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Sample records for activity body position

  1. The influence of vibration type, frequency, body position and additional load on the neuromuscular activity during whole body vibration.

    PubMed

    Ritzmann, Ramona; Gollhofer, Albert; Kramer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of different whole body vibration (WBV) determinants on the electromyographic (EMG) activity during WBV in order to identify those training conditions that cause highest neuromuscular responses and therefore provide optimal training conditions. In a randomized cross-over study, the EMG activity of six leg muscles was analyzed in 18 subjects with respect to the following determinants: (1) vibration type (side-alternating vibration (SV) vs. synchronous vibration (SyV), (2) frequency (5-10-15-20-25-30 Hz), (3) knee flexion angle (10°-30°-60°), (4) stance condition (forefoot vs. normal stance) and (5) load variation (no extra load vs. additional load equal to one-third of the body weight). The results are: (1) neuromuscular activity during SV was enhanced compared to SyV (P < 0.05); (2) a progressive increase in frequency caused a progressive increase in EMG activity (P < 0.05); (3) the EMG activity was highest for the knee extensors when the knee joint was 60° flexed (P < 0.05); (4) for the plantar flexors in the forefoot stance condition (P < 0.05); and (5) additional load caused an increase in neuromuscular activation (P < 0.05). In conclusion, large variations of the EMG activation could be observed across conditions. However, with an appropriate adjustment of specific WBV determinants, high EMG activations and therefore high activation intensities could be achieved in the selected muscles. The combination of high vibration frequencies with additional load on an SV platform led to highest EMG activities. Regarding the body position, a knee flexion of 60° and forefoot stance appear to be beneficial for the knee extensors and the plantar flexors, respectively. PMID:22538279

  2. Impact of Different Body Positions on Bioelectrical Activity of the Pelvic Floor Muscles in Nulliparous Continent Women

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewska, Daria; Stania, Magdalena; Sobota, Grzegorz; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Błaszczak, Edward; Taradaj, Jakub; Juras, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    We examined pelvic floor muscles (PFM) activity (%MVC) in twenty nulliparous women by body position during exercise as well as the activation of abdominal muscles and the gluteus maximus during voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Activation of transversus abdominis, rectus abdominis, and gluteus maximus during voluntary PFM contractions was also assessed. Significant differences in mean normalized amplitudes of baseline PFM activity were revealed between standing and lying (P < 0.00024) and lying and ball-sitting positions (P < 0.0053). Average peak, average time before peak, and average time after peak did not differ significantly during the voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Baseline PFM activity seemed to depend on the body position and was the highest in standing. Pelvic floor muscles activity during voluntary contractions did not differ by position in continent women. Statistically significant differences between the supine lying and sitting positions were only observed during a sustained 60-second contraction of the PFMs. PMID:25793212

  3. Positive correlation between the body weight of anestrous goats and their response to the male effect with sexually active bucks.

    PubMed

    Véliz, Francisco G; Poindron, Pascal; Malpaux, Benoît; Delgadillo, J Alberto

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the results of two years of response to the male effect in seasonally anestrous goats to investigate whether the activation of female reproductive activity by the male effect is related to the body weight of the females. Seventy-nine adult female Mexican mixed breed goats were used. The anestrous females were exposed during 15 days to sexually active males, and were classified into three categories according to their mean body weight +/-SD (42 +/- 9 kg) (Light: < or = 33 kg, n = 19; Medium: 34-50 kg, n = 46; Heavy: > or = 51 kg, n = 14). More than 98% of the goats from the Medium and Heavy groups showed at least one estrus behavior within the first 15 days following the introduction of the bucks, versus only 63% of the females from the Light group (P < 0.01). The interval between the introduction of the males and the onset of estrus behavior was longer in the females of the Light and Medium groups (4.2 +/- 0.8 and 3.3 +/- 0.3 days) than in the females of the Heavy group (2.0 +/- 0.2 days; P < 0.03). Also, body weight was negatively correlated with latency to first estrus (Spearman r = -0.57; P < 0.001). These results are in agreement with the hypothesis that the ability of anestrous goats to respond to the male effect is positively influenced by their body weight. PMID:17169312

  4. Exercise motives and positive body image in physically active college women and men: Exploring an expanded acceptance model of intuitive eating.

    PubMed

    Tylka, Tracy L; Homan, Kristin J

    2015-09-01

    The acceptance model of intuitive eating posits that body acceptance by others facilitates body appreciation and internal body orientation, which contribute to intuitive eating. Two domains of exercise motives (functional and appearance) may also be linked to these variables, and thus were integrated into the model. The model fit the data well for 406 physically active U.S. college students, although some pathways were stronger for women. Body acceptance by others directly contributed to higher functional exercise motives and indirectly contributed to lower appearance exercise motives through higher internal body orientation. Functional exercise motives positively, and appearance exercise motives inversely, contributed to body appreciation. Whereas body appreciation positively, and appearance exercise motives inversely, contributed to intuitive eating for women, only the latter association was evident for men. To benefit positive body image and intuitive eating, efforts should encourage body acceptance by others and emphasize functional and de-emphasize appearance exercise motives. PMID:26281958

  5. Videofluoroscopic Investigation of Body Position on Articulatory Positioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Youkyung; Perry, Jamie L.; Kuehn, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively examine the effects of body position on the positioning of the epiglottis, tongue, and velum at rest and during speech. Method: Videofluoroscopic data were obtained from 12 healthy adults in the supine and upright positions at rest and during speech while the participants produced 12 VCV sequences. The effects of body…

  6. Muscle Activation and Estimated Relative Joint Force During Running with Weight Support on a Lower-Body Positive-Pressure Treadmill.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bente R; Hovgaard-Hansen, Line; Cappelen, Katrine L

    2016-08-01

    Running on a lower-body positive-pressure (LBPP) treadmill allows effects of weight support on leg muscle activation to be assessed systematically, and has the potential to facilitate rehabilitation and prevent overloading. The aim was to study the effect of running with weight support on leg muscle activation and to estimate relative knee and ankle joint forces. Runners performed 6-min running sessions at 2.22 m/s and 3.33 m/s, at 100%, 80%, 60%, 40%, and 20% body weight (BW). Surface electromyography, ground reaction force, and running characteristics were measured. Relative knee and ankle joint forces were estimated. Leg muscles responded differently to unweighting during running, reflecting different relative contribution to propulsion and antigravity forces. At 20% BW, knee extensor EMGpeak decreased to 22% at 2.22 m/s and 28% at 3.33 m/s of 100% BW values. Plantar flexors decreased to 52% and 58% at 20% BW, while activity of biceps femoris muscle remained unchanged. Unweighting with LBPP reduced estimated joint force significantly although less than proportional to the degree of weight support (ankle). It was concluded that leg muscle activation adapted to the new biomechanical environment, and the effect of unweighting on estimated knee force was more pronounced than on ankle force. PMID:26957520

  7. Body positive: a history of service.

    PubMed

    Cotenoff, S

    1999-07-01

    In May 1999, New York's two leading AIDS service organizations announced that they were merging. The consolidation of Body Positive (BP) and People with AIDS Coalition (PWAC) of New York will bring together two strong groups in response to changing needs and shrinking resources. The history of BP is described. Body Positive began in 1987, with its primary goal to provide information and services for people who were newly diagnosed with HIV and asymptomatic. The programs have changed and expanded over the years, to include peer-based services, social programs, and culturally diverse information. The commitment to empower people continues, by giving them the information they need to manage their lives and treatment. PMID:11367072

  8. Predicting body appreciation in young women: An integrated model of positive body image.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Rachel; Tiggemann, Marika; Clark, Levina

    2016-09-01

    This study examined a range of predictors, based on previous theoretical models, of positive body image in young adult women. Participants were 266 women who completed an online questionnaire measuring body appreciation, activity participation, media consumption, perceived body acceptance by others, self-compassion, and autonomy. Potential mechanisms in predicting body appreciation assessed were self-objectification, social appearance comparison, and thin-ideal internalisation. Results indicated that greater perceived body acceptance by others and self-compassion, and lower appearance media consumption, self-objectification, social comparison, and thin-ideal internalisation were related to greater body appreciation. An integrated model showed that appearance media (negatively) and non-appearance media and self-compassion (positively) were associated with lower self-objectification, social comparison, and thin-ideal internalisation, which in turn related to greater body appreciation. Additionally, perceived body acceptance by others was directly associated with body appreciation. The results contribute to an understanding of potential pathways of positive body image development, thereby highlighting possible intervention targets. PMID:27240100

  9. The mRNA expression of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator surface receptor in human adipose tissue is positively correlated with body mass index.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hien Fuh; Chin, Kin Fah; Chan, Kok-Gan; Ngeow, Yun Fong

    2015-06-01

    suPLAUR is the transcript variant that encodes the soluble form of the urokinase plasminogen activator surface receptor (suPLAUR). This soluble protein has been shown to enhance leukocyte migration and adhesion, and its circulatory level is increased in inflammatory states. In this pilot study, we used RNA-Seq to examine the splicing pattern of PLAUR in omental adipose tissues from obese and lean individuals. Of the three transcript variants of the PLAUR gene, only the proportion of suPLAUR (transcript variant 2) increases in obesity. After removing the effects of gender and age, the expression of suPLAUR is positively correlated with body mass index. This observation was validated using RT-qPCR with an independent cohort of samples. Additionally, in our RNA-Seq differential expression analysis, we also observed, in obese adipose tissues, an up-regulation of genes encoding other proteins involved in the process of chemotaxis and leukocyte adhesion; of particular interest is the integrin beta 2 (ITGB2) that is known to interact with suPLAUR in leukocyte adhesion. These findings suggest an important role for suPLAUR in the recruitment of immune cells to obese adipose tissue, in the pathogenesis of obesity. PMID:26284904

  10. Comparison of cardiovascular and biomechanical parameters of supine lower body negative pressure and upright lower body positive pressure to simulate activity in 1/6 G and 3/8 G

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Velderrain, Armando; Ruckstuhl, Heidi; Stahn, Alexander C.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    For future space exploration missions, it is important to determine the best method of simulating on Earth cardiovascular and biomechanical conditions for lunar and Martian gravities. For this purpose, we compared exercise performed within a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and a lower body positive pressure (LBPP) chamber. Twelve subjects underwent a protocol of resting and walking (0.25 Froude) within supine LBNP and upright LBPP simulation. Each protocol was performed in simulated 1/6 G and 3/8 G. We assessed heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure, oxygen consumption (V̇o2), normalized stride length, normalized vertical peak ground reaction force, duty factor, cadence, perceived exertion (Borg), and comfort of the subject. A mixed linear model was employed to determine effects of the simulation on the respective parameters. Furthermore, parameters were compared with predicted values for lunar and Martian gravities to determine the method that showed the best agreement. During walking, all cardiovascular and biomechanical parameters were unaffected by the simulation used for lunar and Martian gravities. During rest, HR and V̇o2 were lower in supine LBNP compared with upright LBPP. HR, V̇o2, and normalized vertical peak ground reaction force obtained with supine LBNP and upright LBPP showed good agreement with predicted values. Since supine LBNP and upright LBPP are lacking significant differences, we conclude that both simulations are suited to simulate the cardiovascular and biomechanical conditions during activity in lunar and Martian gravities. Operational characteristics and the intended application should be considered when choosing either supine LBNP or upright LBPP to simulate partial gravities on Earth. PMID:23640597

  11. Comparison of cardiovascular and biomechanical parameters of supine lower body negative pressure and upright lower body positive pressure to simulate activity in 1/6 G and 3/8 G.

    PubMed

    Schlabs, Thomas; Rosales-Velderrain, Armando; Ruckstuhl, Heidi; Stahn, Alexander C; Hargens, Alan R

    2013-07-15

    For future space exploration missions, it is important to determine the best method of simulating on Earth cardiovascular and biomechanical conditions for lunar and Martian gravities. For this purpose, we compared exercise performed within a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and a lower body positive pressure (LBPP) chamber. Twelve subjects underwent a protocol of resting and walking (0.25 Froude) within supine LBNP and upright LBPP simulation. Each protocol was performed in simulated 1/6 G and 3/8 G. We assessed heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure, oxygen consumption (Vo2), normalized stride length, normalized vertical peak ground reaction force, duty factor, cadence, perceived exertion (Borg), and comfort of the subject. A mixed linear model was employed to determine effects of the simulation on the respective parameters. Furthermore, parameters were compared with predicted values for lunar and Martian gravities to determine the method that showed the best agreement. During walking, all cardiovascular and biomechanical parameters were unaffected by the simulation used for lunar and Martian gravities. During rest, HR and Vo2 were lower in supine LBNP compared with upright LBPP. HR, Vo2, and normalized vertical peak ground reaction force obtained with supine LBNP and upright LBPP showed good agreement with predicted values. Since supine LBNP and upright LBPP are lacking significant differences, we conclude that both simulations are suited to simulate the cardiovascular and biomechanical conditions during activity in lunar and Martian gravities. Operational characteristics and the intended application should be considered when choosing either supine LBNP or upright LBPP to simulate partial gravities on Earth. PMID:23640597

  12. Positioning the Answerable Body in Research.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kristen E

    2016-11-01

    This essay reflects upon my experiences as a field researcher participating with a running group organized to aid those without homes. Borrowing from dialogic as well as affect theory, I contemplate the importance of the answerable body in research by examining a series of defining moments during my experiences in the field. I conclude with a discussion of the theoretical and methodological implications surrounding the answerable body. PMID:27050562

  13. Cyclists and triathletes have different body positions on the bicycle.

    PubMed

    Bini, Rodrigo Rico; Hume, Patria A; Croft, James

    2014-01-01

    Our study evaluated differences in body position on the bicycle for recreational cyclists, competitive cyclists and triathletes. Thirty-six recreational cyclists, 17 competitive road cyclists and 18 competitive triathletes were assessed for body position on their bicycles on a cycle trainer. Images were taken of cyclists/triathletes in static poses with the crank at the 3 o'clock and 6 o'clock positions. Trunk, pelvis, hip, knee and ankle angles, anterior-posterior and medio-lateral positions of the knees in relation to the pedal axis and frontal projected area were measured using ImageJ. Comparison of body position between groups (recreational, competitive road cyclists and competitive triathletes) was conducted using effects sizes (ES). The greatest differences between groups in the measured variables were observed between the triathletes and the other two groups. Smaller differences were observed between competitive and recreational cyclists. Competitive triathletes had greater body forward projection (10% greater trunk flexion and 66% knee anterior position, ES = 2.5 and 1.2, respectively) and less frontal projected area (17%, ES = 1.3) than competitive road cyclists for body position on the bicycle. Both recreational and competitive cyclists sat on their bicycles with their trunks in a more vertical position compared to triathletes. Guidelines for bicycle configuration for triathletes and road cyclists need to consider the body positions during events. PMID:24444194

  14. Optical positions of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurs, E. J. A.

    1984-04-01

    Optical positions are calculated for 26 active galaxies (mainly Markarian dn Arakelian objects), using the plate-measuring apparatus at Leiden Observatory on the O plates of the Palomar Sky Survey and applying AGK-3 data in the reductions. The results are presented in a table and have accuracy 0.5 arcsec; a comparison with the positions determined by Clements (1981, 1983) for 19 objects reveals a possible offset of -0.28 arcsec in the right-ascension determinations.

  15. Body size is negatively correlated with trophic position among cyprinids

    PubMed Central

    Burress, Edward D.; Holcomb, Jordan M.; Bonato, Karine Orlandi; Armbruster, Jonathan W.

    2016-01-01

    Body size has many ecological and evolutionary implications that extend across multiple levels of organization. Body size is often positively correlated with species traits such as metabolism, prey size and trophic position (TP) due to physiological and mechanical constraints. We used stable isotope analysis to quantify TP among minnows across multiple assemblages that differed in their species composition, diversity and food web structure. Body size significantly predicted TP across different lineages and assemblages, and indicated a significant negative relationship. The observed negative relationship between body size and TP is contrary to conventional knowledge, and is likely to have arisen owing to highly clade-specific patterns, such that clades consist of either large benthic species or small pelagic species. Cyprinids probably subvert the physiological and mechanical constraints that generally produce a positive relationship between body size and TP using anatomical modifications and by consuming small-bodied prey, respectively. The need for herbivorous cyprinids to digest cellulose-rich foods probably selected for larger bodies to accommodate longer intestinal tracts and thereby to facilitate digestion of nutrient-poor resources, such as algae. Therefore, body size and TP are likely to have coevolved in cyprinids in association with specialization along the benthic to pelagic resource axis. PMID:27293777

  16. Body size is negatively correlated with trophic position among cyprinids.

    PubMed

    Burress, Edward D; Holcomb, Jordan M; Bonato, Karine Orlandi; Armbruster, Jonathan W

    2016-05-01

    Body size has many ecological and evolutionary implications that extend across multiple levels of organization. Body size is often positively correlated with species traits such as metabolism, prey size and trophic position (TP) due to physiological and mechanical constraints. We used stable isotope analysis to quantify TP among minnows across multiple assemblages that differed in their species composition, diversity and food web structure. Body size significantly predicted TP across different lineages and assemblages, and indicated a significant negative relationship. The observed negative relationship between body size and TP is contrary to conventional knowledge, and is likely to have arisen owing to highly clade-specific patterns, such that clades consist of either large benthic species or small pelagic species. Cyprinids probably subvert the physiological and mechanical constraints that generally produce a positive relationship between body size and TP using anatomical modifications and by consuming small-bodied prey, respectively. The need for herbivorous cyprinids to digest cellulose-rich foods probably selected for larger bodies to accommodate longer intestinal tracts and thereby to facilitate digestion of nutrient-poor resources, such as algae. Therefore, body size and TP are likely to have coevolved in cyprinids in association with specialization along the benthic to pelagic resource axis. PMID:27293777

  17. An implicit body representation underlying human position sense.

    PubMed

    Longo, Matthew R; Haggard, Patrick

    2010-06-29

    Knowing the body's location in external space is a fundamental perceptual task. Perceiving the location of body parts through proprioception requires that information about the angles of each joint (i.e., body posture) be combined with information about the size and shape of the body segments between joints. Although information about body posture is specified by on-line afferent signals, no sensory signals are directly informative about body size and shape. Thus, human position sense must refer to a stored body model of the body's metric properties, such as body part size and shape. The need for such a model has long been recognized; however, the properties of this model have never been systematically investigated. We developed a technique to isolate and measure this body model. Participants judged the location in external space of 10 landmarks on the hand. By analyzing the internal configuration of the locations of these points, we produced implicit maps of the mental representation of hand size and shape. We show that this part of the body model is massively distorted, in a reliable and characteristic fashion, featuring shortened fingers and broadened hands. Intriguingly, these distortions appear to retain several characteristics of primary somatosensory representations, such as the Penfield homunculus. PMID:20547858

  18. Body position differentially influences responses to exogenous and endogenous cues.

    PubMed

    McAuliffe, Jim; Johnson, Michel J; Weaver, Bruce; Deller-Quinn, Miranda; Hansen, Steve

    2013-10-01

    The influence of vestibular inputs on exogenous (Exp. 1) and endogenous (Exp. 2) orienting of visual attention was examined. The vestibular system was manipulated through a change in static body position. Participants engaged in an exogenous or endogenous response task while in a seated position, while lying in a prone position, and while in a prone position with their head down and neck flexed (HDNF). An attenuation of inhibition and facilitation effects during the exogenous task was observed in the HDNF position. However, responses to the cues remained similar in the endogenous task, irrespective of body position. The results reveal a potential dissociation between reflexive and volitional orienting of visual attention that is dependent on vestibular inputs. PMID:24092358

  19. Predictors and health-related outcomes of positive body image in adolescent girls: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Rachel; Tiggemann, Marika; Clark, Levina

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate prospective predictors and health-related outcomes of positive body image in adolescent girls. In so doing, the modified acceptance model of intuitive eating was also examined longitudinally. A sample of 298 girls aged 12 to 16 years completed a questionnaire containing measures of body appreciation, potential predictors, and a range of health outcomes, at 2 time points separated by 1 year. Longitudinal change regression models showed that perceived body acceptance by others (positively), self-objectification and social comparison (negatively), and body appreciation (positively) prospectively predicted intuitive eating 1 year later, consistent with the acceptance model of intuitive eating. Perceived body acceptance by others was the only proposed predictor to prospectively predict an increase in body appreciation over time. Time 1 body appreciation prospectively predicted a decrease in dieting, alcohol, and cigarette use, and an increase in physical activity 1 year later. In particular, girls with low body appreciation were more likely than girls with high body appreciation to take up alcohol and cigarette use between time points. The results highlight body appreciation as an important target for interventions designed to prevent or delay the uptake of alcohol and cigarette consumption among girls. More broadly, they suggest that a positive body image can confer considerable benefit for adolescent girls. PMID:26727595

  20. Position determination systems. [using orbital antenna scan of celestial bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shores, P. W. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A system for an orbital antenna, operated at a synchronous altitude, to scan an area of a celestial body is disclosed. The antenna means comprises modules which are operated by a steering signal in a repetitive function for providing a scanning beam over the area. The scanning covers the entire area in a pattern and the azimuth of the scanning beam is transmitted to a control station on the celestial body simultaneous with signals from an activated ground beacon on the celestial body. The azimuth of the control station relative to the antenna is known and the location of the ground beacon is readily determined from the azimuth determinations.

  1. Appearance-based exercise motivation moderates the relationship between exercise frequency and positive body image.

    PubMed

    Homan, Kristin J; Tylka, Tracy L

    2014-03-01

    Individuals with a positive body image appreciate their bodies, hold an internal perspective of their bodies, and are satisfied with the functionality of their bodies. Research shows that positive body image is more complex than the absence of body dissatisfaction. Although exercise reduces women's body dissatisfaction, very little research has explored how, or even whether, exercise is associated with positive body image. Therefore, we examined whether exercise frequency was positively related to three aspects of positive body image (body appreciation, internal body orientation, and functional body satisfaction) among 321 college women. Appearance-based exercise motivation (the extent exercise is pursued to influence weight or shape) was hypothesized to moderate these associations. Hierarchical moderated regression analyses showed that exercise frequency was related to higher positive body image, but high levels of appearance-based exercise motivation weakened these relationships. Thus, messages promoting exercise need to de-emphasize weight loss and appearance for positive body image. PMID:24529336

  2. Passive drag reduction using full-body swimsuits: the role of body position.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, Matteo; Fantozzi, Silvia; Di Michele, Rocco; Zamparo, Paola; Gatta, Giorgio

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to analyze whether using full-body swimsuits affects the swimmer's body alignment and to what extent changes in the body position are responsible of the passive drag (Dp) reduction experienced by the swimmers when using these swimsuits. Fourteen swimmers performed 20-m towing trials using a full-body synthetic rubber swimsuit, a full-body textile swimsuit, a traditional brief swimsuit, and a traditional brief swimsuit with a pull buoy. In all trials, the speed-specific drag (k = Dp per v), the trunk incline (TI), and the lower limbs incline (LI) were determined. In comparison with both conditions in which a full-body swimsuit was not used, k was significantly lower when using the rubber swimsuit (-8.4 and -12.2% vs. the brief swimsuit with and without pull bouy, respectively), and the textile swimsuit (-6.9 and -10.8% vs. the brief swimsuit with and without pull bouy, respectively). No differences in TI were observed among conditions, whereas LI was significantly higher when using the rubber swimsuit or the brief swimsuit with pull buoy than when using the traditional brief swimsuit. A linear mixed model showed that k can be reduced by increasing LI (that is lifting the lower limbs), by decreasing TI (that is keeping the trunk more horizontal), and by using either the rubber or textile full-body swimsuit rather than the traditional brief swimsuit. In conclusion, full-body swimsuits involve a reduction of a swimmer's passive drag caused by intrinsic properties related to the "material composition" of the swimsuits and also influenced by changes in the swimmer's body position. PMID:24796982

  3. Response of Autonomic Nervous System to Body Positions:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Aiguo; Gonnella, G.; Federici, A.; Stramaglia, S.; Simone, F.; Zenzola, A.; Santostasi, R.

    Two mathematical methods, the Fourier and wavelet transforms, were used to study the short term cardiovascular control system. Time series, picked from electrocardiogram and arterial blood pressure lasting 6 minutes, were analyzed in supine position (SUP), during the first (HD1) and the second parts (HD2) of 90° head down tilt, and during recovery (REC). The wavelet transform was performed using the Haar function of period T=2j (j=1,2,...,6) to obtain wavelet coefficients. Power spectra components were analyzed within three bands, VLF (0.003-0.04), LF (0.04-0.15) and HF (0.15-0.4) with the frequency unit cycle/interval. Wavelet transform demonstrated a higher discrimination among all analyzed periods than the Fourier transform. For the Fourier analysis, the LF of R-R intervals and VLF of systolic blood pressure show more evident difference for different body positions. For the wavelet analysis, the systolic blood pressures show much more evident differences than the R-R intervals. This study suggests a difference in the response of the vessels and the heart to different body positions. The partial dissociation between VLF and LF results is a physiologically relevant finding of this work.

  4. Gravity matters: Motion perceptions modified by direction and body position.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Jens; Bardins, Stanislavs; Spiegel, Rainer; Strupp, Michael; Kalla, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Motion coherence thresholds are consistently higher at lower velocities. In this study we analysed the influence of the position and direction of moving objects on their perception and thereby the influence of gravity. This paradigm allows a differentiation to be made between coherent and randomly moving objects in an upright and a reclining position with a horizontal or vertical axis of motion. 18 young healthy participants were examined in this coherent threshold paradigm. Motion coherence thresholds were significantly lower when position and motion were congruent with gravity independent of motion velocity (p=0.024). In the other conditions higher motion coherence thresholds (MCT) were found at lower velocities and vice versa (p<0.001). This result confirms previous studies with higher MCT at lower velocity but is in contrast to studies concerning perception of virtual turns and optokinetic nystagmus, in which differences of perception were due to different directions irrespective of body position, i.e. perception took place in an egocentric reference frame. Since the observed differences occurred in an upright position only, perception of coherent motion in this study is defined by an earth-centered reference frame rather than by an ego-centric frame. PMID:27258411

  5. Body position and the neuroendocrine response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Radikova, Z; Penesova, A; Jezova, D; Kvetnansky, R; Vigas, M; Macho, L; Koska, J

    2003-10-01

    Changes in body fluid distribution are known to influence neuroendocrine function. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that changes in plasma volume affect the counterregulatory neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia. The tests were performed in 12 subjects in two situations: 'head-up' (+60 degrees head-up tilt standing for 30 min and hypoglycemia in sitting position afterwards) and 'leg-up' (leg-up position for 30 min and hypoglycemia in leg-up position afterwards) in a random order. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia was adjusted to 2.7 mmol/l for 15 min by glucose infusion. Plasma volume was greater by 2.2% (p < 0.001) in leg-up and lower by 9.6% (p < 0.001) in head-up position compared to the basal value in sitting position. Head-up position was associated with increases in ACTH, aldosterone, norepinephrine levels and plasma renin activity (p < 0.01). Leg-up position resulted in decreases in plasma growth hormone and epinephrine concentrations (p < 0.05). Except epinephrine, the neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia, if any, was mild. Hypoglycemia failed to activate ACTH release after head-up position. Body fluid redistribution did not modify hormonal changes during insulin hypoglycemia. In conclusion, we suggest that body position and accompanying plasma volume changes do not appear to affect neuroendocrine and counterregulatory responses to moderate, short duration hypoglycemia in healthy subjects. PMID:15764080

  6. Compressive-sampling-based positioning in wireless body area networks.

    PubMed

    Banitalebi-Dehkordi, Mehdi; Abouei, Jamshid; Plataniotis, Konstantinos N

    2014-01-01

    Recent achievements in wireless technologies have opened up enormous opportunities for the implementation of ubiquitous health care systems in providing rich contextual information and warning mechanisms against abnormal conditions. This helps with the automatic and remote monitoring/tracking of patients in hospitals and facilitates and with the supervision of fragile, elderly people in their own domestic environment through automatic systems to handle the remote drug delivery. This paper presents a new modeling and analysis framework for the multipatient positioning in a wireless body area network (WBAN) which exploits the spatial sparsity of patients and a sparse fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based feature extraction mechanism for monitoring of patients and for reporting the movement tracking to a central database server containing patient vital information. The main goal of this paper is to achieve a high degree of accuracy and resolution in the patient localization with less computational complexity in the implementation using the compressive sensing theory. We represent the patients' positions as a sparse vector obtained by the discrete segmentation of the patient movement space in a circular grid. To estimate this vector, a compressive-sampling-based two-level FFT (CS-2FFT) feature vector is synthesized for each received signal from the biosensors embedded on the patient's body at each grid point. This feature extraction process benefits in the combination of both short-time and long-time properties of the received signals. The robustness of the proposed CS-2FFT-based algorithm in terms of the average positioning error is numerically evaluated using the realistic parameters in the IEEE 802.15.6-WBAN standard in the presence of additive white Gaussian noise. Due to the circular grid pattern and the CS-2FFT feature extraction method, the proposed scheme represents a significant reduction in the computational complexity, while improving the level of the

  7. Conversion table for running on lower body positive pressure treadmills.

    PubMed

    Kline, John R; Raab, Scot; Coast, J Richard; Bounds, Roger G; McNeill, David K P; de Heer, Hendrik D

    2015-03-01

    Lower body positive pressure (LBPP) or antigravity treadmills are becoming increasingly popular in sports and rehabilitation settings. Running at a decreased body weight (BW) reduces metabolic cost, which can be offset by running at faster speeds. To date, however, little is known about how much faster someone must run to offset the reduced metabolic cost. This study aimed to develop a user-friendly conversion table showing the speeds required on an LBPP treadmill to match the equivalent metabolic output on a regular, non-LBPP, treadmill across a range of body weight supports. A total of 20 recreational runners (11 males, 9 females) ran multiple 3-minute intervals on a regular treadmill and then on an LBPP treadmill at 6 different BWs (50-100%, 10% increments). Metabolic outputs were recorded and matched between the regular and LBPP treadmill sessions. Using regression analyses, a conversion table was successfully created for the speeds from 6.4 to 16.1 km·h (4 to 10 mph) in 0.8 km·h (0.5 mph) increments on the regular treadmill and BW proportions of 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100% on an LBPP treadmill. The table showed that a greater increase in speed on the LBPP treadmill was needed with more support (p < 0.001) but that the proportion increase was smaller at higher speeds (p < 0.001). This research has implications for coaches or practitioners using or prescribing training on an LBPP treadmill. PMID:25162650

  8. Associations among positive mood, brain, and cardiovascular activities in an affectively positive situation.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Kimura, Kenta; Miyakoshi, Makoto; Kanayama, Noriaki; Murakami, Hiroki; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Konagaya, Toshihiro; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Ohira, Hideki

    2009-03-31

    It is hypothesized that experiencing positive emotions such as pleasure leads to a perception of the body being in a positive state. This study demonstrated associations among positive mood, brain, and cardiovascular activities by simultaneously recording these activities when positive emotions were evoked in participants watching films revolving around a love story. Heart rate variability analysis revealed increased parasympathetic nervous activity while watching the film. The following brain regions were significantly activated in the positive condition relative to the control condition: medial prefrontal cortex, thalamus, superior temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and cerebellum. Further, covariate analyses indicated that these brain regions were temporally associated with subjective positive mood. Activities of brain regions considered to be related to interoceptive awareness, such as the insular cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, and orbitofrontal cortex, were also temporally associated with the cardiovascular change. These results suggest that while an individual experiences positive emotions, activities of the central nervous system and cardiovascular system may be interrelated, and the brain may perceive the body to be in a positive state. PMID:19368841

  9. Indoor patient position estimation using particle filtering and wireless body area networks.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongliang; Meng, Max Q H; Xu, Lisheng

    2007-01-01

    Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN) has been recently promoted to monitor the physiological parameters of patient in an unobtrusive and natural way. This paper towards to make advantage of those ongoing wireless communication links between the body sensors to provide estimated position information of patients or particular body area networks, which make daily activity surveillance possible for further analysis. The proposed particle filtering based localization algorithm just picks up the received radio signal strength information from beacons or its neighbors to infer its own pose, which do not require additional hardware or instruments. Theoretical analysis and simulation experiments are presented to examine the performance of location estimating method. PMID:18002445

  10. What is and what is not positive body image? Conceptual foundations and construct definition.

    PubMed

    Tylka, Tracy L; Wood-Barcalow, Nichole L

    2015-06-01

    A decade ago, research on positive body image as a unique construct was relatively nonexistent, and now this area is flourishing. How and why did positive body image scholarship emerge? What is known about this contemporary construct? This article situates and contextualizes positive body image within Cash's scholarship, eating disorder prevention efforts, feminist influences, strength-based disciplines within psychology, and Buddhism. Extracting insights from quantitative and qualitative research, this article demonstrates that positive body image is (a) distinct from negative body image; (b) multifaceted (including body appreciation, body acceptance/love, conceptualizing beauty broadly, adaptive investment in appearance, inner positivity, interpreting information in a body-protective manner); (c) holistic; (d) stable and malleable; (e) protective; (f) linked to self-perceived body acceptance by others; and (g) shaped by social identities. Complementing what positive body image is, this article further details what positive body image is not to provide a more nuanced understanding of this construct. PMID:25921657

  11. Considering an Affect Regulation Framework for Examining the Association Between Body Dissatisfaction and Positive Body Image in Black Older Adolescent Females: Does Body Mass Index Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Butler-Ajibade, Phoebe; Robinson, Seronda A.

    2014-01-01

    The present study provided an initial evaluation of an affect regulation model describing the association between body dissatisfaction and two contemporary measures of positive body image among 247 Black college-bound older adolescent females. We further tested whether possessing a higher body mass index (BMI) would strengthen these associations. Self-reported height and weight were used to calculate BMI. Respondents also completed a culturally-sensitive figure rating scale along with assessments of body appreciation and body image flexibility. Results indicated a robust positive association between the two measures of positive body image; BMI was the strongest predictor of both body appreciation and body image flexibility with body size discrepancy (current minus ideal) contributing incremental variance to both models tested. Implications for improving our understanding of the association between positive and negative body image and bolstering positive body image to promote health-protective behaviors among Black young women at this developmental juncture are discussed. PMID:25079011

  12. Effect of physical activity on body composition

    SciTech Connect

    Zanzi, I; Ellis, K J; Aloia, J; Cohn, S H

    1980-01-01

    It has been noted that the deleterious effects on bone calcium of prolonged periods of inactivity, such as bed rest, are halted following resumption of activity. It would seem possible in light of the observations that have been made, that exercise may stimulate bone formation and perhaps counter, to some extent, bone loss as observed in the osteoporosis of aging. The present study was designed to determine the relation between total body calcium, total body potassium and bone mineral content of the radius to the degree of physical activity in a population of normal subjects. Measurement of the calcium was made by in-vivo total body neutron activation analysis. Bone mineral content of the radius and total body potassium, (an index of lean body mass) were measured by photon absorptiometry and the whole body counter, respectively.

  13. Positional FEM formulation for flexible multi-body dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, M.; Coda, H. B.

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a simple formulation to deal with flexible multi-body dynamic systems by the finite element method. The proposed methodology is based on the minimum potential energy theorem written regarding nodal positions. Velocity, acceleration and strain are achieved directly from positions, not displacements. A non-dimensional space is created and the relative curvature and fibers length are calculated for both reference and deformed configurations and used to calculate the strain energy at general points. The classical Newmark equations are used to integrate time. Damping is introduced into the mechanical system by a rheonomic energy functional. The final formulation has the advantage of being simple and easy to teach, when compared to classical counterparts. The behavior of a bench-mark problem (spin-up maneuver) is studied regarding the influence of mass representation on its overall transient and steady-state behavior. Three other examples are presented to show the applicability of the technique, namely, a flexible slider-crank mechanism, a flexible beam flight and a Peaucellier-type mechanism. The results are compared with other authors' numerical solutions.

  14. Primate body temperature and sleep responses to lower body positive pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, D. M.; Fuller, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Cephalic fluid shifts, induced by lower body positive pressure (LBPP) are known to influence various physiological systems (i.e., cardiovascular and renal). In earlier experiments, an apparent change in the arousal state of primates in such LBPP conditions was observed. This study was designed to examine the effects of LBPP on arousal state and body temperature level which is normally correlated with sleep. Chair-restrained male squirrel monkeys were exposed to 40 mmHg LBPP for 90-100 minutes between the daytime hours of 13:00-15:00. Each monkey was placed in a specially modified restraint chair to which they were highly trained. Deep body temperature (DBT) was collected from 10 animals. Sleep parameters were obtained from six animals chronically implanted for sleep recording. A video camera was used to observe each animal's apparent state of arousal. LBPP resulted in an approximate 0.9 C decrease in DBT. During video observation, some animals appeared drowsy during LBPP; however, sleep recording revealed no significant changes in the state of arousal. Thus, LBPP is capable of inducing a mild hyperthermia. Further, the mechanisms underlying the observed lowering of body temperature appear to be independent of arousal state.

  15. Embodying positive aging and neoliberal rationality: Talking about the aging body within narratives of retirement.

    PubMed

    Laliberte Rudman, Debbie

    2015-08-01

    Within contemporary Western contexts, positive aging discourses are a key aspect of structured mandates for how to think about and act toward aging bodies. This study adds to previous work on embodiment that has situated how aging bodies are managed by focusing on the body as an aspect of retirement preparation, and critically considering how the imperative to govern the aging body in ways consistent with being a 'good' neoliberal citizen circulated through positive aging discourses is negotiated by aging individuals. Utilizing narrative data from a study addressing the discursive re-shaping and narrative negotiation of retirement within the Canadian context conducted with 30 informants aged 45 to 83, this paper draws upon a governmentality perspective to critically analyze ways informants talked about their aging bodies as part of preparing for and moving into retirement. Overall, the findings illustrate how informants embodied positive aging discourses and, in turn, embodied neoliberal rationality particularly in taking up the call to attend to the body as part of the broadening of retirement planning within a neoliberal context in which health, social, financial and other responsibilities are increasingly shifted toward individuals. Although informants described realizing some of the promises offered up with positive aging discourses, such as a sense of youthfulness and bodily control, their narratives also point to detrimental individual and social implications that can arise out of the limits of bodily practices, the need for perpetual risk management, an aversion to oldness, and attributions of failure. As such, this study raises concerns about the implications of the intersections of positive aging discourses and the neoliberal agenda of activation, responsibilization and individualization. PMID:26162721

  16. Body image and health behaviors: is there a relationship between lifestyles and positive body image?

    PubMed

    Zanon, A; Tomassoni, R; Gargano, M; Granai, M G

    2016-01-01

    The study illustrates a research on the relationship between body image and lifestyles in a sample of 262 young amateur athletes that have a regular attendance of a gym in Cassino (Central Italy). The following questionnaires were used: Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ34), International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), Short form 12 items (SF12). The participants were 257 (response rate 98.1%) mainly of young age (18-24 years, 63.8%), single (72%), with a senior high school diploma (57.2%), students (63%). For almost all the BSQ-34 questionnaire items differences for gender were found, with Females more worried than males. 187 (72.8%) reported some vigorous activity during a week, 207 (80.5%) some moderate activity, and 229 (89.1%) walking. The participants had a median PCS score of 54.2 (range: 24.5-64.8) and a median MCS score of 43.8 (range: 9.3 - 58.7). The mean score of the Mediterranean diet was 4.8 (median = 5; Range = 1-8), and only 72 individuals (11.7%) had optimal score (over or equal to 6). PMID:27424512

  17. Workshop on Body Image: Creating or Reinventing a Positive Body Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Christine

    This paper examines the culturization of body image and the impact of body image on women and men, noting that the strict definition of body size has made many women and men dissatisfied with their bodies. The first section defines body image and culturization, explaining how the current media images put tremendous pressure on men and women that…

  18. Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Mark S.; Gray, Casey; Babcock, Shawna; Barnes, Joel; Costas Bradstreet, Christa; Carr, Dawn; Chabot, Guylaine; Choquette, Louise; Chorney, David; Collyer, Cam; Herrington, Susan; Janson, Katherine; Janssen, Ian; Larouche, Richard; Pickett, William; Power, Marlene; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen; Simon, Brenda; Brussoni, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    A diverse, cross-sectorial group of partners, stakeholders and researchers, collaborated to develop an evidence-informed Position Statement on active outdoor play for children aged 3–12 years. The Position Statement was created in response to practitioner, academic, legal, insurance and public debate, dialogue and disagreement on the relative benefits and harms of active (including risky) outdoor play. The Position Statement development process was informed by two systematic reviews, a critical appraisal of the current literature and existing position statements, engagement of research experts (N = 9) and cross-sectorial individuals/organizations (N = 17), and an extensive stakeholder consultation process (N = 1908). More than 95% of the stakeholders consulted strongly agreed or somewhat agreed with the Position Statement; 14/17 participating individuals/organizations endorsed it; and over 1000 additional individuals and organizations requested their name be listed as a supporter. The final Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play states: “Access to active play in nature and outdoors—with its risks— is essential for healthy child development. We recommend increasing children’s opportunities for self-directed play outdoors in all settings—at home, at school, in child care, the community and nature.” The full Position Statement provides context for the statement, evidence supporting it, and a series of recommendations to increase active outdoor play opportunities to promote healthy child development. PMID:26062040

  19. Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Mark S; Gray, Casey; Babcock, Shawna; Barnes, Joel; Bradstreet, Christa Costas; Carr, Dawn; Chabot, Guylaine; Choquette, Louise; Chorney, David; Collyer, Cam; Herrington, Susan; Janson, Katherine; Janssen, Ian; Larouche, Richard; Pickett, William; Power, Marlene; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen; Simon, Brenda; Brussoni, Mariana

    2015-06-01

    A diverse, cross-sectorial group of partners, stakeholders and researchers, collaborated to develop an evidence-informed Position Statement on active outdoor play for children aged 3-12 years. The Position Statement was created in response to practitioner, academic, legal, insurance and public debate, dialogue and disagreement on the relative benefits and harms of active (including risky) outdoor play. The Position Statement development process was informed by two systematic reviews, a critical appraisal of the current literature and existing position statements, engagement of research experts (N=9) and cross-sectorial individuals/organizations (N=17), and an extensive stakeholder consultation process (N=1908). More than 95% of the stakeholders consulted strongly agreed or somewhat agreed with the Position Statement; 14/17 participating individuals/organizations endorsed it; and over 1000 additional individuals and organizations requested their name be listed as a supporter. The final Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play states: "Access to active play in nature and outdoors--with its risks--is essential for healthy child development. We recommend increasing children's opportunities for self-directed play outdoors in all settings--at home, at school, in child care, the community and nature." The full Position Statement provides context for the statement, evidence supporting it, and a series of recommendations to increase active outdoor play opportunities to promote healthy child development. PMID:26062040

  20. Estimating energy expenditure using body-worn accelerometers: a comparison of methods, sensors number and positioning.

    PubMed

    Altini, Marco; Penders, Julien; Vullers, Ruud; Amft, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Several methods to estimate energy expenditure (EE) using body-worn sensors exist; however, quantifications of the differences in estimation error are missing. In this paper, we compare three prevalent EE estimation methods and five body locations to provide a basis for selecting among methods, sensors number, and positioning. We considered 1) counts-based estimation methods, 2) activity-specific estimation methods using METs lookup, and 3) activity-specific estimation methods using accelerometer features. The latter two estimation methods utilize subsequent activity classification and EE estimation steps. Furthermore, we analyzed accelerometer sensors number and on-body positioning to derive optimal EE estimation results during various daily activities. To evaluate our approach, we implemented a study with 15 participants that wore five accelerometer sensors while performing a wide range of sedentary, household, lifestyle, and gym activities at different intensities. Indirect calorimetry was used in parallel to obtain EE reference data. Results show that activity-specific estimation methods using accelerometer features can outperform counts-based methods by 88% and activity-specific methods using METs lookup for active clusters by 23%. No differences were found between activity-specific methods using METs lookup and using accelerometer features for sedentary clusters. For activity-specific estimation methods using accelerometer features, differences in EE estimation error between the best combinations of each number of sensors (1 to 5), analyzed with repeated measures ANOVA, were not significant. Thus, we conclude that choosing the best performing single sensor does not reduce EE estimation accuracy compared to a five sensors system and can reliably be used. However, EE estimation errors can increase up to 80% if a nonoptimal sensor location is chosen. PMID:24691168

  1. Personality and individual difference correlates of positive body image.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Hadji-Michael, Maria; Furnham, Adrian

    2008-09-01

    In the present study, 101 women and 106 men from a community sample of British adults completed the Body Appreciation Scale (BAS), along with a battery of individual difference measures and demographics. Contrary to previous findings, there were no sex differences in BAS scores, either before or after controlling for individual differences in other measures. The results also showed that, moderating for participants' sex, self-assessed attractiveness, educational qualifications, neuroticism, extraversion, and BMI were all significant predictors of body appreciation. In addition, higher media consumption and higher (male-stereotypic) instrumentality were associated with, but did not predict, higher body appreciation. These results are discussed in relation to the extant work on body image. PMID:18585107

  2. Discursive Positionings and Emotions in Modelling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daher, Wajeeh

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modelling is suggested as an activity through which students engage in meaningful mathematics. In the current research, the modelling activity of a group of four seventh-grade students was analysed using the discursive analysis framework. The research findings show that the positionings and emotions of the group members during their…

  3. Discursive positionings and emotions in modelling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daher, Wajeeh

    2015-11-01

    Mathematical modelling is suggested as an activity through which students engage in meaningful mathematics. In the current research, the modelling activity of a group of four seventh-grade students was analysed using the discursive analysis framework. The research findings show that the positionings and emotions of the group members during their participation in the modelling activity changed as the activity proceeded. Overall, it can be said that three of the four group members acted as insiders, while the fourth acted as an outsider, and only, towards the end of the group's work on the activity, he acted as an insider. Moreover, the research findings point at four factors that affected the group members' positionings and emotions during the modelling activity: the member's characteristics, the member's history of learning experiences, the activity characteristics and the modelling phases. Furthermore, the different positionings of the group members in the different modelling phases were accompanied by different emotions experienced by them, where being an insider and a collaborator resulted in positive emotions, while being an outsider resulted in negative emotions.

  4. Mutation of Glycosylation Sites in BST-2 Leads to Its Accumulation at Intracellular CD63-Positive Vesicles without Affecting Its Antiviral Activity against Multivesicular Body-Targeted HIV-1 and Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhu; Lv, Mingyu; Shi, Ying; Yu, Jinghua; Niu, Junqi; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Wenyan

    2016-01-01

    BST-2/tetherin blocks the release of various enveloped viruses including HIV-1 with a “physical tethering” model. The detailed contribution of N-linked glycosylation to this model is controversial. Here, we confirmed that mutation of glycosylation sites exerted an effect of post-translational mis-trafficking, leading to an accumulation of BST-2 at intracellular CD63-positive vesicles. BST-2 with this phenotype potently inhibited the release of multivesicular body-targeted HIV-1 and hepatitis B virus, without affecting the co-localization of BST-2 with EEA1 and LAMP1. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation of human BST-2 is dispensable for intracellular virion retention and imply that this recently discovered intracellular tethering function may be evolutionarily distinguished from the canonical antiviral function of BST-2 by tethering nascent virions at the cell surface. PMID:26938549

  5. Larger Mammalian Body Size Leads to Lower Retroviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Katzourakis, Aris; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Lim, Aaron G.; Gupta, Sunetra; Belshaw, Robert; Gifford, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses have been infecting mammals for at least 100 million years, leaving descendants in host genomes known as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). The abundance of ERVs is partly determined by their mode of replication, but it has also been suggested that host life history traits could enhance or suppress their activity. We show that larger bodied species have lower levels of ERV activity by reconstructing the rate of ERV integration across 38 mammalian species. Body size explains 37% of the variance in ERV integration rate over the last 10 million years, controlling for the effect of confounding due to other life history traits. Furthermore, 68% of the variance in the mean age of ERVs per genome can also be explained by body size. These results indicate that body size limits the number of recently replicating ERVs due to their detrimental effects on their host. To comprehend the possible mechanistic links between body size and ERV integration we built a mathematical model, which shows that ERV abundance is favored by lower body size and higher horizontal transmission rates. We argue that because retroviral integration is tumorigenic, the negative correlation between body size and ERV numbers results from the necessity to reduce the risk of cancer, under the assumption that this risk scales positively with body size. Our model also fits the empirical observation that the lifetime risk of cancer is relatively invariant among mammals regardless of their body size, known as Peto's paradox, and indicates that larger bodied mammals may have evolved mechanisms to limit ERV activity. PMID:25033295

  6. Total body nitrogen analysis. [neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of two potential in vivo neutron activation methods for determining total and partial body nitrogen in animals and humans are described. A method using the CO-11 in the expired air as a measure of nitrogen content was found to be adequate for small animals such as rats, but inadequate for human measurements due to a slow excretion rate. Studies on the method of measuring the induced N-13 in the body show that with further development, this method should be adequate for measuring muscle mass changes occurring in animals or humans during space flight.

  7. Interactive effects of body position and perceived exertion during spinning exercises.

    PubMed

    Rendos, Nicole K; Musto, Anthony A; Signorile, Joseph F

    2015-03-01

    Spinning is a popular group exercise taught in health and fitness facilities worldwide. Throughout a Spinning workout session, intensity is variable and is controlled by body position on the Spinning stationary cycle and perceived resistance. This study examined the effects of 3 body positions and 4 levels of perceived exertion (RPE) on cardiorespiratory response and vastus lateralis normalized electromyographical activity (NrmsEMGVL). Eleven participants (24.4 ± 6.3 years) with 3.2 ± 2.2 years of Spinning experience completed twelve 3-minute randomly assigned Spinning conditions across 4 separate testing days after an 8-hour fast. Conditions were determined by body position (seated, running, and standing climb [SC]) and RPE (low, low-medium, medium-high, and high). Cardiorespiratory data and NrmsEMGVL were recorded continuously during each Spinning condition. Respiratory rate and oxygen consumption were significantly higher for running and SC than seated, and minute ventilation was significantly higher for running than seated. All cardiorespiratory values were higher at medium-high and high RPE, than low or medium-low RPE, and high RPE generated higher respiratory rate and respiratory exchange ratio than medium-high RPE. Significant body position × RPE interactions were observed for heart rate (HR) and NrmsEMGVL with running and SC producing higher HRs than seated at low and high RPE, and running producing higher NrmsEMGVL than seated at low RPE. Results indicate that running and SC provide the greatest cardiorespiratory responses, and maximal efforts are not needed for these responses. Additionally, HR seems to be a poor marker of oxygen consumption, especially at high RPEs. PMID:25226336

  8. Body position alters human resting-state: Insights from multi-postural magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Robert T; Lifshitz, Michael; Raz, Amir

    2016-09-01

    Neuroimaging researchers tacitly assume that body-position scantily affects neural activity. However, whereas participants in most psychological experiments sit upright, many modern neuroimaging techniques (e.g., fMRI) require participants to lie supine. Sparse findings from electroencephalography and positron emission tomography suggest that body position influences cognitive processes and neural activity. Here we leverage multi-postural magnetoencephalography (MEG) to further unravel how physical stance alters baseline brain activity. We present resting-state MEG data from 12 healthy participants in three orthostatic conditions (i.e., lying supine, reclined at 45°, and sitting upright). Our findings demonstrate that upright, compared to reclined or supine, posture increases left-hemisphere high-frequency oscillatory activity over common speech areas. This proof-of-concept experiment establishes the feasibility of using MEG to examine the influence of posture on brain dynamics. We highlight the advantages and methodological challenges inherent to this approach and lay the foundation for future studies to further investigate this important, albeit little-acknowledged, procedural caveat. PMID:26409469

  9. Our Bodies, Our Cells: Children's Activities in Body Systems. Children's Activity Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahn, Marilyn

    The supplemental teaching resources provided in this book offer a variety of concrete, visual activities designed to help classroom and daycare center teachers introduce children to the human body and the way it is organized. An analogy comparing human body parts to house parts is used throughout the book to make lessons clear and age-appropriate.…

  10. Body Position Influences Which Neural Structures Are Recruited by Lumbar Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Danner, Simon M.; Krenn, Matthias; Hofstoetter, Ursula S.; Toth, Andrea; Mayr, Winfried; Minassian, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Transcutaneous stimulation of the human lumbosacral spinal cord is used to evoke spinal reflexes and to neuromodulate altered sensorimotor function following spinal cord injury. Both applications require the reliable stimulation of afferent posterior root fibers. Yet under certain circumstances, efferent anterior root fibers can be co-activated. We hypothesized that body position influences the preferential stimulation of sensory or motor fibers. Stimulus-triggered responses to transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation were recorded using surface-electromyography from quadriceps, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae muscles in 10 individuals with intact nervous systems in the supine, standing and prone positions. Single and paired (30-ms inter-stimulus intervals) biphasic stimulation pulses were applied through surface electrodes placed on the skin between the T11 and T12 inter-spinous processes referenced to electrodes on the abdomen. The paired stimulation was applied to evaluate the origin of the evoked electromyographic response; trans-synaptic responses would be suppressed whereas direct efferent responses would almost retain their amplitude. We found that responses to the second stimulus were decreased to 14%±5% of the amplitude of the response to the initial pulse in the supine position across muscles, to 30%±5% in the standing, and to only 80%±5% in the prone position. Response thresholds were lowest during standing and highest in the prone position and response amplitudes were largest in the supine and smallest in the prone position. The responses obtained in the supine and standing positions likely resulted from selective stimulation of sensory fibers while concomitant motor-fiber stimulation occurred in the prone position. We assume that changes of root-fiber paths within the generated electric field when in the prone position increase the stimulation thresholds of posterior above those of anterior root fibers. Thus, we recommend conducting

  11. Body Position Influences Which Neural Structures Are Recruited by Lumbar Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Danner, Simon M; Krenn, Matthias; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Toth, Andrea; Mayr, Winfried; Minassian, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Transcutaneous stimulation of the human lumbosacral spinal cord is used to evoke spinal reflexes and to neuromodulate altered sensorimotor function following spinal cord injury. Both applications require the reliable stimulation of afferent posterior root fibers. Yet under certain circumstances, efferent anterior root fibers can be co-activated. We hypothesized that body position influences the preferential stimulation of sensory or motor fibers. Stimulus-triggered responses to transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation were recorded using surface-electromyography from quadriceps, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae muscles in 10 individuals with intact nervous systems in the supine, standing and prone positions. Single and paired (30-ms inter-stimulus intervals) biphasic stimulation pulses were applied through surface electrodes placed on the skin between the T11 and T12 inter-spinous processes referenced to electrodes on the abdomen. The paired stimulation was applied to evaluate the origin of the evoked electromyographic response; trans-synaptic responses would be suppressed whereas direct efferent responses would almost retain their amplitude. We found that responses to the second stimulus were decreased to 14%±5% of the amplitude of the response to the initial pulse in the supine position across muscles, to 30%±5% in the standing, and to only 80%±5% in the prone position. Response thresholds were lowest during standing and highest in the prone position and response amplitudes were largest in the supine and smallest in the prone position. The responses obtained in the supine and standing positions likely resulted from selective stimulation of sensory fibers while concomitant motor-fiber stimulation occurred in the prone position. We assume that changes of root-fiber paths within the generated electric field when in the prone position increase the stimulation thresholds of posterior above those of anterior root fibers. Thus, we recommend conducting

  12. Body cues, not facial expressions, discriminate between intense positive and negative emotions.

    PubMed

    Aviezer, Hillel; Trope, Yaacov; Todorov, Alexander

    2012-11-30

    The distinction between positive and negative emotions is fundamental in emotion models. Intriguingly, neurobiological work suggests shared mechanisms across positive and negative emotions. We tested whether similar overlap occurs in real-life facial expressions. During peak intensities of emotion, positive and negative situations were successfully discriminated from isolated bodies but not faces. Nevertheless, viewers perceived illusory positivity or negativity in the nondiagnostic faces when seen with bodies. To reveal the underlying mechanisms, we created compounds of intense negative faces combined with positive bodies, and vice versa. Perceived affect and mimicry of the faces shifted systematically as a function of their contextual body emotion. These findings challenge standard models of emotion expression and highlight the role of the body in expressing and perceiving emotions. PMID:23197536

  13. Exploring the complexities of body image experiences in middle age and older adult women within an exercise context: The simultaneous existence of negative and positive body images.

    PubMed

    Bailey, K Alysse; Cline, Lindsay E; Gammage, Kimberley L

    2016-06-01

    Despite many body changes that accompany the aging process, the extant research is limited on middle age and older adults' body image experiences. The purpose of the present study was to explore how body image is represented for middle age and older adult women. Using thematic analysis, 10 women over the age of 55 were interviewed within an exercise context. The following themes were found: body dissatisfaction, body satisfaction despite ageist stereotypes, neutral body image within cohort, and positive body image characteristics. Negative and positive body images were experienced simultaneously, with neutral experiences expressed as low levels of dissatisfaction. This supports the contention that negative and positive body images exist on separate continuums and neutral body image is likely on the same continuum as negative body image. Programs that foster a social support network to reduce negative body image and improve positive body image in older female populations are needed. PMID:26989980

  14. Flattop regulates basal body docking and positioning in mono- and multiciliated cells

    PubMed Central

    Gegg, Moritz; Böttcher, Anika; Burtscher, Ingo; Hasenoeder, Stefan; Van Campenhout, Claude; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel; Grant, Seth G N; Lickert, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) regulates basal body (BB) docking and positioning during cilia formation, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we investigate the uncharacterized gene Flattop (Fltp) that is transcriptionally activated during PCP acquisition in ciliated tissues. Fltp knock-out mice show BB docking and ciliogenesis defects in multiciliated lung cells. Furthermore, Fltp is necessary for kinocilium positioning in monociliated inner ear hair cells. In these cells, the core PCP molecule Dishevelled 2, the BB/spindle positioning protein Dlg3, and Fltp localize directly adjacent to the apical plasma membrane, physically interact and surround the BB at the interface of the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton. Dlg3 and Fltp knock-outs suggest that both cooperatively translate PCP cues for BB positioning in the inner ear. Taken together, the identification of novel BB/spindle positioning components as potential mediators of PCP signaling might have broader implications for other cell types, ciliary disease, and asymmetric cell division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03842.001 PMID:25296022

  15. Body Talk: Siblings' Use of Positive and Negative Body Self-Disclosure and Associations with Sibling Relationship Quality and Body-Esteem.

    PubMed

    Greer, Kelly Bassett; Campione-Barr, Nicole; Lindell, Anna K

    2015-08-01

    The sibling relationship has been deemed the quintessential "love-hate relationship." Sibling relationships have also been found to have both positive and negative impacts on the adjustment of youth. Unlike previous research, however, the present study examined the associations between siblings' positive and negative body-related disclosures with relationship quality and body-esteem. Additionally, ordinal position, individual sex, and sibling sex composition were tested as moderators. Participants included 101 predominantly White and middle class adolescent sibling dyads (54 % female adolescents, with relatively equal sibling gender compositions). Older siblings were, on average, 16.46 (SD = 1.35) years old with younger siblings an average of 13.67 (SD = 1.56) years. Adolescents completed questionnaires and data were analyzed using Actor-Partner Interdependence Modeling, which focused on disclosure to and from dyad members. In general, sibling body-related disclosure was positive for the quality of the sibling relationship, regardless of the valance of disclosure. Also, adolescents' body esteem was greater when adolescents reported disclosing (i.e., actor-effects) about positive or negative body issues to their siblings (particularly for females). Conversely, when adolescents received positive or negative body-related disclosures from their siblings (i.e., partner-effects), adolescents reported lower levels of body esteem (particularly for girls and younger siblings). Thus, the impact of body-related disclosure on adolescents' feelings of body esteem appear to be associated more with whether they are the discloser or the one being disclosed to, while the impact on the quality of the relationship has simply more to do with whether or not they are generally disclosing to one another. PMID:25185563

  16. Take a look at the bright side: Effects of positive body exposure on selective visual attention in women with high body dissatisfaction.

    PubMed

    Glashouwer, Klaske A; Jonker, Nienke C; Thomassen, Karen; de Jong, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Women with high body dissatisfaction look less at their 'beautiful' body parts than their 'ugly' body parts. This study tested the robustness of this selective viewing pattern and examined the influence of positive body exposure on body-dissatisfied women's attention for 'ugly' and 'beautiful' body parts. In women with high body dissatisfaction (N = 28) and women with low body dissatisfaction (N = 14) eye-tracking was used to assess visual attention towards pictures of their own and other women's bodies. Participants with high body dissatisfaction were randomly assigned to 5 weeks positive body exposure (n = 15) or a no-treatment condition (n = 13). Attention bias was assessed again after 5 weeks. Body-dissatisfied women looked longer at 'ugly' than 'beautiful' body parts of themselves and others, while participants with low body dissatisfaction attended equally long to own/others' 'beautiful' and 'ugly' body parts. Although positive body exposure was very effective in improving participants' body satisfaction, it did not systematically change participants' viewing pattern. The tendency to preferentially allocate attention towards one's 'ugly' body parts seems a robust phenomenon in women with body dissatisfaction. Yet, modifying this selective viewing pattern seems not a prerequisite for successfully improving body satisfaction via positive body exposure. PMID:27236075

  17. Human body contour data based activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Myagmarbayar, Nergui; Yuki, Yoshida; Imamoglu, Nevrez; Gonzalez, Jose; Otake, Mihoko; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    This research work is aimed to develop autonomous bio-monitoring mobile robots, which are capable of tracking and measuring patients' motions, recognizing the patients' behavior based on observation data, and providing calling for medical personnel in emergency situations in home environment. The robots to be developed will bring about cost-effective, safe and easier at-home rehabilitation to most motor-function impaired patients (MIPs). In our previous research, a full framework was established towards this research goal. In this research, we aimed at improving the human activity recognition by using contour data of the tracked human subject extracted from the depth images as the signal source, instead of the lower limb joint angle data used in the previous research, which are more likely to be affected by the motion of the robot and human subjects. Several geometric parameters, such as, the ratio of height to weight of the tracked human subject, and distance (pixels) between centroid points of upper and lower parts of human body, were calculated from the contour data, and used as the features for the activity recognition. A Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is employed to classify different human activities from the features. Experimental results showed that the human activity recognition could be achieved with a high correct rate. PMID:24111015

  18. Effect of body position on vocal tract acoustics: Acoustic pharyngometry and vowel formants

    PubMed Central

    Vorperian, Houri K.; Kurtzweil, Sara L.; Fourakis, Marios; Kent, Ray D.; Tillman, Katelyn K.; Austin, Diane

    2015-01-01

    The anatomic basis and articulatory features of speech production are often studied with imaging studies that are typically acquired in the supine body position. It is important to determine if changes in body orientation to the gravitational field alter vocal tract dimensions and speech acoustics. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of body position (upright versus supine) on (1) oral and pharyngeal measurements derived from acoustic pharyngometry and (2) acoustic measurements of fundamental frequency (F0) and the first four formant frequencies (F1–F4) for the quadrilateral point vowels. Data were obtained for 27 male and female participants, aged 17 to 35 yrs. Acoustic pharyngometry showed a statistically significant effect of body position on volumetric measurements, with smaller values in the supine than upright position, but no changes in length measurements. Acoustic analyses of vowels showed significantly larger values in the supine than upright position for the variables of F0, F3, and the Euclidean distance from the centroid to each corner vowel in the F1-F2-F3 space. Changes in body position affected measurements of vocal tract volume but not length. Body position also affected the aforementioned acoustic variables, but the main vowel formants were preserved. PMID:26328699

  19. Peroxidase-positive Auer bodies in plasma cells in multiple myeloma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; An, Li; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Ren, Xue-Rui; Song, Jing-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Reports of clinical cases with Auer bodies in the plasma cells in multiple myeloma (MM) are rare; however, most of those reported contain peroxidase (POX)-negative Auer bodies rather than the POX-positive Auer bodies observed in myeloid progenitors, indicating differences in their chemical properties. Furthermore, the cases with POX-positive Auer bodies similar to those observed in myeloid cells are extremely rare in non-myeloid cells. Here, we report the clinical features, laboratory investigations, diagnosis and treatment of a case of MM with POX-positive Auer bodies in plasma cells and review related the literature to advance the prognostic evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of similar cases. PMID:26823884

  20. Pre-existent vertebral rotation in the human spine is influenced by body position.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Michiel M A; Vincken, Koen L; Kemp, Bastiaan; Obradov, Marina; De Kleuver, Marinus; Viergever, Max A; Castelein, René M; Bartels, Lambertus W

    2010-01-01

    Human bipedalism appears to be a prerequisite for the development of idiopathic scoliosis. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of different positions of the human spine on vertebral rotation in vivo. Thirty asymptomatic volunteers underwent MRI scanning of the spine in three different body positions; upright, quadrupedal-like and supine. Vertebral rotation in the local transverse plane was measured and compared at different spinal levels between the three body positions. It was shown that in all three positions the mid and lower thoracic vertebrae were predominantly rotated to the right. However, rotation was significantly less in certain areas of the spine in the quadrupedal-like position than in both the standing upright and supine positions. We hypothesize that the erect position of the human spine, but also the supine position, increases dorsally directed shear loads that may increase the tendency of certain spinal segments to rotate. PMID:20543402

  1. New possibilities in the prevention of eating disorders: The introduction of positive body image measures.

    PubMed

    Piran, Niva

    2015-06-01

    Delineating positive psychological processes in inhabiting the body, as well as quantitative measures to assess them, can facilitate progress in the field of prevention of eating disorders by expanding outcome evaluation of prevention interventions, identifying novel mediators of change, and increasing highly needed research into protective factors. Moreover, enhancing positive ways of inhabiting the body may contribute toward the maintenance of gains of prevention interventions. Integrated social etiological models to eating disorders that focus on gender and other social variables, such as the Developmental Theory of Embodiment (Piran & Teall, 2012a), can contribute to positive body image intervention development and research within the prevention field. Using the Developmental Theory of Embodiment as a lens, this article explores whether existing prevention programs (i.e., Cognitive Dissonance and Media Smart) may already work to promote positive body image, and whether prevention programs need to be expanded toward this goal. PMID:25886711

  2. Jerk analysis of active body-weight-transfer.

    PubMed

    Baldinotti, Ivan; Timmann, Dagmar; Kolb, Florian P; Kutz, Dieter F

    2010-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that whole-body vibration improves posture and gait control in stroke patients. Patients with degenerative cerebellar disease suffer from ataxic gait also which is characterised by the variation of gait pattern. Our interest is to test whole-body vibration as a method for rehabilitation treatment in cerebellar patients and to assess the success of the treatment using dynamic tests. The aim of this study was to introduce a method for quantifying movement dynamics during an active voluntary sidestep that results in a body-weight-transfer. Subjects had to perform a step from a feet-apart-position to a feet-together-position and back again. The algorithms presented in this study allow automatic identification of the timing of the dynamic phases by analysing the centre of pressure trajectory. For this study the time flow of averaged speed, acceleration, and jerk was calculated for the active movement only. This study demonstrates that jerk provides a sensitive measure for the improvement in gait in rehabilitation and during training. PMID:20940098

  3. Predictors and Health-Related Outcomes of Positive Body Image in Adolescent Girls: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, Rachel; Tiggemann, Marika; Clark, Levina

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate prospective predictors and health-related outcomes of positive body image in adolescent girls. In so doing, the modified acceptance model of intuitive eating was also examined longitudinally. A sample of 298 girls aged 12 to 16 years completed a questionnaire containing measures of body appreciation, potential…

  4. The Practical Application of Promoting Positive Body Image on a College Campus: Insights from Freshmen Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Jackson, TeriSue; Reel, Justine J.; Thackeray, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Background: Body image disturbances and disordered eating behaviors are prevalent across college campuses and can lead to psychological and physical health consequences. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain formative research on the promotion of positive body image on a university campus with the goal of developing educational programs.…

  5. WHOLE BODY COUNTING AND NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The composition of the human body can be described using a number of different models. The most basic is the atomic model. This chapter describes several nuclear-based techniques that have been used to obtain direct in vivo chemical assays of the whole body of humans. In particular, the body's co...

  6. Consumption of garlic positively affects hedonic perception of axillary body odour.

    PubMed

    Fialová, Jitka; Roberts, S Craig; Havlíček, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Beneficial health properties of garlic, as well as its most common adverse effect - distinctive breath odour - are well-known. In contrast, analogous research on the effect of garlic on axillary odour is currently missing. Here, in three studies varying in the amount and nature of garlic provided (raw garlic in study 1 and 2, garlic capsules in study 3), we tested the effect of garlic consumption on the quality of axillary odour. A balanced within-subject experimental design was used. In total, 42 male odour donors were allocated to either a "garlic" or "non-garlic" condition, after which they wore axillary pads for 12 h to collect body odour. One week later, the conditions were reversed. Odour samples were then judged for their pleasantness, attractiveness, masculinity and intensity by 82 women. We found no significant differences in ratings of any characteristics in study 1. However, the odour of donors after an increased garlic dosage was assessed as significantly more pleasant, attractive and less intense (study 2), and more attractive and less intense in study 3. Our results indicate that garlic consumption may have positive effects on perceived body odour hedonicity, perhaps due to its health effects (e.g., antioxidant properties, antimicrobial activity). PMID:26551789

  7. BODIMOJO: EFFECTIVE INTERNET-BASED PROMOTION OF POSITIVE BODY IMAGE IN ADOLESCENT GIRLS

    PubMed Central

    Franko, Debra L.; Cousineau, Tara M.; Rodgers, Rachel F.; Roehrig, James P.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the efficacy of an Internet-based health promotion program, BodiMojo, designed to promote positive body image in adolescents. Participants were 178 students (mean age 15.2 years, 67.6% ethnic minority) in three public high schools. Intervention groups used BodiMojo for four weekly health class periods, while controls participated in their usual health curriculum. Body image measures were given at baseline, post-intervention, and 3 months. Girls reported decreased body dissatisfaction (p < .05), decreased physical appearance comparison (p < .05), and increased appearance satisfaction (p < .05), relative to controls. Effects were not maintained at 3 month follow-up. No significant differences were found between the intervention and control groups with boys. Moderation analyses suggested positive effects for diverse adolescents as well as those who were overweight or indicated baseline high body dissatisfaction. BodiMojo appears to be modestly effective in decreasing body image concerns among adolescent girls in the short term. PMID:23768797

  8. BodySense: an evaluation of a positive body image intervention on sport climate for female athletes.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Annick; Mack, Heidi; McVey, Gail; Feder, Stephen; Barrowman, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a selective prevention program designed to reduce pressures to be thin in sport, and to promote positive body image and eating behaviors in young female athletes. Participants were competitive female gymnasts (aged 11 to 18 years), parents, and coaches from 7 gymnastic clubs across Ontario, Canada. Four of the seven clubs were randomized to receive the 3-month intervention program (IG) aimed at increasing awareness and positive climate change of body image pressures for athletes in their clubs. Three clubs were randomized to the control group (CG). A total of 62 female gymnasts (IG n = 31; CG n = 31) completed self-report questionnaires examining perceptions of pressure to be thin within their sports clubs, self-efficacy over dieting pressures, awareness and internalization of societal pressure to be thin, body esteem, and eating attitudes and behaviours before and following the intervention. A total of 32 mothers (IG n = 24; CG n = 8) completed measures examining their perceptions of their daughter's pressure to be thin, awareness and internalization of societal pressures to be thin, daughter's self-efficacy over dieting pressures, in addition to mothers' beliefs regarding thinness and success for women in society, before and following the intervention. The findings revealed that participation in the BodySense program resulted in athletes perceiving a reduction in pressure from their sports clubs to be thin, though no changes were found in body esteem, the EAT, or the SATAQ. No significant change was observed over time on mothers' measures. The role of climate change for prevention of eating disorders in athletes is discussed. PMID:18568921

  9. Body position does not affect the hemodynamic response to venous air embolism in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlhorn, Uwe; Burke, Edward J.; Butler, Bruce D.; Davis, Karen L.; Katz, Jeffrey; Melamed, Evan; Morris, William P.; Allen, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Current therapy for massive venous air embolism (VAE) includes the use of the left lateral recumbent (LLR) position. This recommendation is based on animal studies, conducted 50 years ago, which looked primarily at survival. Little is known, however, about the concomitant hemodynamic response after VAE in various body positions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic and cardiovascular changes in various body positions after VAE. Twenty-two mechanically ventilated supine mongrel dogs received a venous air infusion of 2.5 mL/kg at a rate of 5 mL/s. One minute after the infusion, 100% oxygen ventilation was commenced and the body position of the dogs was changed to either the LLR (n = 6), the LLR with the head 10 deg down (LLR-10 deg; n = 6) or the right lateral recumbent (RLR; n = 5) position. Five dogs were maintained in the supine position (SUP; n = 5). One dog died in every group except in the SUP group, where all the dogs recovered. There were no significant differences among the various body positions in terms of heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, central venous pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, or cardiac output. The acute hemodynamic changes occurring during the first 5-15 min after VAE recovered to 80% of control within 60 min. Our data suggest that body repositioning does not influence the cardiovascular response to VAE. Specifically, our data do not support the recommendation of repositioning into the LLR position for the treatment of VAE.

  10. Body position does not affect the hemodynamic response to venous air embolism in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlhorn, U.; Burke, E. J.; Butler, B. D.; Davis, K. L.; Katz, J.; Melamed, E.; Morris, W. P.; Allen, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    Current therapy for massive venous air embolism (VAE) includes the use of the left lateral recumbent (LLR) position. This recommendation is based on animal studies, conducted 50 yr ago, which looked primarily at survival. Little is known, however, about the concomitant hemodynamic response after VAE in various body positions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic and cardiovascular changes in various body positions after VAE. Twenty-two mechanically ventilated supine mongrel dogs received a venous air infusion of 2.5 mL/kg at a rate of 5 mL/s. One minute after the infusion, 100% oxygen ventilation was commenced and the body position of the dogs was changed to either the LLR (n = 6), the LLR with the head 10 degrees down (LLR-10 degrees; n = 6) or the right lateral recumbent (RLR; n = 5) position. Five dogs were maintained in the supine position (SUP; n = 5). One dog died in every group except in the SUP group, where all the dogs recovered. There were no significant differences among the various body positions in terms of heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, central venous pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, or cardiac output. The acute hemodynamic changes occurring during the first 5-15 min after VAE recovered to 80% of control within 60 min. Our data suggest that body repositioning does not influence the cardiovascular response to VAE. Specifically, our data do not support the recommendation of repositioning into the LLR position for the treatment of VAE.

  11. Position Estimation Method of Medical Implanted Devices Using Estimation of Propagation Velocity inside Human Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Makoto; Kohno, Ryuji

    Wireless communication devices in the field of medical implant, such as cardiac pacemakers and capsule endoscopes, have been studied and developed to improve healthcare systems. Especially it is very important to know the range and position of each device because it will contribute to an optimization of the transmission power. We adopt the time-based approach of position estimation using ultra wideband signals. However, the propagation velocity inside the human body differs in each tissue and each frequency. Furthermore, the human body is formed of various tissues with complex structures. For this reason, propagation velocity is different at a different point inside human body and the received signal so distorted through the channel inside human body. In this paper, we apply an adaptive template synthesis method in multipath channel for calculate the propagation time accurately based on the output of the correlator between the transmitter and the receiver. Furthermore, we propose a position estimation method using an estimation of the propagation velocity inside the human body. In addition, we show by computer simulation that the proposal method can perform accurate positioning with a size of medical implanted devices such as a medicine capsule.

  12. Oxidative stress, activity behaviour and body mass in captive parrots.

    PubMed

    Larcombe, S D; Tregaskes, C A; Coffey, J; Stevenson, A E; Alexander, L G; Arnold, K E

    2015-01-01

    Many parrot species are kept in captivity for conservation, but often show poor reproduction, health and survival. These traits are known to be influenced by oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability of antioxidant defences to ameliorate ROS damage. In humans, oxidative stress is linked with obesity, lack of exercise and poor nutrition, all of which are common in captive animals. Here, we tested whether small parrots (budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus) maintained in typical pet cages and on ad libitum food varied in oxidative profile, behaviour and body mass. Importantly, as with many birds held in captivity, they did not have enough space to engage in extensive free flight. Four types of oxidative damage, single-stranded DNA breaks (low-pH comet assay), alkali-labile sites in DNA (high-pH comet assay), sensitivity of DNA to ROS (H2O2-treated comet assay) and malondialdehyde (a byproduct of lipid peroxidation), were uncorrelated with each other and with plasma concentrations of dietary antioxidants. Without strenuous exercise over 28 days in a relatively small cage, more naturally 'active' individuals had more single-stranded DNA breaks than sedentary birds. High body mass at the start or end of the experiment, coupled with substantial mass gain, were all associated with raised sensitivity of DNA to ROS. Thus, high body mass in these captive birds was associated with oxidative damage. These birds were not lacking dietary antioxidants, because final body mass was positively related to plasma levels of retinol, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol. Individuals varied widely in activity levels, feeding behaviour, mass gain and oxidative profile despite standardized living conditions. DNA damage is often associated with poor immunocompetence, low fertility and faster ageing. Thus, we have candidate mechanisms for the limited lifespan and fecundity common to many birds kept for conservation purposes. PMID:27293729

  13. Body-related self-conscious emotions relate to physical activity motivation and behavior in men.

    PubMed

    Castonguay, Andree L; Pila, Eva; Wrosch, Carsten; Sabiston, Catherine M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the associations between the body-related self-conscious emotions of shame, guilt, and pride and physical activity motivation and behavior among adult males. Specifically, motivation regulations (external, introjected, indentified, intrinsic) were examined as possible mediators between each of the body-related self-conscious emotions and physical activity behavior. A cross-sectional study was conducted with adult men (N = 152; Mage = 23.72, SD = 10.92 years). Participants completed a questionnaire assessing body-related shame, guilt, authentic pride, hubristic pride, motivational regulations, and leisure-time physical activity. In separate multiple mediation models, body-related shame was positively associated with external and introjected regulations and negatively correlated with intrinsic regulation. Guilt was positively linked to external, introjected, and identified regulations. Authentic pride was negatively related to external regulation and positively correlated with both identified and intrinsic regulations and directly associated with physical activity behavior. Hubristic pride was positively associated with intrinsic regulation. Overall, there were both direct and indirect effects via motivation regulations between body-related self-conscious emotions and physical activity (R(2) shame = .15, guilt = .16, authentic pride = .18, hubristic pride = .16). These findings highlight the importance of targeting and understanding self-conscious emotions contextualized to the body and links to motivation and positive health behavior among men. PMID:24899517

  14. Active vibration control of a sandwich plate by non-collocated positive position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Giovanni; Amabili, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The active vibration control of a free rectangular sandwich plate by using the Positive Position Feedback (PPF) algorithm was experimentally investigated in a previous study. Four normal modes were controlled by four nearly collocated couples of piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The experimental results of the control showed some limitation, especially in the Multi-Input Multi-Output (MIMO) configuration. This was attributed to the specific type of sensors and their conditioning, as well as to the phase shifts present in the vibration at different points of the structure. An alternative approach is here undertaken by abandoning the configuration of quasi-perfect collocation between sensor and actuator. The positioning of the piezoelectric patches is still led by the strain energy value distribution on the plate; each couple of sensor and actuator is now placed on the same face of the plate but in two distinct positions, opposed and symmetrical with respect to the geometric center of the plate. Single-Input Single-Output (SISO) PPF is tested and the transfer function parameters of the controller are tuned according to the measured values of modal damping. Then the participation matrices necessary for the MIMO control algorithm are determined by means of a completely experimental procedure. PPF is able to mitigate the vibration of the first four natural modes, in spite of the rigid body motions due to the free boundary conditions. The amplitude reduction achieved with the non-collocated configuration is much larger than the one obtained with the nearby collocated one. The phase lags were addressed in the MIMO algorithm by correction phase delays, further increasing the performance of the controller.

  15. Old, down and out? Appearance, body work and positive ageing among elderly South Korean women.

    PubMed

    Elfving-Hwang, Joanna

    2016-08-01

    This article offers an as yet unexplored dimension of our current understanding of the ageing body in the context of contemporary South Korea. Drawing on interviews with twenty elderly women living in the greater Seoul metropolitan area, this article explores the role of appearance, body work, and the presentation of self in the women's everyday lived experiences. Existing research on the ageing female body in South Korea has primarily focused on the so-called noin munjae ('the elderly issue') discourse, within which the ageing body is framed as passive, undesirable, or out-of-control. Contrary to this, the elderly women's own narratives of everyday beauty practices suggest that the act of sustaining well-ordered appearance in later life allows for the enforcing of positive selves in the context of personal beauty and body work. Maintaining a positive appearance was shown to play an important part of their everyday lives, and functioned as a ritual of not only presenting an appearance that signified control over the ageing body, but to continue to enjoy it. The carefully calculated engagement with various non-surgical and surgical beauty practices also emerged as an embodied practice of mediating intersubjective social encounters through which self-esteem was engendered by evidencing the self's efforts to show respect to others. The findings of this study challenge dominant discourses in the west which present body work on the ageing female body as primarily self-indulgent, or driven by anxiety about the body's inability to fit within existing youthful beauty ideals. PMID:27531448

  16. Waif goodbye! Average-size female models promote positive body image and appeal to consumers.

    PubMed

    Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Lee, Christina

    2011-10-01

    Despite consensus that exposure to media images of thin fashion models is associated with poor body image and disordered eating behaviours, few attempts have been made to enact change in the media. This study sought to investigate an effective alternative to current media imagery, by exploring the advertising effectiveness of average-size female fashion models, and their impact on the body image of both women and men. A sample of 171 women and 120 men were assigned to one of three advertisement conditions: no models, thin models and average-size models. Women and men rated average-size models as equally effective in advertisements as thin and no models. For women with average and high levels of internalisation of cultural beauty ideals, exposure to average-size female models was associated with a significantly more positive body image state in comparison to exposure to thin models and no models. For men reporting high levels of internalisation, exposure to average-size models was also associated with a more positive body image state in comparison to viewing thin models. These findings suggest that average-size female models can promote positive body image and appeal to consumers. PMID:21500105

  17. Determination of positions of solar system bodies at Repsold meridian circle from 1992 till 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maigurova, N. V.; Pogoniy, A. D.; Pyshnenko, V. N.; Sibilev, V. P.

    2002-04-01

    Position of the Solar system bodies: Uran, Neptune, Galilean satellites of Jupiter, satellite of Saturn Titan, Ceres, Pallas, Juno, Vesta, Hebe, Iris, and Melpomene were obtained from observations at Repsold Meridian Circle of Nikolaev Astronomical Observatory made in 1992-1999.

  18. Automated Analysis of Two-Dimensional Positions and Body Lengths of Earthworms (Oligochaeta); MimizuTrack

    PubMed Central

    Yonemura, Seiichiro; Kaneda, Satoshi; Ohashi, Mizue; Ikeno, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Earthworms are important soil macrofauna inhabiting almost all ecosystems. Their biomass is large and their burrowing and ingestion of soils alters soil physicochemical properties. Because of their large biomass, earthworms are regarded as an indicator of “soil heath”. However, primarily because the difficulties in quantifying their behavior, the extent of their impact on soil material flow dynamics and soil health is poorly understood. Image data, with the aid of image processing tools, are a powerful tool in quantifying the movements of objects. Image data sets are often very large and time-consuming to analyze, especially when continuously recorded and manually processed. We aimed to develop a system to quantify earthworm movement from video recordings. Our newly developed program successfully tracked the two-dimensional positions of three separate parts of the earthworm and simultaneously output the change in its body length. From the output data, we calculated the velocity of the earthworm's movement. Our program processed the image data three times faster than the manual tracking system. To date, there are no existing systems to quantify earthworm activity from continuously recorded image data. The system developed in this study will reduce input time by a factor of three compared with manual data entry and will reduce errors involved in quantifying large data sets. Furthermore, it will provide more reliable measured values, although the program is still a prototype that needs further testing and improvement. Combined with other techniques, such as measuring metabolic gas emissions from earthworm bodies, this program could provide continuous observations of earthworm behavior in response to environmental variables under laboratory conditions. In the future, this standardized method will be applied to other animals, and the quantified earthworm movement will be incorporated into models of soil material flow dynamics or behavior in response to chemical

  19. High physical activity in young children suggests positive effects by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, E; Ludvigsson, J; Huus, K; Faresjö, M

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity in children is associated with several positive health outcomes such as decreased cardiovascular risk factors, improved lung function, enhanced motor skill development, healthier body composition, and also improved defense against inflammatory diseases. We examined how high physical activity vs a sedentary lifestyle in young children influences the immune response with focus on autoimmunity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, collected from 55 5-year-old children with either high physical activity (n = 14), average physical activity (n = 27), or low physical activity (n = 14), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort, were stimulated with antigens (tetanus toxoid and beta-lactoglobulin) and autoantigens (GAD65 , insulin, HSP60, and IA-2). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), C-peptide and proinsulin were analyzed. Children with high physical activity showed decreased immune activity toward the autoantigens GAD65 (IL-5, P < 0.05), HSP60 and IA-2 (IL-10, P < 0.05) and also low spontaneous pro-inflammatory immune activity (IL-6, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and CCL2 (P < 0.05)) compared with children with an average or low physical activity. High physical activity in young children seems to have positive effects on the immune system by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity. PMID:25892449

  20. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) recommends that all PK-12 schools implement a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program. Schools play an important role in public health, and the physical, mental, and social benefits of regular physical activity for youth are well documented. Leading public health, medical,…

  1. Blood filling and flow in lungs during change in body position in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogodin, A. S.; Mazhbich, B. I.

    1980-01-01

    In the horizontal position (supine and lateral), in the upright position (head up and head down) and during change of the cat body position in space, quantitative responses of regional blood volume and blood flow in the lungs (ml/100 cu cm) revealed presence of the gradient in the gravitation direction. Blood volume and blood flow of different lung portions changed qualitatively and quantitatively in different ways. These changes occurred only in the direction producing the equality of regional hydrostatical and hemodynamic loads in the lungs at either horizontal level.

  2. Oxidative stress, activity behaviour and body mass in captive parrots

    PubMed Central

    Larcombe, S. D.; Tregaskes, C. A.; Coffey, J.; Stevenson, A. E.; Alexander, L. G.; Arnold, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Many parrot species are kept in captivity for conservation, but often show poor reproduction, health and survival. These traits are known to be influenced by oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability of antioxidant defences to ameliorate ROS damage. In humans, oxidative stress is linked with obesity, lack of exercise and poor nutrition, all of which are common in captive animals. Here, we tested whether small parrots (budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus) maintained in typical pet cages and on ad libitum food varied in oxidative profile, behaviour and body mass. Importantly, as with many birds held in captivity, they did not have enough space to engage in extensive free flight. Four types of oxidative damage, single-stranded DNA breaks (low-pH comet assay), alkali-labile sites in DNA (high-pH comet assay), sensitivity of DNA to ROS (H2O2-treated comet assay) and malondialdehyde (a byproduct of lipid peroxidation), were uncorrelated with each other and with plasma concentrations of dietary antioxidants. Without strenuous exercise over 28 days in a relatively small cage, more naturally ‘active’ individuals had more single-stranded DNA breaks than sedentary birds. High body mass at the start or end of the experiment, coupled with substantial mass gain, were all associated with raised sensitivity of DNA to ROS. Thus, high body mass in these captive birds was associated with oxidative damage. These birds were not lacking dietary antioxidants, because final body mass was positively related to plasma levels of retinol, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol. Individuals varied widely in activity levels, feeding behaviour, mass gain and oxidative profile despite standardized living conditions. DNA damage is often associated with poor immunocompetence, low fertility and faster ageing. Thus, we have candidate mechanisms for the limited lifespan and fecundity common to many birds kept for conservation purposes. PMID

  3. Limits to sustained energy intake. XVI. Body temperature and physical activity of female mice during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gamo, Yuko; Bernard, Amelie; Mitchell, Sharon E; Hambly, Catherine; Al Jothery, Aqeel; Vaanholt, Lobke M; Król, Elzbieta; Speakman, John R

    2013-06-15

    Lactation is the most energy-demanding phase of mammalian reproduction, and lactation performance may be affected by events during pregnancy. For example, food intake may be limited in late pregnancy by competition for space in the abdomen between the alimentary tract and fetuses. Hence, females may need to compensate their energy budgets during pregnancy by reducing activity and lowering body temperature. We explored the relationships between energy intake, body mass, body temperature and physical activity throughout pregnancy in the MF1 mouse. Food intake and body mass of 26 females were recorded daily throughout pregnancy. Body temperature and physical activity were monitored every minute for 23 h a day by implanted transmitters. Body temperature and physical activity declined as pregnancy advanced, while energy intake and body mass increased. Compared with a pre-mating baseline period, mice increased energy intake by 56% in late pregnancy. Although body temperature declined as pregnancy progressed, this served mostly to reverse an increase between baseline and early pregnancy. Reduced physical activity may compensate the energy budget of pregnant mice but body temperature changes do not. Over the last 3 days of pregnancy, food intake declined. Individual variation in energy intake in the last phase of pregnancy was positively related to litter size at birth. As there was no association between the increase in body mass and the decline in intake, we suggest the decline was not caused by competition for abdominal space. These data suggest overall reproductive performance is probably not constrained by events during pregnancy. PMID:23720802

  4. Intrathoracic and venous pressure relationships during responses to changes in body position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avasthey, P.; Wood, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    Simultaneous end-expiratory pressures, referred to midthoracic level, in the superior and abdominal venae cavae, pericardial space, and right and left heart, were recorded without thoracotomy in three anesthetized dogs during sudden changes from supine to vertical head-up or head-down body positions. Intrathoracic and dependent great vein pressures referred to midchest level (sixth thoracic vertebra) decreased and showed simple hydrostatic gradients in either vertical position. However, a discontinuity in the large vein hydrostatic gradient occurred just distal to the superior margin of the thorax in either body position and was resumed again above this level. It is concluded that, just as the cerebrospinal fluid and intraperitoneal pressures minimize the effects of gravitational and inertial forces on the cerebral and visceral circulations, the pericardial and pleural pressures have a similar role for the heart proper.

  5. Camouflage through an active choice of a resting spot and body orientation in moths.

    PubMed

    Kang, C-K; Moon, J-Y; Lee, S-I; Jablonski, P G

    2012-09-01

    Cryptic colour patterns in prey are classical examples of adaptations to avoid predation, but we still know little about behaviours that reinforce the match between animal body and the background. For example, moths avoid predators by matching their colour patterns with the background. Active choice of a species-specific body orientation has been suggested as an important function of body positioning behaviour performed by moths after landing on the bark. However, the contribution of this behaviour to moths' crypticity has not been directly measured. From observations of geometrid moths, Hypomecis roboraria and Jankowskia fuscaria, we determined that the positioning behaviour, which consists of walking and turning the body while repeatedly lifting and lowering the wings, resulted in new resting spots and body orientations in J. fuscaria and in new resting spots in H. roboraria. The body positioning behaviour of the two species significantly decreased the probability of visual detection by humans, who viewed photographs of the moths taken before and after the positioning behaviour. This implies that body positioning significantly increases the camouflage effect provided by moth's cryptic colour pattern regardless of whether the behaviour involves a new body orientation or not. Our study demonstrates that the evolution of morphological adaptations, such as colour pattern of moths, cannot be fully understood without taking into account a behavioural phenotype that coevolved with the morphology for increasing the adaptive value of the morphological trait. PMID:22775528

  6. Position-Related Differences in Selected Morphological Body Characteristics of Top-Level Female Handball Players.

    PubMed

    Bon, Marta; Pori, Primoz; Sibila, Marko

    2015-09-01

    The study aimed to establish the main morphological characteristics of Slovenian junior and senior female national handball team players. Morphological characteristics of various player subgroups (goalkeepers, wings, back players and pivots) were also determined so as to establish whether they had distinct profiles. The subjects were 87 handball players who were members of the Slovenian junior and senior female national teams in the period from 2003 to 2009. A standardised anthropometric protocol was used to assess the subjects' morphological characteristics. The measurements included 23 different anthropometric measures. First, basic statistical characteristics of anthropometric measures were obtained for all subjects together and then for each group separately. Somatotypes were determined using Heath-Carter's method. Endomorphic, mesomorphic and ectomorphic components were calculated by computer on the basis of formulas. In order to determine differences in the body composition and anthropometric data of the subjects playing in different positions, a one-way analysis of variance was employed. The results show that, on average, the wings differed the most from the other player groups in terms of their morphological body characteristics. The wings differed most prominently from the other player groups in terms of their morphological body parameters as they were significantly smaller and had a statistically significantly lower body mass than the other groups. In terms of transversal measures of the skeleton and the circumferences, the wings significantly differed mainly from the pivots and goalkeepers and less from the backs. The goalkeepers were the tallest, with high values of body mass and low values of transversal measures compared to P. Their skin folds were the most pronounced among all the groups on average and their share of subcutaneous fat in total body mass was the highest. Consequently, their endomorphic component of the somatotype was pronounced

  7. A Conserved Role for Girdin in Basal Body Positioning and Ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nechipurenko, Inna V; Olivier-Mason, Anique; Kazatskaya, Anna; Kennedy, Julie; McLachlan, Ian G; Heiman, Maxwell G; Blacque, Oliver E; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-09-12

    Primary cilia are ubiquitous sensory organelles that mediate diverse signaling pathways. Cilia position on the cell surface is determined by the location of the basal body (BB) that templates the cilium. The mechanisms that regulate BB positioning in the context of ciliogenesis are largely unknown. Here we show that the conserved signaling and scaffolding protein Girdin localizes to the proximal regions of centrioles and regulates BB positioning and ciliogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neurons and human RPE-1 cells. Girdin depletion alters localization of the intercentriolar linker and ciliary rootlet component rootletin, and rootletin knockdown in RPE-1 cells mimics Girdin-dependent phenotypes. C. elegans Girdin also regulates localization of the apical junction component AJM-1, suggesting that in nematodes Girdin may position BBs via rootletin- and AJM-1-dependent anchoring to the cytoskeleton and plasma membrane, respectively. Together, our results describe a conserved role for Girdin in BB positioning and ciliogenesis. PMID:27623382

  8. Effect of lower-body positive pressure on postural fluid shifts in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.; Kravik, S. E.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of the lower-body positive pressure (LBPP) on the orthostatic fluid and protein shifts were investigated in five men during combined tilt-table/antigravity suit inflation and deflation experiments. Changes in the mass densities of venous blood and plasma were measured and the values were used to calculate the densities of erythrocytes, whole-body blood, and shifted fluid. It was found that the application of 60 mm Hg LBPP during 60-deg head-up tilt prevented about half of the postural hemoconcentration occurring during passive head-up tilt.

  9. Physical Activity, Body Composition and Metabolic Syndrome in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Salonen, Minna K.; Wasenius, Niko; Kajantie, Eero; Lano, Aulikki; Lahti, Jari; Heinonen, Kati; Räikkönen, Katri; Eriksson, Johan G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Low physical activity (PA) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in all age groups. We measured intensity and volume of PA and examined the associations between PA and the metabolic syndrome (MS), its components and body composition among young Finnish adults. Research Design and Methods The study comprises 991 men and women born 1985-86, who participated in a clinical study during the years 2009-11 which included assessments of metabolism, body composition and PA. Objectively measured (SenseWear Armband) five-day PA data was available from 737 participants and was expressed in metabolic equivalents of task (MET). Results The prevalence of MS ranged between 8-10%. Higher total mean volume (MET-hours) or intensity (MET) were negatively associated with the risk of MS and separate components of MS, while the time spent at sedentary level of PA was positively associated with MS. Conclusions MS was prevalent in approximately every tenth of the young adults at the age of 24 years. Higher total mean intensity and volume rates as well as longer duration spent at moderate and vigorous PA level had a beneficial impact on the risk of MS. Longer time spent at the sedentary level of PA increased the risk of MS. PMID:25992848

  10. Positive Tensor Network Approach for Simulating Open Quantum Many-Body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, A. H.; Jaschke, D.; Silvi, P.; Kliesch, M.; Calarco, T.; Eisert, J.; Montangero, S.

    2016-06-01

    Open quantum many-body systems play an important role in quantum optics and condensed matter physics, and capture phenomena like transport, the interplay between Hamiltonian and incoherent dynamics, and topological order generated by dissipation. We introduce a versatile and practical method to numerically simulate one-dimensional open quantum many-body dynamics using tensor networks. It is based on representing mixed quantum states in a locally purified form, which guarantees that positivity is preserved at all times. Moreover, the approximation error is controlled with respect to the trace norm. Hence, this scheme overcomes various obstacles of the known numerical open-system evolution schemes. To exemplify the functioning of the approach, we study both stationary states and transient dissipative behavior, for various open quantum systems ranging from few to many bodies.

  11. Positive Tensor Network Approach for Simulating Open Quantum Many-Body Systems.

    PubMed

    Werner, A H; Jaschke, D; Silvi, P; Kliesch, M; Calarco, T; Eisert, J; Montangero, S

    2016-06-10

    Open quantum many-body systems play an important role in quantum optics and condensed matter physics, and capture phenomena like transport, the interplay between Hamiltonian and incoherent dynamics, and topological order generated by dissipation. We introduce a versatile and practical method to numerically simulate one-dimensional open quantum many-body dynamics using tensor networks. It is based on representing mixed quantum states in a locally purified form, which guarantees that positivity is preserved at all times. Moreover, the approximation error is controlled with respect to the trace norm. Hence, this scheme overcomes various obstacles of the known numerical open-system evolution schemes. To exemplify the functioning of the approach, we study both stationary states and transient dissipative behavior, for various open quantum systems ranging from few to many bodies. PMID:27341253

  12. Influence of road incline and body position on power-cadence relationship in endurance cycling.

    PubMed

    Emanuele, Umberto; Denoth, Jachen

    2012-07-01

    In race cycling, the external power-cadence relationship at the performance level, that is sustainable for the given race distance, plays a key role. The two variables of interest from this relationship are the maximal external power output (P (max)) and the corresponding optimal cadence (C (opt)). Experimental studies and field observations of cyclists have revealed that when cycling uphill is compared to cycling on level ground, the freely chosen cadence is lower and a more upright body position seems to be advantageous. To date, no study has addressed whether P (max) or C (opt) is influenced by road incline or body position. Thus, the main aim of this study was to examine the effect of road incline (0 vs. 7%) and racing position (upright posture vs. dropped posture) on P (max) and C (opt). Eighteen experienced cyclists participated in this study. Experiment I tested the hypothesis that road incline influenced P (max) and C (opt) at the second ventilatory threshold ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]). Experiment II tested the hypothesis that the racing position influenced [Formula: see text], but not [Formula: see text]. The results of experiment I showed that [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] were significantly lower when cycling uphill compared to cycling on level ground (P < 0.01). Experiment II revealed that [Formula: see text] was significantly greater for the upright posture than for the dropped posture (P < 0.01) and that the racing position did not affect [Formula: see text]. The main conclusions of this study were that when cycling uphill, it is reasonable to choose (1) a lower cadence and (2) a more upright body position. PMID:22045414

  13. Physical activity and body composition analysis of female baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Pawloski, Lisa R; Davidson, Michele R

    2003-09-01

    Although nursing students are educated about the importance of healthy diets and the benefits of exercise, many do not engage in health promotion behaviors. This study longitudinally examined specific indicators of obesity among a group of female nursing students who incorporated an exercise program into their normal weekly routine. Indicators for obesity were identified using anthropometric data that included weight, body mass index (BMI), and percentage of body fat. Blood pressure, pulse data, and a physical activity level assessment were performed at the beginning and at the conclusion of the study period. Results indicated improvement in overall body composition, including a reduction in percent body fat and BMI. Students also showed improved physical activity levels. Since nurses need to counsel clients on primary prevention issues such as physical activity and maintaining ideal body weight and lean mass, the importance of positive health behaviors for nursing students and nurses cannot be stressed enough. PMID:19038116

  14. The Relationship between Physical Activity Level, Body Mass Index, and Body Fat Percentages in Urban and Rural Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orhan, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the physical activity levels, physical activity types, Body Mass Index (BMI) and body fat percentage (BF%) values of elementary school students living in rural and urban. Body height (BH), body weight (BW), BF% and BMI data were measured. Physical activity questionnaire was conducted to determine the…

  15. Positional asphyxia without active restraint following an assault.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Tarini; Byard, Roger W

    2013-11-01

    Deaths due to positional asphyxia are most often accidental, associated with alcohol and/or drug intoxication. A 19-year-old male is reported who was assaulted and placed in a head-down position in the back of a car were he was later found dead. Brush abrasions indicated that he had been dragged to the vehicle. The head and right shoulder were wedged into the foot well with the body uppermost. At autopsy, there was marked congestion of the face, neck, and upper chest with conjunctival ecchymoses, bruising of the face and scalp, focal subarachnoid hemorrhage, minor cerebral contusion, and diffuse cerebral swelling with early hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Toxicology was negative. Death was attributed to HIE resulting from the unusual positioning of the body. Cases of positional asphyxia involving others may not always include restraint, and when encountered should initiate a careful evaluation of the possible events and lethal pathophysiological processes. PMID:23786332

  16. Inter- and Intrafraction Variability in Liver Position in Non-Breath-Hold Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Case, Robert B.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Moseley, Douglas J.; Kim, John; Brock, Kristy K.; Dawson, Laura A.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: The inter- and intrafraction variability of liver position was assessed in patients with liver cancer treated with kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 314 CBCT scans obtained in the treatment position immediately before and after each fraction were evaluated from 29 patients undergoing six-fraction, non-breath-hold stereotactic body radiotherapy for unresectable liver cancer. Off-line, the CBCT scans were sorted into 10 bins, according to the phase of respiration. The liver position (relative to the vertebral bodies) was measured using rigid alignment of the exhale CBCT liver with the exhale planning CT liver, following the alignment of the vertebrae. The interfraction liver position change was measured by comparing the pretreatment CBCT scans, and the intrafraction change was measured from the CBCT scans obtained immediately before and after each fraction. Results: The mean amplitude of liver motion for all patients was 1.8 mm (range, 0.1-5.7), 8.0 mm (range, 0.1-18.8), and 4.3 mm (range 0.1-12.1) in the medial-lateral (ML), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively. The mean absolute ML, CC, and AP interfraction changes in liver position were 2.0 mm (90th percentile, 4.2), 3.5 mm (90th percentile, 7.3), and 2.3 mm (90th percentile, 4.7). The mean absolute intrafraction ML, CC, and AP changes were 1.3 mm (90th percentile, 2.9), 1.6 mm (90th percentile, 3.6), and 1.5 mm (90th percentile, 3.1), respectively. The interfraction changes were significantly larger than the intrafraction changes, with a CC systematic error of 2.9 and 1.1 mm, respectively. The intraobserver reproducibility ({sigma}, n = 29 fractions) was 1.3 mm in the ML, 1.4 mm in the CC, and 1.6 mm in the AP direction. Conclusion: Interfraction liver position changes relative to the vertebral bodies are an important source of geometric uncertainty, providing a rationale for

  17. Effect of body position and oxygen tension on foramen ovale recruitment.

    PubMed

    Moses, Kayla L; Beshish, Arij G; Heinowski, Nicole; Baker, Kim R; Pegelow, David F; Eldridge, Marlowe W; Bates, Melissa L

    2015-01-01

    While there is an increased prevalence of stroke at altitude in individuals who are considered to be low risk for thrombotic events, it is uncertain how venous thrombi reach the brain. The patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a recruitable intracardiac shunt between the right and left atrium. We aimed to determine whether body position and oxygen tension affect blood flow through the PFO in healthy adults. We hypothesized that hypoxia and body positions that promote right atrial filling would independently recruit the PFO. Subjects with a PFO (n = 11) performed 11 trials, combining four different fractions of inhaled oxygen (FiO₂) (1.0, 0.21, 0.15, and 0.10) and three positions (upright, supine, and 45° head down), with the exception of FiO₂ = 0.10, while 45° head down. After 5 min in each position, breathing the prescribed oxygen tension, saline bubbles were injected into an antecubital vein and a four-chamber echocardiogram was obtained to evaluate PFO recruitment. We observed a high incidence of PFO recruitment in all conditions, with increased recruitment in response to severe hypoxia and some contribution of body position at moderate levels of hypoxia. We suspect that increased pulmonary vascular pressure, secondary to hypoxia-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction, increased right atrial pressure enough to recruit the PFO. Additionally, we hypothesize that the minor increase in breathing resistance that was added by the mouthpiece, used during experimental trials, affected intrathoracic pressure and venous return sufficiently to recruit the PFO. PMID:25394826

  18. Instant effects of changing body positions on compositions of exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Sukul, Pritam; Trefz, Phillip; Kamysek, Svend; Schubert, Jochen K; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2015-12-01

    Concentrations of exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) may depend not only on biochemical or pathologic processes but also on physiological parameters. As breath sampling may be done in different body positions, effects of the sampling position on exhaled VOC concentrations were investigated by means of real-time mass spectrometry. Breaths from 15 healthy volunteers were analyzed in real-time by PTR-ToF-MS-8000 during paced breathing (12/min) in a continuous side-stream mode. We applied two series of body positions (setup 1: sitting, standing, supine, and sitting; setup 2: supine, left lateral, right lateral, prone, and supine). Each position was held for 2 min. Breath VOCs were quantified in inspired and alveolar air by means of a custom-made algorithm. Parallel monitoring of hemodynamics and capnometry was performed noninvasively. In setup 1, when compared to the initial sitting position, normalized mean concentrations of isoprene, furan, and acetonitrile decreased by 24%, 26%, and 9%, respectively, during standing and increased by 63%, 36%, and 10% during lying mirroring time profiles of stroke volume and pET-CO2. In contrast, acetone and H2S concentrations remained almost constant. In setup 2, when compared to the initial supine position, mean alveolar concentrations of isoprene and furan increased significantly up to 29% and 16%, respectively, when position was changed from lying on the right side to the prone position. As cardiac output and stroke volume decreased at that time, the reasons for the observed concentrations changes have to be linked to the ventilation/perfusion ratio or compartmental distribution rather than to perfusion alone. During final postures, all VOC concentrations, hemodynamics, and pET-CO2 returned to baseline. Exhaled blood-borne VOC profiles changed due to body postures. Changes depended on cardiac stroke volume, origin, compartmental distribution and physico-chemical properties of the substances. Patients' positions and

  19. Physical Activity and Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Candace C.; Wagner, Gregory R.; Caban-Martinez, Alberto J.; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Kenwood, Christopher T.; Sabbath, Erika L.; Hashimoto, Dean M.; Hopcia, Karen; Allen, Jennifer; Sorensen, Glorian

    2014-01-01

    Background The workplace is an important domain for adults, and many effective interventions targeting physical activity and weight reduction have been implemented in the workplace. However, the U.S. workforce is aging and few studies have examined the relationship of BMI, physical activity, and age as they relate to workplace characteristics. Purpose This paper reports on the distribution of physical activity and BMI by age in a population of hospital-based healthcare workers and investigates the relationships among workplace characteristics, physical activity, and BMI. Methods Data from a survey of patient care workers in two large academic hospitals in the Boston area were collected in late 2009 and analyzed in early 2013. Results In multivariate models, workers reporting greater decision latitude (OR=1.02; 95% CI=1.01, 1.03) and job flexibility (OR=1.05; 95% CI=1.01, 1.10) reported greater physical activity. Overweight and obesity increased with age (p<0.01), even after adjusting for workplace characteristics. Sleep deficiency (OR=1.56; 95% CI=1.15, 2.12) and workplace harassment (OR= 1.62; 95% CI=1.20, 2.18) were also associated with obesity. Conclusions These findings underscore the persistent impact of the work environment for workers of all ages. Based on these results, programs or policies aimed at improving the work environment, especially decision latitude, job flexibility and workplace harassment should be included in the design of worksite-based health promotion interventions targeting physical activity or obesity. PMID:24512930

  20. Disrupting Vestibular Activity Disrupts Body Ownership.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Adria E N; Harris, Laurence R

    2015-01-01

    People are more sensitive at detecting asynchrony between a self-generated movement and visual feedback concerning that movement when the movement is viewed from a first-person perspective. We call this the 'self-advantage' and interpret it as an objective measure of self. Here we ask if disruption of the vestibular system in healthy individuals affects the self-advantage. Participants performed finger movements while viewing their hand in a first-person ('self') or third-person ('other') perspective and indicated which of two periods (one with minimum delay and the other with an added delay of 33-264 ms) was delayed. Their sensitivity to the delay was calculated from the psychometric functions obtained. During the testing, disruptive galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was applied in five-minute blocks interleaved with five minutes of no stimulation for a total of 40 min. We confirmed the self-advantage under no stimulation (31 ms). In the presence of disruptive GVS this advantage disappeared and there was no longer a difference in performance between perspectives. The threshold delay for the 'other' perspective was not affected by the GVS. These results suggest that an intact vestibular signal is required to distinguish 'self' from 'other' and to maintain a sense of body ownership. PMID:26595957

  1. Body mass index, physical activity, and risk of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Birmann, Brenda M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Rosner, Bernard; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Colditz, Graham A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have reported a positive relation of baseline body mass index (BMI) with multiple myeloma, but data on other correlates of energy balance are limited. We undertook the present analyses to further examine the role of energy balance in multiple myeloma etiology in two large prospective cohorts with biennially updated exposure data. We followed members of the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study cohorts from baseline until multiple myeloma diagnosis, death, or 2002. Adult height and current weight were reported at enrollment, and weight every 2 years thereafter. Physical activity was queried at baseline and updated every 2-4 years. We computed age-adjusted relative risks (RR) of multiple myeloma for categories of BMI and physical activity using Cox proportional hazards regression. We conducted analyses on each cohort separately and on both cohorts combined. We confirmed 215 incident cases of multiple myeloma in the combined cohort of 136,623 individuals (>2.1 million person-years at risk). BMI was positively associated with multiple myeloma in all analyses. The association was strongest in men with BMI ≥30 kg/m2 (v. BMI <22.0 kg/m2; RR=2.4, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.0-6.0) and modest in overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m2) and obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) women (v. BMI <22.0 kg/m2; RR (95% CI)=1.6 (1.0-2.7) and 1.2 (0.7-2.2), respectively). Physical activity was not significantly related to multiple myeloma risk, although an inverse association was suggested in women. In conclusion, obesity appears to have an etiologic role in multiple myeloma, but the role of other correlates of energy balance remains uncertain. PMID:17627013

  2. Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Body Position in the Transport of Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Homola, J.

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes safety requirements for transport of radioactive waste in Slovakia and the role of regulatory body in the transport licensing and assessment processes. Importance of radioactive waste shipments have been increased since 1999 by starting of NPP A-1 decommissioning and operation of near surface disposal facility. Also some information from history of shipment as well as future activities are given. Legal basis for radioactive waste transport is resulting from IAEA recommendations in this area. Different types of transport equipment were approved by regulatory body for both liquid and solid waste and transportation permits were issued to their shipment. Regulatory body attention during evaluation of transport safety is focused mainly on ability of individual packages to withstand different transport conditions and on safety analyses performed for transport equipment for liquid waste with high frequency of shipments. During past three years no event was occurred in connection with radioactive waste transport in Slovakia.

  3. Self-Objectification and the Use of Body Image Coping Strategies: The Role of Shame in Highly Physically Active Women.

    PubMed

    Bailey, K Alysse; Lamarche, Larkin; Gammage, Kimberley L; Sullivan, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the mediating role of body shame in the relationship between self-objectification and body image coping strategies in highly physically active university women. Bivariate correlations revealed body shame was positively related to self-objectification, appearance fixing, and avoidance coping but unrelated to positive rational acceptance. In addition, self-objectification was positively related to appearance fixing and avoidance coping but unrelated to positive rational acceptance. Mediation analyses showed that body shame partially mediated the relationship between self-objectification and avoidance and appearance fixing coping but did not mediate the relationship between self-objectification and positive rational acceptance. Future research should examine other potential mediators or moderators in this relationship and explore the role of positive body image framed within self-objectification theory. PMID:27029108

  4. The norm of the position shift of a celestial body upon variation of its orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batmunkh, N.; Sannikova, T. N.; Kholshevnikov, K. V.; Shaidulin, V. Sh.

    2016-03-01

    A precise estimate of the variation of the position of a celestial body in the case of small variations of the elements of its orbit is obtained using an Euclidean (mean-square) norm for the deviation in the position. A relatively simple expression for the mean-square deviation of the radius vector d r in terms of the deviations of the elements is derived. These are taken to be first-order small quantitites, with second-order quantities neglected. This relation is applied to estimate the norm || d r|| in two problems. In the first one, small and constant differences between six orbital elements (including the mean anomaly) are considered for two orbits. In the second one, a zero-mass point moves under the gravitation of a central body and a small perturbing acceleration F. The vector F is taken to be constant in a co-moving coordinate system with axes directed along the radius vector, the transversal, and the binormal vector. In this latter problem, d r is the difference between the position vectors in the osculating and mean orbit. The norm || d r||2 is the weighted sum of the squares of the components of F, neglecting higher-order small quantities. The coefficients of the quadratic form depend only on the semi-major axis and the eccentricity of the mean orbit. The results are applied to the motion of a small asteroid under the action of a low-thrust engine imparting a small force.

  5. Respiratory Gating during Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Reduces Tumor Position Variability

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Tetsuo; Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Toya, Ryo; Fukugawa, Yoshiyuki; Toyofuku, Takamasa; Semba, Akiko; Oya, Natsuo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the effects of respiratory gating on treatment accuracy in lung cancer patients undergoing lung stereotactic body radiotherapy by using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. Materials and Methods Our study population consisted of 30 lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (48 Gy/4 fractions/4 to 9 days). Of these, 14 were treated with- (group A) and 16 without gating (group B); typically the patients whose tumors showed three-dimensional respiratory motion ≧5 mm were selected for gating. Tumor respiratory motion was estimated using four-dimensional computed tomography images acquired during treatment simulation. Tumor position variability during all treatment sessions was assessed by measuring the standard deviation (SD) and range of tumor displacement on EPID images. The two groups were compared for tumor respiratory motion and position variability using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results The median three-dimensional tumor motion during simulation was greater in group A than group B (9 mm, range 3–30 mm vs. 2 mm, range 0–4 mm; p<0.001). In groups A and B the median SD of the tumor position was 1.1 mm and 0.9 mm in the craniocaudal- (p = 0.24) and 0.7 mm and 0.6 mm in the mediolateral direction (p = 0.89), respectively. The median range of the tumor position was 4.0 mm and 3.0 mm in the craniocaudal- (p = 0.21) and 2.0 mm and 1.5 mm in the mediolateral direction (p = 0.20), respectively. Conclusions Although patients treated with respiratory gating exhibited greater respiratory tumor motion during treatment simulation, tumor position variability in the EPID images was low and comparable to patients treated without gating. This demonstrates the benefit of respiratory gating. PMID:25379729

  6. Marchi-positive myelinoid bodies at the transition between the central and the peripheral nervous system in some vertebrates.

    PubMed Central

    Corneliuson, O; Berthold, C H; Fabricius, C; Gatzinsky, K; Carlstedt, T

    1989-01-01

    The CNS-PNS (central nervous system-peripheral nervous system) transitional region of cranial and spinal nerve roots in some vertebrate species was analysed with respect to the occurrence and the distribution of myelinoid Marchi-positive bodies. Both cranial and spinal nerve roots contained more Marchi-positive bodies in their CNS than in their PNS segments. An accumulation of Marchi-positive bodies was usually noted just central to the CNS-PNS borderline. Comparisons between calibre spectra and Marchi index in the cat revealed a particularly high number of Marchi-positive bodies in nerve roots with a high content of myelinated fibres with diameters greater than or equal to 5 microns. Marchi-positive bodies were absent in CNS tissue lacking myelinated nerve fibres. CNS borderline internodes measuring between 200 and 300 microns in length were noted in fibres as thick as 15 microns in feline S1 ventral and dorsal roots. The general picture was similar in all analysed species. Noteworthy however, was the small difference in number of Marchi-positive bodies between CNS and PNS tissue in Xenopus. The chicken contained many myelinoid bodies of similar size and texture as the Marchi-positive bodies but without the Marchi-positive staining properties. The results show that normally occurring Marchi-positive bodies in the CNS are more numerous along paranodal segments than along mid-internodal segments of myelinated nerve fibres and thus support the hypothesis that Marchi-positive bodies are preferentially derived from paranodal myelin. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2558098

  7. Sedentary Activity and Body Composition of Middle School Girls: The Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Charlotte; Webber, Larry S.; Baggett, Chris D.; Ward, Dianne; Pate, Russell R.; Murray, David; Lohman, Timothy; Lytle, Leslie; Elder, John P.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the relationships between sedentary activity and body composition in 1,458 sixth-grade girls from 36 middle schools across the United States. Multivariate associations between sedentary activity and body composition were examined with regression analyses using general linear mixed models. Mean age, body mass index, and…

  8. Renal response to seven days of lower body positive pressure in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churchill, Susanne; Pollock, David M.; Natale, Mary Ellen; Moore-Ede, Martin C.

    1987-01-01

    As a ground-based model for weightlessness, the response of the chair-trained squirrel monkey to lower body positive pressure (LBPP) was evaluated in a length of study similar to a typical Space Shuttle mission (7 days). Results were compared to time control experiments that included chair-sitting without exposure to LBPP. Chronic exposure to LBPP results in an acute diuretic and natriuretic response independent of changes in plasma aldosterone concentrations and produces a chronic reduction in fluid volume lasting the duration in the stimulus.

  9. Device for determining relative angular position between a spacecraft and a radiation emitting celestial body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farthing, W. H.; Frisbie, H. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Signals indicative of the relative angular position between a spin stabilized spacecraft, probe, or sounding rocket and a radiation emitting celestial body are derived with a detector including four electrodes for deriving indications of the centroid of the radiation image on the detector. During each spin of the satellite each electrode derives a signal having a first non-zero level while the detector is not illuminated by the radiation, and a sound non-zero level while it is illuminated by the radiation.

  10. Relationships among Fitness, Body Composition, and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    LOHMAN, TIMOTHY G.; RING, KIMBERLY; PFEIFFER, KARIN; CAMHI, SARAH; ARREDONDO, ELVA; PRATT, CHARLOTTE; PATE, RUSS; WEBBER, LARRY S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to examine the associations of physical activity and body composition with cardiorespiratory fitness in eighth grade girls. Methods A random sample of 1440 eighth grade girls at 36 schools participated in this cross-sectional investigation, which represented an ethnically and geographically diverse group. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed using a modified physical work capacity test on a cycle ergometer that predicted workload at a heart rate of 170 beats·min−1. Physical activity was assessed over 6 d in each girl using an accelerometer and body composition was estimated from body mass index and triceps skinfolds using a previously validated equation. Pearson correlations and multiple regression analyses were used to determine the relationships among fitness, physical activity, and body composition. Results Significant linear relationships among cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition, and physical activity were found. The combination of fat and fat-free mass along with racial group and a race by fat-free-mass interaction accounted for 18% (R2) of the variation in physical fitness. Adding moderate-to-vigorous physical activity to the regression model increased the R2 to 22%. Black girls had somewhat lower fitness levels (P < 0.05) especially at higher levels of fat and fat-free mass than other racial/ethnic groups. Conclusions Physical activity, fat-free mass, and the interaction between fat-free mass and racial group are significantly associated with cardiorespiratory fitness in adolescent girls. PMID:18460987

  11. ECG-based detection of body position changes using a Laplacian noise model.

    PubMed

    Mincholé, Ana; Sörnmo, Leif; Laguna, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Body position changes (BPC), which are often manifested in the ECG as shifts in the electrical axis of the heart, result in ST changes, and thus, may be misclassified as ischemic events during ambulatory monitoring. We have developed a BPC detector by modeling shifts as changes in the Karhunen-Loève transform coefficients of the QRS complex and the ST-T waveform. The noise is assumed to have a Laplacian distribution. A generalized likelihood ratio test has been chosen as the strategy to detect BPCs. Two different databases have been used to assess detection performance. The obtained results were 93%/99% in terms of sensitivity/positive predictivity value (S/+PV) and a false alarm rate of 2 events/hour. The results clearly outperform current techniques (S/+PV: 85%/99%) based on the Gaussian noise assumption. PMID:22255932

  12. Fully automated shape model positioning for bone segmentation in whole-body CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränzle, A.; Sumkauskaite, M.; Hillengass, J.; Bäuerle, T.; Bendl, R.

    2014-03-01

    Analysing osteolytic and osteoblastic bone lesions in systematically affected skeletons, e.g. in multiple myeloma or bone metastasis, is a complex task. Quantification of the degree of bone destruction needs segmentation of all lesions but cannot be managed manually. Automatic bone lesion detection is necessary. Our future objective is comparing modified bones with healthy shape models. For applying model based strategies successfully, identification and position information of single bones is necessary. A solution to these requirements based on bone medullary cavities is presented in this paper. Medullary cavities are useful for shape model positioning since they have similar position and orientation as the bone itself but can be separated more easily. Skeleton segmentation is done by simple thresholding. Inside the skeleton medullary cavities are segmented by a flood filling algorithm. The filled regions are considered as medullary cavity objects. To provide automatic shape model selection, medullary cavity objects are assigned to bone structures with pattern recognition. To get a good starting position for shape models, principal component analysis of medullary cavities is performed. Bone identification was tested on 14 whole-body low-dose CT scans of multiple myeloma patients. Random forest classification assigns medullary cavities of long bones to the corresponding bone (overall accuracy 90%). Centroid and first principal component of medullary cavity are sufficiently similar to those of bone (mean centroid difference 21.7 mm, mean difference angle 1.54° for all long bones of one example patient) and therefore suitable for shape model initialization. This method enables locating long bone structures in whole-body CT scans and provides useful information for a reasonable shape model initialization.

  13. "It's all about acceptance": A qualitative study exploring a model of positive body image for people with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bailey, K Alysse; Gammage, Kimberley L; van Ingen, Cathy; Ditor, David S

    2015-09-01

    Using modified constructivist grounded theory, the purpose of the present study was to explore positive body image experiences in people with spinal cord injury. Nine participants (five women, four men) varying in age (21-63 years), type of injury (C3-T7; complete and incomplete), and years post-injury (4-36 years) were recruited. The following main categories were found: body acceptance, body appreciation and gratitude, social support, functional gains, independence, media literacy, broadly conceptualizing beauty, inner positivity influencing outer demeanour, finding others who have a positive body image, unconditional acceptance from others, religion/spirituality, listening to and taking care of the body, managing secondary complications, minimizing pain, and respect. Interestingly, there was consistency in positive body image characteristics reported in this study with those found in previous research, demonstrating universality of positive body image. However, unique characteristics (e.g., resilience, functional gains, independence) were also reported demonstrating the importance of exploring positive body image in diverse groups. PMID:26002149

  14. Promoting positive body image in young girls: an evaluation of 'Shapesville'.

    PubMed

    Dohnt, Hayley K; Tiggemann, Marika

    2008-05-01

    The aim of the current research was to evaluate Shapesville, a children's picture book designed to promote positive body image in young children. Participants were a convenience sample comprising 84 girls (aged 5-9 years) recruited from four private girls' schools. Girls were randomly allocated to be read either Shapesville or a control book. Individual measures of body image, stereotyping on the basis of weight and media internalisation, as well as knowledge of non-appearance topics, were obtained at pre- and post-intervention, as well as at 6-week follow-up. Relative to the control book, girls' appearance satisfaction increased after reading Shapesville. In addition, stereotyping on the basis of weight and internalisation of media ideals was reduced. Finally, reading Shapesville also increased girls' knowledge base of non-appearance topics, such as recognising their special talents and awareness of healthy eating, at post-intervention. These gains were somewhat reduced at follow-up, yet were largely still significantly greater than at pre-intervention. The present study demonstrates that Shapesville has the potential to be a successful prevention tool for use with young girls. Schools can incorporate Shapesville into their curriculum as early as school entry, in order to help prevent the early development of body dissatisfaction and disordered eating. PMID:17680591

  15. Inclusion bodies and purification of proteins in biologically active forms.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, A

    1997-01-01

    Even though recombinant DNA technology has made possible the production of valuable therapeutic proteins, its accumulation in the host cell as inclusion body poses serious problems in the recovery of functionally active proteins. In the last twenty years, alternative techniques have been evolved to purify biologically active proteins from inclusion bodies. Most of these remain only as inventions and very few are commercially exploited. This review summarizes the developments in isolation, refolding and purification of proteins from inclusion bodies that could be used for vaccine and non-vaccine applications. The second section involves a discussion on inclusion bodies, how they are formed, and their physicochemical properties. In vivo protein folding in Escherichia coli and kinetics of in vitro protein folding are the subjects of the third and fourth sections respectively. The next section covers the recovery of bioactive protein from inclusion bodies: it includes isolation of inclusion body from host cell debris, purification in denatured state alternate refolding techniques, and final purification of active molecules. Since purity and safety are two important issues in therapeutic grade proteins, the following three sections are devoted to immunological and biological characterization of biomolecules, nature, and type of impurities normally encountered, and their detection. Lastly, two case studies are discussed to demonstrate the sequence of process steps involved. PMID:8939059

  16. Body composition characteristics of elite Australian rugby union athletes according to playing position and ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Zemski, Adam J; Slater, Gary J; Broad, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the body composition traits of modern-day elite rugby union athletes according to playing position and ethnicity. Thirty-seven international Australian rugby athletes of Caucasian and Polynesian descent undertook body composition assessment using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and surface anthropometry. Forwards were significantly taller, heavier and had a greater total fat mass and lean mass than backs. Backs displayed a higher percentage lean mass and lower sum of seven skinfolds and percentage fat mass. While no whole body composition differences were seen between ethnicities, significant regional differences were observed. In the periphery (arm and leg) regions, Polynesians had a greater proportion of fat mass (53.1% vs. 51.3%, P = 0.052, d = 0.5) and lean mass (49.7% vs. 48.6%, P = 0.040, d = 0.9), while in the trunk region a lower proportion of fat mass (37.2% vs. 39.5%, P = 0.019, d = 0.7) and lean mass (45.6% vs. 46.8%, P = 0.020, d = 1.1). Significant differences were also seen between Caucasian and Polynesian forwards in leg lean mass (31.4 kg vs. 35.9 kg, P = 0.014, d = 2.4) and periphery lean mass (43.8 kg vs. 49.6 kg, P = 0.022, d = 2.4). Elite Polynesian rugby athletes have different distribution patterns of fat mass and lean mass compared to Caucasians, which may influence their suitability for particular positions. PMID:25553727

  17. Activities for Teaching Positive Psychology: A Guide for Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froh, Jeffrey J., Ed.; Parks, Acacia C., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Positive psychology is a rapidly expanding area of study that is of great interest to students at the graduate, undergraduate, and high school levels. But the field is so broad that teachers who want to cover all the bases when designing a positive psychology course may have difficulty locating and selecting materials. "Activities for Teaching…

  18. Sagittal jaw position in relation to body posture in adult humans – a rasterstereographic study

    PubMed Central

    Lippold, Carsten; Danesh, Gholamreza; Schilgen, Markus; Drerup, Burkhard; Hackenberg, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Background The correlations between the sagittal jaw position and the cranio – cervical inclination are described in literature. Only few studies focus on the sagittal jaw position and the body posture using valid and objective orthopaedic examination methods. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that patients with malocclusions reveal significant differences in body posture compared to those without (upper thoracic inclination, kyphotic angle, lordotic angle and lower lumbar inclination). Methods Eighty-four healthy adult patients (with a mean age = 25.6 years and ranging from 16.1 to 55.8 years) were examined with informed consent. The orthodontic examination horizontal overjet (distance between upper and lower incisors) was determined by using an orthodontic digital sliding calliper. The subjects were subdivided in respect of the overjet with the following results: 18 revealed a normal overjet (Class I), 38 had an increased overjet (Class II) and 28 had an reversed overjet (Class III). Rasterstereography was used to carry out a three – dimensional back shape analysis. This method is based on photogrammetry. A three-dimensional shape was produced by analysing the distortion of parallel horizontal white light lines projected on the patient's back, followed by mathematical modelling. On the basis of the sagittal profile the upper thoracic inclination, the thoracic angle, the lordotic angle and the pelvic inclination were determined with a reported accuracy of 2.8° and the correlations to the sagittal jaw position were calculated by means of ANOVA, Scheffé and Kruskal-Wallis procedures. Results Between the different overjet groups, no statistically significant differences or correlations regarding the analysed back shape parameters could be obtained. However, comparing males and females there were statistically significant differences in view of the parameters 'lordotic angle' and 'pelvic inclination'. Conclusion No correlations between overjet and

  19. Comparison of variations between percentage of body fat, body mass index and daily physical activity among young Japanese and Thai female students

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In our series of investigations concerning the causes of seasonal change in fat accumulation in young university students, we could not find any contribution of seasonal variation in the ratio of carbohydrate and fat metabolism to that of body fat percentage in Japanese and Thai participants. After our previous study, we examined the effect of daily physical activity on body fat percentage to look for the major causes of seasonal change in fat accumulation in young university students. Findings In this study, we measured participants’ (young Japanese and Thai university students) daily physical activity by a uniaxial accelerometer in addition to the measurements of body fat percentage and body mass index by a bioelectrical impedance meter. We found that there was significant and moderate negative correlation between body fat percentage and daily step counts among Japanese but not Thai participants. We observed significant, moderate and positive correlations between the percentage of body fat and body mass index among Japanese and Thai participants. Conclusions Daily physical activity plays an important role in the seasonal variation of body fat percentage of Japanese female students. Our present study also confirmed the importance of daily physical activity for controlling body mass index and for the prevention of obesity. PMID:22894563

  20. Active control of a flexible structure using a modal positive position feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poh, S.; Baz, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a new Modal Positive Position Feedback (MPPF) strategy in controlling the vibration of a complex flexible structure using a single piezo-electric active structural member is demonstrated. The control strategy generates its control forces by manipulating only the modal position signals of the structure to provide a damping action to undamped modes. This is in contrast to conventional modal controllers that rely in their operation on negative feedback of both the modal position and velocity. The proposed strategy is very simple to design and implement as it designs the controller at the uncoupled modal level and utilizes simple first order filters to achieve the Positive Position Feedback effect. The performance of the new strategy is enhanced by augmenting it with a time sharing strategy to share a small number of actuators between larger number of modes. The effectiveness of the new strategy is validated experimentally on a flexible box-type structure that has four bays and its first two bending modes are 2.015 and 6.535 Hz respectively. A single piezo-electric actuator is utilized as an active structural member to control several transverse bending modes of the structure. The performance of the active control system is determined in the time and the frequency domains. The results are compared with those obtained when using the Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) of Meirovitch. The experimental results suggest the potential of the proposed strategy as a viable means for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures in real time.

  1. Active control of a flexible structure using a modal positive position feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poh, S.; Baz, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a new Modal Positive Position Feedback (MPPF) strategy in controlling the vibration of a complex flexible structure using a single piezo-electric active structural member is demonstrated. The control strategy generates its control forces by manipulating only the modal position signals of the structure to provide a damping action to undamped modes. This is in contrast to conventional modal controllers that rely in their operation on negative feedback of both the modal position and velocity. The proposed strategy is very simple to design and implement as it designs the controller at the uncoupled modal level and utilizes simple first order filters to achieve the Positive Position Feedback effect. The performance of the new strategy is enhanced by augmenting it with a time sharing strategy to share a small number of actuators between larger number of modes. The effectiveness of the new strategy is validated experimentally on a flexible box-type structure that has four bays and its first two bending modes are 2.015 and 6.535 Hz, respectively. A single piezo-electric actuator is utilized as an active structural member to control several transverse bending modes of the structure. The performance of the active control system is determined in the time and the frequency domains. The results are compared with those obtained when using the Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) of Meirovitch. The experimental results suggest the potential of the proposed strategy as a viable means for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures in real time.

  2. The effect of active video gaming on children's physical activity, behavior preferences and body composition.

    PubMed

    Graves, Lee E F; Ridgers, Nicola D; Atkinson, Greg; Stratton, Gareth

    2010-11-01

    Active video game interventions typically provide children a single game that may become unappealing. A peripheral device (jOG) encourages step-powered gaming on multiple games. This trial evaluated the effect of jOG on children's objectively measured PA, body fat and self-reported behaviors. 42 of 58 eligible children (8-10 y) randomly assigned to an intervention (jOG) or control (CON) completed the trial. Intervention children received two jOG devices for home use. Analyses of covariance compared the intervention effect at 6 and 12 weeks from baseline. No differences were found between groups for counts per minute (CPM; primary outcome) at 6 and 12 weeks (p > .05). Active video gaming increased (adjusted change 0.95 (95% CI 0.25, 1.65) h·d⁻¹, p <.01) and sedentary video gaming decreased (-0.34 (-1.24, 0.56) h·d⁻¹, p > .05) at 6 weeks relative to CON. No body fat changes were observed between groups. Targeted changes in video game use did not positively affect PA. Larger trials are needed to verify the impact of active video games on children's PA and health. PMID:21242603

  3. Nonexercise muscle tension and behavioral fidgeting are positively correlated with food availability/palatability and body weight in rats.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Stephen C

    2003-07-01

    While certain measures of energy expenditure such as respiratory quotient and thermogenesis are readily quantifiable using existing animal models, the mechanism for and measurement of energy expenditure via nonexercise activity have not been thoroughly characterized. This low intensity form of physical exertion, associated with involuntary fidgeting and postural changes in man, was quantified in the present studies using passive measurement of muscle tension in rats. In particular, long-term weight loss and gain were induced using diet yoking and feeding of preferred foods in order to assess corresponding changes in locomotor activity and radiotelemetered measures of muscle tension, temperature and global activity. Hind limb muscle tension, but not body temperature, was increased 30-60% by enhancing the availability or palatability of food relative to the decreased muscle tension resulting from limited food availability. Enhancing food availability or palatability also produced a relative 5-15% increase in the amount of telemetered global activity. Importantly, neither diet yoking nor provision of a highly preferred diet altered a precise measure of behavioral locomotor activity. These results suggest that muscle tension and activity-in-place are positively correlated with weight change in the present studies and that these mechanisms of energy expenditure are mobilized by environmental changes in diet composition and meal pattern. PMID:12834791

  4. Active and passive stabilization of body pitch in insect flight

    PubMed Central

    Ristroph, Leif; Ristroph, Gunnar; Morozova, Svetlana; Bergou, Attila J.; Chang, Song; Guckenheimer, John; Wang, Z. Jane; Cohen, Itai

    2013-01-01

    Flying insects have evolved sophisticated sensory–motor systems, and here we argue that such systems are used to keep upright against intrinsic flight instabilities. We describe a theory that predicts the instability growth rate in body pitch from flapping-wing aerodynamics and reveals two ways of achieving balanced flight: active control with sufficiently rapid reactions and passive stabilization with high body drag. By glueing magnets to fruit flies and perturbing their flight using magnetic impulses, we show that these insects employ active control that is indeed fast relative to the instability. Moreover, we find that fruit flies with their control sensors disabled can keep upright if high-drag fibres are also attached to their bodies, an observation consistent with our prediction for the passive stability condition. Finally, we extend this framework to unify the control strategies used by hovering animals and also furnish criteria for achieving pitch stability in flapping-wing robots. PMID:23697713

  5. Body balance under ametropic conditions induced by spherical lenses in an upright position

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Yeob; Moon, Byeong-Yeon; Cho, Hyun Gug

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the changes in body balance under ametropic conditions induced by spherical lenses in an upright position. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty subjects (10 males, 10 females) of average age 23.4±2.70 years participated and they were fully corrected by subjective refraction. To induce ametropic conditions (binocular myopia and hyperopia), lenses of ±0.50 D, ±1.00 D, ±1.50 D, ±2.00 D, ±3.00 D, ±4.00 D and ±5.00 D were used. General stability (ST), fall risk index (FI), and sway path (SP) were analyzed through changes in synchronization of left/right and toe/heel, as measured by the biofeedback system, TETRAX. Measurement was performed for 32 seconds for each condition. [Results] ST increased significantly from +0.50 D-induced myopia and from −1.00 D-induced hyperopia as compared with corrected emmetropia. FI increased significantly from +4.00 D-induced myopia and from −1.50 D-induced hyperopia as compared with corrected emmetropia. In SP, which means a change of body balance, toe/heel was significantly greater than left/right in all ametropic conditions. SP of right/left synchronization was not affected by the side of the dominant eye. [Conclusion] An uncorrected hyperope may cause subjects to have a higher risk of falling than an uncorrected myope. Therefore, clinical specialists should consider the refractive condition, especially hyperopia, when analyzing body balance. PMID:25931692

  6. 77 FR 39259 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Body Armor in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Body Armor in Correctional...: Body Armor in Correctional Institutions Survey. The collections include the forms Body Armor Administrative Agency-Level Survey and Body Armor Individual-level Correctional Officer Survey. (3) Agency...

  7. Interfraction variation in lung tumor position with abdominal compression during stereotactic body radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Ueki, Nami; Iizuka, Yusuke; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yano, Shinsuke

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of abdominal compression on the interfraction variation in tumor position in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in a larger series of patients with large tumor motion amplitude.Methods: Thirty patients with lung tumor motion exceeding 8 mm who underwent SBRT were included in this study. After translational and rotational initial setup error was corrected based on bone anatomy, CBCT images were acquired for each fraction. The residual interfraction variation was defined as the difference between the centroid position of the visualized target in three dimensions derived from CBCT scans and those derived from averaged intensity projection images. The authors compared the magnitude of the interfraction variation in tumor position between patients treated with [n= 16 (76 fractions)] and without [n= 14 (76 fractions)] abdominal compression.Results: The mean ± standard deviation (SD) of the motion amplitude in the longitudinal direction before abdominal compression was 19.9 ± 7.3 (range, 10–40) mm and was significantly (p < 0.01) reduced to 12.4 ± 5.8 (range, 5–30) mm with compression. The greatest variance of the interfraction variation with abdominal compression was observed in the longitudinal direction, with a mean ± SD of 0.79 ± 3.05 mm, compared to −0.60 ± 2.10 mm without abdominal compression. The absolute values of the 95th percentile of the interfraction variation for one side in each direction were 3.97/6.21 mm (posterior/anterior), 4.16/3.76 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.90/2.32 mm (right/left) without abdominal compression, and 2.14/5.03 mm (posterior/anterior), 3.93/9.23 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.37/5.45 mm (right/left) with abdominal compression. An absolute interfraction variation greater than 5 mm was observed in six (9.2%) fractions without and 13 (17.1%) fractions with abdominal compression.Conclusions: Abdominal compression was effective for reducing the amplitude

  8. Position dependent rate dampening in any active hand controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, William W. (Inventor); Kauffman, James W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A control system for an active hand controller, for example, uses a control stick connected to and controlled by a motor. Electronics are provided to control the motor to eliminate oscillations due to motor torque and high gain due to breakout at the control stick when the control stick is at about its null position. Both hardware as well as software implementations can provide position dependent dampening to the control sticks such that when the control stick is located about a null position, a higher rate of dampening is provided than when the control stick is located outside the null position, when a lower rate of dampening is provided. The system provides a stable active hand controller control stick without degraded force and feel characteristics of the system.

  9. Encouraging Lifelong Healthy Habits for a Positive Body Image in Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Christine

    This article discusses issues related to body image in adolescents, explaining what school practitioners can do to encourage lifelong healthy habits that enhance body image. Body image is the picture of physical self carried in the mind's eye. This impression can have little resemblance to how a teen actually looks. Body image culturalization is…

  10. A position-dependent transcription-activating domain in TFIIIA.

    PubMed

    Mao, X; Darby, M K

    1993-12-01

    Transcription of the Xenopus 5S RNA gene by RNA polymerase III requires the gene-specific factor TFIIIA. To identify domains within TFIIIA that are essential for transcriptional activation, we have expressed C-terminal deletion, substitution, and insertion mutants of TFIIIA in bacteria as fusions with maltose-binding protein (MBP). The MBP-TFIIIA fusion protein specifically binds to the 5S RNA gene internal control region and complements transcription in a TFIIIA-depleted oocyte nuclear extract. Random, cassette-mediated mutagenesis of the carboxyl region of TFIIIA, which is not required for promoter binding, has defined a 14-amino-acid region that is critical for transcriptional activation. In contrast to activators of RNA polymerase II, the activity of the TFIIIA activation domain is strikingly sensitive to its position relative to the DNA-binding domain. When the eight amino acids that separate the transcription-activating domain from the last zinc finger are deleted, transcriptional activity is lost. Surprisingly, diverse amino acids can replace these eight amino acids with restoration of full transcriptional activity, suggesting that the length and not the sequence of this region is important. Insertion of amino acids between the zinc finger region and the transcription-activating domain causes a reduction in transcription proportional to the number of amino acids introduced. We propose that to function, the transcription-activating domain of TFIIIA must be correctly positioned at a minimum distance from the DNA-binding domain. PMID:8246967

  11. Incorporating positive body image into the treatment of eating disorders: A model for attunement and mindful self-care.

    PubMed

    Cook-Cottone, Catherine P

    2015-06-01

    This article provides a model for understanding the role positive body image can play in the treatment of eating disorders and methods for guiding patients away from symptoms and toward flourishing. The Attuned Representational Model of Self (Cook-Cottone, 2006) and a conceptual model detailing flourishing in the context of body image and eating behavior (Cook-Cottone et al., 2013) are discussed. The flourishing inherent in positive body image comes hand-in-hand with two critical ways of being: (a) having healthy, embodied awareness of the internal and external aspects of self (i.e., attunement) and (b) engaging in mindful self-care. Attunement and mindful self-care thus are considered as potential targets of actionable therapeutic work in the cultivation of positive body image among those with disordered eating. For context, best-practices in eating disorder treatment are also reviewed. Limitations in current research are detailed and directions for future research are explicated. PMID:25886712

  12. Dynamic recruitment of active proteasomes into polyglutamine initiated inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Schipper-Krom, Sabine; Juenemann, Katrin; Jansen, Anne H; Wiemhoefer, Anne; van den Nieuwendijk, Rianne; Smith, Donna L; Hink, Mark A; Bates, Gillian P; Overkleeft, Hermen; Ovaa, Huib; Reits, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease are hallmarked by neuronal intracellular inclusion body formation. Whether proteasomes are irreversibly recruited into inclusion bodies in these protein misfolding disorders is a controversial subject. In addition, it has been proposed that the proteasomes may become clogged by the aggregated protein fragments, leading to impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here, we show by fluorescence pulse-chase experiments in living cells that proteasomes are dynamically and reversibly recruited into inclusion bodies. As these recruited proteasomes remain catalytically active and accessible to substrates, our results challenge the concept of proteasome sequestration and impairment in Huntington's disease, and support the reported absence of proteasome impairment in mouse models of Huntington's disease. PMID:24291262

  13. Mushroom bodies enhance initial motor activity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Serway, Christine N; Kaufman, Rebecca R; Strauss, Roland; de Belle, J Steven

    2009-01-01

    The central body (or central complex, CCX) and the mushroom bodies (MBs) are brain structures in most insect phyla that have been shown to influence aspects of locomotion. The CCX regulates motor coordination and enhances activity while MBs have, thus far, been shown to suppress motor activity levels measured over time intervals ranging from hours to weeks. In this report, we investigate MB involvement in motor behavior during the initial stages (15 minutes) of walking in Buridan's paradigm. We measured aspects of walking in flies that had MB lesions induced by mutations in six different genes and by chemical ablation. All tested flies were later examined histologically to assess MB neuroanatomy. Mutant strains with MB structural defects were generally less active in walking than wild-type flies. Most mutants in which MBs were also ablated with hydroxyurea (HU) showed additional activity decrements. Variation in measures of velocity and orientation to landmarks among wild-type and mutant flies was attributed to pleiotropy, rather than to MB lesions. We conclude that MBs upregulate activity during the initial stages of walking, but suppress activity thereafter. An MB influence on decision making has been shown in a wide range of complex behaviors. We suggest that MBs provide appropriate contextual information to motor output systems in the brain, indirectly fine tuning walking by modifying the quantity (i.e., activity) of behavior. PMID:19145515

  14. Physical Activity Is Positively Associated with Episodic Memory in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Scott M.; Alosco, Michael L.; Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Cadden, Margaret; Peterson, Kristina M.; Allsup, Kelly; Forman, Daniel E.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with performance reductions in executive function and episodic memory, although there is substantial individual variability in cognition among older adults. One factor that may be positively associated with cognition in aging is physical activity. To date, few studies have objectively assessed physical activity in young and older adults, and examined whether physical activity is differentially associated with cognition in aging. Young (n = 29, age 18–31 years) and older adults (n = 31, ages 55–82 years) completed standardized neuropsychological testing to assess executive function and episodic memory capacities. An experimental face-name relational memory task was administered to augment assessment of episodic memory. Physical activity (total step count and step rate) was objectively assessed using an accelerometer, and hierarchical regressions were used to evaluate relationships between cognition and physical activity. Older adults performed more poorly on tasks of executive function and episodic memory. Physical activity was positively associated with a composite measure of visual episodic memory and face-name memory accuracy in older adults. Physical activity associations with cognition were independent of sedentary behavior, which was negatively correlated with memory performance. Physical activity was not associated with cognitive performance in younger adults. Physical activity is positively associated with episodic memory performance in aging. The relationship appears to be strongest for face-name relational memory and visual episodic memory, likely attributable to the fact that these tasks make strong demands on the hippocampus. The results suggest that physical activity relates to cognition in older, but not younger adults. PMID:26581790

  15. Active diffusion positions the nucleus in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, Maria; Ahmed, Wylie W; Bussonnier, Matthias; Mailly, Philippe; Betz, Timo; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2015-04-01

    In somatic cells, the position of the cell centroid is dictated by the centrosome. The centrosome is instrumental in nucleus positioning, the two structures being physically connected. Mouse oocytes have no centrosomes, yet harbour centrally located nuclei. We demonstrate how oocytes define their geometric centre in the absence of centrosomes. Using live imaging of oocytes, knockout for the formin 2 actin nucleator, with off-centred nuclei, together with optical trapping and modelling, we discover an unprecedented mode of nucleus positioning. We document how active diffusion of actin-coated vesicles, driven by myosin Vb, generates a pressure gradient and a propulsion force sufficient to move the oocyte nucleus. It promotes fluidization of the cytoplasm, contributing to nucleus directional movement towards the centre. Our results highlight the potential of active diffusion, a prominent source of intracellular transport, able to move large organelles such as nuclei, providing in vivo evidence of its biological function. PMID:25774831

  16. Draft position paper on knowledge management in space activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, Jeanne; Moura, Denis

    2003-01-01

    As other fields of industry, space activities are facing the challenge of Knowledge Management and the International Academy of Astronautics decided to settle in 2002 a Study Group to analyse the problem and issue general guidelines. This communication presents the draft position paper of this group in view to be discussed during the 2003 IAF Congress.

  17. Detection and semi-quantitative measurement of lung cancer metabolic activity by whole body PET

    SciTech Connect

    Tse, K.K.M.; Buchpiguel, C.A.; Alavi, J.B.

    1994-05-01

    Conventional radiologic and nuclear medicine techniques have been shown to have a limited role in the staging and monitoring of disease activity in patients with lung cancer. Both qualitative and semi-quantitative position emission tomography (PET) using the F-18 FDG technique have been applied to determine the clinical utility of whole body PET-FDG imaging in lung cancer. Nineteen whole body FDG PET scans were performed in 18 patients; 17 with lung cancer (15 non-small cell and 2 small cell) and 1 with squamous cell carcinoma of the trachea.

  18. Influence of body composition, muscle strength, diet and physical activity on total body and forearm bone mass in Chinese adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Foo, Leng Huat; Zhang, Qian; Zhu, Kun; Ma, Guansheng; Greenfield, Heather; Fraser, David R

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine association between body composition, muscle strength, diet and physical exercise with bone mineral content (BMC) and bone area (BA) in 283 Chinese adolescent girls aged 15 years in Beijing, China. Body composition, pubertal stage, physical activity and dietary intakes were assessed using standard validated protocols. Total body and forearm bone, lean body mass (LBM) and fat body mass (FBM) were determined by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Multivariate linear regression analyses were carried out to examine the predictors of BMC and BA, after controlling for potential confounders. The subjects had a mean age of 15.0 (sd 0.9) years and 99.6 % of them had reached menarche. Multivariate analyses showed that LBM, FBM, handgrip muscle strength and milk intake were significant independent determinants of BMC and BA of the total body and/or forearm sites. LBM was found to be a stronger independent determinant than FBM of BMC and BA, whereas handgrip muscle strength was only found as significant determinant of BMC and BA at the forearm sites than in total body BMC and BA. Further, total physical activity level had a significant positive association with handgrip and LBM. This suggested that greater muscle strength and higher LBM may reflect higher levels of physical activity. Therefore, continuous healthy lifestyle practices such as adequate intake of milk and continuous participation in physical activity should be encouraged throughout adolescence to optimise bone growth during this period. PMID:17640423

  19. Dose Escalated Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy at the Mean Respiratory Position

    SciTech Connect

    Velec, Michael; Moseley, Joanne L.; Dawson, Laura A.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric impact of dose probability based planning target volume (PTV) margins for liver cancer patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was compared with standard PTV based on the internal target volume (ITV). Plan robustness was evaluated by accumulating the treatment dose to ensure delivery of the intended plan. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients planned on exhale CT for 27 to 50 Gy in 6 fractions using an ITV-based PTV and treated free-breathing were retrospectively evaluated. Isotoxic, dose escalated plans were created on midposition computed tomography (CT), representing the mean breathing position, using a dose probability PTV. The delivered doses were accumulated using biomechanical deformable registration of the daily cone beam CT based on liver targeting at the exhale or mean breathing position, for the exhale and midposition CT plans, respectively. Results: The dose probability PTVs were on average 38% smaller than the ITV-based PTV, enabling an average ± standard deviation increase in the planned dose to 95% of the PTV of 4.0 ± 2.8 Gy (9 ± 5%) on the midposition CT (P<.01). For both plans, the delivered minimum gross tumor volume (GTV) doses were greater than the planned nominal prescribed dose in all 20 patients and greater than the planned dose to 95% of the PTV in 18 (90%) patients. Nine patients (45%) had 1 or more GTVs with a delivered minimum dose more than 5 Gy higher with the midposition CT plan using dose probability PTV, compared with the delivered dose with the exhale CT plan using ITV-based PTV. Conclusions: For isotoxic liver SBRT planned and delivered at the mean respiratory, reduced dose probability PTV enables a mean escalation of 4 Gy (9%) in 6 fractions over ITV-based PTV. This may potentially improve local control without increasing the risk of tumor underdosing.

  20. Body Mass Index is Associated with Gene Methylation in Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hair, Brionna Y.; Troester, Melissa A.; Edmiston, Sharon N.; Parrish, Eloise A.; Robinson, Whitney R.; Wu, Michael C.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Swift-Scanlan, Theresa; Conway, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Background Although obesity is associated with breast cancer incidence and prognosis, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Identification of obesity-associated epigenetic changes in breast tissue may advance mechanistic understanding of breast cancer initiation and progression. The goal of this study, therefore, was to investigate associations between obesity and gene methylation in breast tumors. Methods Using the Illumina GoldenGate Cancer I Panel, we estimated the association between body mass index (BMI) and gene methylation in 345 breast tumor samples from Phase I of the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, a population based case-control study. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify sites that were differentially methylated by BMI. Stratification by tumor estrogen receptor status was also conducted. Results In the majority of the 935 probes analyzed (87%), the average beta value increased with obesity (BMI ≥ 30). Obesity was significantly associated with differential methylation (false discovery rate q-value < 0.05) in just 2 gene loci in breast tumor tissue overall and in 21 loci among estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors. Obesity was associated with methylation of genes that function in immune response, cell growth, and DNA repair. Conclusions Obesity is associated with altered methylation overall, and with hypermethylation among ER-positive tumors in particular, suggesting that obesity may influence the methylation of genes with known relevance to cancer. Some of these differences in methylation by obese status may influences levels of gene expression within breast cells. Impact If our results are validated, obesity-associated methylation sites could serve as targets for prevention and treatment research. PMID:25583948

  1. Curvaceous female bodies activate neural reward centers in men

    PubMed Central

    Spicer, Kristen Rae

    2010-01-01

    Facial symmetry, masculinity and shoulder-to-hip ratios in men convey information to mates about reproductive/genetic quality, the so-called “good genes” hypothesis. On the other hand waist-to-hip ratio conveys important reproductive information about women to men. Here using fMRI, men showed activation in neural reward centers when they viewed and rated the attractiveness of surgically optimally configured female bodies. PMID:20714414

  2. LIFECOURSE SOCIOECONOMIC POSITION AND 16 YEAR BODY MASS INDEX TRAJECTORIES : DIFFERENCES BY RACE AND SEX

    PubMed Central

    Insaf, Tabassum Z; Shaw, Benjamin A; Yucel, Recai M; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Strogatz, David S

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between lifecourse socioeconomic position (SEP) and changes in body mass index (BMI), and assess disparities in these associations across racial/ethnic groups. Methods With longitudinal data from 4 waves of the Americans Changing Lives Study (1986–2002), we employed mixed-effects modeling to estimate BMI trajectories for 1,174 Blacks and 2,323 White adults. We also estimated associations between these trajectories and lifecourse SEP variables, including father’s education, perceived childhood SEP, own education, income, wealth, and financial security. Results Blacks had higher baseline BMI’s, and steeper increases in BMI, compared to Whites. Childhood SEP, as measured by high father’s education, was associated with lower baseline BMI among Whites. High education was associated with a lower baseline BMI within both race and sex categories. Income had contrasting effects among men and women. Higher income, was associated with higher BMI only among males Associations between indicators of SEP and BMI trajectories were only found for Whites. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that lifecourse SEP may influence adult BMI differently within different racial and sex groups. PMID:24967954

  3. Debromination of PBDEs in Arkansas Water Bodies Analyzed by Positive Matrix Factorization.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yonghong; Aziz-Schwanbeck, Azivy Che; Wei, Hua; Christensen, Erik R; Rockne, Karl J; Li, An

    2016-02-01

    A previously generated data set for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in dated sediment cores of West Lake of El Dorado (AED), Calion Lake (ACL), and the lagoon of Magnolia Wastewater Treatment Facility (AMW) from Southern Arkansas is examined by a weighted chemical mass balance (CMB) model and positive matrix factorization (PMF) in order to quantify PBDE sources and debromination. DNA extraction and pyrosequencing were done on several core sections in order to investigate microbial debromination. CMB and PMF analyses indicate that deca technical mixtures are the dominant PBDE input (>99% in mole fraction in AED and ACL, and 94.7% in AMW). Minor contributions of penta and octa technical mixtures were found in all three water bodies (<1% in AED and ACL; and 1.1% and 4.1% in AMW, respectively). Results suggest that debromination takes place in all three lakes, but is more intense in AMW. In-situ microbial debromination was supported by the microorganism analysis. The PMF results are validated by PBDE manufacturing records, and the operating history of AMW. Despite the high PBDE concentrations in these sediments near former manufacturing facilities, the extent of debromination is limited, possibly due to sorption to natural organic matter of the sediment. PMID:26741167

  4. Recurrent epimutations activate gene body promoters in primary glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Raman P; Zhang, Bo; Bell, Robert J A; Johnson, Brett E; Olshen, Adam B; Sundaram, Vasavi; Li, Daofeng; Graham, Ashley E; Diaz, Aaron; Fouse, Shaun D; Smirnov, Ivan; Song, Jun; Paris, Pamela L; Wang, Ting; Costello, Joseph F

    2014-05-01

    Aberrant DNA hypomethylation may play an important role in the growth rate of glioblastoma (GBM), but the functional impact on transcription remains poorly understood. We assayed the GBM methylome with MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq, adjusting for copy number differences, in a small set of non-glioma CpG island methylator phenotype (non-G-CIMP) primary tumors. Recurrent hypomethylated loci were enriched within a region of chromosome 5p15 that is specified as a cancer amplicon and also encompasses TERT, encoding telomerase reverse transcriptase, which plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. Overall, 76 gene body promoters were recurrently hypomethylated, including TERT and the oncogenes GLI3 and TP73. Recurring hypomethylation also affected previously unannotated alternative promoters, and luciferase reporter assays for three of four of these promoters confirmed strong promoter activity in GBM cells. Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) ChIP-seq on tissue from the GBMs uncovered peaks that coincide precisely with tumor-specific decrease of DNA methylation at 200 loci, 133 of which are in gene bodies. Detailed investigation of TP73 and TERT gene body hypomethylation demonstrated increased expression of corresponding alternate transcripts, which in TP73 encodes a truncated p73 protein with oncogenic function and in TERT encodes a putative reverse transcriptase-null protein. Our findings suggest that recurring gene body promoter hypomethylation events, along with histone H3K4 trimethylation, alter the transcriptional landscape of GBM through the activation of a limited number of normally silenced promoters within gene bodies, in at least one case leading to expression of an oncogenic protein. PMID:24709822

  5. Characterization of abandoned rocket body families for active removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Carmen; Anselmo, Luciano

    2016-09-01

    A new ranking index was developed and applied to a wide set of rocket body families, characterized by stage dry masses greater than 500 kg and by the presence of at least 5 stages abandoned in LEO. The upper stages selected accounted for more than 80% of the unclassified rocket bodies in LEO and nearly 95% of the associated dry mass. The detailed results obtained for 657 objects clearly identified the most critical altitude-inclination bands and stage models, to be targeted first if and when a debris remediation strategy including the active removal of intact abandoned objects were deemed necessary. Apart from the evaluation of the criticality regarding the long-term evolution of the debris environment, resulting in a priority listing for optimal active removal, the application of the new ranking index is not limited to debris remediation. In fact, if applied before launch to spacecraft and rocket bodies to be disposed in orbit, at the end of mission, it would provide an additional debris mitigation analysis tool for evaluating competing disposal options. Concerning the rocket bodies abandoned in LEO, 274 resulted to have a criticality equal or larger than the average intact object abandoned in an 800 km sun-synchronous orbit. Among them, 243 belonged to the Russian Federation and Ukraine, 25 to China, 5 to Europe and 1 to Japan. In addition to being concentrated in relatively few and narrow altitude-inclinations bands, the most numerous rocket body families often present a quite uniform distribution in right ascension of the ascending node, which is especially convenient for multiple target removal missions.

  6. Positioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conone, Ruth M.

    The key to positioning is the creation of a clear benefit image in the consumer's mind. One positioning strategy is creating in the prospect's mind a position that takes into consideration the company's or agency's strengths and weaknesses as well as those of its competitors. Another strategy is to gain entry into a position ladder owned by…

  7. Positive Body Image and Sexual Functioning in Dutch Female University Students: The Role of Adult Romantic Attachment.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, Femke; Smeets, Monique A M; Hessen, David J; Woertman, Liesbeth

    2016-07-01

    This study focused on links between romantic attachment, positive body image, and sexual functioning. Dutch female university students (N = 399) completed an online survey that included self-report items about body appreciation, sexual functioning, and romantic attachment. A proposed conceptual model was tested using structural equation modeling and a good fit to the data was found. Results revealed that attachment avoidance in a romantic context was negatively related to sexual arousal, vaginal lubrication, the ability to reach orgasm, and sexual satisfaction. Attachment anxiety was negatively related to body appreciation which, in turn, was positively related to sexual desire and arousal. Findings indicated that romantic attachment is meaningfully linked to body appreciation and sexual functioning. Therefore, the concept of adult attachment may be a useful tool for the treatment of sexual problems of young women. PMID:25778405

  8. Effects of body position, hyperinflation, and blood gas tensions on maximal respiratory pressures in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Heijdra, Y. F.; Dekhuijzen, P. N.; van Herwaarden, C. L.; Folgering, H. T.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Inspiratory muscle strength in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be affected by mechanical factors which influence the length of the diaphragm, and by non-mechanical factors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate firstly the effects of body position on respiratory pressures and, secondly, to determine the relative contribution of age, body mass index (BMI), lung volumes, and arterial blood gas tensions to respiratory muscle strength. METHODS--Thirty male patients with stable COPD (mean FEV1 40.4% predicted) participated in the study. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures (PImax, PEmax) and maximal inspiratory transdiaphragmatic pressures (PDI) in the sitting and supine position, lung function, and arterial blood gas tensions were measured. RESULTS--Mean (SD) PImax in the sitting position was higher than in the supine position (7.1(2.3)kPa v 6.4(2.2)kPa respectively). In contrast, PDI in the sitting position was lower than in the supine position (10.0(3.5)kPa v 10.8(3.7)kPa respectively). PEmax was higher in the sitting position (9.3(3.0)kPa) than in the supine position (8.7(2.8)kPa). Significant correlations were found between inspiratory muscle strength on the one hand, and lung function parameters, BMI, and arterial blood gas tensions on the other. CONCLUSIONS--Inspiratory muscle strength in patients with COPD is influenced by mechanical factors (body position, lung volumes) and non-mechanical factors (BMI, FEV1, and blood gases). PImax and PEmax are lower in the supine position while, in contrast to healthy subjects, PDI is higher in the supine position than in the sitting position. PMID:8016765

  9. Physical activity practice, body image and visual impairment: a comparison between Brazilian and Italian children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Greguol, Márcia; Gobbi, Erica; Carraro, Attilio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the physical activity and body image of children and adolescents with visual impairment (VI) in Brazil and Italy. For this, 41 children and adolescents with VI (19 Brazilian and 22 Italian) aged 10.22 ± 2.19 years old (18 girls and 23 boys) answered the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Children (PAQ-C), the Offer Self-Image Questionnaire (OSIQ), and an instrument with information about the disability, body weight and height. We analyzed the relationship between data from PAQ-C and OSIQ, as well as the gender, level of disability (blindness or low vision) and country using independent Mann-Whitney test. Body mass index (BMI) values were higher for Brazilian youths, with more than half of them classified as overweight and obese. Italian youths exhibited values of body image that were more positive and only 27% presented overweight or obesity. Blind children and adolescents were less active than those with low vision, but no differences were found between countries or genders. In Brazil, we detected significant correlations (p>0.05) between physical activity, body image and BMI, which more active youths presenting lower values of BMI and a better perception of body image. Physical activity seems to have a positive influence on body image and BMI for children and adolescents with VI, thus it should be encouraged especially for those with higher disability degrees. PMID:24216343

  10. Positive Active Material For Alkaline Electrolyte Storage Battert Nickel Electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Bernard, Patrick; Baudry, Michelle

    2000-12-05

    A method of manufacturing a positive active material for nickel electrodes of alkaline storage batteries which consists of particles of hydroxide containing mainly nickel and covered with a layer of a hydroxide phase based on nickel and yttrium is disclosed. The proportion of the hydroxide phase is in the range 0.15% to 3% by weight of yttrium expressed as yttrium hydroxide relative to the total weight of particles.

  11. The effects of whole body vibration on balance, joint position sense and cutaneous sensation.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Ross D; Provan, Sally; Martin, Finbarr C; Newham, Di J

    2011-12-01

    Whole body vibration (WBV) may enhance muscular strength and power but little is known about its influence on sensory-motor function. Vibration of a single muscle or tendon affects the afferent system in a manner that depends on amplitude and frequency. WBV stimulates many muscle groups simultaneously and the frequencies and amplitudes used are different from many of the studies on single musculotendinous units. We investigated the effects of WBV at two amplitudes on balance, joint position sense (JPS) and cutaneous sensation in young healthy subjects. Eighteen adults (24.3 ± 1.5 years, 15 females) were assessed before WBV (five 1 min bouts, 30 Hz) then immediately, 15 and 30 min afterwards. Two amplitudes (4 and 8 mm peak to peak) were investigated on different occasions. Standing balance was assessed with feet together and eyes closed, and standing on one leg with eyes open and closed. JPS at the knee and ankle was assessed by repositioning tasks while cutaneous sensation was recorded from six sites in the lower limb using pressure aesthesiometry. Neither amplitude affected JPS (P > 0.05). There were minimal effects on balance only in the vertical plane and only 30 min after WBV (P < 0.05). Low amplitude vibration only reduced sensation at the foot and ankle immediately after WBV (P < 0.008). High amplitude vibration impaired sensation at the foot, ankle and posterior shank for the entire test period (P < 0.008). In young healthy individuals WBV did not affect JPS or static balance, but reduced cutaneous sensation. These data may have implications for older and clinical populations with compromised postural control. PMID:21455611

  12. ECG-based detection of body position changes in ischemia monitoring.

    PubMed

    García, José; Aström, Magnus; Mendive, Javier; Laguna, Pablo; Sörnmo, Leif

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze and detect changes in body position (BPC) during electrocardiogram (ECG) recording. These changes are often manifested as shifts in the electrical axis and may be misclassified as ischemic changes during ambulatory monitoring. We investigate two ECG signal processing methods for detecting BPCs. Different schemes for feature extraction are used (spatial and scalar), while preprocessing, trend postprocessing and detection are identical. The spatial approach is based on VCG loop rotation angles and the scalar approach is based on the Karhunen-Loève transform (KLT) coefficients. The methods are evaluated on two different databases: a database with annotated BPCs and the STAFF III database with recordings from rest and during angioplasty-induced ischemia but not including BPCs. The angle-based detector results in performance values of detection probability PD = 95%, false alarm probability PF = 3% in the BPC database and false alarm rate in the STAFF III database in control ECGs during rest RF(c) = 2 h(-1) (episodes per hour) and in ischemia recordings during angioplasty RF(a) = 7 h(-1), whereas the KLT-based detector produces values of PD = 89%, PF = 3%, RF(c) = 4 h(-1), and RF(a) = 11 h(-1), respectively. Including information on noise level in the detection process to reduce the number of false alarms, performance values of PD approximately equal to 90%, PF approximately equal to 1%, RF(c) approximately equal to 1 h(-1) and RF(a) approximately equal to 2 h(-1) are obtained with both methods. It is concluded that reliable detection of BPCs may be achieved using the ECG signal and should work in parallel to ischemia detectors. PMID:12814234

  13. Body Mass Index Is Positively Associated with Endometrial Cancer in Chinese Women, Especially Prior to Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yifei; Dai, Xujing; Chen, Limei; Lee, Arier C; Tong, Mancy; Wise, Michelle; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Obesity is a well-known risk factor for developing endometrial cancer. However, the incidence and survival rate of endometrial cancer are associated with ethnicity and geographical area. In addition, whether menopausal status is associated with developing endometrial cancer in obese women and whether obesity is associated with subtypes of endometrial cancer have not been fully investigated. Here, we investigated the effect of BMI on developing endometrial cancer in Chinese women taking into account menopausal status and cancer subtypes. Methods: Data on 1,127 women with endometrial cancer including body mass index (BMI), age at diagnosis, parity, menopausal status and cancer subtype were collected from the largest obstetrics & gynaecology hospital in China and analysed. Results: After adjusting for age and parity, the odds for developing endometrial cancer in overweight or obese perimenopausal women was significantly higher than that in women with normal weight (OR=2.6 with 95%CI:1.9-3.5, and OR=3.5 with 95%CI: 2.2-5.4, respectively). The odds of developing endometrial cancer in overweight postmenopausal women were significantly higher than that in women who were normal weight (OR=2.4 with 95%CI: 1.8-3.1), however this was not the case for obese postmenopausal women. We further found that BMI, menopausal status, age and parity were not associated with subtypes of endometrial cancer. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that obesity is positively associated with the incidence of developing endometrial cancer in Chinese women, with more significant effects in perimenopausal women. PMID:27326261

  14. Classification of physical activities based on body-segments coordination.

    PubMed

    Fradet, Laetitia; Marin, Frederic

    2016-09-01

    Numerous innovations based on connected objects and physical activity (PA) monitoring have been proposed. However, recognition of PAs requires robust algorithm and methodology. The current study presents an innovative approach for PA recognition. It is based on the heuristic definition of postures and the use of body-segments coordination obtained through external sensors. The first part of this study presents the methodology required to define the set of accelerations which is the most appropriate to represent the particular body-segments coordination involved in the chosen PAs (here walking, running, and cycling). For that purpose, subjects of different ages and heterogeneous physical conditions walked, ran, cycled, and performed daily activities at different paces. From the 3D motion capture, vertical and horizontal accelerations of 8 anatomical landmarks representative of the body were computed. Then, the 680 combinations from up to 3 accelerations were compared to identify the most appropriate set of acceleration to discriminate the PAs in terms of body segment coordinations. The discrimination was based on the maximal Hausdorff Distance obtained between the different set of accelerations. The vertical accelerations of both knees demonstrated the best PAs discrimination. The second step was the proof of concept, implementing the proposed algorithm to classify PAs of new group of subjects. The originality of the proposed algorithm is the possibility to use the subject's specific measures as reference data. With the proposed algorithm, 94% of the trials were correctly classified. In conclusion, our study proposed a flexible and extendable methodology. At the current stage, the algorithm has been shown to be valid for heterogeneous subjects, which suggests that it could be deployed in clinical or health-related applications regardless of the subjects' physical abilities or characteristics. PMID:27441831

  15. Lifetime physical activity, neuromuscular performance and body composition in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Weeda, J; Horan, S; Beck, B; Weeks, B K

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the relationships between lifetime physical activity participation, neuromuscular performance and body composition in men at musculoskeletal maturity. 50 healthy men (age 25.2±4.5 years) volunteered to participate. Lifetime physical activity was determined from the Bone-specific Physical Activity Questionnaire. Impulse generated during a maximal vertical jump was calculated as an index of neuromuscular performance. Bone mineral density (BMD), lean and fat mass were determined from dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (XR800, Norland). A subsample of participants (n=13) additionally underwent peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT, XCT3000, Stratec) measures. Results demonstrated that those in the highest tertile for lifetime physical activity exhibited the greatest lumbar spine BMD (µdiff=0.12 g/cm2, p=0.005) and lean body mass index (LBMI) (p=0.04). Those in the highest tertile for impulse also exhibited the highest whole body (µdiff=0.08 g/cm2), lumbar spine (µdiff=0.14 g/cm2), and femoral neck BMD (µdiff=0.15 g/cm2) (p≤0.05). All BMD differences exceeded the least significant change. Childhood physical activity was positively related to LBMI (r=0.28, p=0.05), whereas sedentary activity was inversely related to femoral neck BMD (r=-0.33, p=0.02). Results support recommendations for sustained physical activity participation during the growing years. PMID:24886922

  16. Sit up and smell the roses better: olfactory sensitivity to phenyl ethyl alcohol is dependent on body position.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Johan N; Boyle, Julie A; Jones-Gotman, Marilyn

    2006-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that body position can alter auditory sensitivity. Here we demonstrate for the first time that olfactory sensitivity for the commonly used odor phenyl ethyl alcohol (PEA) (rose odor) is also dependent on body position. By using successive dilutions presented in a staircase protocol, we determined olfactory thresholds for PEA in 36 healthy participants (18 women) in both an upright and a supine position. Participants had a significantly greater olfactory sensitivity when tested in an upright than a supine position, with no significant differences between the sexes. This preliminary study sets the stage for further work on the interaction between olfactory functions and our biology. The implications for olfactory neuroimaging studies are discussed. PMID:16394243

  17. Sedentary versus active leisure activities and their relationship with sleeping habits and body mass index in children of 9 and 10 years of age.

    PubMed

    Amigo, Isaac; Peña, Elsa; Errasti, José Manuel; Busto, Raquel

    2014-11-18

    A random sample of 291 9- and 10-year-old schoolchildren from Asturias (Spain) was taken. Using path analysis, a model was tested in which bedtime, the number of hours spent sleeping and leisure activities were the independent variables and the body mass index was the dependent variable. The results show that sedentary and active leisure time and hours spent sleeping are predictors of the body mass index in children. Those children who go to bed late and who use that extra time to watch the television or play with the computer tend to have a greater body mass index, while those children who go to bed earlier and have spent more time reading or playing in the park or at home have a lower body mass index. Encouraging active leisure activities can have an extremely positive effect on their body mass index. PMID:25411196

  18. A Program To Promote Positive Body Image: A 1-Year Follow-Up Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVey, Gail L.; Davis, Ron

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of a program designed to promote body image satisfaction and prevent eating problems in young adolescent girls over a 1-year period. Found no program effect. Found instead, significant increases in body image satisfaction and decreases in eating problem scores over time for participants in both the prevention and…

  19. Catalytic Growth of Macroscopic Carbon Nanofibers Bodies with Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, N.; Muhammad, I. S.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.; Rinaldi, A.; Su, D. S.; Schlogl, R.

    2009-06-01

    Carbon-carbon composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofibers have been synthesized by growing Carbon nanofiber (CNF) on Palm shell-based Activated carbon (AC) with Ni catalyst. The composites are in an agglomerated shape due to the entanglement of the defective CNF between the AC particles forming a macroscopic body. The macroscopic size will allow the composite to be used as a stabile catalyst support and liquid adsorbent. The preparation of CNT/AC nanocarbon was initiated by pre-treating the activated carbon with nitric acid, followed by impregnation of 1 wt% loading of nickel (II) nitrate solutions in acetone. The catalyst precursor was calcined and reduced at 300 deg. C for an hour in each step. The catalytic growth of nanocarbon in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} was carried out at temperature of 550 deg. C for 2 hrs with different rotating angle in the fluidization system. SEM and N{sub 2} isotherms show the level of agglomeration which is a function of growth density and fluidization of the system. The effect of fluidization by rotating the reactor during growth with different speed give a significant impact on the agglomeration of the final CNF/AC composite and thus the amount of CNFs produced. The macrostructure body produced in this work of CNF/AC composite will have advantages in the adsorbent and catalyst support application, due to the mechanical and chemical properties of the material.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of drag and convective heat transfer of individual body segments for different cyclist positions.

    PubMed

    Defraeye, Thijs; Blocken, Bert; Koninckx, Erwin; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Jan

    2011-06-01

    This study aims at investigating drag and convective heat transfer for cyclists at a high spatial resolution. Such an increased spatial resolution, when combined with flow-field data, can increase insight in drag reduction mechanisms and in the thermo-physiological response of cyclists related to heat stress and hygrothermal performance of clothing. Computational fluid dynamics (steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) is used to evaluate the drag and convective heat transfer of 19 body segments of a cyclist for three different cyclist positions. The influence of wind speed on the drag is analysed, indicating a pronounced Reynolds number dependency on the drag, where more streamlined positions show a dependency up to higher Reynolds numbers. The drag and convective heat transfer coefficient (CHTC) of the body segments and the entire cyclist are compared for all positions at racing speeds, showing high drag values for the head, legs and arms and high CHTCs for the legs, arms, hands and feet. The drag areas of individual body segments differ markedly for different cyclist positions whereas the convective heat losses of the body segments are found to be less sensitive to the position. CHTC-wind speed correlations are derived, in which the power-law exponent does not differ significantly for the individual body segments for all positions, where an average value of 0.84 is found. Similar CFD studies can be performed to assess drag and CHTCs at a higher spatial resolution for applications in other sport disciplines, bicycle equipment design or to assess convective moisture transfer. PMID:21497817

  1. Reproducibility of liver position using active breathing coordinator for liver cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, Cynthia; Brock, Kristy K.; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Hawkins, Maria; Dawson, Laura A. . E-mail: laura.dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To measure the intrabreath-hold liver motion and the intrafraction and interfraction reproducibility of liver position relative to vertebral bodies using an active breathing coordinator (ABC) in patients with unresectable liver cancer treated with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: Tolerability of ABC and organ motion during ABC was assessed using kV fluoroscopy in 34 patients. For patients treated with ABC, repeat breath-hold CT scans in the ABC breath-hold position were acquired at simulation to estimate the volumetric intrafraction reproducibility of the liver relative to the vertebral bodies. In addition, preceding each radiation therapy fraction, with the liver immobilized using ABC, repeat anteroposterior (AP) megavoltage verification images were obtained. Off-line alignments were completed to determine intrafraction reproducibility (from repeat images obtained before one treatment) and interfraction reproducibility (from comparisons of the final image for each fraction with the AP) of diaphragm position relative to vertebral bodies. For each image set, the vertebral bodies were aligned, and the resultant craniocaudal (CC) offset in diaphragm position was measured. Liver position during ABC was also evaluated from kV fluoroscopy acquired at the time of simulation, kV fluoroscopy at the time of treatment, and from MV beam's-eye view movie loops acquired during treatment. Results: Twenty-one of 34 patients were screened to be suitable for ABC. The average free breathing range of these patients was 13 mm (range, 5-1 mm). Fluoroscopy revealed that the average maximal diaphragm motion during ABC breath-hold was 1.4 mm (range, 0-3.4 mm). The MV treatment movie loops confirmed diaphragm stability during treatment. For a measure of intrafraction reproducibility, an analysis of 36 repeat ABC computed tomography (CT) scans in 14 patients was conducted. The average mean difference in the liver surface position was -0.9 mm, -0

  2. Dynamic positioning system based on active disturbance rejection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhengling; Guo, Chen; Fan, Yunsheng

    2015-08-01

    A dynamically positioned vessel, by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the certifying class societies (DNV, ABS, LR, etc.), is defined as a vessel that maintains its position and heading (fixed location or pre-determined track) exclusively by means of active thrusters. The development of control technology promotes the upgrading of dynamic positioning (DP) systems. Today there are two different DP systems solutions available on the market: DP system based on PID regulator and that based on model-based control. Both systems have limited disturbance rejection capability due to their design principle. In this paper, a new DP system solution is proposed based on Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) technology. This technology is composed of Tracking-Differentiator (TD), Extended State Observer (ESO) and Nonlinear Feedback Combination. On one hand, both TD and ESO can act as filters and can be used in place of conventional filters; on the other hand, the total disturbance of the system can be estimated and compensated by ESO, which therefore enhances the system's disturbance rejection capability. This technology's advantages over other methods lie in two aspects: 1) This method itself can not only achieve control objectives but also filter noisy measurements without other specialized filters; 2) This method offers a new useful approach to suppress the ocean disturbance. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Evaluation of body composition and nitrogen content of renal patients on chronic dialysis as determined by total body neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.; Brennan, B.L.; Yasumura, S.; Vartsky, D.; Vaswani, A.N.; Ellis, K.J.

    1983-07-01

    Total body protein (nitrogen), body cell mass (potassium), fat, and water were measured in 15 renal patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). Total body nitrogen was measured by means of prompt ..gamma.. neutron activation analysis; total body water was determined with tritium labeled water; total body potassium was measured by whole body counting. The extracellular water was determined by a technique utilizing the measurement of total body chloride and plasma chloride. When compared with corresponding values of a control group of the same age, sex, and height, the protein content, body cell mass, and total body fat of the MHD patients were within the normal range. The only significant change was an increase in the extracellular water/body cell mass ratio in the male MHD patients compared to the control. The lack of significant difference of the nitrogen values of the MHD patients compared to matched controls suggests that dialysis minimizes any residual effects of uremic toxicity or protein-calorie malnutrition. These findings further suggest that there is a need to reevaluate the traditional anthropometric and biochemical standards of nutritional status for MHD patients. It was concluded that it is particularly important to measure protein stores of MHD patients with low protein intake to ascertain nutritional status. Finally, in vivo measurement of total body nitrogen and potassium for determination of body composition provides a simple, direct, and accurate assessment of the nutritional status of MHD patients.

  4. Self-objectification, body self-consciousness during sexual activities, and sexual satisfaction in college women.

    PubMed

    Claudat, Kim; Warren, Cortney S

    2014-09-01

    Few studies examine the mechanisms that link body image to sexual satisfaction in women. Using the tenets of objectification theory, this study investigated the relationships between body surveillance, body shame, body self-consciousness during sexual activities, and sexual satisfaction in an ethnically diverse sample of American female college students (N=368), while controlling for relationship status and body mass index. Results based on self-report measures of these constructs suggested that body shame and body self-consciousness during sexual activity were negatively correlated with sexual satisfaction. Additionally, path analysis indicated that body surveillance predicted increased body self-consciousness during sexual activity, partially mediated by body shame. Body self-consciousness, in turn, predicted decreased sexual satisfaction. Overall, study findings highlight the negative consequences of body image concerns for women's sexual satisfaction. PMID:25173667

  5. Effect of lateral body position on transesophageal echocardiography images and the association with patient characteristics: A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Mita, Norikatsu; Kuroda, Masataka; Saito, Shigeru; Miyoshi, Sohtaro

    2015-01-01

    Background: Changes in heart position are occasionally observed on the transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) image screen after changing the body position from supine to lateral, although the magnitude of change in cardiac position varies individually. We hypothesized that this variation is associated with certain patient characteristics and evaluated how lateral positioning affects visualization of the heart on TEE and whether the magnitude of change in the heart position correlates with patient characteristics. Methods: Fifty-three lung resection patients were enrolled. Two angle and two length parameters (ΔθTV, ΔθAP, ΔLTV, and ΔLAP) were defined to describe location change of the lateral tricuspid annulus and right ventricular apex on the TEE image between supine and lateral position. The correlation coefficients were calculated between these four parameters and patient characteristics, including age, body mass index (BMI), epicardial fat thickness, and pulmonary function variables. Results: The ΔθTV correlated positively and inversely with BMI in both right and left lateral patients (right: r = 0.6365, P = 0.0034; left: r = −0.6616, P < 0.0001, respectively). In left lateral patients, the ΔθTV correlated inversely with epicardial fat thickness (r = −0.4879, P = 0.0182), and the ΔLAP correlated positively with the forced vital capacity percent predicted (r = 0.5736, P = 0.0082). Conclusions: Lateral body positioning affects cardiac visualization on TEE, and the BMI, epicardial fat thickness, and pulmonary function moderate this effect. PMID:26139732

  6. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Book, Michael L. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor); Bell, Joseph L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprising at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  7. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprises at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  8. Six New Lanostane Triterpenoids from the Fruiting Body of Tyromyces sambuceus and Antiproliferative Activity.

    PubMed

    Kokudo, Naoki; Okazoe, Mina; Takahashi, Joji; Iseki, Kanako; Yoshikawa, Kazuko; Imagawa, Hirosi; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Noji, Masaaki; Umeyama, Akemi

    2016-02-01

    During the search for secondary metabolites with antiproliferative activity, six new lanostane triterpenoids, tyrosamic acids A-F (1-6) together with ten known compounds (7-16), were isolated from the fruiting body of Tyromyces sambuceus. Their structures were elucidated using MS analyses, extensive 2D-heteronuclear NMR data interpretation and the structure of 3 was further confirmed by single-crystal X-ray data analyses. All lanostane triterpenoids (1-16) possesses a carboxy group at C-20 position and their strength of antiproliferative activity was affected by the presence or absence of a hydroxy group at C-15 position and at the side chain. Four of the compounds (1, 6, 10, 14) showed antiproliferative activities against human cancer cell lines with IC₅₀ values of 16.8-48.3 µM (HL-60). PMID:27032192

  9. Effects of Body Position and Immersion on Recovery After Swimming Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurray, Robert G.

    1969-01-01

    Coaches have had differeing opinions concerning the best position for recovery following exercise. Preferred positions range from holding the arms over the head while walking, to lying down. Swimmers are in a unique position in that their exercise is performed in a horizontal plane while immersed in water. (CK)

  10. The Distribution of Active Force Generators Controls Mitotic Spindle Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.; Hyman, Anthony A.

    2003-07-01

    During unequal cell divisions a mitotic spindle is eccentrically positioned before cell cleavage. To determine the basis of the net force imbalance that causes spindle displacement in one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, we fragmented centrosomes with an ultraviolet laser. Analysis of the mean and variance of fragment speeds suggests that the force imbalance is due to a larger number of force generators pulling on astral microtubules of the posterior aster relative to the anterior aster. Moreover, activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) α subunits is required to generate these astral forces.

  11. The effect of body position, sedation, and thoracic bandaging on functional residual capacity in healthy deep-chested dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rozanski, Elizabeth A.; Bedenice, Daniela; Lofgren, Jennifer; Abrams, Julie; Bach, Jonathan; Hoffman, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of body position, chest wrap, and sedation on functional residual capacity (FRC) in 6 healthy dogs. Functional residual capacity was determined by helium dilution (re-breathing) whilst in different clinically relevant conditions. These conditions included the standing (sternal) and lateral positions in unsedated dogs and then again both standing and lateral following chest bandaging, and sedation with acepromazine, IV and butorphanol, IV. The mean FRC at each measurement point was determined, as was the change in FRC (delta FRC) from one measurement point to another. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures with Fisher’s LSD post hoc test was used to evaluate the effect of interventions. The differences in delta FRC were evaluated using a t-test or Wilcoxon rank-sum test. P < 0.05 was considered significant. The mean FRC at baseline, defined as standing, unsedated and unwrapped, was 75.3 ± 23.8 mL/kg. Body position or sedation had the most profound effect on FRC with right lateral recumbency lowering FRC by a median of 20.4 mL/kg and sedation lowering FRC by a median of 19.8 mL/kg. Common clinical procedures and positioning result in lowered FRC in healthy deep-chested dogs. In critically ill or injured dogs, the iatrogenic loss of FRC through chest bandaging, sedation, or body position may be clinically relevant. PMID:20357956

  12. [Evaluation of effectiveness of short-term orthostatic positioning of head-down tilted primates on the liquid body sectors].

    PubMed

    Lobachik, V I; Gordeev, Iu V; Krotov, V P

    2008-01-01

    Head-down tilting (HDT) of primates is a well-recognized model for studying the hypokinetic syndrome effects on the body functions. Benefits for the body liquids distribution of periodic transition of primates (rhesus macaques) into the vertical position without support loading were evaluated in a 30-d HDT experiment. Brief (30 to 120 minutes long, 4-5 times a week) transition from tilting into the vertical position had no influence on primates' hydration homeostasis and its infrastructure. However, the orthostatic test at the end of the HDT experiment showed a less increase in blood content of the lower extremities as compared with tilted primates that had not been periodically turned up into the vertical position. PMID:18714731

  13. Evaluation of methods for opto-electronic body surface sensing applied to patient position control in breast radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Baroni, G; Troia, A; Riboldi, M; Orecchia, R; Ferrigno, G; Pedotti, A

    2003-11-01

    The accuracy gap between the high levels of accuracy in radiotherapy planning and the uncertain set-up of each therapy fraction represents a crucial factor in the optimisation of radiation treatment. This occurs because the conventional means of patient alignment and immobilisation do not guarantee accurate implementation of the therapy plan in the actual irradiation treatment. A patient repositioning technique is proposed, based on opto-electronic motion capture and on methods of registration of body surfaces described by a limited dataset. The validation of the method was related to breast cancer radiotherapy and was based on simulated and experimental repositioning procedures involving a phantom and two subjects. With respect to previous work, the surface registration procedure was, in this case, implemented as a constrained non-linear least-square problem (constraints were given by the position of a couple of passive markers placed on the sternum), and three different algorithms were compared in terms of accuracy in misalignment detection and of computational cost. The simulation and experimental activities identified the best performing algorithm, which systematically limited the repositioning errors to below clinically acceptable thresholds (5 mm), with residual surface mismatches lower than 2 mm. PMID:14686594

  14. Moving human full body and body parts detection, tracking, and applications on human activity estimation, walking pattern and face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Wen; McGurr, Mike

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a new way for detection and tracking of human full-body and body-parts with color (intensity) patch morphological segmentation and adaptive thresholding for security surveillance cameras. An adaptive threshold scheme has been developed for dealing with body size changes, illumination condition changes, and cross camera parameter changes. Tests with the PETS 2009 and 2014 datasets show that we can obtain high probability of detection and low probability of false alarm for full-body. Test results indicate that our human full-body detection method can considerably outperform the current state-of-the-art methods in both detection performance and computational complexity. Furthermore, in this paper, we have developed several methods using color features for detection and tracking of human body-parts (arms, legs, torso, and head, etc.). For example, we have developed a human skin color sub-patch segmentation algorithm by first conducting a RGB to YIQ transformation and then applying a Subtractive I/Q image Fusion with morphological operations. With this method, we can reliably detect and track human skin color related body-parts such as face, neck, arms, and legs. Reliable body-parts (e.g. head) detection allows us to continuously track the individual person even in the case that multiple closely spaced persons are merged. Accordingly, we have developed a new algorithm to split a merged detection blob back to individual detections based on the detected head positions. Detected body-parts also allow us to extract important local constellation features of the body-parts positions and angles related to the full-body. These features are useful for human walking gait pattern recognition and human pose (e.g. standing or falling down) estimation for potential abnormal behavior and accidental event detection, as evidenced with our experimental tests. Furthermore, based on the reliable head (face) tacking, we have applied a super-resolution algorithm to enhance

  15. Positions of equilibrium points for dust particles in the circular restricted three-body problem with radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pástor, P.

    2014-11-01

    For a body with negligible mass moving in the gravitational field of a star with one planet in a circular orbit (the circular restricted three-body problem), five equilibrium points exist and are known as the Lagrangian points. The positions of the Lagrangian points are not valid for dust particles because in the derivation of the Lagrangian points it is assumed that no other forces besides the gravitation act on the body with negligible mass. Here, we determined positions of the equilibrium points for the dust particles in the circular restricted three-body problem with radiation. The equilibrium points are located on curves connecting the Lagrangian points in the circular restricted three-body problem. The equilibrium points for Jupiter are distributed in large interval of heliocentric distances due to its large mass. The equilibrium points for the Earth explain a cloud of dust particles trailing the Earth observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The dust particles moving in the equilibrium points are distributed in interplanetary space according to their properties.

  16. Influence of body position, food and beverage consumption on BIS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrano, G.; Eitner, F.; Ismail, A. H.; Pikkemaat, R.; Cordes, A.; Floege, J.; Leonhardt, S.

    2010-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of fluid changes using bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) during hemodialysis could help to predict hypotensive complications and extend the patient's life. Food and beverage consumption during the treatment may influence the measurements and the calculated fluid removal. In the present article the change observed in whole body and segmental (knee-to-knee, abdomen) BIS measurements following a sequence similar to the one of dialysis treatment (lying down, sitting and eating, lying down) on healthy subjects is presented. The measurements have been performed using a commercial bioimpedance device with a frequency range of 5 kHz to 1 MHz. Knee-to-knee measurements seem to be less sensitive to these influences, compared to the standard whole body and the alternative abdomen BIS measurements. The results indicate that the individual influence of both body posture and food and beverage consumption may be superposed when combined.

  17. Isolation of biologically active nanomaterial (inclusion bodies) from bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In recent years bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) were recognised as highly pure deposits of active proteins inside bacterial cells. Such active nanoparticles are very interesting for further downstream protein isolation, as well as for many other applications in nanomedicine, cosmetic, chemical and pharmaceutical industry. To prepare large quantities of a high quality product, the whole bioprocess has to be optimised. This includes not only the cultivation of the bacterial culture, but also the isolation step itself, which can be of critical importance for the production process. To determine the most appropriate method for the isolation of biologically active nanoparticles, three methods for bacterial cell disruption were analyzed. Results In this study, enzymatic lysis and two mechanical methods, high-pressure homogenization and sonication, were compared. During enzymatic lysis the enzyme lysozyme was found to attach to the surface of IBs, and it could not be removed by simple washing. As this represents an additional impurity in the engineered nanoparticles, we concluded that enzymatic lysis is not the most suitable method for IBs isolation. During sonication proteins are released (lost) from the surface of IBs and thus the surface of IBs appears more porous when compared to the other two methods. We also found that the acoustic output power needed to isolate the IBs from bacterial cells actually damages proteins structures, thereby causing a reduction in biological activity. High-pressure homogenization also caused some damage to IBs, however the protein loss from the IBs was negligible. Furthermore, homogenization had no side-effects on protein biological activity. Conclusions The study shows that among the three methods tested, homogenization is the most appropriate method for the isolation of active nanoparticles from bacterial cells. PMID:20831775

  18. Effect of Physical Activity on BMI and Percent Body Fat of Chinese Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Frank H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of regular physical activity on body mass index (BMI) and percent body fat of Chinese girls grouped by age and physical activity patterns. Measurements of skinfold, height, and weight, and BMI calculations, found differences in BMI and percent body fat between active and inactive girls. (SM)

  19. Implicit theories of the body among college women: implications for physical activity.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Claire; Kaufman, Annette R; Rima, Brandi

    2015-09-01

    This study explored the relationship between implicit theories of the body (ITB) and self-reported physical activity. ITB are beliefs about the malleability of the body. Individuals may hold entity ITB (that body appearance is fixed) or incremental ITB (that body appearance can be changed). Female undergraduate students (N = 313) completed an online survey assessing ITB, physical activity, and discrepancy between actual and ideal body weight. Participants endorsing incremental ITB reported more physical activity. A significant ITB by weight discrepancy interaction emerged. Developing interventions targeting implicit theories of the body may be one way to increase physical activity. PMID:24271689

  20. Familial resemblance of body composition, physical activity, and resting metabolic rate in pre-school children

    PubMed Central

    Djafarian, Kurosh; Speakman, John R; Stewart, Joanne; M Jackson, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although parental obesity is a well-established predisposing factor for the development of obesity, associations between regional body compositions, resting metabolic rates (RMR), and physical activity (PA) of parents and their pre-school children remain unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate parent-child correlations for total and regional body compositions, resting energy expenditures, and physical activity. Methods: Participants were 89 children aged 2-6 years and their parents, consisting of 61 families. Resting metabolic rate was assessed using indirect calorimetry. Total and regional body compositions were measured by both dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and deuterium dilution. Physical activity was assessed by an accelerometer. Results: There was a significant parent-offspring regression for total fat free mass (FFM) between children and their mothers (P=0.02), fathers (P=0.02), and mid-parent (average of father and mother value) (P=0.002) when measured by DXA. The same was true for fat mass (FM) between children and mothers (P<0.01), fathers (P=0.02), and mid-parent (P=0.001). There was no significant association between children and parents for physical activity during the entire week, weekend, weekdays, and different parts of days, except for morning activity, which was positively related to the mothers’ morning activities (P<0.01) and mid-parent (P=0.009). No association was found between RMR of children and parents before and after correction for FFM and FM. Conclusion: These data suggest a familial resemblance for total body composition between children and their parents. Our data showed no familial resemblance for PA and RMR between children and their parents. PMID:26989715

  1. Incidence of an electron layer on an electrically insulated body with an unsteady self-consistent positive charge

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, V. A.

    2010-07-15

    Dynamics of an electron layer incident on the surface of an electrically insulated conducting body with an unsteady self-consistent positive charge is investigated. At the initial instant, the electron velocity is directed toward the body and the electron layer is not adjacent to the body surface. One-dimensional plane, cylindrical, and spherical electron motions in vacuum and against the background of motionless ions and neutral particles are considered. Exact analytical solutions to the set of nonlinear plasma hydrodynamics equations with absorbing boundary conditions for electrons are obtained. The spatial and time dependences of the electric field, electron density, and electron velocity are found. The time evolution of the surface charge density is determined.

  2. Homeostasis in Primates in the Hyperdynamic Environment. [circadian timekeeping and effects of lower body positive pressure on sleep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of chronic centrifugation upon the homestatic regulation of the circadian timekeeping system was examined. The interactions of body temperature regulation and the behavioral state of arousal were studied by evaluating the influence of cephalic fluid shifts induced by lower body positive air pressure (LBPP), upon these systems. The small diurnal squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) was used as the non-human primate model. Results show that the circadian timekeeping system of these primates is functional in the hyperdynamic environment, however, some of its components appear to be regulated at different homeostatic levels. The LBPP resulted in an approximate 0.7 C decrease in DBT (p 0.01). However, although on video some animals appeared drowsy during LBPP, sleep recording revealed no significant changes in state of arousal. Thus, the physiological mechanisms underlying this lowering of body temperature can be independent of the arousal state.

  3. Certain peculiarities of the functioning of the cardiovascular system in bedrest conditions during horizontal and antiorthostatic body positions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The adequate modeling of physiological reactions inherent to the state of weightlessness has become a matter of particular urgency in space medicine. This modeling is necessary for studying the phenomenology and degree of disorders, prognostication of the crew's health, and developing the various preventive measures employed in space flights. A comparison is made of the physiological effects brought about by bed rest in a horizontal and antiorthostatic body position. A study is done of the influence of brief antiorthostatic hypokinesia, simulating the acute period of adaptation to weightlessness, on circulation and on a number of involved analytical systems. The basic model accepted is antiorthostatic hypokinesia with a body position declination angle of 4 deg (head lower than feet). The experiment's duration is dictated by the objectives of the research.

  4. Effect of canard position on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a close-coupled canard-wing-body configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Eugene L.

    1992-01-01

    The thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically to investigate the effects of canard vertical position on a close-coupled canard-wing-body configuration at a transonic Mach number of 0.90 and angles of attack ranging from -2 to 12 degrees. Canard-wing interactions are investigated for high-, mid- and low-canard positions. The computational results show favorable canard-wing interactions for the high- and mid-canard configurations. The unfavorable lift and drag characteristics for the low-canard configuration are examined by analyses of the low-canard flowfield structure.

  5. Atomic identification of fluorescent Q-dots on tau-positive fibrils in 3D-reconstructed pick bodies.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Miho; Adachi, Eijiro; Nakamura, Ayako; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Uchihara, Toshiki

    2012-04-01

    Pick body disease, characterized by the presence of Pick bodies, is distinguished from neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer disease on the basis of their smooth, spherical shape. Quantum dots (QDs) are nanometer-scale, water-soluble fluorophores that are detectable both as a fluorescent signal by light microscopy and as electron-dense particles under electron microscopy. In this study, tau-positive Pick bodies were immunofluorescently labeled with QD nanocrystals composed of cadmium selenide for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and subsequently subjected to electron microscopic observation to identify QD immunolabeling on the same Pick body for comparison in detail. The identity of the QD nanocrystals, which label the tau-positive fibrils, was confirmed by the presence of both cadmium and selenium on these nanocrystals, demonstrated as parallel peaks corresponding to these atoms on energy-dispersive X-ray spot analysis under super-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. This confirmation of the specificity of the QD labeling through both its fluorescence and energy-dispersive X-ray spectra reinforces the reliability of the labeling. In addition, this exact comparison of the same structure by electron microscopy and 3D light microscopy demonstrates how its ultrastructural details are related to its surrounding structures on a 3D basis, providing further insights into how molecules woven into specific pathological ultrastructures are at work in situ. PMID:22322305

  6. 77 FR 22345 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested; Body Armor in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested; Body Armor in Correctional... approval of collection. (2) Title of Form/Collection: Body Armor in Correctional Institutions Survey. The collections include the forms Body Armor Administrative Agency-Level Survey and Body Armor...

  7. Starvation resistance is positively correlated with body lipid proportion in five wild caught Drosophila simulans populations.

    PubMed

    Ballard, J William O; Melvin, R G; Simpson, S J

    2008-09-01

    Stress resistance traits in Drosophila often show clinal variation, suggesting that selection affects resistance traits either directly or indirectly. One of the most common causes of stress for animals is the shortage or suboptimal quality of food, and individuals within many species must survive periods of starvation or exposure to nutritionally imbalanced diets. This study determines the relationship between starvation resistance, body lipid content, and lifespan in five recently collected Drosophila simulans populations from four distinct geographic localities. Despite rearing under standard nutritional conditions, we observed significant differences in starvation resistance between sexes and between localities. If body lipid proportion is included as a covariate in statistical analysis the difference between the sexes remains (slopes are parallel, with males more susceptible than females to starvation across all lipid proportions) but the effect of locality disappears. This result suggests that flies from different localities differ in their susceptibility to starvation because of differences in their propensity to store body lipid. We observed a negative relationship between lifespan and starvation resistance in both males and females, suggesting a fitness cost to increasing lipid reserves. These data raise issues about the role of diet in maintaining life history trait variation within and among populations. In conclusion, we show many similarities and surprising differences in life history traits between D. simulans and Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:18706419

  8. Measurement of whole body cellular and collagen nitrogen, potassium, and other elements by neutron activation and whole body counting

    SciTech Connect

    James, H.M.; Fabricius, P.J.; Dykes, P.W.

    1987-09-01

    Whole body nitrogen can be measured by neutron activation analysis with an acceptable radiation dose; it is an index of body protein which, in normal subjects, is 65% cellular protein and 35% extracellular connective collagen. Whole body potassium can be measured by whole body counting without irradiating the subject; it is an index of body cell mass. We measured whole body nitrogen, potassium, extracellular water, intracellular water, and fat-folds. The differences between 37 malnourished patients and five normal subjects suggested that the patients had 9 kg less cell mass than normal, but no difference in extracellular mass. Measurements were made on eight patients before and after 14 days of total parenteral nutrition; balance of nitrogen intake and excretion also was measured. The changes were consistent with mean increases of 3 kg of cellular mass and 3 kg of fat with no change of extracellular mass. The accuracy and sensitivity of the whole body measurements need further confirmation for use in patients with changing body composition. Where tissue wasting is largely from the cellular compartment, potassium could be a more sensitive index of wasting than nitrogen. Multielement analysis of nitrogen, potassium, chlorine, and carbon will probably be valuable in elucidating body composition in malnutrition.

  9. A structural colour ornament correlates positively with parasite load and body condition in an insular lizard species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megía-Palma, Rodrigo; Martínez, Javier; Merino, Santiago

    2016-08-01

    Pigment-based ornaments in vertebrates may reflect the body condition or health status of the individual in correlation with environmental stress and hormonal balance. Among the environmental factors shaping sexual colouration, parasitic infections have been stressed as an important evolutionary pressure constraining the maintenance of pigment-based ornaments. However, the honesty of structure-based ornaments in vertebrates is still under debate. Structural UV-biased ornaments in Gallotia lizards were described as a trait used by conspecifics during mate and rival assessment suggesting the reliability of these signals. We investigated the relationship between parasitaemia, body condition and a structural-based ornament present in the cheek of the sexually dichromatic Canarian lacertid Gallotia galloti in a population with an almost 100 % prevalence of haemoparasites. Using spectrophotometric techniques, we found that males with higher values of cheek UV chroma were infected with more haemoparasites. No significant relationship was found between haemoparasite load and body condition. However, males with higher cheek UV chroma showed significantly better body condition. In addition, we found that cheek hue was significantly related to body condition of individuals in both sexes. In males, cheek reflectivity biased towards the UV range was significantly related to better body condition. In females, those individuals with better body condition showed more whitish cheeks with less UV suggesting that cheek hue serves as an intersexual signal for sex recognition. We conclude that the positive relationship between cheek chroma and parasite load in male lizards is compatible with both differential density of melanin and iridophore arrangement in the dermis conveying an individual's ability to cope with environmental stress.

  10. A structural colour ornament correlates positively with parasite load and body condition in an insular lizard species.

    PubMed

    Megía-Palma, Rodrigo; Martínez, Javier; Merino, Santiago

    2016-08-01

    Pigment-based ornaments in vertebrates may reflect the body condition or health status of the individual in correlation with environmental stress and hormonal balance. Among the environmental factors shaping sexual colouration, parasitic infections have been stressed as an important evolutionary pressure constraining the maintenance of pigment-based ornaments. However, the honesty of structure-based ornaments in vertebrates is still under debate. Structural UV-biased ornaments in Gallotia lizards were described as a trait used by conspecifics during mate and rival assessment suggesting the reliability of these signals. We investigated the relationship between parasitaemia, body condition and a structural-based ornament present in the cheek of the sexually dichromatic Canarian lacertid Gallotia galloti in a population with an almost 100 % prevalence of haemoparasites. Using spectrophotometric techniques, we found that males with higher values of cheek UV chroma were infected with more haemoparasites. No significant relationship was found between haemoparasite load and body condition. However, males with higher cheek UV chroma showed significantly better body condition. In addition, we found that cheek hue was significantly related to body condition of individuals in both sexes. In males, cheek reflectivity biased towards the UV range was significantly related to better body condition. In females, those individuals with better body condition showed more whitish cheeks with less UV suggesting that cheek hue serves as an intersexual signal for sex recognition. We conclude that the positive relationship between cheek chroma and parasite load in male lizards is compatible with both differential density of melanin and iridophore arrangement in the dermis conveying an individual's ability to cope with environmental stress. PMID:27262291

  11. Effects of moderate and vigorous physical activity on fitness and body composition.

    PubMed

    Drenowatz, Clemens; Prasad, Vivek K; Hand, Gregory A; Shook, Robin P; Blair, Steven N

    2016-08-01

    Current physical activity (PA) guidelines indicate that moderate-intensity (MPA) and vigorous intensity (VPA) PA provide similar benefits when total volume is equal. The present study examined the associations of MPA and VPA with body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness in free-living young adults. A total of 197 young adults (52.8 % male) were followed over a period of 15 months. Body composition was assessed via dual X-ray absorptiometry and time spent in various PA intensities was determined with a multi-sensor device every 3 months. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed with a graded exercise test at baseline and 15-months follow-up. Change in VPA was positively associated with cardiorespiratory fitness while MPA had beneficial associations with percent body fat. In overweight/obese participants the association with VO2peak was similar for MVPA bouts and VPA. Even though MPA and VPA have positive associations with overall health, their associations on key health parameters differ. PMID:27055817

  12. Bidirectional associations between valued activities and adolescent positive adjustment in a longitudinal study: positive mood as a mediator.

    PubMed

    DesRoches, Andrea; Willoughby, Teena

    2014-02-01

    Although activity involvement has been linked to positive youth development, the value that adolescents place on these activities (i.e., how much they enjoy the activities, find them important, and spend time on them) has received less attention. The purpose of the present study was to examine the bidirectional longitudinal association between engagement in valued activities and adolescent positive adjustment (optimism, purpose in life, and self-esteem), as well as investigate a possible underlying mechanism for this link. High school students (N = 2,270, 48.7% female) from Ontario, Canada completed questionnaires annually in grades 10, 11, and 12. Auto-regressive cross-lagged path analyses were conducted over time, controlling for gender, parental education, and academic grades. Greater engagement in valued activities predicted higher optimism, purpose, and self-esteem over time. Importantly, the results did not support an alternate hypothesis of selection effects, in that adolescents who were better adjusted were not more likely than their peers to engage in valued activities over time. We also found that the longitudinal associations between valued activities and positive adjustment may be due partly to an underlying effect of increased positive mood. Thus, engagement in valued activities appears to be important for adolescent positive adjustment, and may help to foster thriving. Communities, educators, and parents should actively support and encourage adolescents to develop valued activities, and seek to ensure that there are ample opportunities and resources available for them to do so. PMID:23625185

  13. Brain Fluid Content Related to Body Position and Postmortem Interval - An Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Anna; Vink, Robert; Byard, Roger W

    2016-05-01

    Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were euthanized and placed in a horizontal or vertical (head-down) position at room temperature, after which brain fluid content was measured by a moisture analysis technique at variable time points. No significant difference in brain fluid content was observed between horizontal and vertical postmortem positions. A significant increase in brain fluid content was demonstrated 3, 6, and 24 h after death, with maximal fluid content observed at 24 h. Specifically, the brain fluid content of control animals was 77.79 ± 0.36%, increasing to 80.05 ± 0.22% at 24 h (p < 0.0001). This study has demonstrated no significant differences in brain fluid content related to postmortem position, suggesting that a head-down position is not associated with increased brain fluid content or swelling. However, significant temporal increases in brain fluid content after death, most likely related to cerebral liquefaction, occur. PMID:27122403

  14. Activity of quinolones against gram-positive cocci: clinical features.

    PubMed

    Giamarellou, H

    1995-01-01

    The potential role of the commercially available fluoroquinolones in the treatment of Gram-positive infections is discussed on the basis of data obtained from animal experiments and clinical trials. In respiratory tract infections, and particularly in community-acquired pneumonia, it is evident that the presently available quinolones cannot be prescribed empirically as first-line therapy because of their borderline activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae and anaerobes. Reports of pneumococcal seeding in other tissues during quinolone therapy render their administration a debatable issue. Experience in endocarditis is limited to the use of ciprofloxacin plus rifampicin in intravenous drug users with right-sided Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis. Patients with staphylococcal osteomyelitis are included among cases of other bone infections. In noncontrolled studies ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and pefloxacin attained a staphylococcal eradication rate ranging from 70 to 100%, while the addition of rifampicin has been proven to reduce the emergence of resistant mutants during therapy. In soft tissue and skin structure infections that also involve Gram-negative bacteria, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin eradicated 72.6 and 89% of staphylococci, respectively; however, the presence of diabetes or vascular disease compromised the success of treatment. In staphylococcal peritonitis complicating continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, results with ciprofloxacin given intravenously or intraperitoneally were promising. In infections in neutropenic hosts, success of prophylaxis or therapy is still not clear, since colonisation and breakthrough bacteraemias with viridans streptococci and staphylococci have been reported. Furthermore, therapeutic results are compromised by the low response rate in Gram-positive infections. Despite the reported clinical efficacy of the newer fluoroquinolones, physicians should be alerted to the emergence of staphylococci resistant to fluoroquinolones

  15. Intra-subject variability of snoring sounds in relation to body position, sleep stage, and blood oxygen level.

    PubMed

    Azarbarzin, Ali; Moussavi, Zahra

    2013-04-01

    In a multidimensional feature space, the snoring sounds can extend from a very compact cluster to highly distinct clusters. In this study, we investigated the cause of snoring sound's variation within the snorers. It is known that a change in body position and sleep stage can affect snoring during sleep but it is unclear whether positional, sleep state, and blood oxygen level variations cause the snoring sounds to have different characteristics, and if it does how significant that effect would be. We extracted 12 characteristic features from snoring sound segments of 57 snorers and transformed them into a 4-D feature space using principal component analysis (PCA). Then, they were grouped based on the body position (side, supine, and prone), sleep stage (NREM, REM, and Arousal), and blood oxygen level (Normal and Desaturation). The probability density function of the transformed features was calculated for each class of categorical variables. The distance between the class-densities were calculated to determine which of these parameters affects the snoring sounds significantly. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was run for each categorical variable. The results show that the positional change has the highest effect on the snoring sounds; it results in forming distinct clusters of snoring sounds. Also, sleep state and blood oxygen level variation have been found to moderately affect the snoring sounds. PMID:23269579

  16. Selective internalization of self-assembled artificial oil bodies by HER2/neu-positive cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chung-Jen; Lin, Li-Jen; Lin, Che-Chin; Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Chao, Yun-Peng

    2011-01-01

    A novel delivery carrier was developed using artificial oil bodies (AOBs). Plant seed oil bodies (OBs) consist of a triacylglycerol matrix surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids embedded with the storage protein oleosin (Ole). Ole consists of a central hydrophobic domain with two amphiphatic arms that extrude from the surface of OBs. In this study, a bivalent anti-HER2/neu affibody domain (ZH2) was fused with Ole at the C terminus. After overproduction in Escherichia coli, the fusion protein (Ole-ZH2) was recovered to assemble AOBs. The size of self-assembled AOBs was tailored by varying the oil/Ole-ZH2 ratio and pH to reach a nanoscale. Upon co-incubation with tumor cells, the nanoscale AOBs encapsulated with a hydrophobic fluorescence dye were selectively internalized by HER2/neu-overexpressing cells and displayed biocompatibility with the cells. In addition, the ZH2-mediated endosomal entry of AOBs occurred in a time- and AOB dose-dependent manner. The internalization efficiency was as high as 90%. The internalized AOBs disintegrated at the non-permissive pH (e.g. in acidic endosomes) and the cargo dye was released. Results of in vitro study revealed a sustained and prolonged release profile. Taken together, our findings indicate the potential of AOBs as a delivery carrier.

  17. Improved models for determination of body fat by in vivo neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.; Vaswani, A.; Yasumura, S.; Yuen, K.; Ellis, K.

    1984-08-01

    In the present study, two different models of body composition, based on data obtained by nuclear techniques are used. Total body nitrogen, calcium, and chlorine were obtained by total body neutron activation. Total body chlorine was used to estimate extracellular water, and total body calcium to determine bone mineral and extracellular solids. Total body potassium was measured by whole body counting to obtain the body cell mass. In addition, total body water was measured by the tritium dilution technique. It was found that either model can be used equally well to measure total body fat in normal subjects. Estimation of body fat as the difference between body weight and the sum of total body nitrogen (protein), total body water, and bone ash (model 1) appears to have an advantage over model 2, which uses body cell mass, extracellular water, and extracellular solids, particularly for patients with metabolic disorders. This advantage is partly due to the fact that the parameter protein (total body nitrogen) is less affected in metabolic disorders than the more labile total body potassium. The closely correlated results obtained with the two models based on nuclear measurements support the conclusion that these techniques provide reliable measurements of total body fat.

  18. Hi-alpha forebody design. Part 2: Determination of body shapes for positive directional stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, R.; Mason, William H.

    1991-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been used to study aircraft forebody flowfields at low speed high angle-of-attack conditions with sideslip. The purpose is to define forebody geometries which provide good directional stability characteristics under these conditions. The flows of the F-5A forebody and Erickson forebody were recomputed with better and refined grids. The results were obtained using a modified version of cfl3d to solve either the Euler equations or the Reynolds equations employing a form of the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model. Based on those results, we conclude that current CFD methods can be used to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of forebodies to achieve desirable high angle-of-attack characteristics. An analytically defined generic forebody model is described, and a systematic study of forebody shapes was then conducted to determine which shapes promote a positive contribution to directional stability at high angle-of-attack. A novel way of presenting the results is used to illustrate how the positive contribution arises. Based on the results of this initial parametric study, some guidelines for aerodynamic design to promote positive directional stability are presented.

  19. Physical Activity and Health Perception in Aging: Do Body Mass and Satisfaction Matter? A Three-Path Mediated Link.

    PubMed

    Condello, Giancarlo; Capranica, Laura; Stager, Joel; Forte, Roberta; Falbo, Simone; Di Baldassarre, Angela; Segura-Garcia, Cristina; Pesce, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Although ageing people could benefit from healthy diet and physical activity to maintain health and quality of life, further understandings of the diet- and physical activity-related mechanisms that may cause changes in health and quality of life perception are necessary. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of eating attitudes, body mass and image satisfaction, and exercise dependence in the relationship between physical activity and health and quality of life perception in older individuals. Hundred and seventy-nine late middle-aged, (55-64 yrs), young-old (65-74 yrs), and old (75-84 yrs) senior athletes (n = 56), physically active (n = 58) or sedentary adults (n = 65) were submitted to anthropometric evaluations (body mass, height) and self-reported questionnaires: Body Image Dimensional Assessment, Exercise Dependence Scale, Eating Attitude Test, and Short Form Health Survey (Physical Component Summary [PCS] and Mental Component Summary [MCS] of and health and quality of life perception). Senior athletes, physically active, and sedentary participants subgroups differed (P<0.05) from each other in body mass index (BMI) and several components of body image and exercise dependence. Senior athletes showed, compared to their sedentary counterparts, further differences (P<0.05) in eating attitudes and in both PCS and MCS. Mediation analysis showed that the relationship between physical activity habit and MCS, but not PCS, was indirectly explained by a serial mediation chain composed of objective BMI and subjective body image (dis)satisfaction. Findings confirm the relevant role of physically active life habits for older individuals to perceive good physical and mental health. The novelty of the three-path mediated link between physical activity level and mental health perception suggests that the beneficial effect of a physically active lifestyle on weight control can positively impinge on the cognitive-emotional dimension of mental health by

  20. Active Shape Discrimination with Compliant Bodies as Reservoir Computers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Chris; Philippides, Andrew; Husbands, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Compliant bodies with complex dynamics can be used both to simplify control problems and to lead to adaptive reflexive behavior when engaged with the environment in the sensorimotor loop. By revisiting an experiment introduced by Beer and replacing the continuous-time recurrent neural network therein with reservoir computing networks abstracted from compliant bodies, we demonstrate that adaptive behavior can be produced by an agent in which the body is the main computational locus. We show that bodies with complex dynamics are capable of integrating, storing, and processing information in meaningful and useful ways, and furthermore that with the addition of the simplest of nervous systems such bodies can generate behavior that could equally be described as reflexive or minimally cognitive. PMID:26934092

  1. False-positive uptake on radioiodine whole-body scintigraphy: physiologic and pathologic variants unrelated to thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jong-Ryool; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Radioiodine whole-body scintigraphy (WBS), which takes advantage of the high avidity of radioiodine in the functioning thyroid tissues, has been used for detection of differentiated thyroid cancer. Radioiodine is a sensitive marker for detection of thyroid cancer; however, radioiodine uptake is not specific for thyroid tissue. It can also be seen in healthy tissue, including thymus, breast, liver, and gastrointestinal tract, or in benign diseases, such as cysts and inflammation, or in a variety of benign and malignant non-thyroidal tumors, which could be mistaken for thyroid cancer. In order to accurately interpret radioiodine scintigraphy results, one must be familiar with the normal physiologic distribution of the tracer and frequently encountered physiologic and pathologic variants of radioiodine uptake. This article will provide a systematic overview of potential false-positive uptake of radioiodine in the whole body and illustrate how such unexpected findings can be appropriately evaluated. PMID:23133823

  2. [The Influence of Change in Body Water Distribution Caused by Changing Position Upon Nocturia in Older Men].

    PubMed

    Kiba, Keisuke; Hirayama, Akihide; Yoshikawa, Motokiyo; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Torimoto, Kazumasa; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2016-05-01

    A total of 29 men 60 years and older (mean age 74 years) who complained at least once about nocturnal voiding and were diagnosed with nocturnal polyuria in the frequency volume chart (FVC) were enrolled in this study. Body water was measured by bioelectric impedance analysis just after lying down at 4 pm and after raising legs 30 minutes later. Nocturnal urine production was measured by FVC, and urine production per unit of time at first nocturnal voiding (urine volume at first nocturnal voiding/hours of undisturbed sleep (HUS) : UFN/HUS), urine production per unit of time during sleep (total nocturnal urine volume/hours of sleep : TNV/HS), etc was evaluated. Extra cellular water (ECW) of 0.19 l (4.0%) in legs was reduced caused by body position changing. There was a significant positive correlation between the amount of ECW in legs and UFN/HUS, TNV/HS (r=0. 57, p=0.001 ; r=0. 38, p=0.042, respectively). Moreover, UFN/HUS had a significant correlation with soft lean mass in legs, ECW in legs and daytime water intake. This study suggested that a change in leg fluids caused by a change in position results in increased urine production and decreased HUS. PMID:27320115

  3. PLTP activity in premenopausal women. Relationship with lipoprotein lipase, HDL, LDL, body fat, and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, S J; Carr, M C; Hokanson, J E; Brunzell, J D; Albers, J J

    2000-02-01

    Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is thought to play a major role in the facilitated transfer of phospholipids between lipoproteins and in the modulation of high density lipoprotein (HDL) particle size and composition. However, little has been reported concerning the relationships of PLTP with plasma lipoprotein parameters, lipolytic enzymes, body fat distribution, insulin, and glucose in normolipidemic individuals, particularly females. In the present study, 50 normolipidemic healthy premenopausal females were investigated. The relationships between the plasma PLTP activity and selected variables were assessed. PLTP activity was significantly and positively correlated with low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (r(s) = 0.53), apoB (r(s) = 0.44), glucose (r(s) = 0.40), HDL cholesterol (r(s) = 0.38), HDL(3) cholesterol (r(s) = 0.37), lipoprotein lipase activity (r(s) = 0.36), insulin (r(s) = 0.33), subcutaneous abdominal fat (r(s) = 0.36), intra-abdominal fat (r(s) = 0.29), and body mass index (r(s) = 0.29). HDL(2) cholesterol, triglyceride, and hepatic lipase were not significantly related to PLTP activity. As HDL(2) can be decreased by hepatic lipase and hepatic lipase is increased in obesity with increasing intra-abdominal fat, the participants were divided into sub-groups of non-obese (n = 35) and obese (n = 15) individuals and the correlation of PLTP with HDL(2) cholesterol was re-examined. In the non-obese subjects, HDL(2) cholesterol was found to be significantly and positively related to PLTP activity (r(s) = 0.44). Adjustment of the HDL(2) values for the effect of hepatic lipase activity resulted in a significant positive correlation between PLTP and HDL(2) (r(s) = 0.41), indicating that the strength of the relationship between PLTP activity and HDL(2) can be reduced by the opposing effect of hepatic lipase on HDL(2) concentrations. We conclude that PLTP-facilitated lipid transfer activity is related to HDL and LDL metabolism, as well as

  4. Usage Position and Virtual Keyboard Design Affect Upper-Body Kinematics, Discomfort, and Usability during Prolonged Tablet Typing

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-I Brandon; Hong, Ruei-Hong; Chang, Jer-Hao; Ke, Xin-Min

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The increase in tablet usage allows people to perform computer work in non-traditional office environments. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of changes in tablet keyboard design on postures of the upper extremities and neck, discomfort, and usability under different usage positions during prolonged touch-typing. Methods Eighteen healthy participants familiar with touch-screen devices were randomized into three usage positions (desk, lap, and bed) and completed six, 60-minute typing sessions using three virtual keyboard designs (standard, wide, split). Electrogoniometers continuously measured the postures of the wrists, elbow, and neck. Body discomfort and system usability were evaluated by questionnaires before and immediately after each typing session. Results Separate linear mixed effects models on various postural measures and subjective ratings are conducted with usage position as the between-subject factors, keyboard design and typing duration as the with-in subject factors were conducted. Using the tablet in bed led to more extended wrists but a more natural elbow flexion than the desk position. The angled split virtual keyboard significantly reduced the extent of wrist ulnar deviation than the keyboard with either standard or wide design. However, little difference was observed across the usage position and keyboard design. When the postural data were compared between the middle and end of typing sessions, the wrists, elbow, and neck all exhibited a substantially increased range of joint movements (13% to 38%). The discomfort rating also increased significantly over time in every upper body region investigated. Additionally, the split keyboard design received a higher usability rating in the bed position, whereas participants had more satisfactory experience while using the wide keyboard in the traditional desk setting. Conclusions Prolonged use of tablets in non-traditional office environments may result in awkward postures in the

  5. [Pressure Ulcer Caused by Long-term Keeping of the Same Body Position during Epidural Labour Analgesia].

    PubMed

    Naruse, Satoshi; Uchizaki, Sakiko; Mimura, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Mizuki; Akinaga, Chieko; Sato, Shigehito

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman (height: 153 cm, weight : 62.4 kg, non-pregnant weight : 52 kg, uniparous) without underlying diseases who developed pressure ulcer due to keeping a similar body position during long-term epidural delivery. Induction of childbirth was started in gestational week 40, causing reduction of fetal heart rate, which improved after adoption of a right lateral recumbent position. Severe contractions occurred and epidural labour analgesia was started. The fetal heart rate decreased again and induction of childbirth was suspended, but the right lateral recumbent position was maintained. Epidural administration was continued due to persistent contractions. Next morning, induction of childbirth was restarted and birth occurred in approximately 6 hours. The right lateral recumbent position was maintained for approximately 20 hours. At childbirth, a pressure ulcer was present in the intertrochanteric part of the right femur. The causes included insufficient knowledge of medical staff about the risk of pressure ulcer during epidural delivery, and no position change. A decreased sensation and blocked motor nerve caused by epidural anesthesia might have accelerated pressure ulcer development. This case suggests that preventive measures against pressure ulcer are required in epidural anesthesia in pregnant women. PMID:27483666

  6. Whole-body vibration increases upper and lower body muscle activity in older adults: potential use of vibration accessories.

    PubMed

    Marín, Pedro J; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Santin-Medeiros, Fernanda; Vicente-Rodriguez, German; Casajús, Jose A; Hazell, Tom J; Garatachea, Nuria

    2012-06-01

    The current study examined the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on upper and lower body muscle activity during static muscle contractions (squat and bicep curls). The use of WBV accessories such as hand straps attached to the platform and a soft surface mat were also evaluated. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was measured for the medial gastrocnemius (MG), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps brachii (BB) muscles in fourteen healthy older adults (74.8±4.5 years; mean±SD) with a WBV stimulus at an acceleration of 40 m s(-2) (30 Hz High, 2.5 mm or 46 Hz Low, 1.1 mm). WBV increased lower body (VL and MG) sEMG vs baseline (no WBV) though this was decreased with the use of the soft mat. The addition of the bicep curl with hand straps had no effect on lower body sEMG. WBV also increased BB sEMG vs baseline which was further increased when using the hand straps. There was no upper body effect of the soft mat. This study demonstrates WBV increases both lower and upper body muscle activity in healthy older adults. Moreover, WBV accessories such as hand straps attached to the platform or a soft surface mat may be used to alter exercise intensity. PMID:22406015

  7. Does small-bodied salmon spawning activity enhance streambed mobility?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Marwan A.; Tonina, Daniele; Buxton, Todd H.

    2015-09-01

    Female salmonids bury and lay their eggs in streambeds by digging a pit, which is then covered with sediment from a second pit that is dug immediately upstream. The spawning process alters streambed topography, winnows fine sediment, and mixes sediment in the active layer. The resulting egg nests (redds) contain coarser and looser sediments than those of unspawned streambed areas, and display a dune-like shape with an amplitude and length that vary with fish size, substrate conditions, and flow conditions. Redds increase local bed surface roughness (<10-1 channel width, W), but may reduce the size of macro bedforms by eroding reach-scale topography (100-101W). Research has suggested that spawning may increase flow resistance due to redd form drag, resulting in lower grain shear stress and less particle mobility. Spawning, also prevents streambed armoring by mixing surface and subsurface material, potentially increasing particle mobility. Here we use two-dimensional hydraulic modeling with detailed prespawning and postspawning bathymetries and field observations to test the effect of spawning by small-bodied salmonids on sediment transport. Our results show that topographical roughness from small salmon redds has negligible effects on shear stress at the reach-unit scale, and limited effects at the local scale. Conversely, results indicate sediment mixing reduces armoring and enhances sediment mobility, which increases potential bed load transport by subsequent floods. River restoration in fish-bearing streams should take into consideration the effects of redd excavation on channel stability. This is particularly important for streams that historically supported salmonids and are the focus of habitat restoration actions.

  8. Activity recognition of assembly tasks using body-worn microphones and accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jamie A; Lukowicz, Paul; Tröster, Gerhard; Starner, Thad E

    2006-10-01

    In order to provide relevant information to mobile users, such as workers engaging in the manual tasks of maintenance and assembly, a wearable computer requires information about the user's specific activities. This work focuses on the recognition of activities that are characterized by a hand motion and an accompanying sound. Suitable activities can be found in assembly and maintenance work. Here, we provide an initial exploration into the problem domain of continuous activity recognition using on-body sensing. We use a mock "wood workshop" assembly task to ground our investigation. We describe a method for the continuous recognition of activities (sawing, hammering, filing, drilling, grinding, sanding, opening a drawer, tightening a vise, and turning a screwdriver) using microphones and three-axis accelerometers mounted at two positions on the user's arms. Potentially "interesting" activities are segmented from continuous streams of data using an analysis of the sound intensity detected at the two different locations. Activity classification is then performed on these detected segments using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) on the sound channel and hidden Markov models (HMMs) on the acceleration data. Four different methods at classifier fusion are compared for improving these classifications. Using user-dependent training, we obtain continuous average recall and precision rates (for positive activities) of 78 percent and 74 percent, respectively. Using user-independent training (leave-one-out across five users), we obtain recall rates of 66 percent and precision rates of 63 percent. In isolation, these activities were recognized with accuracies of 98 percent, 87 percent, and 95 percent for the user-dependent, user-independent, and user-adapted cases, respectively. PMID:16986539

  9. Survival following a vertical free fall from 300 feet: the crucial role of body position to impact surface.

    PubMed

    Weckbach, Sebastian; Flierl, Michael A; Blei, Michael; Burlew, Clay Cothren; Moore, Ernest E; Stahel, Philip F

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 28-year old rock climber who survived an "unsurvivable" injury consisting of a vertical free fall from 300 feet onto a solid rock surface. The trauma mechanism and injury kinetics are analyzed, with a particular focus on the relevance of body positioning to ground surface at the time of impact. The role of early patient transfer to a level 1 trauma center, and "damage control" management protocols for avoiding delayed morbidity and mortality in this critically injured patient are discussed. PMID:22027092

  10. The Pro12Ala Polymorphism of the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Gene Modifies the Association of Physical Activity and Body Mass Changes in Polish Women

    PubMed Central

    Zarebska, Aleksandra; Jastrzebski, Zbigniew; Cieszczyk, Pawel; Leonska-Duniec, Agata; Kotarska, Katarzyna; Kaczmarczyk, Mariusz; Sawczuk, Marek; Maciejewska-Karlowska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ is a key regulator of adipogenesis, responsible for fatty acid storage and maintaining energy balance in the human body. Studies on the functional importance of the PPARG Pro12Ala polymorphic variants indicated that the observed alleles may influence body mass measurements; however, obtained results were inconsistent. We have decided to check if body mass changes observed in physically active participants will be modulated by the PPARG Pro12Ala genotype. The genotype distribution of the PPARG Pro12Ala allele was examined in a group of 201 Polish women measured for selected body mass variables before and after the completion of a 12-week training program. The results of our experiment suggest that PPARG genotype can modulate training-induced body mass measurements changes: after completion of the training program, Pro12/Pro12 homozygotes were characterised by a greater decrease of body fat mass measurements in comparison with 12Ala allele carriers. These results indicate that the PPARG 12Ala variant may impair the training-induced positive effects on body mass measurements; however, the detailed mechanism of such interaction remained unclear and observed correlation between PPARG genotype and body mass differential effects should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25371663

  11. Physical Activities Monitoring Using Wearable Acceleration Sensors Attached to the Body

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring physical activities by using wireless sensors is helpful for identifying postural orientation and movements in the real-life environment. A simple and robust method based on time domain features to identify the physical activities is proposed in this paper; it uses sensors placed on the subjects’ wrist, chest and ankle. A feature set based on time domain characteristics of the acceleration signal recorded by acceleration sensors is proposed for the classification of twelve physical activities. Nine subjects performed twelve different types of physical activities, including sitting, standing, walking, running, cycling, Nordic walking, ascending stairs, descending stairs, vacuum cleaning, ironing clothes and jumping rope, and lying down (resting state). Their ages were 27.2 ± 3.3 years and their body mass index (BMI) is 25.11 ± 2.6 Kg/m2. Classification results demonstrated a high validity showing precision (a positive predictive value) and recall (sensitivity) of more than 95% for all physical activities. The overall classification accuracy for a combined feature set of three sensors is 98%. The proposed framework can be used to monitor the physical activities of a subject that can be very useful for the health professional to assess the physical activity of healthy individuals as well as patients. PMID:26203909

  12. Body-ownership for actively operated non-corporeal objects.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke; Hommel, Bernhard

    2015-11-01

    Rubber-hand and virtual-hand illusions show that people can perceive body ownership for objects under suitable conditions. Bottom-up approaches assume that perceived ownership emerges from multisensory matching (e.g., between seen object and felt hand movements), whereas top-down approaches claim that novel body parts are integrated only if they resemble some part of a permanent internal body representation. We demonstrate that healthy adults perceive body ownership for a virtual balloon changing in size, and a virtual square changing in size or color, in synchrony with movements of their real hand. This finding is inconsistent with top-down approaches and amounts to an existence proof that non-corporeal events can be perceived as body parts if their changes are systematically related to one's actions. It also implies that previous studies with passive-stimulation techniques might have underestimated the plasticity of body representations and put too much emphasis on the resemblance between viewed object and real hand. PMID:26094223

  13. "The way I see it": the effect of stigma and depression on self-perceived body image among HIV-positive individuals on treatment in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Alexis K; Duncan, Katrina C; Ayalew, Beza; Zhang, Wendy; Tzemis, Despina; Lima, V; Montaner, Julio S G; Hogg, Robert S

    2011-11-01

    With significant reductions in AIDS-related morbidity and mortality, HIV is increasingly viewed as a chronic condition. However, people on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are experiencing new challenges such as metabolic and morphological body changes, which may affect self-perceived body image. The concept of body image is complex and encompasses an individual's perception of their existential self, physical self and social interpretation of their body by others. The Longitudinal Investigations into Supportive and Ancillary Health Services (LISA) cohort is a prospective study of HIV-positive persons on ART. An interviewer-administered survey collects socio-demographic and health information including body image, stigma, depression, food insecurity, and quality of life (QoL). In bivariate analyses, Chi-squared or Wilcoxon rank sum tests were used to compare individuals reporting positive body image with those reporting negative body image. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine associations between negative body image and covariates. Of 451 LISA participants, 47% reported negative body image. The adjusted multivariate analysis showed participants who reported high stigma in the presence of depressive symptoms were more likely to have negative body image compared to people reporting low stigma and no depressive symptoms (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.41, confidence interval [CI]: 1.24-4.68). The estimated probability of a person having positive body image without stigma or depression was 68%. When stigma alone was included, the probability dropped to 59%, and when depression was included alone the probability dropped to 34%. Depressive symptoms and high stigma combined resulted in a probability of reporting positive body image of 27%. Further efforts are needed to address body image among people living with HIV. In order to lessen the impacts of depression on body image, such issues must be addressed in health care settings. Community interventions are

  14. Active Healthy Kids Canada's Position on Active Video Games for Children and Youth.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Leblanc, Allana G; McFarlane, Allison; Colley, Rachel C; Thivel, David; Biddle, Stuart Jh; Maddison, Ralph; Leatherdale, Scott T; Tremblay, Mark S

    2013-12-01

    The effect of active video games (AVGs) on acute energy expenditure has previously been reported; however, the influence of AVGs on other health-related lifestyle indicators remains unclear. To address this knowledge gap, Active Healthy Kids Canada (AHKC) convened an international group of researchers to conduct a systematic review to understand whether AVGs should be promoted to increase physical activity and improve health indicators in children and youth (zero to 17 years of age). The present article outlines the process and outcomes of the development of the AHKC's position on active video games for children and youth. In light of the available evidence, AHKC does not recommend AVGs as a strategy to help children be more physically active. However, AVGs may exchange some sedentary time for light- to moderate-intensity physical activity, and there may be specific situations in which AVGs provide benefit (eg, motor skill development in special populations and rehabilitation). PMID:24497779

  15. Technical activity profile and influence of body anthropometry on playing performance in female elite team handball.

    PubMed

    Michalsik, Lars B; Aagaard, Per; Madsen, Klavs

    2015-04-01

    To determine the physical demands placed on female elite team handball (TH) players in relation to playing position and body anthropometry, female elite TH primarily field players were monitored during match-play using video recording and subsequent computerized technical match analysis during 5 regular tournament match seasons. Technical match activities were distributed in 6 major types of playing actions (shots, breakthroughs, fast breaks, technical errors, defensive errors, and tackles) and further divided into various subcategories (e.g., type of shot, hard or light tackles, claspings, screenings, and blockings). Furthermore, anthropometric measurements were performed. Each player had 28.3 ± 11.0 (group means ± SD) high-intense playing actions per match with a total effective playing time of 50.70 ± 5.83 minutes. On average, each player made 2.8 ± 2.6 fast breaks, gave 7.9 ± 14.4 screenings, received 14.6 ± 9.2 tackles in total, and performed 7.7 ± 3.7 shots while in offense, along with 3.5 ± 3.8 blockings, 1.9 ± 2.7 claspings, and 6.2 ± 3.8 hard tackles in defense. Mean body height, body mass, and age in the Danish Premier Female Team Handball League were 175.4 ± 6.1 cm, 69.5 ± 6.5 kg, and 25.4 ± 3.7 years, respectively. Wing players were lighter (63.5 ± 4.8 kg, p < 0.001) and smaller (169.3 ± 4.9 cm, p < 0.001) than backcourt players (BP) (70.6 ± 5.3 kg, 177.0 ± 5.4 cm) and pivots (PV) (72.5 ± 4.9 kg, 177.7 ± 4.9 cm). In conclusion, the present match observations revealed that female elite TH players during competitive games intermittently perform a high number of short-term, high-intense technical playing actions making modern female elite TH a physically demanding team sport. No sign of technical fatigue were observed, since the amount of intense technical playing actions remained unchanged in the second half. Marked positional differences in the physical demands were demonstrated, with wing players performing more fast breaks and less

  16. Facebook photo activity associated with body image disturbance in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Meier, Evelyn P; Gray, James

    2014-04-01

    The present study examined the relationship between body image and adolescent girls' activity on the social networking site (SNS) Facebook (FB). Research has shown that elevated Internet "appearance exposure" is positively correlated with increased body image disturbance among adolescent girls, and there is a particularly strong association with FB use. The present study sought to replicate and extend upon these findings by identifying the specific FB features that correlate with body image disturbance in adolescent girls. A total of 103 middle and high school females completed questionnaire measures of total FB use, specific FB feature use, weight dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, thin ideal internalization, appearance comparison, and self-objectification. An appearance exposure score was calculated based on subjects' use of FB photo applications relative to total FB use. Elevated appearance exposure, but not overall FB usage, was significantly correlated with weight dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, thin ideal internalization, and self-objectification. Implications for eating disorder prevention programs and best practices in researching SNSs are discussed. PMID:24237288

  17. The Influence of Body Position on Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure Gradient and Movement in Cats with Normal and Impaired Craniospinal Communication

    PubMed Central

    Radoš, Milan; Erceg, Gorislav; Petošić, Antonio; Jurjević, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a severe therapeutic problem, as there is insufficient knowledge about the physiology of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. In this paper a new CSF pressure regulation hypothesis is proposed. According to this hypothesis, the CSF pressure depends on the laws of fluid mechanics and on the anatomical characteristics inside the cranial and spinal space, and not, as is today generally believed, on CSF secretion, circulation and absorption. The volume and pressure changes in the newly developed CSF model, which by its anatomical dimensions and basic biophysical features imitates the craniospinal system in cats, are compared to those obtained on cats with and without the blockade of craniospinal communication in different body positions. During verticalization, a long-lasting occurrence of negative CSF pressure inside the cranium in animals with normal cranio-spinal communication was observed. CSF pressure gradients change depending on the body position, but those gradients do not enable unidirectional CSF circulation from the hypothetical site of secretion to the site of absorption in any of them. Thus, our results indicate the existence of new physiological/pathophysiological correlations between intracranial fluids, which opens up the possibility of new therapeutic approaches to intracranial hypertension. PMID:24748150

  18. Somatotype and body composition analysis of Korean youth soccer players according to playing position for sports physiotherapy research

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Ji-Woong; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Jeon, Hye-Joo; Lee, Won-Deok; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the somatotype and physical characteristic differences among elite youth soccer players. [Subjects and Methods] In the present study, we evaluated twenty-two Korean youth soccer players in different playing positions. The playing positions were divided into forward (FW), midfielder (MF), defender (DF), and goalkeeper (GK). The participants’ lean body mass (LBM), fat free mass (FFM), fat mass (FM), and basal metabolic rate (BMR) were measured and their somatotype determined according to the Heath-Carter method. [Results] The youth soccer players had twelve ectomorphic, eight mesomorphic, and two central predominant types. The DFs were taller than, but otherwise similar in physical characteristics to the FWs and MFs. The GKs were taller and heavier than the other players; however, their somatotype components were not significantly different. LBM, FFM, and BMR were significantly higher in GKs than in FWs and MFs. Although LBM, FFM, and BMR values between GKs and DFs showed large differences, they were not statistically significant. [Conclusion] The present study may contribute to our understanding of the differences in somatotype and body composition of Korean youth soccer players involved in sports physiotherapy research. PMID:25995545

  19. Somatotype and body composition analysis of Korean youth soccer players according to playing position for sports physiotherapy research.

    PubMed

    Noh, Ji-Woong; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Jeon, Hye-Joo; Lee, Won-Deok; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the somatotype and physical characteristic differences among elite youth soccer players. [Subjects and Methods] In the present study, we evaluated twenty-two Korean youth soccer players in different playing positions. The playing positions were divided into forward (FW), midfielder (MF), defender (DF), and goalkeeper (GK). The participants' lean body mass (LBM), fat free mass (FFM), fat mass (FM), and basal metabolic rate (BMR) were measured and their somatotype determined according to the Heath-Carter method. [Results] The youth soccer players had twelve ectomorphic, eight mesomorphic, and two central predominant types. The DFs were taller than, but otherwise similar in physical characteristics to the FWs and MFs. The GKs were taller and heavier than the other players; however, their somatotype components were not significantly different. LBM, FFM, and BMR were significantly higher in GKs than in FWs and MFs. Although LBM, FFM, and BMR values between GKs and DFs showed large differences, they were not statistically significant. [Conclusion] The present study may contribute to our understanding of the differences in somatotype and body composition of Korean youth soccer players involved in sports physiotherapy research. PMID:25995545

  20. Nestling activity levels during begging behaviour predicts activity level and body mass in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Simon C.

    2014-01-01

    Across a range of species including humans, personality traits, or differences in behaviour between individuals that are consistent over time, have been demonstrated. However, few studies have measured whether these consistent differences are evident in very young animals, and whether they persist over an individual’s entire lifespan. Here we investigated the begging behaviour of very young cross-fostered zebra finch nestlings and the relationship between that and adult activity levels. We found a link between the nestling activity behaviour head movements during begging, measured at just five and seven days after hatching, and adult activity levels, measured when individuals were between three and three and a half years old. Moreover, body mass was found to be negatively correlated with both nestling and adult activity levels, suggesting that individuals which carry less body fat as adults are less active both as adults and during begging as nestlings. Our work suggests that the personality traits identified here in both very young nestlings and adults may be linked to physiological factors such as metabolism or environmental sources of variation. Moreover, our work suggests it may be possible to predict an individual’s future adult personality at a very young age, opening up new avenues for future work to explore the relationship between personality and a number of aspects of individual life history and survival. PMID:25279258

  1. Nestling activity levels during begging behaviour predicts activity level and body mass in adulthood.

    PubMed

    McCowan, Luke S C; Griffith, Simon C

    2014-01-01

    Across a range of species including humans, personality traits, or differences in behaviour between individuals that are consistent over time, have been demonstrated. However, few studies have measured whether these consistent differences are evident in very young animals, and whether they persist over an individual's entire lifespan. Here we investigated the begging behaviour of very young cross-fostered zebra finch nestlings and the relationship between that and adult activity levels. We found a link between the nestling activity behaviour head movements during begging, measured at just five and seven days after hatching, and adult activity levels, measured when individuals were between three and three and a half years old. Moreover, body mass was found to be negatively correlated with both nestling and adult activity levels, suggesting that individuals which carry less body fat as adults are less active both as adults and during begging as nestlings. Our work suggests that the personality traits identified here in both very young nestlings and adults may be linked to physiological factors such as metabolism or environmental sources of variation. Moreover, our work suggests it may be possible to predict an individual's future adult personality at a very young age, opening up new avenues for future work to explore the relationship between personality and a number of aspects of individual life history and survival. PMID:25279258

  2. Controlling balance during quiet standing: proportional and derivative controller generates preceding motor command to body sway position observed in experiments.

    PubMed

    Masani, Kei; Vette, Albert H; Popovic, Milos R

    2006-02-01

    To compensate for significant time delays in the control of human bipedal stance, it was suggested that a feed-forward control mechanism is needed to generate a preceding motor command to the body sway position observed in quiet standing. In this article, we present evidence that a feedback proportional-derivative (PD) controller can effectively generate a desired preceding motor command. We also discuss the following characteristics of the proposed PD controller: (1) the level of robustness of the controller with respect to neurological time delays and (2) how well the controller replicates the system's dynamics observed in experiments with able bodied subjects, i.e. how well the controller generates the observed preceding motor command. Human quiet stance was simulated using an inverted pendulum model regulated by a PD controller. The simulations were used to calculate the center of mass (COM) position and velocity data, and the motor command (ankle joint torque) data as a function of time. These data and the data obtained in the experiments were compared using cross-correlation functions (CCFs). The results presented herein imply that a PD feedback controller is capable of ensuring balance during human bipedal quiet stance, even if the neurological time delays are considerable. The proposed feedback controller can generate the preceding motor command that was observed in the experiments. Therefore, we conclude that a feed-forward mechanism is not necessary to compensate for the long closed-loop time delay in human bipedal stance as suggested in recent literature, and that the PD controller is a good approximation of the control strategy applied by able bodied subjects during quiet stance. PMID:16399512

  3. A Biological Global Positioning System: Considerations for Tracking Stem Cell Behaviors in the Whole Body

    PubMed Central

    Tachiki, Lisa May Ling; Luo, Jane; Dethlefs, Brent A.; Chen, Zhongping; Loudon, William G.

    2010-01-01

    Many recent research studies have proposed stem cell therapy as a treatment for cancer, spinal cord injuries, brain damage, cardiovascular disease, and other conditions. Some of these experimental therapies have been tested in small animals and, in rare cases, in humans. Medical researchers anticipate extensive clinical applications of stem cell therapy in the future. The lack of basic knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology-survival, migration, differentiation, integration in a real time manner when transplanted into damaged CNS remains an absolute bottleneck for attempt to design stem cell therapies for CNS diseases. A major challenge to the development of clinical applied stem cell therapy in medical practice remains the lack of efficient stem cell tracking methods. As a result, the fate of the vast majority of stem cells transplanted in the human central nervous system (CNS), particularly in the detrimental effects, remains unknown. The paucity of knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology—survival, migration, differentiation, integration in real-time when transplanted into damaged CNS remains a bottleneck in the attempt to design stem cell therapies for CNS diseases. Even though excellent histological techniques remain as the gold standard, no good in vivo techniques are currently available to assess the transplanted graft for migration, differentiation, or survival. To address these issues, herein we propose strategies to investigate the lineage fate determination of derived human embryonic stem cells (hESC) transplanted in vivo into the CNS. Here, we describe a comprehensive biological Global Positioning System (bGPS) to track transplanted stem cells. But, first, we review, four currently used standard methods for tracking stem cells in vivo: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and fluorescence imaging (FLI) with quantum dots. We summarize these modalities and propose criteria

  4. Body Mass Index May Positively Correlate with Bone Mineral Density of Lumbar Vertebra and Femoral Neck in Postmenopausal Females

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shi-Feng; Du, Xin-Jie

    2016-01-01

    : body weight, BMI, height, and age. Body weight, BMI, and height were positively correlated with the BMDs of all examined anatomic locations (P<0.05). However, age was negatively correlated with the various components of the body (lumbar vertebra L1, L2 and L4, femoral neck, proximal femur, Ward’s triangle region: P<0.05; lumbar vertebra L3: P>0.05). Conclusions Our study provides evidence that body weight and BMI are important factors affecting BMD. Postmenopausal females with low BMI are more likely to have osteopenia, and are likely to develop osteoporosis. BMI can be used as an important index to prevent osteoporosis. PMID:26766815

  5. Gender Related Differences in Response to “In Favor of Myself” Wellness Program to Enhance Positive Self & Body Image among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Moria; Hagay, Noa; Tamir, Snait

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical, neurological and psychological changes are often experienced differently by male and female adolescents. Positive self-esteem, emotional well-being, school achievements, and family connectedness are considered as protective factors against health-compromising behaviors. This study examines the gender differences in respect to the effect of a school-based interactive wellness program – “In Favor of Myself” – on self-image, body image, eating attitudes and behaviors of young adolescents. Methods Two hundred and ten adolescents (mean age 13.5) participated in the intervention group, 55% were girls and 45% boys. Program consisted of eight 90-minutes structured sessions integrated into a regular school coping skills curriculum. The program focused on self-esteem, self-image, body image, media literacy and cognitive dissonance. The overall impact of the program and the study protocol were previously published. Results Overall, there are gender related differences in respect to body image and self-image in young adolescents in response to “In Favor of Myself”. Compared to boys, girls reported at baseline higher self-esteem, being more contingent by appearance, and their self-image was more influenced by popularity, appearance, interpersonal communication and admired people. Furthermore girls presented greater gap between current body figure and perceived ideal figure. Not only were girls more dissatisfied with their body, but they were more active in attempts to become and/or remain “thin”. At program termination, gender × time effect was detected in reduction of self-worth contingent by others, change in importance given to achievements at schools, parents' perceptions, as well as the impact of comparisons to friends and family members on self-image. Conclusions Girls exhibited more gains than boys from ‘In Favor of Myself’ which raise the questions about how effective would be the program when delivered in mixed gender groups vs

  6. Combined lower body endurance and upper body resistance training improves performance and health parameters in healthy active elderly.

    PubMed

    Verney, Julien; Kadi, Fawzi; Saafi, Mohamed A; Piehl-Aulin, Karin; Denis, Christian

    2006-06-01

    We investigated the effects of combined lower body (LB) endurance and upper body (UB) resistance training on endurance, strength, blood lipid profile and body composition in active older men. Ten healthy still active men (73+/-4 years, V(O2) peak: 36 (31-41) ml min-1 kg-1) were tested before and after 14 weeks of combined training (3 times week-1). Training consisted of 3x12 min of high intensity interval training on a bicycle for endurance interspersed by 3x12 min of UB resistance exercises. V(O2) peak during leg cycling and arm cranking, isokinetic torque of knee extensor and shoulder abductor and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of several muscles from UB and LB were measured. Sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) and abdominal fat area were measured on MRI scans. Total body composition was assessed by hydrostatic weighing (HW) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Blood lipid profile was assessed before and after training. By the end of the training period, V(O2) peak (l min-1) increased significantly by 9 and 16% in leg cycling and arm cranking tests, respectively. Maximal isokinetic torque increased both for the knee extensor and shoulder abductor muscle groups. CSA increased significantly in deltoid muscle. Percentage of body fat decreased by 1.3% (P<0.05) and abdominal fat and SAD decreased by 12 and 6%, respectively (P<0.01). There was also a significant decrease in total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein. Thus, combined LB endurance and UB resistance training can improve endurance, strength, body composition and blood lipid profile even in healthy active elderly. PMID:16770464

  7. The Effects of Body Position on Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Mohammad; Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Alireza; Valiee, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy is the cornerstone of cancer treatment; however, alongside therapeutic effects, nausea and vomiting are two common complications of chemotherapy. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of body position on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Materials and Methods: This was a single-blind randomized controlled clinical trial. We recruited a convenience sample of 79 patients and randomly allocated them to either experimental or control groups. Patients in the control group received chemotherapy in supine position while the experimental group received chemotherapy in semi-Fowler’s position. All patients were assessed for the severity, duration, and frequency of nausea and vomiting episodes every three hours up to 24 hours, ie, in nine time-points. Study data was analyzed by SPSS v. 16. Results: The severity, duration, and frequency of nausea and the severity and frequency of vomiting episodes in the control group differed significantly across the nine measurement time-points (P < 0.001). In the experimental group, the severity (P = 0.254) and frequency of nausea (P = 0.002) episodes as well as the frequency of vomiting (P = 0.008) episodes differed significantly across the measurement time-points. Moreover, the study groups differed significantly across the measurement time-point in terms of the severity (P < 0.001), duration (P < 0.001), and frequency of nausea (P = 0.002) and the severity (P < 0.001) and frequency (P < 0.001) of vomiting episodes. Conclusions: Compared to supine position, semi-Fowler’s position is more effective in relieving chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. PMID:25068049

  8. Active Women: Perspectives on Their Structural Position in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Harriett; And Others

    An exploratory pilot study to determine the personal characteristics of women community leaders and their position in the power structure was conducted in Chippewa and Eau Claire Counties, Wisconsin. The research design involved a comparison of three samples: the traditional power structure identified through reputational techniques; the active…

  9. Positive Youth Development through Physical Activity: Opportunities for Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    As physical educators continue to advocate for school-based PE, they should also consider ways to extend their work into community settings in an effort to ensure that all kids have an opportunity to develop physical literacy. This article describes how positive youth development programs can provide an opportunity for physical educators to engage…

  10. Collecting "Total" Vocational Education and Training Activity. Position Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    In this position paper, NCVER's Managing Director, Dr Tom Karmel, argues that the submission of vocational education and training student data should be mandated as a condition of registration for all registered training organisations, including private providers. This will ensure a comprehensive data collection that gives a realistic view of…

  11. Self-Management of Patient Body Position, Pose, and Motion Using Wide-Field, Real-Time Optical Measurement Feedback: Results of a Volunteer Study

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, James M.; Price, Gareth J.; Sharrock, Phil J.; Jackson, Andrew S.N.; Stratford, Julie; Moore, Christopher J.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: We present the results of a clinical feasibility study, performed in 10 healthy volunteers undergoing a simulated treatment over 3 sessions, to investigate the use of a wide-field visual feedback technique intended to help patients control their pose while reducing motion during radiation therapy treatment. Methods and Materials: An optical surface sensor is used to capture wide-area measurements of a subject's body surface with visualizations of these data displayed back to them in real time. In this study we hypothesize that this active feedback mechanism will enable patients to control their motion and help them maintain their setup pose and position. A capability hierarchy of 3 different level-of-detail abstractions of the measured surface data is systematically compared. Results: Use of the device enabled volunteers to increase their conformance to a reference surface, as measured by decreased variability across their body surfaces. The use of visual feedback also enabled volunteers to reduce their respiratory motion amplitude to 1.7 ± 0.6 mm compared with 2.7 ± 1.4 mm without visual feedback. Conclusions: The use of live feedback of their optically measured body surfaces enabled a set of volunteers to better manage their pose and motion when compared with free breathing. The method is suitable to be taken forward to patient studies.

  12. Physical activity and body composition in outpatients recovering from anorexia nervosa and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Hechler, Tanja; Rieger, Elizabeth; Touyz, Stephen; Beumont, Pierre; Plasqui, Guy; Westerterp, Klaas

    2008-04-01

    The study aimed to compare differences in physical activity, the relationship between physical activity and body composition, and seasonal variation in physical activity in outpatients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and healthy controls. Physical activity (CM-AMT) and time spent in different intensities of 10 female individuals with AN and 15 female controls was assessed across three seasons along with the percentage body fat. The two groups did not differ in their physical activity and both demonstrated seasonal variation. The percentage body fat of individuals with AN, but not that of the controls, was negatively related to CM-AMT and time spent in low-moderate intensity activity (LMI). Seasonal variation in physical activity emerged with increases in engagement in LMI during the summer period for both groups. Possible interpretations of the finding that decreased physical activity was related to a normalization of percentage body fat in the individuals with AN are discussed and implications for treatment are highlighted. PMID:18493090

  13. Change in Diet, Physical Activity, and Body Weight in Female College Freshman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Scott M.; Black, David R.; Blue, Carolyn L.; Gretebeck, Randall J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine diet, physical activity, and body-weight changes associated with relocation from home to university. Methods: Diet, fitness/physical activity, body-weight parameters and self-efficacy were assessed among 54 freshman women upon college entry and 5 months later. Results: Although caloric intake significantly decreased, a…

  14. Guided Saccades Modulate Face- and Body-Sensitive Activation in the Occipitotemporal Cortex during Social Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, James P.; Green, Steven R.; Marion, Brian; McCarthy, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has identified distinct brain regions in ventral occipitotemporal cortex (VOTC) and lateral occipitotemporal cortex (LOTC) that are differentially activated by pictures of faces and bodies. Recent work from our laboratory has shown that the strong LOTC activation evoked by bodies in which the face is…

  15. Body composition of active persons with spinal cord injury and with poliomyelitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study sought to evaluate the body composition of subjects with active spinal cord injuries and polio. Two groups of males and females, active, free-living, of similar ages and body mass index (BMI), were distributed according to the source of deficiency: SCI – low spinal cord injury (T5-T12) an...

  16. Positive feedback of protein kinase C proteolytic activation during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Leverrier, Sabrina; Vallentin, Alice; Joubert, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    In contrast with protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and PKCepsilon, which are better known for promoting cell survival, PKCdelta is known for its pro-apoptotic function, which is exerted mainly through a caspase-3-dependent proteolytic activation pathway. In the present study, we used the rat GH3B6 pituitary adenoma cell line to show that PKCalpha and PKCepsilon are activated and relocalized together with PKCdelta when apoptosis is induced by a genotoxic stress. Proteolytic activation is a crucial step used by the three isoforms since: (1) the catalytic domains of the PKCalpha, PKCepsilon or PKCdelta isoforms (CDalpha, CDepsilon and CDdelta respectively) accumulated, and this accumulation was dependent on the activity of both calpain and caspase; and (2) transient expression of CDalpha, CDepsilon or CDdelta sufficed to induce apoptosis. However, following this initial step of proteolytic activation, the pathways diverge; cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation are induced by CDepsilon and CDdelta, but not by CDalpha. Another interesting finding of the present study is the proteolysis of PKCdelta induced by CDepsilon expression that revealed the existence of a cross-talk between PKC isoforms during apoptosis. Hence the PKC family may participate in the apoptotic process of pituitary adenoma cells at two levels: downstream of caspase and calpain, and via retro-activation of caspase-3, resulting in the amplification of its own proteolytic activation. PMID:12238950

  17. Evaluation of the effect of signalment and body conformation on activity monitoring in companion dogs

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Dorothy Cimino; Michel, Kathryn E.; Love, Molly; Dow, Caitlin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of signalment and body conformation on activity monitoring in companion dogs. Animals 104 companion dogs. Procedures While wearing an activity monitor, each dog was led through a series of standard activities: lying down, walking laps, trotting laps, and trotting up and down stairs. Linear regression analysis was used to determine which signalment and body conformation factors were associated with activity counts. Results There was no significant effect of signalment or body conformation on activity counts when dogs were lying down, walking laps, and trotting laps. However, when dogs were trotting up and down stairs, there was a significant effect of age and body weight such that, for every 1-kg increase in body weight, there was a 1.7% (95% confidence interval, 1.1% to 2.4%) decrease in activity counts and for every 1-year increase in age, there was a 4.2% (95% confidence interval, 1.4% to 6.9%) decrease in activity counts. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance When activity was well controlled, there was no significant effect of signalment or body conformation on activity counts recorded by the activity monitor. However, when activity was less controlled, older dogs and larger dogs had lower activity counts than younger and smaller dogs. The wide range in body conformation (eg, limb or body length) among dogs did not appear to significantly impact the activity counts recorded by the monitor, but age and body weight did and must be considered in analysis of data collected from the monitors. PMID:20187834

  18. Active electric imaging: body-object interplay and object's "electric texture".

    PubMed

    Caputi, Angel A; Aguilera, Pedro A; Pereira, Ana Carolina

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with the role of fish's body and object's geometry on determining the image spatial shape in pulse Gymnotiforms. This problem was explored by measuring local electric fields along a line on the skin in the presence and absence of objects. We depicted object's electric images at different regions of the electrosensory mosaic, paying particular attention to the perioral region where a fovea has been described. When sensory surface curvature increases relative to the object's curvature, the image details depending on object's shape are blurred and finally disappear. The remaining effect of the object on the stimulus profile depends on the strength of its global polarization. This depends on the length of the object's axis aligned with the field, in turn depending on fish body geometry. Thus, fish's body and self-generated electric field geometries are embodied in this "global effect" of the object. The presence of edges or local changes in impedance at the nearest surface of closely located objects adds peaks to the image profiles ("local effect" or "object's electric texture"). It is concluded that two cues for object recognition may be used by active electroreceptive animals: global effects (informing on object's dimension along the field lines, conductance, and position) and local effects (informing on object's surface). Since the field has fish's centered coordinates, and electrosensory fovea is used for exploration of surfaces, fish fine movements are essential to perform electric perception. We conclude that fish may explore adjacent objects combining active movements and electrogenesis to represent them using electrosensory information. PMID:21876730

  19. Active Electric Imaging: Body-Object Interplay and Object's “Electric Texture”

    PubMed Central

    Caputi, Ángel A.; Aguilera, Pedro A.; Pereira, Ana Carolina

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with the role of fish's body and object's geometry on determining the image spatial shape in pulse Gymnotiforms. This problem was explored by measuring local electric fields along a line on the skin in the presence and absence of objects. We depicted object's electric images at different regions of the electrosensory mosaic, paying particular attention to the perioral region where a fovea has been described. When sensory surface curvature increases relative to the object's curvature, the image details depending on object's shape are blurred and finally disappear. The remaining effect of the object on the stimulus profile depends on the strength of its global polarization. This depends on the length of the object's axis aligned with the field, in turn depending on fish body geometry. Thus, fish's body and self-generated electric field geometries are embodied in this “global effect” of the object. The presence of edges or local changes in impedance at the nearest surface of closely located objects adds peaks to the image profiles (“local effect” or “object's electric texture”). It is concluded that two cues for object recognition may be used by active electroreceptive animals: global effects (informing on object's dimension along the field lines, conductance, and position) and local effects (informing on object's surface). Since the field has fish's centered coordinates, and electrosensory fovea is used for exploration of surfaces, fish fine movements are essential to perform electric perception. We conclude that fish may explore adjacent objects combining active movements and electrogenesis to represent them using electrosensory information. PMID:21876730

  20. An outdoor adventure program for young adults with cancer: positive effects on body image and psychosocial functioning.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Robin S; Lange, Whitney; Zebrack, Brad; Moulton, Samuel; Kosslyn, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychological effects of an outdoor adventure program on young adult cancer survivors (ages 18-39). The 6-day adventure program included personal instruction and supervision on the basics of kayaking, surfing, or climbing. Compared to a wait-list control group, participants who took part in the program for the first time had improved (relative to pretest) body image, self-compassion and self-esteem, and less depression and alienation. Participants who took part for the second time, though also helped by the program in similar ways, were no better off psychologically than participants who took part for the first time. Possible explanations for the positive effects and their apparent short duration are offered. PMID:24988227

  1. Analysis of body calcium (regional changes in body calcium by in vivo neutron activation analysis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suki, W.; Johnson, P. C.; Leblanc, A.; Evans, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of space flight on urine and fecal calcium loss was documented during the three long-term Skylab flights. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine regional calcium loss. Various designs for regional analysis were investigated.

  2. Position paper on active countermeasures for computer networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Randwyk, Jamie A.

    2003-07-01

    Computer security professionals have used passive network countermeasures for several years in order to secure computer networks. Passive countermeasures such as firewalls and intrusion detection systems are effective but their use alone is not enough to protect a network. Active countermeasures offer new ways of protecting a computer network. Corporations and government entities should adopt active network countermeasures as a means of protecting their computer networks.

  3. Ecological consequences of body size decline in harvested fish species: positive feedback loops in trophic interactions amplify human impact.

    PubMed

    Audzijonyte, Asta; Kuparinen, Anna; Gorton, Rebecca; Fulton, Elizabeth A

    2013-04-23

    Humans are changing marine ecosystems worldwide, both directly through fishing and indirectly through climate change. One of the little explored outcomes of human-induced change involves the decreasing body sizes of fishes. We use a marine ecosystem model to explore how a slow (less than 0.1% per year) decrease in the length of five harvested species could affect species interactions, biomasses and yields. We find that even small decreases in fish sizes are amplified by positive feedback loops in the ecosystem and can lead to major changes in natural mortality. For some species, a total of 4 per cent decrease in length-at-age over 50 years resulted in 50 per cent increase in predation mortality. However, the magnitude and direction in predation mortality changes differed among species and one shrinking species even experienced reduced predation pressure. Nevertheless, 50 years of gradual decrease in body size resulted in 1-35% decrease in biomasses and catches of all shrinking species. Therefore, fisheries management practices that ignore contemporary life-history changes are likely to overestimate long-term yields and can lead to overfishing. PMID:23365151

  4. Argonaute2 Protein in Rat Spermatogenic Cells Is Localized to Nuage Structures and LAMP2-Positive Vesicles Surrounding Chromatoid Bodies.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yuki; Onohara, Yuko; Fujita, Hideaki; Yokota, Sadaki

    2016-04-01

    Localization of Argonaute2 (AGO2) protein-an essential component for the processing of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-directed RNA interference (RNAi) in RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) in nuage of rat spermatogenic cells-was evaluated by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunoelectron microscopy (IEM). AGO2 was shown, for the first time, to be localized to four previously classified types of nuage: irregularly shaped perinuclear granules (ISPGs), intermitochondrial cement (IMC), satellite bodies (SBs), and chromatoid bodies (CBs). Dual IEM staining for AGO2/Maelstrom (MAEL) protein or AGO2/MIWI protein demonstrated that AGO2 is colocalized with MAEL or MIWI proteins in these types of nuage. Dual IFM and IEM staining of AGO2/lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2) showed that CB in round spermatids are in contact with and surrounded by LAMP2-positive vesicles, whereas nuage in pachytene spermatocytes are not. Taken together, our findings indicate that: (i) AGO2 in pachytene spermatocytes functions in ISPGs, IMC, and SBs; (ii) AGO2 in round spermatids functions in CBs, and that CBs are associated with lysosomal compartments. PMID:27029769

  5. Creation of 3D digital anthropomorphic phantoms which model actual patient non-rigid body motion as determined from MRI and position tracking studies of volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, C. M.; Konik, A.; Dasari, P. K. R.; Segars, P.; Zheng, S.; Johnson, K. L.; Dey, J.; King, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    Patient motion can cause artifacts, which can lead to difficulty in interpretation. The purpose of this study is to create 3D digital anthropomorphic phantoms which model the location of the structures of the chest and upper abdomen of human volunteers undergoing a series of clinically relevant motions. The 3D anatomy is modeled using the XCAT phantom and based on MRI studies. The NURBS surfaces of the XCAT are interactively adapted to fit the MRI studies. A detailed XCAT phantom is first developed from an EKG triggered Navigator acquisition composed of sagittal slices with a 3 x 3 x 3 mm voxel dimension. Rigid body motion states are then acquired at breath-hold as sagittal slices partially covering the thorax, centered on the heart, with 9 mm gaps between them. For non-rigid body motion requiring greater sampling, modified Navigator sequences covering the entire thorax with 3 mm gaps between slices are obtained. The structures of the initial XCAT are then adapted to fit these different motion states. Simultaneous to MRI imaging the positions of multiple reflective markers on stretchy bands about the volunteer's chest and abdomen are optically tracked in 3D via stereo imaging. These phantoms with combined position tracking will be used to investigate both imaging-data-driven and motion-tracking strategies to estimate and correct for patient motion. Our initial application will be to cardiacperfusion SPECT imaging where the XCAT phantoms will be used to create patient activity and attenuation distributions for each volunteer with corresponding motion tracking data from the markers on the body-surface. Monte Carlo methods will then be used to simulate SPECT acquisitions, which will be used to evaluate various motion estimation and correction strategies.

  6. Physical Activity: An Important Adaptative Mechanism for Body-Weight Control

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, Carmine; Gioia, Saverio; La Sala, Nicolina

    2012-01-01

    We review the current concepts about energy expenditure and evaluate the physical activity (PhA) in the context of this knowledge and the available literature. Regular PhA is correlated with low body weight and low body fat mass. The negative fat balance is probably secondary to this negative energy balance. Nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) and physical activity, that is crucial for weight control, may be important in the physiology of weight change. An intriguing doubt that remains unresolved is whether changes in nutrient intake or body composition secondarily affect the spontaneous physical activity. PMID:24533208

  7. Physical activity: an important adaptative mechanism for body-weight control.

    PubMed

    Finelli, Carmine; Gioia, Saverio; La Sala, Nicolina

    2012-01-01

    We review the current concepts about energy expenditure and evaluate the physical activity (PhA) in the context of this knowledge and the available literature. Regular PhA is correlated with low body weight and low body fat mass. The negative fat balance is probably secondary to this negative energy balance. Nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) and physical activity, that is crucial for weight control, may be important in the physiology of weight change. An intriguing doubt that remains unresolved is whether changes in nutrient intake or body composition secondarily affect the spontaneous physical activity. PMID:24533208

  8. Elevated Body Position Early after Delivery Increased Airway Size during Wakefulness, and Decreased Apnea Hypopnea Index in a Woman with Pregnancy Related Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Stefanie; Zaremba, Sebastian; Heisig, Anne; Eikermann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    We report a patient with pregnancy related obstructive sleep apnea ([OSA]; apnea hypopnea index [AHI] 18/h) early after delivery, with improvement of AHI by 87% following 45-degree elevation in body position compared with the non-elevated position. Improvement associated with this position may be explained, at least in part, by an increased upper airway diameter (as measured during wakefulness). Sleep apnea in this patient resolved at 9 months postpartum. This observation suggests that 45-degree elevated body position may be an effective treatment of pregnancy related OSA during the postpartum period. Citation: Jung S, Zaremba S, Heisig A, Eikermann M. Elevated body position early after delivery increased airway size during wakefulness, and decreased apnea hypopnea index in a woman with pregnancy related sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(7):815-817. PMID:25024663

  9. Isolation and characterization of polysaccharides with the antitumor activity from Tuber fruiting bodies and fermentation system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Hua; Li, Hong-Mei; Wang, Shi-Hua; Chen, Tao; Yuan, Zhan-Peng; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2014-03-01

    Fifty-two polysaccharides were isolated from the fermentation systems of Tuber melanosporum, Tuber indicum, Tuber sinense, Tuber aestivum and the fruiting bodies of Tuber indicum, Tuber himalayense, Tuber sinense by elution with an activated carbon column. Polysaccharides from Tuber fermentation system exhibited relatively higher in vitro antitumor activity against HepG2, A549, HCT-116, SK-BR-3, and HL-60 cells than those from Tuber fruiting bodies. All polysaccharides were mainly composed of D-mannose, D-glucose, and D-galactose, which suggested that the polysaccharides from Tuber fruiting bodies and fermentation system have identical chemical compositions. The results of antitumor activity and structural identification indicated that the polysaccharide fractions could promote antitumor activity. Tuber polysaccharides from Tuber fermentation system exhibited relatively higher than that from Tuber fruiting bodies. These results confirm the potential of Tuber fermentation mycelia for use as an alternative resource for its fruiting bodies. PMID:24272369

  10. High Body Mass Index Is an Indicator of Maternal Hypothyroidism, Hypothyroxinemia, and Thyroid-Peroxidase Antibody Positivity during Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Cheng; Li, Chenyan; Mao, Jinyuan; Wang, Weiwei; Xie, Xiaochen; Zhou, Weiwei; Li, Chenyang; Xu, Bin; Bi, Lihua; Meng, Tao; Du, Jianling; Zhang, Shaowei; Gao, Zhengnan; Zhang, Xiaomei; Yang, Liu; Fan, Chenling; Teng, Weiping; Shan, Zhongyan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Maternal thyroid dysfunction in early pregnancy may increase the risk of adverse pregnancy complications and neurocognitive deficiencies in the developing fetus. Currently, some researchers demonstrated that body mass index (BMI) is associated with thyroid function in nonpregnant population. Hence, the American Thyroid Association recommended screening thyroid function in obese pregnant women; however, the evidence for this is weak. For this purpose, our study investigated the relationship between high BMI and thyroid functions during early pregnancy in Liaoning province, an iodine-sufficient region of China. Methods. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid-peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) concentration, urinary iodine concentration (UIC), and BMI were determined in 6303 pregnant women. Results. BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 may act as an indicator of hypothyroxinemia and TPOAb positivity and BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 was associated with increases in the odds of hypothyroidism, hypothyroxinemia, and TPOAb positivity. The prevalence of isolated hypothyroxinemia increased among pregnant women with BMI > 24 kg/m2. Conclusions. High BMI during early pregnancy may be an indicator of maternal thyroid dysfunction; for Asian women whose BMI > 24 kg/m2 and who are within 8 weeks of pregnancy, thyroid functions should be assessed especially. PMID:26273610

  11. Effect of Electrode Belt and Body Positions on Regional Pulmonary Ventilation- and Perfusion-Related Impedance Changes Measured by Electric Impedance Tomography.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Elin; Tesselaar, Erik; Sjöberg, Folke

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-induced or ventilator-associated lung injury (VILI/VALI) is common and there is an increasing demand for a tool that can optimize ventilator settings. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) can detect changes in impedance caused by pulmonary ventilation and perfusion, but the effect of changes in the position of the body and in the placing of the electrode belt on the impedance signal have not to our knowledge been thoroughly evaluated. We therefore studied ventilation-related and perfusion-related changes in impedance during spontaneous breathing in 10 healthy subjects in five different body positions and with the electrode belt placed at three different thoracic positions using a 32-electrode EIT system. We found differences between regions of interest that could be attributed to changes in the position of the body, and differences in impedance amplitudes when the position of the electrode belt was changed. Ventilation-related changes in impedance could therefore be related to changes in the position of both the body and the electrode belt. Perfusion-related changes in impedance were probably related to the interference of major vessels. While these findings give us some insight into the sources of variation in impedance signals as a result of changes in the positions of both the body and the electrode belt, further studies on the origin of the perfusion-related impedance signal are needed to improve EIT further as a tool for the monitoring of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. PMID:27253433

  12. Effect of Electrode Belt and Body Positions on Regional Pulmonary Ventilation- and Perfusion-Related Impedance Changes Measured by Electric Impedance Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ericsson, Elin; Tesselaar, Erik; Sjöberg, Folke

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-induced or ventilator-associated lung injury (VILI/VALI) is common and there is an increasing demand for a tool that can optimize ventilator settings. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) can detect changes in impedance caused by pulmonary ventilation and perfusion, but the effect of changes in the position of the body and in the placing of the electrode belt on the impedance signal have not to our knowledge been thoroughly evaluated. We therefore studied ventilation-related and perfusion-related changes in impedance during spontaneous breathing in 10 healthy subjects in five different body positions and with the electrode belt placed at three different thoracic positions using a 32-electrode EIT system. We found differences between regions of interest that could be attributed to changes in the position of the body, and differences in impedance amplitudes when the position of the electrode belt was changed. Ventilation-related changes in impedance could therefore be related to changes in the position of both the body and the electrode belt. Perfusion-related changes in impedance were probably related to the interference of major vessels. While these findings give us some insight into the sources of variation in impedance signals as a result of changes in the positions of both the body and the electrode belt, further studies on the origin of the perfusion-related impedance signal are needed to improve EIT further as a tool for the monitoring of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. PMID:27253433

  13. Carotid body chemoreceptors, sympathetic neural activation, and cardiometabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Idiaquez, Juan; Somers, Virend K

    2016-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) is the main peripheral chemoreceptor that senses the arterial PO2, PCO2 and pH. In response to hypoxemia, hypercapnia and acidosis, carotid chemosensory discharge elicits reflex respiratory, autonomic and cardiovascular adjustments. The classical construct considers the CB as the main peripheral oxygen sensor, triggering reflex physiological responses to acute hypoxemia and facilitating the ventilatory acclimation to chronic hypoxemia at high altitude. However, a growing body of experimental evidence supports the novel concept that an abnormally enhanced CB chemosensory input to the brainstem contributes to overactivation of the sympathetic nervous system, and consequent pathology. Indeed, the CB has been implicated in several diseases associated with increases in central sympathetic outflow. These include hypertension, heart failure, sleep apnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and metabolic syndrome. Indeed, ablation of the CB has been proposed for the treatment of severe and resistant hypertension in humans. In this review, we will analyze and discuss new evidence supporting an important role for the CB chemoreceptor in the progression of autonomic and cardiorespiratory alterations induced by heart failure, obstructive sleep apnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and metabolic syndrome. PMID:26920146

  14. Impact of Age and Body Position on the Contribution of Nitric Oxide to Femoral Artery Shear Rate: Implications for Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Trinity, Joel D.; Groot, H. Jonathan; Layec, Gwenael; Rossman, Matthew J.; Ives, Stephen J.; Richardson, Russell S.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced shear stress and augmented oscillatory shear rate are associated with the proatherogenic phenotype observed with aging. To date, mechanisms contributing to the age-related alterations in shear rate in humans have only been examined in the conduit vessels of the arm. Therefore, this study sought to examine the contribution of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability to age-related alterations in shear rate and the impact of common body positions (supine and seated) in the atherosclerotic-prone conduit artery of the leg. Inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) was accomplished by intra-arterial infusion of NG-Monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and common femoral artery diameter and blood velocity were measured by Doppler ultrasound in healthy young (n=8, 24±1 yr) and old (n=8, 75±3 yr) men. Old subjects exhibited reduced mean shear rate in the supine (18±3 sec−1) and seated positions (17±3 sec−1) compared with young subjects (supine: 42±6 sec−1, seated: 32±4 sec−1). This reduced mean shear in the old was driven by attenuated antegrade shear as there were no differences in retrograde shear. Inhibition of NOS reduced antegrade shear in the young such that age-related differences were abolished. In contrast, NOS-induced reductions in retrograde shear rate were similar between groups. The seated position reduced mean shear rate in the young to that normally observed in old. Overall, this study reveals that age-related reductions in mean shear rate, assessed in the atherosclerotic-prone vasculature of the leg, are largely explained by reductions in antegrade shear as a result of reduced NO bioavailability in the elderly. PMID:24535011

  15. Metabolic Profiles and Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Cordyceps bassiana Fruiting Bodies According to Developmental Stage

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Sun-Hee; Lee, Seok-Young; Sung, Gi-Ho; Kim, Seong Hwan; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic profiles of Cordyceps bassiana according to fruiting body developmental stage were investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We were able to detect 62 metabolites, including 48 metabolites from 70% methanol extracts and 14 metabolites from 100% n-hexane extracts. These metabolites were classified as alcohols, amino acids, organic acids, phosphoric acids, purine nucleosides and bases, sugars, saturated fatty acids, unsaturated fatty acids, or fatty amides. Significant changes in metabolite levels were found according to developmental stage. Relative levels of amino acids, purine nucleosides, and sugars were higher in development stage 3 than in the other stages. Among the amino acids, valine, isoleucine, lysine, histidine, glutamine, and aspartic acid, which are associated with ABC transporters and aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, also showed higher levels in stage 3 samples. The free radical scavenging activities, which were significantly higher in stage 3 than in the other stages, showed a positive correlation with purine nucleoside metabolites such as adenosine, guanosine, and inosine. These results not only show metabolic profiles, but also suggest the metabolic pathways associated with fruiting body development stages in cultivated C. bassiana. PMID:24058459

  16. SU-E-J-227: Breathing Pattern Consistency and Reproducibility: Comparative Analysis for Supine and Prone Body Positioning

    SciTech Connect

    Laugeman, E; Weiss, E; Chen, S; Hugo, G; Rosu, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate and compare the cycle-to-cycle consistency of breathing patterns and their reproducibility over the course of treatment, for supine and prone positioning. Methods: Respiratory traces from 25 patients were recorded for sequential supine/prone 4DCT scans acquired prior to treatment, and during the course of the treatment (weekly or bi-weekly). For each breathing cycle, the average(AVE), end-of-exhale(EoE) and end-of-inhale( EoI) locations were identified using in-house developed software. In addition, the mean values and variations for the above quantities were computed for each breathing trace. F-tests were used to compare the cycle-to-cycle consistency of all pairs of sequential supine and prone scans. Analysis of variances was also performed using population means for AVE, EoE and EoI to quantify differences between the reproducibility of prone and supine respiration traces over the treatment course. Results: Consistency: Cycle-to-cycle variations are less in prone than supine in the pre-treatment and during-treatment scans for AVE, EoE and EoI points, for the majority of patients (differences significant at p<0.05). The few cases where the respiratory pattern had more variability in prone appeared to be random events. Reproducibility: The reproducibility of breathing patterns (supine and prone) improved as treatment progressed, perhaps due to patients becoming more comfortable with the procedure. However, variability in supine position continued to remain significantly larger than in prone (p<0.05), as indicated by the variance analysis of population means for the pretreatment and subsequent during-treatment scans. Conclusions: Prone positioning stabilizes breathing patterns in most subjects investigated in this study. Importantly, a parallel analysis of the same group of patients revealed a tendency towards increasing motion amplitude of tumor targets in prone position regardless of their size or location; thus, the choice for body positioning

  17. [EFFECTS OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION TRAINING ON BODY COMPOSITION AND PHYSICAL FITNESS IN RECREATIONALLY ACTIVE YOUNG ADULTS].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pardo, Esmeraldo; Martínez-Ruiz, Enrique; Alcaraz, Pedro E; Rubio-Arias, Jacobo A

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, it has been suggested that whole- body vibration training (WBV) may increase neuromuscular performance and consequently affect the muscular improvement as either acute response to vibration or chronic adaptation training. Vibrating platforms generate frequencies from 5-45 Hz and vertical oscillations of 1-11 mm peak to peak, affecting more or less intensity acceleration changing by combining frequency and amplitude. Vibration training, in a session as various offers different results in regard to changes in body composition and in increasing the vertical jump, sprint, and the different manifestations of force development. These promising results await further research to establish parameters (duration, frequency and amplitude) with vibration stimulation in young active subjects. This literature review provides an update on the scientific evidence on the body vibrations in order to answer the question whether WBV, meaning the exercise by increasing the gravitational load collection, is a treatment option if the aim is to improve neuromuscular function, flexibility, balance, agility, coordination and body composition. PMID:26545648

  18. Effect of whole body vibration frequency on neuromuscular activity in ACL-deficient and healthy males.

    PubMed

    Giombini, A; Menotti, F; Laudani, L; Piccinini, A; Fagnani, F; Di Cagno, A; Macaluso, A; Pigozzi, F

    2015-09-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been shown to enhance muscle activity via reflex pathways, thus having the potential to contrast muscle weakness in individuals with rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The present study aimed to compare the magnitude of neuromuscular activation during WBV over a frequency spectrum from 20 to 45 Hz between ACL-deficient and healthy individuals. Fifteen males aged 28±4 with ACL rupture and 15 age-matched healthy males were recruited. Root mean square (RMS) of the surface electromyogram from the vastus lateralis in both limbs was computed during WBV in a static half-squat position at 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 Hz, and normalized to the RMS while maintaining the half-squat position without vibration. The RMS of the vastus lateralis in the ACL-deficient limb was significantly greater than in the contralateral limb at 25, 30, 35 and 40 Hz (P<0.05) and in both limbs of the healthy participants (dominant limb at 25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 Hz, P<0.05; non dominant limb at 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 Hz, P<0.05). The greater neuromuscular activity in the injured limb compared to the uninjured limb of the ACL-deficient patients and to both limbs of the healthy participants during WBV might be due to either augmented excitatory or reduced inhibitory neural inflow to motoneurons of the vastus lateralis through the reflex pathways activated by vibratory stimuli. The study provides optimal WBV frequencies which might be used as reference values for ACL-deficient patients. PMID:26424928

  19. Effect of whole body vibration frequency on neuromuscular activity in ACL-deficient and healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Giombini, A; Menotti, F; Piccinini, A; Fagnani, F; Di Cagno, A; Macaluso, A; Pigozzi, F

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been shown to enhance muscle activity via reflex pathways, thus having the potential to contrast muscle weakness in individuals with rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The present study aimed to compare the magnitude of neuromuscular activation during WBV over a frequency spectrum from 20 to 45 Hz between ACL-deficient and healthy individuals. Fifteen males aged 28±4 with ACL rupture and 15 age-matched healthy males were recruited. Root mean square (RMS) of the surface electromyogram from the vastus lateralis in both limbs was computed during WBV in a static half-squat position at 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 Hz, and normalized to the RMS while maintaining the half-squat position without vibration. The RMS of the vastus lateralis in the ACL-deficient limb was significantly greater than in the contralateral limb at 25, 30, 35 and 40 Hz (P<0.05) and in both limbs of the healthy participants (dominant limb at 25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 Hz, P<0.05; non dominant limb at 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 Hz, P<0.05). The greater neuromuscular activity in the injured limb compared to the uninjured limb of the ACL-deficient patients and to both limbs of the healthy participants during WBV might be due to either augmented excitatory or reduced inhibitory neural inflow to motoneurons of the vastus lateralis through the reflex pathways activated by vibratory stimuli. The study provides optimal WBV frequencies which might be used as reference values for ACL-deficient patients. PMID:26424928

  20. Differences in the body pressure-related sensory changes between the floor and mattress in a static supine position for physiotherapy research: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Deok; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to investigate the difference in body pressure–related sensory changes between the floor and mattress in a static supine position for physiotherapy research. [Subjects and Methods] To analyze body pressure, the Body Pressure Measurement System was used. Body pressure sensors were attached to mattresses and the floor beneath the subjects. The level of pain was evaluated using pain score tools before the static supine position was adopted, at 1, 5, 10, and 15 min, and in total for specific body points. [Results] In analysis of digitized images, there was no significant difference observed between floor and mattress body pressure values at the start position. However, the head pressure intensity was significantly higher than that of the other body parts. In analysis of pain scores, all body part pain scores except those for both legs were significantly higher for the floor than for the mattress. Furthermore, the pain scores of the floor group were significantly increased at minute 1 compared with those of the mattress group. [Conclusion] These results suggest that properties that change in a time-dependent manner and postural changes need to be carefully considered when applying physical therapy. PMID:27190432

  1. Differences in the body pressure-related sensory changes between the floor and mattress in a static supine position for physiotherapy research: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Deok; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to investigate the difference in body pressure-related sensory changes between the floor and mattress in a static supine position for physiotherapy research. [Subjects and Methods] To analyze body pressure, the Body Pressure Measurement System was used. Body pressure sensors were attached to mattresses and the floor beneath the subjects. The level of pain was evaluated using pain score tools before the static supine position was adopted, at 1, 5, 10, and 15 min, and in total for specific body points. [Results] In analysis of digitized images, there was no significant difference observed between floor and mattress body pressure values at the start position. However, the head pressure intensity was significantly higher than that of the other body parts. In analysis of pain scores, all body part pain scores except those for both legs were significantly higher for the floor than for the mattress. Furthermore, the pain scores of the floor group were significantly increased at minute 1 compared with those of the mattress group. [Conclusion] These results suggest that properties that change in a time-dependent manner and postural changes need to be carefully considered when applying physical therapy. PMID:27190432

  2. Recognizing Complex Upper Extremity Activities Using Body Worn Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lemmens, Ryanne J. M.; Janssen-Potten, Yvonne J. M.; Timmermans, Annick A. A.; Smeets, Rob J. E. M.; Seelen, Henk A. M.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate arm-hand therapies for neurological patients it is important to be able to assess actual arm-hand performance objectively. Because instruments that measure the actual quality and quantity of specific activities in daily life are lacking, a new measure needs to be developed. The aims of this study are to a) elucidate the techniques used to identify upper extremity activities, b) provide a proof-of-principle of this method using a set of activities tested in a healthy adult and in a stroke patient, and c) provide an example of the method’s applicability in daily life based on readings taken from a healthy adult. Multiple devices, each of which contains a tri-axial accelerometer, a tri-axial gyroscope and a tri-axial magnetometer were attached to the dominant hand, wrist, upper arm and chest of 30 healthy participants and one stroke patient, who all performed the tasks ‘drinking’, ‘eating’ and ‘brushing hair’ in a standardized environment. To establish proof-of-principle, a prolonged daily life recording of 1 participant was used to identify the task ‘drinking’. The activities were identified using multi-array signal feature extraction and pattern recognition algorithms and 2D-convolution. The activities ‘drinking’, ‘eating’ and ‘brushing hair’ were unambiguously recognized in a sequence of recordings of multiple standardized daily activities in a healthy participant and in a stroke patient. It was also possible to identify a specific activity in a daily life recording. The long term aim is to use this method to a) identify arm-hand activities that someone performs during daily life, b) determine the quantity of activity execution, i.e. amount of use, and c) determine the quality of arm-hand skill performance. PMID:25734641

  3. GITR Activation Positively Regulates Immune Responses against Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Frederico R. C.; Mota, Caroline M.; Santiago, Fernanda M.; Silva, Murilo V.; Ferreira, Marcela D.; Fonseca, Denise M.; Silva, João S.; Mineo, José R.; Mineo, Tiago W. P.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread parasite responsible for causing clinical diseases especially in pregnant and immunosuppressed individuals. Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor (GITR), which is also known as TNFRS18 and belongs to the TNF receptor superfamily, is found to be expressed in various cell types of the immune system and provides an important costimulatory signal for T cells and myeloid cells. However, the precise role of this receptor in the context of T. gondii infection remains elusive. Therefore, the current study investigated the role of GITR activation in the immunoregulation mechanisms induced during the experimental infection of mice with T. gondii. Our data show that T. gondii infection slightly upregulates GITR expression in Treg cells and B cells, but the most robust increment in expression was observed in macrophages and dendritic cells. Interestingly, mice infected and treated with an agonistic antibody anti-GITR (DTA-1) presented a robust increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine production at preferential sites of parasite replication, which was associated with the decrease in latent brain parasitism of mice under treatment with DTA-1. Several in vivo and in vitro analysis were performed to identify the cellular mechanisms involved in GITR activation upon infection, however no clear alterations were detected in the phenotype/function of macrophages, Tregs and B cells under treatment with DTA-1. Therefore, GITR appears as a potential target for intervention during infection by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, even though further studies are still necessary to better characterize the immune response triggered by GITR activation during T. gondii infection. PMID:27027302

  4. Assessment of Isometric Trunk Strength – The Relevance of Body Position and Relationship between Planes of Movement

    PubMed Central

    Kocjan, Andrej; Sarabon, Nejc

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the differences in maximal isometric trunk extension and flexion strength during standing, sitting and kneeling. Additionally, we were interested in correlations between the maximal strength in sagittal, frontal and transverse plane, measured in the sitting position. Sixty healthy subjects (24 male, 36 female; age 41.3 ± 15.1 yrs; body height 1.70 ± 0.09 m; body mass 72.7 ± 13.3 kg) performed maximal voluntary isometric contractions of the trunk flexor and extensor muscles in standing, sitting and kneeling position. The subjects also performed lateral flexions and rotations in the sitting position. Each task was repeated three times and average of maximal forces was used for data analysis. RANOVA with post-hoc testing was applied to the flexion and extension data. The level of statistical significance was set to p < 0.05. Overall, in both genders together, the highest average force for trunk extension was recorded in sitting posture (910.5 ± 271.5 N), followed by kneeling (834.3 ± 242.9 N) and standing (504.0 ± 165.4 N), compared with flexion, where we observed the opposite trend (508.5 ± 213.0 N, 450.9 ± 165.7 N and 443.4 ± 153.1 N, respectively). Post-hoc tests showed significant differences in all extension positions (p < 0.0001) and between sitting/standing (p = 0.018) and kneeling/standing (p = 0.033) flexion exertions. The extension/flexion ratio for sitting was 2.1 ± 0.4, for kneeling 1.9 ± 0.4, followed by standing, where motion forward approximately equals motion backward (1.1 ± 0.6). Trunk sagittal-transverse strength showed the strongest correlation, followed by frontal-transverse and sagittal-frontal plane correlation pairs (R2 = 0.830, 0.712 and 0.657). The baseline trunk isometric strength data provided by this study should help further strength diagnostics, more precisely, the prevention of low back disorders. Key points Maximal voluntary isometric force of the trunk extensors increased with the angle at

  5. Physical activity advertisements that feature daily well-being improve autonomy and body image in overweight women but not men.

    PubMed

    Segar, Michelle L; Updegraff, John A; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Richardson, Caroline R

    2012-01-01

    The reasons for exercising that are featured in health communications brand exercise and socialize individuals about why they should be physically active. Discovering which reasons for exercising are associated with high-quality motivation and behavioral regulation is essential to promoting physical activity and weight control that can be sustained over time. This study investigates whether framing physical activity in advertisements featuring distinct types of goals differentially influences body image and behavioral regulations based on self-determination theory among overweight and obese individuals. Using a three-arm randomized trial, overweight and obese women and men (aged 40-60 yr, n = 1690) read one of three ads framing physical activity as a way to achieve (1) better health, (2) weight loss, or (3) daily well-being. Framing effects were estimated in an ANOVA model with pairwise comparisons using the Bonferroni correction. This study showed that there are immediate framing effects on physical activity behavioral regulations and body image from reading a one-page advertisement about physical activity and that gender and BMI moderate these effects. Framing physical activity as a way to enhance daily well-being positively influenced participants' perceptions about the experience of being physically active and enhanced body image among overweight women, but not men. The experiment had less impact among the obese study participants compared to those who were overweight. These findings support a growing body of research suggesting that, compared to weight loss, framing physical activity for daily well-being is a better gain-frame message for overweight women in midlife. PMID:22701782

  6. Detection of (In)activity Periods in Human Body Motion Using Inertial Sensors: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Alberto; Ramírez, Javier; Górriz, Juan M.; Olivares, Gonzalo; Damas, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Determination of (in)activity periods when monitoring human body motion is a mandatory preprocessing step in all human inertial navigation and position analysis applications. Distinction of (in)activity needs to be established in order to allow the system to recompute the calibration parameters of the inertial sensors as well as the Zero Velocity Updates (ZUPT) of inertial navigation. The periodical recomputation of these parameters allows the application to maintain a constant degree of precision. This work presents a comparative study among different well known inertial magnitude-based detectors and proposes a new approach by applying spectrum-based detectors and memory-based detectors. A robust statistical comparison is carried out by the use of an accelerometer and angular rate signal synthesizer that mimics the output of accelerometers and gyroscopes when subjects are performing basic activities of daily life. Theoretical results are verified by testing the algorithms over signals gathered using an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). Detection accuracy rates of up to 97% are achieved. PMID:22778613

  7. The Effect of “In Favor of Myself”: Preventive Program to Enhance Positive Self and Body Image among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Moria; Hagay, Noaa; Tamir, Snait

    2013-01-01

    Background Positive self-esteem, emotional well-being, school achievements and family connectedness are considered protective factors against health-compromising behaviors. This study examined the effect of an interactive, community-based, media literacy and dissonance wellness program, In Favor of Myself, on the self-image, body image, eating attitudes and behavior of young adolescents. A preliminary cohort study was conducted among 972 program participants who did not take part in the controlled trial. Over 75% of participants said they would recommend the program to their friends. Methods A controlled trial was conducted to evaluate program acceptability, efficacy and effectiveness among 259 participants (210 in the intervention group and 49 in the control group), aged 12–14 years, who completed questionnaires during at least two assessment times. Program materials were provided, along with leaders' training, in order to ensure quality program delivery and creation of a wide network of committed program leaders. Results The program significantly reduced drive for thinness and self-worth contingent upon others' approval, the gap between current body figure and ideal figure, and the impact of mood on girls' self-image. Superiority was found among those participating in the intervention group with respect to recognizing media strategies, the influence of media on desire to change, and the influence of appearance on self-confidence and drive for thinness. Conclusions In Favor of Myself shows promising results for strengthening adolescents' ability to cope with the challenges of their life stage. Suggestions for improving In Favor of Myself are presented. PMID:24265681

  8. The Elastic Body Model: A Pedagogical Approach Integrating Real Time Measurements and Modelling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, C.; Guastella, I.; Tarantino, G.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a pedagogical approach to elastic body movement based on measurements of the contact times between a metallic rod and small bodies colliding with it and on modelling of the experimental results by using a microcomputer-based laboratory and simulation tools. The experiments and modelling activities have been built in the…

  9. Comparison of Organ Dosimetry for Astronaut Phantoms: Earth-Based vs. Microgravity-Based Anthropometry and Body Positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanBaalen, Mary; Bahadon, Amir; Shavers, Mark; Semones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use NASA radiation transport codes to compare astronaut organ dose equivalents resulting from solar particle events (SPE), geomagnetically trapped protons, and free-space galactic cosmic rays (GCR) using phantom models representing Earth-based and microgravity-based anthropometry and positioning. Methods: The Univer sity of Florida hybrid adult phantoms were scaled to represent male and female astronauts with 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile heights and weights as measured on Earth. Another set of scaled phantoms, incorporating microgravity-induced changes, such as spinal lengthening, leg volume loss, and the assumption of the neutral body position, was also created. A ray-tracer was created and used to generate body self-shielding distributions for dose points within a voxelized phantom under isotropic irradiation conditions, which closely approximates the free-space radiation environment. Simplified external shielding consisting of an aluminum spherical shell was used to consider the influence of a spacesuit or shielding of a hull. These distributions were combined with depth dose distributions generated from the NASA radiation transport codes BRYNTRN (SPE and trapped protons) and HZETRN (GCR) to yield dose equivalent. Many points were sampled per organ. Results: The organ dos e equivalent rates were on the order of 1.5-2.5 mSv per day for GCR (1977 solar minimum) and 0.4-0.8 mSv per day for trapped proton irradiation with shielding of 2 g cm-2 aluminum equivalent. The organ dose equivalents for SPE irradiation varied considerably, with the skin and eye lens having the highest organ dose equivalents and deep-seated organs, such as the bladder, liver, and stomach having the lowest. Conclus ions: The greatest differences between the Earth-based and microgravity-based phantoms are observed for smaller ray thicknesses, since the most drastic changes involved limb repositioning and not overall phantom size. Improved self-shielding models

  10. Intrafraction Variation of Mean Tumor Position During Image-Guided Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Grills, Inga S.; Kestin, Larry L.; McGrath, Samuel; Ye Hong; Martin, Shannon K.; Yan Di

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Prolonged delivery times during daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) introduce concerns regarding intrafraction variation (IFV) of the mean target position (MTP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of the IFV-MTP and to assess target margins required to compensate for IFV and postonline CBCT correction residuals. Patient, treatment, and tumor characteristics were analyzed with respect to their impact on IFV-MTP. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with 140 tumors underwent 659 fractions of lung SBRT. Dose prescribed was 48 or 60 Gy in 12 Gy fractions. Translational target position correction of the MTP was performed via onboard CBCT. IFV-MTP was measured as the difference in MTP between the postcorrection CBCT and the posttreatment CBCT excluding residual error. Results: IFV-MTP was 0.2 {+-} 1.8 mm, 0.1 {+-} 1.9 mm, and 0.01 {+-} 1.5 mm in the craniocaudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral dimensions and the IFV-MTP vector was 2.3 {+-} 2.1 mm. Treatment time and excursion were found to be significant predictors of IFV-MTP. An IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 and 5 mm was seen in 40.8% and 7.2% of fractions, respectively. IFV-MTP greater than 2 mm was seen in heavier patients with larger excursions and longer treatment times. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were seen between immobilization devices. The stereotactic frame immobilization device was found to be significantly less likely to have an IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 mm compared with the alpha cradle, BodyFIX, and hybrid immobilization devices. Conclusions: Treatment time and respiratory excursion are significantly associated with IFV-MTP. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were found between immobilization devices. Target margins for IFV-MTP plus post-correction residuals are dependent on immobilization device with 5-mm uniform margins being acceptable for the frame immobilization device.

  11. An accuracy assessment of different rigid body image registration methods and robotic couch positional corrections using a novel phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing Aitang; Jameson, Michael G.; Holloway, Lois

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images greatly reduces interfractional patient positional uncertainties. An understanding of uncertainties in the IGRT process itself is essential to ensure appropriate use of this technology. The purpose of this study was to develop a phantom capable of assessing the accuracy of IGRT hardware and software including a 6 degrees of freedom patient positioning system and to investigate the accuracy of the Elekta XVI system in combination with the HexaPOD robotic treatment couch top. Methods: The constructed phantom enabled verification of the three automatic rigid body registrations (gray value, bone, seed) available in the Elekta XVI software and includes an adjustable mount that introduces known rotational offsets to the phantom from its reference position. Repeated positioning of the phantom was undertaken to assess phantom rotational accuracy. Using this phantom the accuracy of the XVI registration algorithms was assessed considering CBCT hardware factors and image resolution together with the residual error in the overall image guidance process when positional corrections were performed through the HexaPOD couch system. Results: The phantom positioning was found to be within 0.04 ({sigma}= 0.12) Degree-Sign , 0.02 ({sigma}= 0.13) Degree-Sign , and -0.03 ({sigma}= 0.06) Degree-Sign in X, Y, and Z directions, respectively, enabling assessment of IGRT with a 6 degrees of freedom patient positioning system. The gray value registration algorithm showed the least error in calculated offsets with maximum mean difference of -0.2({sigma}= 0.4) mm in translational and -0.1({sigma}= 0.1) Degree-Sign in rotational directions for all image resolutions. Bone and seed registration were found to be sensitive to CBCT image resolution. Seed registration was found to be most sensitive demonstrating a maximum mean error of -0.3({sigma}= 0.9) mm and -1.4({sigma}= 1.7) Degree-Sign in translational

  12. Real-Time GNSS Positioning Along Canada's Active Coastal Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henton, J. A.; Dragert, H.; Lu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    High-rate, low-latency Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data are being refined for real-time applications to monitor and report motions related to large earthquakes in coastal British Columbia. Given the tectonic setting of Canada's west coast, specific goals for real-time regional geodetic monitoring are: (1) the collection of GNSS data with adequate station density to identify the deformation field for regional earthquakes with M>7.3; (2) the robust, continuous real-time analyses of GNSS data with a precision of 1-2 cm and a latency of less than 10s; and (3) the display of results with attending automated alarms and estimations of earthquake parameters. Megathrust earthquakes (M>8) are the primary targets for immediate identification, since the tsunamis they generate will strike the coast within 15 to 20 min. However, large (6.0positioning streams for regional sites received from the Canadian Geodetic Survey (CGS), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). The comparison of these various real-time solutions allows a realistic evaluation of day-to-day software performance especially when faced with adverse conditions such as data gaps or poor satellite geometry. Forward models for scenario earthquakes in this region are used to "fingerprint" the coseismic displacements expected from various offshore events which allows an evaluation of the effectiveness of the current regional coverage. The present distribution and density of real-time sites is largely sufficient for aiding the timely estimation of size, location

  13. Association of objectively measured physical activity with body components in European adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) is suggested to contribute to fat loss not only through increasing energy expenditure “per se” but also increasing muscle mass; therefore, it would be interesting to better understand the specific associations of PA with the different body’s components such as fat mass and muscle mass. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between objectively measured PA and indices of fat mass and muscle components independently of each other giving, at the same time, gender-specific information in a wide cohort of European adolescents. Methods A cross-sectional study in a school setting was conducted in 2200 (1016 males) adolescents (14.7 ±1.2 years). Weight, height, skinfold thickness, bioimpedance and PA (accelerometry) were measured. Indices of fat mass (body mass index, % fat mass, sum of skinfolds) and muscular component (assessed as fat-free mass) were calculated. Multiple regression analyses were performed adjusting for several confounders including fat-free mass and fat mass when possible. Results Vigorous PA was positively associated with height (p < 0.05) in males, whilst, vigorous PA, moderate-vigorous PA and average PA were negatively associated with all the indices of fat mass (all p < 0.01) in both genders, except for average PA in relation with body mass index in females. Regarding muscular components, vigorous PA showed positive associations with fat-free mass and muscle mass (all p < 0.05) in both genders. Average PA was positively associated with fat-free mass (both p < 0.05) in males and females. Conclusion The present study suggests that PA, especially vigorous PA, is negatively associated with indices of fat mass and positively associated with markers of muscle mass, after adjusting for several confounders (including indices of fat mass and muscle mass when possible). Future studies should focus not only on the classical relationship between PA and fat mass, but also on PA and

  14. Study of an Active Control System for a Spinning Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. J.

    1961-01-01

    The mission requirements for some satellites require that they spin continuously and at the same time maintain a precise direction of the spin axis. An analog-computer study has been made of an attitude control system which is suitable for such a satellite. The control system provides the necessary attitude control through the use of a spinning wheel, which will provide precession torques, commanded by an automatic closed-loop servomechanism system. The sensors used in the control loop are rate gyroscopes for damping of any wobble motion and a sun seeker for attitude control. The results of the study show that the controller can eliminate the wobble motion of the satellite resulting from a rectangular pulse moment disturbance and then return the spin axis to the reference space axis. The motion is damped to half amplitude in less than one cycle of the wobble motion. The controller can also reduce the motion resulting from a step change in product of inertia both by causing the new principal axis to be steadily alined with the spin vector and by reducing the cone angle generated by the reference body axis. These methods will reduce the motion whether the satellite is a disk, sphere, or rod configuration.

  15. Novel positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptors with anesthetic activity

    PubMed Central

    Maldifassi, Maria C.; Baur, Roland; Pierce, David; Nourmahnad, Anahita; Forman, Stuart A.; Sigel, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    GABAA receptors are the main inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are targets for numerous clinically important drugs such as benzodiazepines, anxiolytics and anesthetics. We previously identified novel ligands of the classical benzodiazepine binding pocket in α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors using an experiment-guided virtual screening (EGVS) method. This screen also identified novel ligands for intramembrane low affinity diazepam site(s). In the current study we have further characterized compounds 31 and 132 identified with EGVS as well as 4-O-methylhonokiol. We investigated the site of action of these compounds in α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using voltage-clamp electrophysiology combined with a benzodiazepine site antagonist and transmembrane domain mutations. All three compounds act mainly through the two β+/α− subunit transmembrane interfaces of the GABAA receptors. We then used concatenated receptors to dissect the involvement of individual β+/α− interfaces. We further demonstrated that these compounds have anesthetic activity in a small aquatic animal model, Xenopus laevis tadpoles. The newly identified compounds may serve as scaffolds for the development of novel anesthetics. PMID:27198062

  16. Change in Reasoning about the Body through Psychological Distancing Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, James J.; Sagarin, Johanna; Bibace, Roger

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of Sigel's (1993) [Sigel, I.E. (1993). The centrality of a distancing model for the development of representational competence. In Cocking, R. & Renninger, A. (Eds.), The development and meaning of psychological distance (pp. 141-158). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.] psychological distancing activities (PDA) in the process…

  17. Plasma bile acids show a positive correlation with body mass index and are negatively associated with cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, Philip; Hofmann, Tobias; Ahnis, Anne; Elbelt, Ulf; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Klapp, Burghard F.; Rose, Matthias; Stengel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids may be involved in the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of plasma bile acids with body mass index (BMI) and the possible involvement of circulating bile acids in the modulation of physical activity and eating behavior. Blood was obtained in a group of hospitalized patients with normal weight (BMI 18.5–25 kg/m2), underweight (anorexia nervosa, BMI < 17.5 kg/m2) and overweight (obesity with BMI 30–40, 40–50 and >50 kg/m2, n = 14–15/group) and plasma bile acid concentrations assessed. Physical activity and plasma bile acids were measured in a group of patients with anorexia nervosa (BMI 14.6 ± 0.3 kg/m2, n = 43). Lastly, in a population of obese patients (BMI 48.5 ± 0.9 kg/m2, n = 85), psychometric parameters related to disordered eating and plasma bile acids were assessed. Plasma bile acids showed a positive correlation with BMI (r = 0.26, p = 0.03) in the population of patients with broad range of BMI (9–85 kg/m2, n = 74). No associations were observed between plasma bile acids and different parameters of physical activity in anorexic patients (p > 0.05). Plasma bile acids were negatively correlated with cognitive restraint of eating (r = −0.30, p = 0.008), while no associations were observed with other psychometric eating behavior-related parameters (p > 0.05) in obese patients. In conclusion, these data may point toward a role of bile acids in the regulation of body weight. Since plasma bile acids are negatively correlated with the cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients, this may represent a compensatory adaptation to prevent further overeating. PMID:26089773

  18. Methyl jasmonate affects morphology, number and activity of endoplasmic reticulum bodies in Raphanus sativus root cells.

    PubMed

    Gotté, Maxime; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Bernard, Sophie; Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Driouich, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) bodies are ER-derived structures that are found in Brassicaceae species and thought to play a role in defense. Here, we have investigated the occurrence, distribution and function of ER bodies in root cells of Raphanus sativus using a combination of microscopic and biochemical methods. We have also assessed the response of ER bodies to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a phytohormone that mediates plant defense against wounding and pathogens. Our results show that (i) ER bodies do occur in different root cell types from the root cap region to the differentiation zone; (ii) they do accumulate a PYK10-like protein similar to the major marker protein of ER bodies that is involved in defense in Arabidopsis thaliana; and (iii) treatment of root cells with MeJA causes a significant increase in the number of ER bodies and the activity of β-glucosidases. More importantly, MeJA was found to induce the formation of very long ER bodies that results from the fusion of small ones, a phenomenon that has not been reported in any other study so far. These findings demonstrate that MeJA impacts the number and morphology of functional ER bodies and stimulates ER body enzyme activities, probably to participate in defense responses of radish root. They also suggest that these structures may provide a defensive system specific to root cells. PMID:25305245

  19. Positioning of the mouse Hox gene clusters in the nuclei of developing embryos and differentiating embryoid bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Lanctot, Christian . E-mail: christian.lanctot@lrz.uni-muenchen.de; Kaspar, Cornelius; Cremer, Thomas

    2007-04-15

    Expression of Hox genes located on different chromosomes is precisely regulated and synchronized during development. In order to test the hypothesis that the Hox loci might cluster in nuclear space in order to share regulatory components, we performed 3D FISH on cryosections of developing mouse embryos and differentiating embryoid bodies. We did not observe any instances of co-localization of 4 different Hox alleles. Instances of 2 different alleles touching each other were found in 20-47% of nuclei depending on the tissue. The frequency of such 'kissing' events was not significantly different in cells expressing a high proportion of the Hox clusters when compared to cells expressing none or only a few Hox genes. We found that the HoxB and HoxC clusters, which are located in gene-rich regions, were involved more frequently in gene kissing in embryonic nuclei. In the case of HoxB, this observation correlated with the positioning of the corresponding chromosome towards the interior of the nucleus. Our results indicate that co-regulation of the different Hox clusters is not associated with co-localization of the loci at a single regulatory compartment and that the chromosomal context may influence the extent to which they contact each other in the nucleus.

  20. Positioning of the mouse Hox gene clusters in the nuclei of developing embryos and differentiating embryoid bodies.

    PubMed

    Lanctôt, Christian; Kaspar, Cornelius; Cremer, Thomas

    2007-04-15

    Expression of Hox genes located on different chromosomes is precisely regulated and synchronized during development. In order to test the hypothesis that the Hox loci might cluster in nuclear space in order to share regulatory components, we performed 3D FISH on cryosections of developing mouse embryos and differentiating embryoid bodies. We did not observe any instances of co-localization of 4 different Hox alleles. Instances of 2 different alleles touching each other were found in 20-47% of nuclei depending on the tissue. The frequency of such "kissing" events was not significantly different in cells expressing a high proportion of the Hox clusters when compared to cells expressing none or only a few Hox genes. We found that the HoxB and HoxC clusters, which are located in gene-rich regions, were involved more frequently in gene kissing in embryonic nuclei. In the case of HoxB, this observation correlated with the positioning of the corresponding chromosome towards the interior of the nucleus. Our results indicate that co-regulation of the different Hox clusters is not associated with co-localization of the loci at a single regulatory compartment and that the chromosomal context may influence the extent to which they contact each other in the nucleus. PMID:17346703

  1. The effect of changes in patients’ body position on the back pain intensity and hemodynamic status during and after radiofrequency catheter ablation of cardiac dysrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Haghshenas, Hajar; Mansoori, Parisa; Najafi, Saeed; Nikoo, Mohamad Hosein; Zare, Najaf; Jonoobi, Mitra

    2013-01-01

    Background: After radiofrequency catheter ablation of arrhythmias, patients have to bed rest for 4-6 h to prevent bleeding and hematoma. However, such a rest may cause back pain in the patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of continuous change in body position during and after the radiofrequency ablation on the back pain. Materials and Methods: In a quasi-experimental design 75 patients referring to university-affiliated hospitals were randomly assigned to a control group, receiving no change in body position, group A subjected to changes in body position during and after ablation, and group B subjected to changes in body position during ablation. The intensity of pain, blood pressure, heart rate, and extent of bleeding and hematoma were measured. Results: The groups were not significantly different in terms of demographic characteristics, blood pressure, heart rate, overall bleeding, or hematoma at the entry into the coronary care unit. While not significantly different from each other, the intensity of back pain between group A and B were significantly lower than that of group C. Compared to group C, group A and B had a significantly lower pain score up to 6 and 4 h after the procedure, respectively. Group B had a significantly higher pain score at 2, 4, and 6 h post ablation than group A. Conclusions: The findings show that changing the body position during and after the ablation procedure would reduce or prevent the back pain without increasing the chance of bleeding and hematoma. PMID:23983735

  2. Age, Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, Body Composition, and Incidence of Orthopedic Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Effects of age, physical activity, physical fitness, and body mass index (BMI) on the occurrence of orthopedic problems were examined. For men, physical fitness, BMI, and physical activity were associated with orthopedic problems; for women, physical activity was the main predictor. Age was not a factor for either gender. (JD)

  3. Parasympathetic activity and blood catecholamine responses following a single partial-body cryostimulation and a whole-body cryostimulation.

    PubMed

    Hausswirth, Christophe; Schaal, Karine; Le Meur, Yann; Bieuzen, François; Filliard, Jean-Robert; Volondat, Marielle; Louis, Julien

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a single whole-body cryostimulation (WBC) and a partial-body cryostimulation (PBC) (i.e., not exposing the head to cold) on indices of parasympathetic activity and blood catecholamines. Two groups of 15 participants were assigned either to a 3-min WBC or PBC session, while 10 participants constituted a control group (CON) not receiving any cryostimulation. Changes in thermal, physiological and subjective variables were recorded before and during the 20-min after each cryostimulation. According to a qualitative statistical analysis, an almost certain decrease in skin temperature was reported for all body regions immediately after the WBC (mean decrease±90% CL, -13.7±0.7°C) and PBC (-8.3±0.3°C), which persisted up to 20-min after the session. The tympanic temperature almost certainly decreased only after the WBC session (-0.32±0.04°C). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were very likely increased after the WBC session, whereas these changes were trivial in the other groups. In addition, heart rate almost certainly decreased after PBC (-10.9%) and WBC (-15.2%) sessions, in a likely greater proportion for WBC compared to PBC. Resting vagal-related heart rate variability indices (the root-mean square difference of successive normal R-R intervals, RMSSD, and high frequency band, HF) were very likely increased after PBC (RMSSD: +54.4%, HF: +138%) and WBC (RMSSD: +85.2%, HF: +632%) sessions without any marked difference between groups. Plasma norepinephrine concentrations were likely to very likely increased after PBC (+57.4%) and WBC (+76.2%), respectively. Finally, cold and comfort sensations were almost certainly altered after WBC and PBC, sensation of discomfort being likely more pronounced after WBC than PBC. Both acute cryostimulation techniques effectively stimulated the autonomic nervous system (ANS), with a predominance of parasympathetic tone activation. The results of this study also suggest that a

  4. Parasympathetic Activity and Blood Catecholamine Responses Following a Single Partial-Body Cryostimulation and a Whole-Body Cryostimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hausswirth, Christophe; Schaal, Karine; Le Meur, Yann; Bieuzen, François; Filliard, Jean-Robert; Volondat, Marielle; Louis, Julien

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a single whole-body cryostimulation (WBC) and a partial-body cryostimulation (PBC) (i.e., not exposing the head to cold) on indices of parasympathetic activity and blood catecholamines. Two groups of 15 participants were assigned either to a 3-min WBC or PBC session, while 10 participants constituted a control group (CON) not receiving any cryostimulation. Changes in thermal, physiological and subjective variables were recorded before and during the 20-min after each cryostimulation. According to a qualitative statistical analysis, an almost certain decrease in skin temperature was reported for all body regions immediately after the WBC (mean decrease±90% CL, -13.7±0.7°C) and PBC (-8.3±0.3°C), which persisted up to 20-min after the session. The tympanic temperature almost certainly decreased only after the WBC session (-0.32±0.04°C). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were very likely increased after the WBC session, whereas these changes were trivial in the other groups. In addition, heart rate almost certainly decreased after PBC (-10.9%) and WBC (-15.2%) sessions, in a likely greater proportion for WBC compared to PBC. Resting vagal-related heart rate variability indices (the root-mean square difference of successive normal R-R intervals, RMSSD, and high frequency band, HF) were very likely increased after PBC (RMSSD: +54.4%, HF: +138%) and WBC (RMSSD: +85.2%, HF: +632%) sessions without any marked difference between groups. Plasma norepinephrine concentrations were likely to very likely increased after PBC (+57.4%) and WBC (+76.2%), respectively. Finally, cold and comfort sensations were almost certainly altered after WBC and PBC, sensation of discomfort being likely more pronounced after WBC than PBC. Both acute cryostimulation techniques effectively stimulated the autonomic nervous system (ANS), with a predominance of parasympathetic tone activation. The results of this study also suggest that a

  5. Does reading keep you thin? Leisure activities, cultural tastes, and body weight in comparative perspective

    PubMed Central

    Pampel, Fred C.

    2011-01-01

    While sedentary leisure-time activities such as reading, going to movies, attending cultural events, attending sporting events, watching TV, listening to music, and socializing with friends would seem to contribute to excess weight, a perspective focusing on SES differences in cultural tastes suggests the opposite, that some sedentary activities are associated with lower rather than higher body weight. This study aims to test theories of cultural distinction by examining relationships between leisure-time activities and body weight. Using 2007 data on 17 nations from the International Social Survey Program, the analysis estimates relationships between the body mass index and varied leisure-time activities while controlling for SES, physical activities, and sociodemographic variables. Net of controls for SES and physical activities, participation time in cultural activities is associated with lower rather than higher body weight, particularly in high-income nations. The results suggest that both cultural activities and body weight reflect forms of distinction that separate SES-based lifestyles. PMID:21707664

  6. Effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy on muscle tone and upper extremity function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Jung-A; Moon, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Sun-Min; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen chronic stroke patients were included in this study. Prior to occupational therapy, whole-body exercise was performed for 10 minutes, 5 times per week, for a total of 8 weeks. Muscle tone and upper extremity function were measured. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) was used to measure muscle tone, and the Manual Function Test (MFT) and Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FugM) were used to measure upper extremity function. [Results] MAS score was significantly decreased, and MFT and FugM were significantly increased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy had a positive effect on muscle tone, and upper extremity function in stroke patients. PMID:27065354

  7. Effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy on muscle tone and upper extremity function in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Boo, Jung-A; Moon, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Sun-Min; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen chronic stroke patients were included in this study. Prior to occupational therapy, whole-body exercise was performed for 10 minutes, 5 times per week, for a total of 8 weeks. Muscle tone and upper extremity function were measured. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) was used to measure muscle tone, and the Manual Function Test (MFT) and Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FugM) were used to measure upper extremity function. [Results] MAS score was significantly decreased, and MFT and FugM were significantly increased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy had a positive effect on muscle tone, and upper extremity function in stroke patients. PMID:27065354

  8. Sepsis-induced morbidity in mice: effects on body temperature, body weight, cage activity, social behavior and cytokines in brain

    PubMed Central

    Granger, Jill I.; Ratti, Pietro-Luca; Datta, Subhash C.; Raymond, Richard M.; Opp, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Infection negatively impacts mental health, as evidenced by the lethargy, malaise, and cognitive deficits experienced during illness. These changes in central nervous system processes, collectively termed sickness behavior, have been shown in animal models to be mediated primarily by the actions of cytokines in brain. Most studies of sickness behavior to date have used bolus injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or selective administration of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or IL-6 as the immune challenge. Such models, although useful for determining mechanisms responsible for acute changes in physiology and behavior, do not adequately represent the more complex effects on central nervous system (CNS) processes of a true infection with replicating pathogens. In the present study, we used the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model to quantify sepsis-induced alterations in several facets of physiology and behavior of mice. We determined the impact of sepsis on cage activity, body temperature, food and water consumption and body weights of mice. Because cytokines are critical mediators of changes in behavior and temperature regulation during immune challenge, we also quantified sepsis-induced alterations in cytokine mRNA and protein in brain during the acute period of sepsis onset. We now report that cage activity and temperature regulation in mice that survive are altered for up to 23 days after sepsis induction. Food and water consumption are transiently reduced, and body weight is lost during sepsis. Furthermore, sepsis decreases social interactions for 24 – 48 hours. Finally, mRNA and protein for IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) are upregulated in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and brain stem during sepsis onset, from 6–72 hour post sepsis induction. Collectively, these data indicate that sepsis not only acutely alters physiology, behavior and cytokine profiles in brain, but that some brain functions are

  9. Brain activations during judgments of positive self-conscious emotion and positive basic emotion: pride and joy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidehiko; Matsuura, Masato; Koeda, Michihiko; Yahata, Noriaki; Suhara, Tetsuya; Kato, Motoichiro; Okubo, Yoshiro

    2008-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the neural correlates associated with judgments of a positive self-conscious emotion, pride, and elucidate the difference between pride and a basic positive emotion, joy, at the neural basis level using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Study of the neural basis associated with pride might contribute to a better understanding of the pride-related behaviors observed in neuropsychiatric disorders. Sixteen healthy volunteers were studied. The participants read sentences expressing joy or pride contents during the scans. Pride conditions activated the right posterior superior temporal sulcus and left temporal pole, the regions implicated in the neural substrate of social cognition or theory of mind. However, against our prediction, we did not find brain activation in the medial prefrontal cortex, a region responsible for inferring others' intention or self-reflection. Joy condition produced activations in the ventral striatum and insula/operculum, the key nodes of processing of hedonic or appetitive stimuli. Our results support the idea that pride is a self-conscious emotion, requiring the ability to detect the intention of others. At the same time, judgment of pride might require less self-reflection compared with those of negative self-conscious emotions such as guilt or embarrassment. PMID:17638925

  10. The interaction between early-life body size and physical activity on risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hannah; Boeke, Caroline E.; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A.; Wang, Molin; Willett, Walter C.; Eliassen, A. Heather

    2014-01-01

    While early-life body leanness is associated with increased breast cancer risk, early-life physical activity may protect against breast cancer. We examined whether the excess risk among lean girls is modified by their levels of prior, concurrent, or future physical activity. We conducted an analysis among 74,723 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II (follow-up 1997–2011). Participants recalled their body size at ages 5, 10, and 20 years in 1989 using a 9-level pictogram (level 1: most lean). In 1997, they reported adolescent levels of physical activity (ages 12–13 and 14–17 years). Cox proportional hazards models estimated the overall association of body size with breast cancer risk and assessed interactions of adolescent physical activity with body size at three different age periods (5–10, 10–20, and 20 years), adjusting for early-life and adult risk factors for breast cancer. Regardless of levels of adolescent physical activity, early-life body leanness (level 1–2 vs. 4.5+) was significantly associated with higher breast cancer risk. The association was slightly attenuated among those who were active (60+ MET-hr/wk) during adolescence compared to those who were inactive (<30 MET-hr/wk) (body size at ages 5–10 years: hazard ratio=1.37, 95% confidence interval=1.04–1.81 vs. 1.66, 1.29–2.12), but the interaction was not significant (p=0.72). The results were similar for body size at three different age periods. Being lean during early life is a risk factor for breast cancer among both inactive and active girls. Adolescent physical activity did not significantly modify the association, although some interaction cannot be excluded. PMID:25335465

  11. The interaction between early-life body size and physical activity on risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hannah; Boeke, Caroline E; Tamimi, Rulla M; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Wang, Molin; Willett, Walter C; Eliassen, A Heather

    2015-08-01

    While early-life body leanness is associated with increased breast cancer risk, early-life physical activity may protect against breast cancer. We examined whether the excess risk among lean girls is modified by their levels of prior, concurrent, or future physical activity. We conducted an analysis among 74,723 women in the Nurses' Health Study II (follow-up 1997-2011). Participants recalled their body size at ages 5, 10 and 20 years in 1989 using a 9-level pictogram (Level 1 most lean). In 1997, they reported adolescent levels of physical activity (ages 12-13 and 14-17 years). Cox proportional hazards models estimated the overall association of body size with breast cancer risk and assessed interactions of adolescent physical activity with body size at three different age periods (5-10, 10-20 and 20 years), adjusting for early-life and adult risk factors for breast cancer. Regardless of levels of adolescent physical activity, early-life body leanness (level 1-2 vs. 4.5+) was significantly associated with higher breast cancer risk. The association was slightly attenuated among those who were active (60+ MET-hr/wk) during adolescence compared to those who were inactive (<30 MET-hr/wk) (body size at ages 5-10 years: hazard ratio = 1.37, 95% confidence interval = 1.04-1.81 vs. 1.66, 1.29-2.12), but the interaction was not significant (p = 0.72). The results were similar for body size at three different age periods. Being lean during early life is a risk factor for breast cancer among both inactive and active girls. Adolescent physical activity did not significantly modify the association, although some interaction cannot be excluded. PMID:25335465

  12. Influence of pregnancy stage and fetus position on the whole-body and local exposure of the fetus to RF-EMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varsier, N.; Dahdouh, S.; Serrurier, A.; De la Plata, J.-P.; Anquez, J.; Angelini, E. D.; Bloch, I.; Wiart, J.

    2014-09-01

    This paper analyzes the influence of pregnancy stage and fetus position on the whole-body and brain exposure of the fetus to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. Our analysis is performed using semi-homogeneous pregnant woman models between 8 and 32 weeks of amenorrhea. By analyzing the influence of the pregnancy stage on the environmental whole-body and local exposure of a fetus in vertical position, head down or head up, in the 2100 MHz frequency band, we concluded that both whole-body and average brain exposures of the fetus decrease during the first pregnancy trimester, while they advance during the pregnancy due to the rapid weight gain of the fetus in these first stages. From the beginning of the second trimester, the whole-body and the average brain exposures are quite stable because the weight gains are quasi proportional to the absorbed power increases. The behavior of the fetus whole-body and local exposures during pregnancy for a fetus in the vertical position with the head up were found to be of a similar level, when compared to the position with the head down they were slightly higher, especially in the brain.

  13. Influence of pregnancy stage and fetus position on the whole-body and local exposure of the fetus to RF-EMF.

    PubMed

    Varsier, N; Dahdouh, S; Serrurier, A; De la Plata, J-P; Anquez, J; Angelini, E D; Bloch, I; Wiart, J

    2014-09-01

    This paper analyzes the influence of pregnancy stage and fetus position on the whole-body and brain exposure of the fetus to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. Our analysis is performed using semi-homogeneous pregnant woman models between 8 and 32 weeks of amenorrhea. By analyzing the influence of the pregnancy stage on the environmental whole-body and local exposure of a fetus in vertical position, head down or head up, in the 2100 MHz frequency band, we concluded that both whole-body and average brain exposures of the fetus decrease during the first pregnancy trimester, while they advance during the pregnancy due to the rapid weight gain of the fetus in these first stages. From the beginning of the second trimester, the whole-body and the average brain exposures are quite stable because the weight gains are quasi proportional to the absorbed power increases. The behavior of the fetus whole-body and local exposures during pregnancy for a fetus in the vertical position with the head up were found to be of a similar level, when compared to the position with the head down they were slightly higher, especially in the brain. PMID:25098501

  14. Protein kinase A activation enhances β-catenin transcriptional activity through nuclear localization to PML bodies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Mahoney, Emilia; Zuo, Tao; Manchanda, Parmeet K; Davuluri, Ramana V; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2014-01-01

    The Protein Kinase A (PKA) and Wnt signaling cascades are fundamental pathways involved in cellular development and maintenance. In the osteoblast lineage, these pathways have been demonstrated functionally to be essential for the production of mineralized bone. Evidence for PKA-Wnt crosstalk has been reported both during tumorigenesis and during organogenesis, and the nature of the interaction is thought to rely on tissue and cell context. In this manuscript, we analyzed bone tumors arising from mice with activated PKA caused by mutation of the PKA regulatory subunit Prkar1a. In primary cells from these tumors, we observed relocalization of β-catenin to intranuclear punctuate structures, which were identified as PML bodies. Cellular redistribution of β-catenin could be recapitulated by pharmacologic activation of PKA. Using 3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts as a model system, we found that PKA phosphorylation sites on β-catenin were required for nuclear re-localization. Further, β-catenin's transport to the nucleus was accompanied by an increase in canonical Wnt-dependent transcription, which also required the PKA sites. PKA-Wnt crosstalk in the cells was bi-directional, including enhanced interactions between β-catenin and the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and transcriptional crosstalk between the Wnt and PKA signaling pathways. Increases in canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling were associated with a decrease in the activity of the non-canonical Wnt/Ror2 pathway, which has been shown to antagonize canonical Wnt signaling. Taken together, this study provides a new understanding of the complex regulation of the subcellular distribution of β-catenin and its differential protein-protein interaction that can be modulated by PKA signaling. PMID:25299576

  15. The relationship between skeletal muscle mitochondrial citrate synthase activity and whole body oxygen uptake adaptations in response to exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Vigelsø, Andreas; Andersen, Nynne B; Dela, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity and changes in CS activity is often assumed. However, this relationship and absolute values of CS and maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2max) has never been assessed across different studies. A systematic PubMed search on literature published from 1983 to 2013 was performed. The search profile included: citrate, synthase, human, skeletal, muscle, training, not electrical stimulation, not in-vitro, not rats. Studies that reported changes in CS activity and V.O2max were included. Different training types and subject populations were analyzed independently to assess correlation between relative changes in V.O2max and CS activity. 70 publications with 97 intervention groups were included. There was a positive (r = 0.45) correlation (P < 0.001) between the relative change in V.O2max and the relative change in CS activity. All reported absolute values of CS and V.O2max did not correlate (r =- 0.07, n = 148, P = 0.4). Training induced changes in whole body oxidative capacity is matched by changes in muscle CS activity in a nearly 1:1 relationship. Absolute values of CS across different studies cannot be compared unless a standardized analytical method is used by all laboratories. PMID:25057335

  16. Effect of seat positions on discomfort, muscle activation, pressure distribution and pedal force during cycling.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rachita; Hansen, Ernst A; de Zee, Mark; Madeleine, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to measure and analyse discomfort and biomechanics of cycling, i.e., muscle activation, centre of pressure of seat pressure profiles and pedal forces as a function of seat position. Twenty-one recreationally active individuals cycled for 10min at 100W on an ergometer cycle using five different seat positions. The neutral position was considered as basic seat position and was compared with upward, downward, forward and backward seat positions. The initial bout was repeated at the end of the recording session. Discomfort increased for upward and backward condition compared with neutral (P<0.05). Normalized surface electromyography from gastrocnemius decreased in the downward and forward position but increased in the upward and backward position. The minimum force became less negative for forward position compared with neutral seat position (P<0.05). The degree of variability of centre of pressure increased in the upward and backward position and the entropy of the centre of pressure of sitting posture for backward position decreased compared with neutral seat position (P<0.05). The present study revealed that consecutive changes of seat position over time lead to increase in discomfort as well as alterations of the biomechanics of cycling. PMID:26938676

  17. Relationship between alcohol intake, body fat, and physical activity – a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W.; Qi, Rong

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Aside from fat, ethanol is the macronutrient with the highest energy density. Whether the energy derived from ethanol affects the body composition and fat mass is debatable. We investigated the relationship between alcohol intake, body composition, and physical activity in the US population using the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). Methods Ten thousand five hundred and fifty subjects met eligible criteria and constituted our study cohort. Estimated percent body fat and resting metabolic rate were calculated based on the sum of the skinfolds. Multivariate regression analyses were performed accounting for the study sampling weight. Results In both genders, moderate and hazardous alcohol drinkers were younger (p<0.05), had significantly lower BMI (P<0.01) and body weight (p<0.01) than controls, non drinkers. Those with hazardous alcohol consumption had significantly less physical activity compared to those with no alcohol use and moderate drinkers in both genders. Female had significantly higher percent body fat than males. In the multivariate linear regression analyses, the levels of alcohol consumption were found to be an independent predictor associated with lower percent body fat only in male subjects. Conclusions Our results showed that alcoholics are habitually less active and that alcohol drinking is an independent predictor of lower percent body fat especially in male alcoholics. PMID:20696406

  18. Effective seat-to-head transmissibility in whole-body vibration: Effects of posture and arm position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmatalla, Salam; DeShaw, Jonathan

    2011-12-01

    Seat-to-head transmissibility is a biomechanical measure that has been widely used for many decades to evaluate seat dynamics and human response to vibration. Traditionally, transmissibility has been used to correlate single-input or multiple-input with single-output motion; it has not been effectively used for multiple-input and multiple-output scenarios due to the complexity of dealing with the coupled motions caused by the cross-axis effect. This work presents a novel approach to use transmissibility effectively for single- and multiple-input and multiple-output whole-body vibrations. In this regard, the full transmissibility matrix is transformed into a single graph, such as those for single-input and single-output motions. Singular value decomposition and maximum distortion energy theory were used to achieve the latter goal. Seat-to-head transmissibility matrices for single-input/multiple-output in the fore-aft direction, single-input/multiple-output in the vertical direction, and multiple-input/multiple-output directions are investigated in this work. A total of ten subjects participated in this study. Discrete frequencies of 0.5-16 Hz were used for the fore-aft direction using supported and unsupported back postures. Random ride files from a dozer machine were used for the vertical and multiple-axis scenarios considering two arm postures: using the armrests or grasping the steering wheel. For single-input/multiple-output, the results showed that the proposed method was very effective in showing the frequencies where the transmissibility is mostly sensitive for the two sitting postures and two arm positions. For multiple-input/multiple-output, the results showed that the proposed effective transmissibility indicated higher values for the armrest-supported posture than for the steering-wheel-supported posture.

  19. Positioning accuracy for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy patients determined by on-treatment cone-beam CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Richmond, N D; Pilling, K E; Peedell, C; Shakespeare, D; Walker, C P

    2012-06-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer is an emerging treatment option in the UK. Since relatively few high-dose ablative fractions are delivered to a small target volume, the consequences of a geometric miss are potentially severe. This paper presents the results of treatment delivery set-up data collected using Elekta Synergy (Elekta, Crawley, UK) cone-beam CT imaging for 17 patients immobilised using the Bodyfix system (Medical Intelligence, Schwabmuenchen, Germany). Images were acquired on the linear accelerator at initial patient treatment set-up, following any position correction adjustments, and post-treatment. These were matched to the localisation CT scan using the Elekta XVI software. In total, 71 fractions were analysed for patient set-up errors. The mean vector error at initial set-up was calculated as 5.3 ± 2.7 mm, which was significantly reduced to 1.4 ± 0.7 mm following image guided correction. Post-treatment the corresponding value was 2.1 ± 1.2 mm. The use of the Bodyfix abdominal compression plate on 5 patients to reduce the range of tumour excursion during respiration produced mean longitudinal set-up corrections of -4.4 ± 4.5 mm compared with -0.7 ± 2.6 mm without compression for the remaining 12 patients. The use of abdominal compression led to a greater variation in set-up errors and a shift in the mean value. PMID:22665927

  20. The Meckel-Gruber syndrome protein TMEM67 controls basal body positioning and epithelial branching morphogenesis in mice via the non-canonical Wnt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamed, Zakia A.; Natarajan, Subaashini; Wheway, Gabrielle; Inglehearn, Christopher F.; Toomes, Carmel; Johnson, Colin A.; Jagger, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ciliopathies are a group of developmental disorders that manifest with multi-organ anomalies. Mutations in TMEM67 (MKS3) cause a range of human ciliopathies, including Meckel-Gruber and Joubert syndromes. In this study we describe multi-organ developmental abnormalities in the Tmem67tm1Dgen/H1 knockout mouse that closely resemble those seen in Wnt5a and Ror2 knockout mice. These include pulmonary hypoplasia, ventricular septal defects, shortening of the body longitudinal axis, limb abnormalities, and cochlear hair cell stereociliary bundle orientation and basal body/kinocilium positioning defects. The basal body/kinocilium complex was often uncoupled from the hair bundle, suggesting aberrant basal body migration, although planar cell polarity and apical planar asymmetry in the organ of Corti were normal. TMEM67 (meckelin) is essential for phosphorylation of the non-canonical Wnt receptor ROR2 (receptor-tyrosine-kinase-like orphan receptor 2) upon stimulation with Wnt5a-conditioned medium. ROR2 also colocalises and interacts with TMEM67 at the ciliary transition zone. Additionally, the extracellular N-terminal domain of TMEM67 preferentially binds to Wnt5a in an in vitro binding assay. Cultured lungs of Tmem67 mutant mice failed to respond to stimulation of epithelial branching morphogenesis by Wnt5a. Wnt5a also inhibited both the Shh and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathways in wild-type embryonic lung. Pulmonary hypoplasia phenotypes, including loss of correct epithelial branching morphogenesis and cell polarity, were rescued by stimulating the non-canonical Wnt pathway downstream of the Wnt5a-TMEM67-ROR2 axis by activating RhoA. We propose that TMEM67 is a receptor that has a main role in non-canonical Wnt signalling, mediated by Wnt5a and ROR2, and normally represses Shh signalling. Downstream therapeutic targeting of the Wnt5a-TMEM67-ROR2 axis might, therefore, reduce or prevent pulmonary hypoplasia in ciliopathies and other congenital

  1. Fish Swimming: Patternsin the Mechanical Energy Generation, Transmission and Dissipation from Muscle Activation to Body Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Yu, Y. L.; Tong, B. G.

    2011-09-01

    The power consumption of the undulatory fish swimming is produced by active muscles. The mechanical energy generated by stimulated muscles is dissipated partly by the passive tissues of fish while it is being transmitted to the fluid medium. Furthermore, the effective energy, propelling fish movement, is a part of that delivered by the fish body. The process depends on the interactions of the active muscles, the passive tissues, and the water surrounding the fish body. In the previous works, the body-fluid interactions have been investigated widely, but it is rarely considered how the mechanical energy generates, transmits and dissipates in fish swimming. This paper addresses the regular patterns of energy transfer process from muscle activation to body movement for a cruising lamprey (LAMPREY), a kind of anguilliform swimmer. It is necessary to propose a global modelling of the kinematic chain, which is composed of active muscle force-moment model, fish-body dynamic model and hydrodynamic model in order. The present results show that there are traveling energy waves along the fish body from anterior to posterior, accompanied with energy storing and dissipating due to the viscoelastic property of internal tissues. This study is a preliminary research on the framework of kinematic chain coordination performance in fish swimming.

  2. Body Size, Rather Than Male Eye Allometry, Explains Chrysomya megacephala (Diptera: Calliphoridae) Activity in Low Light

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. L.; Palermo, N. A.; Theobald, J. C.; Wells, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Male Chrysomya megacephala (F.) blow fly compound eyes contain an unusual area of enlarged dorsal facets believed to allow for increased light capture. This region is absent in females and has been hypothesized to aid in mate tracking in low light conditions or at greater distances. Many traits used in the attraction and capture of mates are allometric, growing at different rates relative to body size. Previous reports concerning C. megacephala eye properties did not include measurements of body size, making the relationship between the specialized eye region and body size unclear. We examined different morphological features of the eye among individuals of varying sizes. We found total eye size scaled proportionately to body size, but the number of enlarged dorsal facets increased as body size increased. This demonstrated that larger males have an eye that is morphologically different than smaller males. On the basis of external morphology, we hypothesized that since larger males have larger and a greater number of dorsally enlarged facets, and these facets are believed to allow for increased light capture, larger males would be active in lower light levels than smaller males and females of equal size. In a laboratory setting, larger males were observed to become active earlier in the morning than smaller males, although they did not remain active later in the evening. However, females followed the same pattern at similar light levels suggesting that overall body size rather than specialized male eye morphology is responsible for increased activity under low light conditions. PMID:26411786

  3. Changes in morphology and spatial position of coiled bodies during NGF-induced neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Janevski, J; Park, P C; De Boni, U

    1997-11-01

    Interphase nuclei are organized into structural and functional domains. The coiled body, a nuclear organelle of unknown function, exhibits cell type-specific changes in number and morphology. Its association with nucleoli and with small nuclear ribonucleo-proteins (snRNPs) indicates that it functions in RNA processing. In cycling cells, coiled bodies are round structures not associated with nucleoli. In contrast, in neurons, they frequently present as nucleolar "caps." To test the hypothesis that neuronal differentiation is accompanied by changes in the spatial association of coiled bodies with nucleoli and in their morphology, PC12 cells were differentiated into a neuronal phenotype with nerve growth factor (NGF) and coiled bodies detected by immunocytochemical localization of p80-coilin and snRNPs. The fraction of cells that showed coiled bodies as nucleolar caps increased from 1.6 +/- 0.9% (mean +/- SEM) in controls to 16.5 +/- 1.6% in NGF-differentiated cultures. The fraction of cells with ring-like coiled bodies increased from 17.2 +/- 5.0% in controls to 57.8 +/- 4.4% in differentiated cells. This was accompanied by a decrease, from 81.2 +/- 5.7% to 25.7 +/- 3.1%, in the fraction of cells with small, round coiled bodies. SnRNPs remained associated with typical coiled bodies and with ring-like coiled bodies during NGF-induced recruitment of snRNPs to the nuclear periphery. Together with the observation that coiled bodies are also present as nucleolar caps in sensory neurons, the results indicate that coiled bodies alter their morphology and increase their association with nucleoli during NGF-induced neuronal differentiation. PMID:9358854

  4. Body painting to promote self-active learning of hand anatomy for preclinical medical students

    PubMed Central

    Jariyapong, Pitchanee; Punsawad, Chuchard; Bunratsami, Suchirat; Kongthong, Paranyu

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to use the body painting method to teach hand anatomy to a group of preclinical medical students. Methods Students reviewed hand anatomy using the traditional method and body painting exercise. Feedback and retention of the anatomy-related information were examined by a questionnaire and multiple-choice questions, respectively, immediately and 1 month after the painting exercise. Results Students agreed that the exercise was advantageous and helped facilitate self-active learning after in-class anatomy lessons. While there was no significant difference in knowledge retention between the control and experimental groups, the students appreciated the exercise in which they applied body paint to the human body to learn anatomy. Conclusion The body painting was an efficient tool for aiding the interactive learning of medical students and increasing the understanding of gross anatomy. PMID:26945229

  5. The effects of core muscle activation on dynamic trunk position and knee abduction moments: implications for ACL injury.

    PubMed

    Jamison, Steve T; McNally, Michael P; Schmitt, Laura C; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2013-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is one of the most common serious lower-extremity injuries experienced by athletes participating in field and court sports and often occurs during a sudden change in direction or pivot. Both lateral trunk positioning during cutting and peak external knee abduction moments have been associated with ACL injury risk, though it is not known how core muscle activation influences these variables. In this study, the association between core muscle pre-activation and trunk position as well as the association between core muscle pre-activation and peak knee abduction moment during an unanticipated run-to-cut maneuver were investigated in 46 uninjured individuals. Average co-contraction indices and percent differences between muscle pairs were calculated prior to initial contact for internal obliques, external obliques, and L5 extensors using surface electromyography. Outside tilt of the trunk was defined as positive when the trunk was angled away from the cutting direction. No significant associations were found between pre-activations of core muscles and outside tilt of the trunk. Greater average co-contraction index of the L5 extensors was associated with greater peak knee abduction moment (p=0.0107). Increased co-contraction of the L5 extensors before foot contact could influence peak knee abduction moment by stiffening the spine, limiting sagittal plane trunk flexion (a motion pattern previously linked to ACL injury risk) and upper body kinetic energy absorption by the core during weight acceptance. PMID:23891313

  6. Relationship of lactate dehydrogenase activity to body measurements of Angus x Charolais cows and calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives were to examine 1) relationships between lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and body measurements of grazing beef cows, and 2) the association between maternal LDH activity in late gestation and subsequent calf birth weight (BRW), hip height (HH) at weaning, and adjusted weaning weight ...

  7. Relationship of lactate dehydrogenase activity with body measeurements of Angus x Charolais cows and calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Angus x Charolais cows (n = 87) and their Angus-sired, spring-born calves (n = 86) were utilized to examine relationships between lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and body measurements of beef cows; and the relationship between maternal LDH activity in late gestation and subsequent calf birth we...

  8. Walking Activity, Body Composition and Blood Pressure in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanish, Heidi I.; Draheim, Christopher C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Individuals with intellectual disabilities engage in limited physical activity which places their health at risk. This study examined the walking activity, body composition and blood pressure of adults with intellectual disabilities. Methods: A group of male and female adults (n = 103) wore a pedometer for 7 days and were categorized…

  9. University Students Meeting the Recommended Standards of Physical Activity and Body Mass Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Xiaofen; Castelli, Darla; Castro-Pinero, Jose; Guan, Hongwei

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated student physical activity (PA) and body mass index (BMI) in relation to the "Healthy Campus 2010" objectives set by the American College Health Association in 2002. Students (N = 1125) at a U.S. southern state university participated in the study. The percentages of students who were physically active and whose BMI were…

  10. American College of Sports Medicine Position Stand. Exercise and physical activity for older adults.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    ACSM Position Stand on Exercise and Physical Activity for Older Adults. Med. Sci. Sports. Exerc., Vol. 30, No. 6, pp. 992-1008, 1998. By the year 2030, the number of individuals 65 yr and over will reach 70 million in the United States alone; persons 85 yr and older will be the fastest growing segment of the population. As more individuals live longer, it is imperative to determine the extent and mechanisms by which exercise and physical activity can improve health, functional capacity, quality of life, and independence in this population. Aging is a complex process involving many variables (e.g., genetics, lifestyle factors, chronic diseases) that interact with one another, greatly influencing the manner in which we age. Participation in regular physical activity (both aerobic and strength exercises) elicits a number of favorable responses that contribute to healthy aging. Much has been learned recently regarding the adaptability of various biological systems, as well as the ways that regular exercise can influence them. Participation in a regular exercise program is an effective intervention/ modality to reduce/prevent a number of functional declines associated with aging. Further, the trainability of older individuals (including octo- and nonagenarians) is evidenced by their ability to adapt and respond to both endurance and strength training. Endurance training can help maintain and improve various aspects of cardiovascular function (as measured by maximal VO2, cardiac output, and arteriovenous O2 difference), as well as enhance submaximal performance. Importantly, reductions in risk factors associated with disease states (heart disease, diabetes, etc.) improve health status and contribute to an increase in life expectancy. Strength training helps offset the loss in muscle mass and strength typically associated with normal aging. Additional benefits from regular exercise include improved bone health and, thus, reduction in risk for osteoporosis; improved

  11. Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response in Sporadic Inclusion Body Myositis But Not in Hereditary GNE Inclusion Body Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nogalska, Anna; D’Agostino, Carla; Engel, W. King; Cacciottolo, Mafalda; Asada, Shinichi; Mori, Kazutoshi; Askanas, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Muscle fibers in patients with sporadic inclusion-body myositis (s-IBM), the most common age-associated myopathy, are characterized by autophagic vacuoles and accumulation of ubiquitinated and congophilic multiprotein aggregates that contain amyloid-β and phosphorylated tau. Muscle fibers of autosomal-recessive hereditary inclusion-body myopathy due to the GNE mutation (GNE-h-IBM) display similar pathologic features, except with less pronounced congophilia. Accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins inside the ER lumen leads to ER stress, which elicits the unfolded protein response (UPR) as a protective mechanism. Here we demonstrate for the first time that UPR is activated in s-IBM muscle biopsies, since there was a) increased ATF4 protein and increased mRNA of its target CHOP, b) cleavage of the ATF6 and increased mRNA of its target GRP78, and c) an increase of the spliced form of XBP-1 and increased mRNA of EDEM, target of heterodimer of cleaved ATF6 and spliced XBP-1. In contrast, we did not find similar evidence of the UPR induction in GNE-h-IBM patient muscle, suggesting that different intracellular mechanisms might lead to the similar pathological phenotypes. Interestingly, cultured GNE-h-IBM muscle fibers had a robust UPR response to experimental ER stress stimuli, suggesting that the GNE mutation per se is not responsible for the lack of UPR in GNE-h-IBM biopsied muscle. PMID:25978849

  12. TRIM5{alpha} association with cytoplasmic bodies is not required for antiretroviral activity

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Byeongwoon; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Park, Do Hyun; Rogers, Thomas; Stremlau, Matthew; Sodroski, Joseph . E-mail: joseph_sodroski@dfci.harvard.edu

    2005-12-20

    The tripartite motif (TRIM) protein, TRIM5{alpha}, restricts infection by particular retroviruses. Many TRIM proteins form cytoplasmic bodies of unknown function. We investigated the relationship between cytoplasmic body formation and the structure and antiretroviral activity of TRIM5{alpha}. In addition to diffuse cytoplasmic staining, the TRIM5{alpha} proteins from several primate species were located in cytoplasmic bodies of different sizes; by contrast, TRIM5{alpha} from spider monkeys did not form cytoplasmic bodies. Despite these differences, all of the TRIM5{alpha} proteins exhibited the ability to restrict infection by particular retroviruses. Treatment of cells with geldanamycin, an Hsp90 inhibitor, resulted in disappearance or reduction of the TRIM5{alpha}-associated cytoplasmic bodies, yet exerted little effect on the restriction of retroviral infection. Studies of green fluorescent protein-TRIM5{alpha} fusion proteins indicated that no TRIM5{alpha} domain is specifically required for association with cytoplasmic bodies. Apparently, the formation of cytoplasmic bodies is not required for the antiretroviral activity of TRIM5{alpha}.

  13. Interferon gamma regulates accumulation of the proteasome activator PA28 and immunoproteasomes at nuclear PML bodies.

    PubMed

    Fabunmi, R P; Wigley, W C; Thomas, P J; DeMartino, G N

    2001-01-01

    PA28 is an interferon (gamma) (IFN(gamma)) inducible proteasome activator required for presentation of certain major histocompatibility (MHC) class I antigens. Under basal conditions in HeLa and Hep2 cells, a portion of nuclear PA28 is concentrated at promyelocytic leukemia oncoprotein (PML)-containing bodies also commonly known as PODs or ND10. IFN(gamma) treatment greatly increased the number and size of the PA28- and PML-containing bodies, and the effect was further enhanced in serum-deprived cells. PML bodies are disrupted in response to certain viral infections and in diseases such as acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Like PML, PA28 was delocalized from PML bodies by expression of the cytomegalovirus protein, IE1, and in NB4 cells, an APL model line. Moreover, retinoic acid treatment, which causes remission of APL in patients and reformation of PML-containing bodies in NB4 cells, relocalized PA28 to this site. In contrast, the proteasome, the functional target of PA28, was not detected at PML bodies under basal conditions in HeLa and Hep2 cells, but IFN(gamma) promoted accumulation of 'immunoproteasomes' at this site. These results establish PA28 as a novel component of nuclear PML bodies, and suggest that PA28 may assemble or activate immunoproteasomes at this site as part of its role in proteasome-dependent MHC class I antigen presentation. PMID:11112687

  14. Strength Training Improves Body Image and Physical Activity Behaviors Among Midlife and Older Rural Women

    PubMed Central

    Seguin, Rebecca A.; Eldridge, Galen; Lynch, Wesley; Paul, Lynn C.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of strength training on body image is understudied. The Strong Women Program, a 10-week, twice weekly strength-training program, was provided by Extension agents to 341 older rural women (62±12 years); changes in body image and other psychosocial variables were evaluated. Paired-sample t-test analyses were conducted to assess mean differences pre- to post-program. Strength training was associated with significant improvements in several dimensions of body image, health-related quality of life, and physical activity behaviors, satisfaction, and comfort among rural aging women—an often underserved population that stands to benefit considerably from similar programs. PMID:25767297

  15. Impact of maternal physical activity on fetal breathing and body movement--A review.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Dafna; Lye, Stephen J; Wells, Greg D

    2016-03-01

    Fetal movements, which include body and breathing movement, are important indicators of fetal well-being and nervous system development. These have been shown to be affected by intrauterine conditions. While maternal physical activity does induce a change in intrauterine conditions and physiology, its impact on fetal movements is still unclear. This paper will provide a brief review of the literature and outline the current knowledge with regards to the effects of maternal exercise on fetal body and breathing movements. PMID:26811196

  16. Simulation of surface EMG for the analysis of muscle activity during whole body vibratory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fratini, Antonio; Bifulco, Paolo; Romano, Maria; Clemente, Fabrizio; Cesarelli, Mario

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to reproduce the effect of motor-unit synchronization on surface EMG recordings during vibratory stimulation to highlight vibration evoked muscle activity. The authors intended to evaluate, through numerical simulations, the changes in surface EMG spectrum in muscles undergoing whole body vibration stimulation. In some specific bands, in fact, vibration induced motion artifacts are also typically present. In addition, authors meant to compare the simulated EMGs with respect to real recordings in order to discriminate the effect of synchronization of motor units discharges with vibration frequencies from motion artifacts. Computations were performed using a model derived from previous studies and modified to consider the effect of vibratory stimulus, the motor unit synchronization and the endplates-electrodes relative position on the EMG signal. Results revealed that, in particular conditions, synchronization of MUs' discharge generates visible peaks at stimulation frequency and its harmonics. However, only a part of the total power of surface EMGs might be enclosed within artifacts related bands (± 1 Hz centered at the stimulation frequency and its superior harmonics) even in case of strong synchronization of motor units discharges with the vibratory stimulus. PMID:24183387

  17. Impact of nutritional supplementation on immune response, body mass index and bioelectrical impedance in HIV-positive patients starting antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Challenges to HIV care in resource limited settings (RLS) include malnutrition. Limited evidence supports the benefit of nutritional supplementation when starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) in RLS. Methods Randomized controlled pilot study. HIV-positive ART-naive adults with self-reported weight loss were randomized to receive ART plus FutureLife porridge® nutritional supplement (NS) (388 kcal/day) or ART alone (Controls) for 6 months. Patients returned for monthly assessments and blood was drawn at enrolment and 6 months on ART. Differences in body composition, biochemical and laboratory parameters were estimated at 6 months on treatment. Results Of the 36 randomized patients, 26 completed the 6 month follow-up (11 NS vs 15 Controls). At enrolment, groups were similar in terms of age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and bioelectrical impedance. NS patients had a lower median CD4 count (60 cells/mm3 [IQR 12–105 vs 107 cells/mm3 [IQR 63–165]; p = 0.149) and hemoglobin (10.3 g/dL [IQR 9.0-11.3] vs 13.1 g/dL [IQR 11.1-14.7]; p = 0.001). At 6 months, NS patients increased their median CD4 count by 151 cells/mm3 [IQR 120–174) vs 77 cells/mm3 [IQR 33–145] in the Controls. NS patients had higher mean percentage change in body weight (12.7% vs 4.9%; p = 0.047), BMI (7.8% vs 5.5%; p = 0.007), absolute CD4 count (83.0% vs 46.4%, p = 0.002) and hemoglobin (9.5% vs 1.0%; p = 0.026). Patients in the NS arm had a higher mean percentage fat-free mass (16.7% vs −3.5%, p = 0.036), total body water (13.0% vs −1.9%, p = 0.026), intracellular water (16.1% vs −4.1%, p = 0.010) and basal metabolic rate (5.3% vs −0.2%, p = 0.014) compared to Controls. Patients in the NS arm also showed an improvement in physical activity at 6 months post-ART initiation compared to Controls (p = 0.037). Conclusion Preliminary results are encouraging and suggest that NS taken concurrently with ART can promote weight gain

  18. Explaining the Positive Relationship Between Fourth-Grade Children's Body Mass Index and Energy Intake at School-Provided Meals (Breakfast and Lunch)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Caroline H.; Baxter, Suzanne D.; Royer, Julie A.; Hitchcock, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: A 2010 publication showed a positive relationship between children's body mass index (BMI) and energy intake at school-provided meals (as assessed by direct meal observations). To help explain that relationship, we investigated 7 outcome variables concerning aspects of school-provided meals: energy content of items selected,…

  19. "It's Actually Very Normal That I'm Different". How Physically Disabled Youth Discursively Construct and Position Their Body/Self

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Amsterdam, Noortje; Knoppers, Annelies; Jongmans, Marian

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore how physically disabled youth who participate in mainstream education discursively construct and position themselves in relation to dominant discourses about sport and physicality that mark their bodies as "abnormal" and "deviant". We employ a feminist poststructuralist perspective to analyze the…

  20. Beautiful from the Inside Out: A School-Based Programme Designed to Increase Self-Esteem and Positive Body Image among Preadolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwood, Sarah Jane; Murray, Marisa; Nolan, Amanda; Bowker, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to design, implement, and evaluate a school-based programme that aimed to increase self-esteem and positive body image among preadolescent boys and girls. Participants in grades five and six (N = 77; M [subscript age] = 10.86, 53.2% girls) from a public school in Eastern Ontario completed a battery of validated…

  1. Improving the Confidence of Pre-Adolescent Girls by Focusing on the Development of Positive Self-Esteem, Body Image, and Assertiveness Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combes, Alice S.

    This practicum was designed to focus on: (1) the improvement of the confidence of pre-adolescent girls; (2) the establishment of a positive body image; and (3) the strengthening of assertiveness skills. The writer worked in a group of 20 girls over a period of 8 months using exercises designed to facilitate their growth. A curriculum was developed…

  2. Body stability and muscle and motor cortex activity during walking with wide stance.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Brad J; Bulgakova, Margarita A; Beloozerova, Irina N; Sirota, Mikhail G; Prilutsky, Boris I

    2014-08-01

    Biomechanical and neural mechanisms of balance control during walking are still poorly understood. In this study, we examined the body dynamic stability, activity of limb muscles, and activity of motor cortex neurons [primarily pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs)] in the cat during unconstrained walking and walking with a wide base of support (wide-stance walking). By recording three-dimensional full-body kinematics we found for the first time that during unconstrained walking the cat is dynamically unstable in the forward direction during stride phases when only two diagonal limbs support the body. In contrast to standing, an increased lateral between-paw distance during walking dramatically decreased the cat's body dynamic stability in double-support phases and prompted the cat to spend more time in three-legged support phases. Muscles contributing to abduction-adduction actions had higher activity during stance, while flexor muscles had higher activity during swing of wide-stance walking. The overwhelming majority of neurons in layer V of the motor cortex, 82% and 83% in the forelimb and hindlimb representation areas, respectively, were active differently during wide-stance walking compared with unconstrained condition, most often by having a different depth of stride-related frequency modulation along with a different mean discharge rate and/or preferred activity phase. Upon transition from unconstrained to wide-stance walking, proximal limb-related neuronal groups subtly but statistically significantly shifted their activity toward the swing phase, the stride phase where most of body instability occurs during this task. The data suggest that the motor cortex participates in maintenance of body dynamic stability during locomotion. PMID:24790167

  3. Body stability and muscle and motor cortex activity during walking with wide stance

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Brad J.; Bulgakova, Margarita A.; Beloozerova, Irina N.; Sirota, Mikhail G.

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical and neural mechanisms of balance control during walking are still poorly understood. In this study, we examined the body dynamic stability, activity of limb muscles, and activity of motor cortex neurons [primarily pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs)] in the cat during unconstrained walking and walking with a wide base of support (wide-stance walking). By recording three-dimensional full-body kinematics we found for the first time that during unconstrained walking the cat is dynamically unstable in the forward direction during stride phases when only two diagonal limbs support the body. In contrast to standing, an increased lateral between-paw distance during walking dramatically decreased the cat's body dynamic stability in double-support phases and prompted the cat to spend more time in three-legged support phases. Muscles contributing to abduction-adduction actions had higher activity during stance, while flexor muscles had higher activity during swing of wide-stance walking. The overwhelming majority of neurons in layer V of the motor cortex, 82% and 83% in the forelimb and hindlimb representation areas, respectively, were active differently during wide-stance walking compared with unconstrained condition, most often by having a different depth of stride-related frequency modulation along with a different mean discharge rate and/or preferred activity phase. Upon transition from unconstrained to wide-stance walking, proximal limb-related neuronal groups subtly but statistically significantly shifted their activity toward the swing phase, the stride phase where most of body instability occurs during this task. The data suggest that the motor cortex participates in maintenance of body dynamic stability during locomotion. PMID:24790167

  4. Body image emotions, perceptions, and cognitions distinguish physically active and inactive smokers

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Gisèle A.; Sabiston, Catherine M.; O'Loughlin, Erin K.; Bélanger, Mathieu; O'Loughlin, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine if body image emotions (body-related shame and guilt, weight-related stress), perceptions (self-perceived overweight), or cognitions (trying to change weight) differ between adolescents characterized by smoking and physical activity (PA) behavior. Methods Data for this cross-sectional analysis were collected in 2010–11 and were available for 1017 participants (mean (SD) age = 16.8 (0.5) years). Participants were categorized according to smoking and PA status into four groups: inactive smokers, inactive non-smokers, active smokers and active non-smokers. Associations between body image emotions, perceptions and cognitions, and group membership were estimated in multinomial logistic regression. Results Participants who reported body-related shame were less likely (OR (95% CI) = 0.52 (0.29–0.94)) to be in the active smoker group than the inactive smoker group; those who reported body-related guilt and those trying to gain weight were more likely (2.14 (1.32–3.48) and 2.49 (1.22–5.08), respectively) to be in the active smoker group than the inactive smoker group; those who were stressed about weight and those perceiving themselves as overweight were less likely to be in the active non-smoker group than the inactive smoker group (0.79 (0.64–0.97) and 0.41 (0.19–0.89), respectively). Conclusion Body image emotions and cognitions differentiated the active smoker group from the other three groups. PMID:26844062

  5. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Motion Management in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to the Lung: A Controlled Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Jeffrey D.; Lawrence, Yaacov R.; Appel, Sarit; Landau, Efrat; Ben-David, Merav A.; Rabin, Tatiana; Benayun, Maoz; Dubinski, Sergey; Weizman, Noam; Alezra, Dror; Gnessin, Hila; Goldstein, Adam M.; Baidun, Khader; Segel, Michael J.; Peled, Nir; Symon, Zvi

    2015-10-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on tumor motion, lung volume, and dose to critical organs in patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval in December 2013, patients with primary or secondary lung tumors referred for SBRT underwent 4-dimensional computed tomographic simulation twice: with free breathing and with CPAP. Tumor excursion was calculated by subtracting the vector of the greatest dimension of the gross tumor volume (GTV) from the internal target volume (ITV). Volumetric and dosimetric determinations were compared with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. CPAP was used during treatment if judged beneficial. Results: CPAP was tolerated well in 10 of the 11 patients enrolled. Ten patients with 18 lesions were evaluated. The use of CPAP decreased tumor excursion by 0.5 ± 0.8 cm, 0.4 ± 0.7 cm, and 0.6 ± 0.8 cm in the superior–inferior, right–left, and anterior–posterior planes, respectively (P≤.02). Relative to free breathing, the mean ITV reduction was 27% (95% confidence interval [CI] 16%-39%, P<.001). CPAP significantly augmented lung volume, with a mean absolute increase of 915 ± 432 cm{sup 3} and a relative increase of 32% (95% CI 21%-42%, P=.003), contributing to a 22% relative reduction (95% CI 13%-32%, P=.001) in mean lung dose. The use of CPAP was also associated with a relative reduction in mean heart dose by 29% (95% CI 23%-36%, P=.001). Conclusion: In this pilot study, CPAP significantly reduced lung tumor motion compared with free breathing. The smaller ITV, the planning target volume (PTV), and the increase in total lung volume associated with CPAP contributed to a reduction in lung and heart dose. CPAP was well tolerated, reproducible, and simple to implement in the treatment room and should be evaluated further as a novel strategy for motion management in radiation therapy.

  6. Positive affect modulates activity in the visual cortex to images of high calorie foods.

    PubMed

    Killgore, William D S; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A

    2007-05-01

    Activity within the visual cortex can be influenced by the emotional salience of a stimulus, but it is not clear whether such cortical activity is modulated by the affective status of the individual. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the relationship between affect ratings on the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule and activity within the occipital cortex of 13 normal-weight women while viewing images of high calorie and low calorie foods. Regression analyses revealed that when participants viewed high calorie foods, Positive Affect correlated significantly with activity within the lingual gyrus and calcarine cortex, whereas Negative Affect was unrelated to visual cortex activity. In contrast, during presentations of low calorie foods, affect ratings, regardless of valence, were unrelated to occipital cortex activity. These findings suggest a mechanism whereby positive affective state may affect the early stages of sensory processing, possibly influencing subsequent perceptual experience of a stimulus. PMID:17464782

  7. Bioelectrical impedance analysis as a laboratory activity: At the interface of physics and the body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylott, Elliot; Kutschera, Ellynne; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    We present a novel laboratory activity on RC circuits aimed at introductory physics students in life-science majors. The activity teaches principles of RC circuits by connecting ac-circuit concepts to bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) using a custom-designed educational BIA device. The activity shows how a BIA device works and how current, voltage, and impedance measurements relate to bioelectrical characteristics of the human body. From this, useful observations can be made including body water, fat-free mass, and body fat percentage. The laboratory is engaging to pre-health and life-science students, as well as engineering students who are given the opportunity to observe electrical components and construction of a commonly used biomedical device. Electrical concepts investigated include alternating current, electrical potential, resistance, capacitance, impedance, frequency, phase shift, device design, and the use of such topics in biomedical analysis.

  8. Effects of Body Fat on Weight Concerns, Dating, and Sexual Activity: A Longitudinal Analysis of Black and White Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Udry, J. Richard; Suchindran, Chirayath; Campbell, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    Investigated implications of body-fat differences for dating and sexual activity and implications of heterosexual activity for dieting and weight concerns in adolescent girls. Found that among white girls, and blacks with college-educated mothers, more body fat was associated with lower dating probability, even among non-obese girls. Body fat was…

  9. Feeling body dissatisfied after viewing thin-ideal pictures is mediated by self-activation.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Elke; Jansen, Anita; Vossen, Ellis; Ruf, Laura; Roefs, Anne

    2010-09-01

    The present study sought to investigate the influence of self-activation on body and weight satisfaction in restrained and unrestrained eaters, after exposure to thin-ideal images. Restrained eaters (n=39) and unrestrained eaters (n=40) were randomly assigned to a self-activation manipulation versus a control manipulation. After the manipulation, all participants were exposed to eight thin-ideal images. Measures of state body and weight satisfaction and of social comparison tendencies were assessed throughout the experiment. Self-activated restrained eaters showed a significant decrease in body and weight satisfaction after exposure to thin-ideal images, compared to restrained eaters who were not self-activated. In unrestrained eaters, the self-activation manipulation did not have any effect on body or weight dissatisfaction. In conclusion, exposure to fashion models only had a negative influence on women's self-evaluations when two conditions were met: (1) the participant was 'self-activated' and (2) the participant classified as a restrained eater. PMID:20801727

  10. Risperidone alters food intake, core body temperature, and locomotor activity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Mark B.; Li, Xingsheng; Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; DiCostanzo, Catherine A.; Jamison, Wendi G.; Kesterson, Robert A.; Allison, David B.; Nagy, Tim R.

    2009-01-01

    Risperidone induces significant weight gain in female mice; however, the underlying mechanisms related to this effect are unknown. We investigated the effects of risperidone on locomotor activity, core body temperature, and uncoupling protein (UCP) and hypothalamic orexin mRNA expression. Female C57BL/6J mice were acclimated to individual housing and randomly assigned to either risperidone (4 mg/kg BW*day) or placebo (PLA). Activity and body temperature were measured over 48-hour periods twice a week for 3 weeks. Food intake and body weights were measured weekly. UCP1 (BAT), UCP3 (gastrocnemius), and orexin (hypothalamus) mRNA expressions were measured using RT-PCR. Risperidone-treated mice consumed more food (p=0.050) and gained more weight (p=0.0001) than PLA-treated mice after 3 weeks. During the initial 2-days of treatment, there was an acute effect of treatment on activity (p=0.046), but not body temperature (p=0.290). During 3 weeks of treatment, average core body temperatures were higher in risperidone-treated mice compared to controls during the light phase (p=0.0001), and tended to be higher during the dark phase (p=0.057). Risperidone-treated mice exhibited lower activity levels than controls during the dark phase (p=0.006); there were no differences in activity during the light phase (p=0.47). UCP1 (p<0.01) and UCP3 (p<0.05) mRNA expressions were greater in risperidone-treated mice compared to controls, whereas, orexin mRNA expression was lower in risperidone-treated mice (p<0.01). These results suggest that risperidone-induced weight gain in mice is a consequence of increased energy intake and reduced activity, while the elevation in body temperature may be a result of thermogenic effect of food intake and elevated UCP1, UCP3, and a reduced hypothalamic orexin expression. PMID:19084548

  11. Arabidopsis LIP5, a Positive Regulator of Multivesicular Body Biogenesis, Is a Critical Target of Pathogen-Responsive MAPK Cascade in Plant Basal Defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Shang, Yifen; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2014-01-01

    Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) play essential roles in many cellular processes. The MVB pathway requires reversible membrane association of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transports (ESCRTs) for sustained protein trafficking. Membrane dissociation of ESCRTs is catalyzed by the AAA ATPase SKD1, which is stimulated by LYST-INTERACTING PROTEIN 5 (LIP5). We report here that LIP5 is a target of pathogen-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MPKs) and plays a critical role in plant basal resistance. Arabidopsis LIP5 interacts with MPK6 and MPK3 and is phosphorylated in vitro by activated MPK3 and MPK6 and in vivo upon expression of MPK3/6-activating NtMEK2DD and pathogen infection. Disruption of LIP5 has little effects on flg22-, salicylic acid-induced defense responses but compromises basal resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. The critical role of LIP5 in plant basal resistance is dependent on its ability to interact with SKD1. Mutation of MPK phosphorylation sites in LIP5 does not affect interaction with SKD1 but reduces the stability and compromises the ability to complement the lip5 mutant phenotypes. Using the membrane-selective FM1–43 dye and transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrated that pathogen infection increases formation of both intracellular MVBs and exosome-like paramural vesicles situated between the plasma membrane and the cell wall in a largely LIP5-dependent manner. These results indicate that the MVB pathway is positively regulated by pathogen-responsive MPK3/6 through LIP5 phosphorylation and plays a critical role in plant immune system likely through relocalization of defense-related molecules. PMID:25010425

  12. Epstein - Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 suppresses reporter activity through modulation of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encoded Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) has been shown to increase the expression of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) and the immunofluorescent intensity of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs). PML NBs have been implicated in the modulation of transcription and the association of reporter plasmids with PML NBs has been implicated in repression of reporter activity. Additionally, repression of various reporters in the presence of LMP1 has been noted. This study demonstrates that LMP1 suppresses expression of reporter activity in a dose responsive manner and corresponds with the LMP1 induced increase in PML NB intensity. Disruption of PML NBs with arsenic trioxide or a PML siRNA restores reporter activity. These data offer an explanation for previously conflicting data on LMP1 signaling and calls attention to the possibility of false-positives and false-negatives when using reporter assays as a research tool in cells expressing LMP1. PMID:21975125

  13. How the Body Position Can Influence High-resolution Manometry Results in the Study of Esophageal Dysphagia and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ciriza-de-los-Ríos, Constanza; Canga-Rodríguez-Valcárcel, Fernando; Lora-Pablos, David; De-La-Cruz-Bértolo, Javier; Castel-de-Lucas, Isabel; Castellano-Tortajada, Gregorio

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The body position can influence esophageal motility data obtained with high-resolution manometry (HRM). To examine whether the body position influences HRM diagnoses in patients with esophageal dysphagia and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Methods HRM (Manoscan) was performed in 99 patients in the sitting and supine positions; 49 had dysphagia and 50 had GERD assessed by 24-hour pH monitoring. HRM plots were analyzed according to the Chicago classification. Results HRM results varied in the final diagnoses of the esophageal body (EB) in patients with dysphagia (P = 0.024), the result being more distal spasm and weak peristalsis while sitting. In patients with GERD, the HRM diagnoses of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) morphology, and EB varied depending on the position; (P = 0.063, P = 0.017, P = 0.041 respectively). Hypotensive LES, EGJ type III (hiatal hernia), and weak peristalsis were more frequently identified in the sitting position. The reliability (kappa) of the position influencing HRM diagnoses was similar in dysphagia and GERD (“LES diagnosis”: dysphagia 0.32 [0.14–0.49] and GERD 0.31 [0.10–0.52], P = 0.960; “EB diagnosis”: dysphagia 0.49 [0.30–0.69] and GERD 0.39 [0.20–0.59], P = 0.480). The reliability in “EGJ morphology” studies was higher in dysphagia 0.81 (0.68–0.94) than in GERD 0.55 (0.37–0.73), P = 0.020. Conclusions HRM results varied according to the position in patients with dysphagia and GERD. Weak peristalsis was more frequently diagnosed while sitting in dysphagia and GERD. Hypotensive LES and EGJ type III (hiatal hernia) were also more frequently diagnosed in the sitting position in patients with GERD. PMID:26130633

  14. Angiotensin AT1 receptor-mediated excitation of rat carotid body chemoreceptor afferent activity.

    PubMed

    Allen, A M

    1998-08-01

    1. A high density of angiotensin II receptors was observed in the rat carotid body by in vitro autoradiography employing 125I-[Sar1, Ile8]-angiotensin II as radioligand. Displacement studies demonstrated that the receptors were of the AT1 subtype. 2. The binding pattern indicated that the AT1 receptors occurred over clumps of glomus cells, the principal chemoreceptor cell of the carotid body. Selective lesions of the sympathetic or afferent innervation of the carotid body had little effect on the density of receptor binding, demonstrating that the majority of AT1 receptors were intrinsic to the glomus cells. 3. To determine the direct effect of angiotensin II on chemoreceptor function, without the confounding effects of the vasoconstrictor action of angiotensin II, carotid sinus nerve activity was recorded from the isolated carotid body in vitro. The carotid body was superfused with Tyrode solution saturated with carbogen (95 % O2, 5 % CO2), maintained at 36 C, and multi-unit nerve activity recorded with a suction electrode. 4. Angiotensin II elicited a dose-dependent excitation of carotid sinus nerve activity (maximum increase of 36 +/- 11 % with 10 nM angiotensin II) with a threshold concentration of 1 nM. The response was blocked by the addition of an AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan (1 microM), but not by the addition of an AT2 receptor antagonist, PD123319 (1 microM). 5. In approximately 50 % of experiments the excitation was preceded by an inhibition of activity (maximum decrease of 24 +/- 8 % with 10 nM angiotensin II). This inhibitory response was markedly attenuated by losartan but not affected by PD123319. 6. These observations demonstrate that angiotensin II, acting through AT1 receptors located on glomus cells in the carotid body, can directly alter carotid chemoreceptor afferent activity. This provides a means whereby humoral information about fluid and electrolyte homeostasis might influence control of cardiorespiratory function. PMID:9660892

  15. Angiotensin AT1 receptor-mediated excitation of rat carotid body chemoreceptor afferent activity

    PubMed Central

    Allen, A M

    1998-01-01

    A high density of angiotensin II receptors was observed in the rat carotid body by in vitro autoradiography employing 125I-[Sar1,Ile8]-angiotensin II as radioligand. Displacement studies demonstrated that the receptors were of the AT1 subtype.The binding pattern indicated that the AT1 receptors occurred over clumps of glomus cells, the principal chemoreceptor cell of the carotid body. Selective lesions of the sympathetic or afferent innervation of the carotid body had little effect on the density of receptor binding, demonstrating that the majority of AT1 receptors were intrinsic to the glomus cells.To determine the direct effect of angiotensin II on chemoreceptor function, without the confounding effects of the vasoconstrictor action of angiotensin II, carotid sinus nerve activity was recorded from the isolated carotid body in vitro. The carotid body was superfused with Tyrode solution saturated with carbogen (95% O2, 5% CO2), maintained at 36 °C, and multi-unit nerve activity recorded with a suction electrode.Angiotensin II elicited a dose-dependent excitation of carotid sinus nerve activity (maximum increase of 36 ± 11% with 10 nm angiotensin II) with a threshold concentration of 1 nm. The response was blocked by the addition of an AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan (1 μm), but not by the addition of an AT2 receptor antagonist, PD123319 (1 μm).In approximately 50% of experiments the excitation was preceded by an inhibition of activity (maximum decrease of 24 ± 8% with 10 nm angiotensin II). This inhibitory response was markedly attenuated by losartan but not affected by PD123319.These observations demonstrate that angiotensin II, acting through AT1 receptors located on glomus cells in the carotid body, can directly alter carotid chemoreceptor afferent activity. This provides a means whereby humoral information about fluid and electrolyte homeostasis might influence control of cardiorespiratory function. PMID:9660892

  16. Position and velocity sensitivities at the triangular libration points in the restricted problem of three bodies when the bigger primary is an oblate body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. R.; Antia, H. M.; Bhatnagar, K. B.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we have examined the stability of triangular libration points in the restricted problem of three bodies when the bigger primary is an oblate spheroid. Here we followed the time limit and computational process of Tuckness (Celest. Mech. Dyn. Mech. 61, 1-19, 1995) on the stability criteria given by McKenzie and Szebehely (Celest. Mech. 23, 223-229, 1981). In this study it was found that in comparison to other studies the value of the critical mass μ c has been reduced due to oblateness of the bigger primary, i.e. the range of stability of the equilateral triangular libration points reduced with the increase of the oblateness parameter I and hence the order of commensurability was increased.

  17. The effect of music video clips on adolescent boys' body image, mood, and schema activation.

    PubMed

    Mulgrew, Kate E; Volcevski-Kostas, Diana; Rendell, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    There is limited research that has examined experimentally the effects of muscular images on adolescent boys' body image, with no research specifically examining the effects of music television. The aim of the current study was to examine the effects of viewing muscular and attractive singers in music video clips on early, mid, and late adolescent boys' body image, mood, and schema activation. Participants were 180 boys in grade 7 (mean age = 12.73 years), grade 9 (mean age = 14.40 years) or grade 11 (mean age = 16.15 years) who completed pre- and post-test measures of mood and body satisfaction after viewing music videos containing male singers of muscular or average appearance. They also completed measures of schema activation and social comparison after viewing the clips. The results showed that the boys who viewed the muscular clips reported poorer upper body satisfaction, lower appearance satisfaction, lower happiness, and more depressive feelings compared to boys who viewed the clips depicting singers of average appearance. There was no evidence of increased appearance schema activation but the boys who viewed the muscular clips did report higher levels of social comparison to the singers. The results suggest that music video clips are a powerful form of media in conveying information about the male ideal body shape and that negative effects are found in boys as young as 12 years. PMID:23443315

  18. Calibration of the Brookhaven National Laboratory delayed gamma neutron activation facility to measure total body calcium.

    PubMed

    Ma, R; Stamatelatos, I E; Yasumura, S

    2000-05-01

    Differences in body size and shape can cause large variances in the in vivo results of neutron activation analysis. To introduce corrections for body size for the delayed gamma neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, "reference man"-sized and "reference woman"-sized phantoms were constructed. Simulation results using the Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport code also provided correction factors for people of different sizes. For individuals with a body mass index (BMI = weight (kg)/height (m)2) between 20 and 30, no correction was required. At BMIs greater than 30, the effects of neutron attenuation were significant and a correction factor of CF = -0.0192 x BMI + 1.5635 can be applied. PMID:10865727

  19. Excerpts from "Position Statement on Physical Fitness and Activity in the Context of Leisure Education."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruskin, Hilleil

    2002-01-01

    Presents a position statement designed to inform governments, non-governmental organizations, and education institutions about the significance and benefits of physical activity for all and establish a clear relationship between physical activity and leisure education. The statement includes specific recommendations for leisure education and…

  20. Positive Behavior Interventions and Support in a Physical Activity Summer Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Vanessa; Buchanan, Alice M.

    2015-01-01

    This purpose of this study was to investigate the implementation of positive behavior interventions and support (PBIS) in a summer camp. The camp provided physical activity opportunities to underserved children attending a summer program at a local, rural public school. Certified physical education teachers led activity stations. Participants in…

  1. Physical Activity and Psychological Benefits. International Society of Sport Psychology Position Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1992

    1992-01-01

    International Society of Sport Psychology clarifies the psychological benefits of physical activity, noting the positive relationship between physical activity level and mental health. Exercise can reduce anxiety, decrease depression levels, reduce neuroticism and anxiety, reduce stress, and have beneficial emotional effects for both sexes across…

  2. Alignment of Hands-On STEM Engagement Activities with Positive STEM Dispositions in Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-01-01

    This study examines positive dispositions reported by middle school and high school students participating in programs that feature STEM-related activities. Middle school students participating in school-to-home hands-on energy monitoring activities are compared to middle school and high school students in a different project taking part in…

  3. Body composition modifications in people with chronic spinal cord injury after supervised physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Frederico Ribeiro; Lopes, Guilherme Henrique

    2011-01-01

    Background Quantification of body composition variables is important for planning of better activities in relation to individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Objectives (1) To evaluate changes in body composition in patients with SCI after a supervised physical activity process; (2) To correlate total body fat with time since injury. Design Pre-post intervention. Setting Sarah Rehabilitation Hospital Network, Brazil. Participants Fifty-three men with SCI aged 18–52 years with duration of injury >3 years. Interventions The subjects were divided into three groups: tetraplegia (TT) (C5–C8), high paraplegia (HP) (T1–T6), and low paraplegia (LP) (T7–L2). Body composition was estimated in the first and last weeks of hospitalization. Outcome measures Body weight (kg), skinfolds sum (mm), absolute (kg), and relative (%) fat and lean body mass. Results Body weight increased in TT and decreased in HP (0.8 kg, 95%CI 0.1–1.5; and −1.0 kg, 95%CI −2.0 to 0.0, respectively; P < 0.05). Skinfolds sum decreased only in HP (−13.1 mm, 95%CI −20.7 to −5.5; P < 0.05). Absolute and relative body fat decreased significantly in the paraplegia groups. Lean body mass (LBM) percentage increased significantly in the paraplegia groups. Absolute LBM increased in TT and LP (0.8 kg, 95%CI 0.3–1.3; and 1.3 kg, 95%CI 0.8 to 1.8, respectively; P < 0.05). There was no correlation between time since injury and skinfolds sum for the three groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion TT, HP, and LP demonstrated favorable changes in body composition after 29 days of supervised physical activity. However, these changes were different in direction and magnitude. PMID:22330114

  4. Study of the counting efficiency of a WBC setup by using a computational 3D human body library in sitting position based on polygonal mesh surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, T C Ferreira; Bogaerts, R; Lebacq, A L; Mihailescu, C L; Vanhavere, F

    2014-04-01

    A realistic computational 3D human body library, called MaMP and FeMP (Male and Female Mesh Phantoms), based on polygonal mesh surface geometry, has been created to be used for numerical calibration of the whole body counter (WBC) system of the nuclear power plant (NPP) in Doel, Belgium. The main objective was to create flexible computational models varying in gender, body height, and mass for studying the morphology-induced variation of the detector counting efficiency (CE) and reducing the measurement uncertainties. First, the counting room and an HPGe detector were modeled using MCNPX (Monte Carlo radiation transport code). The validation of the model was carried out for different sample-detector geometries with point sources and a physical phantom. Second, CE values were calculated for a total of 36 different mesh phantoms in a seated position using the validated Monte Carlo model. This paper reports on the validation process of the in vivo whole body system and the CE calculated for different body heights and weights. The results reveal that the CE is strongly dependent on the individual body shape, size, and gender and may vary by a factor of 1.5 to 3 depending on the morphology aspects of the individual to be measured. PMID:24562069

  5. Photogrammetric and Global Positioning System Measurements of Active Pahoehoe Lava Lobe Emplacement on Kilauea, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Christopher W.; Glaze, Lori S.; James, Mike R.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Fagents, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    Basalt is the most common rock type on the surface of terrestrial bodies throughout the solar system and -- by total volume and areal coverage -- pahoehoe flows are the most abundant form of basaltic lava in subaerial and submarine environments on Earth. A detailed understanding of pahoehoe emplacement processes is necessary for developing accurate models of flow field development, assessing hazards associated with active lava flows, and interpreting the significance of lava flow morphology on Earth and other planetary bodies. Here, we examine the active emplacement of pahoehoe lobes along the margins of the Hook Flow from Pu'u 'O'o on Kilauea, Hawaii. Topographic data were acquired between 21 and 23 February 2006 using stereo-imaging and differential global positing system (DGPS) measurements. During this time, the average discharge rate for the Hook Flow was 0.01-0.05 cubic m/s. Using stereogrammetric point clouds and interpolated digital terrain models (DTMs), active flow fronts were digitized at 1 minute intervals. These areal spreading maps show that the lava lobe grew by a series of breakouts tha t broadly fit into two categories: narrow (0.2-0.6 m-wide) toes that grew preferentially down-slope, and broad (1.4-3.5 m-wide) breakouts that formed along the sides of the lobe, nearly perpendicular to the down-flow axis. These lobes inflated to half of their final thickness within approx 5 minutes, with a rate of inflation that generally deceased with time. Through a combination of down-slope and cross-slope breakouts, lobes developed a parabolic cross-sectional shape within tens of minutes. We also observed that while the average local discharge rate for the lobe was generally constant at 0.0064 +/- 0.0019 cubic m/s, there was a 2 to 6 fold increase in the areal coverage rate every 4.1 +/- 0.6 minutes. We attribute this periodicity to the time required for the dynamic pressurization of the liquid core of the lava lobe to exceed the cooling-induced strength of the

  6. Transmission of whole-body vibration and its effect on muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Tankisheva, Ekaterina; Jonkers, Ilse; Boonen, Steven; Delecluse, Christophe; van Lenthe, G Harry; Druyts, Hans L J; Spaepen, Pieter; Verschueren, Sabine M P

    2013-09-01

    The aim of current study was to measure the transmission of whole-body vibration through the entire body and to relate this to body posture and induced muscular activation. Eight clinically healthy subjects performed 3 static body postures-high squat (135°), deep squat (110°), and erect stance, whereas vibration transmission was assessed over a wide range of accelerations (from 0.33 to 7.98 g) and frequencies (from 30 to 50 Hz). To assess the vibration transmission, 9 triaxial accelerometers were attached from the ankle up to the head and the root mean square of acceleration signal of each site-specific body point was calculated. Additionally, muscle activity from 7 lower limb muscles was recorded. The results showed a significant attenuation of the platform accelerations transmitted from the feet to the head. Compared with erect stance, knee bent posture significantly diminished vibration transmission at the hip, spine, and the head (p < 0.05). Vibration transmission to the spine was significantly lower in deep vs. high squat (p < 0.05), suggesting that further knee bending may reduce the risk of overloading the spine. Vibration increased the muscle activity in most leg and hip muscles during both squat postures, although, on average, no clear dose-response relationship between the acceleration and/or frequency and muscle response was found. The muscular activation of vastus medialis and rectus femoris showed clear negative correlation to the vibration transmission at the sternum. The specific vibration parameters used in the present study can be considered as safe and suitable for a training program. Moreover, the present results contribute to optimize the most advantageous whole-body vibration protocol and to determine the beneficial effects on muscle and bone. PMID:23222086

  7. Developmental Coordination Disorder, Gender, and Body Weight: Examining the Impact of Participation in Active Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairney, John; Kwan, Matthew Y. W.; Hay, John A.; Faught, Brent E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To examine whether differences in participation in active play (PAP) can account for gender differences in the relationship between Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) and body weight/fat (BMI and percentage fat) in youth. Methods: A cross-sectional investigation of students in grades four through eight (n = 590). Height, weight…

  8. Physical Activity, Body Composition, and Perceived Quality of Life of Adults with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook, Elizabeth A.; Caputo, Jennifer L.; Perry, Tara L.; Fuller, Dana K.; Morgan, Don W.

    2009-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the health and fitness of adults with visual impairments. This article documents the physical activity levels and body-composition profiles of young and middle-aged adults with visual impairments and addresses the concomitant effects of these factors on perceived quality of life. (Contains 2 tables.)

  9. Effect of swimming activity on relative weight and body composition of juvenile rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpkins, D.G.; Hubert, W.A.; Del Rio, C.M.; Rule, D.C.

    2003-01-01

    Fisheries managers often assess body condition using relative weight (Wr) because it provides a comparative measure of fish plumpness among individuals and populations. However, it is not known whether the morphological information that Wr summarizes reflects physiological measures, such as relative lipid reserves, in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. The purpose of this study was to determine whether swimming activity affects either the Wr or proximate body composition of juvenile (total length, 170-260 mm) rainbow trout. When rainbow trout from a hatchery were fed ad libitum for 147 d, inactive (no current) and active (15 cm/s current velocity) fish did not differ in Wr However, inactive rainbow trout maintained relatively constant lipid levels, whereas active fish declined in lipid content. Relative weight may provide a comparable measure of body form, but it is not an accurate index of lipid content between active and inactive rainbow trout fed an excess ration. For assessing the physiological condition of rainbow trout, measurement of proximate body composition appears to be more accurate than indices based on length and weight.

  10. Creatine Kinase Activity Weakly Correlates to Volume Completed Following Upper Body Resistance Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Marco; Willardson, Jeffrey M.; Silva, Dailson P.; Frigulha, Italo C.; Koch, Alexander J.; Souza, Sergio C.

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the relationship between serum creatine kinase (CK) activity following upper body resistance exercise with a 1- or 3-min rest between sets. Twenty men performed two sessions, each consisting of four sets with a 10-repetition maximum load. The results demonstrated significantly greater volume for the 3-min…

  11. Links between Adolescent Physical Activity, Body Mass Index, and Adolescent and Parent Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Susan Lee; Mummery, W. Kerry

    2011-01-01

    Identification of the relationships between adolescent overweight and obesity and physical activity and a range of intrapersonal and interpersonal factors is necessary to develop relevant interventions which target the health needs of adolescents. This study examined adolescent body mass index (BMI) and participation in moderate and vigorous…

  12. Carbonates and sulfates in CI chondrites - Formation by aqueous activity on the parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredriksson, Kurt; Kerridge, John F.

    1988-01-01

    Compositions and morphologies of dolomites, breunnerites, Ca-carbonates, Ca-sulfates and Mg, Ni, Na-sulfates, and their petrologic interrelations, in four CI chondrites are consistent with their having been formed by aqueous activity on the CI parent body. Radiochronometric data indicate that this activity took place very early in solar-system history. No evidence for original ('primitive') condensates seems to be present. However, alteration apparently took place without change in bulk meteorite composition.

  13. Time course of lipolytic activity and lipid peroxidation after whole-body gamma irradiation of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rejholcova, M.; Wilhelm, J.

    1989-01-01

    The content of fluorescing products of lipid peroxidation (LFP) and hormone-stimulated lipolytic activity were determined in rat epididymal adipose tissue during a 29-day interval after whole-body gamma irradiation. An increase in LFP was accompanied by a decrease in lipolytic activity. It is suggested that these effects are interrelated and that the decrease in lipolysis in irradiated, semi fasting rats is an additional deteriorating factor leading to death in some animals.

  14. "Pulling telescoped phantoms out of the stump": manipulating the perceived position of phantom limbs using a full-body illusion.

    PubMed

    Schmalzl, Laura; Thomke, Erik; Ragnö, Christina; Nilseryd, Maria; Stockselius, Anita; Ehrsson, H Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Most amputees experience phantom limbs, or the sensation that their amputated limb is still attached to the body. Phantom limbs can be perceived in the location previously occupied by the intact limb, or they can gradually retract inside the stump, a phenomenon referred to as "telescoping".  Telescoping is relevant from a clinical point of view, as it tends to be related to increased levels of phantom pain. In the current study we demonstrate how a full-body illusion can be used to temporarily revoke telescoping sensations in upper limb amputees. During this illusion participants view the body of a mannequin from a first person perspective while being subjected to synchronized visuo-tactile stimulation through stroking, which makes them experience the mannequin's body as their own. In Experiment 1 we used an intact mannequin, and showed that amputees can experience ownership of an intact body as well as referral of touch from both hands of the mannequin. In Experiment 2 and 3 we used an amputated mannequin, and demonstrated that depending on the spatial location of the strokes applied to the mannequin, participants experienced their phantom hand to either remain telescoped, or to actually be located below the stump. The effects were supported by subjective data from questionnaires, as well as verbal reports of the perceived location of the phantom hand in a visual judgment task. These findings are of particular interest, as they show that the temporary revoking of telescoping sensations does not necessarily have to involve the visualization of an intact hand or illusory movement of the phantom (as in the rubber hand illusion or mirror visual feedback therapy), but that it can also be obtained through mere referral of touch from the stump to the spatial location corresponding to that previously occupied by the intact hand. Moreover, our study also provides preliminary evidence for the fact that these manipulations can have an effect on phantom pain sensations

  15. Positive Auto-Antibody Activity With Retina and Optic Nerve in Smokers and Non-Smokers: The Controversy Continues.

    PubMed

    Chin, Eric K; Almeida, David R P; Lam, Khoa V; Keltner, John L; Thirkill, Charles E

    2015-01-01

    Auto-antibodies assist with the diagnosis of ocular paraneoplastic syndromes and autoimmune ocular conditions; however, the frequency of positive test results as a possible precursor to future disease is unknown. The frequency of positive antibodies in heavy smokers who may be at risk for autoimmune-related retinopathy and optic neuropathy was evaluated. Serum antibody activity was evaluated through the use of Western blot reactions from pig retina and optic nerve extract. Fifty-one patients were included: 35 patients were smokers (average: 40.9 pack-year history) and 26 patients had no past smoking history. None of the patients had any visual complaints or known eye disease. Of the patients studied, 76.5% (39 patients: 18 smokers, 21 non-smokers) had positive antiretinal antibodies, and 19.6% (10 patients: 3 smokers, 7 non-smokers) had positive antioptic nerve antibodies. Anti-retinal antibodies were seen in a majority of randomly selected patients with and without a past smoking history. Anti-optic nerve bodies were less common, but more prevalent in those who never smoked. The specificity of these antibodies remains greatly uncertain and clinical correlation is warranted. PMID:26599255

  16. Analysis of neck muscle activity and comparison of head movement and body movement during rotational motion.

    PubMed

    Sirikantharajah, Shahini; Valter McConville, Kristiina M; Zolfaghari, Nika

    2015-08-01

    The neck is a very delicate part of the body that is highly prone to whiplash injuries, during jerk. A lot of the research relating to whiplash injuries performed to date has been tested in environments with linear motions and have mostly applied their work to car collisions. Whiplash injuries can also affect disabled individuals during falls, bed transfers, and while travelling in wheelchairs. The primary objective of this paper was to focus on neck and body behaviour during rotational motion, rather than linear motion which has been often associated with car collisions. This paper takes the current motion signal processing technique a step further by computing the differential between head and body motion. Neck electromyogram (EMG) and angular velocity data of the head and body were acquired simultaneously from 20 subjects, as they were rotated 45 degrees in the forward pitch plane, with and without visual input, in a motion simulator. The centre of rotation (COR) on the simulator was located behind the subject Results showed that neck muscle behaviour was affected by the forward rotations, as well as visual input. Anterior neck muscles were most active during forward rotations and trials including VR. Maximum effective muscle power and activity of 10.54% and 55.72 (mV/mV)·s were reached respectively. Furthermore, during forward rotations the motion profiles started off with dominance in body motion, followed by dominance in head motion. PMID:26737049

  17. Inhibition of mammillary body neurons by direct activation of Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    The mammillary body is an important neural component of limbic circuitry implicated in learning and memory. Excitatory and inhibitory inputs, primarily mediated by glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), respectively, converge and integrate in this region, before sending information to the thalamus. One potentially overlooked mechanism for inhibition of mammillary body neurons is through direct activation of Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Here, whole-cell patch clamp recordings of in vitro slice preparations containing the mammillary body nuclei of the mouse were employed to record responses to bath application of pharmacological agents to isolate the direct effect of activating Group II mGluRs. Application of the Group II mGluR specific agonist, APDC, resulted in a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential in mammillary body neurons, likely resulting from the opening of a potassium conductance. These data suggest that glutamatergic inputs to the mammillary body may be attenuated via Group II mGluRs and implicates a functional role for these receptors in memory-related circuits and broadly throughout the central nervous system. PMID:27390777

  18. Adaptability and Prediction of Anticipatory Muscular Activity Parameters to Different Movements in the Sitting Position.

    PubMed

    Chikh, Soufien; Watelain, Eric; Faupin, Arnaud; Pinti, Antonio; Jarraya, Mohamed; Garnier, Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Voluntary movement often causes postural perturbation that requires an anticipatory postural adjustment to minimize perturbation and increase the efficiency and coordination during execution. This systematic review focuses specifically on the relationship between the parameters of anticipatory muscular activities and movement finality in sitting position among adults, to study the adaptability and predictability of anticipatory muscular activities parameters to different movements and conditions in sitting position in adults. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Springer-Link, Engineering Village, and EbscoHost. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to retain the most rigorous and specific studies, yielding 76 articles, Seventeen articles were excluded at first reading, and after the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 23 were retained. In a sitting position, central nervous system activity precedes movement by diverse anticipatory muscular activities and shows the ability to adapt anticipatory muscular activity parameters to the movement direction, postural stability, or charge weight. In addition, these parameters could be adapted to the speed of execution, as found for the standing position. Parameters of anticipatory muscular activities (duration, order, and amplitude of muscle contractions constituting the anticipatory muscular activity) could be used as a predictive indicator of forthcoming movement. In addition, this systematic review may improve methodology in empirical studies and assistive technology for people with disabilities. PMID:27440765

  19. Many-body microhydrodynamics of colloidal particles with active boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajesh; Ghose, Somdeb; Adhikari, R.

    2015-06-01

    Colloidal particles with active boundary layers—regions surrounding the particles where non-equilibrium processes produce large velocity gradients—are common in many physical, chemical and biological contexts. The velocity or stress at the edge of the boundary layer determines the exterior fluid flow and, hence, the many-body interparticle hydrodynamic interaction. Here, we present a method to compute the many-body hydrodynamic interaction between N spherical active particles induced by their exterior microhydrodynamic flow. First, we use a boundary integral representation of the Stokes equation to eliminate bulk fluid degrees of freedom. Then, we expand the boundary velocities and tractions of the integral representation in an infinite-dimensional basis of tensorial spherical harmonics and, on enforcing boundary conditions in a weak sense on the surface of each particle, obtain a system of linear algebraic equations for the unknown expansion coefficients. The truncation of the infinite series, fixed by the degree of accuracy required, yields a finite linear system that can be solved accurately and efficiently by iterative methods. The solution linearly relates the unknown rigid body motion to the known values of the expansion coefficients, motivating the introduction of propulsion matrices. These matrices completely characterize hydrodynamic interactions in active suspensions just as mobility matrices completely characterize hydrodynamic interactions in passive suspensions. The reduction in the dimensionality of the problem, from a three-dimensional partial differential equation to a two-dimensional integral equation, allows for dynamic simulations of hundreds of thousands of active particles on multi-core computational architectures. In our simulation of 104 active colloidal particle in a harmonic trap, we find that the necessary and sufficient ingredients to obtain steady-state convective currents, the so-called ‘self-assembled pump’, are (a) one-body

  20. Alignment of Hands-on STEM Engagement Activities with Positive STEM Dispositions in Secondary School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-12-01

    This study examines positive dispositions reported by middle school and high school students participating in programs that feature STEM-related activities. Middle school students participating in school-to-home hands-on energy monitoring activities are compared to middle school and high school students in a different project taking part in activities such as an after-school robotics program. Both groups are compared and contrasted with a third group of high school students admitted at the eleventh grade to an academy of mathematics and science. All students were assessed using the same science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) dispositions instrument. Findings indicate that the after-school group whose participants self-selected STEM engagement activities, and the self-selected academy of mathematics and science group, each had highly positive STEM dispositions comparable to those of STEM professionals, while a subset of the middle school whole-classroom energy monitoring group that reported high interest in STEM as a career, also possessed highly positive STEM dispositions comparable to the STEM Professionals group. The authors conclude that several different kinds of hands-on STEM engagement activities are likely to foster or maintain positive STEM dispositions at the middle school and high school levels, and that these highly positive levels of dispositions can be viewed as a target toward which projects seeking to interest mainstream secondary students in STEM majors in college and STEM careers, can hope to aspire. Gender findings regarding STEM dispositions are also reported for these groups.

  1. Body Position Modulates Gastric Emptying and Affects the Post-Prandial Rise in Plasma Amino Acid Concentrations Following Protein Ingestion in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Holwerda, Andrew M.; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Bierau, Jörgen; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein digestion and amino acid absorption kinetics determine the post-prandial muscle protein synthetic response. Body position may affect gastrointestinal function and modulate the post-prandial rise in plasma amino acid availability. We aimed to assess the impact of body position on gastric emptying rate and the post-prandial rise in plasma amino acid concentrations following ingestion of a single, meal-like amount of protein. In a randomized, cross-over design, eight healthy males (25 ± 2 years, 23.9 ± 0.8 kg·m−2) ingested 22 g protein and 1.5 g paracetamol (acetaminophen) in an upright seated position (control) and in a −20° head-down tilted position (inversion). Blood samples were collected during a 240-min post-prandial period and analyzed for paracetamol and plasma amino acid concentrations to assess gastric emptying rate and post-prandial amino acid availability, respectively. Peak plasma leucine concentrations were lower in the inversion compared with the control treatment (177 ± 15 vs. 236 ± 15 mmol·L−1, p < 0.05), which was accompanied by a lower plasma essential amino acid (EAA) response over 240 min (31,956 ± 6441 vs. 50,351 ± 4015 AU; p < 0.05). Peak plasma paracetamol concentrations were lower in the inversion vs. control treatment (5.8 ± 1.1 vs. 10.0 ± 0.6 mg·L−1, p < 0.05). Gastric emptying rate and post-prandial plasma amino acid availability are significantly decreased after protein ingestion in a head-down tilted position. Therefore, upright body positioning should be considered when aiming to augment post-prandial muscle protein accretion in both health and disease. PMID:27089362

  2. The effects of whole-body vibration exercise on isokinetic muscular function of the knee and jump performance depending on squatting position

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeyuong; Park, Yunjin; Seo, Yonggon; Kang, Gyumin; Park, Sangseo; Cho, Hyeyoung; Moon, Hyunghoon; Kim, Myungki; Yu, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of whole-body vibration exercise (WBVE) on isokinetic muscular function of the knee and jump performance depending on different squatting positions. [Subjects] The subjects were 12 healthy adult men who did not exercise regularly between the ages of 27 and 34. [Methods] WBVE was performed with high squat position (SP), middle SP, and low SP. Before and after the intervention, isokinetic muscular function of the knees and jump performance were measured. [Results] Knee flexion peak torque at 60°/s and total work at 180°/s were significantly increased after implementing WBVE. Jump height also significantly increased after completing the exercise at all positions in comparison with the pre-exercise programs. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that SP during WBVE is an important factor stimulating positive effects on muscular function. PMID:26957749

  3. The effects of whole-body vibration exercise on isokinetic muscular function of the knee and jump performance depending on squatting position.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaeyuong; Park, Yunjin; Seo, Yonggon; Kang, Gyumin; Park, Sangseo; Cho, Hyeyoung; Moon, Hyunghoon; Kim, Myungki; Yu, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of whole-body vibration exercise (WBVE) on isokinetic muscular function of the knee and jump performance depending on different squatting positions. [Subjects] The subjects were 12 healthy adult men who did not exercise regularly between the ages of 27 and 34. [Methods] WBVE was performed with high squat position (SP), middle SP, and low SP. Before and after the intervention, isokinetic muscular function of the knees and jump performance were measured. [Results] Knee flexion peak torque at 60°/s and total work at 180°/s were significantly increased after implementing WBVE. Jump height also significantly increased after completing the exercise at all positions in comparison with the pre-exercise programs. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that SP during WBVE is an important factor stimulating positive effects on muscular function. PMID:26957749

  4. Cardiovascular, renal, electrolyte, and hormonal changes in man during gravitational stress, weightlessness, and simulated weightlessness: Lower body positive pressure applied by the antigravity suit. Thesis - Oslo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kravik, Stein E.

    1989-01-01

    Because of their erect posture, humans are more vulnerable to gravitational changes than any other animal. During standing or walking man must constantly use his antigravity muscles and his two columns, his legs, to balance against the force of gravity. At the same time, blood is surging downward to the dependent portions of the body, draining blood away from the brain and heart, and requiring a series of complex cardiovascular adjustments to maintain the human in a bipedal position. It was not until 12 April 1961, when Yuri Gagarin became the first human being to orbit Earth, that we could confirm man's ability to maintain vital functions in space -- at least for 90 min. Nevertheless, man's adaptation to weightlessness entails the deconditioning of various organs in the body. Muscles atrophy, and calcium loss leads to loss of bone strength as the demands on the musculoskeletal system are almost nonexistent in weightlessness. Because of the lack of hydrostatic pressures in space, blood rushes to the upper portions of the body, initiating a complex series of cardioregulatory responses. Deconditioning during spaceflight, however, first becomes a potentially serious problem in humans returning to Earth, when the cardiovascular system, muscles and bones are suddenly exposed to the demanding counterforce of gravity -- weight. One of the main purposes of our studies was to test the feasibility of using Lower Body Positive Pressure, applied with an antigravity suit, as a new and alternative technique to bed rest and water immersion for studying cardioregulatory, renal, electrolyte, and hormonal changes in humans. The results suggest that Lower Body Positive Pressure can be used as an analog of microgravity-induced physiological responses in humans.

  5. "BodyWorks": A Parent-Focused Program to Promote Healthful Eating and Physical Activity for Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Valerie Melino; Labiner-Wolfe, Judith; Blake, Susan M.; Marr, Amanda; Rowe, Jonelle; Wasserman, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The "BodyWorks" program was designed to help parents improve family eating and activity behaviors. "BodyWorks" was associated with significant gains in parents' knowledge about nutrition and activity, and greater self-efficacy to set family nutrition goals, plan physical activities, and change eating habits. (Contains 1 table.)

  6. Everybody Has a Body: Science from Head to Toe. Activities Book for Teachers of Children Ages 3-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockwell, Robert E.; And Others

    This science activity book contains age-appropriate activities that will enable children ages 3-6 to explore one of the first environments they encounter, their own body. The knowledge gained in these activities can be interspersed with pre-science skills, health information, literature, self-concept development, and body awareness. Each chapter…

  7. Estimating Am-241 activity in the body: comparison of direct measurements and radiochemical analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Timothy P.; Tolmachev, Sergei Y.; James, Anthony C.

    2009-06-01

    The assessment of dose and ultimately the health risk from intakes of radioactive materials begins with estimating the amount actually taken into the body. An accurate estimate provides the basis to best assess the distribution in the body, the resulting dose, and ultimately the health risk. This study continues the time-honored practice of evaluating the accuracy of results obtained using in vivo measurement methods and techniques. Results from the radiochemical analyses of the 241Am activity content of tissues and organs from four donors to the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries were compared to the results from direct measurements of radioactive material in the body performed in vivo and post mortem. Two were whole body donations and two were partial body donations The skeleton was the organ with the highest deposition of 241Am activity in all four cases. The activities ranged from 30 Bq to 300 Bq. The skeletal estimates obtained from measurements over the forehead were within 20% of the radiochemistry results in three cases and differed by 78% in one case. The 241Am lung activity estimates ranged from 1 Bq to 30 Bq in the four cases. The results from the direct measurements were within 40% of the radiochemistry results in 3 cases and within a factor of 3 for the other case. The direct measurement estimates of liver activity ranged from 2 Bq to 60 Bq and were generally lower than the radiochemistry results. The results from this study suggest that the measurement methods and calibration techniques used at the In Vivo Radiobioassay and Research Facility to quantify the activity in the lungs, skeleton and liver are reasonable under the most challenging conditions where there is 241Am activity in multiple organs. These methods and techniques are comparable to those used at other Department of Energy sites. This suggests that the current in vivo methods and calibration techniques provide reasonable estimates of radioactive material in the body. Not

  8. Activities of DNA base excision repair enzymes in liver and brain correlate with body mass, but not lifespan.

    PubMed

    Page, Melissa M; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2012-10-01

    Accumulation of DNA lesions compromises replication and transcription and is thus toxic to cells. DNA repair deficiencies are generally associated with cellular replicative senescence and premature aging syndromes, suggesting that efficient DNA repair is required for normal longevity. It follows that the evolution of increasing lifespan amongst animal species should be associated with enhanced DNA repair capacities. Although UV damage repair has been shown to correlate positively with mammalian species lifespan, we lack similar insight into many other DNA repair pathways, including base excision repair (BER). DNA is continuously exposed to reactive oxygen species produced during aerobic metabolism, resulting in the occurrence of oxidative damage within DNA. Short-patch BER plays an important role in repairing the resultant oxidative lesions. We therefore tested whether an enhancement of BER enzyme activities has occurred concomitantly with the evolution of increased maximum lifespan (MLSP). We collected brain and liver tissue from 15 vertebrate endotherm species ranging in MLSP over an order of magnitude. We measured apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease activity, as well as the rates of nucleotide incorporation into an oligonucleotide containing a single nucleotide gap (catalyzed by BER polymerase β) and subsequent ligation of the oligonucleotide. None of these activities correlated positively with species MLSP. Rather, nucleotide incorporation and oligonucleotide ligation activities appeared to be primarily (and negatively) correlated with species body mass. PMID:21853261

  9. Active bodies in the near-Earth region: The tenuous boundary between comets and asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Julio Angel; Sosa, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the different degrees of activity observed in bodies approaching the Earth in short-period orbits (P < 20 yr): near-Earth Jupiter family comets (NEJFCs) and near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). In the general definiton, comets are "active", i.e. they show some coma, while asteroids are "inactive", i.e. they only show a bare nucleus, and this physical criterion applies in particular to our target populations. Besides the activity, NEJFCs are distinguished from NEAs by their dynamical evolution: NEJFCs move on unstable orbits subject to frequent close encounters with Jupiter, whereas NEAs orbits are much more stable and tend to avoid close encounters with Jupiter. However, some JFCs are found to move on stable, asteroidal-type orbits, so the question arises if these objects are asteroids that have become active, perhaps upon approach to the Sun. On the other hand, some seemingly inert NEAs move on unstable, comet-type orbits, so the question about what is a comet and what is an asteroid has become increasingly complex. A further question is if this activity corresponds to the sublimation of water ice or other volatiles, or if it is due to dust emission by some other physical processes. The aim of this presentation is to discuss the different degrees of activity observed in near-Earth objects, which we represent through an equivalent "fraction of active surface area" f. We find a wide range of fractions f for bodies in the near-Earth region, going from f=0 for an "asteroid" to a few tenths for an active JFC. We will also analyze how the observed activity or lack of activity, that defines a comet and an asteroid respectively, correlates with the orbital history of the body, and focus on some interesting cases of near-Earth objects.

  10. In vivo Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility for Total Body Nitrogen and Cd

    SciTech Connect

    Munive, Marco; Revilla, Angel; Solis, Jose L.

    2007-10-26

    A Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system has been designed and constructed to measure the total body nitrogen and Cd for in vivo studies. An aqueous solution of KNO{sub 3} was used as phantom for system calibration. The facility has been used to monitor total body nitrogen (TBN) of mice and found that is related to their diet. Some mice swallowed diluted water with Cl{sub 2}Cd, and the presence of Cd was detected in the animals. The minimum Cd concentration that the system can detect was 20 ppm.

  11. Machine Learning Methods for Classifying Human Physical Activity from On-Body Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Mannini, Andrea; Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2010-01-01

    The use of on-body wearable sensors is widespread in several academic and industrial domains. Of great interest are their applications in ambulatory monitoring and pervasive computing systems; here, some quantitative analysis of human motion and its automatic classification are the main computational tasks to be pursued. In this paper, we discuss how human physical activity can be classified using on-body accelerometers, with a major emphasis devoted to the computational algorithms employed for this purpose. In particular, we motivate our current interest for classifiers based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). An example is illustrated and discussed by analysing a dataset of accelerometer time series. PMID:22205862

  12. Unusual False Positive Radioiodine Uptake on 131I Whole Body Scintigraphy in Three Unrelated Organs with Different Pathologies in Patients of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Rohit; Pawar, Shwetal; Mahajan, Abhishek; Basu, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    Three cases with unusual false positive radioiodine uptake in three different organs and pathologies (infective old fibrotic lesion in the lung, simple liver cyst, and benign breast lesion) on iodine-131 (131I) whole body scintigraphy. Clinicoradiological correlation was undertaken in all three cases and the pathologies were ascertained. In all the three cases, single-photon emission computerized tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) and ancillary imaging modalities were employed and were helpful in arriving at the final diagnosis. PMID:27134566

  13. Associations of body fat and its distribution with dietary intake, physical activity, alcohol, and smoking in blacks and whites.

    PubMed

    Slattery, M L; McDonald, A; Bild, D E; Caan, B J; Hilner, J E; Jacobs, D R; Liu, K

    1992-05-01

    Cross-sectional associations between body fat and its distribution and environmental factors influencing energy balance were examined in 5115 young adults. Protein was directly associated with body mass index (BMI) in all race and sex groups (P less than 0.01) after age, education, cigarette-smoking status, alcohol intake, and physical activity were adjusted for. Carbohydrate intake was inversely associated with BMI in males (P = 0.02). Total physical activity was inversely associated with BMI in white women and with skinfold-thickness measures (P less than 0.01) in all groups. Waist-to-hip-circumference ratio (WHCR) was positively associated with total kilojoules (kilocalories) in women, inversely associated with percent of kilojoules (kilocalories) from carbohydrates in whites, grams of crude fiber/4184 kJ (1000 kcal) (except in black men), and physical activity (except in white women). WHCR was directly associated with cigarette smoking except in black men, and with total alcohol intake in men. Beer was consistently associated with WHCR in all race and sex groups. PMID:1570801

  14. Leptin responses to overfeeding: relationship with body fat and nonexercise activity thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Levine, J A; Eberhardt, N L; Jensen, M D

    1999-08-01

    Administration of leptin to rodents results in weight loss through decreased food intake and increased energy expenditure that occurs in part through increased spontaneous activity. In humans, low levels of spontaneous physical activity and below normal plasma leptin concentrations predict subsequent excess weight gain. We recently found that failure to increase nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) with overfeeding results in greater fat gain in humans, and subsequently evaluated whether changes in leptin are related to NEAT activation. We measured plasma leptin concentrations and adipose tissue leptin messenger ribonucleic acid together with the components of energy expenditure in 16 nonobese humans before and after overfeeding to assess the relationship between leptin responses to overfeeding and the changes in NEAT. Adipocyte leptin expression was up-regulated with overfeeding, and leptin concentrations increased. Leptin concentrations correlated with body fat before and after overfeeding. Changes in leptin with overfeeding were strongly related to changes in body fat, but not to changes in NEAT. Changes in NEAT correlated inversely with fat gain. It is, therefore, unlikely that leptin mediates activation of NEAT with overfeeding in nonobese humans; rather, leptin directly reflects body fat mass and fat mass gain. PMID:10443673

  15. Quantification of motor cortex activity and full-body biomechanics during unconstrained locomotion.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, Boris I; Sirota, Mikhail G; Gregor, Robert J; Beloozerova, Irina N

    2005-10-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of motor cortex function has been achieved primarily by simultaneously recording motor cortex neuron activity and the movement kinematics of the corresponding limb. We have expanded this approach by combining high-quality cortical single-unit activity recordings with synchronized recordings of full-body kinematics and kinetics in the freely behaving cat. The method is illustrated by selected results obtained from two cats tested while walking on a flat surface. Using this method, the activity of 43 pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) was recorded, averaged over 10 bins of a locomotion cycle, and compared with full-body mechanics by means of principal component and multivariate linear regression analyses. Patterns of 24 PTNs (56%) and 219 biomechanical variables (73%) were classified into just four groups of inter-correlated variables that accounted for 91% of the total variance, indicating that many of the recorded variables had similar patterns. The ensemble activity of different groups of two to eight PTNs accurately predicted the 10-bin patterns of all biomechanical variables (neural decoding) and vice versa; different small groups of mechanical variables accurately predicted the 10-bin pattern of each PTN (neural encoding). We conclude that comparison of motor cortex activity with full-body biomechanics may be a useful tool in further elucidating the function of the motor cortex. PMID:15888524

  16. Cthrc1 Controls Adipose Tissue Formation, Body Composition, and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stohn, J. Patrizia; Wang, Qiaozeng; Siviski, Matthew E.; Kennedy, Kevin; Jin, Yong-Ri; Kacer, Doreen; DeMambro, Victoria; Liaw, Lucy; Vary, Calvin P.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Prudovsky, Igor; Lindner, Volkhard

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the effects of loss of Cthrc1 on adipogenesis, body composition, metabolism, physical activity and muscle physiology. Methods Complete metabolic and activity monitoring as well as grip strength measurements and muscle myography were performed in Cthrc1 null and wildtype mice. Results Compared to wildtypes, Cthrc1 null mice had similar body weights but significantly reduced energy expenditure, decreased lean mass and increased fat mass, especially visceral fat. In vitro studies demonstrated that Cthrc1 inhibited adipocyte differentiation as well as PPAR and CREB reporter activity, while preadipocytes isolated from Cthrc1 null mice exhibited enhanced adipogenic differentiation. Voluntary physical activity in Cthrc1 null mice as assessed by wheel running was reduced to approximately half the distance covered by wildtypes. Reduced grip strength was observed in Cthrc1 null mice at the age of 15 weeks or older with reduced performance and mass of fast twitch muscle. In the brain, Cthrc1 expression was most prominent in neurons of thalamic and hypothalamic nuclei with evidence for secretion into the circulation in the median eminence. Conclusions Our data indicate that Cthrc1 regulates body composition through inhibition of adipogenesis. In addition, central Cthrc1 may be a mediator of muscle function and physical activity. PMID:26148471

  17. Body Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, K. Allen

    1989-01-01

    Described are activities for measuring the human body. The activities include measurements and calculations, calculating volume and density, problems related to body measurement, and using a nomogram. Several charts, illustrations, and a nomogram are provided. (YP)

  18. The Body Action Coding System II: muscle activations during the perception and expression of emotion

    PubMed Central

    Huis In ‘t Veld, Elisabeth M. J.; van Boxtel, Geert J. M.; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    Research into the expression and perception of emotions has mostly focused on facial expressions. Recently, body postures have become increasingly important in research, but knowledge on muscle activity during the perception or expression of emotion is lacking. The current study continues the development of a Body Action Coding System (BACS), which was initiated in a previous study, and described the involvement of muscles in the neck, shoulders and arms during expression of fear and anger. The current study expands the BACS by assessing the activity patterns of three additional muscles. Surface electromyography of muscles in the neck (upper trapezius descendens), forearms (extensor carpi ulnaris), lower back (erector spinae longissimus) and calves (peroneus longus) were measured during active expression and passive viewing of fearful and angry body expressions. The muscles in the forearm were strongly active for anger expression and to a lesser extent for fear expression. In contrast, muscles in the calves were recruited slightly more for fearful expressions. It was also found that muscles automatically responded to the perception of emotion, without any overt movement. The observer's forearms responded to the perception of fear, while the muscles used for leaning backwards were activated when faced with an angry adversary. Lastly, the calf responded immediately when a fearful person was seen, but responded slower to anger. There is increasing interest in developing systems that are able to create or recognize emotional body language for the development of avatars, robots, and online environments. To that end, multiple coding systems have been developed that can either interpret or create bodily expressions based on static postures, motion capture data or videos. However, the BACS is the first coding system based on muscle activity. PMID:25294993

  19. Lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay for detecting active tuberculosis in Hiv-positive adults

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maunank; Hanrahan, Colleen; Wang, Zhuo Yu; Dendukuri, Nandini; Lawn, Stephen D; Denkinger, Claudia M; Steingart, Karen R

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid detection of tuberculosis (TB) among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a global health priority. HIV-associated TB may have different clinical presentations and is challenging to diagnose. Conventional sputum tests have reduced sensitivity in HIV-positive individuals, who have higher rates of extrapulmonary TB compared with HIV-negative individuals. The lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay (LF-LAM) is a new, commercially available point-of-care test that detects lipoarabinomannan (LAM), a lipopolysaccharide present in mycobacterial cell walls, in people with active TB disease. Objectives To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM for the diagnosis of active TB disease in HIV-positive adults who have signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB diagnosis).To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM as a screening test for active TB disease in HIV-positive adults irrespective of signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB screening). Search methods We searched the following databases without language restriction on 5 February 2015: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; MEDLINE (PubMed,1966); EMBASE (OVID, from 1980); Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED, from 1900), Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S, from 1900), and BIOSIS Previews (from 1926) (all three using the Web of Science platform; MEDION; LILACS (BIREME, from 1982); SCOPUS (from 1995); the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT); the search portal of the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP); and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&l (from 1861). Selection criteria Eligible study types included randomized controlled trials, cross-sectional studies, and cohort studies that determined LF-LAM accuracy for TB against a microbiological reference standard (culture or nucleic acid amplification test from any body site). A higher quality reference standard was one in which two or more specimen types were

  20. Reliability of 2 Different Positioning Protocols for Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry Measurement of Body Composition in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ava; Slater, Gary J; Byrne, Nuala; Nana, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is an accepted time-efficient method of body composition assessment for total body and regional fat mass (FM), lean mass (LM), and bone mineral content (BMC), but for longitudinal monitoring the measurements must be sufficiently reliable. The aim of this study was to compare the reliability of a new positioning protocol (Nana et al) with the current reference (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey [NHANES]) protocol and investigate their within-protocol precision. Thirty healthy adults (16 females and 14 males) underwent 4 whole-body DXA scans in succession with full repositioning between scans. The scan order was randomized, with 2 scans undertaken in accordance with the current NHANES protocol and 2 using the Nana et al protocol. Magnitudes of typical errors of measurement and changes in the mean of DXA body composition estimates were assessed as standardized effect sizes. The Nana et al protocol repositioning produced trivial typical errors for total body across all LM estimates except for FM in the arms and trunk which were moderately substantial. The NHANES protocol produced similar typical errors for all measurements in LM except for FM and BMC in the trunk and arms which were substantially larger than the smallest worthwhile effect. The difference between protocols produced substantially large typical errors in estimations of both total body FM and regional FM and BMC, but differences in LM were all less than the smallest worthwhile effect. Although both protocols demonstrated acceptable intratest reliability, the Nana et al protocol produced enhanced precision in regional (arms and trunk) FM and BMC. The protocols were substantially different in body composition assessment especially for FM and thus should not to be interchanged. Anecdotally, subjects felt more comfortable and supported during the scan with the Nana et al protocol. PMID:26343822

  1. Summer declines in activity and body temperature offer polar bears limited energy savings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whiteman, J.P.; Harlow, H.J.; Durner, George M.; Anderson-Sprecher, R.; Albeke, Shannon E.; Regehr, Eric V.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Ben-David, M.

    2015-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) summer on the sea ice or, where it melts, on shore. Although the physiology of “ice” bears in summer is unknown, “shore” bears purportedly minimize energy losses by entering a hibernation-like state when deprived of food. Such a strategy could partially compensate for the loss of on-ice foraging opportunities caused by climate change. However, here we report gradual, moderate declines in activity and body temperature of both shore and ice bears in summer, resembling energy expenditures typical of fasting, nonhibernating mammals. Also, we found that to avoid unsustainable heat loss while swimming, bears employed unusual heterothermy of the body core. Thus, although well adapted to seasonal ice melt, polar bears appear susceptible to deleterious declines in body condition during the lengthening period of summer food deprivation.

  2. Animal physiology. Summer declines in activity and body temperature offer polar bears limited energy savings.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, J P; Harlow, H J; Durner, G M; Anderson-Sprecher, R; Albeke, S E; Regehr, E V; Amstrup, S C; Ben-David, M

    2015-07-17

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) summer on the sea ice or, where it melts, on shore. Although the physiology of "ice" bears in summer is unknown, "shore" bears purportedly minimize energy losses by entering a hibernation-like state when deprived of food. Such a strategy could partially compensate for the loss of on-ice foraging opportunities caused by climate change. However, here we report gradual, moderate declines in activity and body temperature of both shore and ice bears in summer, resembling energy expenditures typical of fasting, nonhibernating mammals. Also, we found that to avoid unsustainable heat loss while swimming, bears employed unusual heterothermy of the body core. Thus, although well adapted to seasonal ice melt, polar bears appear susceptible to deleterious declines in body condition during the lengthening period of summer food deprivation. PMID:26185248

  3. Insights on activation enthalpy for non-Schmid slip in body-centered cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Lucas M.; Lim, Hojun; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Battaile, Corbett C.; Weinberger, Christopher R.

    2014-12-18

    We use insights gained from atomistic simulation to develop an activation enthalpy model for dislocation slip in body-centered cubic iron. Furthermore, using a classical potential that predicts dislocation core stabilities consistent with ab initio predictions, we quantify the non-Schmid stress-dependent effects of slip. The kink-pair activation enthalpy is evaluated and a model is identified as a function of the general stress state. Thus, our model enlarges the applicability of the classic Kocks activation enthalpy model to materials with non-Schmid behavior.

  4. The contribution of active body movement to visual development in evolutionary robots.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Mototaka; Floreano, Dario; Di Paolo, Ezequiel A

    2005-01-01

    Inspired by the pioneering work by Held and Hein (1963) on the development of kitten visuo-motor systems, we explore the role of active body movement in the developmental process of the visual system by using robots. The receptive fields in an evolved mobile robot are developed during active or passive movement with a Hebbian learning rule. In accordance to experimental observations in kittens, we show that the receptive fields and behavior of the robot developed under active condition significantly differ from those developed under passive condition. A possible explanation of this difference is derived by correlating receptive field formation and behavioral performance in the two conditions. PMID:16112555

  5. Ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials using air-conducted sound: test parameters and normative data in healthy children; effect of body position on threshold.

    PubMed

    Kastanioudakis, Ioannis; Saravakos, Panagiotis; Leontis, Theodoros; Balatsouras, Dimitrios G; Ziavra, Nausica

    2016-09-01

    In the present prospective study, we both investigated positioning techniques for the enhancement of oVEMP procedures and the viability of oVEMP testing in a healthy children population. A total of 41 healthy children were enrolled in this study. 21 were boys and 20 were girls, with their ages ranging from 4 to 16 years. All children underwent audiometry and tympanometry prior to oVEMP test in upright and supine position. All subjects had normal hearing. The procedure was well tolerated by all children. Typical biphasic oVEMPs presented in 97.56 % in upright position and 90.25 % in the supine position. No statistically significant difference could be found concerning which position elicits the best or worst responses. However, a trend towards the supine position was noticed. It may be concluded that oVEMP test proved to be a well-tolerated examination of the vestibular system in children aged above 4 years old. Our results did not show a statistical difference on the oVEMP thresholds between the two body positions. However, further larger studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26499188

  6. Effects of Intense Physical Activity with Free Water Replacement on Bioimpedance Parameters and Body Fluid Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, E. B.; Ulbricht, L.; Krueger, E.; Romaneli, E. F. R.; Souza, M. N.

    2012-12-01

    Authors have emphasized the need for previous care in order to perform reliable bioimpedance acquisition. Despite of this need some authors have reported that intense physical training has little effect on Bioimpedance Analysis (BIA), while other ones have observed significant effects on bioimpedance parameters in the same condition, leading to body composition estimates considered incompatible with human physiology. The aim of this work was to quantify the changes in bioimpedance parameters, as well as in body fluids estimates by BIA, after four hours of intense physical activity with free water replacement in young males. Xitron Hydra 4200 equipment was used to acquire bioimpedance data before and immediately after the physical training. After data acquisition body fluids were estimates from bioimpedance parameters. Height and weight of all subjects were also acquired to the nearest 0.1 cm and 0.1 kg, respectively. Results point that among the bioimpedance parameter, extracellular resistance presented the most coherent behavior, leading to reliable estimates of the extracellular fluid and part of the total body water. Results also show decreases in height and weight of the participants, which were associated to the decrease in body hydration and in intervertebral discs.

  7. Greater positive schizotypy relates to reduced N100 activity during rejection scenes.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Preethi; Onwumere, Juliana; Wilson, Daniel; Sumich, Alexander; Castro, Antonio; Kumari, Veena; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    Social anxiety due to rejection sensitivity (RS) exacerbates psychosis-like experiences in the general population. While reduced dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) activity during social rejection in high schizotypy has suggested self-distancing from rejection, earlier stages of mental processing such as feature encoding could also contribute to psychosis-like experiences. This study aimed to determine the stage of mental processing of social rejection that relates to positive schizotypy. Forty-one healthy participants were assessed for schizotypy and RS. Event-related potential amplitudes (ERPs) were measured at frontal, temporal and parieto-occipital sites and their cortical sources (dACC, temporal pole and lingual gyrus) at early (N100) and late (P300 and late slow wave, LSW) timeframes during rejection, acceptance and neutral scenes. ERPs were compared between social interaction types. Correlations were performed between positive schizotypy (defined as the presence of perceptual aberrations, hallucinatory experiences and magical thinking), RS and ERPs during rejection. Amplitude was greater during rejection than acceptance or neutral conditions at the dACC-P300, parieto-occipital-P300, dACC-LSW and frontal-LSW. RS correlated positively with positive schizotypy. Reduced dACC N100 activity during rejection correlated with greater positive schizotypy and RS. Reduced dACC N100 activity and greater RS independently predicted positive schizotypy. An N100 deficit that indicates reduced feature encoding of rejection scenes increases with greater positive schizotypy and RS. Higher RS shows that a greater tendency to misattribute ambiguous social situations as rejecting also increases with positive schizotypy. These two processes, namely primary bottom-up sensory processing and secondary misattribution of rejection, combine to increase psychosis-like experiences. PMID:25010933

  8. p21-activated kinase 4 regulates mitotic spindle positioning and orientation.

    PubMed

    Bompard, Guillaume; Morin, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, microtubules (MTs) are massively rearranged into three sets of highly dynamic MTs that are nucleated from the centrosomes to form the mitotic spindle. Tight regulation of spindle positioning in the dividing cell and chromosome alignment at the center of the metaphase spindle are required to ensure perfect chromosome segregation and to position the cytokinetic furrow that will specify the two daughter cells. Spindle positioning requires regulation of MT dynamics, involving depolymerase activities together with cortical and kinetochore-mediated pushing and pulling forces acting on astral MTs and kinetochore fibres. These forces rely on MT motor activities. Cortical pulling forces exerted on astral MTs depend upon dynein/dynactin complexes and are essential in both symmetric and asymmetric cell division. A well-established spindle positioning pathway regulating the cortical targeting of dynein/dynactin involves the conserved LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched-protein) and NuMA (microtubule binding nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) complex. Spindle orientation is also regulated by integrin-mediated cell adhesion and actin retraction fibres that respond to mechanical stress and are influenced by the microenvironment of the dividing cell. Altering the capture of astral MTs or modulating pulling forces affects spindle position, which can impair cell division, differentiation and embryogenesis. In this general scheme, the activity of mitotic kinases such as Auroras and Plk1 (Polo-like kinase 1) is crucial. Recently, the p21-activated kinases (PAKs) emerged as novel important players in mitotic progression. In our recent article, we demonstrated that PAK4 regulates spindle positioning in symmetric cell division. In this commentary, and in light of recent published studies, we discuss how PAK4 could participate in the regulation of mechanisms involved in spindle positioning and orientation. PMID:22960742

  9. College of Radiology, Academy of Medicine of Malaysia position on whole body screening CT scans in healthy asymptomatic individuals (2008)

    PubMed Central

    Ho, ELM; Abdullah, BJJ; Tang, AAL; Nordin, AJ; Nair, AR; Lim, GCC; Samad-Cheung, H; Ng, KH; Ponnusamy, S; Abbas, SF; Bux, SI; Arasaratnam, S; Abdul Aziz, YF; Venugopal, S; Musa, Z; Abdul Manaf, Z

    2008-01-01

    To date, the College of Radiology (CoR) does not see any clear benefit in performing whole body screening computed tomography (CT) examinations in healthy asymptomatic individuals. There are radiation risk issues in CT and principles of screening should be adhered to. There may be a role for targeted cardiac screening CT that derives calcium score, especially for asymptomatic medium-risk individuals and CT colonography when used as part of a strategic programme for colorectal cancer screening in those 50 years and older. However, population based screening CT examinations may become appropriate when evidence emerges regarding a clear benefit for the patient outweighing the associated radiation risks. PMID:21611021

  10. Event-related potentials reveal early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Aitao; Liu, Jing; Zhang, John X

    2012-03-01

    With tasks involving action concept comprehension, many fMRI studies have reported brain activations in sensori-motor regions specific to effectors of the referent action. There is relatively less evidence whether such activations reflect early semantic access or late conceptual re-processing. Here we recorded event-related potentials when participants recognized noun-verb pairs. For Congruent pairs, the verb was the one most commonly associated with the noun (e.g., football-kick). Compared with a control condition, verbs in Congruent pairs showed priming effects in the time windows of 100-150 ms and 210-260 ms. Such activation seems to be specific to body part but not other aspects of the action as similar priming effect was also found when the noun and verb involved different actions though sharing the same body part (e.g., football-jump), documenting for the first time the early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension. PMID:22306088

  11. HIV Serosorting, Status Disclosure, and Strategic Positioning Among Highly Sexually Active Gay and Bisexual Men.

    PubMed

    Grov, Christian; Rendina, H Jonathon; Moody, Raymond L; Ventuneac, Ana; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2015-10-01

    Researchers have identified harm reduction strategies that gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) use to reduce HIV transmission--including serosorting, status disclosure, and strategic positioning. We report on patterns of these behaviors among 376 highly sexually active (i.e., 9+partners, <90 days) GBMSM: mean age of 37, 49.5% men of color, 87.8% gay identified, 57.5% college educated. We found evidence that many men engaged in serosorting, status disclosure, and strategic positioning; however, rates varied based on the participant's HIV status. HIV-positive and HIV-negative men both engaged in sex with men of similar status more often than they engaged in sex with men known to be a different HIV status (i.e., serosorting). However, HIV-negative men disclosed their HIV-status with about half of their partners, whereas HIV-positive participants disclosed with only about one-third. With regard to strategic positioning, HIV-positive participants were the receptive partner about half the time with their HIV-negative partners and with their HIV-positive partners. In contrast, strategic positioning was very common among HIV-negative participants-they rarely bottomed with HIV-positive partners, bottomed about one-third of the time with status-unknown partners, and 42% of the time (on average) with HIV-negative partners. Highly sexually active GBMSM are a critical population in which to both investigate HIV prevention strategies as well as develop effective intervention programs. Providers and clinicians might be well served to include a wide range of behavioral harm reduction strategies in addition to condom use and biomedical approaches to reduce onward HIV transmission. PMID:26348322

  12. Time-Resolved Records of Magnetic Activity on the Pallasite Parent Body and Psyche

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, J. F. J.; Nichols, C. I. O.; Herrero-Albillos, J.; Kronast, F.; Kasama, T.; Alimadadi, H.; van der Laan, G.; Nimmo, F.; Harrison, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Although many small bodies apparently generated dynamo fields in the early solar system, the nature and temporal evolution of these fields has remained enigmatic. Time-resolved records of the Earth's planetary field have been essential in understanding the dynamic history of our planet, and equivalent information from asteroids could provide a unique insight into the development of the solar system. Here we present time-resolved records of magnetic activity on the main-group pallasite parent body and (16) Psyche, obtained using newly-developed nanomagnetic imaging techniques. For the pallasite parent body, the inferred field direction remained relatively constant and the intensity was initially stable at ~100 μT before it decreased in two discrete steps down to 0 μT. We interpret this behaviour as due to vigorous dynamo activity driven by compositional convection in the core, ultimately transitioning from a dipolar to multipolar field as the inner core grew from the bottom-up. For Psyche (measured from IVA iron meteorites), the inferred field direction reversed, while the intensity remained stable at >50 μT. Psyche cooled rapidly as an unmantled core, although the resulting thermal convection alone cannot explain these observations. Instead, this behaviour required top-down core solidification, and is attributed either to compositional convection (if the core also solidified from the bottom-up) or convection generated directly by top-down solidification (e.g. Fe-snow). The mechanism governing convection in small body cores is an open question (due partly to uncertainties in the direction of core solidification), and these observations suggest that unconventional (i.e. not thermal) mechanisms acted in the early solar system. These mechanisms are very efficient at generating convection, implying a long-lasting and widespread epoch of dynamo activity among small bodies in the early solar system.

  13. Voltage-activated currents recorded from rabbit pigmented ciliary body epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Fain, G L; Farahbakhsh, N A

    1989-01-01

    1. The whole-cell recording mode of the patch-clamp technique was used to investigate the presence of voltage-activated currents in the isolated pigmented cells from the rabbit ciliary body epithelium grown in culture. 2. In Ringer solution with composition similar to that of the rabbit aqueous humour, depolarizing voltage steps activated a transient inward current and a delayed outward current, while hyperpolarization elicited an inwardly rectified current. 3. The depolarization-activated inward current was mainly carried by Na+ and was blocked by submicromolar concentrations of tetrodotoxin. This current in many cells was sufficiently large to produce a regenerative Na+ spike. 4. The depolarization-activated outward current was carried by K+ and blocked by external TEA and Ba2+. Its activation appeared to be Ca2(+)-independent. 5. The hyperpolarization-activated inward current was almost exclusively carried by K+ and was blocked by Ba2+ and Cs+. For large hyperpolarizations below -120 mV, this current exhibited a biphasic activation with a fast transient peak followed by a slower sag, that appeared to be due to K+ depletion. 6. The voltage-dependent K+ conductances probably act to stabilize the cell membrane resting potential and may also play a role in ion transport. The function of the Na(+)-dependent inward current is unclear, but it may permit the electrically coupled epithelial cells of the ciliary body to conduct propagated action potentials. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2621623

  14. Recognition of military-specific physical activities with body-fixed sensors.

    PubMed

    Wyss, Thomas; Mäder, Urs

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an algorithm for recognizing military-specific, physically demanding activities using body-fixed sensors. To develop the algorithm, the first group of study participants (n = 15) wore body-fixed sensors capable of measuring acceleration, step frequency, and heart rate while completing six military-specific activities: walking, marching with backpack, lifting and lowering loads, lifting and carrying loads, digging, and running. The accuracy of the algorithm was tested in these isolated activities in a laboratory setting (n = 18) and in the context of daily military training routine (n = 24). The overall recognition rates during isolated activities and during daily military routine activities were 87.5% and 85.5%, respectively. We conclude that the algorithm adequately recognized six military-specific physical activities based on sensor data alone both in a laboratory setting and in the military training environment. By recognizing type of physical activities this objective method provides additional information on military-job descriptions. PMID:21121495

  15. In vivo neutron activation analysis: body composition studies in health and disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, K.J.; Cohn, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    In vivo analysis of body elements by neutron activation is an important tool in medical research. It has provided a direct quantitative measure of body composition of human beings in vivo. Basic physiological differences related to age, sex, race, and body size have been assessed by this noninvasive technique. The diagnosis and management of patients with various metabolic disorders and diseases has also been demonstrated. Two major facilities at Brookhaven are being utilized exclusively for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) of calcium, phosphorus, sodium, chlorine, nitrogen, hydrogen, and potassium. These elements serve as the basis for a four compartment model of body composition: protein, water, mineral ash, and fat. Variations in these compartments are demonstrated in clinical research programs investigating obesity, anorexia, cancer, renal failure, osteoporosis, and normal aging. IVNAA continues to provide a unique approach to the evaluation of clinical diagnosis, efficacy of therapeutic regimens, and monitoring of the aging process. Classical balance studies usually require the patient to be admitted to a hospital for extended periods of confinement. IVNAA, however, allows for clinical management of the patient on an out-patient basis, an important aspect for treatment of chronic diseases. 25 references, 3 figures, 5 tables.

  16. Serum lipocalin-2 levels are positively associated with not only total body fat but also visceral fat area in Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuqi; Ma, Xiaojing; Pan, Xiaoping; Xu, Yiting; Xiong, Qin; Xiao, Yunfeng; Bao, Yuqian; Jia, Weiping

    2016-07-01

    Serum lipocalin-2 (LCN2) plays an important role in the regulation of the obesity-associated dysmetabolic state and cardiovascular disease. However, relatively little is known about the relationship between serum LCN2 levels and body fat content and distribution. We examined the associations of total body fat content and abdominal fat distribution with serum LCN2 levels in Chinese men.The study was based on a cross-sectional analysis of data for 1203 Chinese men aged 22 to 78 years from the Shanghai Obesity Study. Body fat percentage (fat%) was assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and magnetic resonance imaging was adopted to quantify the visceral fat area (VFA) and subcutaneous fat area (SFA). Serum levels of LCN2 were measured with a standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method.Subjects with a high fat% had higher serum LCN2 levels than those with a normal fat% regardless of their body mass index category (<25 and ≥25 kg/m). The frequency of isolated high VFA was increased with increasing quintiles of serum LCN2 levels (P < 0.001), but the frequency of isolated high SFA did not differ between quintiles of serum LCN2 levels. A trend of increasing VFA was observed with increasing serum LCN2 levels (P < 0.001). Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that VFA was positively associated with serum LCN2 levels, independent of overall obesity and other confounding factors (standardized β = 0.082, P = 0.008).Serum LCN2 levels are positively correlated with body fat content and independently associated with VFA in Chinese men. PMID:27472678

  17. Associations of physical activity, fitness, and body composition with heart rate variability–based indicators of stress and recovery on workdays: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate how physical activity (PA), cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and body composition are associated with heart rate variability (HRV)-based indicators of stress and recovery on workdays. Additionally, we evaluated the association of objectively measured stress with self-reported burnout symptoms. Methods Participants of this cross-sectional study were 81 healthy males (age range 26–40 y). Stress and recovery on workdays were measured objectively based on HRV recordings. CRF and anthropometry were assessed in laboratory conditions. The level of PA was based on a detailed PA interview (MET index [MET-h/d]) and self-reported activity class. Results PA, CRF, and body composition were significantly associated with levels of stress and recovery on workdays. MET index (P < 0.001), activity class (P = 0.001), and CRF (P = 0.019) were negatively associated with stress during working hours whereas body fat percentage (P = 0.005) was positively associated. Overall, 27.5% of the variance of total stress on workdays (P = 0.001) was accounted for by PA, CRF, and body composition. Body fat percentage and body mass index were negatively associated with night-time recovery whereas CRF was positively associated. Objective work stress was associated (P = 0.003) with subjective burnout symptoms. Conclusions PA, CRF, and body composition are associated with HRV-based stress and recovery levels, which needs to be taken into account in the measurement, prevention, and treatment of work-related stress. The HRV-based method used to determine work-related stress and recovery was associated with self-reported burnout symptoms, but more research on the clinical importance of the methodology is needed. PMID:24742265

  18. The tracking of active travel and its relationship with body composition in UK adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Falconer, Catherine L.; Leary, Sam D.; Page, Angie S.; Cooper, Ashley R

    2015-01-01

    Background To examine the tracking of active travel through adolescence, and its association with body mass index (BMI) and fat mass at age 17 in a UK cohort. Methods We analysed data collected from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). The analyses include all participants with self-reported travel mode to school at ages 12, 14 and 16 years, and measured height, weight and body composition at age 17 (n=2,026). Tracking coefficients were calculated for individual travel behaviours (including walking and cycling) through adolescence using Generalised Estimating Equations. Linear regression analyses examined associations between travel pattern (consistently passive, consistently active, active at two time points or active at one time point), BMI, and DXA-measured fat mass (expressed as internally derived standard deviation scores) at 17 years. Analyses were adjusted for height (where appropriate), sex, age, parental social class, and maternal education with interaction terms to assess sex differences. Results There was substantial tracking in active travel through adolescence, with 38.5% of males and 32.3% of females consistently walking or cycling to school. In males, a consistently or predominantly active travel pattern was associated with a lower BMI SD score at age 17 (consistently active: adjusted β=−0.23; 95% CI −0.40, −0.06; active at two time points: adjusted β−0.30; 95% CI −0.50, −0.10) compared to those with a consistently passive pattern. No associations were seen in females. Conclusions Maintenance of active travel behaviours throughout adolescence may help to protect against the development of excess BMI in males. In addition to encouraging the adoption of active travel to school, public health messages should aim to prevent drop out from active travel to promote good health in youth. PMID:26740922

  19. Associations Between Sedentary Time, Physical Activity, and Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry Measures of Total Body, Android, and Gynoid Fat Mass in Children.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Lacey; Meendering, Jessica; Specker, Bonny; Binkley, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Negative health outcomes are associated with excess body fat, low levels of physical activity (PA), and high sedentary time (ST). Relationships between PA, ST, and body fat distribution, including android and gynoid fat, assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) have not been measured in children. The purpose of this study was to test associations between levels of activity and body composition in children and to evaluate if levels of activity predict body composition by DXA and by body mass index percentile in a similar manner. PA, ST, and body composition from 87 children (8.8-11.8 yr, grades 3-5, 44 boys) were used to test the association among study variables. Accelerometers measured PA and ST. Body composition measured by DXA included bone mineral content (BMC) and fat and lean mass of the total body (TB, less head), android, and gynoid regions. ST (range: 409-685 min/wk) was positively associated with TB percent fat (0.03, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.00-0.05) and android fat mass (1.5 g, 95% CI: 0.4-3.0), and inversely associated with the lean mass of the TB (-10.7 g, 95% CI: -20.8 to -0.63) and gynoid regions (-2.2 g, 95% CI: -4.3 to -0.2), and with BMC (-0.43 g, 95% CI: 0.77-0.09). Moderate-to-vigorous PA was associated with lower TB (-53 g, 95% CI: -87 to -18), android (-5 g, 95% CI: -8 to -2]), and gynoid fat (-6 g, 95% CI: -11 to -0.5). Vigorous activity results were similar. Light PA was associated with increased TB (17.1 g, 95% CI: 3.0-31.3) and gynoid lean mass (3.9 g, 95% CI: 1.0-6.8) and BMC (0.59 g, 95% CI: 0.10-1.07). In boys, there were significant associations between activity and DXA percent body fat measures that were not found with the body mass index percentile. Objective measures of PA were inversely associated with TB, android, and gynoid fat, whereas ST was directly associated with TB percent fat and, in particular, android fat. Activity levels predict body composition measures by DXA and, in

  20. Hand-Arm Coordinated Manipulation Using Active Body-Environment Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugaiwa, Taisuke; Iwata, Hiroyasu; Sugano, Shigeki

    Human-symbiotic humanoid robots that can perform tasks dexterously with their hands are needed in our homes, welfare facilities, and other places. To improve their performance of tasks, we propose a scheme of controlling motion aimed at appropriately coordinated hand and arm motions. By observing human manual tasks, we identify an active body-environment contact as a kind of human manual skills and devise a motion control scheme based on it. We also analyze the effectiveness of the combination of the active body-environment contact and our proposed scheme in example tasks of the adding/removing constraint task. We validate our motion control scheme through actual tests on a prototype human-symbiotic humanoid robot.

  1. Rapid Identification and Multiple Susceptibility Testing of Pathogens from Positive-Culture Sterile Body Fluids by a Combined MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry and Vitek Susceptibility System.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yueru; Zheng, Bing; Wang, Bei; Lin, Yong; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the bloodstream, central nervous system, peritoneum, joints, and other sterile areas are associated with high morbidity and sequelae risk. Timely initiation of effective antimicrobial therapy is crucial to improving patient prognosis. However, standard final identification and antimicrobial susceptibility tests (ASTs) are reported 16-48 h after a positive alert. For a rapid, effective and low-cost diagnosis, we combined matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry with a Vitek AST system, and performed rapid microbial identification (RMI) and rapid multiple AST (RMAST) on non-duplicated positive body fluid cultures collected from a hospital in Shanghai, China. Sterile body fluid positive culture and blood positive culture caused by Gram negative (GN) or polymicrobial were applied to the MALDI-TOF measurement directly. When positive blood culture caused by Gram positive (GP) bacteria or yeasts, they were resuspended in 1 ml brain heart infusion for 2 or 4 h enrichment, respectively. Regardless of enrichment, the RMI (completed in 40 min per sample) accurately identified GN and GP bacteria (98.9 and 87.2%, respectively), fungi (75.7%), and anaerobes (94.7%). Dominant species in multiple cultures and bacteria that failed to grow on the routing plates were correctly identified in 81.2 and 100% of cases, respectively. The category agreements of RMAST results, determined in the presence of various antibiotics, were similarly to previous studies. The RMI and RMAST results not only reduce the turnaround time of the patient report by 18-36 h, but also indicate whether a patient's antibiotic treatment should be accelerated, ceased or de-escalated, and adjusted the essential drugs modification for an optimized therapy. PMID:27148212

  2. Rapid Identification and Multiple Susceptibility Testing of Pathogens from Positive-Culture Sterile Body Fluids by a Combined MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry and Vitek Susceptibility System

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yueru; Zheng, Bing; Wang, Bei; Lin, Yong; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the bloodstream, central nervous system, peritoneum, joints, and other sterile areas are associated with high morbidity and sequelae risk. Timely initiation of effective antimicrobial therapy is crucial to improving patient prognosis. However, standard final identification and antimicrobial susceptibility tests (ASTs) are reported 16–48 h after a positive alert. For a rapid, effective and low-cost diagnosis, we combined matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry with a Vitek AST system, and performed rapid microbial identification (RMI) and rapid multiple AST (RMAST) on non-duplicated positive body fluid cultures collected from a hospital in Shanghai, China. Sterile body fluid positive culture and blood positive culture caused by Gram negative (GN) or polymicrobial were applied to the MALDI–TOF measurement directly. When positive blood culture caused by Gram positive (GP) bacteria or yeasts, they were resuspended in 1 ml brain heart infusion for 2 or 4 h enrichment, respectively. Regardless of enrichment, the RMI (completed in 40 min per sample) accurately identified GN and GP bacteria (98.9 and 87.2%, respectively), fungi (75.7%), and anaerobes (94.7%). Dominant species in multiple cultures and bacteria that failed to grow on the routing plates were correctly identified in 81.2 and 100% of cases, respectively. The category agreements of RMAST results, determined in the presence of various antibiotics, were similarly to previous studies. The RMI and RMAST results not only reduce the turnaround time of the patient report by 18–36 h, but also indicate whether a patient's antibiotic treatment should be accelerated, ceased or de-escalated, and adjusted the essential drugs modification for an optimized therapy. PMID:27148212

  3. Whole-body CT in polytrauma patients: The effect of arm position on abdominal image quality when using a human phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Hong; Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Sung-Su

    2012-06-01

    For a considerable number of emergency computed tomography (CT) scans, patients are unable to position their arms above their head due to traumatic injuries. The arms-down position has been shown to reduce image quality with beam-hardening artifacts in the dorsal regions of the liver, spleen, and kidneys, rendering these images non-diagnostic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of arm position on the image quality in patients undergoing whole-body CT. We acquired CT scans with various acquisition parameters at voltages of 80, 120, and 140 kVp and an increasing tube current from 200 to 400 mAs in 50 mAs increments. The image noise and the contrast assessment were considered for quantitative analyses of the CT images. The image noise (IN), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the coefficient of variation (COV) were evaluated. Quantitative analyses of the experiments were performed with CT scans representative of five different arm positions. Results of the CT scans acquired at 120 kVp and 250 mAs showed high image quality in patients with both arms raised above the head (SNR: 12.4, CNR: 10.9, and COV: 8.1) and both arms flexed at the elbows on the chest (SNR: 11.5, CNR: 10.2, and COV: 8.8) while the image quality significantly decreased with both arms in the down position (SNR: 9.1, CNR: 7.6, and COV: 11). Both arms raised, one arm raised, and both arms flexed improved the image quality compared to arms in the down position by reducing beam-hardening and streak artifacts caused by the arms being at the side of body. This study provides optimal methods for achieving higher image quality and lower noise in abdominal CT for trauma patients.

  4. A Systematic Review of the Relationship between Socio-Economic Position and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gidlow, Christopher; Johnston, Lynne Halley; Crone, Diane; Ellis, Naomi; James, David

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present review was to examine epidemiological evidence to determine if there is strong evidence of a positive gradient of increasing physical activity across the socio-economic strata, and how relationships are affected by socio-economic measurement. Design: Systematic review. Method: A search of major databases was…

  5. Positive Youth Development through an Outdoor Physical Activity Programme: Evidence from a Four-Year Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armour, Kathleen; Sandford, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    In 2006, Sandford, Armour and Warmington undertook a comprehensive review of the literature on the role of physical activity/sport and physical education in promoting positive development for disaffected youth. This paper revisits the findings of the literature review in light of data from a four-year evaluation of one corporate-sponsored physical…

  6. Enhanced Right Amygdala Activity in Adolescents during Encoding of Positively-Valenced Pictures

    PubMed Central

    Vasa, Roma A.; Pine, Daniel S.; Thorn, Julia M.; Nelson, Tess E.; Spinelli, Simona; Nelson, Eric; Maheu, Francoise S.; Ernst, Monique; Bruck, Maggie; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2010-01-01

    While studies among adults implicate the amygdala and interconnecting brain regions in encoding emotional stimuli, few studies have examined whether developmental changes occur within this emotional-memory network during adolescence. The present study examined whether adolescents and adults differentially engaged the amygdala and hippocampus during successful encoding of emotional pictures, with either positive or negative valence. Eighteen adults and twelve adolescents underwent event-related fMRI while encoding emotional pictures. Approximately 30 minutes later, outside the scanner, subjects were asked to recall the pictures seen during the scan. Age group differences in brain activity in the amygdala and hippocampus during encoding of the pictures that were later successfully and unsuccessfully recalled were separately compared for the positive and negative pictures. Adolescents, relative to adults, demonstrated enhanced activity in the right amygdala during encoding of positive pictures that were later recalled compared to not recalled. There were no age group differences in amygdala or hippocampal activity during successful encoding of negative pictures. The findings of preferential activity within the adolescent right amygdala during successful encoding of positive pictures may have implications for the increased reward and novelty seeking behavior, as well as elevated rates of psychopathology, observed during this distinct developmental period. PMID:21127721

  7. Positive Activities: Qualitative Research with Parents. Solutions Research. Research Report. DCSF-RR142

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Children, Schools and Families, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This research was commissioned by COI and DCSF to understand in depth, the barriers, motivators and messages for parents to encourage participation in positive activities for young people. Within this the research was designed to understand the level of influence of parents in whether a young person participates/what a young person might…

  8. Physical Activity and Positive Youth Development: Impact of a School-Based Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, Kristine A.; Hicks, Katherine; Thompson, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    Background: Protective factors associated with positive youth development predict health and education outcomes. This study explored trends in these protective factors and in physical activity among low-income students, and determined the impact of a school-based youth development program on these trends. Methods: This study used a…

  9. Students' Use of Extra-Curricular Activities for Positional Advantage in Competitive Job Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roulin, Nicolas; Bangerter, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    With the rise of mass higher education, competition between graduates in the labour market is increasing. Students are aware that their degree will not guarantee them a job and realise they should add value and distinction to their credentials to achieve a positional advantage. Participation in extra-curricular activities (ECAs) is one such…

  10. Research on acupuncture points and cortical functional activation position in cats by infrared imaging detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuwang; Sha, Zhanyou; Wang, Shuhai; Wen, Huanming

    2007-12-01

    The research of the brain cognition is mainly to find out the activation position in brain according to the stimulation at present in the world. The research regards the animals as the experimental objects and explores the stimulation response on the cerebral cortex of acupuncture. It provides a new method, which can detect the activation position on the creatural cerebral cortex directly by middle-far infrared imaging. According to the theory of local temperature situation, the difference of cortical temperature maybe associate with the excitement of cortical nerve cells, the metabolism of local tissue and the local hemal circulation. Direct naked detection of temperature variety on cerebral cortex is applied by middle and far infrared imaging technology. So the activation position is ascertained. The effect of stimulation response is superior to other indirect methods. After removing the skulls on the head, full of cerebral cortex of a cat are exposed. By observing the infrared images and measuring the temperatures of the visual cerebral cortex during the process of acupuncturing, the points are used to judge the activation position. The variety in the cortical functional sections is corresponding to the result of the acupuncture points in terms of infrared images and temperatures. According to experimental results, we know that the variety of a cortical functional section is corresponding to a special acupuncture point exactly.

  11. Assessing the Positive Influence of Music Activities in Community Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Steve

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a framework for assessing the positive influence of music activities in community development programs. It examines hybrid music, health and rich media approaches to creative case study with the purpose of developing more compelling evidence based advocacy that examines the claims of a causal link. This preliminary study…

  12. An active cooperation-aware spectrum allocation mechanism for body sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fu; Guo, Ying; Peng, Jun; Hu, Jiankun

    2015-01-01

    A cognitive radio-based spectrum allocation scheme using an active cooperative-aware mechanism is proposed in this paper. The scheme ensures that the primary user and secondary users cooperate actively for their own benefits. The primary user releases some spectrum resources to secondary users to actively stimulate them to actively join the cooperative transmission of the primary user, and secondary users help the primary user to relay data in return, as well as its self-data transmission at the same time. The Stackelberg game is used to evenly and jointly optimize the utilities of both the primary and secondary users. Simulation results show that the proposed active cooperation-aware mechanism could improve the body sensor network performance. PMID:25635409

  13. An Active Cooperation-Aware Spectrum Allocation Mechanism for Body Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fu; Guo, Ying; Peng, Jun; Hu, Jiankun

    2015-01-01

    A cognitive radio-based spectrum allocation scheme using an active cooperative-aware mechanism is proposed in this paper. The scheme ensures that the primary user and secondary users cooperate actively for their own benefits. The primary user releases some spectrum resources to secondary users to actively stimulate them to actively join the cooperative transmission of the primary user, and secondary users help the primary user to relay data in return, as well as its self-data transmission at the same time. The Stackelberg game is used to evenly and jointly optimize the utilities of both the primary and secondary users. Simulation results show that the proposed active cooperation-aware mechanism could improve the body sensor network performance. PMID:25635409

  14. Chemical Constituents from the Fruiting Bodies of Hexagonia apiaria and Their Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Thang, Tran Dinh; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Ngoc, Nguyen Thi Bich; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Yang, Mei-Lin; Ta, Shih-Huang; Lee, E-Jian; Kuo, Dai-Huang; Hung, Nguyen Huy; Tuan, Nguyen Ngoc; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2015-11-25

    A chemical investigation of the fruiting bodies of Hexagonia apiaria resulted in the identification of nine compounds including five new triterpenoids, hexagonins A-E (1-5), along with four known compounds. The purified constituents were examined for their anti-inflammatory activity. Among the tested compounds, hexatenuin A displayed the most significant inhibition of superoxide anion generation and elastase release. These triterpenoids may have potentials as anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:26575215

  15. Changes in Physical Activity and Body Composition in Postmenopausal Women over Time

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Stacy T.; Kubo, Jessica; Desai, Manisha; Bea, Jennifer; Beasley, Jeannette M.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Allison, Matthew; Seguin, Rebecca A.; Chen, Zhao; Michael, Yvonne L.; Sullivan, Shannon D.; Beresford, Shirley; Stefanick, Marcia L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Higher physical activity (PA) has been associated with greater attenuation of body-fat gain and preservation of lean mass across the lifespan. These analyses aimed to determine relationships of change in PA to changes in fat and lean body mass in a longitudinal prospective study of postmenopausal women. Methods Among 11,491 women enrolled at three Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) clinical centers were selected to undergo dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), 8,352 had baseline body composition measurements, with at least one repeated measure at yr 1, 3, and 6. PA data were obtained by self-report at baseline, 3 and 6 yr of follow-up. Time-varying PA impact on change in lean and fat mass during the six-yr study period for age groups (50–59y, 60–69y, 70–79y) was estimated using mixed effects linear regression. Results Baseline PA and body composition differed significantly among the three age groups. The association of change in fat mass from baseline and time-varying PA differed across the three age groups (p=0.0006). In women aged 50–59, gain in fat mass from baseline was attenuated with higher levels of physical activity. Women aged 70–79 lost fat mass at all PA levels. In contrast, change in lean mass from baseline and time-varying PA did not differ by age group (p=0.1935). Conclusions The association between PA and change in fat mass varies by age group, with younger, but not older, women benefitting from higher levels of aerobic PA. Higher levels of aerobic activity are not associated with changes in lean mass, which tends to decrease in older women regardless of activity level. Greater attention to resistance training exercises may be needed to prevent lean mass loss as women age. PMID:23439422

  16. Diabetes and endometrial cancer: effect modification by body weight, physical activity and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lucenteforte, E; Bosetti, C; Talamini, R; Montella, M; Zucchetto, A; Pelucchi, C; Franceschi, S; Negri, E; Levi, F; Vecchia, C La

    2007-01-01

    Among 777 endometrial cancer cases and 1550 controls from Italy and Switzerland, odds ratio was 1.7 (95% confidence interval: 1.2–2.5) for diabetes, and 5.1 for obese diabetic women as compared with non-obese non-diabetic ones. Diabetes shows a supramultiplicative effect with body mass index, but not with physical activity or hypertension. PMID:17912243

  17. Touching a rubber hand: feeling of body ownership is associated with activity in multisensory brain areas.

    PubMed

    Ehrsson, H Henrik; Holmes, Nicholas P; Passingham, Richard E

    2005-11-01

    In the "rubber-hand illusion," the sight of brushing of a rubber hand at the same time as brushing of the person's own hidden hand is sufficient to produce a feeling of ownership of the fake hand. We shown previously that this illusion is associated with activity in the multisensory areas, most notably the ventral premotor cortex (Ehrsson et al., 2004). However, it remains to be demonstrated that this illusion does not simply reflect the dominant role of vision and that the premotor activity does not reflect a visual representation of an object near the hand. To address these issues, we introduce a somatic rubber-hand illusion. The experimenter moved the blindfolded participant's left index finger so that it touched the fake hand, and simultaneously, he touched the participant's real right hand, synchronizing the touches as perfectly as possible. After approximately 9.7 s, this stimulation elicited an illusion that one was touching one's own hand. We scanned brain activity during this illusion and two control conditions, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Activity in the ventral premotor cortices, intraparietal cortices, and the cerebellum was associated with the illusion of touching one's own hand. Furthermore, the rated strength of the illusion correlated with the degree of premotor and cerebellar activity. This finding suggests that the activity in these areas reflects the detection of congruent multisensory signals from one's own body, rather than of visual representations. We propose that this could be the mechanism for the feeling of body ownership. PMID:16280594

  18. Antibacterial activity of the body wall extracts of sea cucumber (Invertebrata; Echinodermata) on infectious oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Negin; Heidari, Behrooz; Rassa, Mehdi; Kadkhodazadeh, Mahdi; Heidari, Bijan

    2014-01-27

    Abstract Background: The present study was carried out to test the antibacterial effect of the body wall of the sea cucumber Holothuria leucospilota Brandt on Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus salivarius. Methods: After sampling sea cucumbers from the Persian Gulf, different extractions were prepared. Then, aqueous, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.8), chloroform, hexane and methanolic extracts from sea cucumber body wall were screened for antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria S. mutans and S. salivarius using the disk diffusion method. Results: The PBS extract did not show any antibacterial or inhibitory activity; the chloroform extract, however, demonstrated high levels of antibacterial activity against S. salivarius while exhibiting low levels of activity against S. mutans. The hexane and methanolic extracts were found to show no antibacterial activity against S. mutans, but exhibited antibacterial activity against S. salivarius. Conclusions: In conclusion, the results demonstrated the possibility of utilizing sea cucumbers as a cheap source of potential antibacterial agents and for treating odontogenic diseases. PMID:24468613

  19. Influence of proline position upon the ion channel activity of alamethicin.

    PubMed Central

    Kaduk, C; Duclohier, H; Dathe, M; Wenschuh, H; Beyermann, M; Molle, G; Bienert, M

    1997-01-01

    Alamethicin, a 20-residue peptaibol, induces voltage-dependent ion channels in lipid bilayers according to the barrel-stave model. To study relationships between the proline-14-induced kink region and the channel-forming behavior of the peptide, a set of alamethicin analogs with proline incorporated at positions 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17, respectively, as well as an analog with alanine instead of proline at position 14 were synthesized. Macroscopic conductance experiments show that the voltage dependence of the peptides is conserved although slightly influenced, but the apparent mean number of monomers forming the channels is significantly reduced when proline is not located at position 14. This is confirmed in single-channel experiments. The analogs with proline next to position 14 (i.e., 13, 15, 16) show stable conductance levels, but of reduced number, which follows the order Alam-P14 > Alam-P15 > Alam-P16 > Alam-P13. This reduction in the number of levels is connected with changes in the lifetime of the channels. Analogs with proline at position 11, 12, or 17 produce erratic, extremely short-lived current events that could not be resolved. The changes in functional properties are related to structural properties as probed by circular dichroism. The results indicate that proline at position 14 results in optimal channel activity, whereas channels formed by the analogs bearing proline at different positions are considerably less stable. PMID:9129817

  20. Relationship Between Respiratory Dynamics and Body Mass Index in Patients Undergoing General Anesthesia with Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) and Comparison Between Lithotomy and Supine Positions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao; Huang, Shiwei; Wang, Zhaomin; Chen, Lianhua; Li, Shitong

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to compare respiratory dynamics in patients undergoing general anesthesia with a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in lithotomy and supine positions and to validate the impact of operational position on effectiveness of LMA ventilation. Material/Methods A total of 90 patients (age range, 18–65 years) who underwent general anesthesia were selected and divided into supine position (SP group) and lithotomy position groups (LP group). Vital signs and respiratory dynamic parameters of the 2 groups were measured at different time points and after implantation of an LMA. The arterial blood gas was monitored at 15 min after induction. The intraoperative changes of hemodynamic indexes and postoperative adverse reactions of LMA were recorded. The possible correlation between body mass index (BMI) and respiratory dynamic indexes was analyzed. Results With prolonged duration of the operation, the inspiratory plateau pressure (Pplat), inspiratory resistance (RI), and work of breathing (WOB) gradually increased, while chest-lung compliance (Compl) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in end-expiratory gas (PetCO2) gradually decreased (all P value <0.05). The mean airway pressure (Pmean), Pplat, and expiratory resistance (Re) in the LP group were significantly higher than in the SP group (P<0.05), while the peak inspiratory flow (FImax), peak expiratory flow (FEmax), WOB, and Compl in the LP group were significantly lower than in the SP group (P<0.05). BMI was positively correlated with peak airway pressure (PIP/Ppeak), Pplat, and airway resistance (Raw) and was negatively correlated with Compl; the differences among patients in lithotomy position were more remarkable (P<0.05). Conclusions The inspiratory plateau pressure and airway resistance increased with prolonged duration of the operation, accompanied by decreased chest-lung compliance. Peak airway pressure and airway resistance were positively correlated with BMI, and chest-lung compliance was

  1. Influence of long-term head-down body position on innervation density in extremity blood vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorant, M.; Raffai, G.; Nadasy, G.; Feher, E.; Monos, E.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantitate and compare the density of nerve terminals (NTD), as well as of their synaptic vesicle population (SyVD) in saphenous and brachial vein and artery, obtained from rats maintained in the horizontal or head-down tilted (HDT) position for two weeks. The same technique was applied as that for the head-up tilt study.

  2. Arsenic mediated disruption of promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies induces ganciclovir susceptibility in Epstein-Barr positive epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Mark D.; Block, Gregory J.; Shan, Bin; Esteves, Kyle C.; Lin, Zhen; Flemington, Erik K.; Lasky, Joseph A.

    2011-06-20

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML NBs) have been implicated in host immune response to viral infection. PML NBs are targeted for degradation during reactivation of herpes viruses, suggesting that disruption of PML NB function supports this aspect of the viral life cycle. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) has been shown to suppress EBV reactivation. Our finding that LMP1 induces PML NB immunofluorescence intensity led to the hypothesis that LMP1 may modulate PML NBs as a means of maintaining EBV latency. Increased PML protein and morphometric changes in PML NBs were observed in EBV infected alveolar epithelial cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Treatment with low dose arsenic trioxide disrupted PML NBs, induced expression of EBV lytic proteins, and conferred ganciclovir susceptibility. This study introduces an effective modality to induce susceptibility to ganciclovir in epithelial cells with implications for the treatment of EBV associated pathologies.

  3. Aged insulin granules display reduced microtubule-dependent mobility and are disposed within actin-positive multigranular bodies

    PubMed Central

    Hoboth, Peter; Müller, Andreas; Ivanova, Anna; Mziaut, Hassan; Dehghany, Jaber; Sönmez, Anke; Lachnit, Martina; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Solimena, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Insulin secretion is key for glucose homeostasis. Insulin secretory granules (SGs) exist in different functional pools, with young SGs being more mobile and preferentially secreted. However, the principles governing the mobility of age-distinct SGs remain undefined. Using the time-reporter insulin-SNAP to track age-distinct SGs we now show that their dynamics can be classified into three components: highly dynamic, restricted, and nearly immobile. Young SGs display all three components, whereas old SGs are either restricted or nearly immobile. Both glucose stimulation and F-actin depolymerization recruit a fraction of nearly immobile young, but not old, SGs for highly dynamic, microtubule-dependent transport. Moreover, F-actin marks multigranular bodies/lysosomes containing aged SGs. These data demonstrate that SGs lose their responsiveness to glucose stimulation and competence for microtubule-mediated transport over time while changing their relationship with F-actin. PMID:25646459

  4. Arsenic mediated disruption of promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies induces ganciclovir susceptibility in Epstein-Barr positive epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sides, Mark D; Block, Gregory J; Shan, Bin; Esteves, Kyle C; Lin, Zhen; Flemington, Erik K; Lasky, Joseph A

    2011-07-20

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML NBs) have been implicated in host immune response to viral infection. PML NBs are targeted for degradation during reactivation of herpes viruses, suggesting that disruption of PML NB function supports this aspect of the viral life cycle. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) has been shown to suppress EBV reactivation. Our finding that LMP1 induces PML NB immunofluorescence intensity led to the hypothesis that LMP1 may modulate PML NBs as a means of maintaining EBV latency. Increased PML protein and morphometric changes in PML NBs were observed in EBV infected alveolar epithelial cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Treatment with low dose arsenic trioxide disrupted PML NBs, induced expression of EBV lytic proteins, and conferred ganciclovir susceptibility. This study introduces an effective modality to induce susceptibility to ganciclovir in epithelial cells with implications for the treatment of EBV associated pathologies. PMID:21605886

  5. Activity of the Aurora Kinase inhibitor VX-680 against Bcr/Abl positive acute lymphoblastic leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Fei; Stoddart, Sonia; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors due to point mutations in Bcr/Abl is a challenging problem for Philadelphia-chromosome positive (Ph-positive) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients, especially for those with the T315I mutation, against which neither nilotinib or dasatinib shows significant activity. VX-680 is a pan-Aurora kinase inhibitor active against all Bcr/Abl proteins but has not been extensively examined in preclinical models of Ph-positive ALL. Here, we have tested VX-680 for treatment of Bcr/Abl positive ALL when leukemic cells are protected by the presence of stroma. Under these conditions, VX-680 showed significant effects on primary human Ph-positive ALL cells both with and without the T315I mutation, including ablation of tyrosine phosphorylation downstream of Bcr/Abl, decreased viability and induction of apoptosis. However, drug treatment of human Ph-positive ALL cells for 3 days followed by drug removal allowed the outgrowth of abnormal cells 21 days later, and upon culture of mouse Bcr/Abl ALL cells on stroma with lower concentrations of VX-680, drug-resistant cells emerged. Combined treatment of human ALL cells lacking the T315I mutation with both VX-680 and dasatinib caused significantly more cytotoxicity than each drug alone. We suggest that use of VX-680 together with a second effective drug as first-line treatment for Ph-positive ALL is likely to be safer and more useful than second-line treatment with VX-680 as monotherapy for drug-resistant T315I Ph-positive ALL. PMID:20388735

  6. Experimental study on active vibration control using genetic algorithm-based system identification and optimized positive position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszulik, Ryan R.; Shan, Jinjun

    2012-12-01

    A genetic algorithm is implemented to identify the transfer function of an experimental system consisting of a flexible manipulator with a collocated piezoelectric sensor/actuator pair. A multi-mode positive position feedback controller is then designed based upon the identified transfer function. To this end, the same iteratively implemented genetic algorithm is used to optimize all controller parameters by minimization of the closed loop H∞-norm. The designed controller is then applied for vibration suppression on the experimental system.

  7. LINE-1 methylation is positively associated with healthier lifestyle but inversely related to body fat mass in healthy young individuals.

    PubMed

    Marques-Rocha, José Luiz; Milagro, Fermin I; Mansego, Maria Luisa; Mourão, Denise Machado; Martínez, J Alfredo; Bressan, Josefina

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of investigating if epigenetic biomarkers from white blood cells (WBC) are associated with dietary, anthropometric, metabolic, inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in young and apparently healthy individuals. We evaluated 156 individuals (91 women, 65 men; age: 23.1±3.5 years; body mass index: 22.0±2.9 kg/m(2)) for anthropometric, biochemical and clinical markers, including some components of the antioxidant defense system and inflammatory response. DNA methylation of LINE-1, TNF-α and IL-6 and the expression of some genes related to the inflammatory process were analyzed in WBC. Adiposity was lower among individuals with higher LINE-1 methylation. On the contrary, body fat-free mass was higher among those with higher LINE-1 methylation. Individuals with higher LINE-1 methylation had higher daily intakes of calories, iron and riboflavin. However, those individuals who presented lower percentages of LINE-1 methylation reported higher intakes of copper, niacin and thiamin. Interestingly, the group with higher LINE-1 methylation had a lower percentage of current smokers and more individuals practicing sports. On the other hand, TNF-α methylation percentage was negatively associated with waist girth, waist-to-hip ratio and waist-to-stature ratio. Plasma TNF-α levels were lower in those individuals with higher TNF-α methylation. This study suggests that higher levels of LINE-1 and TNF-α methylation are associated with better indicators of adiposity status in healthy young individuals. In addition, energy and micronutrient intake, as well as a healthy lifestyle, may have a role in the regulation of DNA methylation in WBC and the subsequent metabolic changes may affect epigenetic biomarkers. PMID:26786189

  8. Population structure, body mass, activity, and orientation of an aquatic snake (Seminatrix pygaea) during a drought

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodd, C.K., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The snout – vent length, tail length, weight, sex, activity, and orientation of a population of swamp snakes (Seminatrix pygaea) in north – central Florida were recorded from 1985 through 1990. A small temporary pond was monitored for 1343 days, using a drift fence – pitfall trap sampling regime. I captured 123 different snakes, plus 45 recaptures. Juveniles comprised 89% of the snakes at the pond. Females were generally longer and weighed more than males, although regression analysis showed no differences between the sexes in the relationship of length versus wet body mass. Males had longer tails than females. The sex ratio of snakes with a snout – vent length of more than 150 mm was 1:1. Activity occurred throughout the year but peaked during summer. Hydroperiod and weather conditions did not appear to influence snake activity. During the latter years of the study, a regional drought that began in the mid-1980s became quite severe. However, drought had little direct effect on overland migration or body condition but caused snakes to leave or to shorten the amount of time they spent within the pond basin. Snakes immigrated and emigrated nonrandomly; orientation was directed to and from the nearest large water body. Certain temporary ponds may comprise developmental habitat for Seminatrix pygaea. The dynamic wet – dry climatic cycles in southeastern North America may lead to the formation of metapopulations in some aquatic snakes.

  9. The electricidal effect is active in an experimental model of Staphylococcus epidermidis chronic foreign body osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Del Pozo, Jose L; Rouse, Mark S; Euba, Gorane; Kang, Cheol-In; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Steckelberg, James M; Patel, Robin

    2009-10-01

    Treatment with low-amperage (200 microA) electrical current was compared to intravenous doxycycline treatment or no treatment in a rabbit model of Staphylococcus epidermidis chronic foreign body osteomyelitis to determine if the electricidal effect is active in vivo. A stainless steel implant and 10(4) CFU of planktonic S. epidermidis were placed into the medullary cavity of the tibia. Four weeks later, rabbits were assigned to one of three groups with treatment administered for 21 days. The groups included those receiving no treatment (n = 10), intravenous doxycycline (n = 14; 8 mg/kg of body weight three times per day), and electrical current (n = 15; 200 microA continuous delivery). Following treatment, rabbits were sacrificed and the tibias quantitatively cultured. Bacterial load was significantly reduced in the doxycycline (median, 2.55 [range, 0.50 to 6.13] log10 CFU/g of bone) and electrical-current (median, 1.09 [range, 0.50 to 2.99] log10 CFU/g of bone) groups, compared to the level for the control group (median, 4.16 [range, 3.70 to 5.66] log10 CFU/g of bone) (P < 0.0001). Moreover, treatment with electrical current was statistically significantly more efficacious (P = 0.035) than doxycycline treatment. The electricidal effect (the bactericidal activity of low-amperage electrical current against bacterial biofilms) is active in vivo in the treatment of experimental S. epidermidis chronic foreign body osteomyelitis. PMID:19651912

  10. Role of physical activity and sleep duration in growth and body composition of preschool-aged children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of physical activity patterns and sleep duration on growth and body composition of preschool-aged children remains unresolved. Aims were (1) to delineate cross-sectional associations among physical activity components, sleep, total energy expenditure (TEE), and body size and composition; ...

  11. Positive effect of exercise training at maximal fat oxidation intensity on body composition and lipid metabolism in overweight middle-aged women.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sijie; Wang, Jianxiong; Cao, Liquan; Guo, Zhen; Wang, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 10 weeks of supervised exercise training at the maximal fat oxidation (FATmax) intensity would improve important variables of body composition and lipid metabolism in overweight middle-aged women. A longitudinal study design was employed to evaluate the effects of FATmax exercise training. Thirty women (45-59 years old; BMI 28·2 ± 1·8 kg m(-2) ; body fat 38·9 ± 4·1%) were randomly allocated into the Exercise and Control groups, n = 15 in each group. Body composition, FATmax, predicted VO2 max, lipid profile, plasma lipoprotein lipase activity and serum leptin concentration were measured before and after the experimental period. The Exercise group was trained at the individualized FATmax intensity, 5 days per week and 1 h per day for 10 weeks. No diet control was introduced during the experimental period for all participants. Exercise group obtained significant decreases in body mass, BMI, body fat % and abdominal fat mass, as well as the concentrations of triglycerides, serum leptin and blood glucose. The activity of lipoprotein lipase was increased in trained participants. There were no changes in these variables in the Control group. In addition, there was no significant change in daily energy intake for all participants before and after the experimental period. In conclusion, the 10-week FATmax exercise training achieved improvements in body composition and lipid metabolism in overweight middle-aged women. This result suggests FATmax is an effective exercise training intensity for obesity treatment. PMID:27072372

  12. Method for making high resistance chromium-free semiconductor substrate body with low resistance active semiconductor layer by surface irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kniepkamp, H.

    1984-10-30

    A high resistance semiconductor substrate body with a thin low resistance active semiconductor layer thereon is generated by a method including the steps of subjecting the semiconductor substrate body to neutron bombardment to a degree which produces high resistance in the semiconductor body and whereby doping substances are generated in the substrate body by the thermal neutron bombardment. A thin low resistant active semiconductor layer is then generated on the substrate body by annealing, a surface of the semiconductor substrate body up to a selected depth by laser radiation or electron radiation such that the lattice deterioration which was caused by the neutron bombardment is eliminated but the doping which was generated by the transmutation of elements during neutron bombardment remains. The annealing can be undertaken only in selected regions on the surface of the semiconductor substrate body, thereby facilitating the construction of integrated circuit components thereon.

  13. Active vibration suppression through positive acceleration feedback on a building-like structure: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enríquez-Zárate, J.; Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the structural and dynamic analysis of a building-like structure consisting of a three-story building with one active vibration absorber. The base of the structure is perturbed using an electromagnetic shaker, which provides forces with a wide range of excitation frequencies, including some resonance frequencies of the structure. One beam-column of the structure is coupled with a PZT stack actuator to reduce the vibrations. The overall mechanical structure is modeled using Euler-Lagrange methodology and validated using experimental modal analysis and Fine Element Method (FEM) techniques. The active control laws are synthesized to actively attenuate the vibration system response via the PZT stack actuator, caused by excitation forces acting on the base of the structure. The control scheme is obtained using Positive Acceleration Feedback (PAF) and Multiple Positive Acceleration Feedback (MPAF) to improve the closed-loop system response. Some experimental results are included to illustrate the overall system performance.

  14. Positive And Negative Feedback Loops Coupled By Common Transcription Activator And Repressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sielewiesiuk, Jan; Łopaciuk, Agata

    2015-03-01

    Dynamical systems consisting of two interlocked loops with negative and positive feedback have been studied using the linear analysis of stability and numerical solutions. Conditions for saddle-node bifurcation were formulated in a general form. Conditions for Hopf bifurcations were found in a few symmetrical cases. Auto-oscillations, when they exist, are generated by the negative feedback repressive loop. This loop determines the frequency and amplitude of oscillations. The positive feedback loop of activation slightly modifies the oscillations. Oscillations are possible when the difference between Hilll's coefficients of the repression and activation is sufficiently high. The highly cooperative activation loop with a fast turnover slows down or even makes the oscillations impossible. The system under consideration can constitute a component of epigenetic or enzymatic regulation network.

  15. The effect of body position on developing ultrasound criteria for the assessment of the internal jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Clements, E; Bonfield, M; Sassano, A

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies investigating chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency highlighted that intracranial venous return has not yet been routinely investigated by ultrasound in the normal population. This creates an absence of a reference standard and raises concerns that the approach introduces variations into the results. The primary objective of this study was to develop reference standards for the assessment of the internal jugular vein in a normal population. A prospective small-scale study was conducted. Internal jugular veins of 31 normal candidates were examined using B-Mode and PW Doppler. Measurements at proximal and mid-point internal jugular vein were taken in sitting (90°) and supine (0°) positions. Area measurements were taken during passive respiration in cm(2). Time average velocity measurements were taken during passive respiration over a 3-second period. Reflux measurements were taken after apnoea and reflux was recorded from any reversed flow. Measurements were taken three times; an average was calculated and statically analysed. Of the 31 participants, one was excluded from the study and 30 were suitable. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyse the results; all results (area, time average velocity and reflux) showed that there was a significant difference between the two positions with p < 0.05 (two-tailed). This pilot study does suggest that there is a significant difference in area, time average velocity and reflux measurements of the internal jugular vein when taken in the sitting and supine position, which could affect the outcome of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency. A further large-scale study is required to validate and standardise the assessment of the internal jugular vein. PMID:27433241

  16. The effect of body position on developing ultrasound criteria for the assessment of the internal jugular vein

    PubMed Central

    Bonfield, M; Sassano, A

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies investigating chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency highlighted that intracranial venous return has not yet been routinely investigated by ultrasound in the normal population. This creates an absence of a reference standard and raises concerns that the approach introduces variations into the results. The primary objective of this study was to develop reference standards for the assessment of the internal jugular vein in a normal population. A prospective small-scale study was conducted. Internal jugular veins of 31 normal candidates were examined using B-Mode and PW Doppler. Measurements at proximal and mid-point internal jugular vein were taken in sitting (90°) and supine (0°) positions. Area measurements were taken during passive respiration in cm2. Time average velocity measurements were taken during passive respiration over a 3-second period. Reflux measurements were taken after apnoea and reflux was recorded from any reversed flow. Measurements were taken three times; an average was calculated and statically analysed. Of the 31 participants, one was excluded from the study and 30 were suitable. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyse the results; all results (area, time average velocity and reflux) showed that there was a significant difference between the two positions with p < 0.05 (two-tailed). This pilot study does suggest that there is a significant difference in area, time average velocity and reflux measurements of the internal jugular vein when taken in the sitting and supine position, which could affect the outcome of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency. A further large-scale study is required to validate and standardise the assessment of the internal jugular vein.

  17. Cumulative activation during positive and negative events and state anxiety predicts subsequent inertia of amygdala reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Miendlarzewska, Ewa A.; Eryilmaz, Hamdi; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Inertia, together with intensity and valence, is an important component of emotion. We tested whether positive and negative events generate lingering changes in subsequent brain responses to unrelated threat stimuli and investigated the impact of individual anxiety. We acquired fMRI data while participants watched positive or negative movie-clips and subsequently performed an unrelated task with fearful and neutral faces. We quantified changes in amygdala reactivity to fearful faces as a function of the valence of preceding movies and cumulative neural activity evoked during them. We demonstrate that amygdala responses to emotional movies spill over to subsequent processing of threat information in a valence-specific manner: negative movies enhance later amygdala activation whereas positive movies attenuate it. Critically, the magnitude of such changes is predicted by a measure of cumulative amygdala responses to the preceding positive or negative movies. These effects appear independent of overt attention, are regionally limited to amygdala, with no changes in functional connectivity. Finally, individuals with higher state anxiety displayed stronger modulation of amygdala reactivity by positive movies. These results suggest that intensity and valence of emotional events as well as anxiety levels promote local changes in amygdala sensitivity to threat, highlighting the importance of past experience in shaping future affective reactivity. PMID:24603023

  18. To use or not to use torpor? Activity and body temperature as predictors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Nereda; Geiser, Fritz

    2007-06-01

    When food is limited and/or environmental conditions are unfavourable, many mammals reduce activity and use torpor to save energy. Nevertheless, reliable predictors for torpor occurrence, especially in the wild, are currently not available. Interrelations between torpor use and other energy conserving strategies are also poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that reductions in normothermic body temperature ( T b) and the period of activity before torpor events could be used as predictors for torpor occurrence in sugar gliders, Petaurus breviceps (body mass, ˜125 g), known to display daily torpor in the wild. Occurrence of torpor was preceded by significant (˜10-25%) reductions of the duration of the activity phase. Moreover, the normothermic resting T b fell by an average of 1.2°C over 3 days before a torpor event, relative to individuals that did not display torpor. Our new findings suggest that before entering torpor, sugar gliders, which appear to use torpor as an emergency measure rather than a routine energy saving strategy, systematically reduce activity times and normothermic resting T bs to lower energy expenditure and perhaps to avoid employing torpor. Thus, reduced activity and normothermic T b may provide a predictive tool for the occurrence of daily torpor in the wild.

  19. Rho GTPase activity in the honey bee mushroom bodies is correlated with age and foraging experience

    PubMed Central

    Dobrin, Scott E.; Fahrbach, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    Foraging experience is correlated with structural plasticity of the mushroom bodies of the honey bee brain. While several neurotransmitter and intracellular signaling pathways have been previously implicated as mediators of these structural changes, none interact directly with the cytoskeleton, the ultimate effector of changes in neuronal morphology. The Rho family of GTPases are small, monomeric G proteins that, when activated, initiate a signaling cascade that reorganizes the neuronal cytoskeleton. In this study, we measured activity of two members of the Rho family of GTPases, Rac and RhoA, in the mushroom bodies of bees with different durations of foraging experience. A transient increase in Rac activity coupled with a transient decrease in RhoA activity was found in honey bees with 4 days foraging experience compared with same-aged new foragers. These observations are in accord with previous reports based on studies of other species of a growth supporting role for Rac and a growth opposing role for RhoA. This is the first report of Rho GTPase activation in the honey bee brain. PMID:22108023

  20. Dose evaluation based on 24Na activity in the human body at the JCO criticality accident in Tokai-mura.

    PubMed

    Momose, T; Tsujimura, N; Tasaki, T; Kanai, K; Kurihara, O; Hayashi, N; Shinohara, K

    2001-09-01

    24Na in the human body, activated by neutrons emitted at the JCO criticality accident, was observed for 62 subjects, where 148 subjects were measured by the whole body counter of JNC Tokai Works. The 148 subjects, including JCO employees and the contractors, residents neighboring the site and emergency service officers, were measured by the whole-body counter. The neutron-energy spectrum around the facility was calculated using neutron transport codes (ANISN and MCNP), and the relation between an amount of activated sodium in human body and neutron dose was evaluated from the calculated neutron energy spectrum and theoretical neutron capture probability by the human body. The maximum 24Na activity in the body was 7.7 kBq (83 Bq(24Na)/g(23Na)) and the relevant effective dose equivalent was 47 mSv. PMID:11791757

  1. The divide within: Older active ICT users position themselves against different 'Others'.

    PubMed

    Kania-Lundholm, Magdalena; Torres, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Although research into older people's internet usage patterns is rapidly growing, their understandings of digital technologies, particularly in relation to how these are informed by their understandings of aging and old age, remain unexplored. This is the case because research on older active ICT users tends to regard old age as an empirically interesting part of the life-course as opposed to a theoretically profuse source of information about why and how older people engage with digital technologies. This article explores - through focus group interviews with 30 older adults (aged 66-89) - the ways in which the social position of old age is used by older active ICT users in order to make sense of how and why they engage with these technologies. In this article, positioning theory is used to shed light on how the older people interviewed positioned themselves as 'active older users' in the interviews. The analysis brings to the fore the divide that older people themselves create as they discursively position themselves against different types of ICT users and non-users (young and old) when describing how and why they engage with digital technologies. PMID:26568212

  2. Effect of sugar positions in ginsenosides and their inhibitory potency on Na+/K+-ATPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ronald JY; Chung, Tse-yu; Li, Feng-yin; Lin, Nan-hei; Tzen, Jason TC

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether ginsenosides with various sugar attachments may act as active components responsible for the cardiac therapeutic effects of ginseng and sanqi (the roots of Panax ginseng and Panax notoginseng) via the same molecular mechanism triggered by cardiac glycosides, such as ouabain and digoxin. Methods: The structural similarity between ginsenosides and ouabain was analyzed. The inhibitory potency of ginsenosides and ouabain on Na+/K+-ATPase activity was examined and compared. Molecular modeling was exhibited for the docking of ginsenosides to Na+/K+-ATPase. Results: Ginsenosides with sugar moieties attached only to the C-3 position of the steroid-like structure, equivalent to the sugar position in cardiac glycosides, and possessed inhibitory potency on Na+/K+-ATPase activity. However, their inhibitory potency was significantly reduced or completely abolished when a monosaccharide was linked to the C-6 or C-20 position of the steroid-like structure; replacement of the monosaccharide with a disaccharide molecule at either of these positions caused the disappearance of the inhibitory potency. Molecular modeling and docking confirmed that the difference in Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitory potency among ginsenosides was due to the steric hindrance of sugar attachment at the C-6 and C-20 positions of the steroid-like structure. Conclusion: The cardiac therapeutic effects of ginseng and sanqi should be at least partly attributed to the effective inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase by their metabolized ginsenosides with sugar moieties attached only to the C-3 position of the steroid-like structure. PMID:19060914

  3. Associations of physical activity and inactivity with body tissue composition among healthy Polish women and women after mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Czerniak, U; Demuth, A; Skrzypczak, M

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the relationship between physical activity and body composition among healthy women and women who have had mastectomy. This is in order to establish whether physical activity of women after breast cancer treatment improves composition and distribution of body mass components to a degree which will allow to achieve the body composition of healthy women. Research material consists of anthropometric measurements (body height, weight) of women and bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) of body composition (using Akern - BIA 101 composition analyzer). Intensity of activity was assessed using the Physical Activity International Questionnaire. The sample consisted of 76 healthy women (active 44.74%, inactive 55.26%) and 70 females after mastectomy (54.29% and 45.71%, respectively). Mean chronological age of women after mastectomy was 53.40 years, SD=7.55, and of the healthy ones 52.38 years SD=11.01). A significant difference in body composition was noted among active and inactive women after mastectomy; namely the active females had lower weight (by approximately 12 kg), body mass index (BMI), level of fat mass (by approximately 8%) and (by approximately 5%) total body water. The active healthy women had 6% less fat mass, almost 4% more body water and 6% more fat free mass. Programmed physical activity undertaken by women after mastectomy is recommended and produces good results in the form of reduction of excessive body fat tissue. Through physical activity these women are able to achieve the same level of fat mass as healthy women. PMID:25012759

  4. Long-chain SFA at the sn-1, 3 positions of TAG reduce body fat deposition in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Gouk, Shiou Wah; Cheng, Sit Foon; Mok, Josephine Shiueh Lian; Ong, Augustine Soon Hock; Chuah, Cheng Hock

    2013-12-14

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of positional distribution of long-chain SFA in TAG, especially at the sn-1, 3 positions, on fat deposition using the C57BL/6 mouse model. Throughout the 15 weeks of the study, mice were fed with diets fortified with palm olein (POo), chemically interesterified POo (IPOo) and soyabean oil (SOY). Mice receiving the SOY-enriched diet gained significantly higher amounts of subcutaneous fat (P= 0·011) and total fat (P= 0·013) compared with the POo group, despite similar body mass gain being recorded. During normalisation with food consumption to obtain the fat:feed ratio, mice fed with the POo-enriched diet exhibited significantly lower visceral (P= 0·044), subcutaneous (P= 0·006) and total (P= 0·003) fat:feed than those fed with the SOY-enriched diet. It is noteworthy that mice fed with the IPOo-enriched diet gained 14·3 % more fat per food consumed when compared with the POo group (P= 0·013), despite their identical total fatty acid compositions. This was mainly attributed to the higher content of long-chain SFA at the sn-1, 3 positions of TAG in POo, which results in delayed absorption after deacylation as evidenced by the higher amounts of long-chain SFA excreted in the faeces of mice fed with the POo-enriched diet. Negative correlations were found between the subcutaneous, visceral as well as total fat accretion per food consumption and the total SFA content at the sn-1, 3 positions, while no relationships were found for MUFA and PUFA. The present results show that the positional distribution of long-chain SFA exerts a more profound effect on body fat accretion than the total SFA content. PMID:23756564

  5. A new copepod with transformed body plan and unique phylogenetic position parasitic in the acorn worm Ptychodera flava.

    PubMed

    Tung, Che-Huang; Cheng, Yu-Rong; Lin, Ching-Yi; Ho, Ju-Shey; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Yu, Jr-Kai; Su, Yi-Hsien

    2014-02-01

    Symbiotic copepods compose one-third of the known copepod species and are associated with a wide range of animal groups. Two parasitic copepods endoparasitic in acorn worms (Hemichordata), Ive balanoglossi and Ubius hilli, collected in the Mediterranean Sea and Australian waters, respectively, were described a century ago. Here we report a new parasitic copepod species, Ive ptychoderae sp. nov., found in Ptychodera flava, a widespread acorn worm in the Indo-Pacific Ocean and an emerging organism for developmental and evolutionary studies. The female of I. ptychoderae is characterized by having a reduced maxilliped and five pairs of annular swellings along the body that are morphologically similar but distinguishable from those in the two previously described parasitic copepods in acorn worms. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 18S rDNA sequence shows that I. ptychoderae may belong to Poecilostomatoida but represent a new family, which we name Iveidae fam. nov. Ive ptychoderae is commonly found in the acorn worm population with an average prevalence of 42% during the collecting period. The infection of the parasite induces the formation of cysts and causes localized lesions of the host tissues, suggesting that it may have negative effects on its host. Interestingly, most cysts contain a single female with one or multiple male copepods, suggesting that their sex determination may be controlled by environmental conditions. The relationships between the parasitic copepods and acorn worms thus provide a platform for understanding physiological and ecological influences and coevolution between parasites and hosts. PMID:24648208

  6. Studies on the Antifatigue Activities of Cordyceps militaris Fruit Body Extract in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Song, Jingjing; Wang, Yingwu; Teng, Meiyu; Cai, Guangsheng; Xu, Hongkai; Guo, Hanxiao; Liu, Yang; Wang, Di; Teng, Lesheng

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris has been used extensively as a crude drug and a folk tonic food in East Asia due to its various pharmacological activities. Our study aims to investigate the effect of Cordyceps militaris fruit body extract (CM) on antifatigue in mouse model. Two week CM administration significantly delayed fatigue phenomenon which is confirmed via rotating rod test, forced swimming test and forced running test. Compared to nontreated mouse, CM administration increased ATP levels and antioxidative enzymes activity and reduced the levels of lactic acid, lactic dehydrogenase, malondialdehyde, and reactive oxygen species. Further data suggests that CM-induced fatigue recovery is mainly through activating 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways and regulating serum hormone level. Moreover, CM-enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK contributes to its antioxidant effect. Our data provides experimental evidence in supporting clinical use of CM as an effective agent against fatigue. PMID:26351509

  7. Maintaining physical activity during refeeding improves body composition, intestinal hyperpermeability and behavior in anorectic mice

    PubMed Central

    Achamrah, Najate; Nobis, Séverine; Breton, Jonathan; Jésus, Pierre; Belmonte, Liliana; Maurer, Brigitte; Legrand, Romain; Bôle-Feysot, Christine; Rego, Jean Luc do; Goichon, Alexis; Rego, Jean Claude do; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O; Claeyssens, Sophie; Coëffier, Moïse

    2016-01-01

    A role of gut-brain axis emerges in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and maintaining adapted physical activity during refeeding remains discussed. We aimed to assess gastrointestinal protein metabolism and investigate the contribution of physical activity during refeeding in C57BL/6 mice with activity-based anorexia (ABA). ABA mice exhibited lower body weight and food intake with increase of lean mass/fat mass ratio and fat oxidation. Colonic permeability was increased in ABA. Ad libitum food access was then restored and ABA group was divided into two subgroups, with access to running wheel (ABA-PA) or not (ABA-NPA). After refeeding, fat free mass was completely restored only in ABA-PA. Colonic permeability was enhanced in ABA-NPA. Finally, muscle kynurenine conversion into kynurenic acid was lower in ABA-NPA who also exhibited altered behavior. Maintaining physical activity during refeeding may thus limit colonic hyperpermeability and improve behavior in anorectic mice. PMID:26906060

  8. Maintaining physical activity during refeeding improves body composition, intestinal hyperpermeability and behavior in anorectic mice.

    PubMed

    Achamrah, Najate; Nobis, Séverine; Breton, Jonathan; Jésus, Pierre; Belmonte, Liliana; Maurer, Brigitte; Legrand, Romain; Bôle-Feysot, Christine; do Rego, Jean Luc; Goichon, Alexis; Rego, Jean Claude do; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O; Claeyssens, Sophie; Coëffier, Moïse

    2016-01-01

    A role of gut-brain axis emerges in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and maintaining adapted physical activity during refeeding remains discussed. We aimed to assess gastrointestinal protein metabolism and investigate the contribution of physical activity during refeeding in C57BL/6 mice with activity-based anorexia (ABA). ABA mice exhibited lower body weight and food intake with increase of lean mass/fat mass ratio and fat oxidation. Colonic permeability was increased in ABA. Ad libitum food access was then restored and ABA group was divided into two subgroups, with access to running wheel (ABA-PA) or not (ABA-NPA). After refeeding, fat free mass was completely restored only in ABA-PA. Colonic permeability was enhanced in ABA-NPA. Finally, muscle kynurenine conversion into kynurenic acid was lower in ABA-NPA who also exhibited altered behavior. Maintaining physical activity during refeeding may thus limit colonic hyperpermeability and improve behavior in anorectic mice. PMID:26906060

  9. Fundamental study of lower limb muscle activity using an angled whole body vibration exercise instrument.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Kang, Seung Rok; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    This research was performed to assess the effects of angled whole body vibration on muscle activity of the lower limbs, by examining adults in their twenties during squat exercises, taking into account two variables of exercise intensity (vibration frequency and gradient). Twenty healthy males in their twenties with previous experience of more than 6 month's weight training and no past medical history were included in this study. The experiment was performed by participating in squat exercises which consisted of 3 sets (1 set = 5 seconds x 3 repetitions of exercise), and the muscle activities of the Rectus Femoris, Vastus Lateralis, Vastus Medialis were measured with variation in the gradients of 0°, 10°, and 20°, and vibration frequencies of 20, 30, and 40 Hz. At 30 and 40 Hz, the vastus lateralis showed the highest change in muscle activity, while activity of the vastus medialis also increased significantly. Analysis of muscle activity according to the gradient showed a significant increase of the vastus lateralis at 20°, while the highest muscle activity at 20° was observed for the vastus medialis. In comparison of the change in lower limb muscle activity according to simultaneous stimulation, at a gradient of 10°, high activity was shown in muscle, while at 20°, high muscle activities were produced at 40 Hz in the vastus lateralis, 40 Hz in the rectus femoris, and both 30 and 40 Hz in the vastus medialis. PMID:25226944

  10. Acute Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on Trunk and Neck Muscle Activity in Consideration of Different Vibration Loads

    PubMed Central

    Perchthaler, Dennis; Hauser, Simon; Heitkamp, Hans-Christian; Hein, Tobias; Grau, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The intention of this study was to systematically analyze the impact of biomechanical parameters in terms of different peak-to-peak displacements and knee angles on trunk and neck muscle activity during whole-body vibration (WBV). 28 healthy men and women (age 23 ± 3 years) performed four static squat positions (2 peak-to-peak displacements x 2 knee angles) on a side alternating vibration platform with and without vibration stimulus. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record the neuromuscular activity of the erector spinae muscle, the rectus abdominis muscle, and of the splenius muscle. EMG levels normalized to maximal voluntary contractions ranged between 3.2 – 27.2 % MVC during WBV. The increase in muscle activity caused by WBV was significant, particularly for the back muscles, which was up to 19.0 % MVC. The impact of the factor ‘condition’ (F-values ranged from 13.4 to 132.0, p ≤ 0.001) and of the factor ‘peak-to-peak displacement’ (F-values ranged from 6.4 to 69.0 and p-values from < 0.001 to 0.01) were statistically significant for each muscle tested. However, the factor ‘knee angle’ only affected the back muscles (F-value 10.3 and 7.3, p ≤ 0.01). The results of this study should give more information for developing effective and safe training protocols for WBV treatment of the upper body. Key points The maximum levels of muscle activity were significantly reached at high amplitudes at a vibration frequency of 30 Hz. WBV leads to a higher muscle activation of the lower back muscles than of the abdominal muscles. Both knee angles of 30° and 45° have similar effects on the vibration load and represent safe positions to prevent any actual harm. Certain combinations of the biomechanical variables have similar effects on the level of muscle activity. PMID:25729303

  11. In Thyroidectomized Thyroid Cancer Patients, False-Positive I-131 Whole Body Scans Are Often Caused by Inflammation Rather Than Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garger, Yana Basis; Winfeld, Mathew; Friedman, Kent; Blum, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To show that I-131 false-positive results on whole-body scans (WBSs) after thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer may be a result of inflammation unassociated with the cancer. Methods. We performed a retrospective image analysis of our database of thyroid cancer patients who underwent WBS from January 2008 to January 2012 to identify and stratify false positives. Results. A total of 564 patients underwent WBS during the study period; 96 patients were referred for 99 I-131 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) scans to better interpret cryptic findings. Among them, 73 scans were shown to be falsely positive; 40/73 or 54.7% of false-positive findings were a result of inflammation. Of the findings, 17 were in the head, 1 in the neck, 4 in the chest, 3 in the abdomen, and 14 in the pelvis; 1 had a knee abscess. Conclusions. In our series, inflammation caused the majority of false-positive WBSs. I-131 SPECT/CT is powerful in the differentiation of inflammation from thyroid cancer. By excluding metastatic disease, one can properly prognosticate outcome and avoid unnecessary, potentially harmful treatment of patients with thyroid cancer. PMID:26977418

  12. Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior: Independent Associations With Body Composition Variables in Brazilian Children.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Gerson Luis de Moraes; Oliveira, Luis Carlos; Araujo, Timoteo Leandro; Matsudo, Victor; Barreira, Tiago V; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Katzmarzyk, Peter

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the independent associations of accelerometer-determined sedentary behavior, physical activity, and steps/day with body composition variables in Brazilian children. 485 children wore accelerometers for 7 days. Variables included time in sedentary behavior and different physical activity intensities (light, moderate, vigorous, or moderate-to-vigorous) and steps/day. Body fat percentage was measured using a bioelectrical impedance scale, and BMI was calculated. Children spent 55.7% of the awake portion of the day in sedentary behavior, 37.6% in light physical activity, 4.6% in moderate physical activity, and 1.9% in vigorous physical activity. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and steps/day were negatively associated with body composition (BMI and body fat percentage) variables, independent of sex and sedentary behavior. Beta values were higher for vigorous physical activity than moderate physical activity. Vigorous physical activity was negatively associated with BMI (β-.1425) and body fat percentage (β-.3082; p < .0001). In boys, there were significant negative associations between moderate, vigorous, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and steps/day with body composition, and in girls, there was only a negative association with vigorous physical activity, independent of sedentary behavior. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and steps/day (in boys), but especially vigorous physical activity (in boys and girls), are associated with body composition, independent of sedentary behavior. Sedentary behavior was not related with any of the body composition variables once adjusted for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. PMID:25902556

  13. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doyle, Patricia M.; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2015-06-23

    Here, chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric 53Mn–53Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as 2.4 +1.8-1.3 Myr after calcium–aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition,more » measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and 4.2+0.8-0.7 Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ~1.8–2.5 Myr after CAIs.« less

  14. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Patricia M.; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2015-06-23

    Here, chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric 53Mn–53Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as 2.4 +1.8-1.3 Myr after calcium–aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition, measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and 4.2+0.8-0.7 Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ~1.8–2.5 Myr after CAIs.

  15. Anaphylaxis Imaging: Non-Invasive Measurement of Surface Body Temperature and Physical Activity in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-Szalai, Krisztina; Pali-Schöll, Isabella; Krishnamurthy, Durga; Stremnitzer, Caroline; Flaschberger, Ingo; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2016-01-01

    In highly sensitized patients, the encounter with a specific allergen from food, insect stings or medications may rapidly induce systemic anaphylaxis with potentially lethal symptoms. Countless animal models of anaphylaxis, most often in BALB/c mice, were established to understand the pathophysiology and to prove the safety of different treatments. The most common symptoms during anaphylactic shock are drop of body temperature and reduced physical activity. To refine, improve and objectify the currently applied manual monitoring methods, we developed an imaging method for the automated, non-invasive measurement of the whole-body surface temperature and, at the same time, of the horizontal and vertical movement activity of small animals. We tested the anaphylaxis imaging in three in vivo allergy mouse models for i) milk allergy, ii) peanut allergy and iii) egg allergy. These proof-of-principle experiments suggest that the imaging technology represents a reliable non-invasive method for the objective monitoring of small animals during anaphylaxis over time. We propose that the method will be useful for monitoring diseases associated with both, changes in body temperature and in physical behaviour. PMID:26963393

  16. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Patricia M.; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2015-06-01

    Chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric 53Mn-53Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first 53Mn-53Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as Myr after calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition, measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and 53Mn-53Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ~1.8-2.5 Myr after CAIs.

  17. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Patricia M; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J; Hutcheon, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    Chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric (53)Mn-(53)Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first (53)Mn-(53)Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as Myr after calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition, measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and (53)Mn-(53)Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ∼1.8-2.5 Myr after CAIs. PMID:26100451

  18. Physical Activity-Associated Bone Loading During Adolescence and Young Adulthood Is Positively Associated With Adult Bone Mineral Density in Men.

    PubMed

    Strope, Matthew A; Nigh, Peggy; Carter, Melissa I; Lin, Nantian; Jiang, Jun; Hinton, Pamela S

    2015-11-01

    Physical activity during growth increases bone mass and strength; however, it remains unclear whether these benefits persist. The purpose of this study was to determine: (a) if bone loading during adolescence (13-18 years) or young adulthood (19-29 years) in men is associated with greater bone mineral density (BMD) in adulthood; (b) if current participation in high-impact activity (ground reaction force>4×body weight) and/or resistance training is associated with greater BMD; and, (c) if continuous participation in a high-impact activity from adolescence to adulthood is associated with greater BMD. Apparently healthy, physically active men aged 30 to 65 years (n=203) participated in this cross-sectional study. Exercise-associated bone loading was estimated based on ground reaction forces of historical physical activity. Current BMD was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Participants were grouped based on current participation in a high-impact activity (n=18), resistance training (n=57), both (n=14), or neither (n=114); groups were compared by two-way analysis of covariance. Bone loading during adolescence and young adulthood were significant, positive predictors of BMD of the whole body, total hip, and lumbar spine, adjusting for lean body mass and/or age in the regression models. Individuals who currently participate in a high-impact activity had greater lumbar spine BMD than nonparticipants. Men who continuously participated in a high-impact activity had greater hip and lumbar spine BMD than those who did not. In conclusion, physical activity-associated bone loading both during and after skeletal growth is positively associated with adult bone mass. PMID:25237041

  19. Total Body Metabolic Tumor Response in ALK Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with ALK Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Koole, Michel J. B.; Bongaerts, Alphons H. H.; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In ALK-positive advanced NSCLC, crizotinib has a high response rate and effectively increases quality of life and survival. CT measurement of the tumor may insufficiently reflect the actual tumor load changes during targeted therapy with crizotinib. We explored whether 18F-FDG PET measured metabolic changes are different from CT based changes and studied the impact of these changes on disease progression. Methods 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed prior to and after 6 weeks of crizotinib treatment. Tumor response on CT was classified with RECIST 1.1, while 18F-FDG PET response was assessed according to the 1999 EORTC recommendations and PERCIST criteria. Agreement was assessed using McNemars test. During follow-up, patients received additional PET/CT during crizotinib treatment and second generation ALK inhibition. We assessed whether PET was able to detect progression earlier then CT. Results In this exploratory study 15 patients were analyzed who were treated with crizotinib. There was a good agreement in the applicability of CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT using the EORTC recommendations. During first line crizotinib and subsequent second line ALK inhibitors, PET was able to detect progression earlier then CT in 10/22 (45%) events of progression and in the others disease progression was detected simultaneously. Conclusion In advanced ALK positive NSCLC PET was able to detect progressive disease earlier than with CT in nearly half of the assessments while both imaging tests performed similar in the others. PMID:27137772

  20. [Comparative urinary bactericidal activity of oral antibiotics against gram-positive pathogens].

    PubMed

    Bedenić, Branka; Budimir, Ana; Gverić, Ana; Plecko, Vanda; Vranes, Jasmina; Bubonja-Sonje, Marina; Kalenić, Smilja

    2012-01-01

    In routine bacteriological laboratories the antibacterial activity of antibiotics is determined by in vitro testing, usually by disk-diffusion test. However, in vitro testing does not always reflect antibacterial efficiency of antibiotics in vivo. In this investigation, the urine samples obtained in a single oral dose pharmacokinetic study were examined for their bactericidal activity against a range of relevant Gram-positive urinary tract pathogens. Urinary bactericidal activity of linezolid had been previously compared with ciprofloxacin but not with other oral antibiotics such as beta-lactams. Linezolid showed satisfactory urinary bactericidal titres throughout the whole testing period against all Gram-positive cocci. Fluoroquinolones displayed high and persisting levels of urinary bactericidal activity against staphylococci, but their activity against enterococci was weaker. According to the results of ex-vivo testing amoxycillin could be recommended only for infections caused by E. faecalis. Amoxycillin combined with clavulanic acid can be considered as a therapeutic option for infections caused by S. saprophyticus and E. faecalis. Older cephalosporins had high titres only against S. saprophyticus. Their drawback is a short elimination half-time in urine resulting in rapid decrease of urinary bactericidal titers during dosing interval. Furthermore, they do not show activity against enterococci due to their intrinsic resistance to cephalosporins. PMID:22930932

  1. Body tissue activation using micro-spot atmospheric pressure plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Takumi; Hirata, Takamichi; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Akiya, Masahiro; Mori, Akira

    2012-10-01

    Experiments have been performed involving directly irradiating body tissues with atmospheric pressure plasma for various medical engineering applications of plasmas. Plasma irradiation was used to burn back dermis of rats. Then, healing and improvement of the scald areas were observed. Additionally, we devoted attention to the angiogenesis, which is a key component of the healing mechanism. Plasma irradiated rats and non treatment were performed an intravenous injection of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labelled tomato-lectin. The neo-vascular vessels were observed by a confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the quantities were calculated. Each quantity was the non treatment: 9.2 +/-- 0.77 and plasma irradiation: 18.4 +/-- 2.9. These data indicates that direct plasma irradiation involving ion/radical may promote angiogenesis, and it promotes living-body activation.

  2. Passive damping to enhance active positioning of a prototype lithography platen

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, D.J.; Kipp, R.L.; Gregory, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    A viscoelastic tuned-mass damper was used to suppress specific structural modes of a prototype lithography platen. The platen is magnetically levitated and it is repositioned and held in position by a closed-loop feedback control system. Important capabilities of the platen control system are precise positioning and rapid repositioning, which tend to require high frequency bandwidth. The high bandwidth excites structural vibration modes which are disruptive to the control system. The present work was to develop and demonstrate a means to suppress these modes using passive vibration damping techniques. The motivation is to increase the robustness of the platen positioning and control system by reducing unwanted modal accelerations excited by high control system bandwidth. Activities performed and discussed in this paper include the analytical design of viscoelastic tuned-mass dampers and the demonstration/testing of their effectiveness on the platen while levitated and controlled.

  3. Patterns of neural activity in the human ventral premotor cortex reflect a whole-body multisensory percept

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Giovanni; Björnsdotter, Malin; Petkova, Valeria I.; Abdulkarim, Zakaryah; Ehrsson, H. Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the integration of multisensory signals from the body in fronto-parietal association areas underlies the perception of a body part as belonging to one's physical self. What are the neural mechanisms that enable the perception of one's entire body as a unified entity? In one behavioral and one fMRI multivoxel pattern analysis experiment, we used a full-body illusion to investigate how congruent visuo-tactile signals from a single body part facilitate the emergence of the sense of ownership of the entire body. To elicit this illusion, participants viewed the body of a mannequin from the first-person perspective via head-mounted displays while synchronous touches were applied to the hand, abdomen, or leg of the bodies of the participant and the mannequin; asynchronous visuo-tactile stimuli served as controls. The psychometric data indicated that the participants perceived ownership of the entire artificial body regardless of the body segment that received the synchronous visuo-tactile stimuli. Based on multivoxel pattern analysis, we found that the neural responses in the left ventral premotor cortex displayed illusion-specific activity patterns that generalized across all tested pairs of body parts. Crucially, a tripartite generalization analysis revealed the whole-body specificity of these premotor activity patterns. Finally, we also identified multivoxel patterns in the premotor, intraparietal, and lateral occipital cortices and in the putamen that reflected multisensory responses specific to individual body parts. Based on these results, we propose that the dynamic formation of a whole-body percept may be mediated by neuronal populations in the ventral premotor cortex that contain visuo-tactile receptive fields encompassing multiple body segments. PMID:25583608

  4. Assessment of physical activity of the human body considering the thermodynamic system.

    PubMed

    Hochstein, Stefan; Rauschenberger, Philipp; Weigand, Bernhard; Siebert, Tobias; Schmitt, Syn; Schlicht, Wolfgang; Převorovská, Světlana; Maršík, František

    2016-01-01

    Correctly dosed physical activity is the basis of a vital and healthy life, but the measurement of physical activity is certainly rather empirical resulting in limited individual and custom activity recommendations. Certainly, very accurate three-dimensional models of the cardiovascular system exist, however, requiring the numeric solution of the Navier-Stokes equations of the flow in blood vessels. These models are suitable for the research of cardiac diseases, but computationally very expensive. Direct measurements are expensive and often not applicable outside laboratories. This paper offers a new approach to assess physical activity using thermodynamical systems and its leading quantity of entropy production which is a compromise between computation time and precise prediction of pressure, volume, and flow variables in blood vessels. Based on a simplified (one-dimensional) model of the cardiovascular system of the human body, we develop and evaluate a setup calculating entropy production of the heart to determine the intensity of human physical activity in a more precise way than previous parameters, e.g. frequently used energy considerations. The knowledge resulting from the precise real-time physical activity provides the basis for an intelligent human-technology interaction allowing to steadily adjust the degree of physical activity according to the actual individual performance level and thus to improve training and activity recommendations. PMID:26296149

  5. Individual Public Transportation Accessibility is Positively Associated with Self-Reported Active Commuting

    PubMed Central

    Djurhuus, Sune; Hansen, Henning Sten; Aadahl, Mette; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Background: Active commuters have lower risk of chronic disease. Understanding which of the, to some extent, modifiable characteristics of public transportation that facilitate its use is thus important in a public health perspective. The aim of the study was to examine the association between individual public transportation accessibility and self-reported active commuting, and whether the associations varied with commute distance, age, and gender. Methods: Twenty-eight thousand nine hundred twenty-eight commuters in The Capital Region of Denmark reported self-reported time spent either walking or cycling to work or study each day and the distance to work or study. Data were obtained from the Danish National Health Survey collected in February to April 2010. Individual accessibility by public transportation was calculated using a multi-modal network in a GIS. Multilevel logistic regression was used to analyze the association between accessibility, expressed as access area, and being an active commuter. Results: Public transport accessibility area based on all stops within walking and cycling distance was positively associated with being an active commuter. Distance to work, age, and gender modified the associations. Residing within 10 km commute distance and in areas of high accessibility was associated with being an active commuter and meeting the recommendations of physical activity. For the respondents above 29 years, individual public transportation accessibility was positively associated with being an active commuter. Women having high accessibility had significantly higher odds of being an active commuter compared to having a low accessibility. For men, the associations were insignificant. Conclusion: This study extends the knowledge about the driving forces of using public transportation for commuting by examining the individual public transportation accessibility. Findings suggest that transportation accessibility supports active commuting and planning

  6. Food reward in active compared to inactive men: Roles for gastric emptying and body fat.

    PubMed

    Horner, Katy M; Finlayson, Graham; Byrne, Nuala M; King, Neil A

    2016-06-01

    Habitual exercise could contribute to weight management by altering processes of food reward via the gut-brain axis. We investigated hedonic processes of food reward in active and inactive men and characterised relationships with gastric emptying and body fat. Forty-four men (active: n=22; inactive: n=22, BMI range 21-36kg/m(2); percent fat mass range 9-42%) were studied. Participants were provided with a standardised fixed breakfast and an ad libitum lunch meal 5h later. Explicit liking, implicit wanting and preference among high-fat, low-fat, sweet and savoury food items were assessed immediately post-breakfast (fed state) and again pre-lunch (hungry state) using the Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire. Gastric emptying was assessed by (13)C-octanoic acid breath test. Active individuals exhibited a lower liking for foods overall and a greater implicit wanting for low-fat savoury foods in the fed state, compared to inactive men. Differences in the fed state remained significant after adjusting for percent fat mass. Active men also had a greater increase in liking for savoury foods in the interval between breakfast and lunch. Faster gastric emptying was associated with liking for savoury foods and with an increase in liking for savoury foods in the postprandial interval. In contrast, greater implicit wanting for high-fat foods was associated with slower gastric emptying. These associations were independent of each other, activity status and body fat. In conclusion, active and inactive men differ in processes of food reward. The rate of gastric emptying may play a role in the association between physical activity status and food reward, via the gut-brain axis. PMID:27072508

  7. Positively Valenced Stimuli Facilitate Creative Novel Metaphoric Processes by Enhancing Medial Prefrontal Cortical Activation

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Karuna; Beeman, Mark; Faust, Miriam; Mashal, Nira

    2013-01-01

    A metaphor is a figure of speech in which a subject is symbolic of another unrelated object. In the present study, we examined neural patterns associated with both novel unfamiliar and conventional familiar metaphoric processing, and how these patterns are modulated by affective valence. Prior to fMRI scanning, participants received a list of word pairs (novel unfamiliar metaphors as well as conventional familiar metaphors) and were asked to denote the valence (positive, negative, or neutral) of each word pair. During scanning, participants had to decide whether the word pairs formed meaningful or meaningless expressions. Results indicate that participants were faster and more accurate at deciding that positively valenced metaphors were meaningful compared to neutral metaphors. These behavioral findings were accompanied by increased activation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and the right inferior parietal lobe (RIPL). Specifically, positively valenced novel unfamiliar metaphors elicited activation in these brain regions in addition to the left superior temporal gyrus when compared to neutral novel metaphors. We also found that the mPFC and PCC mediated the processing of positively valenced metaphors when compared to negatively valenced metaphors. Positively valenced conventional metaphors, however, elicited different neural signatures when contrasted with either neutral or negatively valenced conventional metaphors. Together, our results indicate that positively valenced stimuli facilitate creative metaphoric processes (specifically novel metaphoric processes) by mediating attention and cognitive control processes required for the access, integration, and selection of semantic associations via modulation of the mPFC. The present study is important for the development of neural accounts of emotion-cognition interactions required for creativity, language, and successful social functioning in general. PMID:23637686

  8. Unintentional movements produced by back-coupling between the actual and referent body configurations: Violations of equifinality in multi-joint positional tasks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Solnik, Stanislaw; Wu, Yen-Hsun; Latash, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    We tested several predictions of a recent theory that combines the ideas of control with referent configurations, hierarchical control, and the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis. In particular, we tested a hypothesis that unintentional changes in hand coordinate can happen following a long-lasting transient perturbation. The subjects grasped a handle with the right hand, occupied an initial position against a bias force produced by the Hapticmaster robot, and then tried not to react to changes in the robot-produced force. Changes in the force were smooth and transient; they always ended with the same force as the bias force. The force-change amplitude and the time the force was kept at the new level (dwell time) varied across conditions. After the transient force change was over, the handle rested in a position that differed significantly from the initial position. The amplitude of this unintentional movement increased with the amplitude of transient force change and with the dwell time. In the new position, the across-trials joint configuration variance was mostly confined to a sub-space compatible with the average handle coordinate and orientation (the UCMs for these variables). We view these results as the first experimental support for the hypothesis on back-coupling between the referent and actual body configurations during multi-joint actions. The results suggest that, even under the instruction “not to react to transient force changes”, the subjects may be unable to prevent unintentional drift of the referent configuration. The structure of joint configuration variance after such movements was similar to that in earlier reports on joint configuration variance after intentional movements. We conclude that the intentional and unintentional movements are products of a single neural system that can lead to intentional and unintentional shifts of the referent body configuration. PMID:25150552

  9. Identification of novel aminopiperidine derivatives for antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Yeol; An, Kyung-Mi; Jung, Juyoung; Koo, Je-Min; Kim, Jeong-Geun; Yoon, Jong-Min; Lee, Myong-Jae; Jang, HyeonSoo; Lee, Hong-Sub; Park, Soobong; Kang, Jae-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    We have previously reported amidopiperidine derivatives as a novel peptide deformylase (PDF) inhibitor and evaluated its antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, but poor pharmacokinetic profiles have resulted in low efficacy in in vivo mouse models. In order to overcome these weaknesses, we newly synthesized aminopiperidine derivatives with remarkable antimicrobial properties and oral bioavailability, and also identified their in vivo efficacy against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP). PMID:27173797

  10. Dynamic detection of window starting positions and its implementation within an activity recognition framework.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qin; Patterson, Timothy; Cleland, Ian; Nugent, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Activity recognition is an intrinsic component of many pervasive computing and ambient intelligent solutions. This has been facilitated by an explosion of technological developments in the area of wireless sensor network, wearable and mobile computing. Yet, delivering robust activity recognition, which could be deployed at scale in a real world environment, still remains an active research challenge. Much of the existing literature to date has focused on applying machine learning techniques to pre-segmented data collected in controlled laboratory environments. Whilst this approach can provide valuable ground truth information from which to build recognition models, these techniques often do not function well when implemented in near real time applications. This paper presents the application of a multivariate online change detection algorithm to dynamically detect the starting position of windows for the purposes of activity recognition. PMID:27392647

  11. Graduated exposure and positive reinforcement to overcome setting and activity avoidance in an adolescent with autism.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jonathan D; Luiselli, James K; Rue, Hanna; Whalley, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Some students who have developmental disabilities avoid settings and activities that can improve their learning and quality of life. This two-phase study concerned an adolescent boy with autism who avoided the gross-motor exercise room, gymnasium, and music room at his school; he demonstrated distress, agitation, and problem behaviors when prompted to enter these areas. Using graduated exposure combined with positive reinforcement, he learned to enter these settings without resisting and eventually to participate in activities within the settings. This article discusses this intervention approach for reducing and eliminating avoidant behavior. PMID:22987915

  12. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis. PMID:27457620

  13. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis.

  14. TNF activation of NF-κB is essential for development of single-positive thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Webb, Louise V; Ley, Steven C; Seddon, Benedict

    2016-07-25

    NF-κB activation has been implicated at multiple stages of thymic development of T cells, during which it is thought to mediate developmental signals originating from the T cell receptor (TCR). However, the Card11-Bcl10-Malt1 (CBM) complex that is essential for TCR activation of NF-κB in peripheral T cells is not required for thymocyte development. It has remained unclear whether the TCR activates NF-κB independent of the CBM complex in thymocyte development or whether another NF-κB activating receptor is involved. In the present study, we generated mice in which T cells lacked expression of both catalytic subunits of the inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK) complex, IKK1 and IKK2, to investigate this question. Although early stages of T cell development were unperturbed, maturation of CD4 and CD8 single-positive (SP) thymocytes was blocked in mice lacking IKK1/2 in the T cell lineage. We found that IKK1/2-deficient thymocytes were specifically sensitized to TNF-induced cell death in vitro. Furthermore, the block in thymocyte development in IKK1/2-deficient mice could be rescued by blocking TNF with anti-TNF mAb or by ablation of TNFRI expression. These experiments reveal an essential role for TNF activation of NF-κB to promote the survival and development of single positive T cells in the thymus. PMID:27432943

  15. Whole-body vibration effects on the muscle activity of upper and lower body muscles during the baseball swing in recreational baseball hitters.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Gabriel F; Dickin, D Clark; Crusat, Nolan J K; Dolny, Dennis G

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on the muscle recruitment of selected upper and lower body muscles during the baseball swing. Participants were recreationally trained males (n = 16, 22 +/- 2 years, 181.4 +/- 7.4 cm, 84.7 +/- 9.0 kg), with previous baseball experience. Subjects participated in three randomized sessions on separate days, consisting of three sets of five swings offa hitting tee. Exercises (upper and lower body dynamic and static movements) with or without WBVexposure were performed between swing sets. During each swing, the gastrocnemius, biceps femoris, gluteus maximus, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, and triceps brachii were evaluated for electromyographic (EMG) activity. EMG values were normalized to EMG measured during maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences in EMG activity across the three treatments. In addition, the results displayed a specific muscle recruitment order during the swing, starting with the lower body followed by the upper body muscles. This study was the first to report the recruitment order during the baseball swing. Although acute exposure to WBV did not significantly alter the muscle recruitment, these results may prove useful for practitioners looking to enhance baseball swing performance. PMID:22303781

  16. A Three-Dimensional Skeletal Reconstruction of the Stem Amniote Orobates pabsti (Diadectidae): Analyses of Body Mass, Centre of Mass Position, and Joint Mobility.

    PubMed

    Nyakatura, John A; Allen, Vivian R; Lauströer, Jonas; Andikfar, Amir; Danczak, Marek; Ullrich, Hans-Jürgen; Hufenbach, Werner; Martens, Thomas; Fischer, Martin S

    2015-01-01

    Orobates pabsti, a basal diadectid from the lower Permian, is a key fossil for the understanding of early amniote evolution. Quantitative analysis of anatomical information suffers from fragmentation of fossil bones, plastic deformation due to diagenetic processes and fragile preservation within surrounding rock matrix, preventing further biomechanical investigation. Here we describe the steps taken to digitally reconstruct MNG 10181, the holotype specimen of Orobates pabsti, and subsequently use the digital reconstruction to assess body mass, position of the centre of mass in individual segments as well as the whole animal, and study joint mobility in the shoulder and hip joints. The shape of most fossil bone fragments could be recovered from micro-focus computed tomography scans. This also revealed structures that were hitherto hidden within the rock matrix. However, parts of the axial skeleton had to be modelled using relevant isolated bones from the same locality as templates. Based on the digital fossil, mass of MNG 10181 was estimated using a model of body shape that was varied within a plausible range to account for uncertainties of the dimension. In the mean estimate model the specimen had an estimated mass of circa 4 kg. Varying of the mass distribution amongst body segments further revealed that Orobates carried most of its weight on the hind limbs. Mostly unrestricted joint morphology further suggested that MNG 10181 was able to effectively generate propulsion with the pelvic limbs. The digital reconstruction is made available for future biomechanical studies. PMID:26355297

  17. A Three-Dimensional Skeletal Reconstruction of the Stem Amniote Orobates pabsti (Diadectidae): Analyses of Body Mass, Centre of Mass Position, and Joint Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Nyakatura, John A.; Allen, Vivian R.; Lauströer, Jonas; Andikfar, Amir; Danczak, Marek; Ullrich, Hans-Jürgen; Hufenbach, Werner; Martens, Thomas; Fischer, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Orobates pabsti, a basal diadectid from the lower Permian, is a key fossil for the understanding of early amniote evolution. Quantitative analysis of anatomical information suffers from fragmentation of fossil bones, plastic deformation due to diagenetic processes and fragile preservation within surrounding rock matrix, preventing further biomechanical investigation. Here we describe the steps taken to digitally reconstruct MNG 10181, the holotype specimen of Orobates pabsti, and subsequently use the digital reconstruction to assess body mass, position of the centre of mass in individual segments as well as the whole animal, and study joint mobility in the shoulder and hip joints. The shape of most fossil bone fragments could be recovered from micro-focus computed tomography scans. This also revealed structures that were hitherto hidden within the rock matrix. However, parts of the axial skeleton had to be modelled using relevant isolated bones from the same locality as templates. Based on the digital fossil, mass of MNG 10181 was estimated using a model of body shape that was varied within a plausible range to account for uncertainties of the dimension. In the mean estimate model the specimen had an estimated mass of circa 4 kg. Varying of the mass distribution amongst body segments further revealed that Orobates carried most of its weight on the hind limbs. Mostly unrestricted joint morphology further suggested that MNG 10181 was able to effectively generate propulsion with the pelvic limbs. The digital reconstruction is made available for future biomechanical studies. PMID:26355297

  18. Perceived body discomfort and trunk muscle activity in three prolonged sitting postures

    PubMed Central

    Waongenngarm, Pooriput; Rajaratnam, Bala S.; Janwantanakul, Prawit

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the perceived discomfort and trunk muscle activity in three different 1-hour sitting postures. [Subjects] A repeated-measures design study was conducted on 10 healthy subjects. [Methods] Each subject sat for an hour in three sitting postures (i.e., upright, slumped, and forward leaning sitting postures). Subjects rated perceived body discomfort using Borg’s CR-10 scale at the beginning and after 1 hour sitting. The electromyographic activity of the trunk muscle activity was recorded during the 1-hour period of sitting. [Results] The forward leaning sitting posture led to higher Borg scores in the low back than those in the upright (p = 0.002) and slumped sitting postures (p < 0.001). The forward leaning posture was significantly associated with increased iliocostalis lumborum pars thoracis (ICL) and superficial lumbar multifidus (MF) muscle activity compared with the upright and slumped sitting postures. The upright sitting posture was significantly associated with increased internal oblique (IO)/transversus abdominis (TrA) and ICL muscle activity compared with the slumped sitting posture. [Conclusion] The sitting posture with the highest low back discomfort after prolonged sitting was the forward leaning posture. Sitting in an upright posture is recommended because it increases IO/TrA muscle activation and induces only relatively moderate ICL and MF muscle activation. PMID:26311951

  19. The effect of pedometer use on physical activity and body weight in obese women.

    PubMed

    Cayir, Yasemin; Aslan, Secil Menekse; Akturk, Zekeriya

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity and healthy eating are of the utmost importance in treatment of obesity. However obese generally tend to have a sedentary lifestyle. Walking is a form of physical activity that is both simple and can be performed by everyone, but it requires an objective measurement. Number of steps taken during tracking can be recorded with the pedometer, a device used to measure the level of physical activity. We aimed to investigate whether or not using pedometers as a motivational technique to increase the level of physical activity in obese women has an impact on weight loss. Eighty-four obese women who are similar age referring to Ataturk University Faculty of Medicine Healthy Living Clinic, Turkey were randomly divided into two groups. Intervention group were given pedometers, and control group were prescribed similar diet and physical activity with a three-month follow-up plan without pedometers. Mean weight in pedometer group initially was 88.9 ± 8.4 kg, which decreased to 80.2 ± 8.7 kg after the programme. Mean weight in control group was 86.1 ± 9.2 kg at the beginning, and it decreased to 84.7 ± 8.8 kg after three months. It was observed in pedometer group that the mean number of steps 8817 ± 2725 steps/day at the beginning increased to mean 9716 ± 2811 steps/day at the end of the study. Weight, body mass index, body fat percentage and waist circumference measurements decreased more greatly in the pedometer when compared to the control group (p < 0.001). Pedometers may be recommended to obese patients to monitor and increase the level of physical activity and to promote weight loss. PMID:25068676

  20. Is being a boy and feeling fat a barrier for physical activity? The association between body image, gender and physical activity among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kopcakova, Jaroslava; Veselska, Zuzana Dankulincova; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; van Dijk, Jitse P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2014-11-01

    Regular physical activity leads to physical and mental health benefits. Previous studies have shown physical activity to be associated with body image and gender. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the associations of body image with physical activity of adolescents and whether gender modifies this association. We obtained data on body image and physical activity as part of the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study in 2010 from Slovakia (n = 8042, age 11-15 years, 49% boys, response rate: 79.5%). Adolescents answered questions about their body image and the frequency of their physical activity. Sufficient physical activity was more likely in adolescents perceiving themselves as fat (OR = 0.63, 95%CI 0.54-0.73) and in boys (OR = 2.15, 95%CI 1.92-2.42). A poor body image among girls was not associated with physical activity, whereas among boys it was associated with less physical activity. Gender seems to moderate the relationship between body image and physical activity in youths. Health promotion should be targeted in particular at boys with a negative body image, as they are at higher risk of physical inactivity. PMID:25350010