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Sample records for activity calcium deposition

  1. Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Thomas; Furman, Janet

    2016-06-01

    Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) arthropathy, also called pseudogout, is common, and becomes more prevalent as patients age. The presenting symptoms are similar to both gout and septic arthritis but may be treated differently. This article describes a typical patient presentation and management from an emergency medicine and orthopedic surgery standpoint. PMID:27228038

  2. [Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease].

    PubMed

    Koitschev, C; Kaiserling, E; Koitschev, A

    2003-08-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) of the temporomandibular joint is rare. The disorder is characterized by the presence of crystal deposits within the affected joint. The deposition of crystals in adjacent soft tissue may lead to the formation of pseudotumors. This form of the disease is called tophaceous pseudogout and typically affects the temporomandibular joint. It is difficult to differentiate the disease, particularly from malignant tumors, on the clinical and radiographic findings alone. The diagnosis is based on histological identification of the calcium pyrophosphate crystals. We present an unusually advanced case of tophaceous pseudogout of the temporomandibular joint. The etiology, clinical and diagnostic criteria as well as treatment options are discussed on the basis of our own experience and a review of the literature. PMID:12942180

  3. Update on calcium pyrophosphate deposition.

    PubMed

    Abhishek, Abhishek; Doherty, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition (CPPD) associates with ageing, osteoarthritis (OA), uncommon metabolic diseases, mutations and polymorphisms in the ankylosis human gene (ANKH). CPPD is frequently polyarticular, occurs due to a generalised articular predisposition, and the association between CPPD and OA is joint specific, for example CPPD associates with knee OA, but not with hip OA. Other recently identified associations include knee malalignment (knee CC), low cortical BMD and soft-tissue calcification. CPPD is generally asymptomatic. A recent study reported that knees with OA plus CC at the index joint, or at distant joints (in absence of index joint CC), were more likely to have attrition. CPPD can cause acute CPP crystal arthritis, chronic CPP crystal inflammatory arthritis, and is frequently present in joints with OA. Joint aspiration remains the gold standard for diagnosing CPPD, although other promising techniques are emerging. Patients with polyarticular or young onset CPPD should be screened for underlying metabolic abnormalities, however, such testing can be unrewarding. The treatment of CPPD is symptomatic. Acute CPP crystal arthritis is treated with rest, local application of ice-packs, joint aspiration, colchicine and/or intra-articular corticosteroid injection (once infection is excluded). Colchicine, low-dose corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine and radiosynovectomy are recommended for the treatment of chronic or recurrent acute CPP crystal arthritis. Recent RCTs did not confirm any benefit from methotrexate, and although there is increasing interest in the use of anti-IL1 agents for acute or chronic CPP crystal arthritis, their efficacy has not been formally examined. Unlike gout, currently there are no treatments to eliminate CPP crystal deposits. PMID:27586801

  4. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 and extracellular calcium promote mineral deposition via NPP1 activity in a mature osteoblast cell line MLO-A5.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongqing; Turner, Andrew G; Wijenayaka, Asiri R; Anderson, Paul H; Morris, Howard A; Atkins, Gerald J

    2015-09-01

    While vitamin D supplementation is common, the anabolic mechanisms that improve bone status are poorly understood. Under standard mineralising conditions including media ionised calcium of 1.1 mM, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) enhanced differentiation and mineral deposition by the mature osteoblast/pre-osteocyte cell line, MLO-A5. This effect was markedly increased with a higher ionised calcium level (1.5 mM). Gene expression analyses revealed that 1,25D-induced mineral deposition was associated with induction of Enpp1 mRNA, coding for nucleotide pyrophosphatase phosphodiesterase 1 (NPP1) and NPP1 protein levels. Since MLO-A5 cells express abundant alkaline phosphatase that was not further modified by 1,25D treatment or exposure to increased calcium, this finding suggested that the NPP1 production of pyrophosphate (PPi) may provide alkaline phosphatase with substrate for the generation of inorganic phosphate (Pi). Consistent with this, co-treatment with Enpp1 siRNA or a NPP1 inhibitor, PPADS, abrogated 1,25D-induced mineral deposition. These data demonstrate that 1,25D stimulates osteoblast differentiation and mineral deposition, and interacts with the extracellular calcium concentration. 1,25D regulates Enpp1 expression, which presumably, in the context of adequate tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase activity, provides Pi to stimulate mineralisation. Our findings suggest a mechanism by which vitamin D with adequate dietary calcium can improve bone mineral status. PMID:26054750

  5. Curiosity Finds Calcium-Rich Deposits

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s Curiosity rover finds calcium deposits on Mars similar to thoseseen on Earth when water circulates in cracks and rock fractures.Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech    › Curiosity's mission site

  6. The Interaction between Enterobacteriaceae and Calcium Oxalate Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Barr-Beare, Evan; Saxena, Vijay; Hilt, Evann E.; Thomas-White, Krystal; Schober, Megan; Li, Birong; Becknell, Brian; Hains, David S.; Wolfe, Alan J.; Schwaderer, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of calcium oxalate crystals and deposits in UTI pathogenesis has not been established. The objectives of this study were to identify bacteria present in pediatric urolithiasis and, using in vitro and in vivo models, to determine the relevance of calcium oxalate deposits during experimental pyelonephritis. Methods Pediatric kidney stones and urine were collected and both cultured and sequenced for bacteria. Bacterial adhesion to calcium oxalate was compared. Murine kidney calcium oxalate deposits were induced by intraperitoneal glyoxalate injection and kidneys were transurethrally inoculated with uropathogenic Escherichia coli to induce pyelonephritis Results E. coli of the family Enterobacteriaceae was identified in patients by calcium oxalate stone culture. Additionally Enterobacteriaceae DNA was sequenced from multiple calcium oxalate kidney stones. E. coli selectively aggregated on and around calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals. Mice inoculated with glyoxalate and uropathogenic E. coli had higher bacterial burdens, increased kidney calcium oxalate deposits and an increased kidney innate immune response compared to mice with only calcium oxalate deposits or only pyelonephritis. Conclusions In a murine model, the presence of calcium oxalate deposits increases pyelonephritis risk, likely due to preferential aggregation of bacteria on and around calcium oxalate crystals. When both calcium oxalate deposits and uropathogenic bacteria were present, calcium oxalate deposit number increased along with renal gene transcription of inner stone core matrix proteins increased. Therefore renal calcium oxalate deposits may be a modifiable risk factor for infections of the kidney and urinary tract. Furthermore, bacteria may be present in calcium oxalate deposits and potentially contribute to calcium oxalate renal disease. PMID:26448465

  7. [Calcium pyrophosphate deposits--a chameleon].

    PubMed

    Beyeler, Ch

    2002-10-01

    Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate (CPPD) crystals deposit in articular fibro- or hyaline cartilage (chondrocalcinosis), joint capsules, synovium, periarticular ligaments and tendons resulting in an age dependent prevalence. These calcifications may be asymptomatic or may manifest as acute pseudogout arthritis, pseudorheumatoid arthritis, bursitis, tenosynovitis, tendinitis, polymyalgic syndrome or chronic pyrophosphate arthropathy. The diagnosis is based on the presence of intracellular CPPD crystals in synovial fluid detected by polarizing microscopy, the characteristic radiological changes and the typical clinical presentations. The therapy is symptom oriented or disease specific in case of an underlying metabolic disease such as hemochromatosis, hyperparathyroidism, hypophosphatasia, hypomagnesemia or hypothyroidism. PMID:12428437

  8. Subcellular localization of calcium deposits during zebrafish (Danio rerio) oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Golpour, Amin; Pšenička, Martin; Niksirat, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Calcium plays prominent roles in regulating a broad range of physiological events in reproduction. The aim of this study was to describe the subcellular distribution of calcium deposits during stages of oogenesis in zebrafish using a combined oxalate-pyroantimonate technique. The oocyte development of zebrafish was categorized into four stages: primary growth, cortical-alveolus, vitellogenic, and maturation, based on morphological criteria. Calcium deposits in the primary growth stage were detected in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus, and follicular cells. At the cortical-alveolus stage, calcium particles were transported from follicular cells and deposited in the cortical alveoli. In the vitellogenic stage, some cortical alveoli were compacted and transformed from flocculent electron-lucent to electron-dense objects with the progression of the stage. Calcium deposits were transformed from larger to smaller particles, coinciding with compaction of cortical alveoli. In the maturation stage, calcium deposits in all oocyte compartments decreased, with the exception of those in mitochondria. The proportion of area covered by calcium deposits in the mitochondria and cortical alveoli of oocytes at different stages of development was significantly different (p<0.05). The extent of calcium deposits in the cortical alveoli of mature oocytes was substantially lower than in earlier stages. Basic information about calcium distribution during zebrafish oogenesis may contribute to better understanding of its role in oogenesis. PMID:26402915

  9. The pressure-induced calcium deposition on crosslinked polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Shunmugakumar, N; Jayabalan, M

    1992-06-01

    The pressure-induced calcium deposition in crosslinked polyurethane was studied. Two polyurethane systems, IPDI-PTMG/PPG-TMP and SMDI-PTMG/PPG-TMP were subjected to calcification under induced pressure. Calcium deposition in IPDI polymers was linear with the increase of soft segment (PTMG) content whereas in SMDI polymers the reverse trend was observed. Decreased phase mixing and hydrophilicity in the polymer (SMDI based) having increased soft segment content was attributed to the decreased calcification. The enhanced amount of calcium deposition under pressure indicates the possible influence of pressure on calcification. PMID:10078255

  10. Diagnosis and clinical manifestations of calcium pyrophosphate and basic calcium phosphate crystal deposition diseases.

    PubMed

    Ea, Hang-Korng; Lioté, Frédéric

    2014-05-01

    Basic calcium phosphate and pyrophosphate calcium crystals are the 2 main calcium-containing crystals that can deposit in all skeletal tissues. These calcium crystals give rise to numerous manifestations, including acute inflammatory attacks that can mimic alarming and threatening differential diagnoses, osteoarthritis-like lesions, destructive arthropathies, and calcific tendinitis. Awareness of uncommon localizations and manifestations such as intraspinal deposition (eg, crowned dens syndrome, tendinitis of longus colli muscle, massive cervical myelopathy compression) prevents inappropriate procedures and cares. Coupling plain radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and synovial fluid analysis allow accurate diagnosis by directly or indirectly identifying the GRAAL of microcrystal-related symptoms. PMID:24703344

  11. The Role of ANK in Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease.

    PubMed

    Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Gohr, Claudia M; Bettendorf, Brittany; Rosenthal, Ann K

    2016-05-01

    The protein product of the progressive ankylosis gene, known as ANK, is a 492-amino acid multi-pass transmembrane protein. This protein is critical for the regulation of pyrophosphate, and gain of function ANK mutations is associated with calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. Much about the structure, function, and regulation of ANK remain unstudied. This review of the current literature examines recent contributions to our understanding of ANK. We focus on new work on the function, binding partners, and regulators of ANK. A more complete understanding of this important protein may help to identify future therapeutic targets for the treatment of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. PMID:27032788

  12. The activity of calcium in calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochifuji, Yuichiro; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka; Sano, Nobuo

    1995-08-01

    The standard Gibbs energy of reaction Ca (1) + O (mass pct, in Zr) = CaO (s) has been determined as follows by equilibrating molten calcium with solid zirconium in a CaO crucible: Δ G° = -64,300(±700) + 19.8(±3.5) T J/mol (1373 to 1623 K) The activities of calcium in the CaOsatd-Ca- MF2 ( M: Ca, Ba, Mg) and CaOsatd-Ca-NaF systems were measured as a function of calcium composition at high calcium contents at 1473 K on the basis of the standard Gibbs energy. The activities of calcium increase in the order of CaF2, BaF2, and MgF2 at the same calcium fraction of these fluxes. The observed activities are compared with those estimated by using the Temkin model for ionic solutions. Furthermore, the possibility of the removal of tramp elements such as tin, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, and lead from carbon-saturated iron by using calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes is discussed.

  13. The activity of calcium in calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Ochifuji, Yuichiro; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka; Sano, Nobuo

    1995-08-01

    The standard Gibbs energy of reaction Ca (1) + {und O} (mass pct, in Zr) = CaO (s) has been determined as follows by equilibrating molten calcium with solid zirconium in a CaO crucible: {Delta}G{degree} = {minus}64,300({+-}700) + 19.8({+-}3.5)T J/mol (1,373 to 1,623 K). The activities of calcium in the CaO{sub satd.}-Ca-MF{sub 2} (M: Ca, Ba, Mg) and CaO{sub satd.}-Ca-NaF systems were measured as a function of calcium composition at high calcium contents at 1,473 K on the basis of the standard Gibbs energy. The activities of calcium increase in the order of CaF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, and MgF{sub 2} at the same calcium fraction of these fluxes. The observed activities are compared with those estimated by using the Temkin model for ionic solutions. Furthermore, the possibility of the removal of tramp elements such as tin, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, and lead from carbon-saturated iron by using calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes is discussed.

  14. Composition and genesis of calcium deposits in atheroma plaques.

    PubMed

    Lara, María Jesús; Ros, Eduardo; Sierra, Manuel; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Aguilar, José

    2014-05-01

    The composition of atheromatous plaque determines its progression toward rupture or thrombosis. Although its histopathological structure has been widely studied, little attention has been paid to its structural and chemical composition and even less to its mineral component. Thirty-three atheromatous plaques were obtained by carotid thromboendarterectomy. Three types of materials were observed under polarized light microscopy: apatite crystals in the form of glomeruli (dark with plane polarized illumination and greensh with cross-polarized illumination); fibrous-like cholesterol (uncolored or grayish with plane-polarized illumination); and amorphous organic material as brownish deposits. SEM-EDX analysis showed an abundance of phosphorus and calcium in sufficient quantities to form calcium phosphates, and appreciably reduced levels of sodium. X-ray diffraction results differentiated samples into three groups: group I with predominance of hydroxyapatite-type crystals, group II with crystalline material containing an amorphous component, and group III with wholly amorphous material. The most abundant mineral in atheromatous plaque is hydroxyapatite, on which crystals of cholesterol and lipid nuclei are deposited, stratifying the plaque into layers that reflect the different stages of its formation. The difference in calcium and sodium concentrations between arteries with and without atheromata may indicate an important relationship in the pathophysiological development of calcium deposits. PMID:24134634

  15. Aluminum citrate prevents renal injury from calcium oxalate crystal deposition.

    PubMed

    Besenhofer, Lauren M; Cain, Marie C; Dunning, Cody; McMartin, Kenneth E

    2012-12-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals are responsible for the kidney injury associated with exposure to ethylene glycol or severe hyperoxaluria. Current treatment strategies target the formation of calcium oxalate but not its interaction with kidney tissue. Because aluminum citrate blocks calcium oxalate binding and toxicity in human kidney cells, it may provide a different therapeutic approach to calcium oxalate-induced injury. Here, we tested the effects of aluminum citrate and sodium citrate in a Wistar rat model of acute high-dose ethylene glycol exposure. Aluminum citrate, but not sodium citrate, attenuated increases in urea nitrogen, creatinine, and the ratio of kidney to body weight in ethylene glycol-treated rats. Compared with ethylene glycol alone, the addition of aluminum citrate significantly increased the urinary excretion of both crystalline calcium and crystalline oxalate and decreased the deposition of crystals in renal tissue. In vitro, aluminum citrate interacted directly with oxalate crystals to inhibit their uptake by proximal tubule cells. These results suggest that treating with aluminum citrate attenuates renal injury in rats with severe ethylene glycol toxicity, apparently by inhibiting calcium oxalate's interaction with, and retention by, the kidney epithelium. PMID:23138489

  16. Aluminum Citrate Prevents Renal Injury from Calcium Oxalate Crystal Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Besenhofer, Lauren M.; Cain, Marie C.; Dunning, Cody

    2012-01-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals are responsible for the kidney injury associated with exposure to ethylene glycol or severe hyperoxaluria. Current treatment strategies target the formation of calcium oxalate but not its interaction with kidney tissue. Because aluminum citrate blocks calcium oxalate binding and toxicity in human kidney cells, it may provide a different therapeutic approach to calcium oxalate-induced injury. Here, we tested the effects of aluminum citrate and sodium citrate in a Wistar rat model of acute high-dose ethylene glycol exposure. Aluminum citrate, but not sodium citrate, attenuated increases in urea nitrogen, creatinine, and the ratio of kidney to body weight in ethylene glycol–treated rats. Compared with ethylene glycol alone, the addition of aluminum citrate significantly increased the urinary excretion of both crystalline calcium and crystalline oxalate and decreased the deposition of crystals in renal tissue. In vitro, aluminum citrate interacted directly with oxalate crystals to inhibit their uptake by proximal tubule cells. These results suggest that treating with aluminum citrate attenuates renal injury in rats with severe ethylene glycol toxicity, apparently by inhibiting calcium oxalate’s interaction with, and retention by, the kidney epithelium. PMID:23138489

  17. Calcium release-activated calcium current in rat mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hoth, M; Penner, R

    1993-06-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of membrane currents and fura-2 measurements of free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were used to study the biophysical properties of a calcium current activated by depletion of intracellular calcium stores in rat peritoneal mast cells. 2. Calcium influx through an inward calcium release-activated calcium current (ICRAC) was induced by three independent mechanisms that result in store depletion: intracellular infusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) or extracellular application of ionomycin (active depletion), and intracellular infusion of calcium chelators (ethylene glycol bis-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA)) to prevent reuptake of leaked-out calcium into the stores (passive depletion). 3. The activation of ICRAC induced by active store depletion has a short delay (4-14 s) following intracellular infusion of InsP3 or extracellular application of ionomycin. It has a monoexponential time course with a time constant of 20-30 s and, depending on the complementary Ca2+ buffer, a mean normalized amplitude (at 0 mV) of 0.6 pA pF-1 (with EGTA) and 1.1 pA pF-1 (with BAPTA). 4. After full activation of ICRAC by InsP3 in the presence of EGTA (10 mM), hyperpolarizing pulses to -100 mV induced an instantaneous inward current that decayed by 64% within 50 ms. This inactivation is probably mediated by [Ca2+]i, since the decrease of inward current in the presence of the fast Ca2+ buffer BAPTA (10 mM) was only 30%. 5. The amplitude of ICRAC was dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration with an apparent dissociation constant (KD) of 3.3 mM. Inward currents were nonsaturating up to -200 mV. 6. The selectivity of ICRAC for Ca2+ was assessed by using fura-2 as the dominant intracellular buffer (at a concentration of 2 mM) and relating the absolute changes in the calcium-sensitive fluorescence (390 nm excitation) with the calcium current integral

  18. Boron Induces Early Matrix Mineralization via Calcium Deposition and Elevation of Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Differentiated Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Movahedi Najafabadi, Bent-al-hoda; Abnosi, Mohammad Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Objective Boron (B) is essential for plant development and might be an essential micronutrient for animals and humans. This study was conducted to characterize the impact of boric acid (BA) on the cellular and molecular nature of differentiated rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Materials and Methods In this experimental study, BMSCs were extracted and expanded to the 3rdpassage, then cultured in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM) complemented with osteogenic media as well as 6 ng/ml and 6 µg/ml of BA. After 5, 10, 15 and 21 days the viability and the level of mineralization was determined using MTT assay and alizarin red respectively. In addition, the morphology, nuclear diameter and cytoplasmic area of the cells were studied with the help of fluorescent dye. The concentration of calcium, activity of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as well as sodium and potassium levels were also evaluated using commercial kits and a flame photometer respectively. Results Although 6 µg/ml of BA was found to be toxic, a concentration of 6 ng/ml increased the osteogenic ability of the cell significantly throughout the treatment. In addition it was observed that B treatment caused the early induction of matrix mineralization compared to controls. Conclusion Although more investigation is required, we suggest the prescription of a very low concentration of B in the form of BA or foods containing BA, in groups at high risk of osteoporosis or in the case of bone fracture. PMID:27054120

  19. Calcium and egg activation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sartain, Caroline V; Wolfner, Mariana F

    2013-01-01

    In many animals, a rise in intracellular calcium levels is the trigger for egg activation, the process by which an arrested mature oocyte transitions to prepare for embryogenesis. In nearly all animals studied to date, this calcium rise, and thus egg activation, is triggered by the fertilizing sperm. However in the insects that have been examined, fertilization is not necessary to activate their oocytes. Rather, these insects' eggs activate as they transit through the female's reproductive tract, regardless of male contribution. Recent studies in Drosophila have shown that egg activation nevertheless requires calcium and that the downstream events and molecules of egg activation are also conserved, despite the difference in initial trigger. Genetic studies have uncovered essential roles for the calcium-dependent enzyme calcineurin and its regulator calcipressin, and have hinted at roles for calmodulin, in Drosophila egg activation. Physiological and in vitro studies have led to a model in which mechanical forces that impact the Drosophila oocyte as it moves through the reproductive tract triggers the influx of calcium from the external environment, thereby initiating egg activation. Future research will aim to test this model, as well as to determine the spatiotemporal dynamics of cytoplasmic calcium flux and mode of signal propagation in this unique system. PMID:23218670

  20. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  1. Calcium alloy as active material in secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Roche, Michael F.; Preto, Sandra K.; Martin, Allan E.

    1976-01-01

    Calcium alloys such as calcium-aluminum and calcium-silicon, are employed as active material within a rechargeable negative electrode of an electrochemical cell. Such cells can use a molten salt electrolyte including calcium ions and a positive electrode having sulfur, sulfides, or oxides as active material. The calcium alloy is selected to prevent formation of molten calcium alloys resulting from reaction with the selected molten electrolytic salt at the cell operating temperatures.

  2. Increased calcium deposits and decreased Ca2+-ATPase in right ventricular myocardium of ascitic broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Li, K; Qiao, J; Zhao, L; Dong, S; Ou, D; Wang, J; Wang, H; Xu, T

    2006-11-01

    Right ventricular hypertrophy and failure is an important step in the development of ascites syndrome (AS) in broiler chickens. Cytoplasmic calcium concentration is a major regulator of cardiac contractile function and various physiological processes in cardiac muscle cells. The purpose of this study was to measure the right ventricular pressure and investigate the precise ultrastructural location of Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-ATPase in the right ventricular myocardium of chickens with AS induced by low ambient temperature. The results showed that the right ventricular diastolic pressure of ascitic broilers was significantly higher than that of control broilers (P < 0.01), and the maximum change ratio of right intraventricular pressure (RV +/- dp/dt(max)) of ascitic broilers was significantly lower than that of the controls (P < 0.01). Extensively increased calcium deposits were observed in the right ventricular myocardium of ascitic broilers, whereas in the age-matched control broilers, calcium deposits were much less. The Ca(2+)-ATPase reactive products were obviously found on the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial membrane of the control right ventricular myocardium, but rarely observed in the ascitic broilers. The data suggest that in ascitic broilers there is the right ventricular diastolic dysfunction, in which the overload of intracellular calcium and the decreased Ca(2+)-ATPase activity might be the important factors. PMID:17054481

  3. Hydrothermal-electrochemical deposition of calcium phosphates on various metals.

    PubMed

    Ban, S; Matsuo, K; Mizutani, N; Hasegawa, J

    1999-09-01

    Calcium phosphates were formed on five kinds of substrate metals using a hydrothermal-electrochemical method in an autoclave with two electrodes. The electrolyte dissolving NaCl, K2HPO4, CaCl2.2H2O, tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane, and hydrochloric acid was maintained at 100 degrees C, 150 degrees C and 200 degrees C. The counter electrode, the anode, was platinum plate, 20 x 20 x 0.5 mm, and the working electrodes as cathode were pure titanium, pure zinc, pure nickel, pure iron, and stainless steel plates. A constant direct current at 12.5 mA/cm2 was loaded for 1 hr. Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] only deposited at three temperatures on pure titanium plate. On pure zinc plate, both parascholzite [CaZn2(PO4)2.2H2O] and hydroxyapatite were formed at 150 degrees C and both parascholzite and ZnO were formed at 200 degrees C. Both hydroxyapatite and beta-TCP [beta-Ca3(PO4)2] were formed on pure nickel, pure iron, and stainless steel plates at 200 degrees C. It seems that the incorporation of the metal ions released from the electrode decreased the Ca/P ratio of the deposit due to the formation of other compounds except hydroxyapatite. PMID:10786136

  4. Analysis of body calcium (regional changes in body calcium by in vivo neutron activation analysis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suki, W.; Johnson, P. C.; Leblanc, A.; Evans, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of space flight on urine and fecal calcium loss was documented during the three long-term Skylab flights. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine regional calcium loss. Various designs for regional analysis were investigated.

  5. Structural aspects of calcium-release activated calcium channel function

    PubMed Central

    Stathopulos, Peter B; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Store-operated calcium (Ca2+) entry is the process by which molecules located on the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) respond to decreased luminal Ca2+ levels by signaling Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channels (CRAC) channels to open on the plasma membrane (PM). This activation of PM CRAC channels provides a sustained cytosolic Ca2+ elevation associated with myriad physiological processes. The identities of the molecules which mediate SOCE include stromal interaction molecules (STIMs), functioning as the ER/SR luminal Ca2+ sensors, and Orai proteins, forming the PM CRAC channels. This review examines the current available high-resolution structural information on these CRAC molecular components with particular focus on the solution structures of the luminal STIM Ca2+ sensing domains, the crystal structures of cytosolic STIM fragments, a closed Orai hexameric crystal structure and a structure of an Orai1 N-terminal fragment in complex with calmodulin. The accessible structural data are discussed in terms of potential mechanisms of action and cohesiveness with functional observations. PMID:24213636

  6. Effect of dietary calcium and magnesium on experimental renal tubular deposition of calcium oxalate crystal induced by ethylene glycol administration and its prevention with phytin and citrate.

    PubMed

    Ebisuno, S; Morimoto, S; Yoshida, T; Fukatani, T; Yasukawa, S; Ohkawa, T

    1987-01-01

    Oral administration of ethylene glycol to rats, and the resultant intratubular depositions of microcrystals of calcium oxalate were studied investigating the influences of dietary calcium or magnesium and assessing the protective efficacies against the crystallizations by treatment with phytin and sodium citrate. With increase of calcium intake and consequent increase of urinary calcium excretion there was a marked increase in the amount of tubular deposit of calcium oxalate crystal and in the calcium content of renal tissue. Although magnesium deficiency accelerated renal tubular calcium oxalate deposition, the protection against the crystal formation was not observed with excessive dietary magnesium. When rats were fed a high-calcium diet supplemented with phytin, a significant inhibition of the intratubular crystallization was observed. It appeared obvious that a hypocalciuric action of phytin was attributed to the effect of the prevention. There was vigorous protection of crystal formation by treatment with sodium citrate, which correlated with the level of citrate concentration in the drinking water. PMID:3433579

  7. Initial stages of calcium uptake and mineral deposition in sea urchin embryos

    PubMed Central

    Vidavsky, Netta; Addadi, Sefi; Mahamid, Julia; Shimoni, Eyal; Ben-Ezra, David; Shpigel, Muki; Weiner, Steve; Addadi, Lia

    2014-01-01

    Sea urchin larvae have an endoskeleton consisting of two calcitic spicules. We reconstructed various stages of the formation pathway of calcium carbonate from calcium ions in sea water to mineral deposition and integration into the forming spicules. Monitoring calcium uptake with the fluorescent dye calcein shows that calcium ions first penetrate the embryo and later are deposited intracellularly. Surprisingly, calcium carbonate deposits are distributed widely all over the embryo, including in the primary mesenchyme cells and in the surface epithelial cells. Using cryo-SEM, we show that the intracellular calcium carbonate deposits are contained in vesicles of diameter 0.5–1.5 μm. Using the newly developed airSEM, which allows direct correlation between fluorescence and energy dispersive spectroscopy, we confirmed the presence of solid calcium carbonate in the vesicles. This mineral phase appears as aggregates of 20–30-nm nanospheres, consistent with amorphous calcium carbonate. The aggregates finally are introduced into the spicule compartment, where they integrate into the growing spicule. PMID:24344263

  8. [Effect of the dispersion of calcium deposits on allogenic aortic valves durability. Mineralization phases].

    PubMed

    Lis, Grzegorz J; Rokita, Eugeniusz; Podolec, Piotr; Gajda, Mariusz; Sadowski, Jerzy; Cichocki, Tadeusz

    2004-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at comparison of calcium content and calcium dispersion in allogenic aortic valve leaflets removed due to dysfunction, to establish the influence of both parameters on graft durability. Calcification was assessed histochemically (von Kossa) as well as physicochemically using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The morpho-metric data (leaflet area involved in the calcification process) were obtained by computer-assisted image analysis system. The dry weight content of leaflet calcium and phosphorus were assessed by atomic absorptive spectroscopy (AAS) and Ca/P ratio was calculated. Calcium dispersion coefficient (Dc) was established according to the formula: Dc = 1/Ca(c)/Ap, where Ca(c) = calcium dry weight concentration; Ap = percent of leaflet area involved in calcification. We found biphasic correlation between calcium concentration and area involved in calcification. The first one was characterized by rising dispersion of calcium deposits while for the second one saturation with hydroxyapatite of formerly calcified areas was predominant, negatively influencing graft durability. Allograft durability was correlated with calcium dispersion (Dc) (p<0.001), while no significant correlation was found with calcium concentration. Decreased Dc was characteristic for 93.8% of low durability grafts (<11.6 years). Our results suggest that lowered calcium dispersion decreasing allograft lifetime and is a better predictor of allograft durability than the total calcium content. PMID:15724647

  9. Bilateral Olecranon Bursitis – A Rare Clinical presentation of Calcium Pyrophosphate Crystal Deposition Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jignesh; Girishkumar; Mruthyunjaya; Rupakumar, C. S

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease (CPPD) is the most common form of crystal arthropathy second only to gout. Common clinical presentation is an acute monoarticular arthritis commonly occurring in knee joints. We presented a case of bilateral olecranon bursitis in a calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease. Case Report: A 42-year-old female patient is presented with golf ball sized painless swellings in the posterior aspect of her elbows. Elbow joints were clinically normal except for restriction of terminal flexion. X-ray showed mild erosion at the tip of olecranon. Excision biopsy of the swelling showed positive birefringent calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals on the inner wall of the specimen on polarized light microscopy. Conclusion: Bilateral olecranon bursitis may be part of the extraarticular manifestations of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease with good prognosis following in toto bursa excision. PMID:27298934

  10. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    PubMed Central

    Wernimont, Amy K.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Finerty, Patrick; Lin, Y.; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites, and comprise a CaMK-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C-terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N-terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate-binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal transduction pathways. PMID:20436473

  11. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  12. Imaging Calcium in Drosophila at Egg Activation.

    PubMed

    Derrick, Christopher J; York-Andersen, Anna H; Weil, Timothy T

    2016-01-01

    Egg activation is a universal process that includes a series of events to allow the fertilized egg to complete meiosis and initiate embryonic development. One aspect of egg activation, conserved across all organisms examined, is a change in the intracellular concentration of calcium (Ca(2+)) often termed a 'Ca(2+) wave'. While the speed and number of oscillations of the Ca(2+) wave varies between species, the change in intracellular Ca(2+) is key in bringing about essential events for embryonic development. These changes include resumption of the cell cycle, mRNA regulation, cortical granule exocytosis, and rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. In the mature Drosophila egg, activation occurs in the female oviduct prior to fertilization, initiating a series of Ca(2+)-dependent events. Here we present a protocol for imaging the Ca(2+) wave in Drosophila. This approach provides a manipulable model system to interrogate the mechanism of the Ca(2+) wave and the downstream changes associated with it. PMID:27584955

  13. Calcium Modulation of Plant Plasma Membrane-Bound Atpase Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic properties of barley enzyme are discussed and compared with those of other plants. Possibilities for calcium transport in the plasma membrane by proton pump and ATPase-dependent calcium pumps are explored. Topics covered include the ph phase of the enzyme; high affinity of barley for calcium; temperature dependence, activation enthalpy, and the types of ATPase catalytic sites. Attention is given to lipids which are both screened and bound by calcium. Studies show that barley has a calmodulin activated ATPase that is found in the presence of magnesium and calcium.

  14. Calcium Fluoride Precipitation and Deposition From 12 mmol/L Fluoride Solutions With Different Calcium Addition Rates

    PubMed Central

    Markovic, M; Takagi, S; Chow, LC; Frukhtbeyn, S

    2009-01-01

    The effects of different Ca-addition rates on calcium fluoride (CaF2) precipitation and deposition were investigated in 12 mmol/L sodium fluoride solutions to which 0.1 mol/L calcium chloride solution was continuously added at average rates of (5, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15 or 20) mmol L−1 min−1. The changes in ionic fluoride and calcium concentrations, as well as turbidity, were continuously recorded by F and Ca electrodes, and a fiber optic based spectrophotometer, respectively. The F− concentration decreased and turbidity increased with time indicating precipitation of CaF2. For the systems with Ca-addition rates of (5, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15, and 20) mmol L−1 min−1, the 1 min CaF2 depositions in the model substrate (cellulose filter paper, pores 0.2 µm) expressed as mean ± SD of deposited F per substrate surface area were (3.78 ± 0.31, 11.45 ± 0.89, 9.31 ± 0.68, 8.20 ± 0.56, 6.63 ± 0.43, and 2.09 ± 0.28) µg/cm2, respectively (n = 10 for each group). The 1-min F depositions did not show positive correlation to Ca-addition rates. The lowest 1-min F deposition was obtained in the systems with the highest Ca-addition rate of 20 mmol L−1 min−1 for which CaF2 precipitation rate reached the maximum value of 0.31 mmol L−1 s−1 almost immediately after beginning of reaction (6 s). The largest 1-min F depositions were obtained from the systems with Ca addition rates of (7.5 to 12.5) mmol L−1 min−1 in which CaF2 precipitation rates continuously increased reaching the maximum values of (0.13 to 0.20) mmol L−1 s−1 after (18 to 29) s, respectively. The 1-min F depositions were greatly enhanced in comparison with the control F solutions that did not have continuous Ca-addition. This indicates that continuous Ca addition that controls the rate of CaF2 formation could be a critical factor for larger F depositions from F solutions. The efficacy of conventional F mouthrinses could be improved with addition of a substance that continuously releases Ca.

  15. Enzymatic pH control for biomimetic deposition of calcium phosphate coatings.

    PubMed

    Nijhuis, Arnold W G; Nejadnik, M Reza; Nudelman, Fabio; Walboomers, X Frank; te Riet, Joost; Habibovic, Pamela; Tahmasebi Birgani, Zeinab; Li, Yubao; Bomans, Paul H H; Jansen, John A; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G

    2014-02-01

    The current study examines the enzymatic decomposition of urea into carbon dioxide and ammonia as a means to increase the pH during biomimetic deposition of calcium phosphate (CaP) onto implant surfaces. The kinetics of the enzymatically induced pH increase were studied by monitoring pH, calcium concentration and conductivity of the aqueous solutions as a function of time, urease concentration and initial concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy was used to study the process of homogeneous CaP precipitation in solution, whereas CaP deposition on conventional acid-etched titanium and micropatterned polystyrene (PS) surfaces was studied using scanning electron microscopy. The data presented in this study confirm that the substrate-enzyme combination urea-urease offers strong control over the rate of pH increase by varying the concentrations of precursor salts and urease. Formation of biomimetic CaP coatings was shown to proceed via formation of ionic polymeric assemblies of prenucleation complexes. The process of deposition and corresponding coating morphology was strongly dependent on the concentration of calcium, phosphate and urease. Finally, it was shown that the substrate-enzyme combination urea-urease allowed for spatial distribution of CaP crystals along the grooves of micropatterned PS surfaces at low concentrations of calcium, phosphate and urease, stressing the sensitivity of the presented method. PMID:24095783

  16. The "crowned dens" revisited: imaging findings in calcium crystal deposition diseases around the odontoid.

    PubMed

    Viana, Sergio L; Fernandes, João L; De Araújo Coimbra, Pablo P; De Mendonça, José L F; Freitas, Flávia M O; De Carvalho Barbosa Viana, Maria A

    2010-10-01

    The so-called "crowned dens" is a peculiar manifestation of calcium crystal deposition diseases, either caused by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate or caused by calcium hydroxiapatite crystals, characterized by the presence of calcific deposits around the odontoid, often showing a crown-like configuration on imaging. It has protean clinical and radiological pictures, and care should be taken to avoid misinterpretation and diagnostic errors. Although asymptomatic in many patients, this entity may present as a predominantly algic or febrile condition, and in some cases, signs of compression of the spinal cord may be the major complaint. The detection of calcifications in the periodontoid tissues is the key to the diagnosis, erosive osseous changes, and variably calcified soft-tissue masses being occasionally associated. Computed tomography is the most important imaging study to be performed in this setting. PMID:19344369

  17. The effect of nanotopography on calcium and phosphorus deposition on metallic materials in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ward, Brian C; Webster, Thomas Jay

    2006-06-01

    To date, long-term functions of osteoblasts leading to calcium and phosphorus mineral deposition on nanometals have not been determined. Nanometals are metals with constituent metal particles and/or surface features less than 100 nm in at least one dimension. For this reason, the objective of this in vitro study was to determine the amount of calcium and phosphorus mineral formation on microphase compared to nanophase Ti, Ti6Al4V, and CoCrMo cultured with and without osteoblasts (bone-forming cells). The results of this study provided the first evidence of significantly greater calcium and phosphorus deposition by osteoblasts and precipitation from culture media without osteoblasts on nanophase compared to respective microphase Ti6Al4V and CoCrMo after 21 days; the greatest calcium and phosphorus mineral deposition occurred on nanophase CoCrMo while the greatest calcium and phosphorus mineral precipitation without osteoblasts occurred on nanophase Ti6Al4V. No differences were found for any type of Ti: wrought, microphase, or nanophase. Moreover, increased calcium and phosphorus mineral content correlated to greater amounts of underlying aluminum content on Ti6Al4V surfaces. Since, compared to microphase Ti6Al4V, nanophase Ti6Al4V contained a higher amount of aluminum at the surface (due to greater surface area), this may provide a reason for enhanced calcium and phosphorus mineral content on nanophase Ti6Al4V. Regardless of the mechanism, this study continues to support the further investigation of nanometals for improved orthopedic applications. PMID:16476478

  18. Mineral Deposition in Bacteria-Filled and Bacteria-Free Calcium Bodies in the Crustacean Hyloniscus riparius (Isopoda: Oniscidea)

    PubMed Central

    Vittori, Miloš; Rozman, Alenka; Grdadolnik, Jože; Novak, Urban; Štrus, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Crustacean calcium bodies are epithelial sacs which contain a mineralized matrix. The objectives of this study were to describe the microscopic anatomy of calcium bodies in the terrestrial isopod Hyloniscus riparius and to establish whether they undergo molt-related structural changes. We performed 3D reconstruction of the calcium bodies from paraffin sections and analyzed their structure with light and electron microscopy. In addition, we analyzed the chemical composition of their mineralized matrices with micro-Raman spectroscopy. Two pairs of these organs are present in H. riparius. One pair is filled with bacteria while the other pair is not. In non-molting animals, the bacteria-filled calcium bodies contain apatite crystals and the bacteria-free calcium bodies enclose CaCO3-containing concretions with little organic matrix. During preparation for molt, an additional matrix layer is deposited in both pairs of calcium bodies. In the bacteria-filled calcium bodies it contains a mixture of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate, whereas only calcium carbonate is present in bacteria-free calcium bodies. After ecdysis, all mineral components in bacteria-free calcium bodies and the additional matrix layer in bacteria-filled calcium bodies are completely resorbed. During calcium resorption, the apical surface of the calcium body epithelium is deeply folded and electron dense granules are present in spaces between epithelial cells. Our results indicate that the presence of bacteria might be linked to calcium phosphate mineralization. Calcium bodies likely provide a source of calcium and potentially phosphate for the mineralization of the new cuticle after molt. Unlike other terrestrial isopods, H. riparius does not form sternal CaCO3 deposits and the bacteria-free calcium bodies might functionally replace them in this species. PMID:23554963

  19. Antimicrobial Activity of Calcium Hydroxide in Endodontics: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shalavi, S; Yazdizadeh, M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of endodontic therapy is to preserve the patient's natural teeth without compromising the patient's local or systemic health. Calcium hydroxide has been included in several materials and antimicrobial formulations that are used in several treatment modalities in endodontics, such as inter-appointment intracanal medicaments. The purpose of this article was to review the antimicrobial properties of calcium hydroxide in endodontics. Calcium hydroxide has a high pH (approximately 12.5-12.8) and is classified chemically as a strong base. The lethal effects of calcium hydroxide on bacterial cells are probably due to protein denaturation and damage to DNA and cytoplasmic membranes. Calcium hydroxide has a wide range of antimicrobial activity against common endodontic pathogens but is less effective against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. Calcium hydroxide is also a valuable anti-endotoxin agent. However, its effect on microbial biofilms is controversial. PMID:23323217

  20. Subcellular localization of calcium and Ca-ATPase activity during nuclear maturation in Bufo arenarum oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Inés; Cisint, Susana B; Crespo, Claudia A; Medina, Marcela F; Fernández, Silvia N

    2009-08-01

    The localization of calcium and Ca-ATPase activity in Bufo arenarum oocytes was investigated by ultracytochemical techniques during progesterone-induced nuclear maturation, under in vitro conditions. No Ca2+ deposits were detected in either control oocytes or progesterone-treated ones for 1-2 h. At the time when nuclear migration started, electron dense deposits of Ca2+ were visible in vesicles, endoplasmic reticulum cisternae and in the space between the annulate lamellae membranes. Furthermore, Ca-ATPase activity was also detected in these membrane structures. As maturation progressed, the cation deposits were observed in the cytomembrane structures, which underwent an important reorganization and redistribution. Thus, they moved from the subcortex and became located predominantly in the oocyte cortex area when nuclear maturation ended. Ca2+ stores were observed in vesicles surrounding or between the cortical granules, which are aligned close to the plasma membrane. The positive Ca-ATPase reaction in these membrane structures could indicate that the calcium deposit is an ATP-dependent process. Our results suggest that during oocyte maturation calcium would be stored in membrane structures where it remains available for release at the time of fertilization. Data obtained under our experimental conditions indicate that calcium from the extracellular medium would be important for the oocyte maturation process. PMID:19397840

  1. Hydrocarbon Deposition Attenuates Osteoblast Activity on Titanium

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, R.; Ueno, T.; Migita, S.; Tsutsumi, Y.; Doi, H.; Ogawa, T.; Hanawa, T.; Wakabayashi, N.

    2014-01-01

    Although the reported percentage of bone-implant contact is far lower than 100%, the cause of such low levels of bone formation has rarely been investigated. This study tested the negative biological effect of hydrocarbon deposition onto titanium surfaces, which has been reported to be inevitable. Osteogenic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on titanium disks on which the carbon concentration was experimentally regulated to achieve carbon/titanium (C/Ti) ratios of 0.3, 0.7, and 1.0. Initial cellular activities such as cell attachment and cell spreading were concentration-dependently suppressed by the amount of carbon on the titanium surface. The osteoblastic functions of alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium mineralization were also reduced by more than 40% on the C/Ti (1.0) surface. These results indicate that osteoblast activity is influenced by the degree of hydrocarbon contamination on titanium implants and suggest that hydrocarbon decomposition before implant placement may increase the biocompatibility of titanium. PMID:24868012

  2. Effects of acid deposition on calcium nutrition and health of Southern Appalachian spruce fir forests

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Wullschleger, S.; Stone, A.; Wimmer, R.; Joslin, J.D.

    1995-02-01

    The role of acid deposition in the health of spruce fir forests in the Southern Appalachian Mountains has been investigated by a wide variety of experimental approaches during the past 10 years. These studies have proceeded from initial dendroecological documentation of altered growth patterns of mature trees to increasingly more focused ecophysiological research on the causes and characteristics of changes in system function associated with increased acidic deposition. Field studies across gradients in deposition and soil chemistry have been located on four mountains spanning 85 km of latitude within the Southern Appalachians. The conclusion that calcium nutrition is an important component regulating health of red spruce in the Southern Appalachians and that acid deposition significantly reduces calcium availability in several ways has emerged as a consistent result from multiple lines or research. These have included analysis of trends in wood chemistry, soil solution chemistry, foliar nutrition, gas exchange physiology, root histochemistry, and controlled laboratory and field studies in which acid deposition and/or calcium nutrition has been manipulated and growth and nutritional status of saplings or mature red spruce trees measured. This earlier research has led us to investigate the broader implications and consequences of calcium deficiency for changing resistance of spruce-fir forests to natural stresses. Current research is exploring possible relationships between altered calcium nutrition and shifts in response of Fraser fir to insect attack by the balsam wooly adelgid. In addition, changes in wood ultrastructural properties in relation to altered wood chemistry is being examined to evaluate its possible role in canopy deterioration, under wind and ice stresses typical of high elevation forests.

  3. Quantifying bursting neuron activity from calcium signals using blind deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Park, In Jun; Bobkov, Yuriy V; Ache, Barry W; Principe, Jose C

    2013-09-15

    Advances in calcium imaging have enabled studies of the dynamic activity of both individual neurons and neuronal assemblies. However, challenges, such as unknown nonlinearities in the spike-calcium relationship, noise, and the often relatively low temporal resolution of the calcium signal compared to the time-scale of spike generation, restrict the accurate estimation of action potentials from the calcium signal. Complex neuronal discharge, such as the activity demonstrated by bursting and rhythmically active neurons, represents an even greater challenge for reconstructing spike trains based on calcium signals. We propose a method using blind calcium signal deconvolution based on an information-theoretic approach. This model is meant to maximise the output entropy of a nonlinear filter where the nonlinearity is defined by the cumulative distribution function of the spike signal. We tested our maximum entropy (ME) algorithm using bursting olfactory receptor neurons (bORNs) of the lobster olfactory organ. The advantage of the ME algorithm is that the filter can be trained online based only on the statistics of the spike signal, without any assumptions regarding the unknown transfer function characterizing the relation between the spike and calcium signal. We show that the ME method is able to more accurately reconstruct the timing of the first and last spikes of a burst compared to other methods and that it improves the temporal precision fivefold compared to direct timing resolution of calcium signal. PMID:23711821

  4. Therapeutic effect of Xue Niao An on glyoxylate-induced calcium oxalate crystal deposition based on urinary metabonomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhongjiang; Chen, Wei; Gao, Songyan; Su, Li; Li, Na; Wang, Li; Lou, Ziyang; Dong, Xin; Guo, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    The anti-nephrolithiasis effect of Xue Niao An (XNA) capsules is explored by analyzing urine metabolic profiles in mouse models, with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS). An animal model of calcium oxalate crystal renal deposition was established in mice by intra-abdominal injection of glyoxylate. Then, treatment with XNA by intra-gastric administration was performed. At the end of the study, calcium deposition in kidney was measured by Von Kossa staining under light microscopy, and the Von Kossa staining changes showed that XNA significantly alleviated the calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Meanwhile, urine samples for fifteen metabolites, including amino acids and fatty acids, with significant differences were detected in the calcium oxalate group, while XNA treatment attenuated metabolic imbalances. Our study indicated that the metabonomic strategy provided comprehensive insight on the metabolic response to XNA treatment of rodent renal calcium oxalate deposition. PMID:25411524

  5. Link between the early calcium deposition in placenta and nanobacterial-like infection.

    PubMed

    Agababov, R M; Abashina, T N; Suzina, N E; Vainshtein, M B; Schwartsburd, P M

    2007-09-01

    The placenta is a vitally important organ in the regulation of embryonic development. That is why extensive calcium deposition [also named as pathological placental calcification (PPC)] could have serious negative consequences for the adequate growth of embryos. The nature and mechanism of PPC development has not been defined as yet. In the present investigation, we have tested the hypothesis that the molecular basis of PPC development consists of nanobacteria-induced calcification in infected female placenta. Electron microscopy findings support this hypothesis. The initial stage of micro-calcification may originate from the external surface of individual nanobacteria-like particles found mainly in placental extracellular matrix, where initial calcium deposition occurs as a needle surface deposition or as an amorphous-like surface precipitate. Further calcific propagation in placenta takes place in the newly formed macro-cavities, which are characterized by low electron density, possibly reflecting its liquid content around calcium deposition. The micro-cavities contain free nanobacterial-like particles, which may relate to atypical Gram-negative bacteria but not to apoptotic bodies by morphological characters and DNA/RNA distribution. We hypothesize that the increased placental calcification might be caused, at least in part, by nanobacterial infection. PMID:17954977

  6. Calcium Activities During Different Ion Exchange Separation Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhu, H.; Liu, Y.; Liu, F.; Zhang, C.; Sun, W.

    2014-12-01

    Calcium is a major element and participates in many geological processes. Investigations on stable calcium isotopic compositions of natural geological samples provide a great powerful tool to understand all kinds of those geological processes from a view of the field of isotope geochemistry. With the development of modern instruments and chemical separation techniques, calcium isotopic compositions could be determined even more precisely if the column chemistry brings no deviation. Usually, Calcium is separated from matrix elements using cation resin columns and the related chemical separation techniques seem to be robust. However, more detailed work still need to be done on matrix effects and calcium isotopic fractionations on column chemistry or during elution processes. If calcium is run on TIMS instruments, the interference effect could be lower and easier controlled, thus, the requirement to the chemistry is relatively not critic, but calcium fractionation on filaments could be much difficult to monitor. If calcium is run on MC-ICP-MS instruments, the interference effect could be huge and is really difficult to be recognized and subtracted, the requirement to the chemistry is much more critical in order to get a real result of the sample, but the instrument fractionation could be easier to monitor. Here we investigate calcium activities on several kinds of cation resins under different column/acid conditions. We seek to find a good balance between recovery and interference effect on column chemistry and are intend to set up a better chemical separation procedure to satisfy the instrument requirements for calcium. In addition, Calcium isotopic fractionation on column will also be discussed further here based on our previous and ongoing results.

  7. Effect of temperature on morphology of electrochemically-deposited calcium phosphates.

    PubMed

    Ban, S; Maruno, S; Harada, A; Hattori, M; Narita, K; Hasegawa, J

    1996-06-01

    Calcium phosphates were electrochemically deposited on titanium plates at temperatures from 4 degrees C to 92 degrees C in a solution of NaCl, K2HPO4 and CaCl2 x 2H20. Scanning electron microscopic studies showed that granular deposits formed on the electrode at electrolyte temperatures of 4 degrees C, 22 degrees C, and 37 degrees C; needle-like deposits formed at 52 degrees C-92 degrees C. The width and length of the needles increased with the temperature of the electrolyte. Based on the results of characterization by electron diffractometry. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry, the granular deposits were identified as carbonate-containing calcium phosphate with low crystallinity, and the needle-like deposits as carbonate-containing apatite crystals elongated along the c-axis. Crystallinity of the deposits increased with the temperature of the electrolyte, whereas the orientation indices of the apatite increased with temperature up to 82 degrees C and slightly decreased at 92 degrees C. PMID:8940536

  8. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements are carbonate and citrate. Calcium carbonate is inexpensive, but is absorbed best when taken ... antacid products, such as Tums® and Rolaids®, contain calcium carbonate. Each pill or chew provides 200–400 mg ...

  9. Increased calcium deposits and decreased Ca2+ -ATPase in erythrocytes of ascitic broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Zhao, Lihong; Geng, Guangrui; Ma, Liqin; Dong, Shishan; Xu, Tong; Wang, Jianlin; Wang, Huiyu; Tian, Yong; Qiao, Jian

    2011-06-01

    The decrease of erythrocyte deformability may be one of the predisposing factors for pulmonary hypertension and ascites in broiler chickens. In mammals, the cytoplasmic calcium is a major regulator of erythrocyte deformability. In this study, the erythrocyte deformability was measured, and the precise locations of Ca2+ and Ca2+ -ATPase in the erythrocytes were investigated in chickens with ascites syndrome induced by low ambient temperature. The results showed that ascitic broilers had higher filtration index of erythrocyte compared with control groups, indicating a decrease in erythrocyte deformability in ascitic broilers. The more calcium deposits were observed in the erythrocytes of ascitic broilers compared with those of the age-matched control birds. The Ca2+ -ATPase reactive grains were significantly decreased on the erythrocyte membranes of ascitic broilers. Our data suggest that accumulation of intracellular calcium and inhibition of Ca2+ -ATPase might be important factors for the reduced deformability of the erythrocytes of ascitic broilers. PMID:20728193

  10. Subcellular localization of calcium deposits in the noble crayfish Astacus astacus spermatophore: Implications for post-mating spermatophore hardening and spermatozoon maturation.

    PubMed

    Niksirat, Hamid; Kouba, Antonín

    2016-04-01

    The freshly ejaculated spermatophore of crayfish undergoes a hardening process during post-mating storage on the body surface of female. The ultrastructural distribution of calcium deposits were studied and compared in freshly ejaculated and post-mating noble crayfish spermatophores, using the oxalate-pyroantimonate technique, to determine possible roles of calcium in post-mating spermatophore hardening and spermatozoon maturation. Small particles of sparsely distributed calcium deposits were visible in the wall of freshly ejaculated spermatophore. Also, large amount of calcium deposits were visible in the membranes of the freshly ejaculated spermatozoon. Five minutes post-ejaculation, granules in the spermatophore wall appeared as porous formations with numerous electron lucent spaces. Calcium deposits were visible within the spaces and scattered in the spermatophore wall matrix, where smaller calcium deposits combined to form globular calcium deposits. Large numbers of the globular calcium deposits were visible in the wall of the post-mating spermatophore. Smaller calcium deposits were detected in the central area of post-mating spermatophore, which contains the sperm mass, and in the extracellular matrix and capsule. While the density of calcium deposits decreased in the post-mating spermatozoon membranes, numerous small calcium deposits appeared in the subacrosomal zone and nucleus. Substantial changes in calcium deposit distribution in the crayfish spermatophore during post-mating storage on the body of female may be involved in the processes of the spermatophore hardening and spermatozoon maturation. PMID:26817519

  11. Calcium Activation Profile In Electrically Stimulated Intact Rat Heart Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, Hugo; Nuydens, Rony; Ver Donck, Luc; Nuyens, Roger; De Brabander, Marc; Borgers, Marcel

    1988-06-01

    Recent advances in fluorescent probe technology and image processing equipment have made available the measurement of calcium in living systems on a real-time basis. We present the use of the calcium indicator Fura-2 in intact normally stimulated rat heart cells for the spatial and dynamic measurement of the calcium excitation profile. After electric stimulation (1 Hz), the activation proceeds from the center of the myocyte toward the periphery. Within two frame times (80 ms), the whole cell is activated. The activation is slightly faster in the center of the cell than in the periphery. The mean recovery time is 200-400 ms. There is no difference along the cell's long axis. The effect of a beta-agonist and of a calcium antagonist is described.

  12. FKBP-12 exhibits an inhibitory activity on calcium oxalate crystal growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Han, In Sook; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Park, Jong Wook; Suh, Min Ho; Suh, Sung Il; Shin, Song Woo; Ahn, Su Yul; Choe, Byung Kil

    2002-02-01

    Urolithiasis and calcium oxalate crystal deposition diseases are still significant medical problems. In the course of nephrocalcin cDNA cloning, we have identified FKBP-12 as an inhibitory molecule of calcium oxalate crystal growth. lambdagt 11 cDNA libraries were constructed from renal carcinoma tissues and screened for nephrocalcin cDNA clones using anti-nephrocalcin antibody as a probe. Clones expressing recombinant proteins, which appeared to be antigenically cross-reactive to nephrocalcin, were isolated and their DNA sequences and inhibitory activities on the calcium oxalate crystal growth were determined. One of the clone lambda gt 11 #31-1 had a partial fragment (80 bp) of FKBP-12 cDNA as an insert. Therefore, a full-length FKBP-12 cDNA was PCR-cloned from the lambda gt 11 renal carcinoma cDNA library and was subcloned into an expression vector. The resultant recombinant FKBP-12 exhibited an inhibitory activity on the calcium oxalate crystal growth (Kd=10(-7) M). Physiological effect of the extracellular FKBP-12 was investigated in terms of macrophage activation and proinflammatory cytokine gene induction. Extracellular FKBP-12 failed to activate macrophages even at high concentrations. FKBP-12 seems an anti-stone molecule for the oxalate crystal deposition disease and recurrent stone diseases. PMID:11850587

  13. Calcium-dependent Dimerization of Human Soluble Calcium Activated Nucleotidase: Characterization of the Dimer Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,M.; Horii, K.; Herr, A.; Kirley, T.

    2006-01-01

    Mammals express a protein homologous to soluble nucleotidases used by blood-sucking insects to inhibit host blood clotting. These vertebrate nucleotidases may play a role in protein glycosylation. The activity of this enzyme family is strictly dependent on calcium, which induces a conformational change in the secreted, soluble human nucleotidase. The crystal structure of this human enzyme was recently solved; however, the mechanism of calcium activation and the basis for the calcium-induced changes remain unclear. In this study, using analytical ultracentrifugation and chemical cross-linking, we show that calcium or strontium induce noncovalent dimerization of the soluble human enzyme. The location and nature of the dimer interface was elucidated using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and chemical cross-linking, coupled with crystallographic analyses. Replacement of Ile{sup 170}, Ser{sup 172}, and Ser{sup 226} with cysteine residues resulted in calcium-dependent, sulfhydryl-specific intermolecular cross-linking, which was not observed after cysteine introduction at other surface locations. Analysis of a super-active mutant, E130Y, revealed that this mutant dimerized more readily than the wild-type enzyme. The crystal structure of the E130Y mutant revealed that the mutated residue is found in the dimer interface. In addition, expression of the full-length nucleotidase revealed that this membrane-bound form can also dimerize and that these dimers are stabilized by spontaneous oxidative cross-linking of Cys{sup 30}, located between the single transmembrane helix and the start of the soluble sequence. Thus, calcium-mediated dimerization may also represent a mechanism for regulation of the activity of this nucleotidase in the physiological setting of the endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi.

  14. Calcium can mobilize and activate myosin-VI

    PubMed Central

    Batters, Christopher; Brack, Dario; Ellrich, Heike; Averbeck, Beate; Veigel, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The ability to coordinate the timing of motor protein activation lies at the center of a wide range of cellular motile processes including endocytosis, cell division, and cancer cell migration. We show that calcium dramatically alters the conformation and activity of the myosin-VI motor implicated in pivotal steps of these processes. We resolved the change in motor conformation and in structural flexibility using single particle analysis of electron microscopic data and identified interacting domains using fluorescence spectroscopy. We discovered that calcium binding to calmodulin increases the binding affinity by a factor of 2,500 for a bipartite binding site on myosin-VI. The ability of calcium-calmodulin to seek out and bridge between binding site components directs a major rearrangement of the motor from a compact dormant state into a cargo binding primed state that is nonmotile. The lack of motility at high calcium is due to calmodulin switching to a higher affinity binding site, which leaves the original IQ-motif exposed, thereby destabilizing the lever arm. The return to low calcium can either restabilize the lever arm, required for translocating the cargo-bound motors toward the center of the cell, or refold the cargo-free motors into an inactive state ready for the next cellular calcium flux. PMID:26811464

  15. Activation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Sensor STIM1 and Store-Operated Calcium Entry by Rotavirus Requires NSP4 Viroporin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hyser, Joseph M.; Utama, Budi; Crawford, Sue E.; Broughman, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) induces dramatic changes in cellular calcium homeostasis. These include increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) permeability, resulting in decreased ER calcium stores and activation of plasma membrane (PM) calcium influx channels, ultimately causing a 2- to 4-fold elevation in cytoplasmic calcium. Elevated cytoplasmic calcium is absolutely required for virus replication, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for calcium influx remain poorly understood. NSP4 is an ER-localized viroporin, whose activity depletes ER calcium, which ultimately leads to calcium influx. We hypothesized that NSP4-mediated depletion of ER calcium activates store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) through activation of the ER calcium sensor stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). We established and used a stable yellow fluorescent protein-expressing STIM1 cell line (YFP-STIM1) as a biosensor to assess STIM1 activation (puncta formation) by rotavirus infection and NSP4 expression. We found that STIM1 is constitutively active in rotavirus-infected cells and that STIM1 puncta colocalize with the PM-localized Orai1 SOCE calcium channel. Expression of wild-type NSP4 activated STIM1, resulting in PM calcium influx, but an NSP4 viroporin mutant failed to induce STIM1 activation and did not activate the PM calcium entry pathway. Finally, knockdown of STIM1 significantly reduced rotavirus yield, indicating STIM1 plays a critical role in virus replication. These data demonstrate that while rotavirus may ultimately activate multiple calcium channels in the PM, calcium influx is predicated on NSP4 viroporin-mediated activation of STIM1 in the ER. This is the first report of viroporin-mediated activation of SOCE, reinforcing NSP4 as a robust model to understand dysregulation of calcium homeostasis during virus infections. PMID:24109210

  16. Characterization of calcium phosphate coatings doped with Mg, deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique using ArF excimer laser.

    PubMed

    Mróz, W; Jedyński, M; Prokopiuk, A; Slósarczyk, A; Paszkiewicz, Z

    2009-01-01

    Calcium phosphate layers were deposited on Ti6Al4V substrates with TiN buffer layers by use of pulsed laser deposition method. With this technique three pressed pellets consisted of tricalcium phosphate (TCP, Ca(3)(PO(4))(2)), hydroxyapatite (HA, Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)(OH)(2)) and hydroxyapatite-doped with magnesium (HA with 4% of Mg and trace amount of (Ca,Mg)(3)(PO(4))(2)) were ablated using ArF excimer laser (lambda=193 nm). The using of different targets enabled to determine the influence of target composition on the nature of deposited layers. The obtained deposits were characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction method (XRD). The obtained Fourier spectras revealed differences in terms of intensity of spectral bands of different layers. The analysis from XRD showed that Mg-doped HA layer has crystalline structure and TCP and HA layers composition is characterized by amorphous nature. PMID:18407507

  17. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them ... in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as canned sardines and ...

  18. Calcium-dependent activation of Pyk2 by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Beitner-Johnson, Dana; Ferguson, Tsuneo; Rust, Randy T; Kobayashi, Shuichi; Millhorn, David E

    2002-02-01

    The Pyk2 tyrosine kinase can be activated by both calcium-dependent and calcium-independent mechanisms. Exposure to moderate hypoxia (5% O(2)) induced a rapid and persistent tyrosine phosphorylation of Pyk2 in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Hypoxia and KCl-depolarization increased the phosphotyrosine content of Pyk2 by twofold and fourfold, respectively. Both of these effects were abolished in the absence of extracellular calcium. There was a modest activation of MAPK in parallel with the onset of Pyk2 phosphorylation. However, there was no detectable activation of either JNK or c-src, two other known downstream targets of Pyk2. Thus, exposure to hypoxia may selectively target specific subsets of Pyk2 signalling pathways. PMID:11781137

  19. Mobilization of hepatic calcium pools by platelet activating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, D.S.; Hanahan, D.J.; Olson, M.S.

    1987-03-24

    In the perfused rat liver, platelet activating factor, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (AGEPC), infusion produces an extensive but transient glycogenolytic response which at low AGEPC concentrations is markedly dependent upon the perfusate calcium levels. The role of calcium in the glycogenolytic response of the liver to AGEPC was investigated by assessing the effect of AGEPC on various calcium pools in the intact liver. Livers from fed rats were equilibrated with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/, and the kinetics of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux were determined in control, AGEPC-stimulated, and phenylephrine-stimulated livers during steady-state washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. AGEPC treatment had only a slight if any effect on the pattern of steady-state calcium efflux from the liver, as opposed to major perturbations in the pattern of calcium efflux effected by the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine. Infusion of short pulses of AGEPC during the washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from labeled livers caused a transient release of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ which was not abolished at low calcium concentrations in the perfusate. Infusion of latex beads, which are removed by the reticuloendothelial cells, caused the release of hepatic /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in a fashion similar to the case with AGEPC. The findings indicate that AGEPC does not perturb a major pool of calcium within the liver as occurs upon ..cap alpha..-adrenergic stimulation; it is likely that AGEPC mobilizes calcium from a smaller yet very important pool, very possibly from nonparenchymal cells in the liver.

  20. Calcium imaging of infrared-stimulated activity in rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Cayce, Jonathan Matthew; Bouchard, Matthew B; Chernov, Mykyta M; Chen, Brenda R; Grosberg, Lauren E; Jansen, E Duco; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2014-04-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a promising neurostimulation technique that can activate neural tissue with high spatial precision and without the need for exogenous agents. However, little is understood about how infrared light interacts with neural tissue on a cellular level, particularly within the living brain. In this study, we use calcium sensitive dye imaging on macroscopic and microscopic scales to explore the spatiotemporal effects of INS on cortical calcium dynamics. The INS-evoked calcium signal that was observed exhibited a fast and slow component suggesting activation of multiple cellular mechanisms. The slow component of the evoked signal exhibited wave-like properties suggesting network activation, and was verified to originate from astrocytes through pharmacology and 2-photon imaging. We also provide evidence that the fast calcium signal may have been evoked through modulation of glutamate transients. This study demonstrates that pulsed infrared light can induce intracellular calcium modulations in both astrocytes and neurons, providing new insights into the mechanisms of action of INS in the brain. PMID:24674600

  1. Calcium imaging of infrared-stimulated activity in rodent brain

    PubMed Central

    Cayce, Jonathan Matthew; Bouchard, Matthew B.; Chernov, Mykyta M.; Chen, Brenda R.; Grosberg, Lauren E.; Jansen, E. Duco; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Summary Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a promising neurostimulation technique that can activate neural tissue with high spatial precision and without the need for exogenous agents. However, little is understood about how infrared light interacts with neural tissue on a cellular level, particularly within the living brain. In this study, we use calcium sensitive dye imaging on macroscopic and microscopic scales to explore the spatiotemporal effects of INS on cortical calcium dynamics. The INS-evoked calcium signal that was observed exhibited a fast and slow component suggesting activation of multiple cellular mechanisms. The slow component of the evoked signal exhibited wave-like properties suggesting network activation, and was verified to originate from astrocytes through pharmacology and 2-photon imaging. We also provide evidence that the fast calcium signal may have been evoked through modulation of glutamate transients. This study demonstrates that pulsed infrared light can induce intracellular calcium modulations in both astrocytes and neurons, providing new insights into the mechanisms of action of INS in the brain. PMID:24674600

  2. Neuronal modulation of calcium channel activity in cultured rat astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Corvalan, V.; Cole, R.; De Vellis, J.; Hagiwara, Susumu )

    1990-06-01

    The patch-clamp technique was used to study whether cocultivation of neurons and astrocytes modulates the expression of calcium channel activity in astrocytes. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from rat brain astrocytes cocultured with rat embryonic neurons revealed two types of voltage-dependent inward currents carried by Ca{sup 2+} and blocked by either Cd{sup 2+} or Co{sup 2+} that otherwise were not detected in purified astrocytes. This expression of calcium channel activity in astrocytes was neuron dependent and was not observed when astrocytes were cocultured with purified oligodendrocytes.

  3. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  4. Biological Origin of Micro-laminated Calcium Carbonate Deposits on Antarctic Rock Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, M.; Stone, J. O.

    2001-12-01

    We have observed and sampled patchy encrustations of calcium carbonate on rock surfaces in East and West Antarctica. Individual disk-like deposits are up to 1 cm across and a few mm thick, but in places coalesce to form more extensive, colloform coatings. We have observed these deposits on substrates of granite, sandstone, and schist. Their distribution appears similar to that of Antarctic lichens and endolithic algae, extending up to ca. 1000m elevation, but has no consistent relationship to snow drifts, solar radiation, or prevailing winds. The morphology and position of the deposits are distinct from sub-glacial carbonate precipitates. In Marie Byrd Land, the encrustations occur on the surfaces exposed by deglaciation within the past 5000 yrs, and the sample from East Antarctica contains live C-14 (M. Mabin, pers. comm.), suggesting a possible biological origin Electron microprobe and SEM examination of cross-sectioned specimens reveals micron-scale layering of predominantly calcium carbonate, but with a number of bright laminae in SEM images, believed to be calcium fluoride. Sections closely resemble desert varnish in micro-morphology, though not in mineralogy. Isotopic analysis of an organic carbon extract (as opposed to C from the CaCO3 itself) gave a delta C-13 PDB value of -23.3 per mil, similar to values expected in carbon of biological origin. However, we have no proof yet that the carbon analyzed was produced by organisms within the encrustation, rather than being entrapped during an inorganic precipitation process. To investigate the possible biological origin of this material, we attempted to sequence the 16S segment of rRNA in the organic extract, but have not yet completed successful PCR replication. We are continuing attempts to isolate and analyze the pertinent genetic material. The micro-morphology, strongly negative delta C-13 and presence of live C-14 suggest a biological process for precipitation of these calcium carbonate deposits. We hope to

  5. Gitelman syndrome disclosed by calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease: early diagnosis by ultrasonographic study.

    PubMed

    Zabotti, A; Della Siega, P; Picco, L; Quartuccio, L; Bassetti, M; De Vita, S

    2016-01-01

    Gitelman's syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive tubular disorder characterized by hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria associated to hypokalemia. The clinical spectrum is wide and usually characterized by chronic fatigue, cramps, muscle weakness and paresthesiae. We describe a case of a 43 year-old male patient with early onset of knee arthritis and no other symptoms. Ultrasound revealed diffuse and confluent hyperechoic deposits in cartilage, fibrocartilage of the menisci and synovium and calcium pyrophosphate crystals were observed in the synovial fluid of the knee. The concomitant presence of hypomagnesemia, hypocalciuria and hypokalemia made clear the diagnosis of Gitelman's syndrome associated with chondrocalcinosis. PMID:27339375

  6. A comprehensive search for calcium binding sites critical for TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel activity.

    PubMed

    Tien, Jason; Peters, Christian J; Wong, Xiu Ming; Cheng, Tong; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh; Yang, Huanghe

    2014-01-01

    TMEM16A forms calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) that regulate physiological processes such as the secretions of airway epithelia and exocrine glands, the contraction of smooth muscles, and the excitability of neurons. Notwithstanding intense interest in the mechanism behind TMEM16A-CaCC calcium-dependent gating, comprehensive surveys to identify and characterize potential calcium sensors of this channel are still lacking. By aligning distantly related calcium-activated ion channels in the TMEM16 family and conducting systematic mutagenesis of all conserved acidic residues thought to be exposed to the cytoplasm, we identify four acidic amino acids as putative calcium-binding residues. Alterations of the charge, polarity, and size of amino acid side chains at these sites alter the ability of different divalent cations to activate the channel. Furthermore, TMEM16A mutant channels containing double cysteine substitutions at these residues are sensitive to the redox potential of the internal solution, providing evidence for their physical proximity and solvent accessibility. PMID:24980701

  7. Decrease in T Cell Activation and Calcium Flux during Clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence; Holtzclaw, J. David

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of altered gravitational environments on T cell activation. We isolated human, naive T cells (CD3+CD14-CD19-CD16-CD56-CD25-CD69-CD45RA-) following IRB approved protocols. These purified T cells were then incubated with 6 mm polystyrene beads coated with OKT3 (Ortho Biotech, Raritan, NJ) and antiCD28 (Becton Dickinson (BD), San Jose, CA) at 37 C for 24 hours. Antibodies were at a 1:1 ratio and the bead-to-cell ratio was 2:1. Four incubation conditions existed: 1) static or "1g"; 2) centrifugation at 10 relative centrifugal force (RCF) or "10g"; 3) clinorotation at 25 RPM (functional weightlessness or "0g"); and 4) clinorotation at 80 RPM ("1g" plus net shear force approx.30 dynes/sq cm). Following incubation, T cells were stained for CD25 expression (BD) and intracellular calcium (ratio of Fluo4 to Fura Red, Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR) and analyzed by flow cytometry (Coulter EPICS XL, Miami, FL). Results: Static or "1g" T cells had the highest level of CD25 expression and intracellular calcium. T cells centrifuged at 10 RCF ("10g") had lower CD25 expression and calcium levels compared to the static control. However, cells centrifuged at 10 RCF had higher CD25 expression and calcium levels than those exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation ("0g"). T cells exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation had lower CD25 expression, but the approximately the same calcium levels than T cells exposed to 80 RPM clinorotation. These data suggest that stress-activated calcium channel exist in T cells and may play a role during T cell activation.

  8. A Rare Case of Tumoral Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Crystal Deposition Disease of the Wrist Joint

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Osamu; Kaji, Yoshio; Yamagami, Yoshiki; Yamaguchi, Kounosuke; Nishimura, Hideki; Fukuoka, Natsuko; Yamamoto, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Tumoral calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease (CPPDCD), also known as tophaceous calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPDD), is a tumorlike lesion, and it should be distinguished from usual CPDD that causes severe joint inflammation and arthralgia. A case of tumoral CPPDCD of the wrist joint that required differentiation from synovial osteochondromatosis is described. Case Presentation. The patient was a 78-year-old woman with a 5-year history of nodular lesions at the right wrist that had gradually increased in size. An excisional biopsy and a histological examination of the excised nodular lesions by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining were performed, demonstrating numerous polarizable, rhabdoid, and rectangular crystals, surrounded by fibroblasts, macrophages, and foreign body-type giant cells, consistent with tumoral CPPDCD. Conclusion. Tumoral CPPDCD, especially at the wrist joint, is rare, and, to the best of our knowledge, only 2 articles have been published. This case seems to need further follow-up for recurrence, because tumoral CPPDCD may recur after complete or incomplete surgical excision. PMID:26783477

  9. Both barium and calcium activate neuronal potassium currents.

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, A B; Spitzer, N C

    1987-01-01

    Amphibian spinal neurons in culture possess both rapidly inactivating and sustained calcium-dependent potassium current components, similar to those described for other cells. Divalent cation-dependent whole-cell outward currents were isolated by subtracting the voltage-dependent potassium currents recorded from Xenopus laevis neurons in the presence of impermeant cadmium (100-500 microM) from the currents produced without cadmium but in the presence of permeant divalent cations (50-100 microM). These concentrations of permeant ions were low enough to avoid contamination by macroscopic inward currents through calcium channels. Calcium-dependent potassium currents were reduced by 1 microM tetraethylammonium. These currents can also be activated by barium or strontium. Barium as well as calcium activated outward currents in young neurons (6-8 hr) and in relatively mature neurons (19-26 hr in vitro). However, barium influx appeared to suppress the sustained voltage-dependent potassium current in most cells. Barium also activated at least one class of potassium channels observed in excised membrane patches, while blocking others. The blocking action may have masked and hindered detection of the stimulatory action of barium in other systems. PMID:2442762

  10. Osteoporosis Knowledge, Calcium Intake, and Weight-Bearing Physical Activity in Three Age Groups of Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrio, Kate; Auld, Garry W.

    2002-01-01

    Determined the extent and integration of osteoporosis knowledge in three age groups of women, comparing knowledge to calcium intake and weight bearing physical activity (WBPA). Overall calcium intake was relatively high. There were no differences in knowledge, calcium intake, or WBPA by age, nor did knowledge predict calcium intake and WBPA. None…

  11. Characterization of calcium phosphate deposited on valve metal by anodic oxidation with polarity inversion.

    PubMed

    Okawa, Seigo; Homma, Kikuo; Kanatani, Mitsugu; Watanabe, Kouichi

    2009-07-01

    Electrochemical deposition of calcium phosphate (CAP) on valve metals such as Ta, Nb, and Zr, was performed by anodic oxidation with alternate polarity inversion at an applied 20 VDC. A saturated hydroxyapatite(HAP)-phosphoric acid solution (pH 3) was used as the electrolyte. FTIR, XRD, and XPS were employed to investigate the detailed characteristics of the deposition. HAP was precipitated on Ta; HAP including brushite and monetite on Nb; and HAP and monetite on Zr. The Ca/P atomic ratios were 1.3-1.5 by XPS, and HPO(4)(2- )bands were detected on Ta by FTIR. Therefore, the HAP precipitated on Ta was a Ca-deficient HAP. In addition, the XPS spectra of the specimens showed that phosphate ions were incorporated into the anodic oxide film. Deposits with nano-grain size were observed by AFM. The results confirmed that CAP with nano-grain size was deposited on valve metals by the anodic oxidation with polarity inversion. PMID:19721291

  12. Dendritic NMDA receptors activate axonal calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Jason M.; Jahr, Craig E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation can alter synaptic strength by regulating transmitter release from a variety of neurons in the CNS. As NMDARs are permeable to Ca2+ and monovalent cations, they could alter release directly by increasing presynaptic Ca2+ or indirectly by axonal depolarization sufficient to activate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs). Using two-photon microscopy to measure Ca2+ excursions, we found that somatic depolarization or focal activation of dendritic NMDARs elicited small Ca2+ transients in axon varicosities of cerebellar stellate cell interneurons. These axonal transients resulted from Ca2+ entry through VSCCs that were opened by the electrotonic spread of the NMDAR-mediated depolarization elicited in the dendrites. In contrast, we were unable to detect direct activation of NMDARs on axons indicating an exclusive somatodendritic expression of functional NMDARs. In cerebellar stellate cells, dendritic NMDAR activation masquerades as a presynaptic phenomenon and may influence Ca2+-dependent forms of presynaptic plasticity and release. PMID:18957221

  13. Fractional absorption of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa) and calcium carbonate measured by a dual stable-isotope method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa), obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI), with that of calcium carbonate. In ...

  14. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  15. Calcium influx, but not intracellular calcium release, supports PACAP-mediated ERK activation in HEK PAC1 receptor cells.

    PubMed

    May, Victor; Clason, Todd A; Buttolph, Thomas R; Girard, Beatrice M; Parsons, Rodney L

    2014-11-01

    In HEK cells expressing GFP-tagged PAC1Hop1 receptors, PACAP augments ERK phosphorylation through two parallel pathways: one through PACAP/PAC1 receptor internalization/endosome MEK/ERK signaling and the other through PLC/DAG/PKC activation. We examined whether elevation of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) was required for either of the PACAP/PAC1 receptor-mediated ERK activation mechanisms. The PACAP (25 nM)-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)]i was greater with cells maintained in Ca(2+)-containing than in Ca(2+)-deficient solution, suggesting that both calcium release from internal stores and calcium influx contributed to the rise in [Ca(2+)]i. A thapsigargin-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i also was greater with calcium in the external solution. OAG, the cell permeable analogue of DAG, increased [Ca(2+)]i, but only in Ca(2+)-containing solution. Decreasing external calcium or depleting internal calcium stores did not block PACAP-induced PAC1 receptor internalization. Omission of calcium from the external solution, but not thapsigargin pretreatment, significantly blunted PACAP-stimulated ERK phosphorylation. The PKC inhibitor BimI decreased PACAP-mediated ERK activation in both Ca(2+)-containing or Ca(2+)-deficient solutions. In contrast, following Pitstop 2 pretreatment to block endocytic mechanisms, PACAP activated ERK only when calcium was present in the external solution. We conclude that the endosome signaling pathway is largely calcium-independent whereas calcium influx appears necessary for the PLC/DAG/PKC component of PACAP-induced ERK activation. PMID:24723666

  16. Role of Calcium Signaling in B Cell Activation and Biology.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yoshihiro; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Increase in intracellular levels of calcium ions (Ca2+) is one of the key triggering signals for the development of B cell response to the antigen. The diverse Ca2+ signals finely controlled by multiple factors participate in the regulation of gene expression, B cell development, and effector functions. B cell receptor (BCR)-initiated Ca2+ mobilization is sourced from two pathways: one is the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and other is the prolonged influx of extracellular Ca2+ induced by depleting the stores via store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. The identification of stromal interaction molecule 1(STIM1), the ER Ca2+ sensor, and Orai1, a key subunit of the CRAC channel pore, has now provided the tools to understand the mode of Ca2+ influx regulation and physiological relevance. Herein, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying BCR-triggered Ca2+ signaling as well as its contribution to the B cell biological processes and diseases. PMID:26369772

  17. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  19. Posterior C1-C2 calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Isaac Bing-Yi; Arkun, Knarik; Riesenburger, Ron I

    2016-01-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease rarely occurs in the posterior aspect of the craniocervical junction (CCJ). To the best of our knowledge, there have been only 2 previously reported cases of patients with posterior CPPD lesions in this region that have led to cervical myelopathy. We report the case of a 70-year-old man presenting with neck pain and cervical myelopathy with multilevel stenosis from C1-C6. The stenosis was worst at C1-C2, secondary to compression by a CPPD lesion posterior to the spinal cord. The patient underwent a C2-C6 laminectomy and fusion with resection of the CPPD lesion. In this report, we discuss the patient and present a novel theory to explain the preponderance of CPPD lesions in the CCJ occurring anteriorly and not posteriorly to the spinal cord. PMID:26976840

  20. Deposition of calcium carbonate films by a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gower, Laurie B.; Odom, Damian J.

    2000-03-01

    A polypeptide additive has been used to transform the solution crystallization of calcium carbonate to a solidification process of a liquid-phase mineral precursor. In situ observations reveal that polyaspartate induces liquid-liquid phase separation of droplets of a mineral precursor. The droplets deposit on the substrate and coalesce to form a coating, which then solidifies into calcitic tablets and films. Transition bars form during the amorphous to crystalline transition, leading to sectorization of calcite tablets, and the defect textures and crystal morphologies are atypical of solution grown crystals. The formation of nonequilibrium crystal morphologies using an acidic polypeptide may have implications in the field of biomineralization, and the environmentally friendly aspects of this polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process may offer new techniques for aqueous-based processing of ceramic films, coatings, and particulates.

  1. Engineering of pulsed laser deposited calcium phosphate biomaterials in controlled atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukteinis, Saulius E.

    Synthetic calcium phosphates (CAP) such as hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used as regenerative bone graft materials and also as thin films to improve the integration of biomedical implant devices within skeletal tissue. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) can deposit crystalline HA with significant adhesion on titanium biomaterials. However, there are PLD processing constraints due to the complex physical and chemical interactions occurring simultaneously during PLD, which influence ablation plume formation and development. In this investigation PLD CAP films were engineered with a focus on novel decoupling of partial pressure of H2O (g) ( PH2O ) from total background pressure, in combination with substrate heat treatment and laser energy density control. Characterization of these films was performed with X-ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and Optical Profilometry. In vitro cellular adhesion testing was also performed using osteoblast (MC3T3) cell lines to evaluate adhesion of bone-forming cells on processed PLD CAP samples. Preferred a-axis orientation films were deposited in H2O (g) saturated atmospheres with reduced laser fluence (< 4 J/cm2). Crystalline HA/tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) films were deposited in H2O ( g)-deficient atmospheres with higher laser fluence (> 3 J/cm 2). Varied PH2O resulted in control of biphasic HA/TTCP composition with increasing TTCP at lower PH2O . These were dense continuous films composed of micron-scale particles. Cellular adhesion assays did not demonstrate a significant difference between osteoblast adhesion density on HA films compared with biphasic HA/TTCP films. Room temperature PLD at varied PH2O combined with furnace heat treatment resulted in controlled variation in surface amplitude parameters including surface roughness (S a), root mean square (Sq), peak to valley height (St), and ten-point height ( Sz). These discontinuous films were

  2. Calcium and cargoes as regulators of myosin 5a activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, James R. Thirumurugan, Kavitha; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Hammer, John A.; Knight, Peter J.

    2008-04-25

    Myosin 5a is a two-headed actin-dependent motor that transports various cargoes in cells. Its enzymology and mechanochemistry have been extensively studied in vitro. It is a processive motor that takes multiple 36 nm steps on actin. The enzymatic activity of myosin 5 is regulated by an intramolecular folding mechanism whereby its lever arms fold back against the coiled-coil tail such that the motor domains directly bind the globular tail domains. We show that the structure seen in individual folded molecules is consistent with electron density map of two-dimensional crystals of the molecule. In this compact state, the actin-activated MgATPase activity of the molecule is markedly inhibited and the molecule cannot move processively on surface bound actin filaments. The actin-activated MgATPase activity of myosin 5a is activated by increasing the calcium concentration or by binding of a cargo-receptor molecule, melanophilin, in vitro. However, calcium binding to the calmodulin light chains results in dissociation of some of the calmodulin which disrupts the ability of myosin 5a to move on actin filaments in vitro. Thus we propose that the physiologically relevant activation pathway in vivo involves binding of cargo-receptor proteins.

  3. ALTERATIONS IN CALCIUM ION ACTIVITY BY ELF AND RF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory



    Alterations in calcium ion activity by ELF and RF electromagnetic fields

    Introduction

    Calcium ions play many important roles in biological systems. For example, calcium ion activity can be used as an indicator of second-messenger signal-transduction processe...

  4. Effect of calcium on adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Shang, Junteng; Wang, Ying; Li, Yansheng; Gao, Hong

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effect of calcium ion on the adsorption of humic acid (HA) (as a target pollutant) by powered activated carbon. The HA adsorption isotherms at different pH and kinetics of two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), were performed. It was showed that the adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for HA was markedly enhanced when Ca(2+) was doped into HA. Also, HA and Ca(2+) taken as nitrate were tested on the uptake of each other respectively and it was showed that the adsorbed amounts of both of them were significantly promoted when HA and calcium co-existed. Furthermore, the adsorbed amount of HA slightly decreased with the increasing of Ca(2+) concentration, whereas the amount of calcium increased with the increasing of HA concentration, but all above the amounts without addition. Finally, the change of pH before and after adsorption process is studied. In the two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), pH had a small rise, but the extent of pH of later solution was bigger. PMID:25078809

  5. {sup 41}Ca as a tracer for calcium uptake and deposition in heart tissue during ischemia and reperfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Southon, J.R.; Bishop, M.S.; Kost, G.J.

    1993-09-17

    We have developed techniques and are commencing experiments using enriched {sup 41}Ca as a tracer in isolated rabbit heart preparations. The aims of the study are to measure calcium uptake and deposition in response to cardiac ischemia and reperfusion, and to investigate events and mechanism leading to irreversible myocyte injury.

  6. Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlying mechanism of calcium oscillations through the power of mathematical modeling. We also summarize recent findings on the role of calcium entry through store-operated channels in sustaining calcium oscillations and in the mechanism by which calcium oscillations couple to downstream effectors. PMID:21421924

  7. Synthesis of europium-activated calcium tungstate phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovici, Elisabeth-Jeanne; Forgaciu, Flavia; Nemes, Miloslava; Ursu, Veronica

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish the way in which different synthesis conditions influence on the structural and luminescent characteristics of europium activated calcium tungstate powder phosphor. CaWO4:Eu3+ samples were prepared by thermal synthesis from mixtures consisting of precipitated-CaWO4, equivalent amounts of Eu2O3 and WO3 (activating system) and CaCl2 or Na2WO4 as flux. Calcination was performed at 800 - 1000 degree(s)C for 2 h, in air. The crystalline structure (XRD-patterns) and luminescent characteristics (emission and excitation spectra of phosphor samples were determined and interpreted.

  8. Determination of fracture toughness of calcium phosphate coatings deposited onto Ti6Al4V substrate by using indentation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Ibrahim; Cetinel, Hakan; Pasinli, Ahmet

    2012-09-01

    In this study, fracture toughness values of calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings deposited onto Ti6Al4V substrate were determined by using Vickers indentation method. In this new patent holding method, the activation processes were performed with NaOH and NaOH+H2O2 on the Ti6Al4V material surface. Thicknesses of CaP coatings were measured from cross-sections of the samples by using optical microscopy. Vickers indentation tests were performed by using microhardness tester. Young's modulus values of the coatings were determined by using ultra microhardness tester. As a result, fracture toughness (K1C) values of the CaP coatings produced by using two different activation processes, were calculated by using experimental study results. These were found to be 0.43 MPa m1/2 and 0.39 MPa m1/2, respectively. It was determined that the CaP coating on Ti6Al4V activated by NaOH+H2O2 had higher fracture toughness than the CaP coating on Ti6Al4V activated by NaOH.

  9. Growth of calcium phosphate thin films by in situ assisted ultraviolet pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelea, V.; Craciun, V.; Iliescu, M.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Pelletier, H.; Mille, P.; Werckmann, J.

    2003-03-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) thin films including hydroxyapatite were intensively studied in order to optimize the technology of the bone prostheses manufacturing. A drawback in the CaP films processing is the poor mechanical characteristics, especially hardness, tensile strength and adherence to the metallic substrate. We report a new method for the growth of high quality CaP films with substantial improvement of the mechanical properties: pulsed laser deposition (PLD) assisted by in situ ultraviolet (UV) radiation emitted by a low pressure Hg lamp. The depositions were made on Si and Ti-5Al-2.5Fe alloys in very low ambient oxygen at pressures of 10 -2 to 10 -1 Pa with the substrates maintained at 500-600 °C temperature. The films were analyzed by electron microscopy, white light confocal microscopy (WLCM), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and Berkovich nanoindentation. The films were crystalline and exhibited remarkable mechanical characteristics with values of hardness and Young modulus of 6-8 and 150-170 GPa, respectively, which are uncommonly high for the CaP ceramics. The UV lamp radiation enhanced the gas reactivity and atoms mobility during processing, while the tensile strength between the film's grains and the bonding strength at the CaP film-substrate interface were increased.

  10. The effect of magnetic field on electrochemically deposited calcium phosphate/collagen coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueni; He, Jianpeng; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xudong; Wang, Wanying

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured calcium phosphate/collagen (CaP/COL) coatings were deposited on the carbon/carbon (C/C) composites through electrochemical deposition (ECD) under magnetic field. The effect of magnetic fields with different orientations on the morphology and composition was investigated. Both the morphology and composition of the coatings could be altered by superimposed magnetic field. Under zero magnetic field and magnetic field, three-dimensional network structure consisting of collagen fibers and CaP were formed on the C/C substrate. The applied magnetic field in the electric field helped to form nanostructured and plate-like CaP on collagen fibers. For the ECD under magnetic field, the Ca/P molar ratio of the coatings was lower than the one under B=0. This may be contributed to the decreased electrical resistance or the increased electrical conductivity of electrolyte solutions under magnetic field. The nanosized CaP/COL coatings exhibited the similar morphology to the human bone and could present excellent cell bioactivity and osteoblast functions. PMID:25201398

  11. Fast calcium sensor proteins for monitoring neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Badura, Aleksandra; Sun, Xiaonan Richard; Giovannucci, Andrea; Lynch, Laura A.; Wang, Samuel S.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. A major goal of the BRAIN Initiative is the development of technologies to monitor neuronal network activity during active information processing. Toward this goal, genetically encoded calcium indicator proteins have become widely used for reporting activity in preparations ranging from invertebrates to awake mammals. However, slow response times, the narrow sensitivity range of Ca2+ and in some cases, poor signal-to-noise ratio still limit their usefulness. Here, we review recent improvements in the field of neural activity-sensitive probe design with a focus on the GCaMP family of calcium indicator proteins. In this context, we present our newly developed Fast-GCaMPs, which have up to 4-fold accelerated off-responses compared with the next-fastest GCaMP, GCaMP6f. Fast-GCaMPs were designed by destabilizing the association of the hydrophobic pocket of calcium-bound calmodulin with the RS20 binding domain, an intramolecular interaction that protects the green fluorescent protein chromophore. Fast-GCaMP6f-RS06 and Fast-GCaMP6f-RS09 have rapid off-responses in stopped-flow fluorimetry, in neocortical brain slices, and in the intact cerebellum in vivo. Fast-GCaMP6f variants should be useful for tracking action potentials closely spaced in time, and for following neural activity in fast-changing compartments, such as axons and dendrites. Finally, we discuss strategies that may allow tracking of a wider range of neuronal firing rates and improve spike detection. PMID:25558464

  12. Mechanisms of caffeine activation of single calcium-release channels of sheep cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Sitsapesan, R; Williams, A J

    1990-01-01

    1. Calcium-release channels of sheep cardiac junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum were incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers. Single-channel current fluctuations were recorded under voltage clamp conditions. 2. Channels incorporate into the bilayer with a fixed orientation and channel open probability is regulated by the calcium concentration at the cytosolic face of the membrane. 3. Addition of caffeine (0.5-2.0 mM) to the cytosolic side of the membrane increased the open probability of the calcium-activated calcium-release channel by increasing the frequency of opening without significant alteration to the durations of open events. This effect was observed at both 0.1 and 10 microM-activating cytosolic calcium. 4. Caffeine (0.5-2.0 mM) did not activate the channel at a subactivating cytosolic calcium concentration (80 pM). 5. At subactivating calcium concentrations, channels could be activated by higher concentrations of caffeine (greater than 5.0 mM) revealing a second, calcium-independent, mechanism for channel activation. Channel openings induced by these high concentrations of caffeine at subactivating calcium concentrations displayed different kinetics from those observed with calcium as the sole activating ligand or with combinations of calcium and low concentrations of caffeine. 6. Activation of channel opening by caffeine in the presence of calcium did not affect single-channel conductance. Channel openings produced by caffeine at subactivating cytosolic calcium concentrations had identical conductance and relative permeability to those seen on calcium activation. 7. Channels activated by caffeine at both activating and subactivating calcium concentrations were characteristically modified by ryanodine, Ruthenium Red, ATP and magnesium, implying that the same channel is involved under both conditions. PMID:2167363

  13. Acceleration of catalytic activity of calcium oxide for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Ayato; Matsubara, Koh; Honda, Katsuhisa

    2009-01-01

    This research was aimed at studying the acceleration of the catalytic activity of calcium oxide (CaO) for developing an effective heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production by the transesterification of plant oil with methanol. CaO was activated by pretreatment with methanol and was used for the transesterification reaction. The activation and transesterification reaction conditions were examined. The obtained optimal reaction conditions were 0.1-g CaO, 3.9-g methanol, 15-g rapeseed oil, and 1.5-h activation time at room temperature that provided methyl ester in approximately 90% yield within a reaction time of 3h at 60 degrees C. The activation mechanism was also investigated, and the proposed mechanism is as follows. By pretreatment with methanol, a small amount of CaO gets converted into Ca(OCH(3))(2) that acts as an initiating reagent for the transesterification reaction and produces glycerin as a by-product. Subsequently, a calcium-glycerin complex, formed due to the reaction of CaO with glycerin, functions as the main catalyst and accelerates the transesterification reaction. PMID:18684617

  14. An inferred relationship between some uranium deposits and calcium carbonate cement in southern Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gott, Garland B.

    1956-01-01

    Evidence resulting from geologic mapping in the southern Black Hills indicates that the areas marginal to some of the larger carbonate-cemented sandstones constitute favorable geochemical environments for the localization of uranium deposits. To determine whether these favorable environments are predictable a limited experimental core-drilling program was carried out. An extensive deposit was discovered in an area marginal to a sandstone well-cemented with calcium carbonate. The deposit has not yet been developed, but from the available data it appears that there is a significant quantity of mineralized rock present containing as much as 3.0 percent eU3O8.

  15. Depletion of intracellular calcium stores activates a calcium conducting nonselective cation current in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Krause, E; Pfeiffer, F; Schmid, A; Schulz, I

    1996-12-20

    Receptor-mediated Ca2+ release from inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca2+ stores causes "capacitative calcium entry" in many cell types (Putney, J. W., Jr. (1986) Cell Calcium 7, 1-12; Putney, J. W., Jr. (1990) Cell Calcium 11, 611-624). We used patch-clamp and fluorescence techniques in isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells to identify ion currents and cytosolic calcium concentrations under conditions in which intracellular Ca2+ stores were emptied. We found that depletion of Ca2+ stores activated a calcium-release-activated nonselective cation current (ICRANC) which did not discriminate between monovalent cations. ICRANC possessed a significant conductance for Ca2+ and Ba2+. It was not inhibited by La3+, Gd3+, Co2+, or Cd2+ but was completely abolished by flufenamic acid or genistein. In whole cell and cell-attached recordings, a 40-45 pS nonselective cation channel was identified which was activated by Ca2+ store depletion. Calcium entry as detected by single cell fluorescence measurements with fluo-3 or fura-2, showed the same pharmacological properties as ICRANC. We conclude that in mouse pancreatic acinar cells 40-45 pS nonselective cation channels serve as a pathway for capacitative Ca2+ entry. This entry pathway differs from the previously described ICRAC (Hoth, M., and Penner, R. (1992) Nature 355, 353-356) in its ion-selectivity, pharmacological profile, and single-channel conductance. PMID:8955076

  16. Photoluminescent thermometry based on europium-activated calcium sulphide.

    PubMed

    Samulski, T V; Chopping, P T; Haas, B

    1982-01-01

    A photoluminescent thermometer, based on the transient emission response of a europium-activated calcium sulphide phosphor, is described in detail. This optical thermometry system has special advantages for temperature measurements in microwave and RF fields and potential application in electromagnetically induced clinical hyperthermia. A laboratory system has been constructed which utilises a fibreoptic probe with external diameter 0.8 mm. A system temperature resolution of 0.1 degree C has been achieved in the range 37-47 degrees C. PMID:6965160

  17. Calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels mediate the β(2)-adrenergic regulation of Na,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Keller, Michael J; Lecuona, Emilia; Prakriya, Murali; Cheng, Yuan; Soberanes, Saul; Budinger, G R Scott; Sznajder, Jacob I

    2014-12-20

    β2-Adrenergic agonists have been shown to regulate Na,K-ATPase in the alveolar epithelium by recruiting Na,K-ATPase-containing vesicles to the plasma membrane of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Here, we provide evidence that β2-agonists induce store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in AECs. This calcium entry is necessary for β2-agonist-induced recruitment of Na,K-ATPase to the plasma membrane of AECs. Specifically, we show that β2-agonists induce SOCE via stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1)-associated calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. We also demonstrate that the magnitude of SOCE affects the abundance of Na,K-ATPase at the plasma membrane of AECs. PMID:25447523

  18. Calcium Release-Activated Calcium (CRAC) Channels Mediate the β2-Adrenergic Regulation of Na,K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael J.; Lecuona, Emilia; Prakriya, Murali; Cheng, Yuan; Soberanes, Saul; Scott Budinger, G.R.; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2014-01-01

    β2-adrenergic agonists have been shown to regulate Na,K-ATPase in the alveolar epithelium by recruiting Na,K-ATPase-containing vesicles to the plasma membrane of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Here, we provide evidence that β2-agonists induce store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in AECs. This calcium entry is necessary for β2-agonist-induced recruitment of Na,K-ATPase to the plasma membrane of AECs. Specifically, we show that β2-agonists induce SOCE via stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1)-associated calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. We also demonstrate that the magnitude of SOCE affects the abundance of Na,K-ATPase at the plasma membrane of AECs. PMID:25447523

  19. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne; Civitelli, Roberto; Sorensen, Ole Helmer; Steinberg, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium.

  20. Calcium phosphates deposited on titanium electrode surface--part 1: Effect of the electrode polarity and oxide film on the deposited materials.

    PubMed

    Okawa, Seigo; Watanabe, Kouichi; Kanatani, Mitsugu

    2013-01-01

    We report experimental results about the effect of polarity of electrode and anodized titanium oxide film on the deposited materials by electrolysis of an acidic calcium phosphate solution. Mirror-polished titanium and anodized titanium were used as anode or cathode, and a Pt plate was used as a counter electrode. The load voltage was held constant at 20 VDC. No deposited materials were found on the anode surface. On the other hand, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was deposited on the cathode surface at the beginning of the electrolysis. After the electrolysis time 600 s, the non-stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (HAp) with several hundred nanometers was formed on the specimen surface. Based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data, the anodized oxide film contained both P(5+) and P(3+) ions. This characteristic of the oxide film and the electrolysis conditions were related to the behavior of the deposition of ultra fine HAp with high crystallinity. PMID:23538764

  1. Sensitive red protein calcium indicators for imaging neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Hod; Mohar, Boaz; Sun, Yi; Narayan, Sujatha; Gordus, Andrew; Hasseman, Jeremy P; Tsegaye, Getahun; Holt, Graham T; Hu, Amy; Walpita, Deepika; Patel, Ronak; Macklin, John J; Bargmann, Cornelia I; Ahrens, Misha B; Schreiter, Eric R; Jayaraman, Vivek; Looger, Loren L; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) allow measurement of activity in large populations of neurons and in small neuronal compartments, over times of milliseconds to months. Although GFP-based GECIs are widely used for in vivo neurophysiology, GECIs with red-shifted excitation and emission spectra have advantages for in vivo imaging because of reduced scattering and absorption in tissue, and a consequent reduction in phototoxicity. However, current red GECIs are inferior to the state-of-the-art GFP-based GCaMP6 indicators for detecting and quantifying neural activity. Here we present improved red GECIs based on mRuby (jRCaMP1a, b) and mApple (jRGECO1a), with sensitivity comparable to GCaMP6. We characterized the performance of the new red GECIs in cultured neurons and in mouse, Drosophila, zebrafish and C. elegans in vivo. Red GECIs facilitate deep-tissue imaging, dual-color imaging together with GFP-based reporters, and the use of optogenetics in combination with calcium imaging. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12727.001 PMID:27011354

  2. Sensitive red protein calcium indicators for imaging neural activity.

    PubMed

    Dana, Hod; Mohar, Boaz; Sun, Yi; Narayan, Sujatha; Gordus, Andrew; Hasseman, Jeremy P; Tsegaye, Getahun; Holt, Graham T; Hu, Amy; Walpita, Deepika; Patel, Ronak; Macklin, John J; Bargmann, Cornelia I; Ahrens, Misha B; Schreiter, Eric R; Jayaraman, Vivek; Looger, Loren L; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) allow measurement of activity in large populations of neurons and in small neuronal compartments, over times of milliseconds to months. Although GFP-based GECIs are widely used for in vivo neurophysiology, GECIs with red-shifted excitation and emission spectra have advantages for in vivo imaging because of reduced scattering and absorption in tissue, and a consequent reduction in phototoxicity. However, current red GECIs are inferior to the state-of-the-art GFP-based GCaMP6 indicators for detecting and quantifying neural activity. Here we present improved red GECIs based on mRuby (jRCaMP1a, b) and mApple (jRGECO1a), with sensitivity comparable to GCaMP6. We characterized the performance of the new red GECIs in cultured neurons and in mouse, Drosophila, zebrafish and C. elegans in vivo. Red GECIs facilitate deep-tissue imaging, dual-color imaging together with GFP-based reporters, and the use of optogenetics in combination with calcium imaging. PMID:27011354

  3. Regulation of Arterial Tone by Activation of Calcium-Dependent Potassium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brayden, Joseph E.; Nelson, Mark T.

    1992-04-01

    Blood pressure and tissue perfusion are controlled in part by the level of intrinsic (myogenic) vascular tone. However, many of the molecular determinants of this response are unknown. Evidence is now presented that the degree of myogenic tone is regulated in part by the activation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in arterial smooth muscle. Tetraethylammonium ion (TEA^+) and charybdotoxin (CTX), at concentrations that block calcium-activated potassium channels in smooth muscle cells isolated from cerebral arteries, depolarized and constricted pressurized cerebral arteries with myogenic tone. Both TEA^+ and CTX had little effect on arteries when intracellular calcium was reduced by lowering intravascular pressure or by blocking calcium channels. Elevation of intravascular pressure through membrane depolarization and an increase in intracellular calcium may activate calcium-activated potassium channels. Thus, these channels may serve as a negative feedback pathway to control the degree of membrane depolarization and vasoconstriction.

  4. Ossifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff after arthroscopic excision of calcium deposits: report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Merolla, Giovanni; Dave, Arpit C; Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    Ossifying tendinitis (OT) is a type of heterotopic ossification, characterized by deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in a histologic pattern of mature lamellar bone. It is usually associated with surgical intervention or trauma and is more commonly seen in Achilles or distal biceps tendons, and also in the gluteus maximus tendon. To our knowledge, there is no description of OT as a complication of calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff. In this report, we describe two cases in which the patients developed an OT of the supraspinatus after arthroscopic removal of calcium deposits. The related literature is reviewed. PMID:25017026

  5. Depolarization-induced contractile activity of smooth muscle in calcium-free solution.

    PubMed

    Mangel, A W; Nelson, D O; Rabovsky, J L; Prosser, C L; Connor, J A

    1982-01-01

    In calcium-free solution, strips of cat intestinal muscle developed slow, rhythmic electrical potential changes that triggered contractions. Some strips failed to develop spontaneous electrical activity in calcium-free solution but responded with contractions to depolarization by direct electrical stimulation or by treatment with barium chloride, potassium chloride, or acetylcholine. Similar results were obtained with segments of cat stomach, colon, esophagus, bladder, uterus, and vena cava, as well as with rabbit vena cava. In calcium-free saline, rat small intestinal muscle showed fast electrical activity with accompanying development of a tetanuslike contraction. After 60 min in calcium-free solution, cat small intestinal muscle retained 17.7% of its original concentration of calcium. It is concluded that in some smooth muscles, depolarization-triggered release of intracellular calcium does not require an associated influx of calcium. PMID:7058877

  6. Synthesis of Calcium(II) Amidinate Precursors for Atomic Layer Deposition through a Redox Reaction between Calcium and Amidines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Bok; Yang, Chuanxi; Powers, Tamara; Davis, Luke M; Lou, Xiabing; Gordon, Roy G

    2016-08-22

    We have prepared two new Ca(II) amidinates, which comprise a new class of ALD precursors. The syntheses proceed by a direct reaction between Ca metal and the amidine ligands in the presence of ammonia. Bis(N,N'-diisopropylformamidinato)calcium(II) (1) and bis(N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinato)calcium(II) (2) adopt dimeric structures in solution and in the solid state. X-ray crystallography revealed asymmetry in one of the bridging ligands to afford the structure [(η(2) -L)Ca(μ-η(2) :η(2) -L)(μ-η(2) :η(1) -L)Ca(η(2) -L)]. These amidinate complexes showed unprecedentedly high volatility as compared to the widely employed and commercially available Ca(II) precursor, [Ca3 (tmhd)6 ]. In CaS ALD with 1 and H2 S, the ALD window was approximately two times wider and lower in temperature by about 150 °C than previously reported with [Ca3 (tmhd)6 ] and H2 S. Complexes 1 and 2, with their excellent volatility and thermal stability (up to at least 350 °C), are the first homoleptic Ca(II) amidinates suitable for use as ALD precursors. PMID:27351794

  7. Osteopontin knockdown in the kidneys of hyperoxaluric rats leads to reduction in renal calcium oxalate crystal deposition.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Hidenori; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Nozawa, Masahiro; Umekawa, Tohru; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; De Velasco, Marco A; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Khan, Saeed R

    2014-06-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) expression is increased in kidneys of rats with ethylene glycol (EG) induced hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate (CaOx) nephrolithiasis. The aim of this study is to clarify the effect of OPN knockdown by in vivo transfection of OPN siRNA on deposition of CaOx crystals in the kidneys. Hyperoxaluria was induced in 6-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats by administering 1.5% EG in drinking water for 2 weeks. Four groups of six rats each were studied: Group A, untreated animals (tap water); Group B, administering 1.5% EG; Group C, 1.5% EG with in vivo transfection of OPN siRNA; Group D, 1.5% EG with in vivo transfection of negative control siRNA. OPN siRNA transfections were performed on day 1 and 8 by renal sub-capsular injection. Rats were killed at day 15 and kidneys were removed. Extent of crystal deposition was determined by measuring renal calcium concentrations and counting renal crystal deposits. OPN siRNA transfection resulted in significant reduction in expression of OPN mRNA as well as protein in group C compared to group B. Reduction in OPN expression was associated with significant decrease in crystal deposition in group C compared to group B. Specific suppression of OPN mRNA expression in kidneys of hyperoxaluric rats leads to a decrease in OPN production and simultaneously inhibits renal crystal deposition. PMID:24619192

  8. Osteopontin knockdown in the kidneys of hyperoxaluric rats leads to reduction in renal calcium oxalate crystal deposition

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Nobutaka; Nozawa, Masahiro; Umekawa, Tohru; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; De Velasco, Marco A.; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Khan, Saeed R.

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) expression is increased in kidneys of rats with ethylene glycol (EG) induced hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate (CaOx) nephrolithiasis. The aim of this study is to clarify the effect of OPN knockdown by in vivo transfection of OPN siRNA on deposition of CaOx crystals in the kidneys. Hyperoxaluria was induced in 6-week-old male Sprague–Dawley rats by administering 1.5 % EG in drinking water for 2 weeks. Four groups of six rats each were studied: Group A, untreated animals (tap water); Group B, administering 1.5 % EG; Group C, 1.5 % EG with in vivo transfection of OPN siRNA; Group D, 1.5 % EG with in vivo transfection of negative control siRNA. OPN siRNA transfections were performed on day 1 and 8 by renal sub-capsular injection. Rats were killed at day 15 and kidneys were removed. Extent of crystal deposition was determined by measuring renal calcium concentrations and counting renal crystal deposits. OPN siRNA transfection resulted in significant reduction in expression of OPN mRNA as well as protein in group C compared to group B. Reduction in OPN expression was associated with significant decrease in crystal deposition in group C compared to group B. Specific suppression of OPN mRNA expression in kidneys of hyperoxaluric rats leads to a decrease in OPN production and simultaneously inhibits renal crystal deposition. PMID:24619192

  9. Lab-Scale Study of the Calcium Carbonate Dissolution and Deposition by Marine Cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karakis, S. G.; Dragoeva, E. G.; Lavrenyuk, T. I.; Rogochiy, A.; Gerasimenko, L. M.; McKay, D. S.; Brown, I. I.

    2006-01-01

    Suggestions that calcification in marine organisms changes in response to global variations in seawater chemistry continue to be advanced (Wilkinson, 1979; Degens et al. 1985; Kazmierczak et al. 1986; R. Riding 1992). However, the effect of [Na+] on calcification in marine cyanobacteria has not been discussed in detail although [Na+] fluctuations reflect both temperature and sea-level fluctuations. The goal of these lab-scale studies therefore was to study the effect of environmental pH and [Na+] on CaCO3 deposition and dissolution by marine cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum. Marine cyanobacterium P. subcapitatum has been cultivated in ASN-III medium. [Ca2+] fluctuations were monitored with Ca(2+) probe. Na(+) concentrations were determined by the initial solution chemistry. It was found that the balance between CaCO3 dissolution and precipitation induced by P. subcapitatum grown in neutral ASN III medium is very close to zero. No CaCO3 precipitation induced by cyanobacterial growth occurred. Growth of P. subcapitatum in alkaline ASN III medium, however, was accompanied by significant oscillations in free Ca(2+) concentration within a Na(+) concentration range of 50-400 mM. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurred during the log phase of P. subcapitatum growth while carbonate dissolution was typical for the stationary phase of P. subcapitatum growth. The highest CaCO3 deposition was observed in the range of Na(+) concentrations between 200-400 mM. Alkaline pH also induced the clamping of P. subcapitatum filaments, which appeared to have a strong affinity to envelop particles of chemically deposited CaCO3 followed by enlargement of those particles size. EDS analysis revealed the presence of Mg-rich carbonate (or magnesium calcite) in the solution containing 10-100 mM Na(+); calcite in the solution containing 200 mM Na(+); and aragonite in the solution containing with 400 mM Na(+). Typical present-day seawater contains xxmM Na(+). Early (Archean) seawater was

  10. Relationship between structure of phenothiazine analogues and their activity on platelet calcium fluxes.

    PubMed Central

    Enouf, J.; Lévy-Toledano, S.

    1984-01-01

    Phenothiazine analogues have been tested for their effect on calcium uptake into platelet membrane vesicles and on ionophore-induced platelet activation, both phenomena being Ca2+-dependent. Both calcium uptake into membrane vesicles and ionophore-induced platelet activation were inhibited by the drugs. Evidence for two inhibitors as potent as chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine was found. These drugs are apparently competitive inhibitors of calcium uptake. A structure-activity relationship has been established. The data suggest that the phenothiazines are able to inhibit calmodulin-insensitive calcium uptake of platelet membrane vesicles and that therefore they cannot be assumed to be selective inhibitors of calmodulin interactions under all circumstances. PMID:6697061

  11. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F.; Weiger, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences. PMID:26287261

  12. Diagnostic value of ultrasound in calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gamon, Etienne; Combe, Bernard; Barnetche, Thomas; Mouterde, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    Objective A systematic review and meta-analysis of data from cohort studies to analyse the diagnostic performances (ie, sensitivity and specificity) of ultrasound (US) for diagnosis of calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) disease with microscopic crystal detection used as a gold standard. Methods We performed a systematic review of articles published up to December 2014 using EMBASE, MEDLINE and Cochrane databases and abstracts from the past two EULAR and ACR annual meetings. Only studies reporting the performance of US for diagnosis of CPPD disease were selected. A meta-analysis involved the inverse variance method to evaluate global sensitivity and specificity of US. Statistical heterogeneity was assessed by the Cochran Q-test and I2 values. Results The search resulted in 85 articles and 11 abstracts; 17 and 4, respectively, were selected for the systematic review. A total of 262 patients with CPPD disease and 335 controls from 4 original articles and 4 abstracts were included in the meta-analysis. The US diagnostic patterns most frequently recorded were thin hyperechoic bands in the hyaline cartilage (8 articles); hyperechoic spots in fibrous cartilage or in tendons (7 articles); and homogeneous hyperechoic nodules localised in bursa or articular recesses (4 articles). The meta-analysis revealed a heterogeneity of the data, with a sensitivity of 87.9% (95% CI 80.9% to 94.9%) and specificity of 91.5% (95% CI 85.5% to 97.5%) using a random model. Conclusions This meta-analysis confirmed that US has high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of CPPD and may be a promising tool for the diagnosis and management of CPPD. PMID:26535143

  13. Cellular Mechanisms of Calcium-Mediated Triggered Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhen

    Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias continue to pose a major health problem. Ventricular fibrillation, which is a complex form of electrical wave turbulence in the lower chambers of the heart, stops the heart from pumping and is the largest cause of natural death in the United States. Atrial fibrillation, a related form of wave turbulence in the upper heart chambers, is in turn the most common arrhythmia diagnosed in clinical practice. Despite extensive research to date, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias remain poorly understood. It is well established that both spatial disorder of the refractory period of heart cells and triggered activity (TA) jointly contribute to the initiation and maintenance of arrhythmias. TA broadly refers to the abnormal generation of a single or a sequence of abnormal excitation waves from a small submillimeter region of the heart in the interval of time between two normal waves generated by the heart's natural pacemaker (the sinoatrial node). TA has been widely investigated experimentally and occurs in several pathological conditions where the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ions in heart cells becomes elevated. Under such conditions, Ca2+ can be spontaneously released from intracellular stores, thereby driving an electrogenic current that exchanges 3Na+ ions for one Ca2+ ion across the cell membrane. This current in turn depolarizes the membrane of heart cells after a normal excitation. If this calcium-mediated "delayed after depolarization'' (DAD) is sufficiently large, it can generate an action potential. While the arrhythmogenic importance of spontaneous Ca2+ release and DADs is well appreciated, the conditions under which they occur in heart pathologies remain poorly understood. Calcium overload is only one factor among several other factors that can promote DADs, including sympathetic nerve stimulation, different expression levels of membrane ion channels and calcium handling proteins, and different mutations of those

  14. Calcium-Oxidant Signaling Network Regulates AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activation upon Matrix Deprivation*

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, Ananthalakshmy; Amirtham, Usha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been implicated in anoikis resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that activate AMPK upon matrix detachment remain unexplored. In this study, we show that AMPK activation is a rapid and sustained phenomenon upon matrix deprivation, whereas re-attachment to the matrix leads to its dephosphorylation and inactivation. Because matrix detachment leads to loss of integrin signaling, we investigated whether integrin signaling negatively regulates AMPK activation. However, modulation of focal adhesion kinase or Src, the major downstream components of integrin signaling, failed to cause a corresponding change in AMPK signaling. Further investigations revealed that the upstream AMPK kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) contribute to AMPK activation upon detachment. In LKB1-deficient cells, we found AMPK activation to be predominantly dependent on CaMKKβ. We observed no change in ATP levels under detached conditions at early time points suggesting that rapid AMPK activation upon detachment was not triggered by energy stress. We demonstrate that matrix deprivation leads to a spike in intracellular calcium as well as oxidant signaling, and both these intracellular messengers contribute to rapid AMPK activation upon detachment. We further show that endoplasmic reticulum calcium release-induced store-operated calcium entry contributes to intracellular calcium increase, leading to reactive oxygen species production, and AMPK activation. We additionally show that the LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK axis and intracellular calcium levels play a critical role in anchorage-independent cancer sphere formation. Thus, the Ca2+/reactive oxygen species-triggered LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK signaling cascade may provide a quick, adaptable switch to promote survival of metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:27226623

  15. Activation of PAC1 Receptors in Rat Cerebellar Granule Cells Stimulates Both Calcium Mobilization from Intracellular Stores and Calcium Influx through N-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Basille-Dugay, Magali; Vaudry, Hubert; Fournier, Alain; Gonzalez, Bruno; Vaudry, David

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and a high density of PACAP binding sites have been detected in the developing rat cerebellum. In particular, PACAP receptors are actively expressed in immature granule cells, where they activate both adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of PACAP to induce calcium mobilization in cerebellar granule neurons. Administration of PACAP-induced a transient, rapid, and monophasic rise of the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), while vasoactive intestinal peptide was devoid of effect, indicating the involvement of the PAC1 receptor in the Ca2+ response. Preincubation of granule cells with the Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, or the d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, markedly reduced the stimulatory effect of PACAP on [Ca2+]i. Furthermore, addition of the calcium chelator, EGTA, or exposure of cells to the non-selective Ca2+ channel blocker, NiCl2, significantly attenuated the PACAP-evoked [Ca2+]i increase. Preincubation of granule neurons with the N-type Ca2+ channel blocker, ω-conotoxin GVIA, decreased the PACAP-induced [Ca2+]i response, whereas the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, nifedipine, and the P- and Q-type Ca2+ channel blocker, ω-conotoxin MVIIC, had no effect. Altogether, these findings indicate that PACAP, acting through PAC1 receptors, provokes an increase in [Ca2+]i in granule neurons, which is mediated by both mobilization of calcium from IP3-sensitive intracellular stores and activation of N-type Ca2+ channel. Some of the activities of PACAP on proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation of cerebellar granule cells could thus be mediated, at least in part, through these intracellular and/or extracellular calcium fluxes. PMID:23675369

  16. Activation of PAC1 Receptors in Rat Cerebellar Granule Cells Stimulates Both Calcium Mobilization from Intracellular Stores and Calcium Influx through N-Type Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Basille-Dugay, Magali; Vaudry, Hubert; Fournier, Alain; Gonzalez, Bruno; Vaudry, David

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and a high density of PACAP binding sites have been detected in the developing rat cerebellum. In particular, PACAP receptors are actively expressed in immature granule cells, where they activate both adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of PACAP to induce calcium mobilization in cerebellar granule neurons. Administration of PACAP-induced a transient, rapid, and monophasic rise of the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), while vasoactive intestinal peptide was devoid of effect, indicating the involvement of the PAC1 receptor in the Ca(2+) response. Preincubation of granule cells with the Ca(2+) ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, or the d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, markedly reduced the stimulatory effect of PACAP on [Ca(2+)]i. Furthermore, addition of the calcium chelator, EGTA, or exposure of cells to the non-selective Ca(2+) channel blocker, NiCl2, significantly attenuated the PACAP-evoked [Ca(2+)]i increase. Preincubation of granule neurons with the N-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, ω-conotoxin GVIA, decreased the PACAP-induced [Ca(2+)]i response, whereas the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, nifedipine, and the P- and Q-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, ω-conotoxin MVIIC, had no effect. Altogether, these findings indicate that PACAP, acting through PAC1 receptors, provokes an increase in [Ca(2+)]i in granule neurons, which is mediated by both mobilization of calcium from IP3-sensitive intracellular stores and activation of N-type Ca(2+) channel. Some of the activities of PACAP on proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation of cerebellar granule cells could thus be mediated, at least in part, through these intracellular and/or extracellular calcium fluxes. PMID:23675369

  17. Calcium promotes activity and confers heat stability on plant peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Plieth, Christoph; Vollbehr, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how peroxidase (PO) activities and their heat stability correlate with the availability of free Ca2+ ions. Calcium ions work as a molecular switch for PO activity and exert a protective function, rendering POs heat stable. The concentration ranges of these two activities differ markedly. POs are activated by µM Ca2+ concentration ranges, whereas heat stabilization is observed in the nM range. This suggests the existence of different Ca2+ binding sites. The heat stability of POs depends on the source plant species. Terrestrial plants have POs that exhibit higher temperature stability than those POs from limnic and marine plants. Different POs from a single species can differ in terms of heat stability. The abundance of different POs within a plant is dependent on age and developmental stage. The heat stability of a PO does not necessarily correlate with the maximum temperature the source species is usually exposed to in its natural habitat. This raises questions on the role of POs in the heat tolerance of plants. Consequently, detailed investigations are needed to identify and characterize individual POs, with regard to their genetic origin, subcellular expression, tissue abundance, developmental emergence and their functions in innate and acquired heat tolerance. PMID:22580695

  18. Antilithiatic Activity of phlorotannin rich extract of Sarghassum Wightii on Calcium Oxalate Urolithiais – In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Sujatha, D.; Singh, Kiranpal; Vohra, Mursalin; Kumar, K. Vijay; Sunitha, S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Urolithiasis is a common urological disorder responsible for serious human affliction and cost to the society with a high recurrence rate. The aim of the present study was to systematically evaluate the phlorotannin rich extract of Sargassum wightii using suitable in vitro and in vivo models to provide scientific evidence for its antilithiatic activity. Materials and Methods: To explore the effect of Sargassum wightii on calcium oxalate crystallization, in vitro assays like crystal nucleation, aggregation and crystal growth were performed. Calcium oxalate urolithiasis was induced in male Sprague dawley rats using a combination of gentamicin and calculi producing diet (5% ammonium oxalate and rat pellet feed). The biochemical parameters like calcium, oxalate, magnesium, phosphate, sodium and potassium were evaluated in urine, serum and kidney homogenates. Histopathological studies were also done to confirm the biochemical findings. Results: The yield of Sargassum wightii extract was found to be 74.5 gm/kg and confirmed by quantitative analysis. In vitro experiments with Sargassum wightii showed concentration dependent inhibition of calcium oxalate nucleation, aggregation and growth supported by SEM analysis. In the in vivo model, Sargassum wightii reduced both calcium and oxalate supersaturation in urine, serum and deposition in the kidney. The biochemical results were supported by histopathological studies. Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that Sargassum wightii has the ability to prevent nucleation, aggregation and growth of calcium oxalate crystals. Sargassum wightii has better preventive effect on calcium oxalate stone formation indicating its strong potential to develop as a therapeutic option to prevent recurrence of urolithiasis. PMID:26200544

  19. Calcium-activated potassium channels and endothelial dysfunction: therapeutic options?

    PubMed Central

    Félétou, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The three subtypes of calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa) of large, intermediate and small conductance (BKCa, IKCa and SKCa) are present in the vascular wall. In healthy arteries, BKCa channels are preferentially expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells, while IKCa and SKCa are preferentially located in endothelial cells. The activation of endothelial IKCa and SKCa contributes to nitric oxide (NO) generation and is required to elicit endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizations. In the latter responses, the hyperpolarization of the smooth muscle cells is evoked either via electrical coupling through myo-endothelial gap junctions or by potassium ions, which by accumulating in the intercellular space activate the inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir2.1 and/or the Na+/K+-ATPase. Additionally, endothelium-derived factors such as cytochrome P450-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and under some circumstances NO, prostacyclin, lipoxygenase products and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) hyperpolarize and relax the underlying smooth muscle cells by activating BKCa. In contrast, cytochrome P450-derived 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and various endothelium-derived contracting factors inhibit BKCa. Aging and cardiovascular diseases are associated with endothelial dysfunctions that can involve a decrease in NO bioavailability, alterations of EDHF-mediated responses and/or enhanced production of endothelium-derived contracting factors. Because potassium channels are involved in these endothelium-dependent responses, activation of endothelial and/or smooth muscle KCa could prevent the occurrence of endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, direct activators of these potassium channels or compounds that regulate their activity or their expression may be of some therapeutic interest. Conversely, blockers of IKCa may prevent restenosis and that of BKCa channels sepsis-dependent hypotension. PMID:19187341

  20. Continuous cellularization of calcium phosphate hybrid scaffolds induced by plasma polymer activation.

    PubMed

    Bergemann, Claudia; Cornelsen, Matthias; Quade, Antje; Laube, Thorsten; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Rebl, Henrike; Weißmann, Volker; Seitz, Hermann; Nebe, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    The generation of hybrid materials based on β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and various biodegradable polymers like poly(l-lactide-co-d,l-lactide) (PLA) represents a common approach to overcoming the disadvantages of pure TCP devices. These disadvantages lie in TCP's mechanical properties, such as brittleness. The positive characteristic of PLA - improvement of compressive strength of calcium phosphate scaffolds - is diametrically opposed to its cell attractiveness. Therefore, the objective of this work was to optimize osteoblast migration and cellularization inside a three-dimensionally (3D) printed, PLA polymer stabilized TCP hybrid scaffold by a plasma polymer process depositing amino groups via allylamine. MG-63 osteoblastic cells inside the 10mm hybrid scaffold were dynamically cultivated for 14days in a 3D model system integrated in a perfusion reactor. The whole TCP/PLA hybrid scaffold was continuously colonized due to plasma polymerized allylamine activation inducing the migration potential of osteoblasts. PMID:26652403

  1. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Jessica R; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Markus, Benedikt M; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Ramek, Alexander; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E; Schwartz, Thomas U; Ploegh, Hidde L; Lourido, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics, the effects of 1B7-kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes. PMID:26305940

  2. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Jessica R.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Markus, Benedikt M.; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Ramek, Alexander; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Lourido, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics, the effects of 1B7–kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes. PMID:26305940

  3. Low temperature solution deposition of calcium phosphate coatings for orthopedic implants

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.A.; Graff, G.L.

    1994-04-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings were grown from aqueous solution onto a derivatized self-assmebled monolayer (SAM) which was covalently bound to a titanium metal substrate. The SAM molecules provided an idea connection between the metal surface and the calcium phosphate coating. The trichlorosilane terminus of the SAM molecule insured covalent attachment to the surface, while the functionalized ``tail`` induced heterogeneous nucleation of the calcium phosphate coating from supersaturated solutions. This low temperature process allowed for uniform coatings to be produced onto complex-shaped and/or microporous surfaces and provided better control of phase purity.

  4. Reconstruction of burst activity from calcium imaging of neuronal population via Lq minimization and interval screening

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Tingwei; Lv, Xiaohua; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Calcium imaging is becoming an increasingly popular technology to indirectly measure activity patterns in local neuronal networks. Based on the dependence of calcium fluorescence on neuronal spiking, two-photon calcium imaging affords single-cell resolution of neuronal population activity. However, it is still difficult to reconstruct neuronal activity from complex calcium fluorescence traces, particularly for traces contaminated by noise. Here, we describe a robust and efficient neuronal-activity reconstruction method that utilizes Lq minimization and interval screening (IS), which we refer to as LqIS. The simulation results show that LqIS performs satisfactorily in terms of both accuracy and speed of reconstruction. Reconstruction of simulation and experimental data also shows that LqIS has advantages in terms of the recall rate, precision rate, and timing error. Finally, LqIS is demonstrated to effectively reconstruct neuronal burst activity from calcium fluorescence traces recorded from large-size neuronal population. PMID:27375930

  5. Protein kinases as mediators of fluid shear stress stimulated signal transduction in endothelial cells: a hypothesis for calcium-dependent and calcium-independent events activated by flow.

    PubMed

    Berk, B C; Corson, M A; Peterson, T E; Tseng, H

    1995-12-01

    Fluid shear stress regulates endothelial cell function, but the signal transduction mechanisms involved in mechanotransduction remain unclear. Recent findings demonstrate that several intracellular kinases are activated by mechanical forces. In particular, members of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family are stimulated by hyperosmolarity, stretch, and stress such as heat shock. We propose a model for mechanotransduction in endothelial cells involving calcium-dependent and calcium-independent protein kinase pathways. The calcium-dependent pathway involves activation of phospholipase C, hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), increases in intracellular calcium and stimulation of kinases such as calcium-calmodulin and C kinases (PKC). The calcium-independent pathway involves activation of a small GTP-binding protein and stimulation of calcium-independent PKC and MAP kinases. The calcium-dependent pathway mediates the rapid, transient response to fluid shear stress including activation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and ion transport. In contrast, the calcium-independent pathway mediates a slower response including the sustained activation of NOS and changes in cell morphology and gene expression. We propose that focal adhesion complexes link the calcium-dependent and calcium-independent pathways by regulating activity of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) 5-kinase (which regulates PIP2 levels) and p125 focal adhesion kinase (FAK, which phosphorylates paxillin and interacts with cytoskeletal proteins). This model predicts that dynamic interactions between integrin molecules present in focal adhesion complexes and membrane events involved in mechanotransduction will be integrated by calcium-dependent and calcium-independent kinases to generate intracellular signals involved in the endothelial cell response to flow. PMID:8666584

  6. Cellular Mechanisms of Calcium-Mediated Triggered Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhen

    Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias continue to pose a major health problem. Ventricular fibrillation, which is a complex form of electrical wave turbulence in the lower chambers of the heart, stops the heart from pumping and is the largest cause of natural death in the United States. Atrial fibrillation, a related form of wave turbulence in the upper heart chambers, is in turn the most common arrhythmia diagnosed in clinical practice. Despite extensive research to date, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias remain poorly understood. It is well established that both spatial disorder of the refractory period of heart cells and triggered activity (TA) jointly contribute to the initiation and maintenance of arrhythmias. TA broadly refers to the abnormal generation of a single or a sequence of abnormal excitation waves from a small submillimeter region of the heart in the interval of time between two normal waves generated by the heart's natural pacemaker (the sinoatrial node). TA has been widely investigated experimentally and occurs in several pathological conditions where the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ions in heart cells becomes elevated. Under such conditions, Ca2+ can be spontaneously released from intracellular stores, thereby driving an electrogenic current that exchanges 3Na+ ions for one Ca2+ ion across the cell membrane. This current in turn depolarizes the membrane of heart cells after a normal excitation. If this calcium-mediated "delayed after depolarization'' (DAD) is sufficiently large, it can generate an action potential. While the arrhythmogenic importance of spontaneous Ca2+ release and DADs is well appreciated, the conditions under which they occur in heart pathologies remain poorly understood. Calcium overload is only one factor among several other factors that can promote DADs, including sympathetic nerve stimulation, different expression levels of membrane ion channels and calcium handling proteins, and different mutations of those

  7. Calcium alone does not fully activate the thin filament for S1 binding to rigor myofibrils.

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, D R; Moss, R L; Greaser, M L

    1996-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contraction is regulated by calcium via troponin and tropomyosin and appears to involve cooperative activation of cross-bridge binding to actin. We studied the regulation of fluorescent myosin subfragment 1 (fS1) binding to rigor myofibrils over a wide range of fS1 and calcium levels using highly sensitive imaging techniques. At low calcium and low fS1, the fluorescence was restricted to the actin-myosin overlap region. At high calcium and very low fS1, the fluorescence was still predominantly in the overlap region. The ratio of nonoverlap to overlap fluorescence intensity showed that increases in the fS1 level resulted in a shift in maximum fluorescence from the overlap to the nonoverlap region at both low and high calcium; this transition occurred at lower fS1 levels in myofibrils with high calcium. At a fixed fS1 level, increases in calcium also resulted in a shift in maximum fluorescence from the overlap region to the nonoverlap region. These results suggest that calcium alone does not fully activate the thin filament for rigor S1 binding and that, even at high calcium, the thin filament is not activated along its entire length. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 11 PMID:8889164

  8. Promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity in corn microsomal membranes by calcium and protein phosphorylation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paliyath, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    Regulation of the activity of beta-glucan synthase was studied using microsomal preparations from corn coleoptiles. The specific activity as measured by the incorporation of glucose from uridine diphospho-D-[U-14C]glucose varied between 5 to 15 pmol (mg protein)-1 min-1. Calcium promoted beta-glucan synthase activity and the promotion was observed at free calcium concentrations as low as 1 micromole. Kinetic analysis of substrate-velocity curve showed an apparent Km of 1.92 x 10(-4) M for UDPG. Calcium increased the Vmax from 5.88 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 in the absence of calcium to 9.52 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 and 1.66 x 10(-6) mol liter-1 min-1 in the presence of 0.5 mM and 1 mM calcium, respectively. The Km values remained the same under these conditions. Addition of ATP further increased the activity above the calcium-promoted level. Sodium fluoride, a phosphoprotein phosphatase inhibitor, promoted glucan synthase activity indicating that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are involved in the regulation of the enzyme activity. Increasing the concentration of sodium fluoride from 0.25 mM to 10 mM increased glucan synthase activity five-fold over the + calcium + ATP control. Phosphorylation of membrane proteins also showed a similar increase under these conditions. Calmodulin, in the presence of calcium and ATP stimulated glucan synthase activity substantially, indicating that calmodulin could be involved in the calcium-dependent phosphorylation and promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity. The role of calcium in mediating auxin action is discussed.

  9. Characteristic patterns of the longitudinal and circumferential distribution of calcium deposits by parent coronary arteries observed from computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Ehara, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Hasegawa, Takao; Otsuka, Kenichiro; Sakaguchi, Mikumo; Shimada, Kenei; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2016-04-01

    Many investigators have reported that the total amount of coronary calcium correlates with the overall magnitude of atherosclerotic plaque burden in the entire coronary tree and is a powerful predictor of future cardiovascular events. However, the development and spatial distribution of coronary calcifications remain unclear. We investigated the spatial distribution of calcifications throughout the coronary tree during coronary artery evaluation using coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA). A further aim was to assess the progression of existing calcifications and the development of new deposits in a follow-up study. The study population consisted of 287 patients for the cross-sectional study using CTA to evaluate the spatial distribution of calcifications by parent coronary arteries. Next, we analyzed a CTA dataset of 57 patients who had undergone two CTA examinations. In this group, the two CTA images were used for assessing the progression of existing calcifications and the development of new deposits. The coronary calcifications tended to be clustered within the proximal and middle portions. Moreover, in the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), small calcifications were located more toward the inner pericardial side. Finally, new calcium deposits developed within the proximal and middle portions of the LAD and left circumflex coronary artery, but those in the right coronary artery were likely to appear evenly from the proximal to the distal portion. This study shows the characteristic patterns of the longitudinal and circumferential distribution of calcifications by parent coronary arteries. PMID:25712608

  10. Toxic industrial deposit remediation by ant activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilkova, Veronika; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Toxic industrial deposits are often contaminated by heavy metals and the substrates have low pH values. In such systems, soil development is thus slowed down by high toxicity and acidic conditions which are unfavourable to soil fauna. Ants (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) are considered tolerant to heavy metal pollution and are known to increase organic matter content and microbial activity in their nests. Here, we focused on soil remediation caused by three ant species (Formica sanguinea, Lasius niger, and Tetramorium sp.) in an ore-washery sedimentation basin near Chvaletice (Czech Republic). Soil samples were taken from the centre of ant nests and from the nest surroundings (>3 m from nests). Samples were then analyzed for microbial activity and biomass and contents of organic matter and nutrients. As a result, ant species that most influenced soil properties was F. sanguinea as there were higher microbial activity and total nitrogen and ammonia contents in ant nests than in the surrounding soil. We expected such a result because F. sanguinea builds conspicuous large nests and is a carnivorous species that brings substantial amounts of nitrogen in insect prey to their nests. Effects of the other two ant species might be lower because of smaller nests and different feeding habits as they rely mainly on honeydew from aphids or on plant seeds that do not contain much nutrients.

  11. Gas Diffusion Barriers Using Atomic Layer Deposition: A New Calcium Test and Polymer Substrate Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Jacob Andrew

    The increasing demand on available energy resources has led to a desire for more energy efficient devices. The wide use of displays in consumer electronics, such as televisions, cell phones, cameras and computers makes them an ideal target for improvement. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are a good candidate to replace traditional Si based devices. However, the low work function metals typically used as electrodes in OLEDs are very reactive with water and oxygen. Ultralow permeability gas diffusion barriers with water vapor transmission rates (WVTRs) as low as <10-6g/(m2*day) are required on the polymers used to fabricate organic electronic and thin film photovoltaic devices. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) uses self-limiting surface reactions to deposit thin conformal films. ALD is capable of depositing thin, conformal, high quality barriers. WVTR values as low as ˜5 x 10-5 g/(m2*day) have been measured for Al2O3 ALD films at 38 °C/85% RH using the Ca test with optical transmission probing. The Ca test is a technique with very high sensitivity to measure ultralow WVTRs. This test relies on measuring the oxidation of a Ca metal film by monitoring the change in its optical or electrical properties. However, glass lid control experiments have indicated that the WVTRs measured by the Ca test are limited by H2O permeability through the epoxy seals. Varying results have been reported in the literature using the electrical conductance of Ca to measure permeation. In this work, two approaches were applied to overcome the epoxy edge seal limitations. The first approach was to deposit Al2O 3 ALD barriers directly on Ca metal. While the Al 2O3 ALD barriers were successfully deposited, the measurement of an accurate WVTR was limited by barrier pinholes. The presence of pinholes in the Al2O3 ALD barrier on Ca results in the localized oxidation of the Ca sensor. Heterogeneous degradation of the Ca causes inaccuracies in the conductance of the film. As oxidation regions

  12. Extracellular magnesium and calcium blockers modulate macrophage activity.

    PubMed

    Libako, Patrycja; Nowacki, Wojciech; Castiglioni, Sara; Mazur, Andrzej; Maier, Jeanette A M

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) possesses anti-inflammatory properties, partly because it antagonizes calcium (Ca) and inhibits L-type Ca channels. Our aim was to determine the effects of different concentrations of extracellular Mg, with or without Ca-channel blockers, in macrophages. A macrophage-like cell line J774.E was cultured in different concentrations of extracellular Mg and exposed to i) the phorbol ester PMA to induce the production of reactive oxygen species ii) lipopolysaccharide to induce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, or iii) ovalbumin to study endocytosis. The Ca antagonists verapamil and/or TMB-8 were used to interfere with Ca homeostasis. Different concentrations of extracellular Mg did not impact on endocytosis, while Ca antagonists markedly decreased it. Low extracellular Mg exacerbated, whereas Ca antagonists inhibited, PMA-induced production of free radicals. Ca blockers prevented lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription and release of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, while extracellular Mg had only a marginal effect. Ca channel inhibitors markedly reduced the activity of J774.E cells, thus underscoring the critical role of Ca in the non-specific immune response, a role which was, in some instances, also modulated by extracellular Mg. PMID:27160489

  13. Prolonged spontaneous normocalcaemia in pseudohypoparathyroidism from resorption of soft tissue calcium deposits: a cautionary tale

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Erin E; Kline, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    A 42-year-old man diagnosed with pseudohypoparathyroidism and Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy as an infant was lost to follow-up and remained, unmonitored, on calcitriol and calcium for over 20 years. He presented after having an ST-elevation myocardial infarction. In addition to coronary artery calcifications, he was found to have diffuse subcutaneous and joint calcifications. His calcium, phosphate and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were normal, and given the lack of prior documentation in the diagnosis he was instructed to discontinue calcitriol and calcium until further investigations were completed. Despite stopping the medication, his serum calcium remained normal for over 1 year. It was not until 18 months later, when his soft tissue calcium stores were depleted, that he finally developed symptomatic hypocalcaemia and an elevated PTH. This case not only emphasises the importance of long-term follow-up for patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism, but also highlights the potential complications of long-term, unmonitored, calcitriol use. PMID:24481017

  14. Calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis: effect of renal crystal deposition on the cellular composition of the renal interstitium.

    PubMed

    de Water, R; Noordermeer, C; van der Kwast, T H; Nizze, H; Boevé, E R; Kok, D J; Schröder, F H

    1999-04-01

    Urinary calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals and crystal agglomerates are normally harmlessly excreted, but in nephrolithiasis they are retained by tubular epithelial cells and shifted into the renal interstitium. This crystalline material induces an inflammatory response consisting of an increase in the number of interstitial cells and an expansion of the extracellular matrix. The newly arrived cells either derive from the blood or the connective tissue or they are formed by local proliferation. Identification of the cells that surround the interstitial crystals is a first step in investigating the question of whether the interstitial cells could remove the crystalline material. Therefore, we performed an immunohistochemical study on the kidneys of rats made hyperoxaluric by ethylene glycol (EG) and ammonium chloride (AC). Attention was paid to expression of the leukocyte common antigen (LCA), which identifies all types of leukocytes, the ED1 antigen, which is specific for monocytes and macrophages, and the major histocompatibility class II antigen (MHC II), which is present on dendritic cells, B lymphocytes, and activated macrophages. The results obtained were compared with those seen in two human kidney specimens with acute and chronic oxalosis. In both rat and humans, macrophages and multinucleated giant cells are the major cells that encapsulate the interstitial crystals. This similarity in response underlines the relevance of the rat nephrolithiasis model. The rat experiments showed, furthermore, that the number of interstitial crystals and the amount of biochemically measured kidney-associated oxalate both decrease with time, if the nephrolithiatic agents EG and AC are omitted from the drinking water. Further studies must clarify whether macrophages and multinucleated giant cells are able to remove the interstitial crystals and how these cells are recruited at the inflammatory site. PMID:10196021

  15. Calcium-activated chloride channels in the apical region of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Dibattista, Michele; Amjad, Asma; Maurya, Devendra Kumar; Sagheddu, Claudia; Montani, Giorgia; Tirindelli, Roberto; Menini, Anna

    2012-07-01

    The rodent vomeronasal organ plays a crucial role in several social behaviors. Detection of pheromones or other emitted signaling molecules occurs in the dendritic microvilli of vomeronasal sensory neurons, where the binding of molecules to vomeronasal receptors leads to the influx of sodium and calcium ions mainly through the transient receptor potential canonical 2 (TRPC2) channel. To investigate the physiological role played by the increase in intracellular calcium concentration in the apical region of these neurons, we produced localized, rapid, and reproducible increases in calcium concentration with flash photolysis of caged calcium and measured calcium-activated currents with the whole cell voltage-clamp technique. On average, a large inward calcium-activated current of -261 pA was measured at -50 mV, rising with a time constant of 13 ms. Ion substitution experiments showed that this current is anion selective. Moreover, the chloride channel blockers niflumic acid and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid partially inhibited the calcium-activated current. These results directly demonstrate that a large chloride current can be activated by calcium in the apical region of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons. Furthermore, we showed by immunohistochemistry that the calcium-activated chloride channels TMEM16A/anoctamin1 and TMEM16B/anoctamin2 are present in the apical layer of the vomeronasal epithelium, where they largely colocalize with the TRPC2 transduction channel. Immunocytochemistry on isolated vomeronasal sensory neurons showed that TMEM16A and TMEM16B coexpress in the neuronal microvilli. Therefore, we conclude that microvilli of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons have a high density of calcium-activated chloride channels that may play an important role in vomeronasal transduction. PMID:22732308

  16. Target-Cell Contact Activates a Highly Selective Capacitative Calcium Entry Pathway in Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zweifach, Adam

    2000-01-01

    Calcium influx is critical for T cell activation. Evidence has been presented that T cell receptor–stimulated calcium influx in helper T lymphocytes occurs via channels activated as a consequence of depletion of intracellular calcium stores, a mechanism known as capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE). However, two key questions have not been addressed. First, the mechanism of calcium influx in cytotoxic T cells has not been examined. While the T cell receptor–mediated early signals in helper and cytotoxic T cells are similar, the physiology of the cells is strikingly different, raising the possibility that the mechanism of calcium influx is also different. Second, contact of T cells with antigen-presenting cells or targets involves a host of intercellular interactions in addition to those between antigen–MHC and the T cell receptor. The possibility that calcium influx pathways in addition to those activated via the T cell receptor may be activated by contact with relevant cells has not been addressed. We have used imaging techniques to show that target-cell–stimulated calcium influx in CTLs occurs primarily through CCE. We investigated the permeability of the CTL influx pathway for divalent cations, and compared it to the permeability of CCE in Jurkat human leukemic T cells. CCE in CTLs shows a similar ability to discriminate between calcium, barium, and strontium as CCE in Jurkat human leukemic T lymphocytes, where CCE is likely to mediated by Ca2+ release–activated Ca2+ current (CRAC) channels, suggesting that CRAC channels also underlie CCE in CTLs. These results are the first determination of the mechanism of calcium influx in cytotoxic T cells and the first demonstration that cell contact–mediated calcium signals in T cells occur via depletion-activated channels. PMID:10662784

  17. Impact of calcium-activated potassium channels on NMDA spikes in cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bock, Tobias; Stuart, Greg J

    2016-03-01

    Active electrical events play an important role in shaping signal processing in dendrites. As these events are usually associated with an increase in intracellular calcium, they are likely to be under the control of calcium-activated potassium channels. Here, we investigate the impact of calcium-activated potassium channels onN-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent spikes, or NMDA spikes, evoked by glutamate iontophoresis onto basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We found that small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK channels) act to reduce NMDA spike amplitude but at the same time, also decrease the iontophoretic current required for their generation. This SK-mediated decrease in NMDA spike threshold was dependent on R-type voltage-gated calcium channels and indicates a counterintuitive, excitatory effect of SK channels on NMDA spike generation, whereas the capacity of SK channels to suppress NMDA spike amplitude is in line with the expected inhibitory action of potassium channels on dendritic excitability. Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels had no significant impact on NMDA spikes, indicating that these channels are either absent from basal dendrites or not activated by NMDA spikes. These experiments reveal complex and opposing interactions among NMDA receptors, SK channels, and voltage-gated calcium channels in basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons during NMDA spike generation, which are likely to play an important role in regulating the way these neurons integrate the thousands of synaptic inputs they receive. PMID:26936985

  18. Characterization of the bone-like apatite precipitated on high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed calcium phosphate deposits.

    PubMed

    Khor, K A; Li, H; Cheang, P

    2003-02-01

    Bone-like apatite was precipitated on the surface of thermal sprayed calcium phosphate coatings following in vitro incubation in a simulated body fluid. The coatings were initially deposited on titanium alloy substrates by the high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray technique. Structural characterization and mechanical evaluation of the precipitated apatite layer were conducted. Results showed that the precipitation rate was directly influenced by the local Ca(2+) concentration in the vicinity of the coating's surface and that preferential dissolution of certain phases was found to accelerate the precipitation of the bone-like apatite. The dense precipitates exhibited a competitive Young's modulus value of approximately 120GPa, which was obtained through nanoindentation. This compared favorably to the calcium phosphate matrix. Differences in microstructure at various locations within the layer resulted in altered Young's modulus and microhardness values. Precipitation mechanism investigation was carried out through a comparative experiment. Chemical analysis showed that the precipitation of bone-like apatite on the calcium phosphate coating was quite conceivably a partial diffusion-controlled process. PMID:12485795

  19. Inhibition of parathyroid hormone release by maitotoxin, a calcium channel activator

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, L.A.; Yasumoto, T.; Aurbach, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    Maitotoxin, a toxin derived from a marine dinoflagellate, is a potent activator of voltage-sensitive calcium channels. To further test the hypothesis that inhibition of PTH secretion by calcium is mediated via a calcium channel we studied the effect of maitotoxin on dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Maitotoxin inhibited PTH release in a dose-dependent fashion, and inhibition was maximal at 1 ng/ml. Chelation of extracellular calcium by EGTA blocked the inhibition of PTH by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin enhanced the effects of the dihydropyridine calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and increased the rate of radiocalcium uptake in parathyroid cells. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein that interacts with calcium channels in the parathyroid cell, did not affect the inhibition of PTH secretion by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin, by its action on calcium channels allows entry of extracellular calcium and inhibits PTH release. Our results suggest that calcium channels are involved in the release of PTH. Inhibition of PTH release by maitotoxin is not sensitive to pertussis toxin, suggesting that maitotoxin may act distal to the site interacting with a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, or maitotoxin could interact with other ions or second messengers to inhibit PTH release.

  20. Calcium Deposits in the Crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus: Microstructure Versus Elemental Distribution.

    PubMed

    Luquet, Gilles; Dauphin, Yannicke; Percot, Aline; Salomé, Murielle; Ziegler, Andreas; Fernández, Maria S; Arias, José L

    2016-02-01

    The crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus stores calcium ions, easily mobilizable after molting, for calcifying parts of the new exoskeleton. They are chiefly stored as amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) during each premolt in a pair of gastroliths synthesized in the stomach wall. How calcium carbonate is stabilized in the amorphous state in such a biocomposite remains speculative. The knowledge of the microstructure at the nanometer level obtained by field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy combined with scanning electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, micro-Raman and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy gave relevant information on the elaboration of such an ACC-stabilized biomineral. We observed nanogranules distributed along chitin-protein fibers and the aggregation of granules in thin layers. AFM confirmed the nanolevel structure, showing granules probably surrounded by an organic layer and also revealing a second level of aggregation as described for other crystalline biominerals. Raman analyses showed the presence of ACC, amorphous calcium phosphate, and calcite. Elemental analyses confirmed the presence of elements like Fe, Na, Mg, P, and S. P and S are heterogeneously distributed. P is present in both the mineral and organic phases of gastroliths. S seems present as sulfate (probably as sulfated sugars), sulfonate, sulfite, and sulfoxide groups and, in a lesser extent, as sulfur-containing amino acids. PMID:26818557

  1. Anti-melanin deposition activity of ceramicines from Chisocheton ceramicus.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Chie; Wong, Chin Piow; Nugroho, Alfarius Eko; Sotozono, Yayoi; Someya, Saki; Hirasawa, Yusuke; Kaneda, Toshio; Hadi, A Hamid A; Morita, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    The ceramicines, a series of limonoids from Chisocheton ceramicus (Meliaceae), were evaluated for anti-melanin deposition activity on α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)-treated B16-F10 melanoma cell, and several ceramicines were found to be active. The structure-activity relationship of ceramicines as anti-melanin deposition inhibitors was deduced. Furthermore, the mechanism of anti-melanin deposition activity of ceramicine B, a major constituent of C. ceramicus that showed potent anti-melanin deposition activity, was investigated. Tyrosinase enzymatic activity and tyrosinase mRNA expression were not affected by ceramicine B. The anti-melanin deposition activity of ceramicine B was shown to be related to the downregulation of tyrosinase protein expression. These results suggest that ceramicines have potential to be used as depigmentation agents. PMID:27357963

  2. Loading Capacity versus Enzyme Activity in Anisotropic and Spherical Calcium Carbonate Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Donatan, Senem; Yashchenok, Alexey; Khan, Nazimuddin; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan; Cocquyt, Melissa; Pinchasik, Bat-El; Khalenkow, Dmitry; Möhwald, Helmuth; Konrad, Manfred; Skirtach, Andre

    2016-06-01

    A new method of fabrication of calcium carbonate microparticles of ellipsoidal, rhomboidal, and spherical geometries is reported by adjusting the relative concentration ratios of the initial salt solutions and/or the ethylene glycol content in the reaction medium. Morphology, porosity, crystallinity, and loading capacity of synthesized CaCO3 templates were characterized in detail. Particles harboring dextran or the enzyme guanylate kinase were obtained through encapsulation of these macromolecules using the layer-by-layer assembly technique to deposit positively and negatively charged polymers on these differently shaped CaCO3 templates and were characterized by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy, fluorometric techniques, and enzyme activity measurements. The enzymatic activity, an important application of such porous particles and containers, has been analyzed in comparison with the loading capacity and geometry. Our results reveal that the particles' shape influences morphology of particles and that, as a result, affects the activity of the encapsulated enzymes, in addition to the earlier reported influence on cellular uptake. These particles are promising candidates for efficient drug delivery due to their relatively high loading capacity, biocompatibility, and easy fabrication and handling. PMID:27166641

  3. Citrus Bioflavonoids Ameliorate Hyperoxaluria Induced Renal Injury and Calcium Oxalate Crystal Deposition in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Badrinathan, Sridharan; Shiju, Micheal Thomas; Arya, Ramachandran; Rajesh, Ganesh Nachiappa; Viswanathan, Pragasam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Citrus is considered as a medically important plant from ancient times and the bioflavonoids of different variety of citrus fruits were well explored for their biological activities. The study aim was to explore the effect of citrus bioflavonoids (CB) to prevent and cure hyperoxaluria induced urolithiasis. Methods: Twenty four Wistar rats were segregated into 4 Groups. Group 1: Control; Group 2: Urolithic (EG-0.75%); Group 3: Preventive study (EG+CB, day 1-50); Group 4: Curative study (EG+CB, day 30-50). Animals received CB orally (20mg/kg body weight) after performing a toxicity study. Results: Urinary risk factors and serum renal function parameters were significantly reduced by CB administration in both preventive and curative study (p<0.001). Hematoxylin & Eosin and von Kossa staining demonstrated that renal protection was offered by CB against EG insult. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed over expression and abnormal localization of THP and NF-κB in urolithic rats, while it was effectively regulated by CB supplementation. Conclusion: CB prevented and significantly controlled lithogenic factors and CaOx deposition in rats. We propose CB as a potential therapy in management of urolithiasis. PMID:26504765

  4. Deposition of calcium phosphate coatings using condensed phosphates (P2O7(4-) and P3O10(5-)) as phosphate source through induction heating.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan; Hou, Saisai; Zhang, Mingjie; Yang, Mengmeng; Deng, Linhong; Xiong, Xinbo; Ni, Xinye

    2016-12-01

    In present work condensed phosphates (P2O7(4-) and P3O10(5-)) were used as phosphate source in induction heating to deposit calcium phosphate coatings. The phase, morphology, and composition of different phosphate-related coatings were characterized and compared using XRD, FTIR, and SEM analyses. Results showed that P2O7(4-)formed calcium pyrophosphate hydrate coatings with interconnected cuboid-like particles. The as-deposited calcium tripolyphosphate hydrate coating with P3O10(5-) was mainly composed of flower-like particles assembled by plate-like crystals. The bioactivity and cytocompatibility of the coatings were also studied. Moreover, the feasibility of using hybrid phosphate sources for preparing and depositing coatings onto magnesium alloy was investigated. PMID:27612721

  5. Detection of calcium activity in human monocytes by the fura-2 fluorescence method: in vitro differentiation sensitizes cells to dihydropyridine calcium channel modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Cabello, Olga A.; Shan, Qin; Tittel, Frank K.; Henry, Philip D.

    1994-07-01

    Dihydropyridine (DHP) calcium channel blockers have been shown to suppress atherogenesis in various species and controlled angiographic trials suggest that these drugs may retard the progression of occlusive coronary disease in humans. Because mononuclear leukocytes play a key role in the formation of early and advanced atheromatous lesions, we determined effects of DHP calcium channel modulators on calcium uptake by cells of the monocytic lineage. Human peripheral blood monocytes were evaluated before and after undergoing in vitro differentiation induced by two days of culture with fetal calf serum and FMLP. Changes in intracellular calcium activity were estimated with fura-2, a fluorescent calcium indicator. Freshly isolated (unactivated) monocytes were insensitive to DHP drugs both in the presence and absence of high potassium membrane depolarization. In contrast, nisoldipine, a DHP calcium channel blocker, and BAY K 8644, a DHP calcium channel activator, decreased and increased calcium uptake by KC1-depolarized differentiated monocytes. Results suggest that differentiation of monocytes to macrophages may involve a change in the expression and/or regulation of DHP- sensitive calcium channels.

  6. Nutritional impact of elevated calcium transport activity in carrots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrition recommendations worldwide emphasize ingestion of plant-based diets rather than diets that rely primarily on animal products. However, this plant-based diet could limit the intake of essential nutrients such as calcium. Osteoporosis is one of the world's most prevalent nutritional disorders...

  7. Calcium mobilization and phosphoinositide turnover in fluoride-activated human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Strnad, C.F.; Wong, K.

    1986-05-01

    Fluoride ion, at concentrations above 10 mM, has been found to activate a superoxide production response in human neutrophils which is strongly dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium. In an attempt to further explore the calcium requirement of fluoride-induced neutrophil activation, intracellular calcium concentrations were monitored through use of the fluorescent calcium probe, Quin 2. Fluoride ion, at concentrations between 10 and 20 mM, was found to elicit a rise in intracellular calcium levels which was characterized by a lag period of 4 to 10 min and a prolonged duration of action (greater than 20 min). In contrast, the chemotactic peptide, formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), induced a rise in intracellular calcium concentration which peaked within 1 min. Preincubation of cells with 1 ..mu..g/ml pertussis toxin resulted in inhibition of the FMLP-induced response, but not that elicited by fluoride. Furthermore, anion exchange chromatography indicated that inositol phosphate accumulation occurred in fluoride-treated cells in association with calcium mobilization. Recent evidence suggests that the FMLP receptor is coupled to phospholipase C and phosphoinositide turnover through a guanine nucleotide binding protein susceptible to inhibition by pertussis toxin. Present results suggest that fluoride ion may serve to activate this protein in a manner resistant to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

  8. Decrease in the transmembrane sodium activity gradient in ferret papillary muscle as a prerequisite to the calcium paradox.

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, T

    1988-01-01

    Sodium-dependent calcium exchange may be an important mediator of calcium reperfusion damage during the calcium paradox phenomenon. We measured intracellular sodium activity with ion-selective electrodes during a 15-min period of calcium reperfusion in isolated ferret papillary muscles. During the calcium-free period, alpha Nai increased from 9.0 +/- 0.9 to 18.9 +/- 4.3 mM. With reinstitution of calcium there was a significant contracture. The amount of contracture after calcium reinstitution was related to sodium loading during the calcium-free period. We were unable to block sodium entry during the calcium-free period with either nitrendipine, tetrodotoxin, or low concentrations of amiloride. 10(-3) M amiloride or lithium for sodium substitution in the calcium-free period, however, obliterated the increase in alpha Nai activity and the subsequent paradox. These data suggest that sodium loading is a necessary prerequisite for the calcium paradox and that one mechanism of sodium entry is through Na+/Ca2+ exchange. Under these conditions, no increase in the rest force is seen without previous sodium gains, suggesting that sodium-dependent calcium exchange is an important trigger for the calcium reflow, the calcium paradox. PMID:2454951

  9. Electrophoretic deposition of bioactive silica-calcium phosphate nanocomposite on Ti-6Al-4V orthopedic implant.

    PubMed

    Aniket; El-Ghannam, Ahmed

    2011-11-01

    Bioactive silica-calcium phosphate nanocomposite (SCPC) has been coated on Ti-6Al-4V implant employing an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique. The effects of composition and pH of the suspending medium on the zeta potential of three different SCPC formulations; SCPC25, SCPC50 and SCPC75 were analyzed. The average zeta potential of SCPC50 in pure ethanol was more negative than that of SCPC25 or SCPC75; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Discs of Ti-6Al-4V were passivated, coated with SCPC50 (200 nm-10 μm) and thermally treated at 600-800°C to produce a coating thickness in the range of 43.1 ± 5.7 to 30.1 ± 4.6 μm. After treatment at 600, 700, and 800°C, the adhesion strength at the SCPC50/Ti-6Al-4V interface was 42.6 ± 3.6, 44.7 ± 8.7, and 47.2 ± 4.3 MPa, respectively. SEM-EDX analyses of SCPC50-coated Ti-6Al-4V preimmersed in PBS for 7 days showed the formation of a Ca-deficient hydroxyapatite surface layer. ICP-OES analyses of the immersing solution (n = 6) showed an increase in the ionic concentration of Si from 3.3 ± 0.9 to 5.0 ± 1.2 ppm between days 1 and 4; after which no significant change in the Si concentration was measured. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells attached to the SCPC50-coated implants expressed significantly higher (p < 0.05) alkaline phosphatase activity (82.4 ± 25.6 nmoles p-NP/mg protein/min) than that expressed by cells attached to HA-coated or uncoated implants. Results of the study suggest that bioactive SCPC50 can efficiently be coated on Ti-6Al-4V using EPD. The SCPC50 coating has the potential to enhance bone integration with the orthopedic implant. PMID:21948397

  10. Calcium-channel number critically influences synaptic strength and plasticity at the active zone

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jiansong; He, Liming; Zheng, Hongwei; Xue, Lei; Luo, Fujun; Shin, Wonchul; Sun, Tao; Kuner, Thomas; Yue, David T; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-01-01

    How synaptic-vesicle release is controlled at the basic release structure, the active zone, is poorly understood. By performing cell-attached current and capacitance recordings predominantly at single active zones in rat calyces, we found that single active zones contained 5-218 (mean, 42) calcium channels and 1–10 (mean, 5) readily releasable vesicles (RRVs) and released 0–5 vesicles during a 2-ms depolarization. Large variation in the number of calcium channels caused wide variation in release strength (measured during a 2-ms depolarization) by regulating the RRV release probability (PRRV) and the RRV number. Consequently, an action potential opened ~1–35 (mean, ~7) channels, resulting in different release probabilities at different active zones. As the number of calcium-channels determined PRRV, it critically influenced whether subsequent release would be facilitated or depressed. Regulating calcium channel density at active zones may thus be a major mechanism to yield synapses with different release properties and plasticity. These findings may explain large differences reported at synapses regarding release strength (release of 0, 1 or multiple vesicles), PRRV, short-term plasticity, calcium transients and the requisite calcium-channel number for triggering release. PMID:22683682

  11. Relationship between Salivary Alkaline Phosphatase Enzyme Activity and The Concentrations of Salivary Calcium and Phosphate Ions

    PubMed Central

    Jazaeri, Mina; Malekzadeh, Hosein; Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman; Samami, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Although salivary alkaline phosphatase (ALP) can balance deand remineralization processes of enamel, there is no evidence regarding its effects on the concentrations of calcium and phosphate in saliva. The present study aims to determine the relationship between salivary ALP activity and the concentrations of calcium and phosphate in saliva. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated salivary markers in 120 males, ages 19 to 44 years. All participants provided 5 mL of unstimulated whole saliva and the level of enzyme activity as well as calcium and phosphate concentrations were measured using a colorimetric method. Data were gathered and analyzed by statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) 13.00 using Pearson correlation test. A p value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. The mean age of participants in the present study was 32.95 ± 8.09 years. The mean pH of saliva was 6.65 ± 0.62. Salivary parameters included average ALP activity (5.04 ± 1.866 U/dL), calcium (4.77 ± 0.877 mg/dL) and phosphate (10.38 ± 2.301 mg/dL). Pearson correlation test showed no significant relationship between ALP activity and calcium and phosphate concentrations in saliva (p>0.05). According to the results of the present study, there was no significant relation between salivary ALP activity and calcium and phosphate concentrations in saliva. However, further research is highly recommended. PMID:25870846

  12. Relationship between Salivary Alkaline Phosphatase Enzyme Activity and The Concentrations of Salivary Calcium and Phosphate Ions.

    PubMed

    Jazaeri, Mina; Malekzadeh, Hosein; Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman; Samami, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Although salivary alkaline phosphatase (ALP) can balance deand remineralization processes of enamel, there is no evidence regarding its effects on the concentrations of calcium and phosphate in saliva. The present study aims to determine the relationship between salivary ALP activity and the concentrations of calcium and phosphate in saliva. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated salivary markers in 120 males, ages 19 to 44 years. All participants provided 5 mL of unstimulated whole saliva and the level of enzyme activity as well as calcium and phosphate concentrations were measured using a colorimetric method. Data were gathered and analyzed by statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) 13.00 using Pearson correlation test. A p value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. The mean age of participants in the present study was 32.95 ± 8.09 years. The mean pH of saliva was 6.65 ± 0.62. Salivary parameters included average ALP activity (5.04 ± 1.866 U/dL), calcium (4.77 ± 0.877 mg/dL) and phosphate (10.38 ± 2.301 mg/dL). Pearson correlation test showed no significant relationship between ALP activity and calcium and phosphate concentrations in saliva (p>0.05). According to the results of the present study, there was no significant relation between salivary ALP activity and calcium and phosphate concentrations in saliva. However, further research is highly recommended. PMID:25870846

  13. Calcium phosphate thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition: Physico-chemical characterization and in vitro cell response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailescu, I. N.; Torricelli, P.; Bigi, A.; Mayer, I.; Iliescu, M.; Werckmann, J.; Socol, G.; Miroiu, F.; Cuisinier, F.; Elkaim, R.; Hildebrand, G.

    2005-07-01

    We review the progress made by us using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of two bioactive calcium phosphates: octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and Mn doped carbonated hydroxyapatite (Mn-CHA). Coatings of these materials well suited for biomimetic medical prostheses and pivots were synthesized on titanium substrates with a pulsed KrF* UV laser source. The best deposition conditions for Mn-CHA thin films were 13 Pa O 2, 400 °C with post heat treatment of 6 h in air enriched with water vapours. The coatings are stoichiometric and crystalline. For OCP, deposition at 150 °C in 50 Pa water vapor atmosphere, post treated by 6 h annealing in hot flux of water vapours, resulted in stoichiometric, but poorly-crystallized films. Degradation tests show different behavior for the OCP and Mn-CHA coatings. In vitro cell growth shows excellent adherence and biocompatibility of osteoblasts and fibroblasts in both OCP and Mn-CHA coatings. Human osteoblasts display normal proliferation and viability, and good differentiation behaviour.

  14. Oxygen nano-bubble water reduces calcium oxalate deposits and tubular cell injury in ethylene glycol-treated rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yasuhiko; Yasui, Takahiro; Taguchi, Kazumi; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Niimi, Kazuhiro; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Okada, Atsushi; Kubota, Yasue; Kawai, Noriyasu; Itoh, Yasunori; Tozawa, Keiichi; Sasaki, Shoichi; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2013-08-01

    Renal tubular cell injury induced by oxalate plays an important role in kidney stone formation. Water containing oxygen nano-bubbles (nanometer-sized bubbles generated from oxygen micro-bubbles; ONB) has anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ONB water on kidney stone formation in ethylene glycol (EG)-treated rats. We divided 60 rats, aged 4 weeks, into 5 groups: control, the water-fed group; 100 % ONB, the 100 % ONB water-fed group; EG, the EG treated water-fed group; EG + 50 % ONB and EG + 100 % ONB, water containing EG and 50 % or 100 % ONB, respectively. Renal calcium oxalate (CaOx) deposition, urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), and renal expression of inflammation-related proteins, oxidative stress biomarkers, and the crystal-binding molecule hyaluronic acid were compared among the 5 groups. In the control and 100 % ONB groups, no renal CaOx deposits were detected. In the EG + 50 % ONB and EG + 100 % ONB groups, ONB water significantly decreased renal CaOx deposits, urinary NAG excretion, and renal monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, osteopontin, and hyaluronic acid expression and increased renal superoxide dismutase-1 expression compared with the EG group. ONB water substantially affected kidney stone formation in the rat kidney by reducing renal tubular cell injury. ONB water is a potential prophylactic agent for kidney stones. PMID:23754513

  15. The role of oxygen in the deposition of copper-calcium thin film as diffusion barrier for copper metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhinong; Ren, Ruihuang; Xue, Jianshe; Yao, Qi; Li, Zhengliang; Hui, Guanbao; Xue, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The properties of copper (Cu) metallization based on copper-calcium (CuCa) diffusion barrier as a function of oxygen flux in the CuCa film deposition were investigated in view of adhesion, diffusion and electronic properties. The CuCa film as the diffusion barrier of Cu film improves the adhesion of Cu film, however, and increases the resistance of Cu film. The introduction of oxygen into the deposition of CuCa film induces the improvement of adhesion and crystallinity of Cu film, but produces a slight increase of resistance. The increased resistance results from the partial oxidation of Cu film. The annealing process in vacuum further improves the adhesion, crystallinity and conductivity of Cu film. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) show that the CuCa alloy barrier layer deposited at oxygen atmosphere has perfect anti-diffusion between Cu film and substrate due to the formation of Ca oxide in the interface of CuCa/substrate.

  16. Characterization of the Golgi Complex Cleared of Proteins in Transit and Examination of Calcium Uptake Activities

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Randall S.; Jones, Steven M.; Dahl, Rolf H.; Nordeen, Mark H.; Howell, Kathryn E.

    1997-01-01

    To characterize endogenous molecules and activities of the Golgi complex, proteins in transit were >99% cleared from rat hepatocytes by using cycloheximide (CHX) treatment. The loss of proteins in transit resulted in condensation of the Golgi cisternae and stacks. Isolation of a stacked Golgi fraction is equally efficient with or without proteins in transit [control (CTL SGF1) and cycloheximide (CHX SGF1)]. Electron microscopy and morphometric analysis showed that >90% of the elements could be positively identified as Golgi stacks or cisternae. Biochemical analysis showed that the cis-, medial-, trans-, and TGN Golgi markers were enriched over the postnuclear supernatant 200- to 400-fold with and 400- to 700-fold without proteins in transit. To provide information on a mechanism for import of calcium required at the later stages of the secretory pathway, calcium uptake into CTL SGF1 and CHX SGF1 was examined. All calcium uptake into CTL SGF1 was dependent on a thapsigargin-resistant pump not resident to the Golgi complex and a thapsigargin-sensitive pump resident to the Golgi. Experiments using CHX SGF1 showed that the thapsigargin-resistant activity was a plasma membrane calcium ATPase isoform in transit to the plasma membrane and the thapsigargin-sensitive pump was a sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase isoform. In vivo both of these calcium ATPases function to maintain millimolar levels of calcium within the Golgi lumen. PMID:9348533

  17. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  18. Localization of calcium stimulated adenosine triphosphatase activity in blood vessels of the skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, S. B.

    1985-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme found in bone forming cells which decreases in certain bones as a result of hypogravity or non-weight bearing. This enzyme can also hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate. Therefore, an effort was made to localize calcium-stimulated ATPase by cytochemistry to determine whether altered bone cell activity might be related to changing calcium levels which occur during hypogravity. The results indicate that Ca(++)-ATPase is largely found along the endothelium and basal lamina of blood vessels, and not found in bone forming cells. This suggests that calcium regulation in the vicinity of bone formation may be modulated by the vasculature of the area.

  19. Porcine malignant hyperthermia susceptibility: increased calcium-sequestering activity of skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, P J

    1986-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that calcium-sequestration by isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum was abnormal in skeletal muscle of malignant hyperthermia-susceptible swine. A heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum fraction was isolated from malignant hyperthermia and control muscle using differential and density-gradient centrifugation. Prior to onset of malignant hyperthermia, calcium-sequestering activity (Vmax at 37 degrees C, mumol calcium/mg/min) was twofold increased in malignant hyperthermia sarcoplasmic reticulum compared to control sarcoplasmic reticulum (1.96 +/- 0.50 versus 4.00 +/- 0.87, P less than 0.01), although thermodynamic and kinetic properties of this activity were otherwise indistinguishable between groups. This increased activity of the malignant hyperthermia sarcoplasmic reticulum fraction was associated with twofold increased concentration of Ca-ATPase and calsequestrin protein. When a malignant hyperthermia-reaction developed, calcium-uptake was depressed to less than 5% of control values. These data indicate that malignant hyperthermia is not initiated due to a defect in the calcium-sequestration mechanism, however, loss of calcium-uptake activity occurring after the onset of malignant hyperthermia might result in the propagation and irreversibility of the malignant hyperthermia reaction. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3742368

  20. Trypsin-Sensitive, Rapid Inactivation of a Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solaro, Christopher R.; Lingle, Christopher J.

    1992-09-01

    Most calcium-activated potassium channels couple changes in intracellular calcium to membrane excitability by conducting a current with a probability that depends directly on submembrane calcium concentration. In rat adrenal chromaffin cells, however, a large conductance, voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channel (BK) undergoes rapid inactivation, suggesting that this channel has a physiological role different than that of other BK channels. The inactivation of the BK channel, like that of the voltage-gated Shaker B potassium channel, is removed by trypsin digestion and channels are blocked by the Shaker B amino-terminal inactivating domain. Thus, this BK channel shares functional and possibly structural homologies with other inactivating voltage-gated potassium channels.

  1. Enhanced osteogenic activity of poly ether ether ketone using calcium plasma immersion ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao; Qian, Shi; Meng, Fanhao; Ning, Congqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-06-01

    As a promising implantable material, poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) possesses similar elastic modulus to that of cortical bones yet suffers from bio-inertness and poor osteogenic properties, which limits its application as orthopedic implants. In this work, calcium is introduced onto PEEK surface using calcium plasma immersion ion implantation (Ca-PIII). The results obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirm the modified layer with varying contents of calcium are formed on PEEK surfaces. Water contact angle measurements reveal the increasing hydrophobicity of both Ca-PIII treated surfaces. In vitro cell adhesion, viability assay, alkaline phosphatase activity and collagen secretion analyses disclose improved the adhesion, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs) on Ca-PIII treated surfaces. The obtained results indicate that PEEK surface with enhanced osteogenic activity can be produced by calcium incorporation. PMID:26954085

  2. Diabetic state-induced activation of calcium-activated neutral proteinase in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Fujihara, M; Hoshino, N; Kimura, I; Kimura, M

    1989-12-01

    The effect of a diabetic state in the diabetic KK-CAy mouse on calcium activated neutral proteinase (CANP) of hind-limb skeletal muscles was investigated. In the diabetic state, there was an increased sensitivity to activation of CANP by calcium (Ca). In addition, there was an enhancement of maximal activity of the enzyme. The effect was induced by secondary modification of the diabetic state, but not genetical factors. Several lines of evidence suggest that the CANP is responsible for 92 K dalton protein in diabetic skeletal muscles. Among the evidence are the following: a) The 92 K band in the diabetic muscles was lower than in the prediabetic mouse and restored by the addition of 2 mM EDTA and 2 mM EGTA. b) The band was reduced by increasing the Ca content and neutral pH in the non-diabetic normal muscles. c) E-64-C, a CANP inhibitor, restored the 92 K component reduced by the diabetic state. Since the band in denervated muscles was not changed by the Ca chelating agents, the reduction of the band in the diabetic muscles is related with musculotrophic factors, not diabetic neuropathy. These results suggest that diabetic amyotrophy may be regarded as a phenomenon linked to an increase in intracellular Ca ions and an increase in CANP activity. PMID:2561275

  3. Carbon nanotubes play an important role in the spatial arrangement of calcium deposits in hydrogels for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cancian, Giulia; Tozzi, Gianluca; Hussain, Amirul Ashraf Bin; De Mori, Arianna; Roldo, Marta

    2016-08-01

    Age related bone diseases such as osteoporosis are considered among the main causes of reduced bone mechanical stability and bone fractures. In order to restore both biological and mechanical function of diseased/fractured bones, novel bioactive scaffolds that mimic the bone structure are constantly under development in tissue engineering applications. Among the possible candidates, chitosan-based thermosensitive hydrogel scaffolds represent ideal systems due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, enhanced antibacterial properties, promotion of osteoblast formation and ease of injection, which makes them suitable for less invasive surgical procedures. As a main drawback, these chitosan systems present poor mechanical performance that could not support load-bearing applications. In order to produce more mechanically-competent biomaterials, the combined addition of hydroxyapatite and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is proposed in this study. Specifically, the aim of this work is to develop thermosensitive chitosan hydrogels containing stabilised single-walled and multi-walled CNTs, where their effect on the mechanical/physiochemical properties, calcium deposition patterns and ability to provide a platform for the controlled release of protein drugs was investigated. It was found that the addition of CNTs had a significant effect on the sol-gel transition time and significantly increased the resistance to compression for the hydrogels. Moreover, in vitro calcification studies revealed that CNTs played a major role in the spatial arrangements of newly formed calcium deposits in the composite materials studied, suggesting that they may have a role in the way the repair of fragile and/or fractured bones occurs in vivo. PMID:27324780

  4. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Couples Localised Calcium Influx to Activation of Akt in Central Nerve Terminals.

    PubMed

    Nicholson-Fish, Jessica C; Cousin, Michael A; Smillie, Karen J

    2016-03-01

    The efficient retrieval of synaptic vesicle membrane and cargo in central nerve terminals is dependent on the efficient recruitment of a series of endocytosis modes by different patterns of neuronal activity. During intense neuronal activity the dominant endocytosis mode is activity-dependent endocytosis (ADBE). Triggering of ADBE is linked to calcineurin-mediated dynamin I dephosphorylation since the same stimulation intensities trigger both. Dynamin I dephosphorylation is maximised by a simultaneous inhibition of its kinase glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) by the protein kinase Akt, however it is unknown how increased neuronal activity is transduced into Akt activation. To address this question we determined how the activity-dependent increases in intracellular free calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) control activation of Akt. This was achieved using either trains of high frequency action potentials to evoke localised [Ca(2+)]i increases at active zones, or a calcium ionophore to raise [Ca(2+)]i uniformly across the nerve terminal. Through the use of either non-specific calcium channel antagonists or intracellular calcium chelators we found that Akt phosphorylation (and subsequent GSK3 phosphorylation) was dependent on localised [Ca(2+)]i increases at the active zone. In an attempt to determine mechanism, we antagonised either phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or calmodulin. Activity-dependent phosphorylation of both Akt and GSK3 was arrested on inhibition of PI3K, but not calmodulin. Thus localised calcium influx in central nerve terminals activates PI3K via an unknown calcium sensor to trigger the activity-dependent phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3. PMID:26198194

  5. Members of the thrombospondin gene family bind stromal interaction molecule 1 and regulate calcium channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Duquette, Mark; Nadler, Monica; Okuhara, Dayne; Thompson, Jill; Shuttleworth, Trevor; Lawler, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The thrombospondins (TSPs) are a family of matricellular proteins that regulate cellular phenotype through interactions with a myriad of other proteins and proteoglycans. We have identified a novel interaction of the members of the TSP gene family with stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). This association is robust since it is preserved in Triton X-100, can be detected with multiple anti-TSP-1 and anti-STIM1 antibodies, and is detected in a wide range of cell types. We have also found that STIM1 co-immunoprecipitates with TSP-4 and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and that a recombinant version of the N-terminal domain of STIM1 binds to the signature domain of TSP-1 and COMP. The association of the TSPs with STIM1 is observed in both the presence and absence of calcium indicating that the calcium-dependent conformation of the signature domain of TSPs is not required for binding. Thus, this interaction could occur in the ER under conditions of normal or low calcium concentration. Furthermore, we observed that the expression of COMP in HEK 293 cells decreases STIM1-mediated calcium release activated calcium (CRAC) channel currents and increases arachidonic acid calcium (ARC) channel currents. These data indicate that the TSPs regulate STIM1 function and participate in the reciprocal regulation of two channels that mediate calcium entry into the cell. PMID:24845346

  6. Calcium-activated butyrylcholinesterase in human skin protects acetylcholinesterase against suicide inhibition by neurotoxic organophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Schallreuter, Karin U.; University of Bradford ). E-mail: K.Schallreuter@bradford.ac.uk; Gibbons, Nicholas C.J.; Elwary, Souna M.; Parkin, Susan M.; Wood, John M.

    2007-04-20

    The human epidermis holds an autocrine acetylcholine production and degradation including functioning membrane integrated and cytosolic butyrylcholinesterase (BuchE). Here we show that BuchE activities increase 9-fold in the presence of calcium (0.5 x 10{sup -3}M) via a specific EF-hand calcium binding site, whereas acetylcholinesterase (AchE) is not affected. {sup 45}Calcium labelling and computer simulation confirmed the presence of one EF-hand binding site per subunit which is disrupted by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation. Moreover, we confirmed the faster hydrolysis by calcium-activated BuchE using the neurotoxic organophosphate O-ethyl-O-(4-nitrophenyl)-phenylphosphonothioate (EPN). Considering the large size of the human skin with 1.8 m{sup 2} surface area with its calcium gradient in the 10{sup -3}M range, our results implicate calcium-activated BuchE as a major protective mechanism against suicide inhibition of AchE by organophosphates in this non-neuronal tissue.

  7. Compartment calcium model of frog skeletal muscle during activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weifan; Olson, Sarah D

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contraction is triggered by a rise in calcium (Ca(2+)) concentration in the myofibrillar space. The objective of this study was to develop a voltage dependent compartment model of Ca(2+) dynamics in frog skeletal muscle fibers. The compartment model corresponds to the myofibrillar space (MS) and a calcium store, the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Ca(2+) is released from the SR to the MS based on the voltage and is able to bind to several proteins in the MS. We use a detailed model to account for voltage dependent Ca(2+) release and inactivation. With this model, we are able to match previous experimental data for Ca(2+) release and binding to proteins for an applied (fixed) voltage. We explore the sensitivity of parameters in the model and illustrate the importance of inactivation of the SR; during a long depolarization, the SR must be inactivated in order to achieve realistic Ca(2+) concentrations in the MS. A Hodgkin Huxley type model was also developed to describe voltage at the surface membrane using electrophysiological data from previous experiments. This voltage model was then used as the time dependent voltage to determine Ca(2+) release from the SR. With this fully coupled model, we were able to match previous experimental results for Ca(2+) concentrations for a given applied current. Additionally, we examined simulated Ca(2+) concentrations in the case of twitch and tetanus, corresponding to different applied currents. The developed model is robust and reproduces many aspects of voltage dependent calcium signaling in frog skeletal muscle fibers. This modeling framework provides a platform for future studies of excitation contraction coupling in skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:25234233

  8. Cold Transiently Activates Calcium-Permeable Channels in Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells1[W

    PubMed Central

    Carpaneto, Armando; Ivashikina, Natalya; Levchenko, Victor; Krol, Elzbieta; Jeworutzki, Elena; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hedrich, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Living organisms are capable of discriminating thermal stimuli from noxious cold to noxious heat. For more than 30 years, it has been known that plant cells respond to cold with a large and transient depolarization. Recently, using transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing the calcium-sensitive protein aequorin, an increase in cytosolic calcium following cold treatment was observed. Applying the patch-clamp technique to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts, we could identify a transient plasma membrane conductance induced by rapid cooling. This cold-induced transient conductance was characterized as an outward rectifying 33 pS nonselective cation channel. The permeability ratio between calcium and cesium was 0.7, pointing to a permeation pore >3.34 Å (ø of cesium). Our experiments thus provide direct evidence for the predicted but not yet measured cold-activated calcium-permeable channel in plants. PMID:17114272

  9. Effect of renal insufficiency on the active transport of calcium by the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Baerg, Richard D.; Kimberg, Daniel V.; Gershon, Elaine

    1970-01-01

    The intestinal absorption of calcium is often depressed in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. Furthermore, the malabsorption of calcium and the osteodystrophy which occur in association with chronic renal disease are often “resistant” to vitamin D; the basis for this resistance remains uncertain however. Recent studies by others have emphasized the role of an abnormality in the metabolism of vitamin D in accounting for the alterations in the calcium absorption and the apparent vitamin D-resistance which accompany the uremic syndrome. The present studies with an experimentally uremic animal model demonstrate a defect in the active transport of calcium by duodenal gut sacs in vitro. This abnormality is not due to the semistarvation associated with renal insufficiency and cannot be corrected by the administration of physiologic amounts of vitamin D3: it is reversed by massive doses of the vitamin. Neither the metabolism of vitamin D3 nor the levels of calcium binding protein activity in the duodenal mucosa are affected by renal insufficiency under the conditions employed in the present studies. The results of the present studies strongly suggest that in addition to the recently proposed mechanism involving an interference with the metabolism of vitamin D renal insufficiency also affects the cellular mechanisms for calcium transport in a manner which, while opposite in direction to that of vitamin D, is independent of a direct interaction with the vitamin or its metabolites. PMID:5422027

  10. Activation of the MAP Kinase Cascade by Exogenous Calcium-Sensing Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hobson, Susan A.; Wright, Jay W.; Lee, Fred; Mcneil, Scott; Bilderback, Tim R.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-02-01

    In Rat-1 fibroblasts and ovarian surface epithelial cells, extracellular calcium induces a proliferative response which appears to be mediated by the G-protein coupled Calcium-sensing Receptor (CaR), as expression of the non-functional CaR-R795W mutant inhibits both thymidine incorporation and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) in response to calcium. In this report we utilized CaR-transfected HEK293 cells to demonstrate that functional CaR is necessary and sufficient for calcium-induced ERK activation. CaR-dependent ERK activation was blocked by co-expression of the Ras dominant-negative mutant, Ras N17, and by exposure to the phosphatidyl inositol 3' kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. In contrast to Rat-1 fibroblasts, CaR-mediated in vitro kinase activity of ERK2 was unaffected by tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin in CaR-transfected HEK293 cells. These results suggest that usage of distinct pathways downstream of the CaR varies in a cell-type specific manner, suggesting a potential mechanism by which activation of the CaR could couple to distinct calcium-dependent responses.

  11. Calcium-dependent proteasome activation is required for axonal neurofilament degradation.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo Youn; Jang, So Young; Shin, Yoon Kyung; Suh, Duk Joon; Park, Hwan Tae

    2013-12-25

    Even though many studies have identified roles of proteasomes in axonal degeneration, the molecular mechanisms by which axonal injury regulates proteasome activity are still unclear. In the present study, we found evidence indicating that extracellular calcium influx is an upstream regulator of proteasome activity during axonal degeneration in injured peripheral nerves. In degenerating axons, the increase in proteasome activity and the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins were significantly suppressed by extracellular calcium chelation. In addition, electron microscopic findings revealed selective inhibition of neurofilament degradation, but not microtubule depolymerization or mitochondrial swelling, by the inhibition of calpain and proteasomes. Taken together, our findings suggest that calcium increase and subsequent proteasome activation are an essential initiator of neurofilament degradation in Wallerian degeneration. PMID:25206662

  12. Osteogenic Differentiation of MSC through Calcium Signaling Activation: Transcriptomics and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Viti, Federica; Landini, Martina; Mezzelani, Alessandra; Petecchia, Loredana; Milanesi, Luciano; Scaglione, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The culture of progenitor mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) onto osteoconductive materials to induce a proper osteogenic differentiation and mineralized matrix regeneration represents a promising and widely diffused experimental approach for tissue-engineering (TE) applications in orthopaedics. Among modern biomaterials, calcium phosphates represent the best bone substitutes, due to their chemical features emulating the mineral phase of bone tissue. Although many studies on stem cells differentiation mechanisms have been performed involving calcium-based scaffolds, results often focus on highlighting production of in vitro bone matrix markers and in vivo tissue ingrowth, while information related to the biomolecular mechanisms involved in the early cellular calcium-mediated differentiation is not well elucidated yet. Genetic programs for osteogenesis have been just partially deciphered, and the description of the different molecules and pathways operative in these differentiations is far from complete, as well as the activity of calcium in this process. The present work aims to shed light on the involvement of extracellular calcium in MSC differentiation: a better understanding of the early stage osteogenic differentiation program of MSC seeded on calcium-based biomaterials is required in order to develop optimal strategies to promote osteogenesis through the use of new generation osteoconductive scaffolds. A wide spectrum of analysis has been performed on time-dependent series: gene expression profiles are obtained from samples (MSC seeded on calcium-based scaffolds), together with related microRNAs expression and in vivo functional validation. On this basis, and relying on literature knowledge, hypotheses are made on the biomolecular players activated by the biomaterial calcium-phosphate component. Interestingly, a key role of miR-138 was highlighted, whose inhibition markedly increases osteogenic differentiation in vitro and enhance ectopic bone formation in vivo

  13. Soil calcium status and the response of stream chemistry to changing acidic deposition rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.; Lovett, Gary M.; Murdoch, Peter S.; Burns, Douglas A.; Stoddard, J.L.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Porter, J.H.; Thompson, A.W.

    1999-01-01

    Despite a decreasing trend in acidic deposition rates over the past two to three decades, acidified surface waters in the northeastern United States have shown minimal changes. Depletion of soil Ca pools has been suggested as a cause, although changes in soil Ca pools have not been directly related to long-term records of stream chemistry. To investigate this problem, a comprehensive watershed study was conducted in the Neversink River Basin, in the Catskill Mountains of New York, during 1991-1996. Spatial variations of atmospheric deposition, soil chemistry, and stream chemistry were evaluated over an elevation range of 817-1234 m to determine whether these factors exhibited elevational patterns. An increase in atmospheric deposition of SO4 with increasing elevation corresponded with upslope decreases of exchangeable soil base concentrations and acid-neutralizing capacity of stream water. Exchangeable base concentrations in homogeneous soil incubated within the soil profile for one year also decreased with increasing elevation. An elevational gradient in precipitation was not observed, and effects of a temperature gradient on soil properties were not detected. Laboratory leaching experiments with soils from this watershed showed that (1) concentrations of Ca in leachate increased as the concentrations of acid anions in added solution increased, and (2) the slope of this relationship was positively correlated with base saturation. Field and laboratory soil analyses are consistent with the interpretation that decreasing trends in acid-neutralizing capacity in stream water in the Neversink Basin, dating back to 1984, are the result of decreases in soil base saturation caused by acidic deposition.

  14. Effects of Post-Deposition Annealing on the Properties of Calcium Manganese Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrone, Natalie; Chaudhry, Adeel; Hart, Cacie; Lawson, Bridget; Houston, David; Neubauer, Samuel; Johnson, Anthony; Schaefer, David; Kolagani, Rajeswari

    We will present our results on the effects of post-deposition annealing on the structural and electrical properties of CaMnO3-d thin films grown by Pulsed Laser deposition. The thin films are epitaxially grown on (100) LaAlO3 which has larger in-plane lattice parameters than that of bulk CaMnO3, which leads to bi-axial tensile strain in the thin films. Results from our laboratory show that bi-axial tensile strain leads to low resistivity in thinner films, the resistivity increasing with increasing thickness. These results are suggestive of a coupling between strain and oxygen stoichiometry in the thin films. We have investigated the effects of post-deposition annealing in various gas ambients towards the goal of understanding the effects of relaxation and oxygen stoichiometric changes. We will present a comparison of the structural and electrical properties of as-grown and post-annealed films over a range of thicknesses. Support from Towson University Office of Undergraduate Research, Fisher Endowment Grant & Undergraduate Research Grant from the Fisher College of Science & Mathematics, Seed Funding Grant from the School of Emerging technologies, & NSF Grant ECCS 112856.

  15. Inactivation of calcium-activated chloride channels in smooth muscle by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Xiao; Kotlikoff, Michael I.

    1997-01-01

    To determine the mechanisms responsible for the termination of Ca2+-activated Cl− currents (ICl(Ca)), simultaneous measurements of whole cell currents and intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) were made in equine tracheal myocytes. In nondialyzed cells, or cells dialyzed with 1 mM ATP, ICl(Ca) decayed before the [Ca2+]i decline, whereas the calcium-activated potassium current decayed at the same rate as [Ca2+]i. Substitution of AMP-PNP or ADP for ATP markedly prolonged the decay of ICl(Ca), resulting in a rate of current decay similar to that of the fall in [Ca2+]i. In the presence of ATP, dialysis of the calmodulin antagonist W7, the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN93, or a CaMKII-specific peptide inhibitor the rate of ICl(Ca) decay was slowed and matched the [Ca2+]i decline, whereas H7, a nonspecific kinase inhibitor with low affinity for CaMKII, was without effect. When a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i was produced in ATP dialyzed cells, the current decayed completely, whereas in cells loaded with 5′-adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), KN93, or the CaMKII inhibitory peptide, ICl(Ca) did not decay. Slowly decaying currents were repeatedly evoked in ADP- or AMP-PNP-loaded cells, but dialysis of adenosine 5′-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) or okadaic acid resulted in a smaller initial ICl(Ca), and little or no current (despite a normal [Ca2+]i transient) with a second stimulation. These data indicate that CaMKII phosphorylation results in the inactivation of calcium-activated chloride channels, and that transition from the inactivated state to the closed state requires protein dephosphorylation. PMID:9405714

  16. Calcium signaling and the secretory activity of bile duct epithelia.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Maria Jimena; Nathanson, Michael H

    2014-06-01

    Cytosolic calcium (Cai(2+)) is a second messenger that is important for the regulation of secretion in many types of tissues. Bile duct epithelial cells, or cholangiocytes, are polarized epithelia that line the biliary tree in liver and are responsible for secretion of bicarbonate and other solutes into bile. Cai(2+) signaling plays an important role in the regulation of secretion by cholangiocytes, and this review discusses the machinery involved in the formation of Ca(2+) signals in cholangiocytes, along with the evidence that these signals regulate ductular secretion. Finally, this review discusses the evidence that impairments in cholangiocyte Ca(2+) signaling play a primary role in the pathogenesis of cholestatic disorders, in which hepatic bile secretion is impaired. PMID:24612866

  17. Calcium-binding affinity and calcium-enhanced activity of Clostridium thermocellum endoglucanase D.

    PubMed Central

    Chauvaux, S; Beguin, P; Aubert, J P; Bhat, K M; Gow, L A; Wood, T M; Bairoch, A

    1990-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum endoglucanase D (EC 3.2.1.4: EGD), which is encoded by the celD gene, was found to bind Ca2+ with an association constant of 2.03 x 10(6) M-1. Ca2+ stimulated the activity of EGD towards swollen Avicel by 2-fold. In the presence of Ca2+, the Kd of the enzyme towards p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-cellobioside and carboxymethylcellulose was decreased by 4-fold. Furthermore, Ca2+ increased the half-life of the enzyme at 75 degrees C from 13 to 47 min. Since the 3' sequence of celD encodes a duplicated region sharing similarities with the Ca2+-binding site of several Ca2+-binding proteins, a deleted clone was constructed and used to purify a truncated form of the enzyme which no longer contained the duplicated region. The truncated enzyme was very similar to EGD expressed from the intact gene with respect to activity, Ca2(+)-binding kinetics and Ca2+ effects on substrate binding and thermostability. Thus the latter parameters do not appear to be mediated through the duplicated conserved region. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2302168

  18. Familial Alzheimer's disease-associated presenilin-1 alters cerebellar activity and calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Hagel, Christian; Korwitz, Anne; Vinueza-Veloz, Maria Fernanda; Zhou, Kuikui; Schonewille, Martijn; Zhou, Haibo; Velazquez-Perez, Luis; Rodriguez-Labrada, Roberto; Villegas, Andres; Ferrer, Isidro; Lopera, Francisco; Langer, Thomas; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Glatzel, Markus

    2014-04-01

    Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) is characterized by autosomal dominant heritability and early disease onset. Mutations in the gene encoding presenilin-1 (PS1) are found in approximately 80% of cases of FAD, with some of these patients presenting cerebellar damage with amyloid plaques and ataxia with unclear pathophysiology. A Colombian kindred carrying the PS1-E280A mutation is the largest known cohort of PS1-FAD patients. Here, we investigated PS1-E280A-associated cerebellar dysfunction and found that it occurs early in PS1-E208A carriers, while cerebellar signs are highly prevalent in patients with dementia. Postmortem analysis of cerebella of PS1-E280A carrier revealed greater Purkinje cell (PC) loss and more abnormal mitochondria compared with controls. In PS1-E280A tissue, ER/mitochondria tethering was impaired, Ca2+ channels IP3Rs and CACNA1A were downregulated, and Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial transport proteins MIRO1 and KIF5C were reduced. Accordingly, expression of PS1-E280A in a neuronal cell line altered ER/mitochondria tethering and transport compared with that in cells expressing wild-type PS1. In a murine model of PS1-FAD, animals exhibited mild ataxia and reduced PC simple spike activity prior to cerebellar β-amyloid deposition. Our data suggest that impaired calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction in PS1-FAD PCs reduces their activity and contributes to motor coordination deficits prior to Aβ aggregation and dementia. We propose that PS1-E280A affects both Ca2+ homeostasis and Aβ precursor processing, leading to FAD and neurodegeneration. PMID:24569455

  19. Familial Alzheimer’s disease–associated presenilin-1 alters cerebellar activity and calcium homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Hagel, Christian; Korwitz, Anne; Vinueza-Veloz, Maria Fernanda; Zhou, Kuikui; Schonewille, Martijn; Zhou, Haibo; Velazquez-Perez, Luis; Rodriguez-Labrada, Roberto; Villegas, Andres; Ferrer, Isidro; Lopera, Francisco; Langer, Thomas; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Glatzel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD) is characterized by autosomal dominant heritability and early disease onset. Mutations in the gene encoding presenilin-1 (PS1) are found in approximately 80% of cases of FAD, with some of these patients presenting cerebellar damage with amyloid plaques and ataxia with unclear pathophysiology. A Colombian kindred carrying the PS1-E280A mutation is the largest known cohort of PS1-FAD patients. Here, we investigated PS1-E280A–associated cerebellar dysfunction and found that it occurs early in PS1-E208A carriers, while cerebellar signs are highly prevalent in patients with dementia. Postmortem analysis of cerebella of PS1-E280A carrier revealed greater Purkinje cell (PC) loss and more abnormal mitochondria compared with controls. In PS1-E280A tissue, ER/mitochondria tethering was impaired, Ca2+ channels IP3Rs and CACNA1A were downregulated, and Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial transport proteins MIRO1 and KIF5C were reduced. Accordingly, expression of PS1-E280A in a neuronal cell line altered ER/mitochondria tethering and transport compared with that in cells expressing wild-type PS1. In a murine model of PS1-FAD, animals exhibited mild ataxia and reduced PC simple spike activity prior to cerebellar β-amyloid deposition. Our data suggest that impaired calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction in PS1-FAD PCs reduces their activity and contributes to motor coordination deficits prior to Aβ aggregation and dementia. We propose that PS1-E280A affects both Ca2+ homeostasis and Aβ precursor processing, leading to FAD and neurodegeneration. PMID:24569455

  20. Osteoporosis knowledge, calcium intake, and weight-bearing physical activity in three age groups of women.

    PubMed

    Terrio, Kate; Auld, Garry W

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent and integration of osteoporosis knowledge in three age groups of women and compare knowledge to calcium intake and weight-bearing physical activity (WBPA). In this cross-sectional study, knowledge, calcium intake and WBPA were assessed using probe interviews, a food frequency and an activity questionnaire, respectively. Seventy-five white women were separated into three groups: young (25-35 years), middle aged (36-46 years) and postmenopausal (50+ years). Concept maps were used to assess knowledge (concepts, integration and misconceptions). Calcium intakes from diet, supplements and fortified orange juice were estimated as were minutes of daily WBPA. Analysis of covariance was used to compare knowledge, calcium intake and WBPA by age group. Covariates included education, family history, physical problems making exercise difficult, and lactose intolerance. Chi square analysis was used to determine differences in these covariates across age groups. Correlations and regression analysis were used to determine relationships between knowledge and behaviors. Knowledge scores averaged 32-44 points (183 possible). Average calcium intake in all groups exceeded the Dietary Reference Intake's recommended Adequate Intake but 20-24% consumed less than 60% of the AI. Housework, walking at work, and standing at home and work accounted for 90% of WBPA. Knowledge about osteoporosis was limited and not associated with age, WBPA or calcium intake. Calcium intake and WBPA were not associated with age. Practitioners need to provide explicit information on osteoporosis and risk reducing behaviors to women of all ages. PMID:12238730

  1. Bioactive vapor deposited calcium-phosphate silica sol-gel particles for directing osteoblast behavior.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Katherine L; Holmes, Hallie R; McCarthy, Connor; Rajachar, Rupak M

    2016-09-01

    Silica-based materials are being developed and used for a variety of applications in orthopedic tissue engineering. In this work, we characterize the ability of a novel silica sol vapor deposition system to quickly modify biomaterial substrates and modulate surface hydrophobicity, surface topography, and composition. We were able to show that surface hydrophobicity, surface roughness, and composition could be rapidly modified. The compositional modification was directed towards generating apatitic-like surface mineral compositions (Ca/P ratios ∼1.30). Modified substrates were also capable of altering cell proliferation and differentiation behavior of preosteoblasts (MC3T3) and showed potential once optimized to provide a simple means to generate osteo-conductive substrates for tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2135-2148, 2016. PMID:27087349

  2. Location of Release Sites and Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels Relative to Calcium Channels at the Photoreceptor Ribbon Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, A. J.; Rabl, K.; Riccardi, G. E.; Brecha, N. C.; Stella, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicle release from photoreceptor ribbon synapses is regulated by L-type Ca2+ channels, which are in turn regulated by Cl− moving through calcium-activated chloride [Cl(Ca)] channels. We assessed the proximity of Ca2+ channels to release sites and Cl(Ca) channels in synaptic terminals of salamander photoreceptors by comparing fast (BAPTA) and slow (EGTA) intracellular Ca2+ buffers. BAPTA did not fully block synaptic release, indicating some release sites are <100 nm from Ca2+ channels. Comparing Cl(Ca) currents with predicted Ca2+ diffusion profiles suggested that Cl(Ca) and Ca2+ channels average a few hundred nanometers apart, but the inability of BAPTA to block Cl(Ca) currents completely suggested some channels are much closer together. Diffuse immunolabeling of terminals with an antibody to the putative Cl(Ca) channel TMEM16A supports the idea that Cl(Ca) channels are dispersed throughout the presynaptic terminal, in contrast with clustering of Ca2+ channels near ribbons. Cl(Ca) currents evoked by intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation through flash photolysis of DM-nitrophen exhibited EC50 values of 556 and 377 nM with Hill slopes of 1.8 and 2.4 in rods and cones, respectively. These relationships were used to estimate average submembrane [Ca2+]i in photoreceptor terminals. Consistent with control of exocytosis by [Ca2+] nanodomains near Ca2+ channels, average submembrane [Ca2+]i remained below the vesicle release threshold (∼400 nM) over much of the physiological voltage range for cones. Positioning Ca2+ channels near release sites may improve fidelity in converting voltage changes to synaptic release. A diffuse distribution of Cl(Ca) channels may allow Ca2+ influx at one site to influence relatively distant Ca2+ channels. PMID:21084687

  3. Calcium micro-depositions in jugular truncular venous malformations revealed by Synchrotron-based XRF imaging.

    PubMed

    Pascolo, Lorella; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Rizzardi, Clara; Tisato, Veronica; Salomé, Murielle; Calligaro, Carla; Salvi, Fabrizio; Paterson, David; Zamboni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the internal jugular vein may exhibit abnormalities classified as truncular venous malformations (TVMs). The investigation of possible morphological and biochemical anomalies at jugular tissue level could help to better understand the link between brain venous drainage and neurodegenerative disorders, recently found associated with jugular TVMs. To this end we performed sequential X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyses on jugular tissue samples from two TVM patients and two control subjects, using complementary energies at three different synchrotrons. This investigation, coupled with conventional histological analyses, revealed anomalous micro-formations in the pathological tissues and allowed the determination of their elemental composition. Rapid XRF analyses on large tissue areas at 12.74 keV showed an increased Ca presence in the pathological samples, mainly localized in tunica adventitia microvessels. Investigations at lower energy demonstrated that the high Ca level corresponded to micro-calcifications, also containing P and Mg. We suggest that advanced synchrotron XRF micro-spectroscopy is an important analytical tool in revealing biochemical changes, which cannot be accessed by conventional investigations. Further research on a larger number of samples is needed to understand the pathogenic significance of Ca micro-depositions detected on the intramural vessels of vein walls affected by TVMs. PMID:25286775

  4. Calcium micro-depositions in jugular truncular venous malformations revealed by Synchrotron-based XRF imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pascolo, Lorella; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Rizzardi, Clara; Tisato, Veronica; Salomé, Murielle; Calligaro, Carla; Salvi, Fabrizio; Paterson, David; Zamboni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the internal jugular vein may exhibit abnormalities classified as truncular venous malformations (TVMs). The investigation of possible morphological and biochemical anomalies at jugular tissue level could help to better understand the link between brain venous drainage and neurodegenerative disorders, recently found associated with jugular TVMs. To this end we performed sequential X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyses on jugular tissue samples from two TVM patients and two control subjects, using complementary energies at three different synchrotrons. This investigation, coupled with conventional histological analyses, revealed anomalous micro-formations in the pathological tissues and allowed the determination of their elemental composition. Rapid XRF analyses on large tissue areas at 12.74 keV showed an increased Ca presence in the pathological samples, mainly localized in tunica adventitia microvessels. Investigations at lower energy demonstrated that the high Ca level corresponded to micro-calcifications, also containing P and Mg. We suggest that advanced synchrotron XRF micro-spectroscopy is an important analytical tool in revealing biochemical changes, which cannot be accessed by conventional investigations. Further research on a larger number of samples is needed to understand the pathogenic significance of Ca micro-depositions detected on the intramural vessels of vein walls affected by TVMs. PMID:25286775

  5. Preparation and bioactive properties of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite thin films obtained by conversion of atomic layer deposited calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Jani; Kauppinen, Kyösti; Mizohata, Kenichiro; Santala, Eero; Mikkola, Esa; Heikkilä, Mikko; Kokkonen, Hanna; Leskelä, Markku; Lehenkari, Petri; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ritala, Mikko

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite thin films were fabricated on silicon and titanium by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of CaCO3 and its subsequent conversion to hydroxyapatite by diammonium hydrogen phosphate (DAP) solution. The effects of conversion process parameters to crystallinity and morphology of the films were examined. DAP concentration was found to be critical in controlling the crystal size and homogeneity of the films. The hydroxyapatite phase was identified by XRD. ToF-elastic recoil detection analysis studies revealed that the films are calcium deficient in relation to hydroxyapatite with a Ca/P ratio of 1.39 for films converted with 0.2 M DAP at 95 °C. The coatings prepared on titanium conformally follow the rough surface topography of the substrate, verifying that the good step coverage of the ALD method was maintained in the conversion process. The dissolution tests revealed that the coating was nondissolvable in the cell culture medium. Annealing the coated sample at 700 °C for 1 h seemed to enhance its bonding properties to the substrate. Also, the biocompatibility of the coatings was confirmed by human bone marrow derived cells in vitro. The developed method provides a new possibility to produce thin film coatings on titanium implants with bone-type hydroxyapatite that is biocompatible with human osteoblasts and osteoclasts. PMID:25280849

  6. Calcium dependence of ciliary activity in the oviduct of the salamander Necturus

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Roger; Murakami, Akira

    1972-01-01

    1. Ciliary activity in the oviduct of the mud puppy Necturus maculosus was monitored by a photometric technique in normal, decalcified, and Triton X-extracted preparations to investigate the regulatory role of calcium ions. 2. The frequency of ciliary beating in the isolated tissue ranged from 0 to 12 beats/sec. The frequency in any one group of cells underwent large cyclical variations with periods of 2 min or more. 3. Frequency of beating reached a maximum and remained at a plateau upon addition of 1 mM caffeine. Beating temporarily ceased upon removal of the caffeine. 4. Ionophoretic injection of calcium ions into an active cell bathed in Ringer solution produced an increased rate of beating. In cells rendered quiescent by prior decalcification with EGTA, injected calcium rapidly restored ciliary activity. 5. Epithelia extracted in Triton X-100 were inactive until reactivated by addition of ATP and magnesium ions. The frequency of beating increased between 0·1 and 4·0 mM ATP in 1 mM magnesium, and between 0·2 and 2·5 mM magnesium in 1 mM ATP. 6. The frequency of beating in the ATP-reactivated, Triton-extracted tissue was independent of the calcium ion concentration. 7. Cells inactivated by decalcification were reactivated by injection of ATP or by extracellular ATP levels as low as 3 × 10-8 M. 8. It is concluded that the frequency of beating depends directly on the concentration of the available energy source, presumably ATP, and that an indirect dependence of beating frequency on calcium concentration in the living tissue results from rate-limiting effects of intracellular calcium on metabolic steps in pathways leading to ATP synthesis. PMID:4637627

  7. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells: Progress report, January 1986--June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of this proposal are to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. Several different energy-dependent Ca transport systems have been identified and characterized from oat root tissue (a monocot tissue) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot tissue). They are described in more detail below. I also have included in this progress report our continuing studies to understand the mode of action of the Helminthosporium maydis T toxin. This study was initially supported by a preceding DOE grant. The time needed to complete the study overlapped partly with the present grant period.

  8. Activation and inhibition of TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yu-Li; Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, Tsung-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) encoded by family members of transmembrane proteins of unknown function 16 (TMEM16) have recently been intensely studied for functional properties as well as their physiological roles as chloride channels in various tissues. One technical hurdle in studying these channels is the well-known channel rundown that frequently impairs the precision of electrophysiological measurements for the channels. Using experimental protocols that employ fast-solution exchange, we circumvented the problem of channel rundown by normalizing the Ca(2+)-induced current to the maximally-activated current obtained within a time period in which the channel rundown was negligible. We characterized the activation of the TMEM16A-encoded CaCC (also called ANO1) by Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+), and discovered that Mg(2+) competes with Ca(2+) in binding to the divalent-cation binding site without activating the channel. We also studied the permeability of the ANO1 pore for various anions and found that the anion occupancy in the pore-as revealed by the permeability ratios of these anions-appeared to be inversely correlated with the apparent affinity of the ANO1 inhibition by niflumic acid (NFA). On the other hand, the NFA inhibition was neither affected by the degree of the channel activation nor influenced by the types of divalent cations used for the channel activation. These results suggest that the NFA inhibition of ANO1 is likely mediated by altering the pore function but not through changing the channel gating. Our study provides a precise characterization of ANO1 and documents factors that can affect divalent cation activation and NFA inhibition of ANO1. PMID:24489780

  9. [Biophysical aspects of biological activity structure--strain calcium carbonat in micellar form].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V I; Stekhin, A A; Iakovleva, G V; Savostikova, O N; Alekseeva, A V; P'ianzina, I P

    2013-01-01

    Results of the study of electrochemical and structural state of phase of associated water in the solutions of structurally stressed calcium carbonate in the micellar form are reported. On the base on the comparison of structural--physical changes of activated water with the data on the activity of bioluminiscentic "Ecolyum" microorganisms in their noncontact activation the electronic mechanism of the effect of activated water on cellular metabolism is substantiated The use of "Micellate of calcium" possessing non-contact electron-donor action on cellular structures was shown to permit to compensate the deficit of electrons and thereby to restore the activities of reductases and iron-containing peptides required for the production of regulatory ROS and alteration in redox state of the intracellular environment. PMID:24624817

  10. Oxalate Blockage of Calcium and Iron: A Student Learning Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Noojin

    1988-01-01

    Describes a student learning activity used to teach the meaning of percentage composition, mole concept, selective precipitation, and limiting factors. Presents two word problems and their solutions. (CW)

  11. Volvariella volvacea lectin activates mouse T lymphocytes by a calcium dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Sze, S C W; Ho, J C K; Liu, W K

    2004-08-15

    The immunomodulatory lectin, Volvariella volvacea lectin (VVL), isolated from the edible mushroom, Volvariella volvacea, has been shown to stimulate the expression of Th1 cytokines and the proliferative activity of mouse splenocytes (She et al. [1998]: Biochem Biophys Res Comm 247:106-111). In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these activities, we conducted a kinetic analysis of the early and late activation markers in mouse T lymphocytes: (1) flow cytometric analysis of calcium influx, (2) induction of activation molecules (CD25 and CD69), (3) expression and DNA-binding activity of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), NFkappaB, and activation protein-1 (AP-1), (4) translational production of cytokines (interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFNgamma)), and (5) cell proliferation by expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and tritiated thymidine incorporation. All results showed that VVL induced a rapid expression of CD69, CD25, NFAT, IL-2, and PCNA in a dose- and time-dependent manner, leading to lymphocyte proliferation. These effects brought about by VVL were more potent than those stimulated by equimolar concentrations of mitogenic lectin, concanavalin A (Con A). Cell activation and proliferation were mediated through a calcium-dependent pathway as demonstrated by a VVL-induced increase of intracellular calcium influx, and a proliferation inhibition by the Ca-dependent phosphatase calcineurin blocker-cyclosporin A (CsA). Taken all data together, VVL is a lectin which activates lymphocyte through successive calcium influx, nuclear localization of NFAT transcription factor, induction of activation markers, CD25 and CD69, intracellular cytokine production, and cell proliferation. PMID:15258902

  12. Bioactivity and osteogenic cell response of TiO2 nanotubes coupled with nanoscale calcium phosphate via ultrasonification-assisted electrochemical deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianyu; Zhang, Zhiguang; Ouyang, Jianglin; Chen, Xianshuai; Xu, Zhewu; Sun, Xuetong

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasonification-assisted electrochemical deposition was used to introduce nanoscale calcium phosphate (CaP) into well-ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays (NTA) fabricated by anodic oxidation. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and a drop-shape analysis system were used to investigate the morphology, constituent components and hydrophilicity of the nanostructured CaP/NTA surface. Bioactivity and osteogenic cell response were also characterized by hydroxyapatite (HA) formation tests, protein adsorption tests, and in vitro preosteoblast culture experiments. Abundant acicular nanoscale calcium phosphate was successfully deposited on the inner and outer walls of the nanotubes. After immersion in simulated body fluid, increased hydroxyapatite formation was apparent on the surface of TiO2 nanotubes coupled with nanoscale CaP when compared to simple nanotube structures and polished titanium. The CaP/NTA surface also adsorbed a greater amount of protein after being exposed to bovine serum albumin solution. During cell culture experiments, the preosteoblasts exhibited enhanced cellular adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation on the CaP/NTA surfaces. The results demonstrate that the introduction of nanoscale calcium phosphate into self-organized TiO2 nanotubes via a straightforward ultrasonification-assisted deposition technique enhances the bioactivity and osteogenic cell response, owing to the combined effects of the nanostructured surface topography, chemical composition, and hydrophilicity.

  13. Effects of Calcium Spikes in the Layer 5 Pyramidal Neuron on Coincidence Detection and Activity Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Yansong; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic spiking mechanisms in neural processing is so far poorly understood. To investigate the role of calcium spikes in the functional properties of the single neuron and recurrent networks, we investigated a three compartment neuron model of the layer 5 pyramidal neuron with calcium dynamics in the distal compartment. By performing single neuron simulations with noisy synaptic input and occasional large coincident input at either just the distal compartment or at both somatic and distal compartments, we show that the presence of calcium spikes confers a substantial advantage for coincidence detection in the former case and a lesser advantage in the latter. We further show that the experimentally observed critical frequency phenomenon, in which action potentials triggered by stimuli near the soma above a certain frequency trigger a calcium spike at distal dendrites, leading to further somatic depolarization, is not exhibited by a neuron receiving realistically noisy synaptic input, and so is unlikely to be a necessary component of coincidence detection. We next investigate the effect of calcium spikes in propagation of spiking activities in a feed-forward network (FFN) embedded in a balanced recurrent network. The excitatory neurons in the network are again connected to either just the distal, or both somatic and distal compartments. With purely distal connectivity, activity propagation is stable and distinguishable for a large range of recurrent synaptic strengths if the feed-forward connections are sufficiently strong, but propagation does not occur in the absence of calcium spikes. When connections are made to both the somatic and the distal compartments, activity propagation is achieved for neurons with active calcium dynamics at a much smaller number of neurons per pool, compared to a network of passive neurons, but quickly becomes unstable as the strength of recurrent synapses increases. Activity propagation at higher scaling factors can be

  14. Lithogenic activity as a factor to consider in the metabolic evaluation of patients with calcium lithiasis.

    PubMed

    Arrabal-Polo, Miguel Angel; Cano-Garcia, Maria Del Carmen; Arrabal-Martin, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic evaluation is important in high-risk patients with a history of urinary calculi, in order to prevent recurrence. This study aimed to compare patients with calcium calculi and mild lithogenic activity with those with moderate to severe lithogenic activity. Patients with moderate to severe activity had higher levels of urinary calcium level (271.9 mg/24h versus 172.1 mg/24 h, P < .001), uric acid (612.3 mg/24 h versus 528.9 mg/24h, P = .008), and fasting calcium-creatinine ratio (0.16 versus 0.12, P = .001) compared to those with mild lithogenic activity. No association was observed between lithogenic factors in 24-hour urine and mild lithogenic activity in multivariable analysis. We initially thought that in patients who develop recurrent calculi after 5 years or who have mild lithogenic activity, complete metabolic evaluation would not be necessary. However, based on our study findings, it may be important to conduct further studies assessing the lithogenic activity. PMID:26552354

  15. Calcium-activated chloride currents prolongs the duration of contractions in pregnant rat myometrial tissue.

    PubMed

    Young, Roger C; Bemis, Adam

    2009-08-01

    We investigated the importance of pharmacologically blocking calcium-activated chloride (I(Cl(Ca))) and L-type calcium currents on isometric contractions of strips of D21 pregnant rat myometrial tissue, while simultaneously measuring the electrical activity of the tissue strips with extracellular contact electrodes. When measured with contact electrodes, the duration of the spiking activity directly reflects the duration of the tissue-level plateau potential. We correlated the number of spikes, durations of spiking activity, and the spiking frequencies with changes of the area under the force curves as a function of exposure to low doses of anthracene-9-carboxylate (9-AC, a non-specific Cl channel blocker), chlorotoxin (a specific I(Cl(Ca)) blocker) and nifedipine (an L-type calcium channel blocker). The area under the force curve was measured only during spiking electrical activity, thereby separating pharmacological effects on tissue relaxation from those that modulate force production. Blocking chloride channels reduced impulse, shortened the duration of spiking activity, and reduced the number of spikes generated in each contraction. This was observed without a change in the frequency of spike production or a reduction of peak force. Nifedipine reduced impulse, shortened the duration of spiking activity, and reduced the number of spikes. In contrast to chloride channel blockade, nifedipine reduced maximum spike frequency and peak force. Taken together, our data suggest that blocking L-type calcium channels reduces impulse directly by reducing peak force, and indirectly by reducing activation of I(Cl(Ca)) , which shortens the duration of the contraction. PMID:19380901

  16. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels: Potential Target for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dong, De-Li; Bai, Yun-Long; Cai, Ben-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (KCa) are classified into three subtypes: big conductance (BKCa), intermediate conductance (IKCa), and small conductance (SKCa) KCa channels. The three types of KCa channels have distinct physiological or pathological functions in cardiovascular system. BKCa channels are mainly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and inner mitochondrial membrane of cardiomyocytes, activation of BKCa channels in these locations results in vasodilation and cardioprotection against cardiac ischemia. IKCa channels are expressed in VSMCs, endothelial cells, and cardiac fibroblasts and involved in vascular smooth muscle proliferation, migration, vessel dilation, and cardiac fibrosis. SKCa channels are widely expressed in nervous and cardiovascular system, and activation of SKCa channels mainly contributes membrane hyperpolarization. In this chapter, we summarize the physiological and pathological roles of the three types of KCa channels in cardiovascular system and put forward the possibility of KCa channels as potential target for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27038376

  17. Calcium-activated chloride current expression in axotomized sensory neurons: what for?

    PubMed Central

    Boudes, Mathieu; Scamps, Frédérique

    2012-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride currents (CaCCs) are activated by an increase in intracellular calcium concentration. Peripheral nerve injury induces the expression of CaCCs in a subset of adult sensory neurons in primary culture including mechano- and proprioceptors, though not nociceptors. Functional screenings of potential candidate genes established that Best1 is a molecular determinant for CaCC expression among axotomized sensory neurons, while Tmem16a is acutely activated by inflammatory mediators in nociceptors. In nociceptors, such CaCCs are preferentially activated under receptor-induced calcium mobilization contributing to cell excitability and pain. In axotomized mechano- and proprioceptors, CaCC activation does not promote electrical activity and prevents firing, a finding consistent with electrical silencing for growth competence of adult sensory neurons. In favor of a role in the process of neurite growth, CaCC expression is temporally correlated to neurons displaying a regenerative mode of growth. This perspective focuses on the molecular identity and role of CaCC in axotomized sensory neurons and the future directions to decipher the cellular mechanisms regulating CaCC during neurite (re)growth. PMID:22461766

  18. Oxidative Regulation of Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiang D.; Daggett, Heather; Hanner, Markus; Garcia, Maria L.; McManus, Owen B.; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2001-01-01

    Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are readily generated in vivo, playing roles in many physiological and pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, by oxidatively modifying various proteins. Previous studies indicate that large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa or Slo) are subject to redox regulation. However, conflicting results exist whether oxidation increases or decreases the channel activity. We used chloramine-T, which preferentially oxidizes methionine, to examine the functional consequences of methionine oxidation in the cloned human Slo (hSlo) channel expressed in mammalian cells. In the virtual absence of Ca2+, the oxidant shifted the steady-state macroscopic conductance to a more negative direction and slowed deactivation. The results obtained suggest that oxidation enhances specific voltage-dependent opening transitions and slows the rate-limiting closing transition. Enhancement of the hSlo activity was partially reversed by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, suggesting that the upregulation is mediated by methionine oxidation. In contrast, hydrogen peroxide and cysteine-specific reagents, DTNB, MTSEA, and PCMB, decreased the channel activity. Chloramine-T was much less effective when concurrently applied with the K+ channel blocker TEA, which is consistent with the possibility that the target methionine lies within the channel pore. Regulation of the Slo channel by methionine oxidation may represent an important link between cellular electrical excitability and metabolism. PMID:11222629

  19. Aurora A kinase activity influences calcium signaling in kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, Olga V; Pugacheva, Elena N; Golemis, Erica A

    2011-06-13

    Most studies of Aurora A (AurA) describe it as a mitotic centrosomal kinase. However, we and others have recently identified AurA functions as diverse as control of ciliary resorption, cell differentiation, and cell polarity control in interphase cells. In these activities, AurA is transiently activated by noncanonical signals, including Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding. These and other observations suggested that AurA might be involved in pathological conditions, such as polycystic kidney disease (PKD). In this paper, we show that AurA is abundant in normal kidney tissue but is also abnormally expressed and activated in cells lining PKD-associated renal cysts. PKD arises from mutations in the PKD1 or PKD2 genes, encoding polycystins 1 and 2 (PC1 and PC2). AurA binds, phosphorylates, and reduces the activity of PC2, a Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation channel and, thus, limits the amplitude of Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum. These and other findings suggest AurA may be a relevant new biomarker or target in the therapy of PKD. PMID:21670214

  20. Choice of solvent in the extraction of Angelica archangelica roots with reference to calcium blocking activity.

    PubMed

    Härmälä, P; Vuorela, H; Törnquist, K; Hiltunen, R

    1992-04-01

    Twenty solvents were tested in the extraction of compounds from the roots of Angelica archangelica L. (Apiaceae), and the calcium-antagonistic activity of the extracts was investigated. Special attention was paid to the physical and chemical properties of the solvents and their extraction abilities. The calcium antagonistic effect of the extracts was investigated by measuring the inhibition of depolarization-induced Ca2+ uptake in rat pituitary GH4C1 cells. The criteria used in determining the best solvents for the extraction were the yield and the biological activity of the extract, as well as the amount of nonpolar compounds in the extract. The final criterion used in selecting the solvent was its usability with reference to boiling point, chemical interactions (e.g. methylation), etc. Chloroform was found to be the best solvent for the extraction of nonpolar, biologically active compounds from the roots of A. archangelica. PMID:1529031

  1. Synaptic vesicle exocytosis and increased cytosolic calcium are both necessary but not sufficient for activity-dependent bulk endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Andrew; Marland, Jamie R K; Cousin, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis mode in central nerve terminals during intense neuronal activity. By definition this mode is triggered by neuronal activity; however, key questions regarding its mechanism of activation remain unaddressed. To determine the basic requirements for ADBE triggering in central nerve terminals, we decoupled SV fusion events from activity-dependent calcium influx using either clostridial neurotoxins or buffering of intracellular calcium. ADBE was monitored both optically and morphologically by observing uptake of the fluid phase markers tetramethylrhodamine-dextran and horse radish peroxidase respectively. Ablation of SV fusion with tetanus toxin resulted in the arrest of ADBE, but had no effect on other calcium-dependent events such as activity-dependent dynamin I dephosphorylation, indicating that SV exocytosis is necessary for triggering. Furthermore, the calcium chelator EGTA abolished ADBE while leaving SV exocytosis intact, demonstrating that ADBE is triggered by intracellular free calcium increases outside the active zone. Activity-dependent dynamin I dephosphorylation was also arrested in EGTA-treated neurons, consistent with its proposed role in triggering ADBE. Thus, SV fusion and increased cytoplasmic free calcium are both necessary but not sufficient individually to trigger ADBE. Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis mode in central nerve terminals during intense neuronal activity. To determine the minimal requirements for ADBE triggering, we decoupled SV fusion events from activity-dependent calcium influx using either clostridial neurotoxins or buffering of intracellular calcium. We found that SV fusion and increased cytoplasmic free calcium are both necessary but not sufficient to trigger ADBE. PMID:25913068

  2. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  3. Calmodulin-dependent activation and inactivation of anoctamin calcium-gated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Vocke, Kerstin; Dauner, Kristin; Hahn, Anne; Ulbrich, Anne; Broecker, Jana; Keller, Sandro; Frings, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent chloride channels serve critical functions in diverse biological systems. Driven by cellular calcium signals, the channels codetermine excitatory processes and promote solute transport. The anoctamin (ANO) family of membrane proteins encodes three calcium-activated chloride channels, named ANO 1 (also TMEM16A), ANO 2 (also TMEM16B), and ANO 6 (also TMEM16F). Here we examined how ANO 1 and ANO 2 interact with Ca2+/calmodulin using nonstationary current analysis during channel activation. We identified a putative calmodulin-binding domain in the N-terminal region of the channel proteins that is involved in channel activation. Binding studies with peptides indicated that this domain, a regulatory calmodulin-binding motif (RCBM), provides two distinct modes of interaction with Ca2+/calmodulin, one at submicromolar Ca2+ concentrations and one in the micromolar Ca2+ range. Functional, structural, and pharmacological data support the concept that calmodulin serves as a calcium sensor that is stably associated with the RCBM domain and regulates the activation of ANO 1 and ANO 2 channels. Moreover, the predominant splice variant of ANO 2 in the brain exhibits Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent inactivation, a loss of channel activity within 30 s. This property may curtail ANO 2 activity during persistent Ca2+ signals in neurons. Mutagenesis data indicated that the RCBM domain is also involved in ANO 2 inactivation, and that inactivation is suppressed in the retinal ANO 2 splice variant. These results advance the understanding of Ca2+ regulation in anoctamin Cl− channels and its significance for the physiological function that anoctamin channels subserve in neurons and other cell types. PMID:24081981

  4. Bone Mineral Density Changes after Physical Training and Calcium Intake in Students with Attention Deficit and Hyper Activity Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arab ameri, Elahe; Dehkhoda, Mohammad Reza; Hemayattalab, Rasool

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigate the effects of weight bearing exercise and calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) of students with attention deficit and hyper activity (ADHD) disorder. For this reason 54 male students with ADHD (age 8-12 years old) were assigned to four groups with no differences in age, BMD, calcium intake, and physical…

  5. Death-Associated Protein Kinase Activity Is Regulated by Coupled Calcium/Calmodulin Binding to Two Distinct Sites.

    PubMed

    Simon, Bertrand; Huart, Anne-Sophie; Temmerman, Koen; Vahokoski, Juha; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Komadina, Dana; Hoffmann, Jan-Erik; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Svergun, Dmitri I; Kursula, Petri; Schultz, Carsten; McCarthy, Andrew A; Hart, Darren J; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    The regulation of many protein kinases by binding to calcium/calmodulin connects two principal mechanisms in signaling processes: protein phosphorylation and responses to dose- and time-dependent calcium signals. We used the calcium/calmodulin-dependent members of the death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) family to investigate the role of a basic DAPK signature loop near the kinase active site. In DAPK2, this loop comprises a novel dimerization-regulated calcium/calmodulin-binding site, in addition to a well-established calcium/calmodulin site in the C-terminal autoregulatory domain. Unexpectedly, impairment of the basic loop interaction site completely abolishes calcium/calmodulin binding and DAPK2 activity is reduced to a residual level, indicative of coupled binding to the two sites. This contrasts with the generally accepted view that kinase calcium/calmodulin interactions are autonomous of the kinase catalytic domain. Our data establish an intricate model of multi-step kinase activation and expand our understanding of how calcium binding connects with other mechanisms involved in kinase activity regulation. PMID:27133022

  6. Amphetamine activates calcium channels through dopamine transporter-mediated depolarization.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara N; Solis, Ernesto; Ruchala, Iwona; De Felice, Louis J; Eltit, Jose M

    2015-11-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and its more potent enantiomer S(+)AMPH are psychostimulants used therapeutically to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and have significant abuse liability. AMPH is a dopamine transporter (DAT) substrate that inhibits dopamine (DA) uptake and is implicated in DA release. Furthermore, AMPH activates ionic currents through DAT that modify cell excitability presumably by modulating voltage-gated channel activity. Indeed, several studies suggest that monoamine transporter-induced depolarization opens voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV), which would constitute an additional AMPH mechanism of action. In this study we co-express human DAT (hDAT) with Ca(2+) channels that have decreasing sensitivity to membrane depolarization (CaV1.3, CaV1.2 or CaV2.2). Although S(+)AMPH is more potent than DA in transport-competition assays and inward-current generation, at saturating concentrations both substrates indirectly activate voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV1.3 and CaV1.2) but not the N-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV2.2). Furthermore, the potency to achieve hDAT-CaV electrical coupling is dominated by the substrate affinity on hDAT, with negligible influence of L-type channel voltage sensitivity. In contrast, the maximal coupling-strength (defined as Ca(2+) signal change per unit hDAT current) is influenced by CaV voltage sensitivity, which is greater in CaV1.3- than in CaV1.2-expressing cells. Moreover, relative to DA, S(+)AMPH showed greater coupling-strength at concentrations that induced relatively small hDAT-mediated currents. Therefore S(+)AMPH is not only more potent than DA at inducing hDAT-mediated L-type Ca(2+) channel currents but is a better depolarizing agent since it produces tighter electrical coupling between hDAT-mediated depolarization and L-type Ca(2+) channel activation. PMID:26162812

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives with calcium channel blocking activity.

    PubMed

    Bladen, Chris; Gündüz, Miyase Gözde; Şimşek, Rahime; Şafak, Cihat; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2014-07-01

    1,4-Dihydropyridines (DHPs) are an important class of L-type calcium channel blockers that are used to treat conditions such as hypertension and angina. Their primary target in the cardiovascular system is the Cav1.2 L-type calcium channel isoform, however, a number of DHPs also block low-voltage-activated T-type calcium channels. Here, we describe the synthesis of a series of novel DHP derivatives that have a condensed 1,4-DHP ring system (hexahydroquinoline) and report on their abilities to block both L- and T-type calcium channels. Within this series of compounds, modification of a key ester moiety not only regulates the blocking affinity for both L- and T-type channels, but also allows for the development of DHPs with 30-fold selectivity for T-type channels over the L-type. Our data suggest that a condensed dihydropyridine-based scaffold may serve as a pharmacophore for a new class of T-type selective inhibitors. PMID:24149495

  8. Angiotensin II activates different calcium signaling pathways in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Dolgacheva, Lyudmila P; Turovskaya, Maria V; Dynnik, Vladimir V; Zinchenko, Valery P; Goncharov, Nikolay V; Davletov, Bazbek; Turovsky, Egor A

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is an important mammalian neurohormone involved in reninangiotensin system. Ang II is produced both constitutively and locally by RAS systems, including white fat adipocytes. The influence of Ang II on adipocytes is complex, affecting different systems of signal transduction from early Са(2+) responses to cell proliferation and differentiation, triglyceride accumulation, expression of adipokine-encoding genes and adipokine secretion. It is known that white fat adipocytes express all RAS components and Ang II receptors (АТ1 and АТ2). The current work was carried out with the primary white adipocytes culture, and Са(2+) signaling pathways activated by Ang II were investigated using fluorescent microscopy. Са(2+)-oscillations and transient responses of differentiated adipocytes to Ang II were registered in cells with both small and multiple lipid inclusions. Using inhibitory analysis and selective antagonists, we now show that Ang II initiates periodic Са(2+)-oscillations and transient responses by activating АТ1 and АТ2 receptors and involving branched signaling cascades: 1) Ang II → Gq → PLC → IP3 → IP3Rs → Ca(2+) 2) Gβγ → PI3Kγ → PKB 3) PKB → eNOS → NO → PKG 4) CD38 → cADPR → RyRs → Ca(2+) In these cascades, AT1 receptors play the leading role. The results of the present work open a perspective of using Ang II for correction of signal resistance of adipocytes often observed during obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26850364

  9. Optimization of the activation and nucleation steps in the precipitation of a calcium phosphate primer layer on electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone).

    PubMed

    Luickx, Nathalie; Van den Vreken, Natasja; D'Oosterlinck, Willem; Van der Schueren, Lien; Declercq, Heidi; De Clerck, Karen; Cornelissen, Maria; Verbeeck, Ronald

    2015-02-01

    The present study aimed to optimize the procedure for coating electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibers with a calcium phosphate (CP) layer in order to improve their potential as bone tissue engineering scaffold. In particular, attention was paid to the reproducibility of the procedure, the morphology of the coating, and the preservation of the porous structure of the scaffold. Ethanol dipping followed by an ultrasonic assisted hydrolysis of the fiber surface with sodium hydroxide solution efficiently activated the surface. The resulting reactive groups served as nucleation points for CP precipitation, induced by alternate dipping of the samples in calcium and phosphate rich solutions. By controlling the deposition, a reproducible thin layer of CP was grown onto the fiber surface. The deposited CP was identified as calcium-deficient apatite (CDHAp). Analysis of the cell viability, adhesion, and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells on untreated and CDHAp coated PCL scaffolds showed that the CDHAp coating enhanced the cell response, as the number of attached cells was higher in comparison to the untreated PCL and cells on the CDHAp coated samples showed similar morphologies as the ones found in the positive control. PMID:24733786

  10. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. ... Lists Supporters About Us Leadership Careers at ACR Social Media Newsroom Annual Reports & Financial Statements Policies & Guidelines ...

  11. Buffering effects of calcium salts in kimchi: lowering acidity, elevating lactic acid bacterial population and dextransucrase activity.

    PubMed

    Chae, Seo Eun; Moon, Jin Seok; Jung, Jee Yun; Kim, Ji-Sun; Eom, Hyun-Ju; Kim, So-Young; Yoon, Hyang Sik; Han, Nam Soo

    2009-12-01

    This study investigates the buffering effects of calcium salts in kimchi on total acidity, microbial population, and dextransucrase activity. Calcium chloride or calcium carbonate was added in dongchimi-kimchi, a watery-radish kimchi, and their effects on various biochemical attributes were analyzed. The addition of 0.1% calcium chloride produced a milder decrease in the pH after 24 days of incubation, which allowed the lactic acid bacteria to survive longer than in the control. In particular, the heterofermentative Leuconostoc genus population was 10-fold higher than that in the control. When sucrose and maltose were also added along with the calcium salts, the dextransucrase activity in the kimchi was elevated and a higher concentration of isomaltooligosaccharides was synthesized when compared with the control. Calcium chloride was determined as a better activator compound of dextransucrase than calcium carbonate, probably because of its higher solubility. Therefore, the results of this study confirm the ability of the proposed approach to modulate the kimchi fermentation process and possibly enhance the quality of kimchi based on the addition of dietary calcium salts. PMID:20075632

  12. Calcium carbonate scaling kinetics determined from radiotracer experiments with calcium-47

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C.W.; Smith, D.W.

    1998-02-01

    The deposition of calcium carbonate is one of the principal modes of fouling of the heat-transfer surface of a fresh-water-cooled heat exchanger. The deposition rate of calcium carbonate on a heat-transfer surface has been measured using a calcium-47 radiotracer and compared to the measured rate of thermal fouling. The crystalline phase of calcium carbonate that precipitates depends on the degree of supersaturation at the heat-transfer surface, with aragonite precipitating at higher supersaturations and calcite precipitating at lower supersaturations. Whereas the mass deposition rates were constant with time, the thermal fouling rates decreased throughout the course of each experiment as a result of densification of the deposit. It is proposed that the densification was driven by the temperature gradient across the deposit together with the retrograde solubility of calcium carbonate. The temperature dependence of the deposition rate yielded an activation energy of 79 {+-} 4 kJ/mol for the precipitation of calcium carbonate on a heat-transfer surface.

  13. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels at Nodes of Ranvier Secure Axonal Spike Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Gründemann, Jan; Clark, Beverley A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Functional connectivity between brain regions relies on long-range signaling by myelinated axons. This is secured by saltatory action potential propagation that depends fundamentally on sodium channel availability at nodes of Ranvier. Although various potassium channel types have been anatomically localized to myelinated axons in the brain, direct evidence for their functional recruitment in maintaining node excitability is scarce. Cerebellar Purkinje cells provide continuous input to their targets in the cerebellar nuclei, reliably transmitting axonal spikes over a wide range of rates, requiring a constantly available pool of nodal sodium channels. We show that the recruitment of calcium-activated potassium channels (IK, KCa3.1) by local, activity-dependent calcium (Ca2+) influx at nodes of Ranvier via a T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ current provides a powerful mechanism that likely opposes depolarizing block at the nodes and is thus pivotal to securing continuous axonal spike propagation in spontaneously firing Purkinje cells. PMID:26344775

  14. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels at Nodes of Ranvier Secure Axonal Spike Propagation.

    PubMed

    Gründemann, Jan; Clark, Beverley A

    2015-09-22

    Functional connectivity between brain regions relies on long-range signaling by myelinated axons. This is secured by saltatory action potential propagation that depends fundamentally on sodium channel availability at nodes of Ranvier. Although various potassium channel types have been anatomically localized to myelinated axons in the brain, direct evidence for their functional recruitment in maintaining node excitability is scarce. Cerebellar Purkinje cells provide continuous input to their targets in the cerebellar nuclei, reliably transmitting axonal spikes over a wide range of rates, requiring a constantly available pool of nodal sodium channels. We show that the recruitment of calcium-activated potassium channels (IK, K(Ca)3.1) by local, activity-dependent calcium (Ca(2+)) influx at nodes of Ranvier via a T-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) current provides a powerful mechanism that likely opposes depolarizing block at the nodes and is thus pivotal to securing continuous axonal spike propagation in spontaneously firing Purkinje cells. PMID:26344775

  15. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells. Progress report, May 1986--January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-12-31

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ([Ca{sup 2+}]) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic [Ca{sup 2+}] is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic [Ca{sup 2+}] and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic [Ca{sup 2+}]. The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  16. TRPV1 Activation in Primary Cortical Neurons Induces Calcium-Dependent Programmed Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Song, Juhyun; Lee, Jun Hong; Lee, Sung Ho; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Won Taek; Lee, Jong Eun

    2013-03-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1, also known as vanilloid receptor 1) is a receptor that detects capsaicin, a pungent component of chili peppers, and noxious heat. Although its function in the primary nociceptor as a pain receptor is well established, whether TRPV1 is expressed in the brain is still under debate. In this study, the responses of primary cortical neurons were investigated. Here, we report that 1) capsaicin induces caspase-3-dependent programmed cell death, which coincides with increased production of nitric oxide and peroxynitrite ; that 2) the prolonged capsaicin treatment induces a steady increase in the degree of capase-3 activation, which is prevented by the removal of capsaicin; 3) and that blocking calcium entry and calcium-mediated signaling prevents capsaicin-induced cell death. These results indicate that cortical neurons express TRPV1 whose prolonged activation causes cell death. PMID:23585723

  17. Further characterization of ATP-initiated calcification by matrix vesicles isolated from rachitic rat cartilage. Membrane perturbation by detergents and deposition of calcium pyrophosphate by rachitic matrix vesicles.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H H; Camacho, N P; Anderson, H C

    1999-01-12

    Although membrane associated enzymes such as ATPase, alkaline phosphatase, and NTP pyrophosphohydrolase in matrix vesicles (MVs) may underlie the mechanisms of ATP-promoted calcification, prior to the current investigation, the role of the MV membrane in calcification had not been addressed. In this study, various perturbations were introduced to the MV membrane in in vitro calcification systems to determine ideal conditions for ATP-initiated calcification by MVs isolated from rachitic rat epiphyseal cartilage. Membrane integrity appears to be required, since the rupture of the vesicular membrane by vigorously mixing with 10% butanol abolished calcification. In contrast, a mild treatment of MVs with low concentrations (e.g., 0.01%, which is much below the critical concentration for micelle formation) of either neutral Triton X-100 or anionic deoxycholate stimulated calcification by >2-fold, without inducing obvious changes in vesicular appearance. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies were done to identify the mineral phase formed in these experiments. For the first time, rachitic MVs were shown to induce the formation of a calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate-like phase after their exposure to calcifying medium with 1 mM ATP. The integration of spectral areas indicated that calcification was enhanced by Triton X-100. The detergent effect was reversible and appeared to be not mediated through activation of ATPase, alkaline phosphatase, or ATP pyrophosphohydrolase. In contrast to neutral Triton X-100 and anionic deoxycholate, cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide inhibited both ATPase activity (I50=10 microM) and ATP-initiated calcification. These observations suggest that membrane perturbations can affect calcification and that the presence of NTP-pyrophosphohydrolase in MVs may play a role in the deposition of CaPPi in rachitic cartilage. PMID:9889389

  18. Calcium transients in asymmetrically activated skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Trube, G; Lopez, J R; Taylor, S R

    1981-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers of the frog Rana temporaria were held just taut and stimulated transversely by unidirectional electrical fields. We observed the reversible effects of stimulus duration (0.1-100 ms) and strength on action potentials, intracellular Ca2+ transients (monitored by aequorin), and contractile force during fixed-end contractions. Long duration stimuli (e.g., 10 ms) induced a maintained depolarization on the cathodal side of a cell and a maintained hyperpolarization on its anodal side. The hyperpolarization of the side facing the anode prevented the action potential from reaching mechanical threshold during strong stimuli. Variation of the duration or strength of a stimulus changed the luminescent response from a fiber injected with aequorin. Thus, the intracellular Ca2+ released during excitation-contraction coupling could be changed by the stimulus parameters. Prolongation of a stimulus at field strengths above 1.1 x rheobase decreased the amplitude of aequorin signals and the force of contractions. The decreases in aequorin and force signals from a given fiber paralleled one another and depended on the stimulus strength, but not on the stimulus polarity. These changes were completely reversible for stimulus strengths up to at least 4.2 x rheobase. The graded decreases in membrane depolarization, aequorin signals, and contractile force were correlated with the previously described folding of myofibrils in fibers allowed to shorten in response to the application of a long duration stimulus. The changes in aequorin signals and force suggest an absence of myofilament activation by Ca2+ in the section of the fiber closest to the anode. The results imply that injected aequorin distributes circumferentially in frog muscle with a coefficient of at least 10(-7) cm2/s, which is not remarkably different from the previously measured coefficient of 5 x 10(-8) cm2/s for its diffusion lengthwise. PMID:6976801

  19. STIM1 Protein Activates Store-Operated Calcium Channels in Cellular Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vigont, V. A.; Zimina, O. A.; Glushankova, L. N.; Kolobkova, J. A.; Ryazantseva, M. A.; Mozhayeva, G. N.; Kaznacheyeva, E. V.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that the expression of full-length mutated huntingtin in human neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) leads to an abnormal increase in calcium entry through store-operated channels. In this paper, the expression of the N-terminal fragment of mutated huntingtin (Htt138Q-1exon) is shown to be enough to provide an actual model for Huntington’s disease. We have shown that Htt138Q-1exon expression causes increased store-operated calcium entry, which is mediated by at least two types of channels in SK-N-SH cells with different reversal potentials. Calcium sensor, STIM1, is required for activation of store-operated calcium entry in these cells. The results provide grounds for considering the proteins responsible for the activation and maintenance of the store-operated calcium entry as promising targets for developing novel therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25558393

  20. Optical imaging of neuronal activity in tissue labeled by retrograde transport of Calcium Green Dextran.

    PubMed

    McPherson, D R; McClellan, A D; O'Donovan, M J

    1997-05-01

    In many neurophysiological studies it is desirable to simultaneously record the activity of a large number of neurons. This is particularly true in the study of vertebrate motor systems that generate rhythmic behaviors, such as the pattern generator for locomotion in vertebrate spinal cord. Optical imaging of neurons labeled with appropriate fluorescent dyes, in which fluorescence is activity-dependent, provides a means to record the activity of many neurons at the same time, while also providing fine spatial resolution of the position and morphology of active neurons. Voltage-sensitive dyes have been explored for this purpose and have the advantage of rapid response to transmembrane voltage changes. However, voltage-sensitive dyes bleach readily, which results in phototoxic damage and limits the time that labeled neurons can be imaged. In addition, the signal-to-noise ratio is typically small, so that averaging of responses is usually required. As an alternative to voltage-sensitive dyes, calcium-sensitive dyes can exhibit large changes in fluorescence. Most neurons contain voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels, and numerous reports indicate that neuronal activity is accompanied by increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration. In this protocol we describe a method to use retrograde transport of the dextran conjugate of a calcium-sensitive dye (Calcium Green Dextran) to label selectively populations of brain and spinal interneurons in a primitive vertebrate (lamprey), for subsequent video-rate imaging of changes in intracellular fluorescence during neuronal activity. Although described with specific reference to lampreys, the technique has also been applied to embryonic chick spinal cord and larval zebrafish preparations and should be easily adaptable to other systems. The most significant novel feature of the protocol is the use of retrograde axonal transport to selectively fill neurons that have known axonal trajectories. Using lampreys, we have obtained activity

  1. Reproducible quantification of osteoclastic activity: characterization of a biomimetic calcium phosphate assay.

    PubMed

    Maria, Salwa M; Prukner, Christiane; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Mueller, Frank; Barralet, Jake E; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2014-07-01

    Osteoclasts are responsible for bone and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis, periodontitis, and osteoporosis. Animal tusk slice assays are standard for evaluating the effect of therapeutics on these cells. However, in addition to batch-to-batch variability inherent to animal tusks, their use is clearly not sustainable. Our objective was to develop and characterize a biomimetic calcium phosphate assay based on the use of phase pure hydroxyapatite coated as a thin film on the surface of culture plates, to facilitate the reproducible quantification of osteoclast resorptive activity. Osteoclasts were formed from RAW 264.7 mouse monocyte cell line using a pro-resorptive cytokine RANKL (50 ng/mL). No change in substrate appearance was noted after culture with media without cells, or undifferentiated monocytes. Only in the presence of osteoclasts localized areas of calcium phosphate dissolution were observed. The total area resorbed positively correlated with the osteoclast numbers (R(2) = 0.99). The resorbed area was significantly increased by the addition of RANKL, and decreased after application of known inhibitors of osteoclast resorptive activity, calcitonin (10 μM), or alendronate (100 μM). Thus, calcium phosphate coated substrates allow reliable monitoring of osteoclast resorptive activity and offer an alternative to animal tusk slice assays. PMID:24259122

  2. Effects of an enteric anaerobic bacterial culture supernatant and deoxycholate on intestinal calcium absorption and disaccharidase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Walshe, K; Healy, M J; Speekenbrink, A B; Keane, C T; Weir, D G; O'Moore, R R

    1990-01-01

    Fifty two strains of anaerobic bacteria isolated from the upper gut of patients with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth were screened for phospholipase activity. Bacteroides melaninogenicus spp intermedius had the greatest activity. The effects of culture supernatants of this organism and deoxycholate on intestinal calcium absorption and disaccharidase activity were studied using a rat closed loop model. The supernatant decreased the in vitro uptake of calcium by 15% (p less than 0.001). Deoxycholate reduced calcium uptake by 16% (p less than 0.001). Combined culture supernatant and deoxycholate reduced calcium uptake by 39% (p less than 0.001) suggesting a potentiation of supernatant activity by deoxycholate. Culture supernatant and deoxycholate, both alone and combined, significantly reduced lactase, sucrase, and maltase activity. Electron microscopic evidence showed degeneration of microvilli, disruption of mitochondrial structure, and swelling of the endoplasmic reticulum after exposure of the intestinal loops to the supernatant or deoxycholate. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1973395

  3. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca(2+), possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus. PMID:27445840

  4. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca2+, possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus.

  5. Macrophage-mediated osteogenesis activation in co-culture with osteoblast on calcium silicate cement.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ming-Gene; Chen, Yi-Wen; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-12-01

    The use of calcium silicate (CS) cement holds great promise for bone substitute biomaterials. However, the effects of CS on osteoblast and macrophage cells are not fully understood. This study examines cell proliferation and differentiation of mono- or co-cultured MC3T3-E1 and Raw 264.7 cells on CS cement. Very few studies to date have looked at the effects of osteoblast and macrophages on biomaterial-regulated osteogenesis. In this study the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1, Raw 264.7 and co-cultured MC3T3-E1/Raw 264.7 on CS cements have been analyzed using a PrestoBlue kit and ELISA. In addition, the effect of macrophages on CS-coordinated osteogenesis of MC3T3-E1 has been investigated. Results show that MC3T3-E1, Raw 264.7 and co-cultured MC3T3-E1/Raw 264.7 adhere to and proliferate well on the CS cement. In a co-culture, the CS cements inhibit receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand expression of both genes and proteins in Raw 264.7 cells when compared to those grown in mono-cultured system. Ca deposition of MC3T3-E1 in the co-culture is higher than that of cells in a mono-culture. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) is also significantly up-regulated by the CS cement stimulation, indicating that macrophages may participate in the CS stimulated osteogenesis. Interestingly, when macrophage are cultured with BMP2 receptor-blocking MC3T3-E1 on the CS cements, the osteogenesis differentiation of the cells is significantly inhibited, indicating the important role of macrophages in biomaterial-induced osteogenesis via BMP2 receptors. It is assumed that it is an increase in the secretion of the BMP2 from the Raw 264.7 cell that is primarily involved in the promotion of the osteogenesis of the MC3T3-E1. These results provide valuable insights into both the mechanism of CS-stimulated osteogenesis, and strategies to optimize the evaluation system for the in vitro osteogenesis capacity of bone substitute biomaterials. PMID:26543022

  6. Activation of calcium-sensing receptor increases TRPC3 expression in rat cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Shan-Li; Sun, Ming-Rui; Li, Ting-Ting; Yin, Xin; Xu, Chang-Qing; Sun, Yi-Hua

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) activation stimulates TRP channels. {yields} CaR promoted transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) expression. {yields} Adult rat ventricular myocytes display capacitative calcium entry (CCE), which was operated by TRPCs. {yields} TRPC channels activation induced by CaR activator sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} to evoke cardiomyocytes apoptosis. -- Abstract: Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in cardiomyocytes, which gate a type of influx of extracellular calcium, the capacitative calcium entry. TRP channels play a role in mediating Ca{sup 2+} overload in the heart. Calcium-sensing receptors (CaR) are also expressed in rat cardiac tissue and promote the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by Ca{sup 2+} overload. However, data about the link between CaR and TRP channels in rat heart are few. In this study, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting were used to examine the expression of the TRP canonical proteins TRPC1 and TRPC3 in adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Laser scan confocal microscopy was used to detect intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} levels in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes. The results showed that, in adult rat cardiomyocytes, the depletion of Ca{sup 2+} stores in the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) by thapsigargin induced a transient increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and the subsequent restoration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} for a few minutes, whereas, the persisting elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was reduced in the presence of the TRPC inhibitor SKF96365. The stimulation of CaR by its activator gadolinium chloride (GdCl{sub 3}) or spermine also resulted in the same effect and the duration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase was also shortened in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}. In adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, GdCl{sub 3

  7. Inhibition of calmodulin - regulated calcium pump activity in rat brain by toxaphene

    SciTech Connect

    Trottman, C.H.; Moorthy, K.S.

    1986-03-05

    In vivo effects of toxaphene on calcium pump activity in rat brain synaptosomes was studied. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with toxaphene at 0,25,50, and 100 mg/kg/day for 3 days and sacrificed 24 h after last dose. Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and /sup 45/Ca uptake were determined in brain P/sub 2/ fraction. Toxaphene inhibited both Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake and the inhibition was dose dependent. Both substrate and Ca/sup 2 +/ activation kinetics of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase indicated non-competitive type of inhibition as evidenced by decreased catalytic velocity but not enzyme-substrate affinity. The inhibited Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake were restored to normal level by exogenously added calmodulin which increased both velocity and affinity. The inhibition of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake and restoration by calmodulin suggests that toxaphene may impair active calcium transport mechanisms by decreasing regulator protein calmodulin levels.

  8. Modulation and pharmacology of low voltage-activated ("T-Type") calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Yunker, Anne Marie R

    2003-12-01

    Although T-type calcium channel currents were observed almost 30 years ago, the genes that encode the pore-forming subunits have only been recently reported. When expressed in heterologous systems, three distinct alpha1 subunits (alpha1G (Cav3.1), alpha1H (Car3.2), and alpha1I (Cav3.3)) conduct T-type currents with insert similar but not identical electrophysiological characteristics that. Alpha 1G, alpha 1H, and alpha 1I transcripts are found throughout neural and nonneural tissues, suggesting multiple types of T-type channels (also called low voltage-activated calcium channels (LVAs)) are coexpressed by many tissues. The study of endogenous LVAs has been hampered by a lack of highly selective antagonists that differentiate between LVA subtypes. Furthermore, many pharmacological agents attenuate currents conducted by LVA and high voltage-activated calcium channels (HVAs). At least 15 classes of pharmacological agents affect T-type currents, and the therapeutic use of many of these drugs has implicated LVAs in the etiology of a variety of diseases. Comparison of the responses of recombinant and native LVAs to pharmacological agents and endogenous modulatory molecules will lead to a better understanding of LVAs in normal and diseased cells. PMID:15000521

  9. Calcium activates the light-dependent conductance in melanopsin-expressing photoreceptors of amphioxus

    PubMed Central

    Peinado, Gabriel; Osorno, Tomás; Gomez, María del Pilar; Nasi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Melanopsin, the photopigment of the “circadian” receptors that regulate the biological clock and the pupillary reflex in mammals, is homologous to invertebrate rhodopsins. Evidence supporting the involvement of phosphoinositides in light-signaling has been garnered, but the downstream effectors that control the light-dependent conductance remain unknown. Microvillar photoreceptors of the primitive chordate amphioxus also express melanopsin and transduce light via phospholipase-C, apparently not acting through diacylglycerol. We therefore examined the role of calcium in activating the photoconductance, using simultaneous, high time-resolution measurements of membrane current and Ca2+ fluorescence. The light-induced calcium rise precedes the onset of the photocurrent, making it a candidate in the activation chain. Moreover, photolysis of caged Ca elicits an inward current of similar size, time course and pharmacology as the physiological photoresponse, but with a much shorter latency. Internally released calcium thus emerges as a key messenger to trigger the opening of light-dependent channels in melanopsin-expressing microvillar photoreceptors of early chordates. PMID:26056310

  10. Evaluation of the calcium-antagonist, antidiarrhoeic and central nervous system activities of Baccharis serraefolia.

    PubMed

    Tortoriello, J; Aguilar-Santamaría, L

    1996-09-01

    Baccharis serraefolia is a widely used plant to treat diarrhoea in Mexican traditional medicine. Although the methanolic extract of this plant has shown an important dose-dependent spasmolytic activity, its underlying mechanism has not been studied. In the present work, the methanolic extract of B. serraefolia significantly delayed the onset of tonic seizures induced by strychnine and pentylenetetrazol; besides, it diminished the death rate and number of animals that exhibited convulsions. It produced potentiation of the hypnotic effect of pentobarbital. Oral administration produced an inhibition of gastrointestinal transit in mice as effective as that produced by loperamide. As to the effect on smooth muscles, the active extract produced an inhibition of contraction induced electrically, which could not be reversed by naloxone. The calcium concentration-contraction curve showed a rightward displacement when the extract was added to isolated guinea pig ileum depolarized with high K+ and cumulative concentrations of Ca2+. The results suggest that the methanolic extract does not interact with classical opiate receptors and its effects, at least that produced on smooth muscle, may be due to a probable interference with calcium influx and/or calcium release from an intra-cellular store. PMID:8887023

  11. Calcium activates the light-dependent conductance in melanopsin-expressing photoreceptors of amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Peinado, Gabriel; Osorno, Tomás; Gomez, María del Pilar; Nasi, Enrico

    2015-06-23

    Melanopsin, the photopigment of the "circadian" receptors that regulate the biological clock and the pupillary reflex in mammals, is homologous to invertebrate rhodopsins. Evidence supporting the involvement of phosphoinositides in light-signaling has been garnered, but the downstream effectors that control the light-dependent conductance remain unknown. Microvillar photoreceptors of the primitive chordate amphioxus also express melanopsin and transduce light via phospholipase-C, apparently not acting through diacylglycerol. We therefore examined the role of calcium in activating the photoconductance, using simultaneous, high time-resolution measurements of membrane current and Ca(2+) fluorescence. The light-induced calcium rise precedes the onset of the photocurrent, making it a candidate in the activation chain. Moreover, photolysis of caged Ca elicits an inward current of similar size, time course and pharmacology as the physiological photoresponse, but with a much shorter latency. Internally released calcium thus emerges as a key messenger to trigger the opening of light-dependent channels in melanopsin-expressing microvillar photoreceptors of early chordates. PMID:26056310

  12. Calcium Influx and DREAM Protein Are Required For GnRH Gene Expression Pulse Activity

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, Gilles M.; Boockfor, Fredric R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence using GT1-7 cells indicates that GnRH pulsatility depends on exocytotic-release and gene transcription events. To determine whether calcium or DREAM may play a role in linking these processes, we used an L-type Ca2+-blocker (nimodipine) and found that not only GnRH gene expression (GnRH-GE) pulse activity was abolished but also that binding of proteins to OCT1BS-a (essential site for GnRH-GE pulses) was reduced. We further found that only EF-hand forms of DREAM were expressed in GT1-7 and that DREAM was part of the complex binding to OCT1BS-a. Finally, microinjection of DREAM antibody into cells abolished GnRH-GE pulses demonstrating its importance in pulsatility. These results reveal that calcium and DREAM may bridge cytoplasmic and nuclear events enabling temporal coordination of intermittent activity. Expression of DREAM in various cell types coupled with the universal role of calcium raise the possibility that these factors may play similar role in other secretory cells. PMID:17241740

  13. Energetic basis of catalytic activity of layered nanophase calcium manganese oxides for water oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Birkner, Nancy; Nayeri, Sara; Pashaei, Babak; Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Casey, William H.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Previous measurements show that calcium manganese oxide nanoparticles are better water oxidation catalysts than binary manganese oxides (Mn3O4, Mn2O3, and MnO2). The probable reasons for such enhancement involve a combination of factors: The calcium manganese oxide materials have a layered structure with considerable thermodynamic stability and a high surface area, their low surface energy suggests relatively loose binding of H2O on the internal and external surfaces, and they possess mixed-valent manganese with internal oxidation enthalpy independent of the Mn3+/Mn4+ ratio and much smaller in magnitude than the Mn2O3-MnO2 couple. These factors enhance catalytic ability by providing easy access for solutes and water to active sites and facile electron transfer between manganese in different oxidation states. PMID:23667149

  14. Apamin-sensitive, small-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels mediate cholinergic inhibition of chick auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Yuhas, W A; Fuchs, P A

    1999-11-01

    Acetylcholine released from efferent neurons in the cochlea causes inhibition of mechanosensory hair cells due to the activation of calcium-dependent potassium channels. Hair cells are known to have large-conductance, "BK"-type potassium channels associated with the afferent synapse, but these channels have different properties than those activated by acetylcholine. Whole-cell (tight-seal) and cell-attached patch-clamp recordings were made from short (outer) hair cells isolated from the chicken basilar papilla (cochlea equivalent). The peptides apamin and charybdotoxin were used to distinguish the calcium-activated potassium channels involved in the acetylcholine response from the BK-type channels associated with the afferent synapse. Differential toxin blockade of these potassium currents provides definitive evidence that ACh activates apamin-sensitive, "SK"-type potassium channels, but does not activate carybdotoxin-sensitive BK channels. This conclusion is supported by tentative identification of small-conductance, calcium-sensitive but voltage-insensitive potassium channels in cell-attached patches. The distinction between these channel types is important for understanding the segregation of opposing afferent and efferent synaptic activity in the hair cell, both of which depend on calcium influx. These different calcium-activated potassium channels serve as sensitive indicators for functionally significant calcium influx in the hair cell. PMID:10573868

  15. Modulation of venous endothelial activity and transcellular calcium transport by defibrotide: the adenosine hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Pasini, F L; Frigerio, C; Capecchi, P L; Ceccatelli, L; Messa, G L; Franchi, M; Di Perri, T

    1996-01-01

    Defibrotide is a polydeoxyribonucleotide that possesses profibrinolytic and cytoprotective activities. These properties have been associated with its capacity to induce the release of prostacyclin and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) from endothelial cells. In the present study, the bolus administration of defibrotide in humans was able to induce (100-800 mg) a dose-dependent decrease in plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) (from 19.4 +/- 7.11 to 7.20 +/- 6.41 AU/mL) and an increase in t-PA (from 3.70 +/- 0.96 to 4.50 +/- 1.20 IU/mL) and in the stable prostacyclin derivative 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (from 18.83 +/- 3.83 to 26.75 +/- 8.48 pg/0.1 mL) in the venous blood. In a second part of the study, defibrotide has been shown to inhibit dose-dependently (10-100 microns) neutrophil activation in vitro: it decreased lysosomal enzyme release and superoxide anion and chemiluminescence production induced by the oligopeptide fMLP and the ionophores A23187 and ionomycin. The increase in extracellular calcium concentration from 0.5 to 2 mm antagonized the inhibitory effect of the drug. Defibrotide was able to reduce the cytosolic free calcium increase induced by specific stimuli by blunting calcium entry. Such an inhibitory activity of defibrotide was antagonized by theophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist. The study confirms some pharmacological activities of defibrotide (release of t-PA and prostacyclin in vivo), and it also suggests that the compound blocks Ca2+ entry into the cells, possibly by interfering with the adenosine receptors. PMID:8807723

  16. The requirement of zinc and calcium ions for functional MMP activity in demineralized dentin matrices

    PubMed Central

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Agee, Kelli A.; Hoshika, Tomohiro; Carrilho, Marcela; Breschi, Lorenzo; Tjäderhane, Leo; Nishitani, Yoshihiro; Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Looney, Stephen; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2010-01-01

    The progressive degradation of resin-dentin bonds is due, in part, to the slow degradation of collagen fibrils in the hybrid layer by endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) of the dentin matrix. In in vitro durability studies, the storage medium composition might be important because the optimum activity of MMPs requires both zinc and calcium. Objective This study evaluated the effect of different storage media on changes in matrix stiffness, loss of dry weight or solubilization of collagen from demineralized dentin beams incubated in vitro for up to 60 days. Methods Dentin beams (1×2×6mm) were completely demineralized in 10% phosphoric acid. After baseline measurements of dry mass and elastic modulus (E) (3-point bending, 15% strain) the beams were divided into 5 groups (n=11/group) and incubated at 37°C in either media containing both zinc and calcium designated as complete medium(CM), calcium-free medium, zinc-free medium, a doubled-zinc medium or water. Beams were retested at 3, 7, 14, 30, and 60 days of incubation. The incubation media was hydrolyzed with HCl for the quantitation of hydroxyproline (HOP) as an index of solubilization of collagen by MMPs. Data were analyzed using repeated measures of ANOVA. Results Both the storage medium and storage time showed significant effects on E, mass loss and HOP release (p<0.05). The incubation in CM resulted in relatively rapid and significant (p<0.05) decreases in stiffness, and increasing amounts of mass loss. The HOP content of the experimental media also increased with incubation time but was significantly lower (p<0.05) than in the control CM medium, the recommended storage medium. Conclusions The storage solutions used to age resin-dentin bonds should be buffered solutions that contain both calcium and zinc. The common use of water as an aging medium may underestimate the hydrolytic activity of endogenous dentin MMPs. PMID:20688380

  17. Activation of the calcium sensing receptor with cinacalcet increases serum gastrin levels in healthy older subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric acidity is postulated to enhance calcium absorption since calcium is better dissolved at low pH. Extracellular calcium stimulates gastrin and gastric acid secretion in humans. Ex vivo studies indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), which is expressed on the surface of human G cells...

  18. Cadmium Induces Apoptosis in Freshwater Crab Sinopotamon henanense through Activating Calcium Signal Transduction Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinxiang; Zhang, Pingping; Liu, Na; Wang, Qian; Luo, Jixian; Wang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca2+) is one of the key intracellular signals, which is implicated in the regulation of cell functions such as impregnation, cell proliferation, differentiation and death. Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic environmental pollutant that can disturb cell functions and even lead to cell death. Recently, we have found that Cd induced apoptosis in gill cells of the freshwater crab Sinopotamon henanense via caspase activation. In the present study, we further investigated the role of calcium signaling in the Cd-induced apoptosis in the animals. Our data showed that Cd triggered gill cell apoptosis which is evidenced by apoptotic DNA fragmentation, activations of caspases-3, -8 and -9 and the presence of apoptotic morphological features. Moreover, Cd elevated the intracellular concentration of Ca2+, the protein concentration of calmodulin (CaM) and the activity of Ca2+-ATPase in the gill cells of the crabs. Pretreatment of the animals with ethylene glycol-bis-(b-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N’,N’-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), Ca2+ chelator, inhibited Cd-induced activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9 as well as blocked the Cd-triggered apoptotic DNA fragmentation. The apoptotic morphological features were no longer observed in gill cells pretreated with the Ca2+ signaling inhibitors before Cd treatment. Our results indicate that Cd evokes gill cell apoptosis through activating Ca2+-CaM signaling transduction pathway. PMID:26714174

  19. High-speed in vivo calcium imaging reveals neuronal network activity with near-millisecond precision.

    PubMed

    Grewe, Benjamin F; Langer, Dominik; Kasper, Hansjörg; Kampa, Björn M; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2010-05-01

    Two-photon calcium imaging of neuronal populations enables optical recording of spiking activity in living animals, but standard laser scanners are too slow to accurately determine spike times. Here we report in vivo imaging in mouse neocortex with greatly improved temporal resolution using random-access scanning with acousto-optic deflectors. We obtained fluorescence measurements from 34-91 layer 2/3 neurons at a 180-490 Hz sampling rate. We detected single action potential-evoked calcium transients with signal-to-noise ratios of 2-5 and determined spike times with near-millisecond precision and 5-15 ms confidence intervals. An automated 'peeling' algorithm enabled reconstruction of complex spike trains from fluorescence traces up to 20-30 Hz frequency, uncovering spatiotemporal trial-to-trial variability of sensory responses in barrel cortex and visual cortex. By revealing spike sequences in neuronal populations on a fast time scale, high-speed calcium imaging will facilitate optical studies of information processing in brain microcircuits. PMID:20400966

  20. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Schmelzeisen, Steffen; Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:26558388

  1. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:26558388

  2. Palladacycle (BPC) antitumour activity against resistant and metastatic cell lines: the relationship with cytosolic calcium mobilisation and cathepsin B activity.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Alexandre; Barbosa, Christiano M V; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Garcia, Daniel M; Silva, Luís S; Matsuo, Alisson L; Nascimento, Fábio D; Rodrigues, Elaine G; Caires, Antonio C F; Smaili, Soraya S; Bincoletto, Claudia

    2014-05-22

    The search for new compounds that induce p53-independent apoptosis is the focus of many studies in cancer biology because these compounds could be more specific and would overcome chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro antitumour activity of a Biphosphinic Palladacycle Complex (BPC) and extended preclinical studies to an in vivo model. Saos-2 cells, a p53-null human osteosarcoma drug-resistant cell line, were treated with BPC in the presence or absence of a cathepsin B inhibitor and a calcium chelator (CA074 and BAPTA-AM, respectively), and several parameters related to apoptosis were evaluated. Preclinical studies were performed with mice that were intravenously inoculated with murine melanoma B16F10-Nex2 cells and treated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with BPC (8 mg/kg/day) for ten consecutive days, when lung metastatic nodules were counted. In vitro data show that BPC induces cell death in Saos-2 cells mainly by apoptosis, which was accompanied by the effector caspase-3 activation. These events are most likely related to Bax translocation and increased cytosolic calcium mobilisation, mainly from intracellular compartments. Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilisation (LMP) was also observed after 12 h of BPC exposure. Interestingly, BAPTA-AM and CA074 significantly decreased BPC cytotoxicity, suggesting that both calcium and cathepsin B are required for BPC antitumour activity. In vivo studies demonstrated that BPC protects mice against murine metastatic melanoma. In conclusion, BPC complex is an effective anticancer compound against metastatic murine melanoma. This complex is cytotoxic to the drug-resistant osteosarcoma Saos-2 human tumour cells by inducing apoptosis triggered by calcium signalling and a lysosomal-dependent pathway. PMID:24709226

  3. PYK2: a calcium-sensitive protein tyrosine kinase activated in response to fertilization of the zebrafish oocyte.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dipika; Kinsey, William H

    2013-01-01

    Fertilization begins with binding and fusion of a sperm with the oocyte, a process that triggers a high amplitude calcium transient which propagates through the oocyte and stimulates a series of preprogrammed signal transduction events critical for zygote development. Identification of the pathways downstream of this calcium transient remains an important step in understanding the basis of zygote quality. The present study demonstrates that the calcium-calmodulin sensitive protein tyrosine kinase PYK2 is a target of the fertilization-induced calcium transient in the zebrafish oocyte and that it plays an important role in actin-mediated events critical for sperm incorporation. At fertilization, PYK2 was activated initially at the site of sperm-oocyte interaction and was closely associated with actin filaments forming the fertilization cone. Later PYK2 activation was evident throughout the entire oocyte cortex, however activation was most intense over the animal hemisphere. Fertilization-induced PYK2 activation could be blocked by suppressing calcium transients in the ooplasm via injection of BAPTA as a calcium chelator. PYK2 activation could be artificially induced in unfertilized oocytes by injection of IP3 at concentrations sufficient to induce calcium release. Functionally, suppression of PYK2 activity by chemical inhibition or by injection of a dominant-negative construct encoding the N-terminal ERM domain of PKY2 inhibited formation of an organized fertilization cone and reduced the frequency of successful sperm incorporation. Together, the above findings support a model in which PYK2 responds to the fertilization-induced calcium transient by promoting reorganization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton to form the fertilization cone. PMID:23084926

  4. Platelet activating factors alters calcium homeostasis in cultured vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, T.A.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    Platelet activating factor (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphorylcholine; PAF), a potent in vivo mediator of allergic and inflammatory reactions, induced a rapid (onset less than 30 s), concentration-dependent (threshold approximately 10(-11) M, half-maximal approximately 10(-10) M, maximal approximately 10(-8)-10(-7) M) efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from preloaded cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). In contrast, deacetylated and other PAF analogues were essentially ineffective. PAF (10(-7) M) was also shown to increase cytosolic free calcium (49 +/- 5%) in suspensions of quin 2 (calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye)-loaded BAEC. PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was not blocked by aspirin treatment (100 or 500 microM, 30 min). In the absence of external calcium, PAF was still highly effective in stimulating unidirectional /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, thus suggesting that PAF mobilized a sequestered pool of intracellular calcium. CV-3988, a PAF antagonist, inhibited PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of BAEC with PAF (10(-8) M, 15 min), but not with other PAF analogues, resulted in a decrease in subsequent PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, thus suggesting an agonist-specific desensitization. PAF also stimulated a 30% net decrease in the equilibrium /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ content of BAEC within 1 min, which gradually recovered to prestimulus levels in 10-15 min. PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was also observed in endothelial cells cultured from human umbilical vein and baboon cephalic vein but not from cultured human dermal fibroblasts or bovine aortic smooth muscle. These studies provide direct evidence for agonist- and cell-specific effects of PAF on vascular endothelium.

  5. Activity-dependent regulation of calcium and ribosomes in the chick cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Call, C L; Hyson, R L

    2016-03-01

    Cochlea removal results in the death of 20-30% of neurons in the chick cochlear nucleus, nucleus magnocellularis (NM). Two potentially cytotoxic events, a dramatic rise in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and a decline in the integrity of ribosomes are observed within 1h of deafferentation. Glutamatergic input from the auditory nerve has been shown to preserve NM neuron health by activating metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), maintaining both normal [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomal integrity. One interpretation of these results is that a common mGluR-activated signaling cascade is required for the maintenance of both [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomal integrity. This could happen if both responses are influenced directly by a common messenger, or if the loss of mGluR activation causes changes in one component that secondarily causes changes in the other. The present studies tested this common-mediator hypothesis in slice preparations by examining activity-dependent regulation of [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomes in the same tissue after selectively blocking group I mGluRs (1-Aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA)) or group II mGluRs (LY 341495) during unilateral auditory nerve stimulation. Changes in [Ca(2+)]i of NM neurons were measured using fura-2 ratiometric calcium imaging and the tissue was subsequently processed for Y10B immunoreactivity (Y10B-ir), an antibody that recognizes a ribosomal epitope. The group I mGluR antagonist blocked the activity-dependent regulation of both [Ca(2+)]i and Y10B-ir, but the group II antagonist blocked only the activity-dependent regulation of Y10B-ir. That is, even when group II receptors were blocked, stimulation continued to maintain low [Ca(2+)]i, but it did not maintain Y10B-ir. These results suggest a dissociation in how calcium and ribosomes are regulated in NM neurons and that ribosomes can be regulated through a mechanism that is independent of calcium regulation. PMID:26739326

  6. Calcium Imaging of Neuronal Activity in Free-Swimming Larval Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Muto, Akira; Kawakami, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Visualization of neuronal activity during animal behavior is a critical step in understanding how the brain generates behavior. In the model vertebrate zebrafish, imaging of the brain has been done mostly by using immobilized fish. Here, we describe a novel method to image neuronal activity of the larval zebrafish brain during prey capture behavior. We expressed a genetically encoded fluorescent calcium indicator, GCaMP, in the optic tectum of the midbrain using the Gal4-UAS system. Tectal activity was then imaged in unrestrained larvae during prey perception. Since larval zebrafish swim only intermittently, detection of the neuronal activity is possible between swimming bouts. Our method makes functional brain imaging under natural behavioral conditions feasible and will greatly benefit the study of neuronal activities that evoke animal behaviors. PMID:27464819

  7. Hydrolytic and autolytic behavior of two forms of calcium-activated neutral protease (CANP).

    PubMed

    Inomata, M; Hayashi, M; Nakamura, M; Imahori, K; Kawashima, S

    1985-08-01

    Some endogenous substrates were incubated with two forms of calcium-activated neutral protease (CANP) with high (muCANP) and low (mCANP) sensitivities to calcium ions. In addition to analyses of the processes of their degradation, changes in the molecular properties of these CANPs were also examined. Among the tested substrate proteins, the myosin heavy chain of rabbit skeletal muscle myofibrils and spectrin or band 3 protein of human erythrocyte membranes were degraded relatively rapidly. So far as these proteins were concerned, a higher degradation velocity was observed for muCANP than for mCANP. Vimentin from ascites tumor cells was degraded most rapidly and no difference was observed in degradation velocity between muCANP and mCANP. In all cases, muCANP and mCANP produced different proteolytic peptide fragments, suggesting the different substrate-specificities of these CANPs. The degradation of substrates always accompanied the autodigestion of CANPs, and the small subunits of both CANPs were degraded in the early stage of the autodigestion. The large subunit of muCANP (79K) was converted to a 76K polypeptide via a 77K polypeptide as an intermediate. The autodigested muCANP with 76K polypeptide retained sufficient protease activity and, moreover, its calcium-sensitivity was higher than that of intact muCANP. The possibility is thus proposed that restricted autodigestion is a necessary activation step for the appearance of activity of muCANP. No such transition was observed for mCANP. PMID:2999095

  8. Role of AQP2 in activation of calcium entry by hypotonicity: implications in cell volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Galizia, L; Flamenco, M P; Rivarola, V; Capurro, C; Ford, P

    2008-03-01

    We previously reported in a rat cortical collecting duct cell line (RCCD(1)) that the presence of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the cell membrane is critical for the rapid activation of regulatory volume decrease mechanisms (RVD) (Ford et al. Biol Cell 97: 687-697, 2005). The aim of our present work was to investigate the signaling pathway that links AQP2 to this rapid RVD activation. Since it has been previously described that hypotonic conditions induce intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) increases in different cell types, we tested the hypothesis that AQP2 could have a role in activation of calcium entry by hypotonicity and its implication in cell volume regulation. Using a fluorescent probe technique, we studied [Ca(2+)](i) and cell volume changes in response to a hypotonic shock in WT-RCCD(1) (not expressing aquaporins) and in AQP2-RCCD(1) (transfected with AQP2) cells. We found that after a hypotonic shock only AQP2-RCCD(1) cells exhibit a substantial increase in [Ca(2+)](i). This [Ca(2+)](i) increase is strongly dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and is partially inhibited by thapsigargin (1 muM) indicating that the rise in [Ca(2+)](i) reflects both influx from the extracellular medium and release from intracellular stores. Exposure of AQP2-RCCD(1) cells to 100 muM gadolinium reduced the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) suggesting the involvement of a mechanosensitive calcium channel. Furthermore, exposure of cells to all of the above described conditions impaired rapid RVD. We conclude that the expression of AQP2 in the cell membrane is critical to produce the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) which is necessary to activate RVD in RCCD(1) cells. PMID:18094031

  9. Calcium Imaging of Neuronal Activity in Drosophila Can Identify Anticonvulsive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Anne K.; Fan, Yuen Ngan; Masullo, Laura; Baines, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Although there are now a number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) available, approximately one-third of epilepsy patients respond poorly to drug intervention. The reasons for this are complex, but are probably reflective of the increasing number of identified mutations that predispose individuals to this disease. Thus, there is a clear requirement for the development of novel treatments to address this unmet clinical need. The existence of gene mutations that mimic a seizure-like behaviour in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, offers the possibility to exploit the powerful genetics of this insect to identify novel cellular targets to facilitate design of more effective AEDs. In this study we use neuronal expression of GCaMP, a potent calcium reporter, to image neuronal activity using a non-invasive and rapid method. Expression in motoneurons in the isolated CNS of third instar larvae shows waves of calcium-activity that pass between segments of the ventral nerve cord. Time between calcium peaks, in the same neurons, between adjacent segments usually show a temporal separation of greater than 200 ms. Exposure to proconvulsants (picrotoxin or 4-aminopyridine) reduces separation to below 200 ms showing increased synchrony of activity across adjacent segments. Increased synchrony, characteristic of epilepsy, is similarly observed in genetic seizure mutants: bangsenseless1 (bss1) and paralyticK1270T (paraK1270T). Exposure of bss1 to clinically-used antiepileptic drugs (phenytoin or gabapentin) significantly reduces synchrony. In this study we use the measure of synchronicity to evaluate the effectiveness of known and novel anticonvulsive compounds (antipain, isethionate, etopiside rapamycin and dipyramidole) to reduce seizure-like CNS activity. We further show that such compounds also reduce the Drosophila voltage-gated persistent Na+ current (INaP) in an identified motoneuron (aCC). Our combined assays provide a rapid and reliable method to screen unknown compounds

  10. A highly sensitive fluorescent indicator dye for calcium imaging of neural activity in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Mayumi; Takeuchi, Atsuya; Hashizume, Miki; Kitamura, Kazuo; Kano, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium imaging of individual neurons is widely used for monitoring their activity in vitro and in vivo. Synthetic fluorescent calcium indicator dyes are commonly used, but the resulting calcium signals sometimes suffer from a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Therefore, it is difficult to detect signals caused by single action potentials (APs) particularly from neurons in vivo. Here we showed that a recently developed calcium indicator dye, Cal-520, is sufficiently sensitive to reliably detect single APs both in vitro and in vivo. In neocortical neurons, calcium signals were linearly correlated with the number of APs, and the SNR was > 6 for in vitro slice preparations and > 1.6 for in vivo anesthetised mice. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, dendritic calcium transients evoked by climbing fiber inputs were clearly observed in anesthetised mice with a high SNR and fast decay time. These characteristics of Cal-520 are a great advantage over those of Oregon Green BAPTA-1, the most commonly used calcium indicator dye, for monitoring the activity of individual neurons both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24405482

  11. Thermal Decomposition of Calcium Perchlorate/Iron-Mineral Mixtures: Implications of the Evolved Oxygen from the Rocknest Eolian Deposit in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruck, A. M.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P.

    2014-01-01

    A major oxygen release between 300 and 500 C was detected by the Mars Curiosity Rover Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument at the Rocknest eolian deposit. Thermal decomposition of perchlorate (ClO4-) salts in the Rocknest samples are a possible explanation for this evolved oxygen release. Releative to Na-, K-, Mg-, and Fe-perchlorate, the thermal decomposition of Ca-perchlorate in laboratory experiments released O2 in the temperature range (400-500degC) closest to the O2 release temperatures observed for the Rocknest material. Furthermore, calcium perchlorate could have been the source of Cl in the chlorinated-hydrocarbons species that were detected by SAM. Different components in the Martian soil could affect the decomposition temperature of calcium per-chlorate or another oxychlorine species. This interaction of the two components in the soil could result in O2 release temperatures consistent with those detected by SAM in the Rocknest materials. The decomposition temperatures of various alkali metal perchlorates are known to decrease in the presence of a catalyst. The objective of this work is to investigate catalytic interactions on calcium perchlorate from various iron-bearing minerals known to be present in the Rocknest material

  12. Physical characteristics and biocompatibility of the polycaprolactone-biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds fabricated using the modified melt stretching and multilayer deposition.

    PubMed

    Thuaksuban, Nuttawut; Luntheng, Thunmaruk; Monmaturapoj, Naruporn

    2016-05-01

    Physical properties and biocompatibility of polycaprolactone (PCL)-biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) scaffolds fabricated by the modified melt stretching and multilayer deposition (mMSMD) technique were evaluated in vitro. The PCL-BCP scaffold specimens included group A; PCL: BCP (wt%) = 80:20 and group B; 70:30. Mechanical properties of the scaffolds were assessed using a universal testing machine. Degradation behaviors of the scaffolds were assessed over 60 days. The amount of calcium and phosphate ions released from the scaffolds was detected over 30 days. Attachment and growth of osteoblasts on the scaffolds and indirect cytocompatibility to those cells were evaluated. The results showed that the scaffolds of both groups could withstand compressive forces on their superior aspect very well; however, their lateral aspect could only withstand light forces. Degradation of the scaffolds over 2 months was low (group A = 1.92 ± 0.47% and group B = 2.9 ± 1.3%,p > 0.05). The concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions released from the scaffolds of both groups significantly increased on day 7 (p < 0.05). Growth of the cells seemed to relate to accumulative increase in those ions. All results between the two ratios of the scaffolds were not statistically different. PMID:27013219

  13. Putative calcium-binding domains of the Caenorhabditis elegans BK channel are dispensable for intoxication and ethanol activation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, S. J.; Scott, L. L.; Ordemann, G.; Philpo, A.; Cohn, J.; Pierce-Shimomura, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol modulates the highly conserved, voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel, which contributes to alcohol-mediated behaviors in species from worms to humans. Previous studies have shown that the calcium-sensitive domains, RCK1 and the Ca2+ bowl, are required for ethanol activation of the mammalian BK channel in vitro. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, ethanol activates the BK channel in vivo, and deletion of the worm BK channel, SLO-1, confers strong resistance to intoxication. To determine if the conserved RCK1 and calcium bowl domains were also critical for intoxication and basal BK channel-dependent behaviors in C. elegans, we generated transgenic worms that express mutated SLO-1 channels predicted to have the RCK1, Ca2+ bowl or both domains rendered insensitive to calcium. As expected, mutating these domains inhibited basal function of SLO-1 in vivo as neck and body curvature of these mutants mimicked that of the BK null mutant. Unexpectedly, however, mutating these domains singly or together in SLO-1 had no effect on intoxication in C. elegans. Consistent with these behavioral results, we found that ethanol activated the SLO-1 channel in vitro with or without these domains. By contrast, in agreement with previous in vitro findings, C. elegans harboring a human BK channel with mutated calcium-sensing domains displayed resistance to intoxication. Thus, for the worm SLO-1 channel, the putative calcium-sensitive domains are critical for basal in vivo function but unnecessary for in vivo ethanol action. PMID:26113050

  14. Long-term correlation in single calcium-activated potassium channel kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos de Oliveira, R. A.; Barbosa, C. T. F.; Consoni, L. H. A.; Rodrigues, A. R. A.; Varanda, W. A.; Nogueira, R. A.

    2006-05-01

    Ion channels are protein molecules found in biological membranes, which can assume distinct open and closed conformational states, a phenomenon called ion channel kinetics. The transitions from one state to another are dependent on the potential energy barrier that separates them and can be controlled by the electrical field, ions and/or drugs. Both Markovian and fractal models have been used for modeling the ion channel kinetics. Ion single channel records are characterized by successive openings and closings, which are correlated in time. Here the rescaled range analysis ( R/S Hurst analysis) is used to test for the occurrence of long-term correlation in the kinetics of a calcium-activated potassium channel of Leydig cells. A Hurst coefficient H=0.640±0.064 ( n=5) was found for the single calcium-activated potassium channel clamped at -80 mV and exposed to a free Ca 2+ concentration equal to 10 nM. This numerical value indicates the presence of long-term correlation (memory) in this kinetic process. However, when the R/ S analysis was applied to ion channel data simulated using Markovian and fractal models, it could not account for the long-term correlation previously found in the experimental data. In summary, in this work we show that: (i) opening and closing dwell times for the single calcium-activated potassium channel of Leydig cells present long-term correlation and (ii) Markovian and fractal models, which describe well the dwell time distributions, are not adequate to describe the memory found in the kinetics of this channel.

  15. Antiresorption implant coatings based on calcium alendronate and octacalcium phosphate deposited by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation.

    PubMed

    Boanini, Elisa; Torricelli, Paola; Forte, Lucia; Pagani, Stefania; Mihailescu, Natalia; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N; Bigi, Adriana

    2015-12-01

    The integration of an implant material with bone tissue depends on the chemistry and physics of the implant surface. In this study we applied matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) in order to synthesize calcium alendronate monohydrate (a bisphosphonate obtained by calcium sequestration from octacalcium phosphate by alendronate) and calcium alendronate monohydrate/octacalcium phosphate composite thin films on titanium substrates. Octacalcium phosphate coatings were prepared as reference material. The powders, which were synthesized in aqueous medium, were suspended in deionised water, frozen at liquid nitrogen temperature and used as targets for MAPLE experiments. The transfer was conducted with a KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τFWHM ≤ 25 ns) in mild conditions of temperature and pressure. XRD, FTIR and SEM analyses confirmed that the coatings contain the same crystalline phases as the as-prepared powder samples. Osteoblast derived from stem cells and osteoclast derived from monocytes of osteoporotic subjects were co-cultured on the coatings up to 14 days. Osteoclast displayed significantly reduced proliferation and differentiation in the presence of calcium alendronate monohydrate, pointing to a clear role of the coatings containing this bisphosphonate on inhibiting excessive bone resorption. At variance, osteoblast production of alkaline phosphatase and type I pro-collagen were promoted by the presence of bisphosphonate, which also decreased the production of interleukin 6. The positive influence towards osteoblast differentiation was even more enhanced in the composite coatings, thanks to the presence of octacalcium phosphate. PMID:26445021

  16. Enhanced Bactericidal Activity of Silver Thin Films Deposited via Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Ponja, Sapna D; Sehmi, Sandeep K; Allan, Elaine; MacRobert, Alexander J; Parkin, Ivan P; Carmalt, Claire J

    2015-12-30

    Silver thin films were deposited on SiO2-barrier-coated float glass, fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass, Activ glass, and TiO2-coated float glass via AACVD using silver nitrate at 350 °C. The films were annealed at 600 °C and analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV/vis/near-IR spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. All the films were crystalline, and the silver was present in its elemental form and of nanometer dimension. The antibacterial activity of these samples was tested against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in the dark and under UV light (365 nm). All Ag-deposited films reduced the numbers of E. coli by 99.9% within 6 h and the numbers of S. aureus by 99.9% within only 2 h. FTO/Ag reduced bacterial numbers of E. coli to below the detection limit after 60 min and caused a 99.9% reduction of S. aureus within only 15 min of UV irradiation. Activ/Ag reduced the numbers of S. aureus by 66.6% after 60 min and TiO2/Ag killed 99.9% of S. aureus within 60 min of UV exposure. More remarkably, we observed a 99.9% reduction in the numbers of E. coli within 6 h and the numbers of S. aureus within 4 h in the dark using our novel TiO2/Ag system. PMID:26632854

  17. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXV: Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fen; Wong, Xiuming

    2012-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) are widely expressed in various tissues and implicated in physiological processes such as sensory transduction, epithelial secretion, and smooth muscle contraction. Transmembrane proteins with unknown function 16 (TMEM16A) has recently been identified as a major component of CaCCs. Detailed molecular analysis of TMEM16A will be needed to understand its structure-function relationships. The role this channel plays in physiological systems remains to be established and is currently a subject of intense investigation. PMID:22090471

  18. Properties of a calcium-activated K(+) current on interneurons in the developing rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T; Baraban, S C

    2000-06-01

    Calcium-activated potassium currents have an essential role in regulating excitability in a variety of neurons. Although it is well established that mature CA1 pyramidal neurons possess a Ca(2+)-activated K(+) conductance (I(K(Ca))) with early and late components, modulation by various endogenous neurotransmitters, and sensitivity to K(+) channel toxins, the properties of I(K(Ca)) on hippocampal interneurons (or immature CA1 pyramidal neurons) are relatively unknown. To address this problem, whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings were made from visually identified interneurons in stratum lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) and CA1 pyramidal cells in hippocampal slices from immature rats (P3-P25). A biphasic calcium-activated K(+) tail current was elicited following a brief depolarization from the holding potential (-50 mV). Analysis of the kinetic properties of I(K(Ca)) suggests that an early current component differs between these two cell types. An early I(K(Ca)) with a large peak current amplitude (200.8 +/- 13.2 pA, mean +/- SE), slow time constant of decay (70.9 +/- 3.3 ms), and relatively rapid time to peak (within 15 ms) was observed on L-M interneurons (n = 88), whereas an early I(K(Ca)) with a small peak current amplitude (112.5 +/- 7.3 pA), a fast time constant of decay (39.4 +/- 1.6 ms), and a slower time-to-peak (within 26 ms) was observed on CA1 pyramidal neurons (n = 85). Removal of extracellular calcium or addition of inorganic Ca(2+) channel blockers (cadmium, nickel, or cobalt) was used to demonstrate the calcium dependence of these currents. Addition of norepinephrine, carbachol, and a variety of channel toxins (apamin, iberiotoxin, verruculogen, paxilline, penitrem A, and charybdotoxin) were used to further distinguish between I(K(Ca)) on these two hippocampal cell types. Verruculogen (100 nM), carbachol (100 microM), apamin (100 nM), TEA (1 mM), and iberiotoxin (50 nM) significantly reduced early I(K(Ca)) on CA1 pyramidal neurons; early I(K(Ca)) on L

  19. Differential effect of calcium-activated potassium and chloride channels on rat basilar artery vasomotion.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wang, Rui; Ma, Ke-tao; Li, Xin-zhi; Zhang, Chuan-lin; Liu, Wei-dong; Zhao, Lei; Si, Jun-qiang

    2014-08-01

    Spontaneous, rhythmical contractions, or vasomotion, can be recorded from cerebral vessels under both normal physiological and pathophysiological conditions. We investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying vasomotion in the cerebral basilar artery (BA) of Wistar rats. Pressure myograph video microscopy was used to study the changes in cerebral artery vessel diameter. The main results of this study were as follows: (1) The diameters of BA and middle cerebral artery (MCA) were 314.5±15.7 μm (n=15) and 233.3±10.1 μm (n=12) at 10 mmHg working pressure (P<0.05), respectively. Pressure-induced vasomotion occurred in BA (22/28, 78.6%), but not in MCA (4/31, 12.9%) from 0 to 70 mmHg working pressure. As is typical for vasomotion, the contractile phase of the response was more rapid than the relaxation phase; (2) The frequency of vasomotion response and the diameter were gradually increased in BA from 0 to 70 mmHg working pressure. The amplitude of the rhythmic contractions was relatively constant once stable conditions were achieved. The frequency of contractions was variable and the highest value was 16.7±4.7 (n=13) per 10 min at 60 mmHg working pressure; (3) The pressure-induced vasomotion of the isolated BA was attenuated by nifedipine, NFA, 18β-GA, TEA or in Ca(2+)-free medium. Nifedipine, NFA, 18β-GA or Ca(2+)-free medium not only dampened vasomotion, but also kept BA in relaxation state. In contrasts, TEA kept BA in contraction state. These results suggest that the pressure-induced vasomotion of the isolated BA results from an interaction between Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (CaCCs) currents and K(Ca) currents. We hypothesize that vasomotion of BA depends on the depolarizing of the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to activate CaCCs. Depolarization in turn activates voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, synchronizing contractions of adjacent cells through influx of extracellular calcium and the flow of calcium through gap junctions. Subsequent calcium

  20. Alternative splicing at C terminus of Ca(V)1.4 calcium channel modulates calcium-dependent inactivation, activation potential, and current density.

    PubMed

    Tan, Gregory Ming Yeong; Yu, Dejie; Wang, Juejin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The Ca(V)1.4 voltage-gated calcium channel is predominantly expressed in the retina, and mutations to this channel have been associated with human congenital stationary night blindness type-2. The L-type Ca(V)1.4 channel displays distinct properties such as absence of calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and slow voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI) due to the presence of an autoinhibitory domain (inhibitor of CDI) in the distal C terminus. We hypothesized that native Ca(V)1.4 is subjected to extensive alternative splicing, much like the other voltage-gated calcium channels, and employed the transcript scanning method to identify alternatively spliced exons within the Ca(V)1.4 transcripts isolated from the human retina. In total, we identified 19 alternative splice variations, of which 16 variations have not been previously reported. Characterization of the C terminus alternatively spliced exons using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology revealed a splice variant that exhibits robust CDI. This splice variant arose from the splicing of a novel alternate exon (43*) that can be found in 13.6% of the full-length transcripts screened. Inclusion of exon 43* inserts a stop codon that truncates half the C terminus. The Ca(V)1.4 43* channel exhibited robust CDI, a larger current density, a hyperpolarized shift in activation potential by ∼10 mV, and a slower VDI. Through deletional experiments, we showed that the inhibitor of CDI was responsible for modulating channel activation and VDI, in addition to CDI. Calcium currents in the photoreceptors were observed to exhibit CDI and are more negatively activated as compared with currents elicited from heterologously expressed full-length Ca(V)1.4. Naturally occurring alternative splice variants may in part contribute to the properties of the native Ca(V)1.4 channels. PMID:22069316

  1. Contexts for dopamine specification by calcium spike activity in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Ulloa, Norma A.; Spitzer, Nicholas C.; Dulcis, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-dependent electrical activity plays a significant role in neurotransmitter specification at early stages of development. To test the hypothesis that activity-dependent differentiation depends on molecular context we investigated the development of dopaminergic neurons in the central nervous system of larval Xenopus laevis. We find that different dopaminergic nuclei respond to manipulation of this early electrical activity by ion channel misexpression with different increases and decreases in numbers of dopaminergic neurons. Focusing on the ventral suprachiasmatic nucleus and the spinal cord in order to gain insight into these differences, we identify distinct subpopulations of neurons that express characteristic combinations of GABA and NPY as co-transmitters and Lim1,2 and Nurr1 transcription factors. We demonstrate that the developmental state of neurons identified by their spatial location and expression of these molecular markers is correlated with characteristic spontaneous calcium spike activity. Different subpopulations of dopaminergic neurons respond differently to manipulation of this early electrical activity. Moreover, retinohypothalamic circuit activation of the ventral suprachiasmatic nucleus recruits expression of dopamine selectively in reserve pool neurons that already express GABA and neuropeptide Y. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that spontaneously active neurons expressing GABA are most susceptible to activity-dependent expression of dopamine both in the spinal cord and in the brain. Because loss of dopaminergic neurons plays a role in neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, understanding how subpopulations of neurons become dopaminergic may lead to protocols for differentiation of neurons in vitro to replace those that have been lost in vivo. PMID:21209192

  2. Comparison of Antifungal Activity of 2% Chlorhexidine, Calcium Hydroxide, and Nanosilver gels against Candida Albicans

    PubMed Central

    Mozayeni, Mohammad Ali; Hadian, Ali; Bakhshaei, Pedram; Dianat, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Residual microorganisms in the root canal system (RCS) after endodontic therapy such as Candida albicans are a major cause of endodontic failure. Calcium hydroxide (CH) and chlorhexidine (CHX) have suitable antimicrobial activity against bacteria and can be used as intracanal medicaments. Nanosilver has also shown antimicrobial activity against microorganisms. This study aimed to compare the antifungal effect of calcium hydroxide, 2% chlorhexidine and nanosilver gels on Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: Eighty-one single-rooted teeth were selected. After root canal preparation, the teeth were contaminated. After culture, the teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups. In experimental groups, 24 teeth were selected and completely filled with CH, 2% CHX and nanosilver gels in each group. Nine teeth were selected in the control group and filled with saline solution. After 1, 3, and 7 days, samples were obtained by #30 sterile paper points, and #2 and #4 Gates Glidden drills and cultured on solid Sabouraud agar. Results: The results demonstrated that CH and 2% CHX had equal antifungal effects on samples taken by paper point and #2 Gates Glidden drill at all time points. Both CH and 2% CHX were more effective than nanosilver at all time periods. There was no statistically significant difference between medicaments in samples taken by #4 Gates Glidden drill. Conclusion: CH and 2% CHX gels have significantly higher antifungal activity than nanosilver gel. Also, CH and 2% CHX gels are equally effective against Candida albicans. PMID:26056520

  3. Calcium-activated potassium channels mask vascular dysfunction associated with oxidized LDL exposure in rabbit aorta.

    PubMed

    Bocker, J M; Miller, F J; Oltman, C L; Chappell, D A; Gutterman, D D

    2001-05-01

    Endothelium-dependent vasodilation is impaired in atherosclerosis. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) plays an important role, possibly through alterations in G-protein activation. We examined the effect of acute exposure to ox-LDL on the dilator responses of isolated rabbit aorta segments. We sought also to evaluate the specificity of this dysfunction for dilator stimuli that traditionally operate through a Gi-protein mechanism. Aortic segments were prepared for measurement of isometric tension. After contraction with prostaglandin F2alpha, relaxation to thrombin, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), or the endothelium-independent agonists, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) or papaverine was examined. Maximal relaxation to thrombin was impaired in the presence of ox-LDL (17.7+/-3.7% p<0.05) compared to control (no LDL) (52.6+/-4.0%). Ox-LDL did not affect maximal relaxation to ADP or SNP. However, in the presence of charybdotoxin (CHTX: calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitor) ox-LDL impaired relaxation to ADP (17.4+/-3.2%). CHTX did not affect control (no LDL) responses to ADP (69.6+/-5.0%) or relaxation to thrombin or papaverine. In conclusion, ox-LDL impairs relaxation to thrombin, but in the case of ADP, calcium-activated potassium channels compensate to maintain this relaxation. PMID:11605770

  4. Calcium-dependent depletion zones in the cortical microtubule array coincide with sites of, but do not regulate, wall ingrowth papillae deposition in epidermal transfer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-ming; Talbot, Mark J; McCurdy, David W; Patrick, John W; Offler, Christina E

    2015-09-01

    Trans-differentiation to a transfer-cell morphology is characterized by the localized deposition of wall ingrowth papillae that protrude into the cytosol. Whether the cortical microtubule array directs wall ingrowth papillae formation was investigated using a Vicia faba cotyledon culture system in which their adaxial epidermal cells were spontaneously induced to trans-differentiate to transfer cells. During deposition of wall ingrowth papillae, the aligned cortical microtubule arrays in precursor epidermal cells were reorganized into a randomized array characterized by circular depletion zones. Concurrence of the temporal appearance, spatial pattern, and size of depletion zones and wall ingrowth papillae was consistent with each papilla occupying a depletion zone. Surprisingly, microtubules appeared not to regulate construction of wall ingrowth papillae, as neither depolymerization nor stabilization of cortical microtubules changed their deposition pattern or morphology. Moreover, the size and spatial pattern of depletion zones was unaltered when the formation of wall ingrowth papillae was blocked by inhibiting cellulose biosynthesis. In contrast, the depletion zones were absent when the cytosolic calcium plumes, responsible for directing wall ingrowth papillae formation, were blocked or dissipated. Thus, we conclude that the depletion zones within the cortical microtubule array result from localized depolymerization of microtubules initiated by elevated cytosolic Ca(2+) levels at loci where wall ingrowth papillae are deposited. The physiological significance of the depletion zones as a mechanism to accommodate the construction of wall ingrowth papillae without compromising maintenance of the plasma membrane-microtubule inter-relationship is discussed. PMID:26136268

  5. Calcium-dependent depletion zones in the cortical microtubule array coincide with sites of, but do not regulate, wall ingrowth papillae deposition in epidermal transfer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui-ming; Talbot, Mark J.; McCurdy, David W.; Patrick, John W.; Offler, Christina E.

    2015-01-01

    Trans-differentiation to a transfer-cell morphology is characterized by the localized deposition of wall ingrowth papillae that protrude into the cytosol. Whether the cortical microtubule array directs wall ingrowth papillae formation was investigated using a Vicia faba cotyledon culture system in which their adaxial epidermal cells were spontaneously induced to trans-differentiate to transfer cells. During deposition of wall ingrowth papillae, the aligned cortical microtubule arrays in precursor epidermal cells were reorganized into a randomized array characterized by circular depletion zones. Concurrence of the temporal appearance, spatial pattern, and size of depletion zones and wall ingrowth papillae was consistent with each papilla occupying a depletion zone. Surprisingly, microtubules appeared not to regulate construction of wall ingrowth papillae, as neither depolymerization nor stabilization of cortical microtubules changed their deposition pattern or morphology. Moreover, the size and spatial pattern of depletion zones was unaltered when the formation of wall ingrowth papillae was blocked by inhibiting cellulose biosynthesis. In contrast, the depletion zones were absent when the cytosolic calcium plumes, responsible for directing wall ingrowth papillae formation, were blocked or dissipated. Thus, we conclude that the depletion zones within the cortical microtubule array result from localized depolymerization of microtubules initiated by elevated cytosolic Ca2+ levels at loci where wall ingrowth papillae are deposited. The physiological significance of the depletion zones as a mechanism to accommodate the construction of wall ingrowth papillae without compromising maintenance of the plasma membrane–microtubule inter-relationship is discussed. PMID:26136268

  6. EFFECTS OF SODIUM AND CALCIUM IN LIGNITE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Kurt E. Eylands; Daniel J. Stepan

    2001-12-01

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC) has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs). Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has been working on the development of a PAC product to remove NOM from surface water supplies to prevent the formation of carcinogenic DBPs during chlorination. During previous studies, the sodium and calcium content of the lignites showed a significant effect on the sorption capacity of the activated carbon product. As much as a 130% increase in the humic acid sorption capacity of a PAC produced from a high-sodium-content lignite was observed. During this study, activated carbons were prepared from three coals representing high-sodium, low-sodium--low-calcium, and high-calcium compositions in two steps, an initial char formation followed by mild activation with steam to avoid excessive burnout. This set of carbons was characterized with respect to physical and chemical properties. The BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) nitrogen adsorption isotherms gave relatively low surface areas (ranging from 245 to 370 m{sup 2}/g). The lowest-BET area was obtained for the high-sodium carbon, which can be attributed to enlargement of micropores as a result of sodium-catalyzed gasification reaction of the carbon structure. This hypothesis is consistent with the scanning electron microscopy microprobe analyses, which show that in both the coal and the activated carbon from this coal, the sodium is distributed over both the carbon structure and the mineral particles. Thus it is initially associated with carboxylate groups on the coal and then as sodium oxide or

  7. Platelet adhesion and activation on polyethylene glycol modified polyurethane surfaces. Measurement of cytoplasmic calcium.

    PubMed

    Park, K D; Suzuki, K; Lee, W K; Lee, J E; Kim, Y H; Sakurai, Y; Okano, T

    1996-01-01

    Polyurethane (PU) surfaces were modified by coupling polyethylene glycol (PEG; molecular weight, 1,000) chains carrying different terminal groups (PU-PEG1K-OH, PU-PEG1K-NH2, PU-PEG1K-SO3) and longer PEG chains (MW, 3,350; PU-PEG3.4K-OH). The modified PU surfaces have the same PEG (1K) chain density. Surface induced platelet activation was evaluated by measuring cytoplasmic free calcium concentration in platelets contacting modified surfaces, and platelet adhesion onto modified surfaces was investigated in vitro. Cytoplasmic free calcium levels in platelets contacting PU-PEG-SO3 remained relatively constant, in contrast to the significant increase observed for PU-PEG-NH2, PU-PEG-OH, and control PU surfaces. The degree of platelet adhesion clearly demonstrates that all PEG graft surfaces prevented platelet adhesion. Among PEG1K surfaces, PU-PEG-SO3 shows the lowest platelet adhesion. In the case of relatively longer PEG grafted surfaces (PU-PEG3.4K-OH and PU-PEG3.4K-Hep), both surfaces were found to prevent the increase in both cytoplasmic free calcium and platelet adhesion. These results suggest that longer PEG chain grafting is more effective than shorter grafting in preventing platelet activation and adhesion because of the highly dynamic movement of hydrated PEG chains at the interface. In addition, in vitro platelet interaction is dependent upon terminal groups of PEG chains on PEG1K series surfaces. PMID:8945010

  8. Genetically encoded calcium indicators for multi-color neural activity imaging and combination with optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Akerboom, Jasper; Carreras Calderón, Nicole; Tian, Lin; Wabnig, Sebastian; Prigge, Matthias; Tolö, Johan; Gordus, Andrew; Orger, Michael B.; Severi, Kristen E.; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Pulver, Stefan R.; Wardill, Trevor J.; Fischer, Elisabeth; Schüler, Christina; Chen, Tsai-Wen; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Bargmann, Cornelia I.; Kim, Douglas S.; Kügler, Sebastian; Lagnado, Leon; Hegemann, Peter; Gottschalk, Alexander; Schreiter, Eric R.; Looger, Loren L.

    2013-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) are powerful tools for systems neuroscience. Here we describe red, single-wavelength GECIs, “RCaMPs,” engineered from circular permutation of the thermostable red fluorescent protein mRuby. High-resolution crystal structures of mRuby, the red sensor RCaMP, and the recently published red GECI R-GECO1 give insight into the chromophore environments of the Ca2+-bound state of the sensors and the engineered protein domain interfaces of the different indicators. We characterized the biophysical properties and performance of RCaMP sensors in vitro and in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila larvae, and larval zebrafish. Further, we demonstrate 2-color calcium imaging both within the same cell (registering mitochondrial and somatic [Ca2+]) and between two populations of cells: neurons and astrocytes. Finally, we perform integrated optogenetics experiments, wherein neural activation via channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) or a red-shifted variant, and activity imaging via RCaMP or GCaMP, are conducted simultaneously, with the ChR2/RCaMP pair providing independently addressable spectral channels. Using this paradigm, we measure calcium responses of naturalistic and ChR2-evoked muscle contractions in vivo in crawling C. elegans. We systematically compare the RCaMP sensors to R-GECO1, in terms of action potential-evoked fluorescence increases in neurons, photobleaching, and photoswitching. R-GECO1 displays higher Ca2+ affinity and larger dynamic range than RCaMP, but exhibits significant photoactivation with blue and green light, suggesting that integrated channelrhodopsin-based optogenetics using R-GECO1 may be subject to artifact. Finally, we create and test blue, cyan, and yellow variants engineered from GCaMP by rational design. This engineered set of chromatic variants facilitates new experiments in functional imaging and optogenetics. PMID:23459413

  9. Reporting Sodium Channel Activity Using Calcium Flux: Pharmacological Promiscuity of Cardiac Nav1.5

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkang; Zou, Beiyan; Du, Fang; Xu, Kaiping

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are essential for membrane excitability and represent therapeutic targets for treating human diseases. Recent reports suggest that these channels, e.g., Nav1.3 and Nav1.5, are inhibited by multiple structurally distinctive small molecule drugs. These studies give reason to wonder whether these drugs collectively target a single site or multiple sites in manifesting such pharmacological promiscuity. We thus investigate the pharmacological profile of Nav1.5 through systemic analysis of its sensitivity to diverse compound collections. Here, we report a dual-color fluorescent method that exploits a customized Nav1.5 [calcium permeable Nav channel, subtype 5 (SoCal5)] with engineered-enhanced calcium permeability. SoCal5 retains wild-type (WT) Nav1.5 pharmacological profiles. WT SoCal5 and SoCal5 with the local anesthetics binding site mutated (F1760A) could be expressed in separate cells, each with a different-colored genetically encoded calcium sensor, which allows a simultaneous report of compound activity and site dependence. The pharmacological profile of SoCal5 reveals a hit rate (>50% inhibition) of around 13% at 10 μM, comparable to that of hERG. The channel activity is susceptible to blockage by known drugs and structurally diverse compounds. The broad inhibition profile is highly dependent on the F1760 residue in the inner cavity, which is a residue conserved among all nine subtypes of Nav channels. Both promiscuity and dependence on F1760 seen in Nav1.5 were replicated in Nav1.4. Our evidence of a broad inhibition profile of Nav channels suggests a need to consider off-target effects on Nav channels. The site-dependent promiscuity forms a foundation to better understand Nav channels and compound interactions. PMID:25422141

  10. Functional segregation of voltage-activated calcium channels in motoneurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Garry; Lasser-Katz, Efrat; Simchovitz, Alon; Sharon, Ronit; Soreq, Hermona; Surmeier, D. James

    2015-01-01

    Calcium influx elevates mitochondrial oxidant stress (mOS) in dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurons that are prone to Lewy body pathologies in presymptomatic Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. In experimental PD models, treatment with isradipine, the dihydropyridine with the highest affinity to Cav1.3 channels, prevents subthreshold calcium influx via Cav1.3 channels into midbrain dopamine neurons and protects them from mOS. In DMV neurons, isradipine is also effective in reducing mOS despite overwhelming evidence that subthreshold calcium influx is negligible compared with spike-triggered influx. To solve this conundrum we combined slice electrophysiology, two-photon laser scanning microscopy, mRNA profiling, and computational modeling. We find that the unusually depolarized subthreshold voltage trajectory of DMV neurons is positioned between the relatively hyperpolarized activation curve of Cav1.3 channels and that of other high-voltage activated (HVA) calcium channels, thus creating a functional segregation between Cav1.3 and HVA calcium channels. The HVA channels flux the bulk of calcium during spikes but can only influence pacemaking through their coupling to calcium-activated potassium currents. In contrast, Cav1.3 currents, which we show to be more than an order-of-magnitude smaller than the HVA calcium currents, are able to introduce sufficient inward current to speed up firing. However, Kv4 channels that are constitutively open in the subthreshold range guarantee slow pacemaking, despite the depolarizing action of Cav1.3 and other pacemaking currents. We propose that the efficacy of isradipine in preventing mOS in DMV neurons arises from its mixed effect on Cav1.3 channels and on HVA Cav1.2 channels. PMID:26156385

  11. Calcium-activated potassium channels in insect pacemaker neurons as unexpected target site for the novel fumigant dimethyl disulfide.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Hélène; Auger, Jacques; Legros, Christian; Lapied, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), a plant-derived insecticide, is a promising fumigant as a substitute for methyl bromide. To further understand the mode of action of DMDS, we examined its effect on cockroach octopaminergic neurosecretory cells, called dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons, using whole-cell patch-clamp technique, calcium imaging and antisense oligonucleotide strategy. At low concentration (1 microM), DMDS modified spontaneous regular spike discharge into clear bursting activity associated with a decrease of the amplitude of the afterhyperpolarization. This effect led us to suspect alterations of calcium-activated potassium currents (IKCa) and [Ca(2+)](i) changes. We showed that DMDS reduced amplitudes of both peak transient and sustained components of the total potassium current. IKCa was confirmed as a target of DMDS by using iberiotoxin, cadmium chloride, and pSlo antisense oligonucleotide. In addition, we showed that DMDS induced [Ca(2+)](i) rise in Fura-2-loaded DUM neurons. Using calcium-free solution, and (R,S)-(3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-isoquinoline-1-yl)-2-phenyl-N,N-di-[2-(2,3,4-trimethoxy-phenyl)ethyl]-acetamide (LOE 908) [an inhibitor of transient receptor potential (TRP)gamma], we demonstrated that TRPgamma initiated calcium influx. By contrast, omega-conotoxin GVIA (an inhibitor of N-type high-voltage-activated calcium channels), did not affect the DMDS-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rise. Finally, the participation of the calcium-induced calcium release mechanism was investigated using thapsigargin, caffeine, and ryanodine. Our study revealed that DMDS-induced elevation in [Ca(2+)](i) modulated IKCa in an unexpected bell-shaped manner via intracellular calcium. In conclusion, DMDS affects multiple targets, which could be an effective way to improve pest control efficacy of fumigation. PMID:17942746

  12. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  13. The Role of Calcium Activated Protease Calpain in Experimental Retinal Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, M.; Shearer, T.R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the recent evidence linking the family of ubiquitous proteases called calpains (EC 3.4.22.17) to neuropathologies of the retina. The hypothesis being tested in such studies is that over-activation of calpains by elevated intracellular calcium contributes to retinal cell death produced by conditions such as elevated intraocular pressure and hypoxia. Recent x-ray diffraction studies have provided insight into the molecular events causing calpain activation. Further, x-ray diffraction data has provided details on how side chains on calpain inhibitors affect docking into the active site of calpain 1. This opens the possibility of testing calpain-specific inhibitors, such as SJA6017 and SNJ1945, for human safety and as a site-directed form of treatment for retinal pathologies. PMID:18348880

  14. Effects of cadmium on myometrial activity of the nonpregnant human. Interactions with calcium and oxytocin.

    PubMed

    Sipowicz, M; Kostrzewska, A; Laudanski, T; Akerlund, M

    1995-02-01

    With respect to recent reports suggesting an involvement of cadmium in preterm labor, the effects of this ion on the activity of myometrial strips from term pregnant women were examined. The interactions of cadmium with calcium and oxytocin on myometrial activity were also studied. Cadmium alone inhibited spontaneous contractile activity already in a concentration of 10(-9) M and in 10(-3) M myometrial contractions were almost completely abolished. Responses to Ca2+ and oxytocin were significantly increased by exposure to cadmium in low concentration (10(-9) M-10(-8) M), whereas higher concentration of Cd2+ had inhibitory action. These results suggest that cadmium not only blocks Ca2+ channels in the human myometrium, but also interferes with intracellular mechanisms involved in excitation-contraction coupling. The increased responses to Ca2+ and oxytocin in the presence of low amounts of Cd2+ support a role of cadmium in mechanisms of preterm labor. PMID:7900519

  15. Effect of Hydraulic Activity on Crystallization of Precipitated Calcium Carbonate (PCC) for Eco-Friendly Paper

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Ah; Han, Gi-Chun; Lim, Mihee; You, Kwang-Suk; Ryu, Miyoung; Ahn, Ji-Whan; Fujita, Toyohisa; Kim, Hwan

    2009-01-01

    Wt% of aragonite, a CaCO3 polymorph, increased with higher hydraulic activity (°C) of limestone in precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) from the lime-soda process (Ca(OH)2-NaOH-Na2CO3). Only calcite, the most stable polymorph, was crystallized at hydraulic activity under 10 °C, whereas aragonite also started to crystallize over 10 °C. The crystallization of PCC is more dependent on the hydraulic activity of limestone than CaO content, a factor commonly used to classify limestone ores according to quality. The results could be effectively applied to the determination of polymorphs in synthetic PCC for eco-friendly paper manufacture. PMID:20087470

  16. The calcium response of mouse sperm flagella: role of calcium ions in the regulation of dynein activity.

    PubMed

    Lesich, Kathleen A; Kelsch, Courtney B; Ponichter, Kristen L; Dionne, Benjamin J; Dang, Loan; Lindemann, Charles B

    2012-04-01

    Triton X-100-extracted mouse sperm treated with 0.1 mM ATP and 1.0 mM Ca(2+) exhibit an extremely coiled configuration that has been previously described as a curlicue. Sperm in the curlicue configuration exhibit a monotonically curved flagellum where the shear angle of the flagellum can reach a value as high as 14 radians at the flagellar tip. We utilized this strong reaction to Ca(2+) to elucidate the mechanism of the calcium response. The disintegration of the axoneme was facilitated by the use of an extraction procedure that removed the mitochondrial sheath without eliminating the calcium response. The order of emergence of the doublet microtubule outer dense fiber complexes was observed in the presence and absence of added Ca(2+). The identity of the emergent elements was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Ca(2+) altered the order of emergence of internal axoneme elements to favor the appearance of the elements of the 9-1-2 side of the axoneme. These elements are propelled baseward by the action of dyneins on doublets 1 and 2. It was also possible to establish that the motive force for maintaining the curlicue configuration is dynein-based. The curlicues were relaxed by inhibition with 50 μM NaVO(3) and were reestablished by disinhibiting the vanadate with 2.5 mM catechol. PMID:22262695

  17. Activation of Src and release of intracellular calcium by phosphatidic acid during Xenopus laevis fertilization.

    PubMed

    Bates, Ryan C; Fees, Colby P; Holland, William L; Winger, Courtney C; Batbayar, Khulan; Ancar, Rachel; Bergren, Todd; Petcoff, Douglas; Stith, Bradley J

    2014-02-01

    We report a new step in the fertilization in Xenopus laevis which has been found to involve activation of Src tyrosine kinase to stimulate phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) which increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to release intracellular calcium ([Ca](i)). Molecular species analysis and mass measurements suggested that sperm activate phospholipase D (PLD) to elevate phosphatidic acid (PA). We now report that PA mass increased 2.7 fold by 1 min after insemination and inhibition of PA production by two methods inhibited activation of Src and PLCγ, increased [Ca](i) and other fertilization events. As compared to 14 other lipids, PA specifically bound Xenopus Src but not PLCγ. Addition of synthetic PA activated egg Src (an action requiring intact lipid rafts) and PLCγ as well as doubling the amount of PLCγ in rafts. In the absence of elevated [Ca](i), PA addition elevated IP3 mass to levels equivalent to that induced by sperm (but twice that achieved by calcium ionophore). Finally, PA induced [Ca](i) release that was blocked by an IP3 receptor inhibitor. As only PLD1b message was detected, and Western blotting did not detect PLD2, we suggest that sperm activate PLD1b to elevate PA which then binds to and activates Src leading to PLCγ stimulation, IP3 elevation and [Ca](i) release. Due to these and other studies, PA may also play a role in membrane fusion events such as sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis, the elevation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and the large, late increase in sn 1,2-diacylglycerol in fertilization. PMID:24269904

  18. Activation of Src and release of intracellular calcium by phosphatidic acid during Xenopus laevis fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Ryan C.; Fees, Colby P.; Holland, William L.; Winger, Courtney C.; Batbayar, Khulan; Ancar, Rachel; Bergren, Todd; Petcoff, Douglas; Stith, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new step in the fertilization in Xenopus laevis which has been found to involve activation of Src tyrosine kinase to stimulate phospholipase C-γ (PLC- γ) which increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to release intracellular calcium ([Ca]i). Molecular species analysis and mass measurements suggested that sperm activate phospholipase D (PLD) to elevate phosphatidic acid (PA). We now report that PA mass increased 2.7 fold by 1 minute after insemination and inhibition of PA production by two methods inhibited activation of Src and PLCγ, increased [Ca]i and other fertilization events. As compared to 14 other lipids, PA strongly bound Xenopus Src but not PLCγ. Addition of synthetic PA activated egg Src (an action requiring intact lipid rafts) and PLCγ as well as doubling the amount of PLCγ in rafts. In the absence of elevated [Ca]i, PA addition elevated IP3 mass to levels equivalent to that induced by sperm (but twice that achieved by calcium ionophore). Finally, PA induced [Ca]i release that was blocked by an IP3 receptor inhibitor. As only PLD1b message was detected, and Western blotting did not detect PLD2, we suggest that sperm activate PLD1b to elevate PA which then binds to and activates Src leading to PLCγ stimulation, IP3 elevation and [Ca]i release. Due to these and other studies, PA may also play a role in membrane fusion events such as sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis, the elevation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and the large, late increase in sn 1,2-diacylglycerol in fertilization. PMID:24269904

  19. Streptomyces griseus aminopeptidase is a calcium-activated zinc metalloprotein. Purification and properties of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Spungin, A; Blumberg, S

    1989-08-01

    A heat-stable aminopeptidase with an N-terminal Ala-Pro-Asp-Ile-Pro-Leu sequence has been purified from Streptomyces griseus by heat treatment followed by gel-exclusion and anion-exchange chromatographic procedures. The enzyme is a monomeric zinc metalloenzyme showing an apparent molecular mass of 33 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 21 kDa by gel filtration on Superose 12. Calcium ions bind to the enzyme, pKCa 4.5, and activate it about sixfold when the substrate is leucine-4-nitroanilide (0.4 mM in 50 mM Tris/HCl pH 8.0, 25 degrees C). Binding of Ca2+ also contributes to the thermal stability of the protein. This aminopeptidase may be useful for two-stage assays of bacterial and mammalian metalloendopeptidases; it may also serve in studies of proteolytic enzyme activation by calcium ions. PMID:2503378

  20. Copper-induced activation of TRP channels promotes extracellular calcium entry, activation of CaMs and CDPKs, copper entry and membrane depolarization in Ulva compressa

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Melissa; González, Alberto; Sáez, Claudio A.; Morales, Bernardo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify channels involved in membrane depolarization, Ulva compressa was incubated with agonists of TRP channels C5, A1 and V1, and the level of intracellular calcium was detected. Agonists of TRPC5, A1 and V1 induced increases in intracellular calcium at 4, 9, and 11 min of exposure, respectively, and antagonists of TRPC5, A1, and V1 corresponding to SKF-96365 (SKF), HC-030031 (HC), and capsazepin (CPZ), respectively, inhibited calcium increases indicating that functional TRPs exist in U. compressa. In addition, copper excess induced increases in intracellular calcium at 4, 9, and 12 min which were inhibited by SKF, HC, and CPZ, respectively, indicating that copper activate TRPC5, A1, and V1 channels. Moreover, copper-induced calcium increases were inhibited by EGTA, a non-permeable calcium chelating agent, but not by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium ATPase, indicating that activation of TRPs leads to extracellular calcium entry. Furthermore, copper-induced calcium increases were not inhibited by W-7, an inhibitor of CaMs, and staurosporine, an inhibitor of CDPKs, indicating that extracellular calcium entry did not require activation of CaMs and CDPKs. In addition, copper induced membrane depolarization events at 4, 8, and 11 min and these events were inhibited by SKF, HC, CPZ, and bathocuproine, a specific copper chelating agent, indicating that copper entry through TRP channels leads to membrane depolarization. Moreover, membrane depolarization events were inhibited by W-7 and staurosporine, indicating that activation of CaMs and CDPKs is required to allow copper entry through TRPs. Interestingly, copper-induced calcium increases and depolarization events were light-dependent and were inhibited by DCMU, an inhibitor of photosystem II, and ATP-γ-S, a non-hydrolizable analog of ATP, suggesting that ATP derived from photosynthesis is required to activate TRPs. Thus, light-dependent copper-induced activation TRPC5, A1

  1. Flow cytometric analysis of platelet activation under calcium ion-chelating conditions.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, T; Yokota, M; Tsuda, I; Tatsumi, N

    2002-04-01

    Platelet activation and aggregation results in factitious counting and sizing in routine haematology testing. In this study, the possibility of platelet activation in anticoagulated solutions was examined. Whole blood was examined using an automated counter and a flow cytometer before and after strong vortex agitation. Blood treated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) exhibited platelet activation both pre- and postagitation but activated platelets did not cause platelet aggregation. With sodium citrate, platelets were only minimally activated both pre- and postagitation. Heparin-treated blood exhibited minimal platelet activation preagitation, but agitation resulted in strong platelet activation and aggregation. Platelet size was increased by agitation in blood with EDTA and with sodium citrate, in association with significant increases in mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW), but MPV and PDW were significantly higher in EDTA solution than in sodium citrate solution. Change in platelet size was observed even in the presence of EDTA, indicating that careful sampling and processing are needed in the collection of specimens. Specimens obtained from patients with EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia exhibited the same level of activation as controls, although platelets exhibited aggregation in such specimens. In conclusion, platelet activation involving platelet size change can occur in the absence of calcium ions in blood treated with EDTA. PMID:11985558

  2. Calcium-activated inward spike after-currents in bursting neurone R15 of Aplysia.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D V

    1988-01-01

    1. Slow inward and outward after-currents follow action potentials in the bursting pacemaker neurone, R 15, of Aplysia californica. These experiments were performed to examine the role of axo-dendritic calcium influx in activating these after currents. 2. Depolarizing voltage-clamp commands issued at the soma were used to elicit the after-currents. The earlier inward depolarizing after-current of DAC was followed by the hyperpolarizing after-current or HAC. The DAC and HAC appeared at a threshold following depolarizing commands in normal sea water, presumably due to triggering of action potentials in inadequately space-clamped axon. In 100 microM-tetrodotoxin (TTX), the after-currents were graded, increasing gradually in amplitude with increasing voltage or duration of the command. 3. After-current amplitudes varied with the holding potential through the range tested, -40 to -80 mV. DACs were maximum at -40 to -50 mV and decreased in amplitude with hyperpolarization. HACs were maximum at -40 mV and decreased with hyperpolarization to disappear between -70 and -80 mV. 4. The dependence of after-currents upon intracellular calcium accumulation during the depolarizing command was tested in several ways. Bathing R15 in 0 Ca2+-2 mM-EGTA (ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid) sea water eliminated the after-currents. Bathing in 1 mM-Ca2+ sea water reduced the DAC by 76% and the HAC by 87% following 10 ms long depolarizations to +40 mV. Application of Mn2+ (25 mM) or La3+ (5 mM) blocked the after-currents. Injection of EGTA intracellularly practically eliminated after-currents. Greatly prolonged depolarizations were required to elicit them after EGTA injection. Substitution of Ba2+ for Ca2+ also eliminated after-currents. 5. Sodium-free sea water eliminated the DAC. The HAC following brief (less than 30 ms) depolarizing commands was also eliminated in zero sodium, although longer commands were followed by an outward tail current. 6. Although the

  3. Dual mode antibacterial activity of ion substituted calcium phosphate nanocarriers for bone infections.

    PubMed

    Sampath Kumar, T S; Madhumathi, K; Rubaiya, Y; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential for the management of infectious diseases caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, through the development of newer antibacterial materials and efficient modes of antibiotic delivery. Calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics are commonly used as bone substitutes due to their similarity to bone mineral and are widely researched upon for the treatment of bone infections associated with bone loss. CaPs can be used as local antibiotic delivery agents for bone infections and can be substituted with antibacterial ions in their crystal structure to have a wide spectrum, sustained antibacterial activity even against drug resistant bacteria. In the present work, a dual mode antibiotic delivery system with antibacterial ion substituted calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanoparticles has been developed. Antibacterial ions such as zinc, silver, and strontium have been incorporated into CDHA at concentrations of 6, 0.25-0.75, and 2.5-7.5 at. %, respectively. The samples were found to be phase pure, acicular nanoparticles of length 40-50 nm and width 5-6 nm approximately. The loading and release profile of doxycycline, a commonly used antibiotic, was studied from the nanocarriers. The drug release was studied for 5 days and the release profile was influenced by the ion concentrations. The release of antibacterial ions was studied over a period of 21 days. The ion substituted CDHA samples were tested for antibacterial efficacy on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by MIC/MBC studies and time-kill assay. AgCDHA and ZnCDHA showed high antibacterial activity against both bacteria, while SrCDHA was weakly active against S. aureus. Present study shows that the antibiotic release can provide the initial high antibacterial activity, and the sustained ion release can provide a long-term antibacterial activity. Such dual mode antibiotic and antibacterial ion release offers an efficient and potent way to treat an incumbent drug

  4. Model Vestibular Nuclei Neurons Can Exhibit a Boosting Nonlinearity Due to an Adaptation Current Regulated by Spike-Triggered Calcium and Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Adam D.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro studies have previously found a class of vestibular nuclei neurons to exhibit a bidirectional afterhyperpolarization (AHP) in their membrane potential, due to calcium and calcium-activated potassium conductances. More recently in vivo studies of such vestibular neurons were found to exhibit a boosting nonlinearity in their input-output tuning curves. In this paper, a Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) type neuron model, originally developed to reproduce the in vitro AHP, is shown to produce a boosting nonlinearity similar to that seen in vivo for increased the calcium conductance. Indicative of a bifurcation, the HH model is reduced to a generalized integrate-and-fire (IF) model that preserves the bifurcation structure and boosting nonliearity. By then projecting the neuron model’s phase space trajectories into 2D, the underlying geometric mechanism relating the AHP and boosting nonlinearity is revealed. Further simplifications and approximations are made to derive analytic expressions for the steady steady state firing rate as a function of bias current, μ, as well as the gain (i.e. its slope) and the position of its peak at μ = μ*. Finally, although the boosting nonlinearity has not yet been experimentally observed in vitro, testable predictions indicate how it might be found. PMID:27427914

  5. Isoflurane-Induced Caspase-3 Activation Is Dependent on Cytosolic Calcium and Can Be Attenuated by Memantine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guohua; Dong, Yuanlin; Zhang, Bin; Ichinose, Fumito; Wu, Xu; Culley, Deborah J.; Crosby, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that caspase activation and apoptosis are associated with a variety of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. We reported that anesthetic isoflurane can induce apoptosis, alter processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and increase amyloid-β protein (Aβ) generation. However, the mechanism by which isoflurane induces apoptosis is primarily unknown. We therefore set out to assess effects of extracellular calcium concentration on isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in H4 human neuroglioma cells stably transfected to express human full-length APP (H4-APP cells). In addition, we tested effects of RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of IP3 receptor, NMDA receptor, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium pump, sacro-/ER calcium ATPase (SERCA1). Finally, we examined the effects of the NMDA receptor partial antagonist, memantine, in H4-APP cells and brain tissue of naive mice. EDTA (10 mm), BAPTA (10 μm), and RNAi silencing of IP3 receptor, NMDA receptor, or SERCA1 attenuated capase-3 activation. Memantine (4 μm) inhibited isoflurane-induced elevations in cytosolic calcium levels and attenuated isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation, apoptosis, and cell viability. Memantine (20 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in brain tissue of naive mice. These results suggest that disruption of calcium homeostasis underlies isoflurane-induced caspase activation and apoptosis. We also show for the first time that the NMDA receptor partial antagonist, memantine, can prevent isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. These findings, indicating that isoflurane-induced caspase activation and apoptosis are dependent on cytosolic calcium levels, should facilitate the provision of safer anesthesia care, especially for Alzheimer's disease and elderly patients. PMID:18434534

  6. 12 CFR 347.206 - Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a foreign bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a foreign bank. 347.206 Section 347.206 Banks and Banking FEDERAL... Banks § 347.206 Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a...

  7. 12 CFR 347.206 - Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a foreign bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a foreign bank. 347.206 Section 347.206 Banks and Banking FEDERAL... Banks § 347.206 Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a...

  8. 12 CFR 347.206 - Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a foreign bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a foreign bank. 347.206 Section 347.206 Banks and Banking FEDERAL... Banks § 347.206 Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a...

  9. 12 CFR 347.206 - Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a foreign bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a foreign bank. 347.206 Section 347.206 Banks and Banking FEDERAL... Banks § 347.206 Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a...

  10. 12 CFR 347.206 - Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a foreign bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a foreign bank. 347.206 Section 347.206 Banks and Banking FEDERAL... Banks § 347.206 Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a...

  11. Calcium-dependent regulation of Rab activation and vesicle fusion by an intracellular P2X ion channel.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Katie; Baines, Abigail E; Keller, Thomas; Gruenheit, Nicole; Bragg, Laricia; North, R Alan; Thompson, Christopher R L

    2014-01-01

    Rab GTPases play key roles in the delivery, docking and fusion of intracellular vesicles. However, the mechanism by which spatial and temporal regulation of Rab GTPase activity is controlled is poorly understood. Here we describe a mechanism by which localized calcium release through a vesicular ion channel controls Rab GTPase activity. We show that activation of P2XA, an intracellular ion channel localized to the Dictyostelium discoideum contractile vacuole system, results in calcium efflux required for downregulation of Rab11a activity and efficient vacuole fusion. Vacuole fusion and Rab11a downregulation require the activity of CnrF, an EF-hand-containing Rab GAP found in a complex with Rab11a and P2XA. CnrF Rab GAP activity for Rab11a is enhanced by the presence of calcium and the EF-hand domain. These findings suggest that P2XA activation results in vacuolar calcium release, which triggers activation of CnrF Rab GAP activity and subsequent downregulation of Rab11a to allow vacuole fusion. PMID:24335649

  12. Calcium influx through stretch-activated channels mediates microfilament reorganization in osteoblasts under simulated weightlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Mingzhi; Yang, Zhouqi; Li, Jingbao; Xu, Huiyun; Li, Shengsheng; Zhang, Wei; Qian, Airong; Shang, Peng

    2013-06-01

    We have explored the role of Ca2+ signaling in microfilament reorganization of osteoblasts induced by simulated weightlessness using a random positioning machine (RPM). The RPM-induced alterations of cell morphology, microfilament distribution, cell proliferation, cell migration, cytosol free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), and protein expression in MG63 osteoblasts were investigated. Simulated weightlessness reduced cell size, disrupted microfilament, inhibited cellular proliferation and migration, and induced an increase in [Ca2+]i in MG63 human osteosarcoma cells. Gadolinium chloride (Gd), an inhibitor for stretch-activated channels, attenuated the increase in [Ca2+]i and microfilament disruption. Further, the expression of calmodulin was significantly increased by simulated weightlessness, and an inhibitor of calmodulin, W-7, aggravated microfilament disruption. Our findings demonstrate that simulated weightlessness induces Ca2+ influx through stretch-activated channels, then results in microfilament disruption.

  13. Calcium Imaging of Basal Forebrain Activity during Innate and Learned Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Thomas C.; Pinto, Lucas; Brock, Julien R.; Dan, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays crucial roles in arousal, attention, and memory, and its impairment is associated with a variety of cognitive deficits. The BF consists of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons. Electrical or optogenetic stimulation of BF cholinergic neurons enhances cortical processing and behavioral performance, but the natural activity of these cells during behavior is only beginning to be characterized. Even less is known about GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. Here, we performed microendoscopic calcium imaging of BF neurons as mice engaged in spontaneous behaviors in their home cages (innate) or performed a go/no-go auditory discrimination task (learned). Cholinergic neurons were consistently excited during movement, including running and licking, but GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons exhibited diverse responses. All cell types were activated by overt punishment, either inside or outside of the discrimination task. These findings reveal functional similarities and distinctions between BF cell types during both spontaneous and task-related behaviors. PMID:27242444

  14. Lack of relationship between activity of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and calcium or phosphate absorption.

    PubMed

    Asteggiano, C; Tolosa, N; Pereira, R; Moreno, J; Cañas, F

    1981-01-01

    The effects of vitamin D3 and the aqueous extract of Solanum malacoxylon on intestinal alkaline phosphatase and tissue phosphate content were studied on rachitic chicks treated with large doses of ethane-1-hydroxy-1,1 diphosphonate (EHDP). The EHDP treatment blocks the increase of intestinal calcium or phosphate absorption induced by the vitamin D3, while it has no effects on the rise of intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity or the increment in tissue phosphate content. The lack of correlation between the increment of alkaline phosphatase and that of Ca or phosphate absorption in vitamin D3 plus EHDP treated chicks excludes a participation of the alkaline phosphatase in the mechanism of Ca or P intestinal absorption. The Ca or phosphorus absorption are elicited specifically by 1,25-(OH)2-D3, while alkaline phosphatase activity and phosphate tissue concentration respond to a broader spectrum of stimuli. PMID:6316731

  15. Extracellular calcium is not an absolute requirement for tumoricidal activation of RAW-264 macrophage-like cell line.

    PubMed

    Gorecka-Tisera, A M; McCulloch, M A

    1986-08-01

    The purpose of these studies was to establish whether extracellular calcium (Cao2+) plays a role in the process of activation of RAW-264 macrophages for tumor cell killing. We found that these cells were capable of developing a significant level of cytolytic activity under treatment with lymphokine (LK) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in the absence of Cao2+ and that responses developed in Ca2+-free media were only 6-18% lower in comparison with the responses developed in the presence of Cao2+. The determination of 45calcium uptake in RAW-264 cells treated with LK and LPS showed that the rate of 45calcium uptake has displayed no increase during either the course of activation or in activated, highly cytolytic cells. Finally, three calcium channel blockers examined here: verapamil, diltiazem and flunarizine, with concentrations ranging from 1 X 10(-7) M - 2.5 X 10(-5) M, showed no inhibitory effect on the process of activation. Nifedipine, another calcium channel blocker, inhibited the development of cytolytic activity with concentrations ranging from 1 X 10(-6) M - 2.5 X 10(-5) M. It could be argued, however, that this inhibition was nonspecific, since this agent was 13 times more potent with regard to the calcium ionophore A23187-induced release of beta-glucuronidase, the function which is entirely dependent on Cao2+. Taken together, these results suggest that Cao2+ is not an absolute requirement for the process of tumoricidal activation of RAW-264 macrophages but it may play some supportive role in this process. PMID:3461096

  16. Artificial activation of bovine and equine oocytes with cycloheximide, roscovitine, strontium, or 6-dimethylaminopurine in low or high calcium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Claudia Barbosa; Devito, Liani Gasparini; Martins, Lilian Rigatto; Blanco, Ieda Dala Pria; de Lima Neto, João Ferreria; Tsuribe, Patricia Myakawa; Gonçalves, Camila Gabriela Pereria; da Cruz Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda

    2014-08-01

    Knowledge on parthenogenetic activation of oocytes is important to improve the efficiency of nuclear transfer (NT) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) because artificial activation of oocyte (AOA) is an essential step to achieve embryo production. Although different procedures for AOA have been established, the efficiency of in vitro production of embryos remains low, especially in equines and Bos taurus bovines. In an attempt to improve the techniques of NT and ICSI in bovine and equine species, we tested different combinations of drugs that had different mechanisms of action for the parthenogenetic activation of oocytes in these animals. The oocytes were collected, in vitro matured for 24 to 30 h and activated artificially, in the presence of low or high concentrations of calcium, with combinations of calcium ionophore (ionomycin) with cycloheximide, roscovitine, strontium, or 6-dimethylaminopurine (6-DMAP). For assessment of activation rates, oocytes were stained with Hoechst 33342 and observed under an inverted microscope. We showed that all combinations of drugs were equally efficient in activating bovine oocytes, with the best results obtained when high concentrations of calcium were adopted. For equine oocytes, high concentrations of calcium were not beneficial for the parthenogenetic activation and the combination of ionomycin with either 6-DMAP or roscovitine was effective in inducing artificial activation of oocytes. We believe that our preliminary findings provide some clues for the development of a better AOA protocol to be used with these species. PMID:23340077

  17. Molecular Interactions between Tarantula Toxins and Low-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Autoosa; Vega, Benjamin S.; Milescu, Lorin S.; Milescu, Mirela

    2016-01-01

    Few gating-modifier toxins have been reported to target low-voltage-activated (LVA) calcium channels, and the structural basis of toxin sensitivity remains incompletely understood. Studies of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels have identified the S3b–S4 “paddle motif,” which moves at the protein-lipid interface to drive channel opening, as the target for these amphipathic neurotoxins. Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels contain four homologous voltage sensor domains, suggesting multiple toxin binding sites. We show here that the S3–S4 segments within Cav3.1 can be transplanted into Kv2.1 to examine their individual contributions to voltage sensing and pharmacology. With these results, we now have a more complete picture of the conserved nature of the paddle motif in all three major voltage-gated ion channel types (Kv, Nav, and Cav). When screened with tarantula toxins, the four paddle sequences display distinct toxin binding properties, demonstrating that gating-modifier toxins can bind to Cav channels in a domain specific fashion. Domain III was the most commonly and strongly targeted, and mutagenesis revealed an acidic residue that is important for toxin binding. We also measured the lipid partitioning strength of all toxins tested and observed a positive correlation with their inhibition of Cav3.1, suggesting a key role for membrane partitioning. PMID:27045173

  18. Molecular Interactions between Tarantula Toxins and Low-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Salari, Autoosa; Vega, Benjamin S; Milescu, Lorin S; Milescu, Mirela

    2016-01-01

    Few gating-modifier toxins have been reported to target low-voltage-activated (LVA) calcium channels, and the structural basis of toxin sensitivity remains incompletely understood. Studies of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels have identified the S3b-S4 "paddle motif," which moves at the protein-lipid interface to drive channel opening, as the target for these amphipathic neurotoxins. Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels contain four homologous voltage sensor domains, suggesting multiple toxin binding sites. We show here that the S3-S4 segments within Cav3.1 can be transplanted into Kv2.1 to examine their individual contributions to voltage sensing and pharmacology. With these results, we now have a more complete picture of the conserved nature of the paddle motif in all three major voltage-gated ion channel types (Kv, Nav, and Cav). When screened with tarantula toxins, the four paddle sequences display distinct toxin binding properties, demonstrating that gating-modifier toxins can bind to Cav channels in a domain specific fashion. Domain III was the most commonly and strongly targeted, and mutagenesis revealed an acidic residue that is important for toxin binding. We also measured the lipid partitioning strength of all toxins tested and observed a positive correlation with their inhibition of Cav3.1, suggesting a key role for membrane partitioning. PMID:27045173

  19. A coarse-grained model to study calcium activation of the cardiac thin filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is one of the most common heart disease caused by genetic mutations. Cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation involve regulation of crossbridge binding to the cardiac thin filament, which regulates actomyosin interactions through calcium-dependent alterations in the dynamics of cardiac troponin (cTn) and tropomyosin (Tm). An atomistic model of cTn complex interacting with Tm has been studied by our group. A more realistic model requires the inclusion of the dynamics of actin filament, which is almost 6 times larger than cTn and Tm in terms of atom numbers, and extensive sampling of the model becomes very resource-demanding. By using physics-based protein united-residue force field, we introduce a coarse-grained model to study the calcium activation of the thin filament resulting from cTn's allosteric regulation of Tm dynamics on actin. The time scale is much longer than that of all-atom molecular dynamics simulation because of the reduction of the degrees of freedom. The coarse-grained model is a good template for studying cardiac thin filament mutations that cause FHC, and reduces the cost of computational resources.

  20. A Calcium-dependent switch in a CREST-BRG1 complex regulates activity-dependent gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zilong; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2009-01-01

    Activity-dependent gene expression plays an important role in mediating the effects of sensory experience on nervous system development and function. While several activity-dependent transcription factors have been identified, the mechanism by which calcium signaling converts a promoter from a silenced to an active state is not well understood. Here we show that a CREST-BRG1 complex plays a critical role in regulating promoter activation by orchestrating a calcium-dependent release of a repressor complex, and a recruitment of an activator complex. In resting neurons, transcription of the c-fos promoter is inhibited by BRG1-dependent recruitment of a phospho-Rb-HDAC repressor complex. Upon calcium influx, Rb becomes dephosphorylated at Serine 795 by Calcineurin, which leads to release of the repressor complex. At the same time there is increased recruitment of CBP to the promoter by a CREST-dependent mechanism, which leads to transcriptional activation. The CREST-BRG1 also binds to the NR2B promoter and activity-dependent induction of NR2B expression involves a release of HDAC1 and recruitment of CBP, suggesting that this mechanism may be generally involved in regulating calcium-dependent transcription of neuronal genes. PMID:19081374

  1. Low-Voltage-Activated CaV3.1 Calcium Channels Shape T Helper Cell Cytokine Profiles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiyun; Zhang, Xuexin; Xue, Li; Xing, Juan; Jouvin, Marie-Hélène; Putney, James W; Anderson, Matthew P; Trebak, Mohamed; Kinet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-19

    Activation of T cells is mediated by the engagement of T cell receptors (TCRs) followed by calcium entry via store-operated calcium channels. Here we have shown an additional route for calcium entry into T cells-through the low-voltage-activated T-type CaV3.1 calcium channel. CaV3.1 mediated a substantial current at resting membrane potentials, and its deficiency had no effect on TCR-initiated calcium entry. Mice deficient for CaV3.1 were resistant to the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and had reduced productions of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by central nervous system (CNS)-infiltrating T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells. CaV3.1 deficiency led to decreased secretion of GM-CSF from in vitro polarized Th1 and Th17 cells. Nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) was also reduced in CaV3.1-deficient T cells. These data provide evidence for T-type channels in immune cells and their potential role in shaping the autoimmune response. PMID:27037192

  2. Effect of Trisetum flavescens P.B. on calcium and phosphorus metabolism in rats. Experimental evidence for the principle actively affecting phospho-calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, H; Ston, J; Pacovský, V

    1978-01-01

    After reviewing the literature on the vitamin D3-like activity of certain plants [Solanum malacoxylon, Cestrum diurnum and Trisetum flavescens], the authors present results of experiments in which dried Trisetum flavescens was administered perorally to rats. The addition of 2.5% dried Trisetum flavescens to the standard laboratory diet caused a drop in blood phosphate levels and a simultaneous marked increase in the calcium and phosphorus content of bones of the experimental animals. The mechanism of the action of Trisetum flavescens on phosphocalcium metabolism is discussed. PMID:150612

  3. Calcium phosphate deposition rate, structure and osteoconductivity on electrospun poly(l-lactic acid) matrix using electrodeposition or simulated body fluid incubation

    PubMed Central

    He, Chuanglong; Jin, Xiaobing; Ma, Peter X.

    2013-01-01

    Mineralized nanofibrous scaffolds have been proposed as promising scaffolds for bone regeneration due to their ability to mimic both nanoscale architecture and chemical composition of natural bone extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, a novel electrodeposition method was compared with an extensively explored simulated body fluid (SBF) incubation method in terms of the deposition rate, chemical composition, and morphology of calcium phosphate formed on electrospun fibrous thin matrices with a fiber diameter in the range from about 200 nm to about 1400 nm prepared using 6, 8, 10 and 12 wt% poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) solutions in a mixture of dichloromethane and acetone (2:1 in volume). The effects of the surface modification using the two mineralization techniques on osteoblastic cell (MC3T3-E1) proliferation and differentiation were also examined. It was found that electrodeposition was two to three orders of magnitude faster than the SBF method in mineralizing the fibrous matrices, reducing the mineralization time from about two weeks to an hour to achieve the same amounts of mineralization. The mineralization rate also varied with the fiber diameter but in opposite directions between the two mineralization methods. As a general trend, the increase of fiber diameter resulted in a faster mineralization rate for the electrodeposition method but a slower mineralization rate for the SBF incubation method. Using the electrodeposition method, one can control the chemical composition and morphology of the calcium phosphate by varying the electric deposition potential and electrolyte temperature to tune the mixture of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and hydroxy apatite (HAp). Using the SBF method, one can only obtain a low crystallinity HAp. The mineralized electrospun PLLA fibrous matrices from either method similarly facilitate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells as compared to neat PLLA matrices. Therefore, the

  4. PACAP modulation of calcium ion activity in developing granule cells of the neonatal mouse olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Mavis; Greig, Ann; Tvrdik, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+ activity in the CNS is critical for the establishment of developing neuronal circuitry prior to and during early sensory input. In developing olfactory bulb (OB), the neuromodulators that enhance network activity are largely unknown. Here we provide evidence that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP)-specific PAC1 receptors (PAC1Rs) expressed in postnatal day (P)2–P5 mouse OB are functional and enhance network activity as measured by increases in calcium in genetically identified granule cells (GCs). We used confocal Ca2+ imaging of OB slices from Dlx2-tdTomato mice to visualize GABAergic GCs. To address whether the PACAP-induced Ca2+ oscillations were direct or indirect effects of PAC1R activation, we used antagonists for the GABA receptors (GABARs) and/or glutamate receptors (GluRs) in the presence and absence of PACAP. Combined block of GABARs and GluRs yielded a 66% decrease in the numbers of PACAP-responsive cells, suggesting that 34% of OB neurons are directly activated by PACAP. Similarly, immunocytochemistry using anti-PAC1 antibody showed that 34% of OB neurons express PAC1R. Blocking either GluRs or GABARs alone indirectly showed that PACAP stimulates release of both glutamate and GABA, which activate GCs. The appearance of PACAP-induced Ca2+ activity in immature GCs suggests a role for PACAP in GC maturation. To conclude, we find that PACAP has both direct and indirect effects on neonatal OB GABAergic cells and may enhance network activity by promoting glutamate and GABA release. Furthermore, the numbers of PACAP-responsive GCs significantly increased between P2 and P5, suggesting that PACAP-induced Ca2+ activity contributes to neonatal OB development. PMID:25475351

  5. Inhibition of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity by nifedipine and nisoldipine is independent of their calcium-channel-blocking activity.

    PubMed

    Chang, J; Blazek, E; Carlson, R P

    1987-09-01

    The effects of several calcium antagonists on phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity were examined. Nifedipine and nisoldipine inhibited a cell-free preparation of PLA2 in a dose-dependent manner with maximal inhibition of 71-77% observed at 100 microM. More potent or equipotent dihydropyridine calcium antagonists such as nitrendipine and felodipine did not inhibit PLA2 activity. In addition, nondihydropyridine calcium antagonists such as diltiazem, verapamil, and cinnarazine failed to reduce PLA2 activity markedly. Nifedipine and nisoldipine also reduced PLA2 activity in intact mouse peritoneal macrophages where PLA2 activity was monitored by free [14C]arachidonic acid release from [14C]arachidonic acid-prelabeled cells. When levels of PGE2 and LTC4 were measured by radioimmunoassay, it was found that the synthesis of these two metabolites was concomitantly inhibited by nifedipine and nisoldipine. In vivo, nifedipine and nisoldipine inhibited tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) induced ear edema. UV irradiation of nifedipine and nisoldipine (which destroys the slow calcium-channel-blocking activity of these compounds) did not result in a loss of PLA2 inhibitory activity. In fact, in both instances the UV-irradiated forms of nifedipine and nisoldipine were slightly more potent PLA2 inhibitors than the parent compound alone. We therefore conclude that the ability of nifedipine and nisoldipine to inhibit PLA2 was direct and unrelated to their actions on slow calcium channels. PMID:3115895

  6. Enhanced Proliferation of Porcine Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by Extracellular Calcium is Associated with the Activation of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor and ERK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jingjing; Ai, Wei; Zhang, Fenglin; Zhu, Xiaotong; Shu, Gang; Wang, Lina; Gao, Ping; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, YongLiang; Jiang, Qingyan; Wang, Songbo

    2016-01-01

    Porcine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (pBMSCs) have the potential for application in regenerative medicine. This study aims to investigate the effects of extracellular calcium ([Ca2+]o) on pBMSCs proliferation and to explore the possible underlying mechanisms. The results demonstrated that 4 mM [Ca2+]o significantly promoted pBMSCs proliferation by reducing the G0/G1 phase cell percentage and by increasing the S phase cell proportion and the proliferation index of pBMSCs. Accordingly, [Ca2+]o stimulated the expression levels of proliferative genes such as cyclin A2, cyclin D1/3, cyclin E2, and PCNA and inhibited the expression of p21. In addition, [Ca2+]o resulted in a significant elevation of intracellular calcium and an increased ratio of p-ERK/ERK. However, inhibition of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) by its antagonist NPS2143 abolished the aforementioned effects of [Ca2+]o. Moreover, [Ca2+]o-induced promotion of pBMSCs proliferation, the changes of proliferative genes expression levels, and the activation of ERK1/2 signaling pathway were effectively blocked by U0126, a selective ERK kinase inhibitor. In conclusion, our findings provided evidence that the enhanced pBMSCs proliferation in response to [Ca2+]o was associated with the activation of CaSR and ERK1/2 signaling pathway, which may be useful for the application of pBMSCs in future clinical studies aimed at tissue regeneration and repair. PMID:27123007

  7. Noradrenaline activates a calcium-activated chloride conductance and increases the voltage-dependent calcium current in cultured single cells of rat portal vein.

    PubMed

    Pacaud, P; Loirand, G; Mironneau, C; Mironneau, J

    1989-05-01

    1. Membrane responses were recorded by a patch pipette technique in cultured cells isolated from rat portal vein. Using the whole-cell mode, pressure ejections of noradrenaline evoked depolarization (current clamp) and inward current (voltage clamp) at membrane potentials of -60 to -70 mV. The noradrenaline-induced response was reversibly blocked by prazosin indicating that the response was mediated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors. 2. The ionic mechanism of the noradrenaline-induced inward current was investigated in potassium-free caesium-containing solutions. Alteration of the chloride equilibrium potential produced similar changes in the reversal potential of the noradrenaline-induced current, indicating that noradrenaline opened chloride-selective channels. There was no evidence implicating sodium or calcium as the charge-carrying ion. 3. Caffeine applied in the bathing solution also induced a transient increase in chloride conductance but the noradrenaline-induced response was lost after application of caffeine. This is interpreted to mean that the increase in chloride conductance induced by noradrenaline and caffeine can occur as a consequence of a rise in intracellular calcium concentration depending on release of calcium from the same intracellular stores. 4. In the presence of caffeine, noradrenaline increased both the voltage-dependent calcium and chloride membrane conductances during application of repetitive depolarizing pulses. It is concluded that in isolated cells of the rat portal vein the depolarization in response to noradrenaline is mediated by an increase in chloride conductance depending on both the calcium release from intracellular stores and the increase of the voltage-dependent calcium current. PMID:2470458

  8. Shikonin Inhibits Intestinal Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels and Prevents Rotaviral Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2016-01-01

    Secretory diarrhea remains a global health burden and causes major mortality in children. There have been some focuses on antidiarrheal therapies that may reduce fluid losses and intestinal motility in diarrheal diseases. In the present study, we identified shikonin as an inhibitor of TMEM16A chloride channel activity using cell-based fluorescent-quenching assay. The IC50 value of shikonin was 6.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurements demonstrated that shikonin inhibited Eact-induced Cl(-) current in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 1.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurement showed that shikonin exhibited inhibitory effect against CCh-induced Cl(-) currents in mouse colonic epithelia but did not affect cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration as well as the other major enterocyte chloride channel conductance regulator. Characterization study found that shikonin inhibited basolateral K(+) channel activity without affecting Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities. In vivo studies revealed that shikonin significantly delayed intestinal motility in mice and reduced stool water content in a neonatal mice model of rotaviral diarrhea without affecting the viral infection process in vivo. Taken together, the results suggested that shikonin inhibited enterocyte calcium-activated chloride channels, the inhibitory effect was partially through inhbition of basolateral K(+) channel activity, and shikonin could be a lead compound in the treatment of rotaviral secretory diarrhea. PMID:27601995

  9. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P; Brennan, Sarah C; Mun, Hee-Chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D; Colecraft, Henry M; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R

    2016-01-01

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca(2+) ions stabilize the active state, PO4(3-) ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits. PMID:27434672

  10. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P; Brennan, Sarah C; Mun, Hee-chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D; Colecraft, Henry M; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R

    2016-01-01

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca2+ homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca2+ and PO43- ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca2+ ions stabilize the active state, PO43- ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13662.001 PMID:27434672

  11. The effects of electrolyte on the supercapacitive performance of activated calcium carbide-derived carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Xianyou; Jiang, Lanlan; Wu, Chun; Zhao, Qinglan; Liu, Xue; Hu, Ben'an; Yi, Lanhua

    2013-03-01

    Porous calcium carbide-derived carbon (CCDC) has been prepared by one-step route from CaC2 in a freshly prepared chlorine environment at lower temperature, and following activated by ZnCl2 to get activated CCDC. The performances of the supercapacitors based on activated CCDC as electrode active material in aqueous KOH, K2SO4, KCl and KNO3 electrolytes are studied by cyclic voltammetry, constant current charged/discharged, cyclic life and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It has been found that the supercapacitor using 6 M KOH as electrolyte shows an energy density of 8.3 Wh kg-1 and a power density of 1992 W kg-1 based on the total weight of the electrode active materials with a voltage range 0 V-1 V. Meanwhile, the specific capacitance of the supercapacitor in 6 M KOH electrolyte is 68 F g-1 at the scan rate of 1 mV s-1 in the voltage range of 0 V-1 V, the charge-transfer resistance is extremely low and the relaxation time is the least of all. The supercapacitor also exhibits a good cycling performance and keeps 95% of initial capacity over 5000 cycles.

  12. Shikonin Inhibits Intestinal Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels and Prevents Rotaviral Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2016-01-01

    Secretory diarrhea remains a global health burden and causes major mortality in children. There have been some focuses on antidiarrheal therapies that may reduce fluid losses and intestinal motility in diarrheal diseases. In the present study, we identified shikonin as an inhibitor of TMEM16A chloride channel activity using cell-based fluorescent-quenching assay. The IC50 value of shikonin was 6.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurements demonstrated that shikonin inhibited Eact-induced Cl- current in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 1.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurement showed that shikonin exhibited inhibitory effect against CCh-induced Cl- currents in mouse colonic epithelia but did not affect cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration as well as the other major enterocyte chloride channel conductance regulator. Characterization study found that shikonin inhibited basolateral K+ channel activity without affecting Na+/K+-ATPase activities. In vivo studies revealed that shikonin significantly delayed intestinal motility in mice and reduced stool water content in a neonatal mice model of rotaviral diarrhea without affecting the viral infection process in vivo. Taken together, the results suggested that shikonin inhibited enterocyte calcium-activated chloride channels, the inhibitory effect was partially through inhbition of basolateral K+ channel activity, and shikonin could be a lead compound in the treatment of rotaviral secretory diarrhea. PMID:27601995

  13. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yaqin; Liu, Jiane; Miao, Fengqin; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2015-01-01

    MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s) underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA) treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade. PMID:26263390

  14. Calcium-deficient apatite: influence of granule size and consolidation mode on release and in vitro activity of vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Obadia, L; Amador, G; Daculsi, G; Bouler, J-M

    2003-03-01

    The use of dynamic compaction and isostatic compression to consolidate calcium phosphate powder loaded with a therapeutic agent avoids a sintering step that could destroy the drug. The present study applied these consolidation methods to vancomycin-loaded calcium-deficient apatite powder, using three granulometric fractions (40-80, 80-200 and 200-500 micrometer). In vitro release profiles were determined via an original system derived from low-pressure liquid chromatography. The biological activity of vancomycin was measured by an in vitro standardized bacteriologic assay, which showed that the drug is completely active after association with calcium phosphate. Regardless of the consolidation method and granulometric fraction used, release profiles were not significantly different and therefore adaptable to injectable suspensions. PMID:12527267

  15. Increased Plasminogen Activator (Urokinase) in Tissue Culture After Fibrin Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Bernik, Maria B.

    1973-01-01

    Lysis of fibrin in tissue culture has been shown to be due to plasminogen activator identified immunologically as urokinase. The present study examines fibrinolytic events in culture, particularly mechanisms leading to increased urokinase levels and accelerated fibrinolysis. Deposition of fibrin on cells in culture was followed by a two- to six-fold increase in urokinase in the supernates and rapid disappearance of the fibrin. Investigation of factors that might be responsible for these events (including fibrin, fibrinogen, vasoactive stimuli, and the enzymes thrombin and plasmin) indicated that the enhanced urokinase yields were mediated through plasmin and thrombin. Study of the possible modes of action of thrombin and plasmin indicated that these enzymes are capable of acting on the cells themselves as well as on cell-produced material. The effect on cells was manifested by mitotic activity or, occasionally, cell injury and death. Although these effects influenced urokinase levels, enhanced yields were explained best by the action of enzymes on cellproduced material. Studies with plasmin and thrombin, and also trypsin, indicated that proteolytic enzymes may act in various ways—affect the stability of urokinase, interfere with inhibition of urokinase by naturally occurring inhibitor(s), and induce urokinase activity from inactive material. Plasma and thrombin appeared to act primarily through the latter mechanism. Inactive material, which gave rise to urokinase upon exposure to proteolytic enzymes and which may represent urokinase precursor, was found in cultures of kidney, lung, spleen, and thyroid. Urokinase in such inactive state appears to be readily accessible to activation by enzymes, particularly plasmin and thrombin, thus facilitating removal of fibrin and possibly also providing pathways to excessive fibrinolysis. PMID:4266421

  16. Osteogenic activity of cyclodextrin-encapsulated doxycycline in a calcium phosphate PCL and PLGA composite.

    PubMed

    Trajano, V C C; Costa, K J R; Lanza, C R M; Sinisterra, R D; Cortés, M E

    2016-07-01

    Composites of biodegradable polymers and calcium phosphate are bioactive and flexible, and have been proposed for use in tissue engineering and bone regeneration. When associated with the broad-spectrum antibiotic doxycycline (DOX), they could favor antimicrobial action and enhance the action of osteogenic composites. Composites of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and a bioceramic of biphasic calcium phosphate Osteosynt® (BCP) were loaded with DOX encapsulated in β-cyclodextrin (βCD) and were evaluated for effects on osteoblastic cell cultures. The DOX/βCD composite was prepared with a double mixing method. Osteoblast viability was assessed with methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays after 1day, 7day, and 14days of composite exposure; alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity and collagen production were evaluated after 7days and 14days, and mineral nodule formation after 14days. Composite structures were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Osteoblasts exposed to the composite containing 25μg/mL DOX/βCD had increased cell proliferation (p<0.05) compared to control osteoblast cultures at all experimental time points, reaching a maximum in the second week. AP activity and collagen secretion levels were also elevated in osteoblasts exposed to the DOX/βCD composite (p<0.05 vs. controls) and reached a maximum after 14days. These results were corroborated by Von Kossa test results, which showed strong formation of mineralization nodules during the same time period. SEM of the composite material revealed a surface topography with pore sizes suitable for growing osteoblasts. Together, these results suggest that osteoblasts are viable, proliferative, and osteogenic in the presence of a DOX/βCD-containing BCP ceramic composite. PMID:27127066

  17. Evaluation of cytotoxicity, antimicrobial activity and physicochemical properties of a calcium aluminate-based endodontic material

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; HERRERA, Daniel Rodrigo; ROSA, Tiago Pereira; DUQUE, Thais Mageste; JACINTO, Rogério Castilho; GOMES, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida; ZAIA, Alexandre Augusto

    2014-01-01

    A calcium aluminate-based endodontic material, EndoBinder, has been developed in order to reduce MTA negative characteristics, preserving its biological properties and clinical applications. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity, antimicrobial activity, pH, solubility and water sorption of EndoBinder and to compare them with those of white MTA (WMTA). Material and Methods Cytotoxicity was assessed through a multiparametric analysis employing 3T3 cells. Antimicrobial activity against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212), Staphylococcus aureus. (ATCC 25923) and Candida albicans (ATCC 10556) was determined by the agar diffusion method. pH was measured at periods of 3, 24, 72 and 168 hours. Solubility and water sorption evaluation were performed following ISO requirements. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey`s test with a significance level of 5%. Results EndoBinder and WMTA were non-cytotoxic in all tested periods and with the different cell viability parameters. There was no statistical differences between both materials (P>.05). All tested materials were inhibitory by direct contact against all microbial strains tested. EndoBinder and WMTA presented alkaline pH in all tested times with higher values of pH for WMTA (P<.05). Both materials showed values complying with the solubility minimum requirements. However, EndoBinder showed lower solubility than WMTA (P<.05). No statistical differences were observed regarding water sorption (P>.05). Conclusion Under these experimental conditions, we concluded that the calcium aluminate-based endodontic material EndoBinder demonstrated suitable biological and physicochemical properties, so it can be suggested as a material of choice in root resorption, perforations and root-end filling. PMID:24626250

  18. Activation of NADPH oxidase 1 increases intracellular calcium and migration of smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Matthew C; Takapoo, Maysam; Jagadeesha, Dammanahalli K; Stanic, Bojana; Banfi, Botond; Bhalla, Ramesh C; Miller, Francis J

    2011-09-01

    Redox-dependent migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are central events in the development of vascular proliferative diseases; however, the underlying intracellular signaling mechanisms are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that activation of Nox1 NADPH oxidase modulates intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) levels. Using cultured SMCs from wild-type and Nox1 null mice, we confirmed that thrombin-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species requires Nox1. Thrombin rapidly increased [Ca(2+)](i), as measured by fura-2 fluorescence ratio imaging, in wild-type but not Nox1 null SMCs. The increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in wild-type SMCs was inhibited by antisense to Nox1 and restored by expression of Nox1 in Nox1 null SMCs. Investigation into potential mechanisms by which Nox1 modulates [Ca(2+)](i) showed that thrombin-induced inositol triphosphate generation and thapsigargin-induced intracellular calcium mobilization were similar in wild-type and Nox1 null SMCs. To examine the effects of Nox1 on Ca(2+) entry, cells were either bathed in Ca(2+)-free medium or exposed to dihydropyridines to block L-type Ca(2+) channel activity. Treatment with nifedipine or removal of extracellular Ca(2+) reduced the thrombin-mediated increase of [Ca(2+)](i) in wild-type SMCs, whereas the response in Nox1 null SMCs was unchanged. Sodium vanadate, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases, restored the thrombin-induced increase of [Ca(2+)](i) in Nox1 null SMCs. Migration of SMCs was impaired with deficiency of Nox1 and restored with expression of Nox1 or the addition of sodium vanadate. In summary, we conclude that Nox1 NADPH oxidase modulates Ca(2+) mobilization in SMCs, in part through regulation of Ca(2+) influx, to thereby promote cell migration. PMID:21810651

  19. Bicarbonate absorption stimulates active calcium absorption in the rat proximal tubule.

    PubMed Central

    Bomsztyk, K; Calalb, M B

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of luminal bicarbonate on calcium reabsorption, rat proximal tubules were perfused in vivo. Perfusion solution contained mannitol to reduce water flux to zero. Total Ca concentration was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry, Ca ion concentration in the tubule lumen (CaL2+) and the peritubular capillary (CaP2+), and luminal pH (pHL) with ion-selective microelectrodes and transepithelial voltage (VTE) with conventional microelectrodes. When tubules were perfused with buffer-free Cl-containing solution, net Ca absorption (JCa) averaged 3.33 pmol/min. Even though VTE was 1.64 mV lumen-positive, CaL2+, 1.05 mM, did not fall below the concentration in the capillary blood, 1.07 mM. When 27 mM of Cl was replaced with HCO3, there was luminal fluid acidification. Despite a decrease in VTE and CaL2+, JCa increased to 7.13 pmol/min, indicating that the enhanced JCa could not be accounted for by the reduced electrochemical gradient, delta CCa. When acetazolamide or an analogue of amiloride was added to the HCO3 solution, JCa was not different from the buffer-free solution, suggesting that HCO3-stimulated JCa may be linked to acidification. To further test this hypothesis, we used 27 mM Hepes as the luminal buffer. With Hepes there was luminal fluid acidification and JCa was not different from the buffer-free solution but delta CCa was significantly reduced, indicating enhanced active calcium transport. We conclude from the results of the present study that HCO3 stimulates active Ca absorption, a process that may be linked to acidification-mediated HCO3 absorption. PMID:3366902

  20. Burst pacemaker activity of the sinoatrial node in sodium–calcium exchanger knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Torrente, Angelo G.; Zhang, Rui; Zaini, Audrey; Giani, Jorge F.; Kang, Jeanney; Lamp, Scott T.; Philipson, Kenneth D.; Goldhaber, Joshua I.

    2015-01-01

    In sinoatrial node (SAN) cells, electrogenic sodium–calcium exchange (NCX) is the dominant calcium (Ca) efflux mechanism. However, the role of NCX in the generation of SAN automaticity is controversial. To investigate the contribution of NCX to pacemaking in the SAN, we performed optical voltage mapping and high-speed 2D laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) of Ca dynamics in an ex vivo intact SAN/atrial tissue preparation from atrial-specific NCX knockout (KO) mice. These mice lack P waves on electrocardiograms, and isolated NCX KO SAN cells are quiescent. Voltage mapping revealed disorganized and arrhythmic depolarizations within the NCX KO SAN that failed to propagate into the atria. LSCM revealed intermittent bursts of Ca transients. Bursts were accompanied by rising diastolic Ca, culminating in long pauses dominated by Ca waves. The L-type Ca channel agonist BayK8644 reduced the rate of Ca transients and inhibited burst generation in the NCX KO SAN whereas the Ca buffer 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (acetoxymethyl ester) (BAPTA AM) did the opposite. These results suggest that cellular Ca accumulation hinders spontaneous depolarization in the NCX KO SAN, possibly by inhibiting L-type Ca currents. The funny current (If) blocker ivabradine also suppressed NCX KO SAN automaticity. We conclude that pacemaker activity is present in the NCX KO SAN, generated by a mechanism that depends upon If. However, the absence of NCX-mediated depolarization in combination with impaired Ca efflux results in intermittent bursts of pacemaker activity, reminiscent of human sinus node dysfunction and “tachy-brady” syndrome. PMID:26195795

  1. Calcium regulation of HCN channels supports persistent activity in a multiscale model of neocortex.

    PubMed

    Neymotin, S A; McDougal, R A; Bulanova, A S; Zeki, M; Lakatos, P; Terman, D; Hines, M L; Lytton, W W

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium (Ca(2+)) regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. The network contained 776 compartmental neurons arranged in the cortical layers, connected using synapses containing AMPA/NMDA/GABAA/GABAB receptors. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) produced inositol triphosphate (IP3) which caused the release of Ca(2+) from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores, with reuptake by sarco/ER Ca(2+)-ATP-ase pumps (SERCA), and influence on HCN channels. Stimulus-induced depolarization led to Ca(2+) influx via NMDA and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs). After a delay, mGluR activation led to ER Ca(2+) release via IP3 receptors. These factors increased HCN channel conductance and produced firing lasting for ∼1min. The model displayed inter-scale synergies among synaptic weights, excitation/inhibition balance, firing rates, membrane depolarization, Ca(2+) levels, regulation of HCN channels, and induction of persistent activity. The interaction between inhibition and Ca(2+) at the HCN channel nexus determined a limited range of inhibition strengths for which intracellular Ca(2+) could prepare population-specific persistent activity. Interactions between metabotropic and ionotropic inputs to the neuron demonstrated how multiple pathways could contribute in a complementary manner to persistent activity. Such redundancy and complementarity via multiple pathways is a critical feature of biological systems. Mediation of activation at different time scales, and through different pathways, would be expected to protect against disruption, in

  2. Crystal structure of metastasis-associated protein S100A4 in the active, calcium-bound form

    PubMed Central

    Pathuri, Puja; Vogeley, Lutz; Luecke, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Summary S100A4 (metastasin) is a member of the S100 family of calcium-binding proteins that is directly involved in tumorgenesis. Until recently, the only structural information available was the solution NMR structure of the inactive, calcium-free form of the protein. Here we report the crystal structure of human S100A4 in the active, calcium-bound state at 2.03 Å resolution that was solved by molecular replacement in the space group P65 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit from perfectly merohedrally twinned crystals. The Ca2+-bound S100A4 structure reveals a large conformational change in the three-dimensional structure of the dimeric S100A4 protein upon calcium binding. This calcium-dependent conformational change opens up a hydrophobic binding pocket that is capable of binding to target proteins such as annexin A2, the p53 tumor suppressor protein, and myosin IIA. The structure of the active form of S100A4 provides insight into its interactions with its binding partners and a better understanding on its role in metastasis. PMID:18783790

  3. Effect of cyclosporin A and analogues on cytosolic calcium and vasoconstriction: possible lack of relationship to immunosuppressive activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lo Russo, A.; Passaquin, A. C.; André, P.; Skutella, M.; Rüegg, U. T.

    1996-01-01

    1. The full therapeutic potential of the main immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporin A (CsA), is limited because of its side effects, namely nephrotoxicity and hypertension. Several lines of evidence suggest that the origin of both side effects could be CsA-induced vasoconstriction. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. 2. Diameter measurements of rat isolated mesenteric arteries showed an increase in noradrenaline- and [Arg]8vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction when arteries were pretreated with CsA. 3. Measurements in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) of either cytosolic calcium concentration or of 45Ca2+ efflux showed that CsA potentiated the calcium influx to several vasoconstrictor hormones: [Arg]8vasopressin, angiotensin II, endothelin-1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine. On the other hand, 45Ca2+ efflux in response to thapsigargin, which depletes calcium from intracellular pools, was not potentiated by CsA. 45Ca2+ uptake was not altered by CsA or by any of the analogues tested. 4. Time-course studies in cultured VSMC showed that maximal CsA-induced Ca2+ potentiation occurred after ca. 20 h and this effect was reversed over approximately the next 20 h. 5. To investigate the possible role played by the known intracellular targets of CsA, namely cyclophilin and calcineurin, CsA derivatives with variable potencies with respect to their immunosuppressive activity, were tested on the calcium influx to [Arg]8vasopressin. Derivatives devoid of immunosuppressive activity (cyclosporin H, PSC-833) potentiated calcium signalling, while the potent immunosuppressant, FK520, a close derivative of FK506, and MeVal4CsA, an antagonist of the immunosuppressive effect of CsA did not. The latter compound was unable to reverse the calcium potentiating effect of CsA. 6. Our results show that CsA increases the calcium influx to vasoconstrictor hormones in smooth muscle cells, which presumably increases vasoconstriction. Loading of the intracellular

  4. Characterization of L-type calcium channel activity in atrioventricular nodal myocytes from rats with streptozotocin-induced Diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yuill, Kathryn H; Al Kury, Lina T; Howarth, Frank Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications are common in patients with Diabetes mellitus (DM). In addition to changes in cardiac muscle inotropy, electrical abnormalities are also commonly observed in these patients. We have previously shown that spontaneous cellular electrical activity is altered in atrioventricular nodal (AVN) myocytes, isolated from the streptozotocin (STZ) rat model of type-1 DM. In this study, utilizing the same model, we have characterized the changes in L-type calcium channel activity in single AVN myocytes. Ionic currents were recorded from AVN myocytes isolated from the hearts of control rats and from those with STZ-induced diabetes. Patch-clamp recordings were used to assess the changes in cellular electrical activity in individual myocytes. Type-1 DM significantly altered the cellular characteristics of L-type calcium current. A reduction in peak ICaL density was observed, with no corresponding changes in the activation parameters of the current. L-type calcium channel current also exhibited faster time-dependent inactivation in AVN myocytes from diabetic rats. A negative shift in the voltage dependence of inactivation was also evident, and a slowing of restitution parameters. These findings demonstrate that experimentally induced type-1 DM significantly alters AVN L-type calcium channel cellular electrophysiology. These changes in ion channel activity may contribute to the abnormalities in cardiac electrical function that are associated with high mortality levels in patients with DM. PMID:26603460

  5. Age-related differences in the structure of human pineal calcium deposits: results of transmission electron microscopy and mineralographic microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Schmid, H A; Raykhtsaum, G

    1995-01-01

    Pineal tissue calcifications (male, ages 14, 47, 62, 82), which were metallographically embedded and polished at controlled levels and studied by transmission electron microscopy and microanalytic spectroscopy, showed age-related differences. Results show that concentrically arranged crescent-shaped lamellae increase in number and decrease in width with age. Calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) per point measurements in dark and light lamellae at various distances from the core show Ca/P molar ratios between 1.49-1.62 in the 82-year-old specimen as compared to 1.26 to 1.41 in the younger specimens. The 62-year-old specimens show a decrease in P and an increase in Ca from periphery to center. These data and other descriptive details suggest that the sum of these changes represent remodelling of the mineralogical structure within the same calcification throughout the life span. PMID:7776174

  6. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... at both ionized calcium and calcium attached to proteins. You may need to have a separate ionized calcium test if you have factors that increase or decrease total calcium levels. These may include abnormal blood levels ...

  7. RIM Promotes Calcium Channel Accumulation at Active Zones of the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Ethan R.; Valakh, Vera; Wright, Christina M.; Wu, Chunlai; Liu, Zhihua; Zhang, Yong Q.; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Summary Synaptic communication requires the controlled release of synaptic vesicles from presynaptic axon terminals. Release efficacy is regulated by the many proteins that comprise the presynaptic release apparatus, including Ca2+ channels and proteins that influence Ca2+ channel accumulation at release sites. Here we identify Drosophila RIM and demonstrate that it localizes to active zones at the larval neuromuscular junction. In Drosophila RIM mutants, there is a large decrease in evoked synaptic transmission, due to a significant reduction in both the clustering of Ca2+ channels and the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles at active zones. Hence, RIM plays an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating synaptic calcium channel localization and readily releasable pool size. Since RIM has traditionally been studied as an effector of Rab3 function, we investigate whether RIM is involved in the newly identified function of Rab3 in the distribution of presynaptic release machinery components across release sites. Bruchpilot (Brp), an essential component of the active zone cytomatrix T bar, is unaffected by RIM disruption, indicating that Brp localization and distribution across active zones does not require wild type RIM. In addition, larvae containing mutations in both RIM and rab3 have reduced Ca2+ channel levels and a Brp distribution that is very similar to that of the rab3 single mutant, indicating that RIM functions to regulate Ca2+ channel accumulation but is not a Rab3 effector for release machinery distribution across release sites. PMID:23175814

  8. EFFECTS OF SODIUM AND CALCIUM IN LIGNITE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Kurt E. Eylands; Daniel J. Stepan

    2001-12-01

    New federal drinking water regulations have been promulgated to restrict the levels of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in finished public water supplies. DBPs are suspected carcinogens and are formed when organic material is partially oxidized by disinfectants commonly used in the water treatment industry. Additional federal mandates are expected in the near future that will also affect public water suppliers with respect to DBPs. These new federal drinking water regulations may require public water suppliers to adjust treatment practices or incorporate additional treatment operations into their existing treatment trains. Many options have been identified, including membrane processes, granular activated carbon, powered activated carbon (PAC), enhanced coagulation and/or softening, and alternative disinfectants (e.g., chlorine dioxide, ozone, and chloramines). Of the processes being considered, PAC appears to offer an attractive benefit-to-cost advantage for many water treatment plants, particularly small systems (those serving fewer than 10,000 customers). PAC has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated DBPs. Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. Activated carbons can be produced from a variety of raw materials, including wood, peat, coconut husks, and numerous types of coal. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been working on the development of a PAC product to remove NOM from surface water supplies to prevent the formation of carcinogenic DBPs during chlorination. During that study, the sodium and calcium content of the lignites showed a significant effect on the sorption capacity of the activated carbon

  9. Dual Mode Antibacterial Activity of Ion Substituted Calcium Phosphate Nanocarriers for Bone Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sampath Kumar, T. S.; Madhumathi, K.; Rubaiya, Y.; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential for the management of infectious diseases caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, through the development of newer antibacterial materials and efficient modes of antibiotic delivery. Calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics are commonly used as bone substitutes due to their similarity to bone mineral and are widely researched upon for the treatment of bone infections associated with bone loss. CaPs can be used as local antibiotic delivery agents for bone infections and can be substituted with antibacterial ions in their crystal structure to have a wide spectrum, sustained antibacterial activity even against drug resistant bacteria. In the present work, a dual mode antibiotic delivery system with antibacterial ion substituted calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanoparticles has been developed. Antibacterial ions such as zinc, silver, and strontium have been incorporated into CDHA at concentrations of 6, 0.25–0.75, and 2.5–7.5 at. %, respectively. The samples were found to be phase pure, acicular nanoparticles of length 40–50 nm and width 5–6 nm approximately. The loading and release profile of doxycycline, a commonly used antibiotic, was studied from the nanocarriers. The drug release was studied for 5 days and the release profile was influenced by the ion concentrations. The release of antibacterial ions was studied over a period of 21 days. The ion substituted CDHA samples were tested for antibacterial efficacy on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by MIC/MBC studies and time-kill assay. AgCDHA and ZnCDHA showed high antibacterial activity against both bacteria, while SrCDHA was weakly active against S. aureus. Present study shows that the antibiotic release can provide the initial high antibacterial activity, and the sustained ion release can provide a long-term antibacterial activity. Such dual mode antibiotic and antibacterial ion release offers an efficient and potent way to treat an incumbent

  10. The intracellular calcium increase at fertilization in Urechis caupo oocytes: activation without waves.

    PubMed

    Stephano, J L; Gould, M C

    1997-11-01

    The intracellular Ca2+ (Cai) increase at fertilization of the marine worm Urechis caupo (Echiura) was studied with conventional and confocal epifluorescence microscopy in oocytes microinjected with calcium green dextran or dually labeled with the calcium-insensitive dye tetramethylrhodamine dextran. Calcium green fluorescence was also measured with a photomultiplier system while the oocyte membrane potential was recorded and manipulated. The results show that Cai rises simultaneously around the oocyte cortex and peaks slightly later in the nucleoplasm. The Cai rise coincides with the initiation of the fertilization potential and we conclude that it is due primarily to external Ca2+ entering through the voltage-gated Ca2+ action potential channels that open during the fertilization potential because: (1) current clamping the oocyte membrane potential to positive values in the absence of sperm produces a similar Cai increase, (2) external Ca2+ is required, (3) and the confocal images are consistent with this mechanism. External application of sperm acrosomal peptide (P23) also caused a Cai increase that was inhibited in the presence of CoCl2. Cai and pHi (measured with BCECF dextran) were manipulated in experiments employing microinjection of BAPTA (to chelate Cai), external application of NH4Cl (to increase pHi) and CoCl2 (to block Ca2+ channels), and fertilization of eggs in pH 7 seawater (Cai increase without pHi increase). The results showed that increases in both Cai and pHi are required for GVBD; neither alone is sufficient. However, although nuclear and cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels tended to parallel each other in oocytes fertilized at pH 7, and during the initial Cai response in oocytes fertilized at pH 8, there was a disproportionate fluorescence increase in the nucleoplasm of the latter prior to GVBD which could not be explained by any artifact we tested, suggesting there may be a selective increase in nuclear Ca2+ associated with GVBD. Finally

  11. Concerted but Noncooperative Activation of Nucleotide and Actuator Domains of the Ca-ATPase Upon Calcium Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Mahaney, James E.; Mayer, M. Uljana; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2008-11-25

    Calcium-dependent domain movements of the nucleotide (N) and actuator (A) domains of the SERCA2a isoform of the Ca-ATPase were assessed using constructs containing engineered tetracysteine binding motifs, which were expressed in insect High-Five cells and subsequently labeled with the biarsenical fluorophore 4’,5’-bis(1,3,2-dithoarsolan-2-yl)fluorescein (FlAsH-EDT2). Maximum catalytic function is retained in microsomes isolated from High-Five cells and labeled with FlAsH-EDT2. Distance measurements using the nucleotide analog TNP-ATP, which acts as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) acceptor from FlAsH, identify a 2.4 Å increase in the spatial separation between the N- and A-domains induced by high-affinity calcium binding; this structural change is comparable to that observed in crystal structures. No significant distance changes occur across the N-domain between FlAsH and TNP-ATP, indicating that calcium activation induces rigid body domain movements rather than intradomain conformational changes. Calcium-dependent decreases in the fluorescence of FlAsH bound respectively to either the N- or A-domains indicate coordinated and noncooperative domain movements, where both N- and A-domains domains display virtually identical calcium dependencies (i.e., Kd = 4.8 ± 0.4 μM). We suggest that occupancy of a single high-affinity calcium binding site induces the rearrangement of the A- and N-domains of the Ca-ATPase to form an intermediate state, which facilitates ATP utilization upon occupancy of the second high-affinity calcium site to enhance transport efficiency.

  12. Oscillating activity of a calcium-activated K+ channel in normal and cancerous mammary cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, K; Furuya, K; Maeno, T; Edwards, C; Oka, T

    1991-01-01

    Calcium-activated potassium channels were the channels most frequently observed in primary cultured normal mammary cell and in the established mammary tumor cell, MMT060562. In both cells, single-channel and whole-cell clamp recordings sometimes showed slow oscillations of the Ca2(+)-gated K+ current. The characteristics of the Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels in normal and cancerous mammary cells were quite similar. The slope conductances changed from 8 to 70 pS depending on the mode of recording and the ionic composition in the patch electrode. The open probability of this channel increased between 0.1 to 1 microM of the intracellular Ca2+, but it was independent of the membrane potential. Charybdotoxin reduced the activity of the Ca2(+)-activated K+ channel and the oscillation of the membrane current, but apamin had no apparent effect. The application of tetraethylammonium (TEA) from outside and BaCl2 from inside of the cell diminished the activity of the channel. The properties of this channel were different from those of both the large conductance (BK or MAXI K) and small conductance (SK) type Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels. PMID:1710671

  13. Calcium ion gradients modulate the zinc affinity and antibacterial activity of human calprotectin.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Megan Brunjes; Hayden, Joshua A; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2012-10-31

    Calprotectin (CP) is an antimicrobial protein produced and released by neutrophils that inhibits the growth of pathogenic microorganisms by sequestering essential metal nutrients in the extracellular space. In this work, spectroscopic and thermodynamic metal-binding studies are presented to delineate the zinc-binding properties of CP. Unique optical absorption and EPR spectroscopic signatures for the interfacial His(3)Asp and His(4) sites of human calprotectin are identified by using Co(II) as a spectroscopic probe. Zinc competition titrations employing chromophoric Zn(II) indicators provide a 2:1 Zn(II):CP stoichiometry, confirm that the His(3)Asp and His(4) sites of CP coordinate Zn(II), and reveal that the Zn(II) affinity of both sites is calcium-dependent. The calcium-insensitive Zn(II) competitor ZP4 affords dissociation constants of K(d1) = 133 ± 58 pM and K(d2) = 185 ± 219 nM for CP in the absence of Ca(II). These values decrease to K(d1) ≤ 10 pM and K(d2) ≤ 240 pM in the presence of excess Ca(II). The K(d1) and K(d2) values are assigned to the His(3)Asp and His(4) sites, respectively. In vitro antibacterial activity assays indicate that the metal-binding sites and Ca(II)-replete conditions are required for CP to inhibit the growth of both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Taken together, these data provide a working model whereby calprotectin responds to physiological Ca(II) gradients to become a potent Zn(II) chelator in the extracellular space. PMID:23082970

  14. Array of amorphous calcium phosphate particles improves cellular activity on a hydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Kim, InAe; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2010-04-01

    Poor interaction between cells and surfaces, especially hydrophobic surfaces, results in delayed proliferation and increased apoptosis due to low cell adhesion signaling. To improve cell adhesion, hydrophilic array of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) was fabricated on a surface. A phosphate-buffered solution containing calcium ions was prepared at low temperature to prevent spontaneous precipitation. Then, the ion solution was heated to generate nuclei of ACP nanoparticles. The ACP nanoparticles adhered to the hydrophobic polystyrene surface forming an array composed of ACP particles. Multiple treatments of these nuclei with fresh CaP ion solutions increased the diameter and decreased the solubility of ACP particles enough to mediate cellular adhesion. The particle density in the array was dependent on the ion concentration of the CaP ion solutions. The ACP array improved a wide variety of activities when osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on the ACP array fabricated on a hydrophobic bacteriological dish surface, compared to those cultured without the ACP array in vitro. The use of ACP array resulted in a lower apoptosis and also increased the spreading of cells to form stress fibers and focal contacts. Cells cultured on the ACP array proliferated more than cells cultured on a hydrophobic surface without the ACP array. The ACP array increased the expression of markers of differentiation in osteoblast. These results indicate that an array of ACP can be used as a coating material for enhancing biocompatibility in tissue engineering or biomaterials rather than modifying the surface with organic molecules. PMID:20119940

  15. Serotonin Regulates Calcium Homeostasis in Lactation by Epigenetic Activation of Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Laporta, Jimena; Keil, Kimberly P.; Weaver, Samantha R.; Cronick, Callyssa M.; Prichard, Austin P.; Crenshaw, Thomas D.; Heyne, Galen W.; Vezina, Chad M.; Lipinski, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. We previously showed that nonneuronal/peripheral serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] causes the lactating mammary gland to synthesize and secrete PTHrP in an acute fashion. Here, using a mouse model, we found that genetic inactivation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in peripheral 5-HT synthesis, reduced circulating and mammary PTHrP expression, osteoclast activity, and maternal circulating calcium concentrations during the transition from pregnancy to lactation. Tph1 inactivation also reduced sonic hedgehog signaling in the mammary gland during lactation. Each of these deficiencies was rescued by daily injections of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (an immediate precursor of 5-HT) to Tph1-deficient dams. We used immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts to demonstrate that 5-HT induces PTHrP through a sonic hedgehog-dependent signal transduction mechanism. We also found that 5-HT altered DNA methylation of the Shh gene locus, leading to transcriptional initiation at an alternate start site and formation of a variant transcript in mouse embryonic fibroblasts in vitro and in mammary tissue in vivo. These results support a new paradigm of 5-HT-mediated Shh regulation involving DNA methylation remodeling and promoter switching. In addition to having immediate implications for lactation biology, identification and characterization of a novel functional regulatory relationship between nonneuronal 5-HT, hedgehog signaling, and PTHrP offers new avenues for the study of these important factors in development and disease. PMID:25192038

  16. Regulation of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels by S-palmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Shipston, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    BK (large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium) channels are important determinants of physiological control in the nervous, endocrine and vascular systems with channel dysfunction associated with major disorders ranging from epilepsy to hypertension and obesity. Thus the mechanisms that control channel surface expression and/or activity are important determinants of their (patho)physiological function. BK channels are S-acylated (palmitoylated) at two distinct sites within the N- and C-terminus of the pore-forming α-subunit. Palmitoylation of the N-terminus controls channel trafficking and surface expression whereas palmitoylation of the C-terminal domain determines regulation of channel activity by AGC-family protein kinases. Recent studies are beginning to reveal mechanistic insights into how palmitoylation controls channel trafficking and cross-talk with phosphorylation-dependent signalling pathways. Intriguingly, each site of palmitoylation is regulated by distinct zDHHCs (palmitoyl acyltransferases) and APTs (acyl thioesterases). This supports that different mechanisms may control substrate specificity by zDHHCs and APTs even within the same target protein. As palmitoylation is dynamically regulated, this fundamental post-translational modification represents an important determinant of BK channel physiology in health and disease. PMID:23356260

  17. Calcium signaling in mammalian egg activation and embryo development: Influence of subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yi-Liang; Williams, Carmen J.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signals drive the fundamental events surrounding fertilization and the activation of development in all species examined to date. Initial studies of Ca2+ signaling at fertilization in marine animals were tightly linked to new discoveries of bioluminescent proteins and their use as fluorescent Ca2+ sensors. Since that time, there has been rapid progress in our understanding of the key functions for Ca2+ in many cell types and the impact of cellular localization on Ca2+ signaling pathways. In this review, which focuses on mammalian egg activation, we consider how Ca2+ is regulated and stored at different stages of oocyte development and examine the functions of molecules that serve as both regulators of Ca2+ release and effectors of Ca2+ signals. We then summarize studies exploring how Ca2+ directs downstream effectors mediating both egg activation and later signaling events required for successful preimplantation embryo development. Throughout this review, we focus attention on how localization of Ca2+ signals influences downstream signaling events, and attempt to highlight gaps in our knowledge that are ripe areas for future research. PMID:22888043

  18. Graded boosting of synaptic signals by low-threshold voltage-activated calcium conductance.

    PubMed

    Carbó Tano, Martín; Vilarchao, María Eugenia; Szczupak, Lidia

    2015-07-01

    Low-threshold voltage-activated calcium conductances (LT-VACCs) play a substantial role in shaping the electrophysiological attributes of neurites. We have investigated how these conductances affect synaptic integration in a premotor nonspiking (NS) neuron of the leech nervous system. These cells exhibit an extensive neuritic tree, do not fire Na(+)-dependent spikes, but express an LT-VACC that was sensitive to 250 μM Ni(2+) and 100 μM NNC 55-0396 (NNC). NS neurons responded to excitation of mechanosensory pressure neurons with depolarizing responses for which amplitude was a linear function of the presynaptic firing frequency. NNC decreased these synaptic responses and abolished the concomitant widespread Ca(2+) signals. Coherent with the interpretation that the LT-VACC amplified signals at the postsynaptic level, this conductance also amplified the responses of NS neurons to direct injection of sinusoidal current. Synaptic amplification thus is achieved via a positive feedback in which depolarizing signals activate an LT-VACC that, in turn, boosts these signals. The wide distribution of LT-VACC could support the active propagation of depolarizing signals, turning the complex NS neuritic tree into a relatively compact electrical compartment. PMID:25972583

  19. Material and structural characterization of alkali activated low-calcium brown coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Skvára, Frantisek; Kopecký, Lubomír; Smilauer, Vít; Bittnar, Zdenek

    2009-09-15

    The waste low-calcium Czech brown coal fly ash represents a considerable environmental burden due to the quantities produced and the potentially high content of leachable heavy metals. The heterogeneous microstucture of the geopolymer M(n) [-(Si-O)(z)-Al-O](n).wH(2)O, that forms during the alkaline activation, was examined by means of microcalorimetry, XRD, TGA, DSC, MIP, FTIR, NMR MAS ((29)Si, (27)Al, (23)Na), ESEM, EDS, and EBSD. The leaching of heavy metals and the evolution of compressive strength were also monitored. The analysis of raw fly ash identified a number of different morphologies, unequal distribution of elements, Fe-rich rim, high internal porosity, and minor crystalline phases of mullite and quartz. Microcalorimetry revealed exothermic reactions with dependence on the activator alkalinity. The activation energy of the geopolymerization process was determined as 86.2kJ/mol. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed no additional crystalline phases associated with geopolymer formation. Over several weeks, the (29)Si NMR spectrum testified a high degree of polymerization and Al penetration into the SiO(4) tetrahedra. The (23)Na NMR MAS spectrum hypothesized that sodium is bound in the form of Na(H(2)O)(n) rather than Na(+), thus causing efflorescence in a moisture-gradient environment. As and Cr(6+) are weakly bonded in the geopolymer matrix, while excellent immobilization of Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Cr(3+) are reported. PMID:19303704

  20. Calcium metabolism in bone and teeth of rats during exposure to restriction of motor activity and to swimming exercise.

    PubMed

    Zorbas, Y G; Charapakhin, K P; Kuznetsov, N A; Kakurin, V J

    1999-06-01

    The effects of motor activity restriction for 90 days (hypokinesia, HK) and swimming training (T) on calcium metabolism in rat bones and teeth were evaluated. Male Wistar rats were distributed in four groups: untrained vivarium control rats (UVCR), untrained hypokinetic rats (UHKR), trained hypokinetic rats (THKR) and trained vivarium control rats (TVCR). Hypokinesia was obtained keeping the animals for 90 days in small individual cages which restricted their movements in all directions without hindering food and water intakes. Rats of THKR and TVCR were forced to swim for 15 to 90 minutes everyday. On the 1st, 7th, 15th day of a prehypokinetic period and on the 5th, 10th, 20th, 40th, 60th and 90th day of the hypokinetic period, six rats of each group were decapitated. Radioactive calcium was injected to the animals 70 days before autopsy. Calcium and phosphorus in serum, bones (molars, incisors, upper and lower jaws, parietal, scapular, clavicle, pelvic and tibial bones) and in the respective ash residues were measured. Body and bone weights, and radioactive calcium were also determined. Under prolonged exposure to HK (THKR and UHKR groups), bone weights and bone and ash Ca and P concentrations decreased, whereas serum Ca and P and 45Ca resorption increased, in comparison to the respective values in the UVCR and TVCR groups. Swimming exercise apparently did not modify calcium metabolism in the hypokinetic or control rats. PMID:10517263

  1. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Inhibits Calcium Channel Activation, Exocytosis, and Endocytosis at a Central Nerve Terminal

    PubMed Central

    Baydyuk, Maryna; Wu, Xin-Sheng; He, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that regulates synaptic function and plasticity and plays important roles in neuronal development, survival, and brain disorders. Despite such diverse and important roles, how BDNF, or more generally speaking, neurotrophins affect synapses, particularly nerve terminals, remains unclear. By measuring calcium currents and membrane capacitance during depolarization at a large mammalian central nerve terminal, the rat calyx of Held, we report for the first time that BDNF slows down calcium channel activation, including P/Q-type channels, and inhibits exocytosis induced by brief depolarization or single action potentials, inhibits slow and rapid endocytosis, and inhibits vesicle mobilization to the readily releasable pool. These presynaptic mechanisms may contribute to the important roles of BDNF in regulating synapses and neuronal circuits and suggest that regulation of presynaptic calcium channels, exocytosis, and endocytosis are potential mechanisms by which neurotrophins achieve diverse neuronal functions. PMID:25788684

  2. Radiolead (210)Pb and (210)Po/(210)Pb activity ratios in calcium supplements and the assessment of their possible dose to consumers.

    PubMed

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    2016-08-23

    This paper presents the results of pioneer study of the most popular calcium supplements as a potential additional source of radiolead (210)Pb in human diet. The analyzed calcium pharmaceutics contained organic or inorganic calcium compounds; some came from natural sources as mussels' shells, fish extracts, or sedimentary rocks. The idea was to investigate the naturally occurring (210)Pb activity in different calcium supplements and calculate the annual effective radiation dose from radiolead (210)Pb decay in consumed calcium supplement. The results showed (210)Pb concentrations in natural origin calcium supplements (especially sedimentary rocks) were significantly higher. The highest (210)Pb activity concentrations were determined in mineral tablets made from dolomite - 2.97 ± 0.18 mBq g(-1), while the lowest was observed in organic calcium compounds - both calcium lactate - 0.08 ± 0.01 and 0.13 ± 0.01 mBq g(-1). The highest annual radiation dose from (210)Pb taken with 1 tablet of calcium supplement per day was calculated for soluble calcium lactate sample - 1.19 ± 0.03 µSv year(-1), while the highest annual radiation dose from (210)Pb taken daily with 1 g of pure Ca for dolomite - 5.57 ± 0.34 µSv year(-1). PMID:27253716

  3. Calcium influx enhances neuropeptide activation of ecdysteroid hormone production by mosquito ovaries.

    PubMed

    McKinney, David A; Eum, Jai-Hoon; Dhara, Animesh; Strand, Michael R; Brown, Mark R

    2016-03-01

    A critical step in mosquito reproduction is the ingestion of a blood meal from a vertebrate host. In mosquitoes like Aedes aegypti, blood feeding stimulates the release of ovary ecdysteroidogenic hormone (OEH) and insulin-like peptide 3 (ILP3). This induces the ovaries to produce ecdysteroid hormone (ECD), which then drives egg maturation. In many immature insects, prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) stimulates the prothoracic glands to produce ECD that directs molting and metamorphosis. The receptors for OEH, ILP3 and PTTH are different receptor tyrosine kinases with OEH and ILP3 signaling converging downstream in the insulin pathway and PTTH activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Calcium (Ca(2+)) flux and cAMP have also been implicated in PTTH signaling, but the role of Ca(2+) in OEH, ILP3, and cAMP signaling in ovaries is unknown. Here, we assessed whether Ca(2+) flux affects OEH, ILP3, and cAMP activity in A. aegypti ovaries and also asked whether PTTH stimulated ovaries to produce ECD. Results indicated that Ca(2+) flux enhanced but was not essential for OEH or ILP3 activity, whereas cAMP signaling was dependent on Ca(2+) flux. Recombinant PTTH from Bombyx mori fully activated ECD production by B. mori PTGs, but exhibited no activity toward A. aegypti ovaries. Recombinant PTTH from A. aegypti also failed to stimulate either B. mori PTGs or A. aegypti ovaries to produce ECD. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of mosquito reproduction and ECD biosynthesis by insects generally. PMID:26772671

  4. Active overbank deposition during the last century, South River, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzuto, Jim; Skalak, Katherine; Pearson, Adam; Benthem, Adam

    2016-03-01

    regional synthesis of floodplain deposition rates since European settlement. Floodplain sedimentation rates were high following European settlement, with published estimates ranging from 50 to 200 cm/100 years. Sedimentation rates decreased by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries; but despite these lower sedimentation rates, floodplains continue to store a significant fraction of total suspended sediment load. Many floodplains of the mid-Atlantic region are active landforms fully connected to the rivers that flow within them and should not be considered terraces isolated from contemporary fluvial processes by post-settlement aggradation.

  5. The ability of AIF-1 to activate human vascular smooth muscle cells is lost by mutations in the EF-hand calcium-binding region

    SciTech Connect

    Autieri, Michael V. . E-mail: mautieri@temple.edu; Chen Xing

    2005-07-01

    Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1 (AIF-1) is a cytoplasmic calcium-binding protein expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in response to injury or cytokine stimulation. AIF-1 contains a partially conserved EF-hand calcium-binding domain, and participates in VSMC activation by activation of Rac1 and induction of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) expression; however, the mechanism whereby AIF-1 mediates these effects is presently uncharacterized. To determine if calcium binding plays a functional role in AIF-1 activity, a single site-specific mutation was made in the EF-hand calcium-binding domain to abrogate binding of calcium (AIF-1{delta}A), which was confirmed by calcium overlay. Functionally, similar to wild-type AIF-1, AIF-1{delta}A was able to polymerize F-actin in vitro. However, in contrast to wild-type AIF-1, over-expression of AIF-1{delta}A was unable to increase migration or proliferation of primary human VSMC. Further, it was unable to activate Rac1, or induce G-CSF expression to the degree as wild-type AIF-1. Taken together, modification of the wild-type EF-hand domain and native calcium-binding activity results in a loss of AIF-1 function. We conclude that appropriate calcium-binding potential is critical in AIF-1-mediated effects on VSMC pathophysiology, and that AIF-1 activity is mediated by Rac1 activation and G-CSF expression.

  6. Deoxycholic acid mediates non-canonical EGFR-MAPK activation through the induction of calcium signaling in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Centuori, Sara M; Gomes, Cecil J; Trujillo, Jesse; Borg, Jamie; Brownlee, Joshua; Putnam, Charles W; Martinez, Jesse D

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and a western diet have been linked to high levels of bile acids and the development of colon cancer. Specifically, increased levels of the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA), an established tumor promoter, has been shown to correlate with increased development of colorectal adenomas and progression to carcinoma. Herein we investigate the mechanism by which DCA leads to EGFR-MAPK activation, a candidate mechanism by which DCA may promote colorectal tumorigenesis. DCA treated colon cancer cells exhibited strong and prolonged activation of ERK1/2 when compared to EGF treatment alone. We also showed that DCA treatment prevents EGFR degradation as opposed to the canonical EGFR recycling observed with EGF treatment. Moreover, the combination of DCA and EGF treatment displayed synergistic activity, suggesting DCA activates MAPK signaling in a non-canonical manner. Further evaluation showed that DCA treatment increased intracellular calcium levels and CAMKII phosphorylation, and that blocking calcium with BAPTA-AM abrogated MAPK activation induced by DCA, but not by EGF. Finally we showed that DCA-induced CAMKII leads to MAPK activation through the recruitment of c-Src. Taken together, we demonstrated that DCA regulates MAPK activation through calcium signaling, an alternative mechanism not previously recognized in human colon cancer cells. Importantly, this mechanism allows for EGFR to escape degradation and thus achieve a constitutively active state, which may explain its tumor promoting effects. PMID:27086143

  7. Sperm-derived WW domain-binding protein, PAWP, elicits calcium oscillations and oocyte activation in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Aarabi, Mahmoud; Balakier, Hanna; Bashar, Siamak; Moskovtsev, Sergey I; Sutovsky, Peter; Librach, Clifford L; Oko, Richard

    2014-10-01

    Mammalian zygotic development is initiated by sperm-mediated intracellular calcium oscillations, followed by activation of metaphase II-arrested oocytes. Sperm postacrosomal WW binding protein (PAWP) fulfils the criteria set for an oocyte-activating factor by inducing oocyte activation and being stored in the perinuclear theca, the sperm compartment whose content is first released into oocyte cytoplasm during fertilization. However, proof that PAWP initiates mammalian zygotic development relies on demonstration that it acts upstream of oocyte calcium oscillations. Here, we show that PAWP triggers calcium oscillations and pronuclear formation in human and mouse oocytes similar to what is observed during intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Most important, sperm-induced calcium oscillations are blocked by coinjection of a competitive inhibitor, derived from the WWI domain-binding motif of PAWP, implying the requirement of sperm PAWP and an oocyte-derived WWI domain protein substrate of PAWP for successful fertilization. Sperm-delivered PAWP is, therefore, a unique protein with a nonredundant role during human and mouse fertilization, required to trigger zygotic development. Presented data confirm our previous findings in nonmammalian models and suggest potential applications of PAWP in the diagnosis and treatment of infertility.- PMID:24970390

  8. CNTF-Treated Astrocyte Conditioned Medium Enhances Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel Activity in Rat Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Xu, Huanbai; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-08-01

    Seizure activity is linked to astrocyte activation as well as dysfunctional cortical neuron excitability produced from changes in calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channel function. Ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) can be used to investigate the peripheral effects of activated astrocytes upon cortical neurons. However, CNTF-ACM's effect upon KCa channel activity in cultured cortical neurons has not yet been investigated. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed in rat cortical neurons to evaluate CNTF-ACM's effects upon charybdotoxin-sensitive large-conductance KCa (BK) channel currents and apamin-sensitive small-conductance KCa (SK) channel current. Biotinylation and RT-PCR were applied to assess CNTF-ACM's effects upon the protein and mRNA expression, respectively, of the SK channel subunits SK2 and SK3 and the BK channel subunits BKα1 and BKβ3. An anti-fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) monoclonal neutralizing antibody was used to assess the effects of the FGF-2 component of CNTF-ACM. CNTF-ACM significantly increased KCa channel current density, which was predominantly attributable to gains in BK channel activity (p < 0.05). CNTF-ACM produced a significant increase in BKα1 and BKβ3 expression (p < 0.05) but had no significant effect upon SK2 or SK3 expression (p > 0.05). Blocking FGF-2 produced significant reductions in KCa channel current density (p > 0.05) as well as BKα1 and BKβ3 expression in CNTF-ACM-treated neurons (p > 0.05). CNTF-ACM significantly enhances BK channel activity in rat cortical neurons and that FGF-2 is partially responsible for these effects. CNTF-induced astrocyte activation results in secretion of neuroactive factors which may affect neuronal excitability and resultant seizure activity in mammalian cortical neurons. PMID:27097551

  9. Mouse Spermatozoa Contain a Nuclease that Is Activated by Pretreatment with EGTA and Subsequent Calcium Incubation

    PubMed Central

    Boaz, Segal M.; Dominguez, Kenneth; Shaman, Jeffrey A.; Ward, W. Steven

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrated that mouse spermatozoa cleave their DNA into ~50 kb loop-sized fragments with topoisomerase IIB when treated with MnCl2 and CaCl2 in a process we term sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF). SCF can be reversed by EDTA. A nuclease then further degrades the DNA in a process we term sperm DNA degradation (SDD). MnCl2 alone could elicit this activity, but CaCl2 had no effect. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a nuclease in the vas deferens that can be activated by EGTA to digest the sperm DNA by SDD. Spermatozoa were extracted with salt and dithiothreitol to remove protamines and then incubated with EGTA. Next, the EGTA was removed and divalent cations were added. We found that Mn+2, Ca+2, or Zn+2 could each activate SDD in spermatozoa but Mg+2 could not. When the reaction was slowed by incubation on ice, EGTA pretreatment followed by incubation in Ca+2 elicited the reversible fragmentation of sperm DNA evident in SCF. When the reactions were then incubated at 37°C they progressed to the more complete degradation of DNA by SDD. EDTA could also be used to activate the nuclease, but required a higher concentration than EGTA. This EGTA-activatable nuclease activity was found in each fraction of the vas deferens plasma: in the spermatozoa, in the surrounding fluid, and in the insoluble components in the fluid. These results suggest that this sperm nuclease is regulated by a mechanism that is sensitive to EGTA, possibly by removing inhibition of a calcium binding protein. PMID:17879959

  10. Eight years of follow-up after laminectomy of calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition in the cervical yellow ligament of patient with Coffin–Lowry syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morino, Tadao; Ogata, Tadanori; Horiuchi, Hideki; Yamaoka, Shintaro; Fukuda, Mitsumasa; Miura, Hiromasa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We report 8 years of follow-up after decompression to treat cervical myelopathy in a patient with Coffin–Lowry syndrome (CLS). CLS is a rare X-linked semidominant syndrome associated with growth and psychomotor retardation, general hypotonia, and skeletal abnormalities. In this patient, the spinal cord was compressed by calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition in the cervical yellow ligament (YL). To date, only 1 report has described clinical features after surgery for calcified cervical YL in CLS. Methods: A 15-year-old male with tetraplegia secondary to compression of the cervical spinal cord induced by a hypoplastic posterior arch of C1 and calcification of the YL from C2 to C7 was treated surgically with laminectomy from C1 to C7. The patient's history, clinical examination, imaging findings, and treatment are reported. The patient was incapable of speech because of mental retardation, so he could not describe his symptoms. Gait disturbance worsened over the 2 months before admission to our hospital. At admission, the patient could not move his extremities, and tendon reflexes of the upper and lower extremities were significantly increased. Computed tomography of the cervical spine showed YL calcification from C2 to C7. Magnetic resonance imaging showed consecutive compression of the cervical spinal cord. We diagnosed quadriplegia secondary to cervical cord damage and performed emergency surgery. Results: During C1–C7 laminectomy, YL calcification in C2–C7 was observed. The calcification was confirmed as calcium pyrophosphate by crystal analysis. Quadriplegia gradually resolved, and almost disappeared by 2 weeks after the operation. Cervical hyperlordosis was observed in radiographs starting from 1 month after the operation, but it has not progressed and is not associated with any symptoms. Conclusions: The efficacy of decompression continued, and no postoperative complications have occurred during at least 8 years of follow-up. PMID

  11. Study of permeation and blocker binding in TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Reyes, J P; Huanosta-Gutiérrez, A; López-Rodríguez, A; Martínez-Torres, A

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of mutations of positively charged amino acid residues in the pore of X. tropicalis TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels: K613E, K628E, K630E; R646E and R761E. The activation and deactivation kinetics were not affected, and only K613E showed a lower current density. K628E and R761E affect anion selectivity without affecting Na(+) permeation, whereas K613E, R646E and the double mutant K613E + R646E affect anion selectivity and permeability to Na(+). Furthermore, altered blockade by the chloride channel blockers anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (A-9-C), 4, 4'-Diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonic acid (DIDS) and T16inh-A01 was observed. These results suggest the existence of 2 binding sites for anions within the pore at electrical distances of 0.3 and 0.5. These sites are also relevant for anion permeation and blockade. PMID:25853341

  12. Optimization of a GCaMP calcium indicator for neural activity imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akerboom, Jasper; Chen, Tsai-Wen; Wardill, Trevor J.; Tian, Lin; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Mutlu, Sevinç; Calderón, Nicole Carreras; Esposti, Federico; Borghuis, Bart G.; Sun, Xiaonan Richard; Gordus, Andrew; Orger, Michael B.; Portugues, Ruben; Engert, Florian; Macklin, John J.; Filosa, Alessandro; Aggarwal, Aman; Kerr, Rex; Takagi, Ryousuke; Kracun, Sebastian; Shigetomi, Eiji; Khakh, Baljit S.; Baier, Herwig; Lagnado, Leon; Wang, Samuel S.-H.; Bargmann, Cornelia I.; Kimmel, Bruce E.; Jayaraman, Vivek; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S.; Schreiter, Eric R.; Looger, Loren L.

    2012-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) are powerful tools for systems neuroscience. Recent efforts in protein engineering have significantly increased the performance of GECIs. The state-of-the art single-wavelength GECI, GCaMP3, has been deployed in a number of model organisms and can reliably detect three or more action potentials (APs) in short bursts in several systems in vivo. Through protein structure determination, targeted mutagenesis, high-throughput screening, and a battery of in vitro assays, we have increased the dynamic range of GCaMP3 by several-fold, creating a family of “GCaMP5” sensors. We tested GCaMP5s in several systems: cultured neurons and astrocytes, mouse retina, and in vivo in Caenorhabditis chemosensory neurons, Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction and adult antennal lobe, zebrafish retina and tectum, and mouse visual cortex. Signal-to-noise ratio was improved by at least 2–3-fold. In the visual cortex, two GCaMP5 variants detected twice as many visual stimulus-responsive cells as GCaMP3. By combining in vivo imaging with electrophysiology we show that GCaMP5 fluorescence provides a more reliable measure of neuronal activity than its predecessor GCaMP3. GCaMP5 allows more sensitive detection of neural activity in vivo and may find widespread applications for cellular imaging in general. PMID:23035093

  13. Application of calcium peroxide activated with Fe(II)-EDDS complex in trichloroethylene degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Miao, Zhouwei; Xu, Minhui; Fu, Xiaori; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to assess the application of calcium peroxide (CP) activated with Fe(II) chelated by (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinic acid (EDDS) to enhance trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation in aqueous solution. It was indicated that EDDS prevented soluble iron from precipitation, and the optimum molar ratio of Fe(II)/EDDS to accelerate TCE degradation was 1/1. The influences of initial TCE, CP and Fe(II)-EDDS concentration were also investigated. The combination of CP and Fe(II)-EDDS complex rendered the efficient degradation of TCE at near neutral pH range. Chemical probe and scavenger tests identified that TCE degradation mainly owed to the oxidation of HO while O2(-) promoted HO generation. Cl(-), HCO3(-) and humic acid were found to inhibit CP/Fe(II)-EDDS performance on different levels. In conclusion, the application of CP activated with Fe(II)-EDDS complex is a promising technology in chemical remediation of groundwater, while further research in practical implementation is needed. PMID:27351899

  14. Factor Xa stimulates fibroblast procollagen production, proliferation, and calcium signaling via PAR{sub 1} activation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc-Brude, Olivier P. . E-mail: olivier.blanc-brude@larib.inserm.fr; Archer, Fabienne; Leoni, Patricia; Derian, Claudia; Bolsover, Steven; Laurent, Geoffrey J.; Chambers, Rachel C.

    2005-03-10

    Fibroblast proliferation and procollagen production are central features of tissue repair and fibrosis. In addition to its role in blood clotting, the coagulation cascade proteinase thrombin can contribute to tissue repair by stimulating fibroblasts via proteolytic activation of proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR{sub 1}). During hemostasis, the coagulation cascade proteinase factor X is converted into factor Xa. We have previously shown that factor Xa upregulates fibroblast proliferation via production of autocrine PDGF. In this study, we further examined the effects of factor Xa on fibroblast function and aimed to identify its signaling receptor. We showed that factor Xa stimulates procollagen promoter activity and protein production by human and mouse fibroblasts. This effect was independent of PDGF and thrombin production, but dependent on factor Xa proteolytic activity. We also showed that PAR{sub 1}-deficient mouse fibroblasts did not upregulate procollagen production, mobilize cytosolic calcium, or proliferate in response to factor Xa. Desensitization techniques and PAR{sub 1}-specific agonists and inhibitors were used to demonstrate that PAR{sub 1} mediates factor Xa signaling in human fibroblasts. This is the first report that factor Xa stimulates extracellular matrix production. In contrast with endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts appear to be the only cell type in which the effects of factor Xa are mediated mainly via PAR{sub 1} and not PAR{sub 2}. These findings are critical for our understanding of tissue repair and fibrotic mechanisms, and for the design of novel approaches to inhibit the profibrotic effects of the coagulation cascade without compromising blood hemostasis.

  15. Activation of portal-hepatic osmoreceptors in rats: role of calcium, acetylcholine and cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Stoppini, L; Baertschi, A J

    1984-11-01

    Osmoreceptors are sensory organs of paramount importance in water and electrolyte balance, yet the mechanisms for their activation are virtually unknown. Peripheral osmoreceptors have been localised in the hepatic portal vein area of rats. We thus superfused the portal adventitia with 0.2 ml of 4% NaCl before and after various pharmacological pretreatments (0.4 ml of 1 mM solutions) of the portal area, while monitoring the neural activity of the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system. Portal superfusion with verapamil, to reduce Ca-influx, reversibly inhibited the response to osmotic stimuli by up to 50% (P less than 0.0005). Such inhibition (58%; P less than 0.0005) was also seen with portal superfusion by atropine. Atropine did not affect hypothalamo-neurohypophysial responses to stimulation of portal bradykinin receptors with 0.2 ml 1 muM bradykinin, and portal superfusion with acetylcholine activated the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system. The results thus support the hypothesis of a cholinergic neurotransmission linking portal osmoreceptive structures and afferent nerve endings. Diamide, which inhibits water efflux in frog skin, also reversibly inhibited responses to osmotic stimuli by 38% (P less than 0.0005). Pretreatments with trifluoperazine, a calmodulin inhibitor, and cordycepin, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, diminished responses to osmotic stimuli by 30-45% (P less than 0.005), while cAMP and theophilline potentiated them by 38% (P less than 0.0005). Responses to bradykinin superfusion were reduced 20-30% (P less than 0.05) by both cordycepin and cAMP. The results suggest that portal osmoreceptors release acetylcholine to excite afferent nerves when exposed to an osmotic gradient. The mechanism of this release may be mediated by an efflux of water and an increase of intracellular calcium activity and cAMP. PMID:6150955

  16. Plasma Membrane Calcium ATPase Activity Is Regulated by Actin Oligomers through Direct Interaction*

    PubMed Central

    Dalghi, Marianela G.; Fernández, Marisa M.; Ferreira-Gomes, Mariela; Mangialavori, Irene C.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Strehler, Emanuel E.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F. C.

    2013-01-01

    As recently described by our group, plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) activity can be regulated by the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we characterize the interaction of purified G-actin with isolated PMCA and examine the effect of G-actin during the first polymerization steps. As measured by surface plasmon resonance, G-actin directly interacts with PMCA with an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry in the presence of Ca2+ with an apparent affinity in the micromolar range. As assessed by the photoactivatable probe 1-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[125I]iodo-4-(trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the association of PMCA to actin produced a shift in the distribution of the conformers of the pump toward a calmodulin-activated conformation. G-actin stimulates Ca2+-ATPase activity of the enzyme when incubated under polymerizing conditions, displaying a cooperative behavior. The increase in the Ca2+-ATPase activity was related to an increase in the apparent affinity for Ca2+ and an increase in the phosphoenzyme levels at steady state. Although surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed only one binding site for G-actin, results clearly indicate that more than one molecule of G-actin was needed for a regulatory effect on the pump. Polymerization studies showed that the experimental conditions are compatible with the presence of actin in the first stages of assembly. Altogether, these observations suggest that the stimulatory effect is exerted by short oligomers of actin. The functional interaction between actin oligomers and PMCA represents a novel regulatory pathway by which the cortical actin cytoskeleton participates in the regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:23803603

  17. Active vitamin D potentiates the anti-neoplastic effects of calcium in the colon: A cross talk through the calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Abhishek; Höbaus, Julia; Tennakoon, Samawansha; Prinz-Wohlgenannt, Maximilian; Graça, João; Price, Sally A; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina; Kállay, Enikö

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest an inverse correlation between dietary calcium (Ca(2+)) and vitamin D intake and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). It has been shown in vitro that the active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-D3) can upregulate expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). In the colon, CaSR has been suggested to regulate proliferation of colonocytes. However, during tumorigenesis colonic CaSR expression is downregulated and we hypothesized that the loss of CaSR could influence the anti-tumorigenic effects of Ca(2+) and vitamin D. Our aim was to assess the impact of CaSR expression and function on the anti-neoplastic effects of 1,25-D3 in colon cancer cell lines. We demonstrated that in the healthy colon of mice, high vitamin D diet (2500 IU/kg diet) increased expression of differentiation and apoptosis markers, decreased expression of proliferation markers and significantly upregulated CaSR mRNA expression, compared with low vitamin D diet (100 IU/kg diet). To determine the role of CaSR in this process, we transfected Caco2-15 and HT29 CRC cells with wild type CaSR (CaSR-WT) or a dominant negative CaSR mutant (CaSR-DN) and treated them with 1,25-D3 alone, or in combination with CaSR activators (Ca(2+) and NPS R-568). 1,25-D3 enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of Ca(2+) and induced differentiation and apoptosis only in cells with a functional CaSR, which were further enhanced in the presence of NPS R-568, a positive allosteric modulator of CaSR. The mutant CaSR inhibited the anti-tumorigenic effects of 1,25-D3 suggesting that the anti-neoplastic effects of 1,25-D3 are, at least in part, mediated by the CaSR. Taken together, our data provides molecular evidence to support the epidemiological observation that both, vitamin D and calcium are needed for protection against malignant transformation of the colon and that their effect is modulated by the presence of a functional CaSR. This article is part of a Special Issue

  18. Comparison of ground and aerial application, fungicide deposition and biological activity in large pecan tree canopies.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study was conducted to determine vertical spray deposition in pecan canopies of large trees and to estimate the biological activity of the deposited fungicides. Tracer elements were used at molar concentrations equivalent to the molar amount of active ingredient found in the recommended rates o...

  19. Cross Talk among Calcium, Hydrogen Peroxide, and Nitric Oxide and Activation of Gene Expression Involving Calmodulins and Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinases in Ulva compressa Exposed to Copper Excess1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    González, Alberto; Cabrera, M. de los Ángeles; Henríquez, M. Josefa; Contreras, Rodrigo A.; Morales, Bernardo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the copper-induced cross talk among calcium, nitric oxide (NO), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the calcium-dependent activation of gene expression, the marine alga Ulva compressa was treated with the inhibitors of calcium channels, ned-19, ryanodine, and xestospongin C, of chloroplasts and mitochondrial electron transport chains, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and antimycin A, of pyruvate dehydrogenase, moniliformin, of calmodulins, N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphtalene sulfonamide, and of calcium-dependent protein kinases, staurosporine, as well as with the scavengers of NO, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, and of H2O2, ascorbate, and exposed to a sublethal concentration of copper (10 μm) for 24 h. The level of NO increased at 2 and 12 h. The first peak was inhibited by ned-19 and 3-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and the second peak by ned-19 and antimycin A, indicating that NO synthesis is dependent on calcium release and occurs in organelles. The level of H2O2 increased at 2, 3, and 12 h and was inhibited by ned-19, ryanodine, xestospongin C, and moniliformin, indicating that H2O2 accumulation is dependent on calcium release and Krebs cycle activity. In addition, pyruvate dehydrogenase, 2-oxoxglutarate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities of the Krebs cycle increased at 2, 3, 12, and/or 14 h, and these increases were inhibited in vitro by EGTA, a calcium chelating agent. Calcium release at 2, 3, and 12 h was inhibited by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide and ascorbate, indicating activation by NO and H2O2. In addition, the level of antioxidant protein gene transcripts decreased with N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphtalene sulfonamide and staurosporine. Thus, there is a copper-induced cross talk among calcium, H2O2, and NO and a calcium-dependent activation of gene expression involving calmodulins and calcium-dependent protein kinases. PMID:22234999

  20. Zolpidem Reduces Hippocampal Neuronal Activity in Freely Behaving Mice: A Large Scale Calcium Imaging Study with Miniaturized Fluorescence Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Berdyyeva, Tamara; Otte, Stephani; Aluisio, Leah; Ziv, Yaniv; Burns, Laurie D.; Dugovic, Christine; Yun, Sujin; Ghosh, Kunal K.; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Lovenberg, Timothy; Bonaventure, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic drugs for cognitive and psychiatric disorders are often characterized by their molecular mechanism of action. Here we demonstrate a new approach to elucidate drug action on large-scale neuronal activity by tracking somatic calcium dynamics in hundreds of CA1 hippocampal neurons of pharmacologically manipulated behaving mice. We used an adeno-associated viral vector to express the calcium sensor GCaMP3 in CA1 pyramidal cells under control of the CaMKII promoter and a miniaturized microscope to observe cellular dynamics. We visualized these dynamics with and without a systemic administration of Zolpidem, a GABAA agonist that is the most commonly prescribed drug for the treatment of insomnia in the United States. Despite growing concerns about the potential adverse effects of Zolpidem on memory and cognition, it remained unclear whether Zolpidem alters neuronal activity in the hippocampus, a brain area critical for cognition and memory. Zolpidem, when delivered at a dose known to induce and prolong sleep, strongly suppressed CA1 calcium signaling. The rate of calcium transients after Zolpidem administration was significantly lower compared to vehicle treatment. To factor out the contribution of changes in locomotor or physiological conditions following Zolpidem treatment, we compared the cellular activity across comparable epochs matched by locomotor and physiological assessments. This analysis revealed significantly depressive effects of Zolpidem regardless of the animal’s state. Individual hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells differed in their responses to Zolpidem with the majority (∼65%) significantly decreasing the rate of calcium transients, and a small subset (3%) showing an unexpected and significant increase. By linking molecular mechanisms with the dynamics of neural circuitry and behavioral states, this approach has the potential to contribute substantially to the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of CNS disorders. PMID:25372144

  1. CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through upregulating L-type calcium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Xu, Huanbai; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-09-01

    A specialized culture medium termed ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) allows investigators to assess the peripheral effects of CNTF-induced activated astrocytes upon cultured neurons. CNTF-ACM has been shown to upregulate neuronal L-type calcium channel current activity, which has been previously linked to changes in mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate CNTF-ACM's effects upon mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in rat cortical neurons. Cortical neurons, CNTF-ACM, and untreated control astrocyte-conditioned medium (UC-ACM) were prepared from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat cortical tissue. Neurons were cultured in either CNTF-ACM or UC-ACM for a 48-h period. Changes in the following parameters before and after treatment with the L-type calcium channel blocker isradipine were assessed: (i) intracellular calcium levels, (ii) mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), (iii) oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) formation, (iv) intracellular nitric oxide (NO) levels, (v) mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and (vi) susceptibility to the mitochondrial complex I toxin rotenone. CNTF-ACM neurons displayed the following significant changes relative to UC-ACM neurons: (i) increased intracellular calcium levels (p < 0.05), (ii) elevation in ΔΨm (p < 0.05), (iii) increased OCR and ATP formation (p < 0.05), (iv) increased intracellular NO levels (p < 0.05), (v) increased mitochondrial ROS production (p < 0.05), and (vi) increased susceptibility to rotenone (p < 0.05). Treatment with isradipine was able to partially rescue these negative effects of CNTF-ACM (p < 0.05). CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through elevating L-type calcium channel activity. PMID:27514537

  2. Relaxin stimulates myometrial calcium-activated potassium channel activity via protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Meera, P; Anwer, K; Monga, M; Oberti, C; Stefani, E; Toro, L; Sanborn, B M

    1995-08-01

    Relaxin, a hormone that is elevated during pregnancy, can suppress myometrial contractile activity. Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels (KCa) play a role in the modulation of uterine contractions and myometrial Ca2+ homeostasis and have been implicated in the control of smooth muscle excitability. We now show that relaxin stimulates KCa channels in cell-attached patches in a cell line derived from term pregnant human myometrium. This effect was prevented by the protein kinase A (PKA) antagonist, the Rp diastereomer of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate (Rp-cAMPS). After patch excision, the channel was activated by PKA and inhibited by alkaline phosphatase. These data suggest that relaxin may promote myometrial quiescence in part by stimulation of KCa channels via a PKA-mediated mechanism. PMID:7653512

  3. Calcium-calmodulin does not alter the anion permeability of the mouse TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yawei; Kuan, Ai-Seon

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane protein TMEM16A forms a Ca2+-activated Cl− channel that is permeable to many anions, including SCN−, I−, Br−, Cl−, and HCO3−, and has been implicated in various physiological functions. Indeed, controlling anion permeation through the TMEM16A channel pore may be critical in regulating the pH of exocrine fluids such as the pancreatic juice. The anion permeability of the TMEM16A channel pore has recently been reported to be modulated by Ca2+-calmodulin (CaCaM), such that the pore of the CaCaM-bound channel shows a reduced ability to discriminate between anions as measured by a shift of the reversal potential under bi-ionic conditions. Here, using a mouse TMEM16A clone that contains the two previously identified putative CaM-binding motifs, we were unable to demonstrate such CaCaM-dependent changes in the bi-ionic potential. We confirmed the activity of CaCaM used in our study by showing CaCaM modulation of the olfactory cyclic nucleotide–gated channel. We suspect that the different bi-ionic potentials that were obtained previously from whole-cell recordings in low and high intracellular [Ca2+] may result from different degrees of bi-ionic potential shift secondary to a series resistance problem, an ion accumulation effect, or both. PMID:24981232

  4. Molecular mechanism underlying β1 regulation in voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Karen; Contreras, Gustavo F.; Pupo, Amaury; Torres, Yolima P.; Neely, Alan; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Being activated by depolarizing voltages and increases in cytoplasmic Ca2+, voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and their modulatory β-subunits are able to dampen or stop excitatory stimuli in a wide range of cellular types, including both neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. Minimal alterations in BK channel function may contribute to the pathophysiology of several diseases, including hypertension, asthma, cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes. Several gating processes, allosterically coupled to each other, control BK channel activity and are potential targets for regulation by auxiliary β-subunits that are expressed together with the α (BK)-subunit in almost every tissue type where they are found. By measuring gating currents in BK channels coexpressed with chimeras between β1 and β3 or β2 auxiliary subunits, we were able to identify that the cytoplasmic regions of β1 are responsible for the modulation of the voltage sensors. In addition, we narrowed down the structural determinants to the N terminus of β1, which contains two lysine residues (i.e., K3 and K4), which upon substitution virtually abolished the effects of β1 on charge movement. The mechanism by which K3 and K4 stabilize the voltage sensor is not electrostatic but specific, and the α (BK)-residues involved remain to be identified. This is the first report, to our knowledge, where the regulatory effects of the β1-subunit have been clearly assigned to a particular segment, with two pivotal amino acids being responsible for this modulation. PMID:25825713

  5. Molecular mechanism underlying β1 regulation in voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Karen; Contreras, Gustavo F; Pupo, Amaury; Torres, Yolima P; Neely, Alan; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2015-04-14

    Being activated by depolarizing voltages and increases in cytoplasmic Ca(2+), voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and their modulatory β-subunits are able to dampen or stop excitatory stimuli in a wide range of cellular types, including both neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. Minimal alterations in BK channel function may contribute to the pathophysiology of several diseases, including hypertension, asthma, cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes. Several gating processes, allosterically coupled to each other, control BK channel activity and are potential targets for regulation by auxiliary β-subunits that are expressed together with the α (BK)-subunit in almost every tissue type where they are found. By measuring gating currents in BK channels coexpressed with chimeras between β1 and β3 or β2 auxiliary subunits, we were able to identify that the cytoplasmic regions of β1 are responsible for the modulation of the voltage sensors. In addition, we narrowed down the structural determinants to the N terminus of β1, which contains two lysine residues (i.e., K3 and K4), which upon substitution virtually abolished the effects of β1 on charge movement. The mechanism by which K3 and K4 stabilize the voltage sensor is not electrostatic but specific, and the α (BK)-residues involved remain to be identified. This is the first report, to our knowledge, where the regulatory effects of the β1-subunit have been clearly assigned to a particular segment, with two pivotal amino acids being responsible for this modulation. PMID:25825713

  6. Imaging activity in astrocytes and neurons with genetically encoded calcium indicators following in utero electroporation.

    PubMed

    Gee, J Michael; Gibbons, Meredith B; Taheri, Marsa; Palumbos, Sierra; Morris, S Craig; Smeal, Roy M; Flynn, Katherine F; Economo, Michael N; Cizek, Christian G; Capecchi, Mario R; Tvrdik, Petr; Wilcox, Karen S; White, John A

    2015-01-01

    Complex interactions between networks of astrocytes and neurons are beginning to be appreciated, but remain poorly understood. Transgenic mice expressing fluorescent protein reporters of cellular activity, such as the GCaMP family of genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs), have been used to explore network behavior. However, in some cases, it may be desirable to use long-established rat models that closely mimic particular aspects of human conditions such as Parkinson's disease and the development of epilepsy following status epilepticus. Methods for expressing reporter proteins in the rat brain are relatively limited. Transgenic rat technologies exist but are fairly immature. Viral-mediated expression is robust but unstable, requires invasive injections, and only works well for fairly small genes (<5 kb). In utero electroporation (IUE) offers a valuable alternative. IUE is a proven method for transfecting populations of astrocytes and neurons in the rat brain without the strict limitations on transgene size. We built a toolset of IUE plasmids carrying GCaMP variants 3, 6s, or 6f driven by CAG and targeted to the cytosol or the plasma membrane. Because low baseline fluorescence of GCaMP can hinder identification of transfected cells, we included the option of co-expressing a cytosolic tdTomato protein. A binary system consisting of a plasmid carrying a piggyBac inverted terminal repeat (ITR)-flanked CAG-GCaMP-IRES-tdTomato cassette and a separate plasmid encoding for expression of piggyBac transposase was employed to stably express GCaMP and tdTomato. The plasmids were co-electroporated on embryonic days 13.5-14.5 and astrocytic and neuronal activity was subsequently imaged in acute or cultured brain slices prepared from the cortex or hippocampus. Large spontaneous transients were detected in slices obtained from rats of varying ages up to 127 days. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of this toolset for interrogating astrocytic and neuronal activity

  7. On the calcium receptor activating exocytosis: inhibitory effects of calmodulin-interacting drugs on rat mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, W W; Nemeth, E F

    1982-01-01

    1. A series of neuroleptic drugs (five phenothiazines, imipramine, and pimozide) and the smooth muscle relaxant W-7, which all inhibit calcium-calmodulin-activated processes inhibited rat mast cell secretion elicited by antigen, by 48/80, and by the calcium ionophore A23187. 2. Neither the phenothiazines nor W-7 reduced 45Ca uptake in response to A23187. The drugs thus exert an inhibitory action distal to the rise in intracellular Ca ions that activates exocytosis. 3. Chlorpromazine sulphoxide, which shares several membrane-perturbing actions of the phenothiazines but is a weak inhibitor of calmodulin, did not inhibit secretion. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of the phenothiazines were not overcome by a 5- or 10-fold increase in the concentration of calcium, which should counter unspecific membrane effects. 4. The inhibitory effects of the various neuroleptic drugs appeared to be related to their ability to inhibit calmodulin because the individual potencies of these compounds on secretion evoked by 48/80 or A23187 correlated significantly with their reported potencies in inhibiting calmodulin-activated processes. (The greater potency and different rank order of these compounds on secretion evoked by antigen suggests an additional inhibitory action, perhaps involving Ca entry.) 5. These results, which parallel those obtained with drugs of this sort in smooth muscle where calmodulin seemingly functions as the Ca receptor activating contraction, strengthen the view that calmodulin, or some calmodulin-like protein, is the Ca receptor activating exocytosis. PMID:6178817

  8. Plasmonic activation of gold nanorods for remote stimulation of calcium signaling and protein expression in HEK 293T cells.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, Sandra P; Sauer, Jeremy P; Stanley, Sarah A; Qian, Xi; Gottesdiener, Andrew; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Dordick, Jonathan S

    2016-10-01

    Remote activation of specific cells of a heterogeneous population can provide a useful research tool for clinical and therapeutic applications. Here, we demonstrate that photostimulation of gold nanorods (AuNRs) using a tunable near-infrared (NIR) laser at specific longitudinal surface plasmon resonance wavelengths can induce the selective and temporal internalization of calcium in HEK 293T cells. Biotin-PEG-Au nanorods coated with streptavidin Alexa Fluor-633 and biotinylated anti-His antibodies were used to decorate cells genetically modified with His-tagged TRPV1 temperature-sensitive ion channel and AuNRs conjugated to biotinylated RGD peptide were used to decorate integrins in unmodified cells. Plasmonic activation can be stimulated at weak laser power (0.7-4.0 W/cm(2) ) without causing cell damage. Selective activation of TRPV1 channels could be controlled by laser power between 1.0 and 1.5 W/cm(2) . Integrin targeting robustly stimulated calcium signaling due to a dense cellular distribution of nanoparticles. Such an approach represents a functional tool for combinatorial activation of cell signaling in heterogeneous cell populations. Our results suggest that it is possible to induce cell activation via NIR-induced gold nanorod heating through the selective targeting of membrane proteins in unmodified cells to produce calcium signaling and downstream expression of specific genes with significant relevance for both in vitro and therapeutic applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2228-2240. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27563853

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Calcium Hydroxide and Betamethasone on Enterococcus faecalis; An in vitro Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizizadeh, Mahdi; Rasti, Mojtaba; Ayatollahi, Fatemeh; Mossadegh, Mohammad Hossein; Zandi, Hengameh; Dehghan, Farzad; Mousavi, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Calcium hydroxide (CH) is one of the most common intracanal medications. Corticosteroids (CS) are used in endodontics because of their anti-inflammatory activity. This study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of CH+betamethasone and CH+saline against Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) using agar diffusion test and measuring the microbial zone of inhibition (ZOI). Methods and Materials: Four plates containing Mueller-Hinton broth and E. faecalis culture media, were prepared. In each plate, 5 holes (5×3 mm) were created and a creamy mixture of CH+betamethasone was inserted into the holes (10 holes for each material). Two holes with ampicillin disks and two empty holes were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. Plates were incubated for 24 h and then the diameter of microbial ZOI was measured. The pH of each mixture was measured by pH meter. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: The mean diameter of ZOI for CH+betamethasone and CH+saline was 3.4 and 3 mm, respectively. The difference was not significant (P=0.143). The pH was 12.5 for CH+saline and 12.3 CH+betamethasone, respectively. Conclusion: The mixture of CH+betamethasone had good antimicrobial effects against E. faecalis. Further studies are needed to confirm the value of this mixture in clinical settings. PMID:26213541

  10. Mechanochemically Activated, Calcium Oxide-Based, Magnesium Oxide-Stabilized Carbon Dioxide Sorbents.

    PubMed

    Kurlov, Alexey; Broda, Marcin; Hosseini, Davood; Mitchell, Sharon J; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier; Müller, Christoph R

    2016-09-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is a promising approach to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions and mitigate climate change. However, the costs associated with the capture of CO2 using the currently available technology, that is, amine scrubbing, are considered prohibitive. In this context, the so-called calcium looping process, which relies on the reversible carbonation of CaO, is an attractive alternative. The main disadvantage of naturally occurring CaO-based CO2 sorbents, such as limestone, is their rapid deactivation caused by thermal sintering. Here, we report a scalable route based on wet mechanochemical activation to prepare MgO-stabilized, CaO-based CO2 sorbents. We optimized the synthesis conditions through a fundamental understanding of the underlying stabilization mechanism, and the quantity of MgO required to stabilize CaO could be reduced to as little as 15 wt %. This allowed the preparation of CO2 sorbents that exceed the CO2 uptake of the reference limestone by 200 %. PMID:27529608

  11. LASER ENGINEERED DISSOLVING MICRONEEDLES FOR ACTIVE TRANSDERMAL DELIVERY OF NADROPARIN CALCIUM

    PubMed Central

    Gomaa, Yasmine A.; Garland, Martin J.; McInnes, Fiona; El-Khordagui, Labiba K.; Wilson, Clive; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need to replace the injection currently used for low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) multi-dose therapy with a non-invasive delivery device. In this study, laser-engineered dissolving microneedle (DMN) arrays fabricated from aqueous blends of 15% w/w poly (methylvinylether co maleic anhydride) have been fabricated as a potential device for the active transdermal delivery of nadroparin calcium (NC) as a model LMWH. An array loading of 630 IU of NC was achieved without compromising the array mechanical strength or the drug bioactivity. Application of NC-DMNs to dermatomed human skin (DHS) using the single step “poke and release” approach allowed permeation of approximately 10.6 % of the total NC load over a 48 h-study period. The cumulative amount of NC that permeated DHS at 24 h and 48 h attained 12.28 ± 4.23 IU/cm2 and 164.84 ± 8.47 IU/cm2, respectively. Skin permeation of NC could be modulated by controlling the DMN array variables, such as MN length and array density as well as application force to meet various clinical requirements including adjustment for body mass and renal function. NC-loaded DMN offer potentials as a relatively low cost functional delivery system for the transdermal delivery of LMWH and other macromolecules. PMID:22836025

  12. Chaotic model and memory in single calcium-activated potassium channel kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandeira, Heliovânio T.; Barbosa, Catão T. F.; Campos De Oliveira, Regina A.; Aguiar, José F.; Nogueira, Romildo A.

    2008-09-01

    Ion channels are pores formed by proteins and responsible for carrying ion fluxes through cellular membranes. The ion channels can assume conformational states thereby controlling ion flow. Physically, the conformational transitions from one state to another are associated with energy barriers between them and are dependent on stimulus, such as, electrical field, ligands, second messengers, etc. Several models have been proposed to describe the kinetics of ion channels. The classical Markovian model assumes that a future transition is independent of the time that the ion channel stayed in a previous state. Others models as the fractal and the chaotic assume that the rate of transitions between the states depend on the time that the ionic channel stayed in a previous state. For the calcium activated potassium channels of Leydig cells the R/S Hurst analysis has indicated that the channels are long-term correlated with a Hurst coefficient H around 0.7, showing a persistent memory in this kinetic. Here, we applied the R /S analysis to the opening and closing dwell time series obtained from simulated data from a chaotic model proposed by L. Liebovitch and T. Tóth [J. Theor. Biol. 148, 243 (1991)] and we show that this chaotic model or any model that treats the set of channel openings and closings as independent events is inadequate to describe the long-term correlation (memory) already described for the experimental data.

  13. Calcium II K Line as a Measure of Activity: Meshing Sac Peak and Solis Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Elana; Earley, J.; Keil, S.

    2012-05-01

    The Calcium II K line is an important indicator of solar and stellar activity. Disk integrated Ca K measurements have been taken at the Evans Solar Facility at Sacramento Peak Observatory since 1976. This instrument will be shut down by the end of the year, and the observations will be continued by the Solis Integrated Sunlight Spectrometer (ISS), which has been taking measurements since 2006. We attempt to regress the measurements from Sacramento Peak and ISS. In addition, we compare the Ca K measurements with disk averaged line of sight magnetic field measurements, which will help us predict the magnetic field of other stars. We also compare the measurements with Lyman α, allowing us to use Ca K as an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) proxy. This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) [or Research Experiences for Teachers (RET)] site program, which is co-funded by the Department of Defense in partnership with the National Science Foundation REU/RET Program. The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  14. Antibacterial activity and ion release of bonding agent containing amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Weir, Michael D.; Cheng, Lei; Lin, Nancy; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Chow, Laurence C.; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent caries at the margins is a primary reason for restoration failure. The objectives of this study were to develop bonding agent with the double benefits of antibacterial and remineralizing capabilities, to investigate the effects of NACP filler level and solution pH on Ca and P ion release from adhesive, and to examine the antibacterial and dentin bond properties. Methods Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and a quaternary ammonium monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM) were synthesized. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) primer and adhesive served as control. DMADDM was incorporated into primer and adhesive at 5% by mass. NACP was incorporated into adhesive at filler mass fractions of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to test the antibacterial bonding agents. Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases from the cured adhesive samples were measured vs. filler level and solution pH of 7, 5.5 and 4. Results Adding 5% DMADDM and 10–40% NACP into bonding agent, and water-aging for 28 days, did not affect dentin bond strength, compared to SBMP control at 1 day (p > 0.1). Adding DMADDM into bonding agent substantially decreased the biofilm metabolic activity and lactic acid production. Total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci were greatly reduced for bonding agents containing DMADDM. Increasing NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive increased the Ca and P ion release by an order of magnitude. Decreasing solution pH from 7 to 4 increased the ion release from adhesive by 6–10 folds. Significance Bonding agents containing antibacterial DMADDM and remineralizer NACP were formulated to have Ca and P ion release, which increased with NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive. NACP adhesive was “smart” and dramatically increased the ion release at cariogenic pH 4, when these ions would be most-needed to inhibit caries. Therefore, bonding agent

  15. Activation of two different receptors mobilizes calcium from distinct stores in Xenopus oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, H.; Lupu-Meiri, M.; Gershengorn, M.C.; Oron, Y. )

    1990-06-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) utilize inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) as a second messenger and evoke independent depolarizing membrane electrical responses accompanied by characteristic {sup 45}Ca efflux profiles in Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with GH3 pituitary cell mRNA. To determine whether this could be accounted for by mobilization of calcium from functionally separate stores, we measured simultaneously {sup 45}Ca efflux and membrane electrical responses to ACh and TRH in single oocytes. We found that depletion of ACh-sensitive calcium store did not affect the membrane electrical response to TRH and the TRH-evoked {sup 45}Ca efflux. Our data suggest that ACh and TRH mobilize calcium from distinct cellular stores in the oocyte. This is the first demonstration in a single cell of strict subcellular compartmentalization of calcium stores coupled to two different populations of cell membrane receptors that utilize the same second messenger.

  16. Activity-Dependent Gating of Calcium Spikes by A-type K+ Channels Controls Climbing Fiber Signaling in Purkinje Cell Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Otsu, Yo; Marcaggi, Païkan; Feltz, Anne; Isope, Philippe; Kollo, Mihaly; Nusser, Zoltan; Mathieu, Benjamin; Kano, Masanobu; Tsujita, Mika; Sakimura, Kenji; Dieudonné, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Summary In cerebellar Purkinje cell dendrites, heterosynaptic calcium signaling induced by the proximal climbing fiber (CF) input controls plasticity at distal parallel fiber (PF) synapses. The substrate and regulation of this long-range dendritic calcium signaling are poorly understood. Using high-speed calcium imaging, we examine the role of active dendritic conductances. Under basal conditions, CF stimulation evokes T-type calcium signaling displaying sharp proximodistal decrement. Combined mGluR1 receptor activation and depolarization, two activity-dependent signals, unlock P/Q calcium spikes initiation and propagation, mediating efficient CF signaling at distal sites. These spikes are initiated in proximal smooth dendrites, independently from somatic sodium action potentials, and evoke high-frequency bursts of all-or-none fast-rising calcium transients in PF spines. Gradual calcium spike burst unlocking arises from increasing inactivation of mGluR1-modulated low-threshold A-type potassium channels located in distal dendrites. Evidence for graded activity-dependent CF calcium signaling at PF synapses refines current views on cerebellar supervised learning rules. PMID:25220810

  17. Activity-dependent gating of calcium spikes by A-type K+ channels controls climbing fiber signaling in Purkinje cell dendrites.

    PubMed

    Otsu, Yo; Marcaggi, Païkan; Feltz, Anne; Isope, Philippe; Kollo, Mihaly; Nusser, Zoltan; Mathieu, Benjamin; Kano, Masanobu; Tsujita, Mika; Sakimura, Kenji; Dieudonné, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    In cerebellar Purkinje cell dendrites, heterosynaptic calcium signaling induced by the proximal climbing fiber (CF) input controls plasticity at distal parallel fiber (PF) synapses. The substrate and regulation of this long-range dendritic calcium signaling are poorly understood. Using high-speed calcium imaging, we examine the role of active dendritic conductances. Under basal conditions, CF stimulation evokes T-type calcium signaling displaying sharp proximodistal decrement. Combined mGluR1 receptor activation and depolarization, two activity-dependent signals, unlock P/Q calcium spikes initiation and propagation, mediating efficient CF signaling at distal sites. These spikes are initiated in proximal smooth dendrites, independently from somatic sodium action potentials, and evoke high-frequency bursts of all-or-none fast-rising calcium transients in PF spines. Gradual calcium spike burst unlocking arises from increasing inactivation of mGluR1-modulated low-threshold A-type potassium channels located in distal dendrites. Evidence for graded activity-dependent CF calcium signaling at PF synapses refines current views on cerebellar supervised learning rules. PMID:25220810

  18. The prevalence of chondrocalcinosis (CC) of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint on chest radiographs and correlation with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Guillermo; Baynes, Keith; Mautz, Alan; DuBois, Melissa; Cerniglia, Ross; Ryan, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    Digital imaging combined with picture archiving and communication system (PACS) access allows detailed image retrieval and magnification. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals preferentially deposit in fibrocartilages, the cartilage of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint being one such structure. We sought to determine if examination of the AC joints on magnified PACS imaging of chest films would be useful in identifying chondrocalcinosis (CC). Retrospective radiographic readings and chart reviews involving 1,920 patients aged 50 or more who had routine outpatient chest radiographs over a 4-month period were performed. Knee radiographs were available for comparison in 489 patients. Medical records were reviewed to abstract demographics, chest film reports, and diagnoses. AC joint CC was identified in 1.1 % (21/1,920) of consecutive chest films. Patients with AC joint CC were 75 years of age versus 65.4 in those without CC (p<0.0002). Four hundred eighty-nine patients had knee films. Six of these patients had AC joint CC, and of these, five also had knee CC (83 %). Of the 483 without AC joint CC, 62 (12 %) had knee CC (p=0.002). Patients with AC joint CC were more likely to have a recorded history of CPPD crystal deposition disease than those without AC joint CC (14 versus 1 %, p=0.0017). The prevalence of AC joint CC increases with age and is associated with knee CC. A finding of AC joint CC should heighten suspicion of pseudogout or secondary osteoarthritis in appropriate clinical settings and, in a young patient, should alert the clinician to the possibility of an associated metabolic condition. PMID:23609408

  19. Activity of calcium activated protease in skeletal muscles and its changes in atrophy and stretch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.; Nagainis, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    The reduction of protein content in skeletal muscle undergoing disuse-induced atrophy is correlated with accelerated rates of protein degradation and reduced rates of protein synthesis (Goldspink, 1977). It is not known in what manner myofibers are partially disassembled during disuse atrophy to fibers of smaller diameter; nor is it known which proteases are responsible for this morphological change in contractile protein mass. Dayton and colleagues (1975) have suggested that the Ca(2+)-activated protease (CaP) may initiate myofibril degradation. The discovery of a form of CaP that is activatable by nano-molar concentrations of Ca(2+) indicates that CaP activity may be regulated by physiological concentrations of Ca(2+) (Mellgren, 1980). The enhancement of proteolysis by the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187, reported by Etlinger (1979), is consistent with a significant role for CaP in protein degradation. It was of interest, therefore, to measure the levels of CaP activity and the CaP inhibitor in extracts obtained from skeletal muscles of rat and chicken limbs undergoing disuse atrophy or stretch hypertrophy, respectively.

  20. Activity-dependent accumulation of calcium in Purkinje cell dendritic spines

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, S.B.; Leapman, R.D.; Landis, D.M.; Reese, T.S.

    1988-03-01

    The calcium content of synapses of parallel fibers on Purkinje cell dendritic spines was determined by electron probe x-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried cryosections from directly frozen slices of mouse cerebellar cortex. In fresh slices frozen within 20-30 sec of excision, calcium concentrations ranging from 0.8 to 18.6 mmol/kg of dry weight were measured in cisterns of smooth endoplasmic reticulum within Purkinje cell dendritic spines. The average calcium content of spine cisterns in rapidly excised slices (6.7 +/- 0.6 mmol/kg of dry weight +/- SEM) was higher than the average calcium content of spine cisterns in brain slices incubated without stimulation for 1-2 hr before direct freezing (2.5 +/- 0.4 mmol/kg of dry weight). Depolarization of incubated cerebellar slices by isotonic 55 mM KCl resulted in the accumulation within spine cisterns of very high amounts of calcium or isotonically substituted strontium, both derived from the extracellular fluid. These results suggest that one function of spine cisterns is to sequester free calcium that enters the spine through ligand-gated or voltage-gated channels during synaptic transmission.

  1. Inhibition of Glycolate Oxidase With Dicer-substrate siRNA Reduces Calcium Oxalate Deposition in a Mouse Model of Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Chaitali; Avitahl-Curtis, Nicole; Pursell, Natalie; Larsson Cohen, Marita; Holmes, Benjamin; Diwanji, Rohan; Zhou, Wei; Apponi, Luciano; Koser, Martin; Ying, Bo; Chen, Dongyu; Shui, Xue; Saxena, Utsav; Cyr, Wendy A; Shah, Anee; Nazef, Naim; Wang, Weimin; Abrams, Marc; Dudek, Henryk; Salido, Eduardo; Brown, Bob D; Lai, Chengjung

    2016-04-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an autosomal recessive, metabolic disorder caused by mutations of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), a key hepatic enzyme in the detoxification of glyoxylate arising from multiple normal metabolic pathways to glycine. Accumulation of glyoxylate, a precursor of oxalate, leads to the overproduction of oxalate in the liver, which accumulates to high levels in kidneys and urine. Crystalization of calcium oxalate (CaOx) in the kidney ultimately results in renal failure. Currently, the only treatment effective in reduction of oxalate production in patients who do not respond to high-dose vitamin B6 therapy is a combined liver/kidney transplant. We explored an alternative approach to prevent glyoxylate production using Dicer-substrate small interfering RNAs (DsiRNAs) targeting hydroxyacid oxidase 1 (HAO1) mRNA which encodes glycolate oxidase (GO), to reduce the hepatic conversion of glycolate to glyoxylate. This approach efficiently reduces GO mRNA and protein in the livers of mice and nonhuman primates. Reduction of hepatic GO leads to normalization of urine oxalate levels and reduces CaOx deposition in a preclinical mouse model of PH1. Our results support the use of DsiRNA to reduce liver GO levels as a potential therapeutic approach to treat PH1. PMID:26758691

  2. Bone apposition on implants coated with calcium phosphate by ion beam assisted deposition in oversized drilled sockets: a histologic and histometric analysis in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Ui-Won; Kim, Sungtae; Lee, Jung-Seok; Lee, In-Seop

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the osseointegration of calcium phosphate (CaP)-coated implants by ion beam assisted deposition with a lack of primary stability. Methods A total of 20 CaP-coated implants were bilaterally placed in the mandible of five dogs. In the rotational implant group, the implants were inserted in oversized drilled sockets without mechanical engagement, while the conventional surgical protocol was followed in the control group. Each group was allowed to heal for 4 and 8 weeks. The bone-to-implant contact (BIC, %) was measured by a histometric analysis. Results All of the implants were well-maintained and healing was uneventful. In the histologic observation, all of the implants tested were successfully osseointegrated with a high level of BIC at both observation intervals. There was no significant difference in BIC among any of the groups. Conclusions Within the limitation of this study, successful osseointegration of CaP-coated implants could be achieved in unfavorable conditions without primary stability. PMID:23507657

  3. Inhibition of Glycolate Oxidase With Dicer-substrate siRNA Reduces Calcium Oxalate Deposition in a Mouse Model of Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Chaitali; Avitahl-Curtis, Nicole; Pursell, Natalie; Larsson Cohen, Marita; Holmes, Benjamin; Diwanji, Rohan; Zhou, Wei; Apponi, Luciano; Koser, Martin; Ying, Bo; Chen, Dongyu; Shui, Xue; Saxena, Utsav; Cyr, Wendy A; Shah, Anee; Nazef, Naim; Wang, Weimin; Abrams, Marc; Dudek, Henryk; Salido, Eduardo; Brown, Bob D; Lai, Chengjung

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an autosomal recessive, metabolic disorder caused by mutations of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), a key hepatic enzyme in the detoxification of glyoxylate arising from multiple normal metabolic pathways to glycine. Accumulation of glyoxylate, a precursor of oxalate, leads to the overproduction of oxalate in the liver, which accumulates to high levels in kidneys and urine. Crystalization of calcium oxalate (CaOx) in the kidney ultimately results in renal failure. Currently, the only treatment effective in reduction of oxalate production in patients who do not respond to high-dose vitamin B6 therapy is a combined liver/kidney transplant. We explored an alternative approach to prevent glyoxylate production using Dicer-substrate small interfering RNAs (DsiRNAs) targeting hydroxyacid oxidase 1 (HAO1) mRNA which encodes glycolate oxidase (GO), to reduce the hepatic conversion of glycolate to glyoxylate. This approach efficiently reduces GO mRNA and protein in the livers of mice and nonhuman primates. Reduction of hepatic GO leads to normalization of urine oxalate levels and reduces CaOx deposition in a preclinical mouse model of PH1. Our results support the use of DsiRNA to reduce liver GO levels as a potential therapeutic approach to treat PH1. PMID:26758691

  4. Cardiac sodium/calcium exchanger preconditioning promotes anti-arrhythmic and cardioprotective effects through mitochondrial calcium-activated potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Ying; Cheng, Kang; Lai, Dong; Kong, Ling-Heng; Shen, Min; Yi, Fu; Liu, Bing; Wu, Feng; Zhou, Jing-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reverse-mode of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) stimulation provides cardioprotective effects for the ischemic/reperfused heart during ischemic preconditioning (IP). This study was designed to test the hypothesis that pretreatment with an inhibitor of cardiac delayed-rectifying K+ channel (IKr), E4031, increases reverse-mode of NCX activity, and triggers preconditioning against infarct size (IS) and arrhythmias caused by ischemia/reperfusion injury through mitoKCa channels. Materials and methods: In the isolated perfused rat heart, myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury was created by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery for 30 min followed by 120 min reperfusion. Two cycles of coronary occlusion for 5 min and reperfusion were performed, or pretreatment with E4031 or sevoflurane (Sevo) before the 30 min occlusion with the reversed-mode of NCX inhibitor (KB-R7943) or not. Results: E4031 or Sevo preconditioning not only markedly decreased IS but also reduced arrhythmias, which was significantly blunted by KB-R7943. Furthermore, these effects of E4031 preconditioning on IS and arrhythmias were abolished by inhibition of the mitoKCa channels. Similarly, pretreatment with NS1619, an opener of the mitoKCa channels, for 10 min before occlusion reduced both the infarct size and arrhythmias caused by ischemia/reperfusion. However, these effects weren’t affected by blockade of the NCX with KB-R7943. Conclusion: Taken together, these preliminary results conclude that pretreatment with E4031 reduces infarct size and produces anti-arrhythmic effect via stimulating the reverse-mode NCX, and that the mitoKCa channels mediate the protective effects. PMID:26617732

  5. Comparison of the adjuvant activity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response towards Bothrops asper snake venom.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Hidekel; Herrera, María; Rojas, Leonardo; Villalta, Mauren; Vargas, Mariángela; Leiguez, Elbio; Teixeira, Catarina; Estrada, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, José María; León, Guillermo; Montero, Mavis L

    2014-01-01

    The adjuvanticity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response in mice towards the venom of the snake Bothrops asper was studied. It was found that, in vitro, most of the venom proteins are similarly adsorbed by both mineral salts, with the exception of some basic phospholipases A2, which are better adsorbed by calcium phosphate. After injection, the adjuvants promoted a slow release of the venom, as judged by the lack of acute toxicity when lethal doses of venom were administered to mice. Leukocyte recruitment induced by the venom was enhanced when it was adsorbed on both mineral salts; however, venom adsorbed on calcium phosphate induced a higher antibody response towards all tested HPLC fractions of the venom. On the other hand, co-precipitation of venom with calcium phosphate was the best strategy for increasing: (1) the capacity of the salt to couple venom proteins in vitro; (2) the venom ability to induce leukocyte recruitment; (3) phagocytosis by macrophages; and (4) a host antibody response. These findings suggest that the chemical nature is not the only one determining factor of the adjuvant activity of mineral salts. PMID:23506358

  6. Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Activates CaMMKβ to Initiate Autophagy in PK-15 Cells by Increasing Cytosolic Calcium.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuanxing; Qi, Baozhu; Zhou, Yingshan; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Xian; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2016-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) induces autophagy via the 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in pig kidney PK-15 cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of AMPK activation in autophagy induction remain unknown. With specific inhibitors and RNA interference (RNAi), we show that PCV2 infection upregulated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta (CaMKKβ) by increasing cytosolic Ca(2+) via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R). Elevation of cytosolic calcium ion (Ca(2+)) did not seem to involve inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) release from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) by phosphoinositide phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-γ). CaMKKβ then activated both AMPK and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI). PCV2 employed CaMKI and Trp-Asp (WD) repeat domain phosphoinositide-interacting protein 1 (WIPI1) as another pathway additional to AMPK signaling in autophagy initiation. Our findings could help better understanding of the signaling pathways of autophagy induction as part of PCV2 pathogenesis. Further research is warranted to study if PCV2 interacts directly with IP3R or indirectly with the molecules that antagonize IP3R activity responsible for increased cytosolic Ca(2+) both in PK-15 cells and PCV2-targeted primary cells from pigs. PMID:27213427

  7. Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Activates CaMMKβ to Initiate Autophagy in PK-15 Cells by Increasing Cytosolic Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yuanxing; Qi, Baozhu; Zhou, Yingshan; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Xian; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2016-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) induces autophagy via the 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in pig kidney PK-15 cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of AMPK activation in autophagy induction remain unknown. With specific inhibitors and RNA interference (RNAi), we show that PCV2 infection upregulated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta (CaMKKβ) by increasing cytosolic Ca2+ via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R). Elevation of cytosolic calcium ion (Ca2+) did not seem to involve inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) release from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) by phosphoinositide phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-γ). CaMKKβ then activated both AMPK and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI). PCV2 employed CaMKI and Trp-Asp (WD) repeat domain phosphoinositide-interacting protein 1 (WIPI1) as another pathway additional to AMPK signaling in autophagy initiation. Our findings could help better understanding of the signaling pathways of autophagy induction as part of PCV2 pathogenesis. Further research is warranted to study if PCV2 interacts directly with IP3R or indirectly with the molecules that antagonize IP3R activity responsible for increased cytosolic Ca2+ both in PK-15 cells and PCV2-targeted primary cells from pigs. PMID:27213427

  8. Effects of Zn Content on Crystal Structure, Cytocompatibility, Antibacterial Activity, and Chemical Stability in Zn-Modified Calcium Silicate Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Yu, Jiangming; Xie, Youtao; Huang, Liping; Ye, Xiaojian; Zheng, Xuebin

    2013-08-01

    In our previous study, Zn-modified calcium silicate coatings possess not only excellent chemical stability but also well antibacterial activity. Still, effects of zinc content on these properties and cytocompatibility remain unclear. In this paper, two kinds of Zn-modified calcium silicate coatings (ZC0.3, ZC0.5) were fabricated on Ti-6Al-4V substrates via plasma spraying technology. X-ray diffraction results and transmission electron microscopy observations showed that the ZC0.5 coating was composed of pure hardystonite (Ca2ZnSi2O7) phase, while, besides Ca2ZnSi2O7 phase, the amorphous CaSiO3 phase was also detected in the ZC0.3 coating. Chemical stability in Tris-HCl buffer solution and antibacterial activity of the Zn-modified calcium silicate coatings increased with an increase in zinc content. In vitro cytocompatibility evaluation demonstrated that the proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity and collagen type I (COLI) secretion of osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells on Zn-modified coatings were significantly enhanced compared to the Zn-free coating and Ti-6Al-4V control, and no cytotoxicity appeared on Zn-modified coatings. The better antibacterial activity and the enhanced capability to promote MC3T3-E1 cells differentiation of Zn-modified coatings should be attributed to the slow and constant Zn2+ releasing from the coatings.

  9. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  10. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... best treatment for the most common type of kidney stone , which is made of calcium. This type of ... the kidneys into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production ...

  11. Variomics Screen Identifies the Re-entrant Loop of the Calcium-activated Chloride Channel ANO1 That Facilitates Channel Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Bill, Anke; Popa, M. Oana; van Diepen, Michiel T.; Gutierrez, Abraham; Lilley, Sarah; Velkova, Maria; Acheson, Kathryn; Choudhury, Hedaythul; Renaud, Nicole A.; Auld, Douglas S.; Gosling, Martin; Groot-Kormelink, Paul J.; Gaither, L. Alex

    2015-01-01

    The calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1 regulates multiple physiological processes. However, little is known about the mechanism of channel gating and regulation of ANO1 activity. Using a high-throughput, random mutagenesis-based variomics screen, we generated and functionally characterized ∼6000 ANO1 mutants and identified novel mutations that affected channel activity, intracellular trafficking, or localization of ANO1. Mutations such as S741T increased ANO1 calcium sensitivity and rendered ANO1 calcium gating voltage-independent, demonstrating a critical role of the re-entrant loop in coupling calcium and voltage sensitivity of ANO1 and hence in regulating ANO1 activation. Our data present the first unbiased and comprehensive study of the structure-function relationship of ANO1. The novel ANO1 mutants reported have diverse functional characteristics, providing new tools to study ANO1 function in biological systems, paving the path for a better understanding of the function of ANO1 and its role in health and diseases. PMID:25425649

  12. The release of nickel from nickel-titanium (NiTi) is strongly reduced by a sub-micrometer thin layer of calcium phosphate deposited by rf-magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Surmenev, R A; Ryabtseva, M A; Shesterikov, E V; Pichugin, V F; Peitsch, T; Epple, M

    2010-04-01

    Thin calcium phosphate coatings were deposited on NiTi substrates (plates) by rf-magnetron sputtering. The release of nickel upon immersion in water or in saline solution (0.9% NaCl in water) was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) for 42 days. The coating was analyzed before and after immersion by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). After an initial burst during the first 7 days that was observed for all samples, the rate of nickel release decreased 0.4-0.5 ng cm(-2) d(-1) for a 0.5 mum-thick calcium phosphate coating (deposited at 290 W). This was much less than the release from uncoated NiTi (3.4-4.4 ng cm(-2) d(-1)). Notably, the nickel release rate was not significantly different in pure water and in aqueous saline solution. PMID:20119644

  13. The toxicity of the N-hydroxy and 6-hydroxy metabolites of 3,4-dichloropropionanilide does not depend on calcium release-activated calcium channel inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Tricia L; Holásková, Ida; Barnett, John B

    2013-02-01

    Each year ~1 billion kg of herbicides are used worldwide to control the unwanted growth of plants. In the United States, over a quarter of a billion kg of herbicides are used, representing 28% of worldwide use. (Kiely, T., Donaldson, D., and Grube, A. [2004]. Pesticide Industry Sales and Usage. 2000 and 2001 Market Estimates. Available at: http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/pestsales/01pestsales/market_estimates2001.pdf. Accessed October 25, 2012.) Propanil (3,4-dichloropropionanilide [DCPA]) is a commonly used herbicide in the United States, with 2-4 million kg applied annually to 2 million acres of crop land. The immunomodulatory effects of DCPA have been well documented, but limited data are available on the effects of its metabolites. (Salazar, K. D., Ustyugova, I. V., Brundage, K. M., Barnett, J. B., and Schafer, R. [2008]. A review of the immunotoxicity of the pesticide 3,4-dichloropropionanalide. J. Toxicol. Environ. Health B Crit. Rev. 11, 630-645.) In mammals, hepatic enzymes metabolize DCPA, resulting in the production of 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). Further biotransformation of DCA leads to the production of 6-hydroxy-3,4-dichloroaniline (6OH-DCA) and N-hydroxy-3,4-dichloroaniline (NOH-DCA). We report, for the first time, the immunotoxic effects of DCPA metabolites on T-cell function. Human Jurkat T cells were exposed to varying concentrations of DCPA or its metabolites and assayed for effects on T-cell function. In addition, fluorine analogs of DCPA and DCA were investigated to determine the relative role of chlorine substituents on T-cell immunotoxicity. Here we report that exposure of Jurkat T cells to DCPA and DCA alters IL-2 secretion, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activity, and calcium influx. However, exposure to 6OH-DCA and NOH-DCA reduces IL-2 secretion and NFAT activity but has no effect on calcium flux. When both chlorines in DCPA and DCA were substituted with fluorines all effects were abrogated. Our data indicate that metabolites of

  14. The Toxicity of the N-Hydroxy and 6-Hydroxy Metabolites of 3,4-Dichloropropionanilide Does Not Depend on Calcium Release–Activated Calcium Channel Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Each year ~1 billion kg of herbicides are used worldwide to control the unwanted growth of plants. In the United States, over a quarter of a billion kg of herbicides are used, representing 28% of worldwide use. (Kiely, T., Donaldson, D., and Grube, A. [2004]. Pesticide Industry Sales and Usage. 2000 and 2001 Market Estimates. Available at: http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/pestsales/01pestsales/market_estimates2001.pdf. Accessed October 25, 2012.) Propanil (3,4-dichloropropionanilide [DCPA]) is a commonly used herbicide in the United States, with 2–4 million kg applied annually to 2 million acres of crop land. The immunomodulatory effects of DCPA have been well documented, but limited data are available on the effects of its metabolites. (Salazar, K. D., Ustyugova, I. V., Brundage, K. M., Barnett, J. B., and Schafer, R. [2008]. A review of the immunotoxicity of the pesticide 3,4-dichloropropionanalide. J. Toxicol. Environ. Health B Crit. Rev. 11, 630–645.) In mammals, hepatic enzymes metabolize DCPA, resulting in the production of 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). Further biotransformation of DCA leads to the production of 6-hydroxy-3,4-dichloroaniline (6OH-DCA) and N-hydroxy-3,4-dichloroaniline (NOH-DCA). We report, for the first time, the immunotoxic effects of DCPA metabolites on T-cell function. Human Jurkat T cells were exposed to varying concentrations of DCPA or its metabolites and assayed for effects on T-cell function. In addition, fluorine analogs of DCPA and DCA were investigated to determine the relative role of chlorine substituents on T-cell immunotoxicity. Here we report that exposure of Jurkat T cells to DCPA and DCA alters IL-2 secretion, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activity, and calcium influx. However, exposure to 6OH-DCA and NOH-DCA reduces IL-2 secretion and NFAT activity but has no effect on calcium flux. When both chlorines in DCPA and DCA were substituted with fluorines all effects were abrogated. Our data indicate that metabolites

  15. The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel holds the key to the conundrum of familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jo; Kang, Sun-Yang; Yi, Jin Woong; Kim, Seung-Min

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOKPP) is an autosomal dominant channelopathy characterized by episodic attacks of muscle weakness and hypokalemia. Mutations in the calcium channel gene, CACNA1S, or the sodium channel gene, SCN4A, have been found to be responsible for HOKPP; however, the mechanism that causes hypokalemia remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to improve the understanding of this mechanism by investigating the expression of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channel genes in HOKPP patients. Methods We measured the intracellular calcium concentration with fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester in skeletal muscle cells of HOKPP patients and healthy individuals. We examined the mRNA and protein expression of KCa channel genes (KCNMA1, KCNN1, KCNN2, KCNN3, and KCNN4) in both cell types. Results Patient cells exhibited higher cytosolic calcium levels than normal cells. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the mRNA levels of the KCa channel genes did not significantly differ between patient and normal cells. However, western blot analysis showed that protein levels of the KCNMA1 gene, which encodes KCa1.1 channels (also called big potassium channels), were significantly lower in the membrane fraction and higher in the cytosolic fraction of patient cells than normal cells. When patient cells were exposed to 50 mM potassium buffer, which was used to induce depolarization, the altered subcellular distribution of BK channels remained unchanged. Conclusion These findings suggest a novel mechanism for the development of hypokalemia and paralysis in HOKPP and demonstrate a connection between disease-associated mutations in calcium/sodium channels and pathogenic changes in nonmutant potassium channels. PMID:25379045

  16. Effect of L-type calcium channel blocker (amlodipine) on myocardial iron deposition in patients with thalassaemia with moderate-to-severe myocardial iron deposition: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Amarah; Zahoor, Maaman; Sadaf, Alina; Alvi, Najveen; Fadoo, Zehra; Rizvi, Arjumand; Quadri, Farheen; Tipoo, Fateh Ali; Khurshid, Mohammad; Sajjad, Zaffar; Colan, Steven; Hasan, Babar S

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sideroblastic cardiomyopathy secondary to repeated blood transfusions is a feared complication in thalassaemia. Control of myocardial iron is thus becoming the cornerstone of thalassaemia management. Recent evidence suggests a role for L-type Ca2+ channels in mediating iron uptake by the heart. Blocking the cellular iron uptake through these channels may add to the benefit of therapy to standard chelation in reducing myocardial iron. We aim to determine the efficacy of amlodipine (a calcium channel blocker) as an adjunct to standard aggressive chelation in retarding myocardial iron deposition in thalassaemics with or without cardiomyopathy. Outcomes The primary outcome is to compare the efficacy of amlodipine+chelation (intervention) versus standard chelation (control) in retarding myocardial iron deposition. Secondary outcomes include the effect of amlodipine therapy on systolic and diastolic function, strain and strain rate and liver iron content. Methods and analysis This is a single-centre, parallel-group, prospective randomised control trial. Twenty patients will be randomised in a 1:1 allocation ratio into the intervention and control arms. In addition to conventional echocardiography, MRI T2* values for assessment of cardiac and liver iron load will be obtained at baseline and at 6 and 12 months. Cardiac T2* will be reported as the geometric mean and per cent coefficient of variation, and an increase in cardiac T2* values from baseline will be used as an end point to compare the efficacy of therapy. A p Value of <0.05 will be considered significant. Study setting Department of Pediatric and Child Health, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the Ethics Review Committee and Clinical Trials Unit at The Aga Khan University with respect to scientific content and compliance with applicable research and human subjects regulations. Findings will be reported through scientific

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-1 regulates calcium homeostasis and electrophysiological activities of HL-1 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-Hung; Chen, Yao-Chang; Lee, Ting-I; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chazo, Tze-Fan; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone with antidiabetic effects through stimulating insulin secretion, β cell neogenesis, satiety sensation, and inhibiting glucagon secretion. Administration of GLP-1 provides cardioprotective effects through attenuating cardiac inflammation and insulin resistance. GLP-1 also modulates the heart rate and systolic pressure, which suggests that GLP-1 may have cardiac electrical effects. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to evaluate whether GLP-1 has direct cardiac effects and identify the underlying mechanisms. Patch clamp, confocal microscopy with Fluo-3 fluorescence, and Western blot analyses were used to evaluate the electrophysiological characteristics, calcium homeostasis, and calcium regulatory proteins in HL-1 atrial myocytes with and without GLP-1 (1 and 10nM) incubation for 24h. GLP-1 (1 and 10nM) and control cells had similar action potential durations. However, GLP-1 at 10nM significantly increased calcium transients and sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+) contents. Compared to the control, GLP-1 (10nM)-treated cells significantly decreased phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor at S2814 and total phospholamban, but there were similar protein levels of sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+)-ATPase and the sodium-calcium exchanger. Moreover, exendin (9-39) amide (a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, 10nM) attenuated GLP-1-mediated effects on total SR content and phosphorylated ryanodine receptor S2814. This study demonstrates GLP-1 may regulate HL-1 cell arrhythmogenesis through modulating calcium handling proteins. PMID:26930508

  18. Distribution of High-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Rat Vestibular Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Felix E.; Savin, David; Luu, Cindy; Sultemeier, David R.; Hoffman, Larry F.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channels (BK) are important regulators of neuronal excitability. BK channels seem to be crucial for frequency tuning in nonmammalian vestibular and auditory hair cells. However, there are a paucity of data concerning BK expression in mammalian vestibular hair cells. We therefore investigated the localization of BK channels in mammalian vestibular hair cells, specifically in rat vestibular neuroepithelia. We find that only a subset of hair cells in the utricle and the crista ampullaris express BK channels. BK-positive hair cells are located mainly in the medial striolar region of the utricle, where they constitute at most 12% of hair cells, and in the central zone of the horizontal crista. A majority of BK-positive hair cells are encapsulated by a calretinin-positive calyx defining them as type I cells. The remainder are either type I cells encapsulated by a calretinin-negative calyx or type II hair cells. Surprisingly, the number of BK-positive hair cells in the utricle peaks in juvenile rats and declines in early adulthood. BK channels were not found in vestibular afferent dendrites or somata. Our data indicate that BK channel expression in the mammalian vestibular system differs from the expression pattern in the mammalian auditory and the nonmammalian vestibular system. The molecular diversity of vestibular hair cells indicates a functional diversity that has not yet been fully characterized. The predominance of BK-positive hair cells within the medial striola of juvenile animals suggests that they contribute to a scheme of highly lateralized coding of linear head movements during late development. PMID:19731297

  19. Calcium sensor kinase activates potassium uptake systems in gland cells of Venus flytraps.

    PubMed

    Scherzer, Sönke; Böhm, Jennifer; Krol, Elzbieta; Shabala, Lana; Kreuzer, Ines; Larisch, Christina; Bemm, Felix; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Shabala, Sergey; Rennenberg, Heinz; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2015-06-01

    The Darwin plant Dionaea muscipula is able to grow on mineral-poor soil, because it gains essential nutrients from captured animal prey. Given that no nutrients remain in the trap when it opens after the consumption of an animal meal, we here asked the question of how Dionaea sequesters prey-derived potassium. We show that prey capture triggers expression of a K(+) uptake system in the Venus flytrap. In search of K(+) transporters endowed with adequate properties for this role, we screened a Dionaea expressed sequence tag (EST) database and identified DmKT1 and DmHAK5 as candidates. On insect and touch hormone stimulation, the number of transcripts of these transporters increased in flytraps. After cRNA injection of K(+)-transporter genes into Xenopus oocytes, however, both putative K(+) transporters remained silent. Assuming that calcium sensor kinases are regulating Arabidopsis K(+) transporter 1 (AKT1), we coexpressed the putative K(+) transporters with a large set of kinases and identified the CBL9-CIPK23 pair as the major activating complex for both transporters in Dionaea K(+) uptake. DmKT1 was found to be a K(+)-selective channel of voltage-dependent high capacity and low affinity, whereas DmHAK5 was identified as the first, to our knowledge, proton-driven, high-affinity potassium transporter with weak selectivity. When the Venus flytrap is processing its prey, the gland cell membrane potential is maintained around -120 mV, and the apoplast is acidified to pH 3. These conditions in the green stomach formed by the closed flytrap allow DmKT1 and DmHAK5 to acquire prey-derived K(+), reducing its concentration from millimolar levels down to trace levels. PMID:25997445

  20. Calcium sensor kinase activates potassium uptake systems in gland cells of Venus flytraps

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Sönke; Böhm, Jennifer; Krol, Elzbieta; Shabala, Lana; Kreuzer, Ines; Larisch, Christina; Bemm, Felix; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.; Shabala, Sergey; Rennenberg, Heinz; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The Darwin plant Dionaea muscipula is able to grow on mineral-poor soil, because it gains essential nutrients from captured animal prey. Given that no nutrients remain in the trap when it opens after the consumption of an animal meal, we here asked the question of how Dionaea sequesters prey-derived potassium. We show that prey capture triggers expression of a K+ uptake system in the Venus flytrap. In search of K+ transporters endowed with adequate properties for this role, we screened a Dionaea expressed sequence tag (EST) database and identified DmKT1 and DmHAK5 as candidates. On insect and touch hormone stimulation, the number of transcripts of these transporters increased in flytraps. After cRNA injection of K+-transporter genes into Xenopus oocytes, however, both putative K+ transporters remained silent. Assuming that calcium sensor kinases are regulating Arabidopsis K+ transporter 1 (AKT1), we coexpressed the putative K+ transporters with a large set of kinases and identified the CBL9-CIPK23 pair as the major activating complex for both transporters in Dionaea K+ uptake. DmKT1 was found to be a K+-selective channel of voltage-dependent high capacity and low affinity, whereas DmHAK5 was identified as the first, to our knowledge, proton-driven, high-affinity potassium transporter with weak selectivity. When the Venus flytrap is processing its prey, the gland cell membrane potential is maintained around −120 mV, and the apoplast is acidified to pH 3. These conditions in the green stomach formed by the closed flytrap allow DmKT1 and DmHAK5 to acquire prey-derived K+, reducing its concentration from millimolar levels down to trace levels. PMID:25997445

  1. Membrane potential governs calcium influx into microvascular endothelium: integral role for muscarinic receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Erik J; Segal, Steven S

    2015-10-15

    In resistance arteries, coupling a rise of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) to endothelial cell hyperpolarization underlies smooth muscle cell relaxation and vasodilatation, thereby increasing tissue blood flow and oxygen delivery. A controversy persists as to whether changes in membrane potential (V(m)) alter endothelial cell [Ca(2+)]i. We tested the hypothesis that V(m) governs [Ca(2+)]i in endothelium of resistance arteries by performing Fura-2 photometry while recording and controlling V(m) of intact endothelial tubes freshly isolated from superior epigastric arteries of C57BL/6 mice. Under resting conditions, [Ca(2+)]i did not change when V(m) shifted from baseline (∼-40 mV) via exposure to 10 μM NS309 (hyperpolarization to ∼-80 mV), via equilibration with 145 mm [K(+)]o (depolarization to ∼-5 mV), or during intracellular current injection (±0.5 to 5 nA, 20 s pulses) while V(m) changed linearly between ∼-80 mV and +10 mV. In contrast, during the plateau (i.e. Ca(2+) influx) phase of the [Ca(2+)]i response to approximately half-maximal stimulation with 100 nm ACh (∼EC50), [Ca(2+)]i increased as V(m) hyperpolarized below -40 mV and decreased as V(m) depolarized above -40 mV. The magnitude of [Ca(2+)]i reduction during depolarizing current injections correlated with the amplitude of the plateau [Ca(2+)]i response to ACh. The effect of hyperpolarization on [Ca(2+)]i was abolished following removal of extracellular Ca(2+), was enhanced subtly by raising extracellular [Ca(2+)] from 2 mm to 10 mm and was reduced by half in endothelium of TRPV4(-/-) mice. Thus, during submaximal activation of muscarinic receptors, V(m) can modulate Ca(2+) entry through the plasma membrane in accord with the electrochemical driving force. PMID:26260126

  2. 17Beta-Estradiol Inhibits Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel Expressions in Rat Whole Bladder

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of estrogen on the expression of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels in an overactive bladder rat model. To this end, mRNA and protein levels of KCa channel subtypes in the bladder of ovariectomized rats were measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. Methods: Ten-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into 3 groups: sham-operated control group (n=11), ovariectomy group (n=11), and the group treated with estrogen after ovariectomy (n=12). Rats in the last group were subcutaneously injected with 17β-estradiol (50 μg/kg) every other day for 2 weeks, whereas rats in the other 2 groups received vehicle (soybean oil) alone. Two weeks after treatment, the whole bladder was excised for mRNA and protein measurements. Results: Protein levels of the large-conductance KCa (BK) channels in the ovariectomy group were 1.5 folds higher than those in the sham-operated control group. However, the protein levels of the other KCa channel subtypes did not change significantly upon bilateral ovariectomy. Treatment with 17β-estradiol after ovariectomy restored BK channel protein levels to the control value. In contrast, BK channel mRNA levels were not significantly affected by either ovariectomy alone or 17β-estradiol treatment. The small-conductance KCa type 3 channel (SK3) mRNA and protein levels decreased to 75% of control levels upon 17β-estradiol treatment. Conclusions: These results suggest that 17β-estradiol may influence urinary bladder function by modulating BK and SK3 channel expression. PMID:27032553

  3. Antioxidant and cytoprotective activities of Piper betle, Areca catechu, Uncaria gambir and betel quid with and without calcium hydroxide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Betel quid chewing is a popular habit in Southeast Asia. It is believed that chewing betel quid could reduce stress, strengthen teeth and maintain oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant and cytoprotective activities of each of the ingredients of betel quid and compared with betel quid itself (with and without calcium hydroxide). The correlation of their cytoprotective and antioxidant activities with phenolic content was also determined. Methods Five samples (betel leaf, areca nut, gambir, betel quid and betel quid containing calcium hydroxide) were extracted in deionized distilled water for 12 hours at 37°C. Antioxidant activities were evaluated for radical scavenging activity using DPPH assay, ferric reducing activity using FRAP assay and lipid peroxidation inhibition activity using FTC assay. Total phenolic content (TPC) was determined using Folin-Ciocalteu procedure. Phenolic composition was analyzed using LC-MS/MS. Cytoprotective activity towards human gingival fibroblast cells was examined using MTT assay. Results Among the ingredients of betel quid, gambir demonstrated the highest antioxidant (DPPH - IC50 = 6.4 ± 0.8 μg/mL, FRAP - 5717.8 ± 537.6 μmol Fe(II)/mg), total phenolic content (TPC - 1142.5 ± 106.8 μg TAE/mg) and cytoprotective (100.1 ± 4.6%) activities. Betel quid when compared with betel quid containing calcium hydroxide has higher antioxidant (DPPH - IC50 =59.4 ± 4.4 μg/mL, FRAP - 1022.2 ± 235.7 μmol Fe(II)/mg), total phenolic content (TPC - 140.0 ± 22.3 μg TAE/mg), and cytoprotective (113.5 ± 15.9%) activities. However, all of the five samples showed good lipid peroxidation inhibition compared to vitamin E. LC-MS/MS analysis revealed the presence of quinic acid as the major compound of gambir and betel quid. A positive correlation was observed between TPC and radical scavenging (r = 0.972), reducing power (r = 0.981) and cytoprotective

  4. The novel Solanum tuberosum calcium dependent protein kinase, StCDPK3, is expressed in actively growing organs.

    PubMed

    Grandellis, Carolina; Giammaria, Verónica; Bialer, Magalí; Santin, Franco; Lin, Tian; Hannapel, David J; Ulloa, Rita M

    2012-12-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are key components of calcium regulated signaling cascades in plants. In this work, isoform StCDPK3 from Solanum tuberosum was studied and fully described. StCDPK3 encodes a 63 kDa protein with an N-terminal variable domain (NTV), rich in prolines and glutamines, which presents myristoylation and palmitoylation consensus sites and a PEST sequence indicative of rapid protein degradation. StCDPK3 gene (circa 11 kb) is localized in chromosome 3, shares the eight exons and seven introns structure with other isoforms from subgroup IIa and contains an additional intron in the 5'UTR region. StCDPK3 expression is ubiquitous being transcripts more abundant in early elongating stolons (ES), leaves and roots, however isoform specific antibodies only detected the protein in leaf particulate extracts. The recombinant 6xHis-StCDPK3 is an active kinase that differs in its kinetic parameters and calcium requirements from StCDPK1 and 2 isoforms. In vitro, StCDPK3 undergoes autophosphorylation regardless of the addition of calcium. The StCDPK3 promoter region (circa 1,800 bp) was subcloned by genome walking and fused to GUS. Light and ABRE responsive elements were identified in the promoter region as well as elements associated to expression in roots. StCDPK3 expression was enhanced by ABA while GA decreased it. Potato transgenic lines harboring StCDPK3 promoter∷GUS construct were generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated plant transformation. Promoter activity was detected in leaves, root tips and branching points, early ES, tuber eyes and developing sprouts indicating that StCDPK3 is expressed in actively growing organs. PMID:22922879

  5. Imaging activity in astrocytes and neurons with genetically encoded calcium indicators following in utero electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Gee, J. Michael; Gibbons, Meredith B.; Taheri, Marsa; Palumbos, Sierra; Morris, S. Craig; Smeal, Roy M.; Flynn, Katherine F.; Economo, Michael N.; Cizek, Christian G.; Capecchi, Mario R.; Tvrdik, Petr; Wilcox, Karen S.; White, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Complex interactions between networks of astrocytes and neurons are beginning to be appreciated, but remain poorly understood. Transgenic mice expressing fluorescent protein reporters of cellular activity, such as the GCaMP family of genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs), have been used to explore network behavior. However, in some cases, it may be desirable to use long-established rat models that closely mimic particular aspects of human conditions such as Parkinson's disease and the development of epilepsy following status epilepticus. Methods for expressing reporter proteins in the rat brain are relatively limited. Transgenic rat technologies exist but are fairly immature. Viral-mediated expression is robust but unstable, requires invasive injections, and only works well for fairly small genes (<5 kb). In utero electroporation (IUE) offers a valuable alternative. IUE is a proven method for transfecting populations of astrocytes and neurons in the rat brain without the strict limitations on transgene size. We built a toolset of IUE plasmids carrying GCaMP variants 3, 6s, or 6f driven by CAG and targeted to the cytosol or the plasma membrane. Because low baseline fluorescence of GCaMP can hinder identification of transfected cells, we included the option of co-expressing a cytosolic tdTomato protein. A binary system consisting of a plasmid carrying a piggyBac inverted terminal repeat (ITR)-flanked CAG-GCaMP-IRES-tdTomato cassette and a separate plasmid encoding for expression of piggyBac transposase was employed to stably express GCaMP and tdTomato. The plasmids were co-electroporated on embryonic days 13.5–14.5 and astrocytic and neuronal activity was subsequently imaged in acute or cultured brain slices prepared from the cortex or hippocampus. Large spontaneous transients were detected in slices obtained from rats of varying ages up to 127 days. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of this toolset for interrogating astrocytic and neuronal

  6. Fine spatiotemporal activity in contracting myometrium revealed by motion-corrected calcium imaging

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Fiona C; Shmygol, Anatoly; Richardson, Magnus J E

    2014-01-01

    Successful childbirth depends on the occurrence of precisely coordinated uterine contractions during labour. Calcium indicator fluorescence imaging is one of the main techniques for investigating the mechanisms governing this physiological process and its pathologies. The effective spatiotemporal resolution of calcium signals is, however, limited by the motion of contracting tissue: structures of interest in the order of microns can move over a hundred times their width during a contraction. The simultaneous changes in local intensity and tissue configuration make motion tracking a non-trivial problem in image analysis and confound many of the standard techniques. This paper presents a method that tracks local motion throughout the tissue and allows for the almost complete removal of motion artefacts. This provides a stabilized calcium signal down to a pixel resolution, which, for the data examined, is in the order of a few microns. As a byproduct of image stabilization, a complete kinematic description of the contraction–relaxation cycle is also obtained. This contains novel information about the mechanical response of the tissue, such as the identification of a characteristic length scale, in the order of 40–50 μm, below which tissue motion is homogeneous. Applied to our data, we illustrate that the method allows for analyses of calcium dynamics in contracting myometrium in unprecedented spatiotemporal detail. Additionally, we use the kinematics of tissue motion to compare calcium signals at the subcellular level and local contractile motion. The computer code used is provided in a freely modifiable form and has potential applicability to in vivo calcium imaging of neural tissue, as well as other smooth muscle tissue. PMID:25085893

  7. Comparison of inhibitory activity on calcium phosphate precipitation by acidic proline-rich proteins, statherin, and histatin-1.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, N; Tada, T; Morita, M; Watanabe, T

    2002-07-01

    This study quantitatively compares the inhibition of calcium phosphate (CaP) precipitation by the salivary acidic proline-rich proteins (PRPs) statherin and histatin-1. Saliva and CaCl2 in 125 mM imidazole buffer (pH 7.0) were incubated with potassium phosphate and a hydroxyapatite (HAP) suspension, for 30 min at 25 degrees C, then filtered through nitrocellulose. The calcium (Ca) concentration in the filtrate was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, then deducted from that in the initial solution to determine the amount of CaP precipitation after 30 min. The values of the inhibitory activities on CaP precipitation relative to crude parotid saliva were 4.7, 4.9, 6.9, and 65.8 for histatin-1, large PRPs, small PRPs, and statherin, respectively. PMID:12060866

  8. Involvement of PKC and PKA in the enhancement of L-type calcium current by GABAB receptor activation in neonatal hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Jennifer G.; Mynlieff, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In the early neonatal period activation of GABAB receptors attenuates calcium current through N-type calcium channels while enhancing current through L-type calcium channels in rat hippocampal neurons. The attenuation of N-type calcium current has been previously demonstrated to occur through direct interactions of the βγ subunits of Gi/o G-proteins, but the signal transduction pathway for the enhancement of L-type calcium channels in mammalian neurons remains unknown. In the present study, calcium currents were elicited in acute cultures from postnatal day 6–8 rat hippocampi in the presence of various modulators of protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) pathways. Overnight treatment with an inhibitor of Gi/o (pertussis toxin, 200 ng/ml) abolished the attenuation of calcium current by the GABAB agonist, baclofen (10 μM) with no effect on the enhancement of calcium current. These data indicate that while the attenuation of N-type calcium current is mediated by the Gi/o subtype of G-protein, the enhancement of L-type calcium current requires activation of a different G-protein. The enhancement of the sustained component of calcium current by baclofen was blocked by PKC inhibitors, GF-109203X (500 nM), chelerythrine chloride (5 μM), and PKC fragment 19–36 (2 μM) and mimicked by the PKC activator phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (1 μM). The enhancement of the sustained component of calcium current was blocked by PKA inhibitors H-89 (1 μM) and PKA fragment 6–22 (500 nM) but not Rp-cAMPS (30 μM) and it was not mimicked by the PKA activator, 8-Br-cAMP (500 μM – 1 mM). The data suggest that activation of PKC alone is sufficient to enhance L-type calcium current but that PKA may also be involved in the GABAB receptor mediated effect. PMID:21277353

  9. The inflammatory and tumor-promoting sesquiterpene lactone, thapsigargin, activates platelets by selective mobilization of calcium as shown by protein phosphorylations.

    PubMed

    Thastrup, O; Linnebjerg, H; Bjerrum, P J; Knudsen, J B; Christensen, S B

    1987-01-19

    We have studied the activation of human blood platelets by the inflammatory and tumor-promoting sesquiterpene lactone, thapsigargin. The effect of thapsigargin was compared with other common agonists (calcium ionophore A23187, phorbol ester TPA and thrombin). Platelet aggregation, serotonin release, raised cytoplasmic free calcium level and phosphorylation of platelet proteins was examined in platelet-rich plasma and washed platelet suspension. In contrast to A23187 and thrombin, the platelet activation induced by thapsigargin developed slowly, with maximal response obtained after 2-3 min. Both the thapsigargin- and the A23187-induced serotonin releases were synergistically increased by TPA. Studies of the phosphorylation of platelet proteins revealed that thapsigargin and A23187 equally well induced a selective phosphorylation of two proteins with apparent molecular masses of 20 kDa and 47 kDa. These proteins, which are substrates of myosin light-chain kinase and protein kinase C respectively, are known to be involved in platelet activation. The thapsigargin-induced platelet aggregation and serotonin release was completely inhibited by class I (nimodipine), class II (verapamil) and class III (diltiazem) calcium-channel blockers. The inhibitory activity of nimodipine was abolished by the corresponding 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium-channel agonist, BAY K 8644. These results shows that the thapsigargin-induced platelet activation is mediated by an increase in the cytoplasmic free calcium level, presumably obtained by stimulation of the passive calcium transport through specific channels. These thapsigargin-sensitive channels should predominantly be located in the membranes of intracellular calcium stores rather than in the plasma membrane, because removal of extracellular calcium by EGTA had only an insignificant effect on the thapsigargin-induced rise in cytoplasmic free calcium level. PMID:3098302

  10. Discovery of novel tetrahydroisoquinoline derivatives as orally active N-type calcium channel blockers with high selectivity for hERG potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Ogiyama, Takashi; Inoue, Makoto; Honda, Shugo; Yamada, Hiroyoshi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Gotoh, Takayasu; Kiso, Tetsuo; Koakutsu, Akiko; Kakimoto, Shuichiro; Shishikura, Jun-ichi

    2014-12-15

    N-type calcium channels represent a promising target for the treatment of neuropathic pain. The selective N-type calcium channel blocker ziconotide ameliorates severe chronic pain but has a narrow therapeutic window and requires intrathecal administration. We identified tetrahydroisoquinoline derivative 1a as a novel potent N-type calcium channel blocker. However, this compound also exhibited potent inhibitory activity against hERG channels. Structural optimizations led to identification of (1S)-(1-cyclohexyl-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1H)-yl)-2-{[(1-hydroxycyclohexyl)methyl]amino}ethanone ((S)-1h), which exhibited high selectivity for hERG channels while retaining potency for N-type calcium channel inhibition. (S)-1h went on to demonstrate in vivo efficacy as an orally available N-type calcium channel blocker in a rat spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain. PMID:25456079

  11. A 125 year record of fluvial calcium flux from a temperate catchment: Interplay of climate, land-use change and atmospheric deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, F.; Howden, N. J. K.; Burt, T. P.

    2012-10-01

    SummaryThis paper analyses the world's longest fluvial record of water hardness and calcium (Ca) concentration. We used records of permanent and temporary hardness and river flow for the UK's River Thames (catchment area 9998 km2) to estimate annual Ca flux from the river since 1883. The Thames catchment has a mix of agricultural and urban land use; it is dominated by mineral soils with groundwater contributing around 60% of river flow. Since the late 1800s, the catchment has undergone widespread urbanisation and climate warming, but has also been subjected to large-scale land-use change, especially during World War II and agricultural intensification in the 1960s. Here, we use a range of time series methods to explore the relative importance of these drivers in determining catchment-scale biogeochemical response. Ca concentrations in the Thames rose to a peak in the late 1980s (106 mg Ca/l). The flux of Ca peaked in 1916 at 385 ktonnes Ca/yr; the minimum was in 1888 at 34 ktonnes Ca/yr. For both the annual average Ca concentration and the annual flux of Ca, there were significant increases with time; a significant positive memory effect relative to the previous year; and significant correlation with annual water yield. No significant correlation was found with either temperature or land use, but sulphate deposition was found to be significant. It was also possible, for a shorter time series, to show a significant relationship with inorganic nitrogen inputs into the catchment. We suggest that ionic inputs did not acidify the mineral soils of the catchment but did cause the leaching of metals, so we conclude that the decline in river Ca concentrations is caused by the decline in both S and N inputs.

  12. The Intermediate Conductance Calcium-activated Potassium Channel KCa3.1 Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation via Controlling Calcium-dependent Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Dan; Toyama, Kazuyoshi; Lemaître, Vincent; Takai, Jun; Fan, Fan; Jenkins, David P.; Wulff, Heike; Gutterman, David D.; Park, Frank; Miura, Hiroto

    2013-01-01

    The intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 contributes to a variety of cell activation processes in pathologies such as inflammation, carcinogenesis, and vascular remodeling. We examined the electrophysiological and transcriptional mechanisms by which KCa3.1 regulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF)-induced proliferation of human coronary artery VSMCs was attenuated by lowering intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and was enhanced by elevating [Ca2+]i. KCa3.1 blockade or knockdown inhibited proliferation by suppressing the rise in [Ca2+]i and attenuating the expression of phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), c-Fos, and neuron-derived orphan receptor-1 (NOR-1). This antiproliferative effect was abolished by elevating [Ca2+]i. KCa3.1 overexpression induced VSMC proliferation, and potentiated PDGF-induced proliferation, by inducing CREB phosphorylation, c-Fos, and NOR-1. Pharmacological stimulation of KCa3.1 unexpectedly suppressed proliferation by abolishing the expression and activity of KCa3.1 and PDGF β-receptors and inhibiting the rise in [Ca2+]i. The stimulation also attenuated the levels of phosphorylated CREB, c-Fos, and cyclin expression. After KCa3.1 blockade, the characteristic round shape of VSMCs expressing high l-caldesmon and low calponin-1 (dedifferentiation state) was maintained, whereas KCa3.1 stimulation induced a spindle-shaped cellular appearance, with low l-caldesmon and high calponin-1. In conclusion, KCa3.1 plays an important role in VSMC proliferation via controlling Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways, and its modulation may therefore constitute a new therapeutic target for cell proliferative diseases such as atherosclerosis. PMID:23609438

  13. Identifying calcium sources at an acid deposition-impacted spruce forest: A strontium isotope, alkaline earth element multi-tracer approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, T.D.; Bailey, S.W.

    2005-01-01

    Depletion of calcium from forest soils has important implications for forest productivity and health. Ca is available to fine feeder roots from a number of soil organic and mineral sources, but identifying the primary source or changes of sources in response to environmental change is problematic. We used strontium isotope and alkaline earth element concentration ratios of trees and soils to discern the record of Ca sources for red spruce at a base-poor, acid deposition-impacted watershed. We measured 87Sr/86Sr and chemical compositions of cross-sectional stemwood cores of red spruce, other spruce tissues and sequential extracts of co-located soil samples. 87Sr/86Sr and Sr/Ba ratios together provide a tracer of alkaline earth element sources that distinguishes the plant-available fraction of the shallow organic soils from those of deeper organic and mineral soils. Ca/Sr ratios proved less diagnostic, due to within-tree processes that fractionate these elements from each other. Over the growth period from 1870 to 1960, 87Sr/86Sr and Sr/Ba ratios of stemwood samples became progressively more variable and on average trended toward values that considered together are characteristic of the uppermost forest floor. In detail the stemwood chemistry revealed an episode of simultaneous enhanced uptake of all alkaline earth elements during the growth period from 1930 to 1960, coincident with reported local and regional increases in atmospheric inputs of inorganic acidity. We attribute the temporal trends in stemwood chemistry to progressive shallowing of the effective depth of alkaline earth element uptake by fine roots over this growth period, due to preferential concentration of fine roots in the upper forest floor coupled with reduced nutrient uptake by roots in the lower organic and upper mineral soils in response to acid-induced aluminum toxicity. Although both increased atmospheric deposition and selective weathering of Ca-rich minerals such as apatite provide possible

  14. Nitric Oxide-Induced Calcium Release: Activation of Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor, a Calcium Release Channel, through Non-Enzymatic Post-Translational Modification by Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Sho

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a typical gaseous messenger involved in a wide range of biological processes. In our classical knowledge, effects of NO are largely achieved by activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase to form cyclic guanosine-3′, 5′-monophosphate. However, emerging evidences have suggested another signaling mechanism mediated by NO: “S-nitrosylation” of target proteins. S-nitrosylation is a covalent addition of an NO group to a cysteine thiol/sulfhydryl (RSH), and categorized into non-enzymatic post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins, contrasted to enzymatic PTM of proteins, such as phosphorylation mediated by various protein kinases. Very recently, we found novel intracellular calcium (Ca2+) mobilizing mechanism, NO-induced Ca2+ release (NICR) in cerebellar Purkinje cells. NICR is mediated by type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), a Ca2+ release channel expressed in endoplasmic-reticular membrane. Furthermore, NICR is indicated to be dependent on S-nitrosylation of RyR1, and involved in synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum. In this review, molecular mechanisms and functional significance of NICR, as well as non-enzymatic PTM of proteins by gaseous signals, are described. PMID:24130553

  15. Fall of blood ionized calcium on watching a provocative TV program and its prevention by active absorbable algal calcium (AAA Ca).

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Ohgitani, S; Nomura, M

    1999-01-01

    In December 1997, more than 680 children developed convulsive seizures while watching a notorious audiovisually provocative TV program, "Pocket Monster." Emotional stimulation via hyperventilation may cause respiratory alkalosis, fall of blood ionized calcium (Ca), and sensitization of the nervous system to excessive emotional stress. A study was therefore undertaken to follow the changes of blood ionized Ca in eight healthy volunteers after watching the "Pocket Monster" and also a quiet program, "Classical Music," as a control for 20min from 4 P.M. Although neither marked hyperventilation nor convulsions developed in any of these adult volunteers, blood ionized Ca showed a significantly more pronounced fall during and after watching "Pocket Monster," and their plasma intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) was significantly higher 120min after the beginning of "Pocket Monster" than the "Classical Music" program. Plasma total Ca, pH, and albumin were free of detectable changes. Ingestion of 600mg Ca as active absorbable algal Ca (AAA Ca) with high bioavailability completely prevented the fall of ionized Ca and suppressed iPTH. Plama osteocalcin was also significantly suppressed after ingestion of AAA Ca. It may be worthwhile to ingest AAA Ca before anticipated emotional stress such as watching a provocative TV program to prevent possible neuromuscular instability. PMID:10340641

  16. Calcium-chelating alizarin and other anthraquinones inhibit biofilm formation and the hemolytic activity of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Yong Ryu, Shi; Lee, Jintae

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal biofilms are problematic and play a critical role in the persistence of chronic infections because of their abilities to tolerate antimicrobial agents. Thus, the inhibitions of biofilm formation and/or toxin production are viewed as alternative means of controlling Staphylococcus aureus infections. Here, the antibiofilm activities of 560 purified phytochemicals were examined. Alizarin at 10 μg/ml was found to efficiently inhibit biofilm formation by three S. aureus strains and a Staphylococcus epidermidis strain. In addition, two other anthraquinones purpurin and quinalizarin were found to have antibiofilm activity. Binding of Ca2+ by alizarin decreased S. aureus biofilm formation and a calcium-specific chelating agent suppressed the effect of calcium. These three anthraquinones also markedly inhibited the hemolytic activity of S. aureus, and in-line with their antibiofilm activities, increased cell aggregation. A chemical structure-activity relationship study revealed that two hydroxyl units at the C-1 and C-2 positions of anthraquinone play important roles in antibiofilm and anti-hemolytic activities. Transcriptional analyses showed that alizarin repressed the α-hemolysin hla gene, biofilm-related genes (psmα, rbf, and spa), and modulated the expressions of cid/lrg genes (the holin/antiholin system). These findings suggest anthraquinones, especially alizarin, are potentially useful for controlling biofilm formation and the virulence of S. aureus. PMID:26763935

  17. Calcium-chelating alizarin and other anthraquinones inhibit biofilm formation and the hemolytic activity of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Yong Ryu, Shi; Lee, Jintae

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal biofilms are problematic and play a critical role in the persistence of chronic infections because of their abilities to tolerate antimicrobial agents. Thus, the inhibitions of biofilm formation and/or toxin production are viewed as alternative means of controlling Staphylococcus aureus infections. Here, the antibiofilm activities of 560 purified phytochemicals were examined. Alizarin at 10 μg/ml was found to efficiently inhibit biofilm formation by three S. aureus strains and a Staphylococcus epidermidis strain. In addition, two other anthraquinones purpurin and quinalizarin were found to have antibiofilm activity. Binding of Ca(2+) by alizarin decreased S. aureus biofilm formation and a calcium-specific chelating agent suppressed the effect of calcium. These three anthraquinones also markedly inhibited the hemolytic activity of S. aureus, and in-line with their antibiofilm activities, increased cell aggregation. A chemical structure-activity relationship study revealed that two hydroxyl units at the C-1 and C-2 positions of anthraquinone play important roles in antibiofilm and anti-hemolytic activities. Transcriptional analyses showed that alizarin repressed the α-hemolysin hla gene, biofilm-related genes (psmα, rbf, and spa), and modulated the expressions of cid/lrg genes (the holin/antiholin system). These findings suggest anthraquinones, especially alizarin, are potentially useful for controlling biofilm formation and the virulence of S. aureus. PMID:26763935

  18. Activation of the calcium sensing receptor stimulates gastrin and gastric acid secretion in healthy participants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric acid secretion is a complex process regulated by neuronal and hormonal pathways. Ex vivo studies in human gastric tissues indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), expressed on the surface of G and parietal cells, may be involved in this regulation. We sought to determine whether cin...

  19. Activation of the calcium sensing receptor stimulates serum gastrin and gastric acid secretion in healthy subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric acid secretion is a complex process regulated by neuronal and hormonal pathways. Ex vivo studies in human gastric tissues indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), expressed on the surface of G and parietal cells, may be involved in this regulation. We sought to determine whether cin...

  20. ACTIVATION AND REACTIVITY OF NOVEL CALCIUM-BASED SORBENTS FOR DRY SO2 CONTROL IN BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically modified calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) sorbents developed in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (AEERL) for sulfur dioxide (SO2) control in utility boilers were tested in an electrically heated, bench-scale isotherma...

  1. The calcium release-activated calcium channel Orai1 represents a crucial component in hypertrophic compensation and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jaime S; Buckley, Cadie L; Alvarez, Ernest M; Schorlemmer, Anita; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    As exceptionally calcium selective store-operated channels, Orai channels play a prominent role in cellular calcium signaling. While most studied in the immune system, we are beginning to recognize that Orai1 provides unique calcium signaling pathways in numerous tissue contexts. To assess the involvement of Orai1 in cardiac hypertrophy we used transverse aortic constriction to model pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure in Orai1 deficient mice. We demonstrate that Orai1 deficient mice have significantly decreased survival in this pressure overload model. Transthoracic echocardiography reveals that Orai1 deficient mice develop rapid dilated cardiomyopathy, with greater loss of function, and histological and molecular data indicate that this pathology is associated with significant apoptosis, but not major differences in cellular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and some major hypertrophic makers. Orai1 represents a crucial calcium entry mechanism in the compensation of the heart to pressure overload over-load, and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:24135962

  2. The calcium release-activated calcium channel Orai1 represents a crucial component in hypertrophic compensation and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jaime S; Buckley, Cadie L; Alvarez, Ernest M; Schorlemmer, Anita; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    As exceptionally calcium selective store-operated channels, Orai channels play a prominent role in cellular calcium signaling. While most studied in the immune system, we are beginning to recognize that Orai1 provides unique calcium signaling pathways in numerous tissue contexts. To assess the involvement of Orai1 in cardiac hypertrophy we used transverse aortic constriction to model pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure in Orai1 deficient mice. We demonstrate that Orai1 deficient mice have significantly decreased survival in this pressure overload model. Transthoracic echocardiography reveals that Orai1 deficient mice develop rapid dilated cardiomyopathy, with greater loss of function, and histological and molecular data indicate that this pathology is associated with significant apoptosis, but not major differences in cellular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and some major hypertrophic makers. Orai1 represents a crucial calcium entry mechanism in the compensation of the heart to pressure overload over-load, and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:24135962

  3. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Resources and Publications Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  4. Calcium-activated K+ Channels of Mouse β-cells are Controlled by Both Store and Cytoplasmic Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Goforth, P.B.; Bertram, R.; Khan, F.A.; Zhang, M.; Sherman, A.; Satin, L.S.

    2002-01-01

    A novel calcium-dependent potassium current (Kslow) that slowly activates in response to a simulated islet burst was identified recently in mouse pancreatic β-cells (Göpel, S.O., T. Kanno, S. Barg, L. Eliasson, J. Galvanovskis, E. Renström, and P. Rorsman. 1999. J. Gen. Physiol. 114:759–769). Kslow activation may help terminate the cyclic bursts of Ca2+-dependent action potentials that drive Ca2+ influx and insulin secretion in β-cells. Here, we report that when [Ca2+]i handling was disrupted by blocking Ca2+ uptake into the ER with two separate agents reported to block the sarco/endoplasmic calcium ATPase (SERCA), thapsigargin (1–5 μM) or insulin (200 nM), Kslow was transiently potentiated and then inhibited. Kslow amplitude could also be inhibited by increasing extracellular glucose concentration from 5 to 10 mM. The biphasic modulation of Kslow by SERCA blockers could not be explained by a minimal mathematical model in which [Ca2+]i is divided between two compartments, the cytosol and the ER, and Kslow activation mirrors changes in cytosolic calcium induced by the burst protocol. However, the experimental findings were reproduced by a model in which Kslow activation is mediated by a localized pool of [Ca2+] in a subspace located between the ER and the plasma membrane. In this model, the subspace [Ca2+] follows changes in cytosolic [Ca2+] but with a gradient that reflects Ca2+ efflux from the ER. Slow modulation of this gradient as the ER empties and fills may enhance the role of Kslow and [Ca2+] handling in influencing β-cell electrical activity and insulin secretion. PMID:12198088

  5. Biocalcite, a multifunctional inorganic polymer: Building block for calcareous sponge spicules and bioseed for the synthesis of calcium phosphate-based bone

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2014-01-01

    Summary Calcium carbonate is the material that builds up the spicules of the calcareous sponges. Recent results revealed that the calcium carbonate/biocalcite-based spicular skeleton of these animals is formed through an enzymatic mechanism, such as the skeleton of the siliceous sponges, evolutionarily the oldest animals that consist of biosilica. The enzyme that mediates the calcium carbonate deposition has been identified as a carbonic anhydrase (CA) and has been cloned from the calcareous sponge species Sycon raphanus. Calcium carbonate deposits are also found in vertebrate bones besides the main constituent, calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (HA). Evidence has been presented that during the initial phase of HA synthesis poorly crystalline carbonated apatite is deposited. Recent data summarized here indicate that during early bone formation calcium carbonate deposits enzymatically formed by CA, act as potential bioseeds for the precipitation of calcium phosphate mineral onto bone-forming osteoblasts. Two different calcium carbonate phases have been found during CA-driven enzymatic calcium carbonate deposition in in vitro assays: calcite crystals and round-shaped vaterite deposits. The CA provides a new target of potential anabolic agents for treatment of bone diseases; a first CA activator stimulating the CA-driven calcium carbonate deposition has been identified. In addition, the CA-driven calcium carbonate crystal formation can be frozen at the vaterite state in the presence of silintaphin-2, an aspartic acid/glutamic acid-rich sponge-specific protein. The discovery that calcium carbonate crystals act as bioseeds in human bone formation may allow the development of novel biomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Na-alginate hydrogels, enriched with biosilica, have recently been demonstrated as a suitable matrix to embed bone forming cells for rapid prototyping bioprinting/3D cell printing applications. PMID:24991497

  6. Biocalcite, a multifunctional inorganic polymer: Building block for calcareous sponge spicules and bioseed for the synthesis of calcium phosphate-based bone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2014-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is the material that builds up the spicules of the calcareous sponges. Recent results revealed that the calcium carbonate/biocalcite-based spicular skeleton of these animals is formed through an enzymatic mechanism, such as the skeleton of the siliceous sponges, evolutionarily the oldest animals that consist of biosilica. The enzyme that mediates the calcium carbonate deposition has been identified as a carbonic anhydrase (CA) and has been cloned from the calcareous sponge species Sycon raphanus. Calcium carbonate deposits are also found in vertebrate bones besides the main constituent, calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (HA). Evidence has been presented that during the initial phase of HA synthesis poorly crystalline carbonated apatite is deposited. Recent data summarized here indicate that during early bone formation calcium carbonate deposits enzymatically formed by CA, act as potential bioseeds for the precipitation of calcium phosphate mineral onto bone-forming osteoblasts. Two different calcium carbonate phases have been found during CA-driven enzymatic calcium carbonate deposition in in vitro assays: calcite crystals and round-shaped vaterite deposits. The CA provides a new target of potential anabolic agents for treatment of bone diseases; a first CA activator stimulating the CA-driven calcium carbonate deposition has been identified. In addition, the CA-driven calcium carbonate crystal formation can be frozen at the vaterite state in the presence of silintaphin-2, an aspartic acid/glutamic acid-rich sponge-specific protein. The discovery that calcium carbonate crystals act as bioseeds in human bone formation may allow the development of novel biomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Na-alginate hydrogels, enriched with biosilica, have recently been demonstrated as a suitable matrix to embed bone forming cells for rapid prototyping bioprinting/3D cell printing applications. PMID:24991497

  7. Intrinsic differences in atomic ordering of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrates in conventional and alkali-activated cements

    SciTech Connect

    White, Claire E.; Daemen, Luke L.; Hartl, Monika; Page, Katharine

    2015-01-15

    The atomic structures of calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) and calcium (–sodium) aluminosilicate hydrate (C–(N)–A–S–H) gels, and their presence in conventional and blended cement systems, have been the topic of significant debate over recent decades. Previous investigations have revealed that synthetic C–S–H gel is nanocrystalline and due to the chemical similarities between ordinary Portland cement (OPC)-based systems and low-CO{sub 2} alkali-activated slags, researchers have inferred that the atomic ordering in alkali-activated slag is the same as in OPC–slag cements. Here, X-ray total scattering is used to determine the local bonding environment and nanostructure of C(–A)–S–H gels present in hydrated tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S), blended C{sub 3}S–slag and alkali-activated slag, revealing the large intrinsic differences in the extent of nanoscale ordering between C–S–H derived from C{sub 3}S and alkali-activated slag systems, which may have a significant influence on thermodynamic stability, and material properties at higher length scales, including long term durability of alkali-activated cements.

  8. Developmental change in calcium-activated chloride current during the differentiation of Xenopus spinal neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Hussy, N

    1991-09-01

    The duration and ionic dependence of action potentials change during the differentiation of embryonic amphibian spinal neurons both in vivo and in culture. The development of sodium, calcium, and potassium currents has been characterized in these cells and the shortening of the action potential has been shown to depend to a great extent on developmental changes of potassium currents. Previous evidence suggests that a chloride current may also be present in these embryonic neurons. Chloride currents were investigated with intracellular current-clamp and single-electrode and whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. Most neurons exhibited a calcium-activated chloride current (ICl(Ca] that contributed to the postdepolarization following the action potential recorded in the absence of sodium and potassium currents. This current appeared to decrease in density and its deactivation rate increased during the first day in culture. Its incidence also declined during this period. A much larger Ca(2+)-dependent Cl- current was also observed in a subset of neurons after 24 hr, but was absent at earlier stages of development. The results suggest the presence of two Cl- currents with different developmental fates. The early current probably contributes to the repolarization of long calcium-dependent action potentials at initial stages of neuronal development, when potassium currents are small, and may serve to reduce the extent of repetitive firing. PMID:1715301

  9. Cardioprotective activity of alcoholic extract of Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers in calcium chloride-induced cardiac arrhythmia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashish Kumar; Kishore, Kunal; Sharma, Divya; Srinivasan, B.P; Agarwal, Shyam Sunder; Sharma, Ashok; Singh, Santosh Kumar; Gaur, Samir; Jatav, Vijay Singh

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the antiarrhythmic activity of alcoholic extract of Tinospora cordifolia (T. cordifolia) in CaCl2 induced arrhythmia. CaCl2 (25 mg/kg) was administered by intravenous infusion (iv) to produce arrhythmia in rats. The animals were then treated with T. cordifolia extract (150, 250, and 450 mg/kg) and verapamil (5 mg/kg,iv). Lead II electrocardiogram was monitored. Plasma calcium, sodium and potassium levels were measured. In CaCl2 induced arrhythmia, heart rate was decreased by 41.10%, T. cordifolia at 150, 300, and 450 mg/kg decreased the heart rate by 26.30%, 29.16%, and 38.29%, respectively, and verapamil reduced the heart rate by 9.70% compared to the normal group. The PQRST waves were normalized and atrial and ventricular fibrillation was controlled in rats treated with verapamil and T. cordifolia. CaCl2 increased calcium and sodium levels and decreased potassium levels in blood. T. cordifolia dose-dependently decreased calcium and sodium levels and increased potassium levels. Hence, T. cordifolia can be used in antiarrhythmic clinical settings and beneficial in atrial and ventricular fibrillation and flutter and may be indicated in ventricular tachyarrhythmia. PMID:23554702

  10. Nesfatin-1 increases intracellular calcium concentration by protein kinase C activation in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mete; Gok, Zeynep Betul; Kacar, Emine; Serhatlioglu, Ihsan; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2016-04-21

    Nesfatin-1 is a recently identified anorexigenic hypothalamic polypeptide derived from the posttranslational processing of nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2). Several studies have indicated that this neuropeptide may be participated in somatosensory and visceral transmission including pain signals in addition to energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to explore the possible role of nesfatin-1 in the transmission of peripheral neural signals by investigating the effects of nesfatin-1 on intracellular free calcium levels ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultured neonatal rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i in DRG neurons were investigated by using an in vitro calcium imaging system. DRG neurons were grown in primary culture following enzymatic and mechanical dissociation of ganglia from 1-or 2-day-old neonatal Wistar rats. Using the fura-2-based calcium imaging technique, the effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i and role of the protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated pathway in nesfatin-1 effect were assessed. Nesfatin-1 elevated [Ca(2+)]i in cultured DRG neurons. The response was prevented by pretreating the cells with pertussis toxin. The protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed nesfatin-1-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]i. The result shows that nesfatin-1 interacts with a G protein-coupled receptor, leading to an increase of [Ca(2+)]i, which is linked to protein kinase C activation in cultured rat DRG neurons. PMID:26975784

  11. Extracellular zinc stimulates a calcium-activated chloride conductance through mobilisation of intracellular calcium in renal inner medullary collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Linley, J E; Simmons, N L; Gray, M A

    2007-01-01

    We have used the perforated patch clamp and fura-2 fluorescence techniques to study the effect of extracellular Zn(2+) on whole-cell Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents (I (CLCA)) in mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells (mIMCD-3). I (CLCA) was spontaneously active in 74% of cells under basal conditions and displayed time and voltage-independent kinetics and an outwardly rectifying current/voltage relationship (I/V). Addition of zinc chloride (10-400 microM) to the bathing solution resulted in a dose-dependent increase in I (CLCA) with little change in Cl(-) selectivity or biophysical characteristics, whereas gadolinium chloride (30 microM) and lanthanum chloride (100 microM) had no significant effect on the whole-cell current. Using fura-2-loaded mIMCD-3 cells, extracellular Zn(2+) (400 microM) stimulated an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) to an elevated plateau. The Zn(2+)-stimulated [Ca(2+)](i) increase was inhibited by thapsigargin (200 nM), the IP(3) receptor antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (10 microM) and removal of bath Ca(2+). Pre-exposure to Zn(2+) (400 microM) markedly attenuated the ATP (100 microM)-stimulated [Ca(2+)](i) increase. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that extracellular Zn(2+) stimulates an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) by a release of calcium from thapsigargin/IP(3) sensitive stores. A possible physiological role for a divalent metal ion receptor, distinct from the extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor, in IMCD cells is discussed. PMID:17021797

  12. Stretch induced endothelin-1 secretion by adult rat astrocytes involves calcium influx via stretch-activated ion channels (SACs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrow, Lyle W.; Suchyna, Thomas M.; Sachs, Frederick

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Endothelin-1 expression by adult rat astrocytes correlates with cell proliferation. {yields} Stretch-induced ET-1 is inhibited by GsMtx-4, a specific inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+} permeant SACs. {yields} The less specific SAC inhibitor streptomycin also inhibits ET-1 secretion. {yields} Stretch-induced ET-1 production depends on a calcium influx. {yields} SAC pharmacology may provide a new class of therapeutic agents for CNS pathology. -- Abstract: The expression of endothelins (ETs) and ET-receptors is often upregulated in brain pathology. ET-1, a potent vasoconstrictor, also inhibits the expression of astrocyte glutamate transporters and is mitogenic for astrocytes, glioma cells, neurons, and brain capillary endothelia. We have previously shown that mechanical stress stimulates ET-1 production by adult rat astrocytes. We now show in adult astrocytes that ET-1 production is driven by calcium influx through stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the ET-1 production correlates with cell proliferation. Mechanical stimulation using biaxial stretch (<20%) of a rubber substrate increased ET-1 secretion, and 4 {mu}M GsMTx-4 (a specific inhibitor of SACs) inhibited secretion by 30%. GsMTx-4 did not alter basal ET-1 levels in the absence of stretch. Decreasing the calcium influx by lowering extracellular calcium also inhibited stretch-induced ET-1 secretion without effecting ET-1 secretion in unstretched controls. Furthermore, inhibiting SACs with the less specific inhibitor streptomycin also inhibited stretch-induced ET-1 secretion. The data can be explained with a simple model in which ET-1 secretion depends on an internal Ca{sup 2+} threshold. This coupling of mechanical stress to the astrocyte endothelin system through SACs has treatment implications, since all pathology deforms the surrounding parenchyma.

  13. Similar healthy osteoclast and osteoblast activity on nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and nanoparticles of tri-calcium phosphate compared to natural bone

    PubMed Central

    MacMillan, Adam K; Lamberti, Francis V; Moulton, Julia N; Geilich, Benjamin M; Webster, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    While there have been numerous studies to determine osteoblast (bone forming cell) functions on nanocrystalline compared to micron crystalline ceramics, there have been few studies which have examined osteoclast activity (including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, formation of resorption pits, size of resorption pits, and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB [RANK]). This is despite the fact that osteoclasts are an important part of maintaining healthy bone since they resorb bone during the bone remodeling process. Moreover, while it is now well documented that bone formation is enhanced on nanoceramics compared to micron ceramics, some have pondered whether osteoblast functions (such as osteoprotegerin and RANK ligand [RANKL]) are normal (ie, non-diseased) on such materials compared to natural bone. For these reasons, the objective of the present in vitro study was to determine various functions of osteoclasts and osteoblasts on nanocrystalline and micron crystalline hydroxyapatite as well as tri-calcium phosphate materials and compare such results to cortical and cancellous bone. Results showed for the first time similar osteoclast activity (including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, formation of resorption pits, size of resorption pits, and RANK) and osteoblast activity (osteoprotegerin and RANKL) on nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite compared to natural bone, whereas osteoclast and osteoblast functions on micron crystalline versions of these ceramics were much different than natural bone. In this manner, this study provides additional evidence that nanocrystalline calcium phosphates can serve as suitable synthetic analogs to natural bone to improve numerous orthopedic applications. It also provides the first data of healthy osteoclast and osteoblast functions on nanocrystalline calcium phosphates compared to natural bone. PMID:25506216

  14. Tonoplast calcium sensors CBL2 and CBL3 control plant growth and ion homeostasis through regulating V-ATPase activity in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ren-Jie; Liu, Hua; Yang, Yang; Yang, Lei; Gao, Xiao-Shu; Garcia, Veder J; Luan, Sheng; Zhang, Hong-Xia

    2012-01-01

    Plant responses to developmental and environmental cues are often mediated by calcium (Ca2+) signals that are transmitted by diverse calcium sensors. The calcineurin B-like (CBL) protein family represents calcium sensors that decode calcium signals through specific interactions with a group of CBL-interacting protein kinases. We report functional analysis of Arabidopsis CBL2 and CBL3, two closely related CBL members that are localized to the vacuolar membrane through the N-terminal tonoplast-targeting sequence. While cbl2 or cbl3 single mutant did not show any phenotypic difference from the wild type, the cbl2 cbl3 double mutant was stunted with leaf tip necrosis, underdeveloped roots, shorter siliques and fewer seeds. These defects were reminiscent of those in the vha-a2 vha-a3 double mutant deficient in vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase). Indeed, the V-ATPase activity was reduced in the cbl2 cbl3 double mutant, connecting tonoplast CBL-type calcium sensors to the regulation of V-ATPase. Furthermore, cbl2 cbl3 double mutant was compromised in ionic tolerance and micronutrient accumulation, consistent with the defect in V-ATPase activity that has been shown to function in ion compartmentalization. Our results suggest that calcium sensors CBL2 and CBL3 serve as molecular links between calcium signaling and V-ATPase, a central regulator of intracellular ion homeostasis. PMID:23184060

  15. Transmembrane proteoglycans control stretch-activated channels to set cytosolic calcium levels

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Sandeep; Søgaard, Pernille; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.; Pataki, Csilla; Okina, Elena; Xian, Xiaojie; Pedersen, Mikael E.; Stevens, Troy; Griesbeck, Oliver; Park, Pyong Woo; Pocock, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans regulate multiple aspects of cell behavior, but the molecular basis of their signaling is unresolved. The major family of transmembrane proteoglycans is the syndecans, present in virtually all nucleated cells, but with mostly unknown functions. Here, we show that syndecans regulate transient receptor potential canonical (TRPCs) channels to control cytosolic calcium equilibria and consequent cell behavior. In fibroblasts, ligand interactions with heparan sulfate of syndecan-4 recruit cytoplasmic protein kinase C to target serine714 of TRPC7 with subsequent control of the cytoskeleton and the myofibroblast phenotype. In epidermal keratinocytes a syndecan–TRPC4 complex controls adhesion, adherens junction composition, and early differentiation in vivo and in vitro. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the TRPC orthologues TRP-1 and -2 genetically complement the loss of syndecan by suppressing neuronal guidance and locomotory defects related to increases in neuronal calcium levels. The widespread and conserved syndecan–TRPC axis therefore fine tunes cytoskeletal organization and cell behavior. PMID:26391658

  16. Effect of Pd precursor status on sonochemical surface activation in Cu electroless deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kanghoon; Jin, Seonok; Kwon, Oh Joong

    2016-02-01

    Pd surface activation via a sonochemical approach was studied by varying Pd precursor status in the aqueous solution. By aging a K2PdCl6 activation solution overnight with added NH4OH, the chlorinated Pd complex was changed to an ammonia-based Pd complex. The Pd surface activation carried out with the NH4OH complexing agent resulted in improved surface condition following Cu electroless deposition. The Cu thin film deposited on a substrate sonochemically activated with the aged, ammonia-based Pd complex showed improved surface roughness and resistivity compared to that for Cu films deposited via two other precursors (chlorinated Pd complex and ammonia-based complex) without aging. In addition, nitrogen purging during sonochemical activation improved Cu film quality.

  17. Protective activity of calcium entry blockers against ouabain intoxication in anesthetized guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Jonkman, F A; Boddeke, H W; van Zwieten, P A

    1986-01-01

    Several studies have suggested a central role for calcium in the pathogenesis of digitalis-induced arrhythmias. To test this hypothesis, the effects on ouabain-induced arrhythmia of intraarterial pretreatment with the calcium entry blockers nifedipine, flunarizine, verapamil, diltiazem, and bepridil, the calcium entry promotor Bay K 8644, and CaCl2 were compared with those of the currently applied digitalis antidotes phenytoin and lidocaine in urethane-anesthetized (1.5 g/kg i.p.) guinea pigs. Pretreatment with nifedipine (0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg), flunarizine (1 and 3 mg/kg), and phenytoin (10 mg/kg) doubled the time (from 10-20 to 20-40 min) required to provoke toxic ECG changes. Verapamil, diltiazem, and bepridil caused a slight but significant reduction of ouabain toxicity. Pretreatment with CaCl2 (10 mg/kg) enhanced all toxic effects of ouabain. None of the above-mentioned pretreatments as such changed the ECG parameters. Bay k 8644 (0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg) enhanced the effects of ouabain on ventricular rhythm, but abolished the ouabain-induced impairment of AV conduction. Bay k 8644 as such increased heart rate (from 318 +/- 11 to 376 +/- 6 beats/min at 0.1 mg/kg) and shortened the PR interval. The negative inotropic effects of the calcium entry blockers were quantified in electrically paced (3 Hz) guinea pig isolated left atria 15 min after pretreatment with ouabain (3 X 10(-7) M). The rank order of potency for the negative inotropic effect was nifedipine greater than verapamil greater than bepridil greater than diltiazem greater than flunarizine. In conclusion, nifedipine, flunarizine, and phenytoin showed obvious and equally effective protection against ouabain-induced arrhythmia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2429073

  18. Boron influences immune and antioxidant responses by modulating hepatic superoxide dismutase activity under calcium deficit abiotic stress in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Bhasker, T Vijay; Gowda, N K S; Mondal, S; Krishnamoorthy, P; Pal, D T; Mor, A; Bhat, S Karthik; Pattanaik, A K

    2016-07-01

    The influence of Boron (B) supplementation on immune and antioxidant status of rats with or without abiotic stress induced by dietary calcium (Ca) restriction was studied in a feeding trial of 90 days. Wistar strain rats (3-4 wk age, n=84) were divided into 7 dietary groups (4 replicates of 3 each) viz., normal-calcium (100%) basal diet alone (NC, control) or supplemented with B at 5 (NCB-5), 10 (NCB-10), 20 (NCB-20) and 40ppm (NCB-40) levels; low-calcium (50%) basal diet alone (LC) or supplemented with 40ppm B (LCB-40). After 75 days of experimental feeding, rats were challenged with intraperitoneal injection of sheep RBCs to assess their humoral immunity. At the end of the trial, cell-mediated immunity was assessed as foot pad reaction to sheep RBCs injected into the hind leg paws. Eight rats from each group were sacrificed to collect blood for estimation of minerals and total antioxidant activity, and liver for superoxide dismutase gene expression analysis. Supplementation of graded levels of B (5, 10, 20 and 40ppm) as borax in NC diets significantly increased (P<0.01) the footpad thickness and serum total antioxidant activity, hepatic expression levels of both Cu-Zn SOD (SOD1) and Mn-SOD (SOD2) mRNAs. The erythrocytic SOD activity and humoral response did not differ significantly among the dietary groups. In Ca restricted groups, humoral immune response was significantly decreased (P<0.01) compared to control but increased (P<0.05) with 40ppm B supplementation. Serum levels of copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) remained similar among the dietary groups, while the manganese (Mn) content was significantly decreased (P<0.01) with increased levels of dietary B. In conclusion, B supplementation increased the hepatic mRNA expression levels of both SOD isoenzymes, thereby improving the immune and antioxidant status. PMID:27259355

  19. Increasing O-GlcNAcylation Level on Organ Culture of Soleus Modulates the Calcium Activation Parameters of Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Cieniewski-Bernard, Caroline; Montel, Valerie; Berthoin, Serge; Bastide, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    O-N-acetylglucosaminylation is a reversible post-translational modification which presents a dynamic and highly regulated interplay with phosphorylation. New insights suggest that O-GlcNAcylation might be involved in striated muscle physiology, in particular in contractile properties such as the calcium activation parameters. By the inhibition of O-GlcNAcase, we investigated the effect of the increase of soleus O-GlcNAcylation level on the contractile properties by establishing T/pCa relationships. We increased the O-GlcNAcylation level on soleus biopsies performing an organ culture of soleus treated or not with PUGNAc or Thiamet-G, two O-GlcNAcase inhibitors. The enhancement of O-GlcNAcylation pattern was associated with an increase of calcium affinity on slow soleus skinned fibers. Analysis of the glycoproteins pattern showed that this effect is solely due to O-GlcNAcylation of proteins extracted from skinned biopsies. We also characterized the O-GlcNAcylated contractile proteins using a proteomic approach, and identified among others troponin T and I as being O-GlcNAc modified. We quantified the variation of O-GlcNAc level on all these identified proteins, and showed that several regulatory contractile proteins, predominantly fast isoforms, presented a drastic increase in their O-GlcNAc level. Since the only slow isoform of contractile protein presenting an increase of O-GlcNAc level was MLC2, the effect of enhanced O-GlcNAcylation pattern on calcium activation parameters could involve the O-GlcNAcylation of sMLC2, without excluding that an unidentified O-GlcNAc proteins, such as TnC, could be potentially involved in this mechanism. All these data strongly linked O-GlcNAcylation to the modulation of contractile activity of skeletal muscle. PMID:23110217

  20. Simultaneous monitoring of biofilm growth, microbial activity, and inorganic deposits on surfaces with an in situ, online, real-time, non-destructive, optical sensor.

    PubMed

    Strathmann, Martin; Mittenzwey, Klaus-Henrik; Sinn, Gert; Papadakis, Wassilios; Flemming, Hans-Curt

    2013-01-01

    Deposits on surfaces in water-bearing systems, also known as 'fouling', can lead to substantial losses in the performance of industrial processes as well as a decreased product quality. Early detection and localization of such deposits can, to a considerable extent, save such losses. However, most of the surfaces that become fouled, for example, in process water pipes, membrane systems, power plants, and food and beverage industries, are difficult to access and analyses conducted on the water phase do not reveal the site or extent of deposits. Furthermore, it is of interest to distinguish biological from non-biological deposits. Although they usually occur together, different countermeasures are necessary. Therefore, sensors are required that indicate the development of surface fouling in real-time, non-destructively, and in situ, preferably allowing for discrimination between chemical and/or biological deposits. In this paper, an optical deposit sensor is presented which fulfills these requirements. Based on multiple fluorescence excitation emission matrix analysis, it detects autofluorescence of amino acids as indicators of biomass. Autofluorescence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide + hydrogen is interpreted as an indicator of biological activity, thus it acts as a viability marker, making the method suited for assessing the efficacy of disinfection treatments. Scattering signals from abiotic deposits such as calcium carbonate or corrosion products can clearly be distinguished from biotic substances and monitored separately. The sensor provides an early warning of fouling, allowing for timely countermeasures to be deployed. It also provides an assessment of the success of cleaning treatments and is a promising tool for integrated antifouling strategies. PMID:23682638

  1. Neuroserpin Polymers Activate NF-κB by a Calcium Signaling Pathway That Is Independent of the Unfolded Protein Response*

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Mark J.; Miranda, Elena; Roussel, Benoit D.; Kaufman, Randal J.; Marciniak, Stefan J.; Lomas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The autosomal dominant dementia familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies is characterized by the accumulation of ordered polymers of mutant neuroserpin within the endoplasmic reticulum of neurones. We show here that intracellular neuroserpin polymers activate NF-κB by a pathway that is independent of the IRE1, ATF6, and PERK limbs of the canonical unfolded protein response but is dependent on intracellular calcium. This pathway provides a mechanism for cells to sense and react to the accumulation of folded structures of mutant serpins within the endoplasmic reticulum. Our results provide strong support for the endoplasmic reticulum overload response being independent of the unfolded protein response. PMID:19423713

  2. Characterisation of CdO thin films deposited by activated reactive evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna Reddy, K. T.; Sravani, C.; Miles, R. W.

    1998-02-01

    The paper describes the preparation of cadmium oxide thin films produced by "activated reactive evaporation" onto heated glass substrates. The structural, electrical and optical properties of the deposited films were investigated and the effect of substrate temperature on the different physical properties of the films investigated. Highly conducting, polycrystalline CdO films with good transmittances were prepared by controlling the deposition temperature. These layers can be used to produce CdO/CdTe solar cells with efficiencies > 7%.

  3. Simulation of the bursting activity of neuron R15 in Aplysia: role of ionic currents, calcium balance, and modulatory transmitters.

    PubMed

    Canavier, C C; Clark, J W; Byrne, J H

    1991-12-01

    1. An equivalent circuit model of the R15 bursting neuron in Aplysia has been combined with a fluid compartment model, resulting in a model that incorporates descriptions of most of the membrane ion channels that are known to exist in the somata of R15, as well as providing a Ca2+ balance on the cell. 2. A voltage-activated, calcium-inactivated Ca2+ current (denoted the slow inward current ISI) was sufficient to produce bursting activity without invoking any other calcium-dependent currents (such as a nonspecific cation current, INS, or a calcium-activated K+ current, IK,Ca). Furthermore, many characteristics of a typical R15 burst could be simulated, such as a parabolic variation in interspike interval, the depolarizing afterpotential (DAP), and the progressive decrease in the undershoots of spikes during a burst. 3. The dynamic activity of R15 was analyzed by separately characterizing two different temporal domains; the fast dynamics associated with action potentials and the slow dynamics associated with low-amplitude oscillations lasting tens of seconds ("slow waves"). The slow dynamics were isolated by setting the Na+ conductance (gNa) to zero and then studied by the use of a system of equations reduced to two variables: intracellular concentration of Ca2+ and membrane potential. The fixed point of the system was located at the intersection of the nullclines for these two variables. A stability analysis of the fixed point was then used to determine whether a given set of parameters would produce slow-wave activity. 4. If the reduced model predicted slow-wave oscillations for a given set of parameters with gNa set to zero, then bursting activity was observed for the same set of parameters in the full model with gNa reset to its control value. However, for certain sets of parameters with gNa at its usual value, the full model exhibited bursting activity because of a slow oscillation produced by the activation of INS by action potentials. This oscillation resulted

  4. Method for removal of asphaltene depositions with amine-activated disulfide oil

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, S.P.

    1983-04-12

    A method for treating and removing unwanted asphaltene deposits from oil and gas wells, surface equipment, flow lines, and pore spaces of oil-baring formations comprises treatment with an amine -activated aliphatic disulfide oil as an asphaltene solvent. In a preferred aspect, the aliphatic disulfide oil is a dialkyl disulfide oil and is activated by the addition of 10 weight percent of diethylamine. In a specific use, the activated disulfide oil is used to remove asphaltene deposits from an oilbearing formation and a producing well penetrating the formation.

  5. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production of ... Milk-alkali syndrome Proximal renal tubular acidosis Rickets Sarcoidosis Vitamin D Update Date 5/3/2015 Updated ...

  6. The early asthmatic response is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondria activity as revealed by proteomic analysis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The inhalation of allergens by allergic asthmatics results in the early asthmatic response (EAR), which is characterized by acute airway obstruction beginning within a few minutes. The EAR is the earliest indicator of the pathological progression of allergic asthma. Because the molecular mechanism underlying the EAR is not fully defined, this study will contribute to a better understanding of asthma. Methods In order to gain insight into the molecular basis of the EAR, we examined changes in protein expression patterns in the lung tissue of asthmatic rats during the EAR using 2-DE/MS-based proteomic techniques. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteomic data was then performed using PPI Spider and KEGG Spider to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism. Results In total, 44 differentially expressed protein spots were detected in the 2-DE gels. Of these 44 protein spots, 42 corresponded to 36 unique proteins successfully identified using mass spectrometry. During subsequent bioinformatic analysis, the gene ontology classification, the protein-protein interaction networking and the biological pathway exploration demonstrated that the identified proteins were mainly involved in glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity. Using western blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed the changes in expression of five selected proteins, which further supports our proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Conclusions Our results reveal that the allergen-induced EAR in asthmatic rats is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity, which could establish a functional network in which calcium binding may play a central role in promoting the progression of asthma. PMID:20691077

  7. The active metabolite of prasugrel inhibits ADP-stimulated thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation: Influence of other blood cells, calcium, and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R; Fox, Marsha L; Linden, Matthew D; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro; Winters, Kenneth J; Furman, Mark I; Michelson, Alan D

    2007-07-01

    The novel thienopyridine prodrug prasugrel, a platelet P2Y(12) ADP receptor antagonist, requires in vivo metabolism for activity. Although pharmacological data have been collected on the effects of prasugrel on platelet aggregation, there are few data on the direct effects of the prasugrel's active metabolite, R-138727, on other aspects of platelet function. Here we examined the effects of R-138727 on thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation, and the possible modulatory effects of other blood cells, calcium, and aspirin. Blood (PPACK or citrate anticoagulated) from healthy donors pre- and post-aspirin was incubated with R-138727 and the response to ADP assessed in whole blood or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) by aggregometry and flow cytometric analysis of leukocyte-platelet aggregates, platelet surface P-selectin, and GPIIb-IIIa activation. Low-micromolar concentrations of R-138727 resulted in a rapid and consistent inhibition of these ADP-stimulated thrombo-inflammatory markers. These rapid kinetics required physiological calcium levels, but were largely unaffected by aspirin. Lower IC(50) values in whole blood relative to PRP suggested that other blood cells affect ADP-induced platelet activation and hence the net inhibition by R-138727. R-138727 did not inhibit P2Y(12)-mediated ADP-induced shape change, even at concentrations that completely inhibited platelet aggregation, confirming the specificity of R-138727 for P2Y(12). In conclusion, R-138727, the active metabolite of prasugrel, results in rapid, potent, consistent, and selective inhibition of P2Y(12)-mediated up-regulation of thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation. This inhibition is enhanced in the presence other blood cells and calcium, but not aspirin. PMID:17598013

  8. CVD boron on calcium chromate powder

    SciTech Connect

    Coonen, R.M.

    1984-09-01

    This study was an experimental effort to improve the compositional homogeneity of a pyrotechnic mixture of boron and calcium chromate (CaCrO/sub 4/). Boron was deposited onto calcium chromate powders at 350/sup 0/C from a diborane and hydrogen gas mixture at a pressure of 40 torr by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The B:CaCrO/sub 4/ ratio of the coated powders was analyzed by inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy and the distribution of the two phases was observed by electron microprobe analysis. The pyrotechnic activity was determined by differential thermal analysis. In addition to varying the composition of the mixture, an attempt was made to vary the boron distribution by coating both sized and unsized CaCrO/sub 4/ powders. Boron was deposited for 2 h onto sized CaCrO/sub 4/ powder, which resulted in a higher weight percentage of boron in comparison to the unsized powder. CVD coated CaCrO/sub 4/ powders began their pyrotechnic activity at an auto ignition temperature that was lower than the auto ignition temperature observed for mechanically blended mixtures. The coating of sized CaCrO/sub 4/ powder improved the uniformity of boron deposition of CaCrO/sub 4/, but it also decreased the pyrotechnic activity.

  9. TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF METABOLICALLY ACTIVE AND STATIONARY PHASE DEINOCOCCUS RADIODURANS IN UNSATURATED POROUS MEDIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioremediation is a cost efficient clean-up technique that involves the use of metabolically active bacteria to degrade recalcitrant pollutants. To further develop this technique it is important to understand the migration and deposition behaviour of metabolically active bacteria in unsaturated soil...

  10. Controlled deposition of plasma activated coatings on zirconium substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, Behnam; Bilek, Marcela

    2015-12-01

    Zirconium-based alloys are promising materials for orthopedic prostheses due to their low toxicity, superb corrosion resistivity, and favorable mechanical properties. The integration of such bio-implantable devices with local host tissues can strongly be improved by the development of a plasma polymerized acetylene and nitrogen (PPAN) that immobilizes bio-active molecules. The surface chemistry of PPAN is critically important as it plays a key role in affecting the surface free energy that alters the functionality of bio-active molecules at the surface. The cross-linking degree of PPAN is another key property that directly influences the water-permeability and thus also the stability of films in aqueous media. In this study we demonstrate that by simply tuning the zirconium bias voltage, control over the surface chemistry and cross-linking degree of PANN is achieved.

  11. Structure-function of proteins interacting with the α1 pore-forming subunit of high-voltage-activated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Alan; Hidalgo, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Openings of high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channels lead to a transient increase in calcium concentration that in turn activate a plethora of cellular functions, including muscle contraction, secretion and gene transcription. To coordinate all these responses calcium channels form supramolecular assemblies containing effectors and regulatory proteins that couple calcium influx to the downstream signal cascades and to feedback elements. According to the original biochemical characterization of skeletal muscle Dihydropyridine receptors, HVA calcium channels are multi-subunit protein complexes consisting of a pore-forming subunit (α1) associated with four additional polypeptide chains β, α2, δ, and γ, often referred to as accessory subunits. Twenty-five years after the first purification of a high-voltage calcium channel, the concept of a flexible stoichiometry to expand the repertoire of mechanisms that regulate calcium channel influx has emerged. Several other proteins have been identified that associate directly with the α1-subunit, including calmodulin and multiple members of the small and large GTPase family. Some of these proteins only interact with a subset of α1-subunits and during specific stages of biogenesis. More strikingly, most of the α1-subunit interacting proteins, such as the β-subunit and small GTPases, regulate both gating and trafficking through a variety of mechanisms. Modulation of channel activity covers almost all biophysical properties of the channel. Likewise, regulation of the number of channels in the plasma membrane is performed by altering the release of the α1-subunit from the endoplasmic reticulum, by reducing its degradation or enhancing its recycling back to the cell surface. In this review, we discuss the structural basis, interplay and functional role of selected proteins that interact with the central pore-forming subunit of HVA calcium channels. PMID:24917826

  12. Artefactual nanoparticle activation of the inflammasome platform: in vitro evidence with a nano-formed calcium phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Pele, Laetitia; Haas, Carolin T; Hewitt, Rachel; Faria, Nuno; Brown, Andy; Powell, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine whether in vitro experimental conditions dictate cellular activation of the inflammasome by apatitic calcium phosphate nanoparticles. Material & methods The responses of blood-derived primary human cells to in situ-formed apatite were investigated under different experimental conditions to assess the effect of aseptic culture, cell rest and duration of particle exposure. Cell death and particle uptake were assessed, while IL-1β and caspase 1 responses, with and without lipopolysaccharide prestimulation, were evaluated as markers of inflammasome activation. Results Under carefully addressed experimental conditions, apatitic nanoparticles did not induce cell death or engage the inflammasome platform, although both could be triggered through artefacts of experimentation. Conclusion In vitro studies often predict that engineered nanoparticles, such as synthetic apatite, are candidates for inflammasome activation and, hence, are toxic. However, the experimental setting must be very carefully considered as it may promote false-positive outcomes. PMID:24991724

  13. Structure, Chaperone Activity, and Aggregation of Wild-Type and R12C Mutant αB-Crystallins in the Presence of Thermal Stress and Calcium Ion - Implications for Role of Calcium in Cataract Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kashani, M Ragerdi; Yousefi, R; Akbarian, M; Alavianmehr, M M; Ghasemi, Y

    2016-02-01

    The current study was performed with the aim to evaluate the chaperoning ability, structural features, and aggregation propensity of wild-type and R12C mutant αB-crystallins (αB-Cry) under thermal stress and in the presence of calcium ion. The results of different spectroscopic analyses suggest that wild-type and mutant αB-Cry have dissimilar secondary and tertiary structures. Moreover, αB-Cry indicates slightly improved chaperone activity upon the R12C mutation. Thermal stress and calcium, respectively, enhance and reduce the extent of solvent-exposed hydrophobic surfaces accompanying formation of ordered and non-ordered aggregate entities in both proteins. Compared to the wild-type protein, the R12C mutant counterpart shows significant resistance against thermal and calcium-induced aggregation. In addition, in the presence of calcium, significant structural variation was accompanied by reduction in the solvent-exposed hydrophobic patches and attenuation of chaperone activity in both proteins. Additionally, gel mobility shift assay indicates the intrinsic propensity of R12C mutant αB-Cry for disulfide bridge-mediated protein dimerization. Overall, the results of this study are of high significance for understanding the molecular details of different factors that are involved in the pathomechanism of cataract disorders. PMID:27260392

  14. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the human body. It helps build and protect your teeth ... absorb calcium. You can get vitamin D from sunlight exposure to your skin and from your diet. Ask your provider whether ...

  15. Alternative technique for calcium phosphate coating on titanium alloy implants

    PubMed Central

    Le, Van Quang; Pourroy, Geneviève; Cochis, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia; Abdel-Fattah, Wafa I; Mohammed, Hadeer I; Carradò, Adele

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative technique for calcium phosphate coating on titanium alloys, we propose to functionalize the metal surface with anionic bath containing chlorides of palladium or silver as activators. This new deposition route has several advantages such as controlled conditions, applicability to complex shapes, no adverse effect of heating, and cost effectiveness. A mixture of hydroxyapatite and calcium phosphate hydrate is deposited on the surface of Ti–6Al–4V. Calcium phosphate coating is built faster compared with the one by Simulated Body Fluid. Cell morphology and density are comparable to the control one; and the results prove no toxic compound is released into the medium during the previous seven days of immersion. Moreover, the cell viability is comparable with cells cultivated with the virgin medium. These experimental treatments allowed producing cytocompatible materials potentially applicable to manufacture implantable devices for orthopedic and oral surgeries. PMID:24646569

  16. The effect of Si content on structure and mechanical features of silicon-containing calcium-phosphate-based films deposited by RF-magnetron sputtering on titanium substrate treated by pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmeneva, M.; Tyurin, A.; Mukhametkaliyev, T.; Teresov, A.; Koval, A.; Pirozhkova, T.; Shuvarin, I.; Chudinova, E.; Surmenev, R.

    2015-11-01

    Silicon-containing calcium phosphate (Si-CaP) coatings were fabricated by radio frequency (rf) magnetron sputtering using the targets prepared from hydroxyapatite (HA) powder with different silicon content. A powder of Si-HA (Ca10(PO4)6-x(SiO4)x(OH)2-x, x=0.5 and 1.72) was prepared by mechanochemical activation and then used as a precursor-powder to prepare a target for sputtering. The titanium substrate was acid etched and treated with pulsed electron beam with an energy density of 15 J/cm2. The average crystallite size as determined by XRD was 28 nm for the coatings obtained using the target prepared from the Si-HA powder (x=0.5), whereas Si-CaP (Si-HA powder x=1.72) films showed an amorphous structure. The nanohardness and the Young's modulus of the Si-CaP coating (x=0.5) deposited on titanium treated by pulsed electron beam are enhanced to 4.5 and 113 GPa compared to titanium substrate. Increase of Si content resulted in a dramatic decrease of the nanohardness and Young's modulus of Si-CaP films. However, Si-CaP coatings with the highest Si content revealed significantly lower values of elastic modulus, but slightly higher values of H/E and H3/E2 than did the non-coated specimens. Rf-magnetron sputtering allowed us to produce Si- CaP coatings with higher nanohardness and lower elastic modulus compared to titanium substrate.

  17. Local domains of motor cortical activity revealed by fiber-optic calcium recordings in behaving nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Adelsberger, Helmuth; Zainos, Antonio; Alvarez, Manuel; Romo, Ranulfo; Konnerth, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Brain mapping experiments involving electrical microstimulation indicate that the primary motor cortex (M1) directly regulates muscle contraction and thereby controls specific movements. Possibly, M1 contains a small circuit "map" of the body that is formed by discrete local networks that code for specific movements. Alternatively, movements may be controlled by distributed, larger-scale overlapping circuits. Because of technical limitations, it remained unclear how movement-determining circuits are organized in M1. Here we introduce a method that allows the functional mapping of small local neuronal circuits in awake behaving nonhuman primates. For this purpose, we combined optic-fiber-based calcium recordings of neuronal activity and cortical microstimulation. The method requires targeted bulk loading of synthetic calcium indicators (e.g., OGB-1 AM) for the staining of neuronal microdomains. The tip of a thin (200 µm) optical fiber can detect the coherent activity of a small cluster of neurons, but is insensitive to the asynchronous activity of individual cells. By combining such optical recordings with microstimulation at two well-separated sites of M1, we demonstrate that local cortical activity was tightly associated with distinct and stereotypical simple movements. Increasing stimulation intensity increased both the amplitude of the movements and the level of neuronal activity. Importantly, the activity remained local, without invading the recording domain of the second optical fiber. Furthermore, there was clear response specificity at the two recording sites in a trained behavioral task. Thus, the results provide support for movement control in M1 by local neuronal clusters that are organized in discrete cortical domains. PMID:24344287

  18. A novel orange phosphor of Eu{sup 2+}-activated calcium chlorosilicate for white light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Weijia; Wang Jing; Zhang Mei; Zhang Qiuhong; Su Qiang . E-mail: Suqiang@mail.sysu.edu.cn

    2006-11-15

    Novel orange phosphor of Eu{sup 2+}-activated calcium chlorosilicate was synthesized at 1273 K by conventional solid-state reactions under reductive atmosphere and investigated by means of photoluminescence excitation, diffuse reflectance and emission spectroscopies. These results show that this phosphor can be efficiently excited by the incident light of 300-450 nm, well matched with the emission band of 395 nm-emitting InGaN chip, and emits an intense orange light peaking at 585 nm. By combining this phosphor with a 395 nm-emitting InGaN chip, an intense orange light-emitting diode (LED) was fabricated. Under 20 mA forward-bias current, its CIE chromaticity coordinates are (0.486, 0.446). The dependence of as-fabricated orange LED on forward-bias current indicates that it shows excellent chromaticity stability and luminance saturation. These results show that this Eu{sup 2+}-activated calcium chlorosilicate is a promising orange-emitting phosphor for near-ultraviolet (UV) InGaN-based white LED. -- Graphical abstract: The CIE coordinates of as-synthesized and orange LED-based CSCE under I {sub F}=5.0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 mA in the CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram. The inset shows the dependence of the emission intensity on forward-bias currents.

  19. Self-cleavage of Human CLCA1 Protein by a Novel Internal Metalloprotease Domain Controls Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Activation*♦

    PubMed Central

    Yurtsever, Zeynep; Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Randolph, David T.; Scheaffer, Suzanne M.; Roswit, William T.; Alevy, Yael G.; Patel, Anand C.; Heier, Richard F.; Romero, Arthur G.; Nichols, Colin G.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brett, Tom J.

    2012-01-01

    The chloride channel calcium-activated (CLCA) family are secreted proteins that regulate both chloride transport and mucin expression, thus controlling the production of mucus in respiratory and other systems. Accordingly, human CLCA1 is a critical mediator of hypersecretory lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis, that manifest mucus obstruction. Despite relevance to homeostasis and disease, the mechanism of CLCA1 function remains largely undefined. We address this void by showing that CLCA proteins contain a consensus proteolytic cleavage site recognized by a novel zincin metalloprotease domain located within the N terminus of CLCA itself. CLCA1 mutations that inhibit self-cleavage prevent activation of calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC)-mediated chloride transport. CaCC activation requires cleavage to unmask the N-terminal fragment of CLCA1, which can independently gate CaCCs. Gating of CaCCs mediated by CLCA1 does not appear to involve proteolytic cleavage of the channel because a mutant N-terminal fragment deficient in proteolytic activity is able to induce currents comparable with that of the native fragment. These data provide both a mechanistic basis for CLCA1 self-cleavage and a novel mechanism for regulation of chloride channel activity specific to the mucosal interface. PMID:23112050

  20. Direct Phosphorylation and Activation of a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase by a Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Rice[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kabin; Chen, Jianping; Wang, Qin; Yang, Yinong

    2014-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a pivotal point of convergence for many signaling pathways in eukaryotes. In the classical MAPK cascade, a signal is transmitted via sequential phosphorylation and activation of MAPK kinase kinase, MAPK kinase (MKK), and MAPK. The activation of MAPK is dependent on dual phosphorylation of a TXY motif by an MKK, which is considered the sole kinase to phosphorylate and activate MAPK. Here, we report a novel regulatory mechanism of MAPK phosphorylation and activation besides the canonical MAPK cascade. A rice (Oryza sativa) calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK), CPK18, was identified as an upstream kinase of MAPK (MPK5) in vitro and in vivo. Curiously, CPK18 was shown to phosphorylate and activate MPK5 without affecting the phosphorylation of its TXY motif. Instead, CPK18 was found to predominantly phosphorylate two Thr residues (Thr-14 and Thr-32) that are widely conserved in MAPKs from land plants. Further analyses reveal that the newly identified CPK18-MPK5 pathway represses defense gene expression and negatively regulates rice blast resistance. Our results suggest that land plants have evolved an MKK-independent phosphorylation pathway that directly connects calcium signaling to the MAPK machinery. PMID:25035404

  1. Simplified Solutions for Activity Deposited on Moving Filter Media.

    PubMed

    Smith, David L; Chabot, George E

    2016-10-01

    Simplified numerical solutions for particulate activity viewed on moving filter continuous air monitors are developed. The monitor configurations include both rectangular window (RW) and circular window (CW) types. The solutions are demonstrated first for a set of basic airborne radioactivity cases, for a series of concentration pulses, and for indicating the effects of step changes in reactor coolant system (RCS) leakage for a pressurized water reactor. The method is also compared to cases from the prior art. These simplified solutions have additional benefits: They are easily adaptable to multiple radionuclides, they will accommodate collection and detection efficiencies that vary in known ways across the collection area, and they also ease the solution programming. PMID:27575345

  2. Calmodulin effects on steroids-regulated plasma membrane calcium pump activity.

    PubMed

    Zylinska, Ludmila; Kowalska, Iwona; Ferenc, Bozena

    2009-03-01

    It is now generally accepted that non-genomic steroids action precedes their genomic effects by modulation of intracellular signaling pathways within seconds after application. Ca(2+) is a very potent and ubiquitous ion in all cells, and its concentration is precisely regulated. The most sensitive on Ca(2+) increase is ATP-consuming plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA). The enzyme is coded by four genes, but isoforms diversity was detected in excitable and non-excitable cells. It is the only ion pump stimulated directly by calmodulin (CaM). We examined the role of PMCA isoforms composition and CaM effect in regulation of Ca(2+) uptake by estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), pregnenolone (PREG), and their sulfates in a concentration range from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M, using the membranes from rat cortical synaptosomes, differentiated PC12 cells, and human erythrocytes. In excitable membranes with full set of PMCAs steroids apparently increased Ca(2+) uptake, although to a variable extent. In most of the cases, CaM decreased transport by 30-40% below controls. Erythrocyte PMCA was regulated by the steroids somewhat differently than excitable cells. CaM strongly increased the potency for Ca(2+) extrusion in membranes incubated with 17-beta-estradiol and PREG. Our results indicated that steroids may sufficiently control cytoplasmic calcium concentration within physiological and therapeutic range. The response depended on the cell type, PMCA isoforms expression profile, CaM presence, and the steroids structure. PMID:19226536

  3. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activity of the micro/nano structured biogenic silver doped calcium phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supraja, N.; Prasad, T. N. V. K. V.; David, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Scale formation in PVC pipelines reduces the water flow efficiency and enhances microbial contamination. A bio-based composite material comprising of silver doped calcium phosphate (Cp-Ag) was synthesized using a simple technique (photo catalysis) and herein, we report for the first time on preparation and evaluation of the antimicrobial efficacy of silver doped calcite extracted from the scale in drinking water pipe lines. Five concentrations of silver doped calcite materials viz,5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 ppm were prepared using chemical ammonia mediated synthetic method. The material Cp-Ag was characterized by using the techniques UV-Visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Thermo gravimetric analysis, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and X-ray flouresence microscopy (XRF). Typical rhombohedral structure of the silver doped calcite was observed. XRF and XPS studies confirmed the presence of both calcium and silver in the composite material (Cp-Ag). The silver doped calcite material exhibited enhanced inhibition against Escherichia coli and staphylococcus aureus (Kirby-Bauer discs diffusion assay) which is also dependent on the concentration of the Cp-Ag material.

  4. Hypolipidemic Activity of a Natural Mineral Water Rich in Calcium, Magnesium, and Bicarbonate in Hyperlipidemic Adults

    PubMed Central

    Aslanabadi, Naser; Habibi Asl, Bohlool; Bakhshalizadeh, Babak; Ghaderi, Faranak; Nemati, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared the effects of a mineral water rich in calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, and sulfate and a marketed mineral water with a composition similar to that of urban water on the lipid profile of dyslipidemic adults. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 32 adults received one liter of "rich mineral water" daily for one month, and 37 adults drank the same amount of normal mineral water for the same period. Changes in lipid profiles were compared separately in each studied group at the end of one month. Results: Results showed that mean cholesterol and low density lipoprotein LDL levels were significantly decreased in both studied groups after one month of drinking mineral water (P<0.05); however, no significant differences in high density lipoprotein (HDL) and triglyceride (TG) levels were seen in either group one month after drinking. There were no statistically significant differences between the "rich mineral water" and the normal mineral water groups in any of the above-mentioned lipid levels ( P>0.05). Conclusion: A one-month intake of mineral water rich in calcium, magnesium bicarbonate, and sulfate decreased cholesterol and LDL levels but not TG or HDL levels in dyslipidemic adults. PMID:24754016

  5. Wide-field and two-photon imaging of brain activity with voltage- and calcium-sensitive dyes

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Ryota; Baker, Bradley J.; Jin, Lei; Garaschuk, Olga; Konnerth, Arthur; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Zecevic, Dejan

    2009-01-01

    This review presents three examples of using voltage- or calcium-sensitive dyes to image the activity of the brain. Our aim is to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method with particular reference to its application to the study of the brainstem. Two of the examples use wide-field (one-photon) imaging; the third uses two-photon scanning microscopy. Because the measurements have limited signal-to-noise ratio, the paper also discusses the methodological aspects that are critical for optimizing the signal. The three examples are the following. (i) An intracellularly injected voltage-sensitive dye was used to monitor membrane potential in the dendrites of neurons in in vitro preparations. These experiments were directed at understanding how individual neurons convert complex synaptic inputs into the output spike train. (ii) An extracellular, bath application of a voltage-sensitive dye was used to monitor population signals from different parts of the dorsal brainstem. We describe recordings made during respiratory activity. The population signals indicated four different regions with distinct activity correlated with inspiration. (iii) Calcium-sensitive dyes can be used to label many individual cells in the mammalian brain. This approach, combined with two-photon microscopy, made it possible to follow the spike activity in an in vitro brainstem preparation during fictive respiratory rhythms. The organic voltage- and ion-sensitive dyes used today indiscriminatively stain all of the cell types in the preparation. A major effort is underway to develop fluorescent protein sensors of activity for selectively staining individual cell types. PMID:19651647

  6. Developmental axon stretch stimulates neuron growth while maintaining normal electrical activity, intracellular calcium flux, and somatic morphology

    PubMed Central

    Loverde, Joseph R.; Pfister, Bryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Elongation of nerve fibers intuitively occurs throughout mammalian development, and is synchronized with expansion of the growing body. While most tissue systems enlarge through mitosis and differentiation, elongation of nerve fibers is remarkably unique. The emerging paradigm suggests that axons undergo stretch as contiguous tissues enlarge between the proximal and distal segments of spanning nerve fibers. While stretch is distinct from growth, tension is a known stimulus which regulates the growth of axons. Here, we hypothesized that the axon stretch-growth process may be a natural form of injury, whereby regenerative processes fortify elongating axons in order to prevent disconnection. Harnessing the live imaging capability of our axon stretch-growth bioreactors, we assessed neurons both during and following stretch for biomarkers associated with injury. Utilizing whole-cell patch clamp recording, we found no evidence of changes in spontaneous action potential activity or degradation of elicited action potentials during real-time axon stretch at strains of up to 18% applied over 5 min. Unlike traumatic axonal injury, functional calcium imaging of the soma revealed no shifts in free intracellular calcium during axon stretch. Finally, the cross-sectional areas of nuclei and cytoplasms were normal, with no evidence of chromatolysis following week-long stretch-growth limited to the lower of 25% strain or 3 mm total daily stretch. The neuronal growth cascade coupled to stretch was concluded to be independent of the changes in membrane potential, action potential generation, or calcium flux associated with traumatic injury. While axon stretch-growth is likely to share overlap with regenerative processes, we conclude that developmental stretch is a distinct stimulus from traumatic axon injury. PMID:26379492

  7. Hydrogen sulfide-induced itch requires activation of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-Long; Tian, Bin; Huang, Ya; Peng, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Jun-Cheng; Liu, Tong

    2015-0