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Sample records for activity binding peptides

  1. Screening of Pre-miRNA-155 Binding Peptides for Apoptosis Inducing Activity Using Peptide Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Pai, Jaeyoung; Hyun, Soonsil; Hyun, Ji Young; Park, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Won-Je; Bae, Sung-Hun; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; Yu, Jaehoon; Shin, Injae

    2016-01-27

    MicroRNA-155, one of the most potent miRNAs that suppress apoptosis in human cancer, is overexpressed in numerous cancers, and it displays oncogenic activity. Peptide microarrays, constructed by immobilizing 185 peptides containing the C-terminal hydrazide onto epoxide-derivatized glass slides, were employed to evaluate peptide binding properties of pre-miRNA-155 and to identify its binding peptides. Two peptides, which were identified based on the results of peptide microarray and in vitro Dicer inhibition studies, were found to inhibit generation of mature miRNA-155 catalyzed by Dicer and to enhance expression of miRNA-155 target genes in cells. In addition, the results of cell experiments indicate that peptide inhibitors promote apoptotic cell death via a caspase-dependent pathway. Finally, observations made in NMR and molecular modeling studies suggest that a peptide inhibitor preferentially binds to the upper bulge and apical stem-loop region of pre-miRNA-155, thereby suppressing Dicer-mediated miRNA-155 processing. PMID:26771315

  2. Activation of erythropoietin receptor in the absence of hormone by a peptide that binds to a domain different from the hormone binding site

    PubMed Central

    Naranda, Tatjana; Wong, Kenneth; Kaufman, R. Ilene; Goldstein, Avram; Olsson, Lennart

    1999-01-01

    Applying a homology search method previously described, we identified a sequence in the extracellular dimerization site of the erythropoietin receptor, distant from the hormone binding site. A peptide identical to that sequence was synthesized. Remarkably, it activated receptor signaling in the absence of erythropoietin. Neither the peptide nor the hormone altered the affinity of the other for the receptor; thus, the peptide does not bind to the hormone binding site. The combined activation of signal transduction by hormone and peptide was strongly synergistic. In mice, the peptide acted like the hormone, protecting against the decrease in hematocrit caused by carboplatin. PMID:10377456

  3. Collagen-binding VEGF mimetic peptide: Structure, matrix interaction, and endothelial cell activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Tania R.

    Long term survival of artificial tissue constructs depends greatly on proper vascularization. In nature, differentiation of endothelial cells and formation of vasculature are directed by dynamic spatio-temporal cues in the extracellular matrix that are difficult to reproduce in vitro. In this dissertation, we present a novel bifunctional peptide that mimics matrix-bound vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which can be used to encode spatially controlled angiogenic signals in collagen-based scaffolds. The peptide, QKCMP, contains a collagen mimetic domain (CMP) that binds to type I collagen by a unique triple helix hybridization mechanism and a VEGF mimetic domain (QK) with pro-angiogenic activity. We demonstrate QKCMP's ability to hybridize with native and heat denatured collagens through a series of binding studies on collagen and gelatin substrates. Circular dichroism experiments show that the peptide retains the triple helical structure vital for collagen binding, and surface plasmon resonance study confirms the molecular interaction between the peptide and collagen strands. Cell culture studies demonstrate QKCMP's ability to induce endothelial cell morphogenesis and network formation as a matrix-bound factor in 2D and 3D collagen scaffolds. We also show that the peptide can be used to spatially modify collagen-based substrates to promote localized endothelial cell activation and network formation. To probe the biological events that govern these angiogenic cellular responses, we investigated the cell signaling pathways activated by collagen-bound QKCMP and determined short and long-term endothelial cell response profiles for p38, ERK1/2, and Akt signal transduction cascades. Finally, we present our efforts to translate the peptide's in vitro bioactivity to an in vivo burn injury animal model. When implanted at the wound site, QKCMP functionalized biodegradable hydrogels induce enhanced neovascularization in the granulation tissue. The results show QKCMP

  4. Thermodynamics of engineered gold binding peptides: establishing the structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Seker, Urartu Ozgur Safak; Wilson, Brandon; Kulp, John L; Evans, John S; Tamerler, Candan; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2014-07-14

    Adsorption behavior of a gold binding peptide was experimentally studied to achieve kinetics and thermodynamics parameters toward understanding of the binding of an engineered peptide onto a solid metal surface. The gold-binding peptide, GBP1, was originally selected using a cell surface display library and contains 14 amino acid residues. In this work, single- and three-repeats of GBP1 were used to assess the effects of two parameters: molecular architecture versus secondary structure on adsorption on to gold substrate. The adsorption measurements were carried out using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy at temperatures ranging from 10 to 55 °C. At all temperatures, two different regimes of peptide adsorption were observed, which, based on the model, correspond to two sets of thermodynamics values. The values of enthalpy, ΔH(ads), and entropy, ΔS(ads), in these two regimes were determined using the van't Hoff approach and Gibbs-Helmholtz relationship. In general, the values of enthalpy for both peptides are negative indicating GBP1 binding to gold is an exothermic phenomenon and that the binding of three repeat gold binding peptide (3l-GBP1) is almost 5 times tighter than that for the single repeat (l-GBP1). More intriguing result is that the entropy of adsorption for the 3l-GBP1 is negative (-43.4 ± 8.5 cal/(mol K)), while that for the l-GBP1 is positive (10.90 ± 1.3 cal/(mol K)). Among a number of factors that synergistically contribute to the decrease of entropy, long-range ordered self-assembly of the 3l-GBP1 on gold surface is the most effective, probably through both peptide-solid and peptide-peptide intermolecular interactions. Additional adsorption experiments were conducted in the presence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) to determine how the conformational structures of the biomolecules responded to the environmental perturbation. We found that the peptides differ in their conformational responses to the change in solution conditions; while

  5. Thermodynamics of engineered gold binding peptides: establishing the structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Seker, Urartu Ozgur Safak; Wilson, Brandon; Kulp, John L; Evans, John S; Tamerler, Candan; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2014-07-14

    Adsorption behavior of a gold binding peptide was experimentally studied to achieve kinetics and thermodynamics parameters toward understanding of the binding of an engineered peptide onto a solid metal surface. The gold-binding peptide, GBP1, was originally selected using a cell surface display library and contains 14 amino acid residues. In this work, single- and three-repeats of GBP1 were used to assess the effects of two parameters: molecular architecture versus secondary structure on adsorption on to gold substrate. The adsorption measurements were carried out using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy at temperatures ranging from 10 to 55 °C. At all temperatures, two different regimes of peptide adsorption were observed, which, based on the model, correspond to two sets of thermodynamics values. The values of enthalpy, ΔH(ads), and entropy, ΔS(ads), in these two regimes were determined using the van't Hoff approach and Gibbs-Helmholtz relationship. In general, the values of enthalpy for both peptides are negative indicating GBP1 binding to gold is an exothermic phenomenon and that the binding of three repeat gold binding peptide (3l-GBP1) is almost 5 times tighter than that for the single repeat (l-GBP1). More intriguing result is that the entropy of adsorption for the 3l-GBP1 is negative (-43.4 ± 8.5 cal/(mol K)), while that for the l-GBP1 is positive (10.90 ± 1.3 cal/(mol K)). Among a number of factors that synergistically contribute to the decrease of entropy, long-range ordered self-assembly of the 3l-GBP1 on gold surface is the most effective, probably through both peptide-solid and peptide-peptide intermolecular interactions. Additional adsorption experiments were conducted in the presence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) to determine how the conformational structures of the biomolecules responded to the environmental perturbation. We found that the peptides differ in their conformational responses to the change in solution conditions; while

  6. Antifreeze and cryoprotective activities of ice-binding collagen peptides from pig skin.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Zhao, Ying; Zhu, Yu Bing; Xu, Fei; Yu, Jing Song; Yuan, Min

    2016-03-01

    A novel "hyperactive" ice-binding peptide from porcine collagen was prepared by alkaline protease hydrolysis and a series of column chromatography separations, and then its antifreeze and cryoprotective properties were reported. Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the thermal hysteresis (TH) of ice-binding collagen peptides was closely related to their concentration and crystal fraction. Collagen hydrolysates with maximal TH were obtained by hydrolysis at pH 8.0, DH 15.0%, and 5% alkaline protease at 55°C. After purification by column chromatography, the AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide (GLLGPLGPRGLL) with 1162.8Da molecular weights exhibited the highest TH (5.28°C), which can be classified as "hyperactive". Recrystallisation and melt-resistance of ice cream were improved by AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide at 0.2% (w/v) in a similar manner to natural antifreeze proteins. Moreover, the addition of AP-3 collagen peptides in ice cream greatly elevated the glass transition temperature (Tg) to -17.64°C.

  7. Antifreeze and cryoprotective activities of ice-binding collagen peptides from pig skin.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Zhao, Ying; Zhu, Yu Bing; Xu, Fei; Yu, Jing Song; Yuan, Min

    2016-03-01

    A novel "hyperactive" ice-binding peptide from porcine collagen was prepared by alkaline protease hydrolysis and a series of column chromatography separations, and then its antifreeze and cryoprotective properties were reported. Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the thermal hysteresis (TH) of ice-binding collagen peptides was closely related to their concentration and crystal fraction. Collagen hydrolysates with maximal TH were obtained by hydrolysis at pH 8.0, DH 15.0%, and 5% alkaline protease at 55°C. After purification by column chromatography, the AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide (GLLGPLGPRGLL) with 1162.8Da molecular weights exhibited the highest TH (5.28°C), which can be classified as "hyperactive". Recrystallisation and melt-resistance of ice cream were improved by AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide at 0.2% (w/v) in a similar manner to natural antifreeze proteins. Moreover, the addition of AP-3 collagen peptides in ice cream greatly elevated the glass transition temperature (Tg) to -17.64°C. PMID:26471678

  8. NMR structure of a biologically active peptide containing the RNA-binding domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat.

    PubMed Central

    Mujeeb, A; Bishop, K; Peterlin, B M; Turck, C; Parslow, T G; James, T L

    1994-01-01

    The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 enhances transcription by binding to a specific RNA element on nascent viral transcripts. Binding is mediated by a 10-amino acid basic domain that is rich in arginines and lysines. Here we report the three-dimensional peptide backbone structure of a biologically active 25-mer peptide that contains the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat basic domain linked to the core regulatory domain of another lentiviral Tat--i.e., that from equine infectious anemia virus. Circular dichroism and two-dimensional proton NMR studies of this hybrid peptide indicate that the Tat basic domain forms a stable alpha-helix, whereas the adjacent regulatory sequence is mostly in extended form. These findings suggest that the tendency to form stable alpha-helices may be a common property of arginine- and lysine-rich RNA-binding domains. Images PMID:8058789

  9. Purification and sequencing of the active site tryptic peptide from penicillin-binding protein 1b of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, R.A.; Suzuki, H.; Hirota, Y.; Strominger, J.L.

    1985-07-02

    This paper reports the sequence of the active site peptide of penicillin-binding protein 1b from Escherichia coli. Purified penicillin-binding protein 1b was labeled with (/sup 14/C)penicillin G, digested with trypsin, and partially purified by gel filtration. Upon further purification by high-pressure liquid chromatography, two radioactive peaks were observed, and the major peak, representing over 75% of the applied radioactivity, was submitted to amino acid analysis and sequencing. The sequence Ser-Ile-Gly-Ser-Leu-Ala-Lys was obtained. The active site nucleophile was identified by digesting the purified peptide with aminopeptidase M and separating the radioactive products on high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid analysis confirmed that the serine residue in the middle of the sequence was covalently bonded to the (/sup 14/C)penicilloyl moiety. A comparison of this sequence to active site sequences of other penicillin-binding proteins and beta-lactamases is presented.

  10. Intracellular protein delivery activity of peptides derived from insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 3 and 5

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Inomata, Kosuke; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have various IGF-independent cellular activities, including receptor-independent cellular uptake followed by transcriptional regulation, although mechanisms of cellular entry remain unclear. Herein, we focused on their receptor-independent cellular entry mechanism in terms of protein transduction domain (PTD) activity, which is an emerging technique useful for clinical applications. The peptides of 18 amino acid residues derived from IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, which involve heparin-binding regions, mediated cellular delivery of an exogenous protein into NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Relative protein delivery activities of IGFBP-3/5-derived peptides were approximately 20-150% compared to that of the HIV-Tat peptide, a potent PTD. Heparin inhibited the uptake of the fusion proteins with IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, indicating that the delivery pathway is heparin-dependent endocytosis, similar to that of HIV-Tat. The delivery of GST fused to HIV-Tat was competed by either IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5-derived synthetic peptides. Therefore, the entry pathways of the three PTDs are shared. Our data has shown a new approach for designing protein delivery systems using IGFBP-3/5 derived peptides based on the molecular mechanisms of IGF-independent activities of IGFBPs.

  11. Discovery and Characterization of a Potent Interleukin-6 Binding Peptide with Neutralizing Activity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ranganath, Sheila; Bhandari, Ashok; Avitahl-Curtis, Nicole; McMahon, Jaimee; Wachtel, Derek; Zhang, Jenny; Leitheiser, Christopher; Bernier, Sylvie G.; Liu, Guang; Tran, Tran T.; Celino, Herodion; Tobin, Jenny; Jung, Joon; Zhao, Hong; Glen, Katie E.; Graul, Chris; Griffin, Aliesha; Schairer, Wayne C.; Higgins, Carolyn; Reza, Tammi L.; Mowe, Eva; Rivers, Sam; Scott, Sonya; Monreal, Alex; Shea, Courtney; Bourne, Greg; Coons, Casey; Smith, Adaline; Tang, Kim; Mandyam, Ramya A.; Masferrer, Jaime; Liu, David; Patel, Dinesh V.; Fretzen, Angelika; Murphy, Craig A.; Milne, G. Todd; Smythe, Mark L.; Carlson, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important member of the cytokine superfamily, exerting pleiotropic actions on many physiological processes. Over-production of IL-6 is a hallmark of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases such as Castleman’s Disease (CD) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Antagonism of the interleukin IL-6/IL-6 receptor (IL-6R)/gp130 signaling complex continues to show promise as a therapeutic target. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against components of this complex have been approved as therapeutics for both CD and RA. To potentially provide an additional modality to antagonize IL-6 induced pathophysiology, a peptide-based antagonist approach was undertaken. Using a combination of molecular design, phage-display, and medicinal chemistry, disulfide-rich peptides (DRPs) directed against IL-6 were developed with low nanomolar potency in inhibiting IL-6-induced pSTAT3 in U937 monocytic cells. Targeted PEGylation of IL-6 binding peptides resulted in molecules that retained their potency against IL-6 and had a prolongation of their pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles in rodents and monkeys. One such peptide, PN-2921, contained a 40 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety and inhibited IL-6-induced pSTAT3 in U937 cells with sub-nM potency and possessed 23, 36, and 59 h PK half-life values in mice, rats, and cynomolgus monkeys, respectively. Parenteral administration of PN-2921 to mice and cynomolgus monkeys potently inhibited IL-6-induced biomarker responses, with significant reductions in the acute inflammatory phase proteins, serum amyloid A (SAA) and C-reactive protein (CRP). This potent, PEGylated IL-6 binding peptide offers a new approach to antagonize IL-6-induced signaling and associated pathophysiology. PMID:26555695

  12. Discovery and Characterization of a Potent Interleukin-6 Binding Peptide with Neutralizing Activity In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, Sheila; Bhandari, Ashok; Avitahl-Curtis, Nicole; McMahon, Jaimee; Wachtel, Derek; Zhang, Jenny; Leitheiser, Christopher; Bernier, Sylvie G; Liu, Guang; Tran, Tran T; Celino, Herodion; Tobin, Jenny; Jung, Joon; Zhao, Hong; Glen, Katie E; Graul, Chris; Griffin, Aliesha; Schairer, Wayne C; Higgins, Carolyn; Reza, Tammi L; Mowe, Eva; Rivers, Sam; Scott, Sonya; Monreal, Alex; Shea, Courtney; Bourne, Greg; Coons, Casey; Smith, Adaline; Tang, Kim; Mandyam, Ramya A; Masferrer, Jaime; Liu, David; Patel, Dinesh V; Fretzen, Angelika; Murphy, Craig A; Milne, G Todd; Smythe, Mark L; Carlson, Kenneth E

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important member of the cytokine superfamily, exerting pleiotropic actions on many physiological processes. Over-production of IL-6 is a hallmark of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases such as Castleman's Disease (CD) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Antagonism of the interleukin IL-6/IL-6 receptor (IL-6R)/gp130 signaling complex continues to show promise as a therapeutic target. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against components of this complex have been approved as therapeutics for both CD and RA. To potentially provide an additional modality to antagonize IL-6 induced pathophysiology, a peptide-based antagonist approach was undertaken. Using a combination of molecular design, phage-display, and medicinal chemistry, disulfide-rich peptides (DRPs) directed against IL-6 were developed with low nanomolar potency in inhibiting IL-6-induced pSTAT3 in U937 monocytic cells. Targeted PEGylation of IL-6 binding peptides resulted in molecules that retained their potency against IL-6 and had a prolongation of their pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles in rodents and monkeys. One such peptide, PN-2921, contained a 40 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety and inhibited IL-6-induced pSTAT3 in U937 cells with sub-nM potency and possessed 23, 36, and 59 h PK half-life values in mice, rats, and cynomolgus monkeys, respectively. Parenteral administration of PN-2921 to mice and cynomolgus monkeys potently inhibited IL-6-induced biomarker responses, with significant reductions in the acute inflammatory phase proteins, serum amyloid A (SAA) and C-reactive protein (CRP). This potent, PEGylated IL-6 binding peptide offers a new approach to antagonize IL-6-induced signaling and associated pathophysiology. PMID:26555695

  13. A novel peptide can mimic extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein to block the activation of complement system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ya-ping; Dong, Jie; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Yu; Lu, Qiang; Feng, Jian-nan; Tan, Xiao-rong; Yang, Guang

    2013-07-01

    Extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bi-functional protein, which can specifically bind fibrinogen with its N terminus and inhibit deposition of C3b on the surface of S. aureus with its C terminus. Here, we screened the epitopes of Efb using phage display. Four peptides with consensus motif were screened. This consensus motif was identical to C terminus (161-164) of Efb. In the further investigation, it was found the synthesized peptide EC1 (154-165aa of Efb) could specifically bind C3/C3b and subsequently to block the activation of complement. Meanwhile, EC1 could inhibit the interaction between Efb and C3/C3b. Moreover, the interaction between the mutant protein of EmC1 (Efb without EC1) and C3 was decreased. And, the effect on the complement system of the mutant protein was dramatically declined compared with Efb. Our finding suggested that the peptide EC1 could mimic Efb to block complement system activation via binding C3.

  14. Cys-Gly specific dipeptidase Dug1p from S. cerevisiae binds promiscuously to di-, tri-, and tetra-peptides: Peptide-protein interaction, homology modeling, and activity studies reveal a latent promiscuity in substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Hardeep; Datt, Manish; Ekka, Mary Krishna; Mittal, Monica; Singh, Appu Kumar; Kumaran, Sangaralingam

    2011-02-01

    Dug1p is a recently identified novel dipeptidase and plays an important role in glutathione (GSH) degradation. To understand the mechanism of its substrate recognition and specificity towards Cys-Gly dipeptides, we characterized the solution properties of Dug1p and studied the thermodynamics of Dug1p-peptide interactions. In addition, we used homology modeling and ligand docking approaches to get structural insights into Dug1p-peptide interaction. Dug1p exists as dimer and the stoichiometry of peptide-Dug1p complex is 2:1 indicating each monomer in the dimer binds to one peptide. Thermodynamic studies indicate that the free energy change for Dug1p-peptide complex formation is similar (▵G(bind) ∼ -7.0 kcal/mol) for a variety of peptides of different composition and length (22 peptides). Three-dimensional model of Dug1p is constructed and docking of peptides to the modeled structure suggests that hydrogen bonding to active site residues (E172, E171, and D137) lock the N-terminal of the peptide into the binding site. Dug1p recognizes peptides in a metal independent manner and peptide binding is not sensitive to salts (dlogK/dlog[salt] ∼ 0) over a range of [NaCl] (0.02-0.5 M), [ZnCl(2)], and [MnCl(2)] (0-0.5 mM). Our results indicate that promiscuity in peptide binding results from the locking of peptide N-terminus into the active site. These observations were supported by our competitive inhibition activity assays. Dug1p activity towards Cys-Gly peptide is significantly reduced (∼ 70%) in the presence of Glu-Cys-Gly. Therefore, Dug1p can recognize a variety of oligopeptides, but has evolved with post-binding screening potential to hydrolyze Cys-Gly peptides selectively.

  15. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  16. Minimal Determinants for Binding Activated G alpha from the Structure of a G alpha i1-Peptide Dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston,C.; Lobanova, E.; Shavkunov, A.; Low, J.; Ramer, J.; Blasesius, R.; Fredericks, Z.; willard, F.; Kuhlman, B.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    G-Proteins cycle between an inactive GDP-bound state and an active GTP-bound state, serving as molecular switches that coordinate cellular signaling. We recently used phage display to identify a series of peptides that bind G{alpha}subunits in a nucleotide-dependent manner [Johnston, C. A., Willard, F. S., Jezyk, M. R., Fredericks, Z., Bodor, E. T., Jones, M. B., Blaesius, R., Watts, V. J., Harden, T. K., Sondek, J., Ramer, J. K., and Siderovski, D. P. (2005) Structure 13, 1069-1080]. Here we describe the structural features and functions of KB-1753, a peptide that binds selectively to GDP{center_dot}AlF{sub 4{sup -}}- and GTP{gamma}S-bound states of G{alpha}{sup i} subunits. KB-1753 blocks interaction of G{alpha}{sub transducin} with its effector, cGMP phosphodiesterase, and inhibits transducin-mediated activation of cGMP degradation. Additionally, KB-1753 interferes with RGS protein binding and resultant GAP activity. A fluorescent KB-1753 variant was found to act as a sensor for activated G{alpha} in vitro. The crystal structure of KB-1753 bound to G{alpha}{sub i1}-GDP{center_dot}AlF{sub 4{sup -}} reveals binding to a conserved hydrophobic groove between switch II and 3 helices and, along with supporting biochemical data and previous structural analyses, supports the notion that this is the site of effector interactions for G{alpha}i subunits.

  17. Short Self-Assembling Peptides Are Able to Bind to Copper and Activate Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Makhlynets, Olga V; Gosavi, Pallavi M; Korendovych, Ivan V

    2016-07-25

    We have shown that de novo designed peptides self-assemble in the presence of copper to create supramolecular assemblies capable of carrying out the oxidation of dimethoxyphenol in the presence of dioxygen. Formation of the supramolecular assembly, which is akin to a protein fold, is critical for productive catalysis since peptides possessing the same functional groups but lacking the ability to self-assemble do not catalyze substrate oxidation. The ease with which we have discovered robust and productive oxygen activation catalysts suggests that these prion-like assemblies might have served as intermediates in the evolution of enzymatic function and opens the path for the development of new catalyst nanomaterials. PMID:27276534

  18. Peptide Binding for Bio-Based Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bedford, N M; Munro, C J; Knecht, M R

    2016-01-01

    Peptide-based strategies represent transformative approaches to fabricate functional inorganic materials under sustainable conditions by modeling the methods exploited in biology. In general, peptides with inorganic affinity and specificity have been isolated from organisms and through biocombinatorial selection techniques (ie, phage and cell surface display). These peptides recognize and bind the inorganic surface through a series of noncovalent interactions, driven by both enthalpic and entropic contributions, wherein the biomolecules wrap the metallic nanoparticle structure. Through these interactions, modification of the inorganic surface can be accessed to drive the incorporation of significantly disordered surface metal atoms, which have been found to be highly catalytically active for a variety of chemical transformations. We have employed synthetic, site-directed mutagenesis studies to reveal localized binding effects of the peptide at the metallic nanoparticle structure to begin to identify the biological basis of control over biomimetic nanoparticle catalytic activity. The protocols described herein were used to fabricate and characterize peptide-capped nanoparticles in atomic resolution to identify peptide sequence effects on the surface structure of the materials, which can then be directly correlated to the catalytic activity to identify structure/function relationships. PMID:27586350

  19. FRET analysis using sperm-activating peptides tagged with fluorescent proteins reveals that ligand-binding sites exist as clusters.

    PubMed

    Arcos-Hernández, César; Romero, Francisco; Sánchez-Guevara, Yoloxochitl; Beltrán, Carmen; Nishigaki, Takuya

    2016-02-01

    Long-range cellular communication between the sperm and egg is critical for external fertilization. Sperm-activating peptides (SAPs) are diffusible components of the outer layer of eggs in echinoderms, and function as chemoattractants for spermatozoa. The decapeptide named speract is the best-characterized sea urchin SAP. Biochemical and physiological actions of speract have been studied with purified or chemically synthesized peptides. In this work, we prepared recombinant speract fused to a fluorescent protein (FP; FP-speract) using three color variants: a cyan (eCFP), a yellow (mVenus) and a large Stokes shift yellow (mAmetrine) FP. Although these fluorescence tags are 20 times larger than speract, competitive binding experiments using mAmetrine-speract revealed that this FP-speract has binding affinity to the receptor that is comparable (7.6-fold less) to that of non-labeled speract. Indeed, 10 nmol l(-1) eCFP-speract induces physiological sperm responses such as membrane potential changes and increases in intracellular pH and Ca(2+) concentrations similar to those triggered by 10 nmol l(-1) speract. Furthermore, FP-speract maintains its fluorescence upon binding to its receptor. Using this property, we performed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements with eCFP-speract and mVenus-speract as probes and obtained a positive FRET signal upon binding to the receptor, which suggests that the speract receptor exists as an oligomer, at least as a dimer, or alternatively that a single speract receptor protein possesses multiple binding sites. This property could partially account for the positive and/or negative cooperative binding of speract to the receptor.

  20. Interrelationships among biological activity, disulfide bonds, secondary structure, and metal ion binding for a chemically synthesized 34-amino-acid peptide derived from alpha-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    MacColl, R; Eisele, L E; Stack, R F; Hauer, C; Vakharia, D D; Benno, A; Kelly, W C; Mizejewski, G J

    2001-10-01

    A 34-amino-acid peptide has been chemically synthesized based on a sequence from human alpha-fetoprotein. The purified peptide is active in anti-growth assays when freshly prepared in pH 7.4 buffer at 0.20 g/l, but this peptide slowly becomes inactive. This functional change is proven by mass spectrometry to be triggered by the formation of an intrapeptide disulfide bond between the two cysteine residues on the peptide. Interpeptide cross-linking does not occur. The active and inactive forms of the peptide have almost identical secondary structures as shown by circular dichroism (CD). Zinc ions bind to the active peptide and completely prevents formation of the inactive form. Cobalt(II) ions also bind to the peptide, and the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the cobalt-peptide complex shows that: (1) a near-UV sulfur-to-metal-ion charge-transfer band had a molar extinction coefficient consistent with two thiolate bonds to Co(II); (2) the lowest-energy visible d-d transition maximum at 659 nm, also, demonstrated that the two cysteine residues are ligands for the metal ion; (3) the d-d molar extinction coefficient showed that the metal ion-ligand complex was in a distorted tetrahedral symmetry. The peptide has two cysteines, and it is speculated that the other two metal ion ligands might be the two histidines. The Zn(II)- and Co(II)-peptide complexes had similar peptide conformations as indicated by their ultraviolet CD spectra, which differed very slightly from that of the free peptide. Surprisingly, the cobalt ions acted in the reverse of the zinc ions in that, instead of stabilizing anti-growth form of the peptide, they catalyzed its loss. Metal ion control of peptide function is a saliently interesting concept. Calcium ions, in the conditions studied, apparently do not bind to the peptide. Trifluoroethanol and temperature (60 degrees C) affected the secondary structure of the peptide, and the peptide was found capable of assuming various conformations in solution

  1. Inhibition of /sup 125/I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cells by the peptides related to bacterial cell wall mucopeptide precursors: quantitative structure-activity relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.H.; Martin, Y.; Otis, E.; Mao, J.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) of N-Ac amino acids, N-Ac dipeptides, and N-Ac tripeptides in inhibition of /sup 125/I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cell wall have been developed to probe the details of the binding between ristocetin and N-acetylated peptides. The correlation equations indicate that (1) the binding is stronger for peptides in which the side chain of the C-terminal amino acid has a large molar refractivity (MR) value, (2) the binding is weaker for peptides with polar than for those with nonpolar C-terminal side chains, (3) the N-terminal amino acid in N-Ac dipeptides contributes 12 times that of the C-terminal amino acid to binding affinity, and (4) the interactions between ristocetin and the N-terminal amino acid of N-acetyl tripeptides appear to be much weaker than those with the first two amino acids.

  2. Binding studies of antimicrobial peptides to Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Concetta; D'Andrea, Luca D; Saviano, Michele; Olivieri, Michele; Cimmino, Amelia; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is pivotal to the design of new and more active peptides. In the last few years it has become clear that the behavior of antimicrobial peptides on membrane model systems does not always translate to cells; therefore the need to develop methods aimed at capturing details of the interactions of peptides with bacterial cells is compelling. In this work we analyzed binding of two peptides, namely temporin B and TB_KKG6A, to Escherichia coli cells and to Escherichia coli LPS. Temporin B is a natural peptide active against Gram positive bacteria but inactive against Gram negative bacteria, TB_KKG6A is an analogue of temporin B showing activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. We found that binding to cells occurs only for the active peptide TB_KKG6A; stoichiometry and affinity constant of this peptide toward Escherichia coli cells were determined.

  3. Binding studies of antimicrobial peptides to Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Concetta; D'Andrea, Luca D; Saviano, Michele; Olivieri, Michele; Cimmino, Amelia; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is pivotal to the design of new and more active peptides. In the last few years it has become clear that the behavior of antimicrobial peptides on membrane model systems does not always translate to cells; therefore the need to develop methods aimed at capturing details of the interactions of peptides with bacterial cells is compelling. In this work we analyzed binding of two peptides, namely temporin B and TB_KKG6A, to Escherichia coli cells and to Escherichia coli LPS. Temporin B is a natural peptide active against Gram positive bacteria but inactive against Gram negative bacteria, TB_KKG6A is an analogue of temporin B showing activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. We found that binding to cells occurs only for the active peptide TB_KKG6A; stoichiometry and affinity constant of this peptide toward Escherichia coli cells were determined. PMID:27450805

  4. Binding stability of peptides derived from 1ALA residue and 7GLY residues to sites near active center of fluctuating papain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the binding stability of peptides derived from 1ALA residue and 7GLY residues to sites near active center of fluctuating papain via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Replacing GLY residue in 8GLY with ALA residue had a positive effect on binding stability to the sites in some cases although the replacing had a negative effect on it in other cases. Furthermore the replacing had a negative effect on the chance of binding to the sites. Residue in peptide should be replaced on the basis of systematic exploration of its position.

  5. Activity of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein-bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein fusion peptide in an experimental model of Pseudomonas sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Opal, S M; Palardy, J E; Jhung, J W; Donsky, C; Romulo, R L; Parejo, N; Marra, M N

    1995-01-01

    A chimeric protein consisting of the N-terminal domain of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and the C-terminal domain of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein demonstrated a dose-dependent survival benefit (P = 0.001) and reduced endotoxin levels (P < 0.01) in neutropenic rats with Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis. This lipopolysaccharide-binding protein-bactericidal/ permeability-increasing peptide has favorable pharmacokinetics and antiendotoxin properties which may be of value for human sepsis. PMID:8593028

  6. Structural Studies of a Lipid-Binding Peptide from Tunicate Hemocytes with Anti-Biofilm Activity

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Osmar N.; Alves, Eliane S. F.; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Ribeiro, Suzana M.; Mandal, Santi M.; Gaspar, Diana; Veiga, Ana S.; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Andrade, Cesar A. S.; Nascimento, Jessica M.; Fensterseifer, Isabel C. M.; Porto, William F.; Correa, Jose R.; Hancock, Robert. E. W.; Korpole, Suresh; Oliveira, Aline L.; Liao, Luciano M.; Franco, Octavio L.

    2016-01-01

    Clavanins is a class of peptides (23aa) histidine-rich, free of post-translational modifications. Clavanins have been studied largely for their ability to disrupt bacterial membranes. In the present study, the interaction of clavanin A with membranes was assessed by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential and permeabilization assays. We observed through those assays that clavanin A lysis bacterial cells at concentrations corresponding to its MIC. Further, the structure and function of clavanin A was investigated. To better understand how clavanin interacted with bacteria, its NMR structure was elucidated. The solution state NMR structure of clavanin A in the presence of TFE-d3 indicated an α-helical conformation. Secondary structures, based on circular dichroism measurements in anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and TFE (2,2,2-trifluorethanol), in silico lipid-peptide docking and molecular simulations with lipids DPPC and DOPC revealed that clavanin A can adopt a variety of folds, possibly influencing its different functions. Microcalorimetry assays revealed that clavanin A was capable of discriminating between different lipids. Finally, clavanin A was found to eradicate bacterial biofilms representing a previously unrecognized function. PMID:27292548

  7. Structural Studies of a Lipid-Binding Peptide from Tunicate Hemocytes with Anti-Biofilm Activity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Osmar N; Alves, Eliane S F; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Ribeiro, Suzana M; Mandal, Santi M; Gaspar, Diana; Veiga, Ana S; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Andrade, Cesar A S; Nascimento, Jessica M; Fensterseifer, Isabel C M; Porto, William F; Correa, Jose R; Hancock, Robert E W; Korpole, Suresh; Oliveira, Aline L; Liao, Luciano M; Franco, Octavio L

    2016-01-01

    Clavanins is a class of peptides (23aa) histidine-rich, free of post-translational modifications. Clavanins have been studied largely for their ability to disrupt bacterial membranes. In the present study, the interaction of clavanin A with membranes was assessed by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential and permeabilization assays. We observed through those assays that clavanin A lysis bacterial cells at concentrations corresponding to its MIC. Further, the structure and function of clavanin A was investigated. To better understand how clavanin interacted with bacteria, its NMR structure was elucidated. The solution state NMR structure of clavanin A in the presence of TFE-d3 indicated an α-helical conformation. Secondary structures, based on circular dichroism measurements in anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and TFE (2,2,2-trifluorethanol), in silico lipid-peptide docking and molecular simulations with lipids DPPC and DOPC revealed that clavanin A can adopt a variety of folds, possibly influencing its different functions. Microcalorimetry assays revealed that clavanin A was capable of discriminating between different lipids. Finally, clavanin A was found to eradicate bacterial biofilms representing a previously unrecognized function. PMID:27292548

  8. Sequence-Specific DNA Binding by a Short Peptide Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanian, Robert V.; McKnight, C. James; Kim, Peter S.

    1990-08-01

    A recently described class of DNA binding proteins is characterized by the "bZIP" motif, which consists of a basic region that contacts DNA and an adjacent "leucine zipper" that mediates protein dimerization. A peptide model for the basic region of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 has been developed in which the leucine zipper has been replaced by a disulfide bond. The 34-residue peptide dimer, but not the reduced monomer, binds DNA with nanomolar affinity at 4^circC. DNA binding is sequence-specific as judged by deoxyribonuclease I footprinting. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests that the peptide adopts a helical structure when bound to DNA. These results demonstrate directly that the GCN4 basic region is sufficient for sequence-specific DNA binding and suggest that a major function of the GCN4 leucine zipper is simply to mediate protein dimerization. Our approach provides a strategy for the design of short sequence-specific DNA binding peptides.

  9. Identification of peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin by biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library.

    PubMed

    Padmanaban, Guruprasath; Park, Hyekyung; Choi, Ji Suk; Cho, Yong-Woo; Kang, Woong Chol; Moon, Chan-Il; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2014-10-10

    Biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library was performed against myoglobin, a marker for the early assessment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), to identify peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin. Using myoglobin-conjugated magnetic beads, phages that bound to myoglobin were collected and amplified for the next round of screening. A 148-fold enrichment of phage titer was observed after five rounds of screening relative to the first round. After phage binding ELISA, three phage clones were selected (3R1, 3R7 and 3R10) and the inserted peptides were chemically synthesized. The analysis of binding affinity showed that the 3R7 (CPSTLGASC) peptide had higher binding affinity (Kd=57 nM) than did the 3R1 (CNLSSSWIC) and 3R10 (CVPRLSAPC) peptide (Kd=125 nM and 293 nM, respectively). Cross binding activity to other proteins, such as bovine serum albumin, troponin I, and creatine kinase-MB, was minimal. In a peptide-antibody sandwich ELISA, the selected peptides efficiently captured myoglobin. Moreover, the concentrations of myoglobin in serum samples measured by a peptide-peptide sandwich assay were comparable to those measured by a commercial antibody-based kit. These results indicate that the identified peptides can be used for the detection of myoglobin and may be a cost effective alternative to antibodies.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of peptides derived from olive flounder lipopolysaccharide binding protein/bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (LBP/BPI).

    PubMed

    Nam, Bo-Hye; Moon, Ji-Young; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kong, Hee Jeong; Kim, Woo-Jin; Jee, Young Ju; An, Cheul Min; Park, Nam Gyu; Seo, Jung-Kil

    2014-10-17

    We describe the antimicrobial function of peptides derived from the C-terminus of the olive flounder LBP BPI precursor protein. The investigated peptides, namely, ofLBP1N, ofLBP2A, ofLBP4N, ofLBP5A, and ofLBP6A, formed α-helical structures, showing significant antimicrobial activity against several Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and the yeast Candida albicans, but very limited hemolytic activities. The biological activities of these five analogs were evaluated against biomembranes or artificial membranes for the development of candidate therapeutic agents. Gel retardation studies revealed that peptides bound to DNA and inhibited migration on an agarose gel. In addition, we demonstrated that ofLBP6A inhibited polymerase chain reaction. These results suggested that the ofLBP-derived peptide bactericidal mechanism may be related to the interaction with intracellular components such as DNA or polymerase.

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of Peptides Derived from Olive Flounder Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein/Bactericidal Permeability-Increasing Protein (LBP/BPI)

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Bo-Hye; Moon, Ji-Young; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kong, Hee Jeong; Kim, Woo-Jin; Jee, Young Ju; An, Cheul Min; Park, Nam Gyu; Seo, Jung-Kil

    2014-01-01

    We describe the antimicrobial function of peptides derived from the C-terminus of the olive flounder LBP BPI precursor protein. The investigated peptides, namely, ofLBP1N, ofLBP2A, ofLBP4N, ofLBP5A, and ofLBP6A, formed α-helical structures, showing significant antimicrobial activity against several Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and the yeast Candida albicans, but very limited hemolytic activities. The biological activities of these five analogs were evaluated against biomembranes or artificial membranes for the development of candidate therapeutic agents. Gel retardation studies revealed that peptides bound to DNA and inhibited migration on an agarose gel. In addition, we demonstrated that ofLBP6A inhibited polymerase chain reaction. These results suggested that the ofLBP-derived peptide bactericidal mechanism may be related to the interaction with intracellular components such as DNA or polymerase. PMID:25329706

  12. Physicochemical explanation of peptide binding to HLA-A*0201 major histocompatibility complex: a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship study.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2002-08-15

    A three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship method for the prediction of peptide binding affinities to the MHC class I molecule HLA-A*0201 was developed by applying the CoMSIA technique on a set of 266 peptides. To increase the self consistency of the initial CoMSIA model, the poorly predicted peptides were excluded from the training set in a stepwise manner and then included in the study as a test set. The final model, based on 236 peptides and considering the steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, hydrogen bond donor, and hydrogen bond acceptor fields, had q2 = 0.683 and r2 = 0.891. The stability of this model was proven by cross-validations in two and five groups and by a bootstrap analysis of the non-cross-validated model. The residuals between the experimental pIC50 (-logIC50) values and those calculated by "leave-one-out" cross-validation were analyzed. According to the best model, 63.2% of the peptides were predicted with /residuals/ < or = 0.5 log unit; 29.3% with 1.0 < or = /residuals/ < 0.5; and 7.5% with /residuals/ > 1.0 log unit. The mean /residual/ value was 0.489. The coefficient contour maps identify the physicochemical property requirements at each position in the peptide molecule and suggest amino acid sequences for high-affinity binding to the HLA-A*0201 molecule. PMID:12112675

  13. Rational modification of a dendrimeric peptide with antimicrobial activity: consequences on membrane-binding and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Batoni, Giovanna; Casu, Mariano; Giuliani, Andrea; Luca, Vincenzo; Maisetta, Giuseppantonio; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Manzo, Giorgia; Pintus, Manuela; Pirri, Giovanna; Rinaldi, Andrea C; Scorciapino, Mariano A; Serra, Ilaria; Ulrich, Anne S; Wadhwani, Parvesh

    2016-03-01

    Peptide-based antibiotics might help containing the rising tide of antimicrobial resistance. We developed SB056, a semi-synthetic peptide with a dimeric dendrimer scaffold, active against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Being the mechanism of SB056 attributed to disruption of bacterial membranes, we enhanced the amphiphilic profile of the original, empirically derived sequence [WKKIRVRLSA-NH2] by interchanging the first two residues [KWKIRVRLSA-NH2], and explored the effects of this modification on the interaction of peptide, both in linear and dimeric forms, with model membranes and on antimicrobial activity. Results obtained against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus planktonic strains, with or without salts at physiological concentrations, confirmed the added value of dendrimeric structure over the linear one, especially at physiological ionic strength, and the impact of the higher amphipathicity obtained through sequence modification on enhancing peptide performances. SB056 peptides also displayed intriguing antibiofilm properties. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most susceptible strain in sessile form, notably to optimized linear analog lin-SB056-1 and the wild-type dendrimer den-SB056. Membrane affinity of all peptides increased with the percentage of negatively charged lipids and was less influenced by the presence of salt in the case of dendrimeric peptides. The analog lin-SB056-1 displayed the highest overall affinity, even for zwitterionic PC bilayers. Thus, in addition to electrostatics, distribution of charged/polar and hydrophobic residues along the sequence might have a significant role in driving peptide-lipid interaction. Supporting this view, dendrimeric analog den-SB056-1 retained greater membrane affinity in the presence of salt than den-SB056, despite the fact that they bear exactly the same net positive charge. PMID:26614437

  14. Selective immunosuppression by administration of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-binding peptides. I. Evidence for in vivo MHC blockade preventing T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Draining lymph node cells (LNC) from mice immunized with hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) display at their surface antigen-MHC complexes able to stimulate, in the absence of any further antigen addition, HEL peptide- specific, class II-restricted T cell hybridomas. Chloroquine addition to these LNC cultures fails to inhibit antigen presentation, indicating that antigenic complexes of class II molecules and HEL peptides are formed in vivo. MHC class II restriction of antigen presentation by LNC from HEL-primed mice was verified by the use of anti-class II monoclonal antibodies. Coinjection of HEL and the I-Ak-binding peptide HEL 112-129 in mice of H-2k haplotype inhibits the ability of LNC to stimulate I-Ak-restricted, HEL 46-61-specific T cell hybridomas. Similar results are obtained in mice coinjected with the HEL peptides 46-61 and 112-129. Inhibition of T hybridoma activation can also be observed using as antigen-presenting cells irradiated, T cell-depleted LNC from mice coinjected with HEL 46-61 and HEL 112-129, ruling out the possible role of either specific or nonspecific suppressor T cells. Inhibition of T cell proliferation is associated with MHC-specific inhibition of antigen presentation and with occupancy by the competitor of class II binding sites, as measured by activation of peptide- specific T cell hybridomas. These results demonstrate that administration of MHC class II binding peptide competitors selectively inhibits antigen presentation to class II-restricted T cells, indicating competitive blockade of class II molecules in vivo. PMID:1569402

  15. Enhanced In Vivo Tumor Detection by Active Tumor Cell Targeting Using Multiple Tumor Receptor-Binding Peptides Presented on Genetically Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Koo Chul; Ko, Ho Kyung; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-08-01

    Human ferritin heavy-chain nanoparticle (hFTH) is genetically engineered to present tumor receptor-binding peptides (affibody and/or RGD-derived cyclic peptides, named 4CRGD here) on its surface. The affibody and 4CRGD specifically and strongly binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor I (EGFR) and human integrin αvβ3, respectively, which are overexpressed on various tumor cells. Through in vitro culture of EGFR-overexpressing adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-468) and integrin-overexpressing glioblastoma cells (U87MG), it is clarified that specific interactions between receptors on tumor cells and receptor-binding peptides on engineered hFTH is critical in active tumor cell targeting. After labeling with the near-infrared fluorescence dye (Cy5.5) and intravenouse injection into MDA-MB-468 or U87MG tumor-bearing mice, the recombinant hFTHs presenting either peptide or both of affibody and 4CRGD are successfully delivered to and retained in the tumor for a prolonged period of time. In particular, the recombinant hFTH presenting both affibody and 4CRGD notably enhances in vivo detection of U87MG tumors that express heterogeneous receptors, integrin and EGFR, compared to the other recombinant hFTHs presenting either affibody or 4CRGD only. Like affibody and 4CRGD used in this study, other multiple tumor receptor-binding peptides can be also genetically introduced to the hFTH surface for actively targeting of in vivo tumors with heterogenous receptors. PMID:27356892

  16. Exploring the activity space of peptides binding to diverse SH3 domains using principal property descriptors derived from amino acid rotamers.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Wu, Wei; Yang, Kang; Jing, Tao; Liao, Ke-Long; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Hai-Dong; Hua, Xing

    2011-01-01

    Although there were intensive works addressed on multivariate extraction of the informative components from numerous physicochemical parameters of amino acids in isolated state, the various conformational behaviors of amino acids in complicated biological context have long been underappreciated in the field of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR). In this work, the amino acid rotamers, which were derived from statistical survey of protein crystal structures, were used to reproduce the conformational variety of amino acid side-chains in real condition. In this procedure, these rotamers were superposed into a nx x ny x nz lattice and an artificial probe was employed to detect four kinds of nonbonding field potentials (i.e., electrostatic, steric, hydrophobic, and hydrogen bonds) at each lattice point using a Gaussian-type potential function; the generated massive data were then subjected to a principal component analysis (PCA) treatment to obtain a set of few, informative amino acid descriptors. We used this set of descriptors, that we named principal property descriptors derived from amino acid rotamers (PDAR), to characterize over 13,000 peptides with known binding affinities to 10 types of SH3 domains. Genetic algorithm/ partial least square regression (GA/PLS) modeling and Monte Carlo cross-validation (MCCV) demonstrated that the correlation between the PDAR descriptors and the binding affinities of peptides are comparable with or even better than previously published models. Furthermore, from the PDAR-based QSAR models we concluded that the core motif of peptides, particularly the electrostatic property, hydrophobicity, and hydrogen bond at residue positions P3, P2, and/or P0, contribute significantly to the hAmph SH3 domain-peptide binding, whereas two ends of the peptides, such as P6, P4, P-4, and P5, only play a secondary role in the binding.

  17. An Altered gp100 Peptide Ligand with Decreased Binding by TCR and CD8α Dissects T Cell Cytotoxicity from Production of Cytokines and Activation of NFAT.

    PubMed

    Schaft, Niels; Coccoris, Miriam; Drexhage, Joost; Knoop, Christiaan; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Adema, Gosse J; Debets, Reno

    2013-01-01

    Altered peptide ligands (APLs) provide useful tools to study T cell activation and potentially direct immune responses to improve treatment of cancer patients. To better understand and exploit APLs, we studied the relationship between APLs and T cell function in more detail. Here, we tested a broad panel of gp100280-288 APLs with respect to T cell cytotoxicity, production of cytokines, and activation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) by human T cells gene-engineered with a gp100-HLA-A2-specific TCRαβ. We demonstrated that gp100-specific cytotoxicity, production of cytokines, and activation of NFAT were not affected by APLs with single amino acid substitutions, except for an APL with an amino acid substitution at position 3 (APL A3), which did not elicit any T cell response. A gp100 peptide with a double amino acid mutation (APL S4S6) elicited T cell cytotoxicity and production of IFNγ, and to a lesser extent TNFα, IL-4, and IL-5, but not production of IL-2 and IL-10, or activation of NFAT. Notably, T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated functions showed decreases in sensitivities for S4S6 versus gp100 wild-type (wt) peptide, which were minor for cytotoxicity but at least a 1000-fold more prominent for the production of cytokines. TCR-engineered T cells did not bind A3-HLA-A2, but did bind S4S6-HLA-A2 although to a lowered extent compared to wt peptide-HLA-A2. Moreover, S4S6-induced T cell function demonstrated an enhanced dependency on CD8α. Taken together, most gp100 APLs functioned as agonists, but A3 and S4S6 peptides acted as a null ligand and partial agonist, respectively. Our results further suggest that TCR-mediated cytotoxicity can be dissected from production of cytokines and activation of NFAT, and that the agonist potential of peptide mutants relates to the extent of binding by TCR and CD8α. These findings may facilitate the design of APLs to advance the study of T cell activation and their use for therapeutic applications. PMID:24027572

  18. An Altered gp100 Peptide Ligand with Decreased Binding by TCR and CD8α Dissects T Cell Cytotoxicity from Production of Cytokines and Activation of NFAT

    PubMed Central

    Schaft, Niels; Coccoris, Miriam; Drexhage, Joost; Knoop, Christiaan; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.; Adema, Gosse J.; Debets, Reno

    2013-01-01

    Altered peptide ligands (APLs) provide useful tools to study T cell activation and potentially direct immune responses to improve treatment of cancer patients. To better understand and exploit APLs, we studied the relationship between APLs and T cell function in more detail. Here, we tested a broad panel of gp100280–288 APLs with respect to T cell cytotoxicity, production of cytokines, and activation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) by human T cells gene-engineered with a gp100-HLA-A2-specific TCRαβ. We demonstrated that gp100-specific cytotoxicity, production of cytokines, and activation of NFAT were not affected by APLs with single amino acid substitutions, except for an APL with an amino acid substitution at position 3 (APL A3), which did not elicit any T cell response. A gp100 peptide with a double amino acid mutation (APL S4S6) elicited T cell cytotoxicity and production of IFNγ, and to a lesser extent TNFα, IL-4, and IL-5, but not production of IL-2 and IL-10, or activation of NFAT. Notably, T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated functions showed decreases in sensitivities for S4S6 versus gp100 wild-type (wt) peptide, which were minor for cytotoxicity but at least a 1000-fold more prominent for the production of cytokines. TCR-engineered T cells did not bind A3-HLA-A2, but did bind S4S6-HLA-A2 although to a lowered extent compared to wt peptide-HLA-A2. Moreover, S4S6-induced T cell function demonstrated an enhanced dependency on CD8α. Taken together, most gp100 APLs functioned as agonists, but A3 and S4S6 peptides acted as a null ligand and partial agonist, respectively. Our results further suggest that TCR-mediated cytotoxicity can be dissected from production of cytokines and activation of NFAT, and that the agonist potential of peptide mutants relates to the extent of binding by TCR and CD8α. These findings may facilitate the design of APLs to advance the study of T cell activation and their use for therapeutic applications. PMID:24027572

  19. Engineering short peptide sequences for uranyl binding.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Colette; Starck, Matthieu; Gathu, Vicky; Chenavier, Yves; Delangle, Pascale

    2014-12-01

    Peptides are interesting tools to rationalize uranyl-protein interactions, which are relevant to uranium toxicity in vivo. Structured cyclic peptide scaffolds were chosen as promising candidates to coordinate uranyl thanks to four amino acid side chains pre-oriented towards the dioxo cation equatorial plane. The binding of uranyl by a series of decapeptides has been investigated with complementary analytical and spectroscopic methods to determine the key parameters for the formation of stable uranyl-peptide complexes. The molar ellipticity of the uranyl complex at 195 nm is directly correlated to its stability, which demonstrates that the β-sheet structure is optimal for high stability in the peptide series. Cyclodecapeptides with four glutamate residues exhibit the highest affinities for uranyl with log KC =8.0-8.4 and, therefore, appear as good starting points for the design of high-affinity uranyl-chelating peptides. PMID:25324194

  20. Thermodynamics of peptide inhibitor binding to HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Cole, J L; Garsky, V M

    2001-05-15

    The gp41 subunit of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein mediates fusion of the cellular and viral membranes. The gp41 ectodomain is a trimer of alpha-helical hairpins, where N-terminal helices form a parallel three-stranded coiled-coil core and C-terminal helices pack around the core. A deep hydrophobic pocket on the N-terminal core represents an attractive target for antiviral therapeutics. We have employed a soluble derivative of the gp41 core ectodomain and small cyclic disulfide D-peptide inhibitors to define the stoichiometry, affinity, and thermodynamics of ligand binding to this pocket using isothermal titration calorimetry. These inhibitors bind with micromolar affinity to the pocket with the expected stoichiometry of three peptides per gp41 core trimer. There are no cooperative interactions among the three binding sites. Linear eight- or nine-residue D-peptides derived from the pocket-binding domain of the cyclic molecules also bind specifically. A negative heat capacity change is observed and is consistent with burial of hydrophobic surface upon binding. Contrary to expectations for a reaction dominated by the classical hydrophobic effect, peptide binding is enthalpically driven and is opposed by an unfavorable negative entropy change. The calorimetry data support models whereby dominant negative inhibitors bind to a transiently exposed surface on the prefusion intermediate state of gp41 and disrupt subsequent resolution to the fusion-active six-stranded hairpin conformation.

  1. Specific binding sites for muramyl peptides on murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, D.H.S.; Krueger, J.M.; Karnovsky, M.L.

    1986-03-15

    Two radiolabeled (/sup 125/I) muramyl peptide derivatives of high specific activity were prepared: a tripeptide with an iodinated C-terminal tyrosine methyl ester (Ligand I), and a muramyl tripeptide with a C-terminal lysine derivatized with Bolton-Hunter reagent (Ligand II). These were used to characterize binding of muramyl peptides to monolayers of murine macrophages. Saturable high-affinity binding to resident, caseinate-elicited, and Listeria-activated peritoneal cells was observed with both radioligands. Binding affinities varied with the state of activation of the macrophages, and K/sub D/ values ranged from 48 +/- 33 pM (for resident macrophages, Ligand I) to 1020 +/- 90 pM (for activated macrophages, Ligand II). Specific binding sites were also found on a macrophage-derived cell line. The ability of several unlabeled muramyl peptides to compete with Ligands I and II for their binding sites was tested. Competition was stereospecific and correlated with known biological activities of these compounds (i.e., immunoadjuvanticity, pyrogenicity, and somnogenicity). The sites identified here for Ligands I and II may mediate some of the effects that muramyl peptides have previously been demonstrated to have on macrophages.

  2. NEMO Binding Domain peptide inhibits constitutive NF-κB activity and reduces tumor burden in a canine model of relapsed, refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gaurnier-Hausser, Anita; Patel, Reema; Baldwin, Albert S.; May, Michael J.; Mason, Nicola J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Activated B-Cell Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL) is an aggressive, poorly chemoresponsive lymphoid malignancy characterized by constitutive canonical NF-κB activity that promotes lymphomagenesis and chemotherapy resistance via over-expression of anti-apoptotic NF-κB target genes. Inhibition of the canonical NF-κB pathway may therefore have therapeutic relevance in ABC-DLBCL. Here we set out to determine whether dogs with spontaneous DLBCL have comparative aberrant constitutive NF-κB activity and to determine the therapeutic relevance of NF-κB inhibition in dogs with relapsed, resistant DLBCL. Experimental Design Canonical NF-κB activity was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and immunoblot analyses, and NF-κB target gene expression was measured by qRT-PCR. Primary malignant canine B lymphocytes were treated with the selective IKK complex inhibitor Nemo Binding Domain (NBD) peptide, and evaluated for NF-κB activity and apoptosis. NBD peptide was administered intra-nodally to dogs with relapsed B-cell lymphoma and NF-κB target gene expression and tumor burden were evaluated pre and post treatment. Results Constitutive canonical NF-κB activity and increased NF-κB target gene expression was detected in primary DLBCL tissue. NBD peptide inhibited this activity and induced apoptosis of primary malignant B cells in vitro. Intra-tumoral injections of NBD peptide to dogs with relapsed DLBCL inhibited NF-κB target gene expression and reduced tumor burden. Conclusions This work shows that dogs with spontaneous DLBCL represent a clinically relevant, spontaneous, large animal model for human ABC-DLBCL and demonstrates the therapeutic relevance of NF-κB inhibition in the treatment of ABC-DLBCL. These results have important translational relevance for ABC-DLBCL treatment in human patients. PMID:21610150

  3. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Douglas G. . E-mail: Douglas.G.Johns@gsk.com; Ao, Zhaohui; Heidrich, Bradley J.; Hunsberger, Gerald E.; Graham, Taylor; Payne, Lisa; Elshourbagy, Nabil; Lu, Quinn; Aiyar, Nambi; Douglas, Stephen A.

    2007-06-22

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) is a newly-described natriuretic peptide which lowers blood pressure via vasodilation. The natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C) removes natriuretic peptides from the circulation, but whether DNP interacts with human NPR-C directly is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that DNP binds to NPR-C. ANP, BNP, CNP, and the NPR-C ligands AP-811 and cANP(4-23) displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with pM-to-nM K {sub i} values. DNP displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with nM potency, which represents the first direct demonstration of binding of DNP to human NPR-C. DNP showed high pM affinity for the GC-A receptor and no affinity for GC-B (K {sub i} > 1000 nM). DNP was nearly 10-fold more potent than ANP at stimulating cGMP production in GC-A expressing cells. Blockade of NPR-C might represent a novel therapeutic approach in augmenting the known beneficial actions of DNP in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and heart failure.

  4. The anabolic effects of vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) and a novel small peptide on bone.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gary B; Grecco, Kristina J; Safadi, Fayez F; Popoff, Steven N

    2003-01-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) has previously been shown to stimulate bone resorption and correct the skeletal defects associated with osteopetrosis in two nonallelic mutations in rats. This same protein and a small fragment of the protein have now been shown to demonstrate an anabolic effect on the skeleton of both newborn and young adult, intact rats. The novel peptide fragment was synthetically produced based on the human amino acid sequence at the site of glycosylation in the third domain of the native protein (DBP). The peptide tested is 14 amino acids in length and demonstrates no homologies other than to that region of DBP. Newborn rats were injected i.p. with saline, peptide (0.4 ng/g body wt.) or DBP-MAF (2 ng/g body wt.) every other day from birth to 14 days of age. On day 16 the rats were euthanized and the long bones collected for bone densitometry by pQCT. After 2 weeks of treatment with either the whole protein (DBP-MAF) or the small peptide, bone density was significantly increased in the treated animals compared to the saline controls. Young adult female rats (180 grams) were given s.c. injections of saline or peptide (0.4 ng/g body wt. or 5 ng/g body wt.) every other day for 2 weeks; 2 days after the final injections, the rats were euthanized and the femurs and tibias collected for bone densitometry. Both doses of the peptide resulted in significant increases in bone density as determined by pQCT. Young adult rats were injected locally with a single dose of the peptide (1 microg) or saline into the marrow cavity of the distal femur. One week after the single injection, the bones were collected for radiographic and histological evaluation. The saline controls showed no evidence of new bone formation, whereas the peptide-treated animals demonstrated osteoinduction in the marrow cavity and osteogenesis of surrounding cortical and metaphyseal bone. These data suggest that DBP-MAF and the synthetic peptide represent

  5. A cellulose-binding domain-fused recombinant human T cell connective tissue-activating peptide-III manifests heparanase activity.

    PubMed

    Rechter, M; Lider, O; Cahalon, L; Baharav, E; Dekel, M; Seigel, D; Vlodavsky, I; Aingorn, H; Cohen, I R; Shoseyov, O

    1999-02-24

    The chemokine connective tissue-activating peptide (CTAP)-III, which belongs to the leukocyte-derived growth factor family of mediators, was previously shown to be mitogenic for fibroblasts. However, it has recently been shown that CTAP-III, released from platelets, can act like a heparanase enzyme and degrade heparan sulfate. This suggests that CTAP-III may also function as a proinflammatory mediator. We have successfully cloned CTAP-III from a lambdagt11 cDNA library of PHA-activated human CD4(+) T cells and produced recombinant CTAP-III as a fusion protein with a cellulose-binding domain moiety. This recombinant CTAP-III exhibited heparanase activity and released degradation products from metabolically labeled, naturally produced extracellular matrix. We have also developed polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, and these antibodies against the recombinant CTAP-III detected the CTAP-III molecule in human T cells, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and placental extracts. Thus, our study provides tools to examine further immune cell behavior in inflamed sites rich with extracellular moieties and proinflammatory mediators. PMID:10049766

  6. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of a novel series of non-peptide angiotensin II receptor binding inhibitors specific for the AT2 subtype.

    PubMed

    Blankley, C J; Hodges, J C; Klutchko, S R; Himmelsbach, R J; Chucholowski, A; Connolly, C J; Neergaard, S J; Van Nieuwenhze, M S; Sebastian, A; Quin, J

    1991-11-01

    Structure-activity relationships are reported for a novel class of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine-6-carboxylic acid derivatives that displace 125I-labeled angiotensin II from a specific subset of angiotensin II (Ang II) binding sites in rat adrenal preparations. This binding site is not the Ang II receptor mediating vascular contraction or aldosterone release, but, rather, is one whose function has not yet been fully elucidated. It has been identified in a number of tissues and has a similar affinity for Ang II and its peptide analogues as does the vascular receptor. The non-peptide compounds reported here are uniquely specific in displacing Ang II at this binding site and are inactive in antagonizing Ang II at the vascular receptor or in pharmacological assays measuring vascular effects. PD 123,319 (79), one of the most potent compounds, has an IC50 of 34 nM. Certain of these compounds may have utility in the definition and study of Ang II receptor subtypes.

  7. Antimicrobial peptides bind more strongly to membrane pores

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Maja

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small, usually cationic peptides, which permeabilize bacterial membranes. Understanding their mechanism of action might help design better antibiotics. Using an implicit membrane model, modified to include pores of different shapes, we show that four AMPs (alamethicin, melittin, a magainin analogue, MG-H2, and piscidin 1) bind more strongly to membrane pores, consistent with the idea that they stabilize them. The effective energy of alamethicin in cylindrical pores is similar to that in toroidal pores, whereas the effective energy of the other three peptides is lower in toroidal pores. Only alamethicin intercalates into the membrane core; MG-H2, melittin and piscidin are located exclusively at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface. In toroidal pores, the latter three peptides often bind at the edge of the pore, and are in an oblique orientation. The calculated binding energies of the peptides are correlated with their hemolytic activities. We hypothesize that one distinguishing feature of AMPs may be the fact that they are imperfectly amphipathic which allows them to bind more strongly to toroidal pores. An initial test on a melittin-based mutant seems to support this hypothesis. PMID:20188066

  8. Novel complexes of Co(III) and Ni(II) containing peptide ligands: Synthesis, DNA binding and photonuclease activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhamani, C. N.; Bhojya Naik, H. S.; Girija, D.; Sangeetha Gowda, K. R.; Giridhar, M.; Arvinda, T.

    2014-01-01

    The new cobalt(III) and nickel(II) complexes of the type [M(L)2(H2O)2]n+ (where M = Co(III) or Ni(II) ion, n = 3 for Co and 2 for Ni, L = peptides Fmoc. Ala-val-OH (F-AVOH), Fmoc-Phe-Leu-Ome (F-PLOMe) and Z-Ala-Phe-COsbnd NH2 (Z-APCONH2)) were synthesized and structurally characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR, elemental analysis and electronic spectral data. An octahedral geometry has been proposed for all the synthesized Co(III) and Ni(II) metal complexes. The binding property of the complexes with CT-DNA was studied by absorption spectral analysis, followed by viscosity measurement and thermal denaturation studies. Detailed analysis revealed that the metal complexes intercalates into the DNA base stack as intercalator. The photo induced cleavage studies shows that the complexes possess photonuclease property against pUC19 DNA under UV-Visible irradiation.

  9. Sporozoite and liver stage antigen Plasmodium falciparum peptides bind specifically to human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Alvaro; García, Javier; Vera, Ricardo; López, Ramsés; Suarez, Jorge; Rodríguez, Luis; Curtidor, Hernando; Ocampo, Marisol; Tovar, Diana; Forero, Martha; Bermudez, Adriana; Cortes, Jimena; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2004-03-12

    Sporozoite and Liver Stage Antigen (SALSA) sequence synthetic peptides were used in HepG2 cell binding assays to identify regions involved in parasite invasion. SALSA 20608 ( 21IWASEKKDEKEASEQGEESHY40) and 20611 ( 64KKDDGTDKVQEKVLEKSPKY83) peptides were determined as having high binding activity in HepG2 cell assays, some of them were located in immunogenic regions. Immune-fluorescence antibody test with 24276 (20608 peptide analogue, CGIWSSMKMDEKMAAMQGEESHCG) showed sporozoite and merozoite reactivity. This data suggests SALSA high activity binding peptides' (HABPs) possible role in hepatic cell invasion and merozoite invasion of erythrocytes.

  10. Inhibitory effect of midkine-binding peptide on tumor proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui-Lian; Shen, Jian-Fen; Min, Li-Shan; Ping, Jin-Liang; Lu, Yong-Liang; Dai, Li-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the inhibitory effect of midkine-binding peptides on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) proliferation and angiogenesis of xenograft tumor. Methods: The midkine-binding peptides were panned by Ph.D.-7™ Phage Display Peptide Library Kit, and the specific binding activities of positive clones to target protein were examined by phage ELISA. The effect of midkine-binding peptides on proliferation of HUVECs was confirmed by MTT test. The xenograft tumor model was formed in BALB/c mice with the murine hepatocarcinoma cells H22 (H22). Microvessel density (MVD) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry of factor VIII staining. Results: Midkine-binding peptides have the inhibitory effects on tumor angiogenesis, a proliferation assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) indicated that particular midkine-binding peptides significantly inhibited the proliferation of the HUVECs. Midkine-binding peptides were also observed to efficiently suppress angiogenesis induced by murine hepatocarcinoma H22 cells in BALB/c nude mice. Conclusion: The midkine-binding peptides can inhibit solid tumor growth by retarding the formation of new blood vessels. The results indicate that midkine-binding peptides may represent potent anti-angiogenesis agents in vivo. PMID:26191241

  11. A urokinase-type plasminogen activator-inhibiting cyclic peptide with an unusual P2 residue and an extended protease binding surface demonstrates new modalities for enzyme inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Martin; Wind, Troels; Blouse, Grant E; Christensen, Anni; Petersen, Helle H; Kjelgaard, Signe; Mathiasen, Lisa; Holtet, Thor L; Andreasen, Peter A

    2005-11-18

    To find new principles for inhibiting serine proteases, we screened phage-displayed random peptide repertoires with urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) as the target. The most frequent of the isolated phage clones contained the disulfide bridge-constrained sequence CSWRGLENHRMC, which we designated upain-1. When expressed recombinantly with a protein fusion partner, upain-1 inhibited the enzymatic activity of uPA competitively with a temperature and pH-dependent K(i), which at 25 degrees C and pH 7.4 was approximately 500 nm. At the same conditions, the equilibrium dissociation constant K(D), monitored by displacement of p-aminobenzamidine from the specificity pocket of uPA, was approximately 400 nm. By an inhibitory screen against other serine proteases, including trypsin, upain-1 was found to be highly selective for uPA. The cyclical structure of upain-1 was indispensable for uPA binding. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis identified Arg(4) of upain-1 as the P(1) residue and indicated an extended binding interaction including the specificity pocket and the 37-, 60-, and 97-loops of uPA and the P(1), P(2), P(3)', P(4)', and the P(5)' residues of upain-1. Substitution with alanine of the P(2) residue, Trp(3), converted upain-1 into a distinct, although poor, uPA substrate. Upain-1 represents a new type of uPA inhibitor that achieves selectivity by targeting uPA-specific surface loops. Most likely, the inhibitory activity depends on its cyclical structure and the unusual P(2) residue preventing the scissile bond from assuming a tetrahedral geometry and thus from undergoing hydrolysis. Peptide-derived inhibitors such as upain-1 may provide novel mechanistic information about enzyme-inhibitor interactions and alternative methodologies for designing effective protease inhibitors. PMID:16141208

  12. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide induces long-lasting neuroprotection through the induction of activity-dependent signaling via the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein-regulated transcription co-activator 1

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Paul S; Martel, Marc-Andre; McMahon, Aoife; Kind, Peter C; Hardingham, Giles E

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is a neuroprotective peptide which exerts its effects mainly through the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Here, we show that in cortical neurons, PACAP-induced PKA signaling exerts a major part of its neuroprotective effects indirectly, by triggering action potential (AP) firing. Treatment of cortical neurons with PACAP induces a rapid and sustained PKA-dependent increase in AP firing and associated intracellular Ca2+ transients, which are essential for the anti-apoptotic actions of PACAP. Transient exposure to PACAP induces long-lasting neuroprotection in the face of apoptotic insults which is reliant on AP firing and the activation of cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein (CREB)-mediated gene expression. Although direct, activity-independent PKA signaling is sufficient to trigger phosphorylation on CREB’s activating serine-133 site, this is insufficient for activation of CREB-mediated gene expression. Full activation is dependent on CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 1 (CRTC1), whose PACAP-induced nuclear import is dependent on firing activity-dependent calcineurin signaling. Over-expression of CRTC1 is sufficient to rescue PACAP-induced CRE-mediated gene expression in the face of activity-blockade, while dominant negative CRTC1 interferes with PACAP-induced, CREB-mediated neuroprotection. Thus, the enhancement of AP firing may play a significant role in the neuroprotective actions of PACAP and other adenylate cyclase-coupled ligands. PMID:21623792

  13. The survival-promoting peptide Y-P30 enhances binding of pleiotrophin to syndecan-2 and -3 and supports its neuritogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Peter; Wahle, Petra; Pape, Hans-Christian; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Kreutz, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    Y-P30 is a polypeptide produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the maternal immune system during pregnancy. The peptide passes the blood-placenta barrier and accumulates in neurons of the developing infant brain, where it enhances survival of thalamic neurons and displays neuritogenic activities. In this study, we identify pleiotrophin (PTN) and syndecan-2 and -3 as direct binding partners of Y-P30. PTN is known to promote neurite outgrowth of thalamic neurons due to its association with the proteoglycan syndecan-3. Via spontaneous oligomerization Y-P30 can capture large macromolecular complexes containing PTN and potentially syndecans. Accordingly, the neuritogenic activity of Y-P30 in thalamic primary cultures requires the presence of PTN in the media and binding to syndecans. Thus, we propose that the neurite outgrowth promoting actions of Y-P30 during brain development are essentially based on its association with the PTN/syndecan signaling complex. This identifies a new mechanism of communication between the nervous and the immune system that might directly affect the wiring of the brain during development.

  14. Computational modeling of peptide-aptamer binding.

    PubMed

    Rhinehardt, Kristen L; Mohan, Ram V; Srinivas, Goundla

    2015-01-01

    Evolution is the progressive process that holds each living creature in its grasp. From strands of DNA evolution shapes life with response to our ever-changing environment and time. It is the continued study of this most primitive process that has led to the advancement of modern biology. The success and failure in the reading, processing, replication, and expression of genetic code and its resulting biomolecules keep the delicate balance of life. Investigations into these fundamental processes continue to make headlines as science continues to explore smaller scale interactions with increasing complexity. New applications and advanced understanding of DNA, RNA, peptides, and proteins are pushing technology and science forward and together. Today the addition of computers and advances in science has led to the fields of computational biology and chemistry. Through these computational advances it is now possible not only to quantify the end results but also visualize, analyze, and fully understand mechanisms by gaining deeper insights. The biomolecular motion that exists governing the physical and chemical phenomena can now be analyzed with the advent of computational modeling. Ever-increasing computational power combined with efficient algorithms and components are further expanding the fidelity and scope of such modeling and simulations. This chapter discusses computational methods that apply biological processes, in particular computational modeling of peptide-aptamer binding.

  15. Structure-activity relationship of the peptide binding-motif mediating the BRCA2:RAD51 protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Scott, Duncan E; Marsh, May; Blundell, Tom L; Abell, Chris; Hyvönen, Marko

    2016-04-01

    RAD51 is a recombinase involved in the homologous recombination of double-strand breaks in DNA. RAD51 forms oligomers by binding to another molecule of RAD51 via an 'FxxA' motif, and the same recognition sequence is similarly utilised to bind BRCA2. We have tabulated the effects of mutation of this sequence, across a variety of experimental methods and from relevant mutations observed in the clinic. We use mutants of a tetrapeptide sequence to probe the binding interaction, using both isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystallography. Where possible, comparison between our tetrapeptide mutational study and the previously reported mutations is made, discrepancies are discussed and the importance of secondary structure in interpreting alanine scanning and mutational data of this nature is considered.

  16. Virus-Binding Proteins Recovered from Bacterial Culture Derived from Activated Sludge by Affinity Chromatography Assay Using a Viral Capsid Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Daisuke; Matsuo, Takahiro; Omura, Tatsuo

    2004-01-01

    The contamination of water environments by pathogenic viruses has raised concerns about outbreaks of viral infectious diseases in our society. Because conventional water and wastewater treatment systems are not effective enough to inactivate or remove pathogenic viruses, a new technology for virus removal needs to be developed. In this study, the virus-binding proteins (VBPs) in a bacterial culture derived from activated sludge were successfully recovered. The recovery of VBPs was achieved by applying extracted crude proteins from a bacterial culture to an affinity column in which a custom-made peptide of capsid protein from the poliovirus type 1 (PV1) Mahoney strain (H2N-DNPASTTNKDKL-COOH) was immobilized as a ligand. VBPs exhibited the ability to adsorb infectious particles of PV1 Sabin 1 as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The evaluation of surface charges of VBPs with ion-exchange chromatography found that a majority of VBP molecules had a net negative charge under the conditions of affinity chromatography. On the other hand, a calculated isoelectric point implied that the viral peptide in the affinity column was also charged negatively. As a result, the adsorption of the VBPs to the viral peptide in the affinity column occurred with a strong attractive force that was able to overcome the electrostatic repulsive force. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that the isolated VBPs include a number of proteins, and their molecular masses were widely distributed but smaller than 100 kDa. Amino acid sequences of N termini of five VBPs were determined. Homology searches for the N termini against all protein sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database showed that the isolated VBPs in this study were newly discovered proteins. These VBPs that originated with bacteria in activated sludge might be stable, because they are existing in the environment of wastewater treatments. Therefore, a virus removal technology

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-1 binding to rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Delgado, E; Luque, M A; Alcántara, A; Trapote, M A; Clemente, F; Galera, C; Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1995-01-01

    We have found [125I]glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)-amide-specific binding activity in rat skeletal muscle plasma membranes, with an estimated M(r) of 63,000 by cross-linking and SDS-PAGE. The specific binding was time and membrane protein concentration dependent, and displaceable by unlabeled GLP-1(7-36)-amide with an ID50 of 3 x 10(-9) M of the peptide; GLP-1(1-36)-amide also competed, whereas glucagon and insulin did not. GLP-1(7-36)-amide did not modify the basal adenylate cyclase activity in skeletal muscle plasma membranes. These data, together with our previous finding of a potent glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)-amide in rat soleus muscle, and also in isolated hepatocytes, which was not accompanied by a rise in the cell cyclic AMP content, lead use to believe that the insulin-like effects of this peptide on glucose metabolism in the muscle could be mediated by a type of receptor somehow different to that described for GLP-1 in pancreatic B cells, where GLP-1 action is mediated by the cyclic AMP-adenylate cyclase system.

  18. Identification of calmodulin isoform-specific binding peptides from a phage-displayed random 22-mer peptide library.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Young; Lee, Sang Hyoung; Park, Chan Young; Heo, Won Do; Kim, Jong Cheol; Kim, Min Chul; Chung, Woo Sik; Moon, Byeong Cheol; Cheong, Yong Hwa; Kim, Cha Young; Yoo, Jae Hyuk; Koo, Ja Choon; Ok, Hyun Mi; Chi, Seung-Wook; Ryu, Seong-Eon; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lim, Chae Oh; Cho, Moo Je

    2002-06-14

    Plants express numerous calmodulin (CaM) isoforms that exhibit differential activation or inhibition of CaM-dependent enzymes in vitro; however, their specificities toward target enzyme/protein binding are uncertain. A random peptide library displaying a 22-mer peptide on a bacteriophage surface was constructed to screen peptides that specifically bind to plant CaM isoforms (soybean calmodulin (ScaM)-1 and SCaM-4 were used in this study) in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The deduced amino acid sequence analyses of the respective 80 phage clones that were independently isolated via affinity panning revealed that SCaM isoforms require distinct amino acid sequences for optimal binding. SCaM-1-binding peptides conform to a 1-5-10 ((FILVW)XXX(FILV) XXXX(FILVW)) motif (where X denotes any amino acid), whereas SCaM-4-binding peptide sequences conform to a 1-8-14 ((FILVW)XXXXXX(FAILVW)XXXXX(FILVW)) motif. These motifs are classified based on the positions of conserved hydrophobic residues. To examine their binding properties further, two representative peptides from each of the SCaM isoform-binding sequences were synthesized and analyzed via gel mobility shift assays, Trp fluorescent spectra analyses, and phosphodiesterase competitive inhibition experiments. The results of these studies suggest that SCaM isoforms possess different binding sequences for optimal target interaction, which therefore may provide a molecular basis for CaM isoform-specific function in plants. Furthermore, the isolated peptide sequences may serve not only as useful CaM-binding sequence references but also as potential reagents for studying CaM isoform-specific function in vivo.

  19. Design of High-Affinity Stapled Peptides To Target the Repressor Activator Protein 1 (RAP1)/Telomeric Repeat-Binding Factor 2 (TRF2) Protein-Protein Interaction in the Shelterin Complex.

    PubMed

    Ran, Xu; Liu, Liu; Yang, Chao-Yie; Lu, Jianfeng; Chen, Yong; Lei, Ming; Wang, Shaomeng

    2016-01-14

    Shelterin, a six-protein complex, plays a fundamental role in protecting both the length and the stability of telomeres. Repressor activator protein 1 (RAP1) and telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) are two subunits in shelterin that interact with each other. Small-molecule inhibitors that block the RAP1/TRF2 protein-protein interaction can disrupt the structure of shelterin and may be employed as pharmacological tools to investigate the biology of shelterin. On the basis of the cocrystal structure of RAP1/TRF2 complex, we have developed first-in-class triazole-stapled peptides that block the protein-protein interaction between RAP1 and TRF2. Our most potent stapled peptide binds to RAP1 protein with a Ki value of 7 nM and is >100 times more potent than the corresponding wild-type TRF2 peptide. On the basis of our high-affinity peptides, we have developed and optimized a competitive, fluorescence polarization (FP) assay for accurate and rapid determination of the binding affinities of our designed compounds and this assay may also assist in the discovery of non-peptide, small-molecule inhibitors capable of blocking the RAP1/TRF2 protein-protein interaction.

  20. A Prevalent Peptide-Binding Domain Guides Ribosomal Natural Product Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Brandon J.; Hudson, Graham A.; Dunbar, Kyle L.; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are a rapidly growing natural product class. RiPP precursor peptides can undergo extensive enzymatic tailoring, yielding structurally and functionally diverse products, and their biosynthetic logic makes them attractive bioengineering targets. Recent work suggests that unrelated RiPP modifying enzymes contain structurally similar precursor peptide-binding domains. Using profile hidden Markov model comparisons, we discovered related and previously unrecognized peptide-binding domains in proteins spanning the majority of known prokaryotic RiPP classes; thus, we named this conserved domain the RiPP precursor peptide recognition element (RRE). Through binding studies, we verify the role of the RRE for three distinct RiPP classes: linear azole-containing peptides, thiopeptides, and lasso peptides. Because numerous RiPP biosynthetic enzymes act on peptide substrates, our findings have powerful predictive value as to which protein(s) drive substrate binding, laying a foundation for further characterization of RiPP biosynthetic pathways and the rational engineering of new peptide-binding activities. PMID:26167873

  1. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  2. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-1 binding to rat hepatic membranes.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Delgado, E; Trapote, M A; Alcántara, A; Clemente, F; Luque, M A; Perea, A; Valverde, I

    1995-07-01

    We have found [125I]glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1(7-36)amide specific binding activity in rat liver and isolated hepatocyte plasma membranes, with an M(r) of approximately 63,000, estimated by cross-linking and SDS-PAGE. The specific binding was time- and membrane protein concentration-dependent, and equally displaced by unlabelled GLP-1(7-36)amide and by GLP-1(1-36)amide, achieving its ID50 at 3 x 10(-9) M of the peptides. GLP-1(7-36)amide did not modify the basal or the glucagon (10(-8) M)-stimulated adenylate cyclase in the hepatocyte plasma membranes. These data, together with our previous findings of a potent glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)amide in isolated rat hepatocytes, led us to postulate that the insulin-like effects of this peptide on glucose liver metabolism could be mediated by a type of receptor probably different from that described for GLP-1 in pancreatic B-cells or, alternatively, by the same receptor which, in this tissue as well as in muscle, uses a different transduction system.

  4. Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Carlos E.; Badillo-Corona, Jesus A.; Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; Oliver-Salvador, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application. PMID:25815307

  5. Biologically active and antimicrobial peptides from plants.

    PubMed

    Salas, Carlos E; Badillo-Corona, Jesus A; Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; Oliver-Salvador, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application.

  6. Analysis of protective antigen peptide binding motifs using bacterial display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Dorsey, Brandi L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-05-01

    In today's fast-paced world, a new biological threat could emerge at any time, necessitating a prompt, reliable, inexpensive detection reagent in each case. Combined with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), bacterial display technology makes it possible to isolate selective, high affinity peptide reagents in days to weeks. Utilizing the eCPX display scaffold is also a rapid way to screen potential peptide reagents. Peptide affinity reagents for protective antigen (PA) of the biothreat Bacillus anthracis were previously discovered using bacterial display. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the consensus sequence WXCFTC. Additionally, we have discovered PA binding peptides with a WW motif, one of which, YGLHPWWKNAPIGQR, can pull down PA from 1% human serum. The strength of these two motifs combined, to obtain a WWCFTC consensus, is assessed here using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). While monitoring binding to PA, overall expression of the display scaffold was assessed using the YPet Mona expression control tag (YPet), and specificity was assessed by binding to Streptavidin R-Phycoerythrin (SAPE). The importance of high YPet binding is highlighted as many of the peptides in one of the three replicate experiments fell below our 80% binding threshold. We demonstrate that it is preferable to discard this experiment, due to questionable expression of the peptide itself, than to try to normalize for relative expression. The peptides containing the WWCFTC consensus were of higher affinity and greater specificity than the peptides containing the WW consensus alone, validating further investigation to optimize known PA binders.

  7. Peptide binding to HLA-DR1: a peptide with most residues substituted to alanine retains MHC binding.

    PubMed Central

    Jardetzky, T S; Gorga, J C; Busch, R; Rothbard, J; Strominger, J L; Wiley, D C

    1990-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) glycoproteins play an important role in the development of an effective immune response. An important MHC function is the ability to bind and present 'processed antigens' (peptides) to T cells. We show here that the purified human class II MHC molecule, HLA-DR1, binds peptides that have been shown to be immunogenic in vivo. Detergent-solubilized HLA-DR1 and a papain-cleaved form of the protein lacking the transmembrane and intracellular regions have similar peptide binding properties. A total of 39 single substitutions were made throughout an HLA-DR1 restricted hemagglutinin epitope and the results determine one amino acid in this peptide which is crucial to binding. Based on this analysis, a synthetic peptide was designed containing two residues from the original hemagglutinin epitope embedded in a chain of polyalanine. This peptide binds to HLA-DR1, indicating that the majority of peptide side chains are not required for high affinity peptide binding. Images Fig. 3. PMID:2189723

  8. Identification of Chondrocyte-Binding Peptides by Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Crystal S.F.; Lui, Julian C.; Baron, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    As an initial step toward targeting cartilage tissue for potential therapeutic applications, we sought cartilage-binding peptides using phage display, a powerful technology for selection of peptides that bind to molecules of interest. A library of phage displaying random 12-amino acid peptides was iteratively incubated with cultured chondrocytes to select phage that bind cartilage. The resulting phage clones demonstrated increased affinity to chondrocytes by ELISA, when compared to a wild-type, insertless phage. Furthermore, the selected phage showed little preferential binding to other cell types, including primary skin fibroblast, myocyte and hepatocyte cultures, suggesting a tissue-specific interaction. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the selected phage bound chondrocytes themselves and the surrounding extracellular matrix. FITC-tagged peptides were synthesized based on the sequence of cartilage-binding phage clones. These peptides, but not a random peptide, bound cultured chondrocytes, and extracelluar matrix. In conclusion, using phage display, we identified peptide sequences that specifically target chondrocytes. We anticipate that such peptides may be coupled to therapeutic molecules to provide targeted treatment for cartilage disorders. PMID:23440926

  9. Zinc(II) binds to the neuroprotective peptide humanin.

    PubMed

    Armas, Ambar; Sonois, Vanessa; Mothes, Emmanuelle; Mazarguil, Honoré; Faller, Peter

    2006-10-01

    The abnormal accumulation of the peptide amyloid-beta in the form of senile (or amyloid) plaques is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Zinc ions have been implicated in AD and plaques formation. Recently, the peptide humanin has been discovered. Humanin showed neuroprotective activity against amyloid-beta insults. Here the question investigated is if humanin could interact directly with Zn(II). It is shown that Zn(II) and its substitutes Cd(II)/Co(II) bind to humanin via a thiolate bond from the side chain of the single cysteine at position 8. The low intensity of the d-d bands of Co(II)-humanin indicated an octahedral coordination geometry. Titration experiments suggest that Zn(II) binds to humanin with an apparent affinity in the low muM range. This apparent Zn-binding affinity is in the same order as for amyloid-beta and glutathione and could thus be of physiological relevance.

  10. Metal binding to the HIV nucleocapsid peptide.

    PubMed

    McLendon, G; Hull, H; Larkin, K; Chang, W

    1999-04-01

    Co(II) and Zn(II) binding constants have been measured for binding to the HIV-1 nucleocapsid N-terminal metal binding domain (residues 1-18), using competition titration methods and monitoring Co(II) binding by visible absorbance spectroscopy. Enthalpies for binding were directly measured by isothermal titration colorimetry. The results are compared with recent studies of related systems, including a study of Zn(II) binding by the full length protein.

  11. Identification of peptides that bind to irradiated pancreatic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Canhui; Liu, Xiang Y.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Lawrence, Theodore S. . E-mail: tsl@med.umich.edu

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: Peptides targeting tumor vascular cells or tumor cells themselves have the potential to be used as vectors for delivering either DNA in gene therapy or antitumor agents in chemotherapy. We wished to determine if peptides identified by phage display could be used to target irradiated pancreatic cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Irradiated Capan-2 cells were incubated with 5 x 10{sup 12} plaque-forming units of a phage display library. Internalized phage were recovered and absorbed against unirradiated cells. After five such cycles of enrichment, the recovered phage were subjected to DNA sequencing analysis and synthetic peptides made. The binding of both phage and synthetic peptides was evaluated by fluorescence staining and flow cytometry in vitro and in vivo. Results: We identified one 12-mer peptide (PA1) that binds to irradiated Capan-2 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells but not to unirradiated cells. The binding of peptide was significant after 48 h incubation with cells. In vivo experiments with Capan-2 xenografts in nude mice demonstrated that these small peptides are able to penetrate tumor tissue after intravenous injections and bind specifically to irradiated tumor cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that peptides can be identified that target tumors with radiation-induced cell markers and may be clinically useful.

  12. Heparin- and sulfatide-binding peptides from the type I repeats of human thrombospondin promote melanoma cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, N H; Krutzsch, H C; Nègre, E; Vogel, T; Blake, D A; Roberts, D D

    1992-01-01

    Peptides from the three type I repeats of human endothelial cell thrombospondin, containing the consensus sequence-Trp-Ser-Xaa-Trp-, bind to sulfated glycoconjugates including heparin and sulfatide. The peptides are potent inhibitors for the binding of thrombospondin, laminin, or apolipoprotein E to these ligands. The thrombospondin peptides that inhibit heparin binding, but not adjacent peptides from the thrombospondin sequence containing the previously identified adhesive motif Val-Thr-Cys-Gly, promote melanoma cell adhesion when immobilized on plastic. Melanoma cell adhesion to the immobilized peptides is inhibited by soluble recombinant heparin-binding fragment of thrombospondin. The peptides also inhibit heparin-dependent binding of thrombospondin or laminin to human melanoma cells. The active peptides lack any previously identified heparin-binding consensus sequences and most do not contain any basic amino acids. Studies with homologous peptides showed that the tryptophan residues are required for binding. Adjacent basic residues in the second type I repeat enhance binding to heparin but not to sulfatide. Thus the type I peptides of thrombospondin define a distinct class of heparin-binding peptides. Images PMID:1557410

  13. Discovery of 12-mer peptides that bind to wood lignin.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Asako; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Masaharu; Takaya, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, an abundant terrestrial polymer, is the only large-volume renewable feedstock composed of an aromatic skeleton. Lignin has been used mostly as an energy source during paper production; however, recent interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable resources has highlighted its potential value in providing aromatic chemicals. Highly selective degradation of lignin is pivotal for industrial production of paper, biofuels, chemicals, and materials. However, few studies have examined natural and synthetic molecular components recognizing the heterogeneous aromatic polymer. Here, we report the first identification of lignin-binding peptides possessing characteristic sequences using a phage display technique. The consensus sequence HFPSP was found in several lignin-binding peptides, and the outer amino acid sequence affected the binding affinity of the peptides. Substitution of phenylalanine7 with Ile in the lignin-binding peptide C416 (HFPSPIFQRHSH) decreased the affinity of the peptide for softwood lignin without changing its affinity for hardwood lignin, indicating that C416 recognised structural differences between the lignins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that this peptide adopted a highly flexible random coil structure, allowing key residues to be appropriately arranged in relation to the binding site in lignin. These results provide a useful platform for designing synthetic and biological catalysts selectively bind to lignin. PMID:26903196

  14. Discovery of 12-mer peptides that bind to wood lignin

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Asako; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Masaharu; Takaya, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, an abundant terrestrial polymer, is the only large-volume renewable feedstock composed of an aromatic skeleton. Lignin has been used mostly as an energy source during paper production; however, recent interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable resources has highlighted its potential value in providing aromatic chemicals. Highly selective degradation of lignin is pivotal for industrial production of paper, biofuels, chemicals, and materials. However, few studies have examined natural and synthetic molecular components recognizing the heterogeneous aromatic polymer. Here, we report the first identification of lignin-binding peptides possessing characteristic sequences using a phage display technique. The consensus sequence HFPSP was found in several lignin-binding peptides, and the outer amino acid sequence affected the binding affinity of the peptides. Substitution of phenylalanine7 with Ile in the lignin-binding peptide C416 (HFPSPIFQRHSH) decreased the affinity of the peptide for softwood lignin without changing its affinity for hardwood lignin, indicating that C416 recognised structural differences between the lignins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that this peptide adopted a highly flexible random coil structure, allowing key residues to be appropriately arranged in relation to the binding site in lignin. These results provide a useful platform for designing synthetic and biological catalysts selectively bind to lignin. PMID:26903196

  15. Seahorse-derived peptide suppresses invasive migration of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells by competing with intracellular α-enolase for plasminogen binding and inhibiting uPA-mediated activation of plasminogen.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Se-kwon; Jeon, You-Jin; Park, Sun Joo

    2014-12-01

    α-Enolase is a glycolytic enzyme and a surface receptor for plasminogen. α-Enolase-bound plasminogen promotes tumor cell invasion and cancer metastasis by activating plasmin and consequently degrading the extracellular matrix degradation. Therefore, α-enolase and plasminogen are novel targets for cancer therapy. We found that the amino acid sequence of a peptide purified from enzymatic hydrolysates of seahorse has striking similarities to that of α-enolase. In this study, we report that this peptide competes with cellular α-enolase for plasminogen binding and suppresses urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-mediated activation of plasminogen, which results in decreased invasive migration of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. In addition, the peptide treatment decreased the expression levels of uPA compared to that of untreated controls. These results provide new insight into the mechanism by which the seahorse-derived peptide suppresses invasive properties of human cancer cells. Our findings suggest that this peptide could emerge as a potential therapeutic agent for cancer.

  16. Binding of Synthetic LKEKK Peptide to Human T-Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Navolotskaya, E V; Zinchenko, D V; Zolotarev, Y A; Kolobov, A A; Lipkin, V M

    2016-08-01

    The synthetic peptide LKEKK corresponding to sequence 16-20 of human thymosin-α1 and 131-135 of human interferon-α2 was labeled with tritium to specific activity 28 Ci/mol. The [3H]LKEKK bound with high affinity (Kd = 3.7 ± 0.3 nM) to donor blood T-lymphocytes. Treatment of cells with trypsin or proteinase K did not abolish [3H]LKEKK binding, suggesting the non-protein nature of the peptide receptor. The binding was inhibited by thymosin-α1, interferon-α2, and cholera toxin B subunit (Ki = 2.0 ± 0.3, 2.2 ± 0.2, and 3.6 ± 0.3 nM, respectively). Using [3H]LKEKK, we demonstrated the existence of a non-protein receptor common for thymosin-α1, interferon-α2, and cholera toxin B-subunit on donor blood T-lymphocytes. PMID:27677554

  17. Antimicrobial activity of polycationic peptides.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, A; Cirioni, O; Barchiesi, F; Del Prete, M S; Scalise, G

    1999-11-01

    The in vitro activity of six polycationic peptides, buforin II, cecropin P1, indolicidin, magainin II, nisin, and ranalexin, were evaluated against several clinical isolates of gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic bacteria, yeasts, Pneumocystis carinii and Cryptosporidium parvum, by using microbroth dilution methods. The peptides exhibited different antibacterial activities and rapid time-dependent killing. The gram-negative organisms were more susceptible to buforin II and cecropin P1, whereas buforin II and ranalexin were the most active compounds against the gram-positive strains. Similarly, ranalexin showed the highest activity against Candida spp., whereas magainin II exerted the highest anticryptococcal activity. Finally, the peptides showed high anti-Pneumocystis activity, whereas no compound had strong inhibitory effect on C. parvum. PMID:10612440

  18. Sequence-specific DNA binding by glucocorticoid receptor "zinc finger peptides".

    PubMed

    Archer, T K; Hager, G L; Omichinski, J G

    1990-10-01

    Steroid hormone receptors can activate or repress transcription from responsive loci by binding to DNA. We have examined the mechanism of DNA binding by individually synthesizing the putative "zinc finger peptides" from the rat glucocorticoid receptor. Atomic absorption studies show that the peptides will bind zinc on an equimolar basis, and circular dichroism experiments demonstrate a significant alteration in secondary structure in the presence of zinc. The results from a series of experiments establish that metal ion is required for binding to DNA and that the amino-terminal zinc finger shows a significantly greater affinity for glucocorticoid response element-containing DNA over control DNA. These observations indicate that a single synthetic "zinc finger peptide" is able to bind to DNA in a sequence-specific manner. PMID:2120703

  19. Adding energy minimization strategy to peptide-design algorithm enables better search for RNA-binding peptides: Redesigned λ N peptide binds boxB RNA.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xingqing; Hung, Michelle E; Leonard, Joshua N; Hall, Carol K

    2016-10-15

    Our previously developed peptide-design algorithm was improved by adding an energy minimization strategy which allows the amino acid sidechains to move in a broad configuration space during sequence evolution. In this work, the new algorithm was used to generate a library of 21-mer peptides which could substitute for λ N peptide in binding to boxB RNA. Six potential peptides were obtained from the algorithm, all of which exhibited good binding capability with boxB RNA. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were then conducted to examine the ability of the λ N peptide and three best evolved peptides, viz. Pept01, Pept26, and Pept28, to bind to boxB RNA. Simulation results demonstrated that our evolved peptides are better at binding to boxB RNA than the λ N peptide. Sequence searches using the old (without energy minimization strategy) and new (with energy minimization strategy) algorithms confirm that the new algorithm is more effective at finding good RNA-binding peptides than the old algorithm. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Peptide Arrays for Binding Studies of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases.

    PubMed

    Klecker, Maria; Dissmeyer, Nico

    2016-01-01

    The automated SPOT (synthetic peptide arrays on membrane support technique) synthesis technology has entrenched as a rapid and robust method to generate peptide libraries on cellulose membrane supports. The synthesis method is based on conventional Fmoc chemistry building up peptides with free N-terminal amino acids starting at their cellulose-coupled C-termini. Several hundreds of peptide sequences can be assembled with this technique on one membrane comprising a strong binding potential due to high local peptide concentrations. Peptide orientation on SPOT membranes qualifies this array type for assaying substrate specificities of N-recognins, the recognition elements of the N-end rule pathway of targeted protein degradation (NERD). Pioneer studies described binding capability of mammalian and yeast enzymes depending on a peptide's N-terminus. SPOT arrays have been successfully used to describe substrate specificity of N-recognins which are the recognition elements of the N-end rule pathway of targeted protein degradation (NERD). Here, we describe the implementation of SPOT binding assays with focus on the identification of N-recognin substrates, applicable also for plant NERD enzymes. PMID:27424747

  1. H-2Dd exploits a four residue peptide binding motif

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have characterized the amino acid sequences of over 20 endogenous peptides bound by a soluble analog of H-2Dd, H-2Dds. Synthetic analogs corresponding to self, viral, tumor, or motif peptides were then tested for their ability to bind to H-2Dd by serologic epitope induction assays using both purified soluble protein and cell surface H-2Dd. The dominant primary sequence motif included glycine at position 2, proline at position 3, and a hydrophobic COOH terminus: leucine, isoleucine, or phenylalanine at position 9 or 10. Ancillary support for high affinity binding was contributed by a positively charged residue at position 5. Three-dimensional computer models of H-2Dds/peptide complexes, based on the crystallographic structure of the human HLA-B27/peptide complex, showed that the basic residue at position 5 was in position to form a salt bridge with aspartic acid at position 156, a polymorphic residue of the H-2Dd heavy (H) chain. Analysis of 28 such models, including 17 based on nonamer self-peptides, revealed considerable variation in the structure of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) surrounding peptide residue 1, depending on the size and charge of the side chain. Interactions between the side chains of peptide residues 5 and 7, and 6 and 8 commonly occurred. Those peptide positions with limited sequence variability and least solvent accessibility may satisfy structural requirements for high affinity binding of the peptide to the MHC class I H chain, whereas the highly variable positions of the peptide (such as positions 4, 6, and 8) may contribute more to the T cell epitopes. PMID:8245770

  2. Identification of Soft Matter Binding Peptide Ligands Using Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Günay, Kemal Arda; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-10-21

    Phage display is a powerful tool for the selection of highly affine, short peptide ligands. While originally primarily used for the identification of ligands to proteins, the scope of this technique has significantly expanded over the past two decades. Phage display nowadays is also increasingly applied to identify ligands that selectively bind with high affinity to a broad range of other substrates including natural and biological polymers as well as a variety of low-molecular-weight organic molecules. Such peptides are of interest for various reasons. The ability to selectively and with high affinity bind to the substrate of interest allows the conjugation or immobilization of, e.g., nanoparticles or biomolecules, or generally, facilitates interactions at materials interfaces. On the other hand, presentation of peptide ligands that selectively bind to low-molecular-weight organic materials is of interest for the development of sensor surfaces. The aim of this article is to highlight the opportunities provided by phage display for the identification of peptide ligands that bind to synthetic or natural polymer substrates or to small organic molecules. The article will first provide an overview of the different peptide ligands that have been identified by phage display that bind to these "soft matter" targets. The second part of the article will discuss the different characterization techniques that allow the determination of the affinity of the identified ligands to the respective substrates. PMID:26275106

  3. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  4. The latest developments in synthetic peptides with immunoregulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chun-lei; Lu, Rong; Lin, Gang; Yao, Zhi

    2011-02-01

    In the past few years, many researches have provided us with much data demonstrating the abilities of synthetic peptides to impact immune response in vitro and in vivo. These peptides were designed according to the structure of some important protein molecules which play a key role in immune response, so they act with specific targets. The class I and II MHC-derived peptides inhibit the TCR recognition of antigen peptide-MHC complex. Rationally designed CD80 and CD154-binding peptides block the interaction between cell surface costimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and T cells. Some peptides were designed to inhibit the activities of cell signal proteins, including JNK, NF-κB and NFAT. Some peptide antagonists competitively bind to important cytokines and inhibit their activities, such as TNF-α, TGF-β and IL-1β inhibitory peptides. Adhesion molecule ICAM-1 derived peptides block the T cell adhesion and activation. These immunoregulatory peptides showed therapeutic effect in several animal models, including collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), autoimmune cystitis model, murine skin transplant model and cardiac allograft model. These results give us important implications for the development of a novel therapy for immune mediated diseases. PMID:20979984

  5. Identification of high-affinity VEGFR3-binding peptides through a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Li, Cai-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) interaction with its receptor, VEGFR-3/Flt-4, regulates lymphangiogenesis. VEGFR-3/Flt-4 expression in cancer cells has been correlated with clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, and lymphatic invasion. The objective of this study is to identify a VEGFR-3/Flt-4-interacting peptide that could be used to inhibit VEGFR-3 for ovarian cancer therapy. Methods The extracellular fragment of recombinant human VEGFR-3/Flt-4 (rhVEGFR-3/Flt-4) fused with coat protein pIII was screened against a phage-displayed random peptide library. Using affinity enrichment and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, positive clones of phages were amplified. Three phage clones were selected after four rounds of biopanning, and the specific binding of the peptides to rhVEGFR-3 was detected by ELISA and compared with that of VEGF-D. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses of ovarian cancer tissue sections was undertaken to demonstrate the specificity of the peptides. Results After four rounds of biopanning, ELISA confirmed the specificity of the enriched bound phage clones for rhVEGFR-3. Sequencing and translation identified three different peptides. Non-competitive ELISA revealed that peptides I, II, and III had binding affinities for VEGFR-3 with Kaff (affinity constant) of 16.4±8.6 µg/mL (n=3), 9.2±2.1 µg/mL (n=3), and 174.8±31.1 µg/mL (n=3), respectively. In ovarian carcinoma tissue sections, peptide III (WHWLPNLRHYAS), which had the greatest binding affinity, also co-localized with VEGFR-3 in endothelial cells lining lymphatic vessels; its labeling of ovarian tumors in vivo was also confirmed. Conclusion These finding showed that peptide III has high specificity and activity and, therefore, may represent a potential therapeutic approach to target VEGF-VEGFR-3 signaling for the treatment or diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:26197772

  6. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Song, Jie; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  7. Peptide Ligand Structure and I-Aq Binding Avidity Influence T Cell Signaling Pathway Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Linda K; Cullins, David L; Park, Jeoung-Eun; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Brand, David D; Rosloniec, Edward F; Stuart, John M; Kang, Andrew H

    2015-01-01

    Factors that drive T cells to signal through differing pathways remain unclear. We have shown that an altered peptide ligand (A9) activates T cells to utilize an alternate signaling pathway which is dependent upon FcRγ and Syk. However, it remains unknown whether the affinity of peptide binding to MHC drives this selection. To answer this question we developed a panel of peptides designed so that amino acids interacting with the p6 and p9 predicted MHC binding pockets were altered. Analogs were tested for binding to I-Aq using a competitive binding assay and selected analogs were administered to arthritic mice. Using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model, arthritis severity was correlated with T cell cytokine production and molecular T cell signaling responses. We establish that reduced affinity of interaction with the MHC correlates with T cell signaling through the alternative pathway, leading ultimately to secretion of suppressive cytokine and attenuation of arthritis. PMID:25982319

  8. Method of identity analyte-binding peptides

    DOEpatents

    Kauvar, Lawrence M.

    1990-01-01

    A method for affinity chromatography or adsorption of a designated analyte utilizes a paralog as the affinity partner. The immobilized paralog can be used in purification or analysis of the analyte; the paralog can also be used as a substitute for antibody in an immunoassay. The paralog is identified by screening candidate peptide sequences of 4-20 amino acids for specific affinity to the analyte.

  9. Method of identity analyte-binding peptides

    DOEpatents

    Kauvar, L.M.

    1990-10-16

    A method for affinity chromatography or adsorption of a designated analyte utilizes a paralog as the affinity partner. The immobilized paralog can be used in purification or analysis of the analyte; the paralog can also be used as a substitute for antibody in an immunoassay. The paralog is identified by screening candidate peptide sequences of 4--20 amino acids for specific affinity to the analyte. 5 figs.

  10. Identification of a peptide binding protein that plays a role in antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lakey, E.K.; Margoliash, E.; Pierce, S.K.

    1987-03-01

    The helper T-cell response to globular proteins appears, in general, to require intracellular processing of the antigen, such that a peptide fragment containing the T-cell antigenic determinant is released and transported to and held on the surface of an Ia-expressing, antigen-presenting cell. However, the molecular details underlying these phenomena are largely unknown. The means by which antigenic peptides are anchored on the antigen-presenting cell surface was investigated. A cell surface protein is identified that was isolated by it ability to bind to a 24-amino acid peptide fragment of pigeon cytochrome c, residues 81-104, containing the major antigenic determinant for B10.A mouse T cells. This peptide binding protein, purified from (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled cells, appears as two discrete bands of approx. =72 and 74 kDa after NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. The protein can be eluted from the peptide affinity column with equivalent concentrations of either the antigenic pigeon cytochrome c peptide or the corresponding nonantigenic peptide of mouse cytochrome c. However, it does not bind to the native cytochromes c, either of pigeon or mouse, and thus the protein appears to recognize some structure available only in the free peptides. This protein plays a role in antigen presentation. Its expression is not major histocompatibility complex-restricted in that the blocking activity of the antisera can be absorbed on spleen cells from mice of different haplotypes. This peptide binding protein can be isolated from a variety of cell types, including B cells, T cells, and fibroblasts. The anchoring of processed peptides on the cell surface by such a protein may play a role in antigen presentation.

  11. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Genetically Engineered Inorganic Binding Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresswell, Carolyn Gayle

    Understanding how organisms are capable of forming (synthesize, crystallize, and organize) solid minerals into complex architectures has been a fundamental question of biomimetic materials chemistry and biomineralization for decades. This study utilizes short peptides selected using a cell surface display library for the specific polymorphs of calcium carbonate, i.e., aragonite and calcite, to identify two sets of sequences which can then be used to examine their effects in the formation, crystal structure, morphology of the CaCO3 minerals. A procedure of counter selection, along with fluorescence microscopy (FM) characterization, was adapted to insure that the sequences on the cells were specific to their respective substrate, i.e., aragonite or calcite. From the resulting two sets of sequences selected, five distinct strong binders were identified with a variety of biochemical characteristics and synthesized for further study. Protein derived peptides, using the known sequences of the proteins that are associated with calcite or aragonite, were also designed using a bioinformatics-based similarity analysis of the two sets of binders. In particular, an aragonite binding protein segment, AP7, a protein found in nacre, was chosen for this design and the resulting effects of the designed peptides and the AP7 were examined. Specifically, the binding affinities of the selected and the protein derived peptides off the cells were then tested using FM; these studies resulted in different binding characteristics of the synthesized and cellular bound peptides. Two of the peptides that displayed strong binding on the cells bound to neither of the CaCO 3 substrates and both the high and low similarity protein-derived peptides bound to both polymorphs. However, two of the peptides were found to only bind to their respective polymorph showing; these results are significant in that with this study it is demonstrated that the designed peptides based on experimental library

  12. Canine malignant melanoma alpha-3 integrin binding peptides

    PubMed Central

    Aina, Olulanu H.; Maeda, Yoshiko; Harrison, Matthew; Zwingenberger, Allison L.; Walker, Naomi J.; Lam, Kit S.; Kent, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to develop novel targeted imaging and therapeutic agents that can aid in early diagnosis, detection of metastasis and treatment of melanoma. Alpha-3 integrin is overexpressed in 82% of metastatic melanomas in humans and may be a potential target for peptide ligands carrying therapeutic agents. Five melanoma cell lines were generated from canine primary oral and metastatic canine tumors, grown in mice, and validated with melanoma markers Melan A, S-100, Micropthalmia transcription factor (MITF), Tyrosinase, and MART-1. The melanoma cell lines were tested for binding affinity to previously published alpha-3 integrin-binding peptides containing the cdGXGXXc motif. Fluorescent conjugates of the alpha-3 integrin binding OA02 peptide were used to quantify receptor affinity in the cell lines, a specimen of canine primary oral melanoma, and melanoma xenografts. Alpha-3 integrin was expressed by all 5 canine melanoma cell lines. Four of the 5 lines as well as the primary canine tumor showed affinity to alpha-3 integrin binding peptides with the cdGXGXXc motif. Optical imaging of canine melanoma xenografts in nude mice indicates rapid, strong uptake of the optical tracer in the tumor with an average persistence of approximately 48 hours. Ex vivo images showed high tumor-to-background ratio, with tumor signals more than twice that of the kidney and other vital organs. We propose that integrin alpha-3 integrin binding ligands could potentially become useful probes for imaging and delivery of cytotoxic agents for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:21722969

  13. SPARC is a source of copper-binding peptides that stimulate angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lane, T F; Iruela-Arispe, M L; Johnson, R S; Sage, E H

    1994-05-01

    SPARC is a transiently expressed extracellular matrix-binding protein that alters cell shape and regulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. In this study, we show that SPARC mRNA and protein are synthesized by endothelial cells during angiogenesis in vivo. SPARC and peptides derived from a cationic region of the protein (amino acids 113-130) stimulated the formation of endothelial cords in vitro; moreover, these peptides stimulated angiogenesis in vivo. Mapping of the active domain demonstrated that the sequence KGHK was responsible for most of the angiogenic activity; substitution of the His residue decreased the effect. We found that proteolysis of SPARC provided a source of KGHK, GHK, and longer peptides that contained these sequences. Although the Cu(2+)-GHK complex had been identified as a mitogen/morphogen in normal human plasma, we found KGHK and longer peptides to be potent stimulators of angiogenesis. SPARC113-130 and KGHK were shown to bind Cu2+ with high affinity; however, previous incubation with Cu2+ was not required for the stimulatory activity. Since a peptide from a second cationic region of SPARC (SPARC54-73) also bound Cu2+ but had no effect on angiogenesis, the angiogenic activity appeared to be sequence specific and independent of bound Cu2+. Thus, specific degradation of SPARC, a matrix-associated protein expressed by endothelial cells during vascular remodeling, releases a bioactive peptide or peptides, containing the sequence (K)GHK, that could regulate angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:7514608

  14. SPARC is a source of copper-binding peptides that stimulate angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    SPARC is a transiently expressed extracellular matrix-binding protein that alters cell shape and regulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. In this study, we show that SPARC mRNA and protein are synthesized by endothelial cells during angiogenesis in vivo. SPARC and peptides derived from a cationic region of the protein (amino acids 113- 130) stimulated the formation of endothelial cords in vitro; moreover, these peptides stimulated angiogenesis in vivo. Mapping of the active domain demonstrated that the sequence KGHK was responsible for most of the angiogenic activity; substitution of the His residue decreased the effect. We found that proteolysis of SPARC provided a source of KGHK, GHK, and longer peptides that contained these sequences. Although the Cu(2+)-GHK complex had been identified as a mitogen/morphogen in normal human plasma, we found KGHK and longer peptides to be potent stimulators of angiogenesis. SPARC113-130 and KGHK were shown to bind Cu2+ with high affinity; however, previous incubation with Cu2+ was not required for the stimulatory activity. Since a peptide from a second cationic region of SPARC (SPARC54-73) also bound Cu2+ but had no effect on angiogenesis, the angiogenic activity appeared to be sequence specific and independent of bound Cu2+. Thus, specific degradation of SPARC, a matrix-associated protein expressed by endothelial cells during vascular remodeling, releases a bioactive peptide or peptides, containing the sequence (K)GHK, that could regulate angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:7514608

  15. Conformational HER-2/neu B-cell epitope peptide vaccine designed to incorporate two native disulfide bonds enhances tumor cell binding and antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Dakappagari, Naveen K; Lute, Kenneth D; Rawale, Sharad; Steele, Joan T; Allen, Stephanie D; Phillips, Gary; Reilly, R Todd; Kaumaya, Pravin T P

    2005-01-01

    Cancer vaccines designed to elicit an antibody response that target antigenic sites on a tumor antigen must closely mimic the three-dimensional structure of the corresponding region on the antigen. We have designed a complex immunogen derived from the extracellular domain of human HER-2/neu-(626-649) that represents a three-dimensional epitope. We have successfully introduced two disulfide bonds into this sequence, thereby recapitulating the natural disulfide pairings observed in the native protein. To evaluate the immunogenicity of the doubly cyclized disulfide-linked peptide versus the free uncyclized peptide we examined the induction of antibody responses in both inbred and outbred mice strains, with both constructs eliciting high titered antibodies. The disulfide-paired specific antibodies exhibited enhanced cross-reactivity to HER-2/neu expressed on BT-474 cell line as determined by flow cytometry. The antitumor activities of the disulfidepaired specific antibodies did not improve the in vitro growth inhibition of human breast cancer cells overexpressing HER-2, but showed superior antitumor responses in the context of ADCC and interferon-gamma induction. Inbred mice (FVB/n) vaccinated with the disulfide-paired epitope exhibited a statistically significant reduction in the development of exogenously administered tumors in vivo compared with mice receiving either the free uncyclized or the promiscuous T-cell epitope (MVF) control peptide (p = 0.001). This study demonstrates the feasibility and importance of designing conformational epitopes that mimic the tertiary structure of the native protein for eliciting biologically relevant anti-tumor antibodies. Such approaches are a prerequisite to the design of effective peptide vaccines.

  16. Isolation of peptides from phage-displayed random peptide libraries that interact with the talin-binding domain of vinculin.

    PubMed Central

    Adey, N B; Kay, B K

    1997-01-01

    Peptides isolated from combinatorial libraries typically interact with, and thus help to characterize, biologically relevant binding domains of target proteins. To characterize the binding domains of the focal adhesion protein vinculin, vinculin-binding peptides were isolated from two phage-displayed random peptide libraries. Altogether, five non-similar vinculin-binding peptides were identified. Despite the lack of obvious sequence similarity between the peptides, binding and competition studies indicated that all five interact with the talin-binding domain of vinculin and do not disrupt the binding of alpha-actinin or paxillin to vinculin. The identified peptides and talin bind to vinculin in a comparable manner; both bind to immobilized vinculin, but neither binds to soluble vinculin unless the C-terminus of vinculin has been deleted. An analysis of amino acid variants of one of the peptides has revealed three non-contiguous motifs that also occur in the region of talin previously demonstrated to bind vinculin. Amino acid substitutions within a 127-residue segment of talin capable of binding vinculin confirmed the importance of two of the motifs and suggest that residues critical for binding are within a 16-residue region. This study demonstrates that the vinculin-binding peptides interact with vinculin in a biologically relevant manner and represent an excellent tool for further study of the biochemistry of vinculin. PMID:9182713

  17. Lasso Peptide Biosynthetic Protein LarB1 Binds Both Leader and Core Peptide Regions of the Precursor Protein LarA

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lasso peptides are a member of the superclass of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs). Like all RiPPs, lasso peptides are derived from a gene-encoded precursor protein. The biosynthesis of lasso peptides requires two enzymatic activities: proteolytic cleavage between the leader peptide and the core peptide in the precursor protein, accomplished by the B enzymes, and ATP-dependent isopeptide bond formation, accomplished by the C enzymes. In a subset of lasso peptide biosynthetic gene clusters from Gram-positive organisms, the B enzyme is split between two proteins. One such gene cluster is found in the organism Rhodococcus jostii, which produces the antimicrobial lasso peptide lariatin. The B enzyme in R. jostii is split between two open reading frames, larB1 and larB2, both of which are required for lariatin biosynthesis. While the cysteine catalytic triad is found within the LarB2 protein, LarB1 is a PqqD homologue expected to bind to the lariatin precursor LarA based on its structural homology to other RiPP leader peptide binding domains. We show that LarB1 binds to the leader peptide of the lariatin precursor protein LarA with a sub-micromolar affinity. We used photocrosslinking with the noncanonical amino acid p-azidophenylalanine and mass spectrometry to map the interaction of LarA and LarB1. This analysis shows that the LarA leader peptide interacts with a conserved motif within LarB1 and, unexpectedly, the core peptide of LarA also binds to LarB1 in several positions. A Rosetta model built from distance restraints from the photocrosslinking experiments shows that the scissile bond between the leader peptide and core peptide in LarA is in a solvent-exposed loop. PMID:27800552

  18. Antibacterial activity of a synthetic peptide that mimics the LPS binding domain of Indian mud crab, Scylla serrata anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (SsALF) also involved in the modulation of vaginal immune functions through NF-kB signaling.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sachin; Yedery, R D; Patgaonkar, M S; Selvaakumar, C; Reddy, K V R

    2011-01-01

    Recently the cDNA coding for anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) has been identified from the Indian mud crab, Scylla serrata and has been named S. serrata anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (SsALF). SsALF protein sequence demonstrated the presence of two highly conserved cystine residues between which the putative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding domain is known to be located. In this study, we have designed and synthesized a 24 amino acid linear (lSsALF24) and a cyclic (cSsALF24) peptides based on this putative LPS binding domain and demonstrated the ability of these peptides to bind to LPS. The peptides were active against vaginal pathogens demonstrated by MIC, CFU and phagocytosis assays. cSsALF24 did not show toxicity to human vaginal epithelial cells (HeLa-S3), macrophages and rabbit erythrocytes even at high concentration (64.64 μM). Flow cytometry results demonstrated that cSsALF24 peptide suppressed LPS induced phagocytosis of FITC labeled E. coli. HeLa cells were stimulated with LPS (10 μg/ml) alone for 6 h or after two washings with PBS, treated for 1 h with cSsALF24 (64.64 μM). After washing, the cells were cultured for 24 h in fresh media. The spent media as well as cells were collected for the determination of cytokine/chemokine levels such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-1α (IL-1α) using ELISA and RT-PCR respectively. Similar results were obtained with LPS stimulated cells treated with c/nSsALF24 or unstimulated cells treated with c/nSsALF24. The expression of cytokine/chemokines and mRNA's coding these proteins were unaffected in c/nSsALF24 treated cells. In contrast, in LPS stimulated cells, the expression levels of these molecules were up-regulated via the induction of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kB) levels. However, the expression of these pro-inflammatory markers was decreased in LPS stimulated cells following the treatment with cSsALF24, attributing anti

  19. Peptides from the Plasmodium falciparum STEVOR putative protein bind with high affinity to normal human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    García, Javier E; Puentes, Alvaro; Curtidor, Hernando; Vera, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Luis; Valbuena, John; López, Ramses; Ocampo, Marisol; Cortés, Jimena; Vanegas, Magnolia; Rosas, Jaiver; Reyes, Claudia; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2005-07-01

    Synthetic 20-mer long non-overlapped peptides, from STEVOR protein, were tested in RBC binding assays for identifying STEVOR protein regions having high RBC binding activity and evaluating whether these regions inhibit Plasmodium falciparum in vitro invasion. Affinity constants, binding site number per cell and Hill coefficients were determined by saturation assay with high activity binding peptides (HABPs). HABP binding assays using RBCs previously treated with enzymes were carried out to study the nature of the receptor. The molecular weight of RBC surface proteins interacting with HABPs was determined by cross-linking assays and SDS-PAGE analysis. RBC binding assays revealed that peptides 30561 (41MKSRRLAEIQLPKCPHYNND60), 30562 (61PELKKIIDKLNEERIKKYIE80) and 30567 (161ASCCKVHDNYLDNLKKGCFG180) bound saturably and with high binding activity, presenting nanomolar affinity constants. HABP binding activity to RBCs previously treated with neuraminidase and trypsin decreased, suggesting that these peptides bound to RBC surface proteins and that such binding could be sialic acid dependent. Cross-linking and SDS-PAGE assays showed that the three HABPs specifically bound to 30 and 40 kDa molecular weight RBC membrane proteins. Peptides 30561, 30562 and 30567 inhibited P. falciparum in vitro invasion of red blood cells in a concentration-dependent way. Goat sera having STEVOR protein polymeric peptides antibodies inhibit parasite in vitro invasion depending on concentration. Three peptides localized in STEVOR N-terminal and central regions had high, saturable, binding activity to 30 and 40 kDa RBC membrane proteins. These peptides inhibited the parasite's in vitro invasion, suggesting that STEVOR protein regions are involved in P. falciparum invasion processes during intra-erythrocyte stage.

  20. Fe(2+) binding on amyloid β-peptide promotes aggregation.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, Subramaniam; Kolandaivel, Ponmalai

    2016-09-01

    The metal ions Zn(2+) , Cu(2+) , and Fe(2+) play a significant role in the aggregation mechanism of Aβ peptides. However, the nature of binding between metal and peptide has remained elusive; the detailed information on this from the experimental study is very difficult. Density functional theory (dft) (M06-2X/6-311++G (2df,2pd) +LANL2DZ) has employed to determine the force field resulting due to metal and histidine interaction. We performed 200 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation on Aβ1-42 -Zn(2+) , Aβ1-42 -Cu(2+) , and Aβ1-42 -Fe(2+) systems in explicit water with different combination of coordinating residues including the three Histidine residues in the N-terminal. The present investigation, the Aβ1-42 -Zn(2+) system possess three turn conformations separated by coil structure. Zn(2+) binding caused the loss of the helical structure of N-terminal residues which transformed into the S-shaped conformation. Zn(2+) has reduced the coil and increases the turn content of the peptide compared with experimental study. On the other hand, the Cu(2+) binds with peptide, β sheet formation is observed at the N-terminal residues of the peptide. Fe(2+) binding is to promote the formation of Glu22-Lys28 salt-bridge which stabilized the turn conformation in the Phe19-Gly25 residues, subsequently β sheets were observed at His13-Lys18 and Gly29-Gly37 residues. The turn conformation facilitates the β sheets are arranged in parallel by enhancing the hydrophobic contact between Gly25 and Met35, Lys16 and Met35, Leu17 and Leu34, Val18 and Leu34 residues. The Fe(2+) binding reduced the helix structure and increases the β sheet content in the peptide, which suggested, Fe(2+) promotes the oligomerization by enhancing the peptide-peptide interaction. Proteins 2016; 84:1257-1274. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27214008

  1. Fe(2+) binding on amyloid β-peptide promotes aggregation.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, Subramaniam; Kolandaivel, Ponmalai

    2016-09-01

    The metal ions Zn(2+) , Cu(2+) , and Fe(2+) play a significant role in the aggregation mechanism of Aβ peptides. However, the nature of binding between metal and peptide has remained elusive; the detailed information on this from the experimental study is very difficult. Density functional theory (dft) (M06-2X/6-311++G (2df,2pd) +LANL2DZ) has employed to determine the force field resulting due to metal and histidine interaction. We performed 200 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation on Aβ1-42 -Zn(2+) , Aβ1-42 -Cu(2+) , and Aβ1-42 -Fe(2+) systems in explicit water with different combination of coordinating residues including the three Histidine residues in the N-terminal. The present investigation, the Aβ1-42 -Zn(2+) system possess three turn conformations separated by coil structure. Zn(2+) binding caused the loss of the helical structure of N-terminal residues which transformed into the S-shaped conformation. Zn(2+) has reduced the coil and increases the turn content of the peptide compared with experimental study. On the other hand, the Cu(2+) binds with peptide, β sheet formation is observed at the N-terminal residues of the peptide. Fe(2+) binding is to promote the formation of Glu22-Lys28 salt-bridge which stabilized the turn conformation in the Phe19-Gly25 residues, subsequently β sheets were observed at His13-Lys18 and Gly29-Gly37 residues. The turn conformation facilitates the β sheets are arranged in parallel by enhancing the hydrophobic contact between Gly25 and Met35, Lys16 and Met35, Leu17 and Leu34, Val18 and Leu34 residues. The Fe(2+) binding reduced the helix structure and increases the β sheet content in the peptide, which suggested, Fe(2+) promotes the oligomerization by enhancing the peptide-peptide interaction. Proteins 2016; 84:1257-1274. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Structural constraints for the binding of short peptides to claudin-4 revealed by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jun; Liao, Hailing; Clark, Robin; Wong, Mandy Sze Man; Lo, David D

    2008-11-01

    Claudin family transmembrane proteins play an important role in tight junction structure and function in epithelial cells. Among the 24 isoforms identified in mice and humans, claudin-4 and -3 serve as the receptor for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (Cpe). The second extracellular loop (Ecl2) of claudin-4 is responsible for the binding to the C-terminal 30 amino acids of Cpe (Cpe30). To define the structural constraints for the claudin-4/Cpe30 interaction, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) method was developed. GST fusions with claudin-4 revealed that Ecl2 with the downstream transmembrane domain of claudin-4 reconstituted the basic structural requirement for optimal binding activity to Cpe30, with affinity in the nanomolar range. Two 12-mer peptides selected by phage display against claudin-4-transfected CHO cells and a 12-mer Cpe mutant peptide also showed significant affinity for claudin-4 with this SPR assay, suggesting that a short peptide can establish stable contact with Ecl2 with nanomolar affinity. Alignment of these short peptides unveiled a common Ecl2 binding motif: . Whereas the short peptides bound native claudin-4 on transfected CHO cells in pull-down assays, only the larger Cpe30 peptide affected trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TER) in peptide-treated Caco-2BBe monolayers. Importantly, Cpe30 retained its binding to claudin-4 when fused to the C terminus of influenza hemagglutinin, demonstrating that its binding activity can be maintained in a different biochemical context. These studies may help in the design of assays for membrane receptor interactions with soluble ligands, and in applying new targeting ligands to delivering attached "cargo" proteins. PMID:18782762

  3. Binding Interactions of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide and the Cationic Amphiphilic Peptides Polymyxin B and WLBU2

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Matthew P.; Wu, Xiangming; McKelvey, GregR.; McGuire, Joseph; Schilke, Karl F.

    2014-01-01

    Passage of blood through a sorbent device for removal of bacteria and endotoxin by specific binding with immobilized, membrane-active, bactericidal peptides holds promise for treating severe blood infections. Peptide insertion in the target membrane and rapid/strong binding is desirable, while membrane disruption and release of degradation products to the circulating blood is not. Here we describe interactions between bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) and the membrane-active, bactericidal peptides WLBU2 and polymyxin B (PmB). Analysis of the interfacial behavior of mixtures of LPS and peptide using air-water interfacial tensiometry and optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy strongly suggests insertion of intact LPS vesicles by the peptide WLBU2 without vesicle destabilization. In contrast, dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies show that LPS vesicles appear to undergo peptide-induced destabilization in the presence of PmB. Circular dichroism spectra further confirm that WLBU2, which shows disordered structure in aqueous solution and substantially helical structure in membrane-mimetic environments, is stably located within the LPS membrane in peptide-vesicle mixtures. We therefore expect that presentation of WLBU2 at an interface, if tethered in a fashion which preserves its mobility and solvent accessibility, will enable the capture of bacteria and endotoxin without promoting reintroduction of endotoxin to the circulating blood, thus minimizing adverse clinical outcomes. On the other hand, our results suggest no such favorable outcome of LPS interactions with polymyxin B. PMID:24905681

  4. Prediction of Nucleotide Binding Peptides Using Star Graph Topological Indices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Munteanu, Cristian R; Fernández Blanco, Enrique; Tan, Zhiliang; Santos Del Riego, Antonino; Pazos, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    The nucleotide binding proteins are involved in many important cellular processes, such as transmission of genetic information or energy transfer and storage. Therefore, the screening of new peptides for this biological function is an important research topic. The current study proposes a mixed methodology to obtain the first classification model that is able to predict new nucleotide binding peptides, using only the amino acid sequence. Thus, the methodology uses a Star graph molecular descriptor of the peptide sequences and the Machine Learning technique for the best classifier. The best model represents a Random Forest classifier based on two features of the embedded and non-embedded graphs. The performance of the model is excellent, considering similar models in the field, with an Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUROC) value of 0.938 and true positive rate (TPR) of 0.886 (test subset). The prediction of new nucleotide binding peptides with this model could be useful for drug target studies in drug development.

  5. Prediction of Nucleotide Binding Peptides Using Star Graph Topological Indices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Munteanu, Cristian R; Fernández Blanco, Enrique; Tan, Zhiliang; Santos Del Riego, Antonino; Pazos, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    The nucleotide binding proteins are involved in many important cellular processes, such as transmission of genetic information or energy transfer and storage. Therefore, the screening of new peptides for this biological function is an important research topic. The current study proposes a mixed methodology to obtain the first classification model that is able to predict new nucleotide binding peptides, using only the amino acid sequence. Thus, the methodology uses a Star graph molecular descriptor of the peptide sequences and the Machine Learning technique for the best classifier. The best model represents a Random Forest classifier based on two features of the embedded and non-embedded graphs. The performance of the model is excellent, considering similar models in the field, with an Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUROC) value of 0.938 and true positive rate (TPR) of 0.886 (test subset). The prediction of new nucleotide binding peptides with this model could be useful for drug target studies in drug development. PMID:27491034

  6. Peptide binding to a bacterial signal peptidase visualized by peptide tethering and carrier-driven crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Yi Tian; Harris, Paul W. R.; Batot, Gaelle; Brimble, Margaret A.; Baker, Edward N.; Young, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial type I signal peptidases (SPases) are membrane-anchored serine proteases that process the signal peptides of proteins exported via the Sec and Tat secretion systems. Despite their crucial importance for bacterial virulence and their attractiveness as drug targets, only one such enzyme, LepB from Escherichia coli, has been structurally characterized, and the transient nature of peptide binding has stymied attempts to directly visualize SPase–substrate complexes. Here, the crystal structure of SpsB, the type I signal peptidase from the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, is reported, and a peptide-tethering strategy that exploits the use of carrier-driven crystallization is described. This enabled the determination of the crystal structures of three SpsB–peptide complexes, both with cleavable substrates and with an inhibitory peptide. SpsB–peptide interactions in these complexes are almost exclusively limited to the canonical signal-peptide motif Ala-X-Ala, for which clear specificity pockets are found. Minimal contacts are made outside this core, with the variable side chains of the peptides accommodated in shallow grooves or exposed faces. These results illustrate how high fidelity is retained despite broad sequence diversity, in a process that is vital for cell survival. PMID:26870377

  7. A biologically active peptide mimetic of N-acetylgalactosamine/galactose

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Laura L; Hoober, J Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Background Glycosylated proteins and lipids are important regulatory factors whose functions can be altered by addition or removal of sugars to the glycan structure. The glycans are recognized by sugar-binding lectins that serve as receptors on the surface of many cells and facilitate initiation of an intracellular signal that changes the properties of the cells. We identified a peptide that mimics the ligand of an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific lectin and asked whether the peptide would express specific biological activity. Findings A 12-mer phage display library was screened with a GalNAc-specific lectin to identify an amino acid sequence that binds to the lectin. Phage particles that were eluted from the lectin with free GalNAc were considered to have been bound to a GalNAc-binding site. Peptides were synthesized with the selected sequence as a quadravalent structure to facilitate receptor crosslinking. Treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for 24 h with the peptide stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) but not of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The secretion of IL-21 was stimulated as strongly with the peptide as with interferon-γ. Conclusion The data indicate that the quadravalent peptide has biological activity with a degree of specificity. These effects occurred at concentrations in the nanomolar range, in contrast to free sugars that generally bind to proteins in the micro- to millimolar range. PMID:19284521

  8. Antiendotoxin activity of cationic peptide antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Gough, M; Hancock, R E; Kelly, N M

    1996-01-01

    The endotoxin from gram-negative bacteria consists of a molecule lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which can be shed by bacteria during antimicrobial therapy. A resulting syndrome, endotoxic shock, is a leading cause of death in the developed world. Thus, there is great interest in the development of antimicrobial agents which can reverse rather than promote sepsis, especially given the recent disappointing clinical performance of antiendotoxin therapies. We describe here two small cationic peptides, MBI-27 and MBI-28, which have both antiendotoxic and antibacterial activities in vitro and in vivo in animal models. We had previously demonstrated that these peptides bind to LPS with an affinity equivalent to that of polymyxin B. Consistent with this, the peptides blocked the ability of LPS and intact cells to induce the endotoxic shock mediator, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), upon incubation with the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. MBI-28 was equivalent to polymyxin B in its ability to block LPS induction of TNF by this cell line, even when added 60 min after the TNF stimulus. Furthermore, MBI-28 offered significant protection in a galactosamine-sensitized mouse model of lethal endotoxic shock. This protection correlated with the ability of MBI-28 to reduce LPS-induced circulating TNF by nearly 90% in this mouse model. Both MBI-27 and MBI-28 demonstrated antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria in vitro and in vivo against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in neutropenic mice. PMID:8945527

  9. High-affinity binding of short peptides to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules by anchor combinations.

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, J; Belunis, C; Bolin, D; Papadopoulos, J; Walsky, R; Higelin, J; Danho, W; Sinigaglia, F; Nagy, Z A

    1994-01-01

    We have previously identified four anchor positions in HLA-DRB1*0101-binding peptides, and three anchors involved in peptide binding to DRB1*0401 and DRB1*1101 molecules, by screening of an M13 peptide display library (approximately 20 million independent nonapeptides) for DR-binding activity. In this study, high stringency screening of the M13 library for DRB1*0401 binding has resulted in identification of three further anchor positions. Taken together, a peptide-binding motif has been obtained, in which six of seven positions show enrichment of certain residues. We have demonstrated an additive effect of anchors in two different ways: (i) the addition of more anchors is shown to compensate for progressive truncation of designer peptides; (ii) the incorporation of an increasing number of anchors into 6- or 7-residue-long designer peptides is shown to result in a gradual increase of binding affinity to the level of 13-residue-long high-affinity epitopes. The anchor at relative position 1 seems to be obligatory, in that its substitution abrogates binding completely, whereas the elimination of other anchors results only in partial loss of binding affinity. The spacing between anchors is critical, since their effect is lost by shifting them one position toward the N or C terminus. The information born out of this study has been successfully used to identify DR-binding sequences from natural proteins. PMID:8183931

  10. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; Di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D’Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor. PMID:27498819

  11. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D’Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-08-01

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor.

  12. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; Di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D'Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor. PMID:27498819

  13. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; Di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D'Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-08-08

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor.

  14. Fatty acid conjugation enhances the activities of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhining; Yuan, Penghui; Xing, Meng; He, Zhumei; Dong, Chuanfu; Cao, Yongchang; Liu, Qiuyun

    2013-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small molecules that play a crucial role in innate immunity in multi-cellular organisms, and usually expressed and secreted constantly at basal levels to prevent infection, but local production can be augmented upon an infection. The clock is ticking as rising antibiotic abuse has led to the emergence of many drug resistance bacteria. Due to their broad spectrum antibiotic and antifungal activities as well as anti-viral and anti-tumor activities, efforts are being made to develop antimicrobial peptides into future microbial agents. This article describes some of the recent patents on antimicrobial peptides with fatty acid conjugation. Potency and selectivity of antimicrobial peptide can be modulated with fatty acid tails of variable length. Interaction between membranes and antimicrobial peptides was affected by fatty acid conjugation. At concentrations above the critical miscelle concentration (CMC), propensity of solution selfassembly hampered binding of the peptide to cell membranes. Overall, fatty acid conjugation has enhanced the activities of antimicrobial peptides, and occasionally it rendered inactive antimicrobial peptides to be bioactive. Antimicrobial peptides can not only be used as medicine but also as food additives.

  15. A Cell-Permeable Phospholipase C[gamma]1-Binding Peptide Transduces Neurons and Impairs Long-Term Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Sonja; Dash, Pramod K.

    2004-01-01

    Growth factor-mediated signaling has emerged as an essential component of memory formation. In this study, we used a phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLC[gamma]1) binding, cell-penetrating peptide to sequester PLC[gamma]1 away from its target, the phosphotyrosine residues within the activated growth factor receptor. Peptides appear to transduce neurons…

  16. Application of Synthetic Peptide Arrays To Uncover Cyclic Di-GMP Binding Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Düvel, Juliane; Bense, Sarina; Möller, Stefan; Bertinetti, Daniela; Schwede, Frank; Morr, Michael; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Jänsch, Lothar; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Frank, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT High levels of the universal bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) promote the establishment of surface-attached growth in many bacteria. Not only can c-di-GMP bind to nucleic acids and directly control gene expression, but it also binds to a diverse array of proteins of specialized functions and orchestrates their activity. Since its development in the early 1990s, the synthetic peptide array technique has become a powerful tool for high-throughput approaches and was successfully applied to investigate the binding specificity of protein-ligand interactions. In this study, we used peptide arrays to uncover the c-di-GMP binding site of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa protein (PA3740) that was isolated in a chemical proteomics approach. PA3740 was shown to bind c-di-GMP with a high affinity, and peptide arrays uncovered LKKALKKQTNLR to be a putative c-di-GMP binding motif. Most interestingly, different from the previously identified c-di-GMP binding motif of the PilZ domain (RXXXR) or the I site of diguanylate cyclases (RXXD), two leucine residues and a glutamine residue and not the charged amino acids provided the key residues of the binding sequence. Those three amino acids are highly conserved across PA3740 homologs, and their singular exchange to alanine reduced c-di-GMP binding within the full-length protein. IMPORTANCE In many bacterial pathogens the universal bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP governs the switch from the planktonic, motile mode of growth to the sessile, biofilm mode of growth. Bacteria adapt their intracellular c-di-GMP levels to a variety of environmental challenges. Several classes of c-di-GMP binding proteins have been structurally characterized, and diverse c-di-GMP binding domains have been identified. Nevertheless, for several c-di-GMP receptors, the binding motif remains to be determined. Here we show that the use of a synthetic peptide array allowed the identification of a c-di-GMP binding motif of a putative c

  17. Analysis of the haptoglobin binding region on the apolipoprotein A-I-derived P2a peptide.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, Maria Stefania; Di Stasi, Rossella; De Rosa, Lucia; Maresca, Bernadetta; Cigliano, Luisa; D'Andrea, Luca D

    2013-04-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) is the main protein component of the high density lipoproteins and it plays an important role in the reverse cholesterol transport. In particular, it stimulates cholesterol efflux from peripheral cells toward liver and activates the enzyme lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Haptoglobin (Hpt), a plasma α2-glycoprotein belonging to the family of acute-phase proteins, binds to ApoA-I inhibiting the stimulation of the enzyme LCAT. Previously, we reported that a synthetic peptide, P2a, binds to and displaces Hpt from ApoA-I restoring the LCAT cholesterol esterification activity in the presence of Hpt. Here, we investigate the molecular determinants underlining the interaction between Hpt and P2a peptide. Analysis of truncated P2a analogs showed that P2a sequence can only be slight reduced in length at the N-terminal to preserve the ability of binding to Hpt. Binding assays showed that charged residues are not involved in Hpt recognition; actually, E146A and D157A substitutions increase the binding affinity to Hpt. Biological characterization of the corresponding P2a peptide analogs, Apo146 and Apo157, showed that the two peptides interfere with Hpt binding to HDL and are more effective than P2a peptide in rescue LCAT activity from Hpt inhibition. This result suggests novel hints to design peptides with anti-atherogenic activity. PMID:23420675

  18. SABinder: A Web Service for Predicting Streptavidin-Binding Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Juanjuan; Ru, Beibei; Zhou, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Streptavidin is sometimes used as the intended target to screen phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries for streptavidin-binding peptides (SBPs). More often in the biopanning system, however, streptavidin is just a commonly used anchoring molecule that can efficiently capture the biotinylated target. In this case, SBPs creeping into the biopanning results are not desired binders but target-unrelated peptides (TUP). Taking them as intended binders may mislead subsequent studies. Therefore, it is important to find if a peptide is likely to be an SBP when streptavidin is either the intended target or just the anchoring molecule. In this paper, we describe an SVM-based ensemble predictor called SABinder. It is the first predictor for SBP. The model was built with the feature of optimized dipeptide composition. It was observed that 89.20% (MCC = 0.78; AUC = 0.93; permutation test, p < 0.001) of peptides were correctly classified. As a web server, SABinder is freely accessible. The tool provides a highly efficient way to exclude potential SBP when they are TUP or to facilitate identification of possibly new SBP when they are the desired binders. In either case, it will be helpful and can benefit related scientific community. PMID:27610387

  19. SABinder: A Web Service for Predicting Streptavidin-Binding Peptides.

    PubMed

    He, Bifang; Kang, Juanjuan; Ru, Beibei; Ding, Hui; Zhou, Peng; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Streptavidin is sometimes used as the intended target to screen phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries for streptavidin-binding peptides (SBPs). More often in the biopanning system, however, streptavidin is just a commonly used anchoring molecule that can efficiently capture the biotinylated target. In this case, SBPs creeping into the biopanning results are not desired binders but target-unrelated peptides (TUP). Taking them as intended binders may mislead subsequent studies. Therefore, it is important to find if a peptide is likely to be an SBP when streptavidin is either the intended target or just the anchoring molecule. In this paper, we describe an SVM-based ensemble predictor called SABinder. It is the first predictor for SBP. The model was built with the feature of optimized dipeptide composition. It was observed that 89.20% (MCC = 0.78; AUC = 0.93; permutation test, p < 0.001) of peptides were correctly classified. As a web server, SABinder is freely accessible. The tool provides a highly efficient way to exclude potential SBP when they are TUP or to facilitate identification of possibly new SBP when they are the desired binders. In either case, it will be helpful and can benefit related scientific community. PMID:27610387

  20. SABinder: A Web Service for Predicting Streptavidin-Binding Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Juanjuan; Ru, Beibei; Zhou, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Streptavidin is sometimes used as the intended target to screen phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries for streptavidin-binding peptides (SBPs). More often in the biopanning system, however, streptavidin is just a commonly used anchoring molecule that can efficiently capture the biotinylated target. In this case, SBPs creeping into the biopanning results are not desired binders but target-unrelated peptides (TUP). Taking them as intended binders may mislead subsequent studies. Therefore, it is important to find if a peptide is likely to be an SBP when streptavidin is either the intended target or just the anchoring molecule. In this paper, we describe an SVM-based ensemble predictor called SABinder. It is the first predictor for SBP. The model was built with the feature of optimized dipeptide composition. It was observed that 89.20% (MCC = 0.78; AUC = 0.93; permutation test, p < 0.001) of peptides were correctly classified. As a web server, SABinder is freely accessible. The tool provides a highly efficient way to exclude potential SBP when they are TUP or to facilitate identification of possibly new SBP when they are the desired binders. In either case, it will be helpful and can benefit related scientific community.

  1. The TLQP-21 Peptide Activates the G-protein-coupled receptor C3aR1 via a Folding-upon-Binding Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Severini, Cinzia; Gopinath, Tata; Braun, Patrick D.; Sassano, Maria F.; Gurney, Allison; Roth, Bryan L.; Vulchanova, Lucy; Possenti, Roberta; Veglia, Gianluigi; Bartolomucci, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY TLQP-21, a VGF-encoded peptide is emerging as a novel target for obesity-associated disorders. TLQP-21 is found in the sympathetic nerve terminals in the adipose tissue and targets the G-protein-coupled-receptor (GPCR) Complement-3a-Receptor1 (C3aR1). So far, the mechanisms of TLQP-21-induced receptor activation remained unexplored. Here, we report that TLQP-21 is intrinsically disordered and undergoes a disorder-to-order transition, adopting an α-helical conformation, upon targeting cells expressing the C3aR1. We determined that the hot spots for TLQP-21 are located at the C-terminus, with mutations in the last four amino acids progressively reducing the bioactivity and, a single site mutation (R21A) or C-terminal amidation abolishing its function completely. Interestingly, the human TLQP-21 sequence carrying a S20A substitution activates the human C3aR1 receptor with lower potency compared to the rodent sequence. These studies reveal the mechanism of action of TLQP-21 and provide molecular templates for designing agonists and antagonists to modulate C3aR1 functions. PMID:25456411

  2. Selection of peptides binding to metallic borides by screening M13 phage display libraries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal borides are a class of inorganic solids that is much less known and investigated than for example metal oxides or intermetallics. At the same time it is a highly versatile and interesting class of compounds in terms of physical and chemical properties, like semiconductivity, ferromagnetism, or catalytic activity. This makes these substances attractive for the generation of new materials. Very little is known about the interaction between organic materials and borides. To generate nanostructured and composite materials which consist of metal borides and organic modifiers it is necessary to develop new synthetic strategies. Phage peptide display libraries are commonly used to select peptides that bind specifically to metals, metal oxides, and semiconductors. Further, these binding peptides can serve as templates to control the nucleation and growth of inorganic nanoparticles. Additionally, the combination of two different binding motifs into a single bifunctional phage could be useful for the generation of new composite materials. Results In this study, we have identified a unique set of sequences that bind to amorphous and crystalline nickel boride (Ni3B) nanoparticles, from a random peptide library using the phage display technique. Using this technique, strong binders were identified that are selective for nickel boride. Sequence analysis of the peptides revealed that the sequences exhibit similar, yet subtle different patterns of amino acid usage. Although a predominant binding motif was not observed, certain charged amino acids emerged as essential in specific binding to both substrates. The 7-mer peptide sequence LGFREKE, isolated on amorphous Ni3B emerged as the best binder for both substrates. Fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirmed the specific binding affinity of LGFREKE expressing phage to amorphous and crystalline Ni3B nanoparticles. Conclusions This study is, to our knowledge, the first to identify peptides that

  3. Efficient conformational sampling of peptides adsorbed onto inorganic surfaces: insights from a quartz binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Wright, Louise B; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2013-04-01

    Harnessing the properties of biomolecules, such as peptides, adsorbed on inorganic surfaces is of interest to many cross-disciplinary areas of science, ranging from biomineralisation to nanomedicine. Key to advancing research in this area is determination of the peptide conformation(s) in its adsorbed state, at the aqueous interface. Molecular simulation is one such approach for accomplishing this goal. In this respect, use of temperature-based replica-exchange molecular dynamics (T-REMD) can yield enhanced sampling of the interfacial conformations, but does so at great computational expense, chiefly because of the need to include an explicit representation of water at the interface. Here, we investigate a number of more economical variations on REMD, chiefly those based on Replica Exchange with Solvent Tempering (REST), using the aqueous quartz-binding peptide S1-(100) α-quartz interfacial system as a benchmark. We also incorporate additional implementation details specifically targeted at improving sampling of biomolecules at interfaces. We find the REST-based variants yield configurational sampling of the peptide-surface system comparable with T-REMD, at a fraction of the computational time and resource. Our findings also deliver novel insights into the binding behaviour of the S1 peptide at the quartz (100) surface that are consistent with available experimental data.

  4. Activation of superoxide formation and lysozyme release in human neutrophils by the synthetic lipopeptide Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4. Involvement of guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins and synergism with chemotactic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, R; Schultz, G; Richter-Freund, M; Metzger, J; Wiesmüller, K H; Jung, G; Bessler, W G; Hauschildt, S

    1990-01-01

    Upon exposure to the bacterial chemotactic peptide fMet-Leu-Phe, human neutrophils release lysozyme and generate superoxide anions (O2.-). The synthetic lipoamino acid N-palmitoyl-S-[2,3-bis(palmitoyloxy)-(2RS)-propyl]-(R)-cysteine (Pam3Cys), which is derived from the N-terminus of bacterial lipoprotein, when attached to Ser-(Lys)4 [giving Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4], activated O2.- formation and lysozyme release in human neutrophils with an effectiveness amounting to about 15% of that of fMet-Leu-Phe. Palmitic acid, muramyl dipeptide, lipopolysaccharide and the lipopeptides Pam3Cys-Ala-Gly, Pam3Cys-Ser-Gly, Pam3Cys-Ser, Pam3Cys-OMe and Pam3Cys-OH did not activate O2.- formation. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins) and functionally uncouples formyl peptide receptors from G-proteins, prevented activation of O2.- formation by fMet-Leu-Phe and inhibited Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4-induced O2.- formation by 85%. Lipopeptide-induced exocytosis was pertussis-toxin-insensitive. O2.- formation induced by Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 and fMet-Leu-Phe was enhanced by cytochalasin B, by a phorbol ester and by a diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor. Addition of activators of adenylate cyclase and removal of extracellular Ca2+ inhibited O2.- formation by fMet-Leu-Phe and Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 to different extents. Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 synergistically enhanced fMet-Leu-Phe-induced O2.- formation and primed neutrophils to respond to the chemotactic peptide at non-stimulatory concentrations. Our data suggest the following. (1) Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 activates neutrophils through G-proteins, involving pertussis-toxin-sensitive and -insensitive processes. (2) The signal transduction pathways activated by fMet-Leu-Phe and Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 are similar but not identical. (3) In inflammatory processes, bacterial lipoproteins and chemotactic peptides may interact synergistically to activate O2.- formation, leading to enhanced bactericidal activity. PMID:2160237

  5. A hypothetical model for the peptide binding domain of hsp70 based on the peptide binding domain of HLA.

    PubMed Central

    Rippmann, F; Taylor, W R; Rothbard, J B; Green, N M

    1991-01-01

    The sequences of the peptide binding domains of 33 70 kd heat shock proteins (hsp70) have been aligned and a consensus secondary structure has been deduced. Individual members showed no significant deviation from the consensus, which showed a beta 4 alpha motif repeated twice, followed by two further helices and a terminus rich in Pro and Gly. The repeated motif could be aligned with the secondary structure of the functionally equivalent peptide binding domain of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I maintaining equivalent residues in structurally important positions in the two families and a model was built based on this alignment. The interaction of this domain with the ATP domain is considered. The overall model is shown to be consistent with the properties of products of chymotryptic cleavage. PMID:2022182

  6. Mutations in the substrate binding site of human heat-shock protein 70 indicate specific interaction with HLA-DR outside the peptide binding groove.

    PubMed

    Rohrer, Karin M; Haug, Markus; Schwörer, Daniela; Kalbacher, Hubert; Holzer, Ursula

    2014-06-01

    Heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70)-peptide complexes are involved in MHC class I- and II-restricted antigen presentation, enabling enhanced activation of T cells. As shown previously, mammalian cytosolic Hsp70 (Hsc70) molecules interact specifically with HLA-DR molecules. This interaction might be of significance as Hsp70 molecules could transfer bound antigenic peptides in a ternary complex into the binding groove of HLA-DR molecules. The present study provides new insights into the distinct interaction of Hsp70 with HLA-DR molecules. Using a quantitative binding assay, it could be demonstrated that a point mutation of amino acids alanine 406 and valine 438 in the substrate binding pocket led to reduced peptide binding compared with the wild-type Hsp70 whereas HLA-DR binding remains unaffected. The removal of the C-terminal lid neither altered the substrate binding capacity nor the Hsp70 binding characteristics to HLA-DR. A truncated variant lacking the nucleotide binding domain showed no binding interactions with HLA-DR. Furthermore, the truncated ATPase subunit of constitutively expressed Hsc70 revealed similar binding affinities to HLA-DR compared with the complete Hsc70. Hence, it can be assumed that the Hsp70-HLA-DR interaction takes place outside the peptide binding groove and is attributed to the ATPase domain of HSP70 molecules. The Hsp70-chaperoned peptides might thereby be directly transferred into the binding groove of HLA-DR, so enabling enhanced presentation of the peptide on antigen-presenting cells and leading to an improved proliferation of responding T cells as shown previously.

  7. P. falciparum: merozoite surface protein-8 peptides bind specifically to human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Alvaro; García, Javier; Ocampo, Marisol; Rodríguez, Luis; Vera, Ricardo; Curtidor, Hernando; López, Ramsés; Suarez, Jorge; Valbuena, John; Vanegas, Magnolia; Guzman, Fanny; Tovar, Diana; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2003-07-01

    This work determined Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein-8 (MSP-8) regions specifically binding to membrane surface receptors on human erythrocytes. Five high activity binding peptides (HABPs), whose binding to erythrocytes became saturable and sensitive on being treated with neuraminidase and chymotrypsin were identified from the MSP-8 protein. Those amino acids directly involved in interaction with erythrocytes were also determined for each one of the HABPs. Some of them specifically recognized 28, 46, and 73 kDa erythrocyte membrane proteins. Some HABPs inhibited in vitro P. falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes by up to 98%, suggesting the MSP-8 protein's possible role in the invasion process.

  8. Zooming into the binding groove of HLA molecules: which positions and which substitutions change peptide binding most?

    PubMed

    van Deutekom, Hanneke W M; Keşmir, Can

    2015-08-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. Almost all polymorphic residues are located in the peptide-binding groove, resulting in different peptide-binding preferences. Whether a single amino acid change can alter the peptide-binding repertoire of an HLA molecule has never been shown. To experimentally quantify the contribution of a single amino acid change to the peptide repertoire of even a single HLA molecule requires an immense number of HLA peptide-binding measurements. Therefore, we used an in silico method to study the effect of single mutations on the peptide repertoires. We predicted the peptide-binding repertoire of a large set of HLA molecules and used the overlap of the peptide-binding repertoires of each pair of HLA molecules that differ on a single position to measure how much single substitutions change the peptide binding. We found that the effect of a single substitution in the peptide-binding groove depends on the substituted position and the amino acids involved. The positions that alter peptide binding most are the most polymorphic ones, while those that are hardly variable among HLA molecules have the lowest effect on the peptide repertoire. Although expected, the relationship between functional divergence and polymorphism of HLA molecules has never been shown before. Additionally, we show that a single substitution in HLA-B molecules has more effect on the peptide-binding repertoire compared to that in HLA-A molecules. This provides an (alternative) explanation for the larger polymorphism of HLA-B molecules compared to HLA-A molecules.

  9. PeptiSite: a structural database of peptide binding sites in 4D.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Chayan; Kufareva, Irina; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-03-21

    We developed PeptiSite, a comprehensive and reliable database of biologically and structurally characterized peptide-binding sites, in which each site is represented by an ensemble of its complexes with protein, peptide and small molecule partners. The unique features of the database include: (1) the ensemble site representation that provides a fourth dimension to the otherwise three dimensional data, (2) comprehensive characterization of the binding site architecture that may consist of a multimeric protein assembly with cofactors and metal ions and (3) analysis of consensus interaction motifs within the ensembles and identification of conserved determinants of these interactions. Currently the database contains 585 proteins with 650 peptide-binding sites. http://peptisite.ucsd.edu/ link allows searching for the sites of interest and interactive visualization of the ensembles using the ActiveICM web-browser plugin. This structural database for protein-peptide interactions enables understanding of structural principles of these interactions and may assist the development of an efficient peptide docking benchmark. PMID:24406170

  10. Specific bindings of glycine peptides of distinctly different chain length on dynamic papain surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the specific bindings of peptides of 1-10 glycine residues (1-10GLY) on dynamic papain surfaces via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Although the binding specificities of 1-5GLY on papain fluctuated little with time, the binding specificities of 6-10GLY on papain considerably fluctuated with time. Some residues had a significant impact on bindings of 6-10GLY to sites near active center of papain, and some of their residues were specific for each 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY. Modification of these specific residues should allow for control of binding specificity of 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY to the active center.

  11. G-CSF receptor-binding cyclic peptides designed with artificial amino-acid linkers

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Kenji . E-mail: kshibata@kyowa.co.jp; Maruyama-Takahashi, Kumiko; Yamasaki, Motoo; Hirayama, Noriaki . E-mail: hirayama@is.icc.u-tokai.ac.jp

    2006-03-10

    Designing small molecules that mimic the receptor-binding local surface structure of large proteins such as cytokines or growth factors is fascinating and challenging. In this study, we designed cyclic peptides that reproduce the receptor-binding loop structures of G-CSF. We found it is important to select a suitable linker to join two or more discontinuous sequences and both termini of the peptide corresponding to the receptor-binding loop. Structural simulations based on the crystallographic structure of KW-2228, a stable and potent analog of human G-CSF, led us to choose 4-aminobenzoic acid (Abz) as a part of the linker. A combination of 4-Abz with {beta}-alanine or glycine, and disulfide bridges between cysteins or homocysteins, gave a structure suitable for receptor binding. In this structure, the side-chains of several amino acids important for the interactions with the receptor are protruding from one side of the peptide ring. This artificial peptide showed G-CSF antagonistic activity in a cell proliferation assay.

  12. Protection of Nonself Surfaces from Complement Attack by Factor H-Binding Peptides: Implications for Therapeutic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wu, You-Qiang; Qu, Hongchang; Sfyroera, Georgia; Tzekou, Apostolia; Kay, Brian K.; Nilsson, Bo; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of nonself surfaces such as those of biomaterials or transplanted cells and organs to host blood frequently triggers innate immune responses, thereby affecting both their functionality and tolerability. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement plays a decisive role in this unfavorable reaction. Whereas previous studies demonstrated that immobilization of physiological regulators of complement activation (RCA) can attenuate this foreign body-induced activation, simple and efficient approaches for coating artificial surfaces with intact RCA are still missing. The conjugation of small molecular entities that capture RCA with high affinity is an intriguing alternative, as this creates a surface with autoregulatory activity upon exposure to blood. We therefore screened two variable cysteine-constrained phage-displayed peptide libraries for factor H-binding peptides. We discovered three peptide classes that differed with respect to their main target binding areas. Peptides binding to the broad middle region of factor H (domains 5–18) were of particular interest, as they do not interfere with either regulatory or binding activities. One peptide in this group (5C6) was further characterized and showed high factor H-capturing activity while retaining its functional integrity. Most importantly, when 5C6 was coated to a model polystyrene surface and exposed to human lepirudin-anticoagulated plasma, the bound peptide captured factor H and substantially inhibited complement activation by the alternative pathway. Our study therefore provides a promising and novel approach to produce therapeutic materials with enhanced biocompatibility. PMID:21339361

  13. General approach for characterizing in vitro selected peptides with protein binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andrew C; Gillig, Annabelle; Shah, Pankti; Sau, Sujay P; Fenton, Kathryn E; Chaput, John C

    2014-08-01

    In vitro selection technologies are important tools for identifying high affinity peptides to proteins of broad medical and biological interest. However, the technological advances that have made it possible to generate long lists of candidate peptides have far outpaced our ability to characterize the binding properties of individual peptides. Here, we describe a low cost strategy to rapidly synthesize, purify, screen, and characterize peptides for high binding affinity. Peptides are assayed in a 96-well dot blot apparatus using membranes that enable partitioning of bound and unbound peptide-protein complexes. We have validated the binding affinity constants produced by this method using known peptide ligands and applied this process to discover five new peptides with nanomolar affinity to human α-thrombin. Given the need for new analytical tools that can accelerate peptide discovery and characterization, we feel that this approach would be useful to a wide range of technologies that utilize high affinity peptides.

  14. A general and efficient approach for NMR studies of peptide dynamics in class I MHC peptide binding grooves.

    PubMed

    Insaidoo, Francis K; Zajicek, Jaroslav; Baker, Brian M

    2009-10-20

    T-Cell receptor recognition of peptides bound by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins initiates a cellular immune response. Dynamics of peptides within MHC binding grooves can influence TCR recognition, yet NMR studies which could address this rigorously have been hindered by the expense of isotopically labeled peptides and the large size of peptide-MHC complexes. Here we describe a methodology for characterizing peptide dynamics within MHC binding grooves via NMR, using a biosynthetic approach for producing labeled peptide. With the Tax(11-19) peptide bound to the human class I MHC HLA-A*0201, we demonstrate that peptide generated in this manner can be well characterized in MHC binding grooves by NMR, providing opportunities to more precisely study the role of peptide dynamics in TCR recognition. Demonstrating the utility of such studies, the data with the Tax(11-19) peptide indicate the presence of slow conformational exchange in the peptide, supporting an "induced-fit" style TCR binding mechanism.

  15. A general and efficient approach for NMR studies of peptide dynamics in class I MHC peptide binding grooves.

    PubMed

    Insaidoo, Francis K; Zajicek, Jaroslav; Baker, Brian M

    2009-10-20

    T-Cell receptor recognition of peptides bound by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins initiates a cellular immune response. Dynamics of peptides within MHC binding grooves can influence TCR recognition, yet NMR studies which could address this rigorously have been hindered by the expense of isotopically labeled peptides and the large size of peptide-MHC complexes. Here we describe a methodology for characterizing peptide dynamics within MHC binding grooves via NMR, using a biosynthetic approach for producing labeled peptide. With the Tax(11-19) peptide bound to the human class I MHC HLA-A*0201, we demonstrate that peptide generated in this manner can be well characterized in MHC binding grooves by NMR, providing opportunities to more precisely study the role of peptide dynamics in TCR recognition. Demonstrating the utility of such studies, the data with the Tax(11-19) peptide indicate the presence of slow conformational exchange in the peptide, supporting an "induced-fit" style TCR binding mechanism. PMID:19772349

  16. Identification of five different Patr class I molecules that bind HLA supertype peptides and definition of their peptide binding motifs.

    PubMed

    McKinney, D M; Erickson, A L; Walker, C M; Thimme, R; Chisari, F V; Sidney, J; Sette, A

    2000-10-15

    We have sequenced the Pan troglodytes class I (Patr) molecules from three common chimpanzees and expressed them as single molecules in a class I-deficient cell line. These lines were utilized to obtain purified class I molecules to define the peptide binding motifs associated with five different Patr molecules. Based on these experiments, as well as analysis of the predicted structure of the B and F polymorphic MHC pockets, we classified five Patr molecules (Patr-A*0101, Patr-B*0901, Patr-B*0701, Patr-A*0602, and Patr-B*1301) within previously defined supertype specificities associated with HLA class I molecules (HLA-A3, -B7, -A1, and -A24 supertypes). The overlap in the binding repertoire between specific HLA and Patr class I molecules was in the range of 33 to 92%, depending on the particular Patr molecule as assessed by the binding of HIV-, hepatitis B virus-, and hepatitis C virus-derived epitopes. Finally, live cell binding assays of nine chimpanzee-derived B cell lines demonstrated that HLA supertype peptides bound to Patr class I molecules with frequencies in the 20-50% range. PMID:11035079

  17. Small Retinoprotective Peptides Reveal a Receptor-binding Region on Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Kenealey, Jason; Subramanian, Preeti; Comitato, Antonella; Bullock, Jeanee; Keehan, Laura; Polato, Federica; Hoover, David; Marigo, Valeria; Becerra, S. Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The cytoprotective effects of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) require interactions between an as of a yet undefined region with a distinct ectodomain on the PEDF receptor (PEDF-R). Here we characterized the area in PEDF that interacts with PEDF-R to promote photoreceptor survival. Molecular docking studies suggested that the ligand binding site of PEDF-R interacts with the neurotrophic region of PEDF (44-mer, positions 78–121). Binding assays demonstrated that PEDF-R bound the 44-mer peptide. Moreover, peptide P1 from the PEDF-R ectodomain had affinity for the 44-mer and a shorter fragment within it, 17-mer (positions 98–114). Single residue substitutions to alanine along the 17-mer sequence were designed and tested for binding and biological activity. Altered 17-mer[R99A] did not bind to the P1 peptide, whereas 17-mer[H105A] had higher affinity than the unmodified 17-mer. Peptides 17-mer, 17-mer[H105A], and 44-mer exhibited cytoprotective effects in cultured retina R28 cells. Intravitreal injections of these peptides and PEDF in the rd1 mouse model of retinal degeneration decreased the numbers of dying photoreceptors, 17-mer[H105A] being most effective. The blocking peptide P1 hindered their protective effects both in retina cells and in vivo. Thus, in addition to demonstrating that the region composed of positions 98–114 of PEDF contains critical residues for PEDF-R interaction that mediates survival effects, the findings reveal distinct small PEDF fragments with neurotrophic effects on photoreceptors. PMID:26304116

  18. A Heparan Sulfate-Binding Cell Penetrating Peptide for Tumor Targeting and Migration Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ping-Hsueh; Chang, Pei-Lin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2015-01-01

    As heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are known as co-receptors to interact with numerous growth factors and then modulate downstream biological activities, overexpression of HS/HSPG on cell surface acts as an increasingly reliable prognostic factor in tumor progression. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short-chain peptides developed as functionalized vectors for delivery approaches of impermeable agents. On cell surface negatively charged HS provides the initial attachment of basic CPPs by electrostatic interaction, leading to multiple cellular effects. Here a functional peptide (CPPecp) has been identified from critical HS binding region in hRNase3, a unique RNase family member with in vitro antitumor activity. In this study we analyze a set of HS-binding CPPs derived from natural proteins including CPPecp. In addition to cellular binding and internalization, CPPecp demonstrated multiple functions including strong binding activity to tumor cell surface with higher HS expression, significant inhibitory effects on cancer cell migration, and suppression of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, different from conventional highly basic CPPs, CPPecp facilitated magnetic nanoparticle to selectively target tumor site in vivo. Therefore, CPPecp could engage its capacity to be developed as biomaterials for diagnostic imaging agent, therapeutic supplement, or functionalized vector for drug delivery. PMID:26064887

  19. Iron-binding properties of sugar cane yeast peptides.

    PubMed

    de la Hoz, Lucia; Ponezi, Alexandre N; Milani, Raquel F; Nunes da Silva, Vera S; Sonia de Souza, A; Bertoldo-Pacheco, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The extract of sugar-cane yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was enzymatically hydrolysed by Alcalase, Protex or Viscozyme. Hydrolysates were fractionated using a membrane ultrafiltration system and peptides smaller than 5kDa were evaluated for iron chelating ability through measurements of iron solubility, binding capacity and dialyzability. Iron-chelating peptides were isolated using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). They showed higher content of His, Lys, and Arg than the original hydrolysates. In spite of poor iron solubility, hydrolysates of Viscozyme provided higher iron dialyzability than those of other enzymes. This means that more chelates of iron or complexes were formed and these kept the iron stable during simulated gastro-intestinal digestion in vitro, improving its dialyzability.

  20. Biosynthetic regulation of phytochelatins, heavy metal-binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Kazumasa; Tsuji, Naoki; Miyamoto, Kazuhisa

    2005-12-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are heavy metal-binding peptides that play important roles in the detoxification of toxic heavy metals and the regulation of intracellular concentrations of essential metals in eukaryotes, including higher plants, fungi, and microalgae. Recently, PC synthase genes in higher plants and fission yeast have been identified and characterized, enabling molecular biological studies to unravel the mechanisms underlying PC synthesis. Moreover, recent routine database searches have unexpectedly identified genes that are similar to plant PC synthase genes in the genomes of worms and some prokaryotes. In this review, we introduce these recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms for PC biosynthesis and functions in order to supply basic information about the unique and attractive peptides applicable to various fields.

  1. Signal peptides are allosteric activators of the protein translocase

    PubMed Central

    Gouridis, Giorgos; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Gelis, Ioannis; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.; Economou, Anastassios

    2010-01-01

    Extra-cytoplasmic polypeptides are usually synthesized as “preproteins” carrying aminoterminal, cleavable signal peptides1 and secreted across membranes by translocases. The main bacterial translocase comprises the SecYEG protein-conducting channel and the peripheral ATPase motor SecA2,3. Most proteins destined for the periplasm and beyond are exported post-translationally by SecA2,3. Preprotein targeting to SecA is thought to involve signal peptides4 and chaperones like SecB5,6. Here we reveal that signal peptides have a novel role beyond targeting: they are essential allosteric activators of the translocase. Upon docking on their binding groove on SecA, signal peptides act in trans to drive three successive states: first, “triggering” that drives the translocase to a lower activation energy state; then “trapping” that engages non-native preprotein mature domains docked with high affinity on the secretion apparatus and, finally, “secretion” during which trapped mature domains undergo multiple turnovers of translocation in segments7. A significant contribution by mature domains renders signal peptides less critical in bacterial secretory protein targeting than currently assumed. Rather, it is their function as allosteric activators of the translocase that renders signal peptides essential for protein secretion. A role for signal peptides and targeting sequences as allosteric activators may be universal in protein translocases. PMID:19924216

  2. Learning a peptide-protein binding affinity predictor with kernel ridge regression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The cellular function of a vast majority of proteins is performed through physical interactions with other biomolecules, which, most of the time, are other proteins. Peptides represent templates of choice for mimicking a secondary structure in order to modulate protein-protein interaction. They are thus an interesting class of therapeutics since they also display strong activity, high selectivity, low toxicity and few drug-drug interactions. Furthermore, predicting peptides that would bind to a specific MHC alleles would be of tremendous benefit to improve vaccine based therapy and possibly generate antibodies with greater affinity. Modern computational methods have the potential to accelerate and lower the cost of drug and vaccine discovery by selecting potential compounds for testing in silico prior to biological validation. Results We propose a specialized string kernel for small bio-molecules, peptides and pseudo-sequences of binding interfaces. The kernel incorporates physico-chemical properties of amino acids and elegantly generalizes eight kernels, comprised of the Oligo, the Weighted Degree, the Blended Spectrum, and the Radial Basis Function. We provide a low complexity dynamic programming algorithm for the exact computation of the kernel and a linear time algorithm for it’s approximation. Combined with kernel ridge regression and SupCK, a novel binding pocket kernel, the proposed kernel yields biologically relevant and good prediction accuracy on the PepX database. For the first time, a machine learning predictor is capable of predicting the binding affinity of any peptide to any protein with reasonable accuracy. The method was also applied to both single-target and pan-specific Major Histocompatibility Complex class II benchmark datasets and three Quantitative Structure Affinity Model benchmark datasets. Conclusion On all benchmarks, our method significantly (p-value ≤ 0.057) outperforms the current state-of-the-art methods at predicting

  3. Immunomodulatory effects of endogenous and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pomorska, Dorota K; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The main role of endogenous opioid peptides is the modulation of pain. Opioid peptides exert their analgesic activity by binding to the opioid receptors distributed widely in the central nervous system (CNS). However, opioid receptors are also found on tissues and organs outside the CNS, including the cells of the immune system, indicating that opioids are capable of exerting additional effects in periphery. Morphine, which is a gold standard in the treatment of chronic pain, is well-known for its immunosuppressive effects. Much less is known about the immunomodulatory effects exerted by endogenous (enkephalins, endorphins, dynorphins and endomorphins) and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors. In this review we tried to summarize opioid peptide-mediated modulation of immune cell functions which can be stimulatory as well as inhibitory. PMID:25553430

  4. Structural analysis of leader peptide binding enables leader-free cyanobactin processing.

    PubMed

    Koehnke, Jesko; Mann, Greg; Bent, Andrew F; Ludewig, Hannes; Shirran, Sally; Botting, Catherine; Lebl, Tomas; Houssen, Wael E; Jaspars, Marcel; Naismith, James H

    2015-08-01

    Regioselective modification of amino acids within the context of a peptide is common to a number of biosynthetic pathways, and many of the resulting products have potential as therapeutics. The ATP-dependent enzyme LynD heterocyclizes multiple cysteine residues to thiazolines within a peptide substrate. The enzyme requires the substrate to have a conserved N-terminal leader for full activity. Catalysis is almost insensitive to immediately flanking residues in the substrate, suggesting that recognition occurs distant from the active site. Nucleotide and peptide substrate co-complex structures of LynD reveal that the substrate leader peptide binds to and extends the β-sheet of a conserved domain of LynD, whereas catalysis is accomplished in another conserved domain. The spatial segregation of catalysis from recognition combines seemingly contradictory properties of regioselectivity and promiscuity, and it appears to be a conserved strategy in other peptide-modifying enzymes. A variant of LynD that efficiently processes substrates without a leader peptide has been engineered.

  5. Natural and synthetic peptides with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Conti, Stefania; Magliani, Walter; Santinoli, Claudia; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the increase of invasive fungal infections and the emergence of antifungal resistance stressed the need for new antifungal drugs. Peptides have shown to be good candidates for the development of alternative antimicrobial agents through high-throughput screening, and subsequent optimization according to a rational approach. This review presents a brief overview on antifungal natural peptides of different sources (animals, plants, micro-organisms), peptide fragments derived by proteolytic cleavage of precursor physiological proteins (cryptides), synthetic unnatural peptides and peptide derivatives. Antifungal peptides are schematically reported based on their structure, antifungal spectrum and reported effects. Natural or synthetic peptides and their modified derivatives may represent the basis for new compounds active against fungal infections. PMID:27502155

  6. ARSENITE BINDING TO SYNTHETIC PEPTIDES: THE EFFECT OF INCREASING LENGTH BETWEEN TWO CYSTEINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Binding of trivalent arsenicals to peptides and proteins can alter peptide/protein structure and enzyme function and thereby contribute to arsenic toxicity and carcinogenicity. We utilized radioactive 73As- labeled arsenite and vacuum filtration methodology to determine the bindi...

  7. One-step surface modification of polyurethane using affinity binding peptides for enhanced fouling resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yibing; Yu, Yong; Zhang, Liting; Qin, Peng; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Affinity binding peptides were examined for surface fabrication of synthetic polymeric materials. Peptides possessing strong binding affinities toward polyurethane (PU) were discovered via biopanning of M13 phage peptide library. The apparent binding constant (K(app)) was as high as 2.68 × 10(9) M(-1) with surface peptide density exceeded 1.8 μg/cm(2). Structural analysis showed that the ideal peptide had a high content (75%) of H-donor amino acid residues, and that intensified hydrogen bond interaction was the key driving force for the highly stable binding of peptides on PU. PU treated with such affinity peptides promises applications as low-fouling materials, as peptides increased its wettability and substantially reduced protein adsorption and cell adhesion. These results demonstrated a facile but highly efficient one-step strategy for surface property modification of polymeric materials for biotechnological applications. PMID:25732121

  8. Antimicrobial peptides: a review of how peptide structure impacts antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Jason W.; Mello, Charlene M.

    2004-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been discovered in insects, mammals, reptiles, and plants to protect against microbial infection. Many of these peptides have been isolated and studied exhaustively to decipher the molecular mechanisms that impart protection against infectious bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms are still being debated within the scientific community but valuable clues have been obtained through structure/function relationship studies1. Biophysical studies have revealed that cecropins, isolated from insects and pigs, exhibit random structure in solution but undergo a conformational change to an amphipathic α-helix upon interaction with a membrane surface2. The lack of secondary structure in solution results in an extremely durable peptide able to survive exposure to high temperatures, organic solvents and incorporation into fibers and films without compromising antibacterial activity. Studies to better understand the antimicrobial action of cecropins and other AMPs have provided insight into the importance of peptide sequence and structure in antimicrobial activities. Therefore, enhancing our knowledge of how peptide structure imparts function may result in customized peptide sequences tailored for specific applications such as targeted cell delivery systems, novel antibiotics and food preservation additives. This review will summarize the current state of knowledge with respect to cell binding and antimicrobial activity of AMPs focusing primarily upon cecropins.

  9. Copper-binding peptides from human prion protein and newly designed peroxidative biocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Kadono, Takashi; Uezu, Kazuya; Kawano, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    A previous work suggested that peptides from the histidine-containing copper-binding motifs in human prion protein (PrP) function as peroxidase-like biocatalysts catalyzing the generation of superoxide anion radicals in the presence of neurotransmitters (aromatic monoamines) and phenolics such as tyrosine and tyrosyl residues on proteins. In this study, using various phenolic substrates, the phenol-dependent superoxide-generating activities of PrP-derived peptide sequences were compared. Among the peptides tested, the GGGTH pentapeptide was shown to be the most active catalyst for phenol-dependent reactions. Based on these results, we designed a series of oligoglycyl-histidines as novel peroxidative biocatalysts, and their catalytic performances including kinetics, heat tolerance, and freezing tolerance were analysed. PMID:21630593

  10. Inorganic binding peptides designed by phage display techniques for biotechnology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chih-Wei

    Biomacromolecules play an important role in the control of hard tissue structure and function via specific molecular recognition interactions between proteins of the matrix and inorganic species of the biomineral phase. During the construction of the tissue, biomacromolecules are usually folded into a certain comformation, analogous to a "lock" for fitting with other proteins or smaller molecules as a "key". Currently, the rational design of molecular recognition in biomacro-molecules is still hard to accomplish because the protein conformation is too complex to precisely predict based on the existing conformational information of proteins found in biological systems. In the past two decades, the combinatorial approach (e.g. phage display techniques) has been used to select short binding peptides with molecular recognition to an inorganic target material without a prior knowledge of the amino acid sequence required for the specific binding. The technique has been referred to as "biopanning" because bacteriophages are used to "screen" for peptides that exhibit strong binding to a target material of interest. In this study, two diverse applications were chosen to demonstrate the utility of the biopanning approach. In one project, phage display techniques were used to pan for Indium Zinc Oxide (InZnO) binding peptides to serve as linkers between transducer devices and biosensing elements for demonstration of the feasibility of reversibly electro-activated biosensors. The amorphous InZnO, with its homogeneous surface, led to three consensus peptide sequences, AGFPNSTHSSNL, SHAPDSTWFALF, and TNSSSQFVVAIP. In addition, it was demonstrated that some selected phage clones of the InZnO binding peptides were able to be released from the InZnO surface after applying a voltage of 1400 mV on an electro-activated releasing device. In the second project, phage display techniques were used to select phage clones that bind specifically to francolite mineral in order to achieve

  11. Human IgA-binding peptides selected from random peptide libraries: affinity maturation and application in IgA purification.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Takaaki; Ohzono, Shinji; Park, Mirae; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Tsukamoto, Shogo; Sugita, Ryohei; Ishitobi, Hiroyuki; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ito, Osamu; Sorajo, Koichi; Sugimura, Kazuhisa; Ham, Sihyun; Ito, Yuji

    2012-12-14

    Phage display system is a powerful tool to design specific ligands for target molecules. Here, we used disulfide-constrained random peptide libraries constructed with the T7 phage display system to isolate peptides specific to human IgA. The binding clones (A1-A4) isolated by biopanning exhibited clear specificity to human IgA, but the synthetic peptide derived from the A2 clone exhibited a low specificity/affinity (K(d) = 1.3 μm). Therefore, we tried to improve the peptide using a partial randomized phage display library and mutational studies on the synthetic peptides. The designed Opt-1 peptide exhibited a 39-fold higher affinity (K(d) = 33 nm) than the A2 peptide. An Opt-1 peptide-conjugated column was used to purify IgA from human plasma. However, the recovered IgA fraction was contaminated with other proteins, indicating nonspecific binding. To design a peptide with increased binding specificity, we examined the structural features of Opt-1 and the Opt-1-IgA complex using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water. The simulation results revealed that the Opt-1 peptide displayed partial helicity in the N-terminal region and possessed a hydrophobic cluster that played a significant role in tight binding with IgA-Fc. However, these hydrophobic residues of Opt-1 may contribute to nonspecific binding with other proteins. To increase binding specificity, we introduced several mutations in the hydrophobic residues of Opt-1. The resultant Opt-3 peptide exhibited high specificity and high binding affinity for IgA, leading to successful isolation of IgA without contamination.

  12. Unusual features of Self-Peptide/MHC Binding by Autoimmune T Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson,M.; Hahn, M.; Wucherpfennig, K.

    2005-01-01

    Structural studies on T cell receptors (TCRs) specific for foreign antigens demonstrated a remarkably similar topology characterized by a central, diagonal TCR binding mode that maximizes interactions with the MHC bound peptide. However, three recent structures involving autoimmune TCRs demonstrated unusual interactions with self-peptide/MHC complexes. Two TCRs from multiple sclerosis patients bind with unconventional topologies, and both TCRs are shifted toward the peptide N terminus and the MHC class II {beta} chain helix. A TCR from the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model binds in a conventional orientation, but the structure is unusual because the self-peptide only partially fills the binding site. For all three TCRs, interaction with the MHC bound self-peptide is suboptimal, and only two or three TCR loops contact the peptide. Optimal TCR binding modes confer a competitive advantage for antimicrobial T cells during an infection, whereas altered binding properties may permit survival of a subset of autoreactive T cells during thymic selection.

  13. Minimal antizyme peptide fully functioning in the binding and inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase and antizyme inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ju-Yi; Yang, Jung-Yen; Lin, Chih-Li; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2011-01-01

    Antizyme (AZ) is a protein with 228 amino acid residues that regulates ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) by binding to ODC and dissociating its homodimer, thus inhibiting its enzyme activity. Antizyme inhibitor (AZI) is homologous to ODC, but has a higher affinity than ODC for AZ. In this study, we quantified the biomolecular interactions between AZ and ODC as well as AZ and AZI to identify functional AZ peptides that could bind to ODC and AZI and inhibit their function as efficiently as the full-length AZ protein. For these AZ peptides, the inhibitory ability of AZ_95-228 was similar to that of AZ_WT. Furthermore, AZ_95-176 displayed an inhibition (IC(50): 0.20 µM) similar to that of AZ-95-228 (IC(50): 0.16 µM), even though a large segment spanning residues 177-228 was deleted. However, further deletion of AZ_95-176 from either the N-terminus or the C-terminus decreased its ability to inhibit ODC. The AZ_100-176 and AZ_95-169 peptides displayed a noteworthy decrease in ability to inhibit ODC, with IC(50) values of 0.43 and 0.37 µM, respectively. The AZ_95-228, AZ_100-228 and AZ_95-176 peptides had IC(50) values comparable to that of AZ_WT and formed AZ-ODC complexes with K(d,AZ-ODC) values of 1.5, 5.3 and 5.6 µM, respectively. Importantly, our data also indicate that AZI can rescue AZ peptide-inhibited ODC enzyme activity and that it can bind to AZ peptides with a higher affinity than ODC. Together, these data suggest that these truncated AZ proteins retain their AZI-binding ability. Thus, we suggest that AZ_95-176 is the minimal AZ peptide that is fully functioning in the binding of ODC and AZI and inhibition of their function. PMID:21931692

  14. Design of Compact Biomimetic Cellulose Binding Peptides as Carriers for Cellulose Catalytic Degradation.

    PubMed

    Khazanov, Netaly; Iline-Vul, Taly; Noy, Efrat; Goobes, Gil; Senderowitz, Hanoch

    2016-01-21

    The conversion of biomass into biofuels can reduce the strategic vulnerability of petroleum-based systems and at the same time have a positive effect on global climate issues. Lignocellulose is the cheapest and most abundant source of biomass and consequently has been widely considered as a source for liquid fuel. However, despite ongoing efforts, cellulosic biofuels are still far from commercial realization, one of the major bottlenecks being the hydrolysis of cellulose into simpler sugars. Inspired by the structural and functional modularity of cellulases used by many organisms for the breakdown of cellulose, we propose to mimic the cellulose binding domain (CBD) and the catalytic domain of these proteins by small molecular entities. Multiple copies of these mimics could subsequently be tethered together to enhance hydrolytic activity. In this work, we take the first step toward achieving this goal by applying computational approaches to the design of efficient, cost-effective mimetics of the CBD. The design is based on low molecular weight peptides that are amenable to large-scale production. We provide an optimized design of four short (i.e., ∼18 residues) peptide mimetics based on the three-dimensional structure of a known CBD and demonstrate that some of these peptides bind cellulose as well as or better than the full CBD. The structures of these peptides were studied by circular dichroism and their interactions with cellulose by solid phase NMR. Finally, we present a computational strategy for predicting CBD/peptide-cellulose binding free energies and demonstrate its ability to provide values in good agreement with experimental data. Using this computational model, we have also studied the dissociation pathway of the CBDs/peptides from the surface of cellulose. PMID:26691055

  15. Trastuzumab-binding peptide display by Tobacco mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Frolova, Olga Y.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Komarova, Tatiana V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Sheval, Eugene V.; Gleba, Yuri Y.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2010-11-10

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2/neu) is a target for the humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Recently, trastuzumab-binding peptides (TBP) of HER2/neu that inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells were identified. We have now studied conditions of efficient assembly in vivo of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based particles displaying TBP on its surface. The system is based on an Agrobacterium-mediated co-delivery of binary vectors encoding TMV RNA and coat protein (CP) with TBP in its C-terminal extension into plant leaves. We show how the fusion of amino acid substituted TBP (sTBP) to CP via a flexible peptide linker can improve the manufacturability of recombinant TMV (rTMV). We also reveal that rTMV particles with exposed sTBP retained trastuzumab-binding capacity but lost an anti-HER2/neu immunogenic scaffold function. Mouse antibodies against rTMV did not recognize HER2/neu on surface of human SK-BR-3 cells.

  16. Pulling peptides across nanochannels: resolving peptide binding and translocation through the hetero-oligomeric channel from Nocardia farcinica.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pratik Raj; Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Modi, Niraj; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Benz, Roland; Winterhalter, Mathias; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R

    2012-12-21

    We investigated translocation of cationic peptides through nanochannels derived from the Gram-positive bacterium Nocardia farcinica at the single-molecule level. The two subunits NfpA and NfpB form a hetero-oligomeric cation selective channel. On the basis of amino acid comparison we performed homology modeling and obtained a channel structurally related to MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis. The quantitative single-molecule measurements provide an insight into transport processes of solutes through nanochannels. High-resolution ion conductance measurements in the presence of peptides of different charge and length revealed the kinetics of peptide binding. The observed asymmetry in peptide binding kinetics indicated a unidirectional channel insertion in the lipid bilayer. In the case of cationic peptides, the external voltage acts as a driving force that promotes the interaction of the peptide with the channel surface. At low voltage, the peptide just binds to the channel, whereas at higher voltage, the force is strong enough to pull the peptide across the channel. This allows distinguishing quantitatively between peptide binding and translocation through the channel. PMID:23121560

  17. Definition of endotoxin binding sites in horseshoe crab factor C recombinant sushi proteins and neutralization of endotoxin by sushi peptides.

    PubMed

    Tan, N S; Ng, M L; Yau, Y H; Chong, P K; Ho, B; Ding, J L

    2000-09-01

    Three truncated fragments, harboring different sushi domains, namely, sushi123, sushi1, and sushi3 domains, of Factor C were produced as biologically active secreted recombinant proteins. Sushi1 and 3 each has a high-affinity LPS binding site with K:(d) of 10(-9) to 10(-10) M. Positive cooperativity in sushi123 resulted in a 1000-fold increase in K:(d)2. The core LPS binding region of sushi1 and 3 reside in two 34-mer peptides, S1 and S3. A rigidly held disulfide-bonded structure is not essential but is important for LPS binding, as confirmed by a 100- to 10000-fold decrease in affinity. Both S1 and S3 can inhibit LAL reaction and LPS-induced hTNF-alpha secretion with different potency. LAL assay revealed that at least two molecules of S1 bind cooperatively to one LPS molecule, with Hill's coefficient of 2.42. The LPS binding by S3 is independent and noncooperative. The modified SDelta1 and SDelta3 peptides exhibited increased LPS neutralization potential although its LPS binding affinities indicated only a 10-fold improvement. Hence, the structural difference of the four sushi peptides conferred different efficiencies in LPS neutralization without altering their binding affinity for LPS. Circular dichroism spectrometry revealed that the four peptides underwent conformational change in the presence of lipid A, transitioning from a random coil to either an alpha-helical or beta-sheet structure. Two factors are critical for the sensitivity of Factor C to LPS: 1) the presence of multiple binding sites for LPS on a single Factor C molecule; and 2) high positive cooperativity in LPS binding. The results showed that in the design of an improved LPS binding and neutralizing peptide, charge balance of the peptide is a critical parameter in addition to its structure.

  18. The paradox of conformational constraint in the design of Cbl(TKB)-binding peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Eric A.; Chen, Qianyi; Kizhake, Smitha; Kolar, Carol; Kang, Myungshim; Chang, Chia-en A.; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2013-01-01

    Solving the crystal structure of Cbl(TKB) in complex with a pentapeptide, pYTPEP, revealed that the PEP region adopted a poly-L-proline type II (PPII) helix. An unnatural amino acid termed a proline-templated glutamic acid (ptE) that constrained both the backbone and sidechain to the bound conformation was synthesized and incorporated into the pYTPXP peptide. We estimated imposing structural constraints onto the backbone and sidechain of the peptide and preorganize it to the bound conformation in solution will yield nearly an order of magnitude improvement in activity. NMR studies confirmed that the ptE-containing peptide adopts the PPII conformation, however, competitive binding studies showed an order of magnitude loss of activity. Given the emphasis that is placed on imposing structural constraints, we provide an example to support the contrary. These results point to conformational flexibility at the interface, which have implications in the design of potent Cbl(TKB)-binding peptides. PMID:23572190

  19. High-throughput engineering and analysis of peptide binding to class II MHC.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Boder, Eric T

    2010-07-27

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) proteins govern stimulation of adaptive immunity by presenting antigenic peptides to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Many allelic variants of MHC-II exist with implications in peptide presentation and immunity; thus, high-throughput experimental tools for rapid and quantitative analysis of peptide binding to MHC-II are needed. Here, we present an expression system wherein peptide and MHC-II are codisplayed on the surface of yeast in an intracellular association-dependent manner and assayed by flow cytometry. Accordingly, the relative binding of different peptides and/or MHC-II variants can be assayed by genetically manipulating either partner, enabling the application of directed evolution approaches for high-throughput characterization or engineering. We demonstrate the application of this tool to map the side-chain preference for peptides binding to HLA-DR1 and to evolve novel HLA-DR1 mutants with altered peptide-binding specificity.

  20. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by a preS1-binding Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ming; He, Yonggang; Wan, Yanmin; Bai, Weiya; Tao, Shuai; Ren, Yanqin; Zhang, Xinxin; Xu, Jianqing; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Junqi; Hu, Kanghong; Xie, Youhua

    2016-01-01

    Entry inhibitors are promising novel antivirals against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The existing potential entry inhibitors have targeted the cellular receptor(s). In this study, we aim to develop the first entry inhibitor that inhibits HBV infection via targeting viral particles. The preS1 segment of the large envelope glycoprotein of HBV is essential for virion attachment and infection. Previously, we obtained a preS1-binding short peptide B10 by screening a phage display peptide library using the N-terminal half of preS1 (residues 1 to 60, genotype C). We report here that by means of concatenation of B10, we identified a quadruple concatemer 4B10 that displayed a markedly increased preS1-binding activity. The main binding site of 4B10 in preS1 was mapped to the receptor binding enhancing region. 4B10 blocked HBV attachment to hepatic cells and inhibited HBV infection of primary human and tupaia hepatocytes at low nanomolar concentrations. The 4B10-mediated inhibition of HBV infection is specific as it did not inhibit the infection of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentivirus or human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Moreover, 4B10 showed no binding activity to hepatic cells. In conclusion, we have identified 4B10 as a promising candidate for a novel class of HBV entry inhibitors. PMID:27384014

  1. Novel peptide ligand with high binding capacity for antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Lund, Line Naomi; Gustavsson, Per-Erik; Michael, Roice; Lindgren, Johan; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Leif; Lund, Martin; Houen, Gunnar; Staby, Arne; St Hilaire, Phaedria M

    2012-02-17

    Small synthetic ligands for protein purification have become increasingly interesting with the growing need for cheap chromatographic materials for protein purification and especially for the purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Today, Protein A-based chromatographic resins are the most commonly used capture step in mAb down stream processing; however, the use of Protein A chromatography is less attractive due to toxic ligand leakage as well as high cost. Whether used as an alternative to the Protein A chromatographic media or as a subsequent polishing step, small synthetic peptide ligands have an advantage over biological ligands; they are cheaper to produce, ligand leakage by enzymatic degradation is either eliminated or significantly reduced, and they can in general better withstand cleaning in place (CIP) conditions such as 0.1M NaOH. Here, we present a novel synthetic peptide ligand for purification of human IgG. Immobilized on WorkBeads, an agarose-based base matrix from Bio-Works, the ligand has a dynamic binding capacity of up to 48 mg/mL and purifies IgG from harvest cell culture fluid with purities and recovery of >93%. The binding affinity is ∼10⁵ M⁻¹ and the interaction is favorable and entropy-driven with an enthalpy penalty. Our results show that the binding of the Fc fragment of IgG is mediated by hydrophobic interactions and that elution at low pH is most likely due to electrostatic repulsion. Furthermore, we have separated aggregated IgG from non-aggregated IgG, indicating that the ligand could be used both as a primary purification step of IgG as well as a subsequent polishing step.

  2. Selection of TAR RNA-Binding Chameleon Peptides by Using a Retroviral Replication System

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Baode; Calabro, Valerie; Wainberg, Mark A.; Frankel, Alan D.

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between the arginine-rich motif (ARM) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Tat protein and TAR RNA is essential for Tat activation and viral replication. Two related lentiviruses, bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) and Jembrana disease virus (JDV), also require Tat ARM-TAR interactions to mediate activation, but the viruses have evolved different RNA-binding strategies. Interestingly, the JDV ARM can act as a “chameleon,” adopting both the HIV and BIV TAR binding modes. To examine how RNA-protein interactions may evolve in a viral context and possibly to identify peptides that recognize HIV TAR in novel ways, we devised a retroviral system based on HIV replication to amplify and select for RNA binders. We constructed a combinatorial peptide library based on the BIV Tat ARM and identified peptides that, like the JDV Tat ARM, also function through HIV TAR, revealing unexpected sequence characteristics of an RNA-binding chameleon. The results suggest that a retroviral screening approach may help identify high-affinity TAR binders and may provide new insights into the evolution of RNA-protein interactions. PMID:14722301

  3. Improved Bioactivity of Antimicrobial Peptides by Addition of Amino-Terminal Copper and Nickel (ATCUN) Binding Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Libardo, M. Daben; Cervantes, Jorge L.; Salazar, Juan C.; Angeles-Boza, Alfredo M.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates to help circumvent antibiotic resistance, which is an increasing clinical problem. Amino-terminal copper and nickel (ATCUN) binding motifs are known to actively form reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon metal binding. The combination of these two peptidic constructs could lead to a novel class of dual-acting antimicrobial agents. To test this hypothesis, a set of ATCUN binding motifs were screened for their ability to induce ROS formation, and the most potent were then used to modify AMPs with different modes of action. ATCUN binding motif-containing derivatives of anoplin (GLLKRIKTLL-NH2), pro-apoptotic peptide (PAP; KLAKLAKKLAKLAK-NH2), and sh-buforin (RAGLQFPVGRVHRLLRK-NH2) were synthesized and found to be more active than the parent AMPs against a panel of clinically relevant bacteria. The lower minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for the ATCUN-anoplin peptides are attributed to the higher pore-forming activity along with their ability to cause ROS-induced membrane damage. The addition of the ATCUN motifs to PAP also increases its ability to disrupt membranes. DNA damage is the major contributor to the activity of the ATCUN-sh-buforin peptides. Our findings indicate that the addition of ATCUN motifs to AMPs is a simple strategy that leads to AMPs with higher antibacterial activity and possibly to more potent, usable antibacterial agents. PMID:24803240

  4. Isolation of ZnO-binding 12-mer peptides and determination of their binding epitopes by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rothenstein, Dirk; Claasen, Birgit; Omiecienski, Beatrice; Lammel, Patricia; Bill, Joachim

    2012-08-01

    Inorganic-binding peptides are in the focus of research fields such as materials science, nanotechnology, and biotechnology. Applications concern surface functionalization by the specific coupling to inorganic target substrates, the binding of soluble molecules for sensing applications, or biomineralization approaches for the controlled formation of inorganic materials. The specific molecular recognition of inorganic surfaces by peptides is of major importance for such applications. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is an important semiconductor material which is applied in various devices. In this study the molecular fundamentals for a ZnO-binding epitope was determined. 12-mer peptides, which specifically bind to the zinc- or/and the oxygen-terminated sides of single-crystalline ZnO (0001) and (000-1) substrates, were selected from a random peptide library using the phage display technique. For two ZnO-binding peptides the mandatory amino acid residues, which are of crucial importance for the specific binding were determined with a label-free nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approach. NMR spectroscopy allows the identification of pH dependent interaction sites on the atomic level of 12-mer peptides and ZnO nanoparticles. Here, ionic and polar interaction forces were determined. For the oxygen-terminated side the consensus peptide-binding sequence (HSXXH) was predicted in silico and confirmed by the NMR approach. PMID:22720657

  5. Surface Plasmon Resonance Binding Kinetics of Alzheimer’s Disease Amyloid β Peptide Capturing- and Plaque Binding- Monoclonal Antibodies†

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Muthu; Kandimalla, Karunya K.; Wengenack, Thomas M.; Howell, Kyle G.; Poduslo, Joseph F.

    2009-01-01

    Several different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been actively developed in the field of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) for basic science and clinical applications; however, the binding kinetics of many of the mAbs with the β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) are poorly understood. A panel of mAbs with different Aβ recognition sites, including our plaque binding antibody (IgG4.1), a peptide capturing antibody (11A50), and two classical mAbs (6E10 and 4G8) used for immunohistochemistry, were chosen to characterize their binding kinetics to monomeric and fibrillar forms of Aβ40 using surface plasmon resonance and their amyloid plaque binding ability in AD mouse brain sections using immunohistochemistry. The plaque binding antibody (IgG4.1) with epitope specificity of Aβ(2-10) showed a weaker affinity (512 nM) to monomeric Aβ40 but higher affinity (1.5 nM) to Aβ40 fibrils and labeled dense core plaques better than 6E10 by immunohistochemistry. The peptide capturing antibody (11A50) showed preferential affinity (32.5 nM) to monomeric Aβ40, but did not bind to Aβ40 fibrils, whereas antibodies 6E10 and 4G8 had moderate affinity to monomeric Aβ40 (22.3 and 30.1 nM, respectively). 4G8, which labels diffuse plaques better than 6E10, had a higher association rate constant than 6E10 but showed similar association and dissociation kinetics compared to 11A50. Enzymatic digestion of IgG4.1 to the F(ab’)24.1 fragments or their polyamine-modified derivatives that enhance blood brain barrier permeability did not affect the kinetic properties of the antigen binding site. These differences in kinetic binding to monomeric and fibrillar Aβ among various antibodies could be utilized to distinguish mAbs that might be useful for immunotherapy or amyloid plaque imaging versus those that could be utilized for bioanalytical techniques. PMID:19775170

  6. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of the recognition of the S100-binding peptides TRTK12 and p53 by calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Wafer, Lucas N; Tzul, Franco O; Pandharipande, Pranav P; McCallum, Scott A; Makhatadze, George I

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a multifunctional messenger protein that activates a wide variety of signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells in a calcium-dependent manner. CaM has been proposed to be functionally distinct from the S100 proteins, a related family of eukaryotic calcium-binding proteins. Previously, it was demonstrated that peptides derived from the actin-capping protein, TRTK12, and the tumor-suppressor protein, p53, interact with multiple members of the S100 proteins. To test the specificity of these peptides, they were screened using isothermal titration calorimetry against 16 members of the human S100 protein family, as well as CaM, which served as a negative control. Interestingly, both the TRTK12 and p53 peptides were found to interact with CaM. These interactions were further confirmed by both fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. These peptides have distinct sequences from the known CaM target sequences. The TRTK12 peptide was found to independently interact with both CaM domains and bind with a stoichiometry of 2:1 and dissociations constants Kd,C-term = 2 ± 1 µM and Kd,N-term = 14 ± 1 µM. In contrast, the p53 peptide was found to interact only with the C-terminal domain of CaM, Kd,C-term =2 ± 1 µM, 25°C. Using NMR spectroscopy, the locations of the peptide binding sites were mapped onto the structure of CaM. The binding sites for both peptides were found to overlap with the binding interface for previously identified targets on both domains of CaM. This study demonstrates the plasticity of CaM in target binding and may suggest a possible overlap in target specificity between CaM and the S100 proteins. PMID:24947426

  7. GTP-binding peptide of beta-tubulin. Localization by direct photoaffinity labeling and comparison with nucleotide-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Linse, K.; Mandelkow, E.M.

    1988-10-15

    The binding site of the guanine moiety of GTP on beta-tubulin was located within the peptide consisting of residues 63-77, AILVDLEPGTMDSVR. The result was obtained using direct photoaffinity labeling, peptide sequencing, and limited proteolysis. Peptides were identified by end-labeling with a monoclonal antibody against beta-tubulin whose epitope was located between 3 and 4 kDa from the C terminus. The sequence of the GTP-binding site is consistent with predictions from other GTP-binding proteins such as elongation factor Tu or ras p21.

  8. Copper(II) complexes of terminally free alloferon peptide mutants containing two different histidyl (H(1) and H(6) or H(9) or H(12)) binding sites Structure Stability and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Matusiak, Agnieszka; Kuczer, Mariola; Czarniewska, Elżbieta; Urbański, Arkadiusz; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2015-10-01

    Mono- and dinuclear copper(II) complexes of the alloferon 1 with point mutations H9A/H12A H(1)GVSGH(6)GQA(9)GVA(12)G, H6A/H12A H(1)GVSGA(6)GQH(9)GVA(12)G and H6A/H9A H(1)GVSGA(6)GQA(9)GVH(12)G have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible, CD, EPR spectroscopic, and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. Complete complex speciation at metal-to-ligand molar ratios 1:1 and 2:1 was obtained. For all systems studied in the 5 - 6.5 pH range, the CuL complex dominates with 3N{NH2,NIm-H(1),NIm-H(6 or 9 or 12)} binding site. The stability of the CuL complexes for the ligands studied varies according to the H9A/H12A>H6A/H12A>H6A/H9A series. For the dinuclear systems the amine/imidazole nitrogen donor atoms of the histidine residue H(1) and the imidazole nitrogen atoms of H(6) or H(9) or H(12) can be considered as independent metal-binding sites in the species formed. The stability of the dinuclear complexes is higher when two coordinated copper(II) ions are closer to each other. The inductions of phenoloxidase activity and apoptosis in vivo in Tenebrio molitor cells by the ligands and their copper(II) complexes at pH7.4 have been studied. The H6A/H9A, H6A/H12A peptides displayed lower hemocytotoxic activity compared to that of alloferon 1, while the H9A/H12A analogue was not active. Among the copper(II) complexes, the most active was the Cu(II)-H9A/H12A complex formed at pH7.4 with 3N{NH2,NIm-H(1),NIm-H(6)} (CuL) and 3N{NH2,N(-),NIm-H(6)} and/or 4N{NH2,NIm-H(1),N(-),NIm-H(6)} (CuH-1L) binding sites. The Cu(II)-H6A/H9A and Cu(II)-H6A/H12A complexes were not active.

  9. Copper(II) complexes of terminally free alloferon peptide mutants containing two different histidyl (H(1) and H(6) or H(9) or H(12)) binding sites Structure Stability and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Matusiak, Agnieszka; Kuczer, Mariola; Czarniewska, Elżbieta; Urbański, Arkadiusz; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2015-10-01

    Mono- and dinuclear copper(II) complexes of the alloferon 1 with point mutations H9A/H12A H(1)GVSGH(6)GQA(9)GVA(12)G, H6A/H12A H(1)GVSGA(6)GQH(9)GVA(12)G and H6A/H9A H(1)GVSGA(6)GQA(9)GVH(12)G have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible, CD, EPR spectroscopic, and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. Complete complex speciation at metal-to-ligand molar ratios 1:1 and 2:1 was obtained. For all systems studied in the 5 - 6.5 pH range, the CuL complex dominates with 3N{NH2,NIm-H(1),NIm-H(6 or 9 or 12)} binding site. The stability of the CuL complexes for the ligands studied varies according to the H9A/H12A>H6A/H12A>H6A/H9A series. For the dinuclear systems the amine/imidazole nitrogen donor atoms of the histidine residue H(1) and the imidazole nitrogen atoms of H(6) or H(9) or H(12) can be considered as independent metal-binding sites in the species formed. The stability of the dinuclear complexes is higher when two coordinated copper(II) ions are closer to each other. The inductions of phenoloxidase activity and apoptosis in vivo in Tenebrio molitor cells by the ligands and their copper(II) complexes at pH7.4 have been studied. The H6A/H9A, H6A/H12A peptides displayed lower hemocytotoxic activity compared to that of alloferon 1, while the H9A/H12A analogue was not active. Among the copper(II) complexes, the most active was the Cu(II)-H9A/H12A complex formed at pH7.4 with 3N{NH2,NIm-H(1),NIm-H(6)} (CuL) and 3N{NH2,N(-),NIm-H(6)} and/or 4N{NH2,NIm-H(1),N(-),NIm-H(6)} (CuH-1L) binding sites. The Cu(II)-H6A/H9A and Cu(II)-H6A/H12A complexes were not active. PMID:26184757

  10. Interactions between heme and tau-derived R1 peptides: binding and oxidative reactivity.

    PubMed

    Pirota, V; Monzani, E; Dell'Acqua, S; Casella, L

    2016-09-28

    The interaction of hemin with the first 18-amino acid repeat in tau protein has been investigated at both the N-terminal free-amine (R1τ) and N-acetylated (AcR1τ) forms for its potential relevance in traumatic brain injury and possibly other neurodegenerative diseases. The binding properties of hemin-R1τ and hemin-AcR1τ were compared with those of the hemin complex with amyloid-β peptide fragment 1-16 (Aβ16) and synthetic hemins. AcR1τ and R1τ bind with moderate affinity to both monomeric and dimeric hemin to form 1 : 1 complexes, but for the acetylated peptide, the affinity is one order of magnitude larger (K1 = 3.3 × 10(6) M(-1)). The binding constants were similar to that of Aβ16 for hemin, but unlike the latter, neither of the two R1τ peptides forms a 2 : 1 complex with hemin. This is mostly due to electrostatic repulsion between R1τ chains, and in particular the C-terminal proline-15 kink, while structural features of the hemin-R1τ complexes do not seem to play a role. In fact, the same features are observed for the interaction between ferric heme and peptide R1τ*, where the P15 residue is replaced by an alanine. Imidazole neither binds to [hemin(R1τ)] nor [hemin(AcR1τ)], whereas small ligands such as CN and CO easily bind to the ferric and ferrous forms of the complexes, respectively. A detailed comparative study of the peroxidase activity of [hemin(R1τ)] and [hemin(AcR1τ)] shows that such activity is very low. Thus, the association between heme and unfolded neuronal peptides does not, per se, involve a significant gain of toxic pseudo-enzymatic activity. However, under conditions of heavy heme release occurring on traumatic brain injury or when this activity is prolonged for long time, it can contribute to neuronal oxidative stress. In addition, the presence of hemin increases the aggregation propensity of R1τ. PMID:27539650

  11. Structure of an antibacterial peptide ATP-binding cassette transporter in a novel outward occluded state

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Hassanul G.; Tong, Zhen; Mathavan, Indran; Li, Yanyan; Iwata, So; Zirah, Séverine; Rebuffat, Sylvie; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Beis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae produce antimicrobial peptides for survival under nutrient starvation. Microcin J25 (MccJ25) is an antimicrobial peptide with a unique lasso topology. It is secreted by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) exporter McjD, which ensures self-immunity of the producing strain through efficient export of the toxic mature peptide from the cell. Here we have determined the crystal structure of McjD from Escherichia coli at 2.7-Å resolution, which is to the authors’ knowledge the first structure of an antibacterial peptide ABC transporter. Our functional and biochemical analyses demonstrate McjD-dependent immunity to MccJ25 through efflux of the peptide. McjD can directly bind MccJ25 and displays a basal ATPase activity that is stimulated by MccJ25 in both detergent solution and proteoliposomes. McjD adopts a new conformation, termed nucleotide-bound outward occluded. The new conformation defines a clear cavity; mutagenesis and ligand binding studies of the cavity have identified Phe86, Asn134, and Asn302 as important for recognition of MccJ25. Comparisons with the inward-open MsbA and outward-open Sav1866 structures show that McjD has structural similarities with both states without the intertwining of transmembrane (TM) helices. The occluded state is formed by rotation of TMs 1 and 2 toward the equivalent TMs of the opposite monomer, unlike Sav1866 where they intertwine with TMs 3–6 of the opposite monomer. Cysteine cross-linking studies on the McjD dimer in inside-out membrane vesicles of E. coli confirmed the presence of the occluded state. We therefore propose that the outward-occluded state represents a transition intermediate between the outward-open and inward-open conformation of ABC exporters. PMID:24920594

  12. Malaria Parasite Survival Depends on Conserved Binding Peptides' Critical Biological Functions.

    PubMed

    Patarroyo, Manuel E; Arevalo-Pinzon, Gabriela; Reyes, Cesar; Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2016-01-01

    Biochemical, structural and single amino acid level analysis of 49 Plasmodium falciparum protein regions (13 sporozoite and 36 merozoite proteins) has highlighted the functional role of each conserved high activity binding peptide (cHABP) in cell host-microbe interaction, involving biological functions such as gliding motility, traversal activity, binding invasion, reproduction, nutrient ion transport and the development of severe malaria. Each protein's key function in the malaria parasite's asexual lifecycle (pre-erythrocyte and erythro-cyte) is described in terms of cHABPs; their sequences were located in elegant work published by other groups regarding critical binding regions implicated in malarial parasite invasion. Such cHABPs represent the starting point for developing a logical and rational methodology for selecting an appropriate mixture of modified cHABPs to be used in a completely effective, synthetic antimalarial vaccine. Such methodology could be used for developing vaccines against diseases scourging humanity. PMID:26317369

  13. Exploiting anthracene photodimerization within peptides: light induced sequence-selective DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Bullen, Gemma A; Tucker, James H R; Peacock, Anna F A

    2015-05-11

    The unprecedented use of anthracene photodimerization within a protein or peptide system is explored through its incorporation into a DNA-binding peptide, derived from the GCN4 transcription factor. This study demonstrates an effective and dynamic interplay between a photoreaction and a peptide-DNA assembly, with each process able to exert control over the other.

  14. The cell-penetrating peptide domain from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) has anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jue-Yeon; Seo, Yoo-Na; Park, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yoon-Jeong; Chung, Chong-Pyoung

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP sequence identified from HB-EGF has cell penetration activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP inhibits the NF-{kappa}B dependent inflammatory responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP directly blocks phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP inhibits nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit. -- Abstract: A heparin-binding peptide (HBP) sequence from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) was identified and was shown to exhibit cell penetration activity. This cell penetration induced an anti-inflammatory reaction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. HBP penetrated the cell membrane during the 10 min treatment and reduced the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cytokines (TNF-{alpha} and IL-6) in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, HBP inhibited the LPS-induced upregulation of cytokines, including TNF-{alpha} and IL-6, and decreased the interstitial infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in a lung inflammation model. HBP inhibited NF-{kappa}B-dependent inflammatory responses by directly blocking the phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and by subsequently inhibiting the nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, this novel HBP may be potentially useful candidate for anti-inflammatory treatments and can be combined with other drugs of interest to transport attached molecules into cells.

  15. Screening of integrin-binding peptides in a laminin peptide library derived from the mouse laminin β chain short arm regions.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Fumihiko; Takagi, Masaharu; Nakamura, Minako; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Hozumi, Kentaro; Kikkawa, Yamato; Nomizu, Motoyoshi

    2014-05-15

    Laminins, major components of basement membrane, consist of three different subunits, α, β, and γ chains, and so far, five α, three β, and three γ chains have been identified. We have constructed synthetic peptide libraries derived from the laminin sequences and identified various cell-adhesive peptides. Ten active peptides from the laminin α chain sequences (α1-α5) were found to promote integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Previously, we found fourteen cell-adhesive peptides from the β1 chain sequence but their receptors have not been analyzed. Here, we expanded the synthetic peptide library to add peptides from the short arm regions of the laminin β2 and β3 chains and screened for integrin-binding peptides. Twenty-seven peptides promoted human dermal fibroblast (HDF) attachment in a peptide-coated plate assay. The morphological appearance of HDFs on the peptide-coated plates differed depending on the peptides. B34 (REKYYYAVYDMV, mouse laminin β1 chain, 255-266), B67 (IPYSMEYEILIRY, mouse laminin β1 chain, 604-616), B2-105 (APNFWNFTSGRG, mouse laminin β2 chain, 1081-1092), and B3-19 (GHLTGGKVQLNL, mouse laminin β3 chain, 182-193) promoted HDF spreading and HDF attachment was inhibited by EDTA, suggesting that the peptides interact with integrins. Immunostaining analyses revealed that B67 induced well-organized actin stress fibers and focal contacts containing vinculin, however, B34, B2-105, and B3-19 did not exhibit stress fiber formation or focal contacts. The inhibition assay using anti-integrin antibodies indicated that B67 interacts with α3, α6, and β1 integrins, and B34 and B3-19 interact with β1 integrin. Based on adhesion analysis of peptides modified with an alanine scan and on switching analysis with the homologous inactive sequence B2-64 (LPRAMDYDLLLRW, mouse laminin β2 chain, 618-630), the Glu(8) residue in the B67 peptide was critical for HDF adhesion. These findings are useful for identifying an integrin binding motif. The B67 peptide

  16. Computational analysis of binding free energies between peptides and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Liu, G. R.; Li, Z. R.; Lu, C.

    2006-07-01

    Coating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with peptides can solubilize the nanotubes in water solvent. To explore the utilization of CNTs in solvent and the affinities of CNTs for different peptides, binding free energies of peptides to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are calculated and analyzed. The interactions between different peptides and SWCNTs are simulated using molecular dynamics (MD) methods. The binding free energies of peptides onto the outer-surface of the SWCNTs are then estimated based on thermodynamics theory. The estimated results of binding free energies are qualitatively comparable to binding affinities observed in experiments. Furthermore, the conformations of the binding peptides, as well as the energetic contributions to total binding free energies are analyzed to reveal the physical mechanisms of the interactions, which would be difficult to observe using experimental approaches. The van der Waals interaction is found to play a key role in binding of peptides to SWCNTs. Other effects such as hydrophobicity and aromatic rings of peptides are also examined. The findings of this study provide better understanding of the binding strength between proteins and CNTs, and therefore have potential applications in both scientific research and in industry for controlling CNT self-assembly, designing bio-functionalized CNTs as biosensors, and drug and gene delivery devices.

  17. Sequence-selective DNA binding with cell-permeable oligoguanidinium-peptide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Jesús; Sánchez, Mateo I; Valero, Julián; de Mendoza, Javier; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2015-03-21

    Conjugation of a short peptide fragment from a bZIP protein to an oligoguanidinium tail results in a DNA-binding miniprotein that selectively interacts with composite sequences containing the peptide-binding site next to an A/T-rich tract. In addition to stabilizing the complex with the target DNA, the oligoguanidinium unit also endows the conjugate with cell internalization properties.

  18. The complex binding mode of the peptide hormone H2 relaxin to its receptor RXFP1

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Ashish; Bruell, Shoni; Patil, Nitin; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Scott, Daniel J.; Petrie, Emma J.; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Gooley, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    H2 relaxin activates the relaxin family peptide receptor-1 (RXFP1), a class A G-protein coupled receptor, by a poorly understood mechanism. The ectodomain of RXFP1 comprises an N-terminal LDLa module, essential for activation, tethered to a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain by a 32-residue linker. H2 relaxin is hypothesized to bind with high affinity to the LRR domain enabling the LDLa module to bind and activate the transmembrane domain of RXFP1. Here we define a relaxin-binding site on the LDLa-LRR linker, essential for the high affinity of H2 relaxin for the ectodomain of RXFP1, and show that residues within the LDLa-LRR linker are critical for receptor activation. We propose H2 relaxin binds and stabilizes a helical conformation of the LDLa-LRR linker that positions residues of both the linker and the LDLa module to bind the transmembrane domain and activate RXFP1. PMID:27088579

  19. Antifungal Activity and Action Mechanism of Histatin 5-Halocidin Hybrid Peptides against Candida ssp.

    PubMed

    Han, Juhye; Jyoti, Md Anirban; Song, Ho-Yeon; Jang, Woong Sik

    2016-01-01

    The candidacidal activity of histatin 5 is initiated through cell wall binding, followed by translocation and intracellular targeting, while the halocidin peptide exerts its activity by attacking the Candida cell membrane. To improve antimicrobial activities and to understand the killing mechanism of two peptides, six hybrid peptides were designed by conjugating histatin 5 and halocidin. A comparative approach was established to study the activity, salt tolerance, cell wall glucan binding assay, cytotoxicity, generation of ROS and killing kinetics. CD spectrometry was conducted to evaluate secondary structures of these hybrid peptides. Furthermore the cellular localization of hybrid peptides was investigated by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Of the six hybrid congeners, di-PH2, di-WP2 and HHP1 had stronger activities than other hybrid peptides against all tested Candida strains. The MIC values of these peptides were 1-2, 2-4 and 2-4 μg/ml, respectively. Moreover, none of the hybrid peptides was cytotoxic in the hemolytic assay and cell-based cytotoxicity assay. Confocal laser microscopy showed that di-PH2 and HHP1 were translocated into cytoplasm whereas di-WP2 was accumulated on surface of C. albicans to exert their candidacidal activity. All translocated peptides (Hst 5, P113, di-PH2) were capable of generating intracellular ROS except HHP1. Additionally, the KFH residues at C-terminal end of these peptides were assumed for core sequence for active translocation.

  20. Antifungal Activity and Action Mechanism of Histatin 5-Halocidin Hybrid Peptides against Candida ssp

    PubMed Central

    Han, Juhye; Jyoti, Md. Anirban; Song, Ho-Yeon; Jang, Woong Sik

    2016-01-01

    The candidacidal activity of histatin 5 is initiated through cell wall binding, followed by translocation and intracellular targeting, while the halocidin peptide exerts its activity by attacking the Candida cell membrane. To improve antimicrobial activities and to understand the killing mechanism of two peptides, six hybrid peptides were designed by conjugating histatin 5 and halocidin. A comparative approach was established to study the activity, salt tolerance, cell wall glucan binding assay, cytotoxicity, generation of ROS and killing kinetics. CD spectrometry was conducted to evaluate secondary structures of these hybrid peptides. Furthermore the cellular localization of hybrid peptides was investigated by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Of the six hybrid congeners, di-PH2, di-WP2 and HHP1 had stronger activities than other hybrid peptides against all tested Candida strains. The MIC values of these peptides were 1–2, 2–4 and 2–4 μg/ml, respectively. Moreover, none of the hybrid peptides was cytotoxic in the hemolytic assay and cell-based cytotoxicity assay. Confocal laser microscopy showed that di-PH2 and HHP1 were translocated into cytoplasm whereas di-WP2 was accumulated on surface of C. albicans to exert their candidacidal activity. All translocated peptides (Hst 5, P113, di-PH2) were capable of generating intracellular ROS except HHP1. Additionally, the KFH residues at C-terminal end of these peptides were assumed for core sequence for active translocation. PMID:26918792

  1. Antifungal Activity and Action Mechanism of Histatin 5-Halocidin Hybrid Peptides against Candida ssp.

    PubMed

    Han, Juhye; Jyoti, Md Anirban; Song, Ho-Yeon; Jang, Woong Sik

    2016-01-01

    The candidacidal activity of histatin 5 is initiated through cell wall binding, followed by translocation and intracellular targeting, while the halocidin peptide exerts its activity by attacking the Candida cell membrane. To improve antimicrobial activities and to understand the killing mechanism of two peptides, six hybrid peptides were designed by conjugating histatin 5 and halocidin. A comparative approach was established to study the activity, salt tolerance, cell wall glucan binding assay, cytotoxicity, generation of ROS and killing kinetics. CD spectrometry was conducted to evaluate secondary structures of these hybrid peptides. Furthermore the cellular localization of hybrid peptides was investigated by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Of the six hybrid congeners, di-PH2, di-WP2 and HHP1 had stronger activities than other hybrid peptides against all tested Candida strains. The MIC values of these peptides were 1-2, 2-4 and 2-4 μg/ml, respectively. Moreover, none of the hybrid peptides was cytotoxic in the hemolytic assay and cell-based cytotoxicity assay. Confocal laser microscopy showed that di-PH2 and HHP1 were translocated into cytoplasm whereas di-WP2 was accumulated on surface of C. albicans to exert their candidacidal activity. All translocated peptides (Hst 5, P113, di-PH2) were capable of generating intracellular ROS except HHP1. Additionally, the KFH residues at C-terminal end of these peptides were assumed for core sequence for active translocation. PMID:26918792

  2. Characterization of Seven New Polystyrene Plates Binding Peptides from a Phage-Displayed Random 12-Peptide Library.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun-Fei; Gao, Xiao-Chen; Xu, Tian-Qi; Dun, Zhao; Yu, Xing-Long

    2016-01-01

    A random 12-peptide library was screened against Erysipelothrix rhusiopthiae and porcine circovirus 2 recombinant Cap protein and the selected peptides were used for detecting the corresponding pathogens quickly and effectively. To our surprise, seven peptides, P1 (WHWNAP WWNGVY), P2 (FHWTWQFPYTST), P3 (GAMHLPWHMGTL), P4 (HWNIWWQHHPSP), P5 (HFFKWHTRTNDQ), P6 (HFFRWHPSAHLG) and P7 (HFAYWWNGVRGP) with the characteristics of polystyrene plate (PS) binding target-unrelated peptides (TUPs), were selected from the library. It has been found that P2 and P4 shared common motif of plastic binding peptide, moreover, P2, P3, P5 and P7 have been isolated repeatedly in other research groups using different targets. Then, the seven peptide phage clones were identified as the PS binding TUP phages by phage-ELISA and elution titration, particularly, P1 and P2 showed strong PS binding affinity which can not be inhibited by usual blocking buffers. In addition, all of the phages were not propagation-related TUP, but P3 showed the similar propagation rate with M13KE (vector phage). We also found that the seven PS-TUPs are rich in W, H, F, P and G, particularly, both W and H are contained in all PS-TUPs. It deduced that they may play a potential role in peptide binding to plastic. Although it is difficult to eliminate the TUP phages in phage display completely, these PS-TUPs can be used to exclude the false positive peptides rapidly and effectively and help us to obtain truly interesting peptides more accurately. PMID:26980286

  3. The helical propensity of KLA amphipathic peptides enhances their binding to gel-state lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Arouri, Ahmad; Dathe, Margitta; Blume, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    The role and importance of the conformation of antimicrobial peptides for their binding and incorporation into lipid membranes as well as for their bioactivity are still not well understood. In this paper, we studied the interaction between four cationic alpha-helical KLA peptides, which differ primarily in their helical propensity, and the anionic gel-state lipid DPPG (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol). Of particular interest was the influence of the peptide conformation and membrane surface properties on the electrostatic binding process. Dynamic light scattering (DSL) showed that generally the KLA peptides possess high aggregation power but modest solubilization power. Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) spectra revealed that the KLA peptides with the low helical propensity tend to form beta-structures at low lipid/peptide ratios. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermograms showed that the helical KLA peptides stabilize the DPPG bilayer, whereas the beta-structured peptides induce pronounced membrane perturbations. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) isotherms showed that the helical KLA peptides bind more efficiently to DPPG vesicles than the beta-structured KLA peptides, and that the binding affinity of the peptides is proportional to the peptide helical propensity and membrane negative surface charge. The stoichiometry values (N) deduced from the ITC isotherms suggest that the helical KLA peptides have a higher capacity to translocate the DPPG lipid bilayer. The new data presented in this study demonstrate the flexibility of KLA peptides in adopting various conformations in response to the surrounding and also how the peptide structuring controls the mode of peptide-membrane interaction.

  4. The helical propensity of KLA amphipathic peptides enhances their binding to gel-state lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Arouri, Ahmad; Dathe, Margitta; Blume, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    The role and importance of the conformation of antimicrobial peptides for their binding and incorporation into lipid membranes as well as for their bioactivity are still not well understood. In this paper, we studied the interaction between four cationic alpha-helical KLA peptides, which differ primarily in their helical propensity, and the anionic gel-state lipid DPPG (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol). Of particular interest was the influence of the peptide conformation and membrane surface properties on the electrostatic binding process. Dynamic light scattering (DSL) showed that generally the KLA peptides possess high aggregation power but modest solubilization power. Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) spectra revealed that the KLA peptides with the low helical propensity tend to form beta-structures at low lipid/peptide ratios. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermograms showed that the helical KLA peptides stabilize the DPPG bilayer, whereas the beta-structured peptides induce pronounced membrane perturbations. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) isotherms showed that the helical KLA peptides bind more efficiently to DPPG vesicles than the beta-structured KLA peptides, and that the binding affinity of the peptides is proportional to the peptide helical propensity and membrane negative surface charge. The stoichiometry values (N) deduced from the ITC isotherms suggest that the helical KLA peptides have a higher capacity to translocate the DPPG lipid bilayer. The new data presented in this study demonstrate the flexibility of KLA peptides in adopting various conformations in response to the surrounding and also how the peptide structuring controls the mode of peptide-membrane interaction. PMID:23792704

  5. Peptides identify multiple hotspots within the ligand binding domain of the TNF receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Ku-chuan; Brissette, Renee E; Wang, Pinger; Fletcher, Paul W; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Lennick, Michael; Blume, Arthur J; Goldstein, Neil I

    2003-01-01

    Background Hotspots are defined as the minimal functional domains involved in protein:protein interactions and sufficient to induce a biological response. Results Here we describe the use of complex and high diversity phage display libraries to isolate peptides (called Hotspot Ligands or HSPLs) which sub-divide the ligand binding domain of the tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2; p75) into multiple hotspots. We have shown that these libraries could generate HSPLs which not only subdivide hotspots on protein and non-protein targets but act as agonists or antagonists. Using this approach, we generated peptides which were specific for human TNFR2, could be competed by the natural ligands, TNFα and TNFβ and induced an unexpected biological response in a TNFR2-specific manner. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the dissection of the TNFR2 into biologically active hotspots with the concomitant identification of a novel and unexpected biological activity. PMID:12646066

  6. Investigating the Structural Variability and Binding Modes of the Glioma Targeting NFL-TBS.40-63 Peptide on Tubulin.

    PubMed

    Laurin, Yoann; Savarin, Philippe; Robert, Charles H; Takahashi, Masayuki; Eyer, Joel; Prevost, Chantal; Sacquin-Mora, Sophie

    2015-06-16

    NFL-TBS.40-63 is a 24 amino acid peptide corresponding to the tubulin-binding site located on the light neurofilament subunit, which selectively enters glioblastoma cells, where it disrupts their microtubule network and inhibits their proliferation. We investigated its structural variability and binding modes on a tubulin heterodimer using a combination of NMR experiments, docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results show that, while lacking a stable structure, the peptide preferentially binds on a specific single site located near the β-tubulin C-terminal end, thus giving us precious hints regarding the mechanism of action of the NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide's antimitotic activity at the molecular level.

  7. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides with High Anticancer Activity and Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Hao; Yu, Hui-Yuan; Chih, Ya-Han; Cheng, Hsi-Tsung; Chou, Yu-Ting; Cheng, Jya-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We describe a strategy to boost anticancer activity and reduce normal cell toxicity of short antimicrobial peptides by adding positive charge amino acids and non-nature bulky amino acid β-naphthylalanine residues to their termini. Among the designed peptides, K4R2-Nal2-S1 displayed better salt resistance and less toxicity to hRBCs and human fibroblast than Nal2-S1 and K6-Nal2-S1. Fluorescence microscopic studies indicated that the FITC-labeled K4R2-Nal2-S1 preferentially binds cancer cells and causes apoptotic cell death. Moreover, a significant inhibition in human lung tumor growth was observed in the xenograft mice treated with K4R2-Nal2-S1. Our strategy provides new opportunities in the development of highly effective and selective antimicrobial and anticancer peptide-based therapeutics. PMID:25970292

  8. The structural basis for function in diamond-like carbon binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Gabryelczyk, Bartosz; Szilvay, Géza R; Linder, Markus B

    2014-07-29

    The molecular structural basis for the function of specific peptides that bind to diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces was investigated. For this, a competition assay that provided a robust way of comparing relative affinities of peptide variants was set up. Point mutations of specific residues resulted in significant effects, but it was shown that the chemical composition of the peptide was not sufficient to explain peptide affinity. More significantly, rearrangements in the sequence indicated that the binding is a complex recognition event that is dependent on the overall structure of the peptide. The work demonstrates the unique properties of peptides for creating functionality at interfaces via noncovalent binding for potential applications in, for example, nanomaterials, biomedical materials, and sensors. PMID:25007096

  9. Isolation and characterisation of sericin antifreeze peptides and molecular dynamics modelling of their ice-binding interaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinhong; Rong, Yuzhi; Wang, Zhengwu; Zhou, Yanfu; Wang, Shaoyun; Zhao, Bo

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to isolate and characterise a novel sericin antifreeze peptide and investigate its ice-binding molecular mechanism. The thermal hysteresis activity of ice-binding sericin peptides (I-SP) was measured and their activity reached as high as 0.94 °C. A P4 fraction, with high hypothermia protective activity and inhibition activity of ice recrystallisation, was obtained from I-SP, and a purified sericin peptide, named SM-AFP, with the sequence of TTSPTNVSTT and a molecular weight of 1009.50 Da was then isolated from the P4 fraction. Treatment of Lactobacillus delbrueckii Subsp. bulgaricus LB340 LYO with 100 μg/ml synthetic SM-AFP led to 1.4-fold increased survival (p < 0.05). Finally, an SM-AFP/ice binding model was constructed and results of molecular dynamics simulation suggested that the binding of SM-AFP with ice and prevention of ice crystal growth could be attributed to hydrogen bond formation, hydrophobic interaction and non-bond interactions. Sericin peptides could be developed into beneficial cryoprotectants and used in frozen food processing.

  10. Secondary structure propensity and chirality of the amyloidophilic peptide p5 and its analogues impacts ligand binding - In vitro characterization

    DOE PAGES

    Wall, Jonathan S.; Williams, Angela; Wooliver, Craig; Martin, Emily B.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Heidel, R. Eric; Kennel, Stephen J.

    2016-08-11

    Here, polybasic helical peptides, such as peptide p5, bind human amyloid extracts and synthetic amyloid fibrils. When radio labeled, peptide p5 has been shown to specifically bind amyloid in vivo thereby allowing imaging of the disease. Structural requirements for heparin and amyloid binding have been studied using analogues of p5 that modify helicity and chirality.

  11. Design of a RANK-Mimetic Peptide Inhibitor of Osteoclastogenesis with Enhanced RANKL-Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jeonghwan; Ghosh, Ambarnil; Kim, Kabsun; Ta, Hai Minh; Kim, Hyunju; Kim, Nacksung; Hwang, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2016-04-30

    The receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) and its ligand RANKL are key regulators of osteoclastogenesis and well-recognized targets in developing treatments for bone disorders associated with excessive bone resorption, such as osteoporosis. Our previous work on the structure of the RANK-RANKL complex revealed that Loop3 of RANK, specifically the non-canonical disulfide bond at the tip, performs a crucial role in specific recognition of RANKL. It also demonstrated that peptide mimics of Loop3 were capable of interfering with the function of RANKL in osteoclastogenesis. Here, we reported the structure-based design of a smaller peptide with enhanced inhibitory efficiency. The kinetic analysis and osteoclast differentiation assay showed that in addition to the sharp turn induced by the disulfide bond, two consecutive arginine residues were also important for binding to RANKL and inhibiting osteoclastogenesis. Docking and molecular dynamics simulations proposed the binding mode of the peptide to the RANKL trimer, showing that the arginine residues provide electrostatic interactions with RANKL and contribute to stabilizing the complex. These findings provided useful information for the rational design of therapeutics for bone diseases associated with RANK/RANKL function.

  12. Design of a RANK-Mimetic Peptide Inhibitor of Osteoclastogenesis with Enhanced RANKL-Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Jeonghwan; Ghosh, Ambarnil; Kim, Kabsun; Ta, Hai Minh; Kim, Hyunju; Kim, Nacksung; Hwang, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2016-01-01

    The receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) and its ligand RANKL are key regulators of osteoclastogenesis and well-recognized targets in developing treatments for bone disorders associated with excessive bone resorption, such as osteoporosis. Our previous work on the structure of the RANK-RANKL complex revealed that Loop3 of RANK, specifically the non-canonical disulfide bond at the tip, performs a crucial role in specific recognition of RANKL. It also demonstrated that peptide mimics of Loop3 were capable of interfering with the function of RANKL in osteoclastogenesis. Here, we reported the structure-based design of a smaller peptide with enhanced inhibitory efficiency. The kinetic analysis and osteoclast differentiation assay showed that in addition to the sharp turn induced by the disulfide bond, two consecutive arginine residues were also important for binding to RANKL and inhibiting osteoclastogenesis. Docking and molecular dynamics simulations proposed the binding mode of the peptide to the RANKL trimer, showing that the arginine residues provide electrostatic interactions with RANKL and contribute to stabilizing the complex. These findings provided useful information for the rational design of therapeutics for bone diseases associated with RANK/RANKL function. PMID:26923188

  13. The effect of binding of spider-derived antimicrobial peptides, oxyopinins, on lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kaoru; Corzo, Gerardo

    2006-09-01

    Oxyopinins (Oxki1 and Oxki2) are antimicrobial peptides isolated from the crude venom of the wolf spider Oxyopes kitabensis. The effect of oxyopinins on lipid bilayers was investigated using high-sensitivity titration calorimetry and (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopy. High-sensitivity titration calorimetry experiments showed that the binding of oxyopinins was exothermic, and the binding enthalpies (DeltaH) to 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) were -18.1 kcal/mol and -15.0 kcal/mol for Oxki1 and Oxki2, respectively, and peptide partition coefficient (K(p)) was found to be 3.9x10(3) M(-1). (31)P NMR spectra of 1,2-dielaidoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DEPE) membranes in the presence of oxyopinins indicated that they induced a positive curvature in lipid bilayers. The induced positive curvature was stronger in the presence of Oxki2 than in the presence of Oxki1. (31)P NMR spectra of phosphaditylcholine (PC) membranes in the presence of Oxki2 showed that Oxki2 produced micellization of membranes at low peptide concentrations, but unsaturated PC membranes or acidic phospholipids prevented micellization from occurring. Furthermore, (31)P NMR spectra using membrane lipids from E. coli suggested that Oxki1 was more disruptive to bacterial membranes than Oxki2. These results strongly correlate to the known biological activity of the oxyopinins.

  14. Viral Coat Protein Peptides with Limited Sequence Homology Bind Similar Domains of Alfalfa Mosaic Virus and Tobacco Streak Virus RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Maud M.; Ansel-McKinney, Patricia; Houser-Scott, Felicia; Yusibov, Vidadi; Loesch-Fries, L. Sue; Gehrke, Lee

    1998-01-01

    An unusual and distinguishing feature of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and ilarviruses such as tobacco streak virus (TSV) is that the viral coat protein is required to activate the early stages of viral RNA replication, a phenomenon known as genome activation. AMV-TSV coat protein homology is limited; however, they are functionally interchangeable in activating virus replication. For example, TSV coat protein will activate AMV RNA replication and vice versa. Although AMV and TSV coat proteins have little obvious amino acid homology, we recently reported that they share an N-terminal RNA binding consensus sequence (Ansel-McKinney et al., EMBO J. 15:5077–5084, 1996). Here, we biochemically compare the binding of chemically synthesized peptides that include the consensus RNA binding sequence and lysine-rich (AMV) or arginine-rich (TSV) environment to 3′-terminal TSV and AMV RNA fragments. The arginine-rich TSV coat protein peptide binds viral RNA with lower affinity than the lysine-rich AMV coat protein peptides; however, the ribose moieties protected from hydroxyl radical attack by the two different peptides are localized in the same area of the predicted RNA structures. When included in an infectious inoculum, both AMV and TSV 3′-terminal RNA fragments inhibited AMV RNA replication, while variant RNAs unable to bind coat protein did not affect replication significantly. The data suggest that RNA binding and genome activation functions may reside in the consensus RNA binding sequence that is apparently unique to AMV and ilarvirus coat proteins. PMID:9525649

  15. The estimation of affinity constants for the binding of model peptides to DNA by equilibrium dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Standke, K C; Brunnert, H

    1975-01-01

    The binding of lysine model peptides of the type Lys-X-Lys, Lys-X-X-Lys and Lys-X-X-X-Lys (X = different aliphatic and aromatic amino acids) has been studied by equilibrium dialysis. It was shown that the strong electrostatic binding forces generated by protonated amino groups of lysine can be distinguished from the weak forces stemming from neutral and aromatic spacer amino acids. The overall binding strength of the lysine model peptides is modified by these weak binding forces and the apparent binding constants are influenced more by the hydrophobic character of the spacer amino acid side chains than by the chainlength of the spacers. PMID:1187347

  16. Model membrane interaction and DNA-binding of antimicrobial peptide Lasioglossin II derived from bee venom.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Susmita; Lee, Meryl; Sivaraman, J; Chatterjee, Chiradip

    2013-01-01

    Lasioglossins, a new family of antimicrobial peptide, have been shown to have strong antimicrobial activity with low haemo-lytic and mast cell degranulation activity, and exhibit cytotoxic activity against various cancer cells in vitro. In order to understand the active conformation of these pentadecapeptides in membranes, we have studied the interaction of Lasioglossin II (LL-II), one of the members of Lasioglossins family with membrane mimetic micelle Dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) by fluorescence, Circular Dichroism (CD) and two dimensional (2D) (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Fluorescence experiments provide evidence of interaction of the N-terminal tryptophan residue of LL-II with the hydrophobic core of DPC micelle. CD results show an extended chain conformation of LL-II in water which is converted to a partial helical conformation in the presence of DPC micelle. Moreover we have determined the first three-dimensional NMR structure of LL-II bound to DPC micelle with rmsd of 0.36Å. The solution structure of LL-II shows hydrophobic and hydrophilic core formation in peptide pointing towards different direction in the presence of DPC. This amphipathic structure may allow this peptide to penetrate deeply into the interfacial region of negatively charged membranes and leading to local membrane destabilization. Further we have elucidated the DNA binding ability of LL-II by agarose gel retardation and fluorescence quenching experiments.

  17. Caseins from bovine colostrum and milk strongly bind piscidin-1, an antimicrobial peptide from fish.

    PubMed

    Kütt, Mary-Liis; Stagsted, Jan

    2014-09-01

    A model system of bovine colostrum and piscidin, a fish-derived antimicrobial peptide, was developed to study potential interactions of antimicrobial peptides in colostrum. We did not detect any antimicrobial activity of colostrum using the radial plate diffusion assay; in fact colostrum completely abrogated activity of added piscidin. This could not be explained by degradation of piscidin by colostrum, which was less than ten percent. We found that colostrum even protected piscidin against degradation by added proteases. We further observed that colostrum and milk rapidly quenched the fluorescence of fluorescein-piscidin but not that of fluorescein. This effect was not seen with BSA and the specific quenching of fluorescein-piscidin by colostrum was saturably inhibited with unlabeled piscidin. Size exclusion chromatography indicated that fluorescein-piscidin bound to casein micelles with no apparent binding to IgG or whey proteins. Further, addition of pure caseins was able to quench fluorescence of fluorescein-piscidin and to inhibit the antimicrobial activity of piscidin. The interaction between caseins and piscidin could be dissociated by guanidine hydrochloride and recovered piscidin had antimicrobial activity against bacteria. Based on our results we propose that caseins could be carriers for antimicrobial peptides in colostrum and milk. PMID:25036607

  18. Phage-displayed peptides selected for binding to Campylobacter jejuni are antimicrobial.

    PubMed

    Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L; Rea, Philippa J; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2010-10-01

    In developed countries, Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of zoonotic bacterial gastroenteritis in humans with chicken meat implicated as a source of infection. Campylobacter jejuni colonises the lower gastrointestinal tract of poultry and during processing is spread from the gastrointestinal tract onto the surface of dressed carcasses. Controlling or eliminating C.jejuni on-farm is considered to be one of the best strategies for reducing human infection. Molecules on the cell surface of C.jejuni interact with the host to facilitate its colonisation and persistence in the gastrointestinal tract of poultry. We used a subtractive phage-display protocol to affinity select for peptides binding to the cell surface of a poultry isolate of C.jejuni with the aim of finding peptides that could be used to control this microorganism in chickens. In total, 27 phage peptides, representing 11 unique clones, were found to inhibit the growth of C.jejuni by up to 99.9% in vitro. One clone was bactericidal, reducing the viability of C.jejuni by 87% in vitro. The phage peptides were highly specific. They completely inhibited the growth of two of the four poultry isolates of C.jejuni tested with no activity detected towards other Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  19. Thiazole orange-peptide conjugates: sensitivity of DNA binding to chemical structure.

    PubMed

    Carreon, Jay R; Mahon, Kerry P; Kelley, Shana O

    2004-02-19

    [structure: see text] Derivatives of the highly fluorescent and DNA-binding dye thiazole orange (TO) are described that feature appended peptides. Functionalization of TO can be achieved at either of the endocyclic nitrogens, and the photophysical properties and DNA-binding modes are sensitive to the position of the tethered peptide. A series of TO-peptide conjugates are described, demonstrating the utility of a solid-phase synthesis approach to their preparation and illustrating how the photophysical and DNA-binding properties of the compounds are influenced by chemical structure.

  20. T-helper cell-response to MHC class II-binding peptides of the renal cell carcinoma-associated antigen RAGE-1.

    PubMed

    Stassar, M J; Raddrizzani, L; Hammer, J; Zöller, M

    2001-08-01

    Recently, epitope prediction software for HLA-DR binding sequences has become available. In view of the importance of T helper (Th) cell activation in immunotherapy of cancer and evidences supporting immunogenicity of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), we have tested 4 peptides of RAGE-1 binding promiscuously to HLA-DR molecules for induction of an immune response. The peptides predicted by the TEPITOPE program using a stringent threshold were derived from the open reading frame 2 and 5 of RAGE-1. Induction of response was evaluated by culturing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the presence of peptide-loaded dendritic cells (DC) to determine proliferative activity and cytokine expression. Two out of 5 donors did not respond to any of the 4 peptides, 2 donors responded to one peptide and one donor responded to two other peptides. Notably, as revealed by blocking studies and T cell subtype definition, peptides bound to MHC class II molecules and peptide pulsed DC exclusively activated CD4+ T cells, which were of the Th1 subtype. With respect to clinical application it is important that (un)responsiveness of individual donors' PBMC was a very consistent feature. Though we have not tested explicitly whether these peptides correspond to naturally processed peptides, the possibility to define those patients whose Th might respond to in silico predicted peptides of RAGE-1, by an in vitro assay, could well be a helpful step towards setting up a RAGE-1 based immunotherapeutic protocol.

  1. Both major and minor peptide-binding pockets in HLA-A2 influence the presentation of influenza virus matrix peptide to cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Teng, J M; Hogan, K T

    1994-04-01

    Most of the polymorphic residues in class I MHC molecules are concentrated in the alpha 1- and alpha 2-domains with their side chains pointing towards the antigen peptide site. Previous crystal structure analysis revealed six pockets inside the peptide-binding groove and the "extra" electron density in some of the pockets indicated that the pockets are involved in direct peptide binding. In order to investigate the functional role of individual positions from each pocket in antigen presentation, 37 HLA-A2 variants with single amino acid substitution in the peptide-binding groove were generated and used to analyse the specificity of influenza A virus matrix peptide-specific, HLA-A2-restricted CTL. The ability to present peptide by each variant was studied in detail by peptide titration, cold target inhibition, time course and limiting dilution analysis. The direct effect on peptide binding by these substitutions was determined by cell surface class I MHC molecule reconstitution analysis. The results demonstrated that each of the six peptide binding pockets plays a role in T cell recognition. Substitutions introduced into pocket F had less effect on CTL recognition than substitutions introduced in other pockets. With the exception of Tyr substitution for Phe9, single amino acid substitutions in the peptide-binding groove had only minor effects on peptide binding. Therefore, the impact of the substitutions in altering the epitopes recognized by CTL seems to be mediated through an alteration in the conformation of the bound peptide.

  2. Cytotoxicity and DNA cleavage with core-shell nanocomposites functionalized by a KH domain DNA binding peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazak, Remon; Ressl, Jan; Raha, Sumita; Doty, Caroline; Liu, William; Wanzer, Beau; Salam, Seddik Abdel; Elwany, Samy; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2013-11-01

    A nanoconjugate was composed of metal oxide nanoparticles decorated with peptides and fluorescent dye and tested for DNA cleavage following UV light activation. The peptide design was based on a DNA binding domain, the so called KH domain of the hnRNPK protein. This ``KH peptide'' enabled cellular uptake of nanoconjugates and their entry into cell nuclei. The control nanoconjugate carried no peptide; it consisted only of the metal oxide nanoparticle prepared as Fe3O4@TiO2 nanocomposite and the fluorescent dye alizarin red S. These components of either construct are responsible for nanoconjugate activation by UV light and the resultant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Production of ROS at different subcellular locations causes damage to different components of cells: only nanoconjugates inside cell nuclei can be expected to cause DNA cleavage. Degradation of cellular DNA with KH peptide decorated nanoconjugates exceeded the DNA damage obtained from control, no-peptide nanoconjugate counterparts. Moreover, caspase activation and cell death were more extensive in the same cells.A nanoconjugate was composed of metal oxide nanoparticles decorated with peptides and fluorescent dye and tested for DNA cleavage following UV light activation. The peptide design was based on a DNA binding domain, the so called KH domain of the hnRNPK protein. This ``KH peptide'' enabled cellular uptake of nanoconjugates and their entry into cell nuclei. The control nanoconjugate carried no peptide; it consisted only of the metal oxide nanoparticle prepared as Fe3O4@TiO2 nanocomposite and the fluorescent dye alizarin red S. These components of either construct are responsible for nanoconjugate activation by UV light and the resultant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Production of ROS at different subcellular locations causes damage to different components of cells: only nanoconjugates inside cell nuclei can be expected to cause DNA cleavage. Degradation of cellular DNA

  3. Selection of a novel FGF23-binding peptide antagonizing the inhibitory effect of FGF23 on phosphate uptake.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Lin, Xiaomian; Li, Quchou; Luo, Wu; Song, Li; Tan, Xiangpeng; Wang, Wenhui; Li, Xiaokun; Wu, Xiaoping

    2015-04-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a bone-derived endocrine regulator of phosphate homeostasis and has been considered as a potential therapeutic target for hypophosphatemic disorders. Herein, we isolated a novel FGF23-binding peptide by screening a phage display library with FGF23180-205, the minimal epitope of FGF23 binding to the binary fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)-Klotho complex. The corresponding peptide (referred to as 23-b6) showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain III (D3) of FGFR1c, the predominant receptor mediating the phosphaturic activity of FGF23. The 23-b6 peptide and panning target FGF23180-205 carried opposite charges and shared similar hydrophilic profiles. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic 23-b6 peptide exhibited antagonistic effect on the inhibition of phosphate uptake by FGF23 in opossum kidney cells (OK cells). The mechanisms of 23-b6 peptide impairing the bioactivity of FGF23 involved blockade of the activation of Erk cascade and up-regulation of NaPi-2a and NaPi-2c expression in OK cells. Our results demonstrate that the 23-b6 peptide is a potent FGF23 antagonist with increased effect on phosphate uptake in kidney cells and might have therapeutic potentials in hypophosphatemic disorders characterized by an abnormally high level of FGF23. PMID:25515813

  4. Predicting peptide binding to MHC pockets via molecular modeling, implicit solvation, and global optimization.

    PubMed

    Schafroth, Heather D; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2004-02-15

    Development of a computational prediction method based on molecular modeling, global optimization, and implicit solvation has produced accurate structure and relative binding affinity predictions for peptide amino acids binding to five pockets of the MHC molecule HLA-DRB1*0101. Because peptide binding to MHC molecules is essential to many immune responses, development of such a method for understanding and predicting the forces that drive binding is crucial for pharmaceutical design and disease treatment. Underlying the development of this prediction method are two hypotheses. The first is that pockets formed by the peptide binding groove of MHC molecules are independent, separating the prediction of peptide amino acids that bind within individual pockets from those that bind between pockets. The second hypothesis is that the native state of a system composed of an amino acid bound to a protein pocket corresponds to the system's lowest free energy. The prediction method developed from these hypotheses uses atomistic-level modeling, deterministic global optimization, and three methods of implicit solvation: solvent-accessible area, solvent-accessible volume, and Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatics. The method predicts relative binding affinities of peptide amino acids for pockets of HLA-DRB1*0101 by determining computationally an amino acid's global minimum energy conformation. Prediction results from the method are in agreement with X-ray crystallography data and experimental binding assays.

  5. Biocompatible silicon surfaces through orthogonal click chemistries and a high affinity silicon oxide binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Hassert, Rayk; Pagel, Mareen; Ming, Zhou; Häupl, Tilmann; Abel, Bernd; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2012-10-17

    Multifunctionality is gaining more and more importance in the field of improved biomaterials. Especially peptides feature a broad chemical variability and are versatile mediators between inorganic surfaces and living cells. Here, we synthesized a unique peptide that binds to SiO(2) with nM affinity. We equipped the peptide with the bioactive integrin binding c[RGDfK]-ligand and a fluorescent probe by stepwise Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand and copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. For the first time, we report the generation of a multifunctional peptide by combining these innovative coupling reactions. The resulting peptide displayed an outstanding binding to silicon oxide and induced a significant increase in cell spreading and cell viability of osteoblasts on the oxidized silicon surface.

  6. Investigating the Binding of Peptides to Graphene Surfaces for Biosensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garley, Amanda; Saikia, Nabanita; Barr, Stephen; Leuty, Gary; Berry, Rajiv; Heinz, Hendrik

    The Air Force Research Lab is focused on developing highly selective and sensitive graphene-based sensors functionalized with peptides for biomolecule detection. To achieve this there is a need to model interfacial binding interactions between the organic and inorganic components to complement ongoing experimental investigations. It is important to characterize the binding behavior of individual amino acids, with the goal of predicting binding of large peptides. Since polarization is important in graphene systems, a new force field which includes polarizability is used. This allows for an in depth exploration of pi-pi interactions, electrostatics and van der Waals forces involved with binding. The binding strength is determined via enthalpy and free energy calculations. Additionally, structural quantities are computed, such as how aromatic rings align with the graphene surface and the arrangement of various residue substituents in relation to the surface and water layers. Computational results are useful in guiding experimental methods focused on rapidly screening optimal peptide sequence for binding.

  7. Binding of Hemagglutinin and Influenza Virus to a Peptide-Conjugated Lipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Shibata, Rabi; Sato, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) plays an important role in the first step of influenza virus (IFV) infection because it initiates the binding of the virus to the sialylgalactose linkages of the receptors on the host cells. We herein demonstrate that a HA-binding peptide immobilized on a solid support is available to bind to HA and IFV. We previously obtained a HA-binding pentapeptide (Ala-Arg-Leu-Pro-Arg), which was identified by phage-display selection against HAs from random peptide libraries. This peptide binds to the receptor-binding site of HA by mimicking sialic acid. A peptide-conjugated lipid (pep-PE) was chemically synthesized from the peptide and a saturated phospholipid. A lipid bilayer composed of pep-PE and an unsaturated phospholipid (DOPC) was immobilized on a mica plate; and the interaction between HA and the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was investigated using atomic force microscopy. The binding of IFV to the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time reverse transcription PCR. Our results indicate that peptide-conjugated lipids are a useful molecular device for the detection of HA and IFV. PMID:27092124

  8. Engineering of the function of diamond-like carbon binding peptides through structural design.

    PubMed

    Gabryelczyk, Bartosz; Szilvay, Géza R; Singh, Vivek K; Mikkilä, Joona; Kostiainen, Mauri A; Koskinen, Jari; Linder, Markus B

    2015-02-01

    The use of phage display to select material-specific peptides provides a general route towards modification and functionalization of surfaces and interfaces. However, a rational structural engineering of the peptides for optimal affinity is typically not feasible because of insufficient structure-function understanding. Here, we investigate the influence of multivalency of diamond-like carbon (DLC) binding peptides on binding characteristics. We show that facile linking of peptides together using different lengths of spacers and multivalency leads to a tuning of affinity and kinetics. Notably, increased length of spacers in divalent systems led to significantly increased affinities. Making multimers influenced also kinetic aspects of surface competition. Additionally, the multivalent peptides were applied as surface functionalization components for a colloidal form of DLC. The work suggests the use of a set of linking systems to screen parameters for functional optimization of selected material-specific peptides.

  9. Phosphorylation of platelet actin-binding protein during platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, R.C.; Gerrard, J.M.

    1982-03-01

    In this study we have followed the 32P-labeling of actin-binding protein as a function of platelet activation. Utilizing polyacrylamide-sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis to resolve total platelet protein samples, we found 2 to 3-fold labeling increases in actin-binding protein 30 to 60 sec after thrombin stimulation. Somewhat larger increases were observed for 40,000 and 20,000 apparent molecular weight peptides. The actin-binding protein was identified on the gels by coelectrophoresis with purified actin-binding protein, its presence in cytoskeletal cores prepared by detergent extraction of activated 32P-labeled platelets, and by direct immunoprecipitation with antibodies against guinea pig vas deferens filamin (actin-binding protein). In addition, these cytoskeletal cores indicated that the 32P-labeled actin-binding protein was closely associated with the activated platelet's cytoskeleton. Following the 32P-labeling of actin-binding protein over an 8-min time course revealed that in aggregating platelet samples rapid dephosphorylation to almost initial levels occurred between 3 and 5 min. A similar curve was obtained for the 20,000 apparent molecular weight peptide. However, rapid dephosphorylation was not observed if platelet aggregation was prevented by chelating external calcium or by using thrombasthenic platelets lacking the aggregation response. Thus, cell-cell contact would seem to be crucial in initiating the rapid dephosphorylation response.

  10. Structure and Energetic Contributions of a Designed Modular Peptide-Binding Protein with Picomolar Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Simon; Tremmel, Dirk; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Reichen, Christian; Mittl, Peer R E; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-03-16

    Natural armadillo repeat proteins (nArmRP) like importin-α or β-catenin bind their target peptides such that each repeat interacts with a dipeptide unit within the stretched target peptide. However, this modularity is imperfect and also restricted to short peptide stretches of usually four to six consecutive amino acids. Here we report the development and characterization of a regularized and truly modular peptide-specific binding protein, based on designed armadillo repeat proteins (dArmRP), binding to peptides of alternating lysine and arginine residues (KR)n. dArmRP were obtained from nArmRP through cycles of extensive protein engineering, which rendered them more uniform. This regularity is reflected in the consistent binding of dArmRP to (KR)-peptides, where affinities depend on the lengths of target peptides and the number of internal repeats in a very systematic manner, thus confirming the modularity of the interaction. This exponential dependency between affinity and recognition length suggests that each module adds a constant increment of binding energy to sequence-specific recognition. This relationship was confirmed by comprehensive mutagenesis studies that also reveal the importance of individual peptide side chains. The 1.83 Å resolution crystal structure of a dArmRP with five identical internal repeats in complex with the cognate (KR)5 peptide proves a modular binding mode, where each dipeptide is recognized by one internal repeat. The confirmation of this true modularity over longer peptide stretches lays the ground for the design of binders with different specificities and tailored affinities by the assembly of dipeptide-specific modules based on armadillo repeats. PMID:26878586

  11. Differential receptor binding characteristics of consecutive phenylalanines in micro-opioid specific peptide ligand endomorphin-2.

    PubMed

    Honda, Takeshi; Shirasu, Naoto; Isozaki, Kaname; Kawano, Michiaki; Shigehiro, Daiki; Chuman, Yoshiro; Fujita, Tsugumi; Nose, Takeru; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides consist of a conserved amino acid residue of Phe(3) and Phe(4), although their binding modes for opioid receptors have not been elucidated in detail. Endomorphin-2, which is highly selective and specific for the mu opioid receptor, possesses two Phe residues at the consecutive positions 3 and 4. In order to clarify the role of Phe(3) and Phe(4) in binding to the mu receptor, we synthesized a series of analogs in which Phe(3) and Phe(4) were replaced by various amino acids. It was found that the aromaticity of the Phe-beta-phenyl groups of Phe(3) and Phe(4) is a principal determinant of how strongly it binds to the receptor, although better molecular hydrophobicity reinforces the activity. The receptor binding subsites of Phe(3) and Phe(4) of endomorphin-2 were found to exhibit different structural requirements. The results suggest that [Trp(3)]endomorphin-2 (native endomorphin-1) and endomorphin-2 bind to different receptor subclasses. PMID:17395470

  12. A branched peptide mimotope of the nicotinic receptor binding site is a potent synthetic antidote against the snake neurotoxin alpha-bungarotoxin.

    PubMed

    Bracci, Luisa; Lozzi, Luisa; Pini, Alessandro; Lelli, Barbara; Falciani, Chiara; Niccolai, Neri; Bernini, Andrea; Spreafico, Adriano; Soldani, Patrizia; Neri, Paolo

    2002-08-13

    We previously produced synthetic peptides mimicking the snake neurotoxin binding site of the nicotinic receptor. These peptide mimotopes bind the snake neurotoxin alpha-bungarotoxin with higher affinity than peptides reproducing native receptor sequences and inhibit toxin binding to nicotinic receptors in vitro; yet their efficiency in vivo is low. Here we synthesized one of the peptide mimotopes in a tetrabranched MAP form. The MAP peptide binds alpha-bungarotoxin in solution and inhibits its binding to the receptor with a K(A) and an IC(50) similar to the monomeric peptide. Nonetheless, it is at least 100 times more active in vivo. The MAP completely neutralizes toxin lethality when injected in mice at a dose compatible with its use as a synthetic antidote in humans. The in vivo efficacy of the tetrameric peptide cannot be ascribed to a kinetic and thermodynamic effect and is probably related to different pharmacokinetic behavior of the tetrameric molecule, with respect to the monomer. Our findings bring new perspectives to the therapeutic use of multimeric peptides.

  13. A herpes simplex virus scaffold peptide that binds the portal vertex inhibits early steps in viral replication.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kui; Wills, Elizabeth; Baines, Joel D

    2013-06-01

    Previous experiments identified a 12-amino-acid (aa) peptide that was sufficient to interact with the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) portal protein and was necessary to incorporate the portal into capsids. In the present study, cells were treated at various times postinfection with peptides consisting of a portion of the Drosophila antennapedia protein, previously shown to enter cells efficiently, fused to either wild-type HSV-1 scaffold peptide (YPYYPGEARGAP) or a control peptide that contained changes at positions 4 and 5. These 4-tyrosine and 5-proline residues are highly conserved in herpesvirus scaffold proteins and were previously shown to be critical for the portal interaction. Treatment early in infection with subtoxic levels of wild-type peptide reduced viral infectivity by over 1,000-fold, while the mutant peptide had little effect on viral yields. In cells infected for 3 h in the presence of wild-type peptide, capsids were observed to transit to the nuclear rim normally, as viewed by fluorescence microscopy. However, observation by electron microscopy in thin sections revealed an aberrant and significant increase of DNA-containing capsids compared to infected cells treated with the mutant peptide. Early treatment with peptide also prevented formation of viral DNA replication compartments. These data suggest that the antiviral peptide stabilizes capsids early in infection, causing retention of DNA within them, and that this activity correlates with peptide binding to the portal protein. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the portal vertex is the conduit through which DNA is ejected to initiate infection.

  14. Engineered Cystine-Knot Peptides That Bind αvβ3 Integrin With Antibody-Like Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Adam P.; Levin, Aron M.; Lahti, Jennifer L.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2010-01-01

    The αvβ3 integrin receptor is an important cancer target due to its overexpression on many solid tumors and the tumor neovasculature, and its role in metastasis and angiogenesis. We used a truncated form of the Agouti-related protein (AgRP), a 4 kDa cystine-knot peptide with four disulfide bonds and four solvent-exposed loops, as a scaffold for engineering peptides that bound to αvβ3 integrins with high affinity and specificity. A yeast-displayed cystine-knot peptide library was generated by substituting a 6-amino acid loop of AgRP with a 9-amino acid loop containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) integrin recognition motif and randomized flanking residues. Mutant cystine-knot peptides were screened in a high-throughput manner by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to identify clones with high affinity to detergent-solubilized αvβ3 integrin receptor. Select integrin-binding peptides were expressed recombinantly in Pichia pastoris and were tested for their ability to bind to human cancer cells expressing various integrin receptors. These studies showed that the engineered AgRP peptides bound to cells expressing αvβ3 integrins with affinities ranging from 15 nM to 780 pM. Furthermore, the engineered peptides were shown bind specifically to αvβ3 integrins, and had only minimal or no binding to αvβ5, α5β1, and αiibβ3 integrins. The engineered AgRP peptides were also shown to inhibit cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix protein vitronectin, which is a naturally-occurring ligand for αvβ3 and other integrins. Next, to evaluate whether the other three loops of AgRP could modulate integrin specificity, we made second generation libraries by individually randomizing these loops in one of the high affinity integrin-binding variants. Screening of these loop-randomized libraries against αvβ3 integrins resulted in peptides that retained high affinities for αvβ3 and had increased specificities for αvβ3 over αiibβ3 integrins. Collectively, these data

  15. PepComposer: computational design of peptides binding to a given protein surface.

    PubMed

    Obarska-Kosinska, Agnieszka; Iacoangeli, Alfredo; Lepore, Rosalba; Tramontano, Anna

    2016-07-01

    There is a wide interest in designing peptides able to bind to a specific region of a protein with the aim of interfering with a known interaction or as starting point for the design of inhibitors. Here we describe PepComposer, a new pipeline for the computational design of peptides binding to a given protein surface. PepComposer only requires the target protein structure and an approximate definition of the binding site as input. We first retrieve a set of peptide backbone scaffolds from monomeric proteins that harbor the same backbone arrangement as the binding site of the protein of interest. Next, we design optimal sequences for the identified peptide scaffolds. The method is fully automatic and available as a web server at http://biocomputing.it/pepcomposer/webserver. PMID:27131789

  16. PepComposer: computational design of peptides binding to a given protein surface

    PubMed Central

    Obarska-Kosinska, Agnieszka; Iacoangeli, Alfredo; Lepore, Rosalba; Tramontano, Anna

    2016-01-01

    There is a wide interest in designing peptides able to bind to a specific region of a protein with the aim of interfering with a known interaction or as starting point for the design of inhibitors. Here we describe PepComposer, a new pipeline for the computational design of peptides binding to a given protein surface. PepComposer only requires the target protein structure and an approximate definition of the binding site as input. We first retrieve a set of peptide backbone scaffolds from monomeric proteins that harbor the same backbone arrangement as the binding site of the protein of interest. Next, we design optimal sequences for the identified peptide scaffolds. The method is fully automatic and available as a web server at http://biocomputing.it/pepcomposer/webserver. PMID:27131789

  17. New horizons in mouse immunoinformatics: reliable in silico prediction of mouse class I histocompatibility major complex peptide binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Guan, Pingping; Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2004-11-21

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis is a main cornerstone of modern informatic disciplines. Predictive computational models, based on QSAR technology, of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binding affinity have now become a vital component of modern day computational immunovaccinology. Historically, such approaches have been built around semi-qualitative, classification methods, but these are now giving way to quantitative regression methods. The additive method, an established immunoinformatics technique for the quantitative prediction of peptide-protein affinity, was used here to identify the sequence dependence of peptide binding specificity for three mouse class I MHC alleles: H2-D(b), H2-K(b) and H2-K(k). As we show, in terms of reliability the resulting models represent a significant advance on existing methods. They can be used for the accurate prediction of T-cell epitopes and are freely available online ( http://www.jenner.ac.uk/MHCPred). PMID:15534705

  18. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus; identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and ...

  19. Peptide Aptamers That Bind to a Geminivirus Replication Protein Interfere with Viral Replication in Plant Cells †

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Ochoa, Luisa; Ramirez-Prado, Jorge; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda

    2006-01-01

    The AL1 protein of tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV), a member of the geminivirus family, is essential for viral replication in plants. Its N terminus contains three conserved motifs that mediate origin recognition and DNA cleavage during the initiation of rolling-circle replication. We used the N-terminal domain of TGMV AL1 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a random peptide aptamer library constrained in the active site of the thioredoxin A (TrxA) gene. The screen selected 88 TrxA peptides that also bind to the full-length TGMV AL1 protein. Plant expression cassettes corresponding to the TrxA peptides and a TGMV A replicon encoding AL1 were cotransfected into tobacco protoplasts, and viral DNA replication was monitored by semiquantitative PCR. In these assays, 31 TrxA peptides negatively impacted TGMV DNA accumulation, reducing viral DNA levels to 13 to 64% of those of the wild type. All of the interfering aptamers also bound to the AL1 protein of cabbage leaf curl virus. A comparison of the 20-mer peptides revealed that their sequences are not random. The alignments detected seven potential binding motifs, five of which are more highly represented among the interfering peptides. One motif was present in 18 peptides, suggesting that these peptides interact with a hot spot in the AL1 N terminus. The peptide aptamers characterized in these studies represent new tools for studying AL1 function and can serve as the basis for the development of crops with broad-based resistance to single-stranded DNA viruses. PMID:16731923

  20. Tumor-Specific Peptide, Selected from a Phage Peptide Library, Enhances Antitumor Activity of Lactaptin

    PubMed Central

    Makartsova, Anna A.; Fomin, Alexandr S.; Nushtaeva, Anna A.; Koval, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    A recombinant analogue of lactaptin (RL2), a new potential anticancer molecule, induces apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. The tumor suppression efficacy of RL2 was shown against mouse hepatoma-1 cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells. The RL2-based therapeutic drug lactaptin is distributed evenly throughout the organism, which reduces its antitumor efficacy. In the current study, we obtained a genetic construct that allows production of the recombinant fusion protein T3-RL2, consisting of RL2 and T3 peptide (YTYDPWLIFPAN), in E. coli cells. T3 peptide was selected from a phage peptide library as a result of two screenings: in vitro using MDA-MB-231 cell culture and in vivo using a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer MDA-MB-231. It was shown that the displayed peptide T3 provides binding and internalization of phage particles by MDA-MB-231 cells and their specific accumulation in MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue. In addition, based on the nucleotide sequences coding RL2 and the known tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, we obtained genetic constructs that provide synthesis of fusion proteins RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His. We studied the cytotoxic activity of fusion proteins T3-RL2, RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His in vitro using MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human adenocarcinoma cells. The in vitro results showed that the fusion proteins inhibit proliferation of both cell cultures, and their cytotoxic activity is higher than that of RL2. In vivo experiments on the study of the antitumor efficacy of the obtained fusion proteins demonstrated that T3-RL2 protein significantly inhibits MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in a xenograft model compared with RL2, while the antitumor effect of RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His proteins is comparable to the effect of RL2. PMID:27513518

  1. Tumor-Specific Peptide, Selected from a Phage Peptide Library, Enhances Antitumor Activity of Lactaptin.

    PubMed

    Nemudraya, Anna A; Makartsova, Anna A; Fomin, Alexandr S; Nushtaeva, Anna A; Koval, Olga A; Richter, Vladimir A; Kuligina, Elena V

    2016-01-01

    A recombinant analogue of lactaptin (RL2), a new potential anticancer molecule, induces apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. The tumor suppression efficacy of RL2 was shown against mouse hepatoma-1 cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells. The RL2-based therapeutic drug lactaptin is distributed evenly throughout the organism, which reduces its antitumor efficacy. In the current study, we obtained a genetic construct that allows production of the recombinant fusion protein T3-RL2, consisting of RL2 and T3 peptide (YTYDPWLIFPAN), in E. coli cells. T3 peptide was selected from a phage peptide library as a result of two screenings: in vitro using MDA-MB-231 cell culture and in vivo using a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer MDA-MB-231. It was shown that the displayed peptide T3 provides binding and internalization of phage particles by MDA-MB-231 cells and their specific accumulation in MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue. In addition, based on the nucleotide sequences coding RL2 and the known tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, we obtained genetic constructs that provide synthesis of fusion proteins RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His. We studied the cytotoxic activity of fusion proteins T3-RL2, RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His in vitro using MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human adenocarcinoma cells. The in vitro results showed that the fusion proteins inhibit proliferation of both cell cultures, and their cytotoxic activity is higher than that of RL2. In vivo experiments on the study of the antitumor efficacy of the obtained fusion proteins demonstrated that T3-RL2 protein significantly inhibits MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in a xenograft model compared with RL2, while the antitumor effect of RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His proteins is comparable to the effect of RL2. PMID:27513518

  2. Identification of a putative motif for binding of peptides to HLA-DQ2.

    PubMed

    Johansen, B H; Vartdal, F; Eriksen, J A; Thorsby, E; Sollid, L M

    1996-02-01

    To understand the rules determining peptide binding to the celiac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus associated HLA-DQ2 molecule, we have studies in detail the binding of a peptide OVA 258-276Y (IINFEKLTEWTSSNVMEERY) which exhibits strong binding to DQ2. First we tested a set of N- and C-terminal truncated variants, and found the core binding region to comprise residues 267-276Y. Single alanine substitution analysis of the OVA 267-276Y peptide revealed that replacements of V272, E275 and the C-terminal Y had negative effects whereas the substitution of N271 had a positive effect. A polyalanine analogue of the OVA 267-276Y peptide with V272, E275 and a C-terminal Y bound at least as well as the original peptide. A variant peptide with a deletion of R276 displayed decreased binding, suggesting that the anchor residues were out of frame in this analogue. To further characterize the residues playing a role in the binding of the OVA 267-276Y peptide to DQ2 we tested the binding of several analogues with substitutions for V272, E275 and the C-terminal Y residue. Our results indicate that peptides binding to DQ2 have anchor residues in relative positions 4, 7 and (P4, P7 and P9). Residues with negatively charged or hydrophobic aliphatic but not positively charged side chains are preferred in P4 and P7, whereas residues with bulky hydrophobic side chains are preferred in P9. PMID:8671602

  3. Conformational Contribution to Thermodynamics of Binding in Protein-Peptide Complexes through Microscopic Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amit; Chakrabarti, J.; Ghosh, Mahua

    2013-01-01

    We extract the thermodynamics of conformational changes in biomacromolecular complexes from the distributions of the dihedral angles of the macromolecules. These distributions are obtained from the equilibrium configurations generated via all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The conformational thermodynamics data we obtained for calmodulin-peptide complexes using our methodology corroborate well with the experimentally observed conformational and binding entropies. The conformational free-energy changes and their contributions for different peptide-binding regions of calmodulin are evaluated microscopically. PMID:23528087

  4. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suarez, J E; Urquiza, M; Curtidor, H; Rodriguez, L E; Ocampo, M; Torres, E; Guzman, F; Patarroyo, M E

    2000-01-01

    The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720) which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. The residues F701, K703, L705, T706, E713 (FYKILTNTDPNDEVERDNAD) were found to be critical for peptide binding to erythrocytes. PMID:10904405

  5. Cupryphans, metal-binding, redox-active, redesigned conopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Barba, Marco; Sobolev, Anatoli P; Romeo, Cristina; Schininà, M Eugenia; Pietraforte, Donatella; Mannina, Luisa; Musci, Giovanni; Polticelli, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    Contryphans are bioactive peptides, isolated from the venom of marine snails of the genus Conus, which are characterized by the short length of the polypeptide chain and the high degree of unusual post-translational modifications. The cyclization of the polypeptide chain through a single disulphide bond, the presence of two conserved Pro residues, and the epimerization of a Trp/Leu residue confer to Contryphans a stable and well-defined structure in solution, conserved in all members of the family, and tolerant to multiple substitutions. The potential of Contryphans as scaffolds for the design of redox-active (macro)molecules was tested by engineering a copper-binding site on two different variants of the natural peptide Contryphan-Vn. The binding site was designed by computational modeling, and the redesigned peptides were synthesized and characterized by optical, fluorescence, electron spin resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The novel peptides, named Cupryphan and Arg–Cupryphan, bind Cu2+ ions with a 1:1 stoichiometry and a Kd in the 100 nM range. Other divalent metals (e.g., Zn2+ and Mg2+) are bound with much lower affinity. In addition, Cupryphans catalyze the dismutation of superoxide anions with an activity comparable to other nonpeptidic superoxide dismutase mimics. We conclude that the Contryphan motif represents a natural robust scaffold which can be engineered to perform different functions, providing additional means for the design of catalytically active mini metalloproteins. PMID:19241383

  6. [Biologically Active Peptides of King Crab Hepatopancreas].

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, V V; Berezin, B B; Il'ina, A P; Yamskova, V P; Yamskov, I A

    2015-01-01

    Substances of a peptide nature isolated from the hepatopancreas of the king crab Paralithodes camtschaticus exhibited physicochemical properties and membranotropic and specific activities similar to those of membranotropic homeostatic tissue-specific bioregulators previously found in different mammalian and plant tissues. Their biological effect on vertebrate tissues was demonstrated on a model of roller organotypic cultivation of Pleurodeles waltl newt liver tissue. PMID:26353409

  7. Peptide array on cellulose support--a screening tool to identify peptides with dipeptidyl-peptidase IV inhibitory activity within the sequence of α-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Isabelle M E; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y

    2014-11-13

    The inhibition of the enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is an effective pharmacotherapeutic approach for the management of type 2 diabetes. Recent findings have suggested that dietary proteins, including bovine α-lactalbumin, could be precursors of peptides able to inhibit DPP-IV. However, information on the location of active peptide sequences within the proteins is far from being comprehensive. Moreover, the traditional approach to identify bioactive peptides from foods can be tedious and long. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use peptide arrays to screen α-lactalbumin-derived peptides for their interaction with DPP-IV. Deca-peptides spanning the entire α-lactalbumin sequence, with a frame shift of 1 amino acid between successive sequences, were synthesized on cellulose membranes using "SPOT" technology, and their binding to and inhibition of DPP-IV was studied. Among the 114 α-lactalbumin-derived decamers investigated, the peptides 60WCKDDQNPHS69 (αK(i) = 76 µM), 105LAHKALCSEK114 (K(i) = 217 µM) and 110LCSEKLDQWL119 (K(i) = 217 µM) were among the strongest DPP-IV inhibitors. While the SPOT- and traditionally-synthesized peptides showed consistent trends in DPP-IV inhibitory activity, the cellulose-bound peptides' binding behavior was not correlated to their ability to inhibit the enzyme. This research showed, for the first time, that peptide arrays are useful screening tools to identify DPP-IV inhibitory peptides from dietary proteins.

  8. Peptides in headlock – a novel high-affinity and versatile peptide-binding nanobody for proteomics and microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Michael B.; Traenkle, Bjoern; Koch, Philipp A.; Emele, Felix; Weiss, Frederik; Poetz, Oliver; Stehle, Thilo; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Nanobodies are highly valuable tools for numerous bioanalytical and biotechnical applications. Here, we report the characterization of a nanobody that binds a short peptide epitope with extraordinary affinity. Structural analysis reveals an unusual binding mode where the extended peptide becomes part of a β-sheet structure in the nanobody. This interaction relies on sequence-independent backbone interactions augmented by a small number of specificity-determining side chain contacts. Once bound, the peptide is fastened by two nanobody side chains that clamp it in a headlock fashion. Exploiting this unusual binding mode, we generated a novel nanobody-derived capture and detection system. Matrix-coupled nanobody enables the fast and efficient isolation of epitope-tagged proteins from prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems. Additionally, the fluorescently labeled nanobody visualizes subcellular structures in different cellular compartments. The high-affinity-binding and modifiable peptide tag of this system renders it a versatile and robust tool to combine biochemical analysis with microscopic studies. PMID:26791954

  9. Bioluminescent Ligand-Receptor Binding Assays for Protein or Peptide Hormones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence has been widely used in biomedical research due to its high sensitivity, low background, and broad linear range. In recent studies, we applied bioluminescence to ligand-receptor binding assays for some protein or peptide hormones based on a newly developed small monomeric Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) reporter that has the so far brightest bioluminescence. The conventional ligand-receptor binding assays rely on radioligands that have drawbacks, such as radioactive hazards and short shelf lives. In contrast, the novel bioluminescent binding assays use the NanoLuc-based protein or peptide tracers that are safe, stable, and ultrasensitive. Thus, the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assay would be applied to more and more protein or peptide hormones for ligand-receptor interaction studies in future. In the present article, we provided detailed protocols for setting up the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assays using two representative protein hormones as examples. PMID:27424896

  10. Synthesis of gold structures by gold-binding peptide governed by concentration of gold ion and peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungok; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Sylvia J; Rheem, Youngwoo; Myung, Nosang V; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2016-08-01

    Although biological synthesis methods for the production of gold structures by microorganisms, plant extracts, proteins, and peptide have recently been introduced, there have been few reports pertaining to controlling their size and morphology. The gold ion and peptide concentrations affected on the size and uniformity of gold plates by a gold-binding peptide Midas-11. The higher concentration of gold ions produced a larger size of gold structures reached 125.5 μm, but an increased amount of Midas-11 produced a smaller size of gold platelets and increased the yield percentage of polygonal gold particles rather than platelets. The mechanisms governing factors controlling the production of gold structures were primarily related to nucleation and growth. These results indicate that the synthesis of gold architectures can be controlled by newly isolated and substituted peptides under different reaction conditions. PMID:27108675

  11. Synthesis of gold structures by gold-binding peptide governed by concentration of gold ion and peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungok; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Sylvia J; Rheem, Youngwoo; Myung, Nosang V; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2016-08-01

    Although biological synthesis methods for the production of gold structures by microorganisms, plant extracts, proteins, and peptide have recently been introduced, there have been few reports pertaining to controlling their size and morphology. The gold ion and peptide concentrations affected on the size and uniformity of gold plates by a gold-binding peptide Midas-11. The higher concentration of gold ions produced a larger size of gold structures reached 125.5 μm, but an increased amount of Midas-11 produced a smaller size of gold platelets and increased the yield percentage of polygonal gold particles rather than platelets. The mechanisms governing factors controlling the production of gold structures were primarily related to nucleation and growth. These results indicate that the synthesis of gold architectures can be controlled by newly isolated and substituted peptides under different reaction conditions.

  12. Multiple length peptide-pheromone variants produced by Streptococcus pyogenes directly bind Rgg proteins to confer transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Chaitanya; Jimenez, Juan Cristobal; Nanavati, Dhaval; Federle, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, a human-restricted pathogen, accounts for substantial mortality related to infections worldwide. Recent studies indicate that streptococci produce and respond to several secreted peptide signaling molecules (pheromones), including those known as short hydrophobic peptides (SHPs), to regulate gene expression by a quorum-sensing mechanism. Upon transport into the bacterial cell, pheromones bind to and modulate activity of receptor proteins belonging to the Rgg family of transcription factors. Previously, we reported biofilm regulation by the Rgg2/3 quorum-sensing circuit in S. pyogenes. The aim of this study was to identify the composition of mature pheromones from cell-free culture supernatants that facilitate biofilm formation. Bioluminescent reporters were employed to detect active pheromones in culture supernatants fractionated by reverse-phase chromatography, and mass spectrometry was used to characterize their properties. Surprisingly, multiple SHPs that varied by length were detected. Synthetic peptides of each variant were tested individually using bioluminescence reporters and biofilm growth assays, and although activities differed widely among the group, peptides comprising the C-terminal eight amino acids of the full-length native peptide were most active. Direct Rgg/SHP interactions were determined using a fluorescence polarization assay that utilized FITC-labeled peptide ligands. Peptide receptor affinities were seen to be as low as 500 nm and their binding affinities directly correlated with observed bioactivity. Revelation of naturally produced pheromones along with determination of their affinity for cognate receptors are important steps forward in designing compounds whose purpose is positioned for future therapeutics aimed at treating infections through the interference of bacterial communication.

  13. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Rachel L.; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7–36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide–receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design. PMID:26598711

  14. Zinc specifically stimulates the selective binding of a peptide analog of bindin to sulfated fucans.

    PubMed

    DeAngelis, P L; Glabe, C G

    1990-01-01

    A synthetic nonapeptide (Leu-Arg-His-Leu-Arg-His-His-Ser-Asn) derived from the sequence of the sea urchin sperm adhesive protein, bindin, has been shown to bind sulfated fucans in high ionic strength (seawater) conditions. The binding is enhanced by approximately 100-fold in the presence of zinc ions, and no other transition metal tested demonstrates any enhancement. Bindin isolated from sperm contains zinc ion at roughly equimolar concentrations. In the presence of Zn++, the synthetic nonapeptide binds to eggs and inhibits fertilization with a half-maximal effective concentration of 300 microM. The polysaccharide binding selectivity of the peptide/Zn++ complex is similar to bindin but less stringent. Although the order of effectiveness of the inhibitory polysaccharides is the same for bindin and the synthetic peptide, polysaccharides that are only weak inhibitors of fucan binding to bindin show greater effectiveness against the peptide. The effect of chemical modification, pH, and amino acid substitution on the binding properties of the peptide suggest that arginine guanido moieties interact with the sulfated fucans, while histidine groups chelate zinc ions. Although the mechanism of zinc-specific stimulation of fucan binding is not yet clear, one potential explanation is that zinc may stabilize a peptide secondary structure that has a high affinity for fucans.

  15. High-throughput identification of putative receptors for cancer-binding peptides using biopanning and microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Daniel J; Bhave, Sandeep R; Kotipatruni, Rama P; Hunn, Jeremy C; Wildman, Scott A; Hong, Charles; Dadey, David Y. A.; Muhoro, Lincoln K.; Jaboin, Jerry J; Thotala, Dinesh; Hallahan, Dennis E

    2013-01-01

    Phage-display peptide biopanning has been successfully used to identify cancer-targeting peptides in multiple models. For cancer-binding peptides, identification of the peptide receptor is necessary to demonstrate mechanism of action and to further optimize specificity and target binding. The process of receptor identification can be slow and some peptides may turn out to bind ubiquitous proteins not suitable for further drug development. In this report, we describe a high-throughput method for screening a large number of peptides in parallel to identify peptide receptors, which we have termed “reverse biopanning,” which can then be selected for further development based on their peptide receptor. To demonstrate this method, we screened a library of 39 peptides previously identified in our laboratory to bind specifically cancers after irradiation. The reverse biopanning process identified 2 peptides, RKFLMTTRYSRV and KTAKKNVFFCSV, as candidate ligands for the protein tax interacting protein 1 (TIP-1), a protein previously identified in our laboratory to be expressed in the cell surface in tumors and upregulated after exposure to ionizing radiation. We used computational modeling as the initial method for rapid validation of peptide-TIP-1 binding. Pseudo-binding energies were calculated to be −360.645 kcal/mol, −487.239 kcal/mol, and −595.328 kcal/mol for HVGGSSV, TTRYSRV, and NVFFCSV respectively, suggesting that the peptides would have at least similar, if not stronger, binding to TIP-1 compared to the known TIP-1 binding peptide HVGGSSV. We validated peptide in vitro via electrophoretic mobility shift assay, which showed strong binding of RKFLMTTRYSRV and the truncated form TTRYSRV. This method allows for the identification of many peptide receptors and subsequent selection of peptides for further drug development based on the peptide receptor. PMID:23147990

  16. High affinity binding of an engineered, modular peptide to bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Brounts, Sabrina H; Lee, Jae Sung; Weinberg, Sean; Lan Levengood, Sheeny K; Smith, Everett L; Murphy, William L

    2013-05-01

    Bone grafting procedures have become common due in part to a global trend of population aging. Native bone graft is a popular choice when compared to various synthetic bone graft substitutes, owing to superior biological activity. Nonetheless, the insufficient ability of bone allograft to induce new bone formation and the insufficient remodeling of native bone grafts call for osteoinductive factors during bone repair, exemplified by recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP2). We previously developed a modular bone morphogenetic peptide (mBMP) to address complications associated with the clinical use of rhBMP2 as a bone graft substitute. The mBMP is designed to strongly bind to hydroxyapatite, the main inorganic component of bone and teeth, and to provide pro-osteogenic properties analogous to rhBMP2. Our previous in vivo animal studies showed that mBMP bound to hydroxyapatite-coated orthopedic implants with high affinity and stimulated new bone formation. In this study, we demonstrate specific binding of mBMP to native bone grafts. The results show that mBMP binds with high affinity to both cortical and trabecular bones, and that the binding is dependent on the mBMP concentration and incubation time. Importantly, efficient mBMP binding is also achieved in an ex vivo bone bioreactor where bone tissue is maintained viable for several weeks. In addition, mBMP binding can be localized with spatial control on native bone tissue via simple methods, such as dip-coating, spotting, and direct writing. Taken together with the pro-osteogenic activity of mBMP established in previous bone repair models, these results suggest that mBMP may promote bone healing when coated on native bone grafts in a clinically compatible manner.

  17. Cytotoxicity and DNA cleavage with core-shell nanocomposites functionalized by a KH domain DNA binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Bazak, Remon; Ressl, Jan; Raha, Sumita; Doty, Caroline; Liu, William; Wanzer, Beau; Salam, Seddik Abdel; Elwany, Samy; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle E

    2013-12-01

    A nanoconjugate was composed of metal oxide nanoparticles decorated with peptides and fluorescent dye and tested for DNA cleavage following UV light activation. The peptide design was based on a DNA binding domain, the so called KH domain of the hnRNPK protein. This "KH peptide" enabled cellular uptake of nanoconjugates and their entry into cell nuclei. The control nanoconjugate carried no peptide; it consisted only of the metal oxide nanoparticle prepared as Fe3O4@TiO2 nanocomposite and the fluorescent dye alizarin red S. These components of either construct are responsible for nanoconjugate activation by UV light and the resultant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Production of ROS at different subcellular locations causes damage to different components of cells: only nanoconjugates inside cell nuclei can be expected to cause DNA cleavage. Degradation of cellular DNA with KH peptide decorated nanoconjugates exceeded the DNA damage obtained from control, no-peptide nanoconjugate counterparts. Moreover, caspase activation and cell death were more extensive in the same cells.

  18. The irreversible binding of amyloid peptide substrates to insulin-degrading enzyme

    PubMed Central

    de Tullio, Matías B; Morelli, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a conserved Zn2+metalloendopeptidase involved in insulin degradation and in the maintenance of brain steady-state levels of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our recent demonstration that IDE and Aβ are capable of forming a stoichiometric and extremely stable complex raises several intriguing possibilities regarding the role of this unique protein-peptide interaction in physiological and pathological conditions. These include a protective cellular function of IDE as a “dead-end chaperone” alternative to its proteolytic activity and the potential impact of the irreversible binding of Aβ to IDE upon its role as a varicella zoster virus receptor. In a pathological context, the implications for insulin signaling and its relationship to AD pathogenesis are discussed. Moreover, our findings warrant further research regarding a possible general and novel interaction between amyloidogenic peptides and other Zn2+metallopeptidases with an IDE-like fold and a substrate conformation-dependent recognition mechanism. PMID:19098445

  19. Characterization and in vitro activity of a branched peptide boronic acid that interacts with HIV-1 RRE RNA.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Jessica E; Zhang, Wenyu; Tebit, Denis M; Gray, Laurie R; Hammarskjold, Marie-Louise; Rekosh, David; Santos, Webster L

    2016-09-01

    A branched peptide containing multiple boronic acids was found to bind RRE IIB selectively and inhibit HIV-1 p24 capsid production in a dose-dependent manner. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that branching in the peptide is crucial for the low micromolar binding towards RRE IIB, and the peptide demonstrates selectivity towards RRE IIB in the presence of tRNA. Footprinting studies suggest a binding site on the upper stem and internal loop regions of the RNA, which induces enzymatic cleavage of the internal loops of RRE IIB upon binding. PMID:27091070

  20. High-throughput engineering and analysis of peptide binding to class II MHC

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Boder, Eric T.

    2010-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) proteins govern stimulation of adaptive immunity by presenting antigenic peptides to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Many allelic variants of MHC-II exist with implications in peptide presentation and immunity; thus, high-throughput experimental tools for rapid and quantitative analysis of peptide binding to MHC-II are needed. Here, we present an expression system wherein peptide and MHC-II are codisplayed on the surface of yeast in an intracellular association-dependent manner and assayed by flow cytometry. Accordingly, the relative binding of different peptides and/or MHC-II variants can be assayed by genetically manipulating either partner, enabling the application of directed evolution approaches for high-throughput characterization or engineering. We demonstrate the application of this tool to map the side-chain preference for peptides binding to HLA-DR1 and to evolve novel HLA-DR1 mutants with altered peptide-binding specificity. PMID:20622157

  1. Bioinspired silicification of silica-binding peptide-silk protein chimeras: comparison of chemically and genetically produced proteins.

    PubMed

    Canabady-Rochelle, Laetitia L S; Belton, David J; Deschaume, Olivier; Currie, Heather A; Kaplan, David L; Perry, Carole C

    2012-03-12

    Novel protein chimeras constituted of "silk" and a silica-binding peptide (KSLSRHDHIHHH) were synthesized by genetic or chemical approaches and their influence on silica-silk based chimera composite formation evaluated. Genetic chimeras were constructed from 6 or 15 repeats of the 32 amino acid consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes spider silk ([SGRGGLGGQG AGAAAAAGGA GQGGYGGLGSQG](n)) to which one silica binding peptide was fused at the N terminus. For the chemical chimera, 28 equiv of the silica binding peptide were chemically coupled to natural Bombyx mori silk after modification of tyrosine groups by diazonium coupling and EDC/NHS activation of all acid groups. After silica formation under mild, biomaterial-compatible conditions, the effect of peptide addition on the properties of the silk and chimeric silk-silica composite materials was explored. The composite biomaterial properties could be related to the extent of silica condensation and to the higher number of silica binding sites in the chemical chimera as compared with the genetically derived variants. In all cases, the structure of the protein/chimera in solution dictated the type of composite structure that formed with the silica deposition process having little effect on the secondary structural composition of the silk-based materials. Similarly to our study of genetic silk based chimeras containing the R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL), the role of the chimeras (genetic and chemical) used in the present study resided more in aggregation and scaffolding than in the catalysis of condensation. The variables of peptide identity, silk construct (number of consensus repeats or silk source), and approach to synthesis (genetic or chemical) can be used to "tune" the properties of the composite materials formed and is a general approach that can be used to prepare a range of materials for biomedical and sensor-based applications.

  2. Bio-inspired Silicification of Silica-binding Peptide-Silk Protein Chimeras: Comparison of Chemically and Genetically Produced Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Canabady-Rochelle, Laetitia L.S.; Belton, David J.; Deschaume, Olivier; Currie, Heather A.; Kaplan, David L.; Perry, Carole C.

    2012-01-01

    Novel protein chimeras constituted of ‘silk’ and a silica-binding peptide (KSLSRHDHIHHH) were synthesized by genetic or chemical approaches and their influence on silica-silk based chimera composite formation evaluated. Genetic chimeras were constructed from 6 or 15 repeats of the 32 amino acid consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes spider silk ([SGRGGLGGQG AGAAAAAGGA GQGGYGGLGSQG]n) to which one silica binding peptide was fused at the N terminus. For the chemical chimera, 25 equivalents of the silica binding peptide were chemically coupled to natural Bombyx mori silk after modification of tyrosine groups by diazonium coupling and EDC/NHS activation of all acid groups. After silica formation under mild, biomaterial compatible conditions the effect of peptide addition on the properties of the silk and chimeric silk-silica composite materials was explored. The composite biomaterial properties could be related to the extent of silica condensation and to the higher number of silica binding sites in the chemical chimera as compared to the genetically derived variants. In all cases, the structure of the protein / chimera in solution dictated the type of composite structure that formed with the silica deposition process having little effect on the secondary structural composition of the silk based materials. Similarly to our study of genetic silk based chimeras containing the R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL), the role of the chimeras (genetic and chemical) used in the present study resided more in aggregation and scaffolding than in the catalysis of condensation. The variables of peptide identity, silk construct (number of consensus repeats or silk source) and approach to synthesis (genetic or chemical) can be used to ‘tune’ the properties of the composite materials formed and is a general approach which can be used to prepare a range of materials for biomedical and sensor based applications. PMID:22229696

  3. Molecular level studies on binding modes of labeling molecules with polyalanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaobo; Wang, Chenxuan; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhang, Min; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Lan; Niu, Lin; Zeng, Qindao; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the binding modes of typical labeling molecules (thioflavin T (ThT), Congo red (CR) and copper(ii) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (PcCu(SO3Na)4)) on pentaalanine, which is a model peptide segment of amyloidpeptides, have been resolved at the molecular level by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In the STM images, ThT molecules are predominantly adsorbed parallel to the peptide strands and two binding modes could be identified. It was found that ThT molecules are preferentially binding on top of the peptide strand, and the mode of intercalated between neighboring peptides also exists. The parallel binding mode of CR molecules can be observed with pentaalaninepeptides. Besides the binding modes of labeling molecules, the CR and PcCu(SO3Na)4 display different adsorption affinity with the pentaalaninepeptides. The results could be beneficial for obtaining molecular level insight of the interactions between labeling molecules and peptides.In this work, the binding modes of typical labeling molecules (thioflavin T (ThT), Congo red (CR) and copper(ii) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (PcCu(SO3Na)4)) on pentaalanine, which is a model peptide segment of amyloidpeptides, have been resolved at the molecular level by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In the STM images, ThT molecules are predominantly adsorbed parallel to the peptide strands and two binding modes could be identified. It was found that ThT molecules are preferentially binding on top of the peptide strand, and the mode of intercalated between neighboring peptides also exists. The parallel binding mode of CR molecules can be observed with pentaalaninepeptides. Besides the binding modes of labeling molecules, the CR and PcCu(SO3Na)4 display different adsorption affinity with the pentaalaninepeptides. The results could be beneficial for obtaining molecular level insight of the interactions between labeling molecules and peptides. Electronic

  4. [Expression of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) and selection of its specific binding peptide].

    PubMed

    Hou, Li-Hua; Du, Yong; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; An, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Wei

    2004-09-01

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a homologue of the Ly-6/Thy-1 family of cell surface antigen, is expressed by a majority of human prostate cancers and is a promising target for prostate cancer immunotherapy. To obtain the specific peptide binding with PSCA for targeted immunotherapy, PSCA gene was obtained by RT-PCR from human prostate cancer cell line DU145 and the transcated PSCA (tPSCA) gene was cloned into vector pQE30 for soluble expression in E. coli. The identity of recombinant tPSCA was confirmed through ELISA and western blot by use of anti-PSCA monoclonal antibody. Then the 12-peptide phage display library was screened with the purified tPSCA protein for its specific binding peptide through 3 rounds panning. For identifying the peptide's specificity, the peptide was coupled with EGFP (enhanced green fluorecent protein) by recombinant DNA technology and the recombinant coupled protein was termed 11-EGFP. The binding specificity with tPSCA of 11-EGFP was further confirmed by ELISA and competitive inhibition experiment. Flow cytometry demonstrated its binding specificity with cell line DU145. In conclusion, a 12-amino-acid peptide which could bind with PSCA specifically was found and it may be a potential tool for targeted immunotherapy of prostate carcinoma. PMID:15973992

  5. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum RhopH3 protein peptides that specifically bind to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    PubMed Central

    Pinzón, Carlos Giovanni; Curtidor, Hernando; Reyes, Claudia; Méndez, David; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2008-01-01

    The identification of sequences involved in binding to erythrocytes is an important step for understanding the molecular basis of merozoite–erythrocyte interactions that take place during invasion of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite into host cells. Several molecules located in the apical organelles (micronemes, rhoptry, dense granules) of the invasive-stage parasite are essential for erythrocyte recognition, invasion, and establishment of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole. Particularly, it has been demonstrated that rhoptry proteins play an important role in binding to erythrocyte surface receptors, among which is the PfRhopH3 protein, which triggers important immune responses in patients from endemic regions. It has also been reported that anti-RhopH3 antibodies inhibit in vitro invasion of erythrocytes, further supporting its direct involvement in erythrocyte invasion processes. In this study, PfRhopH3 consecutive peptides were synthesized and tested in erythrocyte binding assays for identifying those regions mediating binding to erythrocytes. Fourteen PfRhopH3 peptides presenting high specific binding activity were found, whose bindings were saturable and presented nanomolar dissociation constants. These high-activity binding peptides (HABPs) were characterized by having α-helical structural elements, as determined by circular dichroism, and having receptors of a possible sialic acid-dependent and/or glycoprotein-dependent nature, as evidenced in enzyme-treated erythrocyte binding assays and further corroborated by cross-linking assay results. Furthermore, these HABPs inhibited merozoite in vitro invasion of normal erythrocytes at 200 μM by up to 60% and 90%, suggesting that some RhopH3 protein regions are involved in the P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion. PMID:18593818

  6. Design and production of peptides mimicking the active site of serine esterases with covalent binding to the organophosphorous poison soman. Annual report, 1 July 1984-30 June 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Seltzman, H.H.

    1985-12-09

    The objective of this research program is to design, synthesize, and test peptides and peptide mimics that will scavange soman in vivo and thereby provide protection against this CW agent. The test compounds were designed to mimic the active site of serine esterases (AChE), which are the natural targets of soman, enabling them to react with soman and thus protect endogenous AChE. Cyclodextrins derivatized with peptide functional groups and their equivalents such as imidazole, histamine, ethylene diamine, diethylene triamine, catechol, and ethane dithiol were synthesized for testing. The synthesis of precursors to cyclohexapeptides containing histidine, serine, and aspartic acid, which are amino acids that have been implicated in the active site of numerous esterases, were pursued. Testing of the ability of alpha-, beta, and gamma-cyclodextrins to protect AChE frominactivation by soman was carried out in vitro. From this group of compounds, beta-cyclodextrin was observed to preserve the activity of AChE in a dose response manner achieving a 72.1% preservation of activity when present in 200,000 fold excess versus soman after only ten minutes incubation time (beta-cyclodextrin + soman). Neither alpha, nor gamma-cyclodextrin showed any protective effect at the same doses. The test results suggest that beta cyclodextrin is uniquely suited to scavange soman. Improved scavanging might be achieved with the modified cyclodextrins prepared above for testing.

  7. A Peptide-Coated Gold Nanocluster Exhibits Unique Behavior in Protein Activity Inhibition.

    PubMed

    An, Deyi; Su, Jiguo; Weber, Jeffrey K; Gao, Xueyun; Zhou, Ruhong; Li, Jingyuan

    2015-07-01

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) can be primed for biomedical applications through functionalization with peptide coatings. Often anchored by thiol groups, such peptide coronae not only serve as passivators but can also endow AuNCs with additional bioactive properties. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the structure of a tridecapeptide-coated Au25 cluster and its subsequent interactions with the enzyme thioredoxin reductase 1, TrxR1. We find that, in isolation, both the distribution and conformation of the coating peptides fluctuate considerably. When the coated AuNC is placed around TrxR1, however, the motion of the highly charged peptide coating (+5e/peptide) is quickly biased by electrostatic attraction to the protein; the asymmetric coating acts to guide the nanocluster's diffusion toward the enzyme's negatively charged active site. After the AuNC comes into contact with TrxR1, its peptide corona spreads over the protein surface to facilitate stable binding with protein. Though individual salt bridge interactions between the tridecapeptides and TrxR1 are transient in nature, the cooperative binding of the peptide-coated AuNC is very stable, overall. Interestingly, the biased corona peptide motion, the spreading and the cooperation between peptide extensions observed in AuNC binding are reminiscent of bacterial stimulus-driven approaching and adhesion mechanisms mediated by cilia. The prevailing AuNC binding mode we characterize also satisfies a notable hydrophobic interaction seen in the association of thioredoxin to TrxR1, providing a possible explanation for the AuNC binding specificity observed in experiments. Our simulations thus suggest this peptide-coated AuNC serves as an adept thioredoxin mimic that extends an array of auxiliary structural components capable of enhancing interactions with the target protein in question.

  8. A novel Chk1-binding peptide that enhances genotoxic sensitivity through the cellular redistribution of nuclear Chk1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Seok; Choi, Kyu Jin; Bae, Sangwoo

    2016-01-01

    Since checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is an essential factor for cell viability following DNA damage, the inhibition of Chk1 has been a major focus of pharmaceutical development to enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemo- and radiotherapy that damage DNA. However, due to the off-target effects of conventional Chk1-targeting strategies and the toxicity of Chk1 inhibitors, alternative strategies are required to target Chk1. To facilitate such efforts, in this study, we identified a specific Chk1-binding 12-mer peptide from the screening of a phage display library and characterized the peptide in terms of cellular cytotoxicity, and in terms of its effect on Chk1 activity and sensitivity to genotoxic agents. This peptide, named N-terminal Chk1-binding peptide (Chk1-NP), bound the kinase domain of Chk1. Simulation of the binding revealed that the very N-terminus of the Chk1 kinase domain is the potential peptide binding site. Of note, the polyarginine-mediated internalization of Chk1-NP redistributed nuclear Chk1 with a prominent decrease in the nucleus in the absence of DNA damage. Treatment with Chk1-NP peptide alone decreased the viability of p53-defective HeLa cells, but not that of p53-functional NCI-H460 cells under normal conditions. The treatment of HeLa or NCI-H460 cells with the peptide significantly enhanced radiation sensitivity following ionizing radiation (IR) with a greater enhancement observed in HeLa cells. Moreover, the IR-induced destabilization of Chk1 was aggravated by treatment with Chk1-NP. Therefore, the decreased nuclear localization and protein levels of Chk1 seem to be responsible for the enhanced cancer cell killing following combined treatment with IR and Chk1-NP. The approach using the specific Chk1-binding peptide may facilitate the mechanistic understanding and potential modulation of Chk1 activities and may provide a novel rationale for the development of specific Chk1-targeting agents.

  9. Glucagon-like peptides activate hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mommsen, T P; Andrews, P C; Plisetskaya, E M

    1987-07-13

    Piscine (anglerfish, catfish, coho salmon) glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), applied at 3.5 nM, stimulate (1.1-1.9-fold) flux through gluconeogenesis above control levels in isolated trout and salmon hepatocytes. Human GLP-1 and GLP-2 also activate gluconeogenesis, but to a lesser degree than their piscine counterparts. Minor increases of substrate oxidation are noticed at times of peak gluconeogenic activation through GLPs. These hormones, which are derived from the same precursor peptide as glucagon are more potent activators of gluconeogenesis than glucagon when applied at equimolar concentrations, and do not appear to employ cAMP or cGMP as the intracellular messenger in hepatic tissue. PMID:3109952

  10. Selection of ceramic fluorapatite-binding peptides from a phage display combinatorial peptide library: optimum affinity tags for fluorapatite chromatography.

    PubMed

    Islam, Tuhidul; Bibi, Noor Shad; Vennapusa, Rami Reddy; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo

    2013-08-01

    Peptide affinity tags have become efficient tools for the purification of recombinant proteins from biological mixtures. The most commonly used ligands in this type of affinity chromatography are immobilized metal ions, proteins, antibodies, and complementary peptides. However, the major bottlenecks of this technique are still related to the ligands, including their low stability, difficulties in immobilization, and leakage into the final products. A model approach is presented here to overcome these bottlenecks by utilizing macroporous ceramic fluorapatite (CFA) as the stationary phase in chromatography and the CFA-specific short peptides as tags. The CFA chromatographic materials act as both the support matrix and the ligand. Peptides that bind with affinity to CFA were identified from a randomized phage display heptapeptide library. A total of five rounds of phage selection were performed. A common N-terminal sequence was found in two selected peptides: F4-2 (KPRSMLH) and F5-4 (KPRSVSG). The peptide F5-4, displayed by more than 40% of the phages analyzed in the fifth round of selection, was subjected to further studies. Selectivity of the peptide for the chemical composition and morphology of CFA was assured by the adsorption studies. The dissociation constant, obtained from the F5-4/CFA adsorption isotherm, was in the micromolar range, and the maximum capacity was 39.4 nmol/mg. The chromatographic behavior of the peptides was characterized on a CFA stationary phase with different buffers. Preferential affinity and specific retention properties suggest the possible application of the phage-derived peptides as a tag in CFA affinity chromatography for enhancing the selective recovery of proteins.

  11. Peptide Ligands That Bind Selectively to Spores of Bacillus subtilis and Closely Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Knurr, Jordan; Benedek, Orsolya; Heslop, Jennifer; Vinson, Robert B.; Boydston, Jeremy A.; McAndrew, Joanne; Kearney, John F.; Turnbough, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    As part of an effort to develop detectors for selected species of bacterial spores, we screened phage display peptide libraries for 7- and 12-mer peptides that bind tightly to spores of Bacillus subtilis. All of the peptides isolated contained the sequence Asn-His-Phe-Leu at the amino terminus and exhibited clear preferences for other amino acids, especially Pro, at positions 5 to 7. We demonstrated that the sequence Asn-His-Phe-Leu-Pro (but not Asn-His-Phe-Leu) was sufficient for tight spore binding. We observed equal 7-mer peptide binding to spores of B. subtilis and its most closely related species, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, and slightly weaker binding to spores of the closely related species Bacillus globigii. These three species comprise one branch on the Bacillus phylogenetic tree. We did not detect peptide binding to spores of several Bacillus species located on adjacent and nearby branches of the phylogenetic tree nor to vegetative cells of B. subtilis. The sequence Asn-His-Phe-Leu-Pro was used to identify B. subtilis proteins that may employ this peptide for docking to the outer surface of the forespore during spore coat assembly and/or maturation. One such protein, SpsC, appears to be involved in the synthesis of polysaccharide on the spore coat. SpsC contains the Asn-His-Phe-Leu-Pro sequence at positions 6 to 10, and the first five residues of SpsC apparently must be removed to allow spore binding. Finally, we discuss the use of peptide ligands for bacterial detection and the use of short peptide sequences for targeting proteins during spore formation. PMID:14602648

  12. Limitations of Ab Initio Predictions of Peptide Binding to MHC Class II Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Sette, Alessandro; Bourne, Philip E.; Lund, Ole; Ponomarenko, Julia; Nielsen, Morten; Peters, Bjoern

    2010-01-01

    Successful predictions of peptide MHC binding typically require a large set of binding data for the specific MHC molecule that is examined. Structure based prediction methods promise to circumvent this requirement by evaluating the physical contacts a peptide can make with an MHC molecule based on the highly conserved 3D structure of peptide:MHC complexes. While several such methods have been described before, most are not publicly available and have not been independently tested for their performance. We here implemented and evaluated three prediction methods for MHC class II molecules: statistical potentials derived from the analysis of known protein structures; energetic evaluation of different peptide snapshots in a molecular dynamics simulation; and direct analysis of contacts made in known 3D structures of peptide:MHC complexes. These methods are ab initio in that they require structural data of the MHC molecule examined, but no specific peptide:MHC binding data. Moreover, these methods retain the ability to make predictions in a sufficiently short time scale to be useful in a real world application, such as screening a whole proteome for candidate binding peptides. A rigorous evaluation of each methods prediction performance showed that these are significantly better than random, but still substantially lower than the best performing sequence based class II prediction methods available. While the approaches presented here were developed independently, we have chosen to present our results together in order to support the notion that generating structure based predictions of peptide:MHC binding without using binding data is unlikely to give satisfactory results. PMID:20174654

  13. Functional recombinant MHC class II molecules and high-throughput peptide-binding assays

    PubMed Central

    Justesen, Sune; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper; Nielsen, Lise-Lotte B; Buus, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Background Molecules of the class II major histocompability complex (MHC-II) specifically bind and present exogenously derived peptide epitopes to CD4+ T helper cells. The extreme polymorphism of the MHC-II hampers the complete analysis of peptide binding. It is also a significant hurdle in the generation of MHC-II molecules as reagents to study and manipulate specific T helper cell responses. Methods to generate functional MHC-II molecules recombinantly, and measure their interaction with peptides, would be highly desirable; however, no consensus methodology has yet emerged. Results We generated α and β MHC-II chain constructs, where the membrane-spanning regions were replaced by dimerization motifs, and the C-terminal of the β chains was fused to a biotinylation signal peptide (BSP) allowing for in vivo biotinylation. These chains were produced separately as inclusion bodies in E. coli , extracted into urea, and purified under denaturing and non-reducing conditions using conventional column chromatography. Subsequently, diluting the two chains into a folding reaction with appropriate peptide resulted in efficient peptide-MHC-II complex formation. Several different formats of peptide-binding assay were developed including a homogeneous, non-radioactive, high-throughput (HTS) binding assay. Binding isotherms were generated allowing the affinities of interaction to be determined. The affinities of the best binders were found to be in the low nanomolar range. Recombinant MHC-II molecules and accompanying HTS peptide-binding assay were successfully developed for nine different MHC-II molecules including the DPA1*0103/DPB1*0401 (DP401) and DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201, where both α and β chains are polymorphic, illustrating the advantages of producing the two chains separately. Conclusion We have successfully developed versatile MHC-II resources, which may assist in the generation of MHC class II -wide reagents, data, and tools. PMID:19416502

  14. Eel calcitonin binding site distribution and antinociceptive activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Guidobono, F.; Netti, C.; Sibilia, V.; Villa, I.; Zamboni, A.; Pecile, A.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution of binding site for (/sup 125/I)-eel-calcitonin (ECT) to rat central nervous system, studied by an autoradiographic technique, showed concentrations of binding in the diencephalon, the brain stem and the spinal cord. Large accumulations of grains were seen in the hypothalamus, the amygdala, in the fasciculus medialis prosencephali, in the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, in the ventrolateral part of the periventricular gray matter, in the lemniscus medialis and in the raphe nuclei. The density of grains in the reticular formation and in the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini was more moderate. In the spinal cord, grains were scattered throughout the dorsal horns. Binding of the ligand was displaced equally by cold ECT and by salmon CT(sCT), indicating that both peptides bind to the same receptors. Human CT was much weaker than sCT in displacing (/sup 125/I)-ECT binding. The administration of ECT into the brain ventricles of rats dose-dependently induced a significant and long-lasting enhancement of hot-plate latencies comparable with that obtained with sCT. The antinociceptive activity induced by ECT is compatible with the topographical distribution of binding sites for the peptide and is a further indication that fish CTs are active in the mammalian brain.

  15. Degradation and antioxidant activities of peptides and zinc-peptide complexes during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chan; Li, Bo; Wang, Bo; Xie, Ningning

    2015-04-15

    The degradation characteristics of three peptides (Ser-Met, Asn-Cys-Ser, and glutathione) and their zinc-peptide complexes were studied using a two-stage in vitro digestion model. Enzyme-resistant peptides and zinc-peptide complexes, antioxidant activities, and free amino acids released by digestive enzymes, were measured in this study. The results revealed that the three peptides and their zinc-peptide complexes were resistant to pepsin but not to pancreatin. Pancreatin can partly hydrolyse both peptides and zinc-peptide complexes, but more than half of them remaining in their original form after gastrointestinal digestion. The coordination of zinc improved the enzymatic resistance of the peptide due to lower solubility of complexes and affected the hydrolytic site of pepsin and pancreatin. Zinc-Asn-Cys-Ser, which is highly resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis and maintains Zn in a soluble form, may have potential to improve Zn bioavailability.

  16. Peripheral and integral membrane binding of peptides characterized by time-dependent fluorescence shifts: focus on antimicrobial peptide LAH₄.

    PubMed

    Macháň, Radek; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Olżyńska, Agnieszka; Olšinová, Marie; Cebecauer, Marek; Marquette, Arnaud; Bechinger, Burkhard; Hof, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Positioning of peptides with respect to membranes is an important parameter for biological and biophysical studies using model systems. Our experiments using five different membrane peptides suggest that the time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan can help when distinguishing between peripheral and integral membrane binding and can be a useful, novel tool for studying the impact of transmembrane peptides (TMP) on membrane organization under near-physiological conditions. This article focuses on LAH4, a model α-helical peptide with high antimicrobial and nucleic acid transfection efficiencies. The predominantly helical peptide has been shown to orient in supported model membranes parallel to the membrane surface at acidic and, in a transmembrane manner, at basic pH. Here we investigate its interaction with fully hydrated large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) by TDFS and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). TDFS shows that at acidic pH LAH4 does not influence the glycerol region while at basic pH it makes acyl groups at the glycerol level of the membrane less mobile. TDFS experiments with antimicrobial peptides alamethicin and magainin 2, which are known to assume transmembrane and peripheral orientations, respectively, prove that changes in acyl group mobility at the glycerol level correlate with the orientation of membrane-associated peptide molecules. Analogous experiments with the TMPs LW21 and LAT show similar effects on the mobility of those acyl groups as alamethicin and LAH4 at basic pH. FCS, on the same neutral lipid bilayer vesicles, shows that the peripheral binding mode of LAH4 is more efficient in bilayer permeation than the transmembrane mode. In both cases, the addition of LAH4 does not lead to vesicle disintegration. The influence of negatively charged lipids on the bilayer permeation is also addressed.

  17. Coupling in silico and in vitro analysis of peptide-MHC binding: a bioinformatic approach enabling prediction of superbinding peptides and anchorless epitopes.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Walshe, Valerie A; Jones, Nicola A; Gloster, Simone E; Borrow, Persephone; Flower, Darren R

    2004-06-15

    The ability to define and manipulate the interaction of peptides with MHC molecules has immense immunological utility, with applications in epitope identification, vaccine design, and immunomodulation. However, the methods currently available for prediction of peptide-MHC binding are far from ideal. We recently described the application of a bioinformatic prediction method based on quantitative structure-affinity relationship methods to peptide-MHC binding. In this study we demonstrate the predictivity and utility of this approach. We determined the binding affinities of a set of 90 nonamer peptides for the MHC class I allele HLA-A*0201 using an in-house, FACS-based, MHC stabilization assay, and from these data we derived an additive quantitative structure-affinity relationship model for peptide interaction with the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Using this model we then designed a series of high affinity HLA-A2-binding peptides. Experimental analysis revealed that all these peptides showed high binding affinities to the HLA-A*0201 molecule, significantly higher than the highest previously recorded. In addition, by the use of systematic substitution at principal anchor positions 2 and 9, we showed that high binding peptides are tolerant to a wide range of nonpreferred amino acids. Our results support a model in which the affinity of peptide binding to MHC is determined by the interactions of amino acids at multiple positions with the MHC molecule and may be enhanced by enthalpic cooperativity between these component interactions.

  18. Coupling in silico and in vitro analysis of peptide-MHC binding: a bioinformatic approach enabling prediction of superbinding peptides and anchorless epitopes.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Walshe, Valerie A; Jones, Nicola A; Gloster, Simone E; Borrow, Persephone; Flower, Darren R

    2004-06-15

    The ability to define and manipulate the interaction of peptides with MHC molecules has immense immunological utility, with applications in epitope identification, vaccine design, and immunomodulation. However, the methods currently available for prediction of peptide-MHC binding are far from ideal. We recently described the application of a bioinformatic prediction method based on quantitative structure-affinity relationship methods to peptide-MHC binding. In this study we demonstrate the predictivity and utility of this approach. We determined the binding affinities of a set of 90 nonamer peptides for the MHC class I allele HLA-A*0201 using an in-house, FACS-based, MHC stabilization assay, and from these data we derived an additive quantitative structure-affinity relationship model for peptide interaction with the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Using this model we then designed a series of high affinity HLA-A2-binding peptides. Experimental analysis revealed that all these peptides showed high binding affinities to the HLA-A*0201 molecule, significantly higher than the highest previously recorded. In addition, by the use of systematic substitution at principal anchor positions 2 and 9, we showed that high binding peptides are tolerant to a wide range of nonpreferred amino acids. Our results support a model in which the affinity of peptide binding to MHC is determined by the interactions of amino acids at multiple positions with the MHC molecule and may be enhanced by enthalpic cooperativity between these component interactions. PMID:15187128

  19. Peptides and proteins with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Lôbo, Katiuscia Menezes; Bezerra, Denise Aline Casimiro; Lôbo, Inalzuir

    2008-01-01

    The increase of microbial resistance to antibiotics has led to a continuing search for newer and more effective drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are generally found in animals, plants, and microorganisms and are of great interest to medicine, pharmacology, and the food industry. These peptides are capable of inhibiting pathogenic microorganisms. They can attack parasites, while causing little or no harm to the host cells. The defensins are peptides found in granules in the polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and are responsible for the defense of the organism. Several animal defensins, like dermaseptin, antileukoprotease, protegrin, and others, have had their activities and efficacy tested and been shown to be effective against bacteria, fungi, and protists; there are also specific defensins from invertebrates, e.g., drosomycin and heliomicin; from plants, e.g., the types A and B; and the bacteriocins, e.g., acrocin, marcescin, etc. The aim of the present work was to compile a comprehensive bibliographic review of the diverse potentially antimicrobial peptides in an effort to systematize the current knowledge on these substances as a contribution for further researches. The currently available bibliography does not give a holistic approach on this subject. The present work intends to show that the mechanism of defense represented by defensins is promising from the perspective of its application in the treatment of infectious diseases in human, animals and plants.

  20. Peptide Bacteriocins--Structure Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Etayash, Hashem; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Dangeti, Ramana; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2015-01-01

    With the growing concerns in the scientific and health communities over increasing levels of antibiotic resistance, antimicrobial peptide bacteriocins have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional small molecule antibiotics. A substantial attention has recently focused on the utilization of bacteriocins in food preservation and health safety. Despite the fact that a large number of bacteriocins have been reported, only a few have been fully characterized and structurally elucidated. Since knowledge of the molecular structure is a key for understanding the mechanism of action and therapeutic effects of peptide, we centered our focus in this review on the structure-activity relationships of bacteriocins with a particular focus in seven bacteriocins, namely, nisin, microcin J25, microcin B17, microcin C, leucocin A, sakacin P, and pediocin PA-1. Significant structural changes responsible for the altered activity of the recent bacteriocin analogues are discussed here. PMID:26265354

  1. Binding of small basic peptides to membranes containing acidic lipids: theoretical models and experimental results.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Tal, N; Honig, B; Peitzsch, R M; Denisov, G; McLaughlin, S

    1996-01-01

    We measured directly the binding of Lys3, Lys5, and Lys7 to vesicles containing acidic phospholipids. When the vesicles contain 33% acidic lipids and the aqueous solution contains 100 mM monovalent salt, the standard Gibbs free energy for the binding of these peptides is 3, 5, and 7 kcal/mol, respectively. The binding energies decrease as the mol% of acidic lipids in the membrane decreases and/or as the salt concentration increases. Several lines of evidence suggest that these hydrophilic peptides do not penetrate the polar headgroup region of the membrane and that the binding is mainly due to electrostatic interactions. To calculate the binding energies from classical electrostatics, we applied the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation to atomic models of the phospholipid bilayers and the basic peptides in aqueous solution. The electrostatic free energy of interaction, which arises from both a long-range coulombic attraction between the positively charged peptide and the negatively charged lipid bilayer, and a short-range Born or image charge repulsion, is a minimum when approximately 2.5 A (i.e., one layer of water) exists between the van der Waals surfaces of the peptide and the lipid bilayer. The calculated molar association constants, K, agree well with the measured values: K is typically about 10-fold smaller than the experimental value (i.e., a difference of about 1.5 kcal/mol in the free energy of binding). The predicted dependence of K (or the binding free energies) on the ionic strength of the solution, the mol% of acidic lipids in the membrane, and the number of basic residues in the peptide agree very well with the experimental measurements. These calculations are relevant to the membrane binding of a number of important proteins that contain clusters of basic residues. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:8842196

  2. Complement Component C3 Binds to Activated Normal Platelets without Preceding Proteolytic Activation and Promotes Binding to Complement Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Osama A.; Nilsson, Per H.; Wouters, Diana; Lambris, John D.; Ekdahl, Kristina N.; Nilsson, Bo

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that complement is activated on the surface of activated platelets, despite the presence of multiple regulators of complement activation. To reinvestigate the mechanisms by which activated platelets bind to complement components, the presence of complement proteins on the surfaces of nonactivated and thrombin receptor-activating peptide-activated platelets was analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blot analyses. C1q, C4, C3, and C9 were found to bind to thrombin receptor-activating peptide-activated platelets in lepirudin-anticoagulated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood. However, inhibiting complement activation at the C1q or C3 level did not block the binding of C3 to activated platelets. Diluting PRP and chelating divalent cations also had no effect, further indicating that the deposition of complement components was independent of complement activation. Furthermore, washed, activated platelets bound added C1q and C3 to the same extent as platelets in PRP. The use of mAbs against different forms of C3 demonstrated that the bound C3 consisted of C3(H2O). Furthermore, exogenously added soluble complement receptor 1 was shown to bind to this form of platelet-bound C3. These observations indicate that there is no complement activation on the surface of platelets under physiological conditions. This situation is in direct contrast to a number of pathological conditions in which regulators of complement activation are lacking and thrombocytopenia and thrombotic disease are the ultimate result. However, the generation of C3(H2O) represents nonproteolytic activation of C3 and after factor I cleavage may act as a ligand for receptor binding. PMID:20139276

  3. Interaction of hyaluronan binding peptides with glycosaminoglycans in poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Justine J; Elder, Robert M; Neumann, Alexander J; Jayaraman, Arthi; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2014-04-14

    This study investigates the incorporation of hyaluronan (HA) binding peptides into poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels as a mechanism to bind and retain hyaluronan for applications in tissue engineering. The specificity of the peptide sequence (native RYPISRPRKRC vs non-native RPSRPRIRYKC), the role of basic amino acids, and specificity to hyaluronan over other GAGs in contributing to the peptide-hyaluronan interaction were probed through experiments and simulations. Hydrogels containing the native or non-native peptide retained hyaluronan in a dose-dependent manner. Ionic interactions were the dominating mechanism. In diH2O the peptides interacted strongly with HA and chondroitin sulfate, but in phosphate buffered saline the peptides interacted more strongly with HA. For cartilage tissue engineering, chondrocyte-laden PEG hydrogels containing increasing amounts of HA binding peptide and exogenous HA had increased retention and decreased loss of cell-secreted proteoglycans in and from the hydrogel at 28 days. This new matrix-interactive hydrogel platform holds promise for tissue regeneration. PMID:24597474

  4. Activation of p53-dependent responses in tumor cells treated with a PARC-interacting peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali, Roberta; Cesi, Vincenzo; Tanno, Barbara; Ferrari-Amorotti, Giovanna; Dominici, Carlo; Calabretta, Bruno; Raschella, Giuseppe

    2008-04-04

    We tested the activity of a p53 carboxy-terminal peptide containing the PARC-interacting region in cancer cells with wild type cytoplasmic p53. Peptide delivery was achieved by fusing it to the TAT transduction domain (TAT-p53-C-ter peptide). In a two-hybrid assay, the tetramerization domain (TD) of p53 was necessary and sufficient to bind PARC. The TAT-p53-C-ter peptide disrupted the PARC-p53 complex. Peptide treatment caused p53 nuclear relocation, p53-dependent changes in gene expression and enhancement of etoposide-induced apoptosis. These studies suggest that PARC-interacting peptides are promising candidates for the enhancement of p53-dependent apoptosis in tumors with wt cytoplasmic p53.

  5. Computation of the binding free energy of peptides to graphene in explicit water.

    PubMed

    Welch, Corrinne M; Camden, Aerial N; Barr, Stephen A; Leuty, Gary M; Kedziora, Gary S; Berry, Rajiv J

    2015-07-28

    The characteristic properties of graphene make it useful in an assortment of applications. One particular application--the use of graphene in biosensors--requires a thorough understanding of graphene-peptide interactions. In this study, the binding of glycine (G) capped amino acid residues (termed GXG tripeptides) to trilayer graphene surfaces in aqueous solution was examined and compared to results previously obtained for peptide binding to single-layer free-standing graphene [A. N. Camden, S. A. Barr, and R. J. Berry, J. Phys. Chem. B 117, 10691-10697 (2013)]. In order to understand the interactions between the peptides and the surface, binding enthalpy and free energy values were calculated for each GXG system, where X cycled through the typical 20 amino acids. When the GXG tripeptides were bound to the surface, distinct conformations were observed, each with a different binding enthalpy. Analysis of the binding energy showed the binding of peptides to trilayer graphene was dominated by van der Waals interactions, unlike the free-standing graphene systems, where the binding was predominantly electrostatic in nature. These results demonstrate the utility of computational materials science in the mechanistic explanation of surface-biomolecule interactions which could be applied to a wide range of systems. PMID:26233167

  6. Computation of the binding free energy of peptides to graphene in explicit water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Corrinne M.; Camden, Aerial N.; Barr, Stephen A.; Leuty, Gary M.; Kedziora, Gary S.; Berry, Rajiv J.

    2015-07-01

    The characteristic properties of graphene make it useful in an assortment of applications. One particular application—the use of graphene in biosensors—requires a thorough understanding of graphene-peptide interactions. In this study, the binding of glycine (G) capped amino acid residues (termed GXG tripeptides) to trilayer graphene surfaces in aqueous solution was examined and compared to results previously obtained for peptide binding to single-layer free-standing graphene [A. N. Camden, S. A. Barr, and R. J. Berry, J. Phys. Chem. B 117, 10691-10697 (2013)]. In order to understand the interactions between the peptides and the surface, binding enthalpy and free energy values were calculated for each GXG system, where X cycled through the typical 20 amino acids. When the GXG tripeptides were bound to the surface, distinct conformations were observed, each with a different binding enthalpy. Analysis of the binding energy showed the binding of peptides to trilayer graphene was dominated by van der Waals interactions, unlike the free-standing graphene systems, where the binding was predominantly electrostatic in nature. These results demonstrate the utility of computational materials science in the mechanistic explanation of surface-biomolecule interactions which could be applied to a wide range of systems.

  7. The RXR{alpha} C-terminus T462 is a NMR sensor for coactivator peptide binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Jianyun Chen Minghe; DeKoster, Gregory T.; Cistola, David P.; Li, Ellen

    2008-02-22

    The C-terminal activation function-2 (AF-2) helix plays a crucial role in retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR{alpha})-mediated gene expression. Here, we report a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of the RXR{alpha} ligand-binding domain complexed with 9-cis-retinoic acid and a glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1 peptide. The AF-2 helix and most of the C-terminal residues were undetectable due to a severe line-broadening effect. Due to its outstanding signal-to-noise ratio, the C-terminus residue, threonine 462 (T462) exhibited two distinct crosspeaks during peptide titration, suggesting that peptide binding was in a slow exchange regime on the chemical shift timescale. Consistently, the K{sub d} derived from T462 intensity decay agreed with that derived from isothermal titration calorimetry. Furthermore, the exchange contribution to the {sup 15}N transverse relaxation rate was measurable in either T462 or the bound peptide. These results suggest that T462 is a sensor for coactivator binding and is a potential probe for AF-2 helix mobility.

  8. Identificaiton of Shc Src Homology 2 Domain-Binding Peptoid – Peptide Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Jun; Kim, Sung Eun; Stephen, Andrew G.; Weidlich, Iwona; Giubellino, Alessio; Liu, Fa; Worthy, Karen M.; Bindu, Lakshman; Fivash, Matthew J.; Nicklaus, Marc C.; Bottaro, Donald P.; Fisher, Robert J.; Burke, Terrence R.

    2009-01-01

    A fluorescence anisotropy (FA) competition – based Shc Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-binding was established using the high affinity fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-containing peptide, FITC-NH-(CH2)4-CO-pY-Q-G-L-S-amide (8; Kd = 0.35 μM). Examination of a series of open – chain bis-alkenylamide containing peptides, prepared as ring – closing metathesis precursors, showed that the highest affinities were obtained by replacement of the original Gly residue with Nα-substituted Gly (NSG) “peptoid” residues. This provided peptoid-peptide hybrids of the form, “Ac-pY-Q-[NSG]-L-amide.” Depending on the NSG substituent, certain of these hybrids exhibited up to 40 – fold higher Shc SH2 domain binding affinity than the parent Gly-containing peptide (IC50 = 248 μM), (for example, N-homo-allyl analogue 50; IC50 = 6 μM). To our knowledge, this work represents the first successful example of the application of peptoid-peptide hybrids in the design of SH2 domain-binding antagonists. These results could provide a foundation for further structural optimization of Shc SH2 domain-binding peptide mimetics. PMID:19226165

  9. Identification of Shc Src homology 2 domain-binding peptoid-peptide hybrids.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Jun; Kim, Sung-Eun; Stephen, Andrew G; Weidlich, Iwona; Giubellino, Alessio; Liu, Fa; Worthy, Karen M; Bindu, Lakshman; Fivash, Matthew J; Nicklaus, Marc C; Bottaro, Donald P; Fisher, Robert J; Burke, Terrence R

    2009-03-26

    A fluorescence anisotropy (FA) competition-based Shc Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-binding was established using the high affinity fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) containing peptide, FITC-NH-(CH2)4-CO-pY-Q-G-L-S-amide (8; Kd = 0.35 microM). Examination of a series of open-chain bis-alkenylamide containing peptides, prepared as ring-closing metathesis precursors, showed that the highest affinities were obtained by replacement of the original Gly residue with N alpha-substituted Gly (NSG) "peptoid" residues. This provided peptoid-peptide hybrids of the form "Ac-pY-Q-[NSG]-L-amide." Depending on the NSG substituent, certain of these hybrids exhibited up to 40-fold higher Shc SH2 domain-binding affinity than the parent Gly-containing peptide (IC50 = 248 microM) (for example, for N-homoallyl analogue 50, IC50 = 6 microM). To our knowledge, this work represents the first successful example of the application of peptoid-peptide hybrids in the design of SH2 domain-binding antagonists. These results could provide a foundation for further structural optimization of Shc SH2 domain-binding peptide mimetics. PMID:19226165

  10. Discovery and structural characterization of a phospholamban-binding cyclic peptide and design of novel inhibitors of phospholamban.

    PubMed

    Tilgmann, Carola; Pollesello, Piero; Ovaska, Martti; Kaivola, Juha; Pystynen, Jarmo; Tiainen, Eija; Yliperttula, Marjo; Annila, Arto; Levijoki, Jouko

    2013-04-01

    The interplay between cardiac sarcoplasmic Ca(2+)ATPase and phospholamban is a key regulating factor of contraction and relaxation in the cardiac muscle. In heart failure, aberrations in the inhibition of sarcoplasmic Ca(2+)ATPase by phospholamban are associated with anomalies in cardiac functions. In experimental heart failure models, modulation of the interaction between these two proteins has been shown to be a potential therapeutic approach. The aim of our research was to find molecules able to interfere with the inhibitory activity of phospholamban on sarcoplasmic Ca(2+)ATPase. For this purpose, a portion of phospholamban was synthesized and used as target for a phage-display peptide library screening. The cyclic peptide C-Y-W-E-L-E-W-L-P-C-A was found to bind to phospholamban (1-36) with high specificity. Its functional activity was tested in Ca(2+)uptake assays utilizing preparations from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum. By synthesizing and testing a series of alanine point-mutated cyclic peptides, we identified which amino acid was important for the inhibition of the phospholamban function. The structures of active and inactive alanine-mutated cyclic peptides, and of phospholamban (1-36), were determined by NMR. This structure-activity analysis allowed building a model of phospholamban -cyclic peptide complex. Thereafter, a simple pharmacophore was defined and used for the design of small molecules. Finally, examples of such molecules were synthesized and characterized as phospholamban inhibitors.

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of Novel Synthetic Peptides Derived from Indolicidin and Ranalexin against Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Hassan Mahmood; Le, Cheng Foh; Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Velayuthan, Rukumani Devi; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Isa, Diyana Mohd; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics in order to defeat multidrug-resistant bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, thirteen antimicrobial peptides were designed based on two natural peptides indolicidin and ranalexin. Our results revealed that four hybrid peptides RN7-IN10, RN7-IN9, RN7-IN8, and RN7-IN6 possess potent antibacterial activity against 30 pneumococcal clinical isolates (MIC 7.81-15.62µg/ml). These four hybrid peptides also showed broad spectrum antibacterial activity (7.81µg/ml) against S. aureus, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and E. coli. Furthermore, the time killing assay results showed that the hybrid peptides were able to eliminate S. pneumoniae within less than one hour which is faster than the standard drugs erythromycin and ceftriaxone. The cytotoxic effects of peptides were tested against human erythrocytes, WRL-68 normal liver cell line, and NL-20 normal lung cell line. The results revealed that none of the thirteen peptides have cytotoxic or hemolytic effects at their MIC values. The in silico molecular docking study was carried out to investigate the binding properties of peptides with three pneumococcal virulent targets by Autodock Vina. RN7IN6 showed a strong affinity to target proteins; autolysin, pneumolysin, and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) based on rigid docking studies. Our results suggest that the hybrid peptides could be suitable candidates for antibacterial drug development. PMID:26046345

  12. Catalytic Activities Of [GADV]-Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Takae; Fukushima, Jun; Maruyama, Masako; Iwamoto, Ryoko; Ikehara, Kenji

    2005-10-01

    We have previously postulated a novel hypothesis for the origin of life, assuming that life on the earth originated from “[GADV]-protein world”, not from the “RNA world” (see Ikehara's review, 2002). The [GADV]-protein world is constituted from peptides and proteins with random sequences of four amino acids (glycine [G], alanine [A], aspartic acid [D] and valine [V]), which accumulated by pseudo-replication of the [GADV]-proteins. To obtain evidence for the hypothesis, we produced [GADV]-peptides by repeated heat-drying of the amino acids for 30 cycles ([GADV]-P30) and examined whether the peptides have some catalytic activities or not. From the results, it was found that the [GADV]-P30 can hydrolyze several kinds of chemical bonds in molecules, such as umbelliferyl-β-D-galactoside, glycine-p-nitroanilide and bovine serum albumin. This suggests that [GADV]-P30 could play an important role in the accumulation of [GADV]-proteins through pseudo-replication, leading to the emergence of life. We further show that [GADV]-octapaptides with random sequences, but containing no cyclic compounds as diketepiperazines, have catalytic activity, hydrolyzing peptide bonds in a natural protein, bovine serum albumin. The catalytic activity of the octapeptides was much higher than the [GADV]-P30 produced through repeated heat-drying treatments. These results also support the [GADV]-protein-world hypothesis of the origin of life (see Ikehara's review, 2002). Possible steps for the emergence of life on the primitive earth are presented.

  13. Elastase and suppressor active peptide activity following burn injury.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, A N; Pinney, E; Hoyt, D B; Ninnemann, J; Hansbrough, J

    1988-02-01

    Proteolytic enzyme activity following trauma and inflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of injury. The precise mechanisms involved in the induction of protease release has not been determined. We show here that sera from burn patients with greater than 40% TBSA have significantly elevated levels of active elastase which correspond with significantly increased levels of suppressor active peptide (SAP) and suppression of neutrophil chemotaxis. The elastase inhibitory capacity of serum from burned or blunt trauma patients was within normal range, suggesting that the primary elastase inhibitor, alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor, is functionally active. Additionally, granulocytes exposed to suppressor active peptide in vitro resulted in a markedly elevated release of elastase into the culture supernatants. These data suggest that the suppressor peptide is capable of not only suppressing immune function but is also a potent mediator for the induction of proteolytic enzyme release from leukocytes.

  14. Small Molecule Inhibited Parathyroid Hormone Mediated cAMP Response by N–Terminal Peptide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Baumann, Monika; Balbach, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Ligand binding to certain classes of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) stimulates the rapid synthesis of cAMP through G protein. Human parathyroid hormone (PTH), a member of class B GPCRs, binds to its receptor via its N–terminal domain, thereby activating the pathway to this secondary messenger inside cells. Presently, GPCRs are the target of many pharmaceuticals however, these drugs target only a small fraction of structurally known GPCRs (about 10%). Coordination complexes are gaining interest due to their wide applications in the medicinal field. In the present studies we explored the potential of a coordination complex of Zn(II) and anthracenyl–terpyridine as a modulator of the parathyroid hormone response. Preferential interactions at the N–terminal domain of the peptide hormone were manifested by suppressed cAMP generation inside the cells. These observations contribute a regulatory component to the current GPCR–cAMP paradigm, where not the receptor itself, but the activating hormone is a target. To our knowledge, this is the first report about a coordination complex modulating GPCR activity at the level of deactivating its agonist. Developing such molecules might help in the control of pathogenic PTH function such as hyperparathyroidism, where control of excess hormonal activity is essentially required. PMID:26932583

  15. HIV-1 vaccine development: constrained peptide immunogens show improved binding to the anti-HIV-1 gp41 MAb.

    PubMed

    McGaughey, G B; Citron, M; Danzeisen, R C; Freidinger, R M; Garsky, V M; Hurni, W M; Joyce, J G; Liang, X; Miller, M; Shiver, J; Bogusky, M J

    2003-03-25

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 mediates viral entry through fusion of the target cellular and viral membranes. A segment of gp41 containing the sequence Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala has previously been identified as the epitope of the HIV-1 neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2F5 (MAb 2F5). The 2F5 epitope is highly conserved among HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Antibodies directed at the 2F5 epitope have neutralizing effects on a broad range of laboratory-adapted HIV-1 variants and primary isolates. Recently, a crystal structure of the epitope bound to the Fab fragment of MAb 2F5 has shown that the 2F5 peptide adopts a beta-turn conformation [Pai, E. F., Klein, M. H., Chong, P., and Pedyczak, A. (2000) World Intellectual Property Organization Patent WO-00/61618]. We have designed cyclic peptides to adopt beta-turn conformations by the incorporation of a side-chain to side-chain lactam bridge between the i and i + 4 residues containing the Asp-Lys-Trp segment. Synthesis of extended, nonconstrained peptides encompassing the 2F5 epitope revealed that the 13 amino acid sequence, Glu-Leu-Leu-Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala-Ser-Leu-Trp-Asn, maximized MAb 2F5 binding. Constrained analogues of this sequence were explored to optimize 2F5 binding affinity. The solution conformations of the constrained peptides have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling techniques. The results presented here demonstrate that both inclusion of the lactam constraint and extension of the 2F5 segment are necessary to elicit optimal antibody binding activity. The ability of these peptide immunogens to stimulate a high titer, peptide-specific immune response incapable of viral neutralization is discussed in regard to developing an HIV-1 vaccine designed to elicit a 2F5-like immune response. PMID:12641452

  16. Reassociation with beta 2-microglobulin is necessary for Kb class I major histocompatibility complex binding of exogenous peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Rock, K L; Rothstein, L E; Gamble, S R; Benacerraf, B

    1990-01-01

    T lymphocytes recognize endogenously produced antigenic peptides in association with major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded molecules. Peptides from the extracellular fluid can be displayed in association with class I and class II MHC molecules. Here we report that mature Kb class I MHC molecules bind peptides upon dissociation and reassociation of their light chain. Intact Kb heterodimers, unlike class II MHC molecules, are relatively unreceptive to binding peptides. This property may maintain segregation of class I and class II MHC-restricted peptides and has implications for the use of peptides as vaccines. Images PMID:2217182

  17. Identification of IgE binding to Api g 1-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, Elvira; Aÿ, Bernhard; Boisguerin, Prisca; Dölle, Sabine; Worm, Margitta; Volkmer, Rudolf

    2010-11-01

    Celery is a frequent cause of food allergy in pollen-sensitized patients and can induce severe allergic reactions. Clinical symptoms cannot be predicted by skin prick tests (SPTs) or by determining allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE). Our aim was to identify specific IgE binding peptides by using an array technique. For our study, the sera of 21 patients with positive double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) to celery, as well as the sera of 17 healthy patients were used. Additionally, all patients underwent skin tests along with determinations of specific IgE binding. The major allergen of celery Api g 1.0101 (Apium graveolens) was synthesized as an array of overlapping peptides and probed with the patients' sera. We developed an improved immunoassay protocol by investigating peptide lengths, peptide densities, incubation parameters, and readout systems, which could influence IgE binding. Sera of celery-allergic patients showed binding to three distinct regions of Api g 1.0101. The region including amino acids 100 to 126 of Api g 1.0101 is the most important region for IgE binding. This region caused a fivefold higher binding of IgE from the sera of celery-allergic patients compared to those of healthy individuals. In particular, one peptide (VLVPTADGGSIC) was recognized by all sera of celery-allergic patients. In contrast, no binding to this peptide was detected in sera of the healthy controls. Our improved assay strategy allows us to distinguish between celery-allergic and healthy individuals, but needs to be explored in a larger cohort of well-defined patients.

  18. Identification of the sAPRIL Binding Peptide and Its Growth Inhibition Effects in the Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Li, Jing; He, Mei-rong

    2015-01-01

    Background A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) super family. It binds to its specific receptors and is involved in multiple processes during tumorigenesis and tumor cells proliferation. High levels of APRIL expression are closely correlated to the growth, metastasis, and 5-FU drug resistance of colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to identify a specific APRIL binding peptide (BP) able to block APRIL activity that could be used as a potential treatment for colorectal cancer. Methods A phage display library was used to identify peptides that bound selectively to soluble recombinant human APRIL (sAPRIL). The peptides with the highest binding affinity for sAPRIL were identified using ELISA. The effects of sAPRIL-BP on cell proliferation and cell cycle/apoptosis in vitro were evaluated using the CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. An in vivo mouse model of colorectal cancer was used to determine the anti-tumor efficacy of the sAPRIL-BP. Results Three candidate peptides were characterized from eight phage clones with high binding affinity for sAPRIL. The peptide with the highest affinity was selected for further characterization. The identified sAPRIL-BP suppressed tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in LOVO cells in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo in a mouse colorectal challenge model, the sAPRIL-BP reduced the growth of tumor xenografts in nude mice by inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis intratumorally. Moreover, in an in vivo metastasis model, sAPRIL-BP reduced liver metastasis of colorectal cancer cells. Conclusions sAPRIL-BP significantly suppressed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo and might be a candidate for treating colorectal cancers that express high levels of APRIL. PMID:25826583

  19. Discovery and application of peptides that bind to proteins and solid state inorganic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stearns, Linda A.

    A series of three projects was undertaken on the theme of peptide-based molecular recognition. In the first project, a messenger RNA (mRNA) display selection was carried out against the II-VI semiconductors zinc sulfide (ZnS), zinc selenide (ZnSe), and cadmium sulfide (CdS). Sequence analysis of 18-mer semiconductor-binding peptides (SBPs) following four rounds of selection indicated that the amino acid sequences were enriched in polar residues compared to the naive library, suggesting that hydrogen-bonding interactions are a dominant mode of interaction between the SBPs and their cognate inorganic surfaces. Select peptides were expressed as fusions of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to visualize their recognition of semiconductor crystals. Interpretation of the results was complicated by a high fluorescence background that was observed with certain control GFP fusions. Additional experiments, including cross-specificity binding assays, are needed to characterize the peptides that were isolated in this selection. A second project described the practical application of a known inorganic-binding and nucleating peptide. Peptide A3, which was previously isolated by phage display, was chemically conjugated to a short DNA strand using the heterobifunctional linker succinimidyl 4-[N-maleimidomethyl]cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (SMCC). The resulting peptide-DNA conjugate was hybridized to ten complementary single-stranded capture probes extending outward from the surface of an origami DNA nanotube. A gold precursor solution was added to initiate nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles at the site of the peptide. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to visualize the gold nanoparticle-decorated nanostructures. This approach holds immense promise for organizing compositionally-diverse materials at the nanoscale. In a third project, a novel non-iterative approach to mRNA display called covalent capture was demonstrated. Using human transferrin as a target

  20. Isolation of a peptide binding protein and its role in antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lakey, E.; Pierce, S.K.; Margoliash, E.

    1986-03-05

    A mouse T cell hybrid, TPc9.1, recognizes pigeon cytochrome c (Pc) as processed and presented by histocompatible antigen presenting cells (APC). When paraformaldehyde fixed APC are employed, only a peptide fragment of Pc, Pc 81-104, and not the native Pc, is capable of stimulating TPc9.1 cells. Pc 81-104 appears to associate tightly with the APC surface since paraformaldehyde fixed APC which have been incubated with Pc 81-104 remain stimulatory following extensive washing. When APC are surface labeled with /sup 125/I, solubilized and affinity purified on Pc 81-104-Sepharose 4B columns, two predominant polypeptides of approximately 72 and 74 kd are isolated. Little or no immunoglobulin, Class I or Class II proteins are obtained under these conditions. Antisera from rabbits immunized with the affinity purified material, but not preimmune sera, block the activation of TPc 9.1 cells by Pc as well as Pc 81-104 when presented by live APC. Furthermore, these antisera are even more effective in blocking the activation of TPc9.1 cells by either APC which had been pulsed with Pc and then paraformaldehyde fixed, or by Pc 81-104 when added to paraformaldehyde fixed APC, suggesting that these antisera were not affecting antigen processing. Thus, these peptide binding proteins may play a role in antigen presentation, and they are being further characterized.

  1. Calcium Binding to Amino Acids and Small Glycine Peptides in Aqueous Solution: Toward Peptide Design for Better Calcium Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-06-01

    Deprotonation of amino acids as occurs during transfer from stomach to intestines during food digestion was found by comparison of complex formation constants as determined electrochemically for increasing pH to increase calcium binding (i) by a factor of around 6 for the neutral amino acids, (ii) by a factor of around 4 for anions of the acidic amino acids aspartic and glutamic acid, and (iii) by a factor of around 5.5 for basic amino acids. Optimized structures of the 1:1 complexes and ΔHbinding for calcium binding as calculated by density functional theory (DFT) confirmed in all complexes a stronger calcium binding and shorter calcium-oxygen bond length in the deprotonated form. In addition, the stronger calcium binding was also accompanied by a binding site shift from carboxylate binding to chelation by α-amino group and carboxylate oxygen for leucine, aspartate, glutamate, alanine, and asparagine. For binary amino acid mixtures, the calcium-binding constant was close to the predicted geometric mean of the individual amino acid binding constants indicating separate binding of calcium to two amino acids when present together in solution. At high pH, corresponding to conditions for calcium absorption, the binding affinity increased in the order Lys < Arg < Cys < Gln < Gly ∼ Ala < Asn < His < Leu < Glu< Asp. In a series of glycine peptides, calcium-binding affinity was found to increase in the order Gly-Leu ∼ Gly-Gly < Ala-Gly < Gly-His ∼ Gly-Lys-Gly < Glu-Cys-Gly < Gly-Glu, an ordering confirmed by DFT calculations for the dipeptides and which also accounted for large synergistic effects in calcium binding for up to 6 kJ/mol when compared to the corresponding amino acid mixtures.

  2. Cytotoxicity and DNA cleavage with core-shell nanocomposites functionalized by a KH domain DNA binding peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ressl, Jan; Raha, Sumita; Doty, Caroline; Liu, William; Wanzer, Beau; Salam, Seddik Abdel; Elwany, Samy; Paunesku, Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    A nanoconjugate was composed of metal oxide nanoparticles decorated with peptides and fluorescent dye and tested for DNA cleavage following UV light activation. The peptide design was based on a DNA binding domain, the so called KH domain of the hnRNPK protein. This “KH peptide” enabled cellular uptake of nanoconjugates and their entry into cell nuclei. The control nanoconjugate carried no peptide; it consisted only of the metal oxide nanoparticle prepared an Fe3O4@TiO2 nanocomposite and the fluorescent dye alizarin red S. These components of either construct are responsible for nanoconjugate activation by UV light and the resultant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Production of ROS at different subcellular locations causes damage to different components of cells: only nanoconjugates inside cell nuclei can be expected to cause DNA cleavage. Degradation of cellular DNA with KH peptide decorated nanoconjugates exceeded the DNA damage obtained from control, no-peptide nanoconjugate counterparts. Moreover, caspase activation and cell death were more extensive in the same cells. PMID:23824281

  3. Rational design of YAP WW1 domain-binding peptides to target TGFβ/BMP/Smad-YAP interaction in heterotopic ossification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Liu, Shenghe; Zhang, Wen; Sun, Luyuan

    2015-11-01

    The transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenic protein/Smad signaling pathway has been raised as a new and promising therapeutic target of heterotopic ossification, which is mediated by recruitment of transcription coactivator Yes-associated protein (YAP) to Smad. Here, we described a successful integration of computational modeling and experimental assay to rationally design novel peptide aptamers to disrupt YAP-Smad interaction by targeting YAP WW1 domain. In the protocol, a computational genetic evolution strategy was used to improve a population of potential YAP WW1-binding peptides generated from the YAP-recognition site in Smad protein, from which several promising peptides were selected and their affinities toward YAP WW1 domain were determined using binding assay. In addition, a high-activity peptide was further optimized based on its complex structure with YAP WW1 domain to derive a number of derivative peptides with higher binding potency to the domain. We also found that a strong YAP WW1 binder should have a negatively charged N-terminus, a positively charged C-terminus and a nonpolar core to match the electrostatic distribution pattern in peptide-binding pocket of YAP WW1 domain, which may also form additional nonbonded interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridge and π-π stacking to confer stability and specificity for the domain-peptide recognition.

  4. Rational design of YAP WW1 domain-binding peptides to target TGFβ/BMP/Smad-YAP interaction in heterotopic ossification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Liu, Shenghe; Zhang, Wen; Sun, Luyuan

    2015-11-01

    The transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenic protein/Smad signaling pathway has been raised as a new and promising therapeutic target of heterotopic ossification, which is mediated by recruitment of transcription coactivator Yes-associated protein (YAP) to Smad. Here, we described a successful integration of computational modeling and experimental assay to rationally design novel peptide aptamers to disrupt YAP-Smad interaction by targeting YAP WW1 domain. In the protocol, a computational genetic evolution strategy was used to improve a population of potential YAP WW1-binding peptides generated from the YAP-recognition site in Smad protein, from which several promising peptides were selected and their affinities toward YAP WW1 domain were determined using binding assay. In addition, a high-activity peptide was further optimized based on its complex structure with YAP WW1 domain to derive a number of derivative peptides with higher binding potency to the domain. We also found that a strong YAP WW1 binder should have a negatively charged N-terminus, a positively charged C-terminus and a nonpolar core to match the electrostatic distribution pattern in peptide-binding pocket of YAP WW1 domain, which may also form additional nonbonded interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridge and π-π stacking to confer stability and specificity for the domain-peptide recognition. PMID:26435515

  5. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide–protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize interactions of low affinity peptides with their cognate protein targets. The HDX-MS workflow was optimized to accurately detect low-affinity peptide–protein interactions by use of ion mobility, electron transfer dissociation, nonbinding control peptides, and statistical analysis of replicate data. We show that HDX-MS can identify regions in the two epigenetic regulator proteins KDM4C and KDM1A that are perturbed through weak interactions with PD-identified peptides. Two peptides cause reduced HDX on opposite sides of the active site of KDM4C, indicating distinct binding modes. In contrast, the perturbation site of another PD-selected peptide inhibiting the function of KDM1A maps to a GST-tag. Our results demonstrate that HDX-MS can validate and map weak peptide–protein interactions and pave the way for understanding and optimizing the binding of peptide scaffolds identified through PD and similar ligand discovery approaches. PMID:25325890

  6. Binding of iron(III) to the single tyrosine residue of amyloid β-peptide probed by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Takashi; Suzuki, Kiyoko; Takeuchi, Hideo

    2001-10-01

    The Fe(III) ion binds to amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) and induces significant aggregation of the peptide. In addition to the Aβ aggregation, the redox activity of the Fe(III) ion bound to Aβ is considered to play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In order to understand the role of Fe(III) in Aβ aggregation and neurotoxicity, we have examined the Fe(III)-binding mode of human Aβ by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra of Fe(III)-Aβ complexes excited at 514.5 nm are dominated by resonance Raman bands of metal-bound tyrosinate, evidencing that the Fe(III) ion primarily binds to Aβ via the phenolic oxygen of Tyr10. In addition, carboxylate groups of glutamate/aspartate side chains are also bound to Fe(III). On the other hand, histidine residues in the N-terminal hydrophilic region of Aβ do not bind to Fe(III). These results are in sharp contrast to the Zn(II)- or Cu(II)-induced aggregation of Aβ, in which histidine residues act as the primary metal binding sites. The Fe(III)-Tyr10 binding may play an important role in Aβ aggregation and in decreasing the reduction potential of the bound Fe(III) ion.

  7. Conformation of the ATP binding peptide in actin revealed by proton NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barden, J.A.

    1987-09-22

    The actin peptide 106-124 exists in a completely conserved region of the sequence and binds strongly to both ATP and tripolyphosphate. Binding particularly affects residues 116 and 118 and generally affects the two segments 115-118 and 121-124. One-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement difference spectroscopy was used to detect molecular interactions between both adjacent and nonadjacent residues. The N-terminal segment 106-112 was found to be largely extended. A sharp bend was detected between Pro-112 and Lys-113. The triphosphate moiety binds to the strongly hydrophilic central segment of the peptide. Evidence was obtained for a reverse turn involving residues 121-124. Amide proton temperature coefficients and coupling constants provide evidence for a type I ..beta..-turn. A model of the ATP binding site is proposed together with its relationship to other parts of the actin structure and to the phalloidin binding site.

  8. Biochemical Identification of a Linear Cholesterol-Binding Domain within Alzheimer’s β Amyloid Peptide

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides can self-organize into amyloid pores that may induce acute neurotoxic effects in brain cells. Membrane cholesterol, which regulates Aβ production and oligomerization, plays a key role in this process. Although several data suggested that cholesterol could bind to Aβ peptides, the molecular mechanisms underlying cholesterol/Aβ interactions are mostly unknown. On the basis of docking studies, we identified the linear fragment 22–35 of Aβ as a potential cholesterol-binding domain. This domain consists of an atypical concatenation of polar/apolar amino acid residues that was not previously found in cholesterol-binding motifs. Using the Langmuir film balance technique, we showed that synthetic peptides Aβ17–40 and Aβ22–35, but not Aβ1–16, could efficiently penetrate into cholesterol monolayers. The interaction between Aβ22–35 and cholesterol was fully saturable and lipid-specific. Single-point mutations of Val-24 and Lys-28 in Aβ22–35 prevented cholesterol binding, whereas mutations at residues 29, 33, and 34 had little to no effect. These data were consistent with the in silico identification of Val-24 and Lys-28 as critical residues for cholesterol binding. We conclude that the linear fragment 22–35 of Aβ is a functional cholesterol-binding domain that could promote the insertion of β-amyloid peptides or amyloid pore formation in cholesterol-rich membrane domains. PMID:23509984

  9. Retention of Conformational Entropy upon Calmodulin Binding to Target Peptides is Driven by Transient Salt Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Straatsma, TP; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-10-03

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly flexible calcium-binding protein that mediates signal transduction through an ability to differentially bind to highly variable binding sequences in target proteins. To identify how binding affects CaM motions, and its relationship to conformational entropy and target peptide sequence, we have employed fully atomistic, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of unbound CaM and CaM bound to five different target peptides. The calculated CaM conformational binding entropies correlate with experimentally derived conformational entropies with a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.95. Selected side-chain interactions with target peptides restrain interhelical loop motions, acting to tune the conformational entropy of the bound complex via widely distributed CaM motions. In the complex with the most conformational entropy retention (CaM in complex with the neuronal nitric oxide synthase binding sequence), Lys-148 at the C-terminus of CaM forms transient salt bridges alternating between Glu side chains in the N-domain, the central linker, and the binding target. Additional analyses of CaM structures, fluctuations, and CaM-target interactions illuminate the interplay between electrostatic, side chain, and backbone properties in the ability of CaM to recognize and discriminate against targets by tuning its conformational entropy, and suggest a need to consider conformational dynamics in optimizing binding affinities.

  10. Preliminary characterization of a light-rare-earth-element-binding peptide of a natural perennial fern Dicranopteris dichotoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiou; Shan, Xiao-Quan; Zhang, Shuzhen; Wen, Bei

    2003-05-01

    A light-rare-earth-element (LREE)-binding peptide was isolated from LREE hyperaccumulator Dicranopteris dichotomaleaves and characterized in terms of molecular weight and ultraviolet absorption spectrum. The molecular weight of the LREE-binding peptide was determined to be 2208 Da by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS). The characteristic ultraviolet absorption spectrum of the peptide was observed at 220-300 nm, suggesting that the peptide chain contained aromatic amino acids. Compared to the unique features of the phytochelatins with a low absorption at 280 nm, the LREE-binding peptide is unlikely to be a typical phytochelatin. The present study suggests that the LREE-binding peptide is probably a natural peptide in D. dichotoma, and it may play an important role in hyperaccumulation of LREEs. PMID:12734617

  11. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site: Overlapping Binding Modes for Small Molecule Antagonists and the Endogenous Peptide Agonist.

    PubMed

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W; Frimurer, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    The neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) belongs to the family of 7TM, G protein-coupled receptors, and is activated by the 13-amino-acid peptide neurotensin (NTS) that has been shown to play important roles in neurological disorders and the promotion of cancer cells. Recently, a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of NTSR1 in complex with NTS8-13 has been determined, providing novel insights into peptide ligand recognition by 7TM receptors. SR48692, a potent and selective small molecule antagonist has previously been used extensively as a tool compound to study NTSR1 receptor signaling properties. To investigate the binding mode of SR48692 and other small molecule compounds to NTSR1, we applied an Automated Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization protocol (ALiBERO), taking receptor flexibility and ligand knowledge into account. Structurally overlapping binding poses for SR48692 and NTS8-13 were observed, despite their distinct chemical nature and inverse pharmacological profiles. The optimized models showed significantly improved ligand recognition in a large-scale virtual screening assessment compared to the crystal structure. Our models provide new insights into small molecule ligand binding to NTSR1 and could facilitate the structure-based design of non-peptide ligands for the evaluation of the pharmacological potential of NTSR1 in neurological disorders and cancer. PMID:27491650

  12. Interaction of Hyaluronan Binding Peptides with Glycosaminoglycans in Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the incorporation of hyaluronan (HA) binding peptides into poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels as a mechanism to bind and retain hyaluronan for applications in tissue engineering. The specificity of the peptide sequence (native RYPISRPRKRC vs non-native RPSRPRIRYKC), the role of basic amino acids, and specificity to hyaluronan over other GAGs in contributing to the peptide–hyaluronan interaction were probed through experiments and simulations. Hydrogels containing the native or non-native peptide retained hyaluronan in a dose-dependent manner. Ionic interactions were the dominating mechanism. In diH2O the peptides interacted strongly with HA and chondroitin sulfate, but in phosphate buffered saline the peptides interacted more strongly with HA. For cartilage tissue engineering, chondrocyte-laden PEG hydrogels containing increasing amounts of HA binding peptide and exogenous HA had increased retention and decreased loss of cell-secreted proteoglycans in and from the hydrogel at 28 days. This new matrix-interactive hydrogel platform holds promise for tissue regeneration. PMID:24597474

  13. Dimensionality of Carbon Nanomaterials Determines the Binding and Dynamics of Amyloidogenic Peptides: Multiscale Theoretical Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hine, Nicholas D. M.; Mostofi, Arash A.; Yarovsky, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that nanoparticles can affect the rate of protein self-assembly, possibly interfering with the development of protein misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and prion disease caused by aggregation and fibril formation of amyloid-prone proteins. We employ classical molecular dynamics simulations and large-scale density functional theory calculations to investigate the effects of nanomaterials on the structure, dynamics and binding of an amyloidogenic peptide apoC-II(60-70). We show that the binding affinity of this peptide to carbonaceous nanomaterials such as C60, nanotubes and graphene decreases with increasing nanoparticle curvature. Strong binding is facilitated by the large contact area available for π-stacking between the aromatic residues of the peptide and the extended surfaces of graphene and the nanotube. The highly curved fullerene surface exhibits reduced efficiency for π-stacking but promotes increased peptide dynamics. We postulate that the increase in conformational dynamics of the amyloid peptide can be unfavorable for the formation of fibril competent structures. In contrast, extended fibril forming peptide conformations are promoted by the nanotube and graphene surfaces which can provide a template for fibril-growth. PMID:24339760

  14. Primary structure and binding activity of the hnRNP U protein: binding RNA through RGG box.

    PubMed Central

    Kiledjian, M; Dreyfuss, G

    1992-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) are thought to influence the structure of hnRNA and participate in the processing of hnRNA to mRNA. The hnRNP U protein is an abundant nucleoplasmic phosphoprotein that is the largest of the major hnRNP proteins (120 kDa by SDS-PAGE). HnRNP U binds pre-mRNA in vivo and binds both RNA and ssDNA in vitro. Here we describe the cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the hnRNP U protein, the determination of its amino acid sequence and the delineation of a region in this protein that confers RNA binding. The predicted amino acid sequence of hnRNP U contains 806 amino acids (88,939 Daltons), and shows no extensive homology to any known proteins. The N-terminus is rich in acidic residues and the C-terminus is glycine-rich. In addition, a glutamine-rich stretch, a putative NTP binding site and a putative nuclear localization signal are present. It could not be defined from the sequence what segment of the protein confers its RNA binding activity. We identified an RNA binding activity within the C-terminal glycine-rich 112 amino acids. This region, designated U protein glycine-rich RNA binding region (U-gly), can by itself bind RNA. Furthermore, fusion of U-gly to a heterologous bacterial protein (maltose binding protein) converts this fusion protein into an RNA binding protein. A 26 amino acid peptide within U-gly is necessary for the RNA binding activity of the U protein. Interestingly, this peptide contains a cluster of RGG repeats with characteristic spacing and this motif is found also in several other RNA binding proteins. We have termed this region the RGG box and propose that it is an RNA binding motif and a predictor of RNA binding activity. Images PMID:1628625

  15. Specific RNA binding by amino-terminal peptides of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein.

    PubMed Central

    Baer, M L; Houser, F; Loesch-Fries, L S; Gehrke, L

    1994-01-01

    Specific RNA-protein interactions and ribonucleoprotein complexes are essential for many biological processes, but our understanding of how ribonucleoprotein particles form and accomplish their biological functions is rudimentary. This paper describes the interaction of alfalfa mosaic virus (A1MV) coat protein or peptides with viral RNA. A1MV coat protein is necessary both for virus particle formation and for the initiation of replication of the three genomic RNAs. We have examined protein determinants required for specific RNA binding and analyzed potential structural changes elicited by complex formation. The results indicate that the amino-terminus of the viral coat protein, which lacks primary sequence homology with recognized RNA binding motifs, is both necessary and sufficient for binding to RNA. Circular dichroism spectra and electrophoretic mobility shift experiments suggest that the RNA conformation is altered when amino-terminal coat protein peptides bind to the viral RNA. The peptide--RNA interaction is functionally significant because the peptides will substitute for A1MV coat protein in initiating RNA replication. The apparent conformational change that accompanies RNA--peptide complex formation may generate a structure which, unlike the viral RNA alone, can be recognized by the viral replicase. Images PMID:8313916

  16. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase.

  17. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase. PMID:27555439

  18. Biological effect of varying peptide binding affinity to the BoLA-DRB3*2703 allele

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    MHC class I and II molecules are immunoregulatory cell surface glycoproteins, which selectively bind to and present antigenic peptides to T-lymphocytes. Murine and human studies show that variable peptide binding affinity to MHC II molecules influences Th1/Th2 responses by inducing distinctive cytokine expression. To examine the biological effects of peptide binding affinity to bovine MHC (BoLA), various self peptides (BoLA-DQ and fibrinogen fragments) and non-self peptides from ovalbumin (OVA), as well as VP2 and VP4 peptides from foot and mouth disease virus (FMD-V) were used to (1) determine binding affinities to the BoLA-DRB3*2703 allele, previously associated with mastitis susceptibility and (2) determine whether peptide binding affinity influences T-lymphocyte function. Peptide binding affinity was determined by a competitive assay using high affinity biotinylated self-peptide incubated with purified BoLA-DRB3*2703 in the presence of various concentrations of competing peptides. The concentrations of non-self peptide required to inhibit self-peptide binding by 50% (IC50) were variable, ranging from 26.92 to > 320 μM. Peptide-specific T-lymphocyte function was determined by measuring DNA synthesis, cell division, and IFN-γ production in cultures of mononuclear cells from a BoLA-DRB3*2703 homozygous cow. When compared to non-stimulated control cultures, differences in lymphocyte function were observed for all of the assessed parameters; however, peptide-binding affinity did not always account for the observed differences in lymphocyte function. PMID:12927080

  19. Structure-based optimization of GRP78-binding peptides that enhances efficacy in cancer imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Hung; Lee, Andy Chi-Lung; Chen, I-Ju; Chang, Nai-Chuan; Wu, Han-Chung; Yu, Hui-Ming; Chang, Ya-Jen; Lee, Te-Wei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Yu, Alice L; Yu, John

    2016-07-01

    It is more challenging to design peptide drugs than small molecules through molecular docking and in silico analysis. Here, we developed a structure-based approach with various computational and analytical techniques to optimize cancer-targeting peptides for molecular imaging and therapy. We first utilized a peptide-binding protein database to identify GRP78, a specific cancer cell-surface marker, as a target protein for the lead, L-peptide. Subsequently, we used homologous modeling and molecular docking to identify a peptide-binding domain within GRP78 and optimized a series of peptides with a new protein-ligand scoring program, HotLig. Binding of these peptides to GRP78 was confirmed using an oriented immobilization technique for the Biacore system. We further examined the ability of the peptides to target cancer cells through in vitro binding studies with cell lines and clinical cancer specimens, and in vivo tumor imaging and targeted chemotherapeutic studies. MicroSPECT/CT imaging revealed significantly greater uptake of (188)Re-liposomes linked to these peptides as compared with non-targeting (188)Re-liposomes. Conjugation with these peptides also significantly increased the therapeutic efficacy of Lipo-Dox. Notably, peptide-conjugated Lipo-Dox significantly reduced stem-cell subpopulation in xenografts of breast cancer. The structure-based optimization strategy for peptides described here may be useful for developing peptide drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:27088408

  20. Interaction of the protein C activation peptide with platelets.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cruz, Ruth; Canseco, María Del S Pina; Lopez-Martínez, Jael; Cruz, Pedro A Hernández; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo; Cruz, Margarito Martínez; Alva, Félix Córdoba; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Zenteno, Edgar; Ruiz-Argüelles, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    The peptide NH(2)-DTEDQEDQVDPR-COOH is released during activation of protein C zymogen. We measured the effect of a synthetic peptide with an amino acid sequence similar to that of the natural peptide on platelets from healthy individuals using platelet aggregometry. We found that this synthetic peptide inhibits platelet aggregation induced by thrombin; furthermore, it diminishes mobilization of intraplatelet calcium. Molecular docking showed weak interaction between the synthetic peptide and thrombin. Our findings suggest that this synthetic peptide may interact with a receptor located on the platelet cell membrane.

  1. Peptide vaccines and peptidomimetics of EGFR (HER-1) ligand binding domain inhibit cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Foy, Kevin Chu; Wygle, Ruthie M; Miller, Megan J; Overholser, Jay P; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Kaumaya, Pravin T P

    2013-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a validated target for several cancers including lung, colorectal, and certain subtypes of breast cancer. Cetuximab targets ligand binding of EGFR, but major problems like high cost, short t1/2, toxicity, and emergence of resistance are associated with the drug. Immunization with EGFR B cell epitopes will train the immune system to produce specific Abs that can kill cancer cells. Also, therapy with stable, less-expensive, and nontoxic EGFR peptide mimics will block EGFR signaling and inhibit cancer growth. We designed three peptides based on the contact sites between EGF and EGFR. The B cell epitopes were synthesized alone and also linked with the measles virus T cell epitope to produce a chimeric peptide vaccine. The peptide vaccines were immunogenic in both mice and rabbits and Abs raised against the vaccine specifically bound EGFR-expressing cells and recombinant human EGFR protein. The peptide mimics and the anti-peptide Abs were able to inhibit EGFR signaling pathways. Immunization with the peptide vaccine or treatment with the B cell epitopes significantly reduced tumor growth in both transplantable breast and lung cancer models. Immunohistochemical analysis also showed significant reductions in microvascular density and actively dividing cells in the tumor sections after treatment in the FVB/n breast cancer model. The 418-435 B cell epitope was the best candidate both as a vaccine or peptide mimic because it caused significant inhibition in the two mouse models. Our results show that this novel EGFR B cell epitope has great potential to be used as a vaccine or treatment option for EGFR-expressing cancers.

  2. Computational Design of the Sequence and Structure of a Protein-Binding Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Bosch, Dustin E.; Butterfoss, Glenn L.; Purbeck, Carrie; Machius, Mischa; Siderovski, David P.; Kuhlman, Brian

    2012-08-10

    The de novo design of protein-binding peptides is challenging because it requires the identification of both a sequence and a backbone conformation favorable for binding. We used a computational strategy that iterates between structure and sequence optimization to redesign the C-terminal portion of the RGS14 GoLoco motif peptide so that it adopts a new conformation when bound to G{alpha}{sub i1}. An X-ray crystal structure of the redesigned complex closely matches the computational model, with a backbone root-mean-square deviation of 1.1 {angstrom}.

  3. Synthesis and Kinetic Analysis of Two Conformationally Restricted Peptide Substrates of Escherichia coli Penicillin-Binding Protein 5.

    PubMed

    Nemmara, Venkatesh V; Nicholas, Robert A; Pratt, R F

    2016-07-26

    Escherichia coli PBP5 (penicillin-binding protein 5) is a dd-carboxypeptidase involved in bacterial cell wall maturation. Beyond the C-terminal d-alanyl-d-alanine moiety, PBP5, like the essential high-molecular mass PBPs, has little specificity for other elements of peptidoglycan structure, at least as elicited in vitro by small peptidoglycan fragments. On the basis of the crystal structure of a stem pentapeptide derivative noncovalently bound to E. coli PBP6 (Protein Data Bank entry 3ITB ), closely similar in structure to PBP5, we have modeled a pentapeptide structure at the active site of PBP5. Because the two termini of the pentapeptide are directed into solution in the PBP6 crystal structure, we then modeled a 19-membered cyclic peptide analogue by cross-linking the terminal amines by succinylation. An analogous smaller, 17-membered cyclic peptide, in which the l-lysine of the original was replaced by l-diaminobutyric acid, could also be modeled into the active site. We anticipated that, just as the reactivity of stem peptide fragments of peptidoglycan with PBPs in vivo may be entropically enhanced by immobilization in the polymer, so too would that of our cyclic peptides with respect to their acyclic analogues in vitro. This paper describes the synthesis of the peptides described above that were required to examine this hypothesis and presents an analysis of their structures and reaction kinetics with PBP5. PMID:27420403

  4. The impact of cell-penetrating peptides on membrane bilayer structure during binding and insertion.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Daniel J; Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Kulkarni, Ketav; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the effect of penetratin and a truncated analogue on the bilayer structure using dual polarisation interferometry, to simultaneously measure changes in mass per unit area and birefringence (an optical parameter representing bilayer order) with high sensitivity during the binding and dissociation from the membrane. Specifically, we studied penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), along with a shortened and biotinylated version known as R8K-biotin (RRMKWKKK(Biotin)-NH2). Overall both peptides bound only weakly to the neutral DMPC and POPC bilayers, while much higher binding was observed for the anionic DMPC/DMPG and POPC/POPG. The binding of penetratin to gel-phase DMPC/DMPG was adequately represented by a two-state model, whereas on the fluid-phase POPC/POPG it exhibited a distinctly different binding pattern, best represented by a three-state kinetic model. However, R8K-biotin did not bind well to DMPC/DMPG and showed a more transitory and superficial binding to POPC/POPG. Comparing the modelling results for both peptides binding to POPC/POPG suggests an important role for a securely bound intermediate prior to penetratin insertion and translocation. Overall these results further elucidate the mechanism of penetratin, and provide another example of the significance of the ability of DPI to measure structural changes and the use of kinetic analysis to investigate the stages of peptide-membrane interactions. PMID:27163492

  5. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  6. Amyloid-β Peptide Binds to Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit 1

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1–42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1–42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1–42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1–42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1–42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD. PMID:22927926

  7. Peptide binding landscapes: Specificity and homophilicity across sequence space in a lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Joohyun; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-10-01

    Peptide aggregation frequently involves sequences with strong homophilic binding character, i.e., sequences that self-assemble with like species in a crowded cellular environment, in the face of a multitude of other peptides or proteins as potential heterophilic binding partners. What kinds of sequences display a strong tendency towards homophilic binding and self-assembly, and what are the origins of this behavior? Here, we consider how sequence specificity in oligomerization processes plays out in a simple two-dimensional (2D) lattice statistical-thermodynamic peptide model that permits exhaustive examination of the entire sequence and configurational landscapes. We find that sequences with strong self-specificities have either alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues or short patches of hydrophobic residues, both which minimize intramolecular hydrophobic interactions in part due to the constraints of the 2D lattice. We also find that these specificities are highly sensitive to entropic and free energetic features of the unbound conformational state, such that direct binding interaction energies alone do not capture the complete behavior. These results suggest that the ability of particular peptide sequences to self-assemble and aggregate in a many-protein environment reflects a precise balance of direct binding interactions and behavior in the unbound (monomeric) state.

  8. Transporter associated with antigen processing preselection of peptides binding to the MHC: a bioinformatic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini; Hemsley, Shelley; Flower, Darren R

    2004-12-01

    TAP is responsible for the transit of peptides from the cytosol to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. In an immunological context, this event is followed by the binding of peptides to MHC molecules before export to the cell surface and recognition by T cells. Because TAP transport precedes MHC binding, TAP preferences may make a significant contribution to epitope selection. To assess the impact of this preselection, we have developed a scoring function for TAP affinity prediction using the additive method, have used it to analyze and extend the TAP binding motif, and have evaluated how well this model acts as a preselection step in predicting MHC binding peptides. To distinguish between MHC alleles that are exclusively dependent on TAP and those exhibiting only a partial dependence on TAP, two sets of MHC binding peptides were examined: HLA-A*0201 was selected as a representative of partially TAP-dependent HLA alleles, and HLA-A*0301 represented fully TAP-dependent HLA alleles. TAP preselection has a greater impact on TAP-dependent alleles than on TAP-independent alleles. The reduction in the number of nonbinders varied from 10% (TAP-independent) to 33% (TAP-dependent), suggesting that TAP preselection is an important component in the successful in silico prediction of T cell epitopes. PMID:15557175

  9. Activity Determinants of Helical Antimicrobial Peptides: A Large-Scale Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi; Lazaridis, Themis

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), produced by a wide range of organisms, have attracted attention due to their potential use as novel antibiotics. The majority of these peptides are cationic and are thought to function by permeabilizing the bacterial membrane, either by making pores or by dissolving it (‘carpet’ model). A key hypothesis in the literature is that antimicrobial and hemolytic activity correlate with binding affinity to anionic and zwitterionic membranes, respectively. Here we test this hypothesis by using binding free energy data collected from the literature and theoretical binding energies calculated from implicit membrane models for 53 helical AMPs. We indeed find a correlation between binding energy and biological activity, depending on membrane anionic content: antibacterial activity correlates best with transfer energy to membranes with anionic lipid fraction higher than 30% and hemolytic activity correlates best with transfer energy to a 10% anionic membrane. However, the correlations are weak, with correlation coefficient up to 0.4. Weak correlations of the biological activities have also been found with other physical descriptors of the peptides, such as surface area occupation, which correlates significantly with antibacterial activity; insertion depth, which correlates significantly with hemolytic activity; and structural fluctuation, which correlates significantly with both activities. The membrane surface coverage by many peptides at the MIC is estimated to be much lower than would be required for the ‘carpet’ mechanism. Those peptides that are active at low surface coverage tend to be those identified in the literature as pore-forming. The transfer energy from planar membrane to cylindrical and toroidal pores was also calculated for these peptides. The transfer energy to toroidal pores is negative in almost all cases while that to cylindrical pores is more favorable in neutral than in anionic membranes. The transfer energy to pores

  10. Attractors in Sequence Space: Agent-Based Exploration of MHC I Binding Peptides.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Natalie; Wisniewska, Joanna M; Hiss, Jan A; Freier, Anja; Losch, Florian O; Walden, Peter; Wrede, Paul; Schneider, Gisbert

    2010-01-12

    Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) is a meta-heuristic that utilizes a computational analogue of ant trail pheromones to solve combinatorial optimization problems. The size of the ant colony and the representation of the ants' pheromone trails is unique referring to the given optimization problem. In the present study, we employed ACO to generate novel peptides that stabilize MHC I protein on the plasma membrane of a murine lymphoma cell line. A jury of feedforward neural network classifiers served as fitness function for peptide design by ACO. Bioactive murine MHC I H-2K(b) stabilizing as well as nonstabilizing octapeptides were designed, synthesized and tested. These peptides reveal residue motifs that are relevant for MHC I receptor binding. We demonstrate how the performance of the implemented ACO algorithm depends on the colony size and the size of the search space. The actual peptide design process by ACO constitutes a search path in sequence space that can be visualized as trajectories on a self-organizing map (SOM). By projecting the sequence space on a SOM we visualize the convergence of the different solutions that emerge during the optimization process in sequence space. The SOM representation reveals attractors in sequence space for MHC I binding peptides. The combination of ACO and SOM enables systematic peptide optimization. This technique allows for the rational design of various types of bioactive peptides with minimal experimental effort. Here, we demonstrate its successful application to the design of MHC-I binding and nonbinding peptides which exhibit substantial bioactivity in a cell-based assay.

  11. Attractors in Sequence Space: Agent-Based Exploration of MHC I Binding Peptides.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Natalie; Wisniewska, Joanna M; Hiss, Jan A; Freier, Anja; Losch, Florian O; Walden, Peter; Wrede, Paul; Schneider, Gisbert

    2010-01-12

    Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) is a meta-heuristic that utilizes a computational analogue of ant trail pheromones to solve combinatorial optimization problems. The size of the ant colony and the representation of the ants' pheromone trails is unique referring to the given optimization problem. In the present study, we employed ACO to generate novel peptides that stabilize MHC I protein on the plasma membrane of a murine lymphoma cell line. A jury of feedforward neural network classifiers served as fitness function for peptide design by ACO. Bioactive murine MHC I H-2K(b) stabilizing as well as nonstabilizing octapeptides were designed, synthesized and tested. These peptides reveal residue motifs that are relevant for MHC I receptor binding. We demonstrate how the performance of the implemented ACO algorithm depends on the colony size and the size of the search space. The actual peptide design process by ACO constitutes a search path in sequence space that can be visualized as trajectories on a self-organizing map (SOM). By projecting the sequence space on a SOM we visualize the convergence of the different solutions that emerge during the optimization process in sequence space. The SOM representation reveals attractors in sequence space for MHC I binding peptides. The combination of ACO and SOM enables systematic peptide optimization. This technique allows for the rational design of various types of bioactive peptides with minimal experimental effort. Here, we demonstrate its successful application to the design of MHC-I binding and nonbinding peptides which exhibit substantial bioactivity in a cell-based assay. PMID:27463849

  12. Specific binding of DNA to aggregated forms of Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Camero, Sergio; Ayuso, Jose M; Barrantes, Alejandro; Benítez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2013-04-01

    Anomalous protein aggregation is closely associated to age-related mental illness. Extraneuronal plaques, mainly composed of aggregated amyloid peptides, are considered as hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, this disease starts as a consequence of an abnormal processing of the amyloid precursor protein resulting in an excess of amyloid peptides. Nuclear localization of amyloid peptide aggregates together with amyloid-DNA interaction, have been repeatedly reported. In this paper we have used surface plasmon resonance and electron microscopy to study the structure and behavior of different peptides and proteins, including β-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, histone, casein and the amyloid-β peptides related to Alzheimer's disease Aβ25-35 and Aβ1-40. The main purpose of this study is to investigate whether proneness to DNA interaction is a general property displayed by aggregated forms of proteins, or it is an interaction specifically related to the aggregated forms of those particular proteins and peptides related to neurodegenerative diseases. Our results reveal that those aggregates formed by amyloid peptides show a particular proneness to interact with DNA. They are the only aggregated structures capable of binding DNA, and show more affinity for DNA than for other polyanions like heparin and polyglutamic acid, therefore strengthening the hypothesis that amyloid peptides may, by means of interaction with nuclear DNA, contribute to the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Direct demonstration of unique mode of natural peptide binding to the type 2 cholecystokinin receptor using photoaffinity labeling

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Maoqing; Miller, Laurence J.

    2013-01-01

    Direct analysis of mode of peptide docking using intrinsic photoaffinity labeling has provided detailed insights for the molecular basis of cholecystokinin (CCK) interaction with the type 1 CCK receptor. In the current work, this technique has been applied to the closely related type 2 CCK receptor that also binds the natural full agonist peptide, CCK, with high affinity. A series of photolabile CCK analogue probes with sites of covalent attachment extending from position 26 through 32 were characterized, with the highest affinity analogues that possessed full biological activity utilized in photoaffinity labeling. The position 29 probe, incorporating a photolabile benzoyl-phenylalanine in that position, was shown to bind with high affinity and to be a full agonist, with potency not different from that of natural CCK, and to covalently label the type 2 CCK receptor in a saturable, specific and efficient manner. Using proteolytic peptide mapping, mutagenesis, and radiochemical Edman degradation sequencing, this probe was shown to establish a covalent bond with type 2 CCK receptor residue Phe120 in the first extracellular loop. This was in contrast to its covalent attachment to Glu345 in the third extracellular loop of the type 1 CCK receptor, directly documenting differences in mode of docking this peptide to these receptors. PMID:23770253

  14. OmpA Binding Mediates the Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 on Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Feng; Tsai, Pei-Wen; Chen, Jeng-Yi; Lin, Yun-You; Lan, Chung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has recently emerged as an important pathogen in nosocomial infection; thus, effective antimicrobial regimens are urgently needed. Human antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) exhibit multiple functions and antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi and are proposed to be potential adjuvant therapeutic agents. This study examined the effect of the human cathelicidin-derived AMP LL-37 on A. baumannii and revealed the underlying mode of action. We found that LL-37 killed A. baumannii efficiently and reduced cell motility and adhesion. The bacteria-killing effect of LL-37 on A. baumannii was more efficient compared to other AMPs, including human ß–defensin 3 (hBD3) and histatin 5 (Hst5). Both flow cytometric analysis and immunofluorescence staining showed that LL-37 bound to A. baumannii cells. Moreover, far-western analysis demonstrated that LL-37 could bind to the A. baumannii OmpA (AbOmpA) protein. An ELISA assay indicated that biotin-labelled LL-37 (BA-LL37) bound to the AbOmpA74-84 peptide in a dose-dependent manner. Using BA-LL37 as a probe, the ~38 kDa OmpA signal was detected in the wild type but the ompA deletion strain did not show the protein, thereby validating the interaction. Finally, we found that the ompA deletion mutant was more sensitive to LL-37 and decreased cell adhesion by 32% compared to the wild type. However, ompA deletion mutant showed a greatly reduced adhesion defect after LL-37 treatment compared to the wild strain. Taken together, this study provides evidence that LL-37 affects A. baumannii through OmpA binding. PMID:26484669

  15. Binding of heparin by type III domains and peptides from the carboxy terminal hep-2 region of fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Ingham, K C; Brew, S A; Migliorini, M M; Busby, T F

    1993-11-23

    The major sites of heparin binding by fibronectin are located in fragments of 30 or 40 kDa that contain type III modules 12 through 14 or 15. Various proteolytic or recombinant subfragments and several synthetic peptides derived from this region have been compared with respect to their binding to fluorescein-labeled heparin in solution. Binding was monitored by the change in fluorescence anisotropy at 25 degrees C and pH 7.4 in 0.02 M Tris buffer, alone (TB) or with 0.15M NaCl (TBS). A 23-kDa fragment containing III13 and III14 but lacking III12 had Kd values of 0.3 and 1.8 microM in TB, and TBS, respectively, indistinguishable from the 30-kDa parent. Fragments containing only module III13 bound 2-3-fold weaker than the parent while those containing only III14 bound 6-50-fold weaker depending on the ionic strength. Fragments containing only III12 or III15 failed to bind at all in TBS. A cationic peptide derived from the amino terminus of III13 and containing the Arg-Arg-Ala-Arg consensus sequence, whose integrity was shown by Barkalow and Schwarzbauer [Barkalow, F. J., & Schwarzbauer, J. E. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 7812-7818] to be critical, failed to bind in TBS but bound weakly in TB. Two additional cationic peptides derived from the middle and C-terminal regions of III14 showed similar behavior. Thus while the major determinant(s) of heparin binding are located in III13, those determinants are only active when part of a properly folded structure. Furthermore, module III13 when isolated had a slightly lower affinity than fragments containing both III13 and III14.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8241146

  16. Insights into the Binding Sites of Organometallic Ruthenium Anticancer Compounds on Peptides Using Ultra-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, Rebecca H.; Habtemariam, Abraha; Lopez-Clavijo, Andrea F.; Barrow, Mark P.; Sadler, Peter J.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2014-04-01

    The binding sites of two ruthenium(II) organometallic complexes of the form [(η6-arene)Ru( N, N)Cl]+, where arene/ N, N = biphenyl (bip)/bipyridine (bipy) for complex AH076, and biphenyl (bip)/ o-phenylenediamine ( o-pda) for complex AH078, on the peptides angiotensin and bombesin have been investigated using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry. Fragmentation was performed using collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), with, in some cases, additional data being provided by electron capture dissociation (ECD). The primary binding sites were identified as methionine and histidine, with further coordination to phenylalanine, potentially through a π-stacking interaction, which has been observed here for the first time. This initial peptide study was expanded to investigate protein binding through reaction with insulin, on which the binding sites proposed are histidine, glutamic acid, and tyrosine. Further reaction of the ruthenium complexes with the oxidized B chain of insulin, in which two cysteine residues are oxidized to cysteine sulfonic acid (Cys-SO3H), and glutathione, which had been oxidized with hydrogen peroxide to convert the cysteine to cysteine sulfonic acid, provided further support for histidine and glutamic acid binding, respectively.

  17. Role of peptide bond in the realization of biological activity of short peptides.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Tarnovskaya, S I; Lin'kova, N S; Chervyakova, N A; Nichik, T E; Elashkina, E V; Chalisova, N I

    2015-02-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of biological activity of Lys-Glu peptide and its amino acid constituents. It was established that Lys-Glu stimulated proliferation of splenic cells in organotypic culture, while the mixture of glutamic acid and lysine inhibited culture growth. Using the method of molecular docking, we showed that glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide can interact with different DNA sequences. The energy of interaction and the most beneficial localization of glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide in DNA molecule was calculated. We demonstrated the interaction of the peptide and amino acids with DNA along the minor groove. The energy of DNA interaction with the peptide is higher than with individual amino acids. The peptide bonds increase the interaction of Lys-Glu peptide with DNA, which potentiates the biological effect on cell proliferation in organotypic culture of splenic cells.

  18. Cyclic Limulus anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) factor-derived peptide CLP-19 antagonizes LPS function by blocking binding to LPS binding protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Ni, Bing; Ren, Jian-dong; Chen, Jian-hong; Tian, Zhi-qiang; Tang, Min; Li, Di; Xia, Peiyuan

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation and septic shock due to endotoxins from Gram-negative bacteria infection continue to pose significant challenges to human healthcare. It is, therefore, necessary to develop therapeutic strategies targeting endotoxins, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), to prevent their potentially systemic effects. Pathogenesis due to Gram-negative bacteria involves LPS binding to the host LPS-binding protein (LBP), causing detrimental downstream signaling cascades. Our previous study showed that CLP-19, a synthetic peptide derived from the Limulus anti-LPS factor (LALF), could effectively neutralize LPS toxicity; however, the detailed mechanisms underlying this anti-LPS effect remained unexplained. Thus, we carried out investigations to determine how the CLP-19 neutralizes LPS toxicity. CLP-19 was found to block LPS binding to LBP in a dose-dependent manner, as evidenced by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, CLP-19 blocked LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling proteins p38, extracellular signal-regulating kinase (ERK)1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)1/2. Furthermore, CLP-19 potency in LPS antagonism in vitro and in vivo was directly associated with its ability to block the LPS-LBP interaction. Taken together, the results suggested that CLP-19's inhibitory effect on LPS-LBP binding and on the subsequent MAPK pathway signaling may be responsible for its anti-LPS mechanism. This peptide appears to represent a potential therapeutic agent for clinical treatment of sepsis. PMID:22040879

  19. Multiple biological activities for two peptides derived from the nerve growth factor precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Dicou, Eleni . E-mail: dicou@ipmc.cnrs.fr

    2006-09-01

    ProNGF can be cleaved proteolytically at dibasic residues and liberates two other peptides beside NGF, LIP1 a 29 amino acid (aa) peptide and LIP2 a 38 aa peptide. These peptides were found present in the rat intestine and shown to induce rapid phosphorylation of the Trk receptor in cell lines. The present study describes several novel biological properties for these peptides. They exert an anti-proliferative effect on the mitogenic activity of estrogen and IGF in MCF-7 cells. They protect against in vivo induction of excitotoxic lesions by the glutamatergic analogue ibotenate injected into the developing mouse brain and against in vitro NMDA-induced cell death in primary neuronal cultures. They bind to murine microglial cells and induce phosphorylation of Akt. These results suggest a role for LIP1 and LIP2 in cell survival.

  20. Generation of high-performance binding proteins for peptide motifs by affinity clamping

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Shohei; Huang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    We describe concepts and methodologies for generating “Affinity Clamps”, a new class of recombinant binding proteins that achieve high affinity and high specificity toward short peptide motifs of biological importance, which is a major challenge in protein engineering. The Affinity Clamping concept exploits the potential of nonhomologous recombination of protein domains in generating large changes in protein function and the inherent binding affinity and specificity of the so-called modular interaction domains toward short peptide motifs. Affinity Clamping creates a clamshell architecture that clamps onto a target peptide. The design processes involve (i) choosing a starting modular interaction domain appropriate for the target and applying structure-guided modifications, (ii) attaching a second domain, termed “enhancer domain” and (iii) optimizing the peptide-binding site located between the domains by directed evolution. The two connected domains work synergistically to achieve high levels of affinity and specificity that are unattainable with either domain alone. Because of the simple and modular architecture, affinity clamps are particularly well suited as building blocks for designing more complex functionalities. Affinity Clamping represents a major advance in protein design that is broadly applicable to the recognition of peptide motifs. PMID:23422435

  1. Hotspot autoimmune T cell receptor binding underlies pathogen and insulin peptide cross-reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Cole, David K.; Bulek, Anna M.; Dolton, Garry; Schauenberg, Andrea J.; Szomolay, Barbara; Trimby, Andrew; Jothikumar, Prithiviraj; Fuller, Anna; Skowera, Ania; Rossjohn, Jamie; Zhu, Cheng; Miles, John J.; Wooldridge, Linda; Rizkallah, Pierre J.; Sewell, Andrew K.

    2016-01-01

    The cross-reactivity of T cells with pathogen- and self-derived peptides has been implicated as a pathway involved in the development of autoimmunity. However, the mechanisms that allow the clonal T cell antigen receptor (TCR) to functionally engage multiple peptide–major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC) are unclear. Here, we studied multiligand discrimination by a human, preproinsulin reactive, MHC class-I–restricted CD8+ T cell clone (1E6) that can recognize over 1 million different peptides. We generated high-resolution structures of the 1E6 TCR bound to 7 altered peptide ligands, including a pathogen-derived peptide that was an order of magnitude more potent than the natural self-peptide. Evaluation of these structures demonstrated that binding was stabilized through a conserved lock-and-key–like minimal binding footprint that enables 1E6 TCR to tolerate vast numbers of substitutions outside of this so-called hotspot. Highly potent antigens of the 1E6 TCR engaged with a strong antipathogen-like binding affinity; this engagement was governed though an energetic switch from an enthalpically to entropically driven interaction compared with the natural autoimmune ligand. Together, these data highlight how T cell cross-reactivity with pathogen-derived antigens might break self-tolerance to induce autoimmune disease. PMID:27183389

  2. Inhibition of human spermatozoa-zona pellucida binding by a combinatorially derived peptide from a synthetic target.

    PubMed

    Pieczenik, George; Garrisi, John; Cohen, Jacques

    2006-09-01

    Intact zona-free human oocytes were screened using a combinatorial peptide library selection protocol. Pieczenik Peptide Sequence 1 (PPS1) HEHRKRG binds human spermatozoa. A complementary and unique binding sequence HNSSLSPLATPA (PPS2) was developed from the first PPS1 ligand that binds to the human zona pellucida or oolemma. Cytoplasm-free zonae from unfertilized eggs were obtained and used as an assay system to test the effects of exposure to these two ligands. Spermatozoa were inserted into evacuated zonae and their behaviour and binding activity were assessed at regular intervals. The behaviour of spermatozoa exposed to PPS1 and unlabelled spermatozoa injected into unexposed zonae was similar as far as binding was concerned (50 and 54% binding), but PPS1 exposed spermatozoa had higher motility and displacement, marked by their escape from the zona pellucida. Zonae exposed to PPS2 inhibited the interaction between injected spermatozoa and the inside of the zona when compared with controls (8.3 and 53.8% attached respectively, P < 0.001). The sperm-zona pellucida interaction described in this paper is applied as a functional assay for molecular interactions of sperm binding and can be used to assess function for potential surface markers on gametes. It is shown here that a unique binding ligand (PPS2) can be synthesized from another complimentary ligand (PPS1) without the need for a known intermediate substrate. PPS1 and PPS2 may have properties that can be used to target processes involved in conception and assisted reproduction. A movie sequence taken approximately 30 min after injection of spermatozoa into empty human zonae pellucidae shows behaviour of non-manipulated spermatozoa into zonae not exposed or exposed to ligand. This may be purchased for viewing on the Internet at www.rbmonline.com/Article/2159 (free to web subscribers).

  3. Binding sites of atrial natriuretic peptide in tree shrew adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, E.; Shigematsu, K.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    Adrenal gland binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126) (ANP) were quantitated in tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri) by incubation of adrenal sections with (3-(/sup 125/I)-iodotyrosyl28) atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126), followed by autoradiography with computerized microdensitometry. In the adrenal glands, there are three types of ANP binding sites. One is located in the zona glomerulosa (BMax 84 +/- 6 fmol/mg protein; Kd 122 +/- 9 pM); the second in the zona fasciculata and reticularis (BMax 29 +/- 2 fmol/mg protein; Kd 153 +/- 6 pM) and the third in the adrenal medulla (BMax 179 +/- 1 fmol/mg protein; Kd 70 +/- 2 pM). Besides the influence of ANP on the regulation of adrenocortical mineralcorticoid and glucocorticoid secretion our findings raise the possibility for a local site of action of atrial natriuretic peptide in the regulation of adrenomedullary catecholamines in the tree shrew, primates and man.

  4. Investigating the binding interactions of galantamine with β-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Rao, Praveen P N; Mohamed, Tarek; Osman, Wesseem

    2013-01-01

    The anti-Alzheimer's agent galantamine is known to possess anti-amyloid properties. However the exact mechanisms are not clear. We studied the binding interactions of galantamine with amyloid peptide dimer (Aβ(1-40)) through molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Galantamine's binding site within the amyloid peptide dimer was identified by docking experiments and the most stable complex was analyzed by molecular dynamics simulation. These studies show that galantamine was interacting with the central region of the amyloid dimer (Lys16-Ala21) and the C-terminal region (Ile31-Val36) with minimum structural drift of Cα atom in those regions. Strikingly, a significant drift was observed at the turn region from Asp23-Gly29 (Cα atom RMSD=9.2 Å and 11.6 Å at 50 fs and 100 fs respectively). Furthermore, galantamine's binding mode disrupts the key pi-pi stacking interaction between aromatic rings of Phe19 (chain A) and Phe19 (chain B) and intermolecular hydrogen bonds seen in unbound peptide dimer. Noticeably, the azepine tertiary nitrogen of galantamine was in close proximity to backbone CO of Leu34 (distance <3.5 Å) to stabilize the dimer conformation. In summary, the results indicate that galantamine binding to amyloid peptide dimer leads to a significant conformational change at the turn region (Asp23-Gly29) that disrupts interactions between individual β-strands and promotes a nontoxic conformation of Aβ(1-40) to prevent the formation of neurotoxic oligomers.

  5. PEPTIDE BINDING AS A MODE OF ACTION FOR THE CARCINOGENICITY AND TOXICITY OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exposure leads to tumors in human skin, lung, urinary bladder, kidney and liver. Three likely initial stages of arsenical-macromolecular interaction are (1) binding of trivalent arsenicals to the sulfhydryl groups of peptides and proteins, (2) arsenical-induced generation...

  6. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

    PubMed

    Memczak, Henry; Lauster, Daniel; Kar, Parimal; Di Lella, Santiago; Volkmer, Rudolf; Knecht, Volker; Herrmann, Andreas; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Bier, Frank F; Stöcklein, Walter F M

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing. PMID:27415624

  7. The specificity of protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides by lactoferrin binding protein B.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Ari; Partha, Sarathy K; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-10-01

    A variety of Gram-negative pathogens possess host-specific lactoferrin (Lf) receptors that mediate the acquisition of iron from host Lf. The integral membrane protein component of the receptor, lactoferrin binding protein A specifically binds host Lf and is required for acquisition of iron from Lf. In contrast, the role of the bi-lobed surface lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB), in Lf binding and iron acquisition is uncertain. A common feature of LbpBs from most species is the presence of clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the protein's C-terminal lobe. Recently it has been shown that the negatively charged regions from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB are responsible for protecting against an 11 amino acid cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAP), lactoferricin (Lfcin), derived from human Lf. In this study we investigated whether the LbpB confers resistance to other CAPs since N. meningitidis is likely to encounter other CAPs from the host. LbpB provided protection against the cathelicidin derived peptide, cathelicidin related antimicrobial peptide (mCRAMP), but did not confer protection against Tritrp 1 or LL37 under our experimental conditions. When tested against a range of rationally designed synthetic peptides, LbpB was shown to protect against IDR-1002 and IDR-0018 but not against HH-2 or HHC10. PMID:25038734

  8. Stapling monomeric GCN4 peptides allows for DNA binding and enhanced cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Abhishek; Van Lysebetten, Dorien; Ruiz García, Yara; Louage, Benoit; De Geest, Bruno G; Madder, Annemieke

    2015-04-01

    The basic DNA recognition region of the GCN4 protein comprising 23 amino acids has been modified to contain two optimally positioned cysteines which have been linked and stapled using cross-linkers of suitable lengths. This results in stapled peptides with a stabilized α-helical conformation which allows for DNA binding and concurrent enhancement of cellular uptake.

  9. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Parimal; Di Lella, Santiago; Volkmer, Rudolf; Knecht, Volker; Herrmann, Andreas; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Bier, Frank F.; Stöcklein, Walter F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing. PMID:27415624

  10. Preorganized Peptide Scaffolds as Mimics of Phosphorylated Proteins Binding Sites with a High Affinity for Uranyl.

    PubMed

    Starck, Matthieu; Sisommay, Nathalie; Laporte, Fanny A; Oros, Stéphane; Lebrun, Colette; Delangle, Pascale

    2015-12-01

    Cyclic peptides with two phosphoserines and two glutamic acids were developed to mimic high-affinity binding sites for uranyl found in proteins such as osteopontin, which is believed to be a privileged target of this ion in vivo. These peptides adopt a β-sheet structure that allows the coordination of the latter amino acid side chains in the equatorial plane of the dioxo uranyl cation. Complementary spectroscopic and analytical methods revealed that these cyclic peptides are efficient uranyl chelating peptides with a large contribution from the phosphorylated residues. The conditional affinity constants were measured by following fluorescence tryptophan quenching and are larger than 10(10) at physiological pH. These compounds are therefore promising models for understanding uranyl chelation by proteins, which is relevant to this actinide ion toxicity. PMID:26583259

  11. Activity of Novel Synthetic Peptides against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lum, Kah Yean; Tay, Sun Tee; Le, Cheng Foh; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Sabri, Nadia Hanim; Velayuthan, Rukumani Devi; Hassan, Hamimah; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2015-01-01

    Candida spp. are the most common causes of fungal infections worldwide. Among the Candida species, Candida albicans remains the predominant species that causes invasive candidiasis in most countries. In this study, we used two peptides, KABT-AMP and uperin 3.6 as templates to develop novel antifungal peptides. Their anticandidal activity was assessed using a combination of MIC, time-killing assay and biofilm reduction assay. Hybrid peptides, KU2 and KU3 containing a mixed backbone of KABT-AMP and Uperin 3.6 demonstrated the most potent anticandidal activity with MIC values ranging from 8-16 mg/L. The number of Trp residues and the amphipathic structure of peptides probably enhanced the anticandidal activity of peptides. Increasing the cationicity of the uperin 3.6 analogues resulted in reduced MIC from the range of 64-128 mg/L to 16-64 mg/L and this was also correlated with the antibiofilm activity and killing kinetics of the peptides. Peptides showed synergistic effects when used in combination with conventional antifungals. Peptides demonstrated low haemolytic activity but significant toxicity on two normal human epithelial cell lines. This study provides us with a better understanding on the structure-activity relationship and the balance between cationicity and hydrophobicity of the peptides although the therapeutic application of the peptides is limited. PMID:25965506

  12. Bivalent cation binding effect on formation of the peptide bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, Milan; Rode, Bernd Michael

    2000-01-01

    The reactions between formic acid (or glycine) and ammonia, without and with Mg 2+, Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ cations as catalysts, have been studied as model reactions for peptide bond formation using the Becke3LYP functional and 6-311+G(d,p) basis set of DFT theory. Enthalpies and free energies for the stationary points of each reaction have been calculated to determine the thermodynamics of reactions investigated. A substantial decrease in reaction enthalpies and free energies was found for formic acid-ammonia and glycine-ammonia reactions catalysed by Mg 2+, Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ ions compared with those of the uncatalysed amide bond formation. The catalytic effect of the transition metal ions Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ is of similar strength and more pronounced than that of the Mg 2+ cation.

  13. Mapping of a cholinergic binding site by means of synthetic peptides, monoclonal antibodies, and. alpha. -bungarotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Conti-Tronconi, B.M.; Tang, Fen; Diethelm, B.M.; Spencer, S.R. ); Reinhardt-Maelicke, S.; Maelicke, A. )

    1990-07-03

    Previous studies by several laboratories have identified a narrow sequence region of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) {alpha} subunit, flanking the cysteinyl residues at positions 192 and 193, as containing major elements of, if not all, the binding site for cholinergic ligands. In the present study, the authors used a panel of synthetic peptides as representative structural elements of the AChR to investigate whether additional segments of the AChR sequences are able to bind {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX) and several {alpha}-BTX-competitive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The mAbs used (WF6, WF5, and W2) were raised against native Torpedo AChR, specifically recognize the {alpha}-subunit, and bind to AChR in a mutually exclusive fashion with {alpha}-BTX. The binding of WF5 and W2 to Torpedo AChR is inhibited by all cholinergic ligands. WF6 competes with agonists, but not with low mol. wt. antagonists, for AChR binding. Peptides {alpha}181-200 and {alpha}55-74 both inhibited binding of {sup 125}I-{alpha}-BTX to native Torpedo AChR. None of the peptides corresponding to sequence segments from other subunits bound {alpha}-BTX or WF6, or interfered with their binding. Therefore, the cholinergic binding site is not a single narrow sequence region, but rather two or more discontinuous sequence segments within the N-terminal extracellular region of the AChR {alpha} subunit, folded together in the native structure of the receptor, contribute to form a cholinergic binding region.

  14. Identification and characterization of polydimethylsiloxane-binding peptides (PDMS-tag) for oriented immobilization of functional protein on a PDMS surface.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Yoichi; Otsuki, Ryoko; Sakoda, Yumiko; Akai, Ryota; Matoba, Kazutaka; Katayama, Junko; Kishimoto, Michimasa; Horiuchi, Jun-Ichi

    2016-10-20

    In this study we focused on identifying and characterizing polydimethylsiloxane-binding peptides (PDMS-tags) that show a strong binding affinity towards a PDMS surface. Three kinds of E. coli host proteins (ELN, OMC and TPA) that were preferentially adsorbed onto a PDMS surface were identified from the E. coli cell lysate via 2-D electrophoresis and MALDI TOF MS. Digestion of these PDMS-binding proteins by 3 types of proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin and V8 protease) resulted in the production of a wide variety of peptide fragments with different amino acid biases. Nine types of peptide fragments showing binding affinities to a PDMS surface were identified, and they were genetically fused at the C-terminal region of glutathione S-transferase (GST). The adsorption kinetics of peptide-fused GSTs to a PDMS surface were evaluated using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor equipped with a sensor chip coated with a PDMS thin film. Consequently, all GSTs fused with the peptides adsorbed at a level higher than that of wild-type GST. In particular, the adsorption levels of GSTs fused with ELN-V81, TPA-V81, and OMC-V81 peptides were 8- to 10-fold higher than that of the wild-type GST. These results indicated that the selected peptides possessed a strong binding affinity towards a PDMS surface even in cases where they were introduced to the C-terminal region of a model protein. The remaining activities of GSTs with PDMS-binding peptides were also greater than that of the wild-type GST. Almost a third (30%) of enzymatic activity was maintained by genetic fusion of the peptide ELN-V81, compared with only 1.5% of wild-type GST in the adsorption state. Thus, the PDMS-binding peptides (PDMS-tags) identified in this study will be considerably useful for the site-specific immobilization of functional proteins to a PDMS surface, which will be a powerful tool in the fabrication of protein-based micro-reactors and biosearation chips. PMID:27497760

  15. Caspase-3 binds diverse P4 residues in peptides as revealed by crystallography and structural modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Bin; Fu, Guoxing; Agniswamy, Johnson; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2009-03-31

    Caspase-3 recognition of various P4 residues in its numerous protein substrates was investigated by crystallography, kinetics, and calculations on model complexes. Asp is the most frequent P4 residue in peptide substrates, although a wide variety of P4 residues are found in the cellular proteins cleaved by caspase-3. The binding of peptidic inhibitors with hydrophobic P4 residues, or no P4 residue, is illustrated by crystal structures of caspase-3 complexes with Ac-IEPD-Cho, Ac-WEHD-Cho, Ac-YVAD-Cho, and Boc-D(OMe)-Fmk at resolutions of 1.9-2.6 {angstrom}. The P4 residues formed favorable hydrophobic interactions in two separate hydrophobic regions of the binding site. The side chains of P4 Ile and Tyr form hydrophobic interactions with caspase-3 residues Trp206 and Trp214 within a non-polar pocket of the S4 subsite, while P4 Trp interacts with Phe250 and Phe252 that can also form the S5 subsite. These interactions of hydrophobic P4 residues are distinct from those for polar P4 Asp, which indicates the adaptability of caspase-3 for binding diverse P4 residues. The predicted trends in peptide binding from molecular models had high correlation with experimental values for peptide inhibitors. Analysis of structural models for the binding of 20 different amino acids at P4 in the aldehyde peptide Ac-XEVD-Cho suggested that the majority of hydrophilic P4 residues interact with Phe250, while hydrophobic residues interact with Trp206, Phe250, and Trp214. Overall, the S4 pocket of caspase-3 exhibits flexible adaptation for different residues and the new structures and models, especially for hydrophobic P4 residues, will be helpful for the design of caspase-3 based drugs.

  16. Fluorine substitutions in an antigenic peptide selectively modulate T-cell receptor binding in a minimally perturbing manner

    SciTech Connect

    Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Sommese, Ruth F.; Clemens, John; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Desmond, Clare; Do, Priscilla; Baker, Brian M.

    2010-08-17

    TCR (T-cell receptor) recognition of antigenic peptides bound and presented by MHC (major histocompatibility complex) molecules forms the basis of the cellular immune response to pathogens and cancer. TCRs bind peptide - MHC complexes weakly and with fast kinetics, features which have hindered detailed biophysical studies of these interactions. Modified peptides resulting in enhanced TCR binding could help overcome these challenges. Furthermore, there is considerable interest in using modified peptides with enhanced TCR binding as the basis for clinical vaccines. In the present study, we examined how fluorine substitutions in an antigenic peptide can selectively impact TCR recognition. Using a structure-guided design approach, we found that fluorination of the Tax peptide [HTLV (human T-cell lymphotropic virus)-1 Tax] enhanced binding by the Tax-specific TCR A6, yet weakened binding by the Tax-specific TCR B7. The changes in affinity were consistent with crystallographic structures and fluorine chemistry, and with the A6 TCR independent of other substitutions in the interface. Peptide fluorination thus provides a means to selectively modulate TCR binding affinity without significantly perturbing peptide composition or structure. Lastly, we probed the mechanism of fluorine's effect on TCR binding and we conclude that our results were most consistent with a 'polar hydrophobicity' mechanism, rather than a purely hydrophobic- or electrostatic-based mechanism. This finding should have an impact on other attempts to alter molecular recognition with fluorine.

  17. Quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kyani, Anahita; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Jenssen, Håvard

    2012-02-01

    Defining the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine pathogenesis could lead to the application of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists as novel migraine therapeutics. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of biological activities of a large range of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists was performed using a panel of physicochemical descriptors. The computational studies evaluated different variable selection techniques and demonstrated shuffling stepwise multiple linear regression to be superior over genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression. The linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model revealed better statistical parameters of cross-validation in comparison with the non-linear support vector regression technique. Implementing only five peptide descriptors into this linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model resulted in an extremely robust and highly predictive model with calibration, leave-one-out and leave-20-out validation R(2) of 0.9194, 0.9103, and 0.9214, respectively. We performed docking of the most potent calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists with the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor and demonstrated that peptide antagonists act by blocking access to the peptide-binding cleft. We also demonstrated the direct contact of residues 28-37 of the calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists with the receptor. These results are in agreement with the conclusions drawn from the quantitative structure-activity relationship model, indicating that both electrostatic and steric factors should be taken into account when designing novel calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists. PMID:21974743

  18. Strong Electrostatic Interactions Lead to Entropically Favorable Binding of Peptides to Charged Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, K G; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamic analyses can provide key insights into the origins of protein self-assembly on surfaces, protein function, and protein stability. However, obtaining quantitative measurements of thermodynamic observables from unbiased classical simulations of peptide or protein adsorption is challenging because of sampling limitations brought on by strong biomolecule/surface binding forces as well as time scale limitations. We used the parallel tempering metadynamics in the well-tempered ensemble (PTMetaD-WTE) enhanced sampling method to study the adsorption behavior and thermodynamics of several explicitly solvated model peptide adsorption systems, providing new molecular-level insight into the biomolecule adsorption process. Specifically studied were peptides LKα14 and LKβ15 and trpcage miniprotein adsorbing onto a charged, hydrophilic self-assembled monolayer surface functionalized with a carboxylic acid/carboxylate headgroup and a neutral, hydrophobic methyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer surface. Binding free energies were calculated as a function of temperature for each system and decomposed into their respective energetic and entropic contributions. We investigated how specific interfacial features such as peptide/surface electrostatic interactions and surface-bound ion content affect the thermodynamic landscape of adsorption and lead to differences in surface-bound conformations of the peptides. Results show that upon adsorption to the charged surface, configurational entropy gains of the released solvent molecules dominate the configurational entropy losses of the bound peptide. This behavior leads to an apparent increase in overall system entropy upon binding and therefore to the surprising and seemingly nonphysical result of an apparent increased binding free energy at elevated temperatures. Opposite effects and conclusions are found for the neutral surface. Additional simulations demonstrate that by adjusting the ionic strength of the solution

  19. Lock and Key Binding of the HOX YPWM Peptide to the PBX Homeodomain

    SciTech Connect

    Sprules, Tara; Green, N.; Featherstone, M.; Gehring, Kalle

    2003-01-10

    HOX homeodomain proteins bind short core DNA sequences to control very specific developmental processes. DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity are increased by the formation of cooperative complexes with the PBX homeodomain protein. A conserved YPWM motif in the HOX protein is necessary for cooperative binding with PBX. We have determined the structure of a PBX homeodomain bound to a 14-mer DNA duplex. A relaxation-optimized procedure was developed to measure DNA residual dipolar couplings at natural abundance in the 20-kDa binary complex. When the PBX homeodomain binds to DNA, a fourth alpha-helix is formed in the homeodomain. This helix rigidifies the DNA recognition helix of PBX and forms a hydrophobic binding site for the HOX YPWM peptide. The HOX peptide itself shows some structure in solution and suggests that the interaction between PBX and HOX is an example of "lock and key" binding. The NMR structure explains the requirement of DNA for the PBX-HOX interaction and the increased affinity of DNA binding.

  20. Analysis of peptide-protein binding using amino acid descriptors: prediction and experimental verification for human histocompatibility complex HLA-A0201.

    PubMed

    Guan, Pingping; Doytchinova, Irini A; Walshe, Valerie A; Borrow, Persephone; Flower, Darren R

    2005-11-17

    Amino acid descriptors are often used in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis of proteins and peptides. In the present study, descriptors were used to characterize peptides binding to the human MHC allele HLA-A0201. Two sets of amino acid descriptors were chosen: 93 descriptors taken from the amino acid descriptor database AAindex and the z descriptors defined by Wold and Sandberg. Variable selection techniques (SIMCA, genetic algorithm, and GOLPE) were applied to remove redundant descriptors. Our results indicate that QSAR models generated using five z descriptors had the highest predictivity and explained variance (q2 between 0.6 and 0.7 and r2 between 0.6 and 0.9). Further to the QSAR analysis, 15 peptides were synthesized and tested using a T2 stabilization assay. All peptides bound to HLA-A0201 well, and four peptides were identified as high-affinity binders. PMID:16279801

  1. Signal Peptide-Binding Drug as a Selective Inhibitor of Co-Translational Protein Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Vermeire, Kurt; Bell, Thomas W.; Van Puyenbroeck, Victor; Giraut, Anne; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Schols, Dominique; Hartmann, Enno

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, surface expression of most type I transmembrane proteins requires translation and simultaneous insertion of the precursor protein into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for subsequent routing to the cell surface. This co-translational translocation pathway is initiated when a hydrophobic N-terminal signal peptide (SP) on the nascent protein emerges from the ribosome, binds the cytosolic signal recognition particle (SRP), and targets the ribosome-nascent chain complex to the Sec61 translocon, a universally conserved protein-conducting channel in the ER-membrane. Despite their common function in Sec61 targeting and ER translocation, SPs have diverse but unique primary sequences. Thus, drugs that recognise SPs could be exploited to inhibit translocation of specific proteins into the ER. Here, through flow cytometric analysis the small-molecule macrocycle cyclotriazadisulfonamide (CADA) is identified as a highly selective human CD4 (hCD4) down-modulator. We show that CADA inhibits CD4 biogenesis and that this is due to its ability to inhibit co-translational translocation of CD4 into the lumen of the ER, both in cells as in a cell-free in vitro translation/translocation system. The activity of CADA maps to the cleavable N-terminal SP of hCD4. Moreover, through surface plasmon resonance analysis we were able to show direct binding of CADA to the SP of hCD4 and identify this SP as the target of our drug. Furthermore, CADA locks the SP in the translocon during a post-targeting step, possibly in a folded state, and prevents the translocation of the associated protein into the ER lumen. Instead, the precursor protein is routed to the cytosol for degradation. These findings demonstrate that a synthetic, cell-permeable small-molecule can be developed as a SP-binding drug to selectively inhibit protein translocation and to reversibly regulate the expression of specific target proteins. PMID:25460167

  2. Vasoactive intestinal peptide binding sites and fibers in the brain of the pigeon Columba livia: An autoradiographic and immunohistochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Hof, P.R.; Dietl, M.M.; Charnay, Y.; Martin, J.L.; Bouras, C.; Palacios, J.M.; Magistretti, P.J. )

    1991-03-15

    The distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) binding sites in the pigeon brain was examined by in vitro autoradiography on slide-mounted sections. A fully characterized monoiodinated form of VIP, which maintains the biological activity of the native peptide, was used throughout this study. The highest densities of binding sites were observed in the hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, auditory field L of neostriatum, area corticoidea dorsolateralis and temporo-parieto-occipitalis, area parahippocampalis, tectum opticum, nucleus dorsomedialis anterior thalami, and in the periventricular area of the hypothalamus. Lower densities of specific binding occurred in the neostriatum, hyperstriatum ventrale and nucleus septi lateralis, dorsolateral area of the thalamus, and lateral and posteromedial hypothalamus. Very low to background levels of VIP binding were detected in the ectostriatum, paleostriatum primitivum, paleostriatum augmentatum, lobus parolfactorius, nucleus accumbens, most of the brainstem, and the cerebellum. The distribution of VIP-containing fibers and terminals was examined by indirect immunofluorescence using a polyclonal antibody against porcine VIP. Fibers and terminals were observed in the area corticoidea dorsolateralis, area parahippocampalis, hippocampus, hyperstriatum accessorium, hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, tuberculum olfactorium, nuclei dorsolateralis and dorsomedialis of the thalamus, and throughout the hypothalamus and the median eminence. Long projecting fibers were visualized in the tractus septohippocampalis. In the brainstem VIP immunoreactive fibers and terminals were observed mainly in the substantia grisea centralis, fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, lemniscus lateralis, and in the area surrounding the nuclei of the 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves.

  3. Enhanced Cellular Adhesion on Titanium by Silk Functionalized with titanium binding and RGD peptides

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Guillaume; Blanchi, Thomas; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Calabrese, Rossella; Rossi, Claire; Vigneron, Pascale; Duval, Jean-Luc; Kaplan, David L.; Egles, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue adhesion on titanium represents a challenge for implantable materials. In order to improve adhesion at the cell/material interface we used a new approach based on the molecular recognition of titanium by specific peptides. Silk fibroin protein was chemically grafted with titanium binding peptide (TiBP) to increase adsorption of these chimeric proteins to the metal surface. Quartz Crystal Microbalance was used to quantify the specific adsorption of TiBP-functionalized silk and an increase in protein deposition by more than 35% was demonstrated due to the presence of the binding peptide. A silk protein grafted with TiBP and fibronectin-derived RGD peptide was then prepared. The adherence of fibroblasts on the titanium surface modified with the multifunctional silk coating demonstrated an increase in the number of adhering cells by 60%. The improved adhesion was demonstrated by Scanning Electron Microscopy and immunocytochemical staining of focal contact points. Chick embryo organotypic culture also revealed strong adhesion of endothelial cells expanding on the multifunctional silk-peptide coating. These results demonstrated that silk functionalized with TiBP and RGD represents a promising approach to modify cell-biomaterial interfaces, opening new perspectives for implantable medical devices, especially when reendothelialization is required. PMID:22975628

  4. A novel method to measure HLA-DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHC class II molecules based on peptide binding competition assay and differential IC(50) determination.

    PubMed

    Yin, Liusong; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-04-01

    HLA-DM (DM) functions as a peptide editor that mediates the exchange of peptides loaded onto MHCII molecules by accelerating peptide dissociation and association kinetics. The relative DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHCII molecules correlates with antigen presentation and immunodominance hierarchy, and measurement of DM-susceptibility has been a key effort in this field. Current assays of DM-susceptibility, based on differential peptide dissociation rates measured for individually labeled peptides over a long time base, are difficult and cumbersome. Here, we present a novel method to measure DM-susceptibility based on peptide binding competition assays performed in the presence and absence of DM, reported as a delta-IC(50) (change in 50% inhibition concentration) value. We simulated binding competition reactions of peptides with various intrinsic and DM-catalyzed kinetic parameters and found that under a wide range of conditions the delta-IC(50) value is highly correlated with DM-susceptibility as measured in off-rate assay. We confirmed experimentally that DM-susceptibility measured by delta-IC(50) is comparable to that measured by traditional off-rate assay for peptides with known DM-susceptibility hierarchy. The major advantage of this method is that it allows simple, fast and high throughput measurement of DM-susceptibility for a large set of unlabeled peptides in studies of the mechanism of DM action and for identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes.

  5. Antimicrobial peptides: natural templates for synthetic membrane-active compounds.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, A; Pirri, G; Bozzi, A; Di Giulio, A; Aschi, M; Rinaldi, A C

    2008-08-01

    The innate immunity of multicellular organisms relies in large part on the action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) to resist microbial invasion. Crafted by evolution into an extremely diversified array of sequences and folds, AMPs do share a common amphiphilic 3-D arrangement. This feature is directly linked with a common mechanism of action that predominantly (although not exclusively) develops upon interaction of peptides with cell membranes of target cells. This minireview reports on current understanding of the modes of interaction of AMPs with biological and model membranes, especially focusing on recent insights into the folding and oligomerization requirements of peptides to bind and insert into lipid membranes and exert their antibiotic effects. Given the potential of AMPs to be developed into a new class of anti-infective agents, emphasis is placed on how the information on peptide-membrane interactions could direct the design and selection of improved biomimetic synthetic peptides with antibiotic properties.

  6. Binding Site Prediction of Proteins with Organic Compounds or Peptides Using GALAXY Web Servers.

    PubMed

    Heo, Lim; Lee, Hasup; Baek, Minkyung; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    We introduce two GALAXY web servers called GalaxySite and GalaxyPepDock that predict protein complex structures with small organic compounds and peptides, respectively. GalaxySite predicts ligands that may bind the input protein and generates complex structures of the protein with the predicted ligands from the protein structure given as input or predicted from the input sequence. GalaxyPepDock takes a protein structure and a peptide sequence as input and predicts structures for the protein-peptide complex. Both GalaxySite and GalaxyPepDock rely on available experimentally resolved structures of protein-ligand complexes evolutionarily related to the target. With the continuously increasing size of the protein structure database, the probability of finding related proteins in the database is increasing. The servers further relax the complex structures to refine the structural aspects that are missing in the available structures or that are not compatible with the given protein by optimizing physicochemical interactions. GalaxyPepDock allows conformational change of the protein receptor induced by peptide binding. The atomistic interactions with ligands predicted by the GALAXY servers may offer important clues for designing new molecules or proteins with desired binding properties. PMID:27094284

  7. Design of Cyclic Peptides That Bind Protein Surfaces with Antibody-Like Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Millward, Steven W.; Fiacco, Stephen; Austin, Ryan J.; Roberts, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    There is a pressing need for new molecular tools to target protein surfaces with high affinity and specificity. Here, we describe cyclic messenger RNA display with a trillion-member covalent peptide macrocycle library. Using this library, we have designed a number of high-affinity, redox-insensitive, cyclic peptides that target the signaling protein Gαi1. In addition to cyclization, our library construction took advantage of an expanded genetic code, utilizing nonsense suppression to insert N-methylphenylalanine as a 21st amino acid. The designed macrocycles exhibit several intriguing features. First, the core motif seen in all of the selected variants is the same and shares an identical context with respect to the macrocyclic scaffold, consistent with the idea that selection simultaneously optimizes both the cyclization chemistry and the structural placement of the binding epitope. Second, detailed characterization of one molecule, cyclic Gαi binding peptide (cycGiBP), demonstrates substantially enhanced proteolytic stability relative to that of the parent linear molecule. Third and perhaps most important, the cycGiBP peptide binds the target with very high affinity (Ki ≈ 2.1 nM), similar to those of many of the best monoclonal antibodies and higher than that of the βγ heterodimer, an endogenous Gαi1 ligand. Overall the work provides a general route to design novel, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity ligands that target protein surfaces. PMID:17894440

  8. Design of cyclic peptides that bind protein surfaces with antibody-like affinity.

    PubMed

    Millward, Steven W; Fiacco, Stephen; Austin, Ryan J; Roberts, Richard W

    2007-09-21

    There is a pressing need for new molecular tools to target protein surfaces with high affinity and specificity. Here, we describe cyclic messenger RNA display with a trillion-member covalent peptide macrocycle library. Using this library, we have designed a number of high-affinity, redox-insensitive, cyclic peptides that target the signaling protein G alpha i1. In addition to cyclization, our library construction took advantage of an expanded genetic code, utilizing nonsense suppression to insert N-methylphenylalanine as a 21st amino acid. The designed macrocycles exhibit several intriguing features. First, the core motif seen in all of the selected variants is the same and shares an identical context with respect to the macrocyclic scaffold, consistent with the idea that selection simultaneously optimizes both the cyclization chemistry and the structural placement of the binding epitope. Second, detailed characterization of one molecule, cyclic G alpha i binding peptide (cycGiBP), demonstrates substantially enhanced proteolytic stability relative to that of the parent linear molecule. Third and perhaps most important, the cycGiBP peptide binds the target with very high affinity ( K i approximately 2.1 nM), similar to those of many of the best monoclonal antibodies and higher than that of the betagamma heterodimer, an endogenous G alpha i1 ligand. Overall the work provides a general route to design novel, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity ligands that target protein surfaces.

  9. Short communication: Identification of iron-binding peptides from whey protein hydrolysates using iron (III)-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography and reversed phase-HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Huerta, Elvia; Martínez Maqueda, Daniel; de la Hoz, Lucia; da Silva, Vera S Nunes; Pacheco, Maria Teresa Bertoldo; Amigo, Lourdes; Recio, Isidra

    2016-01-01

    Peptides with iron-binding capacity obtained by hydrolysis of whey protein with Alcalase (Novozymes, Araucaria, PR, Brazil), pancreatin, and Flavourzyme (Novozymes) were identified. Hydrolysates were subjected to iron (III)-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, and the bound peptides were sequenced by mass spectrometry. Regardless of the enzyme used, the domains f(42-59) and f(125-137) from β-lactoglobulin enclosed most of identified peptides. This trend was less pronounced in the case of peptides derived from α-lactalbumin, with sequences deriving from diverse regions. Iron-bound peptides exhibited common structural characteristics, such as an abundance of Asp, Glu, and Pro, as revealed by mass spectrometry and AA analysis. In conclusion, this characterization of iron-binding peptides helps clarify the relationship between peptide structure and iron-chelating activity and supports the promising role of whey protein hydrolysates as functional ingredients in iron supplementation treatments.

  10. Short communication: Identification of iron-binding peptides from whey protein hydrolysates using iron (III)-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography and reversed phase-HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Huerta, Elvia; Martínez Maqueda, Daniel; de la Hoz, Lucia; da Silva, Vera S Nunes; Pacheco, Maria Teresa Bertoldo; Amigo, Lourdes; Recio, Isidra

    2016-01-01

    Peptides with iron-binding capacity obtained by hydrolysis of whey protein with Alcalase (Novozymes, Araucaria, PR, Brazil), pancreatin, and Flavourzyme (Novozymes) were identified. Hydrolysates were subjected to iron (III)-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, and the bound peptides were sequenced by mass spectrometry. Regardless of the enzyme used, the domains f(42-59) and f(125-137) from β-lactoglobulin enclosed most of identified peptides. This trend was less pronounced in the case of peptides derived from α-lactalbumin, with sequences deriving from diverse regions. Iron-bound peptides exhibited common structural characteristics, such as an abundance of Asp, Glu, and Pro, as revealed by mass spectrometry and AA analysis. In conclusion, this characterization of iron-binding peptides helps clarify the relationship between peptide structure and iron-chelating activity and supports the promising role of whey protein hydrolysates as functional ingredients in iron supplementation treatments. PMID:26601589

  11. Autoradiographic localization of peptide YY and neuropeptide Y binding sites in the medulla oblongata

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, R.A.; McDonald, T.J.; Robertson, H.A.

    1988-09-01

    Peptide YY is a highly potent emetic when given intravenously in dogs. We hypothesized that the area postrema, a small brain stem nucleus that acts as a chemoreceptive trigger zone for vomiting and lies outside the blood-brain barrier, might have receptors that PYY would bind to, in order to mediate the emetic response. We prepared (/sup 125/I)PYY and used autoradiography to show that high affinity binding sites for this ligand were highly localized in the area postrema and related nuclei of the dog medulla oblongata. Furthermore, the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites in the rat medulla oblongata was very similar to that in the dog; the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites throughout the rat brain was seen to be similar to the distribution of (/sup 125/I)NPY binding sites.

  12. An alternative mechanism for the catalysis of peptide bond formation by L/F transferase: substrate binding and orientation.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela W; Ebhardt, H Alexander; Abeysundara, Heshani; Moore, Jack; Xu, Zhizhong; Fahlman, Richard P

    2011-06-17

    Eubacterial leucyl/phenylalanyl tRNA protein transferase (L/F transferase) catalyzes the transfer of a leucine or a phenylalanine from an aminoacyl-tRNA to the N-terminus of a protein substrate. This N-terminal addition of an amino acid is analogous to that of peptide synthesis by ribosomes. A previously proposed catalytic mechanism for Escherichia coli L/F transferase identified the conserved aspartate 186 (D186) and glutamine 188 (Q188) as key catalytic residues. We have reassessed the role of D186 and Q188 by investigating the enzymatic reactions and kinetics of enzymes possessing mutations to these active-site residues. Additionally three other amino acids proposed to be involved in aminoacyl-tRNA substrate binding are investigated for comparison. By quantitatively measuring product formation using a quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based assay, our results clearly demonstrate that, despite significant reduction in enzymatic activity as a result of different point mutations introduced into the active site of L/F transferase, the formation of product is still observed upon extended incubations. Our kinetic data and existing X-ray crystal structures result in a proposal that the critical roles of D186 and Q188, like the other amino acids in the active site, are for substrate binding and orientation and do not directly participate in the chemistry of peptide bond formation. Overall, we propose that L/F transferase does not directly participate in the chemistry of peptide bond formation but catalyzes the reaction by binding and orientating the substrates for reaction in an analogous mechanism that has been described for ribosomes.

  13. Chronic Beryllium Disease: revealing the role of beryllium ion and small peptides binding to HLA-DP2.

    PubMed

    Petukh, Marharyta; Wu, Bohua; Stefl, Shannon; Smith, Nick; Hyde-Volpe, David; Wang, Li; Alexov, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Beryllium (Be) Disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder that predominantly affects the lung. The CBD is caused by Be exposure of individuals carrying the HLA-DP2 protein of the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII). While the involvement of Be in the development of CBD is obvious and the binding site and the sequence of Be and peptide binding were recently experimentally revealed [1], the interplay between induced conformational changes and the changes of the peptide binding affinity in presence of Be were not investigated. Here we carry out in silico modeling and predict the Be binding to be within the acidic pocket (Glu26, Glu68 and Glu69) present on the HLA-DP2 protein in accordance with the experimental work [1]. In addition, the modeling indicates that the Be ion binds to the HLA-DP2 before the corresponding peptide is able to bind to it. Further analysis of the MD generated trajectories reveals that in the presence of the Be ion in the binding pocket of HLA-DP2, all the different types of peptides induce very similar conformational changes, but their binding affinities are quite different. Since these conformational changes are distinctly different from the changes caused by peptides normally found in the cell in the absence of Be, it can be speculated that CBD can be caused by any peptide in presence of Be ion. However, the affinities of peptides for Be loaded HLA-DP2 were found to depend of their amino acid composition and the peptides carrying acidic group at positions 4 and 7 are among the strongest binders. Thus, it is proposed that CBD is caused by the exposure of Be of an individual carrying the HLA-DP2*0201 allele and that the binding of Be to HLA-DP2 protein alters the conformational and ionization properties of HLA-DP2 such that the binding of a peptide triggers a wrong signaling cascade.

  14. Prediction of peptides binding to MHC class I and II alleles by temporal motif mining

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex) is a key player in the immune response of most vertebrates. The computational prediction of whether a given antigenic peptide will bind to a specific MHC allele is important in the development of vaccines for emerging pathogens, the creation of possibilities for controlling immune response, and for the applications of immunotherapy. One of the problems that make this computational prediction difficult is the detection of the binding core region in peptides, coupled with the presence of bulges and loops causing variations in the total sequence length. Most machine learning methods require the sequences to be of the same length to successfully discover the binding motifs, ignoring the length variance in both motif mining and prediction steps. In order to overcome this limitation, we propose the use of time-based motif mining methods that work position-independently. Results The prediction method was tested on a benchmark set of 28 different alleles for MHC class I and 27 different alleles for MHC class II. The obtained results are comparable to the state of the art methods for both MHC classes, surpassing the published results for some alleles. The average prediction AUC values are 0.897 for class I, and 0.858 for class II. Conclusions Temporal motif mining using partial periodic patterns can capture information about the sequences well enough to predict the binding of the peptides and is comparable to state of the art methods in the literature. Unlike neural networks or matrix based predictors, our proposed method does not depend on peptide length and can work with both short and long fragments. This advantage allows better use of the available training data and the prediction of peptides of uncommon lengths. PMID:23368521

  15. Characterization of the secondary structure of calmodulin in complex with a calmodulin-binding domain peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, S.M.; Schneider, D.M.; Strobel, L.A.; Wand, A.J. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana ); Van Berkum, M.F.A.; Means, A.R. )

    1992-02-11

    The interaction between calcium-saturated chicken calmodulin and a peptide corresponding to the calmodulin-binding domain of the chicken smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase has been studied by multinuclear and multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance methods. Extensive {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonance assignments of calmodulin in the complex have been obtained from the analysis of two- and three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. The assignment of calmodulin in the complex was facilitated by the use of selective labeling of the protein with {alpha}-{sup 15}N-labeled valine, alanine, lysine, leucine, and glycine. These provided reference points during the main-chain-directed analysis of three-dimensional spectra of complexes prepared with uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled calmodulin. The pattern of nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) seen among main-chain amide NH, C{sub {alpha}}H, and C{sub {beta}}H hydrogens indicates that the secondary structure of the globular domains of calmodulin in the complex closely corresponds to that observed in the calcium-saturated state of the protein in the absence of bound peptide. However, the backbone conformation of residues 76-84 adopts an extended chain conformation upon binding of the peptide in contrast to its helical conformation in the absence of peptide. A sufficient number of NOEs between the globular domains of calmodulin and the bound peptide have been found to indicate that the N- and C-terminal regions of the peptide interact with the C- and N-terminal domains of calmodulin, respectively. The significance of these results are discussed in terms of recently proposed models for the structure of calmodulin-peptide complexes.

  16. Computational exploration of a protein receptor binding space with student proposed peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results.

  17. Computational exploration of a protein receptor binding space with student proposed peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results. PMID:26537635

  18. A Red Cy3-Based Biarsenical Fluorescent Probe Targeted to a Complementary Binding Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Haishi; Xiong, Yijia; Wang, Ting; Chen, Baowei; Squier, Thomas C.; Mayer, M. Uljana

    2007-07-24

    We have synthesized a red biarsenical fluorescent probe, AsCy3, with good photostability, low pH sensitivity, high absorbance and good quantum yield. It is directed specifically to a small tetracysteine peptide binding motif Cy3TAG (CysCysLysAlaGluAlaAlaCysCys) in the presence of other tetracysteine tags. This new probe provides a FRET partner to biarsenical dye FlAsH, making this discovery an important step toward a whole toolkit of colored probes directed to different small peptide motifs.

  19. Effects of water molecules on binding kinetics of peptide receptor on a piezoelectric microcantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui Kim, Sang; Kyoung Yoo, Yong; Chae, Myung-Sic; Yoon Kang, Ji; Song Kim, Tae; Seon Hwang, Kyo; Hoon Lee, Jeong

    2012-12-01

    The use of highly selective reversible peptide receptors is essential for cantilever-based electronic nose systems. Here, we present the effects of water molecules on the binding kinetics of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) molecules with DNT selective peptide receptors linked with a tri(ethylene glycol)-based (TEG) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) in a gas phase in a piezoelectric microcantilever sensor. We observed 1.5-times faster reaction kinetics in wet conditions compared with dry conditions. In a dissociation step, distinctive differences in the recovery time were observed in wet conditions, which could be attributed to water retention efficiency of TEG-linkers for the conformation of biomolecules.

  20. Copper(II) ions and the Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide: Affinity and stoichiometry of binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tõugu, Vello; Friedemann, Merlin; Tiiman, Ann; Palumaa, Peep

    2014-10-01

    Deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides into amyloid plaques is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis this deposition is an early event and primary cause of the disease, however, the mechanisms that cause this deposition remain elusive. An increasing amount of evidence shows that the interactions of biometals can contribute to the fibrillization and amyloid formation by amyloidogenic peptides. From different anions the copper ions deserve the most attention since it can contribute not only toamyloid formation but also to its toxicity due to the generation of ROS. In this thesis we focus on the affinity and stoichiometry of copper(II) binding to the Aβ molecule.

  1. The comparison of BLyS-binding peptides from phage display library and computer-aided design on BLyS-TACI interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yacong; Hao, Xiafei; Feng, Jiannan; Shen, Beifen; Wei, Jing; Sun, Jian

    2015-02-01

    BLyS antagonists have become the therapeutic reagents in the treatment of autoimmune disorders. BLyS binding peptides and their Fc fusion proteins may be alternative BLyS antagonists in such application. In this study, the activity of BLyS binding peptide 814 obtained from phage display library and peptide TA designed by computer-aided modeling on the interaction of BLyS-TACI was compared. In addition, to maintain the spatial conformation and stability of the peptides, human IgG1 Fc fragment was fused to peptides 814 and TA to form peptide-Fc fusion proteins, steady and innovative peptibodies. The prokaryotic expression plasmids pET30a-814-Fc and pET30a-TA-Fc for these peptibodies were acquired by genetic engineering, and confirmed by DNA sequencing. After the right plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), the fusion proteins were expressed and purified by protein A affinity column. As a result of competitive ELISA, peptides 814 and TA at 100μg/ml displayed 52.2% and 28.6% inhibition on the interaction of TACI-Fc with BLyS respectively. Moreover, 814-Fc and TA-Fc fusion proteins could bind to BLyS in a dosage-dependent manner as TACI-Fc did, and displayed 54.7% and 26.1% inhibition on the interaction of TACI-Fc-Myc with BLyS at 100μg/ml respectively. So 814-Fc and TA-Fc proteins had the similar bioactivity as the peptides did. Furthermore, compared with TA-Fc, 814-Fc showed two-fold inhibition effect on BLyS binding to TACI, suggesting that 814-Fc could inhibit BLyS bioactivity significantly and might serve as a potential antagonist to treat autoimmune diseases associated with BLyS overexpression.

  2. Rational Optimization of Conformational Effects Induced By Hydrocarbon Staples in Peptides and their Binding Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lama, Dilraj; Quah, Soo T.; Verma, Chandra S.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Beuerman, Roger W.; Lane, David P.; Brown, Christopher J.

    2013-12-01

    eIF4E is frequently over-expressed in different cancers and causes increased translation of oncogenic proteins via deregulated cap-dependent translation. Inhibitors of the eIF4E:eIF4G interactions represent an approach that would normalize cap-dependent translation. Stapled peptides represent an emerging class of therapeutics that can target protein: protein interactions. We present here molecular dynamics simulations for a set of rationally designed stapled peptides in solution and in complex with eIF4E, supported with biophysical and crystallographic data. Clustering of the simulated structures revealed the favoured conformational states of the stapled peptides in their bound or free forms in solution. Identifying these populations has allowed us to design peptides with improved affinities by introducing mutations into the peptide sequence to alter their conformational distributions. These studies emphasise the effects that engineered mutations have on the conformations of free and bound peptides, and illustrate that both states must be considered in efforts to attain high affinity binding.

  3. Modeling the Interaction between Integrin-Binding Peptide (RGD) and Rutile Surface: The Effect of Na+ on Peptide Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chunya; Skelton, Adam; Chen, Mingjun; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of a single tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) adsorbing onto negatively charged hydroxylated rutile (110) surface in aqueous solution was studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results indicate that the adsorbed Na{sup +} ions play an important role in determining the binding geometry of RGD. With an initial 'horseshoe' configuration, the charged side groups (COO{sup -} and NH{sub 2}) of the peptide are able to interact with the surface through direct hydrogen bonds (H bonds) in the very early stage of adsorption. The Na{sup +} ions approach the positively charged Arg side chain, competing with the Arg side chain for adsorption to the negatively charged hydroxyl oxygen. In coordination with the structural adjustment of the peptide, the Arg residue is driven to detach from the rutile surface. In contrast, the Na+ ions in close proximity to the negatively charged Asp side chain contribute to the binding of the COO{sup -} group on the surface, helping the carboxyl oxygen not involved in COO{sup -}-surface H bonds to orientate toward the hydroxyl hydrogens. Once both carboxyl oxygens form enough H bonds with the hydroxyl hydrogens, the redundant ions move toward a more favorable adsorption site.

  4. Binding of acylated peptides and fatty acids to phospholipid vesicles: pertinence to myristoylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Peitzsch, R M; McLaughlin, S

    1993-10-01

    We studied the binding of fatty acids and acylated peptides to phospholipid vesicles by making electrophoretic mobility and equilibrium dialysis measurements. The binding energies of the anionic form of the fatty acids and the corresponding acylated glycines were identical; the energies increased by 0.8 kcal/mol per number of carbons in the acyl chain (Ncarbon = 10, 12, 14, 16), a value identical to that for the classical entropy-driven hydrophobic effect discussed by Tanford [The Hydrophobic Effect (1980) Wiley, New York]. The unitary Gibbs free binding energy, delta Gou, of myristoylated glycine, 8 kcal/mol, is independent of the nature of the electrically neutral lipids used to form the vesicles. Similar binding energies were obtained with other myristoylated peptides (e.g., Gly-Ala, Gly-Ala-Ala). The 8 kcal/mol, which corresponds to an effective dissociation constant of 10(-4) M for myristoylated peptides with lipids, provides barely enough energy to attach a myristoylated protein in the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane. Thus, other factors that reduce (e.g., hydrophobic interaction of myristate with the covalently attached protein) or enhance (e.g., electrostatic interactions of basic residues with acidic lipids; protein-protein interactions with intrinsic receptor proteins) the interaction of myristoylated proteins with membranes are likely to be important and may cause reversible translocation of these proteins to the membrane.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Metal-binding peptides: Their role in responses to metal stress

    SciTech Connect

    Rauser, W.E. )

    1989-04-01

    Excess metals are one stress that plants may encounter. The metals Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn are considered because of concern for their entry into the foodchain of animals and man. Studies of metal tolerant plants and cell cultures suggest three types of responses: exclusion of metal from protoplasts by binding to cell walls, differential membrane transport reducing metal exposure of enzymes, and intracellular chelation of metal in innocuous forms. One group of compounds involved in the latter response are metal-binding peptides designated phytochelatins. They are a family of small peptides composed of five kinds of amino acids, including 2 to 11 cysteines which provide thiols for selective binding of metal. Metals induce the synthesis of phytochelatins through unknown enzymes involving glutathione. In plant cell cultures the peptides bind about 90% of the intracellular Cd. In roots of young plants up to half of the metal is bound by phytochelatins. Intact plants probably use a combination of responses to deal with excess metals, phytochelatins may dominate in certain cases.

  6. Identification of peptides that bind hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 and inhibit viral cellular entry from a phage-display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Lü, Xin; Yao, Min; Zhang, Jian-Min; Yang, Jing; Lei, Ying-Feng; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Jia, Zhan-Sheng; Ma, Li; Lan, Hai-Yun; Xu, Zhi-Kai; Yin, Wen

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein E2 is required for the entry of HCV into cells. Viral envelope proteins interact with cell receptors in a multistep process, which may be a promising target for the development of novel antiviral agents. In this study, a heptapeptide M13 phage-display library was screened for peptides that bind specifically to prokaryotically expressed, purified truncated HCV envelope protein E2. ELISA assay was used to quantify the binding of the peptides to HCV E2 protein. Flow cytometry, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and western blotting were used to investigate the inhibition effect of one peptide on HCV infection in hepatoma cells (Huh7.5) in vitro. Four peptides capable of binding specifically to HCV E2 protein were obtained after three rounds of biopanning. Peptide C18 (WPWHNHR), with the highest affinity for binding HCV E2 protein, was synthesized. The results showed that peptide C18 inhibited the viral infectivity of both HCV pseudotype particles (HCVpp) harboring HCV envelope glycoproteins and cell-culture produced HCV (HCVcc). Thus, this study demonstrated that peptide C18 is a potential candidate for anti-HCV therapy as a novel viral entry inhibitor.

  7. M13 phage peptide ZL4 exerts its targeted binding effect on schistosoma japonicum via alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Yang, Shenghui; Xiao, Jianhua; Yu, Liang; Chen, Li; Zou, Ju; Wang, Kegeng; Tan, Sijie; Yu, Zhengyang; Zeng, Qingren

    2015-01-01

    The present study was to determine the targeting effect of M13 phage peptide ZL4 (MppZL4) on Schistosoma japonicum (S.j). Mice infected with S.j were injected with MppZL4. Real-time PCR was used to detect the distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 in the livers and lungs of mice. In vivo refusion test was performed to detect the targeting of MppZL4. Western blotting was employed to determine the expression of MppZL4. Live imaging was used to detect the distribution of oligopeptide MppZL4. Immunohistochemistry was employed to determine MppZL4 location on adult S.j body surface. Gomori method was employed to detect the influence of oligopeptide MppZL4 on alkaline phosphatase activity. The distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 and M13KE are not significantly different from each other at each time point. The abundance of MppZL4 is changed as S.j migrates in mice. The targeted binding effect of MppZL4 varies at different stages. ZL4 oligopeptide targets S.j in mice. The specific binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body are mainly located in syncytial cells. The binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body surface might be ALP or ALP-related proteins. MppZL4 had targeted binding effect on S.j with its binding site being associated with proteins related to S.j alkaline phosphatase. S.j tegument had a specifically binding site with exogenous peptides, offering new means to explore the interactions between hosts and parasites. Additionally, MppZL4 can possibly be used as targeting molecules in worm-resistant drugs or as tracing molecules in imaging diagnosis technologies.

  8. M13 phage peptide ZL4 exerts its targeted binding effect on schistosoma japonicum via alkaline phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Yang, Shenghui; Xiao, Jianhua; Yu, Liang; Chen, Li; Zou, Ju; Wang, Kegeng; Tan, Sijie; Yu, Zhengyang; Zeng, Qingren

    2015-01-01

    The present study was to determine the targeting effect of M13 phage peptide ZL4 (MppZL4) on Schistosoma japonicum (S.j). Mice infected with S.j were injected with MppZL4. Real-time PCR was used to detect the distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 in the livers and lungs of mice. In vivo refusion test was performed to detect the targeting of MppZL4. Western blotting was employed to determine the expression of MppZL4. Live imaging was used to detect the distribution of oligopeptide MppZL4. Immunohistochemistry was employed to determine MppZL4 location on adult S.j body surface. Gomori method was employed to detect the influence of oligopeptide MppZL4 on alkaline phosphatase activity. The distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 and M13KE are not significantly different from each other at each time point. The abundance of MppZL4 is changed as S.j migrates in mice. The targeted binding effect of MppZL4 varies at different stages. ZL4 oligopeptide targets S.j in mice. The specific binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body are mainly located in syncytial cells. The binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body surface might be ALP or ALP-related proteins. MppZL4 had targeted binding effect on S.j with its binding site being associated with proteins related to S.j alkaline phosphatase. S.j tegument had a specifically binding site with exogenous peptides, offering new means to explore the interactions between hosts and parasites. Additionally, MppZL4 can possibly be used as targeting molecules in worm-resistant drugs or as tracing molecules in imaging diagnosis technologies. PMID:25973009

  9. Structure and Bioactivity of a Modified Peptide Derived from the LPS-Binding Domain of an Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor (ALF) of Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Li, Shihao; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2016-05-01

    The lipopolysaccharide binding domain (LBD) in anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is the main functional element of ALF, which exhibits antimicrobial activities. Our previous studies show that the peptide LBDv, synthesized based on the modified sequence of LBD (named LBD2) from FcALF2, exhibited an apparently enhanced antimicrobial activity. To learn the prospect of LBDv application, the characteristics of LBDv were analyzed in the present study. The LBDv peptide showed higher antimicrobial and bactericidal activities compared with LBD2. These activities of the LBDv peptide were stable after heat treatment. LBDv could also exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity to Vibrio harveyi. The LBDv peptide was found to bind bacteria, quickly cause bacterial agglutination, and kill bacteria by damaging their membrane integrity. Structure analysis showed that both LBDv and LBD2 held the β-sheet structure, and the positive net charge and amphipathicity characteristic were speculated as two important components for their antimicrobial activity. The cytotoxicity of LBDv was evaluated in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells and Cherax quadricarinatus hemocytes. More than 80% cells could survive with the LBDv concentration up to 16 μM. Collectively, these findings highlighted the potential antimicrobial mechanism of LBD peptides, and provided important information for the commercial use of LBDv in the future. PMID:27213409

  10. Structure and Bioactivity of a Modified Peptide Derived from the LPS-Binding Domain of an Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor (ALF) of Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Li, Shihao; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2016-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide binding domain (LBD) in anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is the main functional element of ALF, which exhibits antimicrobial activities. Our previous studies show that the peptide LBDv, synthesized based on the modified sequence of LBD (named LBD2) from FcALF2, exhibited an apparently enhanced antimicrobial activity. To learn the prospect of LBDv application, the characteristics of LBDv were analyzed in the present study. The LBDv peptide showed higher antimicrobial and bactericidal activities compared with LBD2. These activities of the LBDv peptide were stable after heat treatment. LBDv could also exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity to Vibrio harveyi. The LBDv peptide was found to bind bacteria, quickly cause bacterial agglutination, and kill bacteria by damaging their membrane integrity. Structure analysis showed that both LBDv and LBD2 held the β-sheet structure, and the positive net charge and amphipathicity characteristic were speculated as two important components for their antimicrobial activity. The cytotoxicity of LBDv was evaluated in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells and Cherax quadricarinatus hemocytes. More than 80% cells could survive with the LBDv concentration up to 16 μM. Collectively, these findings highlighted the potential antimicrobial mechanism of LBD peptides, and provided important information for the commercial use of LBDv in the future. PMID:27213409

  11. Injectable Hyaluronan Hydrogels with Peptide-Binding Dendrimers Modulate the Controlled Release of BMP-2 and TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Seelbach, Ryan J; Fransen, Peter; Pulido, Daniel; D'Este, Matteo; Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Sauerbier, Sebastian; Freiman, Thomas M; Niemeyer, Philipp; Albericio, Fernando; Alini, Mauro; Royo, Miriam; Mata, Alvaro; Eglin, David

    2015-08-01

    BMP-2 and TGF-β1 released from injectable thermoresponsive hydrogels are studied in the presence and absence of branched macromolecules bearing BMP-2 or TGF-β1 affinity binding peptides. The synthesized branched macromolecules and the gelling compositions before and after loading with either BMP-2 or TGF-β1 are characterized physico-chemically and show a significantly lower amount of proteins released in the presence of the affinity binding peptide macromolecules. This study illustrates the potential of affinity binding peptide functionalized dendrimers to modulate the local delivery and availability of growth factors important for musculoskeletal regeneration therapies. PMID:25943094

  12. Peptide-directed binding of quantum dots to integrins in human fibroblast.

    PubMed

    Shi, Peng; Chen, Hongfeng; Cho, Michael R; Stroscio, Michael A

    2006-03-01

    There is currently a major international effort aimed at integrating semiconductor nanostructures with biological structures. This paper reports the use of peptide sequences with certain motifs like artinine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) and leucine-aspartic acid-valine (LDV) to functionalize zinc sulfide (ZnS)-capped cadmiun selenide (CdSe) quantum dots, so that the quantum dot-peptide complexes selectively bind to integrins on HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells membrane. In this way, an interface between semiconductor nanocrystals and subcellular components was achieved, and the distribution pattern of RGD and LDV receptors on HT1080 cell membranes is revealed. These findings point the way to using a wide class of peptide-functionalized semiconductor quantum dots for the study of cellular processes involving integrins.

  13. Asp residues of βDELSEED-motif are required for peptide binding in the Escherichia coli ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Tayou, Junior; Laughlin, Thomas F

    2015-04-01

    This study demonstrates the requirement of Asp-380 and Asp-386 in the βDELSEED-motif of Escherichia coli ATP synthase for peptide binding and inhibition. We studied the inhibition profiles of wild-type and mutant E. coli ATP synthase in presence of c-terminal amide bound melittin and melittin related peptide. Melittin and melittin related peptide inhibited wild-type ATPase almost completely while only partial inhibition was observed in single mutations with replacement of Asp to Ala, Gln, or Arg. Additionally, very little or no inhibition occurred among double mutants βD380A/βD386A, βD380Q/βD386Q, or βD380R/βD386R signifying that removal of one Asp residue allows limited peptide binding. Partial or substantial loss of oxidative phosphorylation among double mutants demonstrates the functional requirement of βD380 and βD386 Asp residues. Moreover, abrogation of wild-type E. coli cell growth and normal growth of mutant cells in presence of peptides provides strong evidence for the requirement of βDELSEED-motif Asp residues for peptide binding. It is concluded that while presence of one Asp residue may allow partial peptide binding, both Asp residues, βD380 and βD386, are essential for proper peptide binding and inhibition of ATP synthase.

  14. Asp residues of βDELSEED-motif are required for peptide binding in the Escherichia coli ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Tayou, Junior; Laughlin, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the requirement of Asp-380 and Asp-386 in the βDELSEED-motif of E. coli ATP synthase for peptide binding and inhibition. We studied the inhibition profiles of wild-type and mutant E. coli ATP synthase in presence of c-terminal amide bound melittin and melittin related peptide. Melittin and melittin related peptide inhibited wild-type ATPase almost completely while only partial inhibition was observed in single mutations with replacement of Asp to Ala, Gln, or Arg. Additionally, very little or no inhibition occurred among double mutants βD380A/βD386A, βD380Q/βD386Q, or βD380R/βD386R signifying that removal of one Asp residue allows limited peptide binding. Partial or substantial loss of oxidative phosphorylation among double mutants demonstrates the functional requirement of βD380 and βD386 Asp residues. Moreover, abrogation of wild-type E. coli cell growth and normal growth of mutant cells in presence of peptides provides strong evidence for the requirement of βDELSEED-motif Asp residues for peptide binding. It is concluded that while presence of one Asp residue may allow partial peptide binding, both Asp residues, βD380 and βD386, are essential for proper peptide binding and inhibition of ATP synthase. PMID:25603139

  15. Neutron Reflectometry Studies Define Prion Protein N-terminal Peptide Membrane Binding

    PubMed Central

    Le Brun, Anton P.; Haigh, Cathryn L.; Drew, Simon C.; James, Michael; Boland, Martin P.; Collins, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP), widely recognized to misfold into the causative agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, has previously been shown to bind to lipid membranes with binding influenced by both membrane composition and pH. Aside from the misfolding events associated with prion pathogenesis, PrP can undergo various posttranslational modifications, including internal cleavage events. Alpha- and beta-cleavage of PrP produces two N-terminal fragments, N1 and N2, respectively, which interact specifically with negatively charged phospholipids at low pH. Our previous work probing N1 and N2 interactions with supported bilayers raised the possibility that the peptides could insert deeply with minimal disruption. In the current study we aimed to refine the binding parameters of these peptides with lipid bilayers. To this end, we used neutron reflectometry to define the structural details of this interaction in combination with quartz crystal microbalance interrogation. Neutron reflectometry confirmed that peptides equivalent to N1 and N2 insert into the interstitial space between the phospholipid headgroups but do not penetrate into the acyl tail region. In accord with our previous studies, interaction was stronger for the N1 fragment than for the N2, with more peptide bound per lipid. Neutron reflectometry analysis also detected lengthening of the lipid acyl tails, with a concurrent decrease in lipid area. This was most evident for the N1 peptide and suggests an induction of increased lipid order in the absence of phase transition. These observations stand in clear contrast to the findings of analogous studies of Ab and α-synuclein and thereby support the possibility of a functional role for such N-terminal fragment-membrane interactions. PMID:25418300

  16. Binding of formyl peptides to Walker 256 carcinosarcoma cells and the chemotactic response of these cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rayner, D.C.; Orr, F.W.; Shiu, R.P.

    1985-05-01

    N-Formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMLP) induces chemotaxis in leukocytes, the response being mediated by peptide binding to a receptor on the plasma membrane. In tumor cells, this peptide has been reported to induce cellular swelling and chemotaxis in vitro and to enhance the localization of circulating tumor cells in vivo. In the Boyden chamber, the authors evaluated the migratory responses of Walker carcinosarcoma 256 cells to varying concentrations of fMLP. Sigmoidal dose-response curves were obtained with the dose of chemotactic factor that elicits a half-maximal chemotactic response of 5.0 +/- 2.5 X 10(-8) M. Checkerboard analysis indicated that these responses were dependent upon a concentration gradient of fMLP with increases in migration of circa 2 to 2.5 times that of random movement. To examine the binding of fMLP, the tumor cells were incubated with 5 X 10(-9) M fML-(/sup 3/H)P in Hanks balanced salt solution. Specific binding (0.5 to 1% of total radioligand, to whole cells inhibited by 5 X 10(-6) M fMLP) approached equilibrium after 4 to 6 h at 4 degrees C and after 6 to 10 h at 22 degrees C. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated heterogeneous binding of the peptide by tumor cells and also showed its intracellular localization. In homogenates of Walker cells prepared in 0.1 M Tris HCl, pH 7.4, with 10 mM MgCl2 and bovine serum albumin (1 mg/ml), specific binding of approximately 0.5% of total fML-(/sup 3/H)P reached equilibrium after 60 min at 4 degrees C. In whole cells and homogenates, binding was reversible by addition of unlabeled fMLP.

  17. Folding and activity of hybrid sequence, disulfide-stabilized peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, J.H.B.; Storrs, R.W.; Wemmer, D.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Peptides have been synthesized that have hybrid sequences, partially derived from the bee venom peptide apamin and partially from the S peptide of ribonuclease A. The hybrid peptides were demonstrated by NMR spectroscopy to fold, forming the same disulfides and basic three-dimensional structure as native apamin, containing a {beta}-turn and an {alpha}-helix. These hybrids were active in complementing S protein, reactivating nuclease activity. In addition, the hybrid peptide was effective in inducing antibodies that cross-react with the RNase, without conjugation to a carrier protein. The stability of the folded structure of this peptide suggests that it should be possible to elicit antibodies that will react not only with a specific sequence, but also with a specific secondary structure. Hybrid sequence peptides also provide opportunities to study separately nucleation and propagation steps in formation of secondary structure. The authors show that in S peptide the {alpha}-helix does not end abruptly but rather terminates gradually over four or five residues. In general, these hybrid sequence peptides, which fold predictably because of disulfide bond formation, can provide opportunities for examining structure - function relationships for many biologically active sequences.

  18. Piezoresistive measurement of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide binding with microcantilever arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, N.; Maldonado, C. J.; Thundat, T.; Passian, A.

    2014-03-01

    Effective detection of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide is crucial as it could be used as a positive control to screen for highly infectious flu strains such as Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1). Piezoresistive microcantilever arrays present a pathway towards highly sensitive and label-free detection of biomolecules by transducing the antigen-antibody binding into change in resistivity via induced surface stress variation. We demonstrate a mechanical transduction of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide binding and suggest the employed technique may offer a potential platform for detection of the H1N1 virus, which could be clinically used to diagnose and provide subsequent relief.

  19. Quantitative online prediction of peptide binding to the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Guan, Pingping; Doytchinova, Irini A; Zygouri, Christianna; Flower, Darren R

    2004-01-01

    With its implications for vaccine discovery, the accurate prediction of T cell epitopes is one of the key aspirations of computational vaccinology. We have developed a robust multivariate statistical method, based on partial least squares, for the quantitative prediction of peptide binding to major histocompatibility complexes (MHC), the principal checkpoint on the antigen presentation pathway. As a service to the immunobiology community, we have made a Perl implementation of the method available via a World Wide Web server. We call this server MHCPred. Access to the server is freely available from the URL: http://www.jenner.ac.uk/MHCPred. We have exemplified our method with a model for peptides binding to the common human MHC molecule HLA-B*3501. PMID:14629978

  20. The designer leptin antagonist peptide Allo-aca compensates for short serum half-life with very tight binding to the receptor.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Laszlo; Vetter, Stefan W; Koladia, Mohit; Knappe, Daniel; Schmidt, Rico; Ostorhazi, Eszter; Kovalszky, Ilona; Bionda, Nina; Cudic, Predrag; Surmacz, Eva; Wade, John D; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2014-04-01

    The leptin receptor antagonist peptide Allo-aca exhibits picomolar activities in various cellular systems and sub-mg/kg subcutaneous efficacies in animal models making it a prime drug candidate and target validation tool. Here we identified the biochemical basis for its remarkable in vivo activity. Allo-aca decomposed within 30 min in pooled human serum and was undetectable beyond the same time period from mouse plasma during pharmacokinetic measurements. The C max of 8.9 μg/mL at 5 min corresponds to approximately 22% injected peptide present in the circulation. The half-life was extended to over 2 h in bovine vitreous fluid and 10 h in human tears suggesting potential efficacy in ophthalmic diseases. The peptide retained picomolar anti-proliferation activity against a chronic myeloid leukemia cell line; addition of a C-terminal biotin label increased the IC50 value by approximately 200-fold. In surface plasmon resonance assays with the biotin-labeled peptide immobilized to a NeutrAvidin-coated chip, Allo-aca exhibited exceptionally tight binding to the binding domain of the human leptin receptor with ka = 5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and kdiss = 1.5 × 10(-4) s(-1) values. Peptides excel in terms of high activity and selectivity to their targets, and may activate or inactivate receptor functions considerably longer than molecular turnovers that take place in experimental animals.

  1. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A; Wepasnick, Kevin A; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  2. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A.; Wepasnick, Kevin A.; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  3. Specific DNA binding to a major histocompatibility complex enhancer sequence by a synthetic 57-residue double zinc finger peptide from a human enhancer binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Omichinski, J G; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M

    1991-04-15

    Two 57-residue peptides containing one pair of "zinc fingers" from a human enhancer binding protein were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. One peptide (MBP-DF) contained the native sequence, while the second peptide ([Abu11]MBP-DF) has an alpha-aminobutyric acid residue substituted for a nonconserved cysteine residue at position 11. The peptides were characterized by several chemical and physical methods, and their DNA binding properties were evaluated using gel retardation experiments. Spectroscopic studies demonstrated that addition of metal ions such as zinc and cobalt resulted in specific conformational changes in both peptides, indicating that cysteine-11 does not appear to be involved in metal chelation. One-dimensional 1H NMR studies indicate that a stable folded structure is formed upon addition of zinc, and the chemical shift pattern is consistent with that previously observed for one constituent single finger (Omichinski, J., Clore, G. M., Appella, E., Sakaguchi, K., and Gronenborn, A. M. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 9324-9334). Gel retardation experiments demonstrate that the peptides are capable of interacting with a 15-mer oligonucleotide comprising a portion of the major histocompatibility complex enhancer sequence and that the interaction is zinc-dependent. The dissociation constant for the [Abu11]MBP-DF peptide is 1.4 x 10(-7) M with maximal binding occurring at a zinc-to-peptide ratio of 2 to 1. The binding specificity observed with respect to related enhancer sequences exhibits the same relative order as noted previously for the whole protein. Studies with point mutants of the major histocompatibility complex enhancer binding sequence indicate that the last GC base pair in a four-guanine stretch plays a pivotal role in the interaction between the peptide and DNA. PMID:2016331

  4. Enhanced Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metal Ions by Bacterial Cells Due to Surface Display of Short Metal Binding Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kotrba, Pavel; Dolečková, Lucie; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Ruml, Tomas

    1999-01-01

    Metal binding peptides of sequences Gly-His-His-Pro-His-Gly (named HP) and Gly-Cys-Gly-Cys-Pro-Cys-Gly-Cys-Gly (named CP) were genetically engineered into LamB protein and expressed in Escherichia coli. The Cd2+-to-HP and Cd2+-to-CP stoichiometries of peptides were 1:1 and 3:1, respectively. Hybrid LamB proteins were found to be properly folded in the outer membrane of E. coli. Isolated cell envelopes of E. coli bearing newly added metal binding peptides showed an up to 1.8-fold increase in Cd2+ binding capacity. The bioaccumulation of Cd2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ by E. coli was evaluated. Surface display of CP multiplied the ability of E. coli to bind Cd2+ from growth medium fourfold. Display of HP peptide did not contribute to an increase in the accumulation of Cu2+ and Zn2+. However, Cu2+ ceased contribution of HP for Cd2+ accumulation, probably due to the strong binding of Cu2+ to HP. Thus, considering the cooperation of cell structures with inserted peptides, the relative affinities of metal binding peptide and, for example, the cell wall to metal ion should be taken into account in the rational design of peptide sequences possessing specificity for a particular metal. PMID:10049868

  5. sNebula, a network-based algorithm to predict binding between human leukocyte antigens and peptides

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Mendrick, Donna L.; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides is important to understand the functioning of the immune system. Since it is time-consuming and costly to measure the binding between large numbers of HLAs and peptides, computational methods including machine learning models and network approaches have been developed to predict HLA-peptide binding. However, there are several limitations for the existing methods. We developed a network-based algorithm called sNebula to address these limitations. We curated qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data and demonstrated the prediction performance of sNebula on this dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation and five-fold cross-validations. This algorithm can predict not only peptides of different lengths and different types of HLAs, but also the peptides or HLAs that have no existing binding data. We believe sNebula is an effective method to predict HLA-peptide binding and thus improve our understanding of the immune system. PMID:27558848

  6. sNebula, a network-based algorithm to predict binding between human leukocyte antigens and peptides.

    PubMed

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Mendrick, Donna L; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides is important to understand the functioning of the immune system. Since it is time-consuming and costly to measure the binding between large numbers of HLAs and peptides, computational methods including machine learning models and network approaches have been developed to predict HLA-peptide binding. However, there are several limitations for the existing methods. We developed a network-based algorithm called sNebula to address these limitations. We curated qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data and demonstrated the prediction performance of sNebula on this dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation and five-fold cross-validations. This algorithm can predict not only peptides of different lengths and different types of HLAs, but also the peptides or HLAs that have no existing binding data. We believe sNebula is an effective method to predict HLA-peptide binding and thus improve our understanding of the immune system. PMID:27558848

  7. HLA-F complex without peptide binds to MHC class I protein in the open conformer form1

    PubMed Central

    Goodridge, Jodie P.; Burian, Aura; Lee, Ni; Geraghty, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    HLA-F has very low levels of polymorphism in humans and is highly conserved among primates suggesting a conserved function in the immune response. In this study we probed the structure of HLA-F on the surface of B-LCLs and activated lymphocytes by direct measurement of peptide binding of native HLA-F. Our findings suggested that HLA-F is expressed independently of bound peptide, at least with respect to peptide complexity profiles similar to those of either HLA-E or classical MHC-I. As a further probe of native HLA-F structure, we used a number of complementary approaches to explore the interactions of HLA-F with other molecules, at the cell surface, intracellularly, and in direct physical biochemical measurements. This analysis demonstrated that HLA-F surface expression was coincident with MHC-I heavy chain (HC) expression and was down regulated upon perturbation of MHC-I HC structure. It was further possible to directly demonstrate that MHC-I would only interact with HLA-F when in the form of open conformer free of peptide and not as trimeric complex. This interaction was directly observed by co-immunoprecipitation and by surface plasmon resonance and indirectly on the surface of cells through coincident tetramer and MHC-I HC co-localization. Together these data suggest that HLA-F is expressed independent of peptide and that a physical interaction specific to MHC-I HC plays a role in the function of MHC-I HC expression in activated lymphocytes. PMID:20483783

  8. Differential changes in atrial natriuretic peptide and vasopressin receptor bindings in kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, T.; Mitsui, T.; Yamamoto, I.; Katayama, E.; Ota, Z.; Ogawa, N.

    1987-01-19

    To elucidate the role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and vasopressin (VP) in a hypertensive state, ANP and VP receptor bindings in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) kidney were analyzed using the radiolabeled receptor assay (RRA) technique. Systolic blood pressure of SHR aged 12 weeks was statistically higher than that of age-matched Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of (/sup 125/I)-ANP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically lower than that of WKY rats, but dissociation constant (Kd) was not significantly different. On the other hand, Bmax of (/sup 3/H)-VP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically higher than that of WKY rats, but Kd were similar. Since the physiological action of ANP is natriuresis and VP is the most important antidiuretic hormone in mammalia, these opposite changes of ANP and VP receptor bindings in SHR kidney suggested that these peptides may play an important role in the pathophysiology of the hypertensive state, although it has not been confirmed as yet.

  9. The Structure of the Amyloid-[beta] Peptide High-Affinity Copper II Binding Site in Alzheimer Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Streltsov, Victor A.; Titmuss, Stephen J.; Epa, V. Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J.; Masters, Colin L.; Varghese, Joseph N.

    2008-11-03

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of A{beta}-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in A{beta} may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of A{beta} peptides complexed with Cu{sup 2+} in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu{sup 2+} binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to A{beta} can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD.

  10. Chloroplast Hsp93 Directly Binds to Transit Peptides at an Early Stage of the Preprotein Import Process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Kai; Chan, Po-Ting; Su, Pai-Hsiang; Chen, Lih-Jen; Li, Hsou-min

    2016-02-01

    Three stromal chaperone ATPases, cpHsc70, Hsp90C, and Hsp93, are present in the chloroplast translocon, but none has been shown to directly bind preproteins in vivo during import, so it remains unclear whether any function as a preprotein-translocating motor and whether they have different functions during the import process. Here, using protein crosslinking followed by ionic detergent solubilization, we show that Hsp93 directly binds to the transit peptides of various preproteins undergoing active import into chloroplasts. Hsp93 also binds to the mature region of a preprotein. A time course study of import, followed by coimmunoprecipitation experiments, confirmed that Hsp93 is present in the same complexes as preproteins at an early stage when preproteins are being processed to the mature size. In contrast, cpHsc70 is present in the same complexes as preproteins at both the early stage and a later stage after the transit peptide has been removed, suggesting that cpHsc70, but not Hsp93, is important in translocating processed mature proteins across the envelope. PMID:26676256

  11. OMP Peptides Activate the DegS Stress-Sensor Protease by a Relief of Inhibition Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Jungsan; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.; MIT

    2010-03-19

    In the E. coli periplasm, C-terminal peptides of misfolded outer-membrane porins (OMPs) bind to the PDZ domains of the trimeric DegS protease, triggering cleavage of a transmembrane regulator and transcriptional activation of stress genes. We show that an active-site DegS mutation partially bypasses the requirement for peptide activation and acts synergistically with mutations that disrupt contacts between the protease and PDZ domains. Biochemical results support an allosteric model, in which these mutations, active-site modification, and peptide/substrate binding act in concert to stabilize proteolytically active DegS. Cocrystal structures of DegS in complex with different OMP peptides reveal activation of the protease domain with varied conformations of the PDZ domain and without specific contacts from the bound OMP peptide. Taken together, these results indicate that the binding of OMP peptides activates proteolysis principally by relieving inhibitory contacts between the PDZ domain and the protease domain of DegS.

  12. Membrane-active peptides from marine organisms--antimicrobials, cell-penetrating peptides and peptide toxins: applications and prospects.

    PubMed

    Ponnappan, Nisha; Budagavi, Deepthi Poornima; Yadav, Bhoopesh Kumar; Chugh, Archana

    2015-03-01

    Marine organisms are known to be a rich and unique source of bioactive compounds as they are exposed to extreme conditions in the oceans. The present study is an attempt to briefly describe some of the important membrane-active peptides (MAPs) such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and peptide toxins from marine organisms. Since both AMPs and CPPs play a role in membrane perturbation and exhibit interchangeable role, they can speculatively fall under the broad umbrella of MAPs. The study focuses on the structural and functional characteristics of different classes of marine MAPs. Further, AMPs are considered as a potential remedy to antibiotic resistance acquired by several pathogens. Peptides from marine organisms show novel post-translational modifications such as cysteine knots, halogenation and histidino-alanine bridge that enable these peptides to withstand harsh marine environmental conditions. These unusual modifications of AMPs from marine organisms are expected to increase their half-life in living systems, contributing to their increased bioavailability and stability when administered as drug in in vivo systems. Apart from AMPs, marine toxins with membrane-perturbing properties could be essentially investigated for their cytotoxic effect on various pathogens and their cell-penetrating activity across various mammalian cells. The current review will help in identifying the MAPs from marine organisms with crucial post-translational modifications that can be used as template for designing novel therapeutic agents and drug-delivery vehicles for treatment of human diseases.

  13. Structure and Activity of Human Mitochondrial Peptide Deformylase, a Novel Cancer Target

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar-Alvarez, Sindy; Goldgur, Yehuda; Yang, Guangli; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Li, Yueming; Scheinberg, David A.

    2009-07-21

    Peptide deformylase proteins (PDFs) participate in the N-terminal methionine excision pathway of newly synthesized peptides. We show that the human PDF (HsPDF) can deformylate its putative substrates derived from mitochondrial DNA-encoded proteins. The first structural model of a mammalian PDF (1.7 A), HsPDF, shows a dimer with conserved topology of the catalytic residues and fold as non-mammalian PDFs. The HsPDF C-terminus topology and the presence of a helical loop (H2 and H3), however, shape a characteristic active site entrance. The structure of HsPDF bound to the peptidomimetic inhibitor actinonin (1.7 A) identified the substrate-binding site. A defined S1' pocket, but no S2' or S3' substrate-binding pockets, exists. A conservation of PDF-actinonin interaction across PDFs was observed. Despite the lack of true S2' and S3' binding pockets, confirmed through peptide binding modeling, enzyme kinetics suggest a combined contribution from P2'and P3' positions of a formylated peptide substrate to turnover.

  14. Biomaterials functionalization using a novel peptide that selectively binds to a conducting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghvi, Archit B.; Miller, Kiley P.-H.; Belcher, Angela M.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2005-06-01

    The goal in biomaterial surface modification is to retain a material's bulk properties while modifying only its surface to possess desired recognition and specificity. Here we develop a unique strategy for surface functionalization of an electrically conductive polymer, chlorine-doped polypyrrole (PPyCl), which has been widely researched for various electronic and biomedical applications. An M13 bacteriophage library was used to screen 109 different 12-mer peptide inserts against PPyCl. A binding phage (ϕT59) was isolated, and its binding stability and specificity to PPyCl was assessed using fluorescence microscopy and titer count analysis. The relative binding strength and mechanism of the corresponding 12-mer peptide and its variants was studied using atomic force microscopy and fluorescamine assays. Further, the T59 peptide was joined to a cell adhesive sequence and used to promote cell attachment on PPyCl. This strategy can be extended to immobilize a variety of molecules to PPyCl for numerous applications. In addition, phage display can be applied to other polymers to develop bioactive materials without altering their bulk properties.

  15. Binding of leachable components of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and peptide on modified SPR chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szaloki, M.; Vitalyos, G.; Harfalvi, J.; Hegedus, Cs

    2013-12-01

    Many types of polymers are often used in dentistry, which may cause allergic reaction, mainly methyl methacrylate allergy due to the leachable, degradable components of polymerized dental products. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between the leachable components of PMMA and peptides by Fourier-transform Surface Plasmon Resonance (FT SPR). In our previous work binding of oligopeptides (Ph.D.-7 and Ph.D.-12 Peptide Library Kit) was investigated to PMMA surface by phage display technique. It was found that oligopeptides bounded specifically to PMMA surface. The most common amino acids were leucine and proline inside the amino acids sequences of DNA of phages. The binding of haptens, as formaldehyde and methacrylic acid, to frequent amino acids was to investigate on the modified gold SPR chip. Self assembled monolayer (SAM) modified the surface of gold chip and ensured the specific binding between the haptens and amino acids. It was found that amino acids bounded to modified SPR gold and the haptens bounded to amino acids by creating multilayer on the chip surface. By the application of phage display and SPR modern bioanalytical methods the interaction between allergens and peptides can be investigated.

  16. Complementary DNA display selection of high-affinity peptides binding the vacuolating toxin (VacA) of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Yumiko; Matsuno, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Wada, Akihiro; Kitamura, Koichiro; Takei, Osamu; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Mizukami, Tamio; Hasegawa, Makoto

    2015-09-01

    Artificial peptides designed for molecular recognition of a bacterial toxin have been developed. Vacuolating cytotoxin A protein (VacA) is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative microaerophilic bacterium inhabiting the upper gastrointestinal tract, particularly the stomach. This study attempted to identify specific peptide sequences with high affinity for VacA using systematic directed evolution in vitro, a cDNA display method. A surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to examine binding of peptides with VacA identified a peptide (GRVNQRL) with high affinity. Cyclization of the peptide by attaching cysteine residues to both termini improved its binding affinity to VacA, with a dissociation constant (Kd ) of 58 nm. This study describes a new strategy for the development of artificial functional peptides, which are promising materials in biochemical analyses and medical applications.

  17. Chlorotoxin, a scorpion-derived peptide, specifically binds to gliomas and tumors of neuroectodermal origin.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Susan A; O'Neal, Jeffrey; Sontheimer, Harald

    2002-08-01

    Highly migratory neuroectodermal cells share a common embryonic origin with cells of the central nervous system (CNS). They include enteric, parasympathetic, sympathoadrenal, and sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells, melanocytes, endocrine cells, and cells forming connective tissue of the face and neck. Because of their common embryologic origin, these cells and the tumors that derive from them can share genetic and antigenic phenotypes with gliomas, tumors derived from CNS glia. We recently discovered that chlorotoxin (ClTx), a 4-kD peptide purified from Leiurus quinquestriatus scorpion, is a highly specific marker for glioma cells in biopsy tissues (Soroceanu et al. Cancer Res 58:4871-4879, 1998) that can target tumors in animal models. We report on the specificity of ClTx as a marker for tumors of neuroectodermal origin that include peripheral neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) and gliomas. Specifically, we histochemically stained frozen and paraffin tissue sections of human biopsy tissues from 262 patients with a synthetically manufactured and biologically active ClTx bearing an N-terminal biotin. The vast majority (74 of 79) of primary human brain tumors investigated showed abundant binding of ClTx with greater than 90% ClTx-positive cells in each section. By comparison, 32 biopsies of uninvolved brain used for comparison were largely ClTx-negative, with only a few isolated reactive astrocytes showing some ClTx binding. However, as with gliomas, the vast majority of PNETs examined showed specific ClTx binding (31 of 34). These include medulloblastomas (4 of 4), neuroblastomas (6 of 7), ganglioneuromas (4 of 4), melanomas (7 of 7), adrenal pheochromocytomas (5 of 6), primitive PNET (1), small cell lung carcinoma (2 of 3), and Ewing's sarcoma (2 of 2). Under identical staining conditions, normal tissues from brain, skin, kidney, and lung were consistently negative for ClTx. These results suggest that chlorotoxin is a reliable and specific

  18. Peptides derived from central turn motifs within integrin αIIb and αV cytoplasmic tails inhibit integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinlei; Liu, Yongqing; Haas, Thomas A

    2014-12-01

    We previously found that peptides derived from the full length of integrin αIIb and αV cytoplasmic tails inhibited their parent integrin activation, respectively. Here we showed that the cell-permeable peptides corresponding to the conserved central turn motif within αIIb and αV cytoplasmic tails, myr-KRNRPPLEED (αIIb peptide) and myr-KRVRPPQEEQ (αV peptide), similarly inhibited both αIIb and αV integrin activation. Pre-treatment with αIIb or αV peptides inhibited Mn(2+)-activated αIIbβ3 binding to soluble fibrinogen as well as the binding of αIIbβ3-expressing Chinese Hamster Ovary cells to immobilized fibrinogen. Our turn peptides also inhibited adhesion of two breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-435 and MCF7) to αV ligand vitronectin. These results suggest that αIIb and αV peptides share a same mechanism in regulating integrin function. Using αIIb peptide as a model, we found that replacement of RPP with AAA significantly attenuated the inhibitory activity of αIIb peptide. Furthermore, we found that αIIb peptide specifically bound to β-tubulin in cells. Our work suggests that the central motif of α tails is an anchoring point for cytoskeletons during integrin activation and integrin-mediated cell adhesion, and its function depends on the turn structure at RPP. However, post-treatment of peptides derived from the full-length tail or from the turn motif did not reverse αIIb and αV integrin activation.

  19. Review: Production and functionality of active peptides from milk.

    PubMed

    Muro Urista, C; Álvarez Fernández, R; Riera Rodriguez, F; Arana Cuenca, A; Téllez Jurado, A

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, research on the production of active peptides obtained from milk and their potential functionality has grown, to a great extent. Bioactive peptides have been defined as specific protein fragments that have a positive impact on body functions or conditions, and they may ultimately have an influence on health. Individual proteins of casein or milk-derived products such as cheese and yogurt have been used as a protein source to study the isolation and activity of peptides with several applications. Currently, the milk whey waste obtained in the production of cheese also represents a protein source from which active peptides could be isolated with potential industrial applications. The active properties of milk peptides and the results found with regard to their physiological effects have led to the classification of peptides as belonging to the group of ingredients of protein nature, appropriate for use in functional foods or pharmaceutical formulations. In this study, the main peptides obtained from milk protein and the past research studies about its production and biological activities will be explained. Second, an analysis will be made on the methods to determinate the biological activities, the separation of bioactive peptides and its structure identification. All of these form the base required to obtain synthetic peptides. Finally, we explain the experimental animal and human trials done in the past years. Nevertheless, more research is required on the design and implementation of equipment for the industrial production and separation of peptides. In addition, different authors suggest that more emphasis should therefore be given to preclinical studies, proving that results are consistent and that effects are demonstrated repeatedly by several research human groups.

  20. G-Protein binding domains of the angiotensin II AT1A receptors mapped with synthetic peptides selected from the receptor sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Kai, H; Alexander, R W; Ushio-Fukai, M; Lyons, P R; Akers, M; Griendling, K K

    1998-01-01

    The vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1AR) is a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily. We mapped the G-protein binding domains of the AT1AR using synthetic peptides selected from the receptor sequence, which interfere with AT1AR-G-protein coupling. Membrane GTPase activity was used as a measure of the functional coupling in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Peptides corresponding to the N-terminal region of the second intracellular loop (residues 125-137), the N-terminal region of the third intracellular loop (217-227) and the juxtamembranous region of the C-terminal tail (304-316) inhibited angiotensin II-induced GTPase activation by 30%, 30%, and 70%, respectively. The latter two domains (217-227 and 304-316) are predicted to form amphiphilic alpha-helices. Only the peptide representing residues 217-227 stimulated basal activity (45%). No synthetic peptide had a significant effect on either the number or the affinity of the AT1AR binding. These observations indicate that domains of the second and third regions and the cytoplasmic tail of the AT1AR interact with G-proteins, and that multiple contacts with these receptor domains may be important for binding and activation of the G-proteins. PMID:9620883

  1. Cell surface-expressed moesin-like receptor regulates T cell interactions with tissue components and binds an adhesion-modulating IL-2 peptide generated by elastase.

    PubMed

    Ariel, A; Hershkoviz, R; Altbaum-Weiss, I; Ganor, S; Lider, O

    2001-03-01

    The adhesion of leukocytes to the extracellular matrix (ECM) depends on their responses to variations in the chemotactic signals in their milieu, as well as on the functioning of cytoskeletal and context-specific receptors. Ezrin, radixin, and moesin constitute a family of proteins that link the plasma membrane to the actin cytoskeleton. The surface expression of moesin on T cells and its role in cell adhesion has not been fully elucidated. Recently, we found that IL-2 peptides generated by elastase modified the adhesion of activated T cells to ECM ligands. Here, we further examined the adhesion regulatory effects of EFLNRWIT, one of the IL-2 peptides, as well as the existence and putative function of its receptor on T cells. We found that when presented to T cells in the absence of another activator, the EFLNRWIT peptide induced cell adhesion to vessel wall and ECM components. Binding of a radiolabeled peptide to T cells, precipitation with the immobilized peptide, and amino acid sequencing of the precipitated protein revealed that EFLNRWIT exerts its function via a cell surface-expressed moesin-like moiety, whose constitutive expression on T cells was increased after activation. This notion was further supported by our findings that: 1) anti-moesin mAb inhibited the binding of T cells to the immobilized EFLNRWIT peptide, 2) immobilized recombinant moesin bound the IL-2 peptide, and 3) soluble moesin inhibited the EFLNRWIT-induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin. Interestingly, moesin appears to be generally involved in T cell responses to adhesion-regulating signals. Thus, the IL-2 peptide EFLNRWIT appears to exert its modulating capacities via an adhesion-regulating moesin-like receptor. PMID:11207255

  2. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Emily B.; Williams, Angela; Heidel, Eric; Macy, Sallie; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Polybasic peptide p5 binds human light chain amyloid extracts. •The binding of p5 with amyloid involves both glycosaminoglycans and fibrils. •Heparinase treatment led to a correlation between p5 binding and fibril content. •p5 binding to AL amyloid requires electrostatic interactions. -- Abstract: In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as

  3. Oligomerization of Peptides LVEALYL and RGFFYT and Their Binding Affinity to Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Hsin-Lin; Ngo, Son Tung; Chen, Chun-Jung; Hu, Chin-Kun; Li, Mai Suan

    2013-01-01

    Recently it has been proposed a model for fibrils of human insulin in which the fibril growth proceeds via stacking LVEALYL (fragment 11–17 from chain B of insulin) into pairs of tightly interdigitated -sheets. The experiments have also shown that LVEALYL has high propensity to self-assembly and binding to insulin. This necessitates study of oligomerization of LVEALYL and its binding affinity to full-length insulin. Using the all-atom simulations with Gromos96 43a1 force field and explicit water it is shown that LVEALYL can aggregate. Theoretical estimation of the binding free energy of LVEALYL to insulin by the molecular mechanic Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method reveals its strong binding affinity to chain B, implying that, in agreement with the experiments, LVEALYL can affect insulin aggregation via binding mechanism. We predict that, similar to LVEALYL, peptide RGFFYT (fragment B22-27) can self-assemble and bind to insulin modulating its fibril growth process. The binding affinity of RGFFYT is shown to be comparable with that of LVEALYL. PMID:23805182

  4. Zinc-induced interaction of the metal-binding domain of amyloid-β peptide with DNA.

    PubMed

    Khmeleva, Svetlana A; Mezentsev, Yuri V; Kozin, Sergey A; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Ivanov, Alexis S; Bodoev, Nikolay V; Makarov, Alexander A; Radko, Sergey P

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of the 16-mer synthetic peptide (Aβ16), which represents the metal-binding domain of the amyloid-β with DNA, was studied employing the surface plasmon resonance technique. It has been shown that Aβ16 binds to the duplex DNA in the presence of zinc ions and thus the metal-binding domain can serve as a zinc-dependent DNA-binding site of the amyloid-β. The interaction of Aβ16 with DNA most probably depends on oligomerization of the peptide and is dominated by interaction with phosphates of the DNA backbone.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of cationic peptides in endodontic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Winfred, Sofi Beaula; Meiyazagan, Gowri; Panda, Jiban J.; Nagendrababu, Venkateshbabu; Deivanayagam, Kandaswamy; Chauhan, Virander S.; Venkatraman, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial and biofilm inhibition activity of synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) against microbes such as Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans which are involved in endodontic infections. Materials and Methods: Agar diffusion test was done to determine the activity of peptides. The morphological changes in E. faecalis and reduction in biofilm formation after treatment with peptides were observed using scanning electron microscope. The efficacy of peptides using an ex vivo dentinal model was determined by polymerase chain reaction and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Platelet aggregation was done to determine the biocompatibility of peptides. Results: Among 11 peptides, two of the amphipathic cationic peptides were found to be highly active against E. faecalis, S. aureus, C. albicans. Efficacy results using dentinal tubule model showed significant reduction in microbial load at 400 μm depth. The peptides were also biocompatible. Conclusion: These results suggest that synthetic AMPs have the potential to be developed as antibacterial agents against microorganisms involved in dental infections and thus could prevent the spread and persistence of endodontic infections improving treatment outcomes and teeth preservation. PMID:24966779

  6. RE-EXAMINATION OF CD91 FUNCTION IN GRP94 (gp96) SURFACE BINDING, UPTAKE AND PEPTIDE CROSS-PRESENTATION1

    PubMed Central

    Jockheck-Clark, Angela R.; Bowers, Edith V.; Totonchy, Mariam B.; Neubauer, Julie; Pizzo, Salvatore V.; Nicchitta, Christopher V.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular GRP94 (gp96) can initiate both innate and adaptive immune responses through interactions with antigen presenting cell surface receptors. Following the identification of CD91 as a receptor functioning in the cross-presentation of GRP94-associated peptides, scavenger receptors SR-A and SREC-I were demonstrated to function in GRP94 cell surface binding and endocytosis, lending controversy to the assignment of CD91 as the unique GRP94 endocytic receptor. To assess CD91 function in GRP94 surface binding and endocytosis, these parameters were examined in murine embyronic fibroblast (MEF) cell lines whose expression of CD91 was either reduced via RNAi or eliminated by genetic disruption of the CD91 locus. Reduction or loss of CD91 expression abrogated the binding and uptake of the CD91 ligand receptor-associated protein (RAP); surface binding and uptake of an N-terminal domain of GRP94 (GRP94.NTD) was unaffected. GRP94.NTD surface binding was markedly suppressed following treatment of MEF cell lines with heparin, the sulfation inhibitor sodium chlorate, or heparinase II, demonstrating that heparin sulfate proteoglycans can function in GRP94.NTD surface binding. The role of CD91 in the cross-presentaton of GRP94-associated peptides was examined in the DC2.4 dendritic cell line. In DC2.4 cells, which express CD91, GRP94.NTD-peptide cross-presentation was insensitive to RAP or activated α2-macroglobulin and occurred primarily via a fluid phase uptake pathway. In summary, these data clarify conflicting data on CD91 function in GRP94 surface binding, endocytosis and peptide cross-presentation and identify HSPGs as novel GRP94 cell surface binding sites. PMID:21048103

  7. Structural and computational analysis of peptide recognition mechanism of class-C type penicillin binding protein, alkaline D-peptidase from Bacillus cereus DF4-B.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shogo; Okazaki, Seiji; Ishitsubo, Erika; Kawahara, Nobuhiro; Komeda, Hidenobu; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline D-peptidase from Bacillus cereus DF4-B, called ADP, is a D-stereospecific endopeptidase reacting with oligopeptides containing D-phenylalanine (D-Phe) at N-terminal penultimate residue. ADP has attracted increasing attention because it is useful as a catalyst for synthesis of D-Phe oligopeptides or, with the help of substrate mimetics, L-amino acid peptides and proteins. Structure and functional analysis of ADP is expected to elucidate molecular mechanism of ADP. In this study, the crystal structure of ADP (apo) form was determined at 2.1 Å resolution. The fold of ADP is similar to that of the class C penicillin-binding proteins of type-AmpH. Docking simulations and fragment molecular orbital analyses of two peptides, (D-Phe)4 and (D-Phe)2-(L-Phe)2, with the putative substrate binding sites of ADP indicated that the P1 residue of the peptide interacts with hydrophobic residues at the S1 site of ADP. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation of ADP for 50 nsec suggested that the ADP forms large cavity at the active site. Formation of the cavity suggested that the ADP has open state in the solution. For the ADP, having the open state is convenient to bind the peptides having bulky side chain, such as (D-Phe)4. Taken together, we predicted peptide recognition mechanism of ADP. PMID:26370172

  8. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to hepatitis C virus-derived peptides containing the HLA A2.1 binding motif.

    PubMed Central

    Cerny, A; McHutchison, J G; Pasquinelli, C; Brown, M E; Brothers, M A; Grabscheid, B; Fowler, P; Houghton, M; Chisari, F V

    1995-01-01

    The HLA class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is a major defense mechanism in viral infections. It has been suggested that the CTL response may contribute to viral clearance and liver cell injury during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To test this hypothesis requires an understanding of the characteristics of HCV-specific cytotoxic effector cells and identification of the target antigens to which they respond. To begin this process we stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a group of HLA-A2 positive patients with chronic hepatitis C with a panel of 130 HCV-derived peptides containing the HLA-A2 binding motif. Effector cells were tested for their capacity to lyse HLA-A2-matched target cells that were either sensitized with peptide or infected with a vaccinia virus construct containing HCV sequences. Using this approach we have identified nine immunogenic peptides in HCV, three of which are derived from the putative core protein, three from the nonstructural (NS) 3 domain, two from NS4 and one from NS5. Selected responses were shown to be HLA-A2 restricted, mediated by CD8+ T cells and to recognize endogenously synthesized viral antigen. Unexpectedly, peptide-specific CTL responses could also be induced in sero-negative individuals, suggesting in vitro activation of naive CTL precursors. The precursor frequency of peptide-specific CTL was 10 to 100-fold higher in infected patients compared to uninfected controls, and the responses were greatly diminished by removal of CD45 RO+ (memory) T cells. Further quantitative studies are clearly required to establish whether a correlation exists between the HCV-specific CTL response and the clinical course of this disease. Definition of the molecular targets of the human CTL response to HCV creates this opportunity, and may also contribute to the development of a T cell-based HCV vaccine. PMID:7860734

  9. Peptide binding in OppA, the crystal structures of the periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein in the unliganded form and in complex with lysyllysine.

    PubMed

    Sleigh, S H; Tame, J R; Dodson, E J; Wilkinson, A J

    1997-08-12

    The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein, OppA, acts as the initial receptor for the uptake of peptides by the oligopeptide permease (Opp) in Gram-negative bacteria. Opp will handle peptides between two and five amino acid residues regardless of their sequence. The crystal structures of a series of OppA-peptide complexes have revealed an enclosed but versatile peptide binding pocket and have illustrated how tri- and tetrapeptide ligands are accommodated. Here, the crystal structures of (i) OppA complexed with a dipeptide (lysyllysine) and (ii) unliganded OppA have been solved using X-ray data extending to 1.8 and 2.4 A spacing, respectively. In the dipeptide complex, the alpha-amino group of the ligand is anchored through an ion pair interaction with Asp419, as observed in complexes with longer peptides. However, its alpha-carboxylate group forms water-mediated interactions with the guanidinium groups of Arg404 and Arg413 rather than the direct salt bridges to Arg413 and His371 observed in the tripeptide and tetrapeptide complexes, respectively. Isothermal titration calorimetric measurements of the binding of lysine-containing peptides of different lengths to OppA show that the dipeptide, KK, is bound with approximately 60-fold lower affinity than related tri- and tetrapeptides (KKK and KKKA, respectively). These data are discussed with reference to the calculated enthalpic and entropic contributions to ligand binding and the structures of the OppA peptide complexes. In the unliganded molecule, domain III has rotated as a rigid body through 26 degrees away from domains I and II, exposing the ligand binding site. The water structure in the binding cleft shows similarities to that in the various OppA-peptide complexes.

  10. Structural Basis for Receptor Activity-Modifying Protein-Dependent Selective Peptide Recognition by a G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Booe, Jason M.; Walker, Christopher S.; Barwell, James; Kuteyi, Gabriel; Simms, John; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A.; Warner, Margaret L.; Bill, Roslyn M.; Harris, Paul W.; Brimble, Margaret A.; Poyner, David R.; Hay, Debbie L.; Pioszak, Augen A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Association of receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP1-3) with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) enables selective recognition of the peptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) that have diverse functions in the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. How peptides selectively bind GPCR:RAMP complexes is unknown. We report crystal structures of CGRP analog-bound CLR:RAMP1 and AM-bound CLR:RAMP2 extracellular domain heterodimers at 2.5 and 1.8 Å resolutions, respectively. The peptides similarly occupy a shared binding site on CLR with conformations characterized by a β-turn structure near their C termini rather than the α-helical structure common to peptides that bind related GPCRs. The RAMPs augment the binding site with distinct contacts to the variable C-terminal peptide residues and elicit subtly different CLR conformations. The structures and accompanying pharmacology data reveal how a class of accessory membrane proteins modulate ligand binding of a GPCR and may inform drug development targeting CLR:RAMP complexes. PMID:25982113

  11. Peptides of the Constant Region of Antibodies Display Fungicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Polonelli, Luciano; Ciociola, Tecla; Magliani, Walter; Zanello, Pier Paolo; D'Adda, Tiziana; Galati, Serena; De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Gabrielli, Elena; Pericolini, Eva; Vecchiarelli, Anna; Arruda, Denise C.; Pinto, Marcia R.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Pertinhez, Thelma A.; Spisni, Alberto; Conti, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic peptides with sequences identical to fragments of the constant region of different classes (IgG, IgM, IgA) of antibodies (Fc-peptides) exerted a fungicidal activity in vitro against pathogenic yeasts, such as Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Malassezia furfur, including caspofungin and triazole resistant strains. Alanine-substituted derivatives of fungicidal Fc-peptides, tested to evaluate the critical role of each residue, displayed unaltered, increased or decreased candidacidal activity in vitro. An Fc-peptide, included in all human IgGs, displayed a therapeutic effect against experimental mucosal and systemic candidiasis in mouse models. It is intriguing to hypothesize that some Fc-peptides may influence the antifungal immune response and constitute the basis for devising new antifungal agents. PMID:22470523

  12. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Inhibits Spontaneous Contractile Activity of Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Lobov, G I; Pan'kova, M N

    2016-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide dose-dependently inhibited spontaneous phase and tonic activity of smooth muscle strips from the capsule of isolated bovine mesenteric lymph nodes. Pretreatment with L-NAME, diclofenac, and methylene blue had practically no effect on the peptide-induced relaxation responses. In contrast, glibenclamide significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of atrial natriuretic peptide. We suppose that the NO-dependent and cyclooxygenase signaling pathways are not involved in implementation of the inhibitory effects of atrial natriuretic peptide. ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels of the smooth muscle cell membrane are the last component in the signaling pathway leading to relaxation of smooth muscles of the lymph node capsule caused by atrial natriuretic peptide; activation of these channels leads to membrane hyperpolarization and smooth muscle relaxation. PMID:27383173

  13. Antioxidant activities of a peptide derived from chicken dark meat.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Yoko; Mizutani, Saki; Nomura, Sarika; Hara, Wakana; Matsui, Riko; Nagai, Kumiko; Murakami, Yuki; Washio, Nanami; Ikemoto, Narumi; Terashima, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    Antioxidant activities against hypochlorite ions and peroxyl radicals of a chicken dark meat hydrolysate digested with pepsin were examined with the myoglobin method based on the structure change of myoglobin due to redox reaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS). A peptide that showed strong antioxidant activity against the peroxyl radical was isolated from the hydrolysate using HPLC equipped with a hydrophobic-interacting column. The sequence of the first five amino acid residues of the peptide was determined as YASGR (Tyr-Ala-Ser-Gly-Arg), and this sequence matched with the amino acid residues 143-147 of chicken β-actin (GenBank: CAA25004.1). The synthetic peptide YASGR showed very high antioxidant activity against the peroxyl radical. Antioxidant activities of the free amino acids, confirmed that the tyrosine residue of this peptide was possibly responsible for antioxidant activity. PMID:27407214

  14. Structural Basis for Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein Binding to the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor and Design of Conformation-selective Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Gardella, Thomas J.; Xu, H. Eric

    2009-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related protein (PTHrP) are two related peptides that control calcium/phosphate homeostasis and bone development, respectively, through activation of the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PTH1R), a class B G protein-coupled receptor. Both peptides hold clinical interest for their capacities to stimulate bone formation. PTH and PTHrP display different selectivity for two distinct PTH1R conformations, but how their binding to the receptor differs is unclear. The high resolution crystal structure of PTHrP bound to the extracellular domain (ECD) of PTH1R reveals that PTHrP binds as an amphipathic {alpha}-helix to the same hydrophobic groove in the ECD as occupied by PTH, but in contrast to a straight, continuous PTH helix, the PTHrP helix is gently curved and C-terminally 'unwound.' The receptor accommodates the altered binding modes by shifting the side chain conformations of two residues within the binding groove: Leu-41 and Ile-115, the former acting as a rotamer toggle switch to accommodate PTH/PTHrP sequence divergence, and the latter adapting to the PTHrP curvature. Binding studies performed with PTH/PTHrP hybrid ligands having reciprocal exchanges of residues involved in different contacts confirmed functional consequences for the altered interactions and enabled the design of altered PTH and PTHrP peptides that adopt the ECD-binding mode of the opposite peptide. Hybrid peptides that bound the ECD poorly were selective for the G protein-coupled PTH1R conformation. These results establish a molecular model for better understanding of how two biologically distinct ligands can act through a single receptor and provide a template for designing better PTH/PTHrP therapeutics.

  15. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emily B; Williams, Angela; Heidel, Eric; Macy, Sallie; Kennel, Stephen J; Wall, Jonathan S

    2013-06-21

    In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as therapeutics for the treatment of amyloid diseases.

  16. Activation of epitope-specific memory cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses by synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Reali, E; Guerrini, R; Giori, B; Borghi, M; Marastoni, M; Tomatis, R; Traniello, S; Masucci, M G; Gavioli, R

    1996-08-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) recognize antigens as short peptides selected for presentation by their ability to bind to MHC class I molecules. Polyclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific memory CTL responses, reactivated from blood lymphocytes of HLA-A11-positive individuals by stimulation with the autologous EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL), are often dominated by reactivites directed to the peptide epitope IVTDFSVIK (IVT), corresponding to amino acids 416-424 of EBV nuclear antigen-4 (EBNA4). We now report the selective activation of IVT-specific CTL by stimulation of lymphocytes with the corresponding synthetic peptide. A more than 10-fold increase in frequency of CTL clones with this specificity (from 8% to 96%) was obtained when the peptide was presented by HLA-A11-transfected T2 cells (T2/A11). Titration of synthetic peptide in cytotoxic assay demonstrated that clones activated under these conditions are as efficient as clones activated by conventional LCL stimulations. Induction of memory CTL responses required low surface density of MHC: peptide complexes, since reactivation was achieved by stimulation with T2/A11 cells pulsed with concentrations of peptide that are suboptimal for induction of target cell lysis. This protocol of activation revealed the presence of IVT-specific CTL precursors in a donor that failed to mount an IVT-specific response upon stimulation with the autologous B95.8 virus-transformed LCL. The results suggest that stimulation with synthetic peptide epitopes can be efficiently used for induction of memory CTL responses, and may be particularly helpful for the selective expansion of subdominant CTL specificities.

  17. Affinity-based release of polymer-binding peptides from hydrogels with the target segments of peptides.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Takeshi; Fukuta, Hiroki; Date, Takaaki; Sawada, Toshiki

    2016-02-01

    Peptides with affinities for the target segments of polymer hydrogels were identified by biological screening using phage-displayed peptide libraries, and these peptides exhibited an affinity-based release capability from hydrogels. The results from cell culture assays demonstrated the sustained anticancer effects of the drug-conjugated peptides that were released from the hydrogels.

  18. Cholesterol-Enriched Domain Formation Induced by Viral-Encoded, Membrane-Active Amphipathic Peptide.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Joshua M; Gettel, Douglas L; Tabaei, Seyed R; Jackman, Joshua; Kim, Min Chul; Sasaki, Darryl Y; Groves, Jay T; Liedberg, Bo; Cho, Nam-Joon; Parikh, Atul N

    2016-01-01

    The α-helical (AH) domain of the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A, anchored at the cytoplasmic leaflet of the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a role in viral replication. However, the peptides derived from this domain also exhibit remarkably broad-spectrum virocidal activity, raising questions about their modes of membrane association. Here, using giant lipid vesicles, we show that the AH peptide discriminates between membrane compositions. In cholesterol-containing membranes, peptide binding induces microdomain formation. By contrast, cholesterol-depleted membranes undergo global softening at elevated peptide concentrations. Furthermore, in mixed populations, the presence of ∼100 nm vesicles of viral dimensions suppresses these peptide-induced perturbations in giant unilamellar vesicles, suggesting size-dependent membrane association. These synergistic composition- and size-dependent interactions explain, in part, how the AH domain might on the one hand segregate molecules needed for viral assembly and on the other hand furnish peptides that exhibit broad-spectrum virocidal activity.

  19. Molecular modeling of hair keratin/peptide complex: Using MM-PBSA calculations to describe experimental binding results.

    PubMed

    Azoia, Nuno G; Fernandes, Margarida M; Micaêlo, Nuno M; Soares, Cláudio M; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2012-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a keratin/peptide complex have been conducted to predict the binding affinity of four different peptides toward human hair. Free energy calculations on the peptides' interaction with the keratin model demonstrated that electrostatic interactions are believed to be the main driving force stabilizing the complex. The molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area methodology used for the free energy calculations demonstrated that the dielectric constant in the protein's interior plays a major role in the free energy calculations, and the only way to obtain accordance between the free energy calculations and the experimental binding results was to use the average dielectric constant.

  20. In Vitro Evolution of a Peptide with a Hematite Binding Motif That May Constitute a Natural Metal-Oxide Binding Archetype

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Brian H.; Lins, Roberto D.; Oestreicher, Zachery W.; Straatsma, T. P.; Hochella Jr., Michael F.; Shi, Liang; Lower, Steven

    2008-04-18

    Phage-display technology was used to evolve peptides that selectively bind to the metal-oxide hematite (Fe2O3) from a library of approximately 3 billion different polypeptides. The sequences of these peptides contained the highly conserved amino acid motif, Ser/Thr-hydrophobic/aromatic-Ser/Thr-Pro-Ser/Thr. To better understand the nature of the peptide-metal oxide binding demonstrated by these experiments, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out for Ser-Pro-Ser at a hematite surface. These simulations show that hydrogen bonding occurs between the two serine amino acids and the hydroxylated hematite surface and that the presence of proline between the hydroxide residues restricts the peptide flexibility, thereby inducing a structural-binding motif. A search of published sequence data revealed that the binding motif (Ser/Thr-Pro-Ser/Thr) is adjacent to the terminal heme-binding domain of both OmcA and MtrC, which are outer membrane cytochromes from the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The entire five amino acid consensus sequence (Ser/Thr-hydrophobic/aromatic-Ser/Thr-Pro-Ser/Thr) was also found as multiple copies in the primary sequences of metal-oxide binding proteins Sil1 and Sil2 from Thalassiosira pseudonana. We suggest that this motif constitutes a natural metal-oxide binding archetype that could be exploited in enzyme-based biofuel cell design and approaches to synthesize tailored metal-oxide nanostructures.

  1. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8positive T-cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presenta...

  2. Glycosaminoglycans differentially bind HARP and modulate its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Vacherot, F; Delbé, J; Heroult, M; Barritault, D; Fernig, D G; Courty, J

    1999-03-19

    Heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP) is a polypeptide belonging to a family of heparin binding growth/differentiation factors. The high affinity of HARP for heparin suggests that this secreted polypeptide should also bind to heparan sulfate proteoglycans derived from cell surface and extracellular matrix defined as extracellular compartments. Using Western blot analysis, we detected HARP bound to heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the extracellular compartments of MDA-MB 231 and MC 3T3-E1 as well as NIH3T3 cells overexpressing HARP protein. Heparitinase treatment of BEL cells inhibited HARP-induced cell proliferation, and the biological activity of HARP in this system was restored by the addition of heparin. We report that heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and to a lesser extent, chondroitin sulfate A, displaced HARP bound to the extracellular compartment. Binding analyses with a biosensor showed that HARP bound heparin with fast association and dissociation kinetics (kass = 1.6 x 10(6) M-1 s-1; kdiss = 0.02 s-1), yielding a Kd value of 13 nM; the interaction between HARP and dermatan sulfate was characterized by slower association kinetics (kass = 0.68 x 10(6) M-1 s-1) and a lower affinity (Kd = 51 nM). Exogenous heparin, heparan sulfate, and dermatan sulfate potentiated the growth-stimulatory activity of HARP, suggesting that corresponding proteoglycans could be involved in the regulation of the mitogenic activity of HARP.

  3. Testing the limits of rational design by engineering pH sensitivity into membrane active peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wiedman, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we sought to rationally design membrane active peptides that are triggered by low pH to form macromolecular-sized pores in lipid bilayers. Such peptides could have broad utility in biotechnology and in nanomedicine as cancer therapeutics or drug delivery vehicles that promote release of macromolecules from endosomes. Our approach to rational design was to combine the properties of a pH-independent peptide, MelP5, which forms large pores allowing passage of macromolecules, with the properties of two pH-dependent membrane active peptides, pHlip and GALA. We created two hybrid sequences, MelP5_Δ4 and MelP5_Δ6 by using the distribution of acidic residues on pHlip and GALA as a guide to insert acidic amino acids into the amphipathic helix of MelP5. We show that the new peptides bind to lipid bilayers and acquire secondary structure in a pH-dependent manner. The peptides also destabilize bilayers in a pH-dependent manner, such that lipid vesicles release the small molecules ANTS/DPX at low pH only. Thus, we were successful in designing pH-triggered pore-forming peptides. However, no macro-molecular release was observed under any conditions. Therefore, we abolished the unique macromolecular poration properties of MelP5 by introducing pH-sensitivity into its sequence. We conclude that the properties of pHlip, GALA and MelP5 are additive, but only partially so. We propose that this lack of additivity is a limitation in the rational design of novel membrane active peptides, and that high-throughput approaches to discovery will be critical for continued progress in the field. PMID:25572997

  4. T lymphocytes need less than 3 min to discriminate between peptide MHCs with similar TCR-binding parameters.

    PubMed

    Brodovitch, Alexandre; Shenderov, Eugene; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Bongrand, Pierre; Pierres, Anne; van der Merwe, Philip Anton

    2015-06-01

    T lymphocytes need to detect rare cognate foreign peptides among numerous foreign and self-peptides. This discrimination seems to be based on the kinetics of TCRs binding to their peptide-MHC (pMHC) ligands, but there is little direct information on the minimum time required for processing elementary signaling events and deciding to initiate activation. Here, we used interference reflection microscopy to study the early interaction between transfected human Jurkat T cells expressing the 1G4 TCR and surfaces coated with five different pMHC ligands of 1G4. The pMHC concentration required for inducing 50% maximal IFN-γ production by T cells, and 1G4-pMHC dissociation rates measured in soluble phase or on surface-bound molecules, displayed six- to sevenfold variation among pMHCs. When T cells were dropped onto pMHC-coated surfaces, rapid spreading occurred after a 2-min lag. The initial spreading rate measured during the first 45 s, and the contact area, were strongly dependent on the encountered TCR ligand. However, the lag duration did not significantly depend on encountered ligand. In addition, spreading appeared to be an all-or-none process, and the fraction of spreading cells was tightly correlated to the spreading rate and spreading area. Thus, T cells can discriminate between fairly similar TCR ligands within 2 min.

  5. On the mechanism of targeting of phage fusion protein-modified nanocarriers: only the binding peptide sequence matters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Kulkarni, Nikita; D'Souza, Gerard G M; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2011-10-01

    The integration of pharmaceutical nanocarriers with phage display techniques is emerging as a new paradigm for targeted cancer nanomedicines. We explored the direct use of landscape phage fusion proteins for the self-assembly of phage-derived binding peptides to liposomes for cancer cell targeting. The primary purpose of this study was to elucidate the targeting mechanism with a particular emphasis on the relative contributions of the two motifs that make up the landscape phage fusion protein (a binding peptide and the phage pVIII coat protein) to the targeting efficiency. Using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we confirmed the formation of phage-liposomes. Using FACS analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence photospectrometry, we found that liposomes modified with MCF-7-specific phage fusion proteins (MCF-7 binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, fused to the phage PVIII coat protein) provided a strong and specific association with target MCF-7 cancer cells but not with cocultured, nontarget cells including C166-GFP and NIH3T3. The substitution for the binding peptide fused to phage pVIII coat protein abolished the targeting specificity. The addition of free binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, competitively inhibited the interaction of MCF-7-specific phage-liposomes with target MCF-7 cells but showed no reduction of MCF-7-associated plain liposomes. The proteolysis of the binding peptide reduced MCF-7 cell-associated phage-liposomes in a proteinase K (PK) concentration-dependent manner with no effect on the binding of plain liposomes to MCF-7 cells. Overall, only the binding peptide motif was involved in the targeting specificity of phage-liposomes. The presence of phage pVIII coat protein did not interfere with the targeting efficiency. PMID:21675738

  6. On the mechanism of targeting of phage fusion protein-modified nanocarriers: only the binding peptide sequence matters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Kulkarni, Nikita; D’Souza, Gerard G.M.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of pharmaceutical nanocarriers with phage display techniques is emerging as a new paradigm for targeted cancer nanomedicines. We explored the direct use of landscape phage fusion proteins for the self-assembly of phage-derived binding peptides to liposomes for cancer cell targeting. The primary purpose of this study was to elucidate the targeting mechanism with a particular emphasis on the relative contributions of the two motifs that make up the landscape phage fusion protein (a binding peptide and the phage pVIII coat protein) to the targeting efficiency. Using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we confirmed the formation of phage-liposomes. Using FACS analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence photospectrometry, we found that liposomes modified with MCF-7-specific phage fusion proteins (MCF-7 binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, fused to the phage PVIII coat protein) provided a strong and specific association with target MCF-7 cancer cells but not with co-cultured, non-target cells including C166-GFP and NIH3T3. The substitution for the binding peptide fused to phage pVIII coat protein abolished the targeting specificity. The addition of free binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, competitively inhibited the interaction of MCF-7-specific phage-liposomes with target MCF-7 cells but showed no reduction of MCF-7-associated plain liposomes. The proteolysis of the binding peptide reduced MCF-7 cell-associated phage-liposomes in a proteinase K (PK) concentration-dependent manner with no effect on the binding of plain liposomes to MCF-7 cells. Overall, only the binding peptide motif was involved in the targeting specificity of phage-liposomes. The presence of phage pVIII coat protein did not interfere with the targeting efficiency. PMID:21675738

  7. T-cell hybridoma specific for a cytochrome c peptide: specific antigen binding and interleukin 2 production.

    PubMed Central

    Carel, S; Bron, C; Corradin, G

    1983-01-01

    T-cell hybridomas were obtained after fusion of BW 5147 thymoma and long-term cultured T cells specific for cytochrome c peptide 66-80 derivatized with a 2,4-dinitroaminophenyl (DNAP) group. The resulting hybridomas were selected for their capacity to specifically bind to soluble radiolabeled peptide antigen. One T-cell hybrid was positive for antigen binding. This hybrid T cell exhibits surface phenotypic markers of the parent antigen-specific T cells. The binding could be inhibited either by an excess of unlabeled homologous antigen or by cytochrome c peptide 11-25 derivatized with a 2-nitrophenylsulfenyl group. Several other peptide antigens tested failed to inhibit binding of the radioactive peptide. This suggests that a specific amino acid sequence, modified by a DNAP group, is the antigenic structure recognized by the putative T-cell receptor. In addition, direct interaction of DNAP-66-80 peptide with the hybridoma cell line induced production of the T-cell growth factor interleukin 2. Furthermore, supernatants derived from syngeneic macrophages pulsed with the relevant peptide also induced the antigen-specific hybridoma to produce interleukin 2. Images PMID:6192442

  8. Contribution of Amphipathicity and Hydrophobicity to the Antimicrobial Activity and Cytotoxicity of β-Hairpin Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have acquired extensive resistance mechanisms to protect themselves against antibiotic action. Today the bacterial membrane has become one of the “final frontiers” in the search for new compounds acting on novel targets to address the threat of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and XDR bacterial pathogens. β-Hairpin antimicrobial peptides are amphipathic, membrane-binding antibiotics that exhibit a broad range of activities against Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal pathogens. However, most members of the class also possess adverse cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity that preclude their development as candidate antimicrobials. We examined peptide hydrophobicity, amphipathicity, and structure to better dissect and understand the correlation between antimicrobial activity and toxicity, membrane binding, and membrane permeability. The hydrophobicity, pI, net charge at physiological pH, and amphipathic moment for the β-hairpin antimicrobial peptides tachyplesin-1, polyphemusin-1, protegrin-1, gomesin, arenicin-3, and thanatin were determined and correlated with key antimicrobial activity and toxicity data. These included antimicrobial activity against five key bacterial pathogens and two fungi, cytotoxicity against human cell lines, and hemolytic activity in human erythrocytes. Observed antimicrobial activity trends correlated with compound amphipathicity and, to a lesser extent, with overall hydrophobicity. Antimicrobial activity increased with amphipathicity, but unfortunately so did toxicity. Of note, tachyplesin-1 was found to be 8-fold more amphipathic than gomesin. These analyses identify tachyplesin-1 as a promising scaffold for rational design and synthetic optimization toward an antibiotic candidate. PMID:27331141

  9. Probing the Mec1ATR Checkpoint Activation Mechanism with Small Peptides.

    PubMed

    Wanrooij, Paulina H; Tannous, Elias; Kumar, Sandeep; Navadgi-Patil, Vasundhara M; Burgers, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Yeast Mec1, the ortholog of human ATR, is the apical protein kinase that initiates the cell cycle checkpoint in response to DNA damage and replication stress. The basal activity of Mec1 kinase is activated by cell cycle phase-specific activators. Three distinct activators stimulate Mec1 kinase using an intrinsically disordered domain of the protein. These are the Ddc1 subunit of the 9-1-1 checkpoint clamp (ortholog of human and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rad9), the replication initiator Dpb11 (ortholog of human TopBP1 and S. pombe Cut5), and the multifunctional nuclease/helicase Dna2. Here, we use small peptides to determine the requirements for Mec1 activation. For Ddc1, we identify two essential aromatic amino acids in a hydrophobic environment that when fused together are proficient activators. Using this increased insight, we have been able to identify homologous motifs in S. pombe Rad9 that can activate Mec1. Furthermore, we show that a 9-amino acid Dna2-based peptide is sufficient for Mec1 activation. Studies with mutant activators suggest that binding of an activator to Mec1 is a two-step process, the first step involving the obligatory binding of essential aromatic amino acids to Mec1, followed by an enhancement in binding energy through interactions with neighboring sequences.

  10. pH-dependence of the specific binding of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions to the amyloid-{beta} peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Ghalebani, Leila; Wahlstroem, Anna; Danielsson, Jens; Waermlaender, Sebastian K.T.S.; Graeslund, Astrid

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu(II) and Zn(II) display pH-dependent binding to the A{beta}(1-40) peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 7.4 both metal ions display residue-specific binding to the A{beta} peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 5.5 the binding specificity is lost for Zn(II). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential Cu(II) and Zn(II) binding may help explain metal-induced AD toxicity. -- Abstract: Metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) are accumulated in Alzheimer's disease amyloid plaques. The amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide involved in the disease interacts with these metal ions at neutral pH via ligands provided by the N-terminal histidines and the N-terminus. The present study uses high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to monitor the residue-specific interactions of Cu(II) and Zn(II) with {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled A{beta}(1-40) peptides at varying pH levels. At pH 7.4 both ions bind to the specific ligands, competing with one another. At pH 5.5 Cu(II) retains its specific histidine ligands, while Zn(II) seems to lack residue-specific interactions. The low pH mimics acidosis which is linked to inflammatory processes in vivo. The results suggest that the cell toxic effects of redox active Cu(II) binding to A{beta} may be reversed by the protective activity of non-redox active Zn(II) binding to the same major binding site under non-acidic conditions. Under acidic conditions, the protective effect of Zn(II) may be decreased or changed, since Zn(II) is less able to compete with Cu(II) for the specific binding site on the A{beta} peptide under these conditions.

  11. Structure-Based Design of Inhibitors of Protein–Protein Interactions: Mimicking Peptide Binding Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Pelay-Gimeno, Marta; Glas, Adrian; Koch, Oliver; Grossmann, Tom N

    2015-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions (PPIs) are involved at all levels of cellular organization, thus making the development of PPI inhibitors extremely valuable. The identification of selective inhibitors is challenging because of the shallow and extended nature of PPI interfaces. Inhibitors can be obtained by mimicking peptide binding epitopes in their bioactive conformation. For this purpose, several strategies have been evolved to enable a projection of side chain functionalities in analogy to peptide secondary structures, thereby yielding molecules that are generally referred to as peptidomimetics. Herein, we introduce a new classification of peptidomimetics (classes A–D) that enables a clear assignment of available approaches. Based on this classification, the Review summarizes strategies that have been applied for the structure-based design of PPI inhibitors through stabilizing or mimicking turns, β-sheets, and helices. PMID:26119925

  12. Novel Pharmacophores of Connexin43 Based on the “RXP” Series of Cx43-binding Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vandana; Larsen, Bjarne Due; Coombs, Wanda; Lin, Xianming; Spagnol, Gaelle; Sorgen, Paul L; Taffet, Steven M; Delmar, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Gap junction pharmacology is a nascent field. Previous studies have identified molecules that enhance intercellular communication, and may offer potential for innovative antiarrhythmic therapy. However, their specific molecular target(s) and mechanism(s) of action remain unknown. Previously, we identified a 34-amino acid peptide (RXP-E) that binds the carboxyl terminal domain of Cx43 (Cx43CT) and prevents cardiac gap junction closure and action potential propagation block. These results supported the feasibility of a peptide-based pharmacology to Cx43, but the structure of the core active element in RXP-E, an essential step for pharmacological development, remained undefined. Here, we used a combination of molecular modeling, surface plasmon resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance and patch clamp strategies to define, for the first time, a unique ensemble of pharmacophores that bind Cx43CT and prevent closure of Cx43 channels. Two particular molecules are best representatives of this family: a cyclized heptapeptide (called CyRP-71), and a linear octapeptide of sequence RRNYRRNY. These two small compounds offer the first structural platform for the design of Cx43-interacting gap junction openers. Moreover, the structure of these compounds offers an imprint of a region of Cx43CT that is fundamental to gap junction channel function. PMID:19556520

  13. Marine Peptides and Their Anti-Infective Activities

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee Kyoung; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2015-01-01

    Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities. In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the treatments available for many infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses are limited. Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored. In this review, we will present the structures and anti-infective activity of peptides isolated from marine sources (sponges, algae, bacteria, fungi and fish) from 2006 to the present. PMID:25603351

  14. Bioactivation of water-soluble peptidic quantum dot through biotin-streptavidin binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dif, A.; Touchet, S.; Nagarajan, S.; Baudy-Floc'h, M.; Dahan, M.; Piehler, J.; Marchi-Artzner, V.

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the preparation of bioactive water-soluble fluorescent CdSe/ZnS semi-conductor quantum dots with a small hydrodynamic diameter of 10 nm. These quantum dots are functionalized with a biotinylated peptide that can be introduced at different ratios onto the surface of the quantum dots. Their ability to bind to streptavidin in solution is tested by using gel electrophoresis and fluorescence resonance energy transfer with a fluorescent labeled-streptavidin. The binding of these quantum dots to Agarose micrometric beads coated with streptavidin is also analyzed by fluorescent optical microscopy. A synthetic pegylated peptide is successfully used to prevent the non specific adsorption of streptavidin onto the quantum dots. A specific binding to the streptavidin results in the formation of a very stable streptavidin-quantum dot complex without any significant aggregation. The average number of streptavidin per quantum dot is found to be to 4 at the most. Such bioactivate quantum dots can be further conjugated to any biotinylated biomolecule and used in biological medium.

  15. Identification and Tumour-Binding Properties of a Peptide with High Affinity to the Disialoganglioside GD2

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jan; Reichel, Robin; Vogt, Sebastian; Müller, Stefan P.; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Brandau, Wolfgang; Eggert, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Neuroectodermal tumours are characterized by aberrant processing of disialogangliosides concomitant with high expression of GD2 or GD3 on cell surfaces. Antibodies targeting GD2 are already in clinical use for therapy of neuroblastoma, a solid tumour of early childhood. Here, we set out to identify peptides with high affinity to human disialoganglioside GD2. To this end, we performed a combined in vivo and in vitro screen using a recombinant phage displayed peptide library. We isolated a phage displaying the peptide sequence WHWRLPS that specifically binds to the human disialoganglioside GD2. Binding specificity was confirmed by mutational scanning and by comparative analyses using structurally related disialogangliosides. In vivo, significant enrichment of phage binding to xenografts of human neuroblastoma cells in mice was observed. Tumour-specific phage accumulation could be blocked by intravenous coinjection of the corresponding peptide. Comparative pharmacokinetic analyses revealed higher specific accumulation of 68Ga-labelled GD2-binding peptide compared to 111In-labelled peptide in xenografts of human neuroblastoma. In contrast to 124I-MIBG, which is currently evaluated as a neuroblastoma marker in PET/CT, 68Ga-labelled GD2-specific peptide spared the thyroid but was enriched in the kidneys, which could be partially blocked by infusion of amino acids.In summary, we here report on a novel tumour-homing peptide that specifically binds to the disialoganglioside GD2, accumulates in xenografts of neuroblastoma cells in mice and bears the potential for tumour detection using PET/CT. Thus, this peptide may serve as a new scaffold for diagnosing GD2-positive tumours of neuroectodermal origin. PMID:27716771

  16. Binding of Cu(II) ions to peptides studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowska, Joanna; Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Uber, Dorota; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Wiczk, Wiesław; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2016-01-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements supported by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) were used to study the interactions of Cu2 + with four peptides. Two of them were taken from the N-terminal part of the FBP28 protein (formin binding protein) WW domain: Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9) and its mutant Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asn-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9_M) as well as two mutated peptides from the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G derived from Streptococcus: Asp-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J1) and Glu-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J2). The measurements were carried out at 298.15 K in 20 mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer solution with a pH of 6. The fluorescence of all peptides was quenched by Cu2 + ions. The stoichiometry, conditional stability constants and thermodynamic parameters for the interactions of the Cu2 + ions with D9 and D9_M were determined from the calorimetric data. The values of the conditional stability constants were additionally determined from fluorescence quenching measurements and compared with those obtained from calorimetric studies. There was a good correlation between data obtained from the two techniques. On the other hand, the studies revealed that J1 and J2 do not exhibit an affinity towards metal ions. The obtained results prove that fluorescence quenching experiments may be successfully used in order to determine stability constants of complexes with fluorescent ligands. Finally, based on the obtained results, the coordinating properties of the peptides towards the Cu2 + ions are discussed.

  17. Binding of Cu(II) ions to peptides studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Joanna; Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Uber, Dorota; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Wiczk, Wiesław; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2016-01-15

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements supported by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) were used to study the interactions of Cu(2+) with four peptides. Two of them were taken from the N-terminal part of the FBP28 protein (formin binding protein) WW domain: Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9) and its mutant Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asn-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9_M) as well as two mutated peptides from the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G derived from Streptococcus: Asp-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J1) and Glu-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J2). The measurements were carried out at 298.15K in 20mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer solution with a pH of 6. The fluorescence of all peptides was quenched by Cu(2+) ions. The stoichiometry, conditional stability constants and thermodynamic parameters for the interactions of the Cu(2+) ions with D9 and D9_M were determined from the calorimetric data. The values of the conditional stability constants were additionally determined from fluorescence quenching measurements and compared with those obtained from calorimetric studies. There was a good correlation between data obtained from the two techniques. On the other hand, the studies revealed that J1 and J2 do not exhibit an affinity towards metal ions. The obtained results prove that fluorescence quenching experiments may be successfully used in order to determine stability constants of complexes with fluorescent ligands. Finally, based on the obtained results, the coordinating properties of the peptides towards the Cu(2+) ions are discussed.

  18. Binding of Cu(II) ions to peptides studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Joanna; Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Uber, Dorota; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Wiczk, Wiesław; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2016-01-15

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements supported by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) were used to study the interactions of Cu(2+) with four peptides. Two of them were taken from the N-terminal part of the FBP28 protein (formin binding protein) WW domain: Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9) and its mutant Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asn-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9_M) as well as two mutated peptides from the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G derived from Streptococcus: Asp-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J1) and Glu-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J2). The measurements were carried out at 298.15K in 20mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer solution with a pH of 6. The fluorescence of all peptides was quenched by Cu(2+) ions. The stoichiometry, conditional stability constants and thermodynamic parameters for the interactions of the Cu(2+) ions with D9 and D9_M were determined from the calorimetric data. The values of the conditional stability constants were additionally determined from fluorescence quenching measurements and compared with those obtained from calorimetric studies. There was a good correlation between data obtained from the two techniques. On the other hand, the studies revealed that J1 and J2 do not exhibit an affinity towards metal ions. The obtained results prove that fluorescence quenching experiments may be successfully used in order to determine stability constants of complexes with fluorescent ligands. Finally, based on the obtained results, the coordinating properties of the peptides towards the Cu(2+) ions are discussed. PMID:26363471

  19. Electrostatic binding and hydrophobic collapse of peptide-nucleic acid aggregates quantified using force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Frutos, Silvia; Bizarro, Cristiano V; de Lorenzo, Sara; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Ramsch, Roland; Vilchez, Susana; Solans, Conxita; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Albericio, Fernando; Eritja, Ramón; Giralt, Ernest; Dev, Sukhendu B; Ritort, Felix

    2013-06-25

    Knowledge of the mechanisms of interaction between self-aggregating peptides and nucleic acids or other polyanions is key to the understanding of many aggregation processes underlying several human diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). Determining the affinity and kinetic steps of such interactions is challenging due to the competition between hydrophobic self-aggregating forces and electrostatic binding forces. Kahalalide F (KF) is an anticancer hydrophobic peptide that contains a single positive charge that confers strong aggregative properties with polyanions. This makes KF an ideal model to elucidate the mechanisms by which self-aggregation competes with binding to a strongly charged polyelectrolyte such as DNA. We use optical tweezers to apply mechanical forces to single DNA molecules and show that KF and DNA interact in a two-step kinetic process promoted by the electrostatic binding of DNA to the aggregate surface followed by the stabilization of the complex due to hydrophobic interactions. From the measured pulling curves we determine the spectrum of binding affinities, kinetic barriers, and lengths of DNA segments sequestered within the KF-DNA complex. We find there is a capture distance beyond which the complex collapses into compact aggregates stabilized by strong hydrophobic forces and discuss how the bending rigidity of the nucleic acid affects this process. We hypothesize that within an in vivo context, the enhanced electrostatic interaction of KF due to its aggregation might mediate the binding to other polyanions. The proposed methodology should be useful to quantitatively characterize other compounds or proteins in which the formation of aggregates is relevant. PMID:23706043

  20. Enhanced Amphiphilic Profile of a Short β-Stranded Peptide Improves Its Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Giorgia; Scorciapino, Mariano A.; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Bürck, Jochen; Montaldo, Nicola Pietro; Pintus, Manuela; Sanna, Roberta; Casu, Mariano; Giuliani, Andrea; Pirri, Giovanna; Luca, Vincenzo; Ulrich, Anne S.; Rinaldi, Andrea C.

    2015-01-01

    SB056 is a novel semi-synthetic antimicrobial peptide with a dimeric dendrimer scaffold. Active against both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria, its mechanism has been attributed to a disruption of bacterial membranes. The branched peptide was shown to assume a β-stranded conformation in a lipidic environment. Here, we report on a rational modification of the original, empirically derived linear peptide sequence [WKKIRVRLSA-NH2, SB056-lin]. We interchanged the first two residues [KWKIRVRLSA-NH2, β-SB056-lin] to enhance the amphipathic profile, in the hope that a more regular β-strand would lead to a better antimicrobial performance. MIC values confirmed that an enhanced amphiphilic profile indeed significantly increases activity against both Gram-positive and -negative strains. The membrane binding affinity of both peptides, measured by tryptophan fluorescence, increased with an increasing ratio of negatively charged/zwitterionic lipids. Remarkably, β-SB056-lin showed considerable binding even to purely zwitterionic membranes, unlike the original sequence, indicating that besides electrostatic attraction also the amphipathicity of the peptide structure plays a fundamental role in binding, by stabilizing the bound state. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism and solid-state 19F-NMR were used to characterize and compare the conformation and mobility of the membrane bound peptides. Both SB056-lin and β-SB056-lin adopt a β-stranded conformation upon binding POPC vesicles, but the former maintains an intrinsic structural disorder that also affects its aggregation tendency. Upon introducing some anionic POPG into the POPC matrix, the sequence-optimized β-SB056-lin forms well-ordered β-strands once electro-neutrality is approached, and it aggregates into more extended β-sheets as the concentration of anionic lipids in the bilayer is raised. The enhanced antimicrobial activity of the analogue correlates with the formation of these extended β-sheets, which

  1. CXC chemokines connective tissue activating peptide-III and neutrophil activating peptide-2 are heparin/heparan sulfate-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hoogewerf, A J; Leone, J W; Reardon, I M; Howe, W J; Asa, D; Heinrikson, R L; Ledbetter, S R

    1995-02-17

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans at cell surfaces or in extracellular matrices bind diverse molecules, including growth factors and cytokines, and it is believed that the activities of these molecules may be regulated by the metabolism of heparan sulfate. In this study, purification of a heparan sulfate-degrading enzyme from human platelets led to the discovery that the enzymatic activity residues in at least two members of the platelet basic protein (PBP) family known as connective tissue activating peptide-III (CTAP-III) and neutrophil activating peptide-2. PBP and its N-truncated derivatives, CTAP-III and neutrophil activating peptide-2, are CXC chemokines, a group of molecules involved in inflammation and wound healing. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the purified heparanase resulted in a single broad band at 8-10 kDa, the known molecular weight of PBP and its truncated derivatives. Gel filtration chromatography of heparanase resulted in peaks of activity corresponding to monomers, dimers, and tetramers; these higher order aggregates are known to form among the chemokines. N-terminal sequence analysis of the same preparation indicated that only PBP and truncated derivatives were present, and commercial CTAP-III from three suppliers had heparanase activity. Antisera produced in animals immunized with a C-terminal synthetic peptide of PBP inhibited heparanase activity by 95%, compared with activity of the purified enzyme in the presence of the preimmune sera. The synthetic peptide also inhibited heparanase by 95% at 250 microM, compared to the 33% inhibition of heparanase activity by two other peptides. The enzyme was determined to be an endoglucosaminidase, and it degraded both heparin and heparan sulfate with optimal activity at pH 5.8. Chromatofocusing of the purified heparanase resulted in two protein peaks: an inactive peak at pI7.3, and an active peak at pI 4.8-5.1. Sequence analysis showed that the two peaks contained identical protein

  2. Conversion of scFv peptide-binding specificity for crystal chaperone development

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Jennifer C.; Culver, Jeffrey A.; Drury, Jason E.; Motani, Rakesh S.; Lieberman, Raquel L.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2012-02-07

    In spite of advances in protein expression and purification over the last decade, many proteins remain recalcitrant to structure determination by X-ray crystallography. One emerging tactic to obtain high-quality protein crystals for structure determination, particularly in the case of membrane proteins, involves co-crystallization with a protein-specific antibody fragment. Here, we report the development of new recombinant single-chain antibody fragments (scFv) capable of binding a specific epitope that can be introduced into internal loops of client proteins. The previously crystallized hexa-histidine-specific 3D5 scFv antibody was modified in the complementary determining region and by random mutagenesis, in conjunction with phage display, to yield scFvs with new biochemical characteristics and binding specificity. Selected variants include those specific for the hexa-histidine peptide with increased expression, solubility (up to 16.6 mg/ml) and sub-micromolar affinity, and those with new specificity for the EE hexa-peptide (EYMPME) and nanomolar affinity. Complexes of one such chaperone with model proteins harboring either an internal or a terminal EE tag were isolated by gel filtration. The 3.1 {angstrom} resolution structure of this chaperone reveals a binding surface complementary to the EE peptide and a {approx}52 {angstrom} channel in the crystal lattice. Notably, in spite of 85% sequence identity, and nearly identical crystallization conditions, the engineered scFv crystallizes in a different space group than the parent 3D5 scFv, and utilizes two new crystal contacts. These engineered scFvs represent a new class of chaperones that may eliminate the need for de novo identification of candidate chaperones from large antibody libraries.

  3. Peptide-Mediated PEGylation of Polysulfone Reduces Protein Adsorption and Leukocyte Activation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elisabeth M; Platnich, Jaye M; Irvin, Randall T; Muruve, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The exposure of blood to bioincompatible materials used for dialysis triggers leukocyte activation and protein adsorption. We describe a single-step, postmanufacturing method for surface modification to create biomaterials used in medical devices and dialysis with altered surface characteristics. Peptides derived from the receptor-binding domain of the type IV pilin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were synthesized using L and D-amino acids to generate L-K122-4, enantiomer D-K122-4, and D-retroinverso RI-K122-4 peptides. L-K122-4, D-K122-4, and RI-K122-4 peptides, but not control peptides, bound durably to the surfaces of materials used in medical devices and dialysis including silicone and polysulfone. D-K122-4 enantiomeric peptides were protease resistant on polysulfone and could remain bound to the surface for up to 28 days. To demonstrate that K122-4 peptides could be used to modify material surfaces, D-K122-4 peptide was conjugated to polyethylene glycol (D-K122-4-PEG) and applied to polysulfone. When compared with untreated material, D-K122-4-PEG reduced the surface adsorption of albumin or immunoglobulin G to polysulfone. In coincubation experiments, although uncoated polysulfone induced pro-interleukin-1β cytokine expression in leukocytes, cellular activation was prevented when leukocytes were incubated with D-K122-4-PEG-modified polysulfone. These data demonstrate the proof of principle that K122-4 peptides can be applied to modify the surface characteristics of materials used for dialysis. PMID:26181712

  4. Sequence motifs of human her-2 protooncogene important for Peptide binding to hla-A2.

    PubMed

    Fisk, B; Chesak, B; Ioannides, M; Wharton, J; Ioannides, C

    1994-07-01

    Tumor progression and metastasis are often associated with overexpression of specific cellular proteins. In 1991, we introduced a hypothesis that epitopes of nonmutated overexpressed proteins can be targets of a specific cellular immune response against tumor mediated by T cells (Mol Carcinogen 6: 77-81, 1992) and that, when T cell epitopes are present, distinction between tumor immunity/autoimmunity and unresponsiveness can be predicated on the protein concentration as a limiting factor of epitope supply. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrated that CTL from patients with ovarian tumors which overexpress HER-2 proto-oncogene can recognize both autologous tumor and synthetic analogs of a specific epitope from HER-2, which was identified based on the convergence of all criteria for selection of HLA-A2 associated epitopes recognized by T cells. In this study, we identified all epitopes in HER-2 containing nonapeptides with HLA-A2 anchors. Of these, analysis of potential amphiphilic sites identified both sequences and specific mutations that positively affected the reactivity of conformationally dependent HLA-A2 specific mAb which served as an indication of HER-2 peptide binding. We also report the in vitro induction of cellular responses to these peptides by PBMC from healthy HLA-A2+ volunteers as an indication of their ability to stimulate/ restimulate pre-existing T cell responses to HER-2. The peptides induced proliferative responses in one of four donors tested and CTL responses (one of three peptides tested in two of three donors). This strategy may allow selection of immunogenic HER-2 peptides and elucidation of mechanisms operating in induction of tolerance to defined epitopes on self-proteins. PMID:21559557

  5. Deciphering the unconventional peptide binding to the PDZ domain of MAST2.

    PubMed

    Delhommel, Florent; Chaffotte, Alain; Terrien, Elouan; Raynal, Bertrand; Buc, Henri; Delepierre, Muriel; Cordier, Florence; Wolff, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and microtubule-associated serine threonine kinase 2 (MAST2) are key negative regulators of survival pathways in neuronal cells. The two proteins interact via the PDZ (PSD-95, Dlg1, Zo-1) domain of MAST2 (MAST2-PDZ). During infection by rabies virus, the viral glycoprotein competes with PTEN for interaction with MAST2-PDZ and promotes neuronal survival. The C-terminal PDZ-binding motifs (PBMs) of the two proteins bind similarly to MAST2-PDZ through an unconventional network of connectivity involving two anchor points. Combining stopped-flow fluorescence, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), microcalorimetry and NMR, we document the kinetics of interaction between endogenous and viral ligands to MAST2-PDZ as well as the dynamic and structural effects of these interactions. Viral and PTEN peptide interactions to MAST2-PDZ occur via a unique kinetic step which involves both canonical C-terminal PBM binding and N-terminal anchoring. Indirect effects induced by the PBM binding include modifications to the structure and dynamics of the PDZ dimerization surface which prevent MAST2-PDZ auto-association. Such an energetic communication between binding sites and distal surfaces in PDZ domains provides interesting clues for protein regulation overall. PMID:25942057

  6. Design of a novel metal binding peptide by molecular dynamics simulation to sequester Cu and Zn ions

    PubMed Central

    Mahnam, K.; Saffar, B.; Mobini-Dehkordi, M.; Fassihi, A.; Mohammadi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metal toxicity has serious adverse effects on the environment. The metal sequestering characteristics of a novel metal binding peptide (Glu-Cys)11 Gly+linker+hexahistidine (EC11:His6) was investigated to determine if it can absorb Cu2+ or Zn2+ cations. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out using a model of 6 Cu2+ or Zn2+ and other ions enclosed in a fully hydrated simulation box with the designed peptide. Totally, 240 nano second (ns) simulations were done in three phases. Results showed that the selected linker is able to separate two domains of this peptide and that the carboxyl oxygens of Glu residues of EC11 in the designed peptide can absorb these ions. Sequestration of Cu2+ or Zn2+ ions by the designed peptide does not change overall tertiary and secondary structures of peptide. PMID:25598801

  7. Stabilized sulfur binding using activated fillers

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Vagin, Vyacheslav P.; Vagin, Sergey P.

    2015-07-21

    A method of making a stable, sulfur binding composite comprising impregnating a solid aggregate with an organic modifier comprising unsaturated hydrocarbons with at least one double or triple covalent bond between adjacent carbon atoms to create a modifier-impregnated aggregate; heating and drying the modifier-impregnated aggregate to activate the surface of the modifier-impregnated aggregate for reaction with sulfur.

  8. Binding of Eu(III) to 1,2-hydroxypyridinone-modified peptide nucleic acids.