder, Nadine; Masutani, Akira; Kilickiran, Pinar; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin

    2014-06-15

    In this work we present liquid crystal (LC) based sensor devices to monitor cell viability. The sensing layer is composed by the LC and a planar monolayer of phospholipids. In the presence of minute traces of phospholipases, which hydrolyze enzymatically phospholipids, the LC-lipid interface is disintegrated. This event causes a change in orientation of the LC, which was followed in a polarized microscope. The lipase activity can be used to measure the cell viability, since members of this enzyme family are released by cells, as they undergo necrosis. The described sensor was used to monitor the presence of the lipases released from three different cell lines, which were either exposed to highly cytotoxic model compounds (sodium azide and paracetamol) or subjected to freeze-thaw cycles to induce cell death by a non-chemical based inducer for apoptosis, such as temperature. Finally, the comparison of lipase activity detected by a state-of-the-art fluorescence assay to the LC based system resulted in the superiority of the LC system concerning incubation time and sensitivity. PMID:24508543

  18. Urinary metabolites of isorhynchophylline in rats and their neuroprotective activities in the HT22 cell assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fangfang; Qi, Wen; Sun, Jiahong; Simpkins, James W.; Yuan, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Isorhynchophylline is one of the major alkaloids from the Uncaria hook possessing the effects of lowered blood pressure, vasodilatation and protection against ischemia-induced neuronal damage. However, the metabolic pathway of isorhynchophylline has not been fully reported yet. In this paper, the metabolism of isorhynchophylline was investigated in rats. Five metabolites were isolated by using solvent extraction and repeated chromatographic methods, and identified by spectroscopic methods including UV, MS, NMR and CD experiments. Three new compounds were identified as 5-oxoisorhynchophyllic acid-22-O-β-D-glucuronide (M1), 17-O-demethyl-16,17-dihydro isorhynchophylline (M2) and 5-oxoisorhynchophyllic acid (M4) together with two known compounds isorhynchophylline (M0) and rhynchophylline (M3). Possible metabolic pathways of isorhynchophylline are proposed. Furthermore, the activity assay for all the metabolites showed that isorhynchophylline (M0) exhibited potent neuroprotective effects against glutamate-induced HT22 cell death. However, little or weak neuroprotective activities were observed for M1–M4. Our present study is important to further understand its metabolic fate and disposition in humans. PMID:24910000

  19. Nondestructive assay of fission products in spent-fuel assemblies using gamma and photoneutron activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakosi, L.; Veres, Á.

    1990-12-01

    Hard γ-radiation (above 1.078 MeV) from spent reactor fuel was detected by means of excitation of 115In to its 4.5 h half-life metastable state induced by the (γ, γ') reaction and subsequent counting of the 336 keV isomeric transition. Resonance-energy quanta were produced by Compton scattering in the source, i.e. the spent fuel itself. The sensitivity of the activation method above 1.67 MeV γ-energy was enhanced by introducing a Be photoneutron converter in order to produce neutrons for exploiting their much larger activation cross sections. For short cooling times (10-40 d) the hard-γ signature of the fuel was due to the fission product 140Ba 140La, detection of which facilitated monitoring of the reactor power which existed in the core just before reactor shutdown. A linear relationship was found between the γ-signal and the fissile content in the fuel. For 100-1000 d cooled fuel the 144Ce 144Pr content could be detected, which was only sensitive to the cooling time. Spent-fuel assemblies of both a research and a power reactor were assayed by these novel methods for reactor operational and nuclear-material safeguard purposes.

  20. Automation of o-dianisidine assay for ceruloplasmin activity analyses: usefulness of investigation in Wilson's disease and in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Siotto, Mariacristina; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Marano, Massimo; Squitti, Rosanna

    2014-10-01

    Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is a serum ferroxidase that plays an essential role in iron metabolism. It is routinely tested by immunoturbidimetric assays that quantify the concentration of the protein both in its active and inactive forms. Cp activity is generally analyzed manually; the process is time-consuming, has a limited repeatability, and is not suitable for a clinical setting. To overcome these inconveniences, we have set the automation of the o-dianisidine Cp activity assay on a Cobas Mira Plus apparatus. The automation was rapid and repeatable, and the data were provided in terms of IU/L. The assay was adapted for human sera and showed a good precision [coefficient of variation (CV) 3.7 %] and low limit of detection (LoD 11.58 IU/L). The simultaneous analysis of Cp concentration and activity in the same run allowed us to calculate the Cp-specific activity that provides a better index of the overall Cp status. To test the usefulness of this automation, we tested this assay on 104 healthy volunteers and 36 patients with Wilson's disease, hepatic encephalopathy, and chronic liver disease. Cp activity and specific activity distinguished better patients between groups with respect to Cp concentration alone, and providing support for the clinical investigation of neurological diseases in which liver failure is one of the clinical hallmarks.

  1. Assaying Bcr-Abl kinase activity and inhibition in whole cell extracts by phosphorylation of substrates immobilized on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ding; Nair-Gill, Evan; Sher, Dorie A; Parker, Laurie L; Campbell, Jennifer M; Siddiqui, Mariah; Stock, Wendy; Kron, Stephen J

    2005-12-01

    There is a current and increasing demand for simple, robust, nonradioactive assays of protein tyrosine kinase activity with applications for clinical diagnosis and high-throughput screening of potential molecularly targeted therapeutic agents. One significant challenge is to detect and measure the activity of specific kinases with key roles in cell signaling as an approach to distinguish normal cells from cancer cells and as a means of evaluating targeted drug efficacy and resistance in cancer cells. Here, we describe a method in which kinase substrates fused to glutathione-S-transferase and immobilized on glutathione agarose beads are phosphorylated, eluted, and then assayed to detect kinase activity. The activity of recombinant, purified c-Abl kinase or Bcr-Abl kinase in whole cell extracts can be detected with equivalent specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility. Similarly, inhibition of recombinant c-Abl or Bcr-Abl in cells or cell extracts by imatinib mesylate and other Bcr-Abl targeted kinase inhibitors is readily assayed. This simple kinase assay is sufficiently straightforward and robust for use in clinical laboratories and is potentially adaptable to high-throughput assay formats.

  2. Development and validation of a simple cell-based fluorescence assay for dipeptidyl peptidase 1 (DPP1) activity.

    PubMed

    Thong, Bob; Pilling, James; Ainscow, Edward; Beri, Raj; Unitt, John

    2011-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 1 (DPP1) (EC 3.4.14.1; also known as cathepsin C, cathepsin J, dipeptidyl aminopeptidase, and dipeptidyl aminotransferase) is a lysosomal cysteinyl protease of the papain family involved in the intracellular degradation of proteins. Isolated enzyme assays for DPP1 activity using a variety of synthetic substrates such as dipeptide or peptide linked to amino-methyl-coumarin (AMC) or other fluorophores are well established. There is, however, no report of a simple whole-cell-based assay for measuring lysosomal DPP1 activity other than the use of flow cytometry (fluorescence-activated cell sorting) or the use of invasive activity-based probes or the production of physiological products such as neutrophil elastase. The authors investigated a number of DPP1 fluorogenic substrates that have the potential to access the lysosome and enable the measurement of DPP1 enzyme activity in situ. They describe the development and evaluation of a simple noninvasive fluorescence assay for measuring DPP1 activity in fresh or cryopreserved human THP-1 cells using the substrate H-Gly-Phe-AFC (amino-fluoro-coumarin). This cell-based fluorescence assay can be performed in a 96-well plate format and is ideally suited for determining the cell potency of potential DPP1 enzyme inhibitors.

  3. Three-stage chromogenic assay for the analysis of activation properties of factor X by cancer procoagulant.

    PubMed

    Mielicki, W P; Gordon, S G

    1993-06-01

    The cysteine proteinase, cancer procoagulant (CP; EC 3.4.22.26) was isolated from human amnion-chorion and purified by precipitation with polyethylene glycol and either ion exchange or immunoaffinity chromatography. A new, sensitive, three-stage chromogenic assay was developed for determination of CP factor X-activating activity. Using this assay some properties including dose-response, effect of calcium, phospholipid and pH on the activation of factor X by CP was determined. There was an excellent linear correlation (r2 = 0.99) between concentration and the enzymatic activity of CP. The activation of factor X by purified CP was calcium dependent with an optimum calcium concentration of 7 mM. CP was not phospholipid dependent. There was a rather broad pH optimum between pH 6.9 and 7.25 for the activation of factor X by CP.

  4. Laboratory demonstration of a primary active mirror for space with the LATT: large aperture telescope technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briguglio, Runa; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Vettore, Christian; d'Amato, Francesco; Xompero, Marco; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Lisi, Franco; Riccardi, Armando; Patauner, Christian; Lazzarini, Paolo; Tintori, Matteo; Duò, Fabrizio; Pucci, Mauro; Zuccaro Marchi, Alessandro; Maresi, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The LATT project is an ESA contract under TRP programme to demonstrate the scalability of the technology from ground-based adaptive mirrors to space active primary mirrors. A prototype spherical mirror based on a 40 cm diameter 1 mm thin glass shell with 19 contactless, voice-coil actuators and co-located position sensors have been manufactured and integrated into a final unit with an areal density lower than 20 kg/m2. Laboratory tests demonstrated the controllability with very low power budget and the survival of the fragile glass shell exposed to launch accelerations, thanks to an electrostatic locking mechanism; such achievements pushes the technology readiness level toward 5. With this prototype, the LATT project explored the feasibility of using an active and lightweight primary for space telescopes. The concept is attractive for large segmented telescopes, with surface active control to shape and co-phase them once in flight. In this paper we will describe the findings of the technological advances and the results of the environmental and optical tests.

  5. Demonstration of prosthetic activation of central auditory pathways using ( sup 14 C)-2-deoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.A.; Niparko, J.K.; Altschuler, R.A.; Frey, K.A.; Miller, J.M. )

    1990-02-01

    The cochlear prosthesis is not applicable to patients who lack an implantable cochlea or an intact vestibulocochlear nerve. Direct electrical stimulation of the cochlear nucleus (CN) of the brain stem might provide a method for auditory rehabilitation of these patients. A penetrating CN electrode has been developed and tissue tolerance to this device demonstrated. This study was undertaken to evaluate metabolic activation of central nervous system (CNS) auditory tracts produced by such implants. Regional cerebral glucose use resulting from CN stimulation was estimated in a series of chronically implanted guinea pigs with the use of ({sup 14}C)-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). Enhanced 2-DG uptake was observed in structures of the auditory tract. The activation of central auditory structures achieved with CN stimulation was similar to that produced by acoustic stimulation and by electrical stimulation of the modiolar portion of the auditory nerve in control groups. An interesting banding pattern was observed in the inferior colliculus following CN stimulation, as previously described with acoustic stimulation. This study demonstrates that functional metabolic activation of central auditory pathways can be achieved with a penetrating CNS auditory prosthesis.

  6. Cytochemically demonstrable B-glucuronidase activity in normal and neoplastic human lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Machin, G A; Halper, J P; Knowles, D M

    1980-12-01

    Mononuclear cell suspensions were prepared from 40 normal peripheral blood and lymphoid tissue specimens and 42 neoplastic specimens obtained from patients with malignant lymphoma and lymphocytic leukemia. These suspensions were analyzed for la antigens, surface immunoglobulin (Slg), sheep erythrocyte (E) rosette formation and, in some instances, acid alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase (ANAE) activity. The results of these studies were correlated with the expression of cytochemically demonstrable BG activity. The percentage of BG+ lymphocytes was found to be comparable, within 10%, to the percentage of E+ (T) cells in the majority of normal, non-neoplastic peripheral blood, tonsil, spleen, and lymph node specimens examined. Occasionally, the percentage of E+ cells exceeded the percentage of BG+ cells by 20% or more, suggesting the presence of an E+BG- T cell subpopulation. BG+ B lymphocytes were only demonstrated in 1 of 40 non-neoplastic lymphoid specimens. The neoplastic B cells in each of 14 B cell (la+Slg+E-) lymphomas were BG-. However, a variable proportion of the neoplastic cells isolated from 6 cases of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and neoplastic plasma cells isolated from 7 cases of multiple myeloma expressed BG activity. Thus, it appears that both normal and neoplastic BG- and BG+ B lymphocyte populations exist; the latter may be related to a state of activation or a stage of B cell differentiation. The neoplastic cells isolated from 4 T cell (la-Slg-E+) malignancies were BG+ while those isolated from 3 T cell malignancies were BG-. The variable expression of BG activity by T cell malignancies may be related to T cell differentiation. Investigation of BG expression by T cell derived malignancies may prove useful in sorting out T cell phenotypes. PMID:7437515

  7. Radioactive Demonstrations Of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) With Hanford Low Activity Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Burket, P. R.; Bannochie, C. J.; Daniel, W. G.; Nash, C. A.; Cozzi, A. D.; Herman, C. C.

    2012-10-22

    Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One immobilization technology being considered is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) which offers a low temperature (700-750?C) continuous method by which wastes high in organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, or other aqueous components may be processed into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The granular waste form produced by co-processing the waste with kaolin clay has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. The FBSR granular product will be monolithed into a final waste form. The granular component is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals such as sodalite. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial, engineering, pilot, and laboratory scales on simulants. Radioactive testing at SRNL commenced in late 2010 to demonstrate the technology on radioactive LAW streams which is the focus of this study.

  8. Reporter Phage and Breath Tests: Emerging Phenotypic Assays for Diagnosing Active Tuberculosis, Antibiotic Resistance, and Treatment Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Paras; Thaler, David S.; Maiga, Mamoudou; Timmins, Graham S.; Bishai, William R.; Hatfull, Graham F.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Jacobs, William R.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid and accurate diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) and its drug susceptibility remain a challenge. Phenotypic assays allow determination of antibiotic susceptibilities even if sequence data are not available or informative. We review 2 emerging diagnostic approaches, reporter phage and breath tests, both of which assay mycobacterial metabolism. The reporter phage signal, Green fluorescent protein (GFP) or β-galactosidase, indicates transcription and translation inside the recipient bacilli and its attenuation by antibiotics. Different breath tests assay, (1) exhaled antigen 85, (2) mycobacterial urease activity, and (3) detection by trained rats of disease-specific odor in sputum, have also been developed. When compared with culture, reporter phage assays shorten the time for initial diagnosis of drug susceptibility by several days. Both reporter phage and breath tests have promise as early markers to determine the efficacy of treatment. While sputum often remains smear and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA positive early in the course of efficacious antituberculous treatment, we predict that both breath and phage tests will rapidly become negative. If this hypothesis proves correct, phage assays and breath tests could become important surrogate markers in early bactericidal activity (EBA) studies of new antibiotics. PMID:21996696

  9. Pit disassembly and conversion demonstration environmental assessment and research and development activities

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    A significant portion of the surplus plutonium is in the form of pits, a nuclear weapons component. Pits are composed of plutonium which is sealed in a metallic shell. These pits would need to be safely disassembled and permanently converted to an unclassified form that would be suitable for long-term disposition and international inspection. To determine the feasibility of an integrated pit disassembly and conversion system, a Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration is proposed to take place at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This demonstration would be done in existing buildings and facilities, and would involve the disassembly of up to 250 pits and conversion of the recovered plutonium to plutonium metal ingots and plutonium dioxide. This demonstration also includes the conversion of up to 80 kilograms of clean plutonium metal to plutonium dioxide because, as part of the disposition process, some surplus plutonium metal may be converted to plutonium dioxide in the same facility as the surplus pits. The equipment to be used for the proposed demonstration addressed in this EA would use some parts of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) capability, other existing equipment/capacities, plus new equipment that was developed at other sites. In addition, small-scale R and D activities are currently underway as part of the overall surplus plutonium disposition program. These R and D activities are related to pit disassembly and conversion, MOX fuel fabrication, and immobilization (in glass and ceramic forms). They are described in Section 7.0. On May 16, 1997, the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) notified potentially affected states and tribes that this EA would be prepared in accordance with NEPA. This EA has been prepared to provide sufficient information for DOE to determine whether a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) is warranted or whether an EIS must be prepared.

  10. A transcriptomic reporter assay employing neutrophils to measure immunogenic activity of septic patients’ plasma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    the other independent set. This subset included several genes previously established in sepsis pathogenesis as well as novel genes. Conclusions These results demonstrate both the suitability and potential clinical relevance of a neutrophil reporter assay for studying plasma, in this case from septic patients. The distinctive transcriptional signature we found could potentially help predict severity of disease and guide treatment. Our findings also shed new light on mechanisms of immune dysregulation in sepsis. PMID:24612859

  11. Post-Spaceflight (STS-135) Mouse Splenocytes Demonstrate Altered Activation Properties and Surface Molecule Expression.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shen-An; Crucian, Brian; Sams, Clarence; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in immune function have been documented during or post-spaceflight and in ground based models of microgravity. Identification of immune parameters that are dysregulated during spaceflight is an important step in mitigating crew health risks during deep space missions. The in vitro analysis of leukocyte activity post-spaceflight in both human and animal species is primarily focused on lymphocytic function. This report completes a broader spectrum analysis of mouse lymphocyte and monocyte changes post 13 days orbital flight (mission STS-135). Analysis includes an examination in surface markers for cell activation, and antigen presentation and co-stimulatory molecules. Cytokine production was measured after stimulation with T-cell mitogen or TLR-2, TLR-4, or TLR-5 agonists. Splenocyte surface marker analysis immediate post-spaceflight and after in vitro culture demonstrated unique changes in phenotypic populations between the flight mice and matched treatment ground controls. Post-spaceflight splenocytes (flight splenocytes) had lower expression intensity of CD4+CD25+ and CD8+CD25+ cells, lower percentage of CD11c+MHC II+ cells, and higher percentage of CD11c+MHC I+ populations compared to ground controls. The flight splenocytes demonstrated an increase in phagocytic activity. Stimulation with ConA led to decrease in CD4+ population but increased CD4+CD25+ cells compared to ground controls. Culturing with TLR agonists led to a decrease in CD11c+ population in splenocytes isolated from flight mice compared to ground controls. Consequently, flight splenocytes with or without TLR-agonist stimulation showed a decrease in CD11c+MHC I+, CD11c+MHC II+, and CD11c+CD86+ cells compared to ground controls. Production of IFN-γ was decreased and IL-2 was increased from ConA stimulated flight splenocytes. This study demonstrated that expression of surface molecules can be affected by conditions of spaceflight and impaired responsiveness persists under culture

  12. RemoveDEBRIS: An in-orbit active debris removal demonstration mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forshaw, Jason L.; Aglietti, Guglielmo S.; Navarathinam, Nimal; Kadhem, Haval; Salmon, Thierry; Pisseloup, Aurélien; Joffre, Eric; Chabot, Thomas; Retat, Ingo; Axthelm, Robert; Barraclough, Simon; Ratcliffe, Andrew; Bernal, Cesar; Chaumette, François; Pollini, Alexandre; Steyn, Willem H.

    2016-10-01

    Since the beginning of the space era, a significant amount of debris has progressively been generated. Most of the objects launched into space are still orbiting the Earth and today these objects represent a threat as the presence of space debris incurs risk of collision and damage to operational satellites. A credible solution has emerged over the recent years: actively removing debris objects by capturing them and disposing of them. This paper provides an update to the mission baseline and concept of operations of the EC FP7 RemoveDEBRIS mission drawing on the expertise of some of Europe's most prominent space institutions in order to demonstrate key active debris remove (ADR) technologies in a low-cost ambitious manner. The mission will consist of a microsatellite platform (chaser) that ejects 2 CubeSats (targets). These targets will assist with a range of strategically important ADR technology demonstrations including net capture, harpoon capture and vision-based navigation using a standard camera and LiDAR. The chaser will also host a drag sail for orbital lifetime reduction. The mission baseline has been revised to take into account feedback from international and national space policy providers in terms of risk and compliance and a suitable launch option is selected. A launch in 2017 is targeted. The RemoveDEBRIS mission aims to be one of the world's first in-orbit demonstrations of key technologies for active debris removal and is a vital prerequisite to achieving the ultimate goal of a cleaner Earth orbital environment.

  13. Post-Spaceflight (STS-135) Mouse Splenocytes Demonstrate Altered Activation Properties and Surface Molecule Expression

    PubMed Central

    Crucian, Brian; Sams, Clarence

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in immune function have been documented during or post-spaceflight and in ground based models of microgravity. Identification of immune parameters that are dysregulated during spaceflight is an important step in mitigating crew health risks during deep space missions. The in vitro analysis of leukocyte activity post-spaceflight in both human and animal species is primarily focused on lymphocytic function. This report completes a broader spectrum analysis of mouse lymphocyte and monocyte changes post 13 days orbital flight (mission STS-135). Analysis includes an examination in surface markers for cell activation, and antigen presentation and co-stimulatory molecules. Cytokine production was measured after stimulation with T-cell mitogen or TLR-2, TLR-4, or TLR-5 agonists. Splenocyte surface marker analysis immediate post-spaceflight and after in vitro culture demonstrated unique changes in phenotypic populations between the flight mice and matched treatment ground controls. Post-spaceflight splenocytes (flight splenocytes) had lower expression intensity of CD4+CD25+ and CD8+CD25+ cells, lower percentage of CD11c+MHC II+ cells, and higher percentage of CD11c+MHC I+ populations compared to ground controls. The flight splenocytes demonstrated an increase in phagocytic activity. Stimulation with ConA led to decrease in CD4+ population but increased CD4+CD25+ cells compared to ground controls. Culturing with TLR agonists led to a decrease in CD11c+ population in splenocytes isolated from flight mice compared to ground controls. Consequently, flight splenocytes with or without TLR-agonist stimulation showed a decrease in CD11c+MHC I+, CD11c+MHC II+, and CD11c+CD86+ cells compared to ground controls. Production of IFN-γ was decreased and IL-2 was increased from ConA stimulated flight splenocytes. This study demonstrated that expression of surface molecules can be affected by conditions of spaceflight and impaired responsiveness persists under culture

  14. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-01

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based ‘cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC.

  15. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor.

    PubMed

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-11

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based 'cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC.

  16. Colorimetric Glucose Assay Based on Magnetic Particles Having Pseudo-peroxidase Activity and Immobilized Glucose Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Martinkova, Pavla; Opatrilova, Radka; Kruzliak, Peter; Styriak, Igor; Pohanka, Miroslav

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic particles (MPs) are currently used as a suitable alternative for peroxidase in the construction of novel biosensors, analytic and diagnostic methods. Their better chemical and thermal stabilities predestine them as appropriate pseudo-enzymatic catalysts. In this point of view, our research was focused on preparation of simply and fast method for immobilization of glucose oxidase onto surface of MPs with peroxidase-like activity. Spectrophotometric method (wavelength 450 nm) optimized for glucose determination using modified MPs has been successfully developed. Concentration curve for optimization of method was assayed, and Michaelis-Menten constant (K m) calculated, maximum reaction rate (V max), limit of detection, and correlation coefficient were determined to be 0.13 mmol/l (2.34 mg/dl), 1.79 pkat, 3.74 µmol/l (0.067 mg/dl), and 0.996, respectively. Interferences of other sugars such as sucrose, sorbitol, deoxyribose, maltose, and fructose were determined as well as effect of substances presenting in plasma (ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione, trolox, and urea). Results in comparison with positive and negative controls showed no interferences of the other sugars and no influence of plasma substances to measuring of glucose. The constructed method showed corresponding results with linear dependence and a correlation coefficient of 0.997. Possibility of repeated use of modified MPs was successfully proved. PMID:27041274

  17. Human skin melanocyte migration towards stromal cell-derived factor-1α demonstrated by optical real-time cell mobility assay: modulation of their chemotactic ability by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Akira; Hadjur, Christophe; Takahashi, Tadahito; Suzuki, Itaru; Hirose, Kunitaka; Mahe, Yann F

    2013-10-01

    To identify potential regulators of normal human melanocyte behaviour, we have developed an in vitro human melanocyte migration assay, using the optically accessible, real-time cell motility assay device TAXIScan. Coating of the glass surface with an extracellular matrix that served as scaffolding molecule was essential to demonstrate efficient melanocyte migration. Among several chemokines tested, stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α/CXCL12 was the most effective driver of human normal skin melanocytes. Incubation of melanocytes with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) before the assay specifically enhanced CXCR4 expression and consequently chemotaxis towards SDF-1α/CXCL12. These results suggest that α-MSH acts on melanocytes to produce melanin as well as stimulates the cells to migrate to the site where they work through CXCR4 up-regulation, which is a new dynamic mode of action of α-MSH on melanocyte physiology.

  18. Experimental demonstration of an active phase randomization and monitor module for quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2012-08-01

    Phase randomization is a very important assumption in the BB84 quantum key distribution (QKD) system with weak coherent source; otherwise, eavesdropper may spy the final key. In this Letter, a stable and monitored active phase randomization scheme for the one-way and two-way QKD system is proposed and demonstrated in experiments. Furthermore, our scheme gives an easy way for Alice to monitor the degree of randomization in experiments. Therefore, we expect our scheme to become a standard part in future QKD systems due to its secure significance and feasibility.

  19. Evaluation of the antioxidants activities of four Slovene medicinal plant species by traditional and novel biosensory assays.

    PubMed

    Kintzios, Spiridon; Papageorgiou, Katerina; Yiakoumettis, Iakovos; Baricevic, Dea; Kusar, Anita

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the antioxidant activity of methanolic and water extracts of Slovene accessions of four medicinal plant species (Salvia officinalis, Achillea millefolium, Origanum vulgare subsp. vulgare and Gentiana lutea). Their free radical-scavenging activity against the DPPH. free radical was studied with a spectrophotometric assay, while their biological activity with the help of a laboratory-made biosensor based on immobilized fibroblast cells (assay duration: 3 min). The observed antioxidant activity of the extracts from the four investigated medicinal plant species was dependent on both the solvent used for extraction and the assay method (conventional or biosensor-based). Independently from the assay method and the solvent used for extraction, the lowest scavenging activity was observed in root extracts of G. lutea. Treatment of the immobilized cells with the plant extracts resulted in an increase of the cell membrane potential (membrane hyperpolarization), possibly due to the reduction of membrane damage due to oxidation. The novel cell biosensor could be utilized as a rapid, high throughput tool for screening the antioxidant properties of plant-derived compounds.

  20. A novel, non-radioactive eukaryotic in vitro transcription assay for sensitive quantification of RNA polymerase II activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many studies of the eukaryotic transcription mechanism and its regulation rely on in vitro assays. Conventional RNA polymerase II transcription assays are based on radioactive labelling of the newly synthesized RNA. Due to the inefficient in vitro transcription, the detection of the RNA involving purification and gel electrophoresis is laborious and not always quantitative. Results Herein, we describe a new, non-radioactive, robust and reproducible eukaryotic in vitro transcription assay that has been established in our laboratory. Upon transcription, the newly synthesized RNA is directly detected and quantified using the QuantiGene assay. Alternatively, the RNA can be purified and a primer extension followed by PCR detection or qPCR quantification can be performed. When applied to assess the activity of RNA polymerase II inhibitors, this new method allowed an accurate estimation of their relative potency. Conclusions Our novel assay provides a non-radioactive alternative to a standard in vitro transcription assay that allows for sensitive detection and precise quantification of the newly transcribed, unlabelled RNA and is particularly useful for quantification of strong transcriptional inhibitors like α-amanitin. Moreover, the method can be easily adapted to quantify the reaction yield and the transcription efficiency of other eukaryotic in vitro systems, thus providing a complementary tool for the field of transcriptional research. PMID:24694320

  1. Thiopurine methyltransferase activity in a French population: h.p.l.c. assay conditions and effects of drugs and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Bessa, E; Medard, Y; Mircheva, Y; Vilmer, E

    1994-07-01

    1. Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) is a cytosolic enzyme involved in the catabolism of thiopurine drugs, which are used to treat cancer patients and organ transplant recipients. Because TPMT activity is polymorphic and under genetic control, large interindividual variations in the immunosuppressive activity and toxicity of these drugs may, at least in part, be inherited. 2. We have developed a specific h.p.l.c. method for measuring 6-methyl mercaptopurine formed from 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) in red blood cell lysates during the TPMT assay procedure. In blinded assays of 55 samples from adult blood donors, the results of the h.p.l.c. method correlated with those of the radiochemical reference method (r = 0.83, P < 0.001). 3. Using this h.p.l.c. assay, we tested the effect of known inhibitors of TPMT activity (syringic acid, p-anisic acid and tropolone) in vitro and showed that they were highly inhibitory. We also found that drugs often administered concomitantly with 6-MP (prednisone, prednisolone, 6-methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole) had little or no effect on TPMT activity in vitro. 4. In a group of 300 French individuals, TMPT activity was highly variable, ranging from 4.7 to 35.3 nmol h-1 ml-1 of packed red blood cells (nmol h-1 ml-1 PRBC) with a mean value of 19.3 +/- 4.9. TMPT activity was not influenced by sex. 5. This sensitive and reproducible h.p.l.c. assay for TPMT activity in red blood cells may prove useful for prospective clinical studies designed to optimise dosage regimens of thiopurine drugs (detection limit for 6-methyl mercaptopurine is 5 ng ml-1, intra- and inter-assay variations are 6.8 and 8.2%, respectively).

  2. Thiopurine methyltransferase activity in a French population: h.p.l.c. assay conditions and effects of drugs and inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Bessa, E; Medard, Y; Mircheva, Y; Vilmer, E

    1994-01-01

    1. Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) is a cytosolic enzyme involved in the catabolism of thiopurine drugs, which are used to treat cancer patients and organ transplant recipients. Because TPMT activity is polymorphic and under genetic control, large interindividual variations in the immunosuppressive activity and toxicity of these drugs may, at least in part, be inherited. 2. We have developed a specific h.p.l.c. method for measuring 6-methyl mercaptopurine formed from 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) in red blood cell lysates during the TPMT assay procedure. In blinded assays of 55 samples from adult blood donors, the results of the h.p.l.c. method correlated with those of the radiochemical reference method (r = 0.83, P < 0.001). 3. Using this h.p.l.c. assay, we tested the effect of known inhibitors of TPMT activity (syringic acid, p-anisic acid and tropolone) in vitro and showed that they were highly inhibitory. We also found that drugs often administered concomitantly with 6-MP (prednisone, prednisolone, 6-methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole) had little or no effect on TPMT activity in vitro. 4. In a group of 300 French individuals, TMPT activity was highly variable, ranging from 4.7 to 35.3 nmol h-1 ml-1 of packed red blood cells (nmol h-1 ml-1 PRBC) with a mean value of 19.3 +/- 4.9. TMPT activity was not influenced by sex. 5. This sensitive and reproducible h.p.l.c. assay for TPMT activity in red blood cells may prove useful for prospective clinical studies designed to optimise dosage regimens of thiopurine drugs (detection limit for 6-methyl mercaptopurine is 5 ng ml-1, intra- and inter-assay variations are 6.8 and 8.2%, respectively). PMID:7946931

  3. Glucocorticoid activity detected by in vivo zebrafish assay and in vitro glucocorticoid receptor bioassay at environmental relevant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiyu; Jia, Ai; Snyder, Shane A; Gong, Zhiyuan; Lam, Siew Hong

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoids are pharmaceutical contaminants of emerging concern due to their incomplete removal during wastewater treatment, increased presence in aquatic environment and their biological potency. The zebrafish is a popular model for aquatic toxicology and environmental risk assessment. This study aimed to determine if glucocorticoids at environmental concentrations would perturb expression of selected glucocorticoid-responsive genes in zebrafish and to investigate their potentials as an in vivo zebrafish assay in complementing in vitro glucocorticoid receptor bioassay. The relative expression of eleven glucocorticoid-responsive genes in zebrafish larvae and liver of adult male zebrafish exposed to three representative glucocorticoids (dexamethasone, prednisolone and triamcinolone) was determined. The expression of pepck, baiap2 and pxr was up-regulated in zebrafish larvae and the expression of baiap2, pxr and mmp-2 was up-regulated in adult zebrafish exposed to glucocorticoids at concentrations equivalent to total glucocorticoids reported in environmental samples. The responsiveness of the specific genes were sufficiently robust in zebrafish larvae exposed to a complex environmental sample detected with in vitro glucocorticoid activity equivalent to 478 pM dexamethasone (DEX-EQ) and confirmed to contain low concentration (0.2 ng/L or less) of the targeted glucocorticoids, and possibly other glucocorticoid-active compounds. The findings provided in vivo relevance to the in vitro glucocorticoid activity and suggested that the environmental sample can perturb glucocorticoid-responsive genes in its original, or half the diluted, concentration as may be found in the environment. The study demonstrated the important complementary roles of in vivo zebrafish and in vitro bioassays coupled with analytical chemistry in monitoring environmental glucocorticoid contaminants.

  4. T-screen and yeast assay for the detection of the thyroid-disrupting activities of cadmium, mercury, and zinc.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Liu, Yun; Kong, Dongdong; Ren, Shujuan; Li, Na

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, a two-hybrid yeast bioassay and a T-screen were used to screen for the thyroid receptor (TR)-disrupting activity of select metallic compounds (CdCl2, ZnCl2, HgCl2, CuSO4, MnSO4, and MgSO4). The results reveal that none of the tested metallic compounds showed TR-agonistic activity, whereas ZnCl2, HgCl2, and CdCl2 demonstrated TR antagonism. For the yeast assay, the dose-response relationship of these metallic compounds was established, and the concentrations producing 20 % of the maximum effect of ZnCl2, HgCl2, and CdCl2 were 9.1 × 10(-5), 3.2 × 10(-6), and 1.2 × 10(-6) mol/L, respectively. The T-screen also supported the finding that ZnCl2, HgCl2, and CdCl2 decreased the cell proliferation at concentrations ranging from 10(-6) to 10(-4) mol/L. Furthermore, the thyroid-disrupting activity of metallic compounds in environmental water samples collected from the Guanting Reservoir, Beijing, China was evaluated. Solid-phase extraction was used to separate the organic extracts, and a modified two-hybrid yeast bioassay revealed that the metallic compounds in the water samples could affect thyroid hormone-induced signaling by decreasing the binding of the thyroid hormone. The addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (30 mg/L) could eliminate the effects. Thus, the cause(s) of the thyroid toxicity in the water samples appeared to be partly related to the metallic compounds.

  5. Demonstration of human immunoglobulin G Fc-binding activity in oral bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, D; Michaud, J

    1994-01-01

    Nonimmune binding of immunoglobulins via the Fc fragment may reduce opsonization and phagocytosis of bacteria and is thus considered a virulence factor. The aim of this study was to investigate a wide range of oral bacterial strains for the presence of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) Fc-binding activity. A total of 132 strains representing 40 different gram-positive and gram negative bacterial species were tested for IgG Fc-binding activity by using a fast and simple dot blot procedure with horseradish peroxidase-conjugated Fc fragments from human IgG. Neither the human nor animal biotype of Porphyromonas gingivalis possessed IgG Fc-binding activity. The strongest positive reaction of gram-negative species with the IgG Fc fragments were obtained with strains of Prevotella intermedia and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Among the gram-positive bacteria tested, Peptostreptococcus micros, Lactobacillus spp., and several species of streptococci possessed IgG Fc-binding activity. In the present investigation, the ability of several oral bacterial species to bind IgG Fc fragments was demonstrated. This factor represents a potential virulence determinant as it may help pathogenic oral bacteria escape host defense mechanisms. PMID:7496956

  6. Abnormal activation of the motor cortical network in idiopathic scoliosis demonstrated by functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Domenech, Julio; García-Martí, G; Martí-Bonmatí, L; Barrios, C; Tormos, J M; Pascual-Leone, A

    2011-07-01

    The aetiology of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) remains unknown, but there is growing support for the possibility of an underlying neurological disorder. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can characterize the abnormal activation of the sensorimotor brain network in movement disorders and could provide further insights into the neuropathogenesis of IS. Twenty subjects were included in the study; 10 adolescents with IS (mean age of 15.2, 8 girls and 2 boys) and 10 age-matched healthy controls. The average Cobb angle of the primary curve in the IS patients was 35° (range 27°-55°). All participants underwent a block-design fMRI experiment in a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner to explore cortical activation following a simple motor task. Rest periods alternated with activation periods during which participants were required to open and close their hand at an internally paced rate of approximately 1 Hz. Data were analyzed with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM5) including age, sex and laterality as nuisance variables to minimise the presence of bias in the results. Compared to controls, IS patients showed significant increases in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) activity in contralateral supplementary motor area when performing the motor task with either hand. No significant differences were observed when testing between groups in the functional activation in the primary motor cortex, premotor cortex and somatosensory cortex. Additionally, the IS group showed a greater interhemispheric asymmetry index than the control group (0.30 vs. 0.13, p < 0.001). This study demonstrates an abnormal pattern of brain activation in secondary motor areas during movement execution in patients with IS. These findings support the hypothesis that a sensorimotor integration disorder underlies the pathogenesis of IS.

  7. A novel label-free fluorescence strategy for methyltransferase activity assay based on dsDNA-templated copper nanoparticles coupled with an endonuclease-assisted signal transduction system.

    PubMed

    Lai, Q Q; Liu, M D; Gu, C C; Nie, H G; Xu, X J; Li, Z H; Yang, Z; Huang, S M

    2016-02-21

    Evaluating DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity has received considerable attention due to its significance in the fields of early cancer clinical diagnostics and drug discovery. Herein, we proposed a novel label-free fluorescence method for MTase activity assay by coupling double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)-templated copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) with an endonuclease-assisted signal transduction system. In this strategy, dsDNA molecules were first methylated by DNA adenine methylation (Dam) MTase and then cleaved by the methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease DpnI. The cleaved DNA fragments could not act as efficient templates for the formation of fluorescent CuNPs and thus no fluorescence signal was produced. Under optimized experimental conditions, the developed strategy exhibited a sensitive fluorescence response to Dam MTase activity. This strategy was also demonstrated to provide an excellent platform to the inhibitor screening for Dam MTase. These results demonstrated the great potential for the practical applications of the proposed strategy for Dam MTase activity assay. PMID:26764536

  8. A versatile biosensing system for DNA-related enzyme activity assay via the synthesis of silver nanoclusters using enzymatically-generated DNA as template.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yijia; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Zhuoliang; Nie, Zhou; Huang, Yan; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2014-11-15

    In the present day, oligonucleotide-encapsulated silver clusters (DNA-AgNCs) have been widely applied into bio-analysis as a signal producer. Herein, we developed a novel method to synthesize DNA-AgNCs encapsulated by long-chain cytosine (C)-rich DNA. Such DNA was polymerized in a template-free way by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT). We demonstrated that TdT-polymerized long chain C-rich DNA can serve as an excellent template for AgNCs synthesis. Based on this novel synthesis strategy, we developed a label-free and turn-on fluorescence assay to detect TdT activity with ultralow limit of detection (LOD) of 0.0318 U and ultrahigh signal to background (S/B) of 46.7. Furthermore, our proposed method was extended to a versatile biosensing strategy for turn-on nucleases activity assay based on the enzyme-activated TdT polymerization. Two nucleases, EcoRI and ExoIII as model of endonuclease and exonuclease, respectively, have been detected with high selectivity and competitive low LOD of 0.0629 U and 0.00867 U, respectively. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of TdT polymerization-based DNA-AgNCs synthesis strategy as a versatile and potent biosensing platform to detect the activity of DNA-related enzymes.

  9. Low Speed, 2-D Rotor/Stator Active Noise Control at the Source Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, John C.; Kousen, Ken A.; Zander, Anthony C.; Bak, Michael; Topol, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Wake/blade-row interaction noise produced by the Annular Cascade Facility at Purdue University has been modeled using the LINFLO analysis. Actuator displacements needed for complete cancellation of the propagating acoustic response modes have been determined, along with the associated actuator power requirements. As an alternative, weighted least squares minimization of the total far-field sound power using individual actuators has also been examined. Attempts were made to translate the two-dimensional aerodynamic results into three-dimensional actuator requirements. The results lie near the limit of present actuator technology. In order to investigate the concept of noise control at the source for active rotor/stator noise control at the source, various techniques for embedding miniature actuators into vanes were examined. Numerous miniature speaker arrangements were tested and analyzed to determine their suitability as actuators for a demonstration test in the Annular Cascade Facility at Purdue. The best candidates demonstrated marginal performance. An alternative concept to using vane mounted speakers as control actuators was developed and tested. The concept uses compression drivers which are mounted externally to the stator vanes. Each compression driver is connected via a tube to an air cavity in the stator vane, from which the driver signal radiates into the working section of the experimental rig. The actual locations and dimensions of the actuators were used as input parameters for a LINFLO computational analysis of the actuator displacements required for complete cancellation of tones in the Purdue experimental rig. The actuators were designed and an arrangement determined which is compatible with the Purdue experimental rig and instrumentation. Experimental tests indicate that the actuators are capable of producing equivalent displacements greater than the requirements predicted by the LINFLO analysis. The acoustic output of the actuators was also found

  10. The stem-loop luciferase assay for polyadenylation (SLAP) method for determining CstF-64-dependent polyadenylation activity.

    PubMed

    Hockert, J Andrew; Macdonald, Clinton C

    2014-01-01

    Polyadenylation is an essential cellular process in eukaryotic cells (Edmonds M and Abrams R, J Biol Chem 235, 1142-1149, 1960; Zhao J et al., Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 63, 405-445, 1999; Edmonds M, Progr Nucleic Acid Res Mol Biol 71, 285-389, 2002). For this reason, it has been difficult to examine the functions of specific polyadenylation proteins in vivo. Here, we describe a cell culture assay that allows structure-function experiments on CstF-64, a protein that binds to pre-mRNAs downstream of the cleavage site for accurate and efficient polyadenylation. We also demonstrate that the stem-loop luciferase assay for polyadenylation (SLAP) accurately reflects CstF-64-dependent polyadenylation. This assay could be easily adapted to the study of other important RNA-binding proteins in polyadenylation.

  11. AroER Tri-Screen Is a Biologically Relevant Assay for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Modulating the Activity of Aromatase and/or the Estrogen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shiuan; Zhou, Dujin; Hsin, Li-Yu; Kanaya, Noriko; Wong, Cynthie; Yip, Richard; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang; Yuan, Yate-Ching; Witt, Kristine; Teng, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interfere with the biosynthesis, metabolism, and functions of steroid hormones, including estrogens and androgens. Aromatase enzyme converts androgen to estrogen. Thus, EDCs against aromatase significantly impact estrogen- and/or androgen-dependent functions, including the development of breast cancer. The current study aimed to develop a biologically relevant cell-based high-throughput screening assay to identify EDCs that act as aromatase inhibitors (AIs), estrogen receptor (ER) agonists, and/or ER antagonists. The AroER tri-screen assay was developed by stable transfection of ER-positive, aromatase-expressing MCF-7 breast cancer cells with an estrogen responsive element (ERE) driven luciferase reporter plasmid. The AroER tri-screen can identify: estrogenic EDCs, which increase luciferase signal without 17β-estradiol (E2); anti-estrogenic EDCs, which inhibit the E2-induced luciferase signal; and AI-like EDCs, which suppress a testosterone-induced luciferase signal. The assay was first optimized in a 96-well plate format and then miniaturized into a 1536-well plate format. The AroER tri-screen was demonstrated to be suitable for high-throughput screening in the 1536-well plate format, with a 6.9-fold signal-to-background ratio, a 5.4% coefficient of variation, and a screening window coefficient (Z-factor) of 0.78. The assay suggested that bisphenol A (BPA) functions mainly as an ER agonist. Results from screening the 446 drugs in the National Institutes of Health Clinical Collection revealed 106 compounds that modulated ER and/or aromatase activities. Among these, two AIs (bifonazole and oxiconazole) and one ER agonist (paroxetine) were confirmed through alternative aromatase and ER activity assays. These findings indicate that AroER tri-screen is a useful high-throughput screening system for identifying ER ligands and aromatase-inhibiting chemicals. PMID:24496634

  12. Depolarization after resonance energy transfer (DARET): a sensitive fluorescence-based assay for botulinum neurotoxin protease activity.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Marcella A; Williams, Dudley; Okawa, Yumiko; Holguin, Bret; James, Nicholas G; Ross, Justin A; Roger Aoki, K; Jameson, David M; Steward, Lance E

    2011-06-01

    The DARET (depolarization after resonance energy transfer) assay is a coupled Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-fluorescence polarization assay for botulinum neurotoxin type A or E (BoNT/A or BoNT/E) proteolytic activity that relies on a fully recombinant substrate. The substrate consists of blue fluorescent protein (BFP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) flanking SNAP-25 (synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa) residues 134-206. In this assay, the substrate is excited with polarized light at 387 nm, which primarily excites the BFP, whereas emission from the GFP is monitored at 509 nm. Energy transfer from the BFP to the GFP in the intact substrate results in a substantial depolarization of the GFP emission. The energy transfer is eliminated when the fluorescent domains separate on cleavage by the endopeptidase, and emission from the directly excited GFP product fragment is then highly polarized, resulting in an overall increase in polarization. This increase in polarization can be monitored to assay the proteolytic activity of BoNT/A and BoNT/E in real time. It allows determination of the turnover rate of the substrate and the kinetic constants (V(max) and k(cat)) based on the concentration of cleaved substrate determined directly from the measurements using the additivity properties of polarization. The assay is amenable to high-throughput applications.

  13. Smart phone: a popular device supports amylase activity assay in fisheries research.

    PubMed

    Thongprajukaew, Karun; Choodum, Aree; Sa-E, Barunee; Hayee, Ummah

    2014-11-15

    Colourimetric determinations of amylase activity were developed based on a standard dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) staining method, using maltose as the analyte. Intensities and absorbances of red, green and blue (RGB) were obtained with iPhone imaging and Adobe Photoshop image analysis. Correlation of green and analyte concentrations was highly significant, and the accuracy of the developed method was excellent in analytical performance. The common iPhone has sufficient imaging ability for accurate quantification of maltose concentrations. Detection limits, sensitivity and linearity were comparable to a spectrophotometric method, but provided better inter-day precision. In quantifying amylase specific activity from a commercial source (P>0.02) and fish samples (P>0.05), differences compared with spectrophotometric measurements were not significant. We have demonstrated that iPhone imaging with image analysis in Adobe Photoshop has potential for field and laboratory studies of amylase.

  14. Novel pro-oxidant activity assay for polyphenols, vitamins C and E using a modified CUPRAC method.

    PubMed

    Kondakçı, Esin; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Apak, Reşat

    2013-10-15

    In this study, a direct assay, a modified CUPRAC (Cupric Ion Reducing Antioxidant Capacity) method, is developed to determine transition metal ion (Cu(II))-catalyzed pro-oxidant activity of polyphenolic compounds, vitamins C and E, and herbal samples in the presence of proteins containing thiol groups. Since transition metal ion-catalyzed pro-oxidant activity of phenolics is usually initiated with the reduction of the metal to lower oxidation states (as a prerequisite of Fenton-type reactions), this method involves the reduction of copper(II) ions to copper(I) by polyphenolic compounds (simultaneously giving rise to reactive species), binding of the formed Cu(I) to egg white protein -SH groups, and liberation of copper(I)-neocuproine (Cu(I)-Nc) chelate (showing maximum absorbance at 450 nm) by treating the incubation product with a neocuproine-ammonium acetate mixture. The proposed method is validated against atomic absorption spectrometric (AAS) determination of protein-bound copper and protein carbonyl assay of oxidative stress. The proposed assay is faster and more specific than the carbonyl assay, and uses low-cost reagents and equipment. Pro-oxidant activity (i.e. proportional to absorbance) varies linearly over a relatively wide range with concentration, as opposed to the reciprocal correlations (i.e. linear regression of 1/(pro-oxidant activity) versus 1/concentration) of other similar assays. The pro-oxidant activity order of the tested antioxidant compounds in terms of 'Quercetin Equivalent Pro-oxidant Activity' (QREPA) coefficients is: gallic acid > epicatechin > quercetin ≈ catechin > α-tocopherol > rosmarinic acid > trolox > caffeic acid > ascorbic acid.

  15. Dual-readout fluorescent assay of protein kinase activity by use of TiO2-coated magnetic microspheres.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jie; Zhao, Yunjie; Wang, Zhibin; Liu, Chenghui; Wang, Yucong; Li, Zhengping

    2013-05-01

    A simple, highly sensitive, and dual-readout fluorescent assay is developed for the detection of protein kinase activity based on the specific recognition utility of TiO2-coated Fe3O4/SiO2 magnetic microspheres (TMSPs) for kinase-induced phosphopeptides. When the fluorophore-labeled substrate peptides are phosphorylated by the kinase reaction, they can bind specifically to the TiO2 layer of TMSPs by means of phosphate groups, resulting in fluorophore enrichment on the TMSP surfaces. The accumulated fluorophores on the TMSPs are proportional to the kinase activity, and the fluorescence signal readout could be run through either direct fluorescent imaging of the TMSPs or measurement of the fluorescence intensity by simply detaching the fluorescent phosphopeptides into the solution. The TMSPs exhibit extremely high selectivity for capturing phosphorylated peptides over the nonphosphorylated ones, resulting in an ultrahigh fluorescence signal-to-background ratio of 42, which is the highest fluorescence change thus far in fluorescent assays for detection of protein kinase activities. Therefore, the proposed fluorescent assay presents high sensitivity, low detection limit of 0.1 milliunit/μL, and wide dynamic range from 0.5 milliunit/μL to 0.5 unit/μL with protein kinase A (PKA) as a model target. Moreover, the TMSP-based fluorescent assay can simultaneously quantify multiple kinase activities with their specific peptides labeled with different dyes. This new strategy is also successfully applied to monitoring drug-triggered PKA activation in cell lysates. Therefore, the TMSP-based fluorescent assay is very promising in high-throughput screening of kinase inhibitors and in highly sensitive detection of kinase activity, and thus it is a valuable tool for development of targeted therapy, clinical diagnosis, and studies of fundamental life science. PMID:23581884

  16. In Vitro Assays for Assessment of Androgenic and Estrogenic Activity of Defined Mixtures and Complex Environmental Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point sources of endocrine active compounds to aquatic environments such as waste water treatment plants, pulp and paper mills, and animal feeding operations invariably contain complex mixtures of chemicals. The current study investigates the use of targeted in vitro assays des...

  17. Lack of DNA-damaging activity of five non-nutritive sweeteners in the rat hepatocyte/DNA repair assay.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, A M; Williams, G M

    2000-04-01

    The non-nutritive sweeteners acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate, saccharin and sucralose were tested for DNA damaging activity in the rat hepatocyte/DNA repair assay. Using hepatocytes from F344 and Sprague-Dawley male rats, all were inactive despite strong responses for the positive control, 2-aminofluorene.

  18. Ultrasensitive detection of protease activity of anthrax and botulinum toxins by a new PCR-based assay.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Kozyr, Arina V; Ryabko, Alyona K; Shemyakin, Igor G

    2016-02-01

    Anthrax and botulism are dangerous infectious diseases that can be fatal unless detected and treated quickly. Fatalities from these diseases are primarily due to endopeptidase toxins secreted by the pathogens. Rapid and sensitive detection of the presence of active toxins is the key element for protection from natural outbreaks of anthrax and botulism, as well as from the threat of bioterrorism. We describe an ultrasensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay for detecting proteolytic activity of anthrax and botulinum toxins using composite probes consisting of covalent peptide-DNA conjugate for the detection of anthrax, and noncovalent protein-aptamer assembly to assay botulinum toxin activity. Probes immobilized on the solid-phase support are cleaved by toxins to release DNA, which is detected by real-time PCR. Both assays can detect subpicogram quantities of active toxins isolated from composite matrices. Special procedures were developed to isolate intact toxins from the matrices under mild conditions. The assay is rapid, uses proven technologies, and can be modified to detect other proteolytic and biopolymer-degrading enzymes. PMID:26620058

  19. Thyroid Histopathology Assessments for the Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay to Detect Thyroid-active Substances

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of an Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (AMA) Test Guideline for the detection of substances that interact with the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, a document was developed that provides a standardized appro...

  20. Direct conscious telemetry recordings demonstrate increased renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Ibrahim M.; Sarma Kandukuri, Divya; Harrison, Joanne L.; Hildreth, Cara M.; Phillips, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with sympathetic hyperactivity and impaired blood pressure control reflex responses, yet direct evidence demonstrating these features of autonomic dysfunction in conscious animals is still lacking. Here we measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) using telemetry-based recordings in a rat model of CKD, the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK) rat, and assessed responses to chemoreflex activation and acute stress. Male LPK and Lewis control animals (total n = 16) were instrumented for telemetric recording of RSNA and MAP. At 12–13 weeks-of-age, resting RSNA and MAP, sympathetic and haemodynamic responses to both peripheral (hypoxia: 10% O2) and central chemoreflex (hypercapnia: 7% CO2) activation and acute stress (open-field exposure), were measured. As indicators of renal function, urinary protein (UPro) and creatinine (UCr) levels were assessed. LPK rats had higher resting RSNA (1.2 ± 0.1 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1 μV, p < 0.05) and MAP (151 ± 8 vs. 97 ± 2 mmHg, p < 0.05) compared to Lewis. MAP was negatively correlated with UCr (r = −0.80, p = 0.002) and positively correlated with RSNA (r = 0.66, p = 0.014), with multiple linear regression modeling indicating the strongest correlation was with Ucr. RSNA and MAP responses to activation of the central chemoreflex and open-field stress were reduced in the LPK relative to the Lewis (all p < 0.05). This is the first description of dual conscious telemetry recording of RSNA and MAP in a genetic rodent model of CKD. Elevated RSNA is likely a key contributor to the marked hypertension in this model, while attenuated RSNA and MAP responses to central chemoreflex activation and acute stress in the LPK indicate possible deficits in the neural processing of autonomic outflows evoked by these sympathoexcitatory pathways. PMID:26300784

  1. General and rare bacterial taxa demonstrating different temporal dynamic patterns in an activated sludge bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taek-Seung; Jeong, Ju-Yong; Wells, George F; Park, Hee-Deung

    2013-02-01

    Temporal variation of general and rare bacterial taxa was investigated using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene from activated sludge samples collected bimonthly for a two-year period. Most of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were allocated to rare taxa (89.6%), but the rare taxa comprised a small portion of the community in terms of abundance of sequences analyzed (28.6%). Temporal variations in OTUs richness significantly differed between the two taxa groups in which the rare taxa showed a higher diversity and a more fluctuating pattern than the general taxa. Furthermore, the two taxa groups were constrained by different explanatory variables: influent BOD, effluent BOD, and DO were the significant (P < 0.05) parameters affecting the pattern of the general taxa, while temperature was the factor for the rare taxa. Over the test period, the general taxa persisted for a longer time (i.e., lower turnover rate) in the bioreactor than the rare taxa. In conclusion, this study demonstrated clear differences in temporal dynamic patterns for the general and rare bacterial taxa in an activated sludge bioreactor, which would be a foundation for better understanding the bacterial ecology of activated sludge. PMID:22526777

  2. Comparison of tetrazolium salt assays for evaluation of drug activity against Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    Ginouves, Marine; Carme, Bernard; Couppie, Pierre; Prevot, Ghislaine

    2014-06-01

    In French Guiana, leishmaniasis is an essentially cutaneous infection. It constitutes a major public health problem, with a real incidence of 0.2 to 0.3%. Leishmania guyanensis is the causal species most frequently encountered in French Guiana. The treatment of leishmaniasis is essentially drug based, but the therapeutic compounds available have major side effects (e.g., liver damage and diabetes) and must be administered parenterally or are costly. The efficacy of some of these agents has declined due to the emergence of resistance in certain strains of Leishmania. There is currently no vaccine against leishmaniasis, and it is therefore both necessary and urgent to identify new compounds effective against Leishmania. The search for new drugs requires effective tests for evaluations of the leishmanicidal activity of a particular molecule or extract. Microculture tetrazolium assays (MTAs) are colorimetric tests based on the use of tetrazolium salts. We compared the efficacies of three tetrazolium salts-3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT), and 2-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (WST-8)-for quantification of the promastigotes of various species of Leishmania. We found that the capacity of Leishmania to metabolize a tetrazolium salt depended on the salt used and the species of Leishmania. WST-8 was the tetrazolium salt best metabolized by L. guyanensis and gave the best sensitivity. PMID:24719447

  3. Comparison of Tetrazolium Salt Assays for Evaluation of Drug Activity against Leishmania spp.

    PubMed Central

    Ginouves, Marine; Carme, Bernard; Couppie, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    In French Guiana, leishmaniasis is an essentially cutaneous infection. It constitutes a major public health problem, with a real incidence of 0.2 to 0.3%. Leishmania guyanensis is the causal species most frequently encountered in French Guiana. The treatment of leishmaniasis is essentially drug based, but the therapeutic compounds available have major side effects (e.g., liver damage and diabetes) and must be administered parenterally or are costly. The efficacy of some of these agents has declined due to the emergence of resistance in certain strains of Leishmania. There is currently no vaccine against leishmaniasis, and it is therefore both necessary and urgent to identify new compounds effective against Leishmania. The search for new drugs requires effective tests for evaluations of the leishmanicidal activity of a particular molecule or extract. Microculture tetrazolium assays (MTAs) are colorimetric tests based on the use of tetrazolium salts. We compared the efficacies of three tetrazolium salts—3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT), and 2-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (WST-8)—for quantification of the promastigotes of various species of Leishmania. We found that the capacity of Leishmania to metabolize a tetrazolium salt depended on the salt used and the species of Leishmania. WST-8 was the tetrazolium salt best metabolized by L. guyanensis and gave the best sensitivity. PMID:24719447

  4. An aptamer based competition assay for protein detection using CNT activated gold-interdigitated capacitor arrays.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Anjum; Roci, Irena; Gurbuz, Yasar; Niazi, Javed H

    2012-04-15

    An aptamer can specifically bind to its target molecule, or hybridize with its complementary strand. A target bound aptamer complex has difficulty to hybridize with its complementary strand. It is possible to determine the concentration of target based on affinity separation system for the protein detection. Here, we exploited this property using C-reactive protein (CRP) specific RNA aptamers as probes that were immobilized by physical adsorption on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) activated gold interdigitated electrodes of capacitors. The selective binding ability of RNA aptamer with its target molecule was determined by change in capacitance after allowing competitive binding with CRP and complementary RNA (cRNA) strands in pure form and co-mixtures (CRP:cRNA=0:1, 1:0, 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1). The sensor showed significant capacitance change with pure forms of CRP/cRNA while responses reduced considerably in presence of CRP:cRNA in co-mixtures (1:1 and 1:2) because of the binding competition. At a critical CRP:cRNA ratio of 2:1, the capacitance response was dramatically lost because of the dissociation of adsorbed aptamers from the sensor surface to bind when excess CRP. Binding assays showed that the immobilized aptamers had strong affinity for cRNA (K(d)=1.98 μM) and CRP molecules (K(d)=2.4 μM) in pure forms, but low affinity for CRP:cRNA ratio of 2:1 (K(d)=8.58 μM). The dynamic detection range for CRP was determined to be 1-8 μM (0.58-4.6 μg/capacitor). The approach described in this study is a sensitive label-free method to detect proteins based on affinity separation of target molecules that can potentially be used for probing molecular interactions.

  5. Transport of a Prolyl Endopeptidase Inhibitory Peptide across the Blood-Brain Barrier Demonstrated Using the hCMEC/D3 Cell Line Transcytosis Assay.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Maria; Moen, Lars Fredrik; Auty, Mark A E; Lea, Tor Erling

    2016-01-13

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains a significant hurdle for treatment of central nervous system (CNS) and mental health disorders. A prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) inhibitory peptide with the amino acid sequence proline-proline-leucine (PPL) was chemically synthesized labeled with 5-FAM and assessed using a transcytosis assay for its ability to cross the BBB. Transport of this peptide across the BBB was determined using an in vitro model of the human BBB, which utilizes the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3). Uptake and transport of 5-FAM-PPL across the hCMEC/D3 cell model was determined using confocal microscopy and mass spectrometry. This is an important parameter in determining whether peptides may reach the target organ (i.e., the brain and central nervous system).This work assessed, for the first time, the ability of a food-derived PEP inhibitory peptide to cross the BBB without the use of animal models.

  6. Effect of early immunization on antibody response to reimmunization with measles vaccine as demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

    PubMed

    Murphy, M D; Brunell, P A; Lievens, A W; Shehab, Z M

    1984-07-01

    A measles epidemic in San Antonio, Texas provided a population of children who were immunized at less than or equal to 10 months of age and reimmunized at greater than or equal to 15 months of age. Of these children, 302 were evaluated for measles antibody by the sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and their responses were compared with those of 300 children who had been immunized at the customary time (greater than or equal to 15 months) with a single immunization. There were only five seronegative findings in each group. The children immunized at the customary time did have significantly higher (P less than .001) antibody titers than the children immunized at less than or equal to 10 months and reimmunized at greater than or equal to 15 months. These results indicate that early immunization followed by reimmunization may be indicated when young infants are at significant risk of measles exposure. This approach should not create an increased number of serologically nonresponsive children when reimmunized at greater than or equal to 15 months.

  7. Transport of a Prolyl Endopeptidase Inhibitory Peptide across the Blood-Brain Barrier Demonstrated Using the hCMEC/D3 Cell Line Transcytosis Assay.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Maria; Moen, Lars Fredrik; Auty, Mark A E; Lea, Tor Erling

    2016-01-13

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains a significant hurdle for treatment of central nervous system (CNS) and mental health disorders. A prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) inhibitory peptide with the amino acid sequence proline-proline-leucine (PPL) was chemically synthesized labeled with 5-FAM and assessed using a transcytosis assay for its ability to cross the BBB. Transport of this peptide across the BBB was determined using an in vitro model of the human BBB, which utilizes the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3). Uptake and transport of 5-FAM-PPL across the hCMEC/D3 cell model was determined using confocal microscopy and mass spectrometry. This is an important parameter in determining whether peptides may reach the target organ (i.e., the brain and central nervous system).This work assessed, for the first time, the ability of a food-derived PEP inhibitory peptide to cross the BBB without the use of animal models. PMID:26716467

  8. Sensitive field assays for water analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, W.L.

    1984-08-01

    The goal of the project is to develop a rapid, simple, and inexpensive dry-film assay device for detection of environmental contaminants using the compound geosmin as a model. Phase I activities centered upon the immunochemical reagents necessary for the assay, development of an enzyme-cycling system that makes possible detection of substances in the parts per billion (PPB) range or lower, and demonstration of how the Immuno-Replacement-Assay can be used to detect geosmin.

  9. HPLC-Analysis of Polyphenolic Compounds in Gardenia jasminoides and Determination of Antioxidant Activity by Using Free Radical Scavenging Assays

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Riaz; Saha, Moni Rani; Subhan, Nusrat; Hossain, Hemayet; Jahan, Ismet Ara; Akter, Raushanara; Alam, Ashraful

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Gardenia jasminoides is a traditional medicinal plant rich in anti-inflammatory flavonoids and phenolic compounds and used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and pain. In this present study, antioxidant potential of Gardenia jasminoides leaves extract was evaluated by using various antioxidant assays. Methods: Various antioxidant assays such as 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay, reducing power and total antioxidant capacity expressed as equivalent to ascorbic acid were employed. Moreover, phenolic compounds were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with diode-array detection. Results: The methanol extract showed significant free radical scavenging activities in DPPH radical scavenging antioxidant assays compared to the reference antioxidant ascorbic acid. Total antioxidant activity was increased in a dose dependent manner. The extract also showed strong reducing power. The total phenolic content was determined as 190.97 mg/g of gallic acid equivalent. HPLC coupled with diode-array detection was used to identify and quantify the phenolic compounds in the extracts. Gallic acid, (+)-catechin, rutin hydrate and quercetin have been identified in the plant extracts. Among the phenolic compounds, catechin and rutin hydrate are present predominantly in the extract. The accuracy and precision of the presented method were corroborated by low intra- and inter-day variations in quantitative results in leaves extract. Conclusion: These results suggest that phenolic compounds and flavonoids might contribute to high antioxidant activities of Gardenia jasminoides leaves. PMID:24754012

  10. Accuracy of the Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting Assay for the Aquaporin-4 Antibody (AQP4-Ab): Comparison with the Commercial AQP4-Ab Assay Kit

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Jin; Cheon, So Young; Kim, Boram; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Park, Kyung Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background The aquaporin-4 antibody (AQP4-Ab) is a disease-specific autoantibody to neuromyelitis optica (NMO). We aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the FACS assay in detecting the AQP4-Ab compared with the commercial cell-based assay (C-CBA) kit. Methods Human embryonic kidney-293 cells were transfected with human aquaporin-4 (M23) cDNA. The optimal cut off values of FACS assay was tested using 1123 serum samples from patients with clinically definite NMO, those at high risk for NMO, patients with multiple sclerosis, patients with other idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases, and negative controls. The accuracy of FACS assay and C-CBA were compared in consecutive 225 samples that were collected between January 2014 and June 2014. Results With a cut-off value of MFIi of 3.5 and MFIr of 2.0, the receiver operating characteristic curve for the FACS assay showed an area under the curve of 0.876. Among 225 consecutive sera, the FACS assay and C-CBA had a sensitivity of 77.3% and 69.7%, respectively, in differentiating the sera of definite NMO patients from sera of controls without IDD or of MS. Both assay had a good specificity of 100% in it. The overall positivity of the C-CBA among FACS-positive sera was 81.5%; moreover, its positivity was low as 50% among FACS-positive sera with relatively low MFIis. Conclusions Both the FACS assay and C-CBA are sensitive and highly specific assays in detecting AQP4-Ab. However, in some sera with relatively low antibody titer, FACS-assay can be a more sensitive assay option. In real practice, complementary use of FACS assay and C-CBA will benefit the diagnosis of NMO patients, because the former can be more sensitive among low titer sera and the latter are easier to use therefore can be widely used. PMID:27658059

  11. A High-Throughput Colorimetric Screening Assay for Terpene Synthase Activity Based on Substrate Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Furubayashi, Maiko; Ikezumi, Mayu; Kajiwara, Jun; Iwasaki, Miki; Fujii, Akira; Li, Ling; Saito, Kyoichi; Umeno, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Terpene synthases catalyze the formation of a variety of terpene chemical structures. Systematic mutagenesis studies have been effective in providing insights into the characteristic and complex mechanisms of C-C bond formations and in exploring the enzymatic potential for inventing new chemical structures. In addition, there is growing demand to increase terpene synthase activity in heterologous hosts, given the maturation of metabolic engineering and host breeding for terpenoid synthesis. We have developed a simple screening method for the cellular activities of terpene synthases by scoring their substrate consumption based on the color loss of the cell harboring carotenoid pathways. We demonstrate that this method can be used to detect activities of various terpene synthase or prenyltransferase genes in a high-throughput manner, irrespective of the product type, enabling the mutation analysis and directed evolution of terpene synthases. We also report the possibility for substrate-specific screening system of terpene synthases by taking advantage of the substrate-size specificity of C30 and C40 carotenoid pathways. PMID:24681801

  12. Identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infection in honey bees: establishment of a medium throughput screening assay based on N. ceranae infected cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Many flowering plants in both natural ecosytems and agriculture are dependent on insect pollination for fruit set and seed production. Managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) and wild bees are key pollinators providing this indispensable eco- and agrosystem service. Like all other organisms, bees are attacked by numerous pathogens and parasites. Nosema apis is a honey bee pathogenic microsporidium which is widely distributed in honey bee populations without causing much harm. Its congener Nosema ceranae was originally described as pathogen of the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) but jumped host from A. cerana to A. mellifera about 20 years ago and spilled over from A. mellifera to Bombus spp. quite recently. N. ceranae is now considered a deadly emerging parasite of both Western honey bees and bumblebees. Hence, novel and sustainable treatment strategies against N. ceranae are urgently needed to protect honey and wild bees. We here present the development of an in vitro medium throughput screening assay for the identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infections. This novel assay is based on our recently developed cell culture model for N. ceranae and coupled with an RT-PCR-ELISA protocol for quantification of N. ceranae in infected cells. The assay has been adapted to the 96-well microplate format to allow automated analysis. Several substances with known (fumagillin) or presumed (surfactin) or no (paromomycin) activity against N. ceranae were tested as well as substances for which no data concerning N. ceranae inhibition existed. While fumagillin and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole, tinidazole) totally inhibited N. ceranae proliferation, all other test substances were inactive. In summary, the assay proved suitable for substance screening and demonstrated the activity of two synthetic antibiotics against N. ceranae.

  13. Identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infection in honey bees: establishment of a medium throughput screening assay based on N. ceranae infected cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Many flowering plants in both natural ecosytems and agriculture are dependent on insect pollination for fruit set and seed production. Managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) and wild bees are key pollinators providing this indispensable eco- and agrosystem service. Like all other organisms, bees are attacked by numerous pathogens and parasites. Nosema apis is a honey bee pathogenic microsporidium which is widely distributed in honey bee populations without causing much harm. Its congener Nosema ceranae was originally described as pathogen of the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) but jumped host from A. cerana to A. mellifera about 20 years ago and spilled over from A. mellifera to Bombus spp. quite recently. N. ceranae is now considered a deadly emerging parasite of both Western honey bees and bumblebees. Hence, novel and sustainable treatment strategies against N. ceranae are urgently needed to protect honey and wild bees. We here present the development of an in vitro medium throughput screening assay for the identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infections. This novel assay is based on our recently developed cell culture model for N. ceranae and coupled with an RT-PCR-ELISA protocol for quantification of N. ceranae in infected cells. The assay has been adapted to the 96-well microplate format to allow automated analysis. Several substances with known (fumagillin) or presumed (surfactin) or no (paromomycin) activity against N. ceranae were tested as well as substances for which no data concerning N. ceranae inhibition existed. While fumagillin and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole, tinidazole) totally inhibited N. ceranae proliferation, all other test substances were inactive. In summary, the assay proved suitable for substance screening and demonstrated the activity of two synthetic antibiotics against N. ceranae. PMID:25658121

  14. Identification of Candidate Agents Active against N. ceranae Infection in Honey Bees: Establishment of a Medium Throughput Screening Assay Based on N. ceranae Infected Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Many flowering plants in both natural ecosytems and agriculture are dependent on insect pollination for fruit set and seed production. Managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) and wild bees are key pollinators providing this indispensable eco- and agrosystem service. Like all other organisms, bees are attacked by numerous pathogens and parasites. Nosema apis is a honey bee pathogenic microsporidium which is widely distributed in honey bee populations without causing much harm. Its congener Nosema ceranae was originally described as pathogen of the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) but jumped host from A. cerana to A. mellifera about 20 years ago and spilled over from A. mellifera to Bombus spp. quite recently. N. ceranae is now considered a deadly emerging parasite of both Western honey bees and bumblebees. Hence, novel and sustainable treatment strategies against N. ceranae are urgently needed to protect honey and wild bees. We here present the development of an in vitro medium throughput screening assay for the identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infections. This novel assay is based on our recently developed cell culture model for N. ceranae and coupled with an RT-PCR-ELISA protocol for quantification of N. ceranae in infected cells. The assay has been adapted to the 96-well microplate format to allow automated analysis. Several substances with known (fumagillin) or presumed (surfactin) or no (paromomycin) activity against N. ceranae were tested as well as substances for which no data concerning N. ceranae inhibition existed. While fumagillin and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole, tinidazole) totally inhibited N. ceranae proliferation, all other test substances were inactive. In summary, the assay proved suitable for substance screening and demonstrated the activity of two synthetic antibiotics against N. ceranae. PMID:25658121

  15. Effect of isolated fractions of Harpagophytum procumbens D.C. (devil's claw) on COX-1, COX-2 activity and nitric oxide production on whole-blood assay.

    PubMed

    Anauate, Maria Cecilia; Torres, Luce Maria; de Mello, Suzana Beatriz Veríssimo

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of isolated fractions of Harpagophytum procumbens (devil's claw) on cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) activities and NO production using a whole blood assay. The activity of COX-1 was quantified as platelet thromboxane B(2) production in blood clotting and COX-2 as prostaglandin E(2) production in LPS-stimulated whole blood. Total NO(2) (-)/NO(3) (-) concentration was determined by Griess reaction in LPS stimulated blood. Assays were performed by incubation of isolated fractions obtained by flash chromatography monitored with HPLC, TLC and identified by (1)HNMR, containing different amounts of harpagoside with blood from healthy donors. Indomethacin and etoricoxib were the positive controls of COX-1 and COX-2 Inhibition. Data shows that fraction containing the highest concentration of harpagoside inhibited indistinctively COX-1 and COX-2 (37.2 and 29.5% respectively) activity and greatly inhibited NO production (66%). In contrast the fraction including iridoid pool increased COX-2 and did not alter NO and COX-1 activities. The fraction containing cinnamic acid was able to reduce only NO production (67%). Our results demonstrated that the harpagoside fraction is the main responsible for the effect of devils claw on these enzyme activities. However, other components from devil's claw crude extract could antagonize or increase the synthesis of inflammatory mediators. PMID:20812280

  16. Potential Role of M. tuberculosis Specific IFN-γ and IL-2 ELISPOT Assays in Discriminating Children with Active or Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chiappini, Elena; Della Bella, Chiara; Bonsignori, Francesca; Sollai, Sara; Amedei, Amedeo; Galli, Luisa; Niccolai, Elena; Singh, Mahavir; D'Elios, Mario M.; de Martino, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Background Although currently available IGRA have been reported to be promising markers for TB infection, they cannot distinguish active tuberculosis (TB) from latent infection (LTBI). Objective Children with LTBI, active TB disease or uninfected were prospectively evaluated by an in-house ELISPOT assay in order to investigate possible immunological markers for a differential diagnosis between LTBI and active TB. Methods Children at risk for TB infection prospectively enrolled in our infectious disease unit were evaluated by in-house IFN-γ and IL-2 based ELISPOT assays using a panel of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens. Results Twenty-nine children were classified as uninfected, 21 as LTBI and 25 as active TB cases (including 5 definite and 20 probable cases). Significantly higher IFN-γ ELISPOT responses were observed in infected vs. uninfected children for ESAT-6 (p<0.0001), CFP-10 (p<0.0001), TB 10.3 (p = 0.003), and AlaDH (p = 0.001), while differences were not significant considering Ag85B (p = 0.063), PstS1 (p = 0.512), and HspX (16 kDa) (p = 0.139). IL-2 ELISPOT assay responses were different for ESAT-6 (p<0.0001), CFP-10 (p<0.0001), TB 10.3 (p<0.0001), HspX (16 kDa) (p<0.0001), PstS1 (p<0.0001) and AlaDH (p = 0.001); but not for Ag85B (p = 0.063). Comparing results between children with LTBI and those with TB disease differences were significant for IFN-γ ELISPOT only for AlaDH antigen (p = 0.021) and for IL-2 ELISPOT assay for AlaDH (p<0.0001) and TB 10.3 antigen (p = 0.043). ROC analyses demonstrated sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 81% of AlaDH-IL-2 ELISPOT assay in discriminating between latent and active TB using a cut off of 12.5 SCF per million PBMCs. Conclusion Our data suggest that IL-2 based ELISPOT with AlaDH antigen may be of help in discriminating children with active from those with latent TB. PMID:23029377

  17. Rectification of SEMG as a tool to demonstrate synchronous motor unit activity during vibration.

    PubMed

    Sebik, Oguz; Karacan, Ilhan; Cidem, Muharrem; Türker, Kemal S

    2013-04-01

    The use of surface electromyography (SEMG) in vibration studies is problematic since motion artifacts occupy the same frequency band with the SEMG signal containing information on synchronous motor unit activity. We hypothesize that using a harsher, 80-500 Hz band-pass filter and using rectification can help eliminate motion artifacts and provide a way to observe synchronous motor unit activity that is phase locked to vibration using SEMG recordings only. Multi Motor Unit (MMU) action potentials using intramuscular electrodes along with SEMG were recorded from the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) of six healthy male volunteers. Data were collected during whole body vibration, using vibration frequencies of 30 Hz, 35 Hz, 40 Hz or 50 Hz. A computer simulation was used to investigate the efficacy of filtering under different scenarios: with or without artifacts and/or motor unit synchronization. Our findings indicate that motor unit synchronization took place during WBV as verified by MMU recordings. A harsh filtering regimen along with rectification proved successful in demonstrating motor unit synchronization in SEMG recordings. Our findings were further supported by the results from the computer simulation, which indicated that filtering and rectification was efficient in discriminating motion artifacts from motor unit synchronization. We suggest that the proposed signal processing technique may provide a new methodology to evaluate the effects of vibration treatments using only SEMG. This is a major advantage, as this non-intrusive method is able to overcome movement artifacts and also indicate the synchronization of underlying motor units.

  18. Characterization of the DNA-binding activity of HIV-1 integrase using a filter binding assay.

    PubMed

    Haugan, I R; Nilsen, B M; Worland, S; Olsen, L; Helland, D E

    1995-12-26

    Based on the selective binding of proteins and DNA to distinct filter materials a double-layered dot blot radio assay was developed to evaluate the binding of DNA to HIV-1 integrase. In this assay the DNA-binding was found to be independent of Mn2+ concentration, inhibited by concentrations of Mg2+ above 5 mM, abolished by zinc chelation and inhibited by monoclonal antibodies reacting with either the N-terminal or C-terminal regions of integrase. Atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed the molar ratio between integrase and zinc to be close to 1. It is concluded that both the N-terminal and the C-terminal regions of integrase are involved in DNA-binding and that the reported double-layered dot blot radio assay is well suited for further characterization of the integrase.

  19. High-content pSTAT3/1 imaging assays to screen for selective inhibitors of STAT3 pathway activation in head and neck cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Paul A; Sen, Malabika; Hua, Yun; Camarco, Daniel; Shun, Tong Ying; Lazo, John S; Grandis, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is hyperactivated in most cancers and represents a plausible therapeutic target. In the absence of STAT3-selective small-molecule inhibitors, we sought to develop pSTAT3/1 high-content imaging (HCS) assays to screen for selective inhibitors of STAT3 pathway activation in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) tumor cell lines. Based on the expression of the interleukin-6 (IL-6)Rα and gp130 subunits of the IL-6 receptor complex and STAT3, we selected the Cal33 HNSCC cell line as our model. After developing image acquisition and analysis procedures, we rigorously investigated the cytokine activation responses to optimize the dynamic ranges of both assays and demonstrated that the pan-Janus kinase inhibitor pyridone 6 nonselectively inhibited pSTAT3 and pSTAT1 activation with 50% inhibition concentrations of 7.19 ± 4.08 and 16.38 ± 8.45 nM, respectively. The optimized pSTAT3 HCS assay performed very well in a pilot screen of 1,726 compounds from the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds and the National Institutes of Health clinical collection sets, and we identified 51 inhibitors of IL-6-induced pSTAT3 activation. However, only three of the primary HCS actives selectively inhibited STAT3 compared with STAT1. Our follow-up studies indicated that the nonselective inhibition of cytokine induced pSTAT3 and pSTAT1 activation by G-alpha stimulatory subunit-coupled G-protein-coupled receptor agonists, and forskolin was likely due to cyclic adenosine monophosphate-mediated up-regulation of suppressors of cytokine signaling 3. Azelastine, an H1 receptor antagonist approved for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis, nonallergic vasomotor rhinitis, and ocular conjunctivitis, was subsequently confirmed as a selective inhibitor of IL-6-induced pSTAT3 activation that also reduced the growth of HNSCC cell lines. These data illustrate the power of a chemical biology

  20. High-content pSTAT3/1 imaging assays to screen for selective inhibitors of STAT3 pathway activation in head and neck cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Paul A; Sen, Malabika; Hua, Yun; Camarco, Daniel; Shun, Tong Ying; Lazo, John S; Grandis, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is hyperactivated in most cancers and represents a plausible therapeutic target. In the absence of STAT3-selective small-molecule inhibitors, we sought to develop pSTAT3/1 high-content imaging (HCS) assays to screen for selective inhibitors of STAT3 pathway activation in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) tumor cell lines. Based on the expression of the interleukin-6 (IL-6)Rα and gp130 subunits of the IL-6 receptor complex and STAT3, we selected the Cal33 HNSCC cell line as our model. After developing image acquisition and analysis procedures, we rigorously investigated the cytokine activation responses to optimize the dynamic ranges of both assays and demonstrated that the pan-Janus kinase inhibitor pyridone 6 nonselectively inhibited pSTAT3 and pSTAT1 activation with 50% inhibition concentrations of 7.19 ± 4.08 and 16.38 ± 8.45 nM, respectively. The optimized pSTAT3 HCS assay performed very well in a pilot screen of 1,726 compounds from the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds and the National Institutes of Health clinical collection sets, and we identified 51 inhibitors of IL-6-induced pSTAT3 activation. However, only three of the primary HCS actives selectively inhibited STAT3 compared with STAT1. Our follow-up studies indicated that the nonselective inhibition of cytokine induced pSTAT3 and pSTAT1 activation by G-alpha stimulatory subunit-coupled G-protein-coupled receptor agonists, and forskolin was likely due to cyclic adenosine monophosphate-mediated up-regulation of suppressors of cytokine signaling 3. Azelastine, an H1 receptor antagonist approved for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis, nonallergic vasomotor rhinitis, and ocular conjunctivitis, was subsequently confirmed as a selective inhibitor of IL-6-induced pSTAT3 activation that also reduced the growth of HNSCC cell lines. These data illustrate the power of a chemical biology

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations used in laboratory chemistry courses. Discusses a "pH-activated" display used to chemically and visually supplement lecture demonstrations. Outlines another demonstration designed to show that copper(II) chloride is made of two ions, blue and yellow, which are combined to produce green. (TW)

  2. Fetal loss in threatened abortion after demonstration of fetal cardiac activity in a low socioeconomic population.

    PubMed

    Dede, F S; Ulucay, U; Kose, M F; Dede, H; Dilbaz, S

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the incidence and risk factors of fetal loss in threatened abortion after ultrasonographic detection of fetal cardiac activity in a low socioeconomic population. A total of 202 women with singleton pregnancies who presented with vaginal bleeding in which fetal heart activity was ultrasonographically demonstrated between 5 and 14 weeks' gestation were included. Pregnancies with fetal abnormalities were excluded from the study. All cases were followed-up with respect to pregnancy outcomes. A total of 54 of 202 pregnancies (26.7%) resulted in fetal loss before 20 weeks' gestation. The mean fetal heart rate (FHR) and cervical length values were lower in spontaneous abortions than in viable pregnancies (121.2 +/- 13.3 vs 143.5 +/- 12.4 and 41 +/- 6.0 vs. 34.8 +/- 6.1, respectively; p < 0.001). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0.88 for FHR and 0.77 for cervical length. A FHR value <130 b.p.m. was 81.4% sensitive, 85.1% specific and a cervical length value <40 mm was 80.8% sensitive, 54.7% specific for determination of fetal loss before 20 weeks' gestation. Fetal loss was observed in about one-quarter of pregnancies admitted with threatened abortion in a low socioeconomic population. Bradycardia and short cervix were found to be significant risk factors affecting the pregnancy outcome in women presenting with vaginal bleeding, in whom fetal cardiac activity was documented. PMID:20701515

  3. A novel high-throughput activity assay for the Trypanosoma brucei editosome enzyme REL1 and other RNA ligases

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Stephan; Hall, Laurence; Riley, Sean; Sørensen, Jesper; Amaro, Rommie E.; Schnaufer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    The protist parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), which threatens millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa. Without treatment the infection is almost always lethal. Current drugs for HAT are difficult to administer and have severe side effects. Together with increasing drug resistance this results in urgent need for new treatments. T. brucei and other trypanosomatid pathogens require a distinct form of post-transcriptional mRNA modification for mitochondrial gene expression. A multi-protein complex called the editosome cleaves mitochondrial mRNA, inserts or deletes uridine nucleotides at specific positions and re-ligates the mRNA. RNA editing ligase 1 (REL1) is essential for the re-ligation step and has no close homolog in the mammalian host, making it a promising target for drug discovery. However, traditional assays for RELs use radioactive substrates coupled with gel analysis and are not suitable for high-throughput screening of compound libraries. Here we describe a fluorescence-based REL activity assay. This assay is compatible with a 384-well microplate format and sensitive, satisfies statistical criteria for high-throughput methods and is readily adaptable for other polynucleotide ligases. We validated the assay by determining kinetic properties of REL1 and by identifying REL1 inhibitors in a library of small, pharmacologically active compounds. PMID:26400159

  4. Convenient microtiter plate-based, oxygen-independent activity assays for flavin-dependent oxidoreductases based on different redox dyes.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Dagmar; Krondorfer, Iris; Zahma, Kawah; Stoisser, Thomas; Bolivar, Juan M; Nidetzky, Bernd; Peterbauer, Clemens K; Haltrich, Dietmar

    2014-04-01

    Flavin-dependent oxidoreductases are increasingly recognized as important biocatalysts for various industrial applications. In order to identify novel activities and to improve these enzymes in engineering approaches, suitable screening methods are necessary. We developed novel microtiter-plate-based assays for flavin-dependent oxidases and dehydrogenases using redox dyes as electron acceptors for these enzymes. 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol, methylene green, and thionine show absorption changes between their oxidized and reduced forms in the visible range, making it easy to judge visually changes in activity. A sample set of enzymes containing both flavoprotein oxidases and dehydrogenases - pyranose 2-oxidase, pyranose dehydrogenase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, D-amino acid oxidase, and L-lactate oxidase - was selected. Assays for these enzymes are based on a direct enzymatic reduction of the redox dyes and not on the coupled detection of a reaction product as in the frequently used assays based on hydrogen peroxide formation. The different flavoproteins show low Michaelis constants with these electron acceptor substrates, and therefore these dyes need to be added in only low concentrations to assure substrate saturation. In conclusion, these electron acceptors are useful in selective, reliable and cheap MTP-based screening assays for a range of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases, and offer a robust method for library screening, which could find applications in enzyme engineering programs. PMID:24376171

  5. Activation of mutagens by hepatocytes and liver 9000 X g supernatant from human origin in the Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay. Comparison with rat liver preparations.

    PubMed

    Neis, J M; Yap, S H; van Gemert, P J; Roelofs, H M; Bos, R P; Henderson, P T

    1986-02-01

    The mutagenicity of 10 known genotoxic compounds, of several chemical classes, was measured in Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assays comprising isolated human hepatocytes or human liver 9000 X g supernatant (S9) from 4 different individuals, as activating system. The mutagenic activity of several compounds as determined with the Salmonella/hepatocyte suspension assay showed obvious differences when compared with the values obtained in the Salmonella/S9 plate assay. For instance, the mutagenic activity of BZ, DMN and DEN appeared to be much higher in the hepatocyte assay than in the S9 assay. However, 2-AF and 2-AAF were activated more effectively into mutagens in the S9 assay than in the hepatocyte assay. 2-AF was slightly more mutagenic than 2-AAF in the hepatocyte assay, whereas it was far more mutagenic than 2-AAF in the S9 assay. DMN was found more mutagenic than DEN in the hepatocyte assay, whereas in the S9 assay DEN appeared to be slightly more mutagenic. Furthermore, great interindividual differences in the metabolic activation of certain compounds, e.g. BZ and DMN, were observed in the hepatocyte suspension assay, whereas these variations were less evident in the S9 plate assay. Comparison of the mutagenicity data obtained with the human liver preparations, with those obtained with rat liver preparations, showed great interspecies differences in the capacity to activate certain chemicals into mutagens. The use of human liver preparations, in particular isolated human hepatocytes, may be of great value in studies on inter- and intraspecies variations in metabolic activation of genotoxic agents.

  6. U.S. Department of Energy -- Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities

    SciTech Connect

    James E. Francfort; Donald Karner; John G. Smart

    2009-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) tests plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in closed track, dynamometer and onroad testing environments. The onroad testing includes the use of dedicated drivers on repeated urban and highway driving cycles that range from 10 to 200 miles, with recharging between each loop. Fleet demonstrations with onboard data collectors are also ongoing with PHEVs operating in several dozen states and Canadian Provinces, during which trips- and miles-per-charge, charging demand and energy profiles, and miles-per-gallon and miles-per-kilowatt-hour fuel use results are all documented, allowing an understanding of fuel use when vehicles are operated in charge depleting, charge sustaining, and mixed charge modes. The intent of the PHEV testing includes documenting the petroleum reduction potential of the PHEV concept, the infrastructure requirements, and operator recharging influences and profiles. As of May 2008, the AVTA has conducted track and dynamometer testing on six PHEV conversion models and fleet testing on 70 PHEVs representing nine PHEV conversion models. A total of 150 PHEVs will be in fleet testing by the end of 2008, all with onboard data loggers. The onroad testing to date has demonstrated 100+ miles per gallon results in mostly urban applications for approximately the first 40 miles of PHEV operations. The primary goal of the AVTA is to provide advanced technology vehicle performance benchmark data for technology modelers, research and development programs, and technology goal setters. The AVTA testing results also assist fleet managers in making informed vehicle purchase, deployment and operating decisions. The AVTA is part of DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation, with Argonne National Laboratory providing dynamometer testing support. The proposed paper

  7. Chemical quantification and antioxidant assay of four active components in Ficus hirta root using UPLC-PAD-MS fingerprinting combined with cluster analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Root of Ficus hirta (RFH) is widely consumed in China as a plant-derived popular food. However, contents of the active constituents of RFH are unknown, and the chemical as well as bioactive properties of RFH may be affected by growing area. In order to ensure the standard efficacy of health products made with RFH, its active constituents should firstly be determined and, secondly, a means of assessing samples for their contents of these constituents is needed. Results Four active components, including two coumarins, namely psoralen and bergapten, and two flavonoids, namely luteolin and apigenin, in twenty RFH samples were quantified using a new ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detector and mass spectrometry (UPLC-PAD-MS) method, and the content level in descending order was psoralen > bergapten > luteolin > apigenin. Chromatographic fingerprint similarity evaluation and cluster analysis were used to assess geographical origin of RFH, and the results revealed a high level of similarity for the tested RFH samples obtained from Hainan, Guangdong, Guangxi provinces and Hong Kong. 2, 2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay was conducted to evaluate the antioxidant potencies of the four components, and the results clearly demonstrated that luteolin was most effective; apigenin exhibited a moderate potency, whereas psoralen and bergapten possessed little effect against free radical reactions. Structure-activity relationship of the components was elucidated, and the 3′-hydroxyl group of luteolin was found to be directly responsible for its antioxidant activity. Conclusion The present UPLC-PAD-MS method and DPPH radical scavenging assay performed well for the purpose of constituent quantification and antioxidant assay. Global profiles were highly similar for RFH samples from different origins. Both the coumarins and flavonoids were involved in the health benefit of RFH. PMID:23835498

  8. Evidence for preferential repair of 3-carbethoxypsoralen plus UVA induced DNA lesions in the active MAT alpha locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the UvrABC assay.

    PubMed

    Méniel, V; Brouwer, J; Averbeck, D

    1993-09-01

    The occurrence of preferential repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of the active MAT alpha locus compared with the inactive HML alpha locus was confirmed after 254 nm UV irradiation. Experiments carried out using the UvrABC excinuclease assay with the monofunctional furocoumarin 3-carbethoxypsoralen (3-CPs) plus UVA radiation which induce mainly monoadducts in DNA demonstrated preferential repair of the active MAT alpha locus compared with the inactive HML alpha locus in a SIR+ strain. However, as after 254 nm UV irradiation, no difference in the rate of removal of 3-CPs plus UVA induced lesions was observed between the two loci in the sir-3 mutant in which both loci are active. Thus, it appears that 3-CPs plus UVA induced monoadducts as well as pyrimidine dimers are subject to preferential repair.

  9. Comparison of Tuberculin Activity in the Interferon-gamma Assay for the Diagnosis of Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle infected with bovine tuberculosis still represent a serious regulatory and health concern in a variety of countries. Early diagnosis using the in vitro interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) assay has been applied for more than a decade. Briefly, IFN-gamma responses in whole blood cultures stimulated w...

  10. Comparison of Tuberculin Activity in the Interferon-gamma Assay for the Diagnosis of Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle infected with bovine tuberculosis still represent a serious regulatory and health concern in a variety of countries. Early diagnosis using the in vitro interferon gamma (IFN-g) assay has been applied for more than a decade. Briefly, IFN-g responses in whole blood cultures stimulated with puri...

  11. Conductimetric assays for the hydrolase and transferase activities of phospholipase D enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mezna, M; Lawrence, A J

    1994-05-01

    Measurement of solution electrical conductance (conductimetry) is a simple direct assay method for the protogenic, hydrolytic reactions catalyzed by all phospholipase enzymes. The technique is especially suitable for assay of phospholipase D (PLD) enzymes where cleavage of zwitterionic substrates reinforces the pH dependent conductance change and allows the method to be used over a much wider pH range than the equivalent titrimetric assay. The ability to detect zwitterion cleavage enables the method to assay reactions in which phospholipase D transfers neutral, or anionic, alcohol species to the zwitterionic substrates phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. The method can follow the sequential attack by different phospholipases and provides a simple technique for investigating the effect of substrate structure on susceptibility to various phospholipase enzymes. The results confirm that PLD from Streptomyces chromofuscus can attack lysophospholipids, but cannot transfer primary alcohols to the phosphatidyl residue, while the PLD from savoy cabbage is an efficient transferase, but cannot attack lysophospholipids. The data suggest that the bacterial PLD fails to act as a transferase because it hydrolyzes the transphosphatidylation products. Some phosphatidyl alcohols are more highly susceptible to PLA2 attack than the parent phosphatidyl choline derivatives.

  12. Development of APE1 enzymatic DNA repair assays: low APE1 activity is associated with increase lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sevilya, Ziv; Leitner-Dagan, Yael; Pinchev, Mila; Kremer, Ran; Elinger, Dalia; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Rennert, Hedy S; Freedman, Laurence S; Rennert, Gad; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Livneh, Zvi

    2015-09-01

    The key role of DNA repair in removing DNA damage and minimizing mutations makes it an attractive target for cancer risk assessment and prevention. Here we describe the development of a robust assay for apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 (APE1; APEX1), an essential enzyme involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. APE1 DNA repair enzymatic activity was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cell protein extracts using a radioactivity-based assay, and its association with lung cancer was determined using conditional logistic regression with specimens from a population-based case-control study with 96 lung cancer cases and 96 matched control subjects. The mean APE1 enzyme activity in case patients was 691 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 655-727] units/ng protein, significantly lower than in control subjects (mean = 793, 95% CI = 751-834 units/ng protein, P = 0.0006). The adjusted odds ratio for lung cancer associated with 1 SD (211 units) decrease in APE1 activity was 2.0 (95% CI = 1.3-3.1; P = 0.002). Comparison of radioactivity- and fluorescence-based assays showed that the two are equivalent, indicating no interference by the fluorescent tag. The APE1Asp148Glu SNP was associated neither with APE1 enzyme activity nor with lung cancer risk. Taken together, our results indicate that low APE1 activity is associated with lung cancer risk, consistent with the hypothesis that 'bad DNA repair', rather than 'bad luck', is involved in cancer etiology. Such assays may be useful, along with additional DNA repair biomarkers, for risk assessment of lung cancer and perhaps other cancers, and for selecting individuals to undergo early detection techniques such as low-dose CT.

  13. The promoter competition assay (PCA): a new approach to identify motifs involved in the transcriptional activity of reporter genes.

    PubMed

    Hube, Florent; Myal, Yvonne; Leygue, Etienne

    2006-05-01

    Identifying particular motifs responsible for promoter activity is a crucial step toward the development of new gene-based preventive and therapeutic strategies. However, to date, experimental methods to study promoter activity remain limited. We present in this report a promoter competition assay designed to identify, within a given promoter region, motifs critical for its activity. This assay consists in co-transfecting the promoter to be analyzed and double-stranded oligonucleotides which will compete for the binding of transcription factors. Using the recently characterized SBEM promoter as model, we first delineated the feasibility of the method and optimized the experimental conditions. We then identified, within an 87-bp region responsible for a strong expression of the reporter gene, an octamer-binding site essential for its transcriptional regulation. The importance of this motif has been confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. The promoter competition assay appears to be a fast and efficient approach to identify, within a given promoter sequence, sites critical for its activity.

  14. "BINACLE" assay for in vitro detection of active tetanus neurotoxin in toxoids.

    PubMed

    Behrensdorf-Nicol, Heike A; Weisser, Karin; Krämer, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) consists of two protein chains connected by a disulfide linkage: The heavy chain mediates the toxin binding and uptake by neurons, whereas the light chain cleaves synaptobrevin and thus blocks neurotransmitter release.Chemically inactivated TeNT (tetanus toxoid) is utilized for the production of tetanus vaccines. For safety reasons, each toxoid bulk has to be tested for the "absence of toxin and irreversibility of toxoid". To date, these mandatory tests are performed as toxicity tests in guinea pigs. A replacement by an animal-free method for the detection of TeNT would be desirable. The BINACLE (BINding And CLEavage) assay takes into account the receptor-binding as well as the proteolytic characteristics of TeNT: The toxin is bound to immobilized receptor molecules, the light chains are then released by reduction and transferred to a microplate containing synaptobrevin, and the fragment resulting from TeNT-induced cleavage is finally detected. This assay offers a higher specificity for discriminating between toxic TeNT and inactivated toxoid molecules than other published assays. Validation studies have shown that the BINACLE assay allows the sensitive and robust detection of TeNT in toxoids, and thus may indeed represent a suitable alternative to the prescribed animal safety tests for toxoids from several European vaccine manufacturers. Product-specific validations (and possibly adaptations) of the assay protocol will be required. A European collaborative study is currently being initiated to further examine the applicability of the method for toxoid testing. The final aim is the inclusion of the method into the European Pharmacopoeia.

  15. Roles of bovine serum albumin and copper in the assay and stability of ammonia monooxygenase activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Juliette, L Y; Hyman, M R; Arp, D J

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effects of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on both the assay and the stability of ammonia-oxidizing activity in cell extracts of Nitrosomonas europaea. Ammonia-dependent O2 uptake activity of freshly prepared extracts did not require BSA. However, a dependence on BSA developed in extracts within a short time. The role of BSA in the assay of ammonia-oxidizing activity apparently is to absorb endogenous free fatty acids which are present in the extracts, because (i) only proteins which bind fatty acids, e.g., BSA or beta-lactoglobulin, supported ammonia-oxidizing activity; (ii) exogenous palmitoleic acid completely inhibited ammonia-dependent O2 uptake activity; (iii) the inhibition caused by palmitoleic acid was reversed only by proteins which bind fatty acids; and (iv) the concentration of endogenous free palmitoleic acid increased during aging of cell extracts. Additionally, the presence of BSA (10 mg/ml) or CuCl2 (500 microM) stabilized ammonia-dependent O2 uptake activity for 2 to 3 days at 4 degrees C. The stabilizing effect of BSA or CuCl2 was apparently due to an inhibition of lipolysis, because both additives inhibited the increase in concentrations of free palmitoleic acid in aging extracts. Other additives which are known to modify lipase activity were also found to stabilize ammonia-oxidizing activity. These additives included HgCl2, lecithin, and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. PMID:7665467

  16. Compounds Derived from the Bhutanese Daisy, Ajania nubigena, Demonstrate Dual Anthelmintic Activity against Schistosoma mansoni and Trichuris muris

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Mark S.; Giacomin, Paul R.; Becker, Luke; Sotillo, Javier; Pickering, Darren

    2016-01-01

    Background Whipworms and blood flukes combined infect almost one billion people in developing countries. Only a handful of anthelmintic drugs are currently available to treat these infections effectively; there is therefore an urgent need for new generations of anthelmintic compounds. Medicinal plants have presented as a viable source of new parasiticides. Ajania nubigena, the Bhutanese daisy, has been used in Bhutanese traditional medicine for treating various diseases and our previous studies revealed that small molecules from this plant have antimalarial properties. Encouraged by these findings, we screened four major compounds isolated from A. nubigena for their anthelmintic properties. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we studied four major compounds derived from A. nubigena for their anthelmintic properties against the nematode whipworm Trichuris muris and the platyhelminth blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni using the xWORM assay technique. Of four compounds tested, two compounds—luteolin (3) and (3R,6R)-linalool oxide acetate (1)—showed dual anthelmintic activity against S. mansoni (IC50 range = 5.8–36.9 μg/mL) and T. muris (IC50 range = 9.7–20.4 μg/mL). Using scanning electron microscopy, we determined luteolin as the most efficacious compound against both parasites and additionally was found effective against the schistosomula, the infective stage of S. mansoni (IC50 = 13.3 μg/mL). Luteolin induced tegumental damage to S. mansoni and affected the cuticle, bacillary bands and bacillary glands of T. muris. Our in vivo assessment of luteolin (3) against T. muris infection at a single oral dosing of 100 mg/kg, despite being significantly (27.6%) better than the untreated control group, was markedly weaker than mebendazole (93.1%) in reducing the worm burden in mice. Conclusions/Significance Among the four compounds tested, luteolin demonstrated the best broad-spectrum activity against two different helminths—T. muris and S. mansoni—and was

  17. A C1-inhibitor-complex assay (INCA): a method to detect C1 activation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Hannema, A J; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Out, T A; Aalberse, R C

    1981-10-01

    A radioimmunoassay (the C1-inhibitor-complex assay, INCA) is described for the detection of complexes that are composed of at least C1s and C1-inhibitor. This INCA is based on demonstrating that C1s and C1-inhibitor (C1-In) are linked: after an incubation with anti-C1s-Sepharose, bound C1sC1-In complexes are detected by 125I-anti-C1-In. C1sC1-In complexes were prepared by the addition of a slight excess of C1s to normal human serum (NHS). As little as 2 ng C1-In bound to C1s was detected. Additional free C1s in serum hardly influenced the detection of C1sC1-In complexes. Complexes presumably composed of C1rC1s(C1-In)2 were generated by the addition of aggregated IgG to NHS. This generation was inhibited by lowering the temperature to 0 degrees C, and by EDTA, and depended on the concentration of aggregated IgG. These complexes had a sedimentation value of approximately 9S. Complexes of C1s and C1-In were also generated in NHS by the addition of DNP-albumin and protein A, but not by zymosan. The INCA was applied to blood samples from normal donors and patients. Sixteen out of 19 samples from patients with acute glomerulonephritis contained increased amounts of C1rC1s(C1-In)2 complexes as compared with the amounts in blood samples from normal donors. The INCA provides a useful tool to assess the activation of C1 in the presence of C1-In, both in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Avian extraintestinal Escherichia coli exhibits enterotoxigenic-like activity in the in vivo rabbit ligated ileal loop assay.

    PubMed

    Maluta, Renato Pariz; Gatti, Maria Silvia Viccari; Joazeiro, Paulo Pinto; de Paiva, Jacqueline Boldrin; Rojas, Thaís Cabrera Galvão; Silveira, Flávio; Houle, Sébastien; Kobayashi, Renata Katsuko Takayama; Dozois, Charles M; Dias da Silveira, Wanderley

    2014-06-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains harbor a number of virulence genes and cause extraintestinal diseases, such as septicemia, swollen-head syndrome, salpingitis, and omphalitis in poultry. APEC strains are not known to cause intestinal diseases. Herein, for the first time, it is reported that APEC strains were able to induce an enterotoxigenic-like effect in rabbit ligated ileal loops. Strain SEPT362 caused cell detachment of the intestinal villi, which also showed a flattened and wilted appearance, but the integrity of the tight junctions was maintained. Additionally, this strain did not adhere to enterocytes in vivo, although adhesin encoding genes ( fimH, csgA, lpfA2-3, and ECP) were present while other lpfA types, sfa, afa, papC, and ral genes were not. This enterotoxigenic-like activity was conserved after thermal treatment of the supernatant at 65°C but not at 100°C. Moreover, experiments based on filtering with different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) pore sizes demonstrated that the component associated with the observed biological effect has a molecular weight >100 kDa. Blast search and polymerase chain reaction assays for known E. coli virulence factors showed that strain SEPT362 harbors the gene encoding for the toxin EAST-1 and the serine protease autotransporter (SPATE) Tsh, but is negative for genes encoding for the toxins LT-I, STh, STp, Stx1, Stx2, CNF-1, CNF-2, CDT and the SPATEs Sat, Pic, Vat, SigA, SepA, EatA, EspP, or EspC. A cloned copy of the tsh gene in E. coli K-12 was also tested and was shown to have an enterotoxic effect. These results suggest that APEC might induce fluid accumulation in the rabbit gut. The Tsh autotransporter seems to be one of the factors associated with this phenotype.

  19. Avian extraintestinal Escherichia coli exhibits enterotoxigenic-like activity in the in vivo rabbit ligated ileal loop assay.

    PubMed

    Maluta, Renato Pariz; Gatti, Maria Silvia Viccari; Joazeiro, Paulo Pinto; de Paiva, Jacqueline Boldrin; Rojas, Thaís Cabrera Galvão; Silveira, Flávio; Houle, Sébastien; Kobayashi, Renata Katsuko Takayama; Dozois, Charles M; Dias da Silveira, Wanderley

    2014-06-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains harbor a number of virulence genes and cause extraintestinal diseases, such as septicemia, swollen-head syndrome, salpingitis, and omphalitis in poultry. APEC strains are not known to cause intestinal diseases. Herein, for the first time, it is reported that APEC strains were able to induce an enterotoxigenic-like effect in rabbit ligated ileal loops. Strain SEPT362 caused cell detachment of the intestinal villi, which also showed a flattened and wilted appearance, but the integrity of the tight junctions was maintained. Additionally, this strain did not adhere to enterocytes in vivo, although adhesin encoding genes ( fimH, csgA, lpfA2-3, and ECP) were present while other lpfA types, sfa, afa, papC, and ral genes were not. This enterotoxigenic-like activity was conserved after thermal treatment of the supernatant at 65°C but not at 100°C. Moreover, experiments based on filtering with different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) pore sizes demonstrated that the component associated with the observed biological effect has a molecular weight >100 kDa. Blast search and polymerase chain reaction assays for known E. coli virulence factors showed that strain SEPT362 harbors the gene encoding for the toxin EAST-1 and the serine protease autotransporter (SPATE) Tsh, but is negative for genes encoding for the toxins LT-I, STh, STp, Stx1, Stx2, CNF-1, CNF-2, CDT and the SPATEs Sat, Pic, Vat, SigA, SepA, EatA, EspP, or EspC. A cloned copy of the tsh gene in E. coli K-12 was also tested and was shown to have an enterotoxic effect. These results suggest that APEC might induce fluid accumulation in the rabbit gut. The Tsh autotransporter seems to be one of the factors associated with this phenotype. PMID:24673684

  20. Soft shell clams Mya arenaria with disseminated neoplasia demonstrate reverse transcriptase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    House, M.L.; Kim, C.H.; Reno, P.W.

    1998-01-01

    Disseminated neoplasia (DN), a proliferative cell disorder of the circulatory system of bivalves, was first reported in oysters in 1969. Since that time, the disease has been determined to be transmissible through water-borne exposure, but the etiological agent has not been unequivocally identified. In order to determine if a viral agent, possibly a retrovirus, could be the causative agent of DN, transmission experiments were performed, using both a cell-free filtrate and a sucrose gradient-purified preparation of a cell-free filtrate of DN positive materials. Additionally, a PCR-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay was used to determine if reverse transcriptase was present in tissues or hemolymph from DN positive soft shell clams Mya arenaria. DN was transmitted to healthy clams by injection with whole DN cells, but not with cell-free flitrates prepared from either tissues from DN positive clams, or DN cells. The cell-free preparations from DN-positive tissues and hemolymph having high levels of DN cells in circulation exhibited positive reactions in the PCR-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay. Cell-free preparations of hemolymph from clams having low levels of DN (<0.1% of cells abnormal), hemocytes from normal soft shell clams, and normal soft shell clam tissues did not produce a positive reaction in the PCR enhanced reverse transcriptase assay.

  1. Effect of metals and other inorganic ions on soil microbial activity: soil dehydrogenase assay as a simple toxicity test

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.E.; Li, S.W.

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to illustrate the utility of the soil dehydrogenase assay as an effective primary test for assessing the potential toxicity of chemicals to soil microbial activity. In this manuscript the authors describe their use of the soil dehydrogenase assay in determining the effects of a number of potential toxic inorganic ions on soil microbial activity. The ions include Cu/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Ni/sup 2 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, NH/sub 4//sup +/, Cd/sup 2 +/, Cr/sup 32/, F/sup -/, AsO/sub 4//sup 3 -/, BO/sub 3//sup 3 -/, and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/.

  2. Simple enzymatic assays for the in vitro motor activity of transcription termination factor Rho from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Boudvillain, Marc; Walmacq, Céline; Schwartz, Annie; Jacquinot, Frédérique

    2010-01-01

    The transcription termination factor Rho from Escherichia coli is a ring-shaped homo-hexameric protein that preferentially interacts with naked cytosine-rich Rut (Rho utilization) regions of nascent RNA transcripts. Once bound to the RNA chain, Rho uses ATP as an energy source to produce mechanical work and disruptive forces that ultimately lead to the dissociation of the ternary transcription complex. Although transcription termination assays have been useful to study Rho activity in various experimental contexts, they do not report directly on Rho mechanisms and kinetics. Here, we describe complementary ATP-dependent RNA-DNA helicase and streptavidin displacement assays that can be used to monitor in vitro Rho's motor activity in a more direct and quantitative manner.

  3. Functional demonstration of Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter activity in isolated, polarized choroid plexus cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Delpire, E; Hebert, S C; Strange, K

    1998-12-01

    The function of the apical Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter in mammalian choroid plexus (CP) is uncertain and controversial. To investigate cotransporter function, we developed a novel dissociated rat CP cell preparation in which single, isolated cells maintain normal polarized morphology. Immunofluorescence demonstrated that in isolated cells the Na+-K+-ATPase, Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter, and aquaporin 1 water channel remained localized to the brush border, whereas the Cl-/HCO-3 (anion) exchanger type 2 was confined to the basolateral membrane. We utilized video-enhanced microscopy and cell volume measurement techniques to investigate cotransporter function. Application of 100 microM bumetanide caused CP cells to shrink rapidly. Elevation of extracellular K+ from 3 to 6 or 25 mM caused CP cells to swell 18 and 33%, respectively. Swelling was blocked completely by Na+ removal or by addition of 100 microM bumetanide. Exposure of CP cells to 5 mM BaCl2 induced rapid swelling that was inhibited by 100 microM bumetanide. We conclude that the CP cotransporter is constitutively active and propose that it functions in series with Ba2+-sensitive K+ channels to reabsorb K+ from cerebrospinal fluid to blood. PMID:9843718

  4. A Sensitive Microplate Assay for Lipase Activity Measurement Using Olive Oil Emulsion Substrate: Modification of the Copper Soap Colorimetric Method.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Ahmad; Karmali, Amin; Abdelmoez, Wael

    2016-01-01

    The present work involves a sensitive high-throughput microtiter plate based colorimetric assay for estimating lipase activity using cupric acetate pyridine reagent (CAPR). In the first approach, three factors two levels factorial design methodology was used to evaluate the interactive effect of different parameters on the sensitivity of the assay method. The optimization study revealed that the optimum CAPR concentration was 7.5% w/v, the optimum solvent was heptane and the optimum CAPR pH was 6. In the second approach, the optimized colorimetric microplate assay was used to measure lipase activity based on enzymatic hydrolysis of olive oil emulsion substrate at 37°C and 150 rpm. The emulsion substrates were formulated by using olive oil, triton X-100 (10% v/v in pH 8) and sodium phosphate buffer of pH 8 in ratio of 1:1:1 in the case of Candida sp. lipase. While in the case of immobilized lipozyme RMIM, The emulsion substrates were formulated by using olive oil, triton X-100 (1% v/v in pH 8) and sodium phosphate buffer of pH 8 in ratio of 2:1:1. Absorbance was measured at 655 nm. The stability of this assay (in terms of colored heptane phase absorbance readings) retained more than 92.5% after 24 h at 4°C compared to the absorbance readings measured at zero time. In comparison with other lipase assay methods, beside the developed sensitivity, the reproducibility and the lower limit of detection (LOD) of the proposed method, it permits analyzing of 96 samples at one time in a 96-well microplate. Furthermore, it consumes small quantities of chemicals and unit operations. PMID:27581492

  5. Ganglioside GD2-specific trifunctional surrogate antibody Surek demonstrates therapeutic activity in a mouse melanoma model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Trifunctional bispecific antibodies (trAb) are a special class of bispecific molecules recruiting and activating T cells and accessory immune cells simultaneously at the targeted tumor. The new trAb Ektomab that targets the melanoma-associated ganglioside antigen GD2 and the signaling molecule human CD3 (hCD3) on T cells demonstrated potent T-cell activation and tumor cell destruction in vitro. However, the relatively low affinity for the GD2 antigen raised the question of its therapeutic capability. To further evaluate its efficacy in vivo it was necessary to establish a mouse model. Methods We generated the surrogate trAb Surek, which possesses the identical anti-GD2 binding arm as Ektomab, but targets mouse CD3 (mCD3) instead of hCD3, and evaluated its chemical and functional quality as a therapeutic antibody homologue. The therapeutic and immunizing potential of Surek was investigated using B78-D14, a B16 melanoma transfected with GD2 and GD3 synthases and showing strong GD2 surface expression. The induction of tumor-associated and autoreactive antibodies was evaluated. Results Despite its low affinity of approximately 107 M-1 for GD2, Surek exerted efficient tumor cell destruction in vitro at an EC50 of 70ng/ml [0.47nM]. Furthermore, Surek showed strong therapeutic efficacy in a dose-dependent manner and is superior to the parental GD2 mono-specific antibody, while the use of a control trAb with irrelevant target specificity had no effect. The therapeutic activity of Surek was strictly dependent on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and cured mice developed a long-term memory response against a second challenge even with GD2-negative B16 melanoma cells. Moreover, tumor protection was associated with humoral immune responses dominated by IgG2a and IgG3 tumor-reactive antibodies indicating a Th1-biased immune response. Autoreactive antibodies against the GD2 target antigen were not induced. Conclusion Our data suggest that Surek revealed strong tumor elimination

  6. RAS - Screens & Assays

    Cancer.gov

    A primary goal of the RAS Initiative is to develop assays for RAS activity, localization, and signaling and adapt those assays so they can be used for finding new drug candidates. Explore the work leading to highly validated screening protocols.

  7. Towards predicting the lung fibrogenic activity of nanomaterials: experimental validation of an in vitro fibroblast proliferation assay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbon nanotubes (CNT) can induce lung inflammation and fibrosis in rodents. Several studies have identified the capacity of CNT to stimulate the proliferation of fibroblasts. We developed and validated experimentally here a simple and rapid in vitro assay to evaluate the capacity of a nanomaterial to exert a direct pro-fibrotic effect on fibroblasts. Methods The activity of several multi-wall (MW)CNT samples (NM400, the crushed form of NM400 named NM400c, NM402 and MWCNTg 2400) and asbestos (crocidolite) was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The proliferative response to MWCNT was assessed on mouse primary lung fibroblasts, human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL-1), mouse embryonic fibroblasts (BALB-3T3) and mouse lung fibroblasts (MLg) by using different assays (cell counting, WST-1 assay and propidium iodide PI staining) and dispersion media (fetal bovine serum, FBS and bovine serum albumin, BSA). C57BL/6 mice were pharyngeally aspirated with the same materials and lung fibrosis was assessed after 2 months by histopathology, quantification of total collagen lung content and pro-fibrotic cytokines in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Results MWCNT (NM400 and NM402) directly stimulated fibroblast proliferation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner and induced lung fibrosis in vivo. NM400 stimulated the proliferation of all tested fibroblast types, independently of FBS- or BSA- dispersion. Results obtained by WST1 cell activity were confirmed with cell counting and cell cycle (PI staining) assays. Crocidolite also stimulated fibroblast proliferation and induced pulmonary fibrosis, although to a lesser extent than NM400 and NM402. In contrast, shorter CNT (NM400c and MWCNTg 2400) did not induce any fibroblast proliferation or collagen accumulation in vivo, supporting the idea that CNT structure is an important parameter for inducing lung fibrosis. Conclusions In this study, an optimized proliferation assay using BSA as a dispersant, MLg cells as targets

  8. Highly Sensitive and Multiple Enzyme Activity Assay Using Reagent-release Capillary-Isoelectric Focusing with Rhodamine 110-based Substrates.

    PubMed

    Sueyoshi, Kenji; Nogawa, Yuto; Sugawara, Kasumi; Endo, Tatsuro; Hisamoto, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a simple and highly sensitive enzyme activity assay based on reagent-release capillary-isoelectric focusing is described. Reagent-release capillaries containing a fluorescent substrate, which produces fluorescent products possessing an isoelectric point after reaction with enzymes, provides a simple procedure. This is because it allows to spontaneously inject a sample solution into the capillary by capillary action, mixing reagents, and subsequently concentrating the fluorescent products based on isoelectric focusing. Fluorescent rhodamine 110 and its monoamide derivative, which were generated as a final product and an intermediate, respectively, were then focused and separated by reagent-release capillary-isoelectric focusing. After 30 min of enzyme reactions, two focused fluorescent bands were clearly isolated along the prepared capillaries. Employing the focused band of rhodamine 110 monoamide allowed for highly sensitive detection of enzyme activity in the 10 pg mL(-1) order, while that of the conventional assay using a microplate was in the ng mL(-1) order. Furthermore, arraying reagent-release capillaries of different substrates on a chip allowed for simultaneous multi-assay of enzyme activity with good sensitivity in the pg mL(-1) order for each protein.

  9. Spectrophotometric method for the assay of steroid 5α-reductase activity of rat liver and prostate microsomes.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Teruki; Wada, Keiji; Watabe, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuki; Ito, Etsuro; Miura, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    A simple spectrophotometric method for the assay of steroid 5α-reductase (5α-SR) was developed in which 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT) and 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol (5α-diol), metabolites formed in the NADPH-dependent reduction of testosterone with enzyme sources of 5α-SR, were measured by enzymatic cycling using 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the presence of excess thionicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (thio-NAD) and NADH. It was found that 5α-SR activity was proportional to the accumulated thio-NADH having an absorption maximum at 400 nm. Because of the high cycling rate (> 600 cycle per min) and no interference from testosterone, enzymatic cycling can determine the sum of 5α-DHT and 5α-diol at the picomole level without separation from excess testosterone. The present method was readily applicable to the assay of 5α-SR activity of rat liver and prostate microsomes as well as to the assay of inhibitory activity of finasteride, a synthetic inhibitor of 5α-SR. PMID:23574674

  10. Toxicity of 8-Hydroxyquinoline in Cryprinus carpio Using the Acute Toxicity Test, Hepatase Activity Analysis and the Comet Assay.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuaiguo; Chen, Lili; Dou, Xiaofei; Qi, Meng; Du, Qiyan; He, Qiaoqiao; Nan, Mingge; Chang, Zhongjie; Nan, Ping

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the environmental toxicity of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HOQ), an important industrial raw material found in China's major ornamental fish, Cryprinus carpio, using the acute toxicity test, hepatase activity analysis and the comet assay. The results indicated that 8-HOQ had significant acute toxicity in adult C. carpio with a 96 h-LC50 of 1.15 and 0.22 mg L(-1) hepatic quinoline residues as assessed by HPLC. 8-HOQ also induced genotoxicity in the form of strand breaks in the DNA of hepatic cells as shown by the comet assay. With regard to physiological toxicity, 8-HOQ induced a decrease in the activities of hepatic GOT and GPT with increased exposure concentration and time. These data suggest that 8-HOQ may be toxic to the health of aquatic organisms when accidentally released into aquatic ecosystems. The data also suggest that the comet assay may be used in biomonitoring to determine 8-HOQ genotoxicity and hepatic GPT and GOT activities may be potential biomarkers of physiological toxicity.

  11. Correlation of In Vivo and In Vitro Assay Results for Assessment of Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Green Tea Nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Abd-ElSalam, Heba-Alla H; Al-Ghobashy, Medhat A; Al-Shorbagy, Muhammad; Nassar, Noha; Zaazaa, Hala E; Ibrahim, Mohamed A

    2016-07-01

    Green tea (GT)-derived catechins; epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) in particular are commonly used nutraceuticals for their free-radical scavenging activity (FRSA). The influence of photodegradation on the protective power of GT nutracenticals against oxidative stress was thoroughly explored. Photodegradation of GT extracts was carried out and monitored using orthogonal stability-indicating testing protocol; in vitro and in vivo assays. Total polyphenol content (TPC) and FRSA were determined spectrophotometrically while EGCG was selectively monitored using SPE-HPLC. In vivo assessment of photodegraded samples was investigated via measuring a number of biomarkers for hepatic oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3, inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitric oxide, mitogen-activated protein kinase, glutathione, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, nuclear factor kappa beta, and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor) as well as liver damage (alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase) in serum of rats previously subjected to oxidative stress. Results showed complete degradation of EGCG in photodegraded green tea samples with no correlation with either TPC or FRSA. On the other hand, in vivo assay results revealed not only loss of activity but formation of harmful pro-oxidants. Photostability was found crucial for the protective effect of GT extract against lead acetate insult. Results confirmed that careful design of quality control protocols requires correlation of chemical assays to bioassays to verify efficacy, stability, and most importantly safety of nutraceuticals.

  12. Toxicity of 8-Hydroxyquinoline in Cryprinus carpio Using the Acute Toxicity Test, Hepatase Activity Analysis and the Comet Assay.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuaiguo; Chen, Lili; Dou, Xiaofei; Qi, Meng; Du, Qiyan; He, Qiaoqiao; Nan, Mingge; Chang, Zhongjie; Nan, Ping

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the environmental toxicity of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HOQ), an important industrial raw material found in China's major ornamental fish, Cryprinus carpio, using the acute toxicity test, hepatase activity analysis and the comet assay. The results indicated that 8-HOQ had significant acute toxicity in adult C. carpio with a 96 h-LC50 of 1.15 and 0.22 mg L(-1) hepatic quinoline residues as assessed by HPLC. 8-HOQ also induced genotoxicity in the form of strand breaks in the DNA of hepatic cells as shown by the comet assay. With regard to physiological toxicity, 8-HOQ induced a decrease in the activities of hepatic GOT and GPT with increased exposure concentration and time. These data suggest that 8-HOQ may be toxic to the health of aquatic organisms when accidentally released into aquatic ecosystems. The data also suggest that the comet assay may be used in biomonitoring to determine 8-HOQ genotoxicity and hepatic GPT and GOT activities may be potential biomarkers of physiological toxicity. PMID:26067700

  13. A novel thrombelastograph tissue factor/kaolin assay of activated clotting times for monitoring heparin anticoagulation during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Jack J; Foley, Donald E; Snider, Carolyn C; Howell, James C; Cohen, Eli; Muenchen, Robert A; Carroll, Roger C

    2004-11-01

    We used a thrombelastograph (TEG) assay with tissue factor and kaolin (TEG TF/K) to measure activated clotting time (ACT) in 31 patients during cardiopulmonary bypass. For comparison, ACTs were also determined by a Hemochron Jr. Signature and a Hepcon HMS. The TEG TF/K correlated with both the Hepcon (r(2) = 0.789) and Hemochron (r(2) = 0.743) ACTs. The average ACT after heparin was 319 +/- 119 s (mean +/- sd) for the TEG TF/K compared with 624 +/- 118 s for the Hepcon instrument. To evaluate the effects of hemodilution on TEG TF/K and Hemochron assays, ACT assays were performed on blood diluted to 50% and titrated with heparin from 0 to 6 U/mL. Both instruments showed significant (P < 0.01) changes in the ACT-versus-heparin slope, but the 0 heparin intercept for the TEG TF/K ACTs was not significantly changed (P = 0.292), in contrast to that for the Hemochron device (P = 0.041). Both instruments also indicated the same 1.3:1 ratio of protamine to heparin for optimum heparin neutralization, with increasing ACTs at ratios >2.6:1. The TEG TF/K ACT assay rapidly monitors heparin anticoagulation, in addition to the capabilities of this instrument to monitor platelet function, clotting factors, and fibrinolysis.

  14. The Fibrin slide assay for detecting urokinase activity in human fetal kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedor, K.

    1985-01-01

    The Fibrin Slide Technique of Hau C. Kwaan and Tage Astrup is discussed. This relatively simple assay involves two steps: the formation of an artificial clot and then the addition of an enzyme (UKOKINASE) to dissolve the clot. The actual dissolving away of the clot is detected by the appearance of holes (lysis zones) in the stained clot. The procedure of Kwaan and Astrup is repeated, along with modifications and suggestions for improvements based on experience with the technique.

  15. In vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation of xenoestrogens using an estrogen responsive in vitro transcriptional activation assay and the in vivo uterotrophic assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widespread contamination of waters with both natural and synthetic estrogens is a concern for potential adverse ecological and human health effects. In vitro assays are valuable screening tools for identifying contaminated environmental samples and chemical specific mechanisms o...

  16. In vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation of xenoestrogens using an estrogen responsive in vitro transcriptional activation assay and the in vivo uterotrophic assay##

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widespread contamination of waters with both natural and synthetic estrogens is a concern for potential adverse ecological and human health effects. In vitro assays are valuable screening tools for identifying contaminated environmental samples and chemical specific mechanisms of...

  17. Development of radiometric assays for quantification of enzyme activities of the key enzymes of thyroid hormones metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pavelka, S

    2014-01-01

    We newly elaborated and adapted several radiometric enzyme assays for the determination of activities of the key enzymes engaged in the biosynthesis (thyroid peroxidase, TPO) and metabolic transformations (conjugating enzymes and iodothyronine deiodinases, IDs) of thyroid hormones (THs) in the thyroid gland and in peripheral tissues, especially in white adipose tissue (WAT). We also elaborated novel, reliable radiometric methods for extremely sensitive determination of enzyme activities of IDs of types 1, 2 and 3 in microsomal fractions of different rat and human tissues, as well as in homogenates of cultured mammalian cells. The use of optimized TLC separation of radioactive products from the unconsumed substrates and film-less autoradiography of radiochromatograms, taking advantage of storage phosphor screens, enabled us to determine IDs enzyme activities as low as 10(-18) katals. In studies of the interaction of fluoxetine (Fluox) with the metabolism of THs, we applied adapted radiometric enzyme assays for iodothyronine sulfotransferases (ST) and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronyltransferase (UDP-GT). Fluox is the most frequently used representative of a new group of non-tricyclic antidepressant drugs--selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors. We used the elaborated assays for quantification the effects of Fluox and for the assessment of the degree of potential induction of rat liver ST and/or UDP-GT enzyme activities by Fluox alone or in combination with T(3). Furthermore, we studied possible changes in IDs activities in murine adipose tissue under the conditions that promoted either tissue hypertrophy (obesogenic treatment) or involution (caloric restriction), and in response to leptin, using our newly developed radiometric enzyme assays for IDs. Our results suggest that deiodinase D1 has a functional role in WAT, with D1 possibly being involved in the control of adipose tissue metabolism and/or accumulation of the tissue. Significant positive correlation between

  18. Melanin-Like Nanoquencher on Graphitic Carbon Nitride Nanosheets for Tyrosinase Activity and Inhibitor Assay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Wen; Wang, Yu-Min; Xu, Liu; Duan, Lu-Ying; Tang, Hao; Yu, Ru-Qin; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Graphitic C3N4 (g-C3N4) nanosheets are a type of emerging graphene-like carbon-based nanomaterials with high fluorescence and large specific surface areas that hold great potential for biosensor applications. However, current g-C3N4 based biosensors have prevailingly been limited to coordination with metal ions, and it is of great significance to develop new designs for g-C3N4 nanosheets based biosensors toward biomarkers of general interest. We report the development of a novel g-C3N4 nanosheet-based nanosensor strategy for highly sensitive, single-step and label-free detection of tyrosinase (TYR) activity and its inhibitor. This strategy relies on the catalytic oxidation of tyrosine by TYR into melanin-like polymers, which form a nanoassembly on the g-C3N4 nanosheets and quench their fluorescence. This strategy was demonstrated to provide excellent selectivity and superior sensitivity and to enable rapid screening for TYR inhibitors. Therefore, the developed approach might create a useful platform for diagnostics and drugs screening for TYR-based diseases including melanoma cancer. PMID:27417635

  19. Lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay for detecting active tuberculosis in Hiv-positive adults

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maunank; Hanrahan, Colleen; Wang, Zhuo Yu; Dendukuri, Nandini; Lawn, Stephen D; Denkinger, Claudia M; Steingart, Karen R

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid detection of tuberculosis (TB) among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a global health priority. HIV-associated TB may have different clinical presentations and is challenging to diagnose. Conventional sputum tests have reduced sensitivity in HIV-positive individuals, who have higher rates of extrapulmonary TB compared with HIV-negative individuals. The lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay (LF-LAM) is a new, commercially available point-of-care test that detects lipoarabinomannan (LAM), a lipopolysaccharide present in mycobacterial cell walls, in people with active TB disease. Objectives To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM for the diagnosis of active TB disease in HIV-positive adults who have signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB diagnosis).To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM as a screening test for active TB disease in HIV-positive adults irrespective of signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB screening). Search methods We searched the following databases without language restriction on 5 February 2015: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; MEDLINE (PubMed,1966); EMBASE (OVID, from 1980); Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED, from 1900), Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S, from 1900), and BIOSIS Previews (from 1926) (all three using the Web of Science platform; MEDION; LILACS (BIREME, from 1982); SCOPUS (from 1995); the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT); the search portal of the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP); and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&l (from 1861). Selection criteria Eligible study types included randomized controlled trials, cross-sectional studies, and cohort studies that determined LF-LAM accuracy for TB against a microbiological reference standard (culture or nucleic acid amplification test from any body site). A higher quality reference standard was one in which two or more specimen types were

  20. The E-screen test and the MELN gene-reporter assay used for determination of estrogenic activity in fruits and vegetables in relation to pesticide residues.

    PubMed

    Schilirò, Tiziana; Porfido, Arianna; Longo, Annalisa; Coluccia, Sara; Gilli, Giorgio

    2013-12-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may lead to adverse systemic effects by interfering with normal hormone homeostasis, and diet is considered to be among the main routes of EDC exposure. The present study investigated the total estrogenic activity of fruits and vegetables by calculating the 17-β-estradiol equivalent quantity (EEQ) using two in vitro tests: the human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7 BUS) proliferation assay (E-screen test) and the luciferase-transfected human breast cancer cell line (MELN) gene-reporter assay. Of the 24 analyzed fruits and vegetables, 14 contained from 1 to 4 pesticide residues in concentrations ranging from 0.02 to 1.19 ppm, whereas the other 10 did not contain any pesticide residues. The EEQ values for all positive samples ranged from 0.010 to 0.616 μg/100g for the above in vitro tests. Our study demonstrates that estrogenic activity was present in fruits and vegetables and that the concentration of allowable pesticide residues and EEQ values were positively correlated; however, no correlation was found by comparing the estrogenic activity and the intrinsic content of phytoestrogens obtained from the available literature. A theoretical adult dietary intake of 0.7-0.9 ng EEQ/L/day from fruits and vegetables was calculated.

  1. An exploration of the estrogen receptor transcription activity of capsaicin analogues via an integrated approach based on in silico prediction and in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Ma, Duo; Lin, Yuan; Fu, Jianjie; Zhang, Aiqian

    2014-06-16

    Capsaicin has been considered as an alternative template of dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT) in antifouling paint. However, information regarding the estrogenic activity of capsaicin analogues is rather limited in comparison to that of DDT analogues and their metabolites. We here explore the ER transcription activity of selected capsaicin analogues via an integrated approach based on in silico prediction and in vitro assays. Molecular simulation and the agonist/antagonist differential-docking screening identified 6-iodonordihydrocapsaicin (6-I-CPS) as a weak ERα agonist, while anti-estrogenicity was expected for N-arachidonoyldopamine, capsazepine, dihydrocapsaicin, trichostatin A, and capsaicin. On the contrary, the large volume of analogues, such as phorbol 12-phenylacetate 13-acetate 20-homovanillate and phorbol 12,13-dinonanoate 20-homovanillate, cannot fit well with the ER cavity. The result of MVLN assay was in accord with the in silico prediction. 6-I-CPS was demonstrated to induce luciferase gene expression, while the other analogues of relatively small molecular volume reduced luciferase gene expression in MVLN cells, both in the absence and presence of estradiol. This finding suggested that the ER transcription activity of capsaicin analogues is generated at least partly through the ERα-mediated pathway. Moreover, receptor polymorphism analysis indicated that capsaicin analogues may exhibit diverse species selectivity for human beings and marine species.

  2. Demonstration of natriuretic activity in urine of neurosurgical patients with renal salt wasting

    PubMed Central

    Youmans, Steven J; Fein, Miriam R; Wirkowski, Elizabeth; Maesaka, John K

    2013-01-01

    We have utilized the persistent elevation of fractional excretion (FE) of urate, > 10%, to differentiate cerebral/renal salt wasting (RSW) from the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), in which a normalization of FEurate occurs after correction of hyponatremia.  Previous studies suggest as well  that an elevated FEurate with normonatremia, without pre-existing hyponatremia, is also consistent with RSW, including studies demonstrating induction of RSW in rats infused with plasma from normonatremic neurosurgical and Alzheimer’s disease patients.  The present studies were designed to test whether precipitates from the urine of normonatremic neurosurgical patients, with either normal or elevated FEurate, and patients with SIADH, display natriuretic activity.   Methods: Ammonium sulfate precipitates from the urine of 6 RSW and 5 non-RSW Control patients were dialyzed (10 kDa cutoff) to remove the ammonium sulfate, lyophilized, and the reconstituted precipitate was tested for its effect on transcellular transport of 22Na across LLC-PK1 cells grown to confluency in transwells. Results: Precipitates from 5 of the 6 patients with elevated FEurate and normonatremia significantly inhibited the in vitro transcellular transport of 22Na above a concentration of 3 μg protein/ml, by 10-25%, versus to vehicle alone, and by 15-40% at concentrations of 5-20 μg/ml as compared to precipitates from 4 of the 5 non-RSW patients with either normal FEurate and normonatremia (2 patients) or with SIADH (2 patients). Conclusion: These studies provide further evidence that an elevated FEurate with normonatremia is highly consistent with RSW.  Evidence in the urine of natriuretic activity suggests significant renal excretion of the natriuretic factor. The potentially large source of the natriuretic factor that this could afford, coupled with small analytical sample sizes required by the in-vitro bioassay used here, should facilitate future experimental

  3. Demonstration of a Spoken Dialogue Interface for Planning Activities of a Semi-autonomous Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowding, John; Frank, Jeremy; Hockey, Beth Ann; Jonsson, Ari; Aist, Gregory

    2002-01-01

    Planning and scheduling in the face of uncertainty and change pushes the capabilities of both planning and dialogue technologies by requiring complex negotiation to arrive at a workable plan. Planning for use of semi-autonomous robots involves negotiation among multiple participants with competing scientific and engineering goals to co-construct a complex plan. In NASA applications this plan construction is done under severe time pressure so having a dialogue interface to the plan construction tools can aid rapid completion of the process. But, this will put significant demands on spoken dialogue technology, particularly in the areas of dialogue management and generation. The dialogue interface will need to be able to handle the complex dialogue strategies that occur in negotiation dialogues, including hypotheticals and revisions, and the generation component will require an ability to summarize complex plans. This demonstration will describe a work in progress towards building a spoken dialogue interface to the EUROPA planner for the purposes of planning and scheduling the activities of a semi-autonomous robot. A prototype interface has been built for planning the schedule of the Personal Satellite Assistant (PSA), a mobile robot designed for micro-gravity environments that is intended for use on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station. The spoken dialogue interface gives the user the capability to ask for a description of the plan, ask specific questions about the plan, and update or modify the plan. We anticipate that a spoken dialogue interface to the planner will provide a natural augmentation or alternative to the visualization interface, in situations in which the user needs very targeted information about the plan, in situations where natural language can express complex ideas more concisely than GUI actions, or in situations in which a graphical user interface is not appropriate.

  4. Hanford Low-Activity Waste Processing: Demonstration of the Off-Gas Recycle Flowsheet - 13443

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, William G.; Esparza, Brian P.

    2013-07-01

    Vitrification of Hanford Low-Activity Waste (LAW) is nominally the thermal conversion and incorporation of sodium salts and radionuclides into borosilicate glass. One key radionuclide present in LAW is technetium-99. Technetium-99 is a low energy, long-lived beta emitting radionuclide present in the waste feed in concentrations on the order of 1-10 ppm. The long half-life combined with a high solubility in groundwater results in technetium-99 having considerable impact on performance modeling (as potential release to the environment) of both the waste glass and associated secondary waste products. The current Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flowsheet calls for the recycle of vitrification process off-gas condensates to maximize the portion of technetium ultimately immobilized in the waste glass. This is required as technetium acts as a semi-volatile specie, i.e. considerable loss of the radionuclide to the process off-gas stream can occur during the vitrification process. To test the process flowsheet assumptions, a prototypic off-gas system with recycle capability was added to a laboratory melter (on the order of 1/200 scale) and testing performed. Key test goals included determination of the process mass balance for technetium, a non-radioactive surrogate (rhenium), and other soluble species (sulfate, halides, etc.) which are concentrated by recycling off-gas condensates. The studies performed are the initial demonstrations of process recycle for this type of liquid-fed melter system. This paper describes the process recycle system, the waste feeds processed, and experimental results. Comparisons between data gathered using process recycle and previous single pass melter testing as well as mathematical modeling simulations are also provided. (authors)

  5. Deactivation of the inferior colliculus by cooling demonstrates intercollicular modulation of neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Orton, Llwyd D; Poon, Paul W F; Rees, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    The auditory pathways coursing through the brainstem are organized bilaterally in mirror image about the midline and at several levels the two sides are interconnected. One of the most prominent points of interconnection is the commissure of the inferior colliculus (CoIC). Anatomical studies have revealed that these fibers make reciprocal connections which follow the tonotopic organization of the inferior colliculus (IC), and that the commissure contains both excitatory and, albeit fewer, inhibitory fibers. The role of these connections in sound processing is largely unknown. Here we describe a method to address this question in the anaesthetized guinea pig. We used a cryoloop placed on one IC to produce reversible deactivation while recording electrophysiological responses to sounds in both ICs. We recorded single units, multi-unit clusters and local field potentials (LFPs) before, during and after cooling. The degree and spread of cooling was measured with a thermocouple placed in the IC and other auditory structures. Cooling sufficient to eliminate firing was restricted to the IC contacted by the cryoloop. The temperature of other auditory brainstem structures, including the contralateral IC and the cochlea were minimally affected. Cooling below 20°C reduced or eliminated the firing of action potentials in frequency laminae at depths corresponding to characteristic frequencies up to ~8 kHz. Modulation of neural activity also occurred in the un-cooled IC with changes in single unit firing and LFPs. Components of LFPs signaling lemniscal afferent input to the IC showed little change in amplitude or latency with cooling, whereas the later components, which likely reflect inter- and intra-collicular processing, showed marked changes in form and amplitude. We conclude that the cryoloop is an effective method of selectively deactivating one IC in guinea pig, and demonstrate that auditory processing in the IC is strongly influenced by the other. PMID:23248587

  6. Deactivation of the inferior colliculus by cooling demonstrates intercollicular modulation of neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Orton, Llwyd D.; Poon, Paul W. F.; Rees, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    The auditory pathways coursing through the brainstem are organized bilaterally in mirror image about the midline and at several levels the two sides are interconnected. One of the most prominent points of interconnection is the commissure of the inferior colliculus (CoIC). Anatomical studies have revealed that these fibers make reciprocal connections which follow the tonotopic organization of the inferior colliculus (IC), and that the commissure contains both excitatory and, albeit fewer, inhibitory fibers. The role of these connections in sound processing is largely unknown. Here we describe a method to address this question in the anaesthetized guinea pig. We used a cryoloop placed on one IC to produce reversible deactivation while recording electrophysiological responses to sounds in both ICs. We recorded single units, multi-unit clusters and local field potentials (LFPs) before, during and after cooling. The degree and spread of cooling was measured with a thermocouple placed in the IC and other auditory structures. Cooling sufficient to eliminate firing was restricted to the IC contacted by the cryoloop. The temperature of other auditory brainstem structures, including the contralateral IC and the cochlea were minimally affected. Cooling below 20°C reduced or eliminated the firing of action potentials in frequency laminae at depths corresponding to characteristic frequencies up to ~8 kHz. Modulation of neural activity also occurred in the un-cooled IC with changes in single unit firing and LFPs. Components of LFPs signaling lemniscal afferent input to the IC showed little change in amplitude or latency with cooling, whereas the later components, which likely reflect inter- and intra-collicular processing, showed marked changes in form and amplitude. We conclude that the cryoloop is an effective method of selectively deactivating one IC in guinea pig, and demonstrate that auditory processing in the IC is strongly influenced by the other. PMID:23248587

  7. A fluorescence-based hydrolytic enzyme activity assay for quantifying toxic effects of Roundup® to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Ørsted, Michael; Roslev, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Daphnia magna is a widely used model organism for aquatic toxicity testing. In the present study, the authors investigated the hydrolytic enzyme activity of D. magna after exposure to toxicant stress. In vivo enzyme activity was quantified using 15 fluorogenic enzyme probes based on 4-methylumbelliferyl or 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin. Probing D. magna enzyme activity was evaluated using short-term exposure (24-48 h) to the reference chemical K2 Cr2 O7 or the herbicide formulation Roundup®. Toxicant-induced changes in hydrolytic enzyme activity were compared with changes in mobility (International Organization for Standardization standard 6341). The results showed that hydrolytic enzyme activity was quantifiable as a combination of whole body fluorescence of D. magna and the fluorescence of the surrounding water. Exposure of D. magna to lethal and sublethal concentrations of Roundup resulted in loss of whole body enzyme activity and release of cell constituents, including enzymes and DNA. Roundup caused comparable inhibition of mobility and alkaline phosphatase activity with median effective concentration values at 20 °C of 8.7 mg active ingredient (a.i.)/L to 11.7 mg a.i./L. Inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity by Roundup was lowest at 14 °C and greater at 20 °C and 26 °C. The results suggest that the fluorescence-based hydrolytic enzyme activity assay (FLEA assay) can be used as an index of D. magna stress. Combining enzyme activity with fluorescence measurements may be applied as a simple and quantitative supplement for toxicity testing with D. magna.

  8. Lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay for detecting active tuberculosis in Hiv-positive adults

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maunank; Hanrahan, Colleen; Wang, Zhuo Yu; Dendukuri, Nandini; Lawn, Stephen D; Denkinger, Claudia M; Steingart, Karen R

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid detection of tuberculosis (TB) among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a global health priority. HIV-associated TB may have different clinical presentations and is challenging to diagnose. Conventional sputum tests have reduced sensitivity in HIV-positive individuals, who have higher rates of extrapulmonary TB compared with HIV-negative individuals. The lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay (LF-LAM) is a new, commercially available point-of-care test that detects lipoarabinomannan (LAM), a lipopolysaccharide present in mycobacterial cell walls, in people with active TB disease. Objectives To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM for the diagnosis of active TB disease in HIV-positive adults who have signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB diagnosis).To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM as a screening test for active TB disease in HIV-positive adults irrespective of signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB screening). Search methods We searched the following databases without language restriction on 5 February 2015: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; MEDLINE (PubMed,1966); EMBASE (OVID, from 1980); Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED, from 1900), Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S, from 1900), and BIOSIS Previews (from 1926) (all three using the Web of Science platform; MEDION; LILACS (BIREME, from 1982); SCOPUS (from 1995); the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT); the search portal of the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP); and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&l (from 1861). Se